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Sample records for abnormal sex development

  1. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  2. The XXXXY Sex Chromosome Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Barr, M. L.; Carr, D. H.; Pozsonyi, J.; Wilson, R. A.; Dunn, H. G.; Jacobson, T. S.; Miller, J. R.; Chown, B.

    1962-01-01

    The most common sex chromosome complex in sex chromatin-positive males with Klinefelter's syndrome is XXY. When the complex is XXYY or XXXY, the clinical findings do not seem to differ materially from those seen in XXY subjects, although more patients with these intersexual chromosome complements need to be studied to establish possible phenotypical expressions of the chromosomal variants. Two male children with an XXXXY sex chromosome abnormality are described. The data obtained from the study of these cases and five others described in the literature suggest that the XXXXY patient is likely to have congenital defects not usually seen in the common form of the Klinefelter syndrome. These include a triad of (1) skeletal anomalies (including radioulnar synostosis), (2) hypogenitalism (hypoplasia of penis and scrotum, incomplete descent of testes and defective prepubertal development of seminiferous tubules), and (3) greater risk of severe mental deficiency. That the conclusions are based on data from a small number of patients is emphasized, together with the need for a cytogenetic survey of a large control or unselected population. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:13969480

  3. Backdoor pathway for dihydrotestosterone biosynthesis: implications for normal and abnormal human sex development.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Maki; Homma, Keiko; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2013-04-01

    We review the current knowledge about the "backdoor" pathway for the biosynthesis of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). While DHT is produced from cholesterol through the conventional "frontdoor" pathway via testosterone, recent studies have provided compelling evidence for the presence of an alternative "backdoor" pathway to DHT without testosterone intermediacy. This backdoor pathway is known to exist in the tammar wallaby pouch young testis and the immature mouse testis, and has been suggested to be present in the human as well. Indeed, molecular analysis has identified pathologic mutations of genes involved in the backdoor pathway in genetic male patients with undermasculinized external genitalia, and urine steroid profile analysis has argued for the relevance of the activated backdoor pathway to abnormal virilization in genetic females with cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency and 21-hydroxylase deficiency. It is likely that the backdoor pathway is primarily operating in the fetal testis in a physiological condition to produce a sufficient amount of DHT for male sex development, and that the backdoor pathway is driven with a possible interaction between fetal and permanent adrenals in pathologic conditions with increased 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels. These findings provide novel insights into androgen biosynthesis in both physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:23073980

  4. Baseline sacroiliac joint magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities and male sex predict the development of radiographic sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Akar, Servet; Isik, Sibel; Birlik, Bilge; Solmaz, Dilek; Sari, Ismail; Onen, Fatos; Akkoc, Nurullah

    2013-10-01

    We evaluated the relationship between the baseline sacroiliac joint (SIJ) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and the development of radiographic sacroiliitis and tested their prognostic significance in cases of ankylosing spondylitis. Patients who had undergone an SIJ MRI at the rheumatology department were identified. Individuals for whom pelvic X-rays were available after at least 1 year of MRI were included in the analysis. All radiographs and MRI examinations were scored by two independent readers. Medical records of the patients were reviewed to obtain potentially relevant demographic and clinical data. We identified 1,069 SIJ MRIs, and 328 fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Reliability analysis revealed moderate to good inter- and intra-observer agreement. On presentation data, 14 cases were excluded because they had unequivocal radiographic sacroiliitis at baseline. After a mean of 34.8 months of follow-up, 24 patients developed radiographic sacroiliitis. The presence of active sacroiliitis (odds ratio (OR) 15.1) and structural lesions on MRI (OR 8.3), male sex (OR 4.7), fulfillment of Calin's inflammatory back pain criteria (P = 0.001), and total MRI activity score (P < 0.001) were found to be related to the development of radiographic sacroiliitis. By regression modeling, the presence of both active inflammatory and structural damage lesions on MRI and male sex were found to be predictive factors for the development of radiographic sacroiliitis. Our present results suggest that the occurrence of both active inflammatory and structural lesions in SIJs revealed by MRI is a significant risk factor for radiographic sacroiliitis, especially in male patients with early inflammatory back pain. PMID:23765093

  5. Cognitive and Academic Skills in Children with Sex Chromosome Abnormalities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Bruce G.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Follows 46 unselected children with various sex chromosome abnormalities using intellectual, language, and achievement testing. Notes that, although most children were not mentally retarded, most received special education help. Finds support for the inference that learning disorders were genetically mediated in this group. (RS)

  6. Abnormal sex ratios in human populations: Causes and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, Therese; Xing, Zhu Wei

    2006-01-01

    In the absence of manipulation, both the sex ratio at birth and the population sex ratio are remarkably constant in human populations. Small alterations do occur naturally; for example, a small excess of male births has been reported to occur during and after war. The tradition of son preference, however, has distorted these natural sex ratios in large parts of Asia and North Africa. This son preference is manifest in sex-selective abortion and in discrimination in care practices for girls, both of which lead to higher female mortality. Differential gender mortality has been a documented problem for decades and led to reports in the early 1990s of 100 million “missing women” across the developing world. Since that time, improved health care and conditions for women have resulted in reductions in female mortality, but these advances have now been offset by a huge increase in the use of sex-selective abortion, which became available in the mid-1980s. Largely as a result of this practice, there are now an estimated 80 million missing females in India and China alone. The large cohorts of “surplus” males now reaching adulthood are predominantly of low socioeconomic class, and concerns have been expressed that their lack of marriageability, and consequent marginalization in society, may lead to antisocial behavior and violence, threatening societal stability and security. Measures to reduce sex selection must include strict enforcement of existing legislation, the ensuring of equal rights for women, and public awareness campaigns about the dangers of gender imbalance. PMID:16938885

  7. Molecular Genetics of the Posterior Sex Combs/Suppressor 2 of Zeste Region of Drosophila: Aberrant Expression of the Suppressor 2 of Zeste Gene Results in Abnormal Bristle Development

    PubMed Central

    Brunk, B. P.; Martin, E. C.; Adler, P. N.

    1991-01-01

    We report the molecular characterization of the Posterior sex combs-Suppressor 2 of zeste region of Drosophila melanogaster. The distal breakpoint of the Aristapedioid inversion divides the region into two parts. We have molecularly mapped the lesions associated with several loss of function mutations in the Polycomb group gene Posterior sex combs (Psc) proximal to this breakpoint. In addition, we have found that lesions associated with several loss of function mutations in the Suppressor 2 of zeste [Su(z)2] gene lie distal to this breakpoint. Since the breakpoint does not cause a loss of function in either gene, no essential sequences are shared by these two neighboring genes. There are three dominant gain of function mutations in the region that result in abnormal bristle development. We find that all three juxtapose foreign DNA sequences upstream of the Su(z)2 gene, and that at least two of these mutations (Arp(1) and vg(D)) behave genetically as gain of function mutations in Su(z)2. Northern and in situ hybridization analyses show that the mutations result in increased accumulation of the Su(z)2 mRNA, which we argue is responsible for the bristle loss phenotype. PMID:1905661

  8. How Sex Attitudes Develop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnstein, Helene S.

    1976-01-01

    Excerpt from "The Roots of Love" (Helene S. Arnstein, 1975). Book is concerned with feelings that are part of child's developmental stages. Included in excerpt are: genital self-discovery, masturbation, discovery of sex differences, and birth fantasies. Stresses importance of parent's feelings which are communicated to child.

  9. X Chromosome Abnormalities and Cognitive Development: Implications for Understanding Normal Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walzer, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Argues that knowledge from studies of individuals with sex chromosome abnormalities can further understanding of aspects of normal human development. Studies of XO girls, XXY boys, XXX girls, and males with a fragile X chromosome are summarized to demonstrate how results contribute to knowledge about normal cognitive development and about…

  10. Disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun Suk; Kim, Jongwon

    2012-01-01

    The birth of a new baby is one of the most dramatic events in a family, and the first question is usually "is it a boy or a girl?" The newborn infant with ambiguous external genitalia often comes as a surprise for the doctors as well as the parents and is sometimes described as an endocrine emergency situation presenting a problem of sex assignment. The nomenclature such as 'intersex', 'hermaphrodite', and 'pseudohermaphrodite' is out of date as well as confusing, and many urologists are concerned that these confusing terms could be perceived to be pejorative by some affected families. In response to concerns regarding outdated and controversial terms, the Chicago Consensus held in 2005 recommended new terminology based on the umbrella term disorders of sex differentiation (DSDs). The term DSD has a comprehensive definition including any problem noted at birth in which the genitalia are atypical in relation to the chromosomes or gonads. The karyotype is used as a prefix defining the classification of DSD. DSDs are rare and complex. The optimal management of patients with DSD must be individualized and multidisciplinary, considering all aspects, including psychological care and full disclosure of alternatives relating to surgery type and timing. Although further studies are necessary to confirm guidelines and recommendations fitting for the individual patients with DSD, this article is an attempt to provide a balanced perspective for new taxonomy, clinical evaluation, and medical, surgical, and psychological management of DSD. PMID:22323966

  11. Gonadal and Sex Differentiation Abnormalities of Dogs and Cats

    PubMed Central

    Meyers-Wallen, V.N.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular steps in normal sexual development were largely discovered by studying patients and animal models with disorders of sexual development (DSD). Although several types of DSD have been reported in the cat and dog, which are often strikingly similar to human DSD, these have been infrequently utilized to contribute to our knowledge of mammalian sexual development. Canine and feline cases of DSD with sufficient evidence to be considered as potential models are summarized in this report. The consensus DSD terminology, and reference to previous terminology, is used to foster adoption of a common nomenclature that will facilitate communication and collaboration between veterinarians, physicians, and researchers. To efficiently utilize these unique resources as molecular tools continue to improve, it will be helpful to deposit samples from valuable cases into repositories where they are available to contribute to our understanding of sexual development, and thus improve human and animal health. PMID:22005097

  12. Disorders of sex development: neonatal diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Paris, Françoise; Gaspari, Laura; Philibert, Pascal; Maïmoun, Laurent; Kalfa, Nicolas; Sultan, Charles

    2012-01-01

    The disorders of sex development (DSD) refer to the insufficient virilization of the external genitalia of a 46,XY fetus or the excessive virilization of those of the 46,XX fetus. Some of these disorders are associated with karyotype abnormalities. DSD arise from abnormal gonadal determination or sex differentiation, as in the case of the abnormal testosterone synthesis or androgen insensitivity of 46,XY DSD. The impact of environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals during fetal life requires further investigation. The basic investigations should include SRY gene sequencing and measurement of 17-hydroxyprogesterone, anti-Mullerian hormone, and testosterone. Choosing the sex of rearing is difficult and the decision must be made by an experienced multidisciplinary team. PMID:22846521

  13. Comparison of Abnormal Cervical Cytology from HIV Positive Women, Female Sex Workers and General Population

    PubMed Central

    Vafaei, Homeira; Asadi, Nasrin; Foroughinia, Leila; Salehi, Alireza; Kuhnavard, Safieh; Akbarzadeh, Mojgan; Ravanbod, Hamid Reza; Mohamadalian, Ferdos; Kasraeian, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background Sex workers and HIV seropositive women are at high risk of abnormal cervical cytology. The objective of this study was to compare the cervical cytology among three groups of women: active sex workers, HIV-infected women, and general population in Iran. Methods This was a cross-sectional study performed in Hazrat Zeinab, Lavan clinics and drop in center (DIC) in Shiraz, Iran. This study was performed from October 2009 to October 2011. A total of 266 patients were assigned into three groups: sex-workers (85), HIV positive patients (100), and general population (81). Pap smear was performed for all participants from the exocervix and endocervix, using a plastic Ayres’s spatula and cytobrush. The samples were sent to a pathology center, using a liquid-based media.  Results The risk of cervical infection in sex workers and HIV positive women was greater than the general population (OR=5.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]:2.24, 13.40), (OR=3.71, 95% CI:1.52, 9.09), respectively. The frequency of abnormal cervical cytology in the HIV positive and sex worker groups was higher than the general population (OR=6. 76, 95% CI:2.25, 20.32), (OR=3. 80, 95% CI:1.19, 12.07), respectively. Low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) were associated with CD4 cell count<200Í106/L, P=0.021 and P<0.001, respectively. Conclusion Vaginal infections were seen more often in the sex worker group, and abnormal cervical cytology was greater in the HIV positive group. PMID:26005687

  14. Cytogenetic studies of 1232 patients with different sexual development abnormalities from the Sultanate of Oman.

    PubMed

    Al-Alawi, Intisar; Goud, Tadakal Mallana; Al-Harasi, Salma; Rajab, Anna

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate cytogenetic findings in Omani patients who had been referred for suspicion of sex chromosome abnormalities that resulted in different clinical disorders. Furthermore, it sought to examine the frequency of chromosomal anomalies in these patients and to compare the obtained results with those reported elsewhere. Cytogenetic analysis was performed on 1232 cases with variant characteristics of sexual development disorders who had been referred to the cytogenetic department, National Genetic Centre, Ministry of Health, from different hospitals in the Sultanate of Oman between 1999 and 2014. The karyotype results demonstrated chromosomal anomalies in 24.2% of the cases, where 67.5% of abnormalities were identified in referral females, whereas only 32.6% were in referral males. Of all sex chromosome anomalies detected, Turner syndrome was the most frequent (38.2%) followed by Klinefelter syndrome (24.9%) and XY phenotypic females (16%). XXX syndrome and XX phenotypic males represented 6.8% and 3.8% of all sex chromosome anomalies, respectively. Cytogenetic analysis of patients referred with various clinical suspicions of chromosomal abnormalities revealed a high rate of chromosomal anomalies. This is the first broad cytogenetic study reporting combined frequencies of sex chromosome anomalies in sex development disorders in Oman. PMID:26706459

  15. Sex hormone replacement in disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Wiebke; Bertelloni, Silvano

    2014-01-01

    People with disorders of sex development (DSD) may have impaired sex steroid production or their gonads removed before, during or after adolescence, thus requiring hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to induce puberty and/or maintain secondary sexual characteristics, to optimize bone health, and to promote physical and social well-being. Oestrogens are usually used for this purpose in persons reared as females (eventually combined with progestins if a uterus is present) and androgens in those reared as males. An alternative therapy for women with ascertained complete androgen insensitivity syndrome could be testosterone, because this is the main sex steroid hormone secreted by their gonads, but this approach remains to be better explored. Few sound evidence-based data are available to guide HRT administration at puberty and in adulthood in individuals with DSD, but recent data and new formulations may give better perspectives for the future. PMID:25247652

  16. Origins of Sex-Role Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Michael; Weintraub, Marsha

    1979-01-01

    Development in general, and sex-role behavior in particular, is influenced by both biological and environmental factors. However, the coalescence of these factors around the child's growing social cognitive abilities is the critical factor in the development of sex role behavior. (Author/EB)

  17. Sex Differences in Intellectual and Ego Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alishio, Kip C.; Schilling, Karen Maitland

    Perry's scheme of intellectual and ethical development was examined for sex differences with respect to content areas for which sex differences have elsewhere been suggested: occupational choice, interpersonal relationships, and sexual identity. In addition, the content area religion and ego development, as measured by Loevinger's sentence…

  18. nr0b1 (DAX1) mutation in zebrafish causes female-to-male sex reversal through abnormal gonadal proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sijie; Zhang, Hefei; Wang, Fenghua; Zhang, Wei; Peng, Gang

    2016-09-15

    Sex determinations are diverse in vertebrates. Although many sex-determining genes and pathways are conserved, the mechanistic roles of these genes and pathways in the genetic sex determination are not well understood. DAX1 (encoded by the NR0B1 gene) is a vertebrate specific orphan nuclear receptor that regulates gonadal development and sexual determination. In human, duplication of the NR0B1 gene leads to male-to-female sex reversal. In mice, Nr0b1 shows both pro-testis and anti-testis functions. We generated inheritable nr0b1 mutation in the zebrafish and found the nr0b1 mutation caused homozygous mutants to develop as fertile males due to female-to-male sex reversal. The nr0b1 mutation did not increase Caspase-3 labeling nor tp53 expression in the developing gonads. Introduction of a tp53 mutation into the nr0b1 mutant did not rescue the sex-reversal phenotype. Further examination revealed reduction in cell proliferation and abnormal somatic cell differentiation in the nr0b1 mutant gonads at the undifferentiated and bi-potential ovary stages. Together, our results suggest nr0b1 regulates somatic cell differentiation and cell proliferation to ensure normal sex development in the zebrafish. PMID:27267667

  19. Development of Sex Role Stereotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naffziger, Claudeen Cline; Naffziger, Ken

    1974-01-01

    This discussion begins with a brief historical analysis of civilization's growth towards patriarchy and analyzes the cognitive, affective and cognitive aspects of stereotyping. Research into sex differences is reported and values and biases are given to fit. Schools and homes are cited for their support in promulgating stereotypes. (Author)

  20. Sex ratio of congenital abnormalities in the function of maternal age: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Csermely, Gyula; Urbán, Robert; Czeizel, Andrew E; Veszprémi, Béla

    2015-05-01

    Maternal age effect is well-known in the origin of numerical chromosomal aberrations and some isolated congenital abnormalities (CAs). The sex ratio (SR), i.e. number of males divided by the number of males and females together, of most CAs deviates from the SR of newborn population (0.51). The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the possible association of maternal age with the SR of isolated CAs in a population-based large dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980-1996. First, SR of 24 CA entities/groups was estimated in 21,494 patients with isolated CA. In the next step SR of different maternal age groups was compared to the mean SR of the given CA-groups. The SR of four CA-groups showed some deviation in certain maternal age groups. Cases with anencephaly had female excess in young mothers (<25 years). Cases with skull's CAs particularly craniosynostosis had a male excess in cases born to women over 30 years. Two other CA groups (cleft lip ± palate and valvar pulmonic stenosis within the group of right-sided obstructive defect of heart) had significant deviation in SR of certain maternal age groups from the mean SR, but these deviations were not harmonized with joining age groups and thus were considered as a chance effect due to multiple testing. In conclusion, our study did not suggest that in general SR of isolated CAs might be modified by certain maternal age groups with some exception such as anencephaly and craniosynostosis. PMID:25354028

  1. Genetics Home Reference: 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development

    MedlinePlus

    ... of sex development 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Close All Description 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development is a condition in which individuals with ...

  2. Lifetime consequences of abnormal fetal pancreatic development

    PubMed Central

    Holemans, K; Aerts, L; Van Assche, F A

    2003-01-01

    There is ample evidence that an adverse intrauterine environment has harmful consequences for health in later life. Maternal diabetes and experimentally induced hyperglycaemia result in asymmetric overgrowth, which is associated with an increased insulin secretion and hyperplasia of the insulin-producing B-cells in the fetuses. In adult life, a reduced insulin secretion is found. In contrast, intrauterine growth restriction is associated with low insulin secretion and a delayed development of the insulin-producing B-cells. These perinatal alterations may induce a deficient adaptation of the endocrine pancreas and insulin resistance in later life. Intrauterine growth restriction in human pregnancy is mainly due to a reduced uteroplacental blood flow or to maternal undernutrition or malnutrition. However, intrauterine growth restriction can be present in severe diabetes complicated by vasculopathy and nephropathy. In animal models, intrauterine growth retardation can be obtained through pharmacological (streptozotocin), dietary (semi-starvation, low protein diet) or surgical (intrauterine artery ligation) manipulation of the maternal animal. The endocrine pancreas and more specifically the insulin-producing B-cells play an important role in the adaptation to an adverse intrauterine milieu and the consequences in later life. The long-term consequences of an unfavourable intrauterine environment are of major importance worldwide. Concerted efforts are needed to explore how these long-term effects can be prevented. This review will consist of two parts. In the first part, we discuss the long-term consequences in relation to the development of the fetal endocrine pancreas and fetal growth in the human; in the second part, we focus on animal models with disturbed fetal and pancreatic development and the consequences for later life. PMID:12562919

  3. [The growing spine : Normal and abnormal development].

    PubMed

    Stücker, R

    2016-06-01

    Growth of the pediatric spine occurs in phases. The first 5 years of life are characterized by rapid growth. The lower extremities and trunk contribute equally to the entire growth by 50 % each. In the following years, until the onset of puberty, a steady but reduced rate of growth is observed. During these years a T1-S1 growth of only 1 cm per year can be detected and the spine contributes only one third to the entire growth. Puberty consists of an acceleration phase lasting 2 years. In the first year of this phase the growth peak of the extremities and in the following year the growth peak of the spine can be noticed. The ensuing deceleration phase of puberty lasts for 3 years. During that period the development of the Risser sign, menarche, and fusion of the trochanter epiphysis are taking place. Clinical parameters such as sitting height, standing height, and arm span may be used to evaluate growth. Important radiological parameters include the Risser sign, the determination of skeletal age according to Greulich and Pyle, and the T1-T12 height. The use of the olecranon method during the ascending phase of puberty can be recommended. Problems of the developing spine may include malformations, developmental disruptions or deformations. According to their manifestations they have a different prognosis, which can be estimated by knowledge of residual growth and the typical course of spinal growth in childhood. PMID:27250620

  4. The surgical challenges of disorders of sex development (DSD).

    PubMed

    Gorduza, Daniela; Vidal, Isabelle; Birraux, Jacques; Gay, Claire-Lise; Demède, Delphine; Mure, Pierre-Yves; Mouriquand, Pierre

    2010-09-01

    Disorders of Sex Development (DSD) remain a fascinating challenge for the paediatricians, endocrinologists, biologists, psychiatrists, geneticists, radiologists, surgeons and for the whole society. This article aims at highlighting the current controversies and questions met with genital reconstruction in children born with abnormal genitalia. The main current techniques of masculinization and feminization are reviewed with their progress and their problems. The tools of decision used to assign a gender in some newborns with complex DSD are discussed showing that at the dawn of the third millenium, one still does not know why a boy is a boy, and a girl is a girl. PMID:20876944

  5. Gross Motor Development, Movement Abnormalities, and Early Identification of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozonoff, Sally; Young, Gregory S.; Goldring, Stacy; Greiss-Hess, Laura; Herrera, Adriana M.; Steele, Joel; Macari, Suzanne; Hepburn, Susan; Rogers, Sally J.

    2008-01-01

    Gross motor development (supine, prone, rolling, sitting, crawling, walking) and movement abnormalities were examined in the home videos of infants later diagnosed with autism (regression and no regression subgroups), developmental delays (DD), or typical development. Group differences in maturity were found for walking, prone, and supine, with…

  6. Sex Differences and Brain Development: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motomatsu, Nancy; Patterson, Bobbie

    This bibliography cites references dealing with background material on the functions of the human brain and current research on sex differences in brain development. A list of 10 books published since 1974 is followed by a more extensive annotated bibliography of 29 articles, and a bibliography of 19 reports, complete with ERIC reference numbers…

  7. Moral Development of Solo Juvenile Sex Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Vugt, Eveline; Stams, Geert Jan; Dekovic, Maja; Brugman, Daan; Rutten, Esther; Hendriks, Jan

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the moral development of solo juvenile male sex offenders (n = 20) and juvenile male non-offenders (n = 76), aged 13-19 years, from lower socioeconomic and educational backgrounds. The Moral Orientation Measure (MOM) was used to assess punishment- and victim-based moral orientation in sexual and non-sexual situations. Moral…

  8. BETA-ENDORPHIN LEVELS IN LONGTAILED AND PIGTAILED MACAQUES VARY BY ABNORMAL BEHAVIOR RATING AND SEX

    PubMed Central

    Crockett, Carolyn M.; Sackett, Gene P.; Sandman, Curt A.; Chicz-DeMet, Aleksandra; Bentson, Kathleen L.

    2007-01-01

    Frequent or severe abnormal behavior may be associated with the release of endorphins that positively reinforce the behavior with an opiate euphoria or analgesia. One line of research exploring this association involves the superhormone, proopiomelanocortin (POMC). The products of POMC appear to be dysregulated in some human subjects who exhibit self-injurious behavior (SIB). Macaque monkeys have POMC very similar to humans, and some laboratory macaques display SIB or frequent stereotypies. We investigated associations between plasma levels of three immunoreactive POMC fragments with possible opioid action and abnormal behavior ratings in macaques. In 58 adult male and female macaques (24 Macaca fascicularis and 34 M. nemestrina), plasma levels of intact beta-endorphin (βE) and the N-terminal fragment (BEN) were significantly higher in animals with higher levels of abnormal behavior. The C-terminal fragment (BEC) was significantly higher in males but unrelated to ratings of abnormal behavior. Levels of ACTH, cortisol, and (βE-ACTH)/βE dysregulation index were unrelated to abnormal behavior. None of the POMC products differed significantly by subjects' species, age, or weight. The finding that intact beta-endorphin is positively related to abnormal behavior in two species of macaque is consistent with some previous research on human subjects and nonprimates. The positive relation of the N-terminal fragment of βE to abnormal behavior is a new finding. PMID:17719139

  9. Prenatal management of disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Chitty, Lyn S; Chatelain, Pierre; Wolffenbuttel, Katja P; Aigrain, Yves

    2012-12-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) rarely present prenatally but, as they are very complex conditions, management should be directed by highly specialised medical teams to allow consideration of all aspects of diagnosis, treatment and ethical issues. In this brief review, we present an overview of the prenatal presentation and management of DSD, including the sonographic appearance of normal genitalia and methods of determining genetic sex, the prenatal management of pregnancies with the unexpected finding of genital ambiguity on prenatal ultrasound and a review of the prenatal management of pregnancies at high risk of DSD. As this is a rapidly developing field, management options will change over time, making the involvement of clinical geneticists, paediatric endocrinologists and urologists, as well as fetal medicine specialists, essential in the care of these complex pregnancies. The reader should also bear in mind that local social, ethical and legal aspects may also influence management. PMID:23131529

  10. Fertility Issues in Disorders of Sex Development.

    PubMed

    Guercio, Gabriela; Costanzo, Mariana; Grinspon, Romina P; Rey, Rodolfo A

    2015-12-01

    Fertility potential should be considered by the multidisciplinary team when addressing gender assignment, surgical management, and patient and family counselling of individuals with disorders of sex development. In 46,XY individuals, defects of gonadal differentiation or androgen or anti-Müllerian hormone synthesis or action result in incomplete or absent masculinization. In severe forms, raised as females, motherhood is possible with oocyte donation if Müllerian ducts have developed. In milder forms, raised as males, azoospermia or oligospermia are frequently found, however paternity has been reported. Most 46,XX patients with normal ovarian organogenesis are raised as females, and fertility might be possible after treatment. PMID:26568498

  11. Sex Differences in Associations Among Obesity, Metabolic Abnormalities, and Chronic Kidney Disease in Japanese Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Masaru; Kobayashi, Junji; Takeda, Yasuo; Nagasawa, Shin-Ya; Yamakawa, Junichi; Moriya, Junji; Mabuchi, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Aims The present study aimed to investigate relationships among abdominal obesity, metabolic abnormalities, and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in relatively lean Japanese men and women. Participants and methods The participants included 8133 men and 15 934 women between 40 and 75 years of age recruited from the government health check-up center in Kanazawa City, Japan. The prevalence of abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and high fasting plasma glucose levels were assessed according to the Japanese criteria for metabolic syndrome. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the modified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation for the Japanese population, and participants with an eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and/or proteinuria were diagnosed with CKD. Results Overall, 23% of males and 14% of females met criteria for CKD. Having more numerous complicated metabolic abnormalities was significantly associated with a higher odds ratio (OR) of CKD for men and women, irrespective of abdominal obesity. However, there was a sex difference in the OR of CKD for obese participants without metabolic abnormalities, such that abdominal obesity without metabolic abnormalities was significantly associated with a higher OR for men (multivariate-adjusted OR 1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16–2.28) but not for women (OR 1.01; 95% CI, 0.71–1.44). Conclusions The present findings demonstrated that obesity without metabolic abnormalities was associated with a higher risk of CKD in men but not women in a relatively lean Japanese population. PMID:27087606

  12. Emotion processes in normal and abnormal development and preventive intervention.

    PubMed

    Izard, Carroll E; Fine, Sarah; Mostow, Allison; Trentacosta, Christopher; Campbell, Jan

    2002-01-01

    We present an analysis of the role of emotions in normal and abnormal development and preventive intervention. The conceptual framework stems from three tenets of differential emotions theory (DET). These principles concern the constructs of emotion utilization; intersystem connections among modular emotion systems, cognition, and action; and the organizational and motivational functions of discrete emotions. Particular emotions and patterns of emotions function differentially in different periods of development and in influencing the cognition and behavior associated with different forms of psychopathology. Established prevention programs have not emphasized the concept of emotion as motivation. It is even more critical that they have generally neglected the idea of modulating emotions, not simply to achieve self-regulation, but also to utilize their inherently adaptive functions as a means of facilitating the development of social competence and preventing psychopathology. The paper includes a brief description of a theory-based prevention program and suggestions for complementary targeted interventions to address specific externalizing and internalizing problems. In the final section, we describe ways in which emotion-centered preventions can provide excellent opportunities for research on the development of normal and abnormal behavior. PMID:12549703

  13. A comprehensive approach to the spectrum of abnormal pubertal development.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, Heather; Malhotra, Shilpa

    2012-04-01

    Puberty is the biological transition from childhood to adulthood. The process involves the coordination of hormonal, physical, psychosocial, and cognitive systems to result in physiologic change. Precocious puberty is defined as pubertal development beginning earlier than expected based on normal standards. Gonadotropin dependent precocious puberty is caused by premature activation of the hypothalamus resulting in pulsatile secretion of GnRH. Gonadotropin independent precocious puberty is caused by excess sex hormones from peripheral or external sources. Treatment with GnRH agonists should be offered to prevent early fusion of the epiphyseal plates to avoid unnecessary short stature and should not be based on perceived psychosocial consequences of early puberty. Delayed puberty is the absence of or incomplete development of secondary sexual characteristics. Hypergonadotropic hypogonadism or primary hypogonadism may result from genetic mutation syndromes or can be acquired from antiovarian antibodies, exposure to radiation or chemotherapy, inflammatory insult, or surgical removal of the gonads. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism or secondary hypogonadism is due to hypothalamic dysfunction resulting in impaired secretion of GnRH. The long-term goal for patients with inadequate estrogen stimulation is to maintain the serum concentration of sex steroids within the normal adult range to promote the development of secondary sexual characteristics, prevent premature bone loss, and ultimately to induce fertility when indicated. PMID:22764552

  14. Risking a Relation: Sex Education and Adolescent Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Jen

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers how issues of adolescent development might be brought into conversation with dilemmas in sex education. Here, sex education is larger than information, affirmation or prohibition. In its address to the most intimate aspects of life--love, loss, vulnerability, power, friendship, aggression--sex education is necessarily…

  15. CHRONIC PERCHLORATE EXPOSURE CAUSES MORPHOLOGICAL ABNORMALITIES IN DEVELOPING STICKLEBACK

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Richard R.; Von Hippel, Frank A.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have examined the effects of chronic perchlorate exposure during growth and development, and fewer still have analyzed the effects of perchlorate over multiple generations. We describe morphological and developmental characteristics for threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) that were spawned and raised to sexual maturity in perchlorate-treated water (G1,2003) and for their offspring (G2,2004) that were not directly treated with perchlorate. The G1,2003 displayed a variety of abnormalities, including impaired formation of calcified traits, slower growth rates, aberrant sexual development, poor survivorship, and reduced pigmentation that allowed internal organs to be visible. Yet these conditions were absent when the offspring of contaminated fish (G2,2004) were raised in untreated water, suggesting a lack of transgenerational effects and that surviving populations may be able to recover following remediation of perchlorate-contaminated sites PMID:21465539

  16. Normal and Abnormal Development in the Arabidopsis Vegetative Shoot Apex.

    PubMed Central

    Medford, JI; Behringer, FJ; Callos, JD; Feldmann, KA

    1992-01-01

    Vegetative development in the Arabidopsis shoot apex follows both sequential and repetitive steps. Early in development, the young vegetative meristem is flat and has a rectangular shape with bilateral symmetry. The first pair of leaf primordia is radially symmetrical and is initiated on opposite sides of the meristem. As development proceeds, the meristem changes first to a bilaterally symmetrical trapezoid and then to a radially symmetrical dome. Vegetative development from the domed meristem continues as leaves are initiated in a repetitive manner. Abnormal development of the vegetative shoot apex is described for a number of mutants. The mutants we describe fall into at least three classes: (1) lesions in the shoot apex that do not show an apparent alteration in the shoot apical meristem, (2) lesions in the apical meristem that also (directly or indirectly) alter leaf primordia, and (3) lesions in the apical meristem that alter meristem size and leaf number but not leaf morphology. These mutations provide tools both to genetically analyze vegetative development of the shoot apex and to learn how vegetative development influences floral development. PMID:12297656

  17. Differential Mental Development of 18 Month-Old Same-Sexed and Opposite-Sexed Twins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Kathryn Norcross; Campbell, Kathleen M.

    This paper describes a study which examined the performance of 48 pairs of 18-month-old twins on the Mental Development Scale of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development to determine whether score differences would be found for the three subgroups of identical, fraternal same-sexed, and fraternal opposite-sexed twins. Of the 96 subjects, 46 (23…

  18. Early estrogen exposure induces abnormal development of Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Urushitani, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Akio; Katsu, Yoshinao; Iguchi, Taisen

    2002-12-01

    Many chemicals released into the environment exhibit estrogenic activity, having the potential to disrupt development and the functioning of the endocrine system. In order to establish a model system to study the effects of such environmental chemicals on aquatic animals, we examined the effects of a natural estrogen, 17 beta-estradiol (E(2)), on early development of Fundulus heteroclitus. Embryos of F. heteroclitus were reared in seawater containing 10(-10), 10(-8), and 10(-6) M E(2) throughout the experiment. Hatching and survival rates decreased in a dose-dependent manner, and fry treated with 10(-6) M E(2) and 10(-8) M E(2) were dead by two weeks and 12 weeks after hatching, respectively. More than 85% of fry treated with 10(-8) M E(2) showed malformations: i.e., eye extrusion, crooked vertebral column, faded lateral-stripe pattern eight weeks after hatching. Body weight and head and body lengths were significantly reduced in E(2)-treated fry when compared to controls. Ossification was not completed in vertebrae, cranial bones, and other bones in fry treated with 10(-8) M E(2) even 12 weeks after hatching. Sex ratio of control fry was 57% male and 43% female, whereas fry treated with 10(-8) M E(2) were 100% female eight weeks after hatching. The present results demonstrate that exogenous estrogen induced death of embryos and fry, malformations, sex reversal, and incomplete ossification of vertebrae and cranial bones, which would result in shorter body and head lengths and in malformed vertebrae leading to a hunchback condition. PMID:12410597

  19. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Normal and abnormal spine and thoracic cage development

    PubMed Central

    Canavese, Federico; Dimeglio, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Development of the spine and thoracic cage consists of a complex series of events involving multiple metabolic processes, genes and signaling pathways. During growth, complex phenomena occur in rapid succession. This succession of events, this establishment of elements, is programmed according to a hierarchy. These events are well synchronized to maintain harmonious limb, spine and thoracic cage relationships, as growth in the various body segments does not occur simultaneously at the same magnitude or rate. In most severe cases of untreated progressive early-onset spinal deformities, respiratory insufficiency and pulmonary and cardiac hypertension (cor pulmonale), which characterize thoracic insufficiency syndrome (TIS), can develop, sometimes leading to death. TIS is the inability of the thorax to ensure normal breathing. This clinical condition can be linked to costo-vertebral malformations (e.g., fused ribs, hemivertebrae, congenital bars), neuromuscular diseases (e.g., expiratory congenital hypotonia), Jeune or Jarcho-Levin syndromes or to 50% to 75% fusion of the thoracic spine before seven years of age. Complex spinal deformities alter normal growth plate development, and vertebral bodies become progressively distorted, perpetuating the disorder. Therefore, many scoliotic deformities can become growth plate disorders over time. This review aims to provide a comprehensive review of how spinal deformities can affect normal spine and thoracic cage growth. Previous conceptualizations are integrated with more recent scientific data to provide a better understanding of both normal and abnormal spine and thoracic cage growth. PMID:24147251

  1. Development of a Sex Anxiety Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janda, Louis H.; O'Grady, Kevin E.

    1980-01-01

    Results indicate that the scale is psychometrically sound and has discriminant validity in relation to the Mosher Forced-Choice Guilt Inventory Sex Guilt subscale. The clinical implications of distinguishing between sexual anxiety and sexual guilt are discussed. (Author)

  2. Sex Education in Perspective: Guidelines for Program Development and Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg. Bureau of Curriculum Services.

    This document is designed to assist schools and communities in: (1) exploring the subject of sex education; (2) developing an awareness of the student as a frame of reference for analyzing sex education and constructing appropriate educational programs; (3) developing an awareness of behavior and educational principles as a logical basis for…

  3. Maternal immune activation and abnormal brain development across CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Knuesel, Irene; Chicha, Laurie; Britschgi, Markus; Schobel, Scott A; Bodmer, Michael; Hellings, Jessica A; Toovey, Stephen; Prinssen, Eric P

    2014-11-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a clear association between maternal infection and schizophrenia or autism in the progeny. Animal models have revealed maternal immune activation (mIA) to be a profound risk factor for neurochemical and behavioural abnormalities in the offspring. Microglial priming has been proposed as a major consequence of mIA, and represents a critical link in a causal chain that leads to the wide spectrum of neuronal dysfunctions and behavioural phenotypes observed in the juvenile, adult or aged offspring. Such diversity of phenotypic outcomes in the mIA model are mirrored by recent clinical evidence suggesting that infectious exposure during pregnancy is also associated with epilepsy and, to a lesser extent, cerebral palsy in children. Preclinical research also suggests that mIA might precipitate the development of Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. Here, we summarize and critically review the emerging evidence that mIA is a shared environmental risk factor across CNS disorders that varies as a function of interactions between genetic and additional environmental factors. We also review ongoing clinical trials targeting immune pathways affected by mIA that may play a part in disease manifestation. In addition, future directions and outstanding questions are discussed, including potential symptomatic, disease-modifying and preventive treatment strategies. PMID:25311587

  4. Abnormal Canine Bone Development Associated with Hypergravity Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. P.; Fisher, G. L.; McNeill, K. L.; Oyama, J.

    1979-01-01

    Chronic centrifugation of 85- to 92-day-old Beagles at 2.0 x g and 2.6 x g for 26 weeks during the time of active skeletal growth caused skeletal abnormalities in the radius and the ulna of ten of 11 dogs. The pattern of change mimicked that found in naturally occurring and experimentally induced premature distal ulnar physeal closure or delayed growth at this physis. Minimal changes in bone density were detected by sensitive photon absorptiometric techniques. Skeletal abnormalities also were found in five of the six cage-control dogs, although the run-control dogs were radiographically normal.

  5. Development of Abnormality Detection System for Bathers using Ultrasonic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Yosuke; Abe, Takehiko; Nambo, Hidetaka; Kimura, Haruhiko; Ogoshi, Yasuhiro

    This paper proposes an abnormality detection system for bather sitting in bathtub. Increasing number of in-bathtub drowning accidents in Japan draws attention. Behind this large number of bathing accidents, Japan's unique social and cultural background come surface. For majority of people in Japan, bathing serves purpose in deep warming up of body, relax and enjoyable time. Therefore it is the custom for the Japanese to soak in bathtub. However overexposure to hot water may cause dizziness or fainting, which is possible to cause in-bathtub drowning. For drowning prevention, the system detects bather's abnormal state using an ultrasonic sensor array. The array, which has many ultrasonic sensors, is installed on the ceiling of bathroom above bathtub. The abnormality detection system uses the following two methods: posture detection and behavior detection. The function of posture detection is to estimate the risk of drowning by monitoring bather's posture. Meanwhile, the function of behavior detection is to estimate the risk of drowning by monitoring bather's behavior. By using these methods, the system detects bathers' different state from normal. As a result of experiment with a subject in the bathtub, the system was possible to detect abnormal state using subject's posture and behavior. Therefore the system is useful for monitoring bather to prevent drowning in bathtub.

  6. Sex-Affirmative Career Development Interventions in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLouglin, Mary Ellen; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The article describes two systematic college career development programs into which sex-free materials could be incorporated, two intervention strategies on career socialization issues, and three additional resources specifically focusing on women's issues in career education. (MF)

  7. Offense related characteristics and psychosexual development of juvenile sex offenders

    PubMed Central

    Hart-Kerkhoffs, Lisette 't A; Doreleijers, Theo AH; Jansen, Lucres MC; van Wijk, Anton PH; Bullens, Ruud AR

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This article reports on offense related characteristics and the psychosexual development in subgroups of juvenile sex offenders as measured by the Global Assessment Instrument for Juvenile Sex Offenders (GAIJSO). The predictive validity of these characteristics for persistent (sexual) offensive behavior in subgroups of juvenile sex offenders was investigated. Methods: One hundred seventy four sex offenders (mean age 14.9 SD 1.4) referred by the police to the Dutch Child Protection Board were examined. Offense related characteristics were assessed by means of the GAIJSO and the BARO (a global assessment tool for juvenile delinquents), and criminal careers of the subjects were ascertained from official judicial records. Results: Serious need for comprehensive diagnostics were found on the domains sexual offense and psychosexual development in juvenile sex offenders, especially in the group of child molesters. These youngsters displayed more internalizing and (psychosexual) developmental problems and their sexual offense was more alarming as compared to the other juvenile sex offender subgroups. Although one third of the juveniles had already committed one or more sex offenses prior to the index offense, at follow up (mean follow up period: 36 months SD 18 months) almost no sexual recidivism was found (0.6% of the entire sample). However, a substantial proportion of the entire sample of juvenile sex offenders showed non-sexual (55.6%) and violent recidivism (32.1%). Several predictors for a history of multiple sex offending and non-sexual recidivism were identified. Conclusion: This study revealed numerous problems in juvenile sex offenders. Assessment using the GAIJSO is helpful in order to identify indicators for extensive diagnostic assessment. In order to investigate the predictive validity for sexual reoffending a longer follow up period is necessary. PMID:19594889

  8. Sex determination of duck embryos: observations on syrinx development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Robert E.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Franson, J. Christian

    2013-01-01

    Ducks exhibit sexual dimorphism in vocal anatomy. Asymmetrical ossification of the syrinx (bulla syringealis) is discernable at about 10 days of age in male Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos domestica) embryos, but information is lacking on the early development of the bulla in wild ducks. To evaluate the reliability of this characteristic for sexing developing embryos, we examined the syrinx of dead embryos and compared results with molecular sexing techniques in high arctic nesting Common Eiders (Somateria mollissima). Embryos 8 days or older were accurately (100%) sexed based on the presence/absence of a bulla, 2 days earlier than Pekin duck. The use of the tracheal bulla can be a valuable technique when sex identification of embryos or young ducklings is required.

  9. Cognitive Development, Sex, and Abstractness in Grade One Word Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yore, Larry D.; Ollila, Lloyd O.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of global cognitive development, sex, and word abstractness on young readers' word recognition were explored. ANOVA results indicated that nouns were recognized more frequently than non-nouns; children with high cognitive development recognized more words than children with lower cognitive development; and females recognized more words…

  10. Abnormal ventricular development in preterm neonates with visually normal MRIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jie; Wang, Yalin; Lao, Yi; Ceschin, Rafael; Mi, Liang; Nelson, Marvin D.; Panigrahy, Ashok; Leporé, Natasha

    2015-12-01

    Children born preterm are at risk for a wide range of neurocognitive and neurobehavioral disorders. Some of these may stem from early brain abnormalities at the neonatal age. Hence, a precise characterization of neonatal neuroanatomy may help inform treatment strategies. In particular, the ventricles are often enlarged in neurocognitive disorders, due to atrophy of surrounding tissues. Here we present a new pipeline for the detection of morphological and relative pose differences in the ventricles of premature neonates compared to controls. To this end, we use a new hyperbolic Ricci flow based mapping of the ventricular surfaces of each subjects to the Poincaré disk. Resulting surfaces are then registered to a template, and a between group comparison is performed using multivariate tensor-based morphometry. We also statistically compare the relative pose of the ventricles within the brain between the two groups, by performing a Procrustes alignment between each subject's ventricles and an average shape. For both types of analyses, differences were found in the left ventricles between the two groups.

  11. Multidisciplinary care for individuals with disorders of sex development

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Lobo, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Recommendations regarding the care of individuals with disorders of sex development include that care be provided by multidisciplinary teams. This article will discuss team composition and function as well as the role of the gynecologist and barriers to such care. Recent findings Many barriers to multidisciplinary care exist, but recent reports stress the roles of different team members as well as tools for planning and implementation of such a team that may help to overcome such barriers. All current recommendations include the participation of a gynecologist in the disorders of sex development team. Gynecologists are in the unique position to continue to provide care as these individuals mature into adulthood. Summary Multidisciplinary care for patients with disorders of sex development is recommended and gynecologists provide unique expertise. PMID:25110979

  12. Structural abnormalities of the brain in schizophrenia: sex differences in the Cantabria First Episode of Schizophrenia Study.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Barquero, J L; Cuesta Núñez, M J; Quintana Pando, F; de la Varga, M; Herrera Castanedo, S; Dunn, G

    1995-11-01

    This paper examines structural brain abnormalities, as evaluated by the CT scan, in first episodes of schizophrenia and their association with sociodemographic, diagnostic and clinical variables. The investigation included all patients with a first episode of schizophrenia who, over a 2-year period, made contact with any of the public mental health services of the Autonomous Region of Cantabria in Northern Spain. Diagnostic and clinical characteristics were evaluated through the use of the Spanish version of the Present State Examination (PSE-9) and the Scales for the Assessment of Positive and Negative Symptoms (SANS and SAPS respectively). The study demonstrated the presence of structural brain abnormalities in this sample of first episode schizophrenics. These abnormalities were mainly expressed in the presence of larger VBR for schizophrenic patients than in the controls, these findings being more marked in women than in men. We failed to reveal, however, any evidence of an association of these brain abnormalities with diagnostic or clinical characteristics. PMID:8637954

  13. The influence of brain abnormalities on psychosocial development, criminal history and paraphilias in sexual murderers.

    PubMed

    Briken, Peer; Habermann, Niels; Berner, Wolfgang; Hill, Andreas

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the number and type of brain abnormalities and their influence on psychosocial development, criminal history and paraphilias in sexual murderers. We analyzed psychiatric court reports of 166 sexual murderers and compared a group with notable signs of brain abnormalities (N = 50) with those without any signs (N = 116). Sexual murderers with brain abnormalities suffered more from early behavior problems. They were less likely to cohabitate with the victim at the time of the homicide and had more victims at the age of six years or younger. Psychiatric diagnoses revealed a higher total number of paraphilias: Transvestic fetishism and paraphilias not otherwise specified were more frequent in offenders with brain abnormalities. A binary logistic regression identified five predictors that accounted for 46.8% of the variance explaining the presence of brain abnormalities. Our results suggest the importance of a comprehensive neurological and psychological examination of this special offender group. PMID:16225232

  14. Constitutive Notch Signaling Causes Abnormal Development of the Oviducts, Abnormal Angiogenesis, and Cyst Formation in Mouse Female Reproductive Tract.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Lydia; Kaftanovskaya, Elena M; Manresa, Carmen; Barbara, Agustin M; Poppiti, Robert J; Tan, Yingchun; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2016-03-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is critical for the differentiation of many tissues and organs in the embryo. To study the consequences of Notch1 gain-of-function signaling on female reproductive tract development, we used a cre-loxP strategy andAmhr2-cretransgene to generate mice with conditionally activated Notch1 (Rosa(Notch1)). TheAmhr2-cretransgene is expressed in the mesenchyme of developing female reproductive tract and in granulosa cells in the ovary. Double transgenicAmhr2-cre, Rosa(Notch1)females were infertile, whereas controlRosa(Notch1)mice had normal fertility. All female reproductive organs in mutants showed hemorrhaging of blood vessels progressing with age. The mutant oviducts did not develop coiling, and were instead looped around the ovary. There were multiple blockages in the lumen along the oviduct length, creating a barrier for sperm or oocyte passage. Mutant females demonstrated inflamed uteri with increased vascularization and an influx of inflammatory cells. Additionally, older females developed ovarian, oviductal, and uterine cysts. The significant change in gene expression was detected in the mutant oviduct expression ofWnt4, essential for female reproductive tract development. Similar oviductal phenotypes have been detected previously in mice with activatedSmoand inbeta-catenin,Wnt4,Wnt7a, andDicerconditional knockouts, indicating a common regulatory pathway disrupted by these genetic abnormalities. PMID:26843448

  15. Contemporary issues in the management of abnormal placentation during pregnancy in developing nations: An Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Sukhwinder Kaur; Singh, Anita; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2013-01-01

    The gap between the developed and developing nations with regards to maternal mortality and morbidity may have narrowed but still a lot of dedicated work is required to bridge these differences. Obstetrical haemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal deaths in these developing nations especially in India. The most common causes of this fatal haemorrhage are the placental abnormalities which rarely get detected before delivery. Numerous factors have been incremental in the causation of this abnormal placental implantation with resultant complications. The present article is an attempt to review possible predictors of abnormal placental implantation. Also, a genuine attempt has been made to enumerate possible measures to identify the predictors of abnormal placentation during early pregnancy and their suitable prevention and management. PMID:24404455

  16. Effects of oil pollution on the development of sex cells in sea urchins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashchenko, M. A.

    1980-03-01

    The sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus is highly sensitive to oil pollution. Experiments were performed in winter, spring and summer over periods of 15 to 45 days. Experimental urchins were kept in water with hydrocarbon concentrations of 10 to 30 mg l-1, and control urchins in pure sea water. Thermal stimulation by Evdokimov's method was applied to obtain mature sexual products during winter and spring tests. Summer investigations were conducted at temperatures of 17 to 18 °C. The gonads were studied histologically and morphometrically, and the sexual cells obtained were analyzed at the embryological level. No histological and morphometrical differences were recorded between sexual cells of controls and experimentals. However, marked hydrocarbon effects were observed in the embryonic development of artificially fertilized cells from experimental urchins. Control embryos developed normally. Embryogenesis of artificially fertilized gametes from control females and experimental males, and vice versa, was found to be distinctly abnormal. Many abnormalities were identified at the first cleavage stage, as well as in blastula, gastrula and pluteus. Fertilization of experimental eggs with experimental sperm resulted in serious disturbances of embryos, followed by the development of non-viable larvae. On the whole, embryogenesis of sexual cells from experimental urchins was characterized by prominent delay, asynchronism and presence of abnormal non-viable larvae. Consequently, long-term effects of sublethal hydrocarbon concentrations resulted in the formation of defective sex cells and high larval mortality.

  17. Sex Education in Bermuda: Curriculum Development and Community Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, June Dobbs

    1976-01-01

    Deal with one instance in which the Government of Bermuda sought to effect social change. Discusses the author's experiences in introducing a sex education program there as well as the implications of that program's development for five social problems, which Bermuda faces in its struggle to maintain economic survival. (RK)

  18. Sex as Development: Curriculum, Pedagogy and Critical Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Diederik Floris

    2009-01-01

    The author of this article proposes a critical approach to sexuality as a pedagogical agenda. The author offers a brief appraisal of sexology as a developmental science, and of the academic notion of developing sex. First, the author locates sexuality education in terms of its conventional curricular organization, arguing that that sex…

  19. Same-Sex Attraction and Successful Adolescent Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busseri, Michael A.; Willoughby, Teena; Chalmers, Heather; Bogaert, Anthony R.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the relation of adolescent same-sex attraction to "successful development" (Baltes, P. B., "Am. Psychol." 32:366-380, 1997). Based on a survey of high-school adolescents, four groups were defined according to the nature of self-reported sexual attraction: exclusively heterosexual (EHA; n=3594); mostly heterosexual (MHA;…

  20. CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF ABNORMAL REPRODUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will determine the critical factors that account for exposures to endocrine disrupting chemicals, or EDCs (ER, AR, AhR mediated and inhibitors of steroidogenesis) during development resulting in adverse effects seen later in life in male and female offspring. Such f...

  1. Developmental vitamin D deficiency causes abnormal brain development.

    PubMed

    Eyles, D W; Feron, F; Cui, X; Kesby, J P; Harms, L H; Ko, P; McGrath, J J; Burne, T H J

    2009-12-01

    There is now clear evidence that vitamin D is involved in brain development. Our group is interested in environmental factors that shape brain development and how this may be relevant to neuropsychiatric diseases including schizophrenia. The origins of schizophrenia are considered developmental. We hypothesised that developmental vitamin D (DVD) deficiency may be the plausible neurobiological explanation for several important epidemiological correlates of schizophrenia namely: (1) the excess winter/spring birth rate, (2) increased incidence of the disease in 2nd generation Afro-Caribbean migrants and (3) increased urban birth rate. Moreover we have published two pieces of direct epidemiological support for this hypothesis in patients. In order to establish the "Biological Plausibility" of this hypothesis we have developed an animal model to study the effect of DVD deficiency on brain development. We do this by removing vitamin D from the diet of female rats prior to breeding. At birth we return all dams to a vitamin D containing diet. Using this procedure we impose a transient, gestational vitamin D deficiency, while maintaining normal calcium levels throughout. The brains of offspring from DVD-deficient dams are characterised by (1) a mild distortion in brain shape, (2) increased lateral ventricle volumes, (3) reduced differentiation and (4) diminished expression of neurotrophic factors. As adults, the alterations in ventricular volume persist and alterations in brain gene and protein expression emerge. Adult DVD-deficient rats also display behavioural sensitivity to agents that induce psychosis (the NMDA antagonist MK-801) and have impairments in attentional processing. In this review we summarise the literature addressing the function of vitamin D on neuronal and non-neuronal cells as well as in vivo results from DVD-deficient animals. Our conclusions from these data are that vitamin D is a plausible biological risk factor for neuropsychiatric disorders and that

  2. Sex-Specific Placental Responses in Fetal Development

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The placenta is an ephemeral but critical organ for the survival of all eutherian mammals and marsupials. It is the primary messenger system between the mother and fetus, where communicational signals, nutrients, waste, gases, and extrinsic factors are exchanged. Although the placenta may buffer the fetus from various environmental insults, placental dysfunction might also contribute to detrimental developmental origins of adult health and disease effects. The placenta of one sex over the other might possess greater ability to respond and buffer against environmental insults. Given the potential role of the placenta in effecting the lifetime health of the offspring, it is not surprising that there has been a resurging interest in this organ, including the Human Placental Project launched by the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development. In this review, we will compare embryological development of the laboratory mouse and human chorioallantoic placentae. Next, evidence that various species, including humans, exhibit normal sex-dependent structural and functional placental differences will be examined followed by how in utero environmental changes (nutritional state, stress, and exposure to environmental chemicals) might interact with fetal sex to affect this organ. Recent data also suggest that paternal state impacts placental function in a sex-dependent manner. The research to date linking placental maladaptive responses and later developmental origins of adult health and disease effects will be explored. Finally, we will focus on how sex chromosomes and epimutations may contribute to sex-dependent differences in placental function, the unanswered questions, and future directions that warrant further consideration. PMID:26241064

  3. Sex-Specific Placental Responses in Fetal Development.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Cheryl S

    2015-10-01

    The placenta is an ephemeral but critical organ for the survival of all eutherian mammals and marsupials. It is the primary messenger system between the mother and fetus, where communicational signals, nutrients, waste, gases, and extrinsic factors are exchanged. Although the placenta may buffer the fetus from various environmental insults, placental dysfunction might also contribute to detrimental developmental origins of adult health and disease effects. The placenta of one sex over the other might possess greater ability to respond and buffer against environmental insults. Given the potential role of the placenta in effecting the lifetime health of the offspring, it is not surprising that there has been a resurging interest in this organ, including the Human Placental Project launched by the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development. In this review, we will compare embryological development of the laboratory mouse and human chorioallantoic placentae. Next, evidence that various species, including humans, exhibit normal sex-dependent structural and functional placental differences will be examined followed by how in utero environmental changes (nutritional state, stress, and exposure to environmental chemicals) might interact with fetal sex to affect this organ. Recent data also suggest that paternal state impacts placental function in a sex-dependent manner. The research to date linking placental maladaptive responses and later developmental origins of adult health and disease effects will be explored. Finally, we will focus on how sex chromosomes and epimutations may contribute to sex-dependent differences in placental function, the unanswered questions, and future directions that warrant further consideration. PMID:26241064

  4. Environmental Enteropathy: Elusive but Significant Subclinical Abnormalities in Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Koji; Petri, William A

    2016-08-01

    Environmental enteropathy/Environmental enteric dysfunction (EE/EED) is a chronic disease of small intestine characterized by gut inflammation and barrier disruption, malabsorption and systemic inflammation in the absence of diarrhea. It is predominantly diseases of children in low income countries and is hypothesized to be caused by continuous exposure to fecally contaminated food, water and fomites. It had not been recognized as a priority health issue because it does not cause overt symptoms and was seen in apparently healthy individuals. However, there is a growing concern of EE/EED because of its impact on longitudinal public health issues, such as growth faltering, oral vaccine low efficacy and poor neurocognitive development. Recent works have provided important clues to unravel its complex pathogenesis, and suggest possible strategies for controlling EE/EED. However, effective diagnostic methods and interventions remain unsettled. Here, we review the existing literature, especially about its pathogenesis, and discuss a solution for children living in the developing world. PMID:27495791

  5. Sex, Race, and the Development of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lemos-Filho, Luciano B.; Mikkelsen, Mark E.; Martin, Greg S.; Dabbagh, Ousama; Adesanya, Adebola; Gentile, Nina; Esper, Annette; Gajic, Ognjen

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prior studies suggest that mortality differs by sex and race in patients who develop acute lung injury (ALI). Whether differences in presentation account for these disparities remains unclear. We sought to determine whether sexual and racial differences exist in the rate of ALI development and ALI-related mortality after accounting for differences in clinical presentations. Methods: This was a multicenter, observational cohort study of 5,201 patients at risk for ALI. Multivariable logistic regression with adjustment for center-level effects was used to adjust for potential covariates. Results: The incidence of ALI development was 5.9%; in-hospital mortality was 5.0% for the entire cohort, and 24.4% for those patients who developed ALI. Men were more likely to develop ALI compared to women (6.9% vs 4.7%, P < .001) and had a nonsignificant increase in mortality when ALI developed (27.6% vs 18.5%, P = .08). However, after adjustment for baseline imbalances between sexes these differences were no longer significant. Black patients, compared to white patients, presented more frequently with pneumonia, sepsis, or shock and had higher severity of illness. Black patients were less likely to develop ALI than whites (4.5% vs. 6.5%, P = .014), and this association remained statistically significant after adjusting for differences in presentation (OR, 0.66; 95 % CI, 0.45-0.96). Conclusions: Sex and race differences exist in the clinical presentation of patients at risk of developing ALI. After accounting for differences in presentation, there was no sex difference in ALI development and outcome. Black patients were less likely to develop ALI despite increased severity of illness on presentation. PMID:23117155

  6. Recent developments in embryo sexing and its field application.

    PubMed

    Bredbacka, P

    1998-01-01

    This review focuses on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sexing of bovine embryos in commercial situations with emphasis on new developments. Simplifications of the biopsy technique is one of the major simplifications over the last few years. The stabilization of the embryo by means of protein-free medium or scratches produced on the bottom of the Petri dish makes it possible to perform a biopsy with a single microinstrument. The traditional PCR sexing approach utilizes electrophoresis, which involves the risk of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) contamination of subsequent assays. Such contamination, resulting in females misdiagnosed as males, is avoided efficiently by using a non-electrophoretic method in which the sex is determined based on fluorescence of unopened tubes. However, female samples cannot be distinguished from blank samples in the non-electrophoretic assay, which thus relies on accurate transfer of biopsy into tubes. Nevertheless, an accuracy of about 95% can be reached with both approaches. High pregnancy rates (50-70%) can be reached with biopsied Grade 1 embryos, but there is evidence that pregnancy rates with Grade 2 embryos is 15-20% lower. Recent data indicate that pregnancy rates of 50% can be achieved with frozen-thawed biopsied Grade 1 embryos. In conclusion, recent developments in biopsy techniques, detection systems and freezing should increase interest in PCR sexing. PMID:9932294

  7. A Brief History of the Development of Abnormal Psychology: A Training Guide. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, William R.

    Presented for practitioners is a history of the development of abnormal psychology. Areas covered include the following: Early medical concepts, ideas carried over from literature, early treatment of the mentally ill, development of the psychological viewpoint, Freud's psychoanalytic theory, Jung's analytic theory, the individual psychology of…

  8. The Development of Sex-Role Stereotypes and Classificatory Skills in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trautner, H. M.; And Others

    Increase in sex-role knowledge represents an early stage of the development of sex role stereotypes in children, which is followed by a decrease in the extent of sex-role discrimination. This process is related to the acquisition of classificatory skills. Groups of children aged 4-10 years were tested for their sex role stereotypes and…

  9. Steroid abnormalities and the developing brain: Declarative memory for emotionally arousing and neutral material in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Maheu, Françoise S.; Merke, Deborah P.; Schroth, Elizabeth A.; Keil, Margaret F.; Hardin, Julie; Poeth, Kaitlin; Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique

    2008-01-01

    Summary Steroid hormones modulate memory in animals and human adults. Little is known on the developmental effect of these hormones on the neural networks underlying memory. Using Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) as a naturalistic model of early steroid abnormalities, this study examines the consequences of CAH on memory and its neural correlates for emotionally arousing and neutral material in children. Seventeen patients with CAH and 17 age- and sex-matched healthy children (ages 12 to 14 years) completed the study. Subjects were presented positive, negative and neutral pictures. Memory recall occurred about 30 minutes after viewing the pictures. Children with CAH showed memory deficits for negative pictures compared to healthy children (p < 0.01). There were no group differences on memory performance for either positive or neutral pictures (p’s >0.1). In patients, 24h urinary-free cortisol levels (reflecting glucocorticoid replacement therapy) and testosterone levels were not associated with memory performance. These findings suggest that early steroid imbalances affect memory for negative material in children with CAH. Such memory impairments may result from abnormal brain organization and function following hormonal dysfunction during critical periods of development. PMID:18162329

  10. The embryonic development of ear-tufts and associated structural head and neck abnormalities of the Araucana fowl.

    PubMed

    Pabilonia, M S; Somes, R G

    1983-08-01

    Developing embryonic structural abnormalities of ear-tufted embryos of the Araucana fowl are described. These abnormal structures are peduncle, cleft, ear opening, tympanic membrane, and columella auris. The structural abnormalities are believed to be due to the early incomplete fusion of the hyoid and mandibular arches from the distal part of the ear opening to the neck area. PMID:6634592

  11. Abnormal Development of Thalamic Microstructure in Premature Neonates with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Lisa B.; Votava-Smith, Jodie K.; Ceschin, Rafael; Nagasunder, Arabhi C.; Jackson, Hollie A.; Blüml, Stefan; Wisnowski, Jessica L.; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Preterm birth is associated with alteration in cortico-thalamic development, which underlies poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. Our hypothesis was that preterm neonates with CHD would demonstrate abnormal thalamic microstructure when compared to critically ill neonates without CHD. A secondary aim was to identify any association between thalamic microstructural abnormalities and peri-operative clinical variables. Material and Methods We compared thalamic DTI measurements in 21 preterm neonates with CHD to two cohorts of neonates without CHD: 28 term and 27 preterm neonates, identified from the same neonatal intensive care unit. Comparison was made with three other selected white matter regions using ROI manual based measurements. Correlation was made with post-conceptional age and peri-operative clinical variables. Results In preterm neonates with CHD, there were age-related differences in thalamic diffusivity (axial and radial) compared to the preterm and term non-CHD group, in contrast to no differences in anisotropy. Contrary to our hypothesis, abnormal thalamic and optic radiation microstructure was most strongly associated with an elevated first arterial blood gas pO2 and elevated pre-operative arterial blood gas pH (p<0.05). Conclusion Age-related thalamic microstructural abnormalities were observed in preterm neonates with CHD. Perinatal hyperoxemia and increased peri-operative serum pH was associated with abnormal thalamic microstructure in preterm neonates with CHD. This study emphasizes the vulnerability of thalamo-cortical development in the preterm neonate with CHD. PMID:25608695

  12. Association of Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors With Development of Major and Minor Electrocardiographic Abnormalities: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Healy, Caroline F; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M

    2016-01-01

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are prevalent in middle aged and are associated with risk of adverse cardiovascular events. It is unclear whether and to what extent traditional risk factors are associated with the development of ECG abnormalities. To determine whether traditional cardiovascular risk factors are associated with the presence or development of ECG abnormalities, we performed a systematic review of the English-language literature for cross-sectional and prospective studies examining associations between traditional cardiovascular risk factors and ECG abnormalities, including major and minor ECG abnormalities, isolated nonspecific ST-segment and T-wave abnormalities, other ST-segment and T-wave abnormalities, QT interval, Q waves, and QRS duration. Of the 202 papers initially identified, 19 were eligible for inclusion. We examined data analyzing risk factor associations with ECG abnormalities in individuals free of cardiovascular disease. For composite major or minor ECG abnormalities, black race, older age, higher blood pressure, use of antihypertensive medications, higher body mass index, diabetes, smoking, and evidence of left ventricular hypertrophy or higher left ventricular mass are the factors most commonly associated with prevalence and incidence. Risk factor associations differ somewhat according to types of specific ECG abnormalities. Because major and minor ECG abnormalities have important and independent prognostic significance, understanding the groups at risk for their development may inform prevention strategies focused on modifiable risk factors to reduce the burden of ECG abnormalities, which may in turn promote CVD prevention. PMID:27054606

  13. Prevalence of anal human papillomavirus infection and cytologic abnormalities among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Latini, Alessandra; Gabriella Dona, Maria; Ronchetti, Livia; Giglio, Amalia; Moretto, Domenico; Colafigli, Manuela; Laquintana, Valentina; Frasca, Mirko; Zaccarelli, Mauro; Antinori, Andrea; Cristaudo, Antonio; Giuliani, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Human papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for 85% of anal cancers. Recently, anal cancer incidence has been increasing, particularly in men who have sex with men (MSM). Cytology may be a useful tool for the detection of anal precancerous lesions. We assessed the prevalence and determinants of anal HPV infection and cytologic abnormalities among HIV-infected and -uninfected MSM. Materials and Methods MSM ≥18-year-old attending an STI clinic in Rome (Italy) were enrolled. Anal cytologic samples were collected in PreservCyt (Hologic) using a Dacron swab. The Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Diagnostics) was used for the detection and genotyping of 37 mucosal HPV types. Liquid-based cytological slides were obtained using a ThinPrep2000 processor (Hologic). The morphology of the anal pap-test was classified following the Bethesda 2001 guidelines. Results We enrolled 180 HIV-infected (median age 41 years, IQR 33–47) and 438 HIV-uninfected MSM (median age 32 years, IQR: 27–39). Most of the individuals were Caucasian (92.2% and 97.0%, respectively). HPV prevalence, both overall (93.3% vs 72.4%, p<.001) and by high-risk (HR) HPV types (80.5% vs 56.0%, p<.001), was significantly higher among HIV-infected than HIV-uninfected individuals. HPV-multiple infections were evidenced in 48.2% of the HIV-uninfected and 76.1% of the HIV-infected MSM (p<.001). HPV16 was the most prevalent genotype in both groups (23.3% in HIV-positive and 17.6% in HIV-negative MSM). HPV6 and 84 were the most frequent low-risk types in both cohorts. Anal cytologic abnormalities were found in a significantly higher proportion of HIV-infected MSM (46.1% vs 27.9%, p<.001). H-SILs (high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions) were exclusively observed among the HIV-infected individuals, although at a low prevalence (1.2%). Conclusions A high prevalence of anal HPV infection and cytologic abnormalities was evidenced in both populations. Nonetheless, HIV-infected MSM showed a

  14. Management framework paradigms for disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Telles-Silveira, Mariana; Knobloch, Felicia; Kater, Claudio E

    2015-10-01

    Until 2005, questions regarding medical treatment and diagnostic information on Disorders of Sex Development (DSD) were not systematically discussed with both the patients and their families; however, the way these patients are currently treated have been changing with time. Interventional changes in the clinical-psychotherapeutic-surgical areas of DSD determine not only different medical recommendations but also help to place the patient and the family into the decisional process of therapy. We must consider two paradigmatic periods that have influenced and transformed the clinical management framework of patients with DSD: a) The "Money era" (1955), which emphasized the role of the gonads as the diagnostic criterion, having the environment as determinant of the sex identity; and b) The Chicago Consensus (2005) phase, in which the role of genetics and molecular biology was critical for an early identification, as well as in building a proper sex identity, emphasizing ethical questions and the "stigma culture". In addition, recent data have focused on the importance of interdisciplinarity and statements on questions concerning Human Rights as key factors in treatment decision making. Despite each of these management models being able to determine specific directions and recommendations regarding the clinical handling of these patients, we verify that a composite of these several models is the clinical routine nowadays. In the present paper, we discuss these several paradigms, and pinpoint clinical differences and their unfolding regarding management of DSD patients and their families. PMID:26331223

  15. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  16. Understanding normal and abnormal development of the Wolffian/epididymal duct by using transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Murashima, Aki; Xu, Bingfang; Hinton, Barry T

    2015-01-01

    The development of the Wolffian/epididymal duct is crucial for proper function and, therefore, male fertility. The development of the epididymis is complex; the initial stages form as a transient embryonic kidney; then the mesonephros is formed, which in turn undergoes extensive morphogenesis under the influence of androgens and growth factors. Thus, understanding of its full development requires a wide and multidisciplinary view. This review focuses on mouse models that display abnormalities of the Wolffian duct and mesonephric development, the importance of these mouse models toward understanding male reproductive tract development, and how these models contribute to our understanding of clinical abnormalities in humans such as congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). PMID:26112482

  17. Understanding normal and abnormal development of the Wolffian/epididymal duct by using transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Murashima, Aki; Xu, Bingfang; Hinton, Barry T

    2015-01-01

    The development of the Wolffian/epididymal duct is crucial for proper function and, therefore, male fertility. The development of the epididymis is complex; the initial stages form as a transient embryonic kidney; then the mesonephros is formed, which in turn undergoes extensive morphogenesis under the influence of androgens and growth factors. Thus, understanding of its full development requires a wide and multidisciplinary view. This review focuses on mouse models that display abnormalities of the Wolffian duct and mesonephric development, the importance of these mouse models toward understanding male reproductive tract development, and how these models contribute to our understanding of clinical abnormalities in humans such as congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). PMID:26112482

  18. Abnormal development of sensory-motor, visual temporal and parahippocampal cortex in children with learning disabilities and borderline intellectual functioning

    PubMed Central

    Baglio, Francesca; Cabinio, Monia; Ricci, Cristian; Baglio, Gisella; Lipari, Susanna; Griffanti, Ludovica; Preti, Maria G.; Nemni, Raffaello; Clerici, Mario; Zanette, Michela; Blasi, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Borderline intellectual functioning (BIF) is a condition characterized by an intelligence quotient (IQ) between 70 and 85. BIF children present with cognitive, motor, social, and adaptive limitations that result in learning disabilities and are more likely to develop psychiatric disorders later in life. The aim of this study was to investigate brain morphometry and its relation to IQ level in BIF children. Thirteen children with BIF and 14 age- and sex-matched typically developing (TD) children were enrolled. All children underwent a full IQ assessment (WISC-III scale) and a magnetic resonance (MR) examination including conventional sequences to assess brain structural abnormalities and high resolution 3D images for voxel-based morphometry analysis. To investigate to what extent the group influenced gray matter (GM) volumes, both univariate and multivariate generalized linear model analysis of variance were used, and the varimax factor analysis was used to explore variable correlations and clusters among subjects. Results showed that BIF children, compared to controls have increased regional GM volume in bilateral sensorimotor and right posterior temporal cortices and decreased GM volume in the right parahippocampal gyrus. GM volumes were highly correlated with IQ indices. The present work is a case study of a group of BIF children showing that BIF is associated with abnormal cortical development in brain areas that have a pivotal role in motor, learning, and behavioral processes. Our findings, although allowing for little generalization to the general population, contribute to the very limited knowledge in this field. Future longitudinal MR studies will be useful in verifying whether cortical features can be modified over time even in association with rehabilitative intervention. PMID:25360097

  19. HIV Programs for Sex Workers: Lessons and Challenges for Developing and Delivering Programs.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David

    2015-06-01

    There is evidence that HIV prevention programs for sex workers, especially female sex workers, are cost-effective in several contexts, including many western countries, Thailand, India, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, and Zimbabwe. The evidence that sex worker HIV prevention programs work must not inspire complacency but rather a renewed effort to expand, intensify, and maximize their impact. The PLOS Collection "Focus on Delivery and Scale: Achieving HIV Impact with Sex Workers" highlights major challenges to scaling-up sex worker HIV prevention programs, noting the following: sex worker HIV prevention programs are insufficiently guided by understanding of epidemic transmission dynamics, situation analyses, and programmatic mapping; sex worker HIV and sexually transmitted infection services receive limited domestic financing in many countries; many sex worker HIV prevention programs are inadequately codified to ensure consistency and quality; and many sex worker HIV prevention programs have not evolved adequately to address informal sex workers, male and transgender sex workers, and mobile- and internet-based sex workers. Based on the wider collection of papers, this article presents three major clusters of recommendations: (i) HIV programs focused on sex workers should be prioritized, developed, and implemented based on robust evidence; (ii) national political will and increased funding are needed to increase coverage of effective sex worker HIV prevention programs in low and middle income countries; and (iii) comprehensive, integrated, and rapidly evolving HIV programs are needed to ensure equitable access to health services for individuals involved in all forms of sex work. PMID:26079267

  20. HIV Programs for Sex Workers: Lessons and Challenges for Developing and Delivering Programs

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, David

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that HIV prevention programs for sex workers, especially female sex workers, are cost-effective in several contexts, including many western countries, Thailand, India, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, and Zimbabwe. The evidence that sex worker HIV prevention programs work must not inspire complacency but rather a renewed effort to expand, intensify, and maximize their impact. The PLOS Collection “Focus on Delivery and Scale: Achieving HIV Impact with Sex Workers” highlights major challenges to scaling-up sex worker HIV prevention programs, noting the following: sex worker HIV prevention programs are insufficiently guided by understanding of epidemic transmission dynamics, situation analyses, and programmatic mapping; sex worker HIV and sexually transmitted infection services receive limited domestic financing in many countries; many sex worker HIV prevention programs are inadequately codified to ensure consistency and quality; and many sex worker HIV prevention programs have not evolved adequately to address informal sex workers, male and transgender sex workers, and mobile- and internet-based sex workers. Based on the wider collection of papers, this article presents three major clusters of recommendations: (i) HIV programs focused on sex workers should be prioritized, developed, and implemented based on robust evidence; (ii) national political will and increased funding are needed to increase coverage of effective sex worker HIV prevention programs in low and middle income countries; and (iii) comprehensive, integrated, and rapidly evolving HIV programs are needed to ensure equitable access to health services for individuals involved in all forms of sex work. PMID:26079267

  1. Sex differences in the rate of fatigue development and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Albert, WJ; Wrigley, AT; McLean, RB; Sleivert, GG

    2006-01-01

    Background Many musculoskeltal injuries in the workplace have been attributed to the repetitive loading of muscle and soft tissues. It is not disputed that muscular fatigue is a risk factor for musculoskeltal injury, however the disparity between gender with respect to muscular fatigability and rate of recovery is not well understood. Current health and safety guidelines do not account for sex differences in fatiguability and may be predisposing one gender to greater risk. The purpose of this study was to quantify the sex differences in fatigue development and recovery rate of lower and upper body musculature after repeated bouts of sustained isometric contractions. Methods Twenty-seven healthy males (n = 12) and females (n = 15) underwent bilateral localized fatigue of either the knee extensors (male: n = 8; female: n = 8), elbow flexors (male: n = 8; female: n = 10), or both muscle groups. The fatigue protocol consisted of ten 30-second sub-maximal isometric contractions. The changes in maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), electrically evoked twitches, and motor unit activation (MUA) were assessed along with the ability to control the sustained contractions (SLP) during the fatigue protocol using a mixed four-factor repeated measures ANOVA (gender × side × muscle × time) design with significance set at p < 0.05. Results There was a significant loss of MVC, MUA, and evoked twitch amplitude from pre- to post-fatigue in both the arms and legs. Males had greater relative loss of isometric force, a higher rate of fatigue development, and were less capable of maintaining the fatiguing contractions in the legs when compared to the females. Conclusion The nature of the induced fatigue was a combination of central and peripheral fatigue that did not fully recover over a 45-minute period. The results appear to reflect sex differences that are peripheral, and partially support the muscle mass hypothesis for explaining differences in muscular fatigue. PMID:16412256

  2. Measuring Sex Role Development: A Comparison of Two Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seegmiller, Bonni R.

    Two basic problems are confronted in this research: (1) What is sex role differentiation?, and (2) How does one go about measuring it? Both questions revolve around construct validity and the adequacy of sex role measures. Most investigators have used dependent "objective-verbal" tests to measure sex role differentiation. These either involve…

  3. Cranial index of children with normal and abnormal brain development in Sokoto, Nigeria: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Muhammad Awwal; Zagga, Abdullahi Daudu; Danfulani, Mohammed; Tadros, Aziz Abdo; Ahmed, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Abnormal brain development due to neurodevelopmental disorders in children has always been an important concern, but yet has to be considered as a significant public health problem, especially in the low- and middle-income countries including Nigeria. Aims: The aim of this study is to determine whether abnormal brain development in the form of neurodevelopmental disorders causes any deviation in the cranial index of affected children. Materials and Methods: This is a comparative study on the head length, head width, and cranial index of 112 children (72 males and 40 females) diagnosed with at least one abnormal problem in brain development, in the form of a neurodevelopmental disorder (NDD), in comparison with that of 218 normal growing children without any form of NDD (121 males and 97 females), aged 0-18 years old seen at the Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, over a period of six months, June to December, 2012. The head length and head width of the children was measured using standard anatomical landmarks and cranial index calculated. The data obtained was entered into the Microsoft excel worksheet and analyzed using SPSS version 17. Results: The mean Cephalic Index for normal growing children with normal brain development was 79.82 ± 3.35 and that of the children with abnormal brain development was 77.78 ± 2.95 and the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusion: It can be deduced from this present study that the cranial index does not change in children with neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:24966551

  4. Abnormal visual experience during development alters the early stages of visual-tactile integration.

    PubMed

    Niechwiej-Szwedo, Ewa; Chin, Jessica; Wolfe, Paul J; Popovich, Christina; Staines, W Richard

    2016-05-01

    Visual experience during the critical periods in early postnatal life is necessary for the normal development of the visual system. Disruption of visual input during this period results in amblyopia, which is associated with reduced activation of the striate and extrastriate cortices. It is well known that visual input converges with other sensory signals and exerts a significant influence on cortical processing in multiple association areas. Recent work in healthy adults has also shown that task-relevant visual input can modulate neural excitability at very early stages of information processing in the primary somatosensory cortex. Here we used electroencephalography to investigate visual-tactile interactions in adults with abnormal binocular vision due to amblyopia and strabismus. Results showed three main findings. First, in comparison to a visually normal control group, participants with abnormal vision had a significantly lower amplitude of the P50 somatosensory event related potential (ERP) when visual and tactile stimuli were presented concurrently. Second, the amplitude of the P100 somatosensory ERP was significantly greater in participants with abnormal vision. These results indicate that task relevant visual input does not significantly influence the excitability of the primary somatosensory cortex, instead, the excitability of the secondary somatosensory cortex is increased. Third, participants with abnormal vision had a higher amplitude of the P1 visual ERP when a tactile stimulus was presented concurrently. Importantly, these results were not modulated by viewing condition, which indicates that the impact of amblyopia on crossmodal interactions is not simply related to the reduced visual acuity as it was evident when viewing with the unaffected eye and binocularly. These results indicate that the consequences of abnormal visual experience on neurophysiological processing extend beyond the primary and secondary visual areas to other modality

  5. Disorders of sex development: a new definition and classification.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ieuan A

    2008-02-01

    A newborn infant with ambiguous genitalia is a complex enough problem to unravel without any further clouding by confusing terms. The nomenclature 'intersex', 'hermaphrodite' and 'pseudohermaphrodite' is anachronistic, unhelpful, and perceived to be pejorative by some affected families. In its place, a consensus statement recommends the term 'disorder of sex development' (DSD), a generic definition encompassing any problem noted at birth where the genitalia are atypical in relation to the chromosomes or gonads. The karyotype is used as a prefix to define the category of DSD, replacing the arcane terminology of male or female pseudohermaphroditism (now known as XY DSD or XX DSD, respectively). The new nomenclature has spawned a simple and logical classification of the causes of DSD. In this chapter new facets of gonadal dysgenesis and novel defects in steroid biosynthesis are reviewed in relation to the DSD classification, and options for early, non-invasive fetal sexing are described. Future research to determine many causes of DSD will benefit from the use of this universal language of scientific communication. PMID:18279784

  6. Sex-specific gonadal and gene expression changes throughout development in fathead minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) are commonly used as a model fish in endocrine disruption studies, none have characterized sex-specific baseline expression of genes involved in sex differentiation during development in this species. Using a sex-linked DNA marker t...

  7. Links Between Sex-Typed Time Use in Middle Childhood and Gender Development in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHale, Susan M.; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Whiteman, Shawn; Crouter, Ann C.

    2004-01-01

    The authors studied sex-typing in the kinds (e.g., sports, handicrafts) and social contexts (same- vs. other-sex companions) of children's free time activities, and the links between sex-typed activities and gender development over 2 years. Participants were 200 White, working- and middle-class children (103 girls, 97 boys; mean age = 10.86…

  8. Sleep and Sex: What Can Go Wrong? A Review of the Literature on Sleep Related Disorders and Abnormal Sexual Behaviors and Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, Carlos H.; Arnulf, Isabelle; Mahowald, Mark W.

    2007-01-01

    stage 1 sleep/wakefulness in one case (with sex provoked by the bed partner). Confusional arousals (CAs) were diagnosed as the cause of “sleepsex” (“sexsomnia”) in 26 cases (with obstructive sleep apnea [OSA] comorbidity in 4 cases), and sleepwalking in 2 cases, totaling 90.3% (28/31) of cases being NREM sleep parasomnias. REM behavior disorder was the presumed cause in the other 3 cases. Bedtime clonazepam therapy was effective in 90% (9/10) of treated parasomnia cases; nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy was effective in controlling comorbid OSA and CAs in both treated cases. All five treated patients with sleep related sexual seizures responded to anticonvulsant therapy. The hypersexuality in KLS, which was twice as common in males compared to females, had no reported effective therapy. Conclusions: A broad range of sleep related disorders associated with abnormal sexual behaviors and experiences exists, with major clinical and forensic consequences. Citation: Schenck CH; Arnulf I; Mahowald MW et al. Sleep and sex: what can go wrong? A review of the literature on sleep related disorders and abnormal sexual behaviors and experiences. SLEEP 2007;30(6):683-702. PMID:17580590

  9. Radiological imaging of disorders of sex development (DSD)

    PubMed Central

    Al Jurayyan, Nasir A.; Al-Jurayyan, Rushaid N.A.; Mohamed, Sarar H.; Babiker, Amir M. I.; Al Otaibi, Hessah M.N.

    2013-01-01

    The birth of a child with ambiguous genitalia is a matter of a medical and social emergency to decide the appropriate sex rearing and eventually to prevent the associated metabolic disturbances. It must be taken with immediacy and great sensitivity. The pediatric endocrinologist should share the care with a team consists of a pediatric urologist, or surgeon, a pediatric radiologist, geneticist and a child psychiatrist or psychologist who should work closely with the family. Ultrasonograpy is the primary modality for demonstrating internal organs while genitography is used to assess the uterus, vagina, and any fistulas or complex tracts. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used as an adjunct modality to assess the internal gonads and genitalia. Early and appropriate gender assignment is necessary for healthy physical and psychological development of children with ambiguous genitalia. PMID:27493368

  10. Sex steroid sensitivity of developing bursa of Fabricius.

    PubMed

    Ylikomi, T; Tuohimaa, P

    1989-03-01

    Sex steroid sensitivity of the bursa of Fabricius (BF) was studied from the early embryonic time until its regression. Expression of progesterone receptor (PR) served as a dual marker: first, as a marker for progesterone sensitivity and second, as a marker for estrogen action, since it is an estrogen-induced protein. The progesterone binding molecule in the bursa was characterized by different chromatography methods and by steroid binding studies. We showed that it fulfils the criteria of a progesterone receptor by binding, structural and immunological properties. With immunohistochemistry and with the combined techniques of immunohistochemistry and autoradiography we demonstrated two cell types which express the PR: smooth muscle cells surrounding the BF and stromal cells located under the bursal epithelium and between the lymphoid follicles. The epithelium and the cells inside the lymphoid follicles were negative. Using immunoelectron microscopy the PR-expressing stromal cells were shown to be fibroblasts. The cloacal mesenchyme, from which the BF develops, was shown to be sensitive to exogenous estrogen very early during the embryonic time. The mesenchyme around and inside the developing BF reached estrogen sensitivity a few days later. The estrogen-sensitive mesenchymal cells were first seen surrounding the bursal primordium and later in the center of the plicae. During a natural sexual maturation without exogenous estradiol an expression of the PR was detected much later, at the age of 10-12 weeks after hatching. This expression correlates with the onset of the bursal regression and with the increase of the sex steroid levels in the blood. In the oviduct stroma PR was undetectable before the onset of sexual maturation. In the oviduct stroma PR becomes detectable a few weeks earlier than in the bursa. PMID:2485693

  11. Gene expression of Hsps in normal and abnormal embryonic development of mouse hindlimbs.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhengli; Wei, Huimiao; Ren, Chuanlu; Yuan, Shishan; Fu, Hu; Lv, Yuan; Zhu, Yongfei; Zhang, Tianbao

    2015-06-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps), which have important biological functions, are a class of highly conserved genetic molecules with the capacity of protecting and promoting cells to repair themselves from damage caused by various stimuli. Our previous studies found that Hsp25, HspB2, HspB3, HspB7, Hsp20, HspB9, HspB10, and Hsp40 may be related to all-trans retinoic acid (atRA)-induced phocomelic and other abnormalities, while HspA12B, HspA14, Trap1, and Hsp105 may be forelimb development-related genes; Grp78 may play an important role in forelimb development. In this study, the embryonic phocomelic, oligodactylic model of both forelimbs and hindlimbs was developed by atRA administered per os to the pregnant mice on gestational day 11, and the expression of 36 members of Hsps family in normal and abnormal development of embryonic hindlimbs was measured by real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). It is found that HspA1L, Hsp22, Hsp10, Hsp60, Hsp47, HspB2, HspB10, HspA12A, Apg1, HspB4, Grp78, and HspB9 probably performs a major function in limb development, and HspA13, Grp94 and Hsp110 may be hindlimb development-related genes. PMID:25352652

  12. Sex chromosome complement determines sex differences in aromatase expression and regulation in the stria terminalis and anterior amygdala of the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Cisternas, Carla D; Tome, Karina; Caeiro, Ximena E; Dadam, Florencia M; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Cambiasso, María J

    2015-10-15

    Aromatase, which converts testosterone in estradiol, is involved in the generation of brain sex dimorphisms. Here we used the "four core genotypes" mouse model, in which the effect of gonadal sex and sex chromosome complement is dissociated, to determine if sex chromosomes influence the expression of brain aromatase. The brain of 16 days old XY mouse embryos showed higher aromatase expression in the stria terminalis and the anterior amygdaloid area than the brain of XX embryos, independent of gonadal sex. Furthermore, estradiol or dihydrotestosterone increased aromatase expression in cultures of anterior amygdala neurons derived from XX embryos, but not in those derived from XY embryos. This effect was also independent of gonadal sex. The expression of other steroidogenic molecules, estrogen receptor-α and androgen receptor was not influenced by sex chromosomes. In conclusion, sex chromosomes determine sex dimorphisms in aromatase expression and regulation in the developing mouse brain. PMID:26231585

  13. Human sex-determination and disorders of sex-development (DSD).

    PubMed

    Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Ken

    2015-09-01

    Several new genes and pathways have been identified in recent years associated with human errors of sex-determination or DSD. SOX family gene mutations, as well as mutations involving GATA4, FOG2 and genes involved in MAP kinase signaling have been associated with virilization in 46,XX individuals or with 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis. Furthermore, mutations involving another key gene in sex-determination, NR5A1, are now known to be an important cause spermatogenic failure in the male and ovarian insufficiency in the female. These new findings offer insights into human sex-determination and highlight important differences between the human and mouse model. This review will critically examine the evidence linking gene mutations, especially MAP3K1, to non-syndromic forms of human 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis or XX testicular/ovotesticular. PMID:26526145

  14. The development of hepatic stellate cells in normal and abnormal human fetuses – an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Christine K C; Pereira, Tamara N; Pozniak, Katarzyna N; Ramsing, Mette; Vogel, Ida; Ramm, Grant A

    2015-01-01

    The precise embryological origin and development of hepatic stellate cells is not established. Animal studies and observations on human fetuses suggest that they derive from posterior mesodermal cells that migrate via the septum transversum and developing diaphragm to form submesothelial cells beneath the liver capsule, which give rise to mesenchymal cells including hepatic stellate cells. However, it is unclear if these are similar to hepatic stellate cells in adults or if this is the only source of stellate cells. We have studied hepatic stellate cells by immunohistochemistry, in developing human liver from autopsies of fetuses with and without malformations and growth restriction, using cellular Retinol Binding Protein-1 (cRBP-1), Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), and α-Smooth Muscle Actin (αSMA) antibodies, to identify factors that influence their development. We found that hepatic stellate cells expressing cRBP-1 are present from the end of the first trimester of gestation and reduce in density throughout gestation. They appear abnormally formed and variably reduced in number in fetuses with abnormal mesothelial Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) function, diaphragmatic hernia and in ectopic liver nodules without mesothelium. Stellate cells showed similarities to intravascular cells and their presence in a fetus with diaphragm agenesis suggests they may be derived from circulating stem cells. Our observations suggest circulating stem cells as well as mesothelium can give rise to hepatic stellate cells, and that they require normal mesothelial function for their development. PMID:26265759

  15. [Intersex and differences of sex development: background, diagnostics, and concepts of care].

    PubMed

    Holterhus, P-M

    2013-12-01

    Intersex is an inherited incongruence of chromosomal, gonadal, and genital sexual characteristics. A typical clinical situation of intersex is the ambiguous genitalia in the newborn. Diagnostics, counseling, and therapy should be offered by specialized multidisciplinary health-care teams. The focus is not only on medical issues but also on psychological, social, and ethical aspects. In the international literature, intersex is now termed "disorders of sex development" (DSD). Alternatively, some authors use "differences of sex development" to underline that patients do not necessarily feel they have a "disorder" but rather a "difference" of sex development compared with normal sex development. PMID:24337131

  16. A mechanical model predicts morphological abnormalities in the developing human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budday, Silvia; Raybaud, Charles; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-07-01

    The developing human brain remains one of the few unsolved mysteries of science. Advancements in developmental biology, neuroscience, and medical imaging have brought us closer than ever to understand brain development in health and disease. However, the precise role of mechanics throughout this process remains underestimated and poorly understood. Here we show that mechanical stretch plays a crucial role in brain development. Using the nonlinear field theories of mechanics supplemented by the theory of finite growth, we model the human brain as a living system with a morphogenetically growing outer surface and a stretch-driven growing inner core. This approach seamlessly integrates the two popular but competing hypotheses for cortical folding: axonal tension and differential growth. We calibrate our model using magnetic resonance images from very preterm neonates. Our model predicts that deviations in cortical growth and thickness induce morphological abnormalities. Using the gyrification index, the ratio between the total and exposed surface area, we demonstrate that these abnormalities agree with the classical pathologies of lissencephaly and polymicrogyria. Understanding the mechanisms of cortical folding in the developing human brain has direct implications in the diagnostics and treatment of neurological disorders, including epilepsy, schizophrenia, and autism.

  17. A mechanical model predicts morphological abnormalities in the developing human brain

    PubMed Central

    Budday, Silvia; Raybaud, Charles; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The developing human brain remains one of the few unsolved mysteries of science. Advancements in developmental biology, neuroscience, and medical imaging have brought us closer than ever to understand brain development in health and disease. However, the precise role of mechanics throughout this process remains underestimated and poorly understood. Here we show that mechanical stretch plays a crucial role in brain development. Using the nonlinear field theories of mechanics supplemented by the theory of finite growth, we model the human brain as a living system with a morphogenetically growing outer surface and a stretch-driven growing inner core. This approach seamlessly integrates the two popular but competing hypotheses for cortical folding: axonal tension and differential growth. We calibrate our model using magnetic resonance images from very preterm neonates. Our model predicts that deviations in cortical growth and thickness induce morphological abnormalities. Using the gyrification index, the ratio between the total and exposed surface area, we demonstrate that these abnormalities agree with the classical pathologies of lissencephaly and polymicrogyria. Understanding the mechanisms of cortical folding in the developing human brain has direct implications in the diagnostics and treatment of neurological disorders, including epilepsy, schizophrenia, and autism. PMID:25008163

  18. Sex role identity in young adults: its parental antecedents and relation to ego development.

    PubMed

    Costos, D

    1986-03-01

    This study, inspired by Block's (1973) work, was designed to enable one to examine how ego development and socialization experience interact in relation to sex role identity. Sex role identity was measured via the Bem Sex Role Inventory, and socialization practices were measured via the Block Child-Rearing Practices Report. Both measures were scaled so as to yield scores on agency, communion, and androgyny. Ego development was assessed via Loevinger's Sentence Completion Test of Ego Development. The sample consisted of 120 young adult men and women, married and single. Analyses revealed that the predictive power of the variables differed by sex. Ego development was predictive of sex role identity in men but not women, whereas socialization practices were predictive of sex role identity in women but not men. The results were seen as supporting Chodorow's (1974) position regarding the differing socialization experiences of men and women. PMID:3701594

  19. Transcriptome Analysis for Abnormal Spike Development of the Wheat Mutant dms

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xin-Xin; Li, Qiao-Yun; Shen, Chun-Cai; Duan, Zong-Biao; Yu, Dong-Yan; Niu, Ji-Shan; Ni, Yong-Jing; Jiang, Yu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Background Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) spike development is the foundation for grain yield. We obtained a novel wheat mutant, dms, characterized as dwarf, multi-pistil and sterility. Although the genetic changes are not clear, the heredity of traits suggests that a recessive gene locus controls the two traits of multi-pistil and sterility in self-pollinating populations of the medium plants (M), such that the dwarf genotype (D) and tall genotype (T) in the progeny of the mutant are ideal lines for studies regarding wheat spike development. The objective of this study was to explore the molecular basis for spike abnormalities of dwarf genotype. Results Four unigene libraries were assembled by sequencing the mRNAs of the super-bulked differentiating spikes and stem tips of the D and T plants. Using integrative analysis, we identified 419 genes highly expressed in spikes, including nine typical homeotic genes of the MADS-box family and the genes TaAP2, TaFL and TaDL. We also identified 143 genes that were significantly different between young spikes of T and D, and 26 genes that were putatively involved in spike differentiation. The result showed that the expression levels of TaAP1-2, TaAP2, and other genes involved in the majority of biological processes such as transcription, translation, cell division, photosynthesis, carbohydrate transport and metabolism, and energy production and conversion were significantly lower in D than in T. Conclusions We identified a set of genes related to wheat floral organ differentiation, including typical homeotic genes. Our results showed that the major causal factors resulting in the spike abnormalities of dms were the lower expression homeotic genes, hormonal imbalance, repressed biological processes, and deficiency of construction materials and energy. We performed a series of studies on the homeotic genes, however the other three causal factors for spike abnormal phenotype of dms need further study. PMID:26982202

  20. Stochastic anomaly of methylome but persistent SRY hypermethylation in disorder of sex development in canine somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Young-Hee; Lu, Hanlin; Park, Chi-Hun; Li, Meiyan; Luo, Huijuan; Kim, Joung Joo; Liu, Siyang; Ko, Kyeong Hee; Huang, Shujia; Hwang, In Sung; Kang, Mi Na; Gong, Desheng; Park, Kang Bae; Choi, Eun Ji; Park, Jung Hyun; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Moon, Changjong; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Kim, Nam Hyung; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Yang, Huanming; Hwang, Woo Suk; Gao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) provides an excellent model for studying epigenomic reprogramming during mammalian development. We mapped the whole genome and whole methylome for potential anomalies of mutations or epimutations in SCNT-generated dogs with XY chromosomal sex but complete gonadal dysgenesis, which is classified as 78, XY disorder of sex development (DSD). Whole genome sequencing revealed no potential genomic variations that could explain the pathogenesis of DSD. However, extensive but stochastic anomalies of genome-wide DNA methylation were discovered in these SCNT DSD dogs. Persistent abnormal hypermethylation of the SRY gene was observed together with its down-regulated mRNA and protein expression. Failure of SRY expression due to hypermethylation was further correlated with silencing of a serial of testis determining genes, including SOX9, SF1, SOX8, AMH and DMRT1 in an early embryonic development stage at E34 in the XY(DSD) gonad, and high activation of the female specific genes, including FOXL2, RSPO1, CYP19A1, WNT4, ERα and ERβ, after one postnatal year in the ovotestis. Our results demonstrate that incomplete demethylation on the SRY gene is the driving cause of XY(DSD) in these XY DSD dogs, indicating a central role of epigenetic regulation in sex determination. PMID:27501986

  1. Stochastic anomaly of methylome but persistent SRY hypermethylation in disorder of sex development in canine somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Young-Hee; Lu, Hanlin; Park, Chi-Hun; Li, Meiyan; Luo, Huijuan; Kim, Joung Joo; Liu, Siyang; Ko, Kyeong Hee; Huang, Shujia; Hwang, In Sung; Kang, Mi Na; Gong, Desheng; Park, Kang Bae; Choi, Eun Ji; Park, Jung Hyun; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Moon, Changjong; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Kim, Nam Hyung; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Yang, Huanming; Hwang, Woo Suk; Gao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) provides an excellent model for studying epigenomic reprogramming during mammalian development. We mapped the whole genome and whole methylome for potential anomalies of mutations or epimutations in SCNT-generated dogs with XY chromosomal sex but complete gonadal dysgenesis, which is classified as 78, XY disorder of sex development (DSD). Whole genome sequencing revealed no potential genomic variations that could explain the pathogenesis of DSD. However, extensive but stochastic anomalies of genome-wide DNA methylation were discovered in these SCNT DSD dogs. Persistent abnormal hypermethylation of the SRY gene was observed together with its down-regulated mRNA and protein expression. Failure of SRY expression due to hypermethylation was further correlated with silencing of a serial of testis determining genes, including SOX9, SF1, SOX8, AMH and DMRT1 in an early embryonic development stage at E34 in the XYDSD gonad, and high activation of the female specific genes, including FOXL2, RSPO1, CYP19A1, WNT4, ERα and ERβ, after one postnatal year in the ovotestis. Our results demonstrate that incomplete demethylation on the SRY gene is the driving cause of XYDSD in these XY DSD dogs, indicating a central role of epigenetic regulation in sex determination. PMID:27501986

  2. Latrunculin A Treatment Prevents Abnormal Chromosome Segregation for Successful Development of Cloned Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Terashita, Yukari; Yamagata, Kazuo; Tokoro, Mikiko; Itoi, Fumiaki; Wakayama, Sayaka; Li, Chong; Sato, Eimei; Tanemura, Kentaro; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer to an enucleated oocyte is used for reprogramming somatic cells with the aim of achieving totipotency, but most cloned embryos die in the uterus after transfer. While modifying epigenetic states of cloned embryos can improve their development, the production rate of cloned embryos can also be enhanced by changing other factors. It has already been shown that abnormal chromosome segregation (ACS) is a major cause of the developmental failure of cloned embryos and that Latrunculin A (LatA), an actin polymerization inhibitor, improves F-actin formation and birth rate of cloned embryos. Since F-actin is important for chromosome congression in embryos, here we examined the relation between ACS and F-actin in cloned embryos. Using LatA treatment, the occurrence of ACS decreased significantly whereas cloned embryo-specific epigenetic abnormalities such as dimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9me2) could not be corrected. In contrast, when H3K9me2 was normalized using the G9a histone methyltransferase inhibitor BIX-01294, the Magea2 gene—essential for normal development but never before expressed in cloned embryos—was expressed. However, this did not increase the cloning success rate. Thus, non-epigenetic factors also play an important role in determining the efficiency of mouse cloning. PMID:24205216

  3. Severe vitamin D deficiency in patients with Kawasaki disease: a potential role in the risk to develop heart vascular abnormalities?

    PubMed

    Stagi, Stefano; Rigante, Donato; Lepri, Gemma; Matucci Cerinic, Marco; Falcini, Fernanda

    2016-07-01

    Twenty-five-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)-vitamin D) is crucial in the regulation of immunologic processes, but-although its deficiency has been reported in patients with different rheumatological disorders-no data are available for Kawasaki disease (KD). The goals of this study were to assess the serum levels of 25(OH)-vitamin D in children with KD and evaluate the relationship with the eventual occurrence of KD-related vascular abnormalities. We evaluated serum 25(OH)-vitamin D levels in 79 children with KD (21 females, 58 males, median age 4.9 years, range 1.4-7.5 years) in comparison with healthy sex-/age-matched controls. A significantly higher percentage of KD patients (98.7 %) were shown to have reduced 25(OH)-vitamin D levels (<30 ng/mL) in comparison with controls (78.6 %, p < 0.0001). Furthermore, KD patients had severely low levels of 25(OH)-vitamin D than controls (9.17 ± 4.94 vs 23.3 ± 10.6 ng/mL, p < 0.0001), especially the subgroup who developed coronary artery abnormalities (4.92 ± 1.36 vs 9.41 ± 4.95 ng/mL, p < 0.0001). In addition, serum 25(OH)-vitamin D levels correlated not only with erythrosedimentation rate (p < 0.0001), C-reactive protein (p < 0.0001), hemoglobin level at KD diagnosis (p < 0.0001) but also with both coronary artery aneurysms (p = 0.005) and non-aneurysmatic cardiovascular lesions (p < 0.05). Low serum concentrations of 25(OH)-vitamin D might have a contributive role in the development of coronary artery complications observed in children with KD. PMID:25994612

  4. Past experiences of adults with disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Audí, Laura

    2014-01-01

    When a human being born with any disorder/difference of sex development (DSD) reaches adulthood, the experience lived may be quite varied, depending partly on the age at diagnosis, the underlying cause, physical and health involvement, family circle, health system care received, societal culture and psychological ability to face the process, etc. As affected persons may suffer not only from diverse types of physical differences, but also difficulties in adapting their lives to the most common social mores, international consensus has long advocated a pluridisciplinary care involving different medical specialities. Although healthcare systems have progressively improved, the physical and psychological experiences of these adults may often have been stressful or traumatic, partly due to the 'rarity or low frequency' of their condition, and also to the fact that the person's sexual life is involved. The creation of support groups by affected individuals and their activities have proved extremely rewarding by improving individual well-being and pushing healthcare systems towards higher standards. In this chapter, we present the work of a patient support group in Spain (objectives, activities and opinions) and reflect present views and past experiences of a number of its adult members. PMID:25247651

  5. Disorders of sex development: effect of molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Achermann, John C; Domenice, Sorahia; Bachega, Tania A S S; Nishi, Mirian Y; Mendonca, Berenice B

    2015-08-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSDs) are a diverse group of conditions that can be challenging to diagnose accurately using standard phenotypic and biochemical approaches. Obtaining a specific diagnosis can be important for identifying potentially life-threatening associated disorders, as well as providing information to guide parents in deciding on the most appropriate management for their child. Within the past 5 years, advances in molecular methodologies have helped to identify several novel causes of DSDs; molecular tests to aid diagnosis and genetic counselling have now been adopted into clinical practice. Occasionally, genetic profiling of embryos prior to implantation as an adjunct to assisted reproduction, prenatal diagnosis of at-risk pregnancies and confirmatory testing of positive results found during newborn biochemical screening are performed. Of the available genetic tests, the candidate gene approach is the most popular. New high-throughput DNA analysis could enable a genetic diagnosis to be made when the aetiology is unknown or many differential diagnoses are possible. Nonetheless, concerns exist about the use of genetic tests. For instance, a diagnosis is not always possible even using new molecular approaches (which can be worrying for the parents) and incidental information obtained during the test might cause anxiety. Careful selection of the genetic test indicated for each condition remains important for good clinical practice. The purpose of this Review is to describe advances in molecular biological techniques for diagnosing DSDs. PMID:25942653

  6. The use of molecular and cytogenetic methods as a valuable tool in the detection of chromosomal abnormalities in horses: a case of sex chromosome chimerism in a Spanish purebred colt.

    PubMed

    Demyda-Peyrás, S; Membrillo, A; Bugno-Poniewierska, M; Pawlina, K; Anaya, G; Moreno-Millán, M

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities associated to sex chromosomes are reported as a problem more common than believed to be in horses. Most of them remain undiagnosed due to the complexity of the horse karyotype and the lack of interest of breeders and veterinarians in this type of diagnosis. Approximately 10 years ago, the Spanish Purebred Breeders Association implemented a DNA paternity test to evaluate the pedigree of every newborn foal. All candidates who showed abnormal or uncertain results are routinely submitted to cytogenetical analysis to evaluate the presence of chromosomal abnormalities. We studied the case of a foal showing 3 and even 4 different alleles in several loci in the short tandem repeat (STR) -based DNA parentage test. To confirm these results, a filiation test was repeated using follicular hair DNA showing normal results. A complete set of conventional and molecular cytogenetic analysis was performed to determine their chromosomal complements. C-banding and FISH had shown that the foal presents a sex chimerism 64,XX/64,XY with a cellular percentage of approximately 70/30, diagnosed in blood samples. The use of a diagnostic approach combining routine parentage QF-PCR-based STR screening tested with classical or molecular cytogenetic analysis could be a powerful tool that allows early detection of foals that will have a poor or even no reproductive performance due to chromosomal abnormalities, saving time, efforts and breeders' resources. PMID:23735586

  7. The character of abnormalities found in eye development of quail embruos exposed under space flight conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, E.; Dadheva, O.; Polinskaya, V.; Guryeva, T.

    The avian embryonic eye is used as a model system for studies on the environmental effects on central nervous system development. Here we present results of qualitative investigation of the eye development in quail embryos incubated in micro-"g" environment. In this study we used eyes of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix Japonica) embryos "flown" onboard biosatellite Kosmos-1129 and on Mir station within the framework of Mir-NASA Program. Eyes obtained from embryos ranging in age from 3-12 days (E3-E12) were prepared histologically and compared with those of the synchronous and laboratory gound controls. Ther most careful consideration was given to finding and analysis of eye developmental abnormalities. Then they were compared with those already described by experimental teratology for birds and mammals. At the stage of the "eye cup" (E3) we found the case of invalid formation of the inner retina. The latter was represented by disorganized neuroblasts occupying whole posterior chamber of the eye. On the 7th day of quail eye development, at the period of cellular growth activation some cases of small eyes with many folds of overgrowing neural and pigmented retinal layers were detected. In retinal folds of these eyes the normal layering was disturbed as well as the formation of aqueous body and pecten oculi. At this time point the changes were also found in the anterior part of the eye. The peculiarities came out of the bigger width of the cornea and separation of its layers, but were found in synchronous control as well. Few embryos of E10 had also eyes with the abnormities described for E7 but this time they were more vivid because of the completion of eye tissue differentiation. At the stage E12 we found the case evaluated as microphthalmia attending by overgrowth of anterior pigmented tissues - iris and ciliary body attached with the cornea. Most, but not all, of abnormalities we found in eye morphogeneses belonged to the birds "flown" aboard Kosmos- 1129 and

  8. Development of PCR‐Based Markers to Determine the Sex of Kelps

    PubMed Central

    Lipinska, Agnieszka P.; Ahmed, Sophia; Peters, Akira F.; Faugeron, Sylvain; Cock, J. Mark; Coelho, Susana M.

    2015-01-01

    Sex discriminating genetic markers are commonly used to facilitate breeding programs in economically and ecologically important animal and plant species. However, despite their considerable economic and ecological value, the development of sex markers for kelp species has been very limited. In this study, we used the recently described sequence of the sex determining region (SDR) of the brown algal model Ectocarpus to develop novel DNA-based sex-markers for three commercially relevant kelps: Laminaria digitata, Undaria pinnatifida and Macrocystis pyrifera. Markers were designed within nine protein coding genes of Ectocarpus male and female (U/V) sex chromosomes and tested on gametophytes of the three kelp species. Seven primer pairs corresponding to three loci in the Ectocarpus SDR amplified sex-specific bands in the three kelp species, yielding at least one male and one female marker for each species. Our work has generated the first male sex-specific markers for L. digitata and U. pinnatifida, as well as the first sex markers developed for the genus Macrocystis. The markers and methodology presented here will not only facilitate seaweed breeding programs but also represent useful tools for population and demography studies and provide a means to investigate the evolution of sex determination across this largely understudied eukaryotic group. PMID:26496392

  9. Unbiased Identification of Patients with Disorders of Sex Development

    PubMed Central

    Hanauer, David A.; Gardner, Melissa; Sandberg, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) represent a collection of rare diseases that generate substantial controversy regarding best practices for diagnosis and treatment. A significant barrier preventing a better understanding of how patients with these conditions should be evaluated and treated, especially from a psychological standpoint, is the lack of systematic and standardized approaches to identify cases for study inclusion. Common approaches include “hand-picked” subjects already known to the practice, which could introduce bias. We implemented an informatics-based approach to identify patients with DSD from electronic health records (EHRs) at three large, academic children’s hospitals. The informatics approach involved comprehensively searching EHRs at each hospital using a combination of structured billing codes as an initial filtering strategy followed by keywords applied to the free text clinical documentation. The informatics approach was implemented to replicate the functionality of an EHR search engine (EMERSE) available at one of the hospitals. At the two hospitals that did not have EMERSE, we compared case ascertainment using the informatics method to traditional approaches employed for identifying subjects. Potential cases identified using all approaches were manually reviewed by experts in DSD to verify eligibility criteria. At the two institutions where both the informatics and traditional approaches were applied, the informatics approach identified substantially higher numbers of potential study subjects. The traditional approaches yielded 14 and 28 patients with DSD, respectively; the informatics approach yielded 226 and 77 patients, respectively. The informatics approach missed only a few cases that the traditional approaches identified, largely because those cases were known to the study team, but patient data were not in the particular children’s hospital EHR. The use of informatics approaches to search electronic documentation can

  10. Development of an object relation-based typology of adolescent sex offenders.

    PubMed

    Gamache, Dominick; Diguer, Louis; Laverdière, Olivier; Rousseau, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a typology of adolescent sex offenders based on object relations theory and Otto F. Kernberg's model of personality organizations (PO). A secondary objective was to compare the identified subtypes on offense characteristics as well as some psychological variables of adolescent sex offenders. Clinical files from 40 male adolescent sex offenders in treatment were examined. Cluster analysis based on PO and object relations variables identified six subtypes of offenders, in line with Kernberg's PO model. These subtypes differed from one another on various variables pertaining to characteristics of sex offenses, general delinquency, relational/sexual history, and trauma history. PMID:23244526

  11. Application of sex-selected semen in heifer development and breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Seidel, George E

    2013-11-01

    The only practicable method for sexing mammalian sperm is by measuring DNA content with a flow cytometer/cell sorter. Although many other methods have been tried and patented, they either are inaccurate, damage sperm severely, or otherwise are unsuitable for practical application. Procedures for sexing sperm damage them slightly, and fewer sperm are packaged per straw than with unsexed semen. These 2 characteristics result in lower fertility with sexed than unsexed semen. Incremental improvements of current sexing procedures are being developed constantly. PMID:24182438

  12. Sleep spindling and fluid intelligence across adolescent development: sex matters.

    PubMed

    Bódizs, Róbert; Gombos, Ferenc; Ujma, Péter P; Kovács, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Evidence supports the intricate relationship between sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) spindling and cognitive abilities in children and adults. Although sleep EEG changes during adolescence index fundamental brain reorganization, a detailed analysis of sleep spindling and the spindle-intelligence relationship was not yet provided for adolescents. Therefore, adolescent development of sleep spindle oscillations were studied in a home polysomnographic study focusing on the effects of chronological age and developmentally acquired overall mental efficiency (fluid IQ) with sex as a potential modulating factor. Subjects were 24 healthy adolescents (12 males) with an age range of 15-22 years (mean: 18 years) and fluid IQ of 91-126 (mean: 104.12, Raven Progressive Matrices Test). Slow spindles (SSs) and fast spindles (FSs) were analyzed in 21 EEG derivations by using the individual adjustment method (IAM). A significant age-dependent increase in average FS density (r = 0.57; p = 0.005) was found. Moreover, fluid IQ correlated with FS density (r = 0.43; p = 0.04) and amplitude (r = 0.41; p = 0.049). The latter effects were entirely driven by particularly reliable FS-IQ correlations in females [r = 0.80 (p = 0.002) and r = 0.67 (p = 0.012), for density and amplitude, respectively]. Region-specific analyses revealed that these correlations peak in the fronto-central regions. The control of the age-dependence of FS measures and IQ scores did not considerably reduce the spindle-IQ correlations with respect to FS density. The only positive spindle-index of fluid IQ in males turned out to be the frequency of FSs (r = 0.60, p = 0.04). Increases in FS density during adolescence may index reshaped structural connectivity related to white matter maturation in the late developing human brain. The continued development over this age range of cognitive functions is indexed by specific measures of sleep spindling unraveling gender differences in adolescent brain maturation and perhaps

  13. Development of abnormal fluid pressures beneath a ramping thrust sheet: Where's the evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltschko, D.V.; Smith, R.E. . Dept. of Geology and Center for Tectonophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Many models for the mechanics of fold and thrust belts hold that fluid pressure is locally, or even everywhere, abnormal, thus aiding both internal deformation and motion along the base. Recent support comes from studies of accretionary prisms where drill-stem measurements of both fluid flow in fault zones and formation pressure are pointed to as evidence for a hydrodynamic system characterized by wide-spread excess fluid pressure. However, despite the general acceptance of high fluid pressure (Pf) as a potentially important controlling mechanism for thrust motion, and despite nearly 30 years of looking, direct evidence for abnormal fluid pressure in ancient continental thrust belts is either rare or ambiguous. The authors have developed a two-dimensional model for the evolution of fluid pressure within and beneath a ramping thrust sheet. In the model, the fluid and heat flow equations are solved and applied at each time step. The model accounts for porosity compaction, thermal pressuring, and fluid flow. Results of this model show, first, that high fluid pressure can be developed during deposition, before thrust motion. The authors used typical rates of deposition, duration of deposition, and a simplified three-layer stratigraphy for North American thrust belts. Second, the models show that high Pf can be maintained and/or further enhanced during thrusting depending upon the permeabilities assigned to the model hydrostratigraphic section. Of the rock properties studied in detail, modes are most sensitive to permeability. Nevertheless, the models show that for best guesses of the relevant rock properties it should be possible to find evidence for high fluid pressure in, (1) the crests of ramp anticlines and, (2) the toe region, especially in the lower plate.

  14. Apert and Crouzon syndromes-Cognitive development, brain abnormalities, and molecular aspects.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Marilyse B L; Maximino, Luciana P; Perosa, Gimol B; Abramides, Dagma V M; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Yacubian-Fernandes, Adriano

    2016-06-01

    Apert and Crouzon are the most common craniosynostosis syndromes associated with mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene. We conducted a study to examine the molecular biology, brain abnormalities, and cognitive development of individuals with these syndromes. A retrospective longitudinal review of 14 patients with Apert and Crouzon syndromes seen at the outpatient Craniofacial Surgery Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies in Brazil from January 1999 through August 2010 was performed. Patients between 11 and 36 years of age (mean 18.29 ± 5.80), received cognitive evaluations, cerebral magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular DNA analyses. Eight patients with Apert syndrome (AS) had full scale intelligence quotients (FSIQs) that ranged from 47 to 108 (mean 76.9 ± 20.2), and structural brain abnormalities were identified in five of eight patients. Six patients presented with a gain-of-function mutation (p.Ser252Trp) in FGFR2 and FSIQs in those patients ranged from 47 to78 (mean 67.2 ± 10.7). One patient with a gain-of-function mutation (p.Pro253Arg) had a FSIQ of 108 and another patient with an atypical splice mutation (940-2A →G) had a FSIQ of 104. Six patients with Crouzon syndrome had with mutations in exons IIIa and IIIc of FGFR2 and their FSIQs ranged from 82 to 102 (mean 93.5 ± 6.7). These reveal that molecular aspects are another factor that can be considered in studies of global and cognitive development of patients with Apert and Crouzon syndrome (CS). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27028366

  15. Selenoprotein N deficiency in mice is associated with abnormal lung development

    PubMed Central

    Moghadaszadeh, Behzad; Rider, Branden E.; Lawlor, Michael W.; Childers, Martin K.; Grange, Robert W.; Gupta, Kushagra; Boukedes, Steve S.; Owen, Caroline A.; Beggs, Alan H.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the human SEPN1 gene, encoding selenoprotein N (SepN), cause SEPN1-related myopathy (SEPN1-RM) characterized by muscle weakness, spinal rigidity, and respiratory insufficiency. As with other members of the selenoprotein family, selenoprotein N incorporates selenium in the form of selenocysteine (Sec). Most selenoproteins that have been functionally characterized are involved in oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, with the Sec residue located at their catalytic site. To model SEPN1-RM, we generated a Sepn1-knockout (Sepn1−/−) mouse line. Homozygous Sepn1−/− mice are fertile, and their weight and lifespan are comparable to wild-type (WT) animals. Under baseline conditions, the muscle histology of Sepn1−/− mice remains normal, but subtle core lesions could be detected in skeletal muscle after inducing oxidative stress. Ryanodine receptor (RyR) calcium release channels showed lower sensitivity to caffeine in SepN deficient myofibers, suggesting a possible role of SepN in RyR regulation. SepN deficiency also leads to abnormal lung development characterized by enlarged alveoli, which is associated with decreased tissue elastance and increased quasi-static compliance of Sepn1−/− lungs. This finding raises the possibility that the respiratory syndrome observed in patients with SEPN1 mutations may have a primary pulmonary component in addition to the weakness of respiratory muscles.—Moghadaszadeh, B., Rider B. E., Lawlor, M. W., Childers, M. K., Grange, R. W., Gupta, K., Boukedes, S. S., Owen, C. A., Beggs, A. H. Selenoprotein N deficiency in mice is associated with abnormal lung development. PMID:23325319

  16. Hyperactivity, Shyness, and Sex: Development and Socio-Emotional Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rydell, Ann-Margret; Diamantopoulou, Sofia; Thorell, Lisa B.; Bohlin, Gunilla

    2009-01-01

    Based on formulations about the possible consequences for adaptation of gender non-normative behaviour, we investigated predictive and concurrent relations of hyperactivity and shyness to various aspects of adaptation focusing on possible effects of sex. At ages 5-6, parents and preschool teachers rated hyperactivity and shyness for 151 children…

  17. The Development of Sex Differences in Aggression: A Revised Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Janet S.; Schuck, John R.

    In response to Maccoby and Jacklin's (1974) conclusion that sex differences in aggression must be biological in origin, we suggest alternative social-learning mechanisms to explain the differences. These mechanisms include: (1) punishment for aggression increases aggression in boys, particularly because boys do not identify with the punisher; (2)…

  18. The Community Attitudes toward Sex Offenders Scale: The Development of a Psychometric Assessment Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Wesley T., II; Wakeman, Emily E.; Miller, Sarah L.; Clements, Carl B.; Sun, Fei

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to examine the nature of individual attitudes toward sex offenders. Because the term "sex offender" tends to evoke strong emotions, and given that open-ended self reports tend to be highly subjective, particularly in the context of such pointed terminology, this study sought to develop an attitude…

  19. Adolescent Girls' Sex Role Development: Relationship with Sports Participation, Self-Esteem, and Age at Menarche.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Janice E.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates development of sex role orientation among adolescent girls, and explores its relationship with sports participation, self-esteem, and age at menarche. Concludes that relationship of sex role orientation with sports participation and self-esteem was not an interactive one, but was reflective of individual differences beginning in late…

  20. Single-Sex and Coeducational Schooling: Relationships to Socioemotional and Academic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mael, Fred A.

    1998-01-01

    The role of coeducation versus single-sex schooling in the academic, socioemotional, interpersonal, and career development of adolescents is discussed, and arguments and research support for both types of schooling are reviewed. Separate-sex schooling seems to provide potential benefits for at least some students. (Author/SLD)

  1. Positioning Sex Educators: A Critical Ethnography of a Professional Development Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Brigitte C.

    2013-01-01

    In this ethnographic research, I offer an analysis of a state-sponsored professional development workshop for sex educators. Positioning theory is used to understand how the lived space of the workshop -- including texts, talk and silence -- positions sex education teachers as professionals and practitioners with certain (limited) speaking rights…

  2. Decision Processes During Development of Molecular Biomarkers for Gonadal Phenotypic Sex

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecular biomarkers for determination of gonadal phenotypic sex in the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), will serve as a case study. The medaka has unique features that aid in the development of appropriate molecular biomarkers of gonad phenotype, a) genetic sex can be determin...

  3. Congenital hydrocephalus and abnormal subcommissural organ development in Sox3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kristie; Tan, Jacqueline; Morris, Michael B; Rizzoti, Karine; Hughes, James; Cheah, Pike See; Felquer, Fernando; Liu, Xuan; Piltz, Sandra; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Thomas, Paul Q

    2012-01-01

    Congenital hydrocephalus (CH) is a life-threatening medical condition in which excessive accumulation of CSF leads to ventricular expansion and increased intracranial pressure. Stenosis (blockage) of the Sylvian aqueduct (Aq; the narrow passageway that connects the third and fourth ventricles) is a common form of CH in humans, although the genetic basis of this condition is unknown. Mouse models of CH indicate that Aq stenosis is associated with abnormal development of the subcommmissural organ (SCO) a small secretory organ located at the dorsal midline of the caudal diencephalon. Glycoproteins secreted by the SCO generate Reissner's fibre (RF), a thread-like structure that descends into the Aq and is thought to maintain its patency. However, despite the importance of SCO function in CSF homeostasis, the genetic program that controls SCO development is poorly understood. Here, we show that the X-linked transcription factor SOX3 is expressed in the murine SCO throughout its development and in the mature organ. Importantly, overexpression of Sox3 in the dorsal diencephalic midline of transgenic mice induces CH via a dose-dependent mechanism. Histological, gene expression and cellular proliferation studies indicate that Sox3 overexpression disrupts the development of the SCO primordium through inhibition of diencephalic roof plate identity without inducing programmed cell death. This study provides further evidence that SCO function is essential for the prevention of hydrocephalus and indicates that overexpression of Sox3 in the dorsal midline alters progenitor cell differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:22291885

  4. Congenital Hydrocephalus and Abnormal Subcommissural Organ Development in Sox3 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kristie; Tan, Jacqueline; Morris, Michael B.; Rizzoti, Karine; Hughes, James; Cheah, Pike See; Felquer, Fernando; Liu, Xuan; Piltz, Sandra; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Thomas, Paul Q.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital hydrocephalus (CH) is a life-threatening medical condition in which excessive accumulation of CSF leads to ventricular expansion and increased intracranial pressure. Stenosis (blockage) of the Sylvian aqueduct (Aq; the narrow passageway that connects the third and fourth ventricles) is a common form of CH in humans, although the genetic basis of this condition is unknown. Mouse models of CH indicate that Aq stenosis is associated with abnormal development of the subcommmissural organ (SCO) a small secretory organ located at the dorsal midline of the caudal diencephalon. Glycoproteins secreted by the SCO generate Reissner's fibre (RF), a thread-like structure that descends into the Aq and is thought to maintain its patency. However, despite the importance of SCO function in CSF homeostasis, the genetic program that controls SCO development is poorly understood. Here, we show that the X-linked transcription factor SOX3 is expressed in the murine SCO throughout its development and in the mature organ. Importantly, overexpression of Sox3 in the dorsal diencephalic midline of transgenic mice induces CH via a dose-dependent mechanism. Histological, gene expression and cellular proliferation studies indicate that Sox3 overexpression disrupts the development of the SCO primordium through inhibition of diencephalic roof plate identity without inducing programmed cell death. This study provides further evidence that SCO function is essential for the prevention of hydrocephalus and indicates that overexpression of Sox3 in the dorsal midline alters progenitor cell differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:22291885

  5. Rice ORMDL controls sphingolipid homeostasis affecting fertility resulting from abnormal pollen development.

    PubMed

    Chueasiri, Chutharat; Chunthong, Ketsuwan; Pitnjam, Keasinee; Chakhonkaen, Sriprapai; Sangarwut, Numphet; Sangsawang, Kanidta; Suksangpanomrung, Malinee; Michaelson, Louise V; Napier, Johnathan A; Muangprom, Amorntip

    2014-01-01

    The orosomucoids (ORM) are ER-resisdent polypeptides encoded by ORM and ORMDL (ORM-like) genes. In humans, ORMDL3 was reported as genetic risk factor associated to asthma. In yeast, ORM proteins act as negative regulators of sphingolipid synthesis. Sphingolipids are important molecules regulating several processes including stress responses and apoptosis. However, the function of ORM/ORMDL genes in plants has not yet been reported. Previously, we found that temperature sensitive genetic male sterility (TGMS) rice lines controlled by tms2 contain a deletion of about 70 kb in chromosome 7. We identified four genes expressed in panicles, including an ORMDL ortholog, as candidates for tms2. In this report, we quantified expression of the only two candidate genes normally expressed in anthers of wild type plants grown in controlled growth rooms for fertile and sterile conditions. We found that only the ORMDL gene (LOC_Os07g26940) showed differential expression under these conditions. To better understand the function of rice ORMDL genes, we generated RNAi transgenic rice plants suppressing either LOC_Os07g26940, or all three ORMDL genes present in rice. We found that the RNAi transgenic plants with low expression of either LOC_Os07g26940 alone or all three ORMDL genes were sterile, having abnormal pollen morphology and staining. In addition, we found that both sphingolipid metabolism and expression of genes involved in sphingolipid synthesis were perturbed in the tms2 mutant, analogous to the role of ORMs in yeast. Our results indicated that plant ORMDL proteins influence sphingolipid homeostasis, and deletion of this gene affected fertility resulting from abnormal pollen development. PMID:25192280

  6. Abnormal Development of Tapetum and Microspores Induced by Chemical Hybridization Agent SQ-1 in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuping; Zhang, Gaisheng; Song, Qilu; Zhang, Yingxin; Li, Zheng; Guo, Jialin; Niu, Na; Ma, Shoucai; Wang, Junwei

    2015-01-01

    Chemical hybridization agent (CHA)-induced male sterility is an important tool in crop heterosis. To demonstrate that CHA-SQ-1-induced male sterility is associated with abnormal tapetal and microspore development, the cytology of CHA-SQ-1-treated plant anthers at various developmental stages was studied by light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferasemediated dUTP nick end-labelling (TUNEL) assay and DAPI staining. The results indicated that the SQ-1-treated plants underwent premature tapetal programmed cell death (PCD), which was initiated at the early-uninucleate stage of microspore development and continued until the tapetal cells were completely degraded; the process of microspore development was then blocked. Microspores with low-viability (fluorescein diacetate staining) were aborted. The study suggests that premature tapetal PCD is the main cause of pollen abortion. Furthermore, it determines the starting period and a key factor in CHA-SQ-1-induced male sterility at the cell level, and provides cytological evidence to further study the mechanism between PCD and male sterility. PMID:25803723

  7. Serotonin transporter variant drives preventable gastrointestinal abnormalities in development and function

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Kara Gross; Li, Zhishan; Stevanovic, Korey; Saurman, Virginia; Anderson, George M.; Snyder, Isaac; Blakely, Randy D.; Gershon, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is an increasingly common behavioral condition that frequently presents with gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances. It is not clear, however, how gut dysfunction relates to core ASD features. Multiple, rare hyperfunctional coding variants of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT, encoded by SLC6A4) have been identified in ASD. Expression of the most common SERT variant (Ala56) in mice increases 5-HT clearance and causes ASD-like behaviors. Here, we demonstrated that Ala56-expressing mice display GI defects that resemble those seen in mice lacking neuronal 5-HT. These defects included enteric nervous system hypoplasia, slow GI transit, diminished peristaltic reflex activity, and proliferation of crypt epithelial cells. An opposite phenotype was seen in SERT-deficient mice and in progeny of WT dams given the SERT antagonist fluoxetine. The reciprocal phenotypes that resulted from increased or decreased SERT activity support the idea that 5-HT signaling regulates enteric neuronal development and can, when disturbed, cause long-lasting abnormalities of GI function. Administration of a 5-HT4 agonist to Ala56 mice during development prevented Ala56-associated GI perturbations, suggesting that excessive SERT activity leads to inadequate 5-HT4–mediated neurogenesis. We propose that deficient 5-HT signaling during development may contribute to GI and behavioral features of ASD. The consequences of therapies targeting SERT during pregnancy warrant further evaluation. PMID:27111230

  8. Serotonin transporter variant drives preventable gastrointestinal abnormalities in development and function.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Kara Gross; Li, Zhishan; Stevanovic, Korey; Saurman, Virginia; Israelyan, Narek; Anderson, George M; Snyder, Isaac; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Blakely, Randy D; Gershon, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is an increasingly common behavioral condition that frequently presents with gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances. It is not clear, however, how gut dysfunction relates to core ASD features. Multiple, rare hyperfunctional coding variants of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT, encoded by SLC6A4) have been identified in ASD. Expression of the most common SERT variant (Ala56) in mice increases 5-HT clearance and causes ASD-like behaviors. Here, we demonstrated that Ala56-expressing mice display GI defects that resemble those seen in mice lacking neuronal 5-HT. These defects included enteric nervous system hypoplasia, slow GI transit, diminished peristaltic reflex activity, and proliferation of crypt epithelial cells. An opposite phenotype was seen in SERT-deficient mice and in progeny of WT dams given the SERT antagonist fluoxetine. The reciprocal phenotypes that resulted from increased or decreased SERT activity support the idea that 5-HT signaling regulates enteric neuronal development and can, when disturbed, cause long-lasting abnormalities of GI function. Administration of a 5-HT4 agonist to Ala56 mice during development prevented Ala56-associated GI perturbations, suggesting that excessive SERT activity leads to inadequate 5-HT4-mediated neurogenesis. We propose that deficient 5-HT signaling during development may contribute to GI and behavioral features of ASD. The consequences of therapies targeting SERT during pregnancy warrant further evaluation. PMID:27111230

  9. Prenatal ketamine exposure causes abnormal development of prefrontal cortex in rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tianyun; Li, Chuanxiang; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Haixing; Ma, Daqing; Song, Xingrong; Zhou, Libing

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is commonly used for anesthesia and as a recreational drug. In pregnant users, a potential neurotoxicity in offspring has been noted. Our previous work demonstrated that ketamine exposure of pregnant rats induces affective disorders and cognitive impairments in offspring. As the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critically involved in emotional and cognitive processes, here we studied whether maternal ketamine exposure influences the development of the PFC in offspring. Pregnant rats on gestational day 14 were treated with ketamine at a sedative dose for 2 hrs, and pups were studied at postnatal day 0 (P0) or P30. We found that maternal ketamine exposure resulted in cell apoptosis and neuronal loss in fetal brain. Upon ketamine exposure in utero, PFC neurons at P30 showed more dendritic branching, while cultured neurons from P0 PFC extended shorter neurites than controls. In addition, maternal ketamine exposure postponed the switch of NR2B/2A expression, and perturbed pre- and postsynaptic protein expression in the PFC. These data suggest that prenatal ketamine exposure impairs neuronal development of the PFC, which may be associated with abnormal behavior in offsprings. PMID:27226073

  10. Deficiency of the chromatin regulator BRPF1 causes abnormal brain development.

    PubMed

    You, Linya; Zou, Jinfeng; Zhao, Hong; Bertos, Nicholas R; Park, Morag; Wang, Edwin; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2015-03-13

    Epigenetic mechanisms are important in different neurological disorders, and one such mechanism is histone acetylation. The multivalent chromatin regulator BRPF1 (bromodomain- and plant homeodomain-linked (PHD) zinc finger-containing protein 1) recognizes different epigenetic marks and activates three histone acetyltransferases, so it is both a reader and a co-writer of the epigenetic language. The three histone acetyltransferases are MOZ, MORF, and HBO1, which are also known as lysine acetyltransferase 6A (KAT6A), KAT6B, and KAT7, respectively. The MORF gene is mutated in four neurodevelopmental disorders sharing the characteristic of intellectual disability and frequently displaying callosal agenesis. Here, we report that forebrain-specific inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene caused early postnatal lethality, neocortical abnormalities, and partial callosal agenesis. With respect to the control, the mutant forebrain contained fewer Tbr2-positive intermediate neuronal progenitors and displayed aberrant neurogenesis. Molecularly, Brpf1 loss led to decreased transcription of multiple genes, such as Robo3 and Otx1, important for neocortical development. Surprisingly, elevated expression of different Hox genes and various other transcription factors, such as Lhx4, Foxa1, Tbx5, and Twist1, was also observed. These results thus identify an important role of Brpf1 in regulating forebrain development and suggest that it acts as both an activator and a silencer of gene expression in vivo. PMID:25568313

  11. Deficiency of the Chromatin Regulator Brpf1 Causes Abnormal Brain Development*

    PubMed Central

    You, Linya; Zou, Jinfeng; Zhao, Hong; Bertos, Nicholas R.; Park, Morag; Wang, Edwin; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are important in different neurological disorders, and one such mechanism is histone acetylation. The multivalent chromatin regulator BRPF1 (bromodomain- and plant homeodomain-linked (PHD) zinc finger-containing protein 1) recognizes different epigenetic marks and activates three histone acetyltransferases, so it is both a reader and a co-writer of the epigenetic language. The three histone acetyltransferases are MOZ, MORF, and HBO1, which are also known as lysine acetyltransferase 6A (KAT6A), KAT6B, and KAT7, respectively. The MORF gene is mutated in four neurodevelopmental disorders sharing the characteristic of intellectual disability and frequently displaying callosal agenesis. Here, we report that forebrain-specific inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene caused early postnatal lethality, neocortical abnormalities, and partial callosal agenesis. With respect to the control, the mutant forebrain contained fewer Tbr2-positive intermediate neuronal progenitors and displayed aberrant neurogenesis. Molecularly, Brpf1 loss led to decreased transcription of multiple genes, such as Robo3 and Otx1, important for neocortical development. Surprisingly, elevated expression of different Hox genes and various other transcription factors, such as Lhx4, Foxa1, Tbx5, and Twist1, was also observed. These results thus identify an important role of Brpf1 in regulating forebrain development and suggest that it acts as both an activator and a silencer of gene expression in vivo. PMID:25568313

  12. Prenatal ketamine exposure causes abnormal development of prefrontal cortex in rat.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tianyun; Li, Chuanxiang; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Haixing; Ma, Daqing; Song, Xingrong; Zhou, Libing

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is commonly used for anesthesia and as a recreational drug. In pregnant users, a potential neurotoxicity in offspring has been noted. Our previous work demonstrated that ketamine exposure of pregnant rats induces affective disorders and cognitive impairments in offspring. As the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critically involved in emotional and cognitive processes, here we studied whether maternal ketamine exposure influences the development of the PFC in offspring. Pregnant rats on gestational day 14 were treated with ketamine at a sedative dose for 2 hrs, and pups were studied at postnatal day 0 (P0) or P30. We found that maternal ketamine exposure resulted in cell apoptosis and neuronal loss in fetal brain. Upon ketamine exposure in utero, PFC neurons at P30 showed more dendritic branching, while cultured neurons from P0 PFC extended shorter neurites than controls. In addition, maternal ketamine exposure postponed the switch of NR2B/2A expression, and perturbed pre- and postsynaptic protein expression in the PFC. These data suggest that prenatal ketamine exposure impairs neuronal development of the PFC, which may be associated with abnormal behavior in offsprings. PMID:27226073

  13. Developing an App for College Women in Abusive Same-Sex Relationships and Their Friends.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Tina; Gielen, Andrea; Glass, Nancy

    2016-06-01

    Young women experiencing dating violence in same-sex relationships face significant barriers to help for safety planning. Therefore, our team developed a tailored smartphone safety decision aid app for dating violence survivors and their peers. College women survivors of same-sex dating violence, peers, and college staff reviewed the app, identifying users' barriers to information, resources, and services and key strategies for dissemination, inclusiveness, and safety for the app. Findings support the use of the app to assist college women experiencing same-sex dating violence and peers to connect with resources and develop tailored safety plans to reduce violence and increase their safety. PMID:26515797

  14. A Restorative Justice Approach to Empathy Development in Sex Offenders: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseman, Christopher P.; Ritchie, Martin; Laux, John M.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe an exploratory study in sex offender treatment using a restorative justice approach to examine the shame, guilt, and empathy development of convicted sexual offenders. Implications for clinical practice and future research are highlighted. (Contains 3 tables.)

  15. Traditional Sex Role Development and Amount of Time Spent Watching Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frueh, Terry; McGhee, Paul E.

    1975-01-01

    Tested the hypothesis that the amount of time spent watching television would be significantly related to the strength of traditional sex role development. Subjects were 80 kindergarten and elementary school children. (SDH)

  16. Sex hormones in early infancy seem to predict aspects of later language development.

    PubMed

    Schaadt, Gesa; Hesse, Volker; Friederici, Angela D

    2015-02-01

    Sex differences in the development of cognitive behavior such as language have long been of great research interest. Lately, researchers have started to associate language function and brain differences with diverse sex hormones (e.g., testosterone/estradiol). However, results concerning the impact of early postnatal sex hormone concentration on the child's later language development are rare. Here, we analyze the impact of testosterone and estradiol in girls and boys as well as their neurophysiological phonemic discrimination at age 5months on language development at age 4years. Interestingly, we found strong positive estradiol and negative testosterone impact on later language performance at age 4years, which was true for both girls and boys. These results demonstrate that postnatal sex hormone surge might be viewed as one factor determining later language development, independent of gender. PMID:25540858

  17. Abnormal Sperm Development in pcd3J-/- Mice: the Importance of Agtpbp1 in Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nameun; Xiao, Rui; Choi, Hojun; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Sang-Jun, Uhm; Chankyu, Park

    2011-01-01

    Homozygous Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd) mutant males exhibit abnormal sperm development. Microscopic examination of the testes from pcd3J-/- mice at postnatal days 12, 15, 18 and 60 revealed histological differences, in comparison to wild-type mice, which were evident by day 18. Greatly reduced numbers of spermatocytes and spermatids were found in the adult testes, and apoptotic cells were identified among the differentiating germ cells after day 15. Our immunohistological analysis using an antihuman AGTPBP1 antibody showed that AGTPBP1 was expressed in spermatogenic cells between late stage primary spermatocytes and round spermatids. A global gene expression analysis from the testes of pcd3J-/- mice showed that expression of cyclin B3 and de-ubiquitinating enzymes USP2 and USP9y was altered by >1.5-fold compared to the expression levels in the wild-type. Our results suggest that the pcd mutant mice have defects in spermatogenesis that begin with the pachytene spermatocyte stage and continue through subsequent stages. Thus, Agtpbp1, the gene responsible for the pcd phenotype, plays an important role in spermatogenesis and is important for survival of germ cells at spermatocytes stage onward. PMID:21110128

  18. Selenoprotein N deficiency in mice is associated with abnormal lung development.

    PubMed

    Moghadaszadeh, Behzad; Rider, Branden E; Lawlor, Michael W; Childers, Martin K; Grange, Robert W; Gupta, Kushagra; Boukedes, Steve S; Owen, Caroline A; Beggs, Alan H

    2013-04-01

    Mutations in the human SEPN1 gene, encoding selenoprotein N (SepN), cause SEPN1-related myopathy (SEPN1-RM) characterized by muscle weakness, spinal rigidity, and respiratory insufficiency. As with other members of the selenoprotein family, selenoprotein N incorporates selenium in the form of selenocysteine (Sec). Most selenoproteins that have been functionally characterized are involved in oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, with the Sec residue located at their catalytic site. To model SEPN1-RM, we generated a Sepn1-knockout (Sepn1(-/-)) mouse line. Homozygous Sepn1(-/-) mice are fertile, and their weight and lifespan are comparable to wild-type (WT) animals. Under baseline conditions, the muscle histology of Sepn1(-/-) mice remains normal, but subtle core lesions could be detected in skeletal muscle after inducing oxidative stress. Ryanodine receptor (RyR) calcium release channels showed lower sensitivity to caffeine in SepN deficient myofibers, suggesting a possible role of SepN in RyR regulation. SepN deficiency also leads to abnormal lung development characterized by enlarged alveoli, which is associated with decreased tissue elastance and increased quasi-static compliance of Sepn1(-/-) lungs. This finding raises the possibility that the respiratory syndrome observed in patients with SEPN1 mutations may have a primary pulmonary component in addition to the weakness of respiratory muscles. PMID:23325319

  19. Abnormalities in synaptic dynamics during development in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    PubMed Central

    Hatanaka, Yusuke; Watase, Kei; Wada, Keiji; Nagai, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Late-onset neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by neurological symptoms and progressive neuronal death. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal dysfunction, rather than neuronal death, causes the symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying the dysfunction that occurs prior to cell death remain unclear. To investigate the synaptic basis of this dysfunction, we employed in vivo two-photon imaging to analyse excitatory postsynaptic dendritic protrusions. We used Sca1154Q/2Q mice, an established knock-in mouse model of the polyglutamine disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), which replicates human SCA1 features including ataxia, cognitive impairment, and neuronal death. We found that Sca1154Q/2Q mice exhibited greater synaptic instability than controls, without synaptic loss, in the cerebral cortex, where obvious neuronal death is not observed, even before the onset of distinct symptoms. Interestingly, this abnormal synaptic instability was evident in Sca1154Q/2Q mice from the synaptic developmental stage, and persisted into adulthood. Expression of synaptic scaffolding proteins was also lower in Sca1154Q/2Q mice than controls before synaptic maturation. As symptoms progressed, synaptic loss became evident. These results indicate that aberrant synaptic instability, accompanied by decreased expression of scaffolding proteins during synaptic development, is a very early pathology that precedes distinct neurological symptoms and neuronal cell death in SCA1. PMID:26531852

  20. Normal and Abnormal Development of the Intrapericardial Arterial Trunks in Man and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Robert H.; Chaudhry, Bill; Mohun, Timothy J.; Bamforth, Simon D.; Hoyland, Darren; Phillips, Helen M.; Webb, Sandra; Moorman, Antoon F.J.; Brown, Nigel A.; Henderson, Deborah J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims The definitive cardiac outflow channels have three components: the intrapericardial arterial trunks; the arterial roots with valves; and the ventricular outflow tracts. We studied the normal and abnormal development of the most distal of these, the arterial trunks, comparing findings in mouse and man. Methods and Results Using lineage tracing and three-dimensional visualization by episcopic reconstruction and scanning electron microscopy, we studied embryonic day 9.5 to 12.5 mouse hearts, clarifying the development of the outflow tracts distal to the primordia of the arterial valves. We characterize a transient aortopulmonary foramen, located between the leading edge of a protrusion from the dorsal wall of the aortic sac and the distal margins of the two outflow cushions. The foramen is closed by fusion of the protrusion, with its cap of neural crest cells, with the neural crest cell-filled cushions; the resulting structure then functioning transiently as an aortopulmonary septum. Only subsequent to this closure is it possible to recognize, more proximally, the previously described aortopulmonary septal complex. The adjacent walls of the intrapericardial trunks are derived from the protrusion and distal parts of the outflow cushions, while the lateral walls are formed from intrapericardial extensions of pharyngeal mesenchyme derived from the second heart field. Conclusions We provide, for the first time, objective evidence of the mechanisms of closure of an aortopulmonary foramen that exists distally between the lumens of the developing intrapericardial arterial trunks. Our findings provide insights into the formation of aortopulmonary windows and the variants of common arterial trunk. PMID:22499773

  1. Phenotype of two males with abnormal Y chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Mićić, M; Mićić, S; Babić, M; Diklić, V

    1990-05-01

    Two infertile males with sex chromosomal abnormalities and mosaic karyotype, 45,X/46,X,dic(Yq) and 45,X/46,X,ring(Y), had considerably changed physical findings, including tooth sizes and craniofacial dimensions. Spermatogenesis was preserved with abnormal meiotic chromosomal behaviour. Mosaic karyotype and structurally changed Y chromosome in both cases had an influence on physical parameters. Tests were normally developed and spermatogenesis was preserved but depressed in later stages. PMID:2354546

  2. Chromosomal Abnormalities and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    BASSETT, ANNE S.; CHOW, EVA W.C.; WEKSBERG, ROSANNA

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common and serious psychiatric illness with strong evidence for genetic causation, but no specific loci yet identified. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia may help to understand the genetic complexity of the illness. This paper reviews the evidence for associations between chromosomal abnormalities and schizophrenia and related disorders. The results indicate that 22q11.2 microdeletions detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) are significantly associated with schizophrenia. Sex chromosome abnormalities seem to be increased in schizophrenia but insufficient data are available to indicate whether schizophrenia or related disorders are increased in patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies. Other reports of chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia have the potential to be important adjuncts to linkage studies in gene localization. Advances in molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e., FISH) have produced significant increases in rates of identified abnormalities in schizophrenia, particularly in patients with very early age at onset, learning difficulties or mental retardation, or dysmorphic features. The results emphasize the importance of considering behavioral phenotypes, including adult onset psychiatric illnesses, in genetic syndromes and the need for clinicians to actively consider identifying chromosomal abnormalities and genetic syndromes in selected psychiatric patients. PMID:10813803

  3. The trajectory of gray matter development in Broca's area is abnormal in people who stutter.

    PubMed

    Beal, Deryk S; Lerch, Jason P; Cameron, Brodie; Henderson, Rhaeling; Gracco, Vincent L; De Nil, Luc F

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition and mastery of speech-motor control requires years of practice spanning the course of development. People who stutter often perform poorly on speech-motor tasks thereby calling into question their ability to establish the stable neural motor programs required for masterful speech-motor control. There is evidence to support the assertion that these neural motor programs are represented in the posterior part of Broca's area, specifically the left pars opercularis. Consequently, various theories of stuttering causation posit that the disorder is related to a breakdown in the formation of the neural motor programs for speech early in development and that this breakdown is maintained throughout life. To date, no study has examined the potential neurodevelopmental signatures of the disorder across pediatric and adult populations. The current study aimed to fill this gap in our knowledge. We hypothesized that the developmental trajectory of cortical thickness in people who stutter would differ across the lifespan in the left pars opercularis relative to a group of control participants. We collected structural magnetic resonance images from 116 males (55 people who stutter) ranging in age from 6 to 48 years old. Differences in cortical thickness across ages and between patients and controls were investigated in 30 brain regions previously implicated in speech-motor control. An interaction between age and group was found for the left pars opercularis only. In people who stutter, the pars opercularis did not demonstrate the typical maturational pattern of gradual gray matter thinning with age across the lifespan that we observed in control participants. In contrast, the developmental trajectory of gray matter thickness in other regions of interest within the neural network for speech-motor control was similar for both groups. Our findings indicate that the developmental trajectory of gray matter in left pars opercularis is abnormal in people who stutter. PMID

  4. The role of estrogens in normal and abnormal development of the prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Prins, Gail S; Huang, Liwei; Birch, Lynn; Pu, Yongbing

    2006-11-01

    Estrogens play a physiologic role during prostate development with regard to programming stromal cells and directing early morphogenic events. However, if estrogenic exposures are abnormally high during the critical developmental period, permanent alterations in prostate branching morphogenesis and cellular differentiation will result, a process referred to as neonatal imprinting or developmental estrogenization. These perturbations are associated with an increased incidence of prostatic lesions with aging, which include hyperplasia, inflammation, and dysplasia. To understand how early estrogenic exposures can permanently alter the prostate and predispose it to neoplasia, we examined the effects of estrogens on prostatic steroid receptors and key developmental genes. Transient and permanent alterations in prostatic AR, ERalpha, ERbeta, and RARs are observed. We propose that estrogen-induced alterations in these critical transcription factors play a fundamental role in initiating prostatic growth and differentiation defects by shifting the prostate from an androgen-dominated gland to one whose development is regulated by estrogens and retinoids. This in turn leads to specific disruptions in the expression patterns of key prostatic developmental genes that normally dictate morphogenesis and differentiation. Specifically, we find transient reductions in Nkx3.1 and permanent reductions in Hoxb-13, which lead to differentiation defects particularly within the ventral lobe. Prolonged developmental expression of Bmp-4 contributes to hypomorphic growth throughout the prostatic complex. Reduced expression of Fgf10 and Shh and their cognate receptors in the dorsolateral lobes leads to branching defects in those specific regions in response to neonatal estrogens. We hypothesize that these molecular changes initiated early in life predispose the prostate to the neoplastic state upon aging. PMID:17261752

  5. Hyperactivity, shyness, and sex: development and socio-emotional functioning.

    PubMed

    Rydell, Ann-Margret; Diamantopoulou, Sofia; Thorell, Lisa B; Bohlin, Gunilla

    2009-09-01

    Based on formulations about the possible consequences for adaptation of gender nonnormative behaviour, we investigated predictive and concurrent relations of hyperactivity and shyness to various aspects of adaptation focusing on possible effects of sex. At ages 5-6, parents and preschool teachers rated hyperactivity and shyness for 151 children (50% boys). At age 9, we obtained teacher ratings of hyperactivity, internalizing and externalizing problems, self-ratings of trait anxiety, and peer nominations of shyness, social preference, and aggression. Several effects of sex were found. Hyperactivity ratings were more strongly related across time and raters for boys than for girls. In the predictive analyses, boys' hyperactivity was more strongly related to aggression than was girls' hyperactivity, and in concurrent analyses, girls' hyperactivity was more strongly associated with low social preference than was boys' hyperactivity. There was a protective effect of shyness with regard to aggression that applied only to boys, that is, at high hyperactivity levels, boys with high shyness levels were less aggressive than boys with low shyness levels. There were also main effects of hyperactivity and shyness. In predictive and concurrent analyses, hyperactivity was associated with low social preference, high levels of externalizing problems and with aggression, whereas shyness was associated with high levels of internalizing problems. Finally, there was an interactive effect of hyperactivity and shyness. In the concurrent analyses, an exacerbating effect was demonstrated insofar as high shyness was associated with low social preference at high, but not at low levels of hyperactivity. The different developmental risks of hyperactivity and shyness were discussed. PMID:19994572

  6. Sex differences in Gadd45b expression and methylation in the developing rodent amygdala.

    PubMed

    Kigar, Stacey L; Chang, Liza; Hayne, Margaret R; Karls, Nicolette T; Auger, Anthony P

    2016-07-01

    Precise spatiotemporal epigenetic regulation of the genome facilitates species-typical development; sexual differentiation of the brain by gonadal hormones and sex chromosomes causes extensive epigenetic reprogramming of many cells in the body, including the brain, and may indirectly predispose males and females to different psychiatric conditions. We and others have demonstrated sex differences in DNA methylation, as well as in the enzymes that form, or 'write', this epigenetic modification. However, while a growing body of evidence suggests that DNA methylation undergoes rapid turnover and is dynamically regulated in vivo, to our knowledge no studies have been done investigating whether sex differences exist in the epigenetic 'erasers' during postnatal development. Here we report sex differences in the expression of growth arrest and DNA damage inducible factor β (Gadd45b), but not family members α (a) or γ (g), in the neonatal and juvenile rodent amygdala. PMID:27086974

  7. Development of early postnatal peripheral nerve abnormalities in Trembler-J and PMP22 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    ROBERTSON, A. M.; HUXLEY, C.; KING, R. H. M.; THOMAS, P. K.

    1999-01-01

    Mutations in the gene for peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) are associated with peripheral neuropathy in mice and humans. Although PMP22 is strongly expressed in peripheral nerves and is localised largely to the myelin sheath, a dual role has been suggested as 2 differentially expressed promoters have been found. In this study we compared the initial stages of postnatal development in transgenic mouse models which have, in addition to the murine pmp22 gene, 7 (C22) and 4 (C61) copies of the human PMP22 gene and in homozygous and heterozygous Trembler-J (TrJ) mice, which have a point mutation in the pmp22 gene. The number of axons that were singly ensheathed by Schwann cells was the same in all groups indicating that PMP22 does not function in the initial ensheathment and separation of axons. At both P4 and P12 all mutants had an increased proportion of fibres that were incompletely surrounded by Schwann cell cytoplasm indicating that this step is disrupted in PMP22 mutants. C22 and homozygous TrJ animals could be distinguished by differences in the Schwann cell morphology at the initiation of myelination. In homozygous TrJ animals the Schwann cell cytoplasm had failed to make a full turn around the axon whereas in the C22 strain most fibres had formed a mesaxon. It is concluded that PMP22 functions in the initiation of myelination and probably involves the ensheathment of the axon by the Schwann cell, and the extension of this cell along the axon. Abnormalities may result from a failure of differentiation but more probably from defective interactions between the axon and the Schwann cell. PMID:10580849

  8. IgG (Gm) allotypes and multiple sclerosis in a French population: phenotype distribution and quantitative abnormalities in CSF with respect to sex, disease severity, and presence of intrathecal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sesboüé, R; Daveau, M; Degos, J D; Martin-Mondiere, C; Goust, J M; Schuller, E; Rivat-Peran, L; Coquerel, A; Dujardin, M; Salier, J P

    1985-11-01

    The association of a given Gm allotype or phenotype with MS susceptibility, as previously described in some Caucasian populations, was not observed in a large French MS group, whether or not considering the possible influence of sex or disease severity. This result could be related to variations in geographical distribution of Gm alleles and MS susceptibility gene(s) or suggests the simultaneous involvement of Gm and other genetic system(s). In contrast, the corresponding CSFs exhibited already known MS-associated abnormalities of IgG1 (G1m) allotype contents, which therefore did not merely result from a Gm-associated MS susceptibility. These quantitative abnormalities were not sex dependent, but may fluctuate with MS severity. The G1m allotype levels in each CSF were not correlated with titers of various intrathecal antibodies but with the number of antibody specificities detected, a picture arguing for a polyclonal, non-antigen-specific activation of G1m allotype-producing B cells present in MS brain. PMID:4042430

  9. Testicular disorder of sex development in four cats with a male karyotype (38,XY; SRY-positive).

    PubMed

    Nowacka-Woszuk, Joanna; Szczerbal, Izabela; Salamon, Sylwia; Kociucka, Beata; Jackowiak, Hanna; Prozorowska, Ewelina; Slaska, Brygida; Rozanska, Dorota; Orzelski, Maciej; Ochota, Malgorzata; Dzimira, Stanislaw; Lipiec, Magdalena; Nizanski, Wojciech; Switonski, Marek

    2014-12-10

    The molecular background of disorders of sex development (DSD) in cats is poorly recognized. In this study we present cytogenetic, molecular and histological analyses of four cats subjected for the analysis due to ambiguous external genitalia. Three cases, with rudimentary penises and an abnormal position of the urethral orifice, represented different types of hypospadias. The fourth case had a normal penis, a blind vulva and spermatogenetically active testes. Histological studies showed structures typical of testes, but spermatogenic activity was observed in two cats only. All the cats had a normal male chromosome complement (38,XY) and the Y-chromosome linked genes (SRY and ZFY) were also detected. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), with the use of the feline BAC probe harboring the SRY gene, excluded the possibility of chromosome translocation of the Y chromosome fragment carrying the SRY gene onto another chromosome. Sequencing of four candidate genes (SRY--sex determining region Y; AR--androgen receptor; SRD5A2--steroid-5-alfa reductase 2 and MAMLD1--mastermind-like domain containing (1) revealed one SNP in the SRY gene, one common polymorphism in exon 1 of the AR gene (tandem repeat of a tri-nucleotide motif--CAG), six polymorphisms (5 SNPs and 1 indel) in the SRD5A2 gene and one SNP in the MAMLD1 gene. Molecular studies of the candidate genes showed no association with the identified polymorphisms, thus molecular background of the studied DSD phenotypes remains unknown. PMID:25455261

  10. Sex differences in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders: Focus on microglial function and neuroinflammation during development.

    PubMed

    Hanamsagar, Richa; Bilbo, Staci D

    2016-06-01

    Several neurological conditions are associated with sex differences in prevalence or outcome. For example, autism predominantly affects boys, depression is more common in women, Parkinson's disease more common in men, and multiple sclerosis in women. In the case of stroke, women have a less favorable outcome and suffer from a more precipitous drop in health status compared to men. As a result, treatment of such diseases is difficult and yields variable results. Despite this, sex is rarely considered when making treatment decisions. The mechanisms underlying sex differences in disease progression are not well understood, however a strong link exists between different inflammation states of men and women and their propensity to develop certain diseases. As neuroinflammation is an important component of pathophysiology in many neurological conditions, it can be speculated that any changes in the state of inflammation in the brain during normal development can potentially lead to an increase in susceptibility to neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Microglia play a crucial role in onset and modulation of inflammation and thus sex differences in microglial function could explain, at least in part, differences observed in susceptibilities and outcomes of neurological disorders in men and women. Understanding the mechanisms behind sex differences could help develop more targeted therapy with higher success rate, especially in diseases where sex differences are most prominent. PMID:26435451

  11. Understanding and Combating the Dangers of Sex-Role Stereotyping to the Development of Creativity in Gifted Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grau, Phyllis

    1982-01-01

    The author offers three parables to examine the danger of sex-role stereotyping as it affects development of creativity in gifted children. It is pointed out that gifted children are likely to demonstrate some opposite sex personality and behavioral traits. Steps toward cross-sex identification are reviewed. (SW)

  12. Sex differences in behavior and neural development and their role in adolescent vulnerability to substance use.

    PubMed

    Hammerslag, Lindsey R; Gulley, Joshua M

    2016-02-01

    Adolescents are especially prone to risky behavior and to the emergence of psychological disorders like substance abuse, anxiety and depression. However, there is a sex (or gender) difference in this vulnerability, with females being more prone to developing internalizing disorders and males being more likely to engage in risky behavior and drug use. While several researchers have proposed that there is a relationship between corticolimbic circuit development and adolescent vulnerability, the current proposed models do not take sex differences into account. In this review, we explore recent findings from both human and rodent studies of sex differences during adolescence. In particular, we consider epidemiological studies on the factors that contribute to the development of substance abuse and internalizing disorders, laboratory studies on reward-related and decision-making behavior, and neuroanatomical studies on the development of several structures in the corticolimbic circuit (i.e., prefrontal cortex [PFC], amygdala and striatum). We then integrate these recent findings into models of adolescent vulnerability to substance use that have previously not addressed sex differences. Lastly, we discuss methodological considerations for the interpretation and design of studies on sex (or gender) differences during adolescence while highlighting some opportunities for future investigations. PMID:25882721

  13. Sex Differences in the Development of Social Relationships in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Amici, Federica; Langos, Doreen; Widdig, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have documented the importance of social bonding for the enhancement of individual fitness. However, little is known about how social relationships develop through ontogeny, and whether their development follows the same trajectory in males and females. Here we analyzed affiliative interactions (proximity, social grooming, play) combined with demographic and genetic data in semi-free-ranging rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) on Cayo Santiago over their first 4 yr of life (from birth to sexual maturation) to understand how these interactions change through development in both sexes. Generalized linear mixed models revealed that social behaviors mostly followed different developmental trajectories in males and females and were highly dependent on the social context. In particular, sex differences in social behavior varied through development depending on the partner’s sex and age. Females engaged in more social interactions than males, especially with other females, and were more involved in grooming around the time of maturation. In contrast, males interacted more with males and age peers, especially around maturation. Sex differences in social behavior varied through development, but also depended on rank, partner’s rank, and kin line, although not consistently. High-ranking individuals, especially older females, were generally preferred as social partners. Moreover, both male and female individuals interacted mostly with maternal kin, although males also preferred paternal kin over nonkin. Importantly, most developmental changes in sociality happened when individuals were ca. 2 yr old, suggesting that this might be a milestone in the development of sociality in rhesus macaques. The only notable exception to this pattern was play, which was more pronounced in males from the beginning of their lives. We propose that play might serve as a trigger of sex differences in social behavior, with sex differences emerging early in development and

  14. Sex Differences in the Development of Moral Reasoning: A Rejoinder to Baumrind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Lawrence J.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the criticisms of Diana Baumrind's review of his research on sex differences in moral reasoning development. Discusses issues such as the nature of moral development, the focus on adulthood, the choice of statistics, the effect of differing sample sizes and scoring systems, and the role of sexual experiences in explaining variability in…

  15. Character Development in Business Education: A Comparison of Coeducational and Single-Sex Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, James H.; Ruhe, John; Lee, Monle; Rajadhyaksha, Ujvala

    2011-01-01

    This study questions the widely held assumption, particularly in the United States, that coeducation is best. Previous research supports the development of single-sex education for both female and male students. This study examines how the learning climate of the coeducation environment seems to affect the character development of female business…

  16. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Vinicius S; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  17. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  18. Sex Differences in Attitudes Toward New Energy Resource Developments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout-Wiegand, Nancy; Trent, Roger B.

    A survey to examine male and female attitudes toward locally proposed energy developments (e.g., coal production, refineries) in an Appalachian community is reported. Four hundred and eighty-five residents were questioned on whether they favor the proposed developments; whether they were currently employed in an energy-related occupation; and…

  19. Gender Development Research in Sex Roles: Historical Trends and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cindy Faith; Ruble, Diane N.; Martin, Carol Lynn; Fabes, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    The late 1960s through the 1970s marked an important turning point in the field of gender research, including theory and research in gender development. The establishment of Sex Roles in 1975 as a forum for this research represented an important milestone in the field. In this article, we celebrate the 35th anniversary of Sex Roles and, in particular, its contributions to the field of research on children’s and adolescents’ gender development. We examine the trends in research on gender development published in Sex Roles since its inception and use this analysis as a vehicle for exploring how the field has grown and evolved over the past few decades. We begin with a brief review of the history of this field of research since 1975. Then, we present a descriptive assessment of articles published on gender development in Sex Roles over time, and link this assessment to general trends that have occurred in the study of gender development over the past 35 years. We conclude with a discussion of future directions for the field of gender development. In particular, we highlight areas in which the journal could play a role in promoting more diversity in topics, methods, and ages employed in gender development research. PMID:21747580

  20. Sex Role Development and Teenage Fertility-Related Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cvetkovich, George; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents some data bearing on the relationship between the psychological development or maturity of adolescent women and their sexual behavior and contraceptive use. Data were collected through the American Public Health Association in 1975 from 369 females and 325 males. (Author/RK)

  1. A Developing Aptitude Model--Sex Equity. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox Valley Technical Coll., Appleton, WI.

    During a 2-year period, Fox Valley Technical College (FVTC) in Wisconsin developed a "New Directions" project, funded by the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA), that successfully identified, enrolled, and graduated 30 women in a training program for nontraditional occupations. Project activities included scheduling morning and evening classes to…

  2. The pleiotropic ABNORMAL FLOWER AND DWARF1 affects plant height, floral development and grain yield in rice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Deyong; Rao, Yuchun; Wu, Liwen; Xu, Qiankun; Li, Zizhuang; Yu, Haiping; Zhang, Yu; Leng, Yujia; Hu, Jiang; Zhu, Li; Gao, Zhenyu; Dong, Guojun; Zhang, Guangheng; Guo, Longbiao; Zeng, Dali; Qian, Qian

    2016-06-01

    Moderate plant height and successful establishment of reproductive organs play pivotal roles in rice grain production. The molecular mechanism that controls the two aspects remains unclear in rice. In the present study, we characterized a rice gene, ABNORMAL FLOWER AND DWARF1 (AFD1) that determined plant height, floral development and grain yield. The afd1 mutant showed variable defects including the dwarfism, long panicle, low seed setting and reduced grain yield. In addition, abnormal floral organs were also observed in the afd1 mutant including slender and thick hulls, and hull-like lodicules. AFD1 encoded a DUF640 domain protein and was expressed in all tested tissues and organs. Subcellular localization showed AFD1-green fluorescent fusion protein (GFP) was localized in the nucleus. Meantime, our results suggested that AFD1 regulated the expression of cell division and expansion related genes. PMID:26486996

  3. Development of a sintering methodology through abnormal glow discharge for manufacturing metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, S.; Pineda, Y.; Sarmiento, A.; López, A.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a sintering methodology is presented by using abnormal glow discharge to metal matrix composites (MMC), consisting of 316 steel, reinforced with titanium carbide (TiC). The wear behaviour of these compounds was evaluated according to the standard ASTM G 99 in a tribometer pin-on-disk. The effect of the percentage of reinforcement (3, 6, and 9%), with 40 minutes of mixing in the planetary mill is analysed, using compaction pressure of 700MPa and sintering temperature of 1,100°C±5°C, gaseous atmosphere of H2 - N2, and sintering time of 30 minutes. As a result of the research, it shows that the best behaviour against wear is obtained when the MMC contains 6% TiC. Under this parameter the lowest percentage of pores and the lowest coefficient of friction are achieved, ensuring that the incorporation of ceramic particles (TiC) in 316 austenitic steel matrix significantly improves the wear resistance. Also, it is shown that it is possible to sinter such materials using the abnormal glow discharge, being a novel and effective method in which the working temperature is reached in a short time.

  4. Sex-Biased Gene Expression during Head Development in a Sexually Dimorphic Stalk-Eyed Fly

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Gerald S.; Johns, Philip M.; Metheny, Jackie D.; Baker, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    Stalk-eyed flies (family Diopsidae) are a model system for studying sexual selection due to the elongated and sexually dimorphic eye-stalks found in many species. These flies are of additional interest because their X chromosome is derived largely from an autosomal arm in other flies. To identify candidate genes required for development of dimorphic eyestalks and investigate how sex-biased expression arose on the novel X, we compared gene expression between males and females using oligonucleotide microarrays and RNA from developing eyestalk tissue or adult heads in the dimorphic diopsid, Teleopsis dalmanni. Microarray analysis revealed sex-biased expression for 26% of 3,748 genes expressed in eye-antennal imaginal discs and concordant sex-biased expression for 86 genes in adult heads. Overall, 415 female-biased and 482 male-biased genes were associated with dimorphic eyestalk development but not differential expression in the adult head. Functional analysis revealed that male-biased genes are disproportionately associated with growth and mitochondrial function while female-biased genes are associated with cell differentiation and patterning or are novel transcripts. With regard to chromosomal effects, dosage compensation occurs by elevated expression of X-linked genes in males. Genes with female-biased expression were more common on the X and less common on autosomes than expected, while male-biased genes exhibited no chromosomal pattern. Rates of protein evolution were lower for female-biased genes but higher for genes that moved on or off the novel X chromosome. These findings cannot be due to meiotic sex chromosome inactivation or by constraints associated with dosage compensation. Instead, they could be consistent with sexual conflict in which female-biased genes on the novel X act primarily to reduce eyespan in females while other genes increase eyespan in both sexes. Additional information on sex-biased gene expression in other tissues and related sexually

  5. Effects of Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies on Brain Development: Evidence From Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lenroot, Rhoshel K.; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Giedd, Jay N.

    2010-01-01

    Variation in the number of sex chromosomes is a relatively common genetic condition, affecting as many as 1/400 individuals. The sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) are associated with characteristic behavioral and cognitive phenotypes, although the degree to which specific individuals are affected can fall within a wide range. Understanding the effects of different dosages of sex chromosome genes on brain development may help to understand the basis for functional differences in affected individuals. It may also be informative regarding how sex chromosomes contribute to typical sexual differentiation. Studies of 47,XXY males make up the bulk of the current literature of neuroimaging studies in individuals with supernumerary sex chromosomes, with a few small studies or case reports of the other SCAs. Findings in 47,XXY males typically include decreased gray and white matter volumes, with most pronounced effects in the frontal and temporal lobes. Functional studies have shown evidence of decreased lateralization. Although the hypogonadism typically found in 47,XXY males may contribute to the decreased brain volume, the observation that 47,XXX females also show decreased brain volume in the presence of normal pubertal maturation suggests a possible direct dosage effect of X chromosome genes. Additional X chromosomes, such as in 49,XXXXY males, are associated with more markedly decreased brain volume and increased incidence of white matter hyperintensities. The limited data regarding effects of having two Y chromosomes (47,XYY) do not find significant differences in brain volume, although there are some reports of increased head size. PMID:20014372

  6. Effects of sex chromosome aneuploidies on brain development: evidence from neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Lenroot, Rhoshel K; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Giedd, Jay N

    2009-01-01

    Variation in the number of sex chromosomes is a relatively common genetic condition, affecting as many as 1/400 individuals. The sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) are associated with characteristic behavioral and cognitive phenotypes, although the degree to which specific individuals are affected can fall within a wide range. Understanding the effects of different dosages of sex chromosome genes on brain development may help to understand the basis for functional differences in affected individuals. It may also be informative regarding how sex chromosomes contribute to typical sexual differentiation. Studies of 47,XXY males make up the bulk of the current literature of neuroimaging studies in individuals with supernumerary sex chromosomes, with a few small studies or case reports of the other SCAs. Findings in 47,XXY males typically include decreased gray and white matter volumes, with most pronounced effects in the frontal and temporal lobes. Functional studies have shown evidence of decreased lateralization. Although the hypogonadism typically found in 47,XXY males may contribute to the decreased brain volume, the observation that 47,XXX females also show decreased brain volume in the presence of normal pubertal maturation suggests a possible direct dosage effect of X chromosome genes. Additional X chromosomes, such as in 49,XXXXY males, are associated with more markedly decreased brain volume and increased incidence of white matter hyperintensities. The limited data regarding effects of having two Y chromosomes (47,XYY) do not find significant differences in brain volume, although there are some reports of increased head size. PMID:20014372

  7. Importance of support groups for intersex (disorders of sex development) patients, families and the medical profession.

    PubMed

    Cull, M L; Simmonds, M

    2010-09-01

    Taboo still surrounds intersex/disorders of sex development, in spite of more openness in society regarding sex. Peer support is valuable in providing information and emotional support to those affected. Support groups also work with clinicians to promote better care, to assist with research studies and to increase clinical awareness and expertise by helping to stage symposia. They also foster greater public understanding via media involvement and training videos; and play an advocacy role, providing one voice to channel the concerns of a scattered population with these rare conditions. PMID:20606384

  8. The Treatment of Sex Roles. Guidelines for the Development of Elementary and Secondary Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Rinehart & Winston, New York, NY.

    Arranged in three sections, this pamphlet outlines publishers' guidelines for developing nonsexist instructional materials for elementary and secondary school use. Section 1 details the following strategies for expanding and balancing the role models of both sexes in instructional literature: illustrations reflecting a variety of dress and…

  9. The Effects of Single-Parenting on Sex-Role Development: The State of the Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Michael R.

    Current thought about the effects of single-parenting on children's sex-role development has supported (1) the traditional view that being raised in a single-parent home is deleterious to the well-being of children; (2) the conditional view noting that differences exist between children in father-absent and father-present homes (but only in…

  10. Multicultural Sex-Role Development in Young Children: Intervention Strategies. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Judith W.; Schau, Candace Garrett

    This is the final report of a project that studied sex role stereotyping behavior among children in four preschools in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and attempted to intervene in the development of such stereotyping. The three phases of the study, which included contacting the schools, data collection and analysis, and information dissemination, are…

  11. Sex-Role Development and Father-Absence: Comparing Meta-Analyses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Michael R.; Black, Kathryn N.

    This paper reports the results of meta-analysis of the literature addressing the effects of father-absence on both male and female sex-role development. Considering both published and unpublished papers, the analysis involved 33 studies of males and 16 studies of females which become available between 1958 and 1982 and which studied father-absence…

  12. The Relationship of Sex Role Identity to Ego Development and Self Esteem in Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtig, Anita Landau; Petersen, Anne C.

    It has been predicted that, if an androgynous identity represents a higher level of psychosocial functioning, there should be a significant relationship between androgynous sex role identity and high self-esteem. To test this hypothesis, 139 male and female high school seniors completed the Sentence Completion Test of Ego Development, the Bem Sex…

  13. Sex Variations in Youth Anxiety Symptoms: Effects of Pubertal Development and Gender Role Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Rona; Silverman, Wendy K.; Jaccard, James

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated whether pubertal development and gender role orientation (i.e., masculinity and femininity) can partially explain sex variations in youth anxiety symptoms among clinic-referred anxious youth (N = 175; ages 9-13 years; 74% Hispanic; 48% female). Using youth and parent ratings of youth anxiety symptoms, structural equation…

  14. Guidelines for Developing Sex Bias Free Vocational Education Programs in Small Secondary Schools in Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau.

    These guidelines, developed by a nine-member task force, were designed to help district administrators, curriculum planners, building principals/head teachers, vocational education directors, and teachers in small rural secondary schools in Alaska to plan, implement, and administer vocational education programs that are free of sex bias. The…

  15. Adult Development and Life Satisfaction Functions of Sex, Marital Status and Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, Claire; McCall, Fran

    Quality of life in adulthood (ages 27-47) was investigated; age, marital status and sex were considered the primary variables. Attention was given to the consideration of the current crises-oriented theory of adult development. The interrelationship of the variables was of principle interest in assessing life satisfaction and personality…

  16. Approach to the Infant with a Suspected Disorder of Sex Development.

    PubMed

    Wherrett, Diane K

    2015-08-01

    A newborn with genital ambiguity requires careful diagnostic evaluation to identify the underlying etiology in an efficient manner and assign gender without lengthy delay. The infant's family needs comprehensive psychosocial support. Such infants should be referred to a multidisciplinary team with expertise in disorders of sex development. PMID:26210628

  17. Development and evaluation of deep intra-uterine artificial insemination using cryopreserved sexed spermatozoa in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Robeck, Todd R; Montano, G A; Steinman, K J; Smolensky, P; Sweeney, J; Osborn, S; O'Brien, J K

    2013-06-01

    Since its development in bottlenose dolphins, widespread application of AI with sex-selected, frozen-thawed (FT) spermatozoa has been limited by the significant expense of the sorting process. Reducing the total number of progressively motile sperm (PMS) required for an AI would reduce the sorting cost. As such, this research compared the efficacy of small-dose deep uterine AI with sexed FT spermatozoa (SEXED-SMALL; ~50×10(6)PMS, n=20), to a moderate dose deposited mid-horn (SEXED-STD, ~200×10(6)PMS; n=20), and a large dose of FT non-sexed spermatozoa deposited in the uterine body (NONSEXED-LARGE, 660×10(6)PMS, n=9). Ten of the 11 calves resulting from use of sexed spermatozoa were of the predetermined sex. Similar rates of conception (NONSEXED-LARGE: 78%, SEXED-STD: 60%, SEXED-SMALL: 57%) and total pregnancy loss (TPL: NONSEXED-LARGE: 28.6%; SEXED-STD: 41.0%; SEXED-SMALL: 63.6%) were observed across groups, but early pregnancy loss (EPL, SEXED-SMALL (54.5%) compared to NONSEXED-LARGE (0%). Animals experiencing EPL were older (31.3 y, P=0.007) than those that calved (21.4y) or did not conceive (19.4y). After excluding females ≥25y, SEXED-SMALL (15.4%) had a tendency for having reduced calving rates compared to NONSEXED-LARGE (50.0%; P=0.08), while SEXED-STD did not differ (40.0%, 4/10; P=0.341). Current findings indicate that acceptable conception and calving rates using sexed FT spermatozoa are achieved after mid-horn deposition of 200×10(6) PMS, when used with females aged less than 25 y. PMID:23660366

  18. IVF affects embryonic development in a sex-biased manner in mice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kun; Wang, Zhuqing; Zhang, Zhenni; An, Lei; Tian, Jianhui

    2016-04-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that IVF (IVF includes in vitro fertilization and culture) embryos and babies are associated with a series of health complications, and some of them show sex-dimorphic patterns. Therefore, we hypothesized that IVF procedures have sex-biased or even sex-specific effects on embryonic and fetal development. Here, we demonstrate that IVF-induced side effects show significant sexual dimorphic patterns from the pre-implantation to the prenatal stage. During the pre-implantation stage, female IVF embryos appear to be more vulnerable to IVF-induced effects, including an increased percentage of apoptosis (7.22 ± 1.94 vs 0.71 ± 0.76, P<0.01), and dysregulated expression of representative sex-dimorphic genes (Xist, Hprt, Pgk1 and Hsp70). During the mid-gestation stage, IVF males had a higher survival rate than IVF females at E13.5 (male:female=1.33:1), accompanied with a female-biased pregnancy loss. In addition, while both IVF males and females had reduced placental vasculogenesis/angiogenesis, the compensatory placental overgrowth was more evident in IVF males. During the late-gestation period, IVF fetuses had a higher sex ratio (male:female=1.48:1) at E19.5, and both male and female IVF placentas showed overgrowth. After birth, IVF males grew faster than their in vivo (IVO) counterparts, while IVF females showed a similar growth pattern with IVO females. The present study provides a new insight into understanding IVF-induced health complications during embryonic and fetal development. By understanding and minimizing these sex-biased effects of the IVF process, the health of IVF-conceived babies may be improved in the future. PMID:26825929

  19. A Korean boy with 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development caused by SOX9 duplication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyung Min; Ko, Jung Min; Shin, Choong Ho; Yang, Sei Won

    2014-06-01

    The 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development (DSD), also known as 46,XX male syndrome, is a rare form of DSD and clinical phenotype shows complete sex reversal from female to male. The sex-determining region Y (SRY) gene can be identified in most 46,XX testicular DSD patients; however, approximately 20% of patients with 46,XX testicular DSD are SRY-negative. The SRY-box 9 (SOX9) gene has several important functions during testis development and differentiation in males, and overexpression of SOX9 leads to the male development of 46,XX gonads in the absence of SRY. In addition, SOX9 duplication has been found to be a rare cause of 46,XX testicular DSD in humans. Here, we report a 4.2-year-old SRY-negative 46,XX boy with complete sex reversal caused by SOX9 duplication for the first time in Korea. He showed normal external and internal male genitalia except for small testes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses failed to detect the presence of SRY, and SOX9 intragenic mutation was not identified by direct sequencing analysis. Therefore, we performed real-time PCR analyses with specific primer pairs, and duplication of the SOX9 gene was revealed. Although SRY-negative 46,XX testicular DSD is a rare condition, an effort to make an accurate diagnosis is important for the provision of proper genetic counseling and for guiding patients in their long-term management. PMID:25077096

  20. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  1. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  2. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious health problems (e.g. Down syndrome ). Single-Gene Abnormalities Sometimes the chromosomes are normal in number, ... blood flow to the fetus impair fetal growth. Alcohol consumption and certain drugs during pregnancy significantly increase ...

  3. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Nail abnormalities are problems with the color, shape, texture, or thickness of the fingernails or toenails. ... Fungus or yeast cause changes in the color, texture, and shape of the nails. Bacterial infection may ...

  4. The human sex ratio from conception to birth

    PubMed Central

    Orzack, Steven Hecht; Stubblefield, J. William; Akmaev, Viatcheslav R.; Colls, Pere; Munné, Santiago; Scholl, Thomas; Steinsaltz, David; Zuckerman, James E.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the trajectory of the human sex ratio from conception to birth by analyzing data from (i) 3- to 6-d-old embryos, (ii) induced abortions, (iii) chorionic villus sampling, (iv) amniocentesis, and (v) fetal deaths and live births. Our dataset is the most comprehensive and largest ever assembled to estimate the sex ratio at conception and the sex ratio trajectory and is the first, to our knowledge, to include all of these types of data. Our estimate of the sex ratio at conception is 0.5 (proportion male), which contradicts the common claim that the sex ratio at conception is male-biased. The sex ratio among abnormal embryos is male-biased, and the sex ratio among normal embryos is female-biased. These biases are associated with the abnormal/normal state of the sex chromosomes and of chromosomes 15 and 17. The sex ratio may decrease in the first week or so after conception (due to excess male mortality); it then increases for at least 10–15 wk (due to excess female mortality), levels off after ∼20 wk, and declines slowly from 28 to 35 wk (due to excess male mortality). Total female mortality during pregnancy exceeds total male mortality. The unbiased sex ratio at conception, the increase in the sex ratio during the first trimester, and total mortality during pregnancy being greater for females are fundamental insights into early human development. PMID:25825766

  5. Sex Variations in Youth Anxiety Symptoms: Effects of Pubertal Development and Gender Role Orientation

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Rona; Silverman, Wendy K.; Jaccard, James

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated whether pubertal development and gender role orientation (i.e., masculinity and femininity) can partially explain sex variations in youth anxiety symptoms among clinic referred anxious youth (N = 175; ages 9-13 years; 74% Hispanic; 48% female). Using youth and parent ratings of youth anxiety symptoms, structural equation modeling results indicated that youth who reported being more advanced in their pubertal development reported high levels of femininity and anxiety symptoms. Youth who reported high levels of masculinity had low levels of anxiety symptoms as reported by both youths and parents. The estimated effects of pubertal development, femininity, and masculinity on youth and parent ratings of youth anxiety symptoms were not significantly moderated by biological sex. Pubertal development and gender role orientation appear to be important in explaining levels of youth anxiety symptoms among clinic referred anxious youth. PMID:21916691

  6. Development of a Sex Education Programme for 12-Year-Old to 14-Year-Old Turkish Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cok, Figen; Gray, Lizbeth Ann

    2007-01-01

    Previous research has documented a need for the development of a sex education programme in Turkish schools in terms of adolescence readiness and the presence of misconceptions regarding critical aspects of sexual issues. Currently no school-based sex education is available for Turkish adolescents. This paper presents the development of a…

  7. Exploring the Development of Existing Sex Education Programmes for People with Intellectual Disabilities: An Intervention Mapping Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaafsma, Dilana; Stoffelen, Joke M. T.; Kok, Gerjo; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disabilities face barriers that affect their sexual health. Sex education programmes have been developed by professionals working in the field of intellectual disabilities with the aim to overcome these barriers. The aim of this study was to explore the development of these programmes. Methods: Sex education…

  8. Targeted massively parallel sequencing provides comprehensive genetic diagnosis for patients with disorders of sex development

    PubMed Central

    Arboleda, VA; Lee, H; Sánchez, FJ; Délot, EC; Sandberg, DE; Grody, WW; Nelson, SF; Vilain, E

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) are rare disorders in which there is discordance between chromosomal, gonadal, and phenotypic sex. Only a minority of patients clinically diagnosed with DSD obtains a molecular diagnosis, leaving a large gap in our understanding of the prevalence, management, and outcomes in affected patients. We created a novel DSD-genetic diagnostic tool, in which sex development genes are captured using RNA probes and undergo massively parallel sequencing. In the pilot group of 14 patients, we determined sex chromosome dosage, copy number variation, and gene mutations. In the patients with a known genetic diagnosis (obtained either on a clinical or research basis), this test identified the molecular cause in 100% (7/7) of patients. In patients in whom no molecular diagnosis had been made, this tool identified a genetic diagnosis in two of seven patients. Targeted sequencing of genes representing a specific spectrum of disorders can result in a higher rate of genetic diagnoses than current diagnostic approaches. Our DSD diagnostic tool provides for first time, in a single blood test, a comprehensive genetic diagnosis in patients presenting with a wide range of urogenital anomalies. PMID:22435390

  9. Mice lacking FABP9/PERF15 develop sperm head abnormalities but are fertile

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Vimal; Asano, Atsushi; Page, Jennifer L.; Nelson, Jacquelyn L.; Kothapalli, Kumar S. D.; Foster, James A.; Brenna, J. Thomas; Weiss, Robert S.; Travis, Alexander J.

    2010-01-01

    The male germ cell-specific fatty acid binding protein 9 (FABP9/PERF15) is the major component of the murine sperm perforatorium and perinuclear theca. Based on its cytoskeletal association and sequence homology to myelin P2 (FABP8), it has been suggested that FABP9 tethers sperm membranes to the underlying cytoskeleton. Furthermore, its upregulation in apoptotic testicular germ cells and its increased phosphorylation status during capacitation suggested multiple important functions for FABP9. Therefore, we investigated specific functions for FABP9 by means of targeted gene disruption in mice. FABP9−/− mice were viable and fertile. Phenotypic analysis showed that FABP9−/− mice had significant increases in sperm head abnormalities (~8% greater than their WT cohorts); in particular, we observed the reduction or absence of the characteristic structural element known as the “ventral spur” in ~10% of FABP9−/− sperm. However, deficiency of FABP9 neither affected membrane tethering to the perinuclear theca nor the fatty acid composition of sperm. Moreover, epididymal sperm numbers were not affected in FABP9−/− mice. Therefore, we conclude that FABP9 plays only a minor role in providing the murine sperm head its characteristic shape and is not absolutely required for spermatogenesis or sperm function. PMID:20920498

  10. The effect of glucosamine concentration on the development and sex ratio of bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Koji; Iwata, Hisataka; Thompson, Jeremy G

    2008-01-30

    Glucosamine is a component of hyaluronic acid and an alternative substrate to glucose for the extracellular matrix synthesis of COCs. Its addition to an IVM medium reduces the glucose consumption of bovine COCs. Glucosamine is also metabolized to UDP-N-acetyl glucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) via the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway and is utilized for O-linked glycosylation by the X-linked enzyme, O-linked GlcNAc transferase (OGT). Moreover, the inactivation of the second X chromosome in female embryos is influential in producing the sex ratio bias observed in vitro when embryos are cultured in the presence of glucose above 2.5mM. Accordingly, the aim of this study is to examine whether the presence of glucosamine during maturation or embryo culture causes a sex ratio bias in bovine blastocysts. Glucosamine was added to the medium in three different embryo developmental periods: in vitro maturation, the one-cell to eight-cell stage (before the maternal-zygotic transition, MZT), and the eight-cell to blastocyst stage (after MZT). When glucosamine was added during in vitro maturation, the developmental competence of oocytes was severely compromised. However, the sex ratio of embryos was not influenced. When glucosamine was added to embryo culture medium during development from one-cell to eight-cell stage (before MZT), it affected neither the development nor the sex ratio of bovine embryos. Finally, when glucosamine was added after MZT, the development rate of embryos was severely decreased, and the sex ratio was skewed toward males. Moreover, an inhibitor of OGT, benzyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-galactopyranoside (BADGP), negated the effect of glucosamine on the sex ratio when it was added to embryo culture medium from the eight-cell to blastocyst stage (after MZT). These results suggest that, like glucose, the supplementation of glucosamine into the medium skewed the sex ratio to males and that OGT, an X-linked enzyme, was involved in this phenomenon. Moreover, this

  11. Evidence for abnormalities of cortical development in adolescent-onset schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Voets, Natalie L; Hough, Morgan G; Douaud, Gwenaelle; Matthews, Paul M; James, Anthony; Winmill, Louise; Webster, Paula; Smith, Stephen

    2008-12-01

    Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) identifies differences in grey matter brain structure in patients with schizophrenia relative to healthy controls, with particularly prominent differences found in patients with the more severe, adolescent-onset form of the disease. However, as VBM is sensitive to a combination of changes in grey matter thickness, intensity and folding, specific neuropathological interpretations are not possible. Here, we attempt to more precisely define cortical changes in 25 adolescent-onset schizophrenic patients and 25 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers using Surface-Based Morphometry (SBM) to disambiguate the relative contributions of cortical thickness and surface area differences to changes in regional grey matter (GM) density measured with VBM. Cortical changes in schizophrenia were widespread, including particularly the prefrontal cortex and superior temporal gyrus. Nine regions of apparent reduction in GM density in patients relative to healthy matched controls were found using VBM that were not found with SBM-derived cortical thickness measures. In Regions of Interest (ROIs) derived from the VBM group results, we confirmed that local surface area differences accounted for these VBM changes. Our results emphasize widespread, but focally distinct cortical pathology in adolescent-onset schizophrenia. Evidence for changes in local surface area (as opposed to simply cortical thinning) is consistent with a neurodevelopmental contribution to the underlying neuropathology of the disease. PMID:18793730

  12. Psychological aspects of the treatment of patients with disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, David E; Gardner, Melissa; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T

    2012-10-01

    Research on the psychological development of persons with Disorders of Sex Development (DSD) has focused on understanding the influence of atypical sex hormone exposure during steroid-sensitive periods of prenatal brain development on the process of psychosexual differentiation (i.e., gender identity, gender role, and sexual orientation). In contrast, analysis of clinical management strategies has focused on gender assignment and the desirability and timing of genital surgery. This review focuses on the psychological issues that confront clinicians managing the care of persons born with DSD and their families. Particular attention is paid to processes and factors that potentially mediate or moderate psychosocial and psychosexual outcomes within and across developmental stages. PMID:23044882

  13. Psychological Aspects of the Treatment of Patients with Disorders of Sex Development

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, David E.; Gardner, Melissa; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T.

    2013-01-01

    Research on the psychological development of persons with Disorders of Sex Development (DSD) has focused on understanding the influence of atypical sex hormone exposure during steroid-sensitive periods of prenatal brain development on the process of psychosexual differentiation (i.e., gender identity, gender role, and sexual orientation). In contrast, analysis of clinical management strategies has focused on gender assignment and the desirability and timing of genital surgery. This review focuses on the psychological issues that confront clinicians managing the care of persons born with DSD and their families. Particular attention is paid to processes and factors that potentially mediate or moderate psychosocial and psychosexual outcomes within and across developmental stages. PMID:23044882

  14. School-Based Sex Education and Neuroscience: What We Know about Sex, Romance, Marriage, and Adolescent Brain Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballonoff Suleiman, Ahna; Johnson, Megan; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.; Galván, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many school-based abstinence-only sex education curricula state that sexual activity outside of marriage is likely to have harmful psychological effects. Recent advances in neuroscience have expanded our understanding of the neural underpinnings of romantic love, marriage, sexual desire, and sexual behavior and improved our…

  15. A panel of free fatty acid ratios to predict the development of metabolic abnormalities in healthy obese individuals

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Linjing; Ni, Yan; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhao, Aihua; Bao, Yuqian; Liu, Jiajian; Chen, Tianlu; Xie, Guoxiang; Panee, Jun; Su, Mingming; Yu, Herbert; Wang, Congrong; Hu, Cheng; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidences support that metabolically healthy obese (MHO) is a transient state. However, little is known about the early markers associated with the development of metabolic abnormalities in MHO individuals. Serum free fatty acids (FFAs) profile is highlighted in its association with obesity-related insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). To examine the association of endogenous fatty acid metabolism with future development of metabolic abnormalities in MHO individuals, we retrospectively analyzed 24 [product FFA]/[precursor FFA] ratios in fasting sera and clinical data from 481 individuals who participated in three independent studies, including 131 metabolic healthy subjects who completed the 10-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS), 312 subjects cross-sectionally sampled from the Shanghai Obesity Study (SHOS), and 38 subjects who completed an 8-week very low carbohydrate diet (VLCD) intervention study. Results showed that higher baseline level of oleic acid/stearic acid (OA/SA), and lower levels of stearic acid/palmitic acid (SA/PA) and arachidonic acid/dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (AA/DGLA) ratios were associated with higher rate of MHO to MUO conversion in the longitudinal SHDS. Further, the finding was validated in the cross-sectional and interventional studies. This panel of FFA ratios could be used for identification and early intervention of at-risk obese individuals. PMID:27344992

  16. A panel of free fatty acid ratios to predict the development of metabolic abnormalities in healthy obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Linjing; Ni, Yan; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhao, Aihua; Bao, Yuqian; Liu, Jiajian; Chen, Tianlu; Xie, Guoxiang; Panee, Jun; Su, Mingming; Yu, Herbert; Wang, Congrong; Hu, Cheng; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidences support that metabolically healthy obese (MHO) is a transient state. However, little is known about the early markers associated with the development of metabolic abnormalities in MHO individuals. Serum free fatty acids (FFAs) profile is highlighted in its association with obesity-related insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). To examine the association of endogenous fatty acid metabolism with future development of metabolic abnormalities in MHO individuals, we retrospectively analyzed 24 [product FFA]/[precursor FFA] ratios in fasting sera and clinical data from 481 individuals who participated in three independent studies, including 131 metabolic healthy subjects who completed the 10-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS), 312 subjects cross-sectionally sampled from the Shanghai Obesity Study (SHOS), and 38 subjects who completed an 8-week very low carbohydrate diet (VLCD) intervention study. Results showed that higher baseline level of oleic acid/stearic acid (OA/SA), and lower levels of stearic acid/palmitic acid (SA/PA) and arachidonic acid/dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (AA/DGLA) ratios were associated with higher rate of MHO to MUO conversion in the longitudinal SHDS. Further, the finding was validated in the cross-sectional and interventional studies. This panel of FFA ratios could be used for identification and early intervention of at-risk obese individuals. PMID:27344992

  17. Cerebellar cortex development in the weaver condition presents regional and age-dependent abnormalities without differences in Purkinje cells neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, María C; Hervás, José P; Bayer, Shirley A; Villegas, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Ataxias are neurological disorders associated with the degeneration of Purkinje cells (PCs). Homozygous weaver mice (wv/wv) have been proposed as a model for hereditary cerebellar ataxia because they present motor abnormalities and PC loss. To ascertain the physiopathology of the weaver condition, the development of the cerebellar cortex lobes was examined at postnatal day (P): P8, P20 and P90. Three approaches were used: 1) quantitative determination of several cerebellar features; 2) qualitative evaluation of the developmental changes occurring in the cortical lobes; and 3) autoradiographic analyses of PC generation and placement. Our results revealed a reduction in the size of the wv/wv cerebellum as a whole, confirming previous results. However, as distinguished from these reports, we observed that quantified parameters contribute differently to the abnormal growth of the wv/wv cerebellar lobes. Qualitative analysis showed anomalies in wv/wv cerebellar cytoarchitecture, depending on the age and lobe analyzed. Such abnormalities included the presence of the external granular layer after P20 and, at P90, ectopic cells located in the molecular layer following several placement patterns. Finally, we obtained autoradiographic evidence that wild-type and wv/wv PCs presented similar neurogenetic timetables, as reported. However, the innovative character of this current work lies in the fact that the neurogenetic gradients of wv/wv PCs were not modified from P8 to P90. A tendency for the accumulation of late-formed PCs in the anterior and posterior lobes was found, whereas early-generated PCs were concentrated in the central and inferior lobes. These data suggested that wv/wv PCs may migrate properly to their final destinations. The extrapolation of our results to patients affected with cerebellar ataxias suggests that all cerebellar cortex lobes are affected with several age-dependent alterations in cytoarchitectonics. We also propose that PC loss may be regionally

  18. Sex Differences in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders Compared with Their Unaffected Siblings and Typically Developing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Subin; Cho, Soo-Churl; Cho, In Hee; Kim, Boong-Nyun; Kim, Jae-Won; Shin, Min-Sup; Chung, Un-Sun; Park, Tae-Won; Son, Jung-Woo; Yoo, Hee Jeong

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the nature of cognitive and behavioral sex differences in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and two comparison groups: a group of typically developing (TD) children and a group of unaffected siblings of ASD children. Sex differences in core autistic symptoms, co-occurring behavioral symptoms, and cognitive styles…

  19. THE IMPACT OF COGNITIVE MATURITY ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF SEX-ROLE ATTITUDES IN THE YEARS 4 TO 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KOHLBERG, LAWRENCE; ZIGLER, EDWARD

    A SERIES OF STUDIES WAS CONDUCTED TO CLARIFY THE ROLE OF INTELLIGENCE IN PERSONALITY ORGANIZATION AND TO ASSESS A COGNITIVE-DEVELOPMENTAL INTERPRETATION OF IQ-PERSONALITY CORRELATIONS. THE SPECIFIC FOCUS OF THE STUDY WAS THE RELATIONSHIP OF INTELLECTUAL MATURITY TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF SEX-ROLE ATTITUDES. AGE-DEVELOPMENTAL TRENDS IN SEX-ROLE…

  20. Chromosome abnormalities in human arrested preimplantation embryos: A multiple-probe FISH study

    SciTech Connect

    Munne, S.; Grifo, J.; Cohen, J. ); Weier, H.U.G. )

    1994-07-01

    Numerical chromosome abnormalities were studied in single blastomeres from arrested or otherwise morphologically abnormal human preimplantation embryos. A 6-h FISH procedure with fluorochrome-labeled DNA probes was developed to determine numerical abnormalities of chromosomes X, Y, and 18. The three chromosomes were stained and detected simultaneously in 571 blastomeres from 131 embryos. Successful analysis including biopsy, fixation, and FISH analysis was achieved in 86.5% of all blastomeres. The procedure described here offers a reliable alternative to sexing of embryos by PCR and allows simultaneous ploidy assessment. For the three chromosomes tested, numerical aberrations were found in 56.5% of the embroys. Most abnormal embryos were polyploid or mosaics, and 6.1% were aneuploid for gonosomes or chromosome 18. Extrapolation of these results to all human chromosomes suggests that the majority of abnormally developing and arrested human embryos carry numerical chromosome abnormalities. 44 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  1. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  2. Synergistic Disruption of External Male Sex Organ Development by a Mixture of Four Antiandrogens

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Sofie; Scholze, Martin; Dalgaard, Majken; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Axelstad, Marta; Kortenkamp, Andreas; Hass, Ulla

    2009-01-01

    Background By disrupting the action of androgens during gestation, certain chemicals present in food, consumer products, and the environment can induce irreversible demasculinization and malformations of sex organs among male offspring. However, the consequences of simultaneous exposure to such chemicals are not well described, especially when they exert their actions by differing molecular mechanisms. Objectives To fill this gap, we investigated the effects of mixtures of a widely used plasticizer, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP); two fungicides present in food, vinclozolin and prochloraz; and a pharmaceutical, finasteride, on landmarks of male sexual development in the rat, including changes in anogenital distance (AGD), retained nipples, sex organ weights, and malformations of genitalia. These chemicals were chosen because they disrupt androgen action with differing mechanisms of action. Results Strikingly, the effect of combined exposure to the selected chemicals on malformations of external sex organs was synergistic, and the observed responses were greater than would be predicted from the toxicities of the individual chemicals. In relation to other hallmarks of disrupted male sexual development, including changes in AGD, retained nipples, and sex organ weights, the combined effects were dose additive. When the four chemicals were combined at doses equal to no observed adverse effect levels estimated for nipple retention, significant reductions in AGD were observed in male offspring. Conclusions Because unhindered androgen action is essential for human male development in fetal life, these findings are highly relevant to human risk assessment. Evaluations that ignore the possibility of combination effects may lead to considerable underestimations of risks associated with exposures to chemicals that disrupt male sexual differentiation. PMID:20049201

  3. Abnormal Development of the Femoral Head Epiphysis in an Infant with no Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Apparent on Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Atalar, Hakan; Gunay, Cuneyd; Aytekin, Mahmut Nedim

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In the investigation of hip development in newborns and infants, ultrasonography and radiography are widely used, but their optimal roles in this setting remain controversial. Case Report: Here we describe an 8.5-month-old infant who had undergone hip radiography at a primary care facility and was referred to our hospital to be evaluated for developmental dysplasia of the hip. Ultrasonography showed no developmental dysplasia of the hip according to standard criteria, but developmental retardation of the femoral head was apparent on the radiograph. Conclusion: This patient's findings demonstrate that abnormalities in femoral head epiphysis development can go undetected during routine ultrasonographic evaluations for developmental dysplasia of the hip. PMID:27298982

  4. Sex-specific development of spatial orientation is independent of peripubertal gonadal steroids.

    PubMed

    Wojniusz, Slawomir; Ropstad, Erik; Evans, Neil; Robinson, Jane; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin; Endestad, Tor; Haraldsen, Ira Ronit Hebold

    2013-09-01

    Prenatal exposure to androgens has been shown to modulate brain development, resulting in changed behavioral attitudes, sexual orientation and cognitive functions, including processing of spatial information. Whether later changes in gonadotropic hormones during puberty induce further organizational effects within the brain is still insufficiently understood. The purpose of this study was to assess development of spatial orientation before and after the time of normal pubertal development, in an ovine model where half of the animals did not undergo typical reproductive maturation due to the pharmacological blockade of gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) signaling. The study formed part of a larger trial and utilized 46 pairs of same sex Scottish Mule Texel Cross twins (22 female and 24 male). One twin remained untreated throughout (control) while the other received a subcutaneous GnRH agonist (GnRHa: Goserelin-Acetate) implant every fourth week. GnRHa treatment began at eight and 28 weeks of age, in males and females respectively, because the timing of the pubertal transition is sexually differentiated in sheep as it is in humans. Spatial orientation was assessed at three different time points: eight weeks of age, before puberty and treatment in both sexes; 28 weeks of age, after 20 weeks GnRHa treatment in males and before puberty and GnRHa treatment in females; and at 48 weeks of age, which is after the normal time of the pubertal transition in both sexes. Spatial orientation was tested in a spatial maze with traverse time as the main outcome measure. GnRHa treatment did not affect spatial maze performance as no significant differences in traverse time between treated and untreated animals were observed at any time-point. Adolescent females (48 weeks of age) traversed the maze significantly faster than adolescent males, whereas no sex differences in traverse time were seen at earlier developmental stages (eight and 28 weeks). Development of sex

  5. Sufficient Numbers of Early Germ Cells Are Essential for Female Sex Development in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiangyan; Jin, Xia; Chen, Xiaowen; He, Jiangyan; Yin, Zhan

    2015-01-01

    The sex determination for zebrafish is controlled by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The determination of sex in zebrafish has been suggested to rely on a mechanism that is affected by germ cell-derived signals. To begin our current study, a simplified and efficient germ cell-specific promoter of the dead end (dnd) gene was identified. Utilizing the metrodinazole (MTZ)/ bacterial nitroreductase (NTR) system for inducible germ cell ablation, several stable Tg (dnd:NTR-EGFP-3'UTR) and Tg (dnd:NTR-EGFP+3'UTR) zebrafish lines were then generated with the identified promoter. A thorough comparison of the expression patterns and tissue distributions of endogenous dnd and ntr-egfp transcripts in vivo revealed that the identified 2032-bp zebrafish dnd promoter can recapitulate dnd expression faithfully in stable transgenic zebrafish. The correlation between the levels of the germ cell-derived signals and requirement for maintaining the female fate has been also explored with different durations of the MTZ treatments. Our results revealed the decreasing ratios of female presented in the treated transgenic group are fairly associated with the reducing levels of the early germ cell-derived signals. After the juvenile transgenic fish treated with 5 mM MTZ for 20 days, all MTZ-treated transgenic fish exclusively developed into males with subfertilities. Taken together, our results identified here a simplified and efficient dnd promoter, and provide clear evidence indicating that it was not the presence but the sufficiency of signals derived from germ cells that is essential for female sex development in zebrafish. Our model also provides a unique system for sex control in zebrafish studies. PMID:25679390

  6. The Development of Sex Category Representation in Infancy: Matching of Faces and Bodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hock, Alyson; Kangas, Ashley; Zieber, Nicole; Bhatt, Ramesh S.

    2015-01-01

    Sex is a significant social category, and adults derive information about it from both faces and bodies. Research indicates that young infants process sex category information in faces. However, no prior study has examined whether infants derive sex categories from bodies and match faces and bodies in terms of sex. In the current study,…

  7. Auditory Processing in Infancy: Do Early Abnormalities Predict Disorders of Language and Cognitive Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzzetta, Francesco; Conti, Guido; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Increasing attention has been devoted to the maturation of sensory processing in the first year of life. While the development of cortical visual function has been thoroughly studied, much less information is available on auditory processing and its early disorders. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the assessment techniques for…

  8. Sexually Dimorphic White Matter Geometry Abnormalities in Adolescent Onset Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Savadjiev, P.; Whitford, T.J.; Hough, M.E.; Clemm von Hohenberg, C.; Bouix, S.; Westin, C.-F.; Shenton, M.E.; Crow, T.J.; James, A.C.; Kubicki, M.

    2014-01-01

    The normal human brain is characterized by a pattern of gross anatomical asymmetry. This pattern, known as the “torque”, is associated with a sexual dimorphism: The male brain tends to be more asymmetric than that of the female. This fact, along with well-known sex differences in brain development (faster in females) and onset of psychosis (earlier with worse outcome in males), has led to the theory that schizophrenia is a disorder in which sex-dependent abnormalities in the development of brain torque, the correlate of the capacity for language, cause alterations in interhemispheric connectivity, which are causally related to psychosis (Crow TJ, Paez P, Chance SE. 2007. Callosal misconnectivity and the sex difference in psychosis. Int Rev Psychiatry. 19(4):449–457.). To provide evidence toward this theory, we analyze the geometry of interhemispheric white matter connections in adolescent-onset schizophrenia, with a particular focus on sex, using a recently introduced framework for white matter geometry computation in diffusion tensor imaging data (Savadjiev P, Kindlmann GL, Bouix S, Shenton ME, Westin CF. 2010. Local white geometry from diffusion tensor gradients. Neuroimage. 49(4):3175–3186.). Our results reveal a pattern of sex-dependent white matter geometry abnormalities that conform to the predictions of Crow's torque theory and correlate with the severity of patients' symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to associate geometrical differences in white matter connectivity with torque in schizophrenia. PMID:23307635

  9. Abnormal development of glomerular endothelial and mesangial cells in mice with targeted disruption of the lama3 gene.

    PubMed

    Abrass, C K; Berfield, A K; Ryan, M C; Carter, W G; Hansen, K M

    2006-09-01

    Mice with targeted disruption of the lama3 gene, which encodes the alpha3 chain of laminin-5 (alpha3beta3gamma2, 332), develop a blistering skin disease similar to junctional epidermolysis bullosa in humans. These animals also develop abnormalities in glomerulogenesis. In both wild-type and mutant animals (lama3(-/-)), podocytes secrete glomerular basement membrane and develop foot processes. Endothelial cells migrate into this scaffolding and secrete a layer of basement membrane that fuses with the one formed by the podocyte. In lama3(-/-) animals, glomerular maturation arrests at this stage. Endothelial cells do not attenuate, develop fenestrae, or form typical lumens, and mesangial cells (MCs) were not identified. LN alpha3 subunit (LAMA3) protein was identified in the basement membrane adjacent to glomerular endothelial cells (GEnCs) in normal rats and mice. In developing rat glomeruli, the LAMA3 subunit was first detectable in the early capillary loop stage, which corresponds to the stage at which maturation arrest was observed in the mutant mice. Lama3 mRNA and protein were identified in isolated rat and mouse glomeruli and cultured rat GEnCs, but not MC. These data document expression of LAMA3 in glomeruli and support a critical role for it in GEnC differentiation. Furthermore, LAMA3 chain expression and/or another product of endothelial cells are required for MC migration into the developing glomerulus. PMID:16850021

  10. Overexpression of the CmACS-3 gene in melon causes abnormal pollen development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Luan, F

    2015-01-01

    Sexual diversity expressed by the Curcurbitaceae family is a primary example of developmental plasticity in plants. Most melon genotypes are andromonoecious, where an initial phase of male flowers is followed by a mixture of bisexual and male flowers. Over-expression of the CmACS-3 gene in melon plants showed an increased number of flower buds, and increased femaleness as demonstrated by a larger number bisexual buds. Transformation of CmACS-3 in melons showed earlier development of and an increased number of bisexual buds that matured to anthesis but also increased the rate of development of the bisexual buds to maturity. Field studies showed that CmACS-3-overexpressing melons had earlier mature bisexual flowers, earlier fruit set, and an increased number of fruits set on closely spaced nodes on the main stem. PMID:26400274

  11. Hippocampal neuronal subtypes develop abnormal dendritic arbors in the presence of Fragile X astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, S; Cheng, C; Doering, L C

    2016-06-01

    Astrocytes are now recognized as key players in the neurobiology of neurodevelopmental disorders such as Fragile X syndrome. However, the nature of Fragile X astrocyte-mediated control of dendrite development in subtypes of hippocampal neurons is not yet known. We used a co-culture procedure in which wildtype primary hippocampal neurons were cultured with astrocytes from either a wildtype or Fragile X mouse, for either 7, 14 or 21days. The neurons were processed for immunocytochemistry with the dendritic marker MAP2, classified by morphological criteria into one of five neuronal subtypes, and subjected to Sholl analyses. Both linear and semi-log methods of Sholl analyses were applied to the neurons in order to provide an in depth analysis of the dendritic arborizations. We found that Fragile X astrocytes affect the development of dendritic arborization of all subtypes of wildtype hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we show that hippocampal neurons with spiny stellate neuron morphology exhibit the most pervasive developmental delays, with significant dendritic arbor alterations persisting at 21days in culture. The results further dictate the critical role astrocytes play in governing neuronal morphology including altered dendrite development in Fragile X. PMID:26968765

  12. Abnormal Cortical Development after Premature Birth Shown by Altered Allometric Scaling of Brain Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kapellou, Olga; Counsell, Serena J; Kennea, Nigel; Dyet, Leigh; Saeed, Nadeem; Stark, Jaroslav; Maalouf, Elia; Duggan, Philip; Ajayi-Obe, Morenike; Hajnal, Jo; Allsop, Joanna M; Boardman, James; Rutherford, Mary A; Cowan, Frances; Edwards, A. David

    2006-01-01

    Background We postulated that during ontogenesis cortical surface area and cerebral volume are related by a scaling law whose exponent gives a quantitative measure of cortical development. We used this approach to investigate the hypothesis that premature termination of the intrauterine environment by preterm birth reduces cortical development in a dose-dependent manner, providing a neural substrate for functional impairment. Methods and Findings We analyzed 274 magnetic resonance images that recorded brain growth from 23 to 48 wk of gestation in 113 extremely preterm infants born at 22 to 29 wk of gestation, 63 of whom underwent neurodevelopmental assessment at a median age of 2 y. Cortical surface area was related to cerebral volume by a scaling law with an exponent of 1.29 (95% confidence interval, 1.25–1.33), which was proportional to later neurodevelopmental impairment. Increasing prematurity and male gender were associated with a lower scaling exponent (p < 0.0001) independent of intrauterine or postnatal somatic growth. Conclusions Human brain growth obeys an allometric scaling relation that is disrupted by preterm birth in a dose-dependent, sexually dimorphic fashion that directly parallels the incidence of neurodevelopmental impairments in preterm infants. This result focuses attention on brain growth and cortical development during the weeks following preterm delivery as a neural substrate for neurodevelopmental impairment after premature delivery. PMID:16866579

  13. Nav2 hypomorphic mutant mice are ataxic and exhibit abnormalities in cerebellar development

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, Elizabeth M.; Klöckner-Bormann, Mariana; Roesler, Elizabeth C.; Talton, Lynn E.; Moechars, Dieder; Clagett-Dame, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Development of the cerebellum involves a coordinated program of neuronal process outgrowth and migration resulting in a foliated structure that plays a key role in motor function. Neuron navigator 2 (Nav2) is a cytoskeletal-interacting protein that functions in neurite outgrowth and axonal elongation. Herein we show that hypomorphic mutant mice lacking the full-length Nav2 transcript exhibit ataxia and defects in cerebellar development. At embryonic day (E)17.5, the mutant cerebellum is reduced in size and exhibits defects in vermal foliation. Reduction in cell proliferation at early times (E12.5 and E14.5) may contribute to this size reduction. The full-length Nav2 transcript is expressed in the premigratory zone of the external granule layer (EGL). Granule cells in the germinal zone of the EGL appear to proliferate normally, however, due to the reduction in cerebellar circumference there are fewer total BrdU-labeled granule cells in the mutants, and these fail to migrate normally toward the interior of the cerebellum. In Nav2 hypomorphs, fewer granule cells migrate out of cerebellar EGL explants and neurite outgrowth from both explants and isolated external granule cell cultures is reduced. This suggests the formation of parallel axon fibers and neuronal migration is disrupted in Nav2 mutants. This work supports an essential role for full-length Nav2 in cerebellar development, including axonal elongation and migration of the EGL neurons. PMID:21419114

  14. Nav2 hypomorphic mutant mice are ataxic and exhibit abnormalities in cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Elizabeth M; Klöckner-Bormann, Mariana; Roesler, Elizabeth C; Talton, Lynn E; Moechars, Dieder; Clagett-Dame, Margaret

    2011-05-15

    Development of the cerebellum involves a coordinated program of neuronal process outgrowth and migration resulting in a foliated structure that plays a key role in motor function. Neuron navigator 2 (Nav2) is a cytoskeletal-interacting protein that functions in neurite outgrowth and axonal elongation. Herein we show that hypomorphic mutant mice lacking the full-length Nav2 transcript exhibit ataxia and defects in cerebellar development. At embryonic day (E)17.5, the mutant cerebellum is reduced in size and exhibits defects in vermal foliation. Reduction in cell proliferation at early times (E12.5 and E14.5) may contribute to this size reduction. The full-length Nav2 transcript is expressed in the premigratory zone of the external granule layer (EGL). Granule cells in the germinal zone of the EGL appear to proliferate normally, however, due to the reduction in cerebellar circumference there are fewer total BrdU-labeled granule cells in the mutants, and these fail to migrate normally toward the interior of the cerebellum. In Nav2 hypomorphs, fewer granule cells migrate out of cerebellar EGL explants and neurite outgrowth from both explants and isolated external granule cell cultures is reduced. This suggests that the formation of parallel axon fibers and neuronal migration is disrupted in Nav2 mutants. This work supports an essential role for full-length Nav2 in cerebellar development, including axonal elongation and migration of the EGL neurons. PMID:21419114

  15. The Development of Sex Reassignment Surgery in Thailand: A Social Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Chokrungvaranont, Prayuth; Jindarak, Sirachai; Angspatt, Apichai; Pungrasmi, Pornthep; Suwajo, Poonpismai; Tiewtranon, Preecha

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of gender reassignment in Thailand during the period of 1975–2012, in terms of social attitude, epidemiology, surgical patients' profile, law and regulation, religion, and patients' path from psychiatric assessment to surgery. Thailand healthcare for transsexual patients is described. Figures related to the number of sex reassignment surgeries performed in Thailand over the past 30 years are reported. Transsexual individuals are only apparently integrated within the Thail society: the law system of Thailand in fact, does not guarantee to transsexuals the same rights as in other Western countries; the governmental healthcare does not offer free treatments for transsexual patients. In favor of the transsexual healthcare, instead, the Medical Council of Thailand recently published a policy entitled “Criteria for the treatment of sex change, Census 2009.” The goal of this policy was to improve the care of transsexual patients in Thailand, by implementing the Standards of Care of the World Professional Association of Transgender Health. Currently, in Thailand, there are 6 major private groups performing sex reassignment surgery, and mostly performing surgery to patients coming from abroad. Particularly, the largest of these (Preecha's group) has performed nearly 3000 vaginoplasties for male-to-female transsexuals in the last 30 years. PMID:24772010

  16. Development and application of a mark-recapture model incorporating predicted sex and transitory behaviour

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conroy, M.J.; Senar, J.C.; Hines, J.E.; Domenech, J.

    1999-01-01

    We developed an extension of Cormack-Jolly-Seber models to handle a complex mark-recapture problem in which (a) the sex of birds cannot be determined prior to first moult, but can be predicted on the basis of body measurements, and (b) a significant portion of captured birds appear to be transients (i.e. are captured once but leave the area or otherwise become ' untrappable'). We applied this methodology to a data set of 4184 serins (Serinus serinus) trapped in northeastern Spain during 1985-96, in order to investigate age-, sex-, and time-specific variation in survival rates. Using this approach, we were able to successfully incorporate the majority of ringings of serins. Had we eliminated birds not previously captured (as has been advocated to avoid the problem of transience) we would have reduced our sample sizes by >2000 releases. In addition, we were able to include 1610 releases of birds of unknown (but predicted) sex; these data contributed to the precision of our estimates and the power of statistical tests. We discuss problems with data structure, encoding of the algorithms to compute parameter estimates, model selection, identifiability of parameters, and goodness-of-fit, and make recommendations for the design and analysis of future studies facing similar problems.

  17. Development and application of a mark-recapture model incorporating predicted sex and transitory behaviour

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conroy, M.J.; Senar, J.C.; Hines, J.E.; Domenech, J.

    1999-01-01

    We developed an extension of Cormack-Jolly-Seber models to handle a complex mark-recapture problem in which (a) the sex of birds cannot be determined prior to first moult, but can be predicted on the basis of body measurements, and (b) a significant portion of captured birds appear to be transients (i.e. are captured once but leave the area or otherwise become 'untrappable'). We applied this methodology to a data set of 4184 serins (Serinus serinus) trapped in northeastern Spain during 1985-96, in order to investigate age-, sex-, and time-specific variation in survival rates. Using this approach, we were able to successfully incorporate the majority of ringings of serins. Had we eliminated birds not previously captured (as has been advocated to avoid the problem of transience) we would have reduced our sample sizes by >2000 releases. In addition, we were able to include 1610 releases of birds of unknown (but predicted) sex; these data contributed to the precision of our estimates and the power of statistical tests. We discuss problems with data structure, encoding of the algorithms to compute parameter estimates, model selection, identifiability of parameters, and goodness-of-fit, and make recommendations for the design and analysis of future studies facing similar problems.

  18. Androgen action during male sex differentiation includes suppression of cranial suspensory ligament development.

    PubMed

    Emmen, J M; McLuskey, A; Grootegoed, J A; Brinkmann, A O

    1998-05-01

    The cranial suspensory ligament is located on the border of the cranial (mesonephric) mesentery in adult female mammals, which runs between the cranial pole of the internal genitalia and the dorsal abdominal wall. Absence of the cranial suspensory ligament in male mammals depends upon exposure of its primordium to fetal testicular androgens and is a prerequisite for testis descent. Female rats were exposed to 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone propionate at different stages of genital development, and cranial suspensory ligament development was studied in neonatal and in adult animals. Androgens suppressed cranial suspensory ligament development when exposure started during the early stages of genital development, until day 19 postconception (pc). Androgen receptor expression was immunohistochemically detected in the cranial mesentery of both sexes from day 16 pc onwards. A decrease of androgen receptor expression in female fetuses from day 18 pc onwards coincided with the appearance of a differentiated cranial suspensory ligament, as evidenced by the expression of two cell differentiation markers: alpha-smooth muscle (alpha-SM) actin and desmin. alpha-SM actin was located on the outer border of the cranial mesentery of both sexes at day 17 pc, and expression increased only in female fetuses. On day 19 pc, desmin expression was also detectable in the a-SM actin-positive cells. Proliferation and apoptosis indices of cells in the cranial mesentery, as analysed by 5'-bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and by detection of DNA strand breaks (TUNEL method) respectively, did not show any difference between the sexes, neither on day 17 nor on day 18 pc. Since primordial cells of the cranial suspensory ligament highly express the androgen receptor during the period of gestation when androgens can suppress cranial suspensory development, altered morphogenesis of these cells may be a direct consequence of androgen action. PMID:9647559

  19. Annual Research Review: Growth connectomics – the organization and reorganization of brain networks during normal and abnormal development

    PubMed Central

    Vértes, Petra E; Bullmore, Edward T

    2015-01-01

    Background We first give a brief introduction to graph theoretical analysis and its application to the study of brain network topology or connectomics. Within this framework, we review the existing empirical data on developmental changes in brain network organization across a range of experimental modalities (including structural and functional MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography in humans). Synthesis We discuss preliminary evidence and current hypotheses for how the emergence of network properties correlates with concomitant cognitive and behavioural changes associated with development. We highlight some of the technical and conceptual challenges to be addressed by future developments in this rapidly moving field. Given the parallels previously discovered between neural systems across species and over a range of spatial scales, we also review some recent advances in developmental network studies at the cellular scale. We highlight the opportunities presented by such studies and how they may complement neuroimaging in advancing our understanding of brain development. Finally, we note that many brain and mind disorders are thought to be neurodevelopmental in origin and that charting the trajectory of brain network changes associated with healthy development also sets the stage for understanding abnormal network development. Conclusions We therefore briefly review the clinical relevance of network metrics as potential diagnostic markers and some recent efforts in computational modelling of brain networks which might contribute to a more mechanistic understanding of neurodevelopmental disorders in future. PMID:25441756

  20. 46,XY Disorders of Sex Development and Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia: A Case with Dysmorphic Facies, Truncus Arteriosus, Bifid Thymus, Gut Malrotation, Rhizomelia, and Adactyly

    PubMed Central

    Esplin, Edward D.; Chaib, Hassan; Haney, Michael; Martin, Brock; Homeyer, Margaret; Urban, Alexander E.; Bernstein, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    The association of 46,XY disorder of sex development (DSD) with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is rare, but has been previously described with and without other congenital anomalies. Literature review identified five cases of 46,XY DSD associated with CDH and other congenital anomalies. These five cases share characteristics including CDH, 46,XY karyotype with external female appearing or ambiguous genitalia, cardiac anomalies, and decreased life span. The present case had novel features including truncus arteriosus, bifid thymus, gut malrotation, and limb anomalies consisting of rhizomelia and adactyly. With this case report, we present a review of the literature of cases of 46,XY DSD and CDH in association with multiple congenital abnormalities. This case may represent a unique syndrome of 46,XY DSD and diaphragmatic hernia or a more severe presentation of a syndrome represented in the previously reported cases. PMID:25898814

  1. P53 functional abnormality in mesenchymal stem cells promotes osteosarcoma development

    PubMed Central

    Velletri, T; Xie, N; Wang, Y; Huang, Y; Yang, Q; Chen, X; Chen, Q; Shou, P; Gan, Y; Cao, G; Melino, G; Shi, Y

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that p53 has a critical role in the differentiation and functionality of various multipotent progenitor cells. P53 mutations can lead to genome instability and subsequent functional alterations and aberrant transformation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The significance of p53 in safeguarding our body from developing osteosarcoma (OS) is well recognized. During bone remodeling, p53 has a key role in negatively regulating key factors orchestrating the early stages of osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Interestingly, changes in the p53 status can compromise bone homeostasis and affect the tumor microenvironment. This review aims to provide a unique opportunity to study the p53 function in MSCs and OS. In the context of loss of function of p53, we provide a model for two sources of OS: MSCs as progenitor cells of osteoblasts and bone tumor microenvironment components. Standing at the bone remodeling point of view, in this review we will first explain the determinant function of p53 in OS development. We will then summarize the role of p53 in monitoring MSC fidelity and in regulating MSC differentiation programs during osteogenesis. Finally, we will discuss the importance of loss of p53 function in tissue microenvironment. We expect that the information provided herein could lead to better understanding and treatment of OS. PMID:26775693

  2. A mitochondrial DNA sequence is associated with abnormal pollen development in cytoplasmic male sterile bean plants.

    PubMed Central

    Johns, C; Lu, M; Lyznik, A; Mackenzie, S

    1992-01-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in common bean is associated with the presence of a 3-kb unique mitochondrial sequence designated pvs. The pvs sequence encodes at least two open reading frames (297 and 720 bp in length) with portions derived from the chloroplast genome. Fertility restoration by the nuclear restorer gene Fr results in the loss of this transcriptionally active unique region. We examined the effect of CMS (pvs present) and fertility restoration by Fr (pvs absent) on the pattern of pollen development in bean. In the CMS line, pollen aborted in the tetrad stage late in microgametogenesis. Microspores maintained cytoplasmic connections throughout pollen development, indicating aberrant or incomplete cytokinesis. Pollen-specific events associated with pollen abortion and fertility restoration imply that a gametophytic factor or event may be involved in CMS. In situ hybridization experiments suggested that significant reduction or complete loss of the mitochondrial sterility-associated sequence occurred in fertile pollen of F2 populations segregating for fertility. These observations support a model of fertility restoration by the loss of a mitochondrial DNA sequence prior to or during microsporogenesis/gametogenesis. PMID:1498602

  3. Sex specific retinoic acid signaling is required for the initiation of urogenital sinus bud development.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Sarah L; Francis, Jeffrey C; Lokody, Isabel B; Wang, Hong; Risbridger, Gail P; Loveland, Kate L; Swain, Amanda

    2014-11-15

    The mammalian urogenital sinus (UGS) develops in a sex specific manner, giving rise to the prostate in the male and the sinus vagina in the embryonic female. Androgens, produced by the embryonic testis, have been shown to be crucial to this process. In this study we show that retinoic acid signaling is required for the initial stages of bud development from the male UGS. Enzymes involved in retinoic acid synthesis are expressed in the UGS mesenchyme in a sex specific manner and addition of ligand to female tissue is able to induce prostate-like bud formation in the absence of androgens, albeit at reduced potency. Functional studies in mouse organ cultures that faithfully reproduce the initiation of prostate development indicate that one of the roles of retinoic acid signaling in the male is to inhibit the expression of Inhba, which encodes the βA subunit of Activin, in the UGS mesenchyme. Through in vivo genetic analysis and culture studies we show that inhibition of Activin signaling in the female UGS leads to a similar phenotype to that of retinoic acid treatment, namely bud formation in the absence of androgens. Our data also reveals that both androgens and retinoic acid have extra independent roles to that of repressing Activin signaling in the development of the prostate during fetal stages. This study identifies a novel role for retinoic acid as a mesenchymal factor that acts together with androgens to determine the position and initiation of bud development in the male UGS epithelia. PMID:25261715

  4. Development of two highly sensitive forensic sex determination assays based on human DYZ1 and Alu repetitive DNA elements.

    PubMed

    Fazi, Amanda; Gobeski, Brianne; Foran, David

    2014-11-01

    Sex determination is a critical component of forensic identification, the standard genetic method for which is detection of the single copy amelogenin gene that has differing homologues on the X and Y chromosomes. However, this assay may not be sensitive enough when DNA samples are minute or highly compromised, thus other strategies for sex determination are needed. In the current research, two ultrasensitive sexing assays, based on real-time PCR and pyrosequencing, were developed targeting the highly repetitive elements DYZ1 on the Y chromosome and Alu on the autosomes. The DYZ1/Alu strategy was compared to amelogenin for overall sensitivity based on high molecular weight and degraded DNA, followed by assaying the sex of 34 touch DNA samples and DNA from 30 hair shafts. The real-time DYZ1/Alu assay proved to be approximately 1500 times more sensitive than its amelogenin counterpart based on high molecular weight DNA, and even more sensitive when sexing degraded DNA. The pyrosequencing DYZ1/Alu assay correctly sexed 26 of the touch DNAs, compared to six using amelogenin. Hair shaft DNAs showed equally improved sexing results using the DYZ1/Alu assays. Overall, both DYZ1/Alu assays were far more sensitive and accurate than was the amelogenin assay, and thus show great utility for sexing poor quality and low quantity DNA evidence. PMID:25168471

  5. Modulation of Serotonin Transporter Function during Fetal Development Causes Dilated Heart Cardiomyopathy and Lifelong Behavioral Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Noorlander, Cornelle W.; Ververs, Frederique F. T.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.; van Echteld, Cees J. A.; Visser, Gerard H. A.; Smidt, Marten P.

    2008-01-01

    Background Women are at great risk for mood and anxiety disorders during their childbearing years and may become pregnant while taking antidepressant drugs. In the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most frequently prescribed drugs, while it is largely unknown whether this medication affects the development of the central nervous system of the fetus. The possible effects are the product of placental transfer efficiency, time of administration and dose of the respective SSRI. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to attain this information we have setup a study in which these parameters were measured and the consequences in terms of physiology and behavior are mapped. The placental transfer of fluoxetine and fluvoxamine, two commonly used SSRIs, was similar between mouse and human, indicating that the fetal exposure of these SSRIs in mice is comparable with the human situation. Fluvoxamine displayed a relatively low placental transfer, while fluoxetine showed a relatively high placental transfer. Using clinical doses of fluoxetine the mortality of the offspring increased dramatically, whereas the mortality was unaffected after fluvoxamine exposure. The majority of the fluoxetine-exposed offspring died postnatally of severe heart failure caused by dilated cardiomyopathy. Molecular analysis of fluoxetine-exposed offspring showed long-term alterations in serotonin transporter levels in the raphe nucleus. Furthermore, prenatal fluoxetine exposure resulted in depressive- and anxiety-related behavior in adult mice. In contrast, fluvoxamine-exposed mice did not show alterations in behavior and serotonin transporter levels. Decreasing the dose of fluoxetine resulted in higher survival rates and less dramatic effects on the long-term behavior in the offspring. Conclusions These results indicate that prenatal fluoxetine exposure affects fetal development, resulting in cardiomyopathy and a higher

  6. Abnormal development of monoaminergic neurons is implicated in mood fluctuations and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Jukic, Marin M; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Bar, Michal; Becker, Gal; Jovanovic, Vukasin M; Zega, Ksenija; Binder, Elisabeth B; Brodski, Claude

    2015-03-01

    Subtle mood fluctuations are normal emotional experiences, whereas drastic mood swings can be a manifestation of bipolar disorder (BPD). Despite their importance for normal and pathological behavior, the mechanisms underlying endogenous mood instability are largely unknown. During embryogenesis, the transcription factor Otx2 orchestrates the genetic networks directing the specification of dopaminergic (DA) and serotonergic (5-HT) neurons. Here we behaviorally phenotyped mouse mutants overexpressing Otx2 in the hindbrain, resulting in an increased number of DA neurons and a decreased number of 5-HT neurons in both developing and mature animals. Over the course of 1 month, control animals exhibited stable locomotor activity in their home cages, whereas mutants showed extended periods of elevated or decreased activity relative to their individual average. Additional behavioral paradigms, testing for manic- and depressive-like behavior, demonstrated that mutants showed an increase in intra-individual fluctuations in locomotor activity, habituation, risk-taking behavioral parameters, social interaction, and hedonic-like behavior. Olanzapine, lithium, and carbamazepine ameliorated the behavioral alterations of the mutants, as did the mixed serotonin receptor agonist quipazine and the specific 5-HT2C receptor agonist CP-809101. Testing the relevance of the genetic networks specifying monoaminergic neurons for BPD in humans, we applied an interval-based enrichment analysis tool for genome-wide association studies. We observed that the genes specifying DA and 5-HT neurons exhibit a significant level of aggregated association with BPD but not with schizophrenia or major depressive disorder. The results of our translational study suggest that aberrant development of monoaminergic neurons leads to mood fluctuations and may be associated with BPD. PMID:25241801

  7. Neural tube opening and abnormal extraembryonic membrane development in SEC23A deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Min; Tao, Jiayi; Vasievich, Matthew P.; Wei, Wei; Zhu, Guojing; Khoriaty, Rami N.; Zhang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    COPII (coat protein complex-II) vesicles transport proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi. Higher eukaryotes have two or more paralogs of most COPII components. Here we characterize mice deficient for SEC23A and studied interactions of Sec23a null allele with the previously reported Sec23b null allele. SEC23A deficiency leads to mid-embryonic lethality associated with defective development of extraembryonic membranes and neural tube opening in midbrain. Secretion defects of multiple collagen types are observed in different connective tissues, suggesting that collagens are primarily transported in SEC23A-containing vesicles in these cells. Other extracellular matrix proteins, such as fibronectin, are not affected by SEC23A deficiency. Intracellular accumulation of unsecreted proteins leads to strong induction of the unfolded protein response in collagen-producing cells. No collagen secretion defects are observed in SEC23B deficient embryos. We report that E-cadherin is a cargo that accumulates in acini of SEC23B deficient pancreas and salivary glands. Compensatory increase of one paralog is observed in the absence of the second paralog. Haploinsufficiency of the remaining Sec23 paralog on top of homozygous inactivation of the first paralog leads to earlier lethality of embryos. Our results suggest that mammalian SEC23A and SEC23B transport overlapping yet distinct spectra of cargo in vivo. PMID:26494538

  8. Role of abnormal lipid metabolism in development, progression, diagnosis and therapy of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Swierczynski, Julian; Hebanowska, Areta; Sledzinski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that metabolic alterations play an important role in cancer development and progression. The metabolism of cancer cells is reprogrammed in order to support their rapid proliferation. Elevated fatty acid synthesis is one of the most important aberrations of cancer cell metabolism. An enhancement of fatty acids synthesis is required both for carcinogenesis and cancer cell survival, as inhibition of key lipogenic enzymes slows down the growth of tumor cells and impairs their survival. Based on the data that serum fatty acid synthase (FASN), also known as oncoantigen 519, is elevated in patients with certain types of cancer, its serum level was proposed as a marker of neoplasia. This review aims to demonstrate the changes in lipid metabolism and other metabolic processes associated with lipid metabolism in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common pancreatic neoplasm, characterized by high mortality. We also addressed the influence of some oncogenic factors and tumor suppressors on pancreatic cancer cell metabolism. Additionally the review discusses the potential role of elevated lipid synthesis in diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. In particular, FASN is a viable candidate for indicator of pathologic state, marker of neoplasia, as well as, pharmacological treatment target in pancreatic cancer. Recent research showed that, in addition to lipogenesis, certain cancer cells can use fatty acids from circulation, derived from diet (chylomicrons), synthesized in liver, or released from adipose tissue for their growth. Thus, the interactions between de novo lipogenesis and uptake of fatty acids from circulation by PDAC cells require further investigation. PMID:24605027

  9. Activation of a Mitochondrial ATPase Gene Induces Abnormal Seed Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kon; Seo, Pil Joon; Park, Chung-Mo

    2011-01-01

    The ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA) proteins are widespread in living organisms. Some of the AAA-type ATPases possess metalloprotease activities. Other members constitute the 26S proteasome complexes. In recent years, a few AAA members have been implicated in vesicle-mediated secretion, membrane fusion, cellular organelle biogenesis, and hypersensitive responses (HR) in plants. However, the physiological roles and biochemical activities of plant AAA proteins have not yet been defined at the molecular level, and regulatory mechanisms underlying their functions are largely unknown. In this study, we showed that overexpression of an Arabidopsis gene encoding a mitochondrial AAA protein, ATPase-in-Seed-Development (ASD), induces morphological and anatomical defects in seed maturation. The ASD gene is expressed at a high level during the seed maturation process and in mature seeds but is repressed rapidly in germinating seeds. Transgenic plants overexpressing the ASD gene are morphologically normal. However, seed formation is severely disrupted in the transgenic plants. The ASD gene is induced by abiotic stresses, such as low temperatures and high salinity, in an abscisic acid (ABA)- dependent manner. The ASD protein possesses ATPase activity and is localized into the mitochondria. Our observations suggest that ASD may play a role in seed maturation by influencing mitochondrial function under abiotic stress. PMID:21359673

  10. Abnormal etioplast development in barley seedlings infected with BSMV by seed transmission.

    PubMed

    Harsányi, Anett; Böddi, Béla; Bóka, Károly; Almási, Asztéria; Gáborjányi, Richard

    2002-01-01

    The effect of barley stripe mosaic hordeivirus (BSMV) was studied on the ultrastructure of etioplasts, protochlorophyllide forms and the greening process of barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Pannónia) plants infected by seed transmission. The leaves of 7- to 11-day-old etiolated seedlings were examined by transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy. The etioplasts of infected seedlings contained smaller prolamellar bodies with less regular membrane structure, while prothylakoid content was higher than in the control. The protochlorophyllide content of virus-infected seedlings was reduced to 74% of the control. In the 77 K fluorescence spectra the relative amount of 655 nm emitting photoactive protochlorophyllide form decreased, and the amount of the 645 and 633 nm emitting forms increased in the infected leaves. A characteristic effect was observed in the process of the Shibata-shift: 40 min delay was observed in the infected leaves. The results of this work proved that BSMV infection delays or inhibits plastid development and the formation of photosynthetic apparatus. PMID:11982946

  11. Deficiency in DGCR8-dependent canonical microRNAs causes infertility due to multiple abnormalities during uterine development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Sun; Kim, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Hyongbum; Yang, Seung Chel; Park, Mira; Yoon, Jung Ah; Lim, Hyunjung J.; Hong, Seok-Ho; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Lydon, John P.; Choi, Youngsok; Lee, Dong Ryul; Song, Haengseok

    2016-01-01

    DGCR8 is an RNA-binding protein that interacts with DROSHA to produce pre-microRNA in the nucleus, while DICER generates not only mature microRNA, but also endogenous small interfering RNAs in the cytoplasm. Here, we produced Dgcr8 conditional knock-out mice using progesterone receptor (PR)-Cre (Dgcr8d/d) and demonstrated that canonical microRNAs dependent on the DROSHA-DGCR8 complex are required for uterine development as well as female fertility in mice. Adult Dgcr8d/d females neither underwent regular reproductive cycles nor produced pups, whereas administration of exogenous gonadotropins induced normal ovulation in these mice. Interestingly, immune cells associated with acute inflammation aberrantly infiltrated into reproductive organs of pregnant Dgcr8d/d mice. Regarding uterine development, multiple uterine abnormalities were noticeable at 4 weeks of age when PR is significantly increased, and the severity of these deformities increased over time. Gland formation and myometrial layers were significantly reduced, and the stromal cell compartment did not expand and became atrophic during uterine development in these mice. These results were consistent with aberrantly reduced stromal cell proliferation and completely failed decidualization. Collectively, we suggest that DGCR8-dependent canonical microRNAs are essential for uterine development and physiological processes such as proper immune modulation, reproductive cycle, and steroid hormone responsiveness in mice. PMID:26833131

  12. The development of sex category representation in infancy: matching of faces and bodies.

    PubMed

    Hock, Alyson; Kangas, Ashley; Zieber, Nicole; Bhatt, Ramesh S

    2015-03-01

    Sex is a significant social category, and adults derive information about it from both faces and bodies. Research indicates that young infants process sex category information in faces. However, no prior study has examined whether infants derive sex categories from bodies and match faces and bodies in terms of sex. In the current study, 5-month-olds exhibited a preference between sex congruent (face and body of the same sex) versus sex-incongruent (face and body belonging to different genders) images. In contrast, 3.5-month-olds failed to exhibit a preference. Thus, 5-month-olds process sex information from bodies and match it to facial information. However, younger infants' failure to match suggests that there is a developmental change between 3.5 and 5 months of age in the processing of sex categories. These results indicate that rapid developmental changes lead to fairly sophisticated social information processing quite early in life. PMID:25621754

  13. Involvement of ethylene in sex expression and female flower development in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus).

    PubMed

    Manzano, Susana; Martínez, Cecilia; García, Juan Manuel; Megías, Zoraida; Jamilena, Manuel

    2014-12-01

    Although it is known that ethylene has a masculinizing effect on watermelon, the specific role of this hormone in sex expression and flower development has not been analyzed in depth. By using different approaches the present work demonstrates that ethylene regulates differentially two sex-related developmental processes: sexual expression, i.e. the earliness and the number of female flowers per plant, and the development of individual floral buds. Ethylene production in the shoot apex as well as in male, female and bisexual flowers demonstrated that the female flower requires much more ethylene than the male one to develop, and that bisexual flowers result from a decrease in ethylene production in the female floral bud. The occurrence of bisexual flowers was found to be associated with elevated temperatures in the greenhouse, concomitantly with a reduction of ethylene production in the shoot apex. External treatments with ethephon and AVG, and the use of Cucurbita rootstocks with different ethylene production and sensitivity, confirmed that, as occurs in other cucurbit species, ethylene is required to arrest the development of stamens in the female flower. Nevertheless, in watermelon ethylene inhibits the transition from male to female flowering and reduces the number of pistillate flowers per plant, which runs contrary to findings in other cucurbit species. The use of Cucurbita rootstocks with elevated ethylene production delayed the production of female flowers but reduced the number of bisexual flowers, which is associated with a reduced fruit set and altered fruit shape. PMID:25463265

  14. Avian Egg Odour Encodes Information on Embryo Sex, Fertility and Development

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Ben; Hayes, William; Pike, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Avian chemical communication is a rapidly emerging field, but has been hampered by a critical lack of information on volatile chemicals that communicate ecologically relevant information (semiochemicals). A possible, but as yet unexplored, function of olfaction and chemical communication in birds is in parent-embryo and embryo-embryo communication. Communication between parents and developing embryos may act to mediate parental behaviour, while communication between embryos can control the synchronicity of hatching. Embryonic vocalisations and vibrations have been implicated as a means of communication during the later stages of development but in the early stages, before embryos are capable of independent movement and vocalisation, this is not possible. Here we show that volatiles emitted from developing eggs of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) convey information on egg fertility, along with the sex and developmental status of the embryo. Specifically, egg volatiles changed over the course of incubation, differed between fertile and infertile eggs, and were predictive of embryo sex as early as day 1 of incubation. Egg odours therefore have the potential to facilitate parent-embryo and embryo-embryo interactions by allowing the assessment of key measures of embryonic development long before this is possible through other modalities. It also opens up the intriguing possibility that parents may be able to glean further relevant information from egg volatiles, such as the health, viability and heritage of embryos. By determining information conveyed by egg-derived volatiles, we hope to stimulate further investigation into the ecological role of egg odours. PMID:25629413

  15. Disorders of Sex Development: Lessons to be Learned from Studies of Spina Bifida and Craniofacial Conditions.

    PubMed

    Holmbeck, G N; Aspinall, C L

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss research methods and clinical management strategies employed with other conditions (i. e., spina bifida and craniofacial conditions) and how these methods and strategies could be applied to youth with disorders of sex development (DSD). The review focuses specifically on the potential overlap between DSD and these other conditions across the following 3 areas: (1) developmentally-oriented theories that underlie the research base for chronic physical conditions; (2) research designs and methodological features that have proved fruitful in these areas; and (3) the potential applicability to DSD of clinical management practices for youth with craniofacial conditions. PMID:25719736

  16. Anal Canal Carcinoma in a Child With Disorders of Sex Development.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshihiko; Horikawa, Reiko; Masaki, Hidekazu; Yoshioka, Takako; Matsumoto, Kimikazu; Kanamori, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal in children is rare. To date, the etiology and outcome of this condition have been not fully understood. Here, we report an 11-year-old child with anal canal cancer who had concomitant disorders of sex development. Radiotherapy followed by salvage surgery achieved disease-free survival of 3 years. Since overexpression of cell cycle regulatory protein p16 was immunohistochemically evident in tumor tissue, human papillomavirus infection was considered as a causative factor in the carcinogenesis. PMID:27037640

  17. Boys and girls on the playground: sex differences in social development are not stable across early childhood.

    PubMed

    Barbu, Stéphanie; Cabanes, Guénaël; Le Maner-Idrissi, Gaïd

    2011-01-01

    Sex differences in human social behaviors and abilities have long been a question of public and scientific interest. Females are usually assumed to be more socially oriented and skillful than males. However, despite an extensive literature, the very existence of sex differences remains a matter of discussion while some studies found no sex differences whereas others reported differences that were either congruent or not with gender stereotypes. Moreover, the magnitude, consistency and stability across time of the differences remain an open question, especially during childhood. As play provides an excellent window into children's social development, we investigated whether and how sex differences change in social play across early childhood. Following a cross-sectional design, 164 children aged from 2 to 6 years old, divided into four age groups, were observed during outdoor free play at nursery school. We showed that sex differences are not stable over time evidencing a developmental gap between girls and boys. Social and structured forms of play emerge systematically earlier in girls than in boys leading to subsequent sex differences in favor of girls at some ages, successively in associative play at 3-4 years, cooperative play at 4-5 years, and social interactions with peers at 5-6 years. Preschool boys also display more solitary play than preschool girls, especially when young. Nevertheless, while boys catch up and girls move on towards more complex play, sex differences in social play patterns are reversed in favor of boys at the following ages, such as in associative play at 4-5 years and cooperative play at 5-6 years. This developmental perspective contributes to resolve apparent discrepancies between single-snapshot studies. A better understanding of the dynamics of sex differences in typical social development should also provide insights into atypical social developments which exhibit sex differences in prevalence, such as autism. PMID:21297987

  18. Electron beam irradiation induces abnormal development and the stabilization of p53 protein of American serpentine leafminer, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Hyun-Na; Yun, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Changmann; Kim, Gil-Hah

    2012-01-01

    The American serpentine leafminer fly, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), is one of the most destructive polyphagous pests worldwide. In this study, we determined electron beam doses for inhibition of normal development of the leaf miner and investigated the effect of electron beam irradiation on DNA damage and p53 stability. Eggs (0-24 h old), larvae (2nd instar), puparia (0-24 h old after pupariation) and adults (24 h after emergence) were irradiated with increasing doses of electron beam irradiation (six levels between 30 and 200 Gy). At 150 Gy, the number of adults that developed from irradiated eggs, larvae and puparia was lower than in the untreated control. Fecundity and egg hatchability decreased depending on the doses applied. Reciprocal crosses between irradiated and unirradiated flies demonstrated that males were more radiotolerant than females. Adult longevity was not affected in all stages. The levels of DNA damage in L. trifolii adults were evaluated using the alkaline comet assay. Our results indicate that electron beam irradiation increased levels of DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, low doses of electron beam irradiation led to the rapid appearance of p53 protein within 6 h; however, it decreased after exposure to high doses (150 Gy and 200 Gy). These results suggest that electron beam irradiation induced not only abnormal development and reproduction but also p53 stability caused by DNA damage in L. trifolii. We conclude that a minimum dose of 150 Gy should be sufficient for female sterilization of L. trifolii.

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor-deficient mice develop aggressiveness and hyperphagia in conjunction with brain serotonergic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, W. Ernest; Mamounas, Laura A.; Ricaurte, George A.; Coppola, Vincenzo; Reid, Susan W.; Bora, Susan H.; Wihler, Cornelia; Koliatsos, Vassilis E.; Tessarollo, Lino

    1999-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has trophic effects on serotonergic (5-HT) neurons in the central nervous system. However, the role of endogenous BDNF in the development and function of these neurons has not been established in vivo because of the early postnatal lethality of BDNF null mice. In the present study, we use heterozygous BDNF+/− mice that have a normal life span and show that these animals develop enhanced intermale aggressiveness and hyperphagia accompanied by significant weight gain in early adulthood; these behavioral abnormalities are known to correlate with 5-HT dysfunction. Forebrain 5-HT levels and fiber density in BDNF+/− mice are normal at an early age but undergo premature age-associated decrements. However, young adult BDNF+/− mice show a blunted c-fos induction by the specific serotonin releaser-uptake inhibitor dexfenfluramine and alterations in the expression of several 5-HT receptors in the cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. The heightened aggressiveness can be ameliorated by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. Our results indicate that endogenous BDNF is critical for the normal development and function of central 5-HT neurons and for the elaboration of behaviors that depend on these nerve cells. Therefore, BDNF+/− mice may provide a useful model to study human psychiatric disorders attributed to dysfunction of serotonergic neurons. PMID:10611369

  20. Coming of Age in the Kisspeptin Era: Sex differences, Development, and Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Kauffman, Alexander S.

    2010-01-01

    The status of the neuroendocrine reproductive axis differs dramatically between early development, puberty, and various stages of adulthood, and also differs in several critical ways between the sexes, including its earlier pubertal activation in females than males and the presence of neural circuitry that generates preovulatory hormone surges in females but not males. The reproductive axis is controlled by various hormonal and neural pathways that converge upon forebrain gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, and many of the critical age and sex differences in the reproductive axis likely reflect differences in the “upstream” circuits and factors that regulate the GnRH system. Recently, the neural kisspeptin system has been implicated as an important regulator of GnRH neurons. Here I discuss the evidence supporting a critical role of kisspeptin signaling at different stages of life, including early postnatal and pubertal development, as well as in adulthood, focusing primarily on information gleaned from mammalian studies. I also evaluate key aspects of sexual differentiation and development of the brain as it relates to the Kiss1 system, with special emphasis on rodents. In addition to discussing recent advances in the field of kisspeptin biology, this paper will highlight a number of unanswered questions and future challenges for kisspeptin investigators, and will stress the importance of studying the kisspeptin system in both males and females, as well as in multiple species. PMID:20083160

  1. Genital surgery for disorders of sex development: implementing a shared decision-making approach.

    PubMed

    Karkazis, Katrina; Tamar-Mattis, Anne; Kon, Alexander A

    2010-08-01

    Ongoing controversy surrounds early genital surgery for children with disorders of sex development, making decisions about these procedures extraordinarily complex. Professional organizations have encouraged healthcare providers to adopt shared decision-making due to its broad potential to improve the decision-making process, perhaps most so when data are lacking, when there is no clear "best-choice" treatment, when decisions involve more than one choice, where each choice has both advantages and disadvantages, and where the ranking of options depends heavily on the decision-maker's values. We present a 6-step model for shared decision-making in decisions about genital surgery for disorders of sex development: (1) Set the stage and develop an appropriate team; (2) Establish preferences for information and roles in decision-making; (3) Perceive and address emotions; (4) Define concerns and values; (5) Identify options and present evidence; and (6) Share responsibility for making a decision. As long as controversy persists regarding surgery for DSD, an SDM process can facilitate the increased sharing of relevant information essential for making important health care decisions. PMID:21073122

  2. Novel Associations in Disorders of Sex Development: Findings From the I-DSD Registry

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Kathryn; Bryce, Jillian; Jiang, Jipu; Rodie, Martina; Sinnott, Richard; Alkhawari, Mona; Arlt, Wiebke; Audi, Laura; Balsamo, Antonio; Bertelloni, Silvano; Cools, Martine; Darendeliler, Feyza; Drop, Stenvert; Ellaithi, Mona; Guran, Tulay; Hiort, Olaf; Holterhus, Paul-Martin; Hughes, Ieuan; Krone, Nils; Lisa, Lidka; Morel, Yves; Soder, Olle; Wieacker, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Context: The focus of care in disorders of sex development (DSD) is often directed to issues related to sex and gender development. In addition, the molecular etiology remains unclear in the majority of cases. Objective: To report the range of associated conditions identified in the international DSD (I-DSD) Registry. Design, Setting, and Patients: Anonymized data were extracted from the I-DSD Registry for diagnosis, karyotype, sex of rearing, genetic investigations, and associated anomalies. If necessary, clarification was sought from the reporting clinician. Results: Of 649 accessible cases, associated conditions occurred in 168 (26%); 103 (61%) cases had one condition, 31 (18%) had two conditions, 20 (12%) had three conditions, and 14 (8%) had four or more conditions. Karyotypes with most frequently reported associations included 45,X with 6 of 8 affected cases (75%), 45,X/46,XY with 19 of 42 cases (45%), 46,XY with 112 of 460 cases (24%), and 46,XX with 27 of 121 cases (22%). In the 112 cases of 46,XY DSD, the commonest conditions included small for gestational age in 26 (23%), cardiac anomalies in 22 (20%), and central nervous system disorders in 22 (20%), whereas in the 27 cases of 46,XX DSD, skeletal and renal anomalies were commonest at 12 (44%) and 8 (30%), respectively. Of 170 cases of suspected androgen insensitivity syndrome, 19 (11%) had reported anomalies and 9 of these had confirmed androgen receptor mutations. Conclusions: Over a quarter of the cases in the I-DSD Registry have an additional condition. These associations can direct investigators toward novel genetic etiology and also highlight the need for more holistic care of the affected person. PMID:24302751

  3. Development of Methods of Genotyping Sex for use in Endocrine Disruption Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting compounds have been shown to completely sex reverse both male and female individuals in amphibian, avian, fish, invertebrate, and reptile species. In many cases these sex-reversed individuals are morphologically indistinguishable from normal individuals. De...

  4. Aplastic Anemia in Two Patients with Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Rush, Eric T; Schaefer, G Bradley; Sanger, Warren G; Coccia, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome aneuploidies range in incidence from rather common to exceedingly rare and have a variable phenotype. We report 2 patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies who developed severe aplastic anemia requiring treatment. The first patient had tetrasomy X (48,XXXX) and presented at 9 years of age, and the second patient had trisomy X (47,XXX) and presented at 5 years of age. Although aplastic anemia has been associated with other chromosomal abnormalities, sex chromosome abnormalities have not been traditionally considered a risk factor for this condition. A review of the literature reveals that at least one other patient with a sex chromosome aneuploidy (45,X) has suffered from aplastic anemia and that other autosomal chromosomal anomalies have been described. Despite the uncommon nature of each condition, it is possible that the apparent association is coincidental. A better understanding of the genetic causes of aplastic anemia remains important. PMID:26571231

  5. Sperm exposure to carbon-based nanomaterials causes abnormalities in early development of purple sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus).

    PubMed

    Mesarič, Tina; Sepčić, Kristina; Drobne, Damjana; Makovec, Darko; Faimali, Marco; Morgana, Silvia; Falugi, Carla; Gambardella, Chiara

    2015-06-01

    We examined egg fertilisation in purple sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus) after sperm exposure to carbon-based nanomaterials, carbon black (CB) and graphene oxide (GO), from 0.0001 mg/L to 1.0mg/L. Gastrula stage embryos were investigated for acetylcholinesterase and propionylcholinesterase activities, and their morphological characteristics. Plutei were analysed for morphological abnormalities, with emphasis on skeletal rod formation. Egg fertilisation was significantly affected by CB, at all concentrations tested. Loss of cell adhesion at the gastrula surface was observed in eggs fertilised with sperm treated with CB. However, concentration-dependent morphological anomalies were observed in the gastrulae and plutei formed after sperm exposure to either CB or GO. The activities of both cholinesterases decreased in the gastrulae, although not in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects appear to arise from physical interactions between these carbon-based nanomaterials and the sperm, whereby nanomaterials attached to the sperm surface interfere with fertilisation, which leads to disturbances in the signalling pathways of early embryonic development. Reduced cholinesterase activity in gastrulae from eggs fertilised with nanomaterial-treated sperm confirms involvement of the cholinergic system in early sea urchin development, including skeletogenesis. PMID:25897690

  6. Blocking Endogenous Leukemia Inhibitory Factor During Placental Development in Mice Leads to Abnormal Placentation and Pregnancy Loss

    PubMed Central

    Winship, Amy; Correia, Jeanne; Krishnan, Tara; Menkhorst, Ellen; Cuman, Carly; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Nicola, Nicos A.; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2015-01-01

    The placenta forms the interface between the maternal and fetal circulation and is critical for the establishment of a healthy pregnancy. Specialized trophoblast cells derived from the embryonic trophectoderm play a pivotal role in the establishment of the placenta. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is one of the predominant cytokines present in the placenta during early pregnancy. LIF has been shown to regulate trophoblast adhesion and invasion in vitro, however its precise role in vivo is unknown. We hypothesized that LIF would be required for normal placental development in mice. LIF and LIFRα were immunolocalized to placental trophoblasts and fetal vessels in mouse implantation sites during mid-gestation. Temporally blocking LIF action during specific periods of placental development via intraperitoneal administration of our specific LIFRα antagonist, PEGLA, resulted in abnormal placental trophoblast and vascular morphology and reduced activated STAT3 but not ERK. Numerous genes regulating angiogenesis and oxidative stress were altered in the placenta in response to LIF inhibition. Pregnancy viability was also significantly compromised in PEGLA treated mice. Our data suggest that LIF plays an important role in placentation in vivo and the maintenance of healthy pregnancy. PMID:26272398

  7. Sex-Role Development and Parental Expectations among Disturbed Adolescent Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Arnold; And Others

    1975-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the sex-linked personality traits of adolescents referred to out-patient clinics for a variety of psychological problems, the sex-linked personality traits of their parents, and the sex-linked personality characteristics that the parents of these adolescents would ideally like for their sons. (Author/RK)

  8. The Development of Sex-Gender Constancy Among Children in Four Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munroe, Ruth H.; Munroe, Robert L.

    The study examines the acquisition of gender constancy in children as it relates to cultural, socioenvironmental, or individual differences. Gender constancy refers to the stages from simple identification of biological sex of self and others, to the understanding that one's sex is stable over time, and to comprehension of one's sex as consistent…

  9. A Guide for Vocational Education Sex Equity Personnel. Research and Development Series No. 143.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vetter, Louise; And Others

    This training package is designed to assist sex equity personnel in implementing the Education Amendments of 1976. Chapter 1 examines the sex equity problem as it relates to vocational education. Chapter 2 discusses the concepts of program management and change agents in relation to the functions of the job of sex equity personnel. Chapter 3…

  10. Development and Refinement of a Measure of Attitudes toward Sex Offender Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wnuk, Dorota; Chapman, Jason E; Jeglic, Elizabeth L.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years public attitudes toward sex offenders have become increasingly punitive. Consequently, new legislation pertaining to the sentencing and treatment of convicted sex offenders has been focused on containment and monitoring rather than rehabilitation. However, research suggests that treatment programs for sex offenders are effective in…