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Sample records for abnormal sex development

  1. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Sex differences in abnormal white matter development associated with conduct disorder in children.

    PubMed

    Decety, Jean; Yoder, Keith J; Lahey, Benjamin B

    2015-08-30

    Associations between white matter pathway abnormalities and antisocial personality disorder in adults are well replicated, and there is some evidence for an association of white matter abnormalities with conduct disorder (CD) in adolescents. In this study, white matter maturation using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was examined in 110 children aged 10.0 ± 0.8 years selected to vary widely in their numbers of CD symptoms. The results replicated age-related increases in fractional anisotropy (FA) found in previous studies. There was not a significant association between the number of CD symptoms and FA, but CD symptoms were found to be significantly associated with greater axial and radial diffusivity in a broad range of white matter tracts, particularly in girls. In complementary analyses, there were similar significant differences in axial and radial diffusivity between children who met diagnostic criteria for CD and healthy children with no symptoms of CD, particularly in girls. Brain structural abnormalities may contribute to the emergence of CD in childhood, perhaps playing a greater role in girls. PMID:26195297

  3. Abnormal sex-duct development in female moles: the role of anti-Müllerian hormone and testosterone.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Federico; Barrionuevo, Francisco J; Berta, Philippe; Ortega, Esperanza; Burgos, Miguel; Jiménez, Rafael

    2003-09-01

    We have performed a morphological, hormonal and molecular study of the development of the sex ducts in the mole Talpa occidentalis. Females develop bilateral ovotestes with a functional ovarian portion and disgenic testicular tissue. The Müllerian ducts develop normally in females and their regression is very fast in males, suggesting a powerful action of the anti-Müllerian hormone in the mole. RT-PCR demonstrated that the gene governing this hormone begins to be expressed in males coinciding with testis differentiation, and expression continues until shortly after birth. Immunohistochemical studies showed that expression occurs in the Sertoli cells of testes. No expression was detected in females. Wolffian duct development was normal in males and degenerate in prenatal females, but developmental recovery after birth gave rise to the formation of rudimentary epididymides. This event coincides in time with increasing serum testosterone levels and Leydig cell differentiation in the female gonad, thus suggesting that testosterone produced by the ovotestes is responsible for masculinisation of female moles. During postnatal development, serum testosterone concentrations decreased in males but increased in females, thus approaching the levels that adult males and females have during the non-breeding season. PMID:14584782

  4. Cognitive and Academic Skills in Children with Sex Chromosome Abnormalities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Bruce G.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Follows 46 unselected children with various sex chromosome abnormalities using intellectual, language, and achievement testing. Notes that, although most children were not mentally retarded, most received special education help. Finds support for the inference that learning disorders were genetically mediated in this group. (RS)

  5. Abnormal sex ratios in human populations: Causes and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, Therese; Xing, Zhu Wei

    2006-01-01

    In the absence of manipulation, both the sex ratio at birth and the population sex ratio are remarkably constant in human populations. Small alterations do occur naturally; for example, a small excess of male births has been reported to occur during and after war. The tradition of son preference, however, has distorted these natural sex ratios in large parts of Asia and North Africa. This son preference is manifest in sex-selective abortion and in discrimination in care practices for girls, both of which lead to higher female mortality. Differential gender mortality has been a documented problem for decades and led to reports in the early 1990s of 100 million “missing women” across the developing world. Since that time, improved health care and conditions for women have resulted in reductions in female mortality, but these advances have now been offset by a huge increase in the use of sex-selective abortion, which became available in the mid-1980s. Largely as a result of this practice, there are now an estimated 80 million missing females in India and China alone. The large cohorts of “surplus” males now reaching adulthood are predominantly of low socioeconomic class, and concerns have been expressed that their lack of marriageability, and consequent marginalization in society, may lead to antisocial behavior and violence, threatening societal stability and security. Measures to reduce sex selection must include strict enforcement of existing legislation, the ensuring of equal rights for women, and public awareness campaigns about the dangers of gender imbalance. PMID:16938885

  6. 46,XY disorders of sex development (DSD).

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho; Domenice, Sorahia; Arnhold, Ivo J P; Costa, Elaine M F

    2009-02-01

    The term disorders of sex development (DSD) includes congenital conditions in which development of chromosomal, gonadal or anatomical sex is atypical. Mutations in genes present in X, Y or autosomal chromosomes can cause abnormalities of testis determination or disorders of sex differentiation leading to 46,XY DSD. Detailed clinical phenotypes allow the identification of new factors that can alter the expression or function of mutated proteins helping to understand new undisclosed biochemical pathways. In this review we present an update on 46,XY DSD aetiology, diagnosis and treatment based on extensive review of the literature and our three decades of experience with these patients. PMID:18811725

  7. Limb malformations and abnormal sex hormone concentrations in frogs.

    PubMed Central

    Sower, S A; Reed, K L; Babbitt, K J

    2000-01-01

    Declines in amphibian populations, and amphibians with gross malformations, have prompted concern regarding the biological status of many anuran species. A survey of bullfrogs, Rana catesbeiana, and green frogs, Rana clamitans, conducted in central and southern New Hampshire showed malformed frogs at 81% of the sites sampled (13 of 16 sites). Brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and the synthesis of androgens and estradiol, hormones essential to reproductive processes, were measured from limb-malformed and normal (no limb malformation) frogs. Normal frogs had significantly higher concentrations (nearly 3-fold) of in vitro produced androgens and of brain GnRH than malformed frogs. Because most malformations are thought to occur during development, we propose that environmental factors or endocrine-disrupting chemicals that may cause developmental abnormalities also act during early development to ultimately cause abnormally reduced GnRH and androgen production in adult frogs. The consequences of reduced GnRH and androgens on anuran reproductive behavior and population dynamics are unknown but certainly may be profound and warrant further research. PMID:11102301

  8. Head circumference and IQ of children with sex chromosome abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ratcliffe, S G; Masera, N; Pan, H; McKie, M

    1994-06-01

    At all ages XXX girls had significantly smaller head circumferences than control girls. Their IQ deficit was 24 points and IQ at age seven correlated significantly with head circumference at birth. In XXY boys, head circumference was significantly reduced at birth and up to nine years of age. The XXY boys' IQ deficit was 22 points, but IQ did not correlate with head circumference, as reductions in the two parameters did not always occur in tandem. The ratio of height-to-head circumference differed most in this group and could be useful in clinical recognition of this condition. XYY boys' head size did not differ from controls, despite their greater height, lower IQ scores indicating an adverse effect of an additional Y chromosome on brain development. The major factor affecting IQ outcome in the cohort was abnormal karyotype, with smaller effects from social class and head growth. PMID:8005365

  9. Non-invasive prenatal testing for sex chromosome abnormalities: a source of confusion.

    PubMed

    Kalafat, Erkan; Seval, Mehmet Murat; Turgay, Batuhan; Koç, Acar

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free fetal DNA has received significant attention for the purposes of prenatal genetic testing in the past decade. Fetal DNA testing is a new method and promising for many applications such as aneuploidy screening, prenatal diagnosis, prediction of preeclampsia and more. A 37-year-old primigravida, with a pregnancy conceived by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), was offered non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) due to advanced maternal age. NIPT performed at 23 weeks' gestation reported a diagnosis of monosomy X. She was offered an amniocentesis, which revealed a euploid fetus with no sex chromosome abnormalities. Even with single nucleotide polymorphism-based NIPT, positive predictive value for detection of sex chromosome abnormalities is around 50%. Positive results of NIPT should be heeded with caution and an invasive diagnostic procedure should be performed, especially for rare chromosomal abnormalities and sex chromosome abnormalities where NIPT performs subpar compared to its performance for detection of trisomy 21. PMID:25631759

  10. Behavioral consequences of abnormal cortical development: insights into developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Berger-Sweeney, J; Hohmann, C F

    1997-07-01

    Cerebral cortical development occurs in precisely-timed stages that can be divided into neurogenesis, neuronal migration and neuronal differentiation. These events occur during discrete time windows that span the late prenatal and early postnatal periods in both rodents and primates, including humans. Insults at particular developmental stages can lead to distinctive cortical abnormalities including cortical hypoplasia (reduced cell number), cortical ectopias (abnormalities in migration) and cortical dysplasias (abnormalities in the shapes or numbers of dendrites). In this review, we examine some of the most extensively-studied animal models of disrupted stages of cortical development and we compare long-term anatomical, neurochemical, and behavior abnormalities in these models. The behavioral abnormalities in these models range from alterations in simple motor behaviors to food hoarding and maternal behaviors as well as cognitive behaviors. Although we examine concisely animal models of cortical hypoplasia and cortical ectopias, we focus here on developmental manipulations that affect cortical differentiation, particularly, those that interrupt the normal ontogeny of the neurotransmitter-defined cortical afferent systems: norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine and acetylcholine. All of these afferents presumably play a critical role in the maturation of their cortical targets; the timing of the afferents' entry into the cortex and their effects on their cortical targets, however, are different. We, therefore, compare the specific anatomical, neurochemical and behavioral effects of manipulations of the different cortical afferents. Because of the considerable evidence that cortical development proceeds differently in the two sexes, when data are available, we address whether perinatal insults differentially affect the sexes. Finally, we discuss how these developmental studies provide insights into cellular and neurochemical correlates of behavioral functional abnormalities and the relevance of these data to understanding developmental disabilities in humans. PMID:9134147

  11. Developmental abnormalities of the gonad and abnormal sex hormone concentrations in juvenile alligators from contaminated and control lakes in Florida.

    PubMed Central

    Guillette, L J; Gross, T S; Masson, G R; Matter, J M; Percival, H F; Woodward, A R

    1994-01-01

    The reproductive development of alligators from a contaminated and a control lake in central Florida was examined. Lake Apopka is adjacent to an EPA Superfund site, listed due to an extensive spill of dicofol and DDT or its metabolites. These compounds can act as estrogens. Contaminants in the lake also have been derived from extensive agricultural activities around the lake that continue today and a sewage treatment facility associated with the city of Winter Garden, Florida. We examined the hypothesis that an estrogenic contaminant has caused the current failure in recruitment of alligators on Lake Apopka. Supporting data include the following: At 6 months of age, female alligators from Lake Apopka had plasma estradiol-17 beta concentrations almost two times greater than normal females from the control lake, Lake Woodruff. The Apopka females exhibited abnormal ovarian morphology with large numbers of polyovular follicles and polynuclear oocytes. Male juvenile alligators had significantly depressed plasma testosterone concentrations comparable to levels observed in normal Lake Woodruff females but more than three times lower than normal Lake Woodruff males. Additionally, males from Lake Apopka had poorly organized testes and abnormally small phalli. The differences between lakes and sexes in plasma hormone concentrations of juvenile alligators remain even after stimulation with luteinizing hormone. Our data suggest that the gonads of juveniles from Lake Apopka have been permanently modified in ovo, so that normal steroidogenesis is not possible, and thus normal sexual maturation is unlikely. Images p680-a Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 3. C Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 4. C Figure 4. D Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 5. C PMID:7895709

  12. How Sex Attitudes Develop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnstein, Helene S.

    1976-01-01

    Excerpt from "The Roots of Love" (Helene S. Arnstein, 1975). Book is concerned with feelings that are part of child's developmental stages. Included in excerpt are: genital self-discovery, masturbation, discovery of sex differences, and birth fantasies. Stresses importance of parent's feelings which are communicated to child.

  13. X Chromosome Abnormalities and Cognitive Development: Implications for Understanding Normal Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walzer, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Argues that knowledge from studies of individuals with sex chromosome abnormalities can further understanding of aspects of normal human development. Studies of XO girls, XXY boys, XXX girls, and males with a fragile X chromosome are summarized to demonstrate how results contribute to knowledge about normal cognitive development and about…

  14. X Chromosome Abnormalities and Cognitive Development: Implications for Understanding Normal Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walzer, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Argues that knowledge from studies of individuals with sex chromosome abnormalities can further understanding of aspects of normal human development. Studies of XO girls, XXY boys, XXX girls, and males with a fragile X chromosome are summarized to demonstrate how results contribute to knowledge about normal cognitive development and about

  15. Gonadal and Sex Differentiation Abnormalities of Dogs and Cats

    PubMed Central

    Meyers-Wallen, V.N.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular steps in normal sexual development were largely discovered by studying patients and animal models with disorders of sexual development (DSD). Although several types of DSD have been reported in the cat and dog, which are often strikingly similar to human DSD, these have been infrequently utilized to contribute to our knowledge of mammalian sexual development. Canine and feline cases of DSD with sufficient evidence to be considered as potential models are summarized in this report. The consensus DSD terminology, and reference to previous terminology, is used to foster adoption of a common nomenclature that will facilitate communication and collaboration between veterinarians, physicians, and researchers. To efficiently utilize these unique resources as molecular tools continue to improve, it will be helpful to deposit samples from valuable cases into repositories where they are available to contribute to our understanding of sexual development, and thus improve human and animal health. PMID:22005097

  16. Comparison of Abnormal Cervical Cytology from HIV Positive Women, Female Sex Workers and General Population

    PubMed Central

    Vafaei, Homeira; Asadi, Nasrin; Foroughinia, Leila; Salehi, Alireza; Kuhnavard, Safieh; Akbarzadeh, Mojgan; Ravanbod, Hamid Reza; Mohamadalian, Ferdos; Kasraeian, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background Sex workers and HIV seropositive women are at high risk of abnormal cervical cytology. The objective of this study was to compare the cervical cytology among three groups of women: active sex workers, HIV-infected women, and general population in Iran. Methods This was a cross-sectional study performed in Hazrat Zeinab, Lavan clinics and drop in center (DIC) in Shiraz, Iran. This study was performed from October 2009 to October 2011. A total of 266 patients were assigned into three groups: sex-workers (85), HIV positive patients (100), and general population (81). Pap smear was performed for all participants from the exocervix and endocervix, using a plastic Ayres’s spatula and cytobrush. The samples were sent to a pathology center, using a liquid-based media.  Results The risk of cervical infection in sex workers and HIV positive women was greater than the general population (OR=5.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]:2.24, 13.40), (OR=3.71, 95% CI:1.52, 9.09), respectively. The frequency of abnormal cervical cytology in the HIV positive and sex worker groups was higher than the general population (OR=6. 76, 95% CI:2.25, 20.32), (OR=3. 80, 95% CI:1.19, 12.07), respectively. Low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) were associated with CD4 cell count<200Í106/L, P=0.021 and P<0.001, respectively. Conclusion Vaginal infections were seen more often in the sex worker group, and abnormal cervical cytology was greater in the HIV positive group. PMID:26005687

  17. Cytogenetic studies of 1232 patients with different sexual development abnormalities from the Sultanate of Oman.

    PubMed

    Al-Alawi, Intisar; Goud, Tadakal Mallana; Al-Harasi, Salma; Rajab, Anna

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate cytogenetic findings in Omani patients who had been referred for suspicion of sex chromosome abnormalities that resulted in different clinical disorders. Furthermore, it sought to examine the frequency of chromosomal anomalies in these patients and to compare the obtained results with those reported elsewhere. Cytogenetic analysis was performed on 1232 cases with variant characteristics of sexual development disorders who had been referred to the cytogenetic department, National Genetic Centre, Ministry of Health, from different hospitals in the Sultanate of Oman between 1999 and 2014. The karyotype results demonstrated chromosomal anomalies in 24.2% of the cases, where 67.5% of abnormalities were identified in referral females, whereas only 32.6% were in referral males. Of all sex chromosome anomalies detected, Turner syndrome was the most frequent (38.2%) followed by Klinefelter syndrome (24.9%) and XY phenotypic females (16%). XXX syndrome and XX phenotypic males represented 6.8% and 3.8% of all sex chromosome anomalies, respectively. Cytogenetic analysis of patients referred with various clinical suspicions of chromosomal abnormalities revealed a high rate of chromosomal anomalies. This is the first broad cytogenetic study reporting combined frequencies of sex chromosome anomalies in sex development disorders in Oman. PMID:26706459

  18. Abnormal Cingulum Bundle Development in Autism: A Probabilistic Tractography Study

    PubMed Central

    Ikuta, Toshikazu; Shafritz, Keith M.; Bregman, Joel; Peters, Bart; Gruner, Patricia; Malhotra, Anil K.; Szeszko, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    There is now considerable evidence that white matter abnormalities play a role in the neurobiology of autism. Little research has been directed, however, at understanding (a)typical white matter development in autism and how this relates to neurocognitive impairments observed in the disorder. In this study we used probabilistic tractography to identify the cingulum bundle in 21 adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and 21 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. We investigated group differences in the relationships between age and fractional anisotropy, a putative measure of white matter integrity, within the cingulum bundle. Moreover, in a preliminary investigation, we examined the relationship between cingulum fractional anisotropy and executive functioning using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). The ASD participants demonstrated significantly lower fractional anisotropy within the cingulum bundle compared to the typically developing volunteers. There was a significant group-by-age interaction such that the ASD group did not show the typical age-associated increases in fractional anisotropy observed among healthy individuals. Moreover, lower fractional anisotropy within the cingulum bundle was associated with worse BRIEF behavioral regulation index scores in the ASD group. The current findings implicate a dysregulation in cingulum bundle white matter development occurring in late adolescence and early adulthood in autism spectrum disorder, and suggest that greater disturbances in this trajectory are associated with executive dysfunction in ASD. PMID:24231056

  19. Sex hormone replacement in disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Wiebke; Bertelloni, Silvano

    2014-01-01

    People with disorders of sex development (DSD) may have impaired sex steroid production or their gonads removed before, during or after adolescence, thus requiring hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to induce puberty and/or maintain secondary sexual characteristics, to optimize bone health, and to promote physical and social well-being. Oestrogens are usually used for this purpose in persons reared as females (eventually combined with progestins if a uterus is present) and androgens in those reared as males. An alternative therapy for women with ascertained complete androgen insensitivity syndrome could be testosterone, because this is the main sex steroid hormone secreted by their gonads, but this approach remains to be better explored. Few sound evidence-based data are available to guide HRT administration at puberty and in adulthood in individuals with DSD, but recent data and new formulations may give better perspectives for the future. PMID:25247652

  20. Sex Differences in Intellectual and Ego Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alishio, Kip C.; Schilling, Karen Maitland

    Perry's scheme of intellectual and ethical development was examined for sex differences with respect to content areas for which sex differences have elsewhere been suggested: occupational choice, interpersonal relationships, and sexual identity. In addition, the content area religion and ego development, as measured by Loevinger's sentence…

  1. Human papillomavirus prevalence, cervical abnormalities and risk factors among female sex workers in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Brown, B; Blas, M M; Cabral, A; Byraiah, G; Guerra-Giraldez, C; Sarabia-Vega, V; Carcamo, C; Gravitt, P E; Halsey, N A

    2015-01-01

    Summary Female sex workers (FSWs) are at high risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Questionnaires were administered to 200 FSWs aged 1826 years in Lima, Peru, to gather risk behaviours, and cervical swab samples were collected for Pap smears and HPV DNA testing as part of a longitudinal study. Participants reported a median of 120 clients in the past month, and 99.2% reported using condoms with clients. The prevalence of any HPV in cervical samples was 66.8%; 34 (17.1%) participants had prevalent HPV 16 or 18, and 92 (46.2%) had one or more oncogenic types. Fifteen women had abnormal Pap smears, 13 of which were HPV DNA positive. Fewer years since first sex was associated with oncogenic HPV prevalence in a model adjusted for previous sexually transmitted infection (STI) status and condom use with partners (prevalence ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.600.97). Our data confirm the high rates of HPV transmission among FSWs in Peru, highlighting the need for early and effective strategies to prevent cervical cancer. PMID:22581946

  2. Sex ratio of congenital abnormalities in the function of maternal age: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Csermely, Gyula; Urbán, Robert; Czeizel, Andrew E; Veszprémi, Béla

    2015-05-01

    Maternal age effect is well-known in the origin of numerical chromosomal aberrations and some isolated congenital abnormalities (CAs). The sex ratio (SR), i.e. number of males divided by the number of males and females together, of most CAs deviates from the SR of newborn population (0.51). The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the possible association of maternal age with the SR of isolated CAs in a population-based large dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980-1996. First, SR of 24 CA entities/groups was estimated in 21,494 patients with isolated CA. In the next step SR of different maternal age groups was compared to the mean SR of the given CA-groups. The SR of four CA-groups showed some deviation in certain maternal age groups. Cases with anencephaly had female excess in young mothers (<25 years). Cases with skull's CAs particularly craniosynostosis had a male excess in cases born to women over 30 years. Two other CA groups (cleft lip ± palate and valvar pulmonic stenosis within the group of right-sided obstructive defect of heart) had significant deviation in SR of certain maternal age groups from the mean SR, but these deviations were not harmonized with joining age groups and thus were considered as a chance effect due to multiple testing. In conclusion, our study did not suggest that in general SR of isolated CAs might be modified by certain maternal age groups with some exception such as anencephaly and craniosynostosis. PMID:25354028

  3. Genetics Home Reference: 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development

    MedlinePlus

    ... of sex development 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Close All Description 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development is a condition in which individuals with ...

  4. Abnormal development of the human cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Squier, Waney; Jansen, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This review presents an overview of human cortical malformation based on the insights gained from examination of human fetal brains. Examination at early stages of fetal brain development allows the identification of the specific pathways which are disrupted in human cortical malformation. Detailed examination of human fetal brains in parallel with studies of genetics and animal models is leading to new concepts of cortical malformations. Here we review a range of human cortical malformations based on a simple classification according to the developmental process thought to be disrupted: neuroblast proliferation, undermigration, overmigration, cortical maturation and destructive lesions. A single case example of a dated intrauterine injury illustrates the spectrum of malformations which may result at a single period in development. The recommended methods of examination of human fetal brain are described together with some of their pitfalls. Detailed neuropathological observations indicate the need for caution in the classification of malformations; radiological findings and pathology of the mature brain do not reflect the specific disruptive pathways of cortical malformations. While many insults may lead to the same pattern of malformation, a single insult can lead to multiple patterns of malformation. Our detailed studies of the human fetal brain suggest that the interface between the meninges and the radial glial end feet may be an intriguing new focus of interest in understanding cortical development. PMID:20979584

  5. Anal cytological abnormalities and epidemiological correlates among men who have sex with men at risk for HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of anal cancer, a Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-related neoplasia, has been increasing in recent decades, mainly in men who have sex with men (MSM). Cytological changes of the anal epithelium induced by HPV can be detected through an anal pap smear. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and epidemiological correlates of anal cytological abnormalities among relatively young MSM at risk for HIV-1 infection, to help clarify whether or not this population deserves further investigation to assess the presence of anal cancer precursor lesions. Methods MSM were recruited among attendees of a large STI clinic for a HIV-1 screening program. Anal samples, collected with a Dracon swab in PreservCyt, were used both for liquid-based cytology and HPV testing by the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test. Data regarding socio-demographic characteristics and sexual behavior were collected in face-to-face interviews. Results A total of 346 MSM were recruited (median age 32 years). Overall, 72.5% of the individuals had an anal HPV infection, with 56.1% of them being infected by oncogenic HPV genotypes. Anal cytological abnormalities were found in 29.8% of the cases (16.7% ASC-US and 13.1% L-SIL). Presence of ASC-US+ was strongly associated with infection by any HPV type (OR=4.21, 95% CI: 1.97-9.23), and particularly by HPV 16 and/or 18 (OR=5.62, 95% CI: 2.33-13.81). A higher proportion of ASC-US+ was found in older MSM, in those with a higher number of lifetime partners and in those with a history of ano-genital warts. However, none of these variables or the others analyzed showed any significant association with abnormal cytological findings. Conclusions The presence of anal cytological abnormalities in about one third of the recruited MSM and their strong association with HPV infection, in particular that caused by HPV 16 and/or 18, might provide a further complement to the data that now support the introduction of HPV vaccination among MSM to protect them from the development of HPV-associated diseases. Additional studies are needed to determine whether and how screening for anal cancer precursor lesions should be performed in younger MSM. PMID:23072547

  6. Patterns of hippocampal abnormalities in malformations of cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Montenegro, M A; Kinay, D; Cendes, F; Bernasconi, A; Bernasconi, N; Coan, A C; Li, L M; Guerreiro, M M; Guerreiro, C A M; Lopes‐Cendes, I; Andermann, E; Dubeau, F; Andermann, F

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess whether different types of malformation of cortical development (MCD) are associated with specific patterns of hippocampal abnormalities. Methods A total of 122 consecutive patients with MRI diagnosis of MCD (53 males, age range 1–58 years) were included in the study. Hippocampal measurements were made on 1–3 mm coronal T1‐weighted MRIs and compared with MRIs of normal controls. Results A total of 39 patients had focal cortical dysplasia, 5 had hemimegalencephaly, 5 had lissencephaly‐agyria‐pachygyria, 11 had SLH, 11 had PNH, 12 had bilateral contiguous PNH, 5 had schizencephaly, and 34 had polymicrogyria. The frequency of hippocampal abnormalities in these patients with MCD was 29.5%. A small hippocampus was present in all types of MCD. Only patients with lissencephaly and SLH had an enlarged hippocampus. Abnormalities in hippocampal rotation and shape were present in all types of MCD; however, these predominated in PNH. None of the patients with lissencephaly‐agyria‐pachygyria or SLH had hyperintense signal on T2 or FLAIR images or abnormal hippocampal internal architecture. Conclusion A small hippocampus was present in all types of MCD; however, the classic MRI characteristics of hippocampal sclerosis were often lacking. Abnormal enlargement of the hippocampus was associated with only diffuse MCD due to abnormal neuronal migration (lissencephaly‐agyria‐pachygyria and SLH). PMID:16484646

  7. The surgical challenges of disorders of sex development (DSD).

    PubMed

    Gorduza, Daniela; Vidal, Isabelle; Birraux, Jacques; Gay, Claire-Lise; Demède, Delphine; Mure, Pierre-Yves; Mouriquand, Pierre

    2010-09-01

    Disorders of Sex Development (DSD) remain a fascinating challenge for the paediatricians, endocrinologists, biologists, psychiatrists, geneticists, radiologists, surgeons and for the whole society. This article aims at highlighting the current controversies and questions met with genital reconstruction in children born with abnormal genitalia. The main current techniques of masculinization and feminization are reviewed with their progress and their problems. The tools of decision used to assign a gender in some newborns with complex DSD are discussed showing that at the dawn of the third millenium, one still does not know why a boy is a boy, and a girl is a girl. PMID:20876944

  8. Relationship between serum sex hormones and glucose, insulin and lipid abnormalities in men with myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, G B

    1977-01-01

    Fifteen patients who had had a myocardial infarction before the age of 43 were compared with thirteen age-matched normal subjects. Twelve of the patients and three of the controls had a delayed glucose and insulin peak in the glucose and insulin areas than normal curves. When the measurements of the four patients with the largest areas under the glucose tolerance curve were separated, significant correlations were observed in the remaining patients and controls. The ratio in serum of the concentrations of estradiol-17beta to testosterone (E/T) correlated with serum glucose area (r equals + 0.69, P is less than 0.001), insulin area (r equals + 0.80, P is less than 0.001), and the ratio of insulin area to glucose area (I/G) (r equals + 0.64, P is less than 0.005) in the glucose tolerance test. Serum cholesterol concentration correlated with E/T, insulin area, and I/G, and serum triglyceride concentration correlated with glucose area, I/G, and serum cholesterol concentration. The hypothesis is presented (i) that in men who have had a myocardial infarction, an abnormality in glucose tolerance and insulin response and elevation in serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations are all part of the same defect (glucose-insulin-lipid defect), (ii) that this glucose-insulin-lipid defect when glucose intolerance is present is the "mild diabetes" commonly associated with myocardial infarction but is based on a mechanism different from that of classical diabetes, (iii) that this glucose-insulin-lipid defect is secondary to an elevation in E/T, and (iv) that an alteration in the sex hormone milieu is the major predisposing factor for myocardial infarction. PMID:193114

  9. CYTOGENETIC ABNORMALITY IN MANWider Implications of Theories of Sex Chromatin Origin

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Charles P.

    1962-01-01

    Female nuclei may be identified by means of sex chromatin. In general the number of sex chromatin bodies is one less than the number of X chromosomes. An exception to this rule is a case of sex chromatin-positive XO Turner's syndrome. This case suggests the possibility of sex chromatin-positive XY males, and it may be evidence for chromosomal differentiation. PMID:14473851

  10. Moral Development of Solo Juvenile Sex Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Vugt, Eveline; Stams, Geert Jan; Dekovic, Maja; Brugman, Daan; Rutten, Esther; Hendriks, Jan

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the moral development of solo juvenile male sex offenders (n = 20) and juvenile male non-offenders (n = 76), aged 13-19 years, from lower socioeconomic and educational backgrounds. The Moral Orientation Measure (MOM) was used to assess punishment- and victim-based moral orientation in sexual and non-sexual situations. Moral…

  11. Fertility Issues in Disorders of Sex Development.

    PubMed

    Guercio, Gabriela; Costanzo, Mariana; Grinspon, Romina P; Rey, Rodolfo A

    2015-12-01

    Fertility potential should be considered by the multidisciplinary team when addressing gender assignment, surgical management, and patient and family counselling of individuals with disorders of sex development. In 46,XY individuals, defects of gonadal differentiation or androgen or anti-Müllerian hormone synthesis or action result in incomplete or absent masculinization. In severe forms, raised as females, motherhood is possible with oocyte donation if Müllerian ducts have developed. In milder forms, raised as males, azoospermia or oligospermia are frequently found, however paternity has been reported. Most 46,XX patients with normal ovarian organogenesis are raised as females, and fertility might be possible after treatment. PMID:26568498

  12. CHRONIC PERCHLORATE EXPOSURE CAUSES MORPHOLOGICAL ABNORMALITIES IN DEVELOPING STICKLEBACK

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Richard R.; Von Hippel, Frank A.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have examined the effects of chronic perchlorate exposure during growth and development, and fewer still have analyzed the effects of perchlorate over multiple generations. We describe morphological and developmental characteristics for threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) that were spawned and raised to sexual maturity in perchlorate-treated water (G1,2003) and for their offspring (G2,2004) that were not directly treated with perchlorate. The G1,2003 displayed a variety of abnormalities, including impaired formation of calcified traits, slower growth rates, aberrant sexual development, poor survivorship, and reduced pigmentation that allowed internal organs to be visible. Yet these conditions were absent when the offspring of contaminated fish (G2,2004) were raised in untreated water, suggesting a lack of transgenerational effects and that surviving populations may be able to recover following remediation of perchlorate-contaminated sites PMID:21465539

  13. Inhibition of polyisoprenoid and glycoprotein biosynthesis causes abnormal embryonic development.

    PubMed Central

    Carson, D D; Lennarz, W J

    1979-01-01

    Compactin, a potent inhibitor of polyisoprenoid biosynthesis, induces abnormal gastrulation during sea urchin development at concentrations that have no effect on earlier embryonic development or on macromolecular synthesis. Three lines of evidence suggest that the developmental lesion caused by compactin results from inhibition of dolichol biosynthesis and a concomitant inhibition in the biosynthesis of the oligosaccharide chains of N-linked glycoproteins. (i) Embryos cultured in the presence of compactin gastrulate normally when supplemented with dolichol alone, whereas supplementation with cholesterol or coenzyme Q or both does not prevent the compactin-induced developmental lesion. (ii) Exogenously supplemented [3H]dolichol is incorporated into a compound with the chromatographic properties of oligosaccharide-pyrophosphoryldolichol. (iii) Embryos cultured in the presence of compactin exhibit a decreased capacity to synthesize mannose-labeled glycolipids and N-linked glycoproteins. This decrease in synthesis is abolished if the embryos are cultured in the presence of dolichol along with compactin. Images PMID:293674

  14. Abnormal retinal vascular development in IL-18 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Hong; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Sassa, Yukio; Hisatomi, Toshio; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Murata, Toshinori; Akira, Shizuo; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2004-08-01

    Recent studies have indicated that interleukin 18 (IL-18) might act as either an angiogenic or an angiostatic factor, but the true function of this protein in vascular development is unclear. We therefore investigated the role of IL-18 in the formation of retinal vessels. Development of the retinal vasculature was compared in IL-18 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice at several different time points. The formation of vessels was evaluated using angiography of flat-mounted retinal samples after inoculation with fluorescein dextran. Retinal samples from both groups were also evaluated through histological examinations, and the expression of angiogenic factors was examined using the reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The capillary retinal vessels in both WT and IL-18 KO mice had reached the peripheral retina by postnatal day (P) 7. However, IL-18 KO mice showed angiectasis and vascular leakage at P7, especially in the mid-peripheral retina. These symptoms were not observed in WT mice at any stage. Histopathological analysis confirmed abnormal vascular formation in IL-18 KO mice at P14. Interestingly, these abnormalities regressed over time and had disappeared by P84. Several angiogenesis-associated factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast-growth factor (bFGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), were overexpressed in the retinas of IL-18 KO mice compared with those of WT mice at P14. Interferon-gamma was detected only in WT mouse retinas at P14. These results provide new evidence for the role of IL-18 in retinal vascular development. PMID:15122309

  15. Early estrogen exposure induces abnormal development of Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Urushitani, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Akio; Katsu, Yoshinao; Iguchi, Taisen

    2002-12-01

    Many chemicals released into the environment exhibit estrogenic activity, having the potential to disrupt development and the functioning of the endocrine system. In order to establish a model system to study the effects of such environmental chemicals on aquatic animals, we examined the effects of a natural estrogen, 17 beta-estradiol (E(2)), on early development of Fundulus heteroclitus. Embryos of F. heteroclitus were reared in seawater containing 10(-10), 10(-8), and 10(-6) M E(2) throughout the experiment. Hatching and survival rates decreased in a dose-dependent manner, and fry treated with 10(-6) M E(2) and 10(-8) M E(2) were dead by two weeks and 12 weeks after hatching, respectively. More than 85% of fry treated with 10(-8) M E(2) showed malformations: i.e., eye extrusion, crooked vertebral column, faded lateral-stripe pattern eight weeks after hatching. Body weight and head and body lengths were significantly reduced in E(2)-treated fry when compared to controls. Ossification was not completed in vertebrae, cranial bones, and other bones in fry treated with 10(-8) M E(2) even 12 weeks after hatching. Sex ratio of control fry was 57% male and 43% female, whereas fry treated with 10(-8) M E(2) were 100% female eight weeks after hatching. The present results demonstrate that exogenous estrogen induced death of embryos and fry, malformations, sex reversal, and incomplete ossification of vertebrae and cranial bones, which would result in shorter body and head lengths and in malformed vertebrae leading to a hunchback condition. PMID:12410597

  16. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Differential Mental Development of 18 Month-Old Same-Sexed and Opposite-Sexed Twins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Kathryn Norcross; Campbell, Kathleen M.

    This paper describes a study which examined the performance of 48 pairs of 18-month-old twins on the Mental Development Scale of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development to determine whether score differences would be found for the three subgroups of identical, fraternal same-sexed, and fraternal opposite-sexed twins. Of the 96 subjects, 46 (23…

  18. Genital tract abnormalities among female sex workers who douche with lemon/lime juice in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Sagay, Atiene S; Imade, Godwin E; Onwuliri, Viola; Egah, Daniel Z; Grigg, Matthew J; Musa, Jonah; Thacher, Tom D; Adisa, James O; Potts, Malcolm; Short, Roger V

    2009-03-01

    Vaginal douche products have been associated with cervical cancer. We examined female sex workers (FSWs) in Nigeria who douche with lemon or lime juice and compared the findings with that of nonusers. We obtained Pap smears and performed colposcopy of the vulva, vagina and cervix. A total of 374 FSWs comprising 81 Lemon users (LUs) and 293 non lemon users (NLUs) were examined. Their mean age was 27.8 +/- 6.7 (range 16-63) years. At colposcopy, 17 (4.5%) had genital warts [LUs 5 (6.2%); NLUs 12 (4.1%); p=0.43], 61 (16.3%) had suspected squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs) [LUs 17 (21.0%); NLUs 44 (15.0%); p=0.20] and 65 (17.4%) had other findings. Pap smear cytology showed that 87 (24.6%) had SILs [LUs 26 (33.3%); NLUs 61 (22.1%); p=0.03]. Lemon/lime use was associated with cervical dysplasia after controlling for HIV status (Adjusted OR=1.8; 95% CI, 1.0-3.0). Our data suggests an association between the practice of douching with citrus juice and cervical dysplasia. PMID:20687264

  19. Normal and abnormal spine and thoracic cage development.

    PubMed

    Canavese, Federico; Dimeglio, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Development of the spine and thoracic cage consists of a complex series of events involving multiple metabolic processes, genes and signaling pathways. During growth, complex phenomena occur in rapid succession. This succession of events, this establishment of elements, is programmed according to a hierarchy. These events are well synchronized to maintain harmonious limb, spine and thoracic cage relationships, as growth in the various body segments does not occur simultaneously at the same magnitude or rate. In most severe cases of untreated progressive early-onset spinal deformities, respiratory insufficiency and pulmonary and cardiac hypertension (cor pulmonale), which characterize thoracic insufficiency syndrome (TIS), can develop, sometimes leading to death. TIS is the inability of the thorax to ensure normal breathing. This clinical condition can be linked to costo-vertebral malformations (e.g., fused ribs, hemivertebrae, congenital bars), neuromuscular diseases (e.g., expiratory congenital hypotonia), Jeune or Jarcho-Levin syndromes or to 50% to 75% fusion of the thoracic spine before seven years of age. Complex spinal deformities alter normal growth plate development, and vertebral bodies become progressively distorted, perpetuating the disorder. Therefore, many scoliotic deformities can become growth plate disorders over time. This review aims to provide a comprehensive review of how spinal deformities can affect normal spine and thoracic cage growth. Previous conceptualizations are integrated with more recent scientific data to provide a better understanding of both normal and abnormal spine and thoracic cage growth. PMID:24147251

  20. Neurogenin 3 mediates sex chromosome effects on the generation of sex differences in hypothalamic neuronal development

    PubMed Central

    Scerbo, María J.; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Cisternas, Carla D.; Brunotto, Mabel; Arevalo, Maria A.; Garcia-Segura, Luis M.; Cambiasso, María J.

    2014-01-01

    The organizational action of testosterone during critical periods of development is the cause of numerous sex differences in the brain. However, sex differences in neuritogenesis have been detected in primary neuronal hypothalamic cultures prepared before the peak of testosterone production by fetal testis. In the present study we assessed the hypothesis of that cell-autonomous action of sex chromosomes can differentially regulate the expression of the neuritogenic gene neurogenin 3 (Ngn3) in male and female hypothalamic neurons, generating sex differences in neuronal development. Neuronal cultures were prepared from male and female E14 mouse hypothalami, before the fetal peak of testosterone. Female neurons showed enhanced neuritogenesis and higher expression of Ngn3 than male neurons. The silencing of Ngn3 abolished sex differences in neuritogenesis, decreasing the differentiation of female neurons. The sex difference in Ngn3 expression was determined by sex chromosomes, as demonstrated using the four core genotypes mouse model, in which a spontaneous deletion of the testis-determining gene Sry from the Y chromosome was combined with the insertion of the Sry gene onto an autosome. In addition, the expression of Ngn3, which is also known to mediate the neuritogenic actions of estradiol, was increased in the cultures treated with the hormone, but only in those from male embryos. Furthermore, the hormone reversed the sex differences in neuritogenesis promoting the differentiation of male neurons. These findings indicate that Ngn3 mediates both cell-autonomous actions of sex chromosomes and hormonal effects on neuritogenesis. PMID:25071448

  1. Quality of life of patients with 46,XX and 46,XY disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Rita Cassia; Inacio, Marlene; Brito, Vinicius N; Bachega, Tania A S S; Domenice, Sorahia; Arnhold, Ivo J P; Madureira, Guiomar; Gomes, Larissa; Costa, Elaine M F; Mendonca, Berenice B

    2015-02-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) result from abnormalities in the complex process of sex determination and differentiation. An important consideration to guide the assignment of social sex in newborns with ambiguous genitalia is the quality of life (QoL) of these patients in adulthood. The rarity of most DSD conditions makes it difficult to conduct a long-term follow-up of affected patients through adulthood. This review of papers on the QoL of DSD patients evaluated in developing and developed countries by qualitative and quantitative instruments revealed a large spectrum of QoL, ranging from very poor to similar to, or even better than, the normal population. A more adequate QoL was found in patients from tertiary centres, indicating that the medical care of DSD patients should be multidisciplinary and carried out by specialized teams. PMID:25040878

  2. Maternal immune activation and abnormal brain development across CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Knuesel, Irene; Chicha, Laurie; Britschgi, Markus; Schobel, Scott A; Bodmer, Michael; Hellings, Jessica A; Toovey, Stephen; Prinssen, Eric P

    2014-11-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a clear association between maternal infection and schizophrenia or autism in the progeny. Animal models have revealed maternal immune activation (mIA) to be a profound risk factor for neurochemical and behavioural abnormalities in the offspring. Microglial priming has been proposed as a major consequence of mIA, and represents a critical link in a causal chain that leads to the wide spectrum of neuronal dysfunctions and behavioural phenotypes observed in the juvenile, adult or aged offspring. Such diversity of phenotypic outcomes in the mIA model are mirrored by recent clinical evidence suggesting that infectious exposure during pregnancy is also associated with epilepsy and, to a lesser extent, cerebral palsy in children. Preclinical research also suggests that mIA might precipitate the development of Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. Here, we summarize and critically review the emerging evidence that mIA is a shared environmental risk factor across CNS disorders that varies as a function of interactions between genetic and additional environmental factors. We also review ongoing clinical trials targeting immune pathways affected by mIA that may play a part in disease manifestation. In addition, future directions and outstanding questions are discussed, including potential symptomatic, disease-modifying and preventive treatment strategies. PMID:25311587

  3. Abnormal Canine Bone Development Associated with Hypergravity Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. P.; Fisher, G. L.; McNeill, K. L.; Oyama, J.

    1979-01-01

    Chronic centrifugation of 85- to 92-day-old Beagles at 2.0 x g and 2.6 x g for 26 weeks during the time of active skeletal growth caused skeletal abnormalities in the radius and the ulna of ten of 11 dogs. The pattern of change mimicked that found in naturally occurring and experimentally induced premature distal ulnar physeal closure or delayed growth at this physis. Minimal changes in bone density were detected by sensitive photon absorptiometric techniques. Skeletal abnormalities also were found in five of the six cage-control dogs, although the run-control dogs were radiographically normal.

  4. Recent Developments in Sex Discrimination Litigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Martha M.

    This paper discusses sex discrimination as a judicial issue. Cases addressing differential treatment of men and women in the following areas are explored: student admissions practices, student athletic programs, employee pregnancy benefits and maternity leave policies, employee retirement benefits programs, and prerequisites to employment. Also…

  5. Prenatal craniofacial development: new insights on normal and abnormal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Johnston, M C; Bronsky, P T

    1995-01-01

    Technical advances are radically altering our concepts of normal prenatal craniofacial development. These include concepts of germ layer formation, the establishment of the initial head plan in the neural plate, and the manner in which head segmentation is controlled by regulatory (homeobox) gene activity in neuromeres and their derived neural crest cells. There is also a much better appreciation of ways in which new cell associations are established. For example, the associations are achieved by neural crest cells primarily through cell migration and subsequent cell interactions that regulate induction, growth, programmed cell death, etc. These interactions are mediated primarily by two groups of regulatory molecules: "growth factors" (e.g., FGF and TGF alpha) and the so-called steroid/thyroid/retinoic acid superfamily. Considerable advances have been made with respect to our understanding of the mechanisms involved in primary and secondary palate formation, such as growth, morphogenetic movements, and the fusion/merging phenomenon. Much progress has been made on the mechanisms involved in the final differentiation of skeletal tissues. Molecular genetics and animal models for human malformations are providing many insights into abnormal development. A mouse model for the fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), a mild form of holoprosencephaly, demonstrates a mid-line anterior neural plate deficiency which leads to olfactory placodes being positioned too close to the mid-line, and other secondary changes. Work on animal models for the retinoic acid syndrome (RAS) shows that there is major involvement of neural crest cells. There is also major crest cell involvement in similar syndromes, apparently including hemifacial microsomia. Later administration of retinoic acid prematurely and excessively kills ganglionic placodal cells and leads to a malformation complex virtually identical to the Treacher Collins syndrome. Most clefts of the lip and/or palate appear to have a multifactorial etiology. Genetic variations in TGF alpha s, RAR alpha s, NADH dehydrogenase, an enzyme involved in oxidative metabolism, and cytochrome P-450, a detoxifying enzyme, have been implicated as contributing genetic factors. Cigarette smoking, with the attendant hypoxia, is a probable contributing environmental factor. It seems likely that few clefts involve single major genes. In most cases, the pathogenesis appears to involve inadequate contact and/or fusion of the facial prominences or palatal shelves. Specific mutations in genes for different FGF receptor molecules have been identified for achondroplasia and Crouzon's syndrome, and in a regulatory gene (Msx2) for one type of craniosynostosis. Poorly co-ordinated control of form and size of structures, or groups of structures (e.g., teeth and jaws), by regulatory genes should do much to explain the very frequent "mismatches" found in malocclusions and other dentofacial "deformities". Future directions for research, including possibilities for prevention, are discussed. PMID:8664424

  6. Offense related characteristics and psychosexual development of juvenile sex offenders

    PubMed Central

    Hart-Kerkhoffs, Lisette 't A; Doreleijers, Theo AH; Jansen, Lucres MC; van Wijk, Anton PH; Bullens, Ruud AR

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This article reports on offense related characteristics and the psychosexual development in subgroups of juvenile sex offenders as measured by the Global Assessment Instrument for Juvenile Sex Offenders (GAIJSO). The predictive validity of these characteristics for persistent (sexual) offensive behavior in subgroups of juvenile sex offenders was investigated. Methods: One hundred seventy four sex offenders (mean age 14.9 SD 1.4) referred by the police to the Dutch Child Protection Board were examined. Offense related characteristics were assessed by means of the GAIJSO and the BARO (a global assessment tool for juvenile delinquents), and criminal careers of the subjects were ascertained from official judicial records. Results: Serious need for comprehensive diagnostics were found on the domains sexual offense and psychosexual development in juvenile sex offenders, especially in the group of child molesters. These youngsters displayed more internalizing and (psychosexual) developmental problems and their sexual offense was more alarming as compared to the other juvenile sex offender subgroups. Although one third of the juveniles had already committed one or more sex offenses prior to the index offense, at follow up (mean follow up period: 36 months SD 18 months) almost no sexual recidivism was found (0.6% of the entire sample). However, a substantial proportion of the entire sample of juvenile sex offenders showed non-sexual (55.6%) and violent recidivism (32.1%). Several predictors for a history of multiple sex offending and non-sexual recidivism were identified. Conclusion: This study revealed numerous problems in juvenile sex offenders. Assessment using the GAIJSO is helpful in order to identify indicators for extensive diagnostic assessment. In order to investigate the predictive validity for sexual reoffending a longer follow up period is necessary. PMID:19594889

  7. It's all about sex: gender, lung development and lung disease.

    PubMed

    Carey, Michelle A; Card, Jeffrey W; Voltz, James W; Arbes, Samuel J; Germolec, Dori R; Korach, Kenneth S; Zeldin, Darryl C

    2007-10-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that gender affects the incidence, susceptibility and severity of several lung diseases. Gender also influences lung development and physiology. Data from both human and animal studies indicate that sex hormones might contribute to disease pathogenesis or serve as protective factors, depending on the disease involved. In this review, the influence of gender and sex hormones on lung development and pathology will be discussed, with specific emphasis on pulmonary fibrosis, asthma and cancer. PMID:17764971

  8. Inherited structural cytogenetic abnormalities detected incidentally in fetuses diagnosed prenatally: frequency, parental-age associations, sex-ratio trends, and comparisons with rates of mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Hook, E B; Schreinemachers, D M; Willey, A M; Cross, P K

    1984-01-01

    Rates of structural chromosome abnormalities were analyzed in 24,951 fetuses studied prenatally in which there were no grounds to suspect an inherited abnormality. In about one in 200 prenatal cytogenetic diagnoses, an unexpected structural abnormality was found. The observed rate was 5.3 per 1,000, of which 1.7 per 1,000 were unbalanced and 3.6 per 1,000 balanced. The rate of inherited abnormalities was 3.1-3.7 per 1,000 (0.4-0.9 per 1,000 for unbalanced abnormalities and 2.6-2.8 per 1,000 for balanced abnormalities). The rate of mutants in this series was, by contrast, 1.6-2.2 per 1,000 (0.8-1.2 per 1,000 for unbalanced abnormalities and 0.8-1.0 per 1,000 for balanced abnormalities). The rate of balanced Robertsonian translocation carriers was 0.6 per 1,000 (about 0.25 per 1,000 for mutants and 0.35 per 1,000 for inherited abnormalities), and for other balanced abnormalities, 3.0 per 1,000 (about 0.6 per 1,000 for mutants and 2.4 per 1,000 for inherited abnormalities). The rates of unbalanced Robertsonian translocations was about 0.1 per 1,000, almost all of which were mutants. For supernumerary rearrangements, the rate was 0.9 per 1,000 (about 0.4 per 1,000 inherited and 0.5 per 1,000 mutant). The rates of all unbalanced (nonmosaic) inherited abnormalities (4.0-5.2 per 10,000) were intermediate between higher rates estimated in all conceptuses (9.1-15.8 per 10,000) and rates observed in newborns (1.5-2.5 per 10,000). This trend is probably attributable to fetal mortality associated with unbalanced rearrangements. The rates of balanced (nonmosaic) inherited abnormalities (26.0-28.0 per 10,000), however, were considerably higher than the rates in all conceptuses (13-16.7 per 10,000) or in all live births (12.2-16.0 per 10,000). The major difference was in the rate of inversions. The use of "banding" methods in the studies of amniocentesis but not in most of the live births or abortus studies probably contributes to at least some of these differences. One trend in parental age among the inherited abnormalities was noteworthy. Paternal age was elevated for inherited balanced reciprocal structural abnormalities of paternal origin but not of maternal origin. With regard to sex ratio, there was a greater proportion of females than males among the unbalanced rearrangements both inherited and mutant. There was no obvious sex difference among the balanced rearrangements. PMID:6711562

  9. The prevalence, and predictive value, of abnormal anal cytology to diagnose anal dysplasia in a population of HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Cranston, R D; Hart, S D; Gornbein, J A; Hirschowitz, S L; Cortina, G; Moe, A A

    2007-02-01

    Due to the increasing incidence of anal cancer in HIV-positive men who have sex with men, and the potential to detect and treat high-grade anal dysplasia--the putative anal cancer precursor--we have introduced an anal cytology screening service. Patients with abnormal anal cytology have follow-up high-resolution anoscopy (HRA) with biopsy of lesions clinically suspicious for high-grade dysplasia. In total, 244 men were screened and 235 (96%) of the samples were adequate for cytological interpretation using the Bethesda 2001 system. One hundred and sixty-four (67%) men had abnormal anal cytology, and 93 of them had follow-up HRA and anal biopsy. The positive predictive value for any anal cytological abnormality to predict any degree of anal dysplasia was 95.7+/-2.1%, and for any anal cytological abnormality to predict high-grade anal dysplasia was 55.9+/-5.1%. Abnormal anal cytology was highly predicative of anal dysplasia on biopsy. PMID:17331275

  10. The development of brain sex differences: a multisignaling process.

    PubMed

    Segovia, S; Guillamón, A; del Cerro, M C; Ortega, E; Pérez-Laso, C; Rodriguez-Zafra, M; Beyer, C

    1999-11-01

    In order to account for the development of sex differences in the brain, we took, as an integrative model, the vomeronasal pathway, which is involved in the control of reproductive physiology and behavior. The fact that brain sex differences take place in complex neural networks will help to develop a motivational theory of sex differences in reproductive behaviors. We also address the classic genomic actions in which three agents (the hormone, the intracellular receptor, and the transcription function) play an important role in brain differentiation, but we also point out refinements that such a theory requires if we want to account of the existence of two morphological patterns of sex differences in the brain, one in which males show greater morphological measures (neuron numbers and/or volume) than females and the opposite. Moreover, we also consider very important processes closely related to neuronal afferent input and membrane excitability for the developing of sex differences. Neurotransmission associated to metabotropic and ionotropic receptors, neurotrophic factors, neuroactive steroids that alter membrane excitability, cross-talk (and/or by-pass) phenomena, and second messenger pathways appear to be involved in the development of brain sex differences. The sexual differentiation of the brain and reproductive behavior is regarded as a cellular multisignaling process. PMID:10553691

  11. Sex determination of duck embryos: observations on syrinx development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Robert E.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Franson, J. Christian

    2013-01-01

    Ducks exhibit sexual dimorphism in vocal anatomy. Asymmetrical ossification of the syrinx (bulla syringealis) is discernable at about 10 days of age in male Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos domestica) embryos, but information is lacking on the early development of the bulla in wild ducks. To evaluate the reliability of this characteristic for sexing developing embryos, we examined the syrinx of dead embryos and compared results with molecular sexing techniques in high arctic nesting Common Eiders (Somateria mollissima). Embryos 8 days or older were accurately (100%) sexed based on the presence/absence of a bulla, 2 days earlier than Pekin duck. The use of the tracheal bulla can be a valuable technique when sex identification of embryos or young ducklings is required.

  12. Altered structure of cortical sulci in gilles de la Tourette syndrome: Further support for abnormal brain development.

    PubMed

    Muellner, Julia; Delmaire, Christine; Valabrégue, Romain; Schüpbach, Michael; Mangin, Jean-François; Vidailhet, Marie; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Hartmann, Andreas; Worbe, Yulia

    2015-04-15

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by the presence of motor and vocal tics. We hypothesized that patients with this syndrome would present an aberrant pattern of cortical formation, which could potentially reflect global alterations of brain development. Using 3 Tesla structural neuroimaging, we compared sulcal depth, opening, and length and thickness of sulcal gray matter in 52 adult patients and 52 matched controls. Cortical sulci were automatically reconstructed and identified over the whole brain, using BrainVisa software. We focused on frontal, parietal, and temporal cortical regions, in which abnormal structure and functional activity were identified in previous neuroimaging studies. Partial correlation analysis with age, sex, and treatment as covariables of noninterest was performed amongst relevant clinical and neuroimaging variables in patients. Patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome showed lower depth and reduced thickness of gray matter in the pre- and post-central as well as superior, inferior, and internal frontal sulci. In patients with associated obsessive-compulsive disorder, additional structural changes were found in temporal, insular, and olfactory sulci. Crucially, severity of tics and of obsessive-compulsive disorder measured by Yale Global Tic severity scale and Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive scale, respectively, correlated with structural sulcal changes in sensorimotor, temporal, dorsolateral prefrontal, and middle cingulate cortical areas. Patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome displayed an abnormal structural pattern of cortical sulci, which correlated with severity of clinical symptoms. Our results provide further evidence of abnormal brain development in GTS. PMID:25820811

  13. Abnormal ventricular development in preterm neonates with visually normal MRIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jie; Wang, Yalin; Lao, Yi; Ceschin, Rafael; Mi, Liang; Nelson, Marvin D.; Panigrahy, Ashok; Leporé, Natasha

    2015-12-01

    Children born preterm are at risk for a wide range of neurocognitive and neurobehavioral disorders. Some of these may stem from early brain abnormalities at the neonatal age. Hence, a precise characterization of neonatal neuroanatomy may help inform treatment strategies. In particular, the ventricles are often enlarged in neurocognitive disorders, due to atrophy of surrounding tissues. Here we present a new pipeline for the detection of morphological and relative pose differences in the ventricles of premature neonates compared to controls. To this end, we use a new hyperbolic Ricci flow based mapping of the ventricular surfaces of each subjects to the Poincaré disk. Resulting surfaces are then registered to a template, and a between group comparison is performed using multivariate tensor-based morphometry. We also statistically compare the relative pose of the ventricles within the brain between the two groups, by performing a Procrustes alignment between each subject's ventricles and an average shape. For both types of analyses, differences were found in the left ventricles between the two groups.

  14. Isolation and characterization of sex chromosome rearrangements generating male muscle dystrophy and female abnormal oogenesis in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Fujii, T; Yokoyama, T; Ninagi, O; Kakehashi, K; Obara, Y; Nenoi, M; Ishikawa, T; Mita, K; Shimada, T; Abe, H

    2007-07-01

    In deletion-mapping of W-specific RAPD (W-RAPD) markers and putative female determinant gene (Fem), we used X-ray irradiation to break the translocation-carrying W chromosome (W( Ze )). We succeeded in obtaining a fragment of the W( Ze ) chromosome designated as Ze (W), having 3 of 12 W-RAPD markers (W-Bonsai, W-Yukemuri-S, W-Yukemuri-L). Inheritance of the Ze (W) fragment by males indicates that it does not include the Fem gene. On the basis of these results, we determined the relative positions of W-Yukemuri-S and W-Yukemuri-L, and we narrowed down the region where Fem gene is located. In addition to the Ze (W) fragment, the Z chromosome was also broken into a large fragment (Z(1)) having the +( sch ) (1-21.5) and a small fragment (Z(2)) having the +( od ) (1-49.6). Moreover, a new chromosomal fragment (Ze (W)Z(2)) was generated by a fusion event between the Ze (W) and the Z(2) fragments. We analyzed the genetic behavior of the Z(1) fragment and the Ze (W)Z(2) fragment during male (Z/Z(1) Ze (W)Z(2)) and female (Z(1) Ze (W)Z(2)/W) meiosis using phenotypic markers. It was observed that the Z(1) fragment and the Z or the W chromosomes separate without fail. On the other hand, non-disjunction between the Ze (W)Z(2) fragment and the Z chromosome and also between the Ze (W)Z(2) fragment and the W chromosome occurred. Furthermore, the females (2A: Z/Ze (W)Z(2)/W) and males (2A: Z/Z(1)) resulting from non-disjunction between the Ze (W)Z(2) fragment and the W chromosome had phenotypic defects: namely, females exhibited abnormal oogenesis and males were flapless due to abnormal indirect flight muscle structure. These results suggest that Z(2) region of the Z chromosome contains dose-sensitive gene(s), which are involved in oogenesis and indirect flight muscle development. PMID:17031495

  15. Multidisciplinary care for individuals with disorders of sex development

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Lobo, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Recommendations regarding the care of individuals with disorders of sex development include that care be provided by multidisciplinary teams. This article will discuss team composition and function as well as the role of the gynecologist and barriers to such care. Recent findings Many barriers to multidisciplinary care exist, but recent reports stress the roles of different team members as well as tools for planning and implementation of such a team that may help to overcome such barriers. All current recommendations include the participation of a gynecologist in the disorders of sex development team. Gynecologists are in the unique position to continue to provide care as these individuals mature into adulthood. Summary Multidisciplinary care for patients with disorders of sex development is recommended and gynecologists provide unique expertise. PMID:25110979

  16. Contemporary issues in the management of abnormal placentation during pregnancy in developing nations: An Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Sukhwinder Kaur; Singh, Anita; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2013-01-01

    The gap between the developed and developing nations with regards to maternal mortality and morbidity may have narrowed but still a lot of dedicated work is required to bridge these differences. Obstetrical haemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal deaths in these developing nations especially in India. The most common causes of this fatal haemorrhage are the placental abnormalities which rarely get detected before delivery. Numerous factors have been incremental in the causation of this abnormal placental implantation with resultant complications. The present article is an attempt to review possible predictors of abnormal placental implantation. Also, a genuine attempt has been made to enumerate possible measures to identify the predictors of abnormal placentation during early pregnancy and their suitable prevention and management. PMID:24404455

  17. Development and Validation of Sex-Balanced Interest Inventory Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, G.R.; And Others

    This report describes the development and validation of the Unisex ACT Interest Inventory (UNIACT). In contrast to other interest inventories in common use, the UNIACT contains scales on which males and females receive similar scores. In the development of the UNIACT, more than 200 potentially sex-balanced items were administered to 10,211 people,…

  18. Development and validation of the sex role conflict scale.

    PubMed

    Chusmir, L H; Koberg, C S

    1986-01-01

    Because the authors found previous attempts at measuring sex role conflict to lack rigor in measurement and interpretation, they sought to develop an instrument for objectively measuring this condition. From a study of an initial group of 102 persons and a follow-up group of 556 persons from Western U.S. urban areas, the authors developed a new, 17-item, Likert-type scale, which they call the Sex Role Conflict Scale (SRCS). They employed factor analysis to arrive at the final 17 items used, and conducted studies of the scale's reliability and validity, correlating its results with previously validated measures of role conflict, job satisfaction, job involvement, and propensity to leave. The authors found correlations between their variables and sex role conflict, and recommend the SRCS for measuring the degree of such conflict experienced by both men and women. PMID:10280320

  19. CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF ABNORMAL REPRODUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will determine the critical factors that account for exposures to endocrine disrupting chemicals, or EDCs (ER, AR, AhR mediated and inhibitors of steroidogenesis) during development resulting in adverse effects seen later in life in male and female offspring. Such f...

  20. X chromosome abnormalities and cognitive development: implications for understanding normal human development.

    PubMed

    Walzer, S

    1985-03-01

    Recent advances in the biological sciences have offered new opportunities to identify biological contributions as they interact with social experience to help determine psychological development. The role of biological factors is more easily demonstrated in subhuman species in which extensive experimental manipulations of variables are possible. One strategy for the study of human behaviour genetics has been the systematic analysis of behaviour in individuals with naturally occurring X chromosome variations. The aim has been to demonstrate whether or not the range of expected variability in particular areas of behavioural development was narrowed by the specific genotypic abnormality. The knowledge obtained from these studies can be applied meaningfully to enhance our understanding about human behavioural development in chromosomally unaffected individuals. PMID:3884639

  1. Effects of oil pollution on the development of sex cells in sea urchins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashchenko, M. A.

    1980-03-01

    The sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus is highly sensitive to oil pollution. Experiments were performed in winter, spring and summer over periods of 15 to 45 days. Experimental urchins were kept in water with hydrocarbon concentrations of 10 to 30 mg l-1, and control urchins in pure sea water. Thermal stimulation by Evdokimov's method was applied to obtain mature sexual products during winter and spring tests. Summer investigations were conducted at temperatures of 17 to 18 °C. The gonads were studied histologically and morphometrically, and the sexual cells obtained were analyzed at the embryological level. No histological and morphometrical differences were recorded between sexual cells of controls and experimentals. However, marked hydrocarbon effects were observed in the embryonic development of artificially fertilized cells from experimental urchins. Control embryos developed normally. Embryogenesis of artificially fertilized gametes from control females and experimental males, and vice versa, was found to be distinctly abnormal. Many abnormalities were identified at the first cleavage stage, as well as in blastula, gastrula and pluteus. Fertilization of experimental eggs with experimental sperm resulted in serious disturbances of embryos, followed by the development of non-viable larvae. On the whole, embryogenesis of sexual cells from experimental urchins was characterized by prominent delay, asynchronism and presence of abnormal non-viable larvae. Consequently, long-term effects of sublethal hydrocarbon concentrations resulted in the formation of defective sex cells and high larval mortality.

  2. Assessing Sex Role Development of Kindergarten Mexican-American Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sultemeier, Barbara

    To assess sex role development in Mexican-American males, about 40 kindergarten boys from low middle to very low socioeconomic backgrounds were divided into 2 statistical test groups according to whether their fathers were or were not resident in the home. Data were obtained from toy preference scorings, which followed Biller's 1968 measure;

  3. Transgenic mice overexpressing reticulon 3 develop neuritic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiangyou; Shi, Qi; Zhou, Xiangdong; He, Wanxia; Yi, Hong; Yin, Xinghua; Gearing, Marla; Levey, Allan; Yan, Riqiang

    2007-01-01

    Dystrophic neurites are swollen dendrites or axons recognizable near amyloid plaques as a part of important pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We report herein that reticulon 3 (RTN3) is accumulated in a distinct population of dystrophic neurites named as RTN3 immunoreactive dystrophic neurites (RIDNs). The occurrence of RIDNs is concomitant with the formation of high-molecular-weight RTN3 aggregates in brains of AD cases and mice expressing mutant APP. Ultrastructural analysis confirms accumulation of RTN3-containing aggregates in RIDNs. It appears that the protein level of RTN3 governs the formation of RIDNs because transgenic mice expressing RTN3 will develop RIDNs, initially in the hippocampal CA1 region, and later in other hippocampal and cortical regions. Importantly, we show that the presence of dystrophic neurites in Tg-RTN3 mice causes impairments in spatial learning and memory, as well as synaptic plasticity, implying that RIDNs potentially contribute to AD cognitive dysfunction. Together, we demonstrate that aggregation of RTN3 contributes to AD pathogenesis by inducing neuritic dystrophy. Inhibition of RTN3 aggregation is likely a therapeutic approach for reducing neuritic dystrophy. PMID:17476306

  4. Sex-Specific Placental Responses in Fetal Development

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The placenta is an ephemeral but critical organ for the survival of all eutherian mammals and marsupials. It is the primary messenger system between the mother and fetus, where communicational signals, nutrients, waste, gases, and extrinsic factors are exchanged. Although the placenta may buffer the fetus from various environmental insults, placental dysfunction might also contribute to detrimental developmental origins of adult health and disease effects. The placenta of one sex over the other might possess greater ability to respond and buffer against environmental insults. Given the potential role of the placenta in effecting the lifetime health of the offspring, it is not surprising that there has been a resurging interest in this organ, including the Human Placental Project launched by the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development. In this review, we will compare embryological development of the laboratory mouse and human chorioallantoic placentae. Next, evidence that various species, including humans, exhibit normal sex-dependent structural and functional placental differences will be examined followed by how in utero environmental changes (nutritional state, stress, and exposure to environmental chemicals) might interact with fetal sex to affect this organ. Recent data also suggest that paternal state impacts placental function in a sex-dependent manner. The research to date linking placental maladaptive responses and later developmental origins of adult health and disease effects will be explored. Finally, we will focus on how sex chromosomes and epimutations may contribute to sex-dependent differences in placental function, the unanswered questions, and future directions that warrant further consideration. PMID:26241064

  5. Sex-Specific Placental Responses in Fetal Development.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Cheryl S

    2015-10-01

    The placenta is an ephemeral but critical organ for the survival of all eutherian mammals and marsupials. It is the primary messenger system between the mother and fetus, where communicational signals, nutrients, waste, gases, and extrinsic factors are exchanged. Although the placenta may buffer the fetus from various environmental insults, placental dysfunction might also contribute to detrimental developmental origins of adult health and disease effects. The placenta of one sex over the other might possess greater ability to respond and buffer against environmental insults. Given the potential role of the placenta in effecting the lifetime health of the offspring, it is not surprising that there has been a resurging interest in this organ, including the Human Placental Project launched by the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development. In this review, we will compare embryological development of the laboratory mouse and human chorioallantoic placentae. Next, evidence that various species, including humans, exhibit normal sex-dependent structural and functional placental differences will be examined followed by how in utero environmental changes (nutritional state, stress, and exposure to environmental chemicals) might interact with fetal sex to affect this organ. Recent data also suggest that paternal state impacts placental function in a sex-dependent manner. The research to date linking placental maladaptive responses and later developmental origins of adult health and disease effects will be explored. Finally, we will focus on how sex chromosomes and epimutations may contribute to sex-dependent differences in placental function, the unanswered questions, and future directions that warrant further consideration. PMID:26241064

  6. Effects of Sex and Birth Order on Sex Role Development and Intelligence in Kindergarten Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laosa, Luis M.; Brophy, Jere E.

    The authors investigate MacDonald's (1969) hypothesis that a sex by birth order interaction should be observed in measures related to sex typing. Since first borns are more thoroughly socialized, MacDonald reasons, and since parental expectations differ according to the child's sex, then first born boys and girls on sex typed variables.…

  7. Recent developments in embryo sexing and its field application.

    PubMed

    Bredbacka, P

    1998-01-01

    This review focuses on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sexing of bovine embryos in commercial situations with emphasis on new developments. Simplifications of the biopsy technique is one of the major simplifications over the last few years. The stabilization of the embryo by means of protein-free medium or scratches produced on the bottom of the Petri dish makes it possible to perform a biopsy with a single microinstrument. The traditional PCR sexing approach utilizes electrophoresis, which involves the risk of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) contamination of subsequent assays. Such contamination, resulting in females misdiagnosed as males, is avoided efficiently by using a non-electrophoretic method in which the sex is determined based on fluorescence of unopened tubes. However, female samples cannot be distinguished from blank samples in the non-electrophoretic assay, which thus relies on accurate transfer of biopsy into tubes. Nevertheless, an accuracy of about 95% can be reached with both approaches. High pregnancy rates (50-70%) can be reached with biopsied Grade 1 embryos, but there is evidence that pregnancy rates with Grade 2 embryos is 15-20% lower. Recent data indicate that pregnancy rates of 50% can be achieved with frozen-thawed biopsied Grade 1 embryos. In conclusion, recent developments in biopsy techniques, detection systems and freezing should increase interest in PCR sexing. PMID:9932294

  8. A Brief History of the Development of Abnormal Psychology: A Training Guide. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, William R.

    Presented for practitioners is a history of the development of abnormal psychology. Areas covered include the following: Early medical concepts, ideas carried over from literature, early treatment of the mentally ill, development of the psychological viewpoint, Freud's psychoanalytic theory, Jung's analytic theory, the individual psychology of…

  9. A Brief History of the Development of Abnormal Psychology: A Training Guide. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, William R.

    Presented for practitioners is a history of the development of abnormal psychology. Areas covered include the following: Early medical concepts, ideas carried over from literature, early treatment of the mentally ill, development of the psychological viewpoint, Freud's psychoanalytic theory, Jung's analytic theory, the individual psychology of

  10. The embryonic development of ear-tufts and associated structural head and neck abnormalities of the Araucana fowl.

    PubMed

    Pabilonia, M S; Somes, R G

    1983-08-01

    Developing embryonic structural abnormalities of ear-tufted embryos of the Araucana fowl are described. These abnormal structures are peduncle, cleft, ear opening, tympanic membrane, and columella auris. The structural abnormalities are believed to be due to the early incomplete fusion of the hyoid and mandibular arches from the distal part of the ear opening to the neck area. PMID:6634592

  11. Postnatal lethality and abnormal development of foregut and spleen in Ndrg4 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xianghu; Li, Jing; Baldwin, H Scott

    2016-02-12

    NDRG4 is a member of the NDRG family (N-myc downstream-regulated gene), which is highly expressed in brain and heart. Previous studies showed that Ndrg1-deficient mice exhibited a progressive demyelinating disorder of peripheral nerves and Ndrg4-deficient mice had spatial learning deficits and vulnerabilities to cerebral ischemia. Here, we report generation of Ndrg4 mutant alleles that exhibit several development defects different from those previously reported. Our homozygous mice showed growth retardation and postnatal lethality. Spleen and thymuses of Ndrg4(-/-) mice are considerably reduced in size from 3 weeks of age. Histological analysis revealed abnormal hyperkeratosis in the squamous foregut and abnormal loss of erythrocytes in the spleen of Ndrg4(-/-) mice. In addition, we observed an abnormal hind limb clasping phenotype upon tail suspension suggesting neurological abnormalities. Consistent to these abnormalities, Ndrg4 is expressed in smooth muscle cells of the stomach, macrophages of the spleen and neurons. Availability of the conditional allele for Ndrg4 should facilitate further detailed analyses of the potential roles of Ndrg4 in gut development, nervous system and immune system. PMID:26801554

  12. The Development of Sex-Role Stereotypes and Classificatory Skills in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trautner, H. M.; And Others

    Increase in sex-role knowledge represents an early stage of the development of sex role stereotypes in children, which is followed by a decrease in the extent of sex-role discrimination. This process is related to the acquisition of classificatory skills. Groups of children aged 4-10 years were tested for their sex role stereotypes and…

  13. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau protein at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease recapitulates phosphorylation during development.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Goedert M; Jakes R; Crowther RA; Six J; Lübke U; Vandermeeren M; Cras P; Trojanowski JQ; Lee VM

    1993-06-01

    Tau is a neuronal phosphoprotein whose expression is developmentally regulated. A single tau isoform is expressed in fetal human brain but six isoforms are expressed in adult brain, with the fetal isoform corresponding to the shortest of the adult isoforms. Phosphorylation of tau is also developmentally regulated, as fetal tau is phosphorylated at more sites than adult tau. In Alzheimer disease, the six adult tau isoforms become abnormally phosphorylated and form the paired helical filament, the major fibrous component of the characteristic neurofibrillary lesions. We show here that Ser-202 (in the numbering of the longest human brain tau isoform) is a phosphorylation site that distinguishes fetal from adult tau and we identify it as one of the abnormal phosphorylation sites in Alzheimer disease. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease thus recapitulates normal phosphorylation during development.

  14. Prevalence of anal human papillomavirus infection and cytologic abnormalities among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Latini, Alessandra; Gabriella Dona, Maria; Ronchetti, Livia; Giglio, Amalia; Moretto, Domenico; Colafigli, Manuela; Laquintana, Valentina; Frasca, Mirko; Zaccarelli, Mauro; Antinori, Andrea; Cristaudo, Antonio; Giuliani, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Human papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for 85% of anal cancers. Recently, anal cancer incidence has been increasing, particularly in men who have sex with men (MSM). Cytology may be a useful tool for the detection of anal precancerous lesions. We assessed the prevalence and determinants of anal HPV infection and cytologic abnormalities among HIV-infected and -uninfected MSM. Materials and Methods MSM ≥18-year-old attending an STI clinic in Rome (Italy) were enrolled. Anal cytologic samples were collected in PreservCyt (Hologic) using a Dacron swab. The Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Diagnostics) was used for the detection and genotyping of 37 mucosal HPV types. Liquid-based cytological slides were obtained using a ThinPrep2000 processor (Hologic). The morphology of the anal pap-test was classified following the Bethesda 2001 guidelines. Results We enrolled 180 HIV-infected (median age 41 years, IQR 33–47) and 438 HIV-uninfected MSM (median age 32 years, IQR: 27–39). Most of the individuals were Caucasian (92.2% and 97.0%, respectively). HPV prevalence, both overall (93.3% vs 72.4%, p<.001) and by high-risk (HR) HPV types (80.5% vs 56.0%, p<.001), was significantly higher among HIV-infected than HIV-uninfected individuals. HPV-multiple infections were evidenced in 48.2% of the HIV-uninfected and 76.1% of the HIV-infected MSM (p<.001). HPV16 was the most prevalent genotype in both groups (23.3% in HIV-positive and 17.6% in HIV-negative MSM). HPV6 and 84 were the most frequent low-risk types in both cohorts. Anal cytologic abnormalities were found in a significantly higher proportion of HIV-infected MSM (46.1% vs 27.9%, p<.001). H-SILs (high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions) were exclusively observed among the HIV-infected individuals, although at a low prevalence (1.2%). Conclusions A high prevalence of anal HPV infection and cytologic abnormalities was evidenced in both populations. Nonetheless, HIV-infected MSM showed a significantly higher rate of HPV infection and abnormal cytology, confirming that HIV-1 infection poses a significant risk for anal HPV infection as well as for anal cellular abnormalities. Screening for anal cancer, which is currently the most frequent non-AIDS-defining cancer in HIV-positive MSM, should be considered for this population. Moreover, vaccination strategies for the prevention of HPV infection should be taken into account. PMID:25397412

  15. Sex, glia, and development: interactions in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Jaclyn M; Bilbo, Staci D

    2012-08-01

    Microglia and astrocytes are the primary immune cells within the central nervous system. Microglia influence processes including neural development, synaptic plasticity and cognition; while their activation and production of immune molecules can induce stereotyped sickness behaviors or pathologies including cognitive dysfunction. Given their role in health and disease, we propose that glia may also be a critical link in understanding the etiology of many neuropsychiatric disorders that present with a strong sex-bias in their symptoms or prevalence. Specifically, males are more likely to be diagnosed with disorders that have distinct developmental origins such as autism or schizophrenia. In contrast, females are more likely to be diagnosed with disorders that present later in life, after the onset of adolescence, such as depression and anxiety disorders. In this review we will summarize the evidence suggesting that sex differences in the colonization and function of glia within the normal developing brain may contribute to distinct windows of vulnerability between males and females. We will also highlight the current gaps in our knowledge as well as the future directions and considerations of research aimed at understanding the link between neuroimmune function and sex differences in mental health disorders. PMID:22387107

  16. Understanding normal and abnormal development of the Wolffian/epididymal duct by using transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Murashima, Aki; Xu, Bingfang; Hinton, Barry T

    2015-01-01

    The development of the Wolffian/epididymal duct is crucial for proper function and, therefore, male fertility. The development of the epididymis is complex; the initial stages form as a transient embryonic kidney; then the mesonephros is formed, which in turn undergoes extensive morphogenesis under the influence of androgens and growth factors. Thus, understanding of its full development requires a wide and multidisciplinary view. This review focuses on mouse models that display abnormalities of the Wolffian duct and mesonephric development, the importance of these mouse models toward understanding male reproductive tract development, and how these models contribute to our understanding of clinical abnormalities in humans such as congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). PMID:26112482

  17. Management framework paradigms for disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Telles-Silveira, Mariana; Knobloch, Felicia; Kater, Claudio E

    2015-10-01

    Until 2005, questions regarding medical treatment and diagnostic information on Disorders of Sex Development (DSD) were not systematically discussed with both the patients and their families; however, the way these patients are currently treated have been changing with time. Interventional changes in the clinical-psychotherapeutic-surgical areas of DSD determine not only different medical recommendations but also help to place the patient and the family into the decisional process of therapy. We must consider two paradigmatic periods that have influenced and transformed the clinical management framework of patients with DSD: a) The "Money era" (1955), which emphasized the role of the gonads as the diagnostic criterion, having the environment as determinant of the sex identity; and b) The Chicago Consensus (2005) phase, in which the role of genetics and molecular biology was critical for an early identification, as well as in building a proper sex identity, emphasizing ethical questions and the "stigma culture". In addition, recent data have focused on the importance of interdisciplinarity and statements on questions concerning Human Rights as key factors in treatment decision making. Despite each of these management models being able to determine specific directions and recommendations regarding the clinical handling of these patients, we verify that a composite of these several models is the clinical routine nowadays. In the present paper, we discuss these several paradigms, and pinpoint clinical differences and their unfolding regarding management of DSD patients and their families. PMID:26331223

  18. Abnormal pairing of X and Y sex chromosomes during meiosis I in interspecific hybrids of Phodopus campbelli and P. sungorus

    PubMed Central

    Ishishita, Satoshi; Tsuboi, Kazuma; Ohishi, Namiko; Tsuchiya, Kimiyuki; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid sterility plays an important role in the maintenance of species identity and promotion of speciation. Male interspecific hybrids from crosses between Campbell's dwarf hamster (Phodopus campbelli) and the Djungarian hamster (P. sungorus) exhibit sterility with abnormal spermatogenesis. However, the meiotic phenotype of these hybrids has not been well described. In the present work, we observed the accumulation of spermatocytes and apoptosis of spermatocyte-like cells in the testes of hybrids between P. campbelli females and P. sungorus males. In hybrid spermatocytes, a high frequency of asynapsis of X and Y chromosomes during the pachytene-like stage and dissociation of these chromosomes during metaphase I (MI) was observed. No autosomal univalency was observed during pachytene-like and MI stages in the hybrids; however, a low frequency of synapsis between autosomes and X or Y chromosomes, interlocking and partial synapsis between autosomal pairs, and γ-H2AFX staining in autosomal chromatin was observed during the pachytene-like stage. Degenerated MI-like nuclei were frequently observed in the hybrids. Most of the spermatozoa in hybrid epididymides exhibited head malformation. These results indicate that the pairing of X and Y chromosomes is more adversely affected than that of autosomes in Phodopus hybrids. PMID:25801302

  19. Abnormal development of sensory-motor, visual temporal and parahippocampal cortex in children with learning disabilities and borderline intellectual functioning

    PubMed Central

    Baglio, Francesca; Cabinio, Monia; Ricci, Cristian; Baglio, Gisella; Lipari, Susanna; Griffanti, Ludovica; Preti, Maria G.; Nemni, Raffaello; Clerici, Mario; Zanette, Michela; Blasi, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Borderline intellectual functioning (BIF) is a condition characterized by an intelligence quotient (IQ) between 70 and 85. BIF children present with cognitive, motor, social, and adaptive limitations that result in learning disabilities and are more likely to develop psychiatric disorders later in life. The aim of this study was to investigate brain morphometry and its relation to IQ level in BIF children. Thirteen children with BIF and 14 age- and sex-matched typically developing (TD) children were enrolled. All children underwent a full IQ assessment (WISC-III scale) and a magnetic resonance (MR) examination including conventional sequences to assess brain structural abnormalities and high resolution 3D images for voxel-based morphometry analysis. To investigate to what extent the group influenced gray matter (GM) volumes, both univariate and multivariate generalized linear model analysis of variance were used, and the varimax factor analysis was used to explore variable correlations and clusters among subjects. Results showed that BIF children, compared to controls have increased regional GM volume in bilateral sensorimotor and right posterior temporal cortices and decreased GM volume in the right parahippocampal gyrus. GM volumes were highly correlated with IQ indices. The present work is a case study of a group of BIF children showing that BIF is associated with abnormal cortical development in brain areas that have a pivotal role in motor, learning, and behavioral processes. Our findings, although allowing for little generalization to the general population, contribute to the very limited knowledge in this field. Future longitudinal MR studies will be useful in verifying whether cortical features can be modified over time even in association with rehabilitative intervention. PMID:25360097

  20. Cranial index of children with normal and abnormal brain development in Sokoto, Nigeria: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Muhammad Awwal; Zagga, Abdullahi Daudu; Danfulani, Mohammed; Tadros, Aziz Abdo; Ahmed, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Abnormal brain development due to neurodevelopmental disorders in children has always been an important concern, but yet has to be considered as a significant public health problem, especially in the low- and middle-income countries including Nigeria. Aims: The aim of this study is to determine whether abnormal brain development in the form of neurodevelopmental disorders causes any deviation in the cranial index of affected children. Materials and Methods: This is a comparative study on the head length, head width, and cranial index of 112 children (72 males and 40 females) diagnosed with at least one abnormal problem in brain development, in the form of a neurodevelopmental disorder (NDD), in comparison with that of 218 normal growing children without any form of NDD (121 males and 97 females), aged 0-18 years old seen at the Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, over a period of six months, June to December, 2012. The head length and head width of the children was measured using standard anatomical landmarks and cranial index calculated. The data obtained was entered into the Microsoft excel worksheet and analyzed using SPSS version 17. Results: The mean Cephalic Index for normal growing children with normal brain development was 79.82 ± 3.35 and that of the children with abnormal brain development was 77.78 ± 2.95 and the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusion: It can be deduced from this present study that the cranial index does not change in children with neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:24966551

  1. HIV Programs for Sex Workers: Lessons and Challenges for Developing and Delivering Programs

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, David

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that HIV prevention programs for sex workers, especially female sex workers, are cost-effective in several contexts, including many western countries, Thailand, India, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, and Zimbabwe. The evidence that sex worker HIV prevention programs work must not inspire complacency but rather a renewed effort to expand, intensify, and maximize their impact. The PLOS Collection “Focus on Delivery and Scale: Achieving HIV Impact with Sex Workers” highlights major challenges to scaling-up sex worker HIV prevention programs, noting the following: sex worker HIV prevention programs are insufficiently guided by understanding of epidemic transmission dynamics, situation analyses, and programmatic mapping; sex worker HIV and sexually transmitted infection services receive limited domestic financing in many countries; many sex worker HIV prevention programs are inadequately codified to ensure consistency and quality; and many sex worker HIV prevention programs have not evolved adequately to address informal sex workers, male and transgender sex workers, and mobile- and internet-based sex workers. Based on the wider collection of papers, this article presents three major clusters of recommendations: (i) HIV programs focused on sex workers should be prioritized, developed, and implemented based on robust evidence; (ii) national political will and increased funding are needed to increase coverage of effective sex worker HIV prevention programs in low and middle income countries; and (iii) comprehensive, integrated, and rapidly evolving HIV programs are needed to ensure equitable access to health services for individuals involved in all forms of sex work. PMID:26079267

  2. HIV Programs for Sex Workers: Lessons and Challenges for Developing and Delivering Programs.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David

    2015-06-01

    There is evidence that HIV prevention programs for sex workers, especially female sex workers, are cost-effective in several contexts, including many western countries, Thailand, India, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, and Zimbabwe. The evidence that sex worker HIV prevention programs work must not inspire complacency but rather a renewed effort to expand, intensify, and maximize their impact. The PLOS Collection "Focus on Delivery and Scale: Achieving HIV Impact with Sex Workers" highlights major challenges to scaling-up sex worker HIV prevention programs, noting the following: sex worker HIV prevention programs are insufficiently guided by understanding of epidemic transmission dynamics, situation analyses, and programmatic mapping; sex worker HIV and sexually transmitted infection services receive limited domestic financing in many countries; many sex worker HIV prevention programs are inadequately codified to ensure consistency and quality; and many sex worker HIV prevention programs have not evolved adequately to address informal sex workers, male and transgender sex workers, and mobile- and internet-based sex workers. Based on the wider collection of papers, this article presents three major clusters of recommendations: (i) HIV programs focused on sex workers should be prioritized, developed, and implemented based on robust evidence; (ii) national political will and increased funding are needed to increase coverage of effective sex worker HIV prevention programs in low and middle income countries; and (iii) comprehensive, integrated, and rapidly evolving HIV programs are needed to ensure equitable access to health services for individuals involved in all forms of sex work. PMID:26079267

  3. mTOR signaling and its roles in normal and abnormal brain development

    PubMed Central

    Takei, Nobuyuki; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) was first identified in yeast as a target molecule of rapamycin, an anti-fugal and immunosuppressant macrolide compound. In mammals, its orthologue is called mammalian TOR (mTOR). mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that converges different extracellular stimuli, such as nutrients and growth factors, and diverges into several biochemical reactions, including translation, autophagy, transcription, and lipid synthesis among others. These biochemical reactions govern cell growth and cause cells to attain an anabolic state. Thus, the disruption of mTOR signaling is implicated in a wide array of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and obesity. In the central nervous system, the mTOR signaling cascade is activated by nutrients, neurotrophic factors, and neurotransmitters that enhances protein (and possibly lipid) synthesis and suppresses autophagy. These processes contribute to normal neuronal growth by promoting their differentiation, neurite elongation and branching, and synaptic formation during development. Therefore, disruption of mTOR signaling may cause neuronal degeneration and abnormal neural development. While reduced mTOR signaling is associated with neurodegeneration, excess activation of mTOR signaling causes abnormal development of neurons and glia, leading to brain malformation. In this review, we first introduce the current state of molecular knowledge of mTOR complexes and signaling in general. We then describe mTOR activation in neurons, which leads to translational enhancement, and finally discuss the link between mTOR and normal/abnormal neuronal growth during development. PMID:24795562

  4. Abnormal visual experience during development alters the early stages of visual-tactile integration.

    PubMed

    Niechwiej-Szwedo, Ewa; Chin, Jessica; Wolfe, Paul J; Popovich, Christina; Staines, W Richard

    2016-05-01

    Visual experience during the critical periods in early postnatal life is necessary for the normal development of the visual system. Disruption of visual input during this period results in amblyopia, which is associated with reduced activation of the striate and extrastriate cortices. It is well known that visual input converges with other sensory signals and exerts a significant influence on cortical processing in multiple association areas. Recent work in healthy adults has also shown that task-relevant visual input can modulate neural excitability at very early stages of information processing in the primary somatosensory cortex. Here we used electroencephalography to investigate visual-tactile interactions in adults with abnormal binocular vision due to amblyopia and strabismus. Results showed three main findings. First, in comparison to a visually normal control group, participants with abnormal vision had a significantly lower amplitude of the P50 somatosensory event related potential (ERP) when visual and tactile stimuli were presented concurrently. Second, the amplitude of the P100 somatosensory ERP was significantly greater in participants with abnormal vision. These results indicate that task relevant visual input does not significantly influence the excitability of the primary somatosensory cortex, instead, the excitability of the secondary somatosensory cortex is increased. Third, participants with abnormal vision had a higher amplitude of the P1 visual ERP when a tactile stimulus was presented concurrently. Importantly, these results were not modulated by viewing condition, which indicates that the impact of amblyopia on crossmodal interactions is not simply related to the reduced visual acuity as it was evident when viewing with the unaffected eye and binocularly. These results indicate that the consequences of abnormal visual experience on neurophysiological processing extend beyond the primary and secondary visual areas to other modality-specific areas. PMID:26896697

  5. Postnatal infection is associated with widespread abnormalities of brain development in premature newborns

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Vann; Brant, Rollin; Poskitt, Kenneth J.; Tam, Emily W. Y.; Synnes, Anne; Miller, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    Infection is a risk factor for adverse neurodevelopmental outcome in preterm newborns. Our objective was to characterize the association of postnatal infection with adverse microstructural and metabolic brain development in premature newborns. One hundred seventeen preterm newborns (24–32 weeks gestation) were studied prospectively at a median of 32.0 and 40.3 weeks postmenstrual age: MRI (white matter injury, hemorrhage), MR (magnetic resonance) spectroscopy (metabolism) and diffusion tensor imaging (microstructure). Newborns were categorized as having “no infection”, “clinical infection”, or “positive-culture infection.” We compared brain injuries, as well as metabolic and microstructural development across these infection groups. In 34 newborns, clinical signs were accompanied by positive cultures while 17 had clinical signs of sepsis alone. White matter injury was identified in 34 newborns. In multivariate regression models infected newborns had brain imaging measures indicative of delayed brain development: lower N-acetylaspartate/choline, elevated average diffusivity (DAV) and decreased white matter fractional anisotropy. These widespread brain abnormalities were found in both newborns with positive-culture infection and in those with clinical infection. These findings suggest that postnatal infection, even without a positive culture, is an important risk factor for widespread abnormalities in brain. These abnormalities extend beyond brain injuries apparent with conventional MRI. PMID:22278180

  6. The Development of Sex-Related Differences in Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Anne C.

    Although sex differences in research have received considerable attention, few researchers have examined the bias, social context, and process of that research. In analyzing sex differences in academic achievement over the past 10 years, three areas (mathematics, spatial ability, and verbal ability) would appear to establish consistent sex

  7. Familial liability, obstetric complications and childhood development abnormalities in early onset schizophrenia: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic and environmental risk factors and gene-environment interactions are linked to higher likelihood of developing schizophrenia in accordance with the neurodevelopmental model of disease; little is known about risk factors and early development in early-onset schizophrenia (EOS) and very early-onset schizophrenia (VEOS). Methods We present a case-control study of a sample of 21 patients with EOS/VEOS and a control group of 21 patients with migraine, recruited from the Child Neuropsychiatry Unit, Department of Neurologic and Psychiatric Science, University of Bari, Italy. The aim was to assess the statistical association between VEOS/EOS and family history for psychiatric disorders, obstetric complications and childhood developmental abnormalities using 2 × 2 tables and a Chi Squared or Fisher test. Results The results show a statistical association between EOS/VEOS and schizophrenia and related disorders (P = 0.02) and personality disorders (P = 0.003) in relatives, and between EOS/VEOS and developmental abnormalities of early relational skills (P = 0.008) and learning (P = 0.04); there is not a statistically relevant difference between cases and controls (P > 0.05) for any obstetric complications (pre, peri and postpartum). Conclusions This study confirms the significant role of familial liability but not of obstetric complications in the pathogenesis of VEOS/EOS; the association between childhood developmental abnormalities and EOS/VEOS supports the neurodevelopmental model of disease. PMID:21492438

  8. Links Between Sex-Typed Time Use in Middle Childhood and Gender Development in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHale, Susan M.; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Whiteman, Shawn; Crouter, Ann C.

    2004-01-01

    The authors studied sex-typing in the kinds (e.g., sports, handicrafts) and social contexts (same- vs. other-sex companions) of children's free time activities, and the links between sex-typed activities and gender development over 2 years. Participants were 200 White, working- and middle-class children (103 girls, 97 boys; mean age = 10.86…

  9. Sex-specific gonadal and gene expression changes throughout development in fathead minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) are commonly used as a model fish in endocrine disruption studies, none have characterized sex-specific baseline expression of genes involved in sex differentiation during development in this species. Using a sex-linked DNA marker t...

  10. Overexpression of Anti-Müllerian Hormone Disrupts Gonadal Sex Differentiation, Blocks Sex Hormone Synthesis, and Supports Cell Autonomous Sex Development in the Chicken.

    PubMed

    Lambeth, Luke S; Morris, Kirsten; Ayers, Katie L; Wise, Terry G; O'Neil, Terri; Wilson, Susanne; Cao, Yu; Sinclair, Andrew H; Cutting, Andrew D; Doran, Timothy J; Smith, Craig A

    2016-03-01

    The primary role of Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) during mammalian development is the regression of Müllerian ducts in males. This highly conserved function is retained in birds and is supported by the high levels of AMH expression in developing testes. Mammalian AMH expression is regulated by a combination of transcription factors, the most important being Sry-type high-mobility-group box transcription factor-9 (SOX9). In the chicken embryo, however, AMH mRNA expression precedes that of SOX9, leading to the view that AMH may play a more central role in avian testicular development. To define its role in chicken gonadal development, AMH was overexpressed using the RCASBP viral vector. AMH caused the gonads of both sexes to develop as small and undeveloped structures at both embryonic and adult stages. Molecular analysis revealed that although female gonads developed testis-like cords, gonads lacked Sertoli cells and were incapable of steroidogenesis. A similar gonadal phenotype was also observed in males, with a complete loss of both Sertoli cells, disrupted SOX9 expression and gonadal steroidogenesis. At sexual maturity both sexes showed a female external phenotype but retained sexually dimorphic body weights that matched their genetic sexes. These data suggest that AMH does not operate as an early testis activator in the chicken but can affect downstream events, such as sex steroid hormone production. In addition, this study provides a unique opportunity to assess chicken sexual development in an environment of sex hormone deficiency, demonstrating the importance of both hormonal signaling and direct cell autonomous factors for somatic sex identity in birds. PMID:26809122

  11. Sleep and Sex: What Can Go Wrong? A Review of the Literature on Sleep Related Disorders and Abnormal Sexual Behaviors and Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, Carlos H.; Arnulf, Isabelle; Mahowald, Mark W.

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: To formulate the first classification of sleep related disorders and abnormal sexual behaviors and experiences. Design: A computerized literature search was conducted, and other sources, such as textbooks, were searched. Results: Many categories of sleep related disorders were represented in the classification: parasomnias (confusional arousals/sleepwalking, with or without obstructive sleep apnea; REM sleep behavior disorder); sleep related seizures; Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS); severe chronic insomnia; restless legs syndrome; narcolepsy; sleep exacerbation of persistent sexual arousal syndrome; sleep related painful erections; sleep related dissociative disorders; nocturnal psychotic disorders; miscellaneous states. Kleine-Levin syndrome (78 cases) and parasomnias (31 cases) were most frequently reported. Parasomnias and sleep related seizures had overlapping and divergent clinical features. Thirty-one cases of parasomnias (25 males; mean age, 32 years) and 7 cases of sleep related seizures (4 males; mean age, 38 years) were identified. A full range of sleep related sexual behaviors with self and/or bed partners or others were reported, including masturbation, sexual vocalizations, fondling, sexual intercourse with climax, sexual assault/rape, ictal sexual hyperarousal, ictal orgasm, and ictal automatism. Adverse physical and/or psychosocial effects from the sleepsex were present in all parasomnia and sleep related seizure cases, but pleasurable effects were reported by 5 bed partners and by 3 patients with sleep related seizures. Forensic consequences were common, occurring in 35.5% (11/31) of parasomnia cases, with most (9/11) involving minors. All parasomnias cases reported amnesia for the sleepsex, in contrast to 28.6% (2/7) of sleep related seizure cases. Polysomnography (without penile tumescence monitoring), performed in 26 of 31 parasomnia cases, documented sexual moaning from slow wave sleep in 3 cases and sexual intercourse during stage 1 sleep/wakefulness in one case (with sex provoked by the bed partner). Confusional arousals (CAs) were diagnosed as the cause of “sleepsex” (“sexsomnia”) in 26 cases (with obstructive sleep apnea [OSA] comorbidity in 4 cases), and sleepwalking in 2 cases, totaling 90.3% (28/31) of cases being NREM sleep parasomnias. REM behavior disorder was the presumed cause in the other 3 cases. Bedtime clonazepam therapy was effective in 90% (9/10) of treated parasomnia cases; nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy was effective in controlling comorbid OSA and CAs in both treated cases. All five treated patients with sleep related sexual seizures responded to anticonvulsant therapy. The hypersexuality in KLS, which was twice as common in males compared to females, had no reported effective therapy. Conclusions: A broad range of sleep related disorders associated with abnormal sexual behaviors and experiences exists, with major clinical and forensic consequences. Citation: Schenck CH; Arnulf I; Mahowald MW et al. Sleep and sex: what can go wrong? A review of the literature on sleep related disorders and abnormal sexual behaviors and experiences. SLEEP 2007;30(6):683-702. PMID:17580590

  12. Fetal alcohol exposure leads to abnormal olfactory bulb development and impaired odor discrimination in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Children whose mothers consumed alcohol during pregnancy exhibit widespread brain abnormalities and a complex array of behavioral disturbances. Here, we used a mouse model of fetal alcohol exposure to investigate relationships between brain abnormalities and specific behavioral alterations during adulthood. Results Mice drank a 10% ethanol solution throughout pregnancy. When fetal alcohol-exposed offspring reached adulthood, we used high resolution MRI to conduct a brain-wide screen for structural changes and found that the largest reduction in volume occurred in the olfactory bulbs. Next, we tested adult mice in an associative olfactory task and found that fetal alcohol exposure impaired discrimination between similar odors but left odor memory intact. Finally, we investigated olfactory bulb neurogenesis as a potential mechanism by performing an in vitro neurosphere assay, in vivo labeling of new cells using BrdU, and in vivo labeling of new cells using a transgenic reporter system. We found that fetal alcohol exposure decreased the number of neural precursor cells in the subependymal zone and the number of new cells in the olfactory bulbs during the first few postnatal weeks. Conclusions Using a combination of techniques, including structural brain imaging, in vitro and in vivo cell detection methods, and behavioral testing, we found that fetal alcohol exposure results in smaller olfactory bulbs and impairments in odor discrimination that persist into adulthood. Furthermore, we found that these abnormalities in olfactory bulb structure and function may arise from deficits in the generation of new olfactory bulb neurons during early postnatal development. PMID:21736737

  13. The development of hepatic stellate cells in normal and abnormal human fetuses – an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Christine K C; Pereira, Tamara N; Pozniak, Katarzyna N; Ramsing, Mette; Vogel, Ida; Ramm, Grant A

    2015-01-01

    The precise embryological origin and development of hepatic stellate cells is not established. Animal studies and observations on human fetuses suggest that they derive from posterior mesodermal cells that migrate via the septum transversum and developing diaphragm to form submesothelial cells beneath the liver capsule, which give rise to mesenchymal cells including hepatic stellate cells. However, it is unclear if these are similar to hepatic stellate cells in adults or if this is the only source of stellate cells. We have studied hepatic stellate cells by immunohistochemistry, in developing human liver from autopsies of fetuses with and without malformations and growth restriction, using cellular Retinol Binding Protein-1 (cRBP-1), Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), and α-Smooth Muscle Actin (αSMA) antibodies, to identify factors that influence their development. We found that hepatic stellate cells expressing cRBP-1 are present from the end of the first trimester of gestation and reduce in density throughout gestation. They appear abnormally formed and variably reduced in number in fetuses with abnormal mesothelial Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) function, diaphragmatic hernia and in ectopic liver nodules without mesothelium. Stellate cells showed similarities to intravascular cells and their presence in a fetus with diaphragm agenesis suggests they may be derived from circulating stem cells. Our observations suggest circulating stem cells as well as mesothelium can give rise to hepatic stellate cells, and that they require normal mesothelial function for their development. PMID:26265759

  14. Sexing development and relocating gender: an organisational case study.

    PubMed

    Magar, V; Storer, G

    2009-01-01

    While gender has become increasingly mainstreamed in international development, it has lost its sharpness as an analytical tool and operational means to women's liberation. Sexuality, while it intersects with gender as a social construct, has been largely ignored within development contexts. This paper draws on findings that emerged from the gains and struggles experienced by project staff in a large international development agency engaging communities on issues related to sexual and women's rights. In so doing, it illustrates how a sexuality lens can move beyond gender equity and sexual health programmes focused on women's vulnerability (largely framed around protecting women and promoting access to services and contraceptive or condom use) to richer understandings of the range of social and cultural factors shaping sexual meanings and gender roles. Reshaping understandings of gender and sexuality requires a change from the conventional development discourse based on biomedical and moral-based sensibilities that associates sex with risk and danger, towards one that also recognises pleasure and agency. Sexuality is a vital aspect of development and sexual rights are a precondition not only for HIV/AIDS prevention, reproductive health or rights, but also for gender equality and social inclusion more widely. While personal and organisational transformation is fundamental, broader social, cultural and political forces, from community groups to governments and donors at large, must lie at the heart of change. PMID:19548159

  15. A mechanical model predicts morphological abnormalities in the developing human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budday, Silvia; Raybaud, Charles; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-07-01

    The developing human brain remains one of the few unsolved mysteries of science. Advancements in developmental biology, neuroscience, and medical imaging have brought us closer than ever to understand brain development in health and disease. However, the precise role of mechanics throughout this process remains underestimated and poorly understood. Here we show that mechanical stretch plays a crucial role in brain development. Using the nonlinear field theories of mechanics supplemented by the theory of finite growth, we model the human brain as a living system with a morphogenetically growing outer surface and a stretch-driven growing inner core. This approach seamlessly integrates the two popular but competing hypotheses for cortical folding: axonal tension and differential growth. We calibrate our model using magnetic resonance images from very preterm neonates. Our model predicts that deviations in cortical growth and thickness induce morphological abnormalities. Using the gyrification index, the ratio between the total and exposed surface area, we demonstrate that these abnormalities agree with the classical pathologies of lissencephaly and polymicrogyria. Understanding the mechanisms of cortical folding in the developing human brain has direct implications in the diagnostics and treatment of neurological disorders, including epilepsy, schizophrenia, and autism.

  16. A mechanical model predicts morphological abnormalities in the developing human brain

    PubMed Central

    Budday, Silvia; Raybaud, Charles; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The developing human brain remains one of the few unsolved mysteries of science. Advancements in developmental biology, neuroscience, and medical imaging have brought us closer than ever to understand brain development in health and disease. However, the precise role of mechanics throughout this process remains underestimated and poorly understood. Here we show that mechanical stretch plays a crucial role in brain development. Using the nonlinear field theories of mechanics supplemented by the theory of finite growth, we model the human brain as a living system with a morphogenetically growing outer surface and a stretch-driven growing inner core. This approach seamlessly integrates the two popular but competing hypotheses for cortical folding: axonal tension and differential growth. We calibrate our model using magnetic resonance images from very preterm neonates. Our model predicts that deviations in cortical growth and thickness induce morphological abnormalities. Using the gyrification index, the ratio between the total and exposed surface area, we demonstrate that these abnormalities agree with the classical pathologies of lissencephaly and polymicrogyria. Understanding the mechanisms of cortical folding in the developing human brain has direct implications in the diagnostics and treatment of neurological disorders, including epilepsy, schizophrenia, and autism. PMID:25008163

  17. Transcriptome Analysis for Abnormal Spike Development of the Wheat Mutant dms

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xin-Xin; Li, Qiao-Yun; Shen, Chun-Cai; Duan, Zong-Biao; Yu, Dong-Yan; Niu, Ji-Shan; Ni, Yong-Jing; Jiang, Yu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Background Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) spike development is the foundation for grain yield. We obtained a novel wheat mutant, dms, characterized as dwarf, multi-pistil and sterility. Although the genetic changes are not clear, the heredity of traits suggests that a recessive gene locus controls the two traits of multi-pistil and sterility in self-pollinating populations of the medium plants (M), such that the dwarf genotype (D) and tall genotype (T) in the progeny of the mutant are ideal lines for studies regarding wheat spike development. The objective of this study was to explore the molecular basis for spike abnormalities of dwarf genotype. Results Four unigene libraries were assembled by sequencing the mRNAs of the super-bulked differentiating spikes and stem tips of the D and T plants. Using integrative analysis, we identified 419 genes highly expressed in spikes, including nine typical homeotic genes of the MADS-box family and the genes TaAP2, TaFL and TaDL. We also identified 143 genes that were significantly different between young spikes of T and D, and 26 genes that were putatively involved in spike differentiation. The result showed that the expression levels of TaAP1-2, TaAP2, and other genes involved in the majority of biological processes such as transcription, translation, cell division, photosynthesis, carbohydrate transport and metabolism, and energy production and conversion were significantly lower in D than in T. Conclusions We identified a set of genes related to wheat floral organ differentiation, including typical homeotic genes. Our results showed that the major causal factors resulting in the spike abnormalities of dms were the lower expression homeotic genes, hormonal imbalance, repressed biological processes, and deficiency of construction materials and energy. We performed a series of studies on the homeotic genes, however the other three causal factors for spike abnormal phenotype of dms need further study. PMID:26982202

  18. The Development of Sex-Related Differences in Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Anne C.

    Although sex differences in research have received considerable attention, few researchers have examined the bias, social context, and process of that research. In analyzing sex differences in academic achievement over the past 10 years, three areas (mathematics, spatial ability, and verbal ability) would appear to establish consistent sex…

  19. [Intersex and differences of sex development: background, diagnostics, and concepts of care].

    PubMed

    Holterhus, P-M

    2013-12-01

    Intersex is an inherited incongruence of chromosomal, gonadal, and genital sexual characteristics. A typical clinical situation of intersex is the ambiguous genitalia in the newborn. Diagnostics, counseling, and therapy should be offered by specialized multidisciplinary health-care teams. The focus is not only on medical issues but also on psychological, social, and ethical aspects. In the international literature, intersex is now termed "disorders of sex development" (DSD). Alternatively, some authors use "differences of sex development" to underline that patients do not necessarily feel they have a "disorder" but rather a "difference" of sex development compared with normal sex development. PMID:24337131

  20. Latrunculin A Treatment Prevents Abnormal Chromosome Segregation for Successful Development of Cloned Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Terashita, Yukari; Yamagata, Kazuo; Tokoro, Mikiko; Itoi, Fumiaki; Wakayama, Sayaka; Li, Chong; Sato, Eimei; Tanemura, Kentaro; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer to an enucleated oocyte is used for reprogramming somatic cells with the aim of achieving totipotency, but most cloned embryos die in the uterus after transfer. While modifying epigenetic states of cloned embryos can improve their development, the production rate of cloned embryos can also be enhanced by changing other factors. It has already been shown that abnormal chromosome segregation (ACS) is a major cause of the developmental failure of cloned embryos and that Latrunculin A (LatA), an actin polymerization inhibitor, improves F-actin formation and birth rate of cloned embryos. Since F-actin is important for chromosome congression in embryos, here we examined the relation between ACS and F-actin in cloned embryos. Using LatA treatment, the occurrence of ACS decreased significantly whereas cloned embryo-specific epigenetic abnormalities such as dimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9me2) could not be corrected. In contrast, when H3K9me2 was normalized using the G9a histone methyltransferase inhibitor BIX-01294, the Magea2 gene—essential for normal development but never before expressed in cloned embryos—was expressed. However, this did not increase the cloning success rate. Thus, non-epigenetic factors also play an important role in determining the efficiency of mouse cloning. PMID:24205216

  1. Sex role identity in young adults: its parental antecedents and relation to ego development.

    PubMed

    Costos, D

    1986-03-01

    This study, inspired by Block's (1973) work, was designed to enable one to examine how ego development and socialization experience interact in relation to sex role identity. Sex role identity was measured via the Bem Sex Role Inventory, and socialization practices were measured via the Block Child-Rearing Practices Report. Both measures were scaled so as to yield scores on agency, communion, and androgyny. Ego development was assessed via Loevinger's Sentence Completion Test of Ego Development. The sample consisted of 120 young adult men and women, married and single. Analyses revealed that the predictive power of the variables differed by sex. Ego development was predictive of sex role identity in men but not women, whereas socialization practices were predictive of sex role identity in women but not men. The results were seen as supporting Chodorow's (1974) position regarding the differing socialization experiences of men and women. PMID:3701594

  2. The Development and Pilot Testing of a Model to Create Awareness of Sex Bias and Sex Stereotyping in Vocational Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Wilma P.; Kelly, Joan M.

    A model for increasing awareness of sex-bias and sex stereotyping in vocational education was developed. The model consisted of a five-hour workshop which included these elements: (1) an introductory slide presentation which provided an overview of sex stereotyping; (2) five group activities (The Exchange, A Closer Look, Taking Stock, What a…

  3. Development of abnormal gait detection and vibratory stimulation system on lower limbs to improve gait stability.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mi; Piao, Yong-Jun; Eun, Hye-in; Kim, Dong-Wook; Ryu, Mun-ho; Kim, Nam-Gyun

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an abnormal gait detection algorithm and a vibratory stimulation system on a lower limb to improve gait stability and prevent falls. The system consists of a gait measurement module, an abnormal gait detection module, and a vibratory stimulation module. The gait measurement module measures the vertical acceleration of the ankle during walking using an accelerometer. The measured acceleration values are sent to a portable microcontroller, which controls vibratory stimulations to the ankles based on an algorithm that detects the peak acceleration values. If the acceleration peaks are found to occur irregularly, the abnormal gait detection algorithm activates the vibratory stimulation module. To determine the effect of vibratory stimulations under dynamic condition, this study investigated the contribution of ankle muscle proprioception on the control of dynamic stability and lower limb kinematics while walking using vibratory stimulation to alter the muscle spindle output of individuals' left lower limb. Vibrators were attached to the left ankle joint (tibialis anterior, triceps surae). Participants were required to walk along a travel path and step over an obstacle placed in their way. There were four task conditions; an obstacle (10%, 20%, and 30% of the participants' height) was positioned at the midpoint of the walkway, or the participants' walking path remained clear. For each obstacle condition, participants experienced either no vibration, or vibration of the tibialis anterior muscle and the triceps surae muscle of the left lower limb. Vibration began upon detection of an abnormal gait and continued for one second. Vibrating the ankle muscles of the left lower limb while stepping over an obstacle resulted in significant changes in COM behavior on both the anterior/posterior (A/P) and medial/lateral (M/L) planes. The results provide strong evidence that the primary endings of the ankle muscle spindles play a significant role in the control of posture and balance during the swing phase of locomotion by providing information on the movement of the body's COM with respect to the support foot. PMID:20703630

  4. The abnormal distribution of development: policies for southern women and children.

    PubMed

    Burman, E

    1995-03-01

    This paper offers a feminist critique of the relationships between gender and development by exploring the intersections between three sets of debates: firstly, the relations between interventions for women and for children through the anomalous position accorded to 'the girl child' in aid and development policies; secondly, the relations between psychological and economic models of development; and thirdly, the gendered and geographical allocation of attributes and opportunities. Drawing on analyses of the 'psychological complex' the author suggests that the cultural resources that inform developmental psychological models are highly cultural and class-specific (white, middle class, of the northern hemisphere), giving rise to a globalization of development that is reinscribed within international aid and development policies. In homogenizing difference to its norms, this globalization paradoxically reproduces the north-south opposition as an expression of cultural and political imperialism. While northern children 'develop', dominant discourses of children of the South are preoccupied with 'survival'. By such means the cultural hegemony of a unitary psychology remains intact. This paper discusses the 'abnormal distribution' of development to draw attention to the ways cultural and gender inequalities flow from the norms and generalized descriptions central to the current practice of developmental psychology and to urge that this is an important site of intervention for feminists addressing gender and development issues. PMID:12319980

  5. The use of molecular and cytogenetic methods as a valuable tool in the detection of chromosomal abnormalities in horses: a case of sex chromosome chimerism in a Spanish purebred colt.

    PubMed

    Demyda-Peyrás, S; Membrillo, A; Bugno-Poniewierska, M; Pawlina, K; Anaya, G; Moreno-Millán, M

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities associated to sex chromosomes are reported as a problem more common than believed to be in horses. Most of them remain undiagnosed due to the complexity of the horse karyotype and the lack of interest of breeders and veterinarians in this type of diagnosis. Approximately 10 years ago, the Spanish Purebred Breeders Association implemented a DNA paternity test to evaluate the pedigree of every newborn foal. All candidates who showed abnormal or uncertain results are routinely submitted to cytogenetical analysis to evaluate the presence of chromosomal abnormalities. We studied the case of a foal showing 3 and even 4 different alleles in several loci in the short tandem repeat (STR) -based DNA parentage test. To confirm these results, a filiation test was repeated using follicular hair DNA showing normal results. A complete set of conventional and molecular cytogenetic analysis was performed to determine their chromosomal complements. C-banding and FISH had shown that the foal presents a sex chimerism 64,XX/64,XY with a cellular percentage of approximately 70/30, diagnosed in blood samples. The use of a diagnostic approach combining routine parentage QF-PCR-based STR screening tested with classical or molecular cytogenetic analysis could be a powerful tool that allows early detection of foals that will have a poor or even no reproductive performance due to chromosomal abnormalities, saving time, efforts and breeders' resources. PMID:23735586

  6. Disorders of sex development: effect of molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Achermann, John C; Domenice, Sorahia; Bachega, Tania A S S; Nishi, Mirian Y; Mendonca, Berenice B

    2015-08-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSDs) are a diverse group of conditions that can be challenging to diagnose accurately using standard phenotypic and biochemical approaches. Obtaining a specific diagnosis can be important for identifying potentially life-threatening associated disorders, as well as providing information to guide parents in deciding on the most appropriate management for their child. Within the past 5 years, advances in molecular methodologies have helped to identify several novel causes of DSDs; molecular tests to aid diagnosis and genetic counselling have now been adopted into clinical practice. Occasionally, genetic profiling of embryos prior to implantation as an adjunct to assisted reproduction, prenatal diagnosis of at-risk pregnancies and confirmatory testing of positive results found during newborn biochemical screening are performed. Of the available genetic tests, the candidate gene approach is the most popular. New high-throughput DNA analysis could enable a genetic diagnosis to be made when the aetiology is unknown or many differential diagnoses are possible. Nonetheless, concerns exist about the use of genetic tests. For instance, a diagnosis is not always possible even using new molecular approaches (which can be worrying for the parents) and incidental information obtained during the test might cause anxiety. Careful selection of the genetic test indicated for each condition remains important for good clinical practice. The purpose of this Review is to describe advances in molecular biological techniques for diagnosing DSDs. PMID:25942653

  7. Abnormal Mammary Development in 129:STAT1-Null Mice is Stroma-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Cardiff, Robert D.; Trott, Josephine F.; Hovey, Russell C.; Hubbard, Neil E.; Engelberg, Jesse A.; Tepper, Clifford G.; Willis, Brandon J.; Khan, Imran H.; Ravindran, Resmi K.; Chan, Szeman R.; Schreiber, Robert D.; Borowsky, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    Female 129:Stat1-null mice (129S6/SvEvTac-Stat1tm1Rds homozygous) uniquely develop estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumors. Herein we report that the mammary glands (MG) of these mice have altered growth and development with abnormal terminal end buds alongside defective branching morphogenesis and ductal elongation. We also find that the 129:Stat1-null mammary fat pad (MFP) fails to sustain the growth of 129S6/SvEv wild-type and Stat1-null epithelium. These abnormalities are partially reversed by elevated serum progesterone and prolactin whereas transplantation of wild-type bone marrow into 129:Stat1-null mice does not reverse the MG developmental defects. Medium conditioned by 129:Stat1-null epithelium-cleared MFP does not stimulate epithelial proliferation, whereas it is stimulated by medium conditioned by epithelium-cleared MFP from either wild-type or 129:Stat1-null females having elevated progesterone and prolactin. Microarrays and multiplexed cytokine assays reveal that the MG of 129:Stat1-null mice has lower levels of growth factors that have been implicated in normal MG growth and development. Transplanted 129:Stat1-null tumors and their isolated cells also grow slower in 129:Stat1-null MG compared to wild-type recipient MG. These studies demonstrate that growth of normal and neoplastic 129:Stat1-null epithelium is dependent on the hormonal milieu and on factors from the mammary stroma such as cytokines. While the individual or combined effects of these factors remains to be resolved, our data supports the role of STAT1 in maintaining a tumor-suppressive MG microenvironment. PMID:26075897

  8. dissatisfaction, a gene involved in sex-specific behavior and neural development of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Finley, Kim D.; Taylor, Barbara J.; Milstein, Marc; McKeown, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Few mutations link well defined behaviors with individual neurons and the activity of specific genes. In Drosophila, recent evidence indicates the presence of a doublesex-independent pathway controlling sexual behavior and neuronal differentiation. We have identified a gene, dissatisfaction (dsf), that affects sex-specific courtship behaviors and neural differentiation in both sexes without an associated general behavioral debilitation. Male and female mutant animals exhibit abnormalities in courtship behaviors, suggesting a requirement for dsf in the brain. Virgin dsf females resist males during courtship and copulation and fail to lay mature eggs. dsf males actively court and attempt copulation with both mature males and females but are slow to copulate because of maladroit abdominal curling. Structural abnormalities in specific neurons indicate a role for dsf in the differentiation of sex-specific abdominal neurons. The egg-laying defect in females correlates with the absence of motor neuronal innervation on uterine muscles, and the reduced abdominal curling in males correlates with alteration in motor neuronal innervation of male ventral abdominal muscles. Epistasis experiments show that dsf acts in a tra-dependent and dsx-independent manner, placing dsf in the dsx-independent portion of the sex determination cascade. PMID:9023356

  9. Normal susceptibility to visual illusions in abnormal development: evidence from Williams Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Palomares, Melanie; Ogbonna, Chinyere; Landau, Barbara; Egeth, Howard

    2009-01-01

    The perception of visual illusions is a powerful diagnostic of implicit integration of global information. Many illusions occur when length, size, orientation, or luminance are misjudged because neighboring visuospatial information cannot be ignored. We asked if people with Williams Syndrome (WS), a rare genetic disorder that results in severely impaired global visuospatial construction abilities, are also susceptible to the context of visual illusions. Remarkably, we found that illusions influenced WS individuals to the same degree as normal adults, although size discrimination was somewhat impaired in WS. Our results are evidence that illusions are a consequence of the brains bias to implicitly integrate visual information, even in a population known to have difficultly in explicitly representing spatial relationships among objects. Moreover, these results suggest that implicit and non-implicit integration of spatial information have different vulnerabilities in abnormal development. PMID:19400429

  10. Apert and Crouzon syndromes-Cognitive development, brain abnormalities, and molecular aspects.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Marilyse B L; Maximino, Luciana P; Perosa, Gimol B; Abramides, Dagma V M; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Yacubian-Fernandes, Adriano

    2016-06-01

    Apert and Crouzon are the most common craniosynostosis syndromes associated with mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene. We conducted a study to examine the molecular biology, brain abnormalities, and cognitive development of individuals with these syndromes. A retrospective longitudinal review of 14 patients with Apert and Crouzon syndromes seen at the outpatient Craniofacial Surgery Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies in Brazil from January 1999 through August 2010 was performed. Patients between 11 and 36 years of age (mean 18.29 ± 5.80), received cognitive evaluations, cerebral magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular DNA analyses. Eight patients with Apert syndrome (AS) had full scale intelligence quotients (FSIQs) that ranged from 47 to 108 (mean 76.9 ± 20.2), and structural brain abnormalities were identified in five of eight patients. Six patients presented with a gain-of-function mutation (p.Ser252Trp) in FGFR2 and FSIQs in those patients ranged from 47 to78 (mean 67.2 ± 10.7). One patient with a gain-of-function mutation (p.Pro253Arg) had a FSIQ of 108 and another patient with an atypical splice mutation (940-2A →G) had a FSIQ of 104. Six patients with Crouzon syndrome had with mutations in exons IIIa and IIIc of FGFR2 and their FSIQs ranged from 82 to 102 (mean 93.5 ± 6.7). These reveal that molecular aspects are another factor that can be considered in studies of global and cognitive development of patients with Apert and Crouzon syndrome (CS). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27028366

  11. Selenoprotein N deficiency in mice is associated with abnormal lung development

    PubMed Central

    Moghadaszadeh, Behzad; Rider, Branden E.; Lawlor, Michael W.; Childers, Martin K.; Grange, Robert W.; Gupta, Kushagra; Boukedes, Steve S.; Owen, Caroline A.; Beggs, Alan H.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the human SEPN1 gene, encoding selenoprotein N (SepN), cause SEPN1-related myopathy (SEPN1-RM) characterized by muscle weakness, spinal rigidity, and respiratory insufficiency. As with other members of the selenoprotein family, selenoprotein N incorporates selenium in the form of selenocysteine (Sec). Most selenoproteins that have been functionally characterized are involved in oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, with the Sec residue located at their catalytic site. To model SEPN1-RM, we generated a Sepn1-knockout (Sepn1−/−) mouse line. Homozygous Sepn1−/− mice are fertile, and their weight and lifespan are comparable to wild-type (WT) animals. Under baseline conditions, the muscle histology of Sepn1−/− mice remains normal, but subtle core lesions could be detected in skeletal muscle after inducing oxidative stress. Ryanodine receptor (RyR) calcium release channels showed lower sensitivity to caffeine in SepN deficient myofibers, suggesting a possible role of SepN in RyR regulation. SepN deficiency also leads to abnormal lung development characterized by enlarged alveoli, which is associated with decreased tissue elastance and increased quasi-static compliance of Sepn1−/− lungs. This finding raises the possibility that the respiratory syndrome observed in patients with SEPN1 mutations may have a primary pulmonary component in addition to the weakness of respiratory muscles.—Moghadaszadeh, B., Rider B. E., Lawlor, M. W., Childers, M. K., Grange, R. W., Gupta, K., Boukedes, S. S., Owen, C. A., Beggs, A. H. Selenoprotein N deficiency in mice is associated with abnormal lung development. PMID:23325319

  12. Development of PCR-Based Markers to Determine the Sex of Kelps.

    PubMed

    Lipinska, Agnieszka P; Ahmed, Sophia; Peters, Akira F; Faugeron, Sylvain; Cock, J Mark; Coelho, Susana M

    2015-01-01

    Sex discriminating genetic markers are commonly used to facilitate breeding programs in economically and ecologically important animal and plant species. However, despite their considerable economic and ecological value, the development of sex markers for kelp species has been very limited. In this study, we used the recently described sequence of the sex determining region (SDR) of the brown algal model Ectocarpus to develop novel DNA-based sex-markers for three commercially relevant kelps: Laminaria digitata, Undaria pinnatifida and Macrocystis pyrifera. Markers were designed within nine protein coding genes of Ectocarpus male and female (U/V) sex chromosomes and tested on gametophytes of the three kelp species. Seven primer pairs corresponding to three loci in the Ectocarpus SDR amplified sex-specific bands in the three kelp species, yielding at least one male and one female marker for each species. Our work has generated the first male sex-specific markers for L. digitata and U. pinnatifida, as well as the first sex markers developed for the genus Macrocystis. The markers and methodology presented here will not only facilitate seaweed breeding programs but also represent useful tools for population and demography studies and provide a means to investigate the evolution of sex determination across this largely understudied eukaryotic group. PMID:26496392

  13. Development of PCR‐Based Markers to Determine the Sex of Kelps

    PubMed Central

    Lipinska, Agnieszka P.; Ahmed, Sophia; Peters, Akira F.; Faugeron, Sylvain; Cock, J. Mark; Coelho, Susana M.

    2015-01-01

    Sex discriminating genetic markers are commonly used to facilitate breeding programs in economically and ecologically important animal and plant species. However, despite their considerable economic and ecological value, the development of sex markers for kelp species has been very limited. In this study, we used the recently described sequence of the sex determining region (SDR) of the brown algal model Ectocarpus to develop novel DNA-based sex-markers for three commercially relevant kelps: Laminaria digitata, Undaria pinnatifida and Macrocystis pyrifera. Markers were designed within nine protein coding genes of Ectocarpus male and female (U/V) sex chromosomes and tested on gametophytes of the three kelp species. Seven primer pairs corresponding to three loci in the Ectocarpus SDR amplified sex-specific bands in the three kelp species, yielding at least one male and one female marker for each species. Our work has generated the first male sex-specific markers for L. digitata and U. pinnatifida, as well as the first sex markers developed for the genus Macrocystis. The markers and methodology presented here will not only facilitate seaweed breeding programs but also represent useful tools for population and demography studies and provide a means to investigate the evolution of sex determination across this largely understudied eukaryotic group. PMID:26496392

  14. Adolescents' lifetime experience of selling sex: development over five years.

    PubMed

    Fredlund, Cecilia; Svensson, Frida; Svedin, Carl Göran; Priebe, Gisela; Wadsby, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Lifetime experience of selling sex among adolescents was investigated together with sociodemographic correlates, parent-child relationship, and the existence of people to confide in. Changes over time regarding the selling of sex were investigated through a comparison of data from 2004 and 2009. This study was carried out using 3,498 adolescents from a representative sample of Swedish high school students with a mean age 18.3 years. Of these adolescents, 1.5% stated that they had given sexual services for reimbursement and both male and female buyers existed. The adolescents who had sold sex had a poorer parent-child relationship during childhood and had fewer people to confide in about problems and worries. Changes over time were found especially regarding the Internet as a contact source and also immigrant background. PMID:23590352

  15. Congenital hydrocephalus and abnormal subcommissural organ development in Sox3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kristie; Tan, Jacqueline; Morris, Michael B; Rizzoti, Karine; Hughes, James; Cheah, Pike See; Felquer, Fernando; Liu, Xuan; Piltz, Sandra; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Thomas, Paul Q

    2012-01-01

    Congenital hydrocephalus (CH) is a life-threatening medical condition in which excessive accumulation of CSF leads to ventricular expansion and increased intracranial pressure. Stenosis (blockage) of the Sylvian aqueduct (Aq; the narrow passageway that connects the third and fourth ventricles) is a common form of CH in humans, although the genetic basis of this condition is unknown. Mouse models of CH indicate that Aq stenosis is associated with abnormal development of the subcommmissural organ (SCO) a small secretory organ located at the dorsal midline of the caudal diencephalon. Glycoproteins secreted by the SCO generate Reissner's fibre (RF), a thread-like structure that descends into the Aq and is thought to maintain its patency. However, despite the importance of SCO function in CSF homeostasis, the genetic program that controls SCO development is poorly understood. Here, we show that the X-linked transcription factor SOX3 is expressed in the murine SCO throughout its development and in the mature organ. Importantly, overexpression of Sox3 in the dorsal diencephalic midline of transgenic mice induces CH via a dose-dependent mechanism. Histological, gene expression and cellular proliferation studies indicate that Sox3 overexpression disrupts the development of the SCO primordium through inhibition of diencephalic roof plate identity without inducing programmed cell death. This study provides further evidence that SCO function is essential for the prevention of hydrocephalus and indicates that overexpression of Sox3 in the dorsal midline alters progenitor cell differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:22291885

  16. Congenital Hydrocephalus and Abnormal Subcommissural Organ Development in Sox3 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kristie; Tan, Jacqueline; Morris, Michael B.; Rizzoti, Karine; Hughes, James; Cheah, Pike See; Felquer, Fernando; Liu, Xuan; Piltz, Sandra; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Thomas, Paul Q.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital hydrocephalus (CH) is a life-threatening medical condition in which excessive accumulation of CSF leads to ventricular expansion and increased intracranial pressure. Stenosis (blockage) of the Sylvian aqueduct (Aq; the narrow passageway that connects the third and fourth ventricles) is a common form of CH in humans, although the genetic basis of this condition is unknown. Mouse models of CH indicate that Aq stenosis is associated with abnormal development of the subcommmissural organ (SCO) a small secretory organ located at the dorsal midline of the caudal diencephalon. Glycoproteins secreted by the SCO generate Reissner's fibre (RF), a thread-like structure that descends into the Aq and is thought to maintain its patency. However, despite the importance of SCO function in CSF homeostasis, the genetic program that controls SCO development is poorly understood. Here, we show that the X-linked transcription factor SOX3 is expressed in the murine SCO throughout its development and in the mature organ. Importantly, overexpression of Sox3 in the dorsal diencephalic midline of transgenic mice induces CH via a dose-dependent mechanism. Histological, gene expression and cellular proliferation studies indicate that Sox3 overexpression disrupts the development of the SCO primordium through inhibition of diencephalic roof plate identity without inducing programmed cell death. This study provides further evidence that SCO function is essential for the prevention of hydrocephalus and indicates that overexpression of Sox3 in the dorsal midline alters progenitor cell differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:22291885

  17. Application of sex-selected semen in heifer development and breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Seidel, George E

    2013-11-01

    The only practicable method for sexing mammalian sperm is by measuring DNA content with a flow cytometer/cell sorter. Although many other methods have been tried and patented, they either are inaccurate, damage sperm severely, or otherwise are unsuitable for practical application. Procedures for sexing sperm damage them slightly, and fewer sperm are packaged per straw than with unsexed semen. These 2 characteristics result in lower fertility with sexed than unsexed semen. Incremental improvements of current sexing procedures are being developed constantly. PMID:24182438

  18. Rice ORMDL Controls Sphingolipid Homeostasis Affecting Fertility Resulting from Abnormal Pollen Development

    PubMed Central

    Chueasiri, Chutharat; Chunthong, Ketsuwan; Pitnjam, Keasinee; Chakhonkaen, Sriprapai; Sangarwut, Numphet; Sangsawang, Kanidta; Suksangpanomrung, Malinee; Michaelson, Louise V.; Napier, Johnathan A.; Muangprom, Amorntip

    2014-01-01

    The orosomucoids (ORM) are ER-resisdent polypeptides encoded by ORM and ORMDL (ORM-like) genes. In humans, ORMDL3 was reported as genetic risk factor associated to asthma. In yeast, ORM proteins act as negative regulators of sphingolipid synthesis. Sphingolipids are important molecules regulating several processes including stress responses and apoptosis. However, the function of ORM/ORMDL genes in plants has not yet been reported. Previously, we found that temperature sensitive genetic male sterility (TGMS) rice lines controlled by tms2 contain a deletion of about 70 kb in chromosome 7. We identified four genes expressed in panicles, including an ORMDL ortholog, as candidates for tms2. In this report, we quantified expression of the only two candidate genes normally expressed in anthers of wild type plants grown in controlled growth rooms for fertile and sterile conditions. We found that only the ORMDL gene (LOC_Os07g26940) showed differential expression under these conditions. To better understand the function of rice ORMDL genes, we generated RNAi transgenic rice plants suppressing either LOC_Os07g26940, or all three ORMDL genes present in rice. We found that the RNAi transgenic plants with low expression of either LOC_Os07g26940 alone or all three ORMDL genes were sterile, having abnormal pollen morphology and staining. In addition, we found that both sphingolipid metabolism and expression of genes involved in sphingolipid synthesis were perturbed in the tms2 mutant, analogous to the role of ORMs in yeast. Our results indicated that plant ORMDL proteins influence sphingolipid homeostasis, and deletion of this gene affected fertility resulting from abnormal pollen development. PMID:25192280

  19. Hyperactivity, Shyness, and Sex: Development and Socio-Emotional Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rydell, Ann-Margret; Diamantopoulou, Sofia; Thorell, Lisa B.; Bohlin, Gunilla

    2009-01-01

    Based on formulations about the possible consequences for adaptation of gender non-normative behaviour, we investigated predictive and concurrent relations of hyperactivity and shyness to various aspects of adaptation focusing on possible effects of sex. At ages 5-6, parents and preschool teachers rated hyperactivity and shyness for 151 children…

  20. Development of Sex-Typed Play Behavior in Toddlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Marion; Huston, Aletha C.

    1985-01-01

    Observed play of 52 toddlers with a set of socially stereotyped masculine, feminine, and neutral toys in a day care setting over 14 months to (1) determine the age at which toddlers consistently exhibit sex-stereotyped toy choices in a natural setting and (2) investigate relation of parents' expectations and the children's own knowledge of gender…

  1. Hyperactivity, Shyness, and Sex: Development and Socio-Emotional Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rydell, Ann-Margret; Diamantopoulou, Sofia; Thorell, Lisa B.; Bohlin, Gunilla

    2009-01-01

    Based on formulations about the possible consequences for adaptation of gender non-normative behaviour, we investigated predictive and concurrent relations of hyperactivity and shyness to various aspects of adaptation focusing on possible effects of sex. At ages 5-6, parents and preschool teachers rated hyperactivity and shyness for 151 children

  2. The Development of Sex Differences in Aggression: A Revised Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Janet S.; Schuck, John R.

    In response to Maccoby and Jacklin's (1974) conclusion that sex differences in aggression must be biological in origin, we suggest alternative social-learning mechanisms to explain the differences. These mechanisms include: (1) punishment for aggression increases aggression in boys, particularly because boys do not identify with the punisher; (2)…

  3. Decision Processes During Development of Molecular Biomarkers for Gonadal Phenotypic Sex

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecular biomarkers for determination of gonadal phenotypic sex in the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), will serve as a case study. The medaka has unique features that aid in the development of appropriate molecular biomarkers of gonad phenotype, a) genetic sex can be determin...

  4. Adolescent Girls' Sex Role Development: Relationship with Sports Participation, Self-Esteem, and Age at Menarche.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Janice E.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates development of sex role orientation among adolescent girls, and explores its relationship with sports participation, self-esteem, and age at menarche. Concludes that relationship of sex role orientation with sports participation and self-esteem was not an interactive one, but was reflective of individual differences beginning in late…

  5. Positioning Sex Educators: A Critical Ethnography of a Professional Development Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Brigitte C.

    2013-01-01

    In this ethnographic research, I offer an analysis of a state-sponsored professional development workshop for sex educators. Positioning theory is used to understand how the lived space of the workshop -- including texts, talk and silence -- positions sex education teachers as professionals and practitioners with certain (limited) speaking rights…

  6. Positioning Sex Educators: A Critical Ethnography of a Professional Development Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Brigitte C.

    2013-01-01

    In this ethnographic research, I offer an analysis of a state-sponsored professional development workshop for sex educators. Positioning theory is used to understand how the lived space of the workshop -- including texts, talk and silence -- positions sex education teachers as professionals and practitioners with certain (limited) speaking rights

  7. Single-Sex and Coeducational Schooling: Relationships to Socioemotional and Academic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mael, Fred A.

    1998-01-01

    The role of coeducation versus single-sex schooling in the academic, socioemotional, interpersonal, and career development of adolescents is discussed, and arguments and research support for both types of schooling are reviewed. Separate-sex schooling seems to provide potential benefits for at least some students. (Author/SLD)

  8. Neural tube defects and abnormal brain development in F52-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, M; Chen, D F; Sasaoka, T; Tonegawa, S

    1996-01-01

    F52 is a myristoylated, alanine-rich substrate for protein kinase C. We have generated F52-deficient mice by the gene targeting technique. These mutant mice manifest severe neural tube defects that are not associated with other complex malformations, a phenotype reminiscent of common human neural tube defects. The neural tube defects observed include both exencephaly and spina bifida, and the phenotype exhibits partial penetrance with about 60% of homozygous embryos developing neural tube defects. Exencephaly is the prominent type of defect and leads to high prenatal lethality. Neural tube defects are observed in a smaller percentage of heterozygous embryos (about 10%). Abnormal brain development and tail formation occur in homozygous mutants and are likely to be secondary to the neural tube defects. Disruption of F52 in mice therefore identifies a gene whose mutation results in isolated neural tube defects and may provide an animal model for common human neural tube defects. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8700893

  9. Prenatal ketamine exposure causes abnormal development of prefrontal cortex in rat.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tianyun; Li, Chuanxiang; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Haixing; Ma, Daqing; Song, Xingrong; Zhou, Libing

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is commonly used for anesthesia and as a recreational drug. In pregnant users, a potential neurotoxicity in offspring has been noted. Our previous work demonstrated that ketamine exposure of pregnant rats induces affective disorders and cognitive impairments in offspring. As the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critically involved in emotional and cognitive processes, here we studied whether maternal ketamine exposure influences the development of the PFC in offspring. Pregnant rats on gestational day 14 were treated with ketamine at a sedative dose for 2 hrs, and pups were studied at postnatal day 0 (P0) or P30. We found that maternal ketamine exposure resulted in cell apoptosis and neuronal loss in fetal brain. Upon ketamine exposure in utero, PFC neurons at P30 showed more dendritic branching, while cultured neurons from P0 PFC extended shorter neurites than controls. In addition, maternal ketamine exposure postponed the switch of NR2B/2A expression, and perturbed pre- and postsynaptic protein expression in the PFC. These data suggest that prenatal ketamine exposure impairs neuronal development of the PFC, which may be associated with abnormal behavior in offsprings. PMID:27226073

  10. IL-1β and Inflammasome Activity Link Inflammation to Abnormal Fetal Airway Development.

    PubMed

    Stouch, Ashley N; McCoy, Alyssa M; Greer, Rachel M; Lakhdari, Omar; Yull, Fiona E; Blackwell, Timothy S; Hoffman, Hal M; Prince, Lawrence S

    2016-04-15

    Inflammation in the developing preterm lung leads to disrupted airway morphogenesis and chronic lung disease in human neonates. However, the molecular mechanisms linking inflammation and the pathways controlling airway morphogenesis remain unclear. In this article, we show that IL-1β released by activated fetal lung macrophages is the key inflammatory mediator that disrupts airway morphogenesis. In mouse lung explants, blocking IL-1β expression, posttranslational processing, and signaling protected the formation of new airways from the inhibitory effects ofEscherichia coliLPS. Consistent with a critical role for IL-1β, mice expressing a gain-of-functionNlrp3allele and subsequent overactive inflammasome activity displayed abnormal saccular-stage lung morphogenesis and died soon after birth. Although the early-stage fetal lung appeared capable of mounting an NF-κB-mediated immune response, airway formation became more sensitive to inflammation later in development. This period of susceptibility coincided with higher expression of multiple inflammasome components that could increase the ability to release bioactive IL-1β. Macrophages fromNlrp3gain-of-function mice also expressed higher levels of more mature cell surface markers, additionally linking inflammasome activation with macrophage maturation. These data identify developmental expression of the inflammasome and IL-1β release by fetal lung macrophages as key mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets for neonatal lung disease. PMID:26951798

  11. Disruption of Eaat2b, a glutamate transporter, results in abnormal motor behaviors in developing zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    McKeown, Kelly Anne; Moreno, Rosa; Hall, Victoria L.; Ribera, Angeles B.; Downes, Gerald B.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of zebrafish mutants that have defects in motor behavior can allow entrée into the hindbrain and spinal cord networks that control locomotion. Here, we report that zebrafish techno trousers (tnt) locomotor mutants harbor a mutation in slc1a2b, which encodes Eaat2b, a plasma membrane glutamate transporter. We used tnt mutants to explore the effects of impaired glutamate transporter activity on locomotor network function. Wild-type larvae perform robust swimming behavior in response to touch stimuli at two and four days after fertilization. In contrast, tnt mutant larvae demonstrate aberrant, exaggerated body bends beginning two days after fertilization and they are almost paralyzed four days after fertilization. We show that slc1a2b is expressed in glial cells in a dynamic fashion across development, which may explain the abnormal sequence of motor behaviors demonstrated by tnt mutants. We also show that tnt larvae demonstrate enhanced excitation of neurons, consistent with the predicted effects of excessive glutamate. These findings illustrate the dynamic regulation and importance of glutamate transporters during development. Since glutamate toxicity caused by EAAT2 dysfunction is thought to promote several different neurological disorders in humans, including epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases, tnt mutants hold promise as a new tool to better understand these pathologies. PMID:22094018

  12. A curious abnormally developed embryo of the pill millipede Glomeris marginata (Villers, 1789)

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This paper reports on an abnormally developed embryo (ADE) of the common pill millipede Glomeris marginata. This ADE represents a modified case of Duplicitas posterior, in which two posterior ends are present, but only one anterior end. While the major posterior germ band of the embryo appears almost normally developed, the minor posterior germ band is heavily malformed, has no clear correlation to the single head, little or no ventral tissue, and a minute amount of yolk. The anterior end of the minor germ band is fused to the ventral side of the major germ band between the first and second trunk segment. At least one appendage of the second trunk segment appears to be shared by the two germ bands. Morphology and position of the minor germ band suggest that the ADE may be the result of an incorrectly established single cumulus [the later posterior segment addition zone (SAZ)]. This differs from earlier reports on Duplicitas posterior type ADEs in Glomeris marginata that are likely the result of the early formation of two separate cumuli. PMID:23794817

  13. Deficiency of the chromatin regulator BRPF1 causes abnormal brain development.

    PubMed

    You, Linya; Zou, Jinfeng; Zhao, Hong; Bertos, Nicholas R; Park, Morag; Wang, Edwin; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2015-03-13

    Epigenetic mechanisms are important in different neurological disorders, and one such mechanism is histone acetylation. The multivalent chromatin regulator BRPF1 (bromodomain- and plant homeodomain-linked (PHD) zinc finger-containing protein 1) recognizes different epigenetic marks and activates three histone acetyltransferases, so it is both a reader and a co-writer of the epigenetic language. The three histone acetyltransferases are MOZ, MORF, and HBO1, which are also known as lysine acetyltransferase 6A (KAT6A), KAT6B, and KAT7, respectively. The MORF gene is mutated in four neurodevelopmental disorders sharing the characteristic of intellectual disability and frequently displaying callosal agenesis. Here, we report that forebrain-specific inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene caused early postnatal lethality, neocortical abnormalities, and partial callosal agenesis. With respect to the control, the mutant forebrain contained fewer Tbr2-positive intermediate neuronal progenitors and displayed aberrant neurogenesis. Molecularly, Brpf1 loss led to decreased transcription of multiple genes, such as Robo3 and Otx1, important for neocortical development. Surprisingly, elevated expression of different Hox genes and various other transcription factors, such as Lhx4, Foxa1, Tbx5, and Twist1, was also observed. These results thus identify an important role of Brpf1 in regulating forebrain development and suggest that it acts as both an activator and a silencer of gene expression in vivo. PMID:25568313

  14. Interaction between normal and CML hematopoietic progenitors and stroma influences abnormal hematopoietic development.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Elvira Alicia Aparicio; Da Rocha Silla, Lúcia Mariano; Cañedo, Andrés Delgado; Allebrandt, Waldir Francisco; Fogliatto, Laura; Nardi, Nance Beyer

    2004-06-01

    Several studies have shown defective progenitor-stromal interactions in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and adhesive defects induced by BCR/ABL have been described. However, controversial results have been reported, and the role of the stroma in abnormal development of the hematopoietic system is not clear. In this study, CML hematopoietic and irradiated stromal cells were co-cultured in different combinations for 10 or 21 days. Maintenance of viable cells was dependent both on the sources of hematopoietic progenitors and stromal adherent layers, with normal cells performing better than their leukemic counterparts. The frequency of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells in the non-adherent fraction was more related to the source of hematopoietic cells than of stroma, and hematopoietic cells from normal subjects showed better performance. The simultaneous analysis of different combinations of normal and leukemic precursor cells and stromal layers, as done in the present work, suggests that the outcome of the interaction depends on characteristics of both compartments. This hematopoietic system development is influenced by intrinsic qualities of both hematopoietic stem cells and the supportive stroma. PMID:15186718

  15. Facial Metrics in Children with Corticotrophin-Producing Pituitary Adenomas Suggest Abnormalities in Midface Development

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Margaret F.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Tumors of the hypothalamic-pituitary unit have been linked to genetic syndromes that are associated with midfacial abnormalities. Aim We hypothesized that mutations of genes that affect the development of the face (and consequently of the anterior pituitary) may be present in children with ACTH-producing pituitary adenomas, and if this is true then facial measurements would be different from those predicted by parental features. Methods We studied 20 children with cortico-tropinomas and a control group and their parents. All facial measurements were expressed according to standard deviation scores. Results Significant differences were seen between the children with pituitary adenomas and their parents for vertical facial height measures: nasal length (p <0.001), lower facial height (p <0.03) and overall facial height (p <0.01). Conclusion We conclude that some of the indices of midline craniofacial development, in particular those affecting the vertical axis, are different in children with corticotroph adenomas producing ACTH. PMID:19344074

  16. Deficiency of the Chromatin Regulator Brpf1 Causes Abnormal Brain Development*

    PubMed Central

    You, Linya; Zou, Jinfeng; Zhao, Hong; Bertos, Nicholas R.; Park, Morag; Wang, Edwin; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are important in different neurological disorders, and one such mechanism is histone acetylation. The multivalent chromatin regulator BRPF1 (bromodomain- and plant homeodomain-linked (PHD) zinc finger-containing protein 1) recognizes different epigenetic marks and activates three histone acetyltransferases, so it is both a reader and a co-writer of the epigenetic language. The three histone acetyltransferases are MOZ, MORF, and HBO1, which are also known as lysine acetyltransferase 6A (KAT6A), KAT6B, and KAT7, respectively. The MORF gene is mutated in four neurodevelopmental disorders sharing the characteristic of intellectual disability and frequently displaying callosal agenesis. Here, we report that forebrain-specific inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene caused early postnatal lethality, neocortical abnormalities, and partial callosal agenesis. With respect to the control, the mutant forebrain contained fewer Tbr2-positive intermediate neuronal progenitors and displayed aberrant neurogenesis. Molecularly, Brpf1 loss led to decreased transcription of multiple genes, such as Robo3 and Otx1, important for neocortical development. Surprisingly, elevated expression of different Hox genes and various other transcription factors, such as Lhx4, Foxa1, Tbx5, and Twist1, was also observed. These results thus identify an important role of Brpf1 in regulating forebrain development and suggest that it acts as both an activator and a silencer of gene expression in vivo. PMID:25568313

  17. Congenital brain abnormalities: an update on malformations of cortical development and infratentorial malformations.

    PubMed

    Poretti, Andrea; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2014-07-01

    In the past two decades, significant progress in neuroimaging and genetic techniques has allowed for advances in the correct definition/classification of congenital brain abnormalities, which have resulted in a better understanding of their pathogenesis. In addition, new groups of diseases, such as axonal guidance disorders or tubulinopathies, are increasingly reported. Well-defined neuroimaging diagnostic criteria have been suggested for the majority of congenital brain abnormalities. Accurate diagnoses of these complex abnormalities, including distinction between malformations and disruptions, are of paramount significance for management, prognosis, and family counseling. In the next decade, these advances will hopefully be translated into deeper understanding of these disorders and more specific treatments. PMID:25192502

  18. Development of senile plaques. Relationships of neuronal abnormalities and amyloid deposits.

    PubMed Central

    Cork, L. C.; Masters, C.; Beyreuther, K.; Price, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of senile plaques and the relationships among neuritic elements, extracellular deposits of the beta-amyloid protein (beta/A4), and vascular beta/A4 are poorly understood. Immunocytochemical methods were used to examine fixed-frozen prefrontal cortices of 14 rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) (14 to 37 years of age) for the presence of abnormal fibers/neurites, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (alpha-ACT), and beta/A4. Age-associated alterations included abnormal fibers/neurites, presence of beta/A4, and association of alpha-ACT with beta/A4 in plaques and blood vessels. Vascular amyloid was present only in the oldest monkeys. The topographic distribution of abnormal fibers/neurites was mapped with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry, and deposits of amyloid were visualized with immunocytochemistry for beta/A4. beta/A4 often was associated with neurites, but many neurites lacked demonstrable beta/A4. Thus in aged monkeys, abnormal neurites may provide one type of focus for the accumulation of the amyloid precursor, which is subsequently abnormally processed to form beta/A4. Our data in rhesus monkeys suggest that fiber and neuritic abnormalities increase with age and that they may precede the majority of beta/A4 deposits; the initial stages of neurite formation and parenchymal amyloid deposits may be independent of the appearance of vascular amyloid; and these processes may be synergistic with advanced age. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 2 PMID:1701963

  19. Abnormalities in synaptic dynamics during development in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    PubMed Central

    Hatanaka, Yusuke; Watase, Kei; Wada, Keiji; Nagai, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Late-onset neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by neurological symptoms and progressive neuronal death. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal dysfunction, rather than neuronal death, causes the symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying the dysfunction that occurs prior to cell death remain unclear. To investigate the synaptic basis of this dysfunction, we employed in vivo two-photon imaging to analyse excitatory postsynaptic dendritic protrusions. We used Sca1154Q/2Q mice, an established knock-in mouse model of the polyglutamine disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), which replicates human SCA1 features including ataxia, cognitive impairment, and neuronal death. We found that Sca1154Q/2Q mice exhibited greater synaptic instability than controls, without synaptic loss, in the cerebral cortex, where obvious neuronal death is not observed, even before the onset of distinct symptoms. Interestingly, this abnormal synaptic instability was evident in Sca1154Q/2Q mice from the synaptic developmental stage, and persisted into adulthood. Expression of synaptic scaffolding proteins was also lower in Sca1154Q/2Q mice than controls before synaptic maturation. As symptoms progressed, synaptic loss became evident. These results indicate that aberrant synaptic instability, accompanied by decreased expression of scaffolding proteins during synaptic development, is a very early pathology that precedes distinct neurological symptoms and neuronal cell death in SCA1. PMID:26531852

  20. Thyroid abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Weetman, Anthony P

    2014-09-01

    Thyroid abnormalities and nonthyroidal illness complicate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Among the effects that result from HIV and other opportunistic infections, distinctive features of HIV infection include early lowering of reverse tri-iodothyromine (T3) levels, with normal free T3 levels. Later, some patients develop an isolated low free thyroxine level. After highly active antiretroviral therapy, the immune system reconstitutes in a way that leads to dysregulation of the autoimmune response and the appearance of Graves disease in 1% to 2% of patients. Opportunistic thyroid infections with unusual organisms are most commonly asymptomatic, but can lead to acute or subacute thyroiditis. PMID:25169567

  1. Developing an App for College Women in Abusive Same-Sex Relationships and Their Friends.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Tina; Gielen, Andrea; Glass, Nancy

    2016-06-01

    Young women experiencing dating violence in same-sex relationships face significant barriers to help for safety planning. Therefore, our team developed a tailored smartphone safety decision aid app for dating violence survivors and their peers. College women survivors of same-sex dating violence, peers, and college staff reviewed the app, identifying users' barriers to information, resources, and services and key strategies for dissemination, inclusiveness, and safety for the app. Findings support the use of the app to assist college women experiencing same-sex dating violence and peers to connect with resources and develop tailored safety plans to reduce violence and increase their safety. PMID:26515797

  2. A Restorative Justice Approach to Empathy Development in Sex Offenders: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseman, Christopher P.; Ritchie, Martin; Laux, John M.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe an exploratory study in sex offender treatment using a restorative justice approach to examine the shame, guilt, and empathy development of convicted sexual offenders. Implications for clinical practice and future research are highlighted. (Contains 3 tables.)

  3. A Realistic Approach to Sex Education for the Developmentally Disabled: The Human Growth and Development Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Donna; Ogle, Peggy

    1981-01-01

    A curriculum designed to incorporate sex education into the regular curriculum through a human growth and development approach is described in a six-level outline focusing on social identity, physiological identity, and health and hygiene. (CL)

  4. The trajectory of gray matter development in Broca's area is abnormal in people who stutter.

    PubMed

    Beal, Deryk S; Lerch, Jason P; Cameron, Brodie; Henderson, Rhaeling; Gracco, Vincent L; De Nil, Luc F

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition and mastery of speech-motor control requires years of practice spanning the course of development. People who stutter often perform poorly on speech-motor tasks thereby calling into question their ability to establish the stable neural motor programs required for masterful speech-motor control. There is evidence to support the assertion that these neural motor programs are represented in the posterior part of Broca's area, specifically the left pars opercularis. Consequently, various theories of stuttering causation posit that the disorder is related to a breakdown in the formation of the neural motor programs for speech early in development and that this breakdown is maintained throughout life. To date, no study has examined the potential neurodevelopmental signatures of the disorder across pediatric and adult populations. The current study aimed to fill this gap in our knowledge. We hypothesized that the developmental trajectory of cortical thickness in people who stutter would differ across the lifespan in the left pars opercularis relative to a group of control participants. We collected structural magnetic resonance images from 116 males (55 people who stutter) ranging in age from 6 to 48 years old. Differences in cortical thickness across ages and between patients and controls were investigated in 30 brain regions previously implicated in speech-motor control. An interaction between age and group was found for the left pars opercularis only. In people who stutter, the pars opercularis did not demonstrate the typical maturational pattern of gradual gray matter thinning with age across the lifespan that we observed in control participants. In contrast, the developmental trajectory of gray matter thickness in other regions of interest within the neural network for speech-motor control was similar for both groups. Our findings indicate that the developmental trajectory of gray matter in left pars opercularis is abnormal in people who stutter. PMID:25784869

  5. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic material inherited from one generation ...

  6. It's all about sex: male-female differences in lung development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Michelle A.; Card, Jeffrey W.; Voltz, James W.; Arbes, Samuel J.; Germolec, Dori R.; Korach, Kenneth S.; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that gender impacts the incidence, susceptibility and severity of several lung diseases. Gender also influences lung development and physiology. Data from both human and animal studies suggests that sex hormones may contribute to disease pathogenesis or serve as protective factors, depending on the disease involved. In this review, the influence of gender and sex hormones on lung development and pathology will be discussed, with specific emphasis on pulmonary fibrosis, asthma and cancer. PMID:17764971

  7. Researching domestic violence in same-sex relationships--a feminist epistemological approach to survey development.

    PubMed

    Hester, Marianne; Donovan, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    The article draws on recently completed research by the authors, involving a detailed study of love and intimate partner violence in same-sex and heterosexual relationships (funded by the ESRC, award RES-000-23-0650). The research, hitherto the most detailed study of its kind in the United Kingdom, included a national same-sex community survey (n = 800) plus four focus groups and interviews with 67 individuals identifying as lesbian, gay, queer, bisexual, transgender, or heterosexual. The article discusses in particular the development of the same-sex community survey, focusing on the epistemological and methodological implications of using a feminist approach. PMID:19363762

  8. Development and experimental validation of computational methods to simulate abnormal thermal and structural environments

    SciTech Connect

    Moya, J.L.; Skocypec, R.D.; Thomas, R.K.

    1993-10-01

    Over the past 40 years, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been actively engaged in research to improve the ability to accurately predict the response of engineered systems to abnormal thermal and structural environments. These engineered systems contain very hazardous materials. Assessing the degree of safety/risk afforded the public and environment by these engineered systems, therefore, is of upmost importance. The ability to accurately predict the response of these systems to accidents (to abnormal environments) is required to assess the degree of safety. Before the effect of the abnormal environment on these systems can be determined, it is necessary to ascertain the nature of the environment. Ascertaining the nature of the environment, in turn, requires the ability to physically characterize and numerically simulate the abnormal environment. Historically, SNL has demonstrated the level of safety provided by these engineered systems by either of two approaches: (1) a purely regulatory approach, or (2) by a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). This paper will address the latter of the two approaches.

  9. Dynamics of yolk steroid hormones during development in a reptile with temperature-dependent sex determination.

    PubMed

    Elf, P K; Lang, J W; Fivizzani, A J

    2002-06-01

    Many oviparous reptiles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD); i.e., the temperature at which the egg is incubated determines the sex of the offspring. In TSD reptiles, yolk steroids not only may influence sex determination, but also may mediate hormonal effects on subsequent growth and behavior, as in some avian species. We investigated changes in the levels of estradiol (E(2)) and testosterone (T) during development in yolks of snapping turtle eggs, examined how incubation temperature affects hormone levels, and determined how hormones in turtle eggs are influenced by individual females (=clutch effects). Results indicate significant decreases in both hormones (>50% decline) by the end of the sex-determining period, when two-thirds of the development is complete. The declines in both E(2) and T were significantly affected by incubation temperature, but in different ways. Eggs incubated at female-producing temperatures maintained high levels, those incubated at male-producing temperatures had low E(2) values, and eggs incubated at pivotal temperatures had intermediate levels of E(2). At all three temperatures, T values underwent significant but approximately equal declines, except during the developmental stages just after the sex-determining period, when T levels decreased more at the male-producing temperature than at either of the other two temperatures. Initially, there were significant clutch effects in both hormones, but such differences, attributable to individual females, were maintained only for E(2) later in development. Here we report for the first time that incubation temperature significantly affects the hormonal environment of the developing embryo of a turtle with temperature-dependent sex determination. Based on this and related findings, we propose that yolk sex steroids influence sexual differentiation in these TSD species and play a role in sex determination at pivotal temperatures. PMID:12161199

  10. Testicular disorder of sex development in four cats with a male karyotype (38,XY; SRY-positive).

    PubMed

    Nowacka-Woszuk, Joanna; Szczerbal, Izabela; Salamon, Sylwia; Kociucka, Beata; Jackowiak, Hanna; Prozorowska, Ewelina; Slaska, Brygida; Rozanska, Dorota; Orzelski, Maciej; Ochota, Malgorzata; Dzimira, Stanislaw; Lipiec, Magdalena; Nizanski, Wojciech; Switonski, Marek

    2014-12-10

    The molecular background of disorders of sex development (DSD) in cats is poorly recognized. In this study we present cytogenetic, molecular and histological analyses of four cats subjected for the analysis due to ambiguous external genitalia. Three cases, with rudimentary penises and an abnormal position of the urethral orifice, represented different types of hypospadias. The fourth case had a normal penis, a blind vulva and spermatogenetically active testes. Histological studies showed structures typical of testes, but spermatogenic activity was observed in two cats only. All the cats had a normal male chromosome complement (38,XY) and the Y-chromosome linked genes (SRY and ZFY) were also detected. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), with the use of the feline BAC probe harboring the SRY gene, excluded the possibility of chromosome translocation of the Y chromosome fragment carrying the SRY gene onto another chromosome. Sequencing of four candidate genes (SRY--sex determining region Y; AR--androgen receptor; SRD5A2--steroid-5-alfa reductase 2 and MAMLD1--mastermind-like domain containing (1) revealed one SNP in the SRY gene, one common polymorphism in exon 1 of the AR gene (tandem repeat of a tri-nucleotide motif--CAG), six polymorphisms (5 SNPs and 1 indel) in the SRD5A2 gene and one SNP in the MAMLD1 gene. Molecular studies of the candidate genes showed no association with the identified polymorphisms, thus molecular background of the studied DSD phenotypes remains unknown. PMID:25455261

  11. Gender Development in Indonesian Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Disorders of Sex Development.

    PubMed

    Ediati, Annastasia; Juniarto, Achmad Zulfa; Birnie, Erwin; Drop, Stenvert L S; Faradz, Sultana M H; Dessens, Arianne B

    2015-07-01

    In most Western countries, clinical management of disorders of sex development (DSD), including ambiguous genitalia, begins at diagnosis soon after birth. For many Indonesian patients born with ambiguous genitalia, limited medical treatment is available. Consequently, affected individuals are raised with ambiguous genitalia and atypical secondary sex characteristics. We investigated gender identity and gender role behavior in 118 Indonesian subjects (77 males, 41 females) with different types of DSD in comparison with 118 healthy controls matched for gender, age, and residential setting (rural, suburban, or urban). In Study 1, we report on methodological aspects of the investigation, including scale adaptation, pilot testing, and determining reliability and validity of measures. In Study 2, we report on gender development in 60 children (42 boys, 18 girls), 24 adolescents (15 boys, 9 girls), and 34 adults (19 men, 15 women) with DSD. The majority of participants with DSD never received any medical or surgical treatment prior to this study. We observed a gender change in all age groups, with the greatest incidence in adults. Among patients who changed, most changed from female to male, possessed a 46,XY karyotype, and had experienced significant masculinization during life. Gender identity confusion and cross-gender behavior was more frequently observed in children with DSD raised as girls compared to boys. Puberty and associated masculinization were related to gender problems in individuals with 46,XY DSD raised female. An integrated clinical and psychological follow-up on gender outcome is necessary prior to puberty and adulthood. PMID:25813609

  12. Sex differences in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders: Focus on microglial function and neuroinflammation during development.

    PubMed

    Hanamsagar, Richa; Bilbo, Staci D

    2016-06-01

    Several neurological conditions are associated with sex differences in prevalence or outcome. For example, autism predominantly affects boys, depression is more common in women, Parkinson's disease more common in men, and multiple sclerosis in women. In the case of stroke, women have a less favorable outcome and suffer from a more precipitous drop in health status compared to men. As a result, treatment of such diseases is difficult and yields variable results. Despite this, sex is rarely considered when making treatment decisions. The mechanisms underlying sex differences in disease progression are not well understood, however a strong link exists between different inflammation states of men and women and their propensity to develop certain diseases. As neuroinflammation is an important component of pathophysiology in many neurological conditions, it can be speculated that any changes in the state of inflammation in the brain during normal development can potentially lead to an increase in susceptibility to neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Microglia play a crucial role in onset and modulation of inflammation and thus sex differences in microglial function could explain, at least in part, differences observed in susceptibilities and outcomes of neurological disorders in men and women. Understanding the mechanisms behind sex differences could help develop more targeted therapy with higher success rate, especially in diseases where sex differences are most prominent. PMID:26435451

  13. Understanding and Combating the Dangers of Sex-Role Stereotyping to the Development of Creativity in Gifted Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grau, Phyllis

    1982-01-01

    The author offers three parables to examine the danger of sex-role stereotyping as it affects development of creativity in gifted children. It is pointed out that gifted children are likely to demonstrate some opposite sex personality and behavioral traits. Steps toward cross-sex identification are reviewed. (SW)

  14. Development of an expert system for abnormal operating procedures in a main control room.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Min-Han; Hwang, Sheue-Ling; Liu, Kang-Hong; Liang, Sheau-Farn Max; Chuang, Chang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    The study was conducted from the perspective of human factors engineering in order to compare the process that operators originally used to diagnose potential and actual faults with a process that included an expert system for diagnosing faults. The results of the study indicated that the existence of an expert system for fault diagnosis makes the task of fault diagnosis easier and reduces errors by quickly suggesting likely Abnormal Operating Procedures (AOPs). PMID:22317151

  15. Gonadoblastoma and selected other aspects of gonadal pathology in young patients with disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Ulbright, Thomas M; Young, Robert H

    2014-09-01

    Some patients with disorders of sex development (DSDs), previously known as intersex disorders, have abnormal gonadal development and an increased risk of germ cell tumors. Because of their relative rarity, however, many pathologists are unfamiliar with the morphological findings in the gonads of DSD patients and their clinical significance. This review concentrates on some of the most common DSDs where gonadal specimens may come to the attention of pathologists. It highlights the findings in gonadal dysgenesis, a DSD with a spectrum of clinical, pathologic, and molecular features but with the shared attributes of having both Y chromosomal material (even if in very limited amounts) in the gonad and also having mutations or deletions in genes necessary for normal gonadal development, mostly in those upstream of the SOX9 gene. This situation results in testicular tissue lacking normal Sertoli cells, which are now considered an essential element for the normal maturation of the primordial germ cells that migrate to the gonad from the embryonic yolk sac. Germ cells with delayed maturation mimic neoplastic germ cells, but there are both morphological and immunohistochemical differences. If the gonad having germ cells with delayed maturation also harbors the TSPY gene on the GBY locus of the Y chromosome, the cells may undergo neoplastic transformation and result in the distinctive gonadoblastoma, whose pathologic features are explored at length herein, including its potential for variant morphologies, such as a "dissecting" pattern. Another important DSD, the androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS), is discussed at length, including the varied appearances of the testis and its distinctive lesions-hamartomas and Sertoli cell adenomas. The potential for germ cell neoplasia in the partial AIS is also discussed and contrasted with that of the complete AIS. A third major topic is ovotesticular DSD (true hermaphroditism). The clinical features and morphology of this condition are reviewed, including the arrangements of the tissue components in an ovotestis. Several other DSDs with distinctive gonadal findings are also considered, including Klinefelter syndrome, 5α-reductase deficiency, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency, and female adrenogenital syndrome. PMID:25129544

  16. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Vinicius S; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  17. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  18. Sex differences in behavior and neural development and their role in adolescent vulnerability to substance use.

    PubMed

    Hammerslag, Lindsey R; Gulley, Joshua M

    2016-02-01

    Adolescents are especially prone to risky behavior and to the emergence of psychological disorders like substance abuse, anxiety and depression. However, there is a sex (or gender) difference in this vulnerability, with females being more prone to developing internalizing disorders and males being more likely to engage in risky behavior and drug use. While several researchers have proposed that there is a relationship between corticolimbic circuit development and adolescent vulnerability, the current proposed models do not take sex differences into account. In this review, we explore recent findings from both human and rodent studies of sex differences during adolescence. In particular, we consider epidemiological studies on the factors that contribute to the development of substance abuse and internalizing disorders, laboratory studies on reward-related and decision-making behavior, and neuroanatomical studies on the development of several structures in the corticolimbic circuit (i.e., prefrontal cortex [PFC], amygdala and striatum). We then integrate these recent findings into models of adolescent vulnerability to substance use that have previously not addressed sex differences. Lastly, we discuss methodological considerations for the interpretation and design of studies on sex (or gender) differences during adolescence while highlighting some opportunities for future investigations. PMID:25882721

  19. Development and Evaluation of Simulation-Problem-Based Learning for Sex Education.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miok; Shin, Minho

    2016-01-01

    Nurses often encounter clients with sexual problems. A sexual problem is complicated and affects the quality of the client's life, and proper care requires the nurse to understand a variety of sex-related issues. Therefore, effective sex education for nursing students is necessary to prepare them for potential challenges from the client's sexual problems. In this study, we developed a simulation-problem-based sex education program for nursing students. The program immerses the students in a sex-related clinical situation to train them with nursing assessment, intervention skills, patient safety, patient privacy, and communication skills. To evaluate the effect of the program on the student's sexual knowledge and attitude, we provided the experimental group with simulation-problem-based sex education program along with traditional lectures, whereas the control group received only lectures. As a result, there were statistically significant differences in the improvement of knowledge (P < .05) and attitude (P < .05) of the two groups. The results show that the designed program effectively promotes nursing students' sexual knowledge and sexual attitude, and the simulation-problem-based learning is a practical and systematic approach to the sex education of nursing students. PMID:26535768

  20. Sex Differences in the Development of Social Relationships in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Amici, Federica; Langos, Doreen; Widdig, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have documented the importance of social bonding for the enhancement of individual fitness. However, little is known about how social relationships develop through ontogeny, and whether their development follows the same trajectory in males and females. Here we analyzed affiliative interactions (proximity, social grooming, play) combined with demographic and genetic data in semi-free-ranging rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) on Cayo Santiago over their first 4 yr of life (from birth to sexual maturation) to understand how these interactions change through development in both sexes. Generalized linear mixed models revealed that social behaviors mostly followed different developmental trajectories in males and females and were highly dependent on the social context. In particular, sex differences in social behavior varied through development depending on the partner’s sex and age. Females engaged in more social interactions than males, especially with other females, and were more involved in grooming around the time of maturation. In contrast, males interacted more with males and age peers, especially around maturation. Sex differences in social behavior varied through development, but also depended on rank, partner’s rank, and kin line, although not consistently. High-ranking individuals, especially older females, were generally preferred as social partners. Moreover, both male and female individuals interacted mostly with maternal kin, although males also preferred paternal kin over nonkin. Importantly, most developmental changes in sociality happened when individuals were ca. 2 yr old, suggesting that this might be a milestone in the development of sociality in rhesus macaques. The only notable exception to this pattern was play, which was more pronounced in males from the beginning of their lives. We propose that play might serve as a trigger of sex differences in social behavior, with sex differences emerging early in development and increasing through time as males and females gradually grow into their adult social roles. PMID:25983360

  1. Characteristics of activities that affect the development of women's same-sex relationships.

    PubMed

    Davis-Delano, Laurel R

    2014-01-01

    The author utilized semistructured interviews with 56 women to explore how a wide range of activities affected the development of the participants' same-sex attractions and relationships. The researcher was able to identify and describe some aspects of the process by which eight characteristics of activities that are more or less present in various social contexts have the potential to impact whether these contexts are more or less conducive or hindering to the development of women's same-sex attractions and relationships. Activities were more apt to nurture the development of the participants' same-sex attractions and relationships when the activity (a) included lesbians, (b) was composed primarily of women, (c) affirmed women, (d) facilitated bonding, (e) featured a climate of acceptance of lesbians/gays/bisexuals, (f) did not feature a climate that emphasized heteronormativity, (g) was perceived as gender neutral, and (h) generated or drew participants who were similar to each other. PMID:24885468

  2. Character Development in Business Education: A Comparison of Coeducational and Single-Sex Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, James H.; Ruhe, John; Lee, Monle; Rajadhyaksha, Ujvala

    2011-01-01

    This study questions the widely held assumption, particularly in the United States, that coeducation is best. Previous research supports the development of single-sex education for both female and male students. This study examines how the learning climate of the coeducation environment seems to affect the character development of female business

  3. Influence of age, sex, hearing loss, and balance on development of running by deaf children.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, S A

    1991-10-01

    130 deaf boys and girls, ages 3 to 14 years, were tested on development of mature running form. The mature form in this skill was associated with chronological age and performance of static and dynamic balance. Sex and hearing loss do not appear to affect development of running. PMID:1766796

  4. Character Development in Business Education: A Comparison of Coeducational and Single-Sex Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, James H.; Ruhe, John; Lee, Monle; Rajadhyaksha, Ujvala

    2011-01-01

    This study questions the widely held assumption, particularly in the United States, that coeducation is best. Previous research supports the development of single-sex education for both female and male students. This study examines how the learning climate of the coeducation environment seems to affect the character development of female business…

  5. Sex Differences in the Development of Moral Reasoning: A Rejoinder to Baumrind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Lawrence J.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the criticisms of Diana Baumrind's review of his research on sex differences in moral reasoning development. Discusses issues such as the nature of moral development, the focus on adulthood, the choice of statistics, the effect of differing sample sizes and scoring systems, and the role of sexual experiences in explaining variability in…

  6. Sex-Dependent Expression of Caveolin 1 in Response to Sex Steroid Hormones Is Closely Associated with Development of Obesity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Rajib; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung Sook; Yun, Jong Won

    2014-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (CAV1) is a conserved group of structural membrane proteins that form special cholesterol and sphingolipid-rich compartments, especially in adipocytes. Recently, it has been reported that CAV1 is an important target protein in sex hormone-dependent regulation of various metabolic pathways, particularly in cancer and diabetes. To clarify distinct roles of CAV1 in sex-dependent obesity development, we investigated the effects of high fat diet (HFD) and sex steroid hormones on CAV1 expression in adipose tissues of male and female rats. Results of animal experiments revealed that estrogen (17-?-estradiol, E2) and androgen (dihydrotestosterone, DHT) had opposite effects on body weight gain as well as on the regulation of CAV1, hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in adipose tissues. Furthermore, sex hormone receptors and aromatase were differentially expressed in a sex-dependent manner in response to E2 and DHT treatments. In vivo data were confirmed using 3T3-L1 and HIB1B cell lines, where Cav1 knock down stimulated lipogenesis but suppressed sex hormone receptor signaling proteins. Most importantly, co-immunoprecipitation enabled the identification of previously unrecognized CAV1-interacting mitochondrial or lipid oxidative pathway proteins in adipose tissues. Taken together, current data showed that CAV1 may play important preventive role in the development of obesity, with more prominent effects in females, and proved to be an important target protein for the hormonal regulation of adipose tissue metabolism by manipulating sex hormone receptors and mitochondrial oxidative pathways. Therefore, we can report, for the first time, the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of sex steroid hormones in the sex-dimorphic regulation of CAV1. PMID:24608114

  7. Sex Differences in Attitudes Toward New Energy Resource Developments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout-Wiegand, Nancy; Trent, Roger B.

    A survey to examine male and female attitudes toward locally proposed energy developments (e.g., coal production, refineries) in an Appalachian community is reported. Four hundred and eighty-five residents were questioned on whether they favor the proposed developments; whether they were currently employed in an energy-related occupation; and…

  8. Gender Development Research in Sex Roles: Historical Trends and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cindy Faith; Ruble, Diane N.; Martin, Carol Lynn; Fabes, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    The late 1960s through the 1970s marked an important turning point in the field of gender research, including theory and research in gender development. The establishment of Sex Roles in 1975 as a forum for this research represented an important milestone in the field. In this article, we celebrate the 35th anniversary of Sex Roles and, in particular, its contributions to the field of research on children’s and adolescents’ gender development. We examine the trends in research on gender development published in Sex Roles since its inception and use this analysis as a vehicle for exploring how the field has grown and evolved over the past few decades. We begin with a brief review of the history of this field of research since 1975. Then, we present a descriptive assessment of articles published on gender development in Sex Roles over time, and link this assessment to general trends that have occurred in the study of gender development over the past 35 years. We conclude with a discussion of future directions for the field of gender development. In particular, we highlight areas in which the journal could play a role in promoting more diversity in topics, methods, and ages employed in gender development research. PMID:21747580

  9. Development of a sintering methodology through abnormal glow discharge for manufacturing metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, S.; Pineda, Y.; Sarmiento, A.; López, A.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a sintering methodology is presented by using abnormal glow discharge to metal matrix composites (MMC), consisting of 316 steel, reinforced with titanium carbide (TiC). The wear behaviour of these compounds was evaluated according to the standard ASTM G 99 in a tribometer pin-on-disk. The effect of the percentage of reinforcement (3, 6, and 9%), with 40 minutes of mixing in the planetary mill is analysed, using compaction pressure of 700MPa and sintering temperature of 1,100°C±5°C, gaseous atmosphere of H2 - N2, and sintering time of 30 minutes. As a result of the research, it shows that the best behaviour against wear is obtained when the MMC contains 6% TiC. Under this parameter the lowest percentage of pores and the lowest coefficient of friction are achieved, ensuring that the incorporation of ceramic particles (TiC) in 316 austenitic steel matrix significantly improves the wear resistance. Also, it is shown that it is possible to sinter such materials using the abnormal glow discharge, being a novel and effective method in which the working temperature is reached in a short time.

  10. Sex Role Development and Teenage Fertility-Related Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cvetkovich, George; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents some data bearing on the relationship between the psychological development or maturity of adolescent women and their sexual behavior and contraceptive use. Data were collected through the American Public Health Association in 1975 from 369 females and 325 males. (Author/RK)

  11. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of a condition caused by numerical abnormalities is Down syndrome, which is marked by mental retardation, learning difficulties, ... muscle tone (hypotonia) in infancy. An individual with Down syndrome has three copies of chromosome 21 rather than ...

  12. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  13. Modeling abnormal early development with induced pluripotent stem cells from aneuploid syndromes.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Wang, Xianming; Fan, Wenxia; Zhao, Ping; Chan, Yau-Chi; Chen, Shen; Zhang, Shiqiang; Guo, Xiangpeng; Zhang, Ya; Li, Yanhua; Cai, Jinglei; Qin, Dajiang; Li, Xingyan; Yang, Jiayin; Peng, Tianran; Zychlinski, Daniela; Hoffmann, Dirk; Zhang, Ruosi; Deng, Kang; Ng, Kwong-Man; Menten, Bjorn; Zhong, Mei; Wu, Jiayan; Li, Zhiyuan; Chen, Yonglong; Schambach, Axel; Tse, Hung-Fat; Pei, Duanqing; Esteban, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    Many human diseases share a developmental origin that manifests during childhood or maturity. Aneuploid syndromes are caused by supernumerary or reduced number of chromosomes and represent an extreme example of developmental disease, as they have devastating consequences before and after birth. Investigating how alterations in gene dosage drive these conditions is relevant because it might help treat some clinical aspects. It may also provide explanations as to how quantitative differences in gene expression determine phenotypic diversity and disease susceptibility among natural populations. Here, we aimed to produce induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines that can be used to improve our understanding of aneuploid syndromes. We have generated iPSCs from monosomy X [Turner syndrome (TS)], trisomy 8 (Warkany syndrome 2), trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) and partial trisomy 11;22 (Emanuel syndrome), using either skin fibroblasts from affected individuals or amniocytes from antenatal diagnostic tests. These cell lines stably maintain the karyotype of the donors and behave like embryonic stem cells in all tested assays. TS iPSCs were used for further studies including global gene expression analysis and tissue-specific directed differentiation. Multiple clones displayed lower levels of the pseudoautosomal genes ASMTL and PPP2R3B than the controls. Moreover, they could be transformed into neural-like, hepatocyte-like and heart-like cells, but displayed insufficient up-regulation of the pseudoautosomal placental gene CSF2RA during embryoid body formation. These data support that abnormal organogenesis and early lethality in TS are not caused by a tissue-specific differentiation blockade, but rather involves other abnormalities including impaired placentation. PMID:21949351

  14. Environmentally relevant concentrations of ammonium perchlorate inhibit thyroid function and alter sex ratios in developing Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Goleman, Wanda L; Carr, James A; Anderson, Todd A

    2002-03-01

    Embryos and larvae of the South African frog Xenopus laevis were exposed to ammonium perchlorate (AP) or control medium for 70 d. The dosage levels (59 ppb, 14,140 ppb) bracketed a range of perchlorate concentrations measured in surface waters at the Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant (LHAAP) in Karnack, Texas, USA. The experiment also included a 28-d nontreatment recovery period to assess the reversibility of AP effects. There were no significant effects of AP on mortality or hatching success. There were no effects of AP on developmental abnormalities such as bent/asymmetric tails or edema. Ammonium perchlorate inhibited forelimb emergence, the percentage of animals completing tail resorption, and hindlimb development during the 70-d exposure period. Only the upper AP concentration reduced whole-body thyroxine content, whereas both concentrations caused significant hypertrophy of the thyroid follicular epithelium. Both concentrations of AP caused a skewed sex ratio, significantly reducing the percentage of males at metamorphosis. The effects of AP on metamorphosis and thyroid function were reversed during the 28-d nontreatment recovery period. We conclude that AP inhibits thyroid activity and alters gonadal differentiation in developing X. laevis. These effects were observed at concentrations at or below concentrations reported in surface waters contaminated with ammonium perchlorate, suggesting that this contaminant may pose a threat to normal development and growth in natural amphibian populations. PMID:11878472

  15. Pathogenesis of germ cell neoplasia in testicular dysgenesis and disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Jrgensen, Anne; Lindhardt Johansen, Marie; Juul, Anders; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Main, Katharina M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2015-09-01

    Development of human gonads is a sex-dimorphic process which evolved to produce sex-specific types of germ cells. The process of gonadal sex differentiation is directed by the action of the somatic cells and ultimately results in germ cells differentiating to become functional gametes through spermatogenesis or oogenesis. This tightly controlled process depends on the proper sequential expression of many genes and signalling pathways. Disturbances of this process can be manifested as a large spectrum of disorders, ranging from severe disorders of sex development (DSD) to - in the genetic male - mild reproductive problems within the testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS), with large overlap between the syndromes. These disorders carry an increased but variable risk of germ cell neoplasia. In this review, we discuss the pathogenesis of germ cell neoplasia associated with gonadal dysgenesis, especially in individuals with 46,XY DSD. We summarise knowledge concerning development and sex differentiation of human gonads, with focus on sex-dimorphic steps of germ cell maturation, including meiosis. We also briefly outline the histopathology of germ cell neoplasia in situ (GCNIS) and gonadoblastoma (GDB), which are essentially the same precursor lesion but with different morphological structure dependent upon the masculinisation of the somatic niche. To assess the risk of germ cell neoplasia in different types of DSD, we have performed a PubMed search and provide here a synthesis of the evidence from studies published since 2006. We present a model for pathogenesis of GCNIS/GDB in TDS/DSD, with the risk of malignancy determined by the presence of the testis-inducing Y chromosome and the degree of masculinisation. The associations between phenotype and the risk of neoplasia are likely further modulated in each individual by the constellation of the gene polymorphisms and environmental factors. PMID:26410164

  16. Effects of sex chromosome aneuploidies on brain development: evidence from neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Lenroot, Rhoshel K; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Giedd, Jay N

    2009-01-01

    Variation in the number of sex chromosomes is a relatively common genetic condition, affecting as many as 1/400 individuals. The sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) are associated with characteristic behavioral and cognitive phenotypes, although the degree to which specific individuals are affected can fall within a wide range. Understanding the effects of different dosages of sex chromosome genes on brain development may help to understand the basis for functional differences in affected individuals. It may also be informative regarding how sex chromosomes contribute to typical sexual differentiation. Studies of 47,XXY males make up the bulk of the current literature of neuroimaging studies in individuals with supernumerary sex chromosomes, with a few small studies or case reports of the other SCAs. Findings in 47,XXY males typically include decreased gray and white matter volumes, with most pronounced effects in the frontal and temporal lobes. Functional studies have shown evidence of decreased lateralization. Although the hypogonadism typically found in 47,XXY males may contribute to the decreased brain volume, the observation that 47,XXX females also show decreased brain volume in the presence of normal pubertal maturation suggests a possible direct dosage effect of X chromosome genes. Additional X chromosomes, such as in 49,XXXXY males, are associated with more markedly decreased brain volume and increased incidence of white matter hyperintensities. The limited data regarding effects of having two Y chromosomes (47,XYY) do not find significant differences in brain volume, although there are some reports of increased head size. PMID:20014372

  17. The Treatment of Sex Roles. Guidelines for the Development of Elementary and Secondary Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Rinehart & Winston, New York, NY.

    Arranged in three sections, this pamphlet outlines publishers' guidelines for developing nonsexist instructional materials for elementary and secondary school use. Section 1 details the following strategies for expanding and balancing the role models of both sexes in instructional literature: illustrations reflecting a variety of dress and…

  18. Sex Variations in Youth Anxiety Symptoms: Effects of Pubertal Development and Gender Role Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Rona; Silverman, Wendy K.; Jaccard, James

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated whether pubertal development and gender role orientation (i.e., masculinity and femininity) can partially explain sex variations in youth anxiety symptoms among clinic-referred anxious youth (N = 175; ages 9-13 years; 74% Hispanic; 48% female). Using youth and parent ratings of youth anxiety symptoms, structural equation…

  19. Family Life and Human Development (Sex Education): The Prince George's County Public Schools Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1981-01-01

    The Prince George's County schools' sex education program for grades K-12 was developed and implemented in the late 1960s and has three focus areas: family life and interpersonal relationships; the physiological and personality changes during puberty; and advanced physiology and psychology of human sexual behavior. The program augments what the…

  20. Approach to the Infant with a Suspected Disorder of Sex Development.

    PubMed

    Wherrett, Diane K

    2015-08-01

    A newborn with genital ambiguity requires careful diagnostic evaluation to identify the underlying etiology in an efficient manner and assign gender without lengthy delay. The infant's family needs comprehensive psychosocial support. Such infants should be referred to a multidisciplinary team with expertise in disorders of sex development. PMID:26210628

  1. Development and evaluation of deep intra-uterine artificial insemination using cryopreserved sexed spermatozoa in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Robeck, Todd R; Montano, G A; Steinman, K J; Smolensky, P; Sweeney, J; Osborn, S; O'Brien, J K

    2013-06-01

    Since its development in bottlenose dolphins, widespread application of AI with sex-selected, frozen-thawed (FT) spermatozoa has been limited by the significant expense of the sorting process. Reducing the total number of progressively motile sperm (PMS) required for an AI would reduce the sorting cost. As such, this research compared the efficacy of small-dose deep uterine AI with sexed FT spermatozoa (SEXED-SMALL; ~50×10(6)PMS, n=20), to a moderate dose deposited mid-horn (SEXED-STD, ~200×10(6)PMS; n=20), and a large dose of FT non-sexed spermatozoa deposited in the uterine body (NONSEXED-LARGE, 660×10(6)PMS, n=9). Ten of the 11 calves resulting from use of sexed spermatozoa were of the predetermined sex. Similar rates of conception (NONSEXED-LARGE: 78%, SEXED-STD: 60%, SEXED-SMALL: 57%) and total pregnancy loss (TPL: NONSEXED-LARGE: 28.6%; SEXED-STD: 41.0%; SEXED-SMALL: 63.6%) were observed across groups, but early pregnancy loss (EPL, SEXED-SMALL (54.5%) compared to NONSEXED-LARGE (0%). Animals experiencing EPL were older (31.3 y, P=0.007) than those that calved (21.4y) or did not conceive (19.4y). After excluding females ≥25y, SEXED-SMALL (15.4%) had a tendency for having reduced calving rates compared to NONSEXED-LARGE (50.0%; P=0.08), while SEXED-STD did not differ (40.0%, 4/10; P=0.341). Current findings indicate that acceptable conception and calving rates using sexed FT spermatozoa are achieved after mid-horn deposition of 200×10(6) PMS, when used with females aged less than 25 y. PMID:23660366

  2. IVF affects embryonic development in a sex-biased manner in mice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kun; Wang, Zhuqing; Zhang, Zhenni; An, Lei; Tian, Jianhui

    2016-04-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that IVF (IVF includes in vitro fertilization and culture) embryos and babies are associated with a series of health complications, and some of them show sex-dimorphic patterns. Therefore, we hypothesized that IVF procedures have sex-biased or even sex-specific effects on embryonic and fetal development. Here, we demonstrate that IVF-induced side effects show significant sexual dimorphic patterns from the pre-implantation to the prenatal stage. During the pre-implantation stage, female IVF embryos appear to be more vulnerable to IVF-induced effects, including an increased percentage of apoptosis (7.22±1.94 vs 0.71±0.76, P<0.01), and dysregulated expression of representative sex-dimorphic genes (Xist, Hprt, Pgk1 and Hsp70). During the mid-gestation stage, IVF males had a higher survival rate than IVF females at E13.5 (male:female=1.33:1), accompanied with a female-biased pregnancy loss. In addition, while both IVF males and females had reduced placental vasculogenesis/angiogenesis, the compensatory placental overgrowth was more evident in IVF males. During the late-gestation period, IVF fetuses had a higher sex ratio (male:female=1.48:1) at E19.5, and both male and female IVF placentas showed overgrowth. After birth, IVF males grew faster than their in vivo (IVO) counterparts, while IVF females showed a similar growth pattern with IVO females. The present study provides a new insight into understanding IVF-induced health complications during embryonic and fetal development. By understanding and minimizing these sex-biased effects of the IVF process, the health of IVF-conceived babies may be improved in the future. PMID:26825929

  3. A Korean boy with 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development caused by SOX9 duplication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyung Min; Ko, Jung Min; Shin, Choong Ho; Yang, Sei Won

    2014-06-01

    The 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development (DSD), also known as 46,XX male syndrome, is a rare form of DSD and clinical phenotype shows complete sex reversal from female to male. The sex-determining region Y (SRY) gene can be identified in most 46,XX testicular DSD patients; however, approximately 20% of patients with 46,XX testicular DSD are SRY-negative. The SRY-box 9 (SOX9) gene has several important functions during testis development and differentiation in males, and overexpression of SOX9 leads to the male development of 46,XX gonads in the absence of SRY. In addition, SOX9 duplication has been found to be a rare cause of 46,XX testicular DSD in humans. Here, we report a 4.2-year-old SRY-negative 46,XX boy with complete sex reversal caused by SOX9 duplication for the first time in Korea. He showed normal external and internal male genitalia except for small testes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses failed to detect the presence of SRY, and SOX9 intragenic mutation was not identified by direct sequencing analysis. Therefore, we performed real-time PCR analyses with specific primer pairs, and duplication of the SOX9 gene was revealed. Although SRY-negative 46,XX testicular DSD is a rare condition, an effort to make an accurate diagnosis is important for the provision of proper genetic counseling and for guiding patients in their long-term management. PMID:25077096

  4. Abnormalities of fuel utilization as predisposing to the development of obesity in humans.

    PubMed

    Schutz, Y

    1995-09-01

    A number of recent investigations in man have demonstrated that a low ratio of fat to carbohydrate oxidation (i.e., a high respiratory quotient or RQ) was associated with actual and/or subsequent body weight gain in obese non-diabetic Pima Indians, in American men of various ages and in post-obese European women investigated shortly after the cessation of a hypocaloric diet. It is well known that numerous exogenous and endogenous factors influence the RQ at rest such as: the level of feeding (positive vs. negative energy balance), the composition of food eaten (high vs. low carbohydrate), the size of the glycogen stores, the amount of adipose tissue as well as genetic factors. It should be stressed that some nutritional situations can co-exist during which a low ratio of fat to carbohydrate is observed (i.e., a high RQ) despite weight loss. Furthermore, in most studies mentioned above, the low fat to carbohydrate oxidation ratio explains less than 10% of the variance in weight gain, suggesting that numerous additional factors also play a substantial role in the onset of weight gain. It is concluded that: 1) a low fat to carbohydrate oxidation ratio or an abnormal fat oxidation is difficult to define quantitatively since it is largely influenced by the energy level and the composition of the diet.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8581773

  5. The human sex ratio from conception to birth

    PubMed Central

    Orzack, Steven Hecht; Stubblefield, J. William; Akmaev, Viatcheslav R.; Colls, Pere; Munné, Santiago; Scholl, Thomas; Steinsaltz, David; Zuckerman, James E.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the trajectory of the human sex ratio from conception to birth by analyzing data from (i) 3- to 6-d-old embryos, (ii) induced abortions, (iii) chorionic villus sampling, (iv) amniocentesis, and (v) fetal deaths and live births. Our dataset is the most comprehensive and largest ever assembled to estimate the sex ratio at conception and the sex ratio trajectory and is the first, to our knowledge, to include all of these types of data. Our estimate of the sex ratio at conception is 0.5 (proportion male), which contradicts the common claim that the sex ratio at conception is male-biased. The sex ratio among abnormal embryos is male-biased, and the sex ratio among normal embryos is female-biased. These biases are associated with the abnormal/normal state of the sex chromosomes and of chromosomes 15 and 17. The sex ratio may decrease in the first week or so after conception (due to excess male mortality); it then increases for at least 10–15 wk (due to excess female mortality), levels off after ∼20 wk, and declines slowly from 28 to 35 wk (due to excess male mortality). Total female mortality during pregnancy exceeds total male mortality. The unbiased sex ratio at conception, the increase in the sex ratio during the first trimester, and total mortality during pregnancy being greater for females are fundamental insights into early human development. PMID:25825766

  6. Development of a Sex Education Programme for 12-Year-Old to 14-Year-Old Turkish Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cok, Figen; Gray, Lizbeth Ann

    2007-01-01

    Previous research has documented a need for the development of a sex education programme in Turkish schools in terms of adolescence readiness and the presence of misconceptions regarding critical aspects of sexual issues. Currently no school-based sex education is available for Turkish adolescents. This paper presents the development of a…

  7. Exploring the Development of Existing Sex Education Programmes for People with Intellectual Disabilities: An Intervention Mapping Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaafsma, Dilana; Stoffelen, Joke M. T.; Kok, Gerjo; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disabilities face barriers that affect their sexual health. Sex education programmes have been developed by professionals working in the field of intellectual disabilities with the aim to overcome these barriers. The aim of this study was to explore the development of these programmes. Methods: Sex education

  8. Exploring the Development of Existing Sex Education Programmes for People with Intellectual Disabilities: An Intervention Mapping Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaafsma, Dilana; Stoffelen, Joke M. T.; Kok, Gerjo; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disabilities face barriers that affect their sexual health. Sex education programmes have been developed by professionals working in the field of intellectual disabilities with the aim to overcome these barriers. The aim of this study was to explore the development of these programmes. Methods: Sex education…

  9. Targeted massively parallel sequencing provides comprehensive genetic diagnosis for patients with disorders of sex development

    PubMed Central

    Arboleda, VA; Lee, H; Sánchez, FJ; Délot, EC; Sandberg, DE; Grody, WW; Nelson, SF; Vilain, E

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) are rare disorders in which there is discordance between chromosomal, gonadal, and phenotypic sex. Only a minority of patients clinically diagnosed with DSD obtains a molecular diagnosis, leaving a large gap in our understanding of the prevalence, management, and outcomes in affected patients. We created a novel DSD-genetic diagnostic tool, in which sex development genes are captured using RNA probes and undergo massively parallel sequencing. In the pilot group of 14 patients, we determined sex chromosome dosage, copy number variation, and gene mutations. In the patients with a known genetic diagnosis (obtained either on a clinical or research basis), this test identified the molecular cause in 100% (7/7) of patients. In patients in whom no molecular diagnosis had been made, this tool identified a genetic diagnosis in two of seven patients. Targeted sequencing of genes representing a specific spectrum of disorders can result in a higher rate of genetic diagnoses than current diagnostic approaches. Our DSD diagnostic tool provides for first time, in a single blood test, a comprehensive genetic diagnosis in patients presenting with a wide range of urogenital anomalies. PMID:22435390

  10. The incidence of abnormal limb development in the Irish thoroughbred from birth to 18 months.

    PubMed

    O'Donohue, D D; Smith, F H; Strickland, K L

    1992-07-01

    A two part survey was carried out in Irish Thoroughbred horses in 1988 and 1989 to establish the incidence and prevalence of developmental skeletal problems, particularly possible manifestations of developmental orthopaedic disease (DOD). Survey One was a retrospective study based on a questionnaire involving the foal crops of 46 stud farms for 3 successive seasons; the 1711 animals initially documented represented 10.46% of Irish foal registrations. The second survey involved repeated monitoring of the 1988 foal crop from birth to 18 months of age on 17 stud farms. The 248 foals initially examined represented 4.24% of foal registrations. Treatment for DOD was deemed necessary for 11.3% of the animals in Survey One. Angular limb deformities and physeal dysplasia ("epiphysitis") together constituted 72.9% of the cases treated. The peak incidence of DOD problems occurred between weaning and the end of December. More than half the animals treated (53.9%) recovered completely, ie achieved expected sale value as yearlings, 27.5% of those treated showed incomplete recovery and mild to moderate loss of sale value and the remaining 18.7% were killed or lost much of their sale value. In the second survey, while 67% of animals exhibited some form of DOD, the incidence and severity of problems treated were not significantly different from those of farms in Survey One. Again, physeal dysplasia and angular limb deformity were the predominant clinical conditions and their severity was greatest during the early winter. During the suckling phase colts had a significantly greater incidence of DOD. At all other stages the incidence and severity of DOD was similar in both sexes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1499540

  11. Administration of the bisphosphonate zoledronic acid during tooth development inhibits tooth eruption and formation and induces dental abnormalities in rats.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Toru; Ninomiya, Tadashi; Hosoya, Akihiro; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2010-06-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are potent inhibitors of osteoclastic bone resorption and widely used for the treatment of osteoporosis and metastatic bone diseases. Recently, BPs have also been shown to benefit children with primary and secondary osteoporosis, including osteogenesis imperfecta; however, their long-term safety has not been established yet. Clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated that BPs delay or inhibit tooth eruption. The failure of tooth eruption causes several dental abnormalities. In this study, to determine the effects of BPs on tooth formation, the BP zoledronic acid (ZOL) was injected into 7- and 14-day-old rats, and the development of the mandibular teeth was examined. X-ray analysis demonstrated that ZOL inhibited the eruption of both incisors and molars and their formation, especially in the molar roots. Histological examination showed that, in ZOL-treated animals, alveolar bone remained unresorbed around tooth crowns, which injured ameloblasts and enamel matrix, leading to defects of the enamel. Furthermore, haphazard proliferation of odontogenic epithelium and mesenchyme associated with primitive tooth structures, which resembles human odontomas, was induced at the basal end of incisors but not around the molars. Tooth ankylosis to alveolar bone was occasionally observed in molars. These results suggest that administration of BPs during tooth development has the potential to inhibit tooth eruption and formation and to induce several types of dental abnormalities, which may be attributed to the altered osteoclastic activities. PMID:20411381

  12. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  13. Planeando Tu Vida: sex and family life education: fundamentals of development, implementation, and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pick De Weiss, S; Givaudan, M; Givaudan, S

    1993-01-01

    Misinformation about sexuality, reproduction, and contraception is widespread among Mexican adolescents and existing sex education programs have been limited in both scope and availability. To address this situation, the Instituto Mexicano de Investigacion de Familia y Poblacion (IMIFAP) designed a comprehensive sex education program based on data gathered in a 1986 diagnostic survey of 865 adolescents 12-19 years of age and interviews with 365 pregnant adolescents. As part of this preliminary research, one group of teens was exposed to a traditional sex education course while another participated in a program that used participatory learning techniques and emphasized communication skills, assertiveness training, value clarification, peer support, and decision making processes. The latter, more effective approach served as the basis for design of a course, Planeando Tu Vida. Operational evaluations of this course conducted at completion and four and eight months later indicated significant increases in knowledge about contraception, but no effect on age at first intercourse. On the other hand, adolescent males who took the course before onset of sexual activity were significantly more likely to use contraceptives at first intercourse than those in traditional courses. This finding underscores the importance of early initiation of sex education programs. To date, the curriculum has been used in over 100 public and private schools, reaching more than 30,000 adolescents. IMIFAP has since developed more than 70 additional health education course guides aimed at children from preschool through high school, all of which emphasize a participatory approach to learning. PMID:12289906

  14. Chromosome abnormalities in human arrested preimplantation embryos: A multiple-probe FISH study

    SciTech Connect

    Munne, S.; Grifo, J.; Cohen, J. ); Weier, H.U.G. )

    1994-07-01

    Numerical chromosome abnormalities were studied in single blastomeres from arrested or otherwise morphologically abnormal human preimplantation embryos. A 6-h FISH procedure with fluorochrome-labeled DNA probes was developed to determine numerical abnormalities of chromosomes X, Y, and 18. The three chromosomes were stained and detected simultaneously in 571 blastomeres from 131 embryos. Successful analysis including biopsy, fixation, and FISH analysis was achieved in 86.5% of all blastomeres. The procedure described here offers a reliable alternative to sexing of embryos by PCR and allows simultaneous ploidy assessment. For the three chromosomes tested, numerical aberrations were found in 56.5% of the embroys. Most abnormal embryos were polyploid or mosaics, and 6.1% were aneuploid for gonosomes or chromosome 18. Extrapolation of these results to all human chromosomes suggests that the majority of abnormally developing and arrested human embryos carry numerical chromosome abnormalities. 44 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  15. Performance Development in Adolescent Track and Field Athletes According to Age, Sex and Sport Discipline

    PubMed Central

    Tønnessen, Espen; Svendsen, Ida Siobhan; Olsen, Inge Christoffer; Guttormsen, Atle; Haugen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sex-specific differences that arise during puberty have a pronounced effect on the training process. However, the consequences this should have for goal-setting, planning and implementation of training for boys and girls of different ages remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to quantify performance developments in athletic running and jumping disciplines in the age range 11-18 and identify progression differences as a function of age, discipline and sex. Methods The 100 all-time best Norwegian male and female 60-m, 800-m, long jump and high jump athletes in each age category from 11 to 18 years were analysed using mixed models with random intercept according to athlete. Results Male and female athletes perform almost equally in running and jumping events up to the age of 12. Beyond this age, males outperform females. Relative annual performance development in females gradually decreases throughout the analyzed age period. In males, annual relative performance development accelerates up to the age of 13 (for running events) or 14 (for jumping events) and then gradually declines when approaching 18 years of age. The relative improvement from age 11 to 18 was twice as high in jumping events compared to running events. For all of the analyzed disciplines, overall improvement rates were >50% higher for males than for females. The performance sex difference evolves from < 5% to 10-18% in all the analyzed disciplines from age 11 to 18 yr. Conclusion To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to present absolute and relative annual performance developments in running and jumping events for competitive athletes from early to late adolescence. These results allow coaches and athletes to set realistic goals and prescribe conditioning programs that take into account sex-specific differences in the rate of performance development at different stages of maturation. PMID:26043192

  16. School-Based Sex Education and Neuroscience: What We Know about Sex, Romance, Marriage, and Adolescent Brain Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballonoff Suleiman, Ahna; Johnson, Megan; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.; Galván, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many school-based abstinence-only sex education curricula state that sexual activity outside of marriage is likely to have harmful psychological effects. Recent advances in neuroscience have expanded our understanding of the neural underpinnings of romantic love, marriage, sexual desire, and sexual behavior and improved our…

  17. School-Based Sex Education and Neuroscience: What We Know about Sex, Romance, Marriage, and Adolescent Brain Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballonoff Suleiman, Ahna; Johnson, Megan; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.; Galvn, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many school-based abstinence-only sex education curricula state that sexual activity outside of marriage is likely to have harmful psychological effects. Recent advances in neuroscience have expanded our understanding of the neural underpinnings of romantic love, marriage, sexual desire, and sexual behavior and improved our

  18. [Role of nitrites and nitroso derivatives on the development of abnormal colorations in cheeses. Study of their decomposition].

    PubMed

    Huynh, C H; Huynh, S; Boivinet, P

    1980-01-01

    Nitrites and nitroso compounds have been incriminated in the development of abnormal colourations of "pont-l'évêque". In a preparation of these cheeses nitrites were added either to the milk or during the manufacturing procedures and in all cases were noticed pink or brown stains and bursting of the cheese pulp with formation of cavities. Our results have demonstrated it is possible to break down these nitroso-compounds with an enzyme from yeast. This enzyme detoxifies the medium following a mechanism which has been elucidated. The addition of yeasts to the cheeses during manufacturing helps to accelerate the desintegration process of the coloured compounds and to obtain a uniform shade of the crust and a total absence of deeper stains. We have shown that the nitrites present in the cheeses will form nitroso compounds. The latter are then responsible for the abnormal and irregular stains; their rapid decomposition helps to detoxify the medium as well as ameliorating the aspect of the cheeses. PMID:7258907

  19. Chronic exposure to low concentrations of hydrogen sulfide produces abnormal growth in developing cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Hannah, R S; Roth, S H

    1991-01-28

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) may produce deleterious effects on the developing central nervous system. The dendritic fields of developing cerebellar Purkinje cells were analyzed to determine the effects of chronic exposure to low concentrations of H2S during perinatal development. Treatment with two concentrations (20 and 50 ppm) of H2S produced severe alterations in the architecture and growth characteristics of the Purkinjec cell dendritic fields. The architectural modifications included longer branches, an increase in the vertex path length and variations in the number of branches in particular areas of the dendritic field. The treated cells also exhibited a nonsymmetrical growth pattern at a time when random terminal branching is normally occurring. These findings suggest that developing neurons exposed to low concentrations of H2S are at risk of severe deficits. PMID:2027523

  20. THE IMPACT OF COGNITIVE MATURITY ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF SEX-ROLE ATTITUDES IN THE YEARS 4 TO 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KOHLBERG, LAWRENCE; ZIGLER, EDWARD

    A SERIES OF STUDIES WAS CONDUCTED TO CLARIFY THE ROLE OF INTELLIGENCE IN PERSONALITY ORGANIZATION AND TO ASSESS A COGNITIVE-DEVELOPMENTAL INTERPRETATION OF IQ-PERSONALITY CORRELATIONS. THE SPECIFIC FOCUS OF THE STUDY WAS THE RELATIONSHIP OF INTELLECTUAL MATURITY TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF SEX-ROLE ATTITUDES. AGE-DEVELOPMENTAL TRENDS IN SEX-ROLE…

  1. Sex Differences in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders Compared with Their Unaffected Siblings and Typically Developing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Subin; Cho, Soo-Churl; Cho, In Hee; Kim, Boong-Nyun; Kim, Jae-Won; Shin, Min-Sup; Chung, Un-Sun; Park, Tae-Won; Son, Jung-Woo; Yoo, Hee Jeong

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the nature of cognitive and behavioral sex differences in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and two comparison groups: a group of typically developing (TD) children and a group of unaffected siblings of ASD children. Sex differences in core autistic symptoms, co-occurring behavioral symptoms, and cognitive styles…

  2. Embryonic exposure to thimerosal, an organomercury compound, causes abnormal early development of serotonergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Ida-Eto, Michiru; Oyabu, Akiko; Ohkawara, Takeshi; Tashiro, Yasura; Narita, Naoko; Narita, Masaaki

    2011-11-14

    Even though neuronal toxicity due to organomercury compounds is well known, thimerosal, an organomercury compound, is widely used in pediatric vaccine preservation. In the present study, we examined whether embryonic exposure to thimerosal affects early development of serotonergic neurons. Thimerosal (1mg Hg/kg) was intramuscularly administered to pregnant rats on gestational day 9 (susceptible time window for development of fetal serotonergic system), and fetal serotonergic neurons were assessed at embryonic day 15 using anti-serotonin antibodies. A dramatic increase in the number of serotonergic neurons localized to the lateral portion of the caudal raphe was observed in thimerosal group (1.9-fold increase, p<0.01 compared to control). These results indicate that embryonic exposure to thimerosal affects early development of serotonergic neurons. PMID:21669256

  3. Auditory Processing in Infancy: Do Early Abnormalities Predict Disorders of Language and Cognitive Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzzetta, Francesco; Conti, Guido; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Increasing attention has been devoted to the maturation of sensory processing in the first year of life. While the development of cortical visual function has been thoroughly studied, much less information is available on auditory processing and its early disorders. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the assessment techniques for

  4. Auditory Processing in Infancy: Do Early Abnormalities Predict Disorders of Language and Cognitive Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzzetta, Francesco; Conti, Guido; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Increasing attention has been devoted to the maturation of sensory processing in the first year of life. While the development of cortical visual function has been thoroughly studied, much less information is available on auditory processing and its early disorders. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the assessment techniques for…

  5. Overexpression of the CmACS-3 gene in melon causes abnormal pollen development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Luan, F

    2015-01-01

    Sexual diversity expressed by the Curcurbitaceae family is a primary example of developmental plasticity in plants. Most melon genotypes are andromonoecious, where an initial phase of male flowers is followed by a mixture of bisexual and male flowers. Over-expression of the CmACS-3 gene in melon plants showed an increased number of flower buds, and increased femaleness as demonstrated by a larger number bisexual buds. Transformation of CmACS-3 in melons showed earlier development of and an increased number of bisexual buds that matured to anthesis but also increased the rate of development of the bisexual buds to maturity. Field studies showed that CmACS-3-overexpressing melons had earlier mature bisexual flowers, earlier fruit set, and an increased number of fruits set on closely spaced nodes on the main stem. PMID:26400274

  6. Development of abnormal and subnormal pressures in reservoirs containing bacterially generated gas

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, C.

    1987-11-01

    Burial of reservoirs containing a bacterially generated gas phase may lead to pressures that are above, equal to, or below hydrostatic. The pressures that develop depend on the way in which the gas-bearing volume is connected to, or isolated from, its surroundings. Where a noncompacting volume is totally isolated, subnormal pressures will develop. This approximates the situation in chalks, which have high porosities but low permeabilities and often contain underpressured gas. Low pressures develop because the thermal pressuring of the gas with depth occurs at a lower rate than the increase in hydrostatic pressure and because the gas dissolves in the water. When the gas-bearing volume is freely connected to surrounding, normally pressured sediments, the gas pressures remain hydrostatic, but the volume of gas steadily diminishes as it dissolves in the pore water. If gas occupies 40% of the pore volume at 1000 ft (305 m), it will all be in solution by 4600 ft (1402 m) and a gas phase will no longer exist. Water must flow in to replace the dissolving gas or the rock must compact. This is the situation for normally compacting shales. When the gas is in an isolated but variable volume system (such as a compacting shale), pressure rises above hydrostatic due to sediment loading. This mechanism likely has produced many of the shallow sands charged with high-pressure gas that are a drilling hazard in many offshore areas. 18 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Nav2 hypomorphic mutant mice are ataxic and exhibit abnormalities in cerebellar development

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, Elizabeth M.; Klöckner-Bormann, Mariana; Roesler, Elizabeth C.; Talton, Lynn E.; Moechars, Dieder; Clagett-Dame, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Development of the cerebellum involves a coordinated program of neuronal process outgrowth and migration resulting in a foliated structure that plays a key role in motor function. Neuron navigator 2 (Nav2) is a cytoskeletal-interacting protein that functions in neurite outgrowth and axonal elongation. Herein we show that hypomorphic mutant mice lacking the full-length Nav2 transcript exhibit ataxia and defects in cerebellar development. At embryonic day (E)17.5, the mutant cerebellum is reduced in size and exhibits defects in vermal foliation. Reduction in cell proliferation at early times (E12.5 and E14.5) may contribute to this size reduction. The full-length Nav2 transcript is expressed in the premigratory zone of the external granule layer (EGL). Granule cells in the germinal zone of the EGL appear to proliferate normally, however, due to the reduction in cerebellar circumference there are fewer total BrdU-labeled granule cells in the mutants, and these fail to migrate normally toward the interior of the cerebellum. In Nav2 hypomorphs, fewer granule cells migrate out of cerebellar EGL explants and neurite outgrowth from both explants and isolated external granule cell cultures is reduced. This suggests the formation of parallel axon fibers and neuronal migration is disrupted in Nav2 mutants. This work supports an essential role for full-length Nav2 in cerebellar development, including axonal elongation and migration of the EGL neurons. PMID:21419114

  8. Hippocampal neuronal subtypes develop abnormal dendritic arbors in the presence of Fragile X astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, S; Cheng, C; Doering, L C

    2016-06-01

    Astrocytes are now recognized as key players in the neurobiology of neurodevelopmental disorders such as Fragile X syndrome. However, the nature of Fragile X astrocyte-mediated control of dendrite development in subtypes of hippocampal neurons is not yet known. We used a co-culture procedure in which wildtype primary hippocampal neurons were cultured with astrocytes from either a wildtype or Fragile X mouse, for either 7, 14 or 21days. The neurons were processed for immunocytochemistry with the dendritic marker MAP2, classified by morphological criteria into one of five neuronal subtypes, and subjected to Sholl analyses. Both linear and semi-log methods of Sholl analyses were applied to the neurons in order to provide an in depth analysis of the dendritic arborizations. We found that Fragile X astrocytes affect the development of dendritic arborization of all subtypes of wildtype hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we show that hippocampal neurons with spiny stellate neuron morphology exhibit the most pervasive developmental delays, with significant dendritic arbor alterations persisting at 21days in culture. The results further dictate the critical role astrocytes play in governing neuronal morphology including altered dendrite development in Fragile X. PMID:26968765

  9. Embryonic and early postnatal abnormalities contributing to the development of hippocampal malformations in a rodent model of dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Mercedes; Pleasure, Samuel J; Baraban, Scott C

    2006-03-01

    While there are many recent examples of single gene deletions that lead to defects in cortical development, most human cases of cortical disorganization can be attributed to a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Elucidating the cellular or developmental basis of teratogenic exposures in experimental animals is an important approach to understanding how environmental insults at particular developmental junctures can lead to complex brain malformations. Rats with prenatal exposure to methylazoxymethanol (MAM) reproduce many anatomical features seen in epilepsy patients. Previous studies have shown that heterotopic clusters of neocortically derived neurons exhibit hyperexcitable firing activity and may be a source of heightened seizure susceptibility; however, the events that lead to the formation of these abnormal cell clusters is unclear. Here we used a panel of molecular markers and birthdating studies to show that in MAM-exposed rats the abnormal cell clusters (heterotopia) first appear postnatally in the hippocampus (P1-2) and that their appearance is preceded by a distinct sequence of perturbations in neocortical development: 1) disruption of the radial glial scaffolding with premature astroglial differentiation, and 2) thickening of the marginal zone with redistribution of Cajal-Retzius neurons to deeper layers. These initial events are followed by disruption of the cortical plate and appearance of subventricular zone nodules. Finally, we observed the erosion of neocortical subventricular zone nodules into the hippocampus around parturition followed by migration of nodules to hippocampus. We conclude that prenatal MAM exposure disrupts critical developmental processes and prenatal neocortical structures, ultimately resulting in neocortical disorganization and hippocampal malformations. PMID:16432901

  10. Sufficient numbers of early germ cells are essential for female sex development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiangyan; Jin, Xia; Chen, Xiaowen; He, Jiangyan; Yin, Zhan

    2015-01-01

    The sex determination for zebrafish is controlled by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The determination of sex in zebrafish has been suggested to rely on a mechanism that is affected by germ cell-derived signals. To begin our current study, a simplified and efficient germ cell-specific promoter of the dead end (dnd) gene was identified. Utilizing the metrodinazole (MTZ)/ bacterial nitroreductase (NTR) system for inducible germ cell ablation, several stable Tg (dnd:NTR-EGFP(-3'UTR)) and Tg (dnd:NTR-EGFP(+3'UTR)) zebrafish lines were then generated with the identified promoter. A thorough comparison of the expression patterns and tissue distributions of endogenous dnd and ntr-egfp transcripts in vivo revealed that the identified 2032-bp zebrafish dnd promoter can recapitulate dnd expression faithfully in stable transgenic zebrafish. The correlation between the levels of the germ cell-derived signals and requirement for maintaining the female fate has been also explored with different durations of the MTZ treatments. Our results revealed the decreasing ratios of female presented in the treated transgenic group are fairly associated with the reducing levels of the early germ cell-derived signals. After the juvenile transgenic fish treated with 5 mM MTZ for 20 days, all MTZ-treated transgenic fish exclusively developed into males with subfertilities. Taken together, our results identified here a simplified and efficient dnd promoter, and provide clear evidence indicating that it was not the presence but the sufficiency of signals derived from germ cells that is essential for female sex development in zebrafish. Our model also provides a unique system for sex control in zebrafish studies. PMID:25679390

  11. Sufficient Numbers of Early Germ Cells Are Essential for Female Sex Development in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiangyan; Jin, Xia; Chen, Xiaowen; He, Jiangyan; Yin, Zhan

    2015-01-01

    The sex determination for zebrafish is controlled by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The determination of sex in zebrafish has been suggested to rely on a mechanism that is affected by germ cell-derived signals. To begin our current study, a simplified and efficient germ cell-specific promoter of the dead end (dnd) gene was identified. Utilizing the metrodinazole (MTZ)/ bacterial nitroreductase (NTR) system for inducible germ cell ablation, several stable Tg (dnd:NTR-EGFP-3'UTR) and Tg (dnd:NTR-EGFP+3'UTR) zebrafish lines were then generated with the identified promoter. A thorough comparison of the expression patterns and tissue distributions of endogenous dnd and ntr-egfp transcripts in vivo revealed that the identified 2032-bp zebrafish dnd promoter can recapitulate dnd expression faithfully in stable transgenic zebrafish. The correlation between the levels of the germ cell-derived signals and requirement for maintaining the female fate has been also explored with different durations of the MTZ treatments. Our results revealed the decreasing ratios of female presented in the treated transgenic group are fairly associated with the reducing levels of the early germ cell-derived signals. After the juvenile transgenic fish treated with 5 mM MTZ for 20 days, all MTZ-treated transgenic fish exclusively developed into males with subfertilities. Taken together, our results identified here a simplified and efficient dnd promoter, and provide clear evidence indicating that it was not the presence but the sufficiency of signals derived from germ cells that is essential for female sex development in zebrafish. Our model also provides a unique system for sex control in zebrafish studies. PMID:25679390

  12. A mitochondrial DNA sequence is associated with abnormal pollen development in cytoplasmic male sterile bean plants.

    PubMed Central

    Johns, C; Lu, M; Lyznik, A; Mackenzie, S

    1992-01-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in common bean is associated with the presence of a 3-kb unique mitochondrial sequence designated pvs. The pvs sequence encodes at least two open reading frames (297 and 720 bp in length) with portions derived from the chloroplast genome. Fertility restoration by the nuclear restorer gene Fr results in the loss of this transcriptionally active unique region. We examined the effect of CMS (pvs present) and fertility restoration by Fr (pvs absent) on the pattern of pollen development in bean. In the CMS line, pollen aborted in the tetrad stage late in microgametogenesis. Microspores maintained cytoplasmic connections throughout pollen development, indicating aberrant or incomplete cytokinesis. Pollen-specific events associated with pollen abortion and fertility restoration imply that a gametophytic factor or event may be involved in CMS. In situ hybridization experiments suggested that significant reduction or complete loss of the mitochondrial sterility-associated sequence occurred in fertile pollen of F2 populations segregating for fertility. These observations support a model of fertility restoration by the loss of a mitochondrial DNA sequence prior to or during microsporogenesis/gametogenesis. PMID:1498602

  13. P53 functional abnormality in mesenchymal stem cells promotes osteosarcoma development

    PubMed Central

    Velletri, T; Xie, N; Wang, Y; Huang, Y; Yang, Q; Chen, X; Chen, Q; Shou, P; Gan, Y; Cao, G; Melino, G; Shi, Y

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that p53 has a critical role in the differentiation and functionality of various multipotent progenitor cells. P53 mutations can lead to genome instability and subsequent functional alterations and aberrant transformation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The significance of p53 in safeguarding our body from developing osteosarcoma (OS) is well recognized. During bone remodeling, p53 has a key role in negatively regulating key factors orchestrating the early stages of osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Interestingly, changes in the p53 status can compromise bone homeostasis and affect the tumor microenvironment. This review aims to provide a unique opportunity to study the p53 function in MSCs and OS. In the context of loss of function of p53, we provide a model for two sources of OS: MSCs as progenitor cells of osteoblasts and bone tumor microenvironment components. Standing at the bone remodeling point of view, in this review we will first explain the determinant function of p53 in OS development. We will then summarize the role of p53 in monitoring MSC fidelity and in regulating MSC differentiation programs during osteogenesis. Finally, we will discuss the importance of loss of p53 function in tissue microenvironment. We expect that the information provided herein could lead to better understanding and treatment of OS.

  14. P53 functional abnormality in mesenchymal stem cells promotes osteosarcoma development.

    PubMed

    Velletri, T; Xie, N; Wang, Y; Huang, Y; Yang, Q; Chen, X; Chen, Q; Shou, P; Gan, Y; Cao, G; Melino, G; Shi, Y

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that p53 has a critical role in the differentiation and functionality of various multipotent progenitor cells. P53 mutations can lead to genome instability and subsequent functional alterations and aberrant transformation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The significance of p53 in safeguarding our body from developing osteosarcoma (OS) is well recognized. During bone remodeling, p53 has a key role in negatively regulating key factors orchestrating the early stages of osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Interestingly, changes in the p53 status can compromise bone homeostasis and affect the tumor microenvironment. This review aims to provide a unique opportunity to study the p53 function in MSCs and OS. In the context of loss of function of p53, we provide a model for two sources of OS: MSCs as progenitor cells of osteoblasts and bone tumor microenvironment components. Standing at the bone remodeling point of view, in this review we will first explain the determinant function of p53 in OS development. We will then summarize the role of p53 in monitoring MSC fidelity and in regulating MSC differentiation programs during osteogenesis. Finally, we will discuss the importance of loss of p53 function in tissue microenvironment. We expect that the information provided herein could lead to better understanding and treatment of OS. PMID:26775693

  15. P53 functional abnormality in mesenchymal stem cells promotes osteosarcoma development

    PubMed Central

    Velletri, T; Xie, N; Wang, Y; Huang, Y; Yang, Q; Chen, X; Chen, Q; Shou, P; Gan, Y; Cao, G; Melino, G; Shi, Y

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that p53 has a critical role in the differentiation and functionality of various multipotent progenitor cells. P53 mutations can lead to genome instability and subsequent functional alterations and aberrant transformation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The significance of p53 in safeguarding our body from developing osteosarcoma (OS) is well recognized. During bone remodeling, p53 has a key role in negatively regulating key factors orchestrating the early stages of osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Interestingly, changes in the p53 status can compromise bone homeostasis and affect the tumor microenvironment. This review aims to provide a unique opportunity to study the p53 function in MSCs and OS. In the context of loss of function of p53, we provide a model for two sources of OS: MSCs as progenitor cells of osteoblasts and bone tumor microenvironment components. Standing at the bone remodeling point of view, in this review we will first explain the determinant function of p53 in OS development. We will then summarize the role of p53 in monitoring MSC fidelity and in regulating MSC differentiation programs during osteogenesis. Finally, we will discuss the importance of loss of p53 function in tissue microenvironment. We expect that the information provided herein could lead to better understanding and treatment of OS. PMID:26775693

  16. Annual Research Review: Growth connectomics – the organization and reorganization of brain networks during normal and abnormal development

    PubMed Central

    Vértes, Petra E; Bullmore, Edward T

    2015-01-01

    Background We first give a brief introduction to graph theoretical analysis and its application to the study of brain network topology or connectomics. Within this framework, we review the existing empirical data on developmental changes in brain network organization across a range of experimental modalities (including structural and functional MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography in humans). Synthesis We discuss preliminary evidence and current hypotheses for how the emergence of network properties correlates with concomitant cognitive and behavioural changes associated with development. We highlight some of the technical and conceptual challenges to be addressed by future developments in this rapidly moving field. Given the parallels previously discovered between neural systems across species and over a range of spatial scales, we also review some recent advances in developmental network studies at the cellular scale. We highlight the opportunities presented by such studies and how they may complement neuroimaging in advancing our understanding of brain development. Finally, we note that many brain and mind disorders are thought to be neurodevelopmental in origin and that charting the trajectory of brain network changes associated with healthy development also sets the stage for understanding abnormal network development. Conclusions We therefore briefly review the clinical relevance of network metrics as potential diagnostic markers and some recent efforts in computational modelling of brain networks which might contribute to a more mechanistic understanding of neurodevelopmental disorders in future. PMID:25441756

  17. Abnormal Hair Development and Apparent Follicular Transformation to Mammary Gland in the Absence of Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gritli-Linde, Amel; Hallberg, Kristina; Harfe, Brian D.; Reyahi, Azadeh; Kannius-Janson, Marie; Nilsson, Jeanette; Cobourne, Martyn T.; Sharpe, Paul T.; McMahon, Andrew P.; Linde, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Summary We show that removing the Shh signal tranducer Smoothened from skin epithelium secondarily results in excess Shh levels in the mesenchyme. Moreover, the phenotypes we observe reflect decreased epithelial Shh signaling, yet increased mesenchymal Shh signaling. For example, the latter contributes to exuberant hair follicle (HF) induction, while the former depletes the resulting follicular stem cell niches. This disruption of the niche apparently also allows the remaining stem cells to initiate hair formation at inappropriate times. Thus, the temporal structure of the hair cycle may depend on the physical structure of the niche. Finally, we find that the ablation of epithelial Shh signaling results in unexpected transformations: the follicular outer root sheath takes on an epidermal character, and certain HFs disappear altogether, having adopted a strikingly mammary gland-like fate. Overall, our study uncovers a multifaceted function for Shh in sculpting and maintaining the integrity and identity of the developing HF. PMID:17199044

  18. Modulation of Serotonin Transporter Function during Fetal Development Causes Dilated Heart Cardiomyopathy and Lifelong Behavioral Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Noorlander, Cornelle W.; Ververs, Frederique F. T.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.; van Echteld, Cees J. A.; Visser, Gerard H. A.; Smidt, Marten P.

    2008-01-01

    Background Women are at great risk for mood and anxiety disorders during their childbearing years and may become pregnant while taking antidepressant drugs. In the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most frequently prescribed drugs, while it is largely unknown whether this medication affects the development of the central nervous system of the fetus. The possible effects are the product of placental transfer efficiency, time of administration and dose of the respective SSRI. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to attain this information we have setup a study in which these parameters were measured and the consequences in terms of physiology and behavior are mapped. The placental transfer of fluoxetine and fluvoxamine, two commonly used SSRIs, was similar between mouse and human, indicating that the fetal exposure of these SSRIs in mice is comparable with the human situation. Fluvoxamine displayed a relatively low placental transfer, while fluoxetine showed a relatively high placental transfer. Using clinical doses of fluoxetine the mortality of the offspring increased dramatically, whereas the mortality was unaffected after fluvoxamine exposure. The majority of the fluoxetine-exposed offspring died postnatally of severe heart failure caused by dilated cardiomyopathy. Molecular analysis of fluoxetine-exposed offspring showed long-term alterations in serotonin transporter levels in the raphe nucleus. Furthermore, prenatal fluoxetine exposure resulted in depressive- and anxiety-related behavior in adult mice. In contrast, fluvoxamine-exposed mice did not show alterations in behavior and serotonin transporter levels. Decreasing the dose of fluoxetine resulted in higher survival rates and less dramatic effects on the long-term behavior in the offspring. Conclusions These results indicate that prenatal fluoxetine exposure affects fetal development, resulting in cardiomyopathy and a higher vulnerability to affective disorders in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:18716672

  19. Abnormal development of monoaminergic neurons is implicated in mood fluctuations and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Jukic, Marin M; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Bar, Michal; Becker, Gal; Jovanovic, Vukasin M; Zega, Ksenija; Binder, Elisabeth B; Brodski, Claude

    2015-03-01

    Subtle mood fluctuations are normal emotional experiences, whereas drastic mood swings can be a manifestation of bipolar disorder (BPD). Despite their importance for normal and pathological behavior, the mechanisms underlying endogenous mood instability are largely unknown. During embryogenesis, the transcription factor Otx2 orchestrates the genetic networks directing the specification of dopaminergic (DA) and serotonergic (5-HT) neurons. Here we behaviorally phenotyped mouse mutants overexpressing Otx2 in the hindbrain, resulting in an increased number of DA neurons and a decreased number of 5-HT neurons in both developing and mature animals. Over the course of 1 month, control animals exhibited stable locomotor activity in their home cages, whereas mutants showed extended periods of elevated or decreased activity relative to their individual average. Additional behavioral paradigms, testing for manic- and depressive-like behavior, demonstrated that mutants showed an increase in intra-individual fluctuations in locomotor activity, habituation, risk-taking behavioral parameters, social interaction, and hedonic-like behavior. Olanzapine, lithium, and carbamazepine ameliorated the behavioral alterations of the mutants, as did the mixed serotonin receptor agonist quipazine and the specific 5-HT2C receptor agonist CP-809101. Testing the relevance of the genetic networks specifying monoaminergic neurons for BPD in humans, we applied an interval-based enrichment analysis tool for genome-wide association studies. We observed that the genes specifying DA and 5-HT neurons exhibit a significant level of aggregated association with BPD but not with schizophrenia or major depressive disorder. The results of our translational study suggest that aberrant development of monoaminergic neurons leads to mood fluctuations and may be associated with BPD. PMID:25241801

  20. The Development of Sex Category Representation in Infancy: Matching of Faces and Bodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hock, Alyson; Kangas, Ashley; Zieber, Nicole; Bhatt, Ramesh S.

    2015-01-01

    Sex is a significant social category, and adults derive information about it from both faces and bodies. Research indicates that young infants process sex category information in faces. However, no prior study has examined whether infants derive sex categories from bodies and match faces and bodies in terms of sex. In the current study,…

  1. The Development of Sex Category Representation in Infancy: Matching of Faces and Bodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hock, Alyson; Kangas, Ashley; Zieber, Nicole; Bhatt, Ramesh S.

    2015-01-01

    Sex is a significant social category, and adults derive information about it from both faces and bodies. Research indicates that young infants process sex category information in faces. However, no prior study has examined whether infants derive sex categories from bodies and match faces and bodies in terms of sex. In the current study,

  2. Disorders of Sex Development (DSD): Peer Relations and Psychosocial Well-Being.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, W M; McCauley, E; Mazur, T

    2015-05-01

    Social and emotional development is shaped by familial and extra-familial experiences especially interactions with peers. Children and adolescents with physical, behavioral or developmental differences, such as youth with disorders of sex development (DSD), may not benefit to the same degree as other children and adolescents from experiences with peers. This paper reviews current thinking about the features and effects of experiences with peers and the potential challenges of peer interactions for children and adolescents with DSD. We review findings from studies of adjustment for individuals with DSD. We finish the paper with a brief outline of a research agenda to promote the understanding of adjustment of individuals with DSD. PMID:25970712

  3. Role of abnormal lipid metabolism in development, progression, diagnosis and therapy of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Swierczynski, Julian; Hebanowska, Areta; Sledzinski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that metabolic alterations play an important role in cancer development and progression. The metabolism of cancer cells is reprogrammed in order to support their rapid proliferation. Elevated fatty acid synthesis is one of the most important aberrations of cancer cell metabolism. An enhancement of fatty acids synthesis is required both for carcinogenesis and cancer cell survival, as inhibition of key lipogenic enzymes slows down the growth of tumor cells and impairs their survival. Based on the data that serum fatty acid synthase (FASN), also known as oncoantigen 519, is elevated in patients with certain types of cancer, its serum level was proposed as a marker of neoplasia. This review aims to demonstrate the changes in lipid metabolism and other metabolic processes associated with lipid metabolism in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common pancreatic neoplasm, characterized by high mortality. We also addressed the influence of some oncogenic factors and tumor suppressors on pancreatic cancer cell metabolism. Additionally the review discusses the potential role of elevated lipid synthesis in diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. In particular, FASN is a viable candidate for indicator of pathologic state, marker of neoplasia, as well as, pharmacological treatment target in pancreatic cancer. Recent research showed that, in addition to lipogenesis, certain cancer cells can use fatty acids from circulation, derived from diet (chylomicrons), synthesized in liver, or released from adipose tissue for their growth. Thus, the interactions between de novo lipogenesis and uptake of fatty acids from circulation by PDAC cells require further investigation. PMID:24605027

  4. Neural tube opening and abnormal extraembryonic membrane development in SEC23A deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Min; Tao, Jiayi; Vasievich, Matthew P.; Wei, Wei; Zhu, Guojing; Khoriaty, Rami N.; Zhang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    COPII (coat protein complex-II) vesicles transport proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi. Higher eukaryotes have two or more paralogs of most COPII components. Here we characterize mice deficient for SEC23A and studied interactions of Sec23a null allele with the previously reported Sec23b null allele. SEC23A deficiency leads to mid-embryonic lethality associated with defective development of extraembryonic membranes and neural tube opening in midbrain. Secretion defects of multiple collagen types are observed in different connective tissues, suggesting that collagens are primarily transported in SEC23A-containing vesicles in these cells. Other extracellular matrix proteins, such as fibronectin, are not affected by SEC23A deficiency. Intracellular accumulation of unsecreted proteins leads to strong induction of the unfolded protein response in collagen-producing cells. No collagen secretion defects are observed in SEC23B deficient embryos. We report that E-cadherin is a cargo that accumulates in acini of SEC23B deficient pancreas and salivary glands. Compensatory increase of one paralog is observed in the absence of the second paralog. Haploinsufficiency of the remaining Sec23 paralog on top of homozygous inactivation of the first paralog leads to earlier lethality of embryos. Our results suggest that mammalian SEC23A and SEC23B transport overlapping yet distinct spectra of cargo in vivo. PMID:26494538

  5. Deficiency in DGCR8-dependent canonical microRNAs causes infertility due to multiple abnormalities during uterine development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Sun; Kim, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Hyongbum; Yang, Seung Chel; Park, Mira; Yoon, Jung Ah; Lim, Hyunjung J.; Hong, Seok-Ho; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Lydon, John P.; Choi, Youngsok; Lee, Dong Ryul; Song, Haengseok

    2016-01-01

    DGCR8 is an RNA-binding protein that interacts with DROSHA to produce pre-microRNA in the nucleus, while DICER generates not only mature microRNA, but also endogenous small interfering RNAs in the cytoplasm. Here, we produced Dgcr8 conditional knock-out mice using progesterone receptor (PR)-Cre (Dgcr8d/d) and demonstrated that canonical microRNAs dependent on the DROSHA-DGCR8 complex are required for uterine development as well as female fertility in mice. Adult Dgcr8d/d females neither underwent regular reproductive cycles nor produced pups, whereas administration of exogenous gonadotropins induced normal ovulation in these mice. Interestingly, immune cells associated with acute inflammation aberrantly infiltrated into reproductive organs of pregnant Dgcr8d/d mice. Regarding uterine development, multiple uterine abnormalities were noticeable at 4 weeks of age when PR is significantly increased, and the severity of these deformities increased over time. Gland formation and myometrial layers were significantly reduced, and the stromal cell compartment did not expand and became atrophic during uterine development in these mice. These results were consistent with aberrantly reduced stromal cell proliferation and completely failed decidualization. Collectively, we suggest that DGCR8-dependent canonical microRNAs are essential for uterine development and physiological processes such as proper immune modulation, reproductive cycle, and steroid hormone responsiveness in mice. PMID:26833131

  6. Abnormal development of the neuromuscular junction in Nedd4-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun; Oppenheim, Ronald W.; Sugiura, Yoshie; Lin, Weichun

    2010-01-01

    Nedd4 (neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated gene 4) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase highly conserved from yeast to humans. The expression of Nedd4 is developmentally down-regulated in the mammalian nervous system, but the role of Nedd4 in mammalian neural development remains poorly understood. Here we show that a null mutation of Nedd4 in mice leads to perinatal lethality: mutant mice were stillborn and many of them died in utero before birth (between E15.5–E18.5). In Nedd4 mutant embryos, skeletal muscle fiber sizes and motoneuron numbers are significantly reduced. Surviving motoneurons project axons to their target muscles on schedule, but motor nerves defasciculate upon reaching the muscle surface, suggesting that Nedd4 plays a critical role in fine-tuning the interaction between the nerve and the muscle. Electrophysiological analyses of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) demonstrate an increased spontaneous miniature endplate potential (mEPP) frequency in Nedd4 mutants. However, the mutant neuromuscular synapses are less responsive to membrane depolarization, compared to the wildtypes. Ultrastructural analyses further reveal that the pre-synaptic nerve terminal branches at the NMJs of Nedd4 mutants are increased in number, but decreased in diameter compared to the wildtypes. These ultrastructural changes are consistent with functional alternation of the NMJs in Nedd4 mutants. Unexpectedly, Nedd4 is not expressed in motoneurons, but is highly expressed in skeletal muscles and Schwann cells. Together, these results demonstrate that Nedd4 is involved in regulating the formation and function of the NMJs through non-cell autonomous mechanisms. PMID:19345204

  7. The Development of Sex Reassignment Surgery in Thailand: A Social Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Chokrungvaranont, Prayuth; Jindarak, Sirachai; Angspatt, Apichai; Pungrasmi, Pornthep; Suwajo, Poonpismai; Tiewtranon, Preecha

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of gender reassignment in Thailand during the period of 1975–2012, in terms of social attitude, epidemiology, surgical patients' profile, law and regulation, religion, and patients' path from psychiatric assessment to surgery. Thailand healthcare for transsexual patients is described. Figures related to the number of sex reassignment surgeries performed in Thailand over the past 30 years are reported. Transsexual individuals are only apparently integrated within the Thail society: the law system of Thailand in fact, does not guarantee to transsexuals the same rights as in other Western countries; the governmental healthcare does not offer free treatments for transsexual patients. In favor of the transsexual healthcare, instead, the Medical Council of Thailand recently published a policy entitled “Criteria for the treatment of sex change, Census 2009.” The goal of this policy was to improve the care of transsexual patients in Thailand, by implementing the Standards of Care of the World Professional Association of Transgender Health. Currently, in Thailand, there are 6 major private groups performing sex reassignment surgery, and mostly performing surgery to patients coming from abroad. Particularly, the largest of these (Preecha's group) has performed nearly 3000 vaginoplasties for male-to-female transsexuals in the last 30 years. PMID:24772010

  8. Development and application of a mark-recapture model incorporating predicted sex and transitory behaviour

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conroy, M.J.; Senar, J.C.; Hines, J.E.; Domenech, J.

    1999-01-01

    We developed an extension of Cormack-Jolly-Seber models to handle a complex mark-recapture problem in which (a) the sex of birds cannot be determined prior to first moult, but can be predicted on the basis of body measurements, and (b) a significant portion of captured birds appear to be transients (i.e. are captured once but leave the area or otherwise become ' untrappable'). We applied this methodology to a data set of 4184 serins (Serinus serinus) trapped in northeastern Spain during 1985-96, in order to investigate age-, sex-, and time-specific variation in survival rates. Using this approach, we were able to successfully incorporate the majority of ringings of serins. Had we eliminated birds not previously captured (as has been advocated to avoid the problem of transience) we would have reduced our sample sizes by >2000 releases. In addition, we were able to include 1610 releases of birds of unknown (but predicted) sex; these data contributed to the precision of our estimates and the power of statistical tests. We discuss problems with data structure, encoding of the algorithms to compute parameter estimates, model selection, identifiability of parameters, and goodness-of-fit, and make recommendations for the design and analysis of future studies facing similar problems.

  9. Development and application of a mark-recapture model incorporating predicted sex and transitory behaviour

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conroy, M.J.; Senar, J.C.; Hines, J.E.; Domenech, J.

    1999-01-01

    We developed an extension of Cormack-Jolly-Seber models to handle a complex mark-recapture problem in which (a) the sex of birds cannot be determined prior to first moult, but can be predicted on the basis of body measurements, and (b) a significant portion of captured birds appear to be transients (i.e. are captured once but leave the area or otherwise become 'untrappable'). We applied this methodology to a data set of 4184 serins (Serinus serinus) trapped in northeastern Spain during 1985-96, in order to investigate age-, sex-, and time-specific variation in survival rates. Using this approach, we were able to successfully incorporate the majority of ringings of serins. Had we eliminated birds not previously captured (as has been advocated to avoid the problem of transience) we would have reduced our sample sizes by >2000 releases. In addition, we were able to include 1610 releases of birds of unknown (but predicted) sex; these data contributed to the precision of our estimates and the power of statistical tests. We discuss problems with data structure, encoding of the algorithms to compute parameter estimates, model selection, identifiability of parameters, and goodness-of-fit, and make recommendations for the design and analysis of future studies facing similar problems.

  10. Exome Sequencing for the Diagnosis of 46,XY Disorders of Sex Development

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Ruth M.; Arboleda, Valerie A.; Lee, Hane; Barseghyan, Hayk; Adam, Margaret P.; Fechner, Patricia Y.; Bargman, Renee; Keegan, Catherine; Travers, Sharon; Schelley, Susan; Hudgins, Louanne; Mathew, Revi P.; Stalker, Heather J.; Zori, Roberto; Gordon, Ora K.; Ramos-Platt, Leigh; Pawlikowska-Haddal, Anna; Eskin, Ascia; Nelson, Stanley F.; Délot, Emmanuèle

    2015-01-01

    Context: Disorders of sex development (DSD) are clinical conditions where there is a discrepancy between the chromosomal sex and the phenotypic (gonadal or genital) sex of an individual. Such conditions can be stressful for patients and their families and have historically been difficult to diagnose, especially at the genetic level. In particular, for cases of 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis, once variants in SRY and NR5A1 have been ruled out, there are few other single gene tests available. Objective: We used exome sequencing followed by analysis with a list of all known human DSD-associated genes to investigate the underlying genetic etiology of 46,XY DSD patients who had not previously received a genetic diagnosis. Design: Samples were either submitted to the research laboratory or submitted as clinical samples to the UCLA Clinical Genomic Center. Sequencing data were filtered using a list of genes known to be involved in DSD. Results: We were able to identify a likely genetic diagnosis in more than a third of cases, including 22.5% with a pathogenic finding, an additional 12.5% with likely pathogenic findings, and 15% with variants of unknown clinical significance. Conclusions: Early identification of the genetic cause of a DSD will in many cases streamline and direct the clinical management of the patient, with more focused endocrine and imaging studies and better-informed surgical decisions. Exome sequencing proved an efficient method toward such a goal in 46,XY DSD patients. PMID:25383892

  11. Islamic bioethical deliberation on the issue of newborns with disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohd Salim; Noor, Siti Nurani Mohd

    2015-04-01

    This article presents the Islamic bioethical deliberation on the issue of sex assignment surgery (SAS) for infants with disorders of sex development (DSD) or intersexed as a case study. The main objective of this study is to present a different approach in assessing a biomedical issue within the medium of the Maqasid al-Shari'ah. Within the framework of the maqasidic scheme of benefits and harms, any practice where benefits are substantial is considered permissible, while those promoting harms are prohibited. The concept of Maqasid al-Shari'ah which is the mechanistic interpretation of Qur'an and Hadith presents the holistic attention of Islam on many life activities, including healthcare. Indeed, this concept encompasses many aspects of worldly life, both for the human individual and collectively for the whole society. In healthcare, the practice of SAS on DSD newborns has presented an assortment of implications on the future livelihood of the affected individual. The process of decision-making seems to be very multifaceted since every element such as the determination of the 'correct' sex and the urgency of early surgery must consider the benefits and harms, as well as the child's rights and best interest. The application of the concept of Maqasid al-Shari'ah, would convey a pragmatic approach that is often disregarded in Western medicine. This approach considers the right of the individual to live life optimally, individually and socially and practice his faith, precisely, in accordance with the assigned gender. PMID:24664170

  12. Sex differences in T-lymphocyte tissue infiltration and development of angiotensin II hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pollow, Dennis P; Uhrlaub, Jennifer; Romero-Aleshire, Melissa J; Sandberg, Kathryn; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko; Brooks, Heddwen L; Hay, Meredith

    2014-08-01

    There is extensive evidence that activation of the immune system is both necessary and required for the development of angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension in males. The purpose of this study was to determine whether sex differences exist in the ability of the adaptive immune system to induce Ang II-dependent hypertension and whether central and renal T-cell infiltration during Ang II-induced hypertension is sex dependent. Recombinant activating gene-1 (Rag-1)(-/-) mice, lacking both T and B cells, were used. Male and female Rag-1(-/-) mice received adoptive transfer of male CD3(+) T cells 3 weeks before 14-day Ang II infusion (490 ng/kg per minute). Blood pressure was monitored via tail cuff. In the absence of T cells, systolic blood pressure responses to Ang II were similar between sexes (Δ22.1 mm Hg males versus Δ18 mm : Hg females). After adoptive transfer of male T cells, Ang II significantly increased systolic blood pressure in males (Δ37.7 mm : Hg; P<0.05) when compared with females (Δ13.7 mm : Hg). Flow cytometric analysis of total T cells and CD4(+), CD8(+), and regulatory Foxp3(+)-CD4(+) T-cell subsets identified that renal lymphocyte infiltration was significantly increased in males versus females in both control and Ang II-infused animals (P<0.05). Immunohistochemical staining for CD3(+)-positive T cells in the subfornical organ region of the brain was increased in males when compared with that in females. These results suggest that female Rag-1(-/-) mice are protected from male T-cell-mediated increases in Ang II-induced hypertension when compared with their male counterparts, and this protection may involve sex differences in the magnitude of T-cell infiltration of the kidney and brain. PMID:24890822

  13. Maternal toxicity, embryolethality and abnormal fetal development in CD-1 mice following one oral dose of T-2 toxin.

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, C G; Schiefer, H B

    1987-08-01

    An experiment was undertaken to determine the teratogenic effect of oral administration of T-2 toxin, a trichothecene mycotoxin. Firstly, a dose response study using 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 3.5 and 4.0 mg/kg T-2 toxin in propylene glycol, on day 9 of pregnancy, was undertaken. Maternal deaths and toxicity was noted in the 4.0 and 3.5 mg/kg groups post-toxin administration. These groups gained less weight throughout gestation than the rest of the groups, because no fetuses were found in the 4.0 mg/kg group and the 3.5 mg/kg group had significantly fewer fetuses than the remaining groups. The total fetal weight was similar among all groups with fetuses, and normal sex ratio of offspring was seen. More major and minor defects were seen in the 3.0 mg/kg T-2 toxin treated group than any other group. Secondly, a day response trial using a single dose of 3.0 mg/kg T-2 toxin given on either days 6, 7, 8, 10, 11 or 12 of gestation was undertaken. Maternal mortality, with placental hemorrhage, was observed. Fetal loss was greater in the T-2 toxin treated groups than in the starved controls. The greatest number of dead term fetuses was seen in mice treated on day 9 of gestation. Normal sex ratios were present in the offspring. Major skeletal defects were more numerous in mice treated on day 7 of gestation, whereas minor defects, retardations and variants were more common in mice treated on day 8. It was concluded that a single oral dose of T-2 toxin in propylene glycol is primarily maternotoxic and embryolethal, and that defective development was possibly secondary to maternal toxicity. PMID:3624788

  14. Silencing Abnormal Wing Disc Gene of the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri Disrupts Adult Wing Development and Increases Nymph Mortality

    PubMed Central

    El-Hawary, Ibrahim; Gowda, Siddarame; Killiny, Nabil

    2013-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) causes considerable economic losses to citrus industries worldwide. Its management depends on controlling of the Asian citrus Psyllid (ACP), the vector of the bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), the causal agent of HLB. Silencing genes by RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising tool to explore gene functions as well as control pests. In the current study, abnormal wing disc (awd) gene associated with wing development in insects is used to interfere with the flight of psyllids. Our study showed that transcription of awd is development-dependent and the highest level was found in the last instar (5th) of the nymphal stage. Micro-application (topical application) of dsRNA to 5th instar of nymphs caused significant nymphal mortality and adult wing-malformation. These adverse effects in ACP were positively correlated with the amounts of dsRNA used. A qRT-PCR analysis confirmed the dsRNA-mediated transcriptional down-regulation of the awd gene. Significant down-regulation was required to induce a wing-malformed phenotype. No effect was found when dsRNA-gfp was used, indicating the specific effect of dsRNA-awd. Our findings suggest a role for awd in ACP wing development and metamorphosis. awd could serve as a potential target for insect management either via direct application of dsRNA or by producing transgenic plants expressing dsRNA-awd. These strategies will help to mitigate HLB by controlling ACP. PMID:23734251

  15. Electron beam irradiation induces abnormal development and the stabilization of p53 protein of American serpentine leafminer, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Hyun-Na; Yun, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Changmann; Kim, Gil-Hah

    2012-01-01

    The American serpentine leafminer fly, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), is one of the most destructive polyphagous pests worldwide. In this study, we determined electron beam doses for inhibition of normal development of the leaf miner and investigated the effect of electron beam irradiation on DNA damage and p53 stability. Eggs (0-24 h old), larvae (2nd instar), puparia (0-24 h old after pupariation) and adults (24 h after emergence) were irradiated with increasing doses of electron beam irradiation (six levels between 30 and 200 Gy). At 150 Gy, the number of adults that developed from irradiated eggs, larvae and puparia was lower than in the untreated control. Fecundity and egg hatchability decreased depending on the doses applied. Reciprocal crosses between irradiated and unirradiated flies demonstrated that males were more radiotolerant than females. Adult longevity was not affected in all stages. The levels of DNA damage in L. trifolii adults were evaluated using the alkaline comet assay. Our results indicate that electron beam irradiation increased levels of DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, low doses of electron beam irradiation led to the rapid appearance of p53 protein within 6 h; however, it decreased after exposure to high doses (150 Gy and 200 Gy). These results suggest that electron beam irradiation induced not only abnormal development and reproduction but also p53 stability caused by DNA damage in L. trifolii. We conclude that a minimum dose of 150 Gy should be sufficient for female sterilization of L. trifolii.

  16. Avian egg odour encodes information on embryo sex, fertility and development.

    PubMed

    Webster, Ben; Hayes, William; Pike, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    Avian chemical communication is a rapidly emerging field, but has been hampered by a critical lack of information on volatile chemicals that communicate ecologically relevant information (semiochemicals). A possible, but as yet unexplored, function of olfaction and chemical communication in birds is in parent-embryo and embryo-embryo communication. Communication between parents and developing embryos may act to mediate parental behaviour, while communication between embryos can control the synchronicity of hatching. Embryonic vocalisations and vibrations have been implicated as a means of communication during the later stages of development but in the early stages, before embryos are capable of independent movement and vocalisation, this is not possible. Here we show that volatiles emitted from developing eggs of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) convey information on egg fertility, along with the sex and developmental status of the embryo. Specifically, egg volatiles changed over the course of incubation, differed between fertile and infertile eggs, and were predictive of embryo sex as early as day 1 of incubation. Egg odours therefore have the potential to facilitate parent-embryo and embryo-embryo interactions by allowing the assessment of key measures of embryonic development long before this is possible through other modalities. It also opens up the intriguing possibility that parents may be able to glean further relevant information from egg volatiles, such as the health, viability and heritage of embryos. By determining information conveyed by egg-derived volatiles, we hope to stimulate further investigation into the ecological role of egg odours. PMID:25629413

  17. Avian Egg Odour Encodes Information on Embryo Sex, Fertility and Development

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Ben; Hayes, William; Pike, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Avian chemical communication is a rapidly emerging field, but has been hampered by a critical lack of information on volatile chemicals that communicate ecologically relevant information (semiochemicals). A possible, but as yet unexplored, function of olfaction and chemical communication in birds is in parent-embryo and embryo-embryo communication. Communication between parents and developing embryos may act to mediate parental behaviour, while communication between embryos can control the synchronicity of hatching. Embryonic vocalisations and vibrations have been implicated as a means of communication during the later stages of development but in the early stages, before embryos are capable of independent movement and vocalisation, this is not possible. Here we show that volatiles emitted from developing eggs of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) convey information on egg fertility, along with the sex and developmental status of the embryo. Specifically, egg volatiles changed over the course of incubation, differed between fertile and infertile eggs, and were predictive of embryo sex as early as day 1 of incubation. Egg odours therefore have the potential to facilitate parent-embryo and embryo-embryo interactions by allowing the assessment of key measures of embryonic development long before this is possible through other modalities. It also opens up the intriguing possibility that parents may be able to glean further relevant information from egg volatiles, such as the health, viability and heritage of embryos. By determining information conveyed by egg-derived volatiles, we hope to stimulate further investigation into the ecological role of egg odours. PMID:25629413

  18. Involvement of ethylene in sex expression and female flower development in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus).

    PubMed

    Manzano, Susana; Martínez, Cecilia; García, Juan Manuel; Megías, Zoraida; Jamilena, Manuel

    2014-12-01

    Although it is known that ethylene has a masculinizing effect on watermelon, the specific role of this hormone in sex expression and flower development has not been analyzed in depth. By using different approaches the present work demonstrates that ethylene regulates differentially two sex-related developmental processes: sexual expression, i.e. the earliness and the number of female flowers per plant, and the development of individual floral buds. Ethylene production in the shoot apex as well as in male, female and bisexual flowers demonstrated that the female flower requires much more ethylene than the male one to develop, and that bisexual flowers result from a decrease in ethylene production in the female floral bud. The occurrence of bisexual flowers was found to be associated with elevated temperatures in the greenhouse, concomitantly with a reduction of ethylene production in the shoot apex. External treatments with ethephon and AVG, and the use of Cucurbita rootstocks with different ethylene production and sensitivity, confirmed that, as occurs in other cucurbit species, ethylene is required to arrest the development of stamens in the female flower. Nevertheless, in watermelon ethylene inhibits the transition from male to female flowering and reduces the number of pistillate flowers per plant, which runs contrary to findings in other cucurbit species. The use of Cucurbita rootstocks with elevated ethylene production delayed the production of female flowers but reduced the number of bisexual flowers, which is associated with a reduced fruit set and altered fruit shape. PMID:25463265

  19. Sex differences in the relationship between children's emotional expression discrimination and their developing hemispheric lateralization.

    PubMed

    Watling, Dawn; Bourne, Victoria J

    2013-01-01

    Strength of lateralization for processing facial emotion becomes more right hemisphere lateralized throughout childhood, but sex differences in this development are not currently understood. This study examines patterns of lateralization for emotion discrimination in 185 6-10-year-olds. Strength of right hemisphere lateralization was stronger in the older children, and right hemisphere dominance emerged at around age 8. Children who were more strongly lateralized performed with greater accuracy on a behavioral test of emotion discrimination and this relationship was significant for boys but not girls, demonstrating that there is a relationship between lateralization and performance (particularly, the discrimination of emotions). PMID:24138218

  20. Anal Canal Carcinoma in a Child With Disorders of Sex Development.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshihiko; Horikawa, Reiko; Masaki, Hidekazu; Yoshioka, Takako; Matsumoto, Kimikazu; Kanamori, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal in children is rare. To date, the etiology and outcome of this condition have been not fully understood. Here, we report an 11-year-old child with anal canal cancer who had concomitant disorders of sex development. Radiotherapy followed by salvage surgery achieved disease-free survival of 3 years. Since overexpression of cell cycle regulatory protein p16 was immunohistochemically evident in tumor tissue, human papillomavirus infection was considered as a causative factor in the carcinogenesis. PMID:27037640

  1. Sperm exposure to carbon-based nanomaterials causes abnormalities in early development of purple sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus).

    PubMed

    Mesarič, Tina; Sepčić, Kristina; Drobne, Damjana; Makovec, Darko; Faimali, Marco; Morgana, Silvia; Falugi, Carla; Gambardella, Chiara

    2015-06-01

    We examined egg fertilisation in purple sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus) after sperm exposure to carbon-based nanomaterials, carbon black (CB) and graphene oxide (GO), from 0.0001 mg/L to 1.0mg/L. Gastrula stage embryos were investigated for acetylcholinesterase and propionylcholinesterase activities, and their morphological characteristics. Plutei were analysed for morphological abnormalities, with emphasis on skeletal rod formation. Egg fertilisation was significantly affected by CB, at all concentrations tested. Loss of cell adhesion at the gastrula surface was observed in eggs fertilised with sperm treated with CB. However, concentration-dependent morphological anomalies were observed in the gastrulae and plutei formed after sperm exposure to either CB or GO. The activities of both cholinesterases decreased in the gastrulae, although not in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects appear to arise from physical interactions between these carbon-based nanomaterials and the sperm, whereby nanomaterials attached to the sperm surface interfere with fertilisation, which leads to disturbances in the signalling pathways of early embryonic development. Reduced cholinesterase activity in gastrulae from eggs fertilised with nanomaterial-treated sperm confirms involvement of the cholinergic system in early sea urchin development, including skeletogenesis. PMID:25897690

  2. Blocking Endogenous Leukemia Inhibitory Factor During Placental Development in Mice Leads to Abnormal Placentation and Pregnancy Loss

    PubMed Central

    Winship, Amy; Correia, Jeanne; Krishnan, Tara; Menkhorst, Ellen; Cuman, Carly; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Nicola, Nicos A.; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2015-01-01

    The placenta forms the interface between the maternal and fetal circulation and is critical for the establishment of a healthy pregnancy. Specialized trophoblast cells derived from the embryonic trophectoderm play a pivotal role in the establishment of the placenta. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is one of the predominant cytokines present in the placenta during early pregnancy. LIF has been shown to regulate trophoblast adhesion and invasion in vitro, however its precise role in vivo is unknown. We hypothesized that LIF would be required for normal placental development in mice. LIF and LIFRα were immunolocalized to placental trophoblasts and fetal vessels in mouse implantation sites during mid-gestation. Temporally blocking LIF action during specific periods of placental development via intraperitoneal administration of our specific LIFRα antagonist, PEGLA, resulted in abnormal placental trophoblast and vascular morphology and reduced activated STAT3 but not ERK. Numerous genes regulating angiogenesis and oxidative stress were altered in the placenta in response to LIF inhibition. Pregnancy viability was also significantly compromised in PEGLA treated mice. Our data suggest that LIF plays an important role in placentation in vivo and the maintenance of healthy pregnancy. PMID:26272398

  3. Boys and Girls on the Playground: Sex Differences in Social Development Are Not Stable across Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Barbu, Stéphanie; Cabanes, Guénaël; Le Maner-Idrissi, Gaïd

    2011-01-01

    Sex differences in human social behaviors and abilities have long been a question of public and scientific interest. Females are usually assumed to be more socially oriented and skilful than males. However, despite an extensive literature, the very existence of sex differences remains a matter of discussion while some studies found no sex differences whereas others reported differences that were either congruent or not with gender stereotypes. Moreover, the magnitude, consistency and stability across time of the differences remain an open question, especially during childhood. As play provides an excellent window into children's social development, we investigated whether and how sex differences change in social play across early childhood. Following a cross-sectional design, 164 children aged from 2 to 6 years old, divided into four age groups, were observed during outdoor free play at nursery school. We showed that sex differences are not stable over time evidencing a developmental gap between girls and boys. Social and structured forms of play emerge systematically earlier in girls than in boys leading to subsequent sex differences in favor of girls at some ages, successively in associative play at 3–4 years, cooperative play at 4–5 years, and social interactions with peers at 5–6 years. Preschool boys also display more solitary play than preschool girls, especially when young. Nevertheless, while boys catch up and girls move on towards more complex play, sex differences in social play patterns are reversed in favor of boys at the following ages, such as in associative play at 4–5 years and cooperative play at 5–6 years. This developmental perspective contributes to resolve apparent discrepancies between single-snapshot studies. A better understanding of the dynamics of sex differences in typical social development should also provide insights into atypical social developments which exhibit sex differences in prevalence, such as autism. PMID:21297987

  4. Boys and girls on the playground: sex differences in social development are not stable across early childhood.

    PubMed

    Barbu, Stéphanie; Cabanes, Guénaël; Le Maner-Idrissi, Gaïd

    2011-01-01

    Sex differences in human social behaviors and abilities have long been a question of public and scientific interest. Females are usually assumed to be more socially oriented and skillful than males. However, despite an extensive literature, the very existence of sex differences remains a matter of discussion while some studies found no sex differences whereas others reported differences that were either congruent or not with gender stereotypes. Moreover, the magnitude, consistency and stability across time of the differences remain an open question, especially during childhood. As play provides an excellent window into children's social development, we investigated whether and how sex differences change in social play across early childhood. Following a cross-sectional design, 164 children aged from 2 to 6 years old, divided into four age groups, were observed during outdoor free play at nursery school. We showed that sex differences are not stable over time evidencing a developmental gap between girls and boys. Social and structured forms of play emerge systematically earlier in girls than in boys leading to subsequent sex differences in favor of girls at some ages, successively in associative play at 3-4 years, cooperative play at 4-5 years, and social interactions with peers at 5-6 years. Preschool boys also display more solitary play than preschool girls, especially when young. Nevertheless, while boys catch up and girls move on towards more complex play, sex differences in social play patterns are reversed in favor of boys at the following ages, such as in associative play at 4-5 years and cooperative play at 5-6 years. This developmental perspective contributes to resolve apparent discrepancies between single-snapshot studies. A better understanding of the dynamics of sex differences in typical social development should also provide insights into atypical social developments which exhibit sex differences in prevalence, such as autism. PMID:21297987

  5. Trajectories of adolescent emotional and cognitive development: effects of sex and risk for drug use.

    PubMed

    Silveri, Marisa M; Tzilos, Golfo K; Pimentel, Patricia J; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A

    2004-06-01

    Adolescence has been widely accepted as a time for notable alterations in brain functioning. The objective of this longitudinal study was to compare trajectories of emotional and cognitive development in adolescent girls and boys with low- versus high-risk for future drug use. Nineteen healthy adolescents (aged 13.9 +/- 2.0 years; 10 girls), stratified into low- and high-risk groups based on family history of drug abuse, were examined at baseline and after one year. Emotional intelligence was assessed using the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory, the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, and the Perceived Stress Scale. The neurocognitive test battery was designed to evaluate academic achievement, executive function, verbal memory and learning, and included the Wide Range Achievement Test, Stroop Color-Word Interference Test, Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, and Digit Span and Digit Symbol subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised. Improvements in academic achievement, executive function, and working memory were observed at the one-year follow-up. Notable sex differences also were evident in emotional intelligence, academic achievement, and memory. Interestingly, these sex-related differences interacted with risk status; improvement in cognitive performance in boys and low-risk girls was generally superior to high-risk girls, who tended to show modest, if any, improvement at the one-year follow-up. These preliminary findings provide evidence of sex differences in emotion intelligence and cognitive function. Furthermore, these data also suggest that history of familial drug abuse may have a more pronounced impact on emotional and cognitive development in adolescent girls than boys. PMID:15251911

  6. Novel Associations in Disorders of Sex Development: Findings From the I-DSD Registry

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Kathryn; Bryce, Jillian; Jiang, Jipu; Rodie, Martina; Sinnott, Richard; Alkhawari, Mona; Arlt, Wiebke; Audi, Laura; Balsamo, Antonio; Bertelloni, Silvano; Cools, Martine; Darendeliler, Feyza; Drop, Stenvert; Ellaithi, Mona; Guran, Tulay; Hiort, Olaf; Holterhus, Paul-Martin; Hughes, Ieuan; Krone, Nils; Lisa, Lidka; Morel, Yves; Soder, Olle; Wieacker, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Context: The focus of care in disorders of sex development (DSD) is often directed to issues related to sex and gender development. In addition, the molecular etiology remains unclear in the majority of cases. Objective: To report the range of associated conditions identified in the international DSD (I-DSD) Registry. Design, Setting, and Patients: Anonymized data were extracted from the I-DSD Registry for diagnosis, karyotype, sex of rearing, genetic investigations, and associated anomalies. If necessary, clarification was sought from the reporting clinician. Results: Of 649 accessible cases, associated conditions occurred in 168 (26%); 103 (61%) cases had one condition, 31 (18%) had two conditions, 20 (12%) had three conditions, and 14 (8%) had four or more conditions. Karyotypes with most frequently reported associations included 45,X with 6 of 8 affected cases (75%), 45,X/46,XY with 19 of 42 cases (45%), 46,XY with 112 of 460 cases (24%), and 46,XX with 27 of 121 cases (22%). In the 112 cases of 46,XY DSD, the commonest conditions included small for gestational age in 26 (23%), cardiac anomalies in 22 (20%), and central nervous system disorders in 22 (20%), whereas in the 27 cases of 46,XX DSD, skeletal and renal anomalies were commonest at 12 (44%) and 8 (30%), respectively. Of 170 cases of suspected androgen insensitivity syndrome, 19 (11%) had reported anomalies and 9 of these had confirmed androgen receptor mutations. Conclusions: Over a quarter of the cases in the I-DSD Registry have an additional condition. These associations can direct investigators toward novel genetic etiology and also highlight the need for more holistic care of the affected person. PMID:24302751

  7. Abnormal immune system development and function in schizophrenia helps reconcile diverse findings and suggests new treatment and prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Anders, Sherry; Kinney, Dennis K

    2015-08-18

    Extensive research implicates disturbed immune function and development in the etiology and pathology of schizophrenia. In addition to reviewing evidence for immunological factors in schizophrenia, this paper discusses how an emerging model of atypical immune function and development helps explain a wide variety of well-established - but puzzling - findings about schizophrenia. A number of theorists have presented hypotheses that early immune system programming, disrupted by pre- and perinatal adversity, often combines with abnormal brain development to produce schizophrenia. The present paper focuses on the hypothesis that disruption of early immune system development produces a latent immune vulnerability that manifests more fully after puberty, when changes in immune function and the thymus leave individuals more susceptible to infections and immune dysfunctions that contribute to schizophrenia. Complementing neurodevelopmental models, this hypothesis integrates findings on many contributing factors to schizophrenia, including prenatal adversity, genes, climate, migration, infections, and stress, among others. It helps explain, for example, why (a) schizophrenia onset is typically delayed until years after prenatal adversity, (b) individual risk factors alone often do not lead to schizophrenia, and (c) schizophrenia prevalence rates actually tend to be higher in economically advantaged countries. Here we discuss how the hypothesis explains 10 key findings, and suggests new, potentially highly cost-effective, strategies for treatment and prevention of schizophrenia. Moreover, while most human research linking immune factors to schizophrenia has been correlational, these strategies provide ethical ways to experimentally test in humans theories about immune function and schizophrenia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroimmunology in Health And Disease. PMID:25736181

  8. Aplastic Anemia in Two Patients with Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Rush, Eric T; Schaefer, G Bradley; Sanger, Warren G; Coccia, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome aneuploidies range in incidence from rather common to exceedingly rare and have a variable phenotype. We report 2 patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies who developed severe aplastic anemia requiring treatment. The first patient had tetrasomy X (48,XXXX) and presented at 9 years of age, and the second patient had trisomy X (47,XXX) and presented at 5 years of age. Although aplastic anemia has been associated with other chromosomal abnormalities, sex chromosome abnormalities have not been traditionally considered a risk factor for this condition. A review of the literature reveals that at least one other patient with a sex chromosome aneuploidy (45,X) has suffered from aplastic anemia and that other autosomal chromosomal anomalies have been described. Despite the uncommon nature of each condition, it is possible that the apparent association is coincidental. A better understanding of the genetic causes of aplastic anemia remains important. PMID:26571231

  9. Development of Methods of Genotyping Sex for use in Endocrine Disruption Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting compounds have been shown to completely sex reverse both male and female individuals in amphibian, avian, fish, invertebrate, and reptile species. In many cases these sex-reversed individuals are morphologically indistinguishable from normal individuals. De...

  10. Morphological abnormalities, impaired fetal development and decrease in myostatin expression following somatic cell nuclear transfer in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hong, Il-Hwa; Jeong, Yeon-Woo; Shin, Taeyoung; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Park, Jin-Kyu; Ki, Mi-Ran; Han, Seon-Young; Park, Se-Il; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Eun-Mi; Kim, Ah-Young; You, Sang-Young; Hwang, Woo-Suk; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2011-05-01

    Several mammals, including dogs, have been successfully cloned using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), but the efficiency of generating normal, live offspring is relatively low. Although the high failure rate has been attributed to incomplete reprogramming of the somatic nuclei during the cloning process, the exact cause is not fully known. To elucidate the cause of death in cloned offspring, 12 deceased offspring cloned by SCNT were necropsied. The clones were either stillborn just prior to delivery or died with dyspnea shortly after birth. On gross examination, defects in the anterior abdominal wall and increased heart and liver sizes were found. Notably, a significant increase in muscle mass and macroglossia lesions were observed in deceased SCNT-cloned dogs. Interestingly, the expression of myostatin, a negative regulator of muscle growth during embryogenesis, was down-regulated at the mRNA level in tongues and skeletal muscles of SCNT-cloned dogs compared with a normal dog. Results of the present study suggest that decreased expression of myostatin in SCNT-cloned dogs may be involved in morphological abnormalities such as increased muscle mass and macroglossia, which may contribute to impaired fetal development and poor survival rates. PMID:21520324

  11. The Development of Sex-Gender Constancy Among Children in Four Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munroe, Ruth H.; Munroe, Robert L.

    The study examines the acquisition of gender constancy in children as it relates to cultural, socioenvironmental, or individual differences. Gender constancy refers to the stages from simple identification of biological sex of self and others, to the understanding that one's sex is stable over time, and to comprehension of one's sex as consistent…

  12. Development and Refinement of a Measure of Attitudes toward Sex Offender Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wnuk, Dorota; Chapman, Jason E; Jeglic, Elizabeth L.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years public attitudes toward sex offenders have become increasingly punitive. Consequently, new legislation pertaining to the sentencing and treatment of convicted sex offenders has been focused on containment and monitoring rather than rehabilitation. However, research suggests that treatment programs for sex offenders are effective in…

  13. Sex-Role Development and Parental Expectations among Disturbed Adolescent Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Arnold; And Others

    1975-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the sex-linked personality traits of adolescents referred to out-patient clinics for a variety of psychological problems, the sex-linked personality traits of their parents, and the sex-linked personality characteristics that the parents of these adolescents would ideally like for their sons. (Author/RK)

  14. Children with disorders of sex development: A qualitative study of early parental experience

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical research on psychological aspects of disorders of sex development (DSD) has focused on psychosexual differentiation with relatively little attention directed toward parents' experiences of early clinical management and their influence on patient and family psychosocial adaptation. Objectives To characterize parental experiences in the early clinical care of children born with DSD. Study Design Content analysis of interviews with parents (n = 41) of 28 children, newborn to 6 years, with DSD. Results Four major domains emerged as salient to parents: (1) the gender assignment process, (2) decisions regarding genital surgery, (3) disclosing information about their child's DSD, and (4) interacting with healthcare providers. Findings suggested discordance between scientific and parental understandings of the determinants of "sex" and "gender." Parents' expectations regarding the benefits of genital surgery appear largely met; however, parents still had concerns about their child's future physical, social and sexual development. Two areas experienced by many parents as particularly stressful were: (1) uncertainties regarding diagnosis and optimal management, and (2) conflicts between maintaining privacy versus disclosing the condition to access social support. Conclusions Parents' experiences and gaps in understanding can be used to inform the clinical care of patients with DSD and their families. Improving communication between parents and providers (and between parents and their support providers) throughout the early clinical management process may be important in decreasing stress and improving outcomes for families of children with DSD. PMID:21992519

  15. Parental Reports of Stigma Associated with Child's Disorder of Sex Development

    PubMed Central

    Rolston, Aimee M.; Vilain, Eric; Sandberg, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) are congenital conditions in which chromosomal, gonadal, or anatomic sex development is atypical. DSD-associated stigma is purported to threaten positive psychosocial adaptation. Parental perceptions of DSD-related stigma were assessed in 154 parents of 107 children (newborn–17 years) questionnaire comprising two scales, child-focused and parent-focused, and three subscales, perceived stigmatization, future worries, and feelings about the child's condition. Medical chart excerpts identified diagnoses and clinical management details. Stigma scale scores were generally low. Parents of children with DSD reported less stigma than parents of children with epilepsy; however, a notable proportion rated individual items in the moderate to high range. Stigma was unrelated to child's age or the number of DSD-related surgeries. Child-focused stigma scores exceeded parent-focused stigma and mothers reported more stigma than fathers, with a moderate level of agreement. Within 46,XY DSD, reported stigma was higher for children reared as girls. In conclusion, in this first quantitative study of ongoing experiences, DSD-related stigma in childhood and adolescence, while limited in the aggregate, is reported at moderate to high levels in specific areas. Because stigma threatens positive psychosocial adaptation, systematic screening for these concerns should be considered and, when reported, targeted for psychoeducational counseling. PMID:25918529

  16. Development of a real-time PCR method for rapid sexing of human preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Martinhago, Cd; Vagnini, Ld; Petersen, Cg; Mauri, Al; Baruffi, Rl; de Oliveira, Rm; Franco, Jg

    2010-01-01

    Genes on the X chromosome are known to be responsible for more than 200 hereditary diseases. After IVF, the simple selection of embryo sex before uterine transfer can prevent the occurrence of affected offspring among couples at risk for these genetic disorders. The aim of this investigation was to develop a rapid method of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the sexing of human embryos, and to compare it to the fluorescence in-situ hybridization technique, considered to be the gold standard. After biopsies were obtained from 40 surplus non-viable embryos for transfer, a total of 98 blastomeres were analysed. It was possible to analyse 24 embryos (60%) by both techniques, generating a total of 70 blastomeres (35 per technique), while 28 blastomeres from 16 embryos (40%) were analysed only by real-time PCR. A rapid and safe method was developed in the present study for the sexual diagnosis of a single human cell (blastomere and buccal cell) using the emerging technology of real-time PCR. PMID:20158991

  17. Potential Adverse Effects of Prolonged Sevoflurane Exposure on Developing Monkey Brain: From Abnormal Lipid Metabolism to Neuronal Damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Rainosek, Shuo W; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica L; Patterson, Tucker A; Paule, Merle G; Slikker, William; Wang, Cheng; Han, Xianlin

    2015-10-01

    Sevoflurane is a volatile anesthetic that has been widely used in general anesthesia, yet its safety in pediatric use is a public concern. This study sought to evaluate whether prolonged exposure of infant monkeys to a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane is associated with any adverse effects on the developing brain. Infant monkeys were exposed to 2.5% sevoflurane for 9 h, and frontal cortical tissues were harvested for DNA microarray, lipidomics, Luminex protein, and histological assays. DNA microarray analysis showed that sevoflurane exposure resulted in a broad identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the monkey brain. In general, these genes were associated with nervous system development, function, and neural cell viability. Notably, a number of DEGs were closely related to lipid metabolism. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that critical lipid components, (eg, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylglycerol) were significantly downregulated by prolonged exposure of sevoflurane. Luminex protein analysis indicated abnormal levels of cytokines in sevoflurane-exposed brains. Consistently, Fluoro-Jade C staining revealed more degenerating neurons after sevoflurane exposure. These data demonstrate that a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane (2.5%) is capable of inducing and maintaining an effective surgical plane of anesthesia in the developing nonhuman primate and that a prolonged exposure of 9 h resulted in profound changes in gene expression, cytokine levels, lipid metabolism, and subsequently, neuronal damage. Generally, sevoflurane-induced neuronal damage was also associated with changes in lipid content, composition, or both; and specific lipid changes could provide insights into the molecular mechanism(s) underlying anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity and may be sensitive biomarkers for the early detection of anesthetic-induced neuronal damage. PMID:26206149

  18. Sex determination in mythology and history.

    PubMed

    Mittwoch, Ursula

    2005-02-01

    The history of ideas on how the sexes became divided spans at least three thousand years. The biblical account of the origin of Eve, and the opinions of the philosophers of classical Greece, have unexpected bearings on present-day ideas. The scientific study of sex determination can be said to have begun in the 17th century with the discovery of spermatozoa, but the origin and function of the "spermatic animalcules" eluded investigators until 1841. The mammalian egg was discovered in 1827, and in the last quarter of the century fertilization was observed. The view current at that time, that sex determination was under environmental control, gave way to the idea of chromosomal determination in the first quarter of the 20th century. The study of human and other mammalian chromosomes during the third quarter of the century, and the discovery of sex-chromosome abnormalities, emphasized the importance of the Y chromosome for male sex determination. The last quarter of the century witnessed a hunt for the "testis-determining" gene, thought to be responsible for the differentiation of Sertoli cells, and culminating in the isolation of SRY (Sry in the mouse). However, an increasing number of additional genes and growth factors were found to be required for the establishment of male sex. During the same period evidence emerged that male development was accompanied by enhanced growth, both of gonads and whole embryos. An unexpected finding was the demonstration of temperature-dependent sex determination in reptiles. With the advent of the 21st century, it was shown that Sry induces cell proliferation in fetal mouse gonads, and it has been suggested that male sex differentiation in mammals requires a higher metabolic rate. These insights could lead to a better understanding and improved treatment of abnormalities of sexual development. PMID:16544030

  19. Drug use and Hispanic men who have sex with men in South Florida: implications for intervention development.

    PubMed

    Fernández, M Isabel; Jacobs, Robin J; Warren, Jacob C; Sanchez, Jesus; Bowen, G Stephen

    2009-10-01

    Despite continued high HIV risk among Hispanic men who have sex with men (HMSM), culturally tailored, theoretically based interventions have yet to be developed and tested. As a first step toward intervention development, we collected quantitative and qualitative data on sociocultural and psychological factors associated with drug use and risky sex among 566 HMSM recruited from community and Internet venues. Participants reported high rates of drug use (43%), unprotected anal sex (45%), and multiple sex partners (median 4) in the past 6 months. In multivariate analyses, use of drugs was associated with HIV seropositivity, less orientation to the Hispanic community, stronger attachment to the gay community, lower levels of homophobia, higher numbers of sex partners and more unprotected anal sex. The need for acceptance and desire to please partners emerged as core drivers of HIV risk in the qualitative data. Findings were used to guide development of Proyecto SOL, a theoretically grounded intervention that targets core determinants of HIV risk, builds on protective cultural influences, and strengthens positive social connections. PMID:19824834

  20. The anterior tooth development of cattle presented for slaughter: an analysis of age, sex and breed.

    PubMed

    Whiting, K J; Brown, S N; Browne, W J; Hadley, P J; Knowles, T G

    2013-08-01

    In a cross-sectional study, data from records of cattle slaughtered over a 1-year period at a large abattoir in South West England were analysed using an ordered category response model to investigate the inter-relationships between age, sex and breed on development of the permanent anterior (PA) teeth. Using the model, transition points at which there was a 50% probability of membership of each category of paired PA teeth were identified. Data from ∼60,000 animals were initially analysed for age and sex effect. The age transition was found to be ∼23 months moving from zero to two teeth; 30 months for two to four teeth; 37 months for four to six teeth and 42 months for six to eight teeth. Males were found to develop, on average, ∼22 days earlier than females across all stages. A reduced data set of ∼23,000 animals registered as pure-bred only was used to compare breed and type interactions and to investigate sex effects within the sub-categories. Breeds were grouped into dairy and beef-type and beef breeds split into native and continental. It was found that dairy-types moved through the transition points earlier than beef-types across all stages (interval varying between ∼8 and 12 weeks) and that collectively, native beef breeds moved through the transition points by up to 3 weeks earlier than the continental beef breeds. Interestingly, in contrast to beef animals, dairy females matured before dairy males. However, the magnitude of the difference between dairy females and males diminished at the later stages of development. Differences were found between breeds. Across the first three stages, Ayrshires and Guernseys developed between 3 and 6 weeks later than Friesian/Holsteins and Simmental, Limousin and Blonde Aquitaine 6 and 8 weeks later than Aberdeen Angus. Herefords, Charolais and South Devon developed later but by a smaller interval and Red Devon and Galloway showed the largest individual effect with transition delayed by 8 to 12 weeks. PMID:23552220

  1. Genetically induced abnormal cranial development in human trisomy 18 with holoprosencephaly: comparisons with the normal tempo of osteogenic-neural development.

    PubMed

    Reid, Shaina N; Ziermann, Janine M; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C

    2015-07-01

    Craniofacial malformations are common congenital defects caused by failed midline inductive signals. These midline defects are associated with exposure of the fetus to exogenous teratogens and with inborn genetic errors such as those found in Down, Patau, Edwards' and Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndromes. Yet, there are no studies that analyze contributions of synchronous neurocranial and neural development in these disorders. Here we present the first in-depth analysis of malformations of the basicranium of a holoprosencephalic (HPE) trisomy 18 (T18; Edwards' syndrome) fetus with synophthalmic cyclopia and alobar HPE. With a combination of traditional gross dissection and state-of-the-art computed tomography, we demonstrate the deleterious effects of T18 caused by a translocation at 18p11.31. Bony features included a single developmentally unseparated frontal bone, and complete dual absence of the anterior cranial fossa and ethmoid bone. From a superior view with the calvarium plates removed, there was direct visual access to the orbital foramen and hard palate. Both the eyes and the pituitary gland, normally protected by bony structures, were exposed in the cranial cavity and in direct contact with the brain. The middle cranial fossa was shifted anteriorly, and foramina were either missing or displaced to an abnormal location due to the absence or misplacement of its respective cranial nerve (CN). When CN development was conserved in its induction and placement, the respective foramen developed in its normal location albeit with abnormal gross anatomical features, as seen in the facial nerve (CNVII) and the internal acoustic meatus. More anteriorly localized CNs and their foramina were absent or heavily disrupted compared with posterior ones. The severe malformations exhibited in the cranial fossae, orbital region, pituitary gland and sella turcica highlight the crucial involvement of transcription factors such as TGIF, which is located on chromosome 18 and contributes to neural patterning, in the proper development of neural and cranial structures. Our study of a T18 specimen emphasizes the intricate interplay between bone and brain development in midline craniofacial abnormalities in general. PMID:26018729

  2. The trajectory of gray matter development in Broca’s area is abnormal in people who stutter

    PubMed Central

    Beal, Deryk S.; Lerch, Jason P.; Cameron, Brodie; Henderson, Rhaeling; Gracco, Vincent L.; De Nil, Luc F.

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition and mastery of speech-motor control requires years of practice spanning the course of development. People who stutter often perform poorly on speech-motor tasks thereby calling into question their ability to establish the stable neural motor programs required for masterful speech-motor control. There is evidence to support the assertion that these neural motor programs are represented in the posterior part of Broca’s area, specifically the left pars opercularis. Consequently, various theories of stuttering causation posit that the disorder is related to a breakdown in the formation of the neural motor programs for speech early in development and that this breakdown is maintained throughout life. To date, no study has examined the potential neurodevelopmental signatures of the disorder across pediatric and adult populations. The current study aimed to fill this gap in our knowledge. We hypothesized that the developmental trajectory of cortical thickness in people who stutter would differ across the lifespan in the left pars opercularis relative to a group of control participants. We collected structural magnetic resonance images from 116 males (55 people who stutter) ranging in age from 6 to 48 years old. Differences in cortical thickness across ages and between patients and controls were investigated in 30 brain regions previously implicated in speech-motor control. An interaction between age and group was found for the left pars opercularis only. In people who stutter, the pars opercularis did not demonstrate the typical maturational pattern of gradual gray matter thinning with age across the lifespan that we observed in control participants. In contrast, the developmental trajectory of gray matter thickness in other regions of interest within the neural network for speech-motor control was similar for both groups. Our findings indicate that the developmental trajectory of gray matter in left pars opercularis is abnormal in people who stutter. PMID:25784869

  3. Models of Abnormal Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Bommie F.; Lee, Jun Yong; Jung, Sung-No

    2013-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are thick, raised dermal scars, caused by derailing of the normal scarring process. Extensive research on such abnormal scarring has been done; however, these being refractory disorders specific to humans, it has been difficult to establish a universal animal model. A wide variety of animal models have been used. These include the athymic mouse, rats, rabbits, and pigs. Although these models have provided valuable insight into abnormal scarring, there is currently still no ideal model. This paper reviews the models that have been developed. PMID:24078916

  4. The Relationship between Personality Dimensions and Resiliency to Environmental Stress in Orange-Winged Amazon Parrots (Amazona amazonica), as Indicated by the Development of Abnormal Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Cussen, Victoria A; Mench, Joy A

    2015-01-01

    Parrots are popular companion animals, but are frequently relinquished because of behavioral problems, including abnormal repetitive behaviors like feather damaging behavior and stereotypy. In addition to contributing to pet relinquishment, these behaviors are important as potential indicators of diminished psychological well-being. While abnormal behaviors are common in captive animals, their presence and/or severity varies between animals of the same species that are experiencing the same environmental conditions. Personality differences could contribute to this observed individual variation, as they are known risk factors for stress sensitivity and affective disorders in humans. The goal of this study was to assess the relationship between personality and the development and severity of abnormal behaviors in captive-bred orange-winged Amazon parrots (Amazona amazonica). We monitored between-individual behavioral differences in enrichment-reared parrots of known personality types before, during, and after enrichment deprivation. We predicted that parrots with higher scores for neurotic-like personality traits would be more susceptible to enrichment deprivation and develop more abnormal behaviors. Our results partially supported this hypothesis, but also showed that distinct personality dimensions were related to different forms of abnormal behavior. While neuroticism-like traits were linked to feather damaging behavior, extraversion-like traits were negatively related to stereotypic behavior. More extraverted birds showed resiliency to environmental stress, developing fewer stereotypies during enrichment deprivation and showing lower levels of these behaviors following re-enrichment. Our data, together with the results of the few studies conducted on other species, suggest that, as in humans, certain personality types render individual animals more susceptible or resilient to environmental stress. Further, this susceptibility/resiliency can have a long-term effect on behavior, as evidenced by behavioral changes that persisted despite re-enrichment. Ours is the first study evaluating the relationship between personality dimensions, environment, and abnormal behaviors in an avian species. PMID:26114423

  5. The Relationship between Personality Dimensions and Resiliency to Environmental Stress in Orange-Winged Amazon Parrots (Amazona amazonica), as Indicated by the Development of Abnormal Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Cussen, Victoria A.; Mench, Joy A.

    2015-01-01

    Parrots are popular companion animals, but are frequently relinquished because of behavioral problems, including abnormal repetitive behaviors like feather damaging behavior and stereotypy. In addition to contributing to pet relinquishment, these behaviors are important as potential indicators of diminished psychological well-being. While abnormal behaviors are common in captive animals, their presence and/or severity varies between animals of the same species that are experiencing the same environmental conditions. Personality differences could contribute to this observed individual variation, as they are known risk factors for stress sensitivity and affective disorders in humans. The goal of this study was to assess the relationship between personality and the development and severity of abnormal behaviors in captive-bred orange-winged Amazon parrots (Amazona amazonica). We monitored between-individual behavioral differences in enrichment-reared parrots of known personality types before, during, and after enrichment deprivation. We predicted that parrots with higher scores for neurotic-like personality traits would be more susceptible to enrichment deprivation and develop more abnormal behaviors. Our results partially supported this hypothesis, but also showed that distinct personality dimensions were related to different forms of abnormal behavior. While neuroticism-like traits were linked to feather damaging behavior, extraversion-like traits were negatively related to stereotypic behavior. More extraverted birds showed resiliency to environmental stress, developing fewer stereotypies during enrichment deprivation and showing lower levels of these behaviors following re-enrichment. Our data, together with the results of the few studies conducted on other species, suggest that, as in humans, certain personality types render individual animals more susceptible or resilient to environmental stress. Further, this susceptibility/resiliency can have a long-term effect on behavior, as evidenced by behavioral changes that persisted despite re-enrichment. Ours is the first study evaluating the relationship between personality dimensions, environment, and abnormal behaviors in an avian species. PMID:26114423

  6. The European disorder of sex development registry: a virtual research environment.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S F; Rodie, M; Jiang, J; Sinnott, R O

    2010-09-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) are a rare group of conditions which require further research. Effective research into understanding the aetiology, as well as long-term outcome of these rare conditions, requires multicentre collaboration often across national boundaries. The EU-funded EuroDSD programme (www.eurodsd.eu) is one such collaboration involving clinical centres and clinical and genetic experts across Europe. At the heart of the EuroDSD collaboration is a European DSD registry and a targeted virtual research environment (VRE) that supports the sharing of DSD data. Security, ethics and information governance are cornerstones of this infrastructure. This paper describes the infrastructure that has been developed, the inherent challenges in security, availability and dependability that must be overcome for the enterprise to succeed and provides a sample of the data that are stored in the registry along with a summary analysis of the current data sets. PMID:20501980

  7. Nonrandom development of immunologic abnormalities after infection with human immunodeficiency virus: implications for immunologic classification of the disease.

    PubMed Central

    Zolla-Pazner, S; Des Jarlais, D C; Friedman, S R; Spira, T J; Marmor, M; Holzman, R; Mildvan, D; Yancovitz, S; Mathur-Wagh, U; Garber, J

    1987-01-01

    Blood specimens from 165 intravenous drug users who were seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), from 158 seropositive homosexual men with lymphadenopathy, and from 77 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were assessed immunologically. Immunologic parameters were analyzed by the Guttman scalogram technique to determine if immunologic abnormalities occurred in a nonrandom pattern. The following four patterns emerged: (i) seropositivity for HIV with no immunologic abnormalities; (ii) seropositivity for HIV with a depressed T4/T8 cell ratio; (iii) seropositivity with a depressed T4/T8 cell ratio and T4-cell depletion; and (iv) seropositivity with a depressed T4/T8 cell ratio, T4-cell depletion, and lymphopenia. Ninety-two to 100% of subjects in each of the three groups of patients were found "to scale" because the abnormalities occurred in the cumulative, ordered fashion described. This nonrandom occurrence of abnormalities indicates an ordered progression of immunologic abnormalities in individuals infected with HIV, a finding useful in the staging of both symptomatic and asymptomatic HIV-seropositive subjects. PMID:3496603

  8. Role of Environment and Sex Differences in the Development of Autoimmune Diseases: A Roundtable Meeting Report

    PubMed Central

    Mallampalli, Monica P.; Davies, Erika; Wood, Debra; Robertson, Hillary; Polato, Federica

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune diseases (ADs) impose substantial health and financial burdens in the United States and in many parts of the world. Women are disproportionately affected by many of these disorders, which often contribute to lifelong disabilities. While the number of patients with some ADs appears to be rising, the complexities of conducting epidemiological studies prevent a thorough understanding of the prevalence and incidence of these various conditions. Research on environmental influences of these illnesses is limited, although they are generally hypothesized to result from the interaction of environmental agents in genetically susceptible individuals. Further, there is little known regarding the role of sex and gender in the environmentally influenced mechanisms leading to the development of AD. To address these issues, particularly the roles of environment and sex and gender in ADs and the factors that contribute to the rise in ADs, the Society for Women's Health Research convened an interdisciplinary roundtable of experts from academia, medicine, and government agencies to share their expertise, address knowledge gaps in research, and propose future research recommendations. PMID:23829184

  9. The role of sexually explicit material in the sexual development of same-sex-attracted Black adolescent males.

    PubMed

    Arrington-Sanders, Renata; Harper, Gary W; Morgan, Anthony; Ogunbajo, Adedotun; Trent, Maria; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2015-04-01

    Sexually explicit material (SEM) (including Internet, video, and print) may play a key role in the lives of Black same-sex sexually active youth by providing the only information to learn about sexual development. There is limited school- and/or family-based sex education to serve as models for sexual behaviors for Black youth. We describe the role SEM plays in the sexual development of a sample of Black same-sex attracted (SSA) young adolescent males ages 15-19. Adolescents recruited from clinics, social networking sites, and through snowball sampling were invited to participate in a 90-min, semi-structured qualitative interview. Most participants described using SEM prior to their first same-sex sexual experience. Participants described using SEM primarily for sexual development, including learning about sexual organs and function, the mechanics of same-gender sex, and to negotiate one's sexual identity. Secondary functions were to determine readiness for sex; to learn about sexual performance, including understanding sexual roles and responsibilities (e.g., "top" or "bottom"); to introduce sexual performance scripts; and to develop models for how sex should feel (e.g., pleasure and pain). Youth also described engaging in sexual behaviors (including condom non-use and/or swallowing ejaculate) that were modeled on SEM. Comprehensive sexuality education programs should be designed to address the unmet needs of young, Black SSA men, with explicit focus on sexual roles and behaviors that may be inaccurately portrayed and/or involve sexual risk-taking (such as unprotected anal intercourse and swallowing ejaculate) in SEM. This work also calls for development of Internet-based HIV/STI prevention strategies targeting young Black SSA men who may be accessing SEM. PMID:25677334

  10. The Role of Sexually Explicit Material (SEM) in the Sexual Development of Black Young Same-Sex-Attracted Men

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Anthony; Ogunbajo, Adedotun; Trent, Maria; Harper, Gary W.; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Sexually explicit material (SEM) (including Internet, video, and print) may play a key role in the lives of Black same-sex sexually active youth by providing the only information to learn about sexual development. There is limited school-and/or family-based sex education to serve as models for sexual behaviors for Black youth. We describe the role SEM plays in the sexual development of a sample of Black same-sex attracted (SSA) young adolescent men ages 15–19. Adolescents recruited from clinics, social networking sites, and through snowball sampling were invited to participate in a 90-min, semi-structured qualitative interview. Most participants described using SEM prior to their first same-sex sexual experience. Participants described using SEM primarily for sexual development, including learning about sexual organs and function, the mechanics of same-gender sex, and to negotiate one’s sexual identity. Secondary functions were to determine readiness for sex; to learn about sexual performance, including understanding sexual roles and responsibilities (e.g., “top” or “bottom”); to introduce sexual performance scripts; and to develop models for how sex should feel (e.g., pleasure and pain). Youth also described engaging in sexual behaviors (including condom non-use and/or swallowing ejaculate) that were modeled on SEM. Comprehensive sexuality education programs should be designed to address the unmet needs of young, Black SSA young men, with explicit focus on sexual roles and behaviors that may be inaccurately portrayed and/or involve sexual risk-taking (such as unprotected anal intercourse and swallowing ejaculate) in SEM. This work also calls for development of Internet-based HIV/STI prevention strategies targeting young Black SSA men who maybe accessing SEM. PMID:25677334

  11. Recrystallization and the Development of Abnormally Large Grains After Small Strain Deformation in a Polycrystalline Nickel-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Victoria M.; Johnson, Anthony E.; Torbet, Chris J.; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2016-04-01

    The formation of abnormally large grains has been investigated in the polycrystalline nickel-based superalloy René 88DT. Cylindrical specimens with a 15 μm grain size were compressed to plastic strains up to 11.0 pct and subsequently rapidly heated to above the γ' solvus at 1423 K (1150° C) and held for 60 seconds. All deformed samples partially recrystallized during the heat treatment, with the recrystallized grain size varying with the degree of deformation. The largest final grain size occurred in samples deformed to approximately 2 pct strain, with isolated grains as large as 700 μm in diameter observed. It is proposed that abnormally large grains appear due to nucleation-limited recrystallization, not abnormal grain growth, based on the high boundary velocities measured and the observed reduction in grain orientation spread.

  12. Gonad development in Midas cichlids and the evolution of sex change in fishes.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, Ronald G

    2011-01-01

    Some fishes mature and function as one sex and later transform to the other sex in response to social interactions. Previous evidence suggested that a change in developmental timing may be involved in the evolution of adult sex change in fishes. The most recent support for this idea came from reports that sex in the Midas cichlid, Amphilophus citrinellus, was determined by social conditions experienced at the juvenile stage. Differentiation as a male was reported to be dependent on large body size relative to group-mates, and thought to be mediated through aggressive interactions. Here I demonstrate that socially controlled sex determination does not occur as was originally reported. Previously, I found that sex was not associated with body size in juveniles either in nature or in captivity. Similarly, I found no association between aggressive behavior and sex in juveniles. I later demonstrated that socially controlled sex determination does not typically occur in the Midas cichlid and closely related species and supported an alternative mechanism to explain large body size in adult males. Finally, in the current study I analyze gonad histology of fish from the same population used by the original authors and lay to rest the idea of socially controlled sex determination in this species. Recent observations of socially controlled sex determination in juveniles of species that typically change sex at the adult stage are examples of phenotypic plasticity, not genetic variation. Therefore, juvenile socially controlled sex determination does not support a theory that a change in developmental timing is involved in the evolution of adult sex change in fishes. PMID:21740508

  13. Abnormal hippocampal–thalamic white matter tract development and positive symptom course in individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jessica A; Orr, Joseph M; Mittal, Vijay A

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Abnormal development of the hippocampus has been reported in adolescents at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis and thalamic abnormalities have been found. However, the white matter connections between the hippocampus and the thalamus have not been studied. The connections between these regions are of key importance to our understanding of the pathophysiology of psychosis. Methods Twenty-six UHR and 21 healthy age-matched controls were tested at a baseline assessment and 12 months later. Symptoms were assessed at both the time points and all the participants underwent diffusion tensor imaging scans. We used tractography to trace the white matter connections in each individual between the thalamus and hippocampus and then extracted fractional anisotropy (FA) to assess white matter structural integrity. Results There was a significant group by time interaction indicating that FA decreased in UHR, and increased in controls over 12 months. Across both groups, baseline FA of the thalamic–hippocampal tract was predictive of positive symptoms at 12-month follow-up. Critically, this pattern remained significant in UHR individual group alone. At baseline, those with higher FA, indicative of abnormal white matter development, show higher positive symptoms 1 year later. Conclusions Here, we provide evidence to indicate that there are differences in white matter development in hippocampal–thalamic connections, both of which are important nodes in networks associated with schizophrenia. Furthermore, abnormal developmental patterns in UHR individuals are associated with positive symptom course. PMID:26120591

  14. Development of a genetic sexing strain in Bactrocera carambolae (Diptera: Tephritidae) by introgression of sex sorting components from B. dorsalis, Salaya1 strain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The carambola fruit fly, Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock is a high profile key pest that is widely distributed in the southwestern ASEAN region. In addition, it has trans-continentally invaded Suriname, where it has been expanding east and southward since 1975. This fruit fly belongs to Bactrocera dorsalis species complex. The development and application of a genetic sexing strain (Salaya1) of B. dorsalis sensu stricto (s.s.) (Hendel) for the sterile insect technique (SIT) has improved the fruit fly control. However, matings between B. dorsalis s.s. and B. carambolae are incompatible, which hinder the application of the Salaya1 strain to control the carambola fruit fly. To solve this problem, we introduced genetic sexing components from the Salaya1 strain into the B. carambolae genome by interspecific hybridization. Results Morphological characteristics, mating competitiveness, male pheromone profiles, and genetic relationships revealed consistencies that helped to distinguish Salaya1 and B. carambolae strains. A Y-autosome translocation linking the dominant wild-type allele of white pupae gene and a free autosome carrying a recessive white pupae homologue from the Salaya1 strain were introgressed into the gene pool of B. carambolae. A panel of Y-pseudo-linked microsatellite loci of the Salaya1 strain served as markers for the introgression experiments. This resulted in a newly derived genetic sexing strain called Salaya5, with morphological characteristics corresponding to B. carambolae. The rectal gland pheromone profile of Salaya5 males also contained a distinctive component of B. carambolae. Microsatellite DNA analyses confirmed the close genetic relationships between the Salaya5 strain and wild B. carambolae populations. Further experiments showed that the sterile males of Salaya5 can compete with wild males for mating with wild females in field cage conditions. Conclusions Introgression of sex sorting components from the Salaya1 strain to a closely related B. carambolae strain generated a new genetic sexing strain, Salaya5. Morphology-based taxonomic characteristics, distinctive pheromone components, microsatellite DNA markers, genetic relationships, and mating competitiveness provided parental baseline data and validation tools for the new strain. The Salaya5 strain shows a close similarity with those features in the wild B. carambolae strain. In addition, mating competitiveness tests suggested that Salaya5 has a potential to be used in B. carambolae SIT programs based on male-only releases. PMID:25471905

  15. Histological Analysis of Early Gonadal Development and Sex Differentiation in Chameleon Goby, Tridentiger trigonocephalus.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun Chul; Hwang, In Joon; Baek, Hea Ja

    2014-03-01

    This study describes the developmental process of gonads in chameleon goby, Tridentiger trigonocephalus from the stage of hatching to 100 days after hatching (DAH). Based on histological observation, the primordial germ cells were observed in mesentery between mesonephric duct and gut at 15 DAH (total length, TL: 6.80.2 mm). At 20 DAH (TL: 7.90.1 mm), the primordial gonad began to protrude into peritoneal cavity and developed between mesonephric duct and gut. Initial ovarian differentiation was identified by the presence of ovarian cavity and oogonia in the gonads at 55 DAH (TL: 21.11.3 mm). Testicular differentiation started at 65 DAH (TL: 23.70.9 mm) with appearance of spermatogonial cells in the gonads. These findings indicate that sex differentiation in T. trigonocephalus occurs earlier in females than males, suggesting that this species can be classified as an undifferentiated gonochorist. PMID:25949171

  16. Histological Analysis of Early Gonadal Development and Sex Differentiation in Chameleon Goby, Tridentiger trigonocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Chul; Hwang, In Joon; Baek, Hea Ja

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the developmental process of gonads in chameleon goby, Tridentiger trigonocephalus from the stage of hatching to 100 days after hatching (DAH). Based on histological observation, the primordial germ cells were observed in mesentery between mesonephric duct and gut at 15 DAH (total length, TL: 6.8±0.2 mm). At 20 DAH (TL: 7.9±0.1 mm), the primordial gonad began to protrude into peritoneal cavity and developed between mesonephric duct and gut. Initial ovarian differentiation was identified by the presence of ovarian cavity and oogonia in the gonads at 55 DAH (TL: 21.1±1.3 mm). Testicular differentiation started at 65 DAH (TL: 23.7±0.9 mm) with appearance of spermatogonial cells in the gonads. These findings indicate that sex differentiation in T. trigonocephalus occurs earlier in females than males, suggesting that this species can be classified as an undifferentiated gonochorist. PMID:25949171

  17. Timing of male sex pheromone biosynthesis in a butterfly - different dynamics under direct or diapause development.

    PubMed

    Larsdotter-Mellström, Helena; Murtazina, Rushana; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Wiklund, Christer

    2012-05-01

    The life history traits and behavior of the butterfly Pieris napi are well-known, as the species is often used as a model organism for evolutionary and ecological studies. The species has two or more generations per year in the major part of its temperate distribution, and as different selection pressures affect the different generations, both behavioral and physiological seasonal polyphenisms have been shown previously. Here, we explored the dynamics of male sex pheromone production. The two generations are shown to have significantly different scent compositions early in life; the direct developers--who have shorter time for pupal development--need the first 24 hr of adult life after eclosion to synthesize the sex pheromone citral (geranial and neral 1:1)--whereas the diapausing individuals who have spent several months in the pupal stage eclose with adult scent composition. Resource allocation and biosynthesis also were studied in greater detail by feeding butterflies (13)C labeled glucose either in the larval or adult stage, and recording incorporation into geranial, neral, and other volatiles produced. Results demonstrate that the pheromone synthesized by newly eclosed adult males is based on materials ingested in the larval stage, and that adult butterflies are able to synthesize the pheromone components geranial and neral and the related alcohols also from adult intake of glucose. In summary, our study shows that time-stress changes the timing in biosynthesis of the complete pheromone between generations, and underpins the importance of understanding resource allocation and the physiological basis of life history traits. PMID:22555771

  18. Anticipation of the sexual and gender development of children adopted by same-sex couples.

    PubMed

    Gato, Jorge; Fontaine, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to characterize beliefs surrounding the sexual and gender development of children adopted by lesbian and gay couples. Participants were 768 Portuguese university students. Using a quasiexperimental design, participants were presented with identical descriptions of a couple interested in adopting a child, manipulating couple sexual orientation and child gender. Participants were then asked to anticipate three aspects of the sexual and gender development of the adopted child: sexual orientation, gender role behavior, and gender identity. MANOVAs and follow-up ANOVAs were conducted in order to analyze the data. Results indicated that participants, particularly males, considered children adopted by either lesbian or gay couples to have a lower probability of developing a normative sexual and gender identity than children adopted by heterosexual couples. Both men and women considered that children would emulate the sexual orientation of their same-sex parents, and that a boy's gender role behavior was more at risk if he was adopted by a lesbian couple. Moreover, men were apprehensive about the gender role behavior of a boy adopted by a gay male couple. Overall, these results indicate persistence of biased evaluations of the sexual and gender development of children adopted by lesbian and gay parents. Furthermore, both gender of the participant and gender of the child play an important role in these evaluations. Results are discussed and interpreted as a way of "doing gender" in the context of hegemonic masculinity. PMID:23837556

  19. Psychiatric Approaches for Disorders of Sex Development: Experience of a Multidisciplinary Team

    PubMed Central

    Özbaran, Burcu; Özen, Samim; Gökşen, Damla; Korkmaz, Özlem; Onay, Hüseyin; Özkınay, Ferda; Çoğulu, Özgür; Erermiş, Serpil; Köse, Sezen; Avanoğlu, Ali; Ulman, İbrahim; Darcan, Şükran

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Disorders of sex development (DSD) are a group of congenital medical conditions that affect life as a whole. In this study, we aimed to reflect the experience of a multidisciplinary team in the clinical/psychiatric follow-up of a group of children and adolescents with DSD. Methods: The study group consisted of 51 patients diagnosed with DSD. The Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised, Draw a Person Test and Children’s Apperception Test, and the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGIS) were used for psychiatric evaluations. Results: The mean age of the patients was 7.8 years (median: 7.8; min: 1.0; max: 18.0). Genetic evaluation showed 46,XX configuration in 15 patients (29.4%) and 46,XY in 35 (68.6%). One patient (2.0%) was diagnosed to have a sex chromosome disorder. Forty patients (78.4%) had no problems with their given gender identity and gender role. Thirty-four (66.7%) patients had normal intellectual capacity. Twenty-eight (54.9%) patients did not have any psychiatric problem. Depression, anxiety disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and adjustment disorders were the common diagnoses. The mean score of symptom severity on CGIS-severity-baseline was 6.15±0.68 and after one year, it was 1.46±0.51 (Z=-3.236 p=0.001). The mean score of CGI–Improvement was 1.23±0.44. Conclusion: It is important to identify and treat the psychiatric disorders encountered in patients with DSD. A psychiatrist needs to be included in the professional team following these patients. Examination and observation results need to be shared by holding periodic team meetings to establish a wholesome point of view for every unique child. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24379031

  20. First description of scrotal testicles in a dog affected by 78, XX testicular disorder of sex development.

    PubMed

    Del Carro, A P; Rosset, E; Josson-Schramme, A; Lambert, V; Buff, S

    2014-10-01

    An eight-month-old female dog presented with ambiguous external genitalia. A thorough clinical examination together with various imaging techniques and a histology examination showed the presence of two testicles linked to both the Mullerian and Wolffian ducts. The discovery of the 78,XX SRY-negative karyotype led to the diagnosis of incoherence between the chromosomal and gonadal sex, which is typical for a 78,XX testicular disorder of sex development. Our case was unique because the testicles were still located in their normal scrotal position, whereas the literature contains reports of the presence of cryptorchid testicles in this karyotype setting. To our knowledge, this is the first case that describes an SRY-negative 78,XX testicular disorder of sex development with bilateral scrotal testicles. PMID:25131568

  1. Effects of gamma radiation on development, sterility, fecundity, and sex ratio of Dermanyssus gallinae (DeGeer) (Acari: Dermanyssidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Entrekin, D.L.; Oliver, J.H. Jr.; Pound, J.M.

    1987-06-01

    Protonymphal Dermanyssus gallinae were irradiated with 0.50, 0.75, 1.0, 3.0, and 6.0 krad of gamma radiation and subsequently monitored regarding their developmental, feeding, and mating success. Also, sex ratios of adults treated as protonymphs were recorded as were sex ratios of embryos and F1 adults produced by these adults. Doses up to 1.0 krad did not prevent development of treated protonymphs to the adult stage or stop mating. Three krad reduced the number of treated protonymphs attaining adulthood and 6.0-krad treatment prevented all mites from developing to the adult stage. Egg (embryo) production was normal for mites treated with 0.50 krad, but significantly curtailed by doses of 0.75 krad and greater. Radiation doses used in this study did not appear to affect the normal variable sex ratios observed in untreated mites.

  2. Influence of age, sex, balance, and sport participation on development of catching by children grades K-8.

    PubMed

    Loovis, E M; Butterfield, S A

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the contributions of age, sex, balance, and sport participation on development of catching by children in Grades K to 8. The subjects were 380 boys and 337 girls (ages 4 to 14) enrolled in a medium-sized school system in southeastern Maine. Each subject was individually assessed on catching and static and dynamic balance. In addition, all subjects completed a survey relative to their participation in school or community-sponsored sports. To assess the independent effects of age, sex, static balance, dynamic balance, and participation in sports within each grade, data were subjected to multiple-regression analysis. Mature catching development was influenced by sex; boys performed better at all grades except in Grade 8 all girls and boys showed mature catching patterns. PMID:8170777

  3. Effects of Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies on Brain Development: Evidence from Neuroimaging Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenroot, Rhoshel K.; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Giedd, Jay N.

    2009-01-01

    Variation in the number of sex chromosomes is a relatively common genetic condition, affecting as many as 1/400 individuals. The sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) are associated with characteristic behavioral and cognitive phenotypes, although the degree to which specific individuals are affected can fall within a wide range. Understanding the…

  4. Sex Role Development: Origins from Birth through Primiparous Parents' Buying Habits and Gifts Received.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Carol A.

    This study investigated the construction of sexual identity and sex stereotypes. A total of 32 mainly Caucasian, married primiparous parents attending birthing classes participated in a study of their buying habits and gifts they received prior to and after the birth of their child, and hence, before and after the child's sex was known. Under both…

  5. Moral Development in Single-Sex Schools: A Review of the Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Madonna M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a systematic review of the research studies on single-sex schools conducted in the last decade. It concludes that there is empirical support to the hypothesis that single-sex schools may be advantageous for both boys and girls in terms of promoting academic achievement with a greater degree of order and control in the classroom and…

  6. Effects of Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies on Brain Development: Evidence from Neuroimaging Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenroot, Rhoshel K.; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Giedd, Jay N.

    2009-01-01

    Variation in the number of sex chromosomes is a relatively common genetic condition, affecting as many as 1/400 individuals. The sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) are associated with characteristic behavioral and cognitive phenotypes, although the degree to which specific individuals are affected can fall within a wide range. Understanding the

  7. Adolescents' Lifetime Experience of Selling Sex: Development over Five Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredlund, Cecilia; Svensson, Frida; Svedin, Carl Goran; Priebe, Gisela; Wadsby, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Lifetime experience of selling sex among adolescents was investigated together with sociodemographic correlates, parent-child relationship, and the existence of people to confide in. Changes over time regarding the selling of sex were investigated through a comparison of data from 2004 and 2009. This study was carried out using 3,498 adolescents…

  8. Sex Role Development: Origins from Birth through Primiparous Parents' Buying Habits and Gifts Received.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Carol A.

    This study investigated the construction of sexual identity and sex stereotypes. A total of 32 mainly Caucasian, married primiparous parents attending birthing classes participated in a study of their buying habits and gifts they received prior to and after the birth of their child, and hence, before and after the child's sex was known. Under both

  9. Adolescents' Lifetime Experience of Selling Sex: Development over Five Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredlund, Cecilia; Svensson, Frida; Svedin, Carl Goran; Priebe, Gisela; Wadsby, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Lifetime experience of selling sex among adolescents was investigated together with sociodemographic correlates, parent-child relationship, and the existence of people to confide in. Changes over time regarding the selling of sex were investigated through a comparison of data from 2004 and 2009. This study was carried out using 3,498 adolescents

  10. Prophylactic Bilateral Gonadectomy for Ovotesticular Disorder of Sex Development in a Patient With Mosaic 45,X/46,X,idic(Y)q11.222 Karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Russell E.N.; Akhavan, Ardavan

    2016-01-01

    Ovotesticular disorder of sex development is historically thought to confer a relatively low risk of germ cell malignancy relative to other disorders of sex development. This is likely due in part to the high prevalence of a normal 46,XX karyotype in these patients. However, disorders of sex development represent a broad phenotypic spectrum, and often patients cannot be neatly categorized with a single diagnosis. We report an atypical case of ovotesticular disorder of sex development in a child with ambiguous genitalia and 45,X/46,XY mosaic karyotype. Prophylactic bilateral gonadectomy was performed at age 14 months. PMID:26793590

  11. Expression of putative sex-determining genes during the thermosensitive period of gonad development in the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina.

    PubMed

    Rhen, T; Metzger, K; Schroeder, A; Woodward, R

    2007-01-01

    Modes of sex determination are quite variable in vertebrates. The developmental decision to form a testis or an ovary can be influenced by one gene, several genes, environmental variables, or a combination of these factors. Nevertheless, certain morphogenetic aspects of sex determination appear to be conserved in amniotes. Here we clone fragments of nine candidate sex-determining genes from the snapping turtle Chelydra serpentina, a species with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). We then analyze expression of these genes during the thermosensitive period of gonad development. In particular, we compare gene expression profiles in gonads from embryos incubated at a male-producing temperature to those from embryos at a female-producing temperature. Expression of Dmrt1 and Sox9 mRNA increased gradually at the male-producing temperature, but was suppressed at the female-producing temperature. This finding suggests that Dmrt1 and Sox9 play a role in testis development. In contrast, expression of aromatase, androgen receptor (Ar), and Foxl2 mRNA was constant at the male-producing temperature, but increased several-fold in embryos at the female-producing temperature. Aromatase, Ar, and Foxl2 may therefore play a role in ovary development. In addition, there was a small temperature effect on ER alpha expression with lower mRNA levels found in embryos at the female-producing temperature. Finally, Dax1, Fgf9, and SF-1 were not differentially expressed during the sex-determining period, suggesting these genes are not involved in sex determination in the snapping turtle. Comparison of gene expression profiles among amniotes indicates that Dmrt1 and Sox9 are part of a core testis-determining pathway and that Ar, aromatase, ER alpha, and Foxl2 are part of a core ovary-determining pathway. PMID:18391536

  12. New developments in osteoarthritis. Sex differences in magnetic resonance imaging-based biomarkers and in those of joint metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Sex differences in the prevalence, incidence, and severity of osteoarthritis (OA) have long been known. Some differences in the evaluation of this issue across studies may be related to differences in study design, sampling, study size, study populations, targeted joint sites, and definitions of OA. This report highlights recent studies of sex differences in individual joint components imaged by magnetic resonance imaging and in systemic biomarkers of joint metabolism. Particularly important are those studies that examine this issue in young unaffected adults and children before the development of disease. Despite some variation across studies, women appear for the most part to have a thinner and more reduced volume of cartilage in the knee than men, and this may occur from early childhood. It is not clear whether women have a more accelerated rate of cartilage volume loss than men. Few data exist on sex differences in systemic biomarkers of joint metabolism. In these studies, it is critically important to characterize the total body burden of OA and the presence of comorbid conditions likely to influence a given biomarker. Lastly, future research should dovetail studies of sex differences in imaging and biochemical biomarkers with genetics to maximize insight into the mechanisms behind observed sex differences. PMID:20701741

  13. Carol Gilligan's theory of sex differences in the development of moral reasoning during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Muuss, R E

    1988-01-01

    Gilligan's work, which focuses on sex differences in moral reasoning, the perception of violence, the resolution of sexual dilemmas and abortion decisions, poses a major challenge to Kohlberg's theory by introducing a feminist perspective of moral development. Kohlberg had shown that the average female attained a moral judgment rating of stage three (good boy-nice girl), while adolescent males score at level four (law and order) and are more likely to move on to postconventional levels. Gilligan suggests that these findings reveal a gender bias, not that females are less mature than boys. Men and women follow different voices. Men tend to organize social relationships in a hierarchical order and subscribe to a morality of rights. Females value interpersonal connectedness, care, sensitivity, and responsibility to people. Kohlberg's scoring criteria give the interpersonal care orientations of females lower ratings than the principled justice orientation. Hence, Gilligan identifies different developmental stages for females. However, she does not claim that one system is better; both are equally valid. Only by integrating these complementary male (justice) and female (care) orientations will we be able to realize our full human potential in moral development. PMID:3381683

  14. Ethical principles for the management of infants with disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Gillam, Lynn H; Hewitt, Jacqueline K; Warne, Garry L

    2010-01-01

    The Fifth World Congress on Family Law and Children's Rights (Halifax, August 2009) adopted a resolution endorsing a new set of ethical guidelines for the management of infants and children with disorders of sex development (DSD) [www.lawrights.asn.au/index.php?option = com_content&view = article&id = 76&Itemid = 109]. The ethical principles developed by our group were the basis for the Halifax Resolution. In this paper, we outline these principles and explain their basis. The principles are intended as the ethical foundation for treatment decisions for DSD, especially decisions about type and timing of genital surgery for infants and young children. These principles were formulated by an analytic review of clinician reasoning in particular cases, in relation to established principles of bioethics, in a process consistent with the Rawlsian concept of reflective equilibrium as the method for building ethical theory. The principles we propose are: (1) minimising physical risk to child; (2) minimising psychosocial risk to child; (3) preserving potential for fertility; (4) preserving or promoting capacity to have satisfying sexual relations; (5) leaving options open for the future, and (6) respecting the parents' wishes and beliefs. PMID:20714113

  15. Direct and mediated effects of testosterone: the development of intersexes in sex reversed mosaic mice, heterozygous for testicular feminization.

    PubMed

    Drews, U

    1975-05-16

    The X-linked Tfm mutation causes androgen insensitivity in the target cells of testerone. Due to random X-inactivation, XX-mice heterozygous for Tfm are mosaics in respect to androgen sensitivity. By the autosomal "sex reversal" mutation, Tfm-heterozygotes were converted to males during embryonic life so that male sex organs developed in which the mosaic was expressed. The mutual influence of both components of the mosaic is analysed. It is shown that cellular differentiation is directly induced by testosterone, while the formation of organ anlagen and proliferation are locally mediated effects. PMID:1147290

  16. Age, sex, and experience as related to the neural basis of cognitive development.

    PubMed

    Goldman, P S

    1975-01-01

    Studies of rhesus monkeys raised from infancy without portions of the central nervous systems provide evidence regarding the timing of functional maturity of specific regions. Some findings have been presented which show that deficits following lesions of specific cortical areas emerge at that age when abilities dependent upon the cortical area in question take on adult form in unoperated monkeys. However, age is but a convenient abstraction for conditions that vary over time. One such condition is the presence and titer of gonadal hormones. The finding that orbital functions may develop at different times in males and females is of interest from a number of perspectives, but it is especially stimulating to consider the possibility that the development of cortical tissue may be regulated by neuroendocrine factors in a fashion analogous to that envisioned for differentiation of hypothalamic mechanisms. Finally, experiential factors may depend greatly on the maturational status of those brain regions designed to be recipients of that stimulation. The fact that young children acquire second languages with far greater ease than adults or conversely that language fails to develop before 18-28 months of age regardless of training are features of human experience consistent with the interdependence of experience and neurological maturation. The present finding that training at relatively early periods of development facilitated recovery from brain injury indicates further that brain-damaged individuals can be even more sensitive to the effects of previous experience than intact cases. Age, sex, and experience are factors that may be isolated for experimental purposes and for the purpose of discussion. However, it is precisely the complex interactions of these variables that constitute the subject matter of future research in neurobiology, to which studies of infant monkeys may contribute animal models of normal and disordered human development. PMID:812229

  17. Structure of pore space in cenozoic argillaceous rocks of Azerbaidzhan in connection with development in them of abnormally high pore pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Buryakovskii, L.A.; Dzenvanshir, R.D.

    1985-09-01

    Petrographic and electron-microscopic study of Tertiary clays and argillaceous rocks lifted from deep drillholes of Azerbaidzhan reveals their porometric characteristics. It is established that these rocks are incompletely consolidated and it is inferred that there is a connection between such a structure or pore space in argillaceous rocks and the development in them of abnormally high pressures of pore fluids, and that these factors affect the screening off properties of argillaceous seals, the mechanism of folding, clay diapirism and earthquakes.

  18. Development of a Sex Education Syllabus for Health Science at American River College. Emergence of Higher Education in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasler, Michael L.

    This practicum paper discusses the development, evaluation, and revision of a student sex education syllabus at American River College (California). The syllabus is intended to provide an alternative learning format to the traditional lecture format. After a review of the literature, it was decided to use a fill-in or sentence completion format…

  19. Development and Field Release of a Genetic Sexing Strain of the Melon Fly, Bactrocera Cucurbitae in Hawaii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first practical genetic sexing strain for the melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae, developed in Hawaii was mass-reared and released as sterile males into wild fly populations. Significant improvements in the field quality of sterile males were made with the pupal color strain in which males can be ...

  20. Sex differences in the development of diabetes in mice with deleted wolframin (Wfs1) gene.

    PubMed

    Noormets, K; Kõks, S; Muldmaa, M; Mauring, L; Vasar, E; Tillmann, V

    2011-05-01

    Wolfram syndrome, caused by mutations in the wolframin (Wfs1) gene, is characterised by juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus, progressive optic atrophy, diabetes insipidus and deafness. Diabetes tend to start earlier in boys. This study investigated sex differences in longitudinal changes in blood glucose concentration (BGC) in wolframin-deficient mice (Wfs1KO) and compared their plasma proinsulin and insulin levels with those of wild-type (wt) mice. Non-fasting BGC was measured weekly in 42 (21 males) mice from both groups at nine weeks of age. An intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) was conducted at the 30 (th) week and plasma insulin, c-peptide and proinsulin levels were measured at the 32 (nd) week. At the 32 (nd) week, Wfs1KO males had increased BGC compared to wt males (9.40±0.60 mmol/l vs. 7.91±0.20 mmol/l; p<0.05). The opposite tendency was seen in females. Both male and female Wfs1KO mice had impaired glucose tolerance on IPGTT. Wfs1KO males had significantly lower mean plasma insulin levels than wt males (57.78±1.80 ng/ml vs. 69.42±3.06 ng/ml; p<0.01) and Wfs1KO females (70.30±4.42 ng/ml; p<0.05). Wfs1KO males had a higher proinsulin/insulin ratio than wt males (0.09±0.02 vs. 0.05±0.01; p=0.05) and Wfs1KO females (0.04±0.01; p<0.05). Plasma c-peptide levels in males were lower in Wfs1KO males (mean 55.3±14.0 pg/ml vs. 112.7±21.9 pg/ml; p<0.05). Male Wfs1KO mice had a greater risk of developing diabetes than female Wfs1KO mice. Low plasma insulin concentration with an increased proinsulin/insulin ratio in Wfs1KO males indicates possible disturbances in converting proinsulin to insulin which in long-term may lead to insulin deficiency. Further investigation is needed to clarify the mechanism for the sex differences in the development of diabetes in Wolfram syndrome. PMID:21031341

  1. Sex-Biased miRNAs in Gonad and Their Potential Roles for Testis Development in Yellow Catfish

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Jing; Wu, Junjie; Liu, Wei; Xiong, Shuting; Ma, Wenge; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Weimin; Gui, Jian-Fang; Mei, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Recently, YY super-male yellow catfish had been created by hormonal-induced sex reversal and sex-linked markers, which provides a promising research model for fish sex differentiation and gonad development, especially for testis development. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been revealed to play crucial roles in the gene regulation and gonad development in vertebrates. In this study, three small RNA libraries constructed from gonad tissues of XX female, XY male and YY super-male yellow catfish were sequenced. The sequencing data generated a total of 384 conserved miRNAs and 113 potential novel miRNAs, among which 23, 30 and 14 miRNAs were specifically detected in XX ovary, XY testis, and YY testis, respectively. We observed relative lower expression of several miR-200 family members, including miR-141 and miR-429 in YY testis compared with XY testis. Histological analysis indicated a higher degree of testis maturity in YY super-males compared with XY males, as shown by larger spermatogenic cyst, more spermatids and fewer spermatocytes in the spermatogenic cyst. Moreover, five miR-200 family members were significantly up-regulated in testis when treated by 17?-ethinylestradiol (EE2), high dose of which will impair testis development and cell proliferation. The down-regulation of miR-141 and 429 coincides with the progression of testis development in both yellow catfish and human. At last, the expression pattern of nine arbitrarily selected miRNAs detected by quantitative RT-PCR was consistent with the Solexa sequencing results. Our study provides a comprehensive miRNA transcriptome analysis for gonad of yellow catfish with different sex genotypes, and identifies a number of sex-biased miRNAs, some of that are potentially involved in testis development and spermatogenesis. PMID:25229553

  2. Failure of SOX9 Regulation in 46XY Disorders of Sex Development with SRY, SOX9 and SF1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Knower, Kevin C.; Kelly, Sabine; Ludbrook, Louisa M.; Bagheri-Fam, Stefan; Sim, Helena; Bernard, Pascal; Sekido, Ryohei; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Harley, Vincent R.

    2011-01-01

    Background In human embryogenesis, loss of SRY (sex determining region on Y), SOX9 (SRY-related HMG box 9) or SF1 (steroidogenic factor 1) function causes disorders of sex development (DSD). A defining event of vertebrate sex determination is male-specific upregulation and maintenance of SOX9 expression in gonadal pre-Sertoli cells, which is preceded by transient SRY expression in mammals. In mice, Sox9 regulation is under the transcriptional control of SRY, SF1 and SOX9 via a conserved testis-specific enhancer of Sox9 (TES). Regulation of SOX9 in human sex determination is however poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that a human embryonal carcinoma cell line (NT2/D1) can model events in presumptive Sertoli cells that initiate human sex determination. SRY associates with transcriptionally active chromatin in NT2/D1 cells and over-expression increases endogenous SOX9 expression. SRY and SF1 co-operate to activate the human SOX9 homologous TES (hTES), a process dependent on phosphorylated SF1. SOX9 also activates hTES, augmented by SF1, suggesting a mechanism for maintenance of SOX9 expression by auto-regulation. Analysis of mutant SRY, SF1 and SOX9 proteins encoded by thirteen separate 46,XY DSD gonadal dysgenesis individuals reveals a reduced ability to activate hTES. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate how three human sex-determining factors are likely to function during gonadal development around SOX9 as a hub gene, with different genetic causes of 46,XY DSD due a common failure to upregulate SOX9 transcription. PMID:21412441

  3. Robust algorithmic detection of the developed cardiac pathologies and emerging or transient abnormalities from short periods of RR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrishchaka, Valeriy V.; Senyukova, Olga

    2011-06-01

    Numerous research efforts and clinical testing have confirmed validity of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis as one of the cardiac diagnostics modalities. The majority of HRV analysis tools currently used in practice are based on linear indicators. Methods from nonlinear dynamics (NLD) provide more natural modeling framework for adaptive biological systems with multiple feedback loops. Compared to linear indicators, many NLD-based measures are much less sensitive to data artifacts and non-stationarity. However, majority of NLD measures require long time series for stable calculation. Similar restrictions also apply for linear indicators. Such requirements could drastically limit practical usability of HRV analysis in many applications, including express diagnostics, early indication of subtle directional changes during personalization of medical treatment, and robust detection of emerging or transient abnormalities. Recently we have illustrated that these challenges could be overcome by using classification framework based on boosting-like ensemble learning techniques that are capable of discovering robust meta-indicators from existing HRV measures and other incomplete empirical knowledge. In this paper we demonstrate universality of such meta-indicators and discuss operational details of their practical usage. Using such pathology examples as congestive heart failure (CHF) and arrhythmias, we show that classifiers trained on short RR segments (down to several minutes) could achieve reasonable classification accuracy (˜80-85% and higher). These indicators calculated from longer RR segments could be applicable for accurate diagnostics with classification accuracy approaching 100%. In addition, it is feasible to discover single "normal-abnormal" meta-classifier capable of detecting multiple abnormalities.

  4. Evolution and development of sex differences in cooperative behavior in meerkats.

    PubMed

    Clutton-Brock, T H; Russell, A F; Sharpe, L L; Young, A J; Balmforth, Z; McIlrath, G M

    2002-07-12

    In cooperatively breeding birds, where helpers of both sexes assist with the provisioning and upbringing of offspring who are not their own, males tend to contribute more than females to rearing young. This sex difference has been attributed to paternity uncertainty, but could also occur because males contribute more where they are likely to remain and breed in their group of origin. In contrast to most birds, female meerkats (Suricata suricatta) are more likely to breed in their natal group than males. We show that female meerkat helpers contribute more to rearing young than males and that female helpers feed female pups more frequently than males. Our results suggest that sex differences in cooperative behavior are generated by sex differences in philopatry and occur because females derive greater direct benefits than males from raising recruits to their natal group. These findings support the view that direct, mutualistic benefits are important in the evolution of specialized cooperative behavior. PMID:12114627

  5. EVALUATING MULTIPLE STRESSORS IN LOGGERHEAD SEA TURTLES: DEVELOPING A TWO-SEX SPATIALLY EXPLICIT MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    North Atlantic loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta L.) populations respond to the integrated effects of multiple environmental stressors. Environmental stressors often occur in spatially distinct frameworks and affect distinct age classes, sexes, and subpopulations differentia...

  6. Development of a Nondestructive Method for Sexing Live Adult Sternoplax souvorowiana (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Ma, Ji; Mao, Xinfang

    2015-01-01

    The darkling beetle, Sternoplax souvorowiana (Reitter) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is flightless and lives in the Guerbantonggut desert in northwestern China. Its special eggshell structure, day-active habit, large body size, short life cycle, and ease of rearing under laboratory conditions make it an excellent model for advanced studies on desert adaptation. Determining the sex of this beetle is usually complicated by the lack of a discreet, externally visible gender-specific character. To date, dissection has been used for sex identification in this species, whereas a nondestructive means is needed for further studies of sexual dimorphism. Here, a new method based on the difference of the pigmentation pattern on the eighth tergite of each sex is described and illustrated. This method can be quickly learned, is nondestructive, is 100% accurate, and is fast enough for most applications in both the field and the laboratory. Experienced users in our laboratory routinely sex 8–10 beetles per minute. PMID:25934924

  7. Development of a nondestructive method for sexing live adult Sternoplax souvorowiana (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Ma, Ji; Mao, Xinfang

    2015-01-01

    The darkling beetle, Sternoplax souvorowiana (Reitter) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is flightless and lives in the Guerbantonggut desert in northwestern China. Its special eggshell structure, day-active habit, large body size, short life cycle, and ease of rearing under laboratory conditions make it an excellent model for advanced studies on desert adaptation. Determining the sex of this beetle is usually complicated by the lack of a discreet, externally visible gender-specific character. To date, dissection has been used for sex identification in this species, whereas a nondestructive means is needed for further studies of sexual dimorphism. Here, a new method based on the difference of the pigmentation pattern on the eighth tergite of each sex is described and illustrated. This method can be quickly learned, is nondestructive, is 100% accurate, and is fast enough for most applications in both the field and the laboratory. Experienced users in our laboratory routinely sex 8-10 beetles per minute. PMID:25934924

  8. Tissue-nonspecific Alkaline Phosphatase Deficiency Causes Abnormal Craniofacial Bone Development in the Alpl−/− Mouse Model of Infantile Hypophosphatasia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Nam, Hwa Kyung; Campbell, Cassie; Gasque, Kellen Cristina da Silva; Millán, José Luis; Hatch, Nan E.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) is an enzyme present on the surface of mineralizing cells and their derived matrix vesicles that promotes hydroxyapatite crystal growth. Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inborn-error-of-metabolism that, dependent upon age of onset, features rickets or osteomalacia due to loss-of function mutations in the gene (Alpl) encoding TNAP. Craniosynostosis is prevalent in infants with HPP and other forms of rachitic disease but how craniosynostosis develops in these disorders is unknown. Objectives: Because craniosynostosis carries high morbidity, we are investigating craniofacial skeletal abnormalities in Alpl−/− mice to establish these mice as a model of HPP-associated craniosynostosis and determine mechanisms by which TNAP influences craniofacial skeletal development. Methods: Cranial bone, cranial suture and cranial base abnormalities were analyzed by micro-CT and histology. Craniofacial shape abnormalities were quantified using digital calipers. TNAP expression was suppressed in MC3T3E1(C4) calvarial cells by TNAP-specific shRNA. Cells were analyzed for changes in mineralization, gene expression, proliferation, apoptosis, matrix deposition and cell adhesion. Results: Alpl−/− mice feature craniofacial shape abnormalities suggestive of limited anterior-posterior growth. Craniosynostosis in the form of bony coronal suture fusion is present by three weeks after birth. Alpl−/− mice also exhibit marked histologic abnormalities of calvarial bones and the cranial base involving growth plates, cortical and trabecular bone within two weeks of birth. Analysis of calvarial cells in which TNAP expression was suppressed by shRNA indicates that TNAP deficiency promotes aberrant osteoblastic gene expression, diminished matrix deposition, diminished proliferation, increased apoptosis and increased cell adhesion. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that Alpl−/− mice exhibit a craniofacial skeletal phenotype similar to that seen in infants with HPP, including true bony craniosynostosis in the context of severely diminished bone mineralization. Future studies will be required to determine if TNAP deficiency and other forms of rickets promote craniosynostosis directly through abnormal calvarial cell behavior, or indirectly due to deficient growth of the cranial base. PMID:25014884

  9. SEX-SPECIFIC ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Tiniakou, Eleni; Costenbader, Karen H.; Kriegel, Martin A.

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences in autoimmune diseases are evolutionarily tied to the fact that the female immune system is confronted with intense alterations during menstrual cycles, pregnancy and childbirth. These events may be associated with breaches in the mucosal epithelial layers that are shielding us from environmental factors. Associations between environmental agents and autoimmune diseases have been described extensively in prior studies. Little evidence, however, exists for sex-specific environmental effects on autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize studies involving this often-neglected aspect. We give examples of environmental factors that may influence the sex bias in autoimmunity. We conclude that most studies do not give insight into sex-specific environmental effects due to the influence of gender-selective social, occupational or other exposures. Prospective studies are needed in order to determine true sex-biased environmental influences. Finally, humanized murine models might aid in better understanding the mechanisms involved in sex-specific environmental effects on autoimmune diseases. PMID:23507400

  10. The Investigation of Quality of Life in 87 Chinese Patients with Disorders of Sex Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunqing; Tian, Qinjie

    2015-01-01

    Objective. In the process of care for disorders of sex development (DSD), clinical decisions should focus on the long-term quality of life (QOL). We sought to investigate the QOL of patients with DSD in China. Design. Case-control study was carried out. Patients. 90 patients of DSD participated in the study. Finally, 87 patients were analyzed including Turner's syndrome (23), Noonan syndrome (2), androgen insensitivity syndrome (22), testicular regression syndrome (2), congenital adrenal hyperplasia (16), and pure gonadal dysgenesis (22). Measurements. The WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire was chosen for the present investigation. Four domain scores were analyzed independently including physical, psychological, and social relationship and environmental domains. Results. The average age of the DSD group is 22.34 ± 4.97 years, and only 13.79% patients ever had sexual life. The scores of psychological and environmental domains were lower than that of the physical and social relationship domains, but the difference was not significant (P > 0.05). Compared with the Chinese urban population, the QOL scores of DSD patients in China were not significantly lower. Conclusions. With proper treatment, including the follow-up and psychological support, the QOL of DSD patients cannot be significantly reduced. For DSD patients, more attention should be paid to the potential psychological and sexual problems. PMID:26075230

  11. Gonadal malignancy in 202 female patients with disorders of sex development containing Y-chromosome material.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian-Fa; Xue, Wei; Deng, Yan; Tian, Qin-Jie; Sun, Ai-Jun

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to examine risks for gonadal malignancy in a large sample of adult female patients with disorders of sex development (DSD). A retrospective-observational study was conducted from July 1992 to March 2015 and 202 women with DSD were enrolled. Tumor risks for different types of DSD were measured. We found that the patients' total gonadal-malignancy risk was 18.3% (37/202). Tumors included gonadoblastoma (n = 11), seminoma (n = 8), dysgerminoma (n = 5), choriocarcinoma (n = 1), sertoli cell tumors (n = 11), and leydig cell tumors (n = 1). The incidence of gonadal malignancy in patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), pure 46, XY gonadal dysgenesis, 45 X/46 XY mixed gonadal dysgenesis, 17α-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase deficiency and partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) were 27.1% (13/48), 22.4% (15/67), 10.9% (5/46), 10% (2/20) and 9.5% (2/21), respectively. Our results suggest that the incidence of gonadal malignancy increases with age for female patients with Y-chromosome material. Upon diagnoses, immediate, prophylactic gonadectomies should be considered for adult female patients with DSD containing Y chromosome material if they cannot receive regular follow-ups. PMID:26608236

  12. Vocal development in captive harbor seal pups, Phoca vitulina richardii: age, sex, and individual differences.

    PubMed

    Khan, Christin B; Markowitz, Hal; McCowan, Brenda

    2006-09-01

    The goal of this research was to determine when harbor seal pup vocalizations become sufficiently distinctive to allow individual recognition. A total of 4593 calls were analyzed from 15 captive pups. Nineteen were harsh, broadband, staccato calls used in an aggressive context. The rest were tonal "mother attraction calls," having an inverted "v"- or "u"-shaped spectrogram with harmonics and a fundamental frequency around 200-600 Hz. Calls were individually distinctive even in pups less than 2 weeks old, suggesting that mothers may be able to recognize pup vocalizations at this early age. Classification rates from discriminant function analysis were generally comparable to those of other phocids and less than in otariids, supporting the theory that recognition is more highly developed in otariids. Significant differences were found between male and female pup calls, and there were significant interactions between pup sex and age. The results of this study should be interpreted with caution until the findings are verified in wild harbor seal pups. PMID:17004489

  13. Phalloplasty: A panacea for 46,XY disorder of sex development conditions with penile deficiency?

    PubMed

    Callens, Nina; Hoebeke, Piet

    2014-01-01

    In cases of severe penile inadequacy, such as in pathological conditions involving penile amputation (e.g. penile cancer), or in 46,XY disorders of sex development with severe undervirilization or maldevelopment of the penis (e.g. idiopathic micropenis, cloacal exstrophy), standard (surgical) penile lengthening techniques do not provide patients with a phallus suitable for sexual intercourse. Genital dissatisfaction can lead to low self-esteem and psychosexual dysfunction. Therefore, phalloplasty, the gold standard in transgender surgery, may provide a possibility to achieve a satisfactory genital appearance and sexual function. Small series have reported cosmetically acceptable and erogenous sensate neophalli with incorporation of a neourethra to allow voiding in a standing position and with enough bulk to allow penile prosthesis insertion for pleasurable intercourse. Although early results seem promising, further publication of series with large numbers and longer follow-up is needed to evaluate to what extent phalloplasty improves physical and sexual outcomes. Complications are of particular concern because of associated scarring and loss of sensitive tissue. Without full preoperative workups assessing patients' expectations and reasons for undergoing surgery, they may still struggle with self/penile image and with psychological barriers for engaging in sexual activity. Recommendations for the psychosocial management of boys and men with penile deficiency are suggested. PMID:25247659

  14. Ethical issues in decision-making for infants with disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Kon, A A

    2015-05-01

    Medical decisions for infants and children should generally be based on the best interests of the child. When there is legitimate controversy over the child's best interests, the right of the child to an open future should generally determine the course of treatment. In the case of infants born with disorders of sex development (DSD), early cosmetic genitoplasty was long believed to be in the child's best interest and was therefore the standard of care. New data suggest that early genitoplasty may be more harmful than helpful, therefore the best interest standard is no longer determinative in such cases. Because children born with DSD have a right to an open future, and because the openness of their future is clearly enhanced by delaying cosmetic genitoplasty until they themselves can participate meaningfully in decision-making, early genitoplasty is ethically supportable only when medically indicated (e.g., when the child is unable to urinate without surgical intervention). Further research is needed to clarify the benefits and burdens of early and delayed genitoplasty. In parallel with further research, efforts should focus on educating society broadly to decrease stigmatization of persons with DSD. PMID:25970711

  15. Abnormal tau phosphorylation at Ser396 in Alzheimer's disease recapitulates development and contributes to reduced microtubule binding.

    PubMed

    Bramblett, G T; Goedert, M; Jakes, R; Merrick, S E; Trojanowski, J Q; Lee, V M

    1993-06-01

    Abnormally phosphorylated tau proteins (A68) are the building blocks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) paired helical filaments. The biological consequences of the conversion of normal adult tau to A68 remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that native A68 does not bind to microtubules (MTs), yet dephosphorylated A68 regains the ability to bind to MTs. Ser396 is phosphorylated in A68, but not in normal adult tau, whereas fetal tau is phosphorylated transiently at this site. Phosphorylation of tau at Ser396 by protein kinases in CHO cells and rat brain produces an electrophoretic mobility similar to that of A68. Using CHO cells transfected with an Ala396 mutant, we show that the phosphorylation of tau at Ser396 reduces its affinity for MTs and its ability to stabilize MTs against nocodazole-induced depolymerization. Our results demonstrate that the abnormal phosphorylation of tau in AD involves Ser396, and we suggest that this may be mediated by the inappropriate activation of fetal kinases or the reduced activity of tau protein phosphatases. Thus, phosphorylation of Ser396 may destabilize MTs in AD, resulting in the degeneration of affected cells. PMID:8318230

  16. Pregnancy Distress Gets Under Fetal Skin: Maternal Ambulatory Assessment & Sex Differences in Prenatal Development

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Colleen; Werner, Elizabeth; Feng, Tianshu; Lee, Seonjoo; Altemus, Margaret; Isler, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal maternal distress is associated with an at-risk developmental profile, yet there is little fetal evidence of this putative in utero process. Moreover, the biological transmission for these maternal effects remains uncertain. In a study of n = 125 pregnant adolescents (ages 14–19), ambulatory assessments of daily negative mood (anger, frustration, irritation, stress), physical activity, blood pressure, heart rate (every 30 min over 24 hr), and salivary cortisol (six samples) were collected at 13–16, 24–27, 34–37 gestational weeks. Corticotropin-releasing hormone, C-reactive protein, and interleukin 6 from blood draws and 20 min assessments of fetal heart rate (FHR) and movement were acquired at the latter two sessions. On average, fetuses showed development in the expected direction (decrease in FHR, increase in SD of FHR and in the correlation of movement and FHR (“coupling”)). Maternal distress characteristics were associated with variations in the level and trajectory of fetal measures, and results often differed by sex. For males, greater maternal 1st and 2nd session negative mood and 2nd session physical activity were associated with lower overall FHR (p <.01), while 1st session cortisol was associated with a smaller increase in coupling (p <.01), and overall higher levels (p = .05)—findings suggesting accelerated development. For females, negative mood, cortisol, and diastolic blood pressure were associated with indications of relatively less advanced and accelerated outcomes. There were no associations between negative mood and biological variables. These data indicate that maternal psychobiological status influences fetal development, with females possibly more variously responsive to different exposures. PMID:25945698

  17. Pregnancy distress gets under fetal skin: Maternal ambulatory assessment & sex differences in prenatal development.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Colleen; Werner, Elizabeth; Feng, Tianshu; Lee, Seonjoo; Altemus, Margaret; Isler, Joseph R; Monk, Catherine

    2015-07-01

    Prenatal maternal distress is associated with an at-risk developmental profile, yet there is little fetal evidence of this putative in utero process. Moreover, the biological transmission for these maternal effects remains uncertain. In a study of n = 125 pregnant adolescents (ages 14-19), ambulatory assessments of daily negative mood (anger, frustration, irritation, stress), physical activity, blood pressure, heart rate (every 30 min over 24 hr), and salivary cortisol (six samples) were collected at 13-16, 24-27, 34-37 gestational weeks. Corticotropin-releasing hormone, C-reactive protein, and interleukin 6 from blood draws and 20 min assessments of fetal heart rate (FHR) and movement were acquired at the latter two sessions. On average, fetuses showed development in the expected direction (decrease in FHR, increase in SD of FHR and in the correlation of movement and FHR ("coupling")). Maternal distress characteristics were associated with variations in the level and trajectory of fetal measures, and results often differed by sex. For males, greater maternal 1st and 2nd session negative mood and 2nd session physical activity were associated with lower overall FHR (p < .01), while 1st session cortisol was associated with a smaller increase in coupling (p < .01), and overall higher levels (p = .05)-findings suggesting accelerated development. For females, negative mood, cortisol, and diastolic blood pressure were associated with indications of relatively less advanced and accelerated outcomes. There were no associations between negative mood and biological variables. These data indicate that maternal psychobiological status influences fetal development, with females possibly more variously responsive to different exposures. PMID:25945698

  18. COLLAPSED ABNORMAL POLLEN1 Gene Encoding the Arabinokinase-Like Protein Is Involved in Pollen Development in Rice1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Kenji; Yoshimura, Fumiaki; Miyao, Akio; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Nonomura, Ken-Ichi; Wabiko, Hiroetsu

    2013-01-01

    We isolated a pollen-defective mutant, collapsed abnormal pollen1 (cap1), from Tos17 insertional mutant lines of rice (Oryza sativa). The cap1 heterozygous plant produced equal numbers of normal and collapsed abnormal grains. The abnormal pollen grains lacked almost all cytoplasmic materials, nuclei, and intine cell walls and did not germinate. Genetic analysis of crosses revealed that the cap1 mutation did not affect female reproduction or vegetative growth. CAP1 encodes a protein consisting of 996 amino acids that showed high similarity to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) l-arabinokinase, which catalyzes the conversion of l-arabinose to l-arabinose 1-phosphate. A wild-type genomic DNA segment containing CAP1 restored mutants to normal pollen grains. During rice pollen development, CAP1 was preferentially expressed in anthers at the bicellular pollen stage, and the effects of the cap1 mutation were mainly detected at this stage. Based on the metabolic pathway of l-arabinose, cap1 pollen phenotype may have been caused by toxic accumulation of l-arabinose or by inhibition of cell wall metabolism due to the lack of UDP-l-arabinose derived from l-arabinose 1-phosphate. The expression pattern of CAP1 was very similar to that of another Arabidopsis homolog that showed 71% amino acid identity with CAP1. Our results suggested that CAP1 and related genes are critical for pollen development in both monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. PMID:23629836

  19. Adenotonsillar hypertrophy as a risk factor of dentofacial abnormality in Korean children.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Kyu; Rhee, Chae Seo; Yun, Pil-Young; Kim, Jeong-Whun

    2015-11-01

    No studies for the role of adenotonsillar hypertrophy in development of dentofacial abnormalities have been performed in Asian pediatric population. Thus, we aimed to investigate the relationship between adenotonsillar hypertrophy and dentofacial abnormalities in Korean children. The present study included consecutive children who visited a pediatric clinic for sleep-disordered breathing due to habitual mouth breathing, snoring or sleep apnea. Their palatine tonsils and adenoids were graded by oropharyngeal endoscopy and lateral cephalometry. Anterior open bite, posterior crossbite, and Angle's class malocclusions were evaluated for dentofacial abnormality. The receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was used to identify age cutoffs to predict dentofacial abnormality. A total of 1,083 children were included. The presence of adenotonsillar hypertrophy was significantly correlated with the prevalence of dentofacial abnormality [adjusted odds ratio = 4.587, 95% CI (2.747-7.658)] after adjusting age, sex, body mass index, allergy, and Korean version of obstructive sleep apnea-18 score. The cutoff age associated with dentofacial abnormality was 5.5 years (sensitivity = 75.5%, specificity = 67%) in the children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy and 6.5 years (sensitivity = 70.6%, specificity = 57%) in those without adenotonsillar hypertrophy. In conclusion, adenotonsillar hypertrophy may be a risk factor for dentofacial abnormalities in Korean children and early surgical intervention could be considered with regards to dentofacial abnormality. PMID:25490975

  20. Androgen modulation of Foxp1 and Foxp2 in the developing rat brain: impact on sex specific vocalization.

    PubMed

    Bowers, J Michael; Perez-Pouchoulen, Miguel; Roby, Clinton R; Ryan, Timothy E; McCarthy, Margaret M

    2014-12-01

    Sex differences in vocal communication are prevalent in both the animals and humans. The mechanism(s) mediating gender differences in human language are unknown, although, sex hormones, principally androgens, play a central role in the development of vocalizations in a wide variety of animal species. The discovery of FOXP2 has added an additional avenue for exploring the origins of language and animal communication. The FOXP2 gene is a member of the forkhead box P (FOXP) family of transcription factors. Prior to the prenatal androgen surge in male fetuses, we observed no sex difference for Foxp2 protein levels in cultured cells. In contrast, 24 hours after the onset of the androgen surge, we found a sex difference for Foxp2 protein levels in cultured cortical cells with males having higher levels than females. Furthermore, we observed the potent nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone altered not only Foxp2 mRNA and protein levels but also Foxp1. Androgen effects on both Foxp2 and Foxp1 were found to occur in the striatum, cerebellar vermis, and cortex. Immunofluorescence microscopy and coimmunoprecipitation demonstrate Foxp2 and the androgen receptor protein interact. Databases for transcription factor binding sites predict a consensus binding motif for androgen receptor on the Foxp2 promoter regions. We also observed a sex difference in rat pup vocalization with males vocalizing more than females and treatment of females with dihydrotestosterone eliminated the sex difference. We propose that androgens might be an upstream regulator of both Foxp2 and Foxp1 expression and signaling. This has important implications for language and communication as well as neuropsychiatric developmental disorders involving impairments in communication. PMID:25247470

  1. Androgen Modulation of Foxp1 and Foxp2 in the Developing Rat Brain: Impact on Sex Specific Vocalization

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Pouchoulen, Miguel; Roby, Clinton R.; Ryan, Timothy E.; McCarthy, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    Sex differences in vocal communication are prevalent in both the animals and humans. The mechanism(s) mediating gender differences in human language are unknown, although, sex hormones, principally androgens, play a central role in the development of vocalizations in a wide variety of animal species. The discovery of FOXP2 has added an additional avenue for exploring the origins of language and animal communication. The FOXP2 gene is a member of the forkhead box P (FOXP) family of transcription factors. Prior to the prenatal androgen surge in male fetuses, we observed no sex difference for Foxp2 protein levels in cultured cells. In contrast, 24 hours after the onset of the androgen surge, we found a sex difference for Foxp2 protein levels in cultured cortical cells with males having higher levels than females. Furthermore, we observed the potent nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone altered not only Foxp2 mRNA and protein levels but also Foxp1. Androgen effects on both Foxp2 and Foxp1 were found to occur in the striatum, cerebellar vermis, and cortex. Immunofluorescence microscopy and coimmunoprecipitation demonstrate Foxp2 and the androgen receptor protein interact. Databases for transcription factor binding sites predict a consensus binding motif for androgen receptor on the Foxp2 promoter regions. We also observed a sex difference in rat pup vocalization with males vocalizing more than females and treatment of females with dihydrotestosterone eliminated the sex difference. We propose that androgens might be an upstream regulator of both Foxp2 and Foxp1 expression and signaling. This has important implications for language and communication as well as neuropsychiatric developmental disorders involving impairments in communication. PMID:25247470

  2. Family Sex Communication Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Clay; Neer, Michael

    1986-01-01

    Suggests (1) family sex communication is infrequent and ineffective, (2) frequent, effective family sex communication may serve as a contextual model for children's communication patterns, (3) strong family sex communication orientation seems to facilitate children's open discussion with dates and parents, and develops responsible pre-parenting…

  3. Age- and Sex-Dependent Changes in Androgen Receptor Expression in the Developing Mouse Cortex and Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Ridder, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    During the perinatal period, male mice are exposed to higher levels of testosterone (T) than females, which promotes sexual dimorphism in their brain structures and behaviors. In addition to acting via estrogen receptors after being locally converted into estradiol by aromatase, T also acts directly through androgen receptor (AR) in the brain. Therefore, we hypothesized that AR expression in the developing mouse cortex and hippocampus was sexually dimorphic. To test our hypothesis, we measured and determined AR mRNA and protein levels in mouse cortex/hippocampus collected on the day of birth (PN0) and 7 (PN7), 14 (PN14), and 21 (PN21) days after birth. We demonstrated that, as age advanced, AR mRNA levels increased in the cortex/hippocampus of both sexes but showed no sex difference. Two AR proteins, the full-length (110 kDa) and a smaller isoform (70 kDa), were detected in the developing mouse cortex/hippocampus with an age-dependent increase in protein levels of both AR isoforms at PN21 and a transient masculine increase in expression of the full-length AR protein on PN7. Thus, we conclude that the postnatal age and sex differences in AR protein expression in combination with the sex differences in circulating T may cause sexual differentiation of the mouse cortex/hippocampus. PMID:26317111

  4. Regulation of gonadal sex ratios and pubertal development by the thyroid endocrine system in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharma, Prakash; Patino, Reynaldo

    2013-01-01

    We examined associations between thyroid condition, gonadal sex and pubertal development in zebrafish. Seventy-two-hour postfertilization larvae were reared in untreated medium or in the presence of goitrogens (sodium perchlorate, 0.82 mM; methimazole, 0.15 and 0.3 mM) or thyroxine (1 and 10 nM) for 30 days. Thyrocyte height, gonadal sex and gonadal development were histologically determined at 45 and 60 days postfertilization (dpf). Thyrocyte hypertrophy, an index of hypothyroidism, was observed at 45 and 60 dpf in perchlorate-treated but only at 45 dpf in methimazole-treated fish. Similarly, gonadal sex ratios were biased toward ovaries relative to control animals at 45 and 60 dpf in perchlorate-treated fish but only at 45 dpf in methimazole-treated fish. Gonadal sex ratios were biased toward testes at 45 and 60 dpf in thyroxine-treated fish. Spermatogenesis was delayed in testes from goitrogen-treated fish at 60 dpf relative to control values, but was unaffected in testes from thyroxine-treated individuals. Oogenesis seemed to be nonspecifically delayed in all treatments relative to control at 60 dpf. This study confirmed the previously reported association between hypothyroid condition and ovarian-skewed ratios, and hyperthyroid condition and testicular-skewed ratios, and also showed that male pubertal development is specifically delayed by experimental hypothyroidism. The simultaneous recovery from the hypothyroid and ovary-inducing effects of methimazole by 60 dpf (27 days post-treatment) suggests that the ovary-skewing effect of goitrogens is reversible when thyroid conditions return to basal levels before developmental commitment of gonadal sex. Conversely, the masculinizing effect of hyperthyroidism seems to be stable and perhaps permanent.

  5. Development of a decision support tool to facilitate primary care management of patients with abnormal liver function tests without clinically apparent liver disease [HTA03/38/02]. Abnormal Liver Function Investigations Evaluation (ALFIE)

    PubMed Central

    Donnan, Peter T; McLernon, David; Steinke, Douglas; Ryder, Stephen; Roderick, Paul; Sullivan, Frank M; Rosenberg, William; Dillon, John F

    2007-01-01

    Background Liver function tests (LFTs) are routinely performed in primary care, and are often the gateway to further invasive and/or expensive investigations. Little is known of the consequences in people with an initial abnormal liver function (ALF) test in primary care and with no obvious liver disease. Further investigations may be dangerous for the patient and expensive for Health Services. The aims of this study are to determine the natural history of abnormalities in LFTs before overt liver disease presents in the population and identify those who require minimal further investigations with the potential for reduction in NHS costs. Methods/Design A population-based retrospective cohort study will follow up all those who have had an incident liver function test (LFT) in primary care to subsequent liver disease or mortality over a period of 15 years (approx. 2.3 million tests in 99,000 people). The study is set in Primary Care in the region of Tayside, Scotland (pop approx. 429,000) between 1989 and 2003. The target population consists of patients with no recorded clinical signs or symptoms of liver disease and registered with a GP. The health technologies being assessed are LFTs, viral and auto-antibody tests, ultrasound, CT, MRI and liver biopsy. The study will utilise the Epidemiology of Liver Disease In Tayside (ELDIT) database to determine the outcomes of liver disease. These are based on hospital admission data (Scottish Morbidity Record 1), dispensed medication records, death certificates, and examination of medical records from Tayside hospitals. A sample of patients (n = 150) with recent initial ALF tests or invitation to biopsy will complete questionnaires to obtain quality of life data and anxiety measures. Cost-effectiveness and cost utility Markov model analyses will be performed from health service and patient perspectives using standard NHS costs. The findings will also be used to develop a computerised clinical decision support tool. Discussion The results of this study will be widely disseminated to primary care, as well as G.I. hospital specialists through publications and presentations at local and national meetings and the project website. This will facilitate optimal decision-making both for the benefit of the patient and the National Health Service. PMID:17437630

  6. A review of the embryological development and associated developmental abnormalities of the sternum in the light of a rare palaeopathological case of sternal clefting.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, A E; Weston, D A; Oostra, R J; Maat, G J R

    2013-04-01

    A sternal cleft or bifid sternum is a rare anterior chest wall abnormality. Although several cases have been reported in clinical literature, very little reference has been made to this anomaly in palaeopathological texts. This paper presents a case of superior sternal clefting observed in a middle-aged female with concurrent Paget's disease and congenital hyperkyphosis excavated from a 19th century Dutch psychiatric asylum cemetery in Bloemendaal, The Netherlands. The embryological development of the sternum and associated developmental abnormalities are reviewed and a differential diagnosis is performed on the suite of observed skeletal anomalies. Goltz syndrome, congenital hypothyroidism, disruption of the Hoxb-4 gene, acute excessive maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy, Coffin-Lowry syndrome and PHACES syndrome were considered as possible causative agents, with the latter two conditions determined to be the most likely. The psychiatric asylum context, from which the individual came, supports the differential diagnosis as neurological abnormalities are common in these two syndromes. This article demonstrates that the integration of embryology, modern clinical literature and palaeopathological principles is vital in the interpretation of developmental anomalies from an archaeological context. PMID:23473075

  7. Development of a PubMed Based Search Tool for Identifying Sex and Gender Specific Health Literature

    PubMed Central

    Song, Michael M.; Simonsen, Cheryl K.; Wilson, Joanna D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: An effective literature search strategy is critical to achieving the aims of Sex and Gender Specific Health (SGSH): to understand sex and gender differences through research and to effectively incorporate the new knowledge into the clinical decision making process to benefit both male and female patients. The goal of this project was to develop and validate an SGSH literature search tool that is readily and freely available to clinical researchers and practitioners. Methods: PubMed, a freely available search engine for the Medline database, was selected as the platform to build the SGSH literature search tool. Combinations of Medical Subject Heading terms, text words, and title words were evaluated for optimal specificity and sensitivity. The search tool was then validated against reference bases compiled for two disease states, diabetes and stroke. Results: Key sex and gender terms and limits were bundled to create a search tool to facilitate PubMed SGSH literature searches. During validation, the search tool retrieved 50 of 94 (53.2%) stroke and 62 of 95 (65.3%) diabetes reference articles selected for validation. A general keyword search of stroke or diabetes combined with sex difference retrieved 33 of 94 (35.1%) stroke and 22 of 95 (23.2%) diabetes reference base articles, with lower sensitivity and specificity for SGSH content. Conclusions: The Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center SGSH PubMed Search Tool provides higher sensitivity and specificity to sex and gender specific health literature. The tool will facilitate research, clinical decision-making, and guideline development relevant to SGSH. PMID:26555409

  8. Safe-sex belief and sexual risk behaviours among adolescents from three developing countries: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Alfonso; Lopez-del Burgo, Cristina; Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Carlos, Silvia; de Irala, Jokin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study intends to evaluate whether the belief that condoms are 100% effective in protecting against HIV infection is associated with sexual risk behaviours among youth. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in representative samples of high-school students in the Philippines, El Salvador and Peru. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire. Students were asked about the risk of HIV transmission if one has sex using condoms. They were also asked to indicate whether they had ever had sexual relations and whether they used a condom in their first sexual relation. The sample was composed of 8994 students, aged 13–18. Results One out of seven adolescents believed condoms are 100% effective (safe-sex believers). Those adolescents were 82% more likely to have had sex than those without such belief, after adjusting for confounders (OR=1.82; 95% CI 1.51 to 2.21). On the contrary, no association was found between risk perception and condom use. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses produced similar results. Conclusions This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first study conducted specifically to evaluate this phenomenon and that has used the same questionnaire and the same data collection protocol in three different developing countries from Asia, Central and South America. These results reasonably suggest that there could be an association between safe sex beliefs and sexual initiation. Longitudinal studies are needed to better understand this possible association as it could influence how to better promote sexual health. PMID:25916489

  9. Safe sex

    MedlinePlus

    Safe sex means taking steps before and during sex that can prevent you from getting an infection, or from ... the skin around the genital area. Before having sex: Get to know your partner and discuss your ...

  10. The influence of sex-linked genetic mechanisms on attention and impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Trent, Simon; Davies, William

    2012-01-01

    It is now generally agreed that there are inherent sex differences in healthy individuals across a number of neurobiological domains (including brain structure, neurochemistry, and cognition). Moreover, there is a burgeoning body of evidence highlighting sex differences within neuropsychiatric populations (in terms of the rates of incidence, clinical features/progression, neurobiology and pathology). Here, we consider the extent to which attention and impulsivity are sexually dimorphic in healthy populations and the extent to which sex might modulate the expression of disorders characterised by abnormalities in attention and/or impulsivity such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism and addiction. We then discuss general genetic mechanisms that might underlie sex differences in attention and impulsivity before focussing on specific positional and functional candidate sex-linked genes that are likely to influence these cognitive processes. Identifying novel sex-modulated molecular targets should ultimately enable us to develop more effective therapies in disorders associated with attentional/impulsive dysfunction. PMID:21983394

  11. Milk from dams fed an obesogenic diet combined with a high-fat/high-sugar diet induces long-term abnormal mammary gland development in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Hue-Beauvais, C; Koch, E; Chavatte-Palmer, P; Galio, L; Chat, S; Letheule, M; Rousseau-Ralliard, D; Jaffrezic, F; Laloë, D; Aujean, E; Révillion, F; Lhotellier, V; Gertler, A; Devinoy, E; Charlier, M

    2015-04-01

    Alterations to the metabolic endocrine environment during early life are crucial to mammary gland development. Among these environmental parameters, the initial nutritional event after birth is the consumption of milk, which represents the first maternal support provided to mammalian newborns. Milk is a complex fluid that exerts effects far beyond its immediate nutritional value. The present study, therefore, aimed to determine the effect of the nutritional changes during the neonatal and prepubertal periods on the adult mammary phenotype. Newborn rabbits were suckled by dams fed a high-fat/high-sugar obesogenic (OD) or a control (CON) diet and then subsequently fed either the OD or CON diets from the onset of puberty and throughout early pregnancy. Mammary glands were collected during early pregnancy (Day 8 of pregnancy). Rabbits fed with OD milk and then subjected to an OD diet displayed an abnormal development of the mammary gland: the mammary ducts were markedly enlarged (P < 0.05) and filled with abundant secretory products. Moreover, the alveolar secretory structures were disorganized, with an abnormal aspect characterized by large lumina. Mammary epithelial cells contained numerous large lipid droplets and exhibited fingering of the apical membrane and abnormally enlarged intercellular spaces filled with casein micelles. Leptin has been shown to be involved in modulating several developmental processes. We therefore analyzed its expression in the mammary gland. Mammary leptin mRNA was strongly expressed in rabbits fed with OD milk and subjected to an OD diet by comparison with the CON rabbits. Leptin transcripts and protein were localized in the epithelial cells, indicating that the increase in leptin synthesis occurs in this compartment. Taken together, these findings suggest that early-life nutritional history, in particular through the milking period, can determine subsequent mammary gland development. Moreover, they highlight the potentially important regulatory role that leptin may play during critical early-life nutritional windows with respect to long-term growth and mammary function. PMID:26020186

  12. Brain abnormalities in male children and adolescents with hemophilia: detection with MR imaging. The Hemophilia Growth and Development Study Group.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D A; Nelson, M D; Fenstermacher, M J; Bohan, T P; Hopper, K D; Tilton, A; Mitchell, W G; Contant, C F; Maeder, M A; Donfield, S M

    1992-11-01

    Cranial magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 124 male patients (aged 7-19 years), from 14 institutions, in whom a diagnosis of moderate to severe hemophilia was made. Blood tests in all subjects were negative for human immunodeficiency virus. Findings in MR studies were abnormal in 25 (20.2%) subjects. Six lesions in five subjects were classified as congenital. The most commonly identified congenital lesion was a posterior fossa collection of cerebrospinal fluid (five cases). Twenty-two subjects had acquired lesions that were probably related to the hemophilia or its treatment. The most commonly acquired lesions were single- or multifocal areas of high signal intensity within the white matter on T2-weighted images noted in 14 (11.3%) subjects. Two subjects had large focal areas of brain atrophy, and six had some degree of diffuse cerebral cortical atrophy. Three subjects (2.4%) had hemorrhagic lesions. To the authors' knowledge, the unexpected finding of small, focal, nonhemorrhagic white matter lesions has not previously been reported. PMID:1410372

  13. Responses to "Neutral" Pronoun Presentations and the Development of Sex-Biased Responding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisk, William R.

    1985-01-01

    Examined whether kindergarten and first-grade children give sex-biased responses if reinforced and/or triggered by language, specifically pronouns, that they hear. Results supported the pronomial dominance theory of pronoun functioning for young children. Results also suggest that boys but not girls use a self-imaging response to neutral…

  14. Developing and Testing a Sex Education Program for the Female Clients of Health Centers in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirpak, Khosro Refaie; Ardebili, Hassan Eftekhar; Mohammad, Kazem; Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Chinichian, Maryam; Ramenzankhani, Ali; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2007-01-01

    In this study a matched intervention-control site design in 14 urban health centers with random selection of 160 participants (80 in each of intervention and control) was used to evaluate a sex education program in Iran. Qualitative methods were used in a needs assessment that also set the content and method of delivery of the program. The…

  15. Reimagining Gender through Policy Development: The Case of a "Single-Sex" Educational Organisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthirt Cohen, Beth

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, a feminist educational organisation in the USA for young women, ages 14-21, adopted a policy in order to clarify their target constituency of girls and young women. The policy defined "girls and young women" not as a designation associated with fixed biological sex, but instead as a self-determined identity label creating an explicit

  16. The Impact of Sex-Role Stereotyping on Human Development. Monograph, Volume 3, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Patricia

    A stereotype is a standardized mental picture based on a common characteristic of a group of people, representing an oversimplified opinion or an uncritical judgment that is not reality-based. In order to understand the psychological basis of sex-role stereotyping it must be understood that the stereotype of men as strong, independent, and in…

  17. Reimagining Gender through Policy Development: The Case of a "Single-Sex" Educational Organisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthirt Cohen, Beth

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, a feminist educational organisation in the USA for young women, ages 14-21, adopted a policy in order to clarify their target constituency of girls and young women. The policy defined "girls and young women" not as a designation associated with fixed biological sex, but instead as a self-determined identity label creating an explicit…

  18. Sex Differential Item Functioning in the Inventory of Early Development III Social-Emotional Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Jessica L.; French, Brian F.; Finch, W. Holmes; Ullrich-French, Sarah C.

    2014-01-01

    Social-emotional (SE) skills in the early developmental years of children influence outcomes in psychological, behavioral, and learning domains. The adult ratings of a child's SE skills can be influenced by sex stereotypes. These rating differences could lead to differential conclusions about developmental progress or risk. To ensure that…

  19. The Use of Sexually Explicit Material in Clinical, Educational and Research Settings in the United Kingdom and Its Relation to the Development of Psychosexual Therapy and Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Marnie; Wylie, Kevan R.

    2008-01-01

    The present review describes the development and use of sexually explicit material in sex education within UK psychosexual therapy clinics, medical schools and also in state-maintained secondary schools with reference to interests that have shaped the provision of sex education since the early twentieth century. A short summary of published books…

  20. A Review of Sex Differences in Peer Relationship Processes: Potential Trade-Offs for the Emotional and Behavioral Development of Girls and Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Amanda J.; Rudolph, Karen D.

    2006-01-01

    Theory and research on sex differences in adjustment focus largely on parental, societal, and biological influences. However, it also is important to consider how peers contribute to girls' and boys' development. This article provides a critical review of sex differences in several peer relationship processes, including behavioral and…

  1. The Use of Sexually Explicit Material in Clinical, Educational and Research Settings in the United Kingdom and Its Relation to the Development of Psychosexual Therapy and Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Marnie; Wylie, Kevan R.

    2008-01-01

    The present review describes the development and use of sexually explicit material in sex education within UK psychosexual therapy clinics, medical schools and also in state-maintained secondary schools with reference to interests that have shaped the provision of sex education since the early twentieth century. A short summary of published books

  2. Role of Sex Hormones in the Development and Progression of Hepatitis B Virus-Associated Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Montella, Maurizio; D'Arena, Giovanni; Crispo, Anna; Capunzo, Mario; Nocerino, Flavia; Grimaldi, Maria; Barbieri, Antonio; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; Tecce, Mario Felice; Amore, Alfonso; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Giudice, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in developed countries. Epidemiological reports indicate that the incidence of HBV-related HCC is higher in males and postmenopausal females than other females. Increasing evidence suggests that sex hormones such as androgens and estrogens play an important role in the progression of an HBV infection and in the development of HBV-related HCC. While androgen is supposed to stimulate the androgen signaling pathway and cooperate to the increased transcription and replication of HBV genes, estrogen may play a protecting role against the progression of HBV infections and in the development of HBV-related HCC through decreasing HBV RNA transcription and inflammatory cytokines levels. Additionally, sex hormones can also affect HBV-related hepatocarcinogenesis by inducing epigenetic changes such as the regulation of mRNA levels by microRNAs (miRNAs), DNA methylation, and histone modification in liver tissue. This review describes the molecular mechanisms underlying the gender disparity in HBV-related HCC with the aim of improving the understanding of key factors underneath the sex disparity often observed in HBV infections. Furthermore, the review will propose more effective prevention strategies and treatments of HBV-derived diseases. PMID:26491442

  3. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  4. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially the progestin-only pill (also called the “mini-pill”) can actually cause abnormal bleeding for some ... affect my chances of getting pregnant in the future? Source Abnormal Uterine Bleeding by KA Oriel, MD, ...

  5. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems in the arms or legs (limbs). ... The term skeletal limb abnormalities is most often used to describe defects in the legs or arms that are due to ...

  6. Abnormal cartilage development and altered N-glycosylation in Tmem165-deficient zebrafish mirrors the phenotypes associated with TMEM165-CDG.

    PubMed

    Bammens, Riet; Mehta, Nickita; Race, Valérie; Foulquier, François; Jaeken, Jaak; Tiemeyer, Michael; Steet, Richard; Matthijs, Gert; Flanagan-Steet, Heather

    2015-06-01

    The congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG), a group of inherited diseases characterized by aberrant glycosylation, encompass a wide range of defects, including glycosyltransferases, glycosidases, nucleotide-sugar transporters as well as proteins involved in maintaining Golgi architecture, pH and vesicular trafficking. Mutations in a previously undescribed protein, TMEM165, were recently shown to cause a new form of CDG, termed TMEM165-CDG. TMEM165-CDG patients exhibit cartilage and bone dysplasia and altered glycosylation of serum glycoproteins. We utilized a morpholino knockdown strategy in zebrafish to investigate the physiologic and pathogenic functions of TMEM165. Inhibition of tmem165 expression in developing zebrafish embryos caused craniofacial abnormalities, largely attributable to fewer chondrocytes. Decreased expression of several markers of cartilage and bone development suggests that Tmem165 deficiency alters both chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation. Glycomic analysis of tmem165 morphants also revealed altered initiation, processing and extension of N-glycans, paralleling some of the glycosylation changes noted in human patients. Collectively, these findings highlight the utility of zebrafish to elucidate pathogenic mechanisms associated with glycosylation disorders and suggest that the cartilage and bone dysplasia manifested in TMEM165-CDG patients may stem from abnormal development of chondrocytes and osteoblasts. PMID:25609749

  7. Potential coverage of circulating HPV types by current and developing vaccines in a group of women in Bosnia and Herzegovina with abnormal Pap smears.

    PubMed

    Salimović-Bešić, I; Hukić, M

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in a group of Bosnian-Herzegovinian women with abnormal cytology and to assess their potential coverage by vaccines. HPVs were identified by multiplex real-time PCR test (HPV High Risk Typing Real-TM; Sacace Biotechnologies, Italy) of 105 women with an abnormal cervical Pap smear and positive high-risk (HR) HPV DNA screening test. The most common genotypes in the study were HPV-16 (32·6%, 48/147), HPV-31 (14·3%, 21/147), HPV-51 (9·5%, 14/147) and HPV-18 (7·5%, 11/147). The overall frequency of HR HPV-16 and/or HPV-18, covered by currently available vaccines [Gardasil® (Merck & Co., USA) and Cervarix®; (GlaxoSmithKline, UK)] was lower than the overall frequency of other HPVs detected in the study (40·1%, 59/174, P = 0·017). Group prevalence of HR HPVs targeted by a nine-valent vaccine in development (code-named V503) was higher than total frequency of other HPVs detected (68·0%, 100/147, P < 0·001). Development of cervical cytological abnormalities was independent of the presence of multiple infections (χ 2 = 0·598, P = 0·741). Compared to other HPVs, dependence of cervical diagnosis and HPV-16, -18 (P = 0·008) and HPV-16, -18, -31 (P = 0·008) infections were observed. Vaccines targeting HR HPV-16, -18 and -31 might be an important tool in the prevention of cervical disease in Bosnia and Herzegovina. PMID:25578155

  8. A Case of ADHD and a Major Y Chromosome Abnormality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Aisling; Gill, Michael; Fitzgerald, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background: ADHD is a common, heritable disorder of childhood. Sex chromosome abnormalities are relatively rare conditions that are sometimes associated with behavioral disorders. Method: The authors present a male child with ADHD and a major de-novo Y chromosome abnormality consisting of deletion of the long arm and duplication of the short arm.

  9. A Case of ADHD and a Major Y Chromosome Abnormality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Aisling; Gill, Michael; Fitzgerald, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background: ADHD is a common, heritable disorder of childhood. Sex chromosome abnormalities are relatively rare conditions that are sometimes associated with behavioral disorders. Method: The authors present a male child with ADHD and a major de-novo Y chromosome abnormality consisting of deletion of the long arm and duplication of the short arm.…

  10. [Abnormal floral meristem development in transgenic tomato plants do not depend on the expression of genes encoding defense-related PR-proteins and antimicrobial peptides].

    PubMed

    Khaliluev, M R; Chaban, I A; Kononenko, N V; Baranova, E N; Dolgov, S V; Kharchenko, P N; Poliakov, V Iu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the morphological and cytoembryological analyses of the tomato plants transformed with the genes encoding chitin-binding proteins (ac and RS-intron-Shir) from Amaranthus caudatus L. andA. retroflexus L., respectively, as well as the gene amp2 encoding hevein-like antimicrobial peptides from Stellaria media L., have been performed. The transgenic lines were adapted to soil and grown the greenhouse. The analysis of putative transgenic tomato plants revealed several lines that did not differ phenotypically from the wild type plants and three lines with disruption in differentiation of the inflorescence shoot and the flower, as well as the fruit formation (modified plants of each line were transformed with a single gene as noted before). Abnormalities in the development of the generative organs were maintained for at least six vegetative generations. These transgenic plants were shown to be defective in the mail gametophyte formation, fertilization, and, consequently, led to parthenocarpic fruits. The detailed analysis of growing ovules in the abnormal transgenic plants showed that the replacement tissue was formed and proliferated instead of unfertilized embryo sac. The structure of the replacement tissue differed from both embryonic and endosperm tissue of the normal ovule. The formation of the replacement tissue occurred due to continuing proliferation of the endothelial cells that lost their ability for differentiation. The final step in the development of the replacement tissue was its death, which resulted in the cell lysis. The expression of the genes used was confirmed by RT-PCR in all three lines with abnormal phenotype, as well as in several lines that did not phenotypically differ from the untransformed control. This suggests that abnormalities in the organs of the generative sphere in the transgenic plants do not depend on the expression of the foreign genes that were introduced in the tomato genome. Here, we argue that agrobacterial transformation affects, directly or indirectly, expression of genes encoding for transcription factors that can activate a gene cascade responsible for the normal plant development. PMID:25720263

  11. Effects of 17α-ethinylestradiol at different water temperatures on zebrafish sex differentiation and gonad development.

    PubMed

    Luzio, Ana; Santos, Dércia; Fontaínhas-Fernandes, António A; Monteiro, Sandra M; Coimbra, Ana M

    2016-05-01

    In the current climate change scenario, studies combining effects of water contaminants with environmental parameters, such as temperature, are essential to predict potentially harmful impacts on aquatic organisms. In zebrafish (Danio rerio), sex determination seems to have a polygenic genetic basis, which can be secondarily influenced by environmental factors, such as temperature and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of the EDC 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), a potent synthetic estrogen, on zebrafish sex differentiation and gonad development at different water temperatures. Therefore, zebrafish raised at three distinct water temperatures (23, 28 or 33±0.5°C), were exposed to 4ng/L of EE2, from 2hours to 60days post-fertilization (dpf). Subsequently, a quantitative (stereological) assessment of zebrafish gonads was performed, at 35 and 60dpf, to identify alterations on gonadal development and differentiation. The results show that low temperature delayed general growth of zebrafish, as well as gonad differentiation and maturation, while high temperature induced an opposite effect. Moreover, sex ratio was skewed toward males when zebrafish were exposed to the high temperature. In general, EE2 exposure promoted gonad maturation in both genders, independently of the temperature. However, at the high temperature condition, exposure to EE2 induced a delay in the male gonad development, with some individuals still showing differentiating gonads at 60dpf. The findings of this study support the notion that zebrafish has a genetic sex determination mechanism highly sensitive to environmental factors and show that it is essential to study the effects of water contaminants at different climate scenarios in order to understand potential future impacts on organisms. PMID:26897088

  12. Sexual Dimorphisms of Adrenal Steroids, Sex Hormones, and Immunological Biomarkers and Possible Risk Factors for Developing Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Alfonse T.; Rehman, Azeem A.; Jorgenson, Laura C.; Smith, Jennifer M.; Aldag, Jean C.

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity and immunological biomarkers are believed to be interrelated with sex hormones and other neuroendocrine factors. Sexual dimorphism mechanisms may be operating in certain rheumatic and inflammatory diseases which occur more frequently in women than men, as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Less data have been available on altered interrelations of the combined neuroendocrine and immune (NEI) systems as risk factors for development of certain diseases. In this study, serological interrelations of NEI biomarkers are analyzed before symptomatic onset of RA (pre-RA) versus control (CN) subjects, stratified by sex. Sexual dimorphism was found in serum levels of acute serum amyloid A (ASAA), soluble interleukin-2 receptor alpha (sIL-2Rα), and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNF-R1). Multiple steroidal and hormonal (neuroendocrine) factors also showed highly (p < 0.001) significant sexual dimorphism in their assayed values, but less for cortisol (p = 0.012), and not for 17-hydroxyprogesterone (p = 0.176). After stratification by sex and risk of developing RA, differential NEI correlational patterns were observed in the interplay of the NEI systems between the pre-RA and CN groups, which deserve further investigation. PMID:26693225

  13. Sex and Breed-Dependent Organ Development and Metabolic Responses in Foetuses from Lean and Obese/Leptin Resistant Swine

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Rovira, Laura; Tarrade, Anne; Astiz, Susana; Mourier, Eve; Perez-Solana, Mariluz; de la Cruz, Paloma; Gomez-Fidalgo, Ernesto; Sanchez-Sanchez, Raul; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale; Gonzalez-Bulnes, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effects of breed and sex on growth patterns and metabolic features of advanced-pregnancy foetuses exposed to the same environmental conditions. Thus, at Day 62 of pregnancy, swine foetuses from an obese breed with leptin resistance (Iberian breed) were compared to lean crossbred foetuses (25% Large White 25% Landrace 50% Pietrain). There were differential developmental patterns in foetuses with leptin resistance, mainly a higher relative weight of the brain resembling brain-sparing effect. Prioritization of brain growth may be protective for the adequate growth and postnatal survival of the Iberian individuals, an ancient breed reared in extensive semi-feral conditions for centuries. There were also clear sex-related differences in foetal development and metabolism in the Iberian breed. Female Iberian foetuses were similar in size and weight to male littermates but had a significantly higher relative liver to body weight ratio resembling liver-sparing effect and a trend for a higher relative intestine to body ratio. Moreover, the availability of triglycerides, cholesterol and IL-6 in female Iberian foetuses was similar to that of lean crossbred foetuses. Overall, these features may favour a better postnatal survival and development of females, the sex more critical for the species survival. These findings set the basis for future translational studies aimed at increasing the knowledge on the interaction between genetic and environmental factors in the early programming of the adult phenotype. PMID:23935823

  14. The Sex Check: The Development of an HIV-Prevention Service to Address the Needs of Latino MSM

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Jennifer L.; Orellana, E. Roberto; Walker, Denise D.; Viquez, Luis; Picciano, Joseph F.; Roffman, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    The Sex Check is a brief, telephone-delivered, HIV-prevention intervention tailored for individuals who are at high risk of HIV infection or transmission but who are neither reducing their risk on their own nor seeking support for this purpose. Because the intervention is delivered on a one-to-one basis, permits anonymity, is marketed to “men who have sex with men,” and is brief, it may be particularly responsive to cultural, structural, and attitudinal barriers to serving Latino MSM. Because many Latino MSM continue to engage in high risk sexual behaviors, developing and testing prevention interventions with this population is a public health priority. PMID:22605913

  15. Sex differences in multisensory speech processing in both typically developing children and those on the autism spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Lars A.; Del Bene, Victor A.; Molholm, Sophie; Frey, Hans-Peter; Foxe, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous work has revealed sizeable deficits in the abilities of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to integrate auditory and visual speech signals, with clear implications for social communication in this population. There is a strong male preponderance in ASD, with approximately four affected males for every female. The presence of sex differences in ASD symptoms suggests a sexual dimorphism in the ASD phenotype, and raises the question of whether this dimorphism extends to ASD traits in the neurotypical population. Here, we investigated possible sexual dimorphism in multisensory speech integration in both ASD and neurotypical individuals. Methods: We assessed whether males and females differed in their ability to benefit from visual speech when target words were presented under varying levels of signal-to-noise, in samples of neurotypical children and adults, and in children diagnosed with an ASD. Results: In typically developing (TD) children and children with ASD, females (n = 47 and n = 15, respectively) were significantly superior in their ability to recognize words under audiovisual listening conditions compared to males (n = 55 and n = 58, respectively). This sex difference was absent in our sample of neurotypical adults (n = 28 females; n = 28 males). Conclusions: We propose that the development of audiovisual integration is delayed in male relative to female children, a delay that is also observed in ASD. In neurotypicals, these sex differences disappear in early adulthood when females approach their performance maximum and males “catch up.” Our findings underline the importance of considering sex differences in the search for autism endophenotypes and strongly encourage increased efforts to study the underrepresented population of females within ASD. PMID:26074757

  16. Karyotype and identification of sex in two endangered crane species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodpasture, C.; Seluja, G.; Gee, G.

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory procedure for sex identification of monomorphic birds was developed using modern cytological methods of detecting chromosome abnormalities in human amniotic fluid samples. A pin feather is taken from a pre-fledging bird for tissue culture and karyotype analysis. Through this method, the sex was identified and the karyotype described of the whooping crane (Grus americana) and the Mississippi sandhill crane (G. canadensis pulla). Giemsa-stained karyotypes of these species showed an identical chromosome constitution with 2n = 78 + 2. However, differences in the amount of centromeric heterochromatin were observed in the Mississippi sandhill crane when compared to the whooping crane C-banded karyotype.

  17. Sex chromosome aneuploidy in cytogenetic findings of referral patients from south of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jouyan, Najmeh; Davoudi Dehaghani, Elham; Senemar, Sara; Shojaee, Ashraf; Mozdarani, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chromosome abnormality (CA) including Sex chromosomes abnormality (SCAs) is one of the most important causes of disordered sexual development and infertility. SCAs formed by numerical or structural alteration in X and Y chromosomes, are the most frequently CA encountered at both prenatal diagnosis and at birth. Objective: This study describes cytogenetic findings of cases suspected with CA referred for cytogenetic study. Materials and Methods: Blood samples of 4151 patients referred for cytogenetic analysis were cultured for chromosome preparation. Karyotypes were prepared for all samples and G-Banded chromosomes were analyzed using x100 objective lens. Sex chromosome aneuploidy cases were analyzed and categorized in two groups of Turners and Klinefelter’s syndrome (KFS). Results: Out of 230 (5.54%) cases with chromosomally abnormal karyotype, 122 (30%) cases suspected of sexual disorder showed SCA including 46% Turner’s syndrome, 46% KFS and the remaining other sex chromosome abnormalities. The frequency of classic and mosaic form of Turner’s syndrome was 33% and 67%, this was 55% and 45% for KFS, respectively. Conclusion: This study shows a relatively high sex chromosome abnormality in this region and provides cytogenetic data to assist clinicians and genetic counselors to determine the priority of requesting cytogenetic study. Differences between results from various reports can be due to different genetic background or ethnicity. PMID:25242988

  18. Kinetics of fertilization and development, and sex ratio of bovine embryos produced using the semen of different bulls.

    PubMed

    Alomar, M; Tasiaux, H; Remacle, S; George, F; Paul, D; Donnay, I

    2008-08-01

    The between bulls variation in in vitro fertility and the shift of sex ratio towards male embryos are two problems affecting the in vitro production (IVP) of bovine embryos. Our objective was to evaluate the kinetics of fertilization, embryo development and the sex ratio of the resulting embryos using the frozen/thawed semen of four different bulls. In a first experiment, the kinetics of pronucleus (PN) formation was evaluated at 8, 12 and 18 h post-insemination (hpi). Based upon the pronuclei sizes and the distance between the two pronuclei, inseminated oocytes were classified in three PN stages. Differences between bulls were observed at each time point, but were more important at 12 hpi. At 8 and 12 hpi bull III showed a significantly faster PN evolution by comparison with the three other bulls (P<0.05), while at 18 hpi, the proportion of the three PN stages was similar to those of bulls I and IV, bull II being delayed. In a second experiment, the kinetics of in vitro embryo development was compared using time-lapse cinematography. The analysis of embryos reaching the blastocyst stage revealed significant differences in the mean time of first cleavage (range of 22.7-25.6h, P<0.05), while the lengths of the subsequent three cell cycles did not differ between bulls. The early mean time of first cleavage with bull III was associated with an early blastulation and a high blastocyst rate at Day 7, in opposition to what was observed with bull II showing a later timing of first cleavage (first cleavage 22.1 hpi versus 25.5 hpi; blastulation 140.4 hpi versus 152.5 hpi; D7 blastocyst rates: 31.3% versus 21.9%; P<0.05). In a third experiment, 65-76 Day 8 blastocysts per bull were sexed by PCR. Only blastocysts obtained with bull III showed a shift in sex ratio towards male embryos (76% male embryos; P<0.05). Such shift was already observed at the 2-cell and morula stages. In conclusion, the bull influences the kinetics of PN formation, of embryo development and the sex ratio of the embryos. Moreover, those parameters might be related. PMID:17629423

  19. Sexing young snowy owls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seidensticker, M.T.; Holt, D.W.; Detienne, J.; Talbot, S.; Gray, K.

    2011-01-01

    We predicted sex of 140 Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) nestlings out of 34 nests at our Barrow, Alaska, study area to develop a technique for sexing these owls in the field. We primarily sexed young, flightless owls (3844 d old) by quantifying plumage markings on the remiges and tail, predicting sex, and collecting blood samples to test our field predictions using molecular sexing techniques. We categorized and quantified three different plumage markings: two types of bars (defined as markings that touch the rachis) and spots (defined as markings that do not touch the rachis). We predicted sex in the field assuming that males had more spots than bars and females more bars than spots on the remiges and rectrices. Molecular data indicated that we correctly sexed 100% of the nestlings. We modeled the data using random forests and classification trees. Both models indicated that the number and type of markings on the secondary feathers were the most important in classifying nestling sex. The statistical models verified our initial qualitative prediction that males have more spots than bars and females more bars than spots on flight feathers P6P10 for both wings and tail feathers T1 and T2. This study provides researchers with an easily replicable and highly accurate method for sexing young Snowy Owls in the field, which should aid further studies of sex-ratios and sex-related variation in behavior and growth of this circumpolar owl species. ?? 2011 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  20. Putting prevention in their pockets: developing mobile phone-based HIV interventions for black men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Muessig, Kathryn E; Pike, Emily C; Fowler, Beth; LeGrand, Sara; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Bull, Sheana S; Wilson, Patrick A; Wohl, David A; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B

    2013-04-01

    Young black men who have sex with men (MSM) bear a disproportionate burden of HIV. Rapid expansion of mobile technologies, including smartphone applications (apps), provides a unique opportunity for outreach and tailored health messaging. We collected electronic daily journals and conducted surveys and focus groups with 22 black MSM (age 18-30) at three sites in North Carolina to inform the development of a mobile phone-based intervention. Qualitative data was analyzed thematically using NVivo. Half of the sample earned under $11,000 annually. All participants owned smartphones and had unlimited texting and many had unlimited data plans. Phones were integral to participants' lives and were a primary means of Internet access. Communication was primarily through text messaging and Internet (on-line chatting, social networking sites) rather than calls. Apps were used daily for entertainment, information, productivity, and social networking. Half of participants used their phones to find sex partners; over half used phones to find health information. For an HIV-related app, participants requested user-friendly content about test site locators, sexually transmitted diseases, symptom evaluation, drug and alcohol risk, safe sex, sexuality and relationships, gay-friendly health providers, and connection to other gay/HIV-positive men. For young black MSM in this qualitative study, mobile technologies were a widely used, acceptable means for HIV intervention. Future research is needed to measure patterns and preferences of mobile technology use among broader samples. PMID:23565925

  1. Sex and the preimplantation embryo: implications of sexual dimorphism in the preimplantation period for maternal programming of embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Peter J; Dobbs, Kyle B; Denicol, Anna C; Siqueira, Luiz G B

    2016-01-01

    The developmental program of the embryo displays a plasticity that can result in long-acting effects that extend into postnatal life. In mammals, adult phenotype can be altered by changes in the maternal environment during the preimplantation period. One characteristic of developmental programming during this time is that the change in adult phenotype is often different for female offspring than for male offspring. In this paper, we propose the hypothesis that sexual dimorphism in preimplantation programming is mediated, at least in part, by sex-specific responses of embryos to maternal regulatory molecules whose secretion is dependent on the maternal environment. The strongest evidence for this idea comes from the study of colony-stimulating factor 2 (CSF2). Expression of CSF2 from the oviduct and endometrium is modified by environmental factors of the mother, in particular seminal plasma and obesity. Additionally, CSF2 alters several properties of the preimplantation embryo and has been shown to alleviate negative consequences of culture of mouse embryos on postnatal phenotype in a sex-dependent manner. In cattle, exposure of preimplantation bovine embryos to CSF2 causes sex-specific changes in gene expression, interferon-? secretion and DNA methylation later in pregnancy (day 15 of gestation). It is likely that several embryokines can alter postnatal phenotype through actions directed towards the preimplantation embryo. Identification of these molecules and elucidation of the mechanisms by which sexually-disparate programming is established will lead to new insights into the control and manipulation of embryonic development. PMID:26391275

  2. Putting Prevention in Their Pockets: Developing Mobile Phone-Based HIV Interventions for Black Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Emily C.; Fowler, Beth; LeGrand, Sara; Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Bull, Sheana S.; Wilson, Patrick A.; Wohl, David A.; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Young black men who have sex with men (MSM) bear a disproportionate burden of HIV. Rapid expansion of mobile technologies, including smartphone applications (apps), provides a unique opportunity for outreach and tailored health messaging. We collected electronic daily journals and conducted surveys and focus groups with 22 black MSM (age 18–30) at three sites in North Carolina to inform the development of a mobile phone-based intervention. Qualitative data was analyzed thematically using NVivo. Half of the sample earned under $11,000 annually. All participants owned smartphones and had unlimited texting and many had unlimited data plans. Phones were integral to participants' lives and were a primary means of Internet access. Communication was primarily through text messaging and Internet (on-line chatting, social networking sites) rather than calls. Apps were used daily for entertainment, information, productivity, and social networking. Half of participants used their phones to find sex partners; over half used phones to find health information. For an HIV-related app, participants requested user-friendly content about test site locators, sexually transmitted diseases, symptom evaluation, drug and alcohol risk, safe sex, sexuality and relationships, gay-friendly health providers, and connection to other gay/HIV-positive men. For young black MSM in this qualitative study, mobile technologies were a widely used, acceptable means for HIV intervention. Future research is needed to measure patterns and preferences of mobile technology use among broader samples. PMID:23565925

  3. [An epidemiologic study of health care seeking behavior of children under 5 years of age by sex in developing countries].

    PubMed

    Tursz, A; Crost, M

    1999-10-01

    Since the end of the 1970's, excess mortality among girls, from the end of the neonatal period until the age of 4 years, has been observed in some South Asian countries. Explanatory hypotheses for this situation have in fact noted differences by sex in food allocation and in care during illness. In some North African and sub-Saharan countries in Africa, mortality data suggest the same type of phenomenon, but less reliable statistics and a lack of data analysis by sex on use of health services does not really allow clarification of the problem. The objective of this study was to analyse health seeking behaviour by sex and to identify explanatory factors for any differences found. A cross sectional study of 1560 consultations of under-5 children was carried out in 6 university and regional hospitals in 3 African countries: Algeria (the zones of Aïn Taya and Tigzirt); Togo (the zones of Lomé, Atakpamé and Kara) and the Congo (Brazzaville). Results confirm the existence of discrimination against girls. In ways which vary according to zones, and in comparison to boys, observations of girls show: under-representation among outpatients (29% in Tigzirt, 40% in Kara), especially when they have many siblings, of which some are sisters; longer duration of the development of symptoms before first resort (leading to increased severity of symptoms); less investment in health care; detrimental feeding practices. Higher SES of the father plays a favourable role, especially for girls, and children of both sexes benefit when the mother has a good educational level. The large regional differences demonstrate the complex interaction among explanatory factors: rurality, problems of access to the hospital, low economic level, low social status of women. This research opens the way so that, in Africa, research will no longer be carried out on health seeking behaviour and utilisation of health services without examining separately the situation of boys and girls, and analysing the possible causes of any differences. PMID:10575716

  4. The use of a novel combination of diagnostic molecular and cytogenetic approaches in horses with sexual karyotype abnormalities: a rare case with an abnormal cellular chimerism.

    PubMed

    Demyda-Peyrás, S; Anaya, G; Bugno-Poniewierska, M; Pawlina, K; Membrillo, A; Valera, M; Moreno-Millán, M

    2014-05-01

    Sex chromosome aberrations are known to cause congenital abnormalities and unexplained infertility in horses. Most of these anomalies remain undiagnosed because of the complexity of the horse karyotype and the lack of specialized laboratories that can perform such diagnoses. On the other hand, the utilization of microsatellite markers is a technique widely spread in horse breeding, mostly because of their usage in parentage tests. We studied the usage of a novel combination of diagnostic approaches in the evaluation of a very uncommon case of chromosomal abnormalities in a Spanish purebred colt, primarily detected using a commercial panel of short tandem repeat (STR) makers. Based on these results, we performed a full cytogenetic analysis using conventional and fluorescent in situ hybridization techniques with individual Equus caballus chromosome X and Equus caballus chromosome Y painting probes. We also tested the presence of two genes associated with the sexual development in horses and an extra novel panel of eight microsatellite markers specifically located in the sex chromosome pair. This is the first case report of a leukocyte chimerism between chromosomally normal (64,XY) and abnormal (63,X0) cell lines in horses. Our results indicate that the use of the short tandem repeat markers as a screening technique and as a confirmation utilizing cytogenetic techniques can be used as a very interesting, easy, and nonexpensive diagnostic approach to detect chromosomal abnormalities in the domestic horse. PMID:24612694

  5. Adult romantic relationships as contexts of human development: a multimethod comparison of same-sex couples with opposite-sex dating, engaged, and married dyads.

    PubMed

    Roisman, Glenn I; Clausell, Eric; Holland, Ashley; Fortuna, Keren; Elieff, Chryle

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a multimethod, multi-informant comparison of community samples of committed gay male (n=30) and lesbian (n=30) couples with both committed (n=50 young engaged and n=40 older married) and noncommitted (n=109 exclusively dating) heterosexual pairs. Specifically, in this study the quality of same- and opposite-sex relationships was examined at multiple levels of analysis via self-reports and partner reports, laboratory observations, and measures of physiological reactivity during dyadic interactions. Additionally, individuals in same-sex, engaged, and marital relationships were compared with one another on adult attachment security as assessed through the coherence of participants' narratives about their childhood experiences. Results indicated that individuals in committed same-sex relationships were generally not distinguishable from their committed heterosexual counterparts, with one exception--lesbians were especially effective at working together harmoniously in laboratory observations. PMID:18194008

  6. Otoacoustic Emissions, Auditory Evoked Potentials and Self-Reported Gender in People Affected by Disorders of Sex Development (DSD)

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Amy B.; Espinoza-Varas, Blas; Aston, Christopher E.; Edmundson, Shelagh; Champlin, Craig A.; Pasanen, Edward G.; McFadden, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Both otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) and auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) are sexually dimorphic, and both are believed to be influenced by prenatal androgen exposure. OAEs and AEPs were collected from people affected by 1 of 3 categories of disorders of sex development (DSD) – (1) women with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS); (2) women with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH); and (3) individuals with 46, XY DSD including prenatal androgen exposure who developed a male gender despite initial rearing as females (men with DSD). Gender identity (GI) and role (GR) were measured both retrospectively and at the time of study participation, using standardized questionnaires. The main objective of this study was to determine if patterns of OAEs and AEPs correlate with gender in people affected by DSD and in controls. A second objective was to assess if OAE and AEP patterns differed according to degrees of prenatal androgen exposure across groups. Control males, men with DSD, and women with CAH produced fewer spontaneous OAEs (SOAEs) – the male-typical pattern – than control females and women with CAIS. Additionally, the number of SOAEs produced correlated with gender development across all groups tested. Although some sex differences in AEPs were observed between control males and females, AEP measures did not correlate with gender development, nor did they vary according to degrees of prenatal androgen exposure, among people with DSD. Thus, OAEs, but not AEPs, may prove useful as bioassays for assessing early brain exposure to androgens and predicting gender development in people with DSD. PMID:25038289

  7. Otoacoustic emissions, auditory evoked potentials and self-reported gender in people affected by disorders of sex development (DSD).

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Amy B; Espinoza-Varas, Blas; Aston, Christopher E; Edmundson, Shelagh; Champlin, Craig A; Pasanen, Edward G; McFadden, Dennis

    2014-08-01

    Both otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) and auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) are sexually dimorphic, and both are believed to be influenced by prenatal androgen exposure. OAEs and AEPs were collected from people affected by 1 of 3 categories of disorders of sex development (DSD) - (1) women with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS); (2) women with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH); and (3) individuals with 46,XY DSD including prenatal androgen exposure who developed a male gender despite initial rearing as females (men with DSD). Gender identity (GI) and role (GR) were measured both retrospectively and at the time of study participation, using standardized questionnaires. The main objective of this study was to determine if patterns of OAEs and AEPs correlate with gender in people affected by DSD and in controls. A second objective was to assess if OAE and AEP patterns differed according to degrees of prenatal androgen exposure across groups. Control males, men with DSD, and women with CAH produced fewer spontaneous OAEs (SOAEs) - the male-typical pattern - than control females and women with CAIS. Additionally, the number of SOAEs produced correlated with gender development across all groups tested. Although some sex differences in AEPs were observed between control males and females, AEP measures did not correlate with gender development, nor did they vary according to degrees of prenatal androgen exposure, among people with DSD. Thus, OAEs, but not AEPs, may prove useful as bioassays for assessing early brain exposure to androgens and predicting gender development in people with DSD. PMID:25038289

  8. Maternal diabetes causes abnormal dynamic changes of endoplasmic reticulum during mouse oocyte maturation and early embryo development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The adverse effects of maternal diabetes on oocyte maturation and embryo development have been reported. Methods In this study, we used time-lapse live cell imaging confocal microscopy to investigate the dynamic changes of ER and the effects of diabetes on the ER’s structural dynamics during oocyte maturation, fertilization and early embryo development. Results We report that the ER first became remodeled into a dense ring around the developing MI spindle, and then surrounded the spindle during migration to the cortex. ER reorganization during mouse early embryo development was characterized by striking localization around the pronuclei in the equatorial section, in addition to larger areas of fluorescence deeper within the cytoplasm. In contrast, in diabetic mice, the ER displayed a significantly higher percentage of homogeneous distribution patterns throughout the entire ooplasm during oocyte maturation and early embryo development. In addition, a higher frequency of large ER aggregations was detected in GV oocytes and two cell embryos from diabetic mice. Conclusions These results suggest that the diabetic condition adversely affects the ER distribution pattern during mouse oocyte maturation and early embryo development. PMID:23597066

  9. Abnormal anal cytology risk in women with known genital squamous intraepithelial lesion.

    PubMed

    do Socorro Nobre, Maria; Jacyntho, Claudia Marcia; Eleutério, José; Giraldo, Paulo César; Gonçalves, Ana Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the risk of abnormal anal cytology in women with known genital squamous intraepithelial lesion. This study evaluated 200 women with and without genital squamous intraepithelial lesion who were recruited for anal Pap smears. Women who had abnormal results on equally or over atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance were classified as having abnormal anal cytology. A multiple logistic regression analysis (stepwise) was performed to identify the risk for developing abnormal anal cytology. Data were analyzed using the SPSS 20.0 program. The average age was 41.09 (±12.64). Of the total participants, 75.5% did not practice anal sex, 91% did not have HPV-infected partners, 92% did not have any anal pathology, and 68.5% did not have anal bleeding. More than half (57.5%) had genital SIL and a significant number developed abnormal anal cytology: 13% in the total sample and 17.4% in women with genital SIL. A significant association was observed between genital squamous intraepithelial lesion and anal squamous intraepithelial lesion (PR=2.46; p=0.03). In the logistic regression model, women having genital intraepithelial lesion were more likely to have abnormal anal Pap smear (aPR=2.81; p=0.02). This report shows that women with genital squamous intraepithelial lesion must be more closely screened for anal cancer. PMID:27037113

  10. Emergence of sex differences in the development of substance use and abuse during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Cynthia

    2015-09-01

    Substance use and abuse begin during adolescence. Male and female adolescent humans initiate use at comparable rates, but males increase use faster. In adulthood, more men than women use and abuse addictive drugs. However, some women progress more rapidly from initiation of use to entry into treatment. In animal models, adolescent males and females consume addictive drugs similarly. However, reproductively mature females acquire self-administration faster, and in some models, escalate use more. Sex/gender differences exist in neurobiologic factors mediating both reinforcement (dopamine, opioids) and aversiveness (CRF, dynorphin), as well as intrinsic factors (personality, psychiatric co-morbidities) and extrinsic factors (history of abuse, environment especially peers and family) which influence the progression from initial use to abuse. Many of these important differences emerge during adolescence, and are moderated by sexual differentiation of the brain. Estradiol effects which enhance both dopaminergic and CRF-mediated processes contribute to the female vulnerability to substance use and abuse. Testosterone enhances impulsivity and sensation seeking in both males and females. Several protective factors in females also influence initiation and progression of substance use including hormonal changes of pregnancy as well as greater capacity for self-regulation and lower peak levels of impulsivity/sensation seeking. Same sex peers represent a risk factor more for males than females during adolescence, while romantic partners increase risk for women during this developmental epoch. In summary, biologic factors, psychiatric co-morbidities as well as personality and environment present sex/gender-specific risks as adolescents begin to initiate substance use. PMID:26049025

  11. Study on development of accessory sex glands in prepubertal kids using two-dimensional ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Sonu; Luthra, R. A.; Chandolia, R. K.; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Parveen; Devender; Kumar, Ankit; Bishnoi, Nidhi; Bishnoi, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The present study was undertaken to study growth pattern of accessory sex glands in prepubertal kids from 2 weeks to 6 months of age using two-dimensional ultrasonography. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on six Beetal kids. The scanning of accessory sex glands was done in standing position using rectal probe and measurements were recorded. Data collected were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Duncan multiple range test was performed using the SPSS (16.0) system for windows. Results: With the advancement of age all the dimensions of glands increased. Both the lobes of prostate gland showed an increase in width with advancement of age. Width of prostate above the urethra (W1) showed a significant increase at 2, 10, and 20 weeks of age, whereas non-significant increase from 2 to 8, 10 to 19, and 20 to 24 weeks of age was recorded. Width of prostate below the urethra (W2) showed a significant increase at 20 weeks of age, whereas non-significant increase was recorded during rest of period of growth. Left and right bulbourethral gland showed a similar pattern of growth with the advancement of age. The circumference dimensions increased significantly at 2, 16, 20, and 21 weeks of age for both glands. The increase was non-significant from 4 to 14, 16 to 19, and 20 to 23 weeks of age. The same pattern was observed for left and right seminal vesicular gland. Conclusion: Significant growth in three accessory sex glands in prepubertal kids was not observed at the same age. The trend observed was that the prostate was the first gland to show significant growth at 10 weeks of age followed by a significant increase in seminal vesicles and bulbourethral gland at 14 and 16 weeks of age, respectively. PMID:27182127

  12. Inactivation of ca10a and ca10b Genes Leads to Abnormal Embryonic Development and Alters Movement Pattern in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Aspatwar, Ashok; Barker, Harlan R.; Saralahti, Anni K.; Bäuerlein, Carina A.; Ortutay, Csaba; Pan, Peiwen; Kuuslahti, Marianne; Parikka, Mataleena; Rämet, Mika; Parkkila, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase related proteins (CARPs) X and XI are highly conserved across species and are predominantly expressed in neural tissues. The biological role of these proteins is still an enigma. Ray-finned fish have lost the CA11 gene, but instead possess two co-orthologs of CA10. We analyzed the expression pattern of zebrafish ca10a and ca10b genes during embryonic development and in different adult tissues, and studied 61 CARP X/XI-like sequences to evaluate their phylogenetic relationship. Sequence analysis of zebrafish ca10a and ca10b reveals strongly predicted signal peptides, N-glycosylation sites, and a potential disulfide, all of which are conserved, suggesting that all of CARP X and XI are secretory proteins and potentially dimeric. RT-qPCR showed that zebrafish ca10a and ca10b genes are expressed in the brain and several other tissues throughout the development of zebrafish. Antisense morpholino mediated knockdown of ca10a and ca10b showed developmental delay with a high rate of mortality in larvae. Zebrafish morphants showed curved body, pericardial edema, and abnormalities in the head and eye, and there was increased apoptotic cell death in the brain region. Swim pattern showed abnormal movement in morphant zebrafish larvae compared to the wild type larvae. The developmental phenotypes of the ca10a and ca10b morphants were confirmed by inactivating these genes with the CRISPR/Cas9 system. In conclusion, we introduce a novel zebrafish model to investigate the mechanisms of CARP Xa and CARP Xb functions. Our data indicate that CARP Xa and CARP Xb have important roles in zebrafish development and suppression of ca10a and ca10b expression in zebrafish larvae leads to a movement disorder. PMID:26218428

  13. Risk of developing multimorbidity across all ages in an historical cohort study: differences by sex and ethnicity

    PubMed Central

    St Sauver, Jennifer L; Boyd, Cynthia M; Grossardt, Brandon R; Bobo, William V; Finney Rutten, Lila J; Roger, Véronique L; Ebbert, Jon O; Therneau, Terry M; Yawn, Barbara P; Rocca, Walter A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the incidence of de novo multimorbidity across all ages in a geographically defined population with an emphasis on sex and ethnic differences. Design Historical cohort study. Setting All persons residing in Olmsted County, Minnesota, USA on 1 January 2000 who had granted permission for their records to be used for research (n=123 716). Participants We used the Rochester Epidemiology Project medical records-linkage system to identify all of the county residents. We identified and removed from the cohort all persons who had developed multimorbidity before 1 January 2000 (baseline date), and we followed the cohort over 14 years (1 January 2000 through 31 December 2013). Main outcome measures Incident multimorbidity was defined as the development of the second of 2 conditions (dyads) from among the 20 chronic conditions selected by the US Department of Health and Human Services. We also studied the incidence of the third of 3 conditions (triads) from among the 20 chronic conditions. Results The incidence of multimorbidity increased steeply with older age; however, the number of people with incident multimorbidity was substantially greater in people younger than 65 years compared to people age 65 years or older (28 378 vs 6214). The overall risk was similar in men and women; however, the combinations of conditions (dyads and triads) differed extensively by age and by sex. Compared to Whites, the incidence of multimorbidity was higher in Blacks and lower in Asians. Conclusions The risk of developing de novo multimorbidity increases steeply with older age, varies by ethnicity and is similar in men and women overall. However, as expected, the combinations of conditions vary extensively by age and sex. These data represent an important first step toward identifying the causes and the consequences of multimorbidity. PMID:25649210

  14. The Role of Chronic Hypoxia in the Development of Neurocognitive Abnormalities in Preterm Infants with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raman, Lakshmi; Georgieff, Michael K.; Rao, Raghavendra

    2006-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia is the most common pulmonary morbidity in preterm infants and is associated with chronic hypoxia. Animal studies have demonstrated structural, neurochemical and functional alterations due to chronic hypoxia in the developing brain. Long-term impairments in visual-motor, gross and fine motor, articulation, reading,

  15. Abnormal Mammary Gland Development and Growth Retardation in Female Mice and MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells Lacking Androgen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Shuyuan; Hu, Yueh-Chiang; Wang, Peng-Hui; Xie, Chao; Xu, Qingquan; Tsai, Meng-Yin; Dong, Zhihong; Wang, Ruey-Sheng; Lee, Ting-Hein; Chang, Chawnshang

    2003-01-01

    Phenotype analysis of female mice lacking androgen receptor (AR) deficient (AR−/−) indicates that the development of mammary glands is retarded with reduced ductal branching in the prepubertal stages, and fewer Cap cells in the terminal end buds, as well as decreased lobuloalveolar development in adult females, and fewer milk-producing alveoli in the lactating glands. The defective development of AR−/− mammary glands involves the defects of insulin-like growth factor I–insulin-like growth factor I receptor and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signals as well as estrogen receptor (ER) activity. Similar growth retardation and defects in growth factor–mediated Ras/Raf/MAPK cascade and ER signaling are also found in AR−/− MCF7 breast cancer cells. The restoration assays show that AR NH2-terminal/DNA-binding domain, but not the ligand-binding domain, is essential for normal MAPK function in MCF7 cells, and an AR mutant (R608K), found in male breast cancer, is associated with the excessive activation of MAPK. Together, our data provide the first in vivo evidence showing that AR-mediated MAPK and ER activation may play important roles for mammary gland development and MCF7 breast cancer cell proliferation. PMID:14676301

  16. The Role of Chronic Hypoxia in the Development of Neurocognitive Abnormalities in Preterm Infants with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raman, Lakshmi; Georgieff, Michael K.; Rao, Raghavendra

    2006-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia is the most common pulmonary morbidity in preterm infants and is associated with chronic hypoxia. Animal studies have demonstrated structural, neurochemical and functional alterations due to chronic hypoxia in the developing brain. Long-term impairments in visual-motor, gross and fine motor, articulation, reading,…

  17. Adult Romantic Relationships as Contexts of Human Development: A Multimethod Comparison of Same-Sex Couples with Opposite-Sex Dating, Engaged, and Married Dyads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roisman, Glenn I.; Clausell, Eric; Holland, Ashley; Fortuna, Keren; Elieff, Chryle

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a multimethod, multi-informant comparison of community samples of committed gay male (n=30) and lesbian (n=30) couples with both committed (n=50 young engaged and n=40 older married) and noncommitted (n=109 exclusively dating) heterosexual pairs. Specifically, in this study the quality of same- and opposite-sex relationships…

  18. Androgen and the Development of Human Sex-Typical Behavior: Rough-and-Tumble Play and Sex of Preferred Playmates in Children with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Melissa; Kaufman, Francine R.

    1994-01-01

    Examined the rough-and-tumble play and gender of preferred playmates in three- to eight-year olds with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH)--hypothesized to masculinize behaviors that show sex differences--and in unaffected three- to eight-year-old relatives. Found that CAH girls did not exhibit increased levels of masculine behavior when compared…

  19. Adult Romantic Relationships as Contexts of Human Development: A Multimethod Comparison of Same-Sex Couples with Opposite-Sex Dating, Engaged, and Married Dyads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roisman, Glenn I.; Clausell, Eric; Holland, Ashley; Fortuna, Keren; Elieff, Chryle

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a multimethod, multi-informant comparison of community samples of committed gay male (n=30) and lesbian (n=30) couples with both committed (n=50 young engaged and n=40 older married) and noncommitted (n=109 exclusively dating) heterosexual pairs. Specifically, in this study the quality of same- and opposite-sex relationships

  20. The unintended consequences of sex education: an ethnography of a development intervention in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erica; Edmonds, Alexander; Ballesteros, Marco; Encalada Soto, Diana; Rodriguez, Octavio

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an ethnography of a four-year, multi-disciplinary adolescent sexual and reproductive health intervention in Bolivia, Nicaragua and Ecuador. An important goal of the intervention – and of the larger global field of adolescent sexual and reproductive health – is to create more open parent-to-teen communication. This paper analyzes the project's efforts to foster such communication and how social actors variously interpreted, responded to, and repurposed the intervention's language and practices. While the intervention emphasized the goal of ‘open communication,’ its participants more often used the term ‘confianza’ (trust). This norm was defined in ways that might – or might not – include revealing information about sexual activity. Questioning public health assumptions about parent–teen communication on sex, in and of itself, is key to healthy sexual behavior, the paper explores a pragmatics of communication on sex that includes silence, implied expectations, gendered conflicts, and temporally delayed knowledge. PMID:25175294

  1. A new computer-tomography-based method of sex estimation: Development of Turkish population-specific standards.

    PubMed

    Gulhan, Oznur; Harrison, Karl; Kiris, Adem

    2015-10-01

    The identification of victims involved in mass fatality incidents has become an increasingly important issue nowadays, and identification of unknown individuals is an important aspect in criminal cases and Disaster Victim Identification scenarios. Therefore, the sex estimation is one of the most important biological attributes towards establishing personal identity. In addition, several studies have demonstrated that metric sex determination methods of the skeleton are population-specific due to variation in size and patterns of sexual dimorphism. Unfortunately, the modern Turkish population still lacks wide and representative population standards for identification. Previous research has shown that modern technologies, such as CT scanning appear to offer promising means for the establishment of new standards for contemporary populations. The main aim of this project is to examine the application of measurements taken from the femur in order to assess sex, as well as to contribute to the establishment of discriminant function equations for the Turkish population for forensic applications. The sample population was composed of CT images taken from 200 adult hospital patients. The images of the femora were segmented from the surrounding bones to ensure correct usage of landmarks as accurately as possible. The 3D reconstructions were then created using the volume-rendering function in OsiriX (v.5.6.). Thirteen measurements were acquired using a 3D viewer and were located and marked on each of the CT reconstructed femora. Thirteen anthropometric parameters were measured and analysed by basic descriptive statistics and discriminant analysis methods using the SPSS 21.0 software package. The intra-observer variation was assessed by obtaining the inter-cross correlation coefficient in order to evaluate the accuracy of the linear measurements taken. The accuracy of sex prediction ranged from 63.5 to 88% with single variables. In stepwise analysis, Epicondylar Breadth, Femur Vertical Diameter of Neck and Medial Lateral Subtrochanteric Diameter were found to be the most discriminating variables providing an accuracy of 91%. Ultimately, it is envisaged that this research study will produce data and interpretations that will inform on and improve standards of sex estimation from postcranial osteometric landmarks. Additionally, this research will consider how this data provides value for a developing discipline of forensic anthropology and how it integrates within the existing systems of criminal investigation and Disaster Victim Identification practices in Turkey. PMID:26250530

  2. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  3. Abnormal hair follicle development and altered cell fate of follicular keratinocytes in transgenic mice expressing ?Np63?

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Rose-Anne; Smalley, Kirsten; Liu, Song; Sinha, Satrajit

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor p63 plays an essential role in epidermal morphogenesis. Animals lacking p63 fail to form many ectodermal organs, including the skin and hair follicles. Although the indispensable role of p63 in stratified epithelial skin development is well established, relatively little is known about this transcriptional regulator in directing hair follicle morphogenesis. Here, using specific antibodies, we have established the expression pattern of ?Np63 in hair follicle development and cycling. ?Np63 is expressed in the developing hair placode, whereas in mature hair its expression is restricted to the outer root sheath (ORS), matrix cells and to the stem cells of the hair follicle bulge. To investigate the role of ?Np63 in hair follicle morphogenesis and cycling, we have utilized a Tet-inducible mouse model system with targeted expression of this isoform to the ORS of the hair follicle. ?Np63 transgenic animals display dramatic defects in hair follicle development and cycling, eventually leading to severe hair loss. Strikingly, expression of ?Np63 leads to a switch in cell fate of hair follicle keratinocytes, causing them to adopt an interfollicular epidermal (IFE) cell identity. Moreover, ?Np63 transgenic animals exhibit a depleted hair follicle stem-cell niche, which further contributes to the overall cycling defects observed in the mutant animals. Finally, global transcriptome analysis of transgenic skin identified altered expression levels of crucial mediators of hair morphogenesis, including key members of the Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway, which, in part, account for these effects. Our data provide evidence supporting a role for ?Np63? in actively suppressing hair follicle differentiation and directing IFE cell lineage commitment. PMID:20335364

  4. Identification of nickel response genes in abnormal early developments of sea urchin by differential display polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Tae Kwon; Lee, Gunsup; Rhee, Yong; Park, Heung-Sik; Chang, Man; Lee, Sukchan; Lee, Jaean; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2012-10-01

    Bioassays and biomarkers have been previously developed to assess the effects of heavy metal contaminants on the early life stages of the sea urchin. In this study, malformation in the early developmental processes was observed in sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus intermedius) larvae exposed to 10 ppm Ni for over 30 h. The most critical stage at which the triggering of nickel effects takes place is thought to be the blastula stage, which occurs after fertilization in larval development. To investigate the molecular-level responses of sea urchin exposed to heavy metal stress and to explore the differentially expressed genes that are induced or repressed by nickel, differential display polymerase chain reaction (DD-PCR) was used with sea urchin mRNAs. The malformation-related genes expressed in the early life stages of the sea urchin were cloned from larvae exposed to 10 ppm of nickel for 15 h, and accessed via DD-PCR. Sequence analysis results revealed that each of the genes evidenced high homology with EGF2, PCSK9, serine/threonine protein kinase, apolipophorin precursor protein, and MGC80921 protein/transcript variant 2. This result may prove useful in the development of novel biomarkers for the assessment of heavy metal stresses on sea urchin embryos. PMID:22809708

  5. Sex hormone exposure during pregnancy and malformations.

    PubMed

    Briggs, M H; Briggs, M

    1979-01-01

    This general review of the effects of exposure to sex hormones during pregnancy and subsequent fetal malformation presents summaries of animal studies, develops the data indicating virilization and feminization in humans, documents chromosome abnormalities, and presents data on the connection of steroid exposure in utero and somatic malformations. Fetal exposure can occur 3 different ways, through hormonal pregnancy test, via obstetrical use of hormones, or because of continued maternal use of oral contraceptives after conception. In the latter case, an ongoing prospective study indicates that accidental ingestion of oral contraceptives after conception is not harmful to the fetus if taken during early pregnancy. Tables present summaries of numerous large surveys and retrospective studies linking particular sex hormones (exogenous) to particular fetal malformations including neural tube defects and other constellations of developmental problems. The question of exogenous hormone effects on the personality of infants who were exposed in utero is addressed. PMID:400321

  6. Neurological Soft Signs Predict Abnormal Cerebellar-Thalamic Tract Development and Negative Symptoms in Adolescents at High Risk for Psychosis: A Longitudinal Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Vijay A.; Dean, Derek J.; Bernard, Jessica A.; Orr, Joseph M.; Pelletier-Baldelli, Andrea; Carol, Emily E.; Gupta, Tina; Turner, Jessica; Leopold, Daniel R.; Robustelli, Briana L.; Millman, Zachary B.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: There is an emerging consensus that neurological soft signs (NSS) may not be “soft” at all but rather may reflect neuropathy, particularly in the cerebellum and thalamus. However, our understanding of connective tract abnormalities is limited, and to date, there have been no investigations examining NSS and longitudinal white matter development during the prodrome. Mapping the correlates of NSS in ultrahigh-risk (UHR) youth offers potential for highlighting a viable biomarker as well as for advancing understanding of pathogenic processes during the adolescent risk period. Methods: A total of 68 (33 UHR and 35 healthy control) adolescents were assessed with an NSS inventory, structured interviews, and diffusion tensor imaging. Fractional anisotropy (FA) of theoretically relevant cerebellar-thalamic tracts was calculated (left/right superior cerebellar peduncles [SCPs]). Twelve months later, a subset of 30 (15 UHR and 15 control) participants returned for follow-up diffusion tension imaging/clinical assessments. Results: UHR youth exhibited elevated NSS across domains. While there were no group differences in the integrity of the SCPs at baseline, controls showed a normative increase while the UHR group showed a decrease in FA over 12 months. NSS predicted a longitudinal decrease in cerebellar-thalamic FA and elevations in negative but not positive symptoms 12 months later. Discussion: Findings of abnormal white matter development provide direct empirical evidence to support prominent neurodevelopmental theories. The predictive relationships between NSS and longitudinal cerebellar-thalamic tract integrity and negative symptom course provide insight into the role of cognitive dysmetria in the high-risk period and inform on a unique biomarker tied to core features underlying psychosis. PMID:24375457

  7. Ectopic expression of nolz-1 in neural progenitors promotes cell cycle exit/premature neuronal differentiation accompanying with abnormal apoptosis in the developing mouse telencephalon.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sunny Li-Yun; Chen, Shih-Yun; Huang, Huai-Huei; Ko, Hsin-An; Liu, Pei-Tsen; Liu, Ya-Chi; Chen, Ping-Hau; Liu, Fu-Chin

    2013-01-01

    Nolz-1, as a murine member of the NET zinc-finger protein family, is expressed in post-mitotic differentiating neurons of striatum during development. To explore the function of Nolz-1 in regulating the neurogenesis of forebrain, we studied the effects of ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors. We generated the Cre-loxP dependent conditional transgenic mice in which Nolz-1 was ectopically expressed in proliferative neural progenitors. Ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors by intercrossing the Nolz-1 conditional transgenic mice with the nestin-Cre mice resulted in hypoplasia of telencephalon in double transgenic mice. Decreased proliferation of neural progenitor cells were found in the telencephalon, as evidenced by the reduction of BrdU-, Ki67- and phospho-histone 3-positive cells in E11.5-12.5 germinal zone of telencephalon. Transgenic Nolz-1 also promoted cell cycle exit and as a consequence might facilitate premature differentiation of progenitors, because TuJ1-positive neurons were ectopically found in the ventricular zone and there was a general increase of TuJ1 immunoreactivity in the telencephalon. Moreover, clusters of strong TuJ1-expressing neurons were present in E12.5 germinal zone. Some of these strong TuJ1-positive clusters, however, contained apoptotic condensed DNA, suggesting that inappropriate premature differentiation may lead to abnormal apoptosis in some progenitor cells. Consistent with the transgenic mouse analysis in vivo, similar effects of Nozl-1 over-expression in induction of apoptosis, inhibition of cell proliferation and promotion of neuronal differentiation were also observed in three different N18, ST14A and N2A neural cell lines in vitro. Taken together, our study indicates that ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors promotes cell cycle exit/premature neuronal differentiation and induces abnormal apoptosis in the developing telencephalon. PMID:24073229

  8. Forebrain-Specific CRF Overproduction During Development is Sufficient to Induce Enduring Anxiety and Startle Abnormalities in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Mate; Gresack, Jodi E; Bangasser, Debra A; Plona, Zach; Valentino, Rita J; Flandreau, Elizabeth I; Mansuy, Isabelle M; Merlo-Pich, Emilio; Geyer, Mark A; Risbrough, Victoria B

    2014-01-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) regulates physiological and behavioral responses to stress. Trauma in early life or adulthood is associated with increased CRF in the cerebrospinal fluid and heightened anxiety. Genetic variance in CRF receptors is linked to altered risk for stress disorders. Thus, both heritable differences and environmentally induced changes in CRF neurotransmission across the lifespan may modulate anxiety traits. To test the hypothesis that CRF hypersignaling is sufficient to modify anxiety-related phenotypes (avoidance, startle, and conditioned fear), we induced transient forebrain-specific overexpression of CRF (CRFOE) in mice (1) during development to model early-life stress, (2) in adulthood to model adult-onset stress, or (3) across the entire postnatal lifespan to model heritable increases in CRF signaling. The consequences of these manipulations on CRF peptide levels and behavioral responses were examined in adulthood. We found that transient CRFOE during development decreased startle habituation and prepulse inhibition, and increased avoidance (particularly in females) recapitulating the behavioral effects of lifetime CRFOE despite lower CRF peptide levels at testing. In contrast, CRFOE limited to adulthood reduced contextual fear learning in females and increased startle reactivity in males but did not change avoidance or startle plasticity. These findings suggest that forebrain CRFOE limited to development is sufficient to induce enduring alterations in startle plasticity and anxiety, while forebrain CRFOE during adulthood results in a different phenotype profile. These findings suggest that startle circuits are particularly sensitive to forebrain CRFOE, and that the impact of CRFOE may be dependent on the time of exposure. PMID:24326400

  9. Abnormalities of Endocytosis, Phagocytosis, and Development Process in Dictyostelium Cells That Over-Express Acanthamoeba castellanii Metacaspase Protein

    PubMed Central

    SAHEB, Entsar; TRZYNA, Wendy; MARINGER, Katherine; BUSH, John

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acanthamoeba castellanii forms a resistant cyst that protects the parasite against the host’s immune response. Acanthamoeba Type-I metacaspase (Acmcp) is a caspase-like protein that has been found to be expressed during the encystations. Dictyostelium discoideum is an organism closely related to Acanthamoeba useful for studying the molecular function of this protozoan caspase-like protein. Methods: The full length of Acmcp and a mutated version of the same gene, which lacks the proline rich N-terminal region (Acmcp-dpr), were cloned into the pDneo2a-GFP vector separately. The pDneo2a-GFP-Acmcp and pDneo2a-GFPAcmcp-dpr were electro-transfected into wild type D. discoideum cells to create cell lines that over-expressed Acmcp or Acmcp-dpr. Results: Both cell lines that over-expressed Acmcp and Acmcp-dpr showed a significant increase in the fluid phase internalization and phagocytosis rate compared to the control cells. Additionally, the cells expressing the Acmcp-dpr mutant were unable to initiate early development and failed to aggregate or form fruiting bodies under starvation conditions, whereas Acmcp over-expressing cells showed the opposite phenomena. Quantitative cell death analysis provided additional support for these findings. Conclusion: Acmcp is involved in the processes of endocytosis and phagocytosis. In addition, the proline rich region in Acmcp is important for cellular development in Dictyostelium. Given its important role in the development process, metacaspase protein is proposed as a candidate drug target against infections caused by A. castellanii. PMID:26246819

  10. Sex Modifies the APOE-Related Risk of Developing Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Andre; Tian, Lu; Henderson, Victor W; Greicius, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Objective The APOE4 allele is the strongest genetic risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Case-control studies suggest the APOE4 link to AD is stronger in women. We examined the APOE4-by-sex interaction in conversion risk (from healthy aging to mild cognitive impairment (MCI)/AD or from MCI to AD) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker levels. Methods Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to compute hazards ratios (HR) for an APOE-by-sex interaction on conversion in controls (N=5,496) and MCI patients (N=2,588). The interaction was also tested in CSF biomarker levels of 980 subjects from the AD Neuroimaging Initiative. Results Among controls, male and female carriers were more likely to convert to MCI/AD, but the effect was stronger in women (HR=1.81 women; HR=1.27 men; interaction P=0.0106). The interaction remained significant in a pre-defined sub-analysis restricted to APOE3/3 and APOE3/4 genotypes. Among MCI patients, male and female carriers were more likely to convert to AD (HR=2.16 women; HR=1.64 men). The effect was nominally stronger in women, but the interaction was not significant (P=0.136). In the sub-analysis restricted to APOE3/3 and APOE 3/4 genotypes, the interaction was significant (P= 0.022; HR=2.17 women; HR=1.51 men). The APOE4-by-sex interaction on biomarker levels was significant for MCI patients in total-tau and the tau-to-Abeta-ratio (P=0.0088 and P=0.020, respectively; more AD-like in women). Interpretation APOE4 confers greater AD risk in women. Biomarker results suggest that increased APOE-related risk in women may be associated with tau pathology. These findings have important clinical implications and suggest novel research approaches into AD pathogenesis. PMID:24623176

  11. Abnormal differentiation of dopaminergic neurons in zebrafish trpm7 mutant larvae impairs development of the motor pattern

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Amanda R.; McNeill, Matthew S.; Lambert, Aaron M.; Overton, Jeffrey D.; Chen, Yu-Chia; Lorca, Ramón A.; Johnson, Nicolas A.; Brockerhoff, Susan E.; Mohapatra, Durga P.; MacArthur, Heather; Panula, Pertti; Masino, Mark A.; Runnels, Loren W.; Cornell, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential, melastatin-like 7 (Trpm7) is a combined ion channel and kinase implicated in the differentiation or function of many cell types. Early lethality in mice and frogs depleted of the corresponding gene impedes investigation of the functions of this protein particularly during later stages of development. By contrast, zebrafish trpm7 mutant larvae undergo early morphogenesis normally and thus do not have this limitation. The mutant larvae are characterized by multiple defects including melanocyte cell death, transient paralysis, and an ion imbalance that leads to the development of kidney stones. Here we report a requirement for Trpm7 in differentiation or function of dopaminergic neurons in vivo. First, trpm7 mutant larvae are hypomotile and fail to make a dopamine-dependent developmental transition in swim-bout length. Both of these deficits are partially rescued by the application of levodopa or dopamine. Second, histological analysis reveals that in trpm7 mutants a significant fraction of dopaminergic neurons lack expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. Third, trpm7 mutants are unusually sensitive to the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, an oxidative stressor, and their motility is partially rescued by application of the iron chelator deferoxamine, an anti-oxidant. Finally, in SH-SY5Y cells, which model aspects of human dopaminergic neurons, forced expression of a channel-dead variant of TRPM7 causes cell death. In summary, a forward genetic screen in zebrafish has revealed that both melanocytes and dopaminergic neurons depend on the ion channel Trpm7. The mechanistic underpinning of this dependence requires further investigation. PMID:24291744

  12. Abnormal pituitary development and function in three siblings of a Jamaican family: A new syndrome involving the Pit-1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J.C.; Schiavi, A.; Parks, J.

    1994-09-01

    In 1967 Mckusick et al. reported three siblings in Canada who had combine pituitary hormone deficiencies (CPHD). Since that report there have been several families with multiple affected members who share the common characteristics of autosomal recessive inheritance and clinical expression of pituitary deficiencies at an early age. We report here a CPHD family of Jamaican origin with three affected and two unaffected siblings. The affected siblings have evidence of severe growth failure, growth hormone deficiency, hypothyroidism and variable prolactin deficiency. Recently, in some families with CPHD a defect has been detected in the Pit-1 gene, which encodes a transcription factor involved in the differentiation of the pituitary and the production of growth hormone, TSH and prolactin. We are studying the Pit-1 gene in this family as a candidate gene that may explain the family phenotype. The Pit-1 gene has been analyzed in DNA extracted from blood. No gross deletion were detected in exons 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 using exon-specific PCR assay developed in our laboratory. Exon 1 is also currently being analyzed. Single stand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, a screening technique for point mutations within genes, is being used to identify putative base pair changes in the Pit-1 gene. The exon findings will be confirmed using standard DNA sequencing procedures. If a Pit-1 gene is detected, this family would provide a novel presentation, since gonadotropin deficiency appears to be present. Alternatively, this family may represent a mutation on another yet unknown factor involved in normal pituitary development.

  13. Abnormal differentiation of dopaminergic neurons in zebrafish trpm7 mutant larvae impairs development of the motor pattern.

    PubMed

    Decker, Amanda R; McNeill, Matthew S; Lambert, Aaron M; Overton, Jeffrey D; Chen, Yu-Chia; Lorca, Ramón A; Johnson, Nicolas A; Brockerhoff, Susan E; Mohapatra, Durga P; MacArthur, Heather; Panula, Pertti; Masino, Mark A; Runnels, Loren W; Cornell, Robert A

    2014-02-15

    Transient receptor potential, melastatin-like 7 (Trpm7) is a combined ion channel and kinase implicated in the differentiation or function of many cell types. Early lethality in mice and frogs depleted of the corresponding gene impedes investigation of the functions of this protein particularly during later stages of development. By contrast, zebrafish trpm7 mutant larvae undergo early morphogenesis normally and thus do not have this limitation. The mutant larvae are characterized by multiple defects including melanocyte cell death, transient paralysis, and an ion imbalance that leads to the development of kidney stones. Here we report a requirement for Trpm7 in differentiation or function of dopaminergic neurons in vivo. First, trpm7 mutant larvae are hypomotile and fail to make a dopamine-dependent developmental transition in swim-bout length. Both of these deficits are partially rescued by the application of levodopa or dopamine. Second, histological analysis reveals that in trpm7 mutants a significant fraction of dopaminergic neurons lack expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. Third, trpm7 mutants are unusually sensitive to the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, an oxidative stressor, and their motility is partially rescued by application of the iron chelator deferoxamine, an anti-oxidant. Finally, in SH-SY5Y cells, which model aspects of human dopaminergic neurons, forced expression of a channel-dead variant of TRPM7 causes cell death. In summary, a forward genetic screen in zebrafish has revealed that both melanocytes and dopaminergic neurons depend on the ion channel Trpm7. The mechanistic underpinning of this dependence requires further investigation. PMID:24291744

  14. Thymidine Kinase 2 Deficiency-Induced Mitochondrial DNA Depletion Causes Abnormal Development of Adipose Tissues and Adipokine Levels in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Villarroya, Joan; Dorado, Beatriz; Vilà, Maya R.; Garcia-Arumí, Elena; Domingo, Pere; Giralt, Marta; Hirano, Michio; Villarroya, Francesc

    2011-01-01

    Mammal adipose tissues require mitochondrial activity for proper development and differentiation. The components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain/oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS) are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. The maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a key element for a functional mitochondrial oxidative activity in mammalian cells. To ascertain the role of mtDNA levels in adipose tissue, we have analyzed the alterations in white (WAT) and brown (BAT) adipose tissues in thymidine kinase 2 (Tk2) H126N knockin mice, a model of TK2 deficiency-induced mtDNA depletion. We observed respectively severe and moderate mtDNA depletion in TK2-deficient BAT and WAT, showing both tissues moderate hypotrophy and reduced fat accumulation. Electron microscopy revealed altered mitochondrial morphology in brown but not in white adipocytes from TK2-deficient mice. Although significant reduction in mtDNA-encoded transcripts was observed both in WAT and BAT, protein levels from distinct OXPHOS complexes were significantly reduced only in TK2-deficient BAT. Accordingly, the activity of cytochrome c oxidase was significantly lowered only in BAT from TK2-deficient mice. The analysis of transcripts encoding up to fourteen components of specific adipose tissue functions revealed that, in both TK2-deficient WAT and BAT, there was a consistent reduction of thermogenesis related gene expression and a severe reduction in leptin mRNA. Reduced levels of resistin mRNA were found in BAT from TK2-deficient mice. Analysis of serum indicated a dramatic reduction in circulating levels of leptin and resistin. In summary, our present study establishes that mtDNA depletion leads to a moderate impairment in mitochondrial respiratory function, especially in BAT, causes substantial alterations in WAT and BAT development, and has a profound impact in the endocrine properties of adipose tissues. PMID:22216345

  15. Mitochondria DNA mutations cause sex-dependent development of hypertension and alterations in cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Golob, Mark J; Tian, Lian; Wang, Zhijie; Zimmerman, Todd A; Caneba, Christine A; Hacker, Timothy A; Song, Guoqing; Chesler, Naomi C

    2015-02-01

    Aging is associated with conduit artery stiffening that is a risk factor for and can precede hypertension and ventricular dysfunction. Increases in mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) frequency have been correlated with aging. Mice with a mutation in the encoding domain (D257A) of a proof-reading deficient version of mtDNA polymerase-γ (POLG) have musculoskeletal features of premature aging and a shortened lifespan. However, few studies using these mice have investigated the effects of mtDNA mutations on cardiovascular function. We hypothesized that the proof-reading deficient mtDNA POLG leads to arterial stiffening, hypertension, and ventricular hypertrophy. Ten to twelve month-old D257A mice (n=13) and age- and sex-matched wild-type controls (n=13) were catheterized for hemodynamic and ventricular function measurements. Left common carotid arteries (LCCA) were harvested for mechanical tests followed by histology. Male D257A mice had pulmonary and systemic hypertension, arterial stiffening, larger LCCA diameter (701±45 vs. 597±60μm), shorter LCCA axial length (8.96±0.56 vs. 10.10±0.80mm), and reduced hematocrit (29.1±6.1 vs. 41.3±8.1; all p<0.05). Male and female D257A mice had biventricular hypertrophy (p<0.05). Female D257A mice did not have significant increases in pressure or arterial stiffening, suggesting that the mechanisms of hypertension or arterial stiffening from mtDNA mutations differ based on sex. Our results lend insight into the mechanisms of age-related cardiovascular disease and may point to novel treatment strategies to address cardiovascular mortality in the elderly. PMID:25582357

  16. Mitochondria DNA mutations cause sex-dependent development of hypertension and alterations in cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    Golob, Mark J.; Tian, Lian; Wang, Zhijie; Zimmerman, Todd A.; Caneba, Christine A.; Hacker, Timothy A.; Song, Guoqing; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with conduit artery stiffening that is a risk factor for and can precede hypertension and ventricular dysfunction. Increases in mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) frequency have been correlated with aging. Mice with a mutation in the encoding domain (D257A) of a proof-reading deficient version of mtDNA polymerase-γ (POLG) have musculoskeletal features of premature aging and a shortened lifespan. However, few studies using these mice have investigated the effects of mtDNA mutations on cardiovascular function. We hypothesized that the proof-reading deficient mtDNA POLG leads to arterial stiffening, hypertension, and ventricular hypertrophy. Ten to twelve month-old D257A mice (n=13) and age- and sex-matched wild-type controls (n=13) were catheterized for hemodynamic and ventricular function measurements. Left common carotid arteries (LCCA) were harvested for mechanical tests followed by histology. Male D257A mice had pulmonary and systemic hypertension, arterial stiffening, larger LCCA diameter (701 ± 45 vs. 597 ± 60 μm), shorter LCCA axial length (8.96 ± 0.56 vs. 10.10 ± 0.80 mm), and reduced hematocrit (29.1 ± 6.1 vs. 41.3 ± 8.1; all p<0.05). Male and female D257A mice had biventricular hypertrophy (p<0.05). Female D257A mice did not have significant increases in pressure or arterial stiffening, suggesting that the mechanisms of hypertension or arterial stiffening from mtDNA mutations differ based on sex. Our results lend insight into the mechanisms of age-related cardiovascular disease and may point to novel treatment strategies to address cardiovascular mortality in the elderly. PMID:25582357

  17. BISPHENOL A EXPOSURE DURING EARLY DEVELOPMENT INDUCES SEX-SPECIFIC CHANGES IN ADULT ZEBRAFISH SOCIAL INTERACTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Daniel N.; Hoffmann, Raymond G.; Hoke, Elizabeth S.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental bisphenol A (BPA) exposure is associated with adverse behavioral effects, although underlying modes of action remain unclear. Because BPA is a suspected xenoestrogen, the objective was to identify sex-based changes in adult zebrafish social behavior developmentally exposed to BPA (0.0, 0.1 or 1 μM) or one of two control compounds (0.1μM 17β-estradiol [E2], and 0.1 μM GSK4716, a synthetic estrogen-related receptor γ ligand). A test chamber was divided lengthwise so each arena held one fish unable to detect the presence of the other fish. A mirror was inserted at one end of each arena; baseline activity levels were determined without mirror. Arenas were divided into 3, computer-generated zones to represent different distances from mirror image. Circadian rhythm patterns were evaluated at 1–3 (= AM) and 5–8 (= PM) hr postprandial. Adult zebrafish were placed into arenas and monitored by digital camera for 5 min. Total distance traveled, % time spent at mirror image, and number of attacks on mirror image were quantified. E2, GSK4716, and all BPA treatments dampened male activity and altered male circadian activity patterns; there was no marked effect on female activity. BPA induced non-monotonic effects (response curve changes direction within range of concentrations examined) on male % time at mirror only in AM. All treatments produced increased % time at the mirror during PM. Male attacks on the mirror were reduced by BPA exposure only during AM. There were sex-specific effects of developmental BPA on social interactions and time-of-day of observation affected results. PMID:25424546

  18. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  19. Assessment of electron beam-induced abnormal development and DNA damage in Spodoptera litura (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Seon-Woo; Koo, Hyun-Na; Kim, Gil-Hah

    2014-03-01

    The armyworm, Spodoptera litura (F.) is a polyphagous and important agricultural pest worldwide. In this study, we examined the effect of electron beam irradiation on developmental stages, reproduction, and DNA damage of S. litura. Eggs (0-24 h old), larvae (3rd instar), pupae (3 days old after pupation), and adults (24 h after emergence) were irradiated with electron beam irradiation of six levels between 30 and 250 Gy. When eggs were irradiated with 100 Gy, egg hatching was completely inhibited. When the larvae were irradiated, the larval period was significantly delayed, depending on the doses applied. At 150 Gy, the fecundity of adults that developed from irradiated pupae was entirely inhibited. However, electron beam irradiation did not induce the instantaneous death of S. litura adults. Reciprocal crosses between irradiated and unirradiated moths demonstrated that females were more radiosensitive than males. We also conducted the comet assay immediately after irradiation and over the following 5 days period. Severe DNA fragmentation in S. litura cells was observed just after irradiation and the damage was repaired during the post-irradiation period in a time-dependent manner. However, at more than 100 Gy, DNA damage was not fully recovered.

  20. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. ... Abnormal urine color may be caused by infection, disease, medicines, or food you eat. Cloudy or milky urine is a sign ...

  1. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Metabolic Abnormalities in Children with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Lesley; Neal, William A.; Ice, Christa; Perez, Miriam K.; Piedimonte, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Childhood asthma and obesity have reached epidemic proportions worldwide, and the latter is also contributing to increasing rates of related metabolic disorders, such as diabetes. Yet, the relationship between asthma, obesity, and abnormal lipid and glucose metabolism is not well understood, nor has it been adequately explored in children. Objectives: To analyze the relationship between asthma diagnosis and body mass in children across the entire range of weight percentile categories, and to test the hypothesis that early derangement in lipid and glucose metabolism is independently associated with increased risk for asthma. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of a representative sample of public school children from a statewide community-based screening program, including a total of 17,994 children, 4 to 12 years old, living in predominantly rural West Virginia, and enrolled in kindergarten, second, or fifth grade classrooms. Measurements and Main Results: We analyzed demographics; family history; smoke exposure; parent-reported asthma diagnosis; body mass index; evidence of acanthosis nigricans as a marker for developing insulin resistance; and fasting serum lipid profile including total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. Regardless of their body mass index percentile, children diagnosed with asthma were more likely than children without asthma to have higher triglyceride levels and acanthosis nigricans after controlling for sex differences and smoke exposure. Conclusions: This study provides the first set of community-based data linking asthma, body mass, and metabolic variables in children. In particular, these findings uniquely describe a statistically significant association between asthma and abnormal lipid and glucose metabolism beyond body mass index associations. PMID:20851922

  3. Equal Is Better: A Voc Ed Guide to Sex Fairness Resources and the Law. Vocational Education Development Series No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    L'Angelle, David, Comp.; Williams, Sarah, Comp.

    Intended to serve as a guide to selected current resources promoting sex equity in vocational education and to the legal regulations which mandate equitable programs, this reference guide is organized into two major sections: Sex Fairness Resources and The Law. Sex Fairness Resources divides the resources listed into sections that reflect six…

  4. Zebrafish sex differentiation and gonad development after exposure to 17α-ethinylestradiol, fadrozole and their binary mixture: A stereological study.

    PubMed

    Luzio, Ana; Monteiro, Sandra M; Garcia-Santos, Sofia; Rocha, Eduardo; Fontaínhas-Fernandes, António A; Coimbra, Ana M

    2015-09-01

    Current knowledge on zebrafish (Danio rerio) sex determination suggests that this trait has a polygenic genetic basis, although environmental factors, such as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC), may also be involved in modeling or disturbing the species sex differentiation and development. This study aimed to assess how sex steroids imbalance triggers impact on sex differentiation and gonad development in zebrafish. Fish where exposed to an estrogen (EE2, i.e. 17α-ethinylestradiol, 4ng/L), to an inhibitor of estrogen synthesis (Fad, i.e. fadrozole, 50μg/L) or to their binary mixture (Mix-EE2+ Fad, 4ng/L+50μg/L), from 2h to 60 days post-fertilization (dpf). Afterwards, a quantitative (stereological) analysis using light microscopy, based on systematic sampling, was made at 35 and 60dpf, to identify alterations on gonad differentiation and development. During the sex differentiation period, our histological data showed that not all zebrafish males develop a "juvenile ovary", contrarily to what is currently taken for granted. Furthermore, the stereological analysis suggests that EE2 alone enhanced both zebrafish growth and gonad development. On the other hand, exposure to Fad affected the sexual development in zebrafish, inducing masculinization of the specimens, with some degree of intersex observed in males. In addition, the binary mixture allowed identifying sex-dependent roles of steroid hormones in the general growth and gonad development of zebrafish, with estrogens acting as growth promoters in females and being essential for ovary development. Data further support that sex-specific and single EDC impact studies are important, but clearly not sufficient to understand what may occur in the environment. PMID:26240953

  5. Sex Education with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koblinsky, Sally; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Discusses guidelines (developed by the Oregon State University Early Childhood Sex Education Project) for developing teacher-parent cooperation in providing sex education to young children. The guidelines concern how to talk about body differences and body functions; how to deal with masturbation, sex play and obscene language; and how to involve…

  6. Parasites and steroid hormones: corticosteroid and sex steroid synthesis, their role in the parasite physiology and development

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Marta C.; Jiménez, Pedro; Miranda-Brito, Carolina; Valdez, Ricardo A.

    2015-01-01

    In many cases parasites display highly complex life cycles that include the penetration and permanence of the larva or adults within host organs, but even in those that only have one host, reciprocal, intricate interactions occur. Evidence indicates that steroid hormones have an influence on the development and course of parasitic infections. The host gender's susceptibility to infection, and the related differences in the immune response are good examples of the host-parasite interplay. However, the capacity of these organisms to synthesize their own steroidogenic hormones still has more questions than answers. It is now well-known that many parasites synthesize ecdysteroids, but limited information is available on sex steroid and corticosteroid synthesis. This review intends to summarize some of the existing information in the field. In most, but not all parasitosis the host's hormonal environment determines the susceptibility, the course, and severity of parasite infections. In most cases the infection disturbs the host environment, and activates immune responses that end up affecting the endocrine system. Furthermore, sex steroids and corticosteroids may also directly modify the parasite reproduction and molting. Available information indicates that parasites synthesize some steroid hormones, such as ecdysteroids and sex steroids, and the presence and activity of related enzymes have been demonstrated. More recently, the synthesis of corticosteroid-like compounds has been shown in Taenia solium cysticerci and tapeworms, and in Taenia crassiceps WFU cysticerci. In-depth knowledge of the parasite's endocrine properties will contribute to understand their reproduction and reciprocal interactions with the host, and may also help designing tools to combat the infection in some clinical situations. PMID:26175665

  7. Sex: Who Cares? Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liben, Lynn S.

    2000-01-01

    Presents evidence supporting claim that sex and gender are important to the explanatory as well as the descriptive goals of developmental psychology. Maintains that studying psychosocial and biological components of gender and sex helps one to develop hypotheses about causal mechanisms for developmental outcomes more generally. Introduces the…

  8. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in structural brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Kyritsis, Athanassios P; Kosmidou, Maria; Giannopoulos, Sotirios

    2013-07-31

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiographic abnormalities are frequently observed after acute cerebrovascular events. The precise mechanism that leads to the development of these arrhythmias is still uncertain, though increasing evidence suggests that it is mainly due to autonomic nervous system dysregulation. In massive brain lesions sympathetic predominance and parasympathetic withdrawal during the first 72 h are associated with the occurrence of severe secondary complications in the first week. Right insular cortex lesions are also related with sympathetic overactivation and with a higher incidence of electrocardiographic abnormalities, mostly QT prolongation, in patients with ischemic stroke. Additionally, female sex and hypokalemia are independent risk factors for severe prolongation of the QT interval which subsequently results in malignant arrhythmias and poor outcome. The prognostic value of repolarization changes commonly seen after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, such as ST segment, T wave, and U wave abnormalities, still remains controversial. In patients with traumatic brain injury both intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoperfusion correlate with low heart rate variability and increased mortality. Given that there are no firm guidelines for the prevention or treatment of the arrhythmias that appear after cerebral incidents this review aims to highlight important issues on this topic. Selected patients with the aforementioned risk factors could benefit from electrocardiographic monitoring, reassessment of the medications that prolong QTc interval, and administration of antiadrenergic agents. Further research is required in order to validate these assumptions and to establish specific therapeutic strategies. PMID:22809542

  9. Ectopic expression of an apple apomixis-related gene MhFIE induces co-suppression and results in abnormal vegetative and reproductive development in tomato.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan-Dan; Dong, Qing-Long; Fang, Mou-Jing; Chen, Ke-Qin; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2012-12-15

    It has been well documented that FERTILIZATION-INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE) plays important regulatory roles in diverse developmental processes in model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it is largely unknown how FIE genes function in economically important crops. In this study, MhFIE gene, which was previously isolated from apomictic tea crabapple (Malus hupehensis Redh. var. pingyiensis), was introduced into tomato. The hemizygous transgenic tomato lines produced curly leaves and decreased in seed germination. In addition, the co-suppression of the transgenic MhFIE and endogenous (SlFIE) genes occurred in homozygous transgenic tomatoes. As a result, FIE silencing brought about abnormal phenotypes during reproductive development in tomato, such as increased sepal and petal numbers in flower, a fused ovule and pistil and parthenocarpic fruit formation. A yeast two-hybrid assay and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) demonstrated that MhFIE interacted with a tomato protein, EZ2 (SlEZ2). Its ectopic expression and SlFIE co-suppression notably influenced the expression of genes associated with leaf, flower, and fruit development. Therefore, together with other PcG proteins, FIE was involved in the regulation of vegetative and reproductive development by modulating the expression of related genes in plants. PMID:23000466

  10. Disorders of Sex Development with Testicular Differentiation in SRY-Negative 46,XX Individuals: Clinical and Genetic Aspects.

    PubMed

    Grinspon, Romina P; Rey, Rodolfo A

    2016-01-01

    Virilisation of the XX foetus is the result of androgen excess, resulting most frequently from congenital adrenal hyperplasia in individuals with typical ovarian differentiation. In rare cases, 46,XX gonads may differentiate into testes, a condition known as 46,XX testicular disorders of sex development (DSD), or give rise to the coexistence of ovarian and testicular tissue, a condition known as 46,XX ovotesticular DSD. Testicular tissue differentiation may be due to the translocation of SRY to the X chromosome or an autosome. In the absence of SRY, overexpression of other pro-testis genes, e.g. SOX family genes, or failure of pro-ovarian/anti-testis genes, such as WNT4 and RSPO1, may underlie the development of testicular tissue. Recent experimental and clinical evidence giving insight into SRY-negative 46,XX testicular or ovotesticular DSD is discussed. PMID:27055195

  11. HIV vulnerability of men who have sex with men in developing countries: Horizons studies, 2001-2008.

    PubMed

    Geibel, Scott; Tun, Waimar; Tapsoba, Placide; Kellerman, Scott

    2010-01-01

    While male-to-male sexual behavior has been recognized as a primary risk factor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), research targeting men who have sex with men (MSM) in less-developed countries has been limited due to high levels of stigma and discrimination. In response, the Population Council's Horizons Program began implementing research activities in Africa and South America beginning in 2001, with the objectives of gathering information on MSM sexual risk behaviors, evaluating HIV-prevention programs, and informing HIV policy makers. The results of this nearly decade-long program are presented in this article as a summary of the Horizons MSM studies in Africa (Senegal and Kenya) and Latin America (Brazil and Paraguay), and include research methodologies, study findings, and interventions evaluated. We also discuss future directions and approaches for HIV research among MSM in developing countries. PMID:20297760

  12. Mutation analysis of mitogen activated protein kinase 1 gene in Indian cases of 46,XY disorder of sex development

    PubMed Central

    Das, Dhanjit Kumar; Rahate, Subodh G; Mehta, Bhakti P; Gawde, Harshavardhan M; Tamhankar, Parag M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Determination of sex is the result of cascade of molecular events that cause undifferentiated bipotential gonad to develop as a testis or an ovary. A series of genes such as SRY, steroidogenic factor-1 (SF1), AR, SRD5 α, Desert hedgehog (DHH) etc., have been reported to have a significant role in development of sex in the fetus and secondary sexual characteristics at the time of puberty. Recently, mitogen activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MAP3K1) gene was found to be associated with 46, XY disorders of sex development (DSD). AIM: The present study is focused to identify mutations in MAP3K1 gene in the cohort of 10 Indian patients with 46,XY DSD including one family with two affected sisters. These patients were already screened for SRY, SF1 and DHH gene, but no mutation was observed in any of these genes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The entire coding regions of MAP3K1 were amplified and sequenced using the gene specific primers. RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS: Sequence analysis of MAP3K1 gene has revealed four variants including one missense, two silent and one deletion mutation. The missense mutation p.D806N was observed in four patients with hypospadias. Two patients showed the presence of silent mutation p.Q1028Q present in exon 14. Another silent mutation p.T428T was observed in a patient with gonadal dysgenesis. We have also observed one deletion mutation p. 942insT present in two patients. The pathogenicity of the missense mutation p.D806N was carried out using in-silico approach. Sequence homology analysis has revealed that the aspartate at 806 was found to be well-conserved across species, indicated the importance of this residue. The score for polyphen analysis of this mutation was found to be 0.999 indicating to be pathogenic mutation. Since, p.D806N mutation was found to be important residue; it might contribute to sexual development. We have reported the presence of mutations/polymorphism in MAP3K1 gene. All the mutations were found to be polymorphism upon comparing to single nucleotide polymorphism database. However, in-silico analysis of the missense mutation revealed to be a pathogenic mutation. PMID:24497709

  13. Same sex, no sex, and unaware sex in neurotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Bernard

    2011-10-01

    Males and females of virtually all species differ in how they respond to their environment. Because such differences exist in almost all biological realms, including disease patterns and therapeutic outcomes, they have evoked calls by various bodies to incorporate their assessment in research. Neurobehavioral indices pose special questions because, unlike outwardly visible markers, they are described by complex functional outcomes or subtle alterations in brain structure. These divergent responses arise because they are inscribed in the genome itself and then by endocrine mechanisms that govern sexual differentiation of the brain during development and operate throughout life. Other organ systems that exhibit sex differences include the liver, an important consideration for neurotoxicology because it may process many toxic chemicals differentially in males and females. Despite the scope and pervasiveness of sex differences, however, they are disregarded by much of neurotoxicology research. Males predominate in behavioral experiments, few such experiments study both sexes, some investigators fail to even describe the sex of their subjects, and in vitro studies tend to wholly ignore sex, even for model systems aimed at neurological disorders that display marked sex differences. The public is acutely aware of sex differences in behavior, as attested by its appetite for books on the topic. It closely follows debates about the proportion of women in professions that feature science and mathematics. Neurotoxicology, especially in the domain of laboratory research, will be hindered in its ability to translate its findings into human health measures if it assigns sex differences to a minor role. It must also be sensitive to how such debates are framed. Often, the differences evoking the most discussion are subtle in scope. They do not lend themselves to the typical analyses conducted by experimenters; that is, reliance on mean differences and null hypothesis testing. PMID:20875453

  14. NEW FRONTIER IN UNDERSTANDING THE MECHANISMS OF DEVELOPMENTAL ABNORMALITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent advancements in molecular developmental biology afford an opportunity to apply newly developed tools for understanding the mechanisms of both normal and abnormal development. lthough a number of agents have been identified as causing developmental abnormalities, knowledge ...

  15. Disruption of the gene encoding the latent transforming growth factor-β binding protein 4 (LTBP-4) causes abnormal lung development, cardiomyopathy, and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sterner-Kock, Anja; Thorey, Irmgard S.; Koli, Katri; Wempe, Frank; Otte, Jürgen; Bangsow, Thorsten; Kuhlmeier, Katharina; Kirchner, Thomas; Jin, Shenchu; Keski-Oja, Jorma; von Melchner, Harald

    2002-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-βs) are multifunctional growth factors that are secreted as inactive (latent) precursors in large protein complexes. These complexes include the latency-associated propeptide (LAP) and a latent transforming growth factor-β binding protein (LTBP). Four isoforms of LTBPs (LTBP-1–LTBP-4) have been cloned and are believed to be structural components of connective tissue microfibrils and local regulators of TGF-β tissue deposition and signaling. By using a gene trap strategy that selects for integrations into genes induced transiently during early mouse development, we have disrupted the mouse homolog of the human LTBP-4 gene. Mice homozygous for the disrupted allele develop severe pulmonary emphysema, cardiomyopathy, and colorectal cancer. These highly tissue-specific abnormalities are associated with profound defects in the elastic fiber structure and with a reduced deposition of TGF-β in the extracellular space. As a consequence, epithelial cells have reduced levels of phosphorylated Smad2 proteins, overexpress c-myc, and undergo uncontrolled proliferation. This phenotype supports the predicted dual role of LTBP-4 as a structural component of the extracellular matrix and as a local regulator of TGF-β tissue deposition and signaling. PMID:12208849

  16. Abnormal peripubertal development of the rat mammary gland following exposure in utero and during lactation to a mixture of genistein and the food contaminant vinclozolin.

    PubMed

    El Sheikh Saad, H; Meduri, G; Phrakonkham, P; Bergès, R; Vacher, S; Djallali, M; Auger, J; Canivenc-Lavier, M C; Perrot-Applanat, M

    2011-07-01

    The impact of early exposure to endocrine disruptor mixtures on mammary gland development is poorly known. Here, we identify the effects of a conception to weaning exposure of rats to the phytoestrogen genistein (G) and/or the antiandrogen vinclozolin (V) at 1mg/kg-d, alone or in association. Using several approaches, we found that G- and GV-exposed rats displayed significantly greater epithelial branching and proliferation, wider terminal end buds than controls at PND35, as well as ductal hyperplasia and periductal fibrosis. Focal branching defects were present in V-exposed rats. An increased ER and AR expression was observed in G- and GV- as compared to V-exposed rats at PND35. Surprisingly, a significant number of GV- and to a lesser extent, V-exposed animals displayed abnormal hyperplasic alveolar structures at PND50. Thus, gestational and lactational exposure to low doses of genistein plus vinclozolin may seriously affect peripubertal development of the rat mammary gland. PMID:21539910

  17. The Homeotic Gene Sex Combs Reduced of Drosophila Melanogaster Is Differentially Regulated in the Embryonic and Imaginal Stages of Development

    PubMed Central

    Pattatucci, A. M.; Kaufman, T. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Sex combs reduced (Scr) locus is unique among the genes contained within the Antennapedia complex (ANT-C) of Drosophila melanogaster in that it directs functions that are required for both cephalic and thoracic development in the embryo and the adult. Antibodies raised against protein encoded by Scr were used to follow the distribution of this gene product in embryos and imaginal discs of third instar larvae. Analysis of Scr protein accumulation in embryos hemizygous for breakpoint lesions mapping throughout the locus has allowed us to determine that sequences required for establishment of the Scr embryonic pattern are contained within a region of DNA that overlaps with the identified upstream regulatory region of the segmentation gene fushi tarazu (ftz). Gain-of-function mutations in Scr result in the presence of ectopic sex comb teeth on the first tarsal segment of mesothoracic and metathoracic legs of adult males. Heterozygous combinations of gain-of-function alleles with a wild-type Scr gene exhibit no evidence of ectopic protein localization in the second and third thoracic segments of embryos. However, mesothoracic and metathoracic leg imaginal discs can be shown to accumulate ectopically expressed Scr protein, implying a differential regulation of the Scr gene during these two periods of development. Additionally, we have found that the spatial pattern of Scr gene expression in imaginal tissues involved in the development of the adult thorax is governed in part by synapsis of homologous chromosomes in this region of the ANT-C. However, those imaginal discs that arise anteriorly to the prothorax do not appear to be sensitive to this form of gene regulation. Finally, we have demonstrated that the extent of Scr expression is influenced by mutations at the Polycomb (Pc) locus but not by mutant alleles of the zeste (z) gene. Taken together, our data suggests that Scr gene expression is differentially regulated both temporally and spatially in a manner that is sensitive to the structure of the locus. PMID:1683847

  18. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  19. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  20. [Considerations from a Children's Hospital Bioethics Committee about diagnosis and treatment of the disorders of sex development].

    PubMed

    Del Valle, Miguel; Díaz Zorita, María Isabel; Stepansky, Nuria; García Barthe, Mónica; Rodríguez, María Celeste; Sánchez, María Del Pilar; Garra, María Mabel; Cúneo, María Martha; Coglianese, Cristina; Firenze Aldeghi, Lorena; Jaureguizar, María de la Paz; Muraciole, Beatriz; Selinger, Cecilia; Chamorro, Gabriela

    2015-06-01

    Through history, diagnosis and management of sex development disorders has been very difficult due to the significant impact on affected children, their families and care takers, representing a great challenge to healthcare professionals. Nowadays, there is significant debate regarding these children's care and outcome. This discussion is not only a medical issue, but it also includes legal and ethical matters. The Bioethics Committee of the "Hospital de Niños Ricardo Gutiérrez" has been considering this conflict and discussing its different aspects. Here we share our beliefs and opinions taking into account that they should not be considered the only and whole truth. There is an open debate in which all involved people should participate. PMID:25996326

  1. Development, genetic and cytogenetic analyses of genetic sexing strains of the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens Loew (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anastrepha ludens is among the pests that have a major impact on México's economy because it attacks fruits as citrus and mangoes. The Mexican Federal government uses integrated pest management to control A. ludens through the Programa Nacional Moscas de la Fruta [National Fruit Fly Program, SAGARPA-SENASICA]. One of the main components of this program is the sterile insect technique (SIT), which is used to control field populations of the pest by releasing sterile flies. Results To increase the efficiency of this technique, we have developed a genetic sexing strain (GSS) in which the sexing mechanism is based on a pupal colour dimorphism (brown-black) and is the result of a reciprocal translocation between the Y chromosome and the autosome bearing the black pupae (bp) locus. Ten strains producing wild-type (brown pupae) males and mutant (black pupae) females were isolated. Subsequent evaluations for several generations were performed in most of these strains. The translocation strain named Tapachula-7 showed minimal effect on survival and the best genetic stability of all ten strains. Genetic and cytogenetic analyses were performed using mitotic and polytene chromosomes and we succeeded to characterize the chromosomal structure of this reciprocal translocation and map the autosome breakpoint, despite the fact that the Y chromosome is not visible in polytene nuclei following standard staining. Conclusions We show that mitotic and polytene chromosomes can be used in cytogenetic analyses towards the development of genetic control methods in this pest species. The present work is the first report of the construction of GSS of Anastrepha ludens, with potential use in a future Moscafrut operational program. PMID:25472896

  2. Sex differences in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Haast, Roy A M; Gustafson, Deborah R; Kiliaan, Amanda J

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences in stroke are observed across epidemiologic studies, pathophysiology, treatments, and outcomes. These sex differences have profound implications for effective prevention and treatment and are the focus of this review. Epidemiologic studies reveal a clear age-by-sex interaction in stroke prevalence, incidence, and mortality. While premenopausal women experience fewer strokes than men of comparable age, stroke rates increase among postmenopausal women compared with age-matched men. This postmenopausal phenomenon, in combination with living longer, are reasons for women being older at stroke onset and suffering more severe strokes. Thus, a primary focus of stroke prevention has been based on sex steroid hormone-dependent mechanisms. Sex hormones affect different (patho)physiologic functions of the cerebral circulation. Clarifying the impact of sex hormones on cerebral vasculature using suitable animal models is essential to elucidate male–female differences in stroke pathophysiology and development of sex-specific treatments. Much remains to be learned about sex differences in stroke as anatomic and genetic factors may also contribute, revealing its multifactorial nature. In addition, the aftermath of stroke appears to be more adverse in women than in men, again based on older age at stroke onset, longer prehospital delays, and potentially, differences in treatment. PMID:23032484

  3. An unbiased approach to identify genes involved in development in a turtle with temperature-dependent sex determination

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many reptiles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). The initial cue in TSD is incubation temperature, unlike genotypic sex determination (GSD) where it is determined by the presence of specific alleles (or genetic loci). We used patterns of gene expression to identify candidates for genes with a role in TSD and other developmental processes without making a priori assumptions about the identity of these genes (ortholog-based approach). We identified genes with sexually dimorphic mRNA accumulation during the temperature sensitive period of development in the Red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta), a turtle with TSD. Genes with differential mRNA accumulation in response to estrogen (estradiol-17β; E2) exposure and developmental stages were also identified. Results Sequencing 767 clones from three suppression-subtractive hybridization libraries yielded a total of 581 unique sequences. Screening a macroarray with a subset of those sequences revealed a total of 26 genes that exhibited differential mRNA accumulation: 16 female biased and 10 male biased. Additional analyses revealed that C16ORF62 (an unknown gene) and MALAT1 (a long noncoding RNA) exhibited increased mRNA accumulation at the male producing temperature relative to the female producing temperature during embryonic sexual development. Finally, we identified four genes (C16ORF62, CCT3, MMP2, and NFIB) that exhibited a stage effect and five genes (C16ORF62, CCT3, MMP2, NFIB and NOTCH2) showed a response to E2 exposure. Conclusions Here we report a survey of genes identified using patterns of mRNA accumulation during embryonic development in a turtle with TSD. Many previous studies have focused on examining the turtle orthologs of genes involved in mammalian development. Although valuable, the limitations of this approach are exemplified by our identification of two genes (MALAT1 and C16ORF62) that are sexually dimorphic during embryonic development. MALAT1 is a noncoding RNA that has not been implicated in sexual differentiation in other vertebrates and C16ORF62 has an unknown function. Our results revealed genes that are candidates for having roles in turtle embryonic development, including TSD, and highlight the need to expand our search parameters beyond protein-coding genes. PMID:22793670

  4. Sex-dependent expression of anti-Müllerian hormone (amh) and amh receptor 2 during sex organ differentiation and characterization of the Müllerian duct development in Xenopus tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Erika; Mattsson, Anna; Goldstone, Jared; Berg, Cecilia

    2016-04-01

    Amphibian gonadal differentiation involves the action of sex steroids. Recent research indicates that the anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is involved in testicular development in some lower vertebrate species. For amphibians there is a lack of data on ontogenetic expression of the AMH receptor AMHR2/amhr2 and of progesterone receptors (PGRS/pgrs). Here we expand the knowledge on amphibian sex differentiation by characterizing ontogenetic mRNA levels of amh, amhr2, intracellular and membrane pgrs (ipgr and mpgr beta) and cytochrome P450 19a1 (cyp19a1) (ovarian marker) in the urogenital complex of the model species Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis. Furthermore, we characterized the ontogenetic development of the Müllerian ducts (precursors of the female reproductive tract) histologically. The developmental period investigated spanned from beginning of gonadal differentiation, Nieuwkoop and Faber (NF) stage 51, to 4weeks post-metamorphosis. The Müllerian ducts were first observed at NF 64 in both sexes. Male-enhanced amh mRNA levels from NF 53/54 to 6days post-metamorphosis and female-enhanced cyp19a1 levels from NF 53 to 4weeks post-metamorphosis were noted. The sexually dimorphic mRNA level profile was more distinct for amh than for cyp19a1. The pgrs mRNA levels increased over the studied period and showed no sex differences. At later developmental stages, the amhr2 mRNA level was increased in putative females compared with males. Our findings suggest that AMH has a role in gonadal differentiation in X. tropicalis. We propose relative gonadal amh mRNA level as a testicular marker during early gonadal development in amphibians. PMID:26987287

  5. Sex-specific gene expression during asexual development of Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Kin, Koryu; Lopez-Giraldez, Francesc; Johannesson, Hanna; Townsend, Jeffrey P.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of loci that determine sexual identity upon the asexual, dominant stage of fungal life history has been well studied. To investigate their impact, expression differences between strains of different mating type during asexual development were assayed, with RNA sampled from otherwise largely isogenic mat A and mat a strains of Neurospora crassaat early, middle, and late clonal stages of development. We observed significant differences in overall gene expression between mating types across clonal development, especially at late development stages. The expression levels of mating-type genes and pheromone genes were assayed by reverse transcription and quantitative PCR, revealing expression of pheromone and receptor genes instrains of both mating types in all development stages, and revealing that mating type (mat) genes were increasingly expressed over the course of asexual development. Interestingly, among differentially expressed genes, the mat A genotype more frequently exhibited a higher expression level than mat a, and demonstrated greater transcriptional regulatory dynamism. Significant up-regulation of expression was observed for many late light-responsive genes at late asexual development stages. Further investigation of the impact of light and the roles of light response genes in asexual development of both mating types are warranted. PMID:22626843

  6. Sex Stereotyping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivas, Richard G.

    This article uses findings from several previous studies to define the kinds of sex stereotyping present in our society. The author considers sex roles as dealt with in children's literature, public schools, advertising, and vocational counseling. He describes, in particular, the situation at an unnamed state university, and cites the woman's…

  7. Sex-related long-term behavioral and hippocampal cellular alterations after nociceptive stimulation throughout postnatal development in rats.

    PubMed

    Lima, Márcia; Malheiros, Jackeline; Negrigo, Aline; Tescarollo, Fabio; Medeiros, Magda; Suchecki, Deborah; Tannús, Alberto; Guinsburg, Ruth; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-02-01

    Early noxious stimuli may alter the neurogenesis rate in the dentate gyrus and the behavioral repertoire of adult rats. This study evaluated the long-term effects of noxious stimulation, imposed in different phases of development, on nociceptive and anxiety-like behaviors, hippocampal activation, cell proliferation, hippocampal BDNF and plasma corticosterone levels in 40 day-old male and female adolescents. Noxious stimulation was induced by intra-plantar injection of Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), on postnatal days (P) 1 (group P1), 8 (P8) or 21 (P21). Control animals were not stimulated in any way. On P21 a subset of animals from each group received BrdU and was perfused on P40 for identification of proliferating cells in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus. Another subset of rats was subjected to behavioral testing on P40 and one week later, to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition. Noxious stimulation evoked hypoalgesia in adolescents, mainly in females (P < 0.02), reflected by greater latency to withdraw the paw and less paw lickings in the hot plate test than controls (P < 0.001). It also resulted in more time spent in the open arms, e.g., less anxiety-like behavior than controls (P < 0.01), especially in females (P < 0.01, compared with males). Proliferative cell rate in the dentate gyrus was the highest in P8 males and females (P < 0.001), with males exhibiting more proliferation than females on P1 and P8, which was directly related to the hippocampal levels of BDNF and inversely related to plasma corticosterone. Sex differences were also detected in manganese-enhanced MRI signal, which was more prominent in P1 females than males (P < 0.01). This study represents the first step of investigation on the cellular basis of the sex-dependent long-term consequences of nociceptive stimuli in newborns. PMID:24148811

  8. Sex differences in the ontogeny of CRF receptors during adolescent development in the dorsal raphe nucleus and ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Lukkes, Jodi L; Norman, Kevin J; Meda, Shirisha; Andersen, Susan L

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and monoaminergic systems originating from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) have been implicated in the etiology and pathophysiology of several stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression and substance abuse. Sub-regions within the DR and VTA give rise to specific projections that have unique roles in limbic- and reward-related behaviors. Given that these disorders typically emerge during adolescence, it is surprising that few studies have examined the age-, sex-, and region-dependent expression of CRF receptors throughout multiple stages of adolescence in these stress-relevant circuits. To determine the ontogeny of CRF receptors during adolescent development, three regions of the DR (dorsal, caudal, and ventrolateral parts) and the posterior VTA were microdissected from Sprague-Dawley male and female rats on postnatal day (P) 25, P35, P42, P56, and P90. Tissue was processed and analyzed with qRT-PCR to measure CRF1 and CRF2 receptors. The serotonin and catecholamine enzymes in the DR and VTA, tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) and tyrosine hydroxylase, respectively, were also analyzed for maturational differences. This study identified that CRF1 receptors are lower in males than females within the dorsal, ventrolateral region of the DR (DRVL), which is involved in anxiety-, stress-, and panic-related responses. Females had higher CRF2 receptors compared to males in the DRVL only. Levels of TPH2 mRNA in the DRVL were overproduced transiently in females before declining into adulthood. These fundamental studies suggest that sex differences in CRF receptors should be considered when examining stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders and their treatment. Synapse 70:125-132, 2016. 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26696011

  9. The course of thyroid abnormalities during lithium treatment: a two-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Bocchetta, A; Bernardi, F; Burrai, C; Pedditzi, M; Loviselli, A; Velluzzi, F; Martino, E; Del Zompo, M

    1992-07-01

    A total of 116 patients on lithium treatment were followed up for 2 years to determine the course and the clinical relevance of thyroid abnormalities. Elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations were transitory in most patients, except those with serum antithyroid antibodies. The patients who initially had microsomal antibodies remained positive, with an increase in titre in two-thirds of cases. Three young patients of both sexes developed thyroid autoimmunity early in the treatment. The risk of developing hypothyroidism was higher in women, especially in the presence of antibodies. TSH concentrations were significantly lower when carbamazepine was combined with lithium. PMID:1414397

  10. The Development of Sex Difference in Young Children's Activities at Home: The Effect of the Social Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloch, Marianne N.

    1987-01-01

    Made spot observations of 83 infant to six-year-old children. Examined sex and age differences in children's typical play and nonplay activities and in the people with whom they interacted. There were fewer sex differences in children's activities, activity partners, and general social settings than expected. (Author/LHW)

  11. An Action Research Project to Assess Middle School Educators' Professional Development Needs in Single-Sex Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simm, Lynnette Marie Gresham

    2010-01-01

    According to the National Association of Single-Sex Public Education (NASSPE, 2010), an increase of 540 public schools offering single-sex classrooms in the United States has occurred since 2001. Educators who understand the gender differences between boys and girls can inspire students to learn to the best of their ability; however, the problem…

  12. Examination of Sex Differences in a Large Sample of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Typical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhardt, Vanessa P.; Wetherby, Amy M.; Schatschneider, Christopher; Lord, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Despite consistent and substantive research documenting a large male to female ratio in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), only a modest body of research exists examining sex differences in characteristics. This study examined sex differences in developmental functioning and early social communication in children with ASD as compared to children with…

  13. Examination of Sex Differences in a Large Sample of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Typical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhardt, Vanessa P.; Wetherby, Amy M.; Schatschneider, Christopher; Lord, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Despite consistent and substantive research documenting a large male to female ratio in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), only a modest body of research exists examining sex differences in characteristics. This study examined sex differences in developmental functioning and early social communication in children with ASD as compared to children with

  14. Chromosome abnormalities in Indonesian patients with short stature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Short stature is associated with several disorders including wide variations of chromosomal disorders and single gene disorders. The objective of this report is to present the cytogenetic findings in Indonesian patients with short stature. Methods G-banding and interphase/metaphase FISH were performed on short stature patients with and without other clinical features who were referred by clinicians all over Indonesia to our laboratory during the year 2003–2009. Results The results of chromosomal analysis of ninety seven patients (mean age: 10.7 years old) were collected. The group of patients with other clinical features showed sex chromosome abnormalities in 45% (18/40) and autosomal abnormalities in 10% (4/40), whereas those with short stature only, 42.1% (24/57) had sex chromosome abnormalities and 1.75% (1/57) had autosomal abnormalities. The autosomal chromosomal abnormalities involved mostly subtelomeric regions. Results discrepancies between karyotype and FISH were found in 10 patients, including detection of low-level monosomy X mosaicism in 6 patients with normal karyotype, and detection of mosaic aneuploidy chromosome 18 in 1 patient with 45,XX,rob(13;14)(q10;q10). Statistical analysis showed no significant association between the groups and the type of chromosomal abnormalities. Conclusion Chromosome abnormalities account for about 50% of the short stature patients. Wide variations of both sex and autosomal chromosomes abnormalities were detected in the study. Since three out of five patients had autosomal structural abnormalities involving the subtelomeric regions, thus in the future, subtelomeric FISH or even a more sensitive method such as genomic/SNP microarray is needed to confirm deletions of subtelomeric regions of chromosome 9, 11 and 18. Low-level mosaicism in normal karyotype patients indicates interphase FISH need to be routinely carried out in short stature patients as an adjunct to karyotyping. PMID:22863325

  15. Refining the regulatory region upstream of SOX9 associated with 46,XX testicular disorders of Sex Development (DSD).

    PubMed

    Hyon, Capucine; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Harbuz, Radu; Bhouri, Rakia; Perrot, Nicolas; Peycelon, Matthieu; Sibony, Mathilde; Rojo, Sandra; Piguel, Xavier; Bilan, Frederic; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Kitzis, Alain; McElreavey, Ken; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre; Bashamboo, Anu

    2015-08-01

    Disorders of Sex Development (DSD) are a heterogeneous group of disorders affecting gonad and/or genito-urinary tract development and usually the endocrine-reproductive system. A genetic diagnosis is made in only around 20% of these cases. The genetic causes of 46,XX-SRY negative testicular DSD as well as ovotesticular DSD are poorly defined. Duplications involving a region located ∼600 kb upstream of SOX9, a key gene in testis development, were reported in several cases of 46,XX DSD. Recent studies have narrowed this region down to a 78 kb interval that is duplicated or deleted respectively in 46,XX or 46,XY DSD. We identified three phenotypically normal patients presenting with azoospermia and 46,XX testicular DSD. Two brothers carried a 83.8 kb duplication located ∼600 kb upstream of SOX9 that overlapped with the previously reported rearrangements. This duplication refines the minimal region associated with 46,XX-SRY negative DSD to a 40.7-41.9 kb element located ∼600 kb upstream of SOX9. Predicted enhancer elements and evolutionary-conserved binding sites for proteins known to be involved in testis determination are located within this region. PMID:25900885

  16. Efficiency of responding to unexpected information varies with sex, age, and pubertal development in early adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Brumback, Ty; Arbel, Yael; Donchin, Emanuel; Goldman, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Entry into adolescence is marked by dramatic changes resulting from a dynamic interplay among biological and psychosocial processes. Despite the complexity, development is often indexed only by age in ERP studies. To broaden this approach, we address the effects of gender and pubertal development, along with age, in adolescents using a psychophysiological probe of decision making, the P300 component. Overall, females exhibited shorter P300 latencies and smaller P300 amplitudes compared to males, suggesting more efficient information processing. In both genders, P300 latency and amplitude also diminished as age and pubertal status increased, again suggesting increasing efficiency of information processing with development. Our findings highlight the necessity of considering more than age when examining cognitive functioning in adolescents, and in particular, the necessity of considering gender whenever developmental issues are addressed. PMID:22846050

  17. Gene Abnormality May Be Key to Down Syndrome, Scientists Say

    MedlinePlus

    ... 157468.html Gene Abnormality May Be Key to Down Syndrome, Scientists Say Results might eventually lead to new ... abnormality that affects brain development in people with Down Syndrome, and they say this finding might lead to ...

  18. Let's Talk about Sex: Development of a Sexual Health Program for Nepali Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Michelle R.; Harman, Jennifer J.; Shrestha, Deepti Khati

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test the feasibility of conducting a sexual health intervention for women in Nepal, a country with high political and economic instability and strong patriarchal systems. Of the 88 women enrolled, 100% retention was obtained over three sessions, and 85% completed a 1-month follow-up. Recruitment was so

  19. Sex, Drugs and STDs: Preliminary Findings from the Belfast Youth Development Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAloney, Kareena; McCrystal, Patrick; Percy, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Young people's participation in sexual risk behaviours is commonly linked with participation in a range of other risky behaviours, and in particular with substance use behaviours. This cross-sectional analysis of the sixth sweep of the Belfast Youth Development Study aimed to examine associations between substance use and sexual activity and…

  20. Let's Talk about Sex: Development of a Sexual Health Program for Nepali Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Michelle R.; Harman, Jennifer J.; Shrestha, Deepti Khati

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test the feasibility of conducting a sexual health intervention for women in Nepal, a country with high political and economic instability and strong patriarchal systems. Of the 88 women enrolled, 100% retention was obtained over three sessions, and 85% completed a 1-month follow-up. Recruitment was so…

  1. Sex, Literacy and Videotape: Learning, Identity and Language Development through Documentary Production with "Overage" Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Steven

    2010-01-01

    This case study examines the learning, identity and language development experienced by "overage" 8th-grade students who have been left behind two or more years in their New York City middle school and are participating in an extended-day video documentary program. The students practise a range of literacy skills naturally embedded in the…

  2. The Tribolium castaneum ortholog of Sex combs reduced controls dorsal ridge development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In insects, the boundary between the embryonic head and thorax is formed by the dorsal ridge, a fused structure composed of portions of the maxillary and labial segments. However, the mechanisms that promote development of this unusual structure remain a mystery. In Drosophila, mutations in the Hox ...

  3. Predictors of Morphosyntactic Growth in Typically Developing Toddlers: Contributions of Parent Input and Child Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Pamela A.; Rispoli, Matthew; Fitzgerald, Colleen; Bahnsen, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Theories of morphosyntactic development must account for between-child differences in morphosyntactic growth rates. This study extends Legate and Yang's (2007) theoretically motivated cross-linguistic approach to determine if variation in properties of parent input accounts for differences in the growth of tense productivity. Method:…

  4. Epiphyseal abnormalities, trabecular bone loss and articular chondrocyte hypertrophy develop in the long bones of postnatal Ext1-deficient mice1

    PubMed Central

    Sgariglia, Federica; Candela, Maria Elena; Huegel, Julianne; Jacenko, Olena; Koyama, Eiki; Yamaguchi, Yu; Pacifici, Maurizio; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Long bones are integral components of the limb skeleton. Recent studies have indicated that embryonic long bone development is altered by mutations in Ext genes and consequent heparan sulfate (HS) deficiency, possibly due to changes in activity and distribution of HS-binding/growth plate-associated signaling proteins. Here we asked whether Ext function is continuously required after birth to sustain growth plate function and long bone growth and organization. Compound transgenic Ext1f/f;Col2CreERT mice were injected with tamoxifen at postnatal day 5 (P5) to ablate Ext1 in cartilage and monitored over time. The Ext1-deficient mice exhibited growth retardation already by 2 weeks post-injection, as did their long bones. Mutant growth plates displayed a severe disorganization of chondrocyte columnar organization, a shortened hypertrophic zone with low expression of collagen X and MMP-13, and reduced primary spongiosa accompanied, however, by increased numbers of TRAP-positive osteoclasts at the chondro-osseous border. The mutant epiphyses were abnormal as well. Formation of a secondary ossification center was significantly delayed but interestingly, hypertrophic-like chondrocytes emerged within articular cartilage, similar to those often seen in osteoarthritic joints. Indeed, the cells displayed a large size and round shape, expressed collagen X and MMP-13 and were surrounded by an abundant Perlecan-rich pericellular matrix not seen in control articular chondrocytes. In addition, ectopic cartilaginous by EXT mutations and HS deficiency. In sum, the data do show that Ext1 is continuously required for postnatal growth and organization of long bones as well as their adjacent joints. Ext1 deficiency elicits defects that can occur in human skeletal conditions including trabecular bone loss, osteoarthritis and HME. PMID:23958822

  5. Development and validation of an high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector method for the simultaneous determination of six phenolic compounds in abnormal savda munziq decoction

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shuge; Liu, Wenxian; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Xuejia; Upur, Halmuart

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Given the high-effectiveness and low-toxicity of abnormal savda munziq (ASMQ), its herbal formulation has long been used in traditional Uyghur medicine to treat complex diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Settings and Design: ASMQ decoction by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a diode array detector was successfully developed for the simultaneous quality assessment of gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, caffeic acid, rutin, rosmarinic acid, and luteolin. The six phenolic compounds were separated on an Agilent TC-C18 reversed-phase analytical column (4.6 × 250 mm, 5 μm) by gradient elution using 0.3% aqueous formic acid (v/v) and 0.3% methanol formic acid (v/v) at 1.0 mL/min. Materials and Methods: The plant material was separately ground and mixed at the following ratios (10): Cordia dichotoma (10.6), Anchusa italic (10.6), Euphorbia humifusa (4.9), Adiantum capillus-veneris (4.9), Ziziphus jujube (4.9), Glycyrrhiza uralensis (7.1), Foeniculum vulgare (4.9), Lavandula angustifolia (4.9), Dracocephalum moldavica L. (4.9), and Alhagi pseudoalhagi (42.3). Statistical Analysis Used: The precisions of all six compounds were <0.60%, and the average recoveries ranged from 99.39% to 104.85%. Highly significant linear correlations were found between component concentrations and specific chromatographic peak areas (R2 > 0.999). Results: The proposed method was successfully applied to determine the levels of six active components in ASMQ. Conclusions: Given the simplicity, precision, specificity, and sensitivity of the method, it can be utilized as a quality control approach to simultaneously determining the six phenolic compounds in AMSQ. PMID:25709227

  6. Gonadal Development, Spawning and Plasma Sex Steroid Levels of the Indoor Cultured Grunt, Hapalogenys nitens

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee Woong; Cho, Jae-Kwon; Son, Maeng-Hyun; Park, Jong Youn; Hong, Chang Gi; Chung, Jae Seung; Chung, Ee-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The gonadosomatic index (GSI), gonadal development and changes in hormones in plasma level of the indoor cultured grunt (Hapalogenys nitens) were investigated by histological study from August 2011 to October 2012. The GSI showed similar trends with gonad developmental stages during the culture periods. Changes in plasma level of estradiol-17β of female H. nitens reached the highest value before the spawning period, and seasonal changes in plasma level of estradiol-17β were similar in trends of oocyte developments and GSI changes. Testosterone levels of male H. nitens reached the highest value before and after the spent stage. Ovarian developmental stages of H. nitens could be classified into early growing stage, late growing stage, mature stage, ripe and spawning stage, recovery and resting stage. The testicular developmental stages could be divided into growing stage, mature stage, ripe and spent stage, and recovery and resting stage. PMID:25949208

  7. AB020. What is advance in molecular diagnosis for 46,XY and 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development?

    PubMed Central

    Dũng, Vũ Chí; Khánh, Nguyễn Ngọc; Thảo, Bùi Phương; Ngọc, Cấn Thị Bích; Đạt, Nguyễn Phú; Dung, Le Anh; Kon, Masafumi; Igarashi, Maki; Fukami, Maki

    2015-01-01

    Background The disorders of sex development (DSD) are defined by congenital conditions in which development of chromosomal, gonadal, or anatomical sex is atypical. It is estimated that genital anomalies occur in 1 in 4,500 births but 1:125 boys has hypospadias. There are three broad groups: 46,XX DSD, 46,XY DSD and sex chromosome aneuploidy DSD. Recently, exome sequencing followed by analysis with a list of all known human DSD-associated genes was used to investigate the underlying genetic etiology of 46,XY DSD patients who had not previously received a genetic diagnosis (E. C. Delot et al. ASHG meeting 2014). The authors identified a likely genetic diagnosis in more than a third of cases, including 22.5% with a pathogenic finding and an additional 12.5% with likely pathogenic findings. In addition, 15% had variants of uncertain clinical significance that may be reclassified as literature evolves. Objective To identify mutations in causative/candidate/susceptibility genes in patients with 46,XY DSD and 46,XX testicular DSD including AR, ATF3, BMP4, BMP7, BNC2, CTGF, CYP1A1, CYR61, DGKK, EGF, ESR1, ESR2, FGF8, FGFR2, GSTM1, GSTT1, HOXA4, HOXB6, HSD3B2, HSD17B3, MAMLD1, MID1, NR5A1 (alias SF1), SRD5A2, and WT1 genes. And to clarify the role of cryptic rearrangements in the development of 46,XY DSD in Vietnamese patients. Patients and methods A total of 61 cases with 46, XY were performed mutation analysis using PCR, next generation sequencing. Eight patients with 46, XX testicular DSD were analysed using whole genome and exome sequencing and 6 cases with 46, XY DSD associated with mental retardation and/or other congenital malformations were diagnosed molecular using CGH. Genomic DNA was extracted from lymphocytes of peripheral blood. Results and conclusions Two cases with primary adrenal insufficiency and 46,XY DSD from two unrelated families were identified novel homozygous mutation in HSD3B2 [c.481G>C (p.A161P)]. One case with simple hypospadias without adrenal insufficiency was identified mutation in HSD3B2 (p.A10T) gene. Six different causative mutations including 3 novel ones of AR gene were identified in 9 patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome [p.L701F (c.2103G>T); p.L705F (c.2113C>T); p. W752S (c. 2256 G>T); p.V747M (c.2239 G>A); p.V867M (c.2599 G>A) and p.Q28X (c.82C>T)]. Three causative mutations of SRD5A gene (coding for 5-alpha reductase) (p.S220L; p.R237G and p.R227Q) were identified in three patients from three unrelated families. Six cases with 46,XY DSD associated with mental retardation and/or other congenital malformation were identified cryptic rearrangements; 2 cases with 46,XX testicular DSD were identified duplication in SOX9. Advances in identification of molecular genetic causes of DSD will help confirmation of diagnosis, appropriate treatment and genetic counseling.

  8. Copy number variation in the region harboring SOX9 gene in dogs with testicular/ovotesticular disorder of sex development (78,XX; SRY-negative).

    PubMed

    Marcinkowska-Swojak, Malgorzata; Szczerbal, Izabela; Pausch, Hubert; Nowacka-Woszuk, Joanna; Flisikowski, Krzysztof; Dzimira, Stanislaw; Nizanski, Wojciech; Payan-Carreira, Rita; Fries, Ruedi; Kozlowski, Piotr; Switonski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Although the disorder of sex development in dogs with female karyotype (XX DSD) is quite common, its molecular basis is still unclear. Among mutations underlying XX DSD in mammals are duplication of a long sequence upstream of the SOX9 gene (RevSex) and duplication of the SOX9 gene (also observed in dogs). We performed a comparative analysis of 16 XX DSD and 30 control female dogs, using FISH and MLPA approaches. Our study was focused on a region harboring SOX9 and a region orthologous to the human RevSex (CanRevSex), which was located by in silico analysis downstream of SOX9. Two highly polymorphic copy number variable regions (CNVRs): CNVR1 upstream of SOX9 and CNVR2 encompassing CanRevSex were identified. Although none of the detected copy number variants were specific to either affected or control animals, we observed that the average number of copies in CNVR1 was higher in XX DSD. No copy variation of SOX9 was observed. Our extensive studies have excluded duplication of SOX9 as the common cause of XX DSD in analyzed samples. However, it remains possible that the causative mutation is hidden in highly polymorphic CNVR1. PMID:26423656

  9. Copy number variation in the region harboring SOX9 gene in dogs with testicular/ovotesticular disorder of sex development (78,XX; SRY-negative)

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkowska-Swojak, Malgorzata; Szczerbal, Izabela; Pausch, Hubert; Nowacka-Woszuk, Joanna; Flisikowski, Krzysztof; Dzimira, Stanislaw; Nizanski, Wojciech; Payan-Carreira, Rita; Fries, Ruedi; Kozlowski, Piotr; Switonski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Although the disorder of sex development in dogs with female karyotype (XX DSD) is quite common, its molecular basis is still unclear. Among mutations underlying XX DSD in mammals are duplication of a long sequence upstream of the SOX9 gene (RevSex) and duplication of the SOX9 gene (also observed in dogs). We performed a comparative analysis of 16 XX DSD and 30 control female dogs, using FISH and MLPA approaches. Our study was focused on a region harboring SOX9 and a region orthologous to the human RevSex (CanRevSex), which was located by in silico analysis downstream of SOX9. Two highly polymorphic copy number variable regions (CNVRs): CNVR1 upstream of SOX9 and CNVR2 encompassing CanRevSex were identified. Although none of the detected copy number variants were specific to either affected or control animals, we observed that the average number of copies in CNVR1 was higher in XX DSD. No copy variation of SOX9 was observed. Our extensive studies have excluded duplication of SOX9 as the common cause of XX DSD in analyzed samples. However, it remains possible that the causative mutation is hidden in highly polymorphic CNVR1. PMID:26423656

  10. Sex determination in dioecious Silene latifolia. Effects of the Y chromosome and the parasitic smut fungus (Ustilago violacea) on gene expression during flower development.

    PubMed Central

    Scutt, C P; Li, T; Robertson, S E; Willis, M E; Gilmartin, P M

    1997-01-01

    We have embarked on a molecular cloning approach to the investigation of sex determination in Silene latifolia Poiret, a dioecious plant species with morphologically distinguishable sex chromosomes. One of our key objectives was to define a range of genes that are up-regulated in male plants in response to Y chromosome sex-determination genes. Here we present the characterization of eight male-specific cDNA sequences and classify these according to their expression dynamics to provide a range of molecular markers for dioecious male flower development. Genetically female S. latifolia plants undergo a partial sex reversal in response to infection by the parasitic smut fungus Ustilago violacea. This phenomenon has been exploited in these studies; male-specific cDNAs have been further categorized as inducible or noninducible in female plants by smut fungus infection. Analysis of the organ-specific expression of male-specific probes in male and female flowers has also identified a gene that is regulated in a sex-specific manner in nonreproductive floral tissues common to both male and female plants. This observation provides, to our knowledge, the first molecular marker for dominant effect of the Y chromosome in nonreproductive floral organs. PMID:9232878

  11. Multifinality in the Development of Personality Disorders: A Biology × Sex × Environment Interaction Model of Antisocial and Borderline Traits

    PubMed Central

    Beauchaine, Theodore P.; Klein, Daniel N.; Crowell, Sheila E.; Derbidge, Christina; Gatzke-Kopp, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Although antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is more common among males and borderline personality disorder (BPD) is more common among females, some (e.g., Paris, 1997) have suggested that the two disorders reflect multifinal outcomes of a single etiology. This assertion is based on several overlapping symptoms and features, including trait impulsivity, emotional lability, high rates of depression and suicide, and a high likelihood of childhood abuse and/or neglect. Furthermore, rates of ASPD are elevated in the first degree relatives of those with BPD, and concurrent comorbidity rates for the two disorders are high. In this article, we present a common model of antisocial and borderline personality development. We begin by reviewing issues and problems with diagnosing and studying personality disorders in children and adolescents. Next, we discuss dopaminergic and serotonergic mechanisms of trait impulsivity as predisposing vulnerabilities to ASPD and BPD. Finally, we extend shared risk models for ASPD and BPD by specifying genetic loci that may confer differential vulnerability to impulsive aggression and mood dysregulation among males and impulsive self-injury and mood dysregulation among females. Although the precise mechanisms of these sex-moderated genetic vulnerabilities remain poorly understood, they appear to interact with environmental risk factors including adverse rearing environments to potentiate the development of ASPD and BPD. PMID:19583882

  12. Multimodal sex-related differences in infant and in infant-directed maternal behaviors during months three through twelve of development.

    PubMed

    Fausto-Sterling, Anne; Crews, David; Sung, Jihyun; García-Coll, Cynthia; Seifer, Ronald

    2015-10-01

    Using the concepts of sensory and affective experience, this work relates the concepts of socialization and cognitive development to the embodiment of gender in the human infant. Evidence obtained from biweekly observations from 30 children and their mothers observed from age 3 months to age 12 months revealed measurable sex-related differences in how mothers handle and touch their infants. This work offers novel approaches to visualizing combinations of behaviors with the aim of encouraging researchers to think in terms of suites of action rather than singular sensory or motor systems. New avenues of research into the mechanisms which produce sex-related differences in behavior are suggested. PMID:26372294

  13. The Development and Feasibility of a Brief Risk Reduction Intervention for Newly HIV-Diagnosed Men Who Have Sex with Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikkema, Kathleen J.; Hansen, Nathan B.; Kochman, Arlene; Santos, Jonathan; Watt, Melissa H.; Wilson, Patrick A.; DeLorenzo, Allyson; Laudato, Jay; Mayer, Gal

    2011-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) represent more than half of all new HIV infections in the United States. Utilizing a collaborative, community-based approach, a brief risk reduction intervention was developed and pilot tested among newly HIV-diagnosed MSM receiving HIV care in a primary care setting. Sixty-five men, within 3 months of diagnosis,…

  14. The Effects of Depression and Stressful Life Events on the Development and Maintenance of Syndromal Social Anxiety: Sex and Age Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aune, Tore; Stiles, Tore C.

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed age and sex differences in the prevalence and incidence rates of syndromal social anxiety (SSA), as well as the predictive role of depressive symptoms and stressful life events on the development and persistence of SSA. A sample of 1,439 young people, between 11 and 14 years of age, was assessed twice within a 12-month…

  15. The gene CmACS-7 provides sequence variation for the development of DNA markers associated with monoecious sex expresion in melon (Cucumis melo L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most melon (Cucumis melo L.) breeding lines in South Korea display andromonoecious sex expression (i.e., possessing both bisexual and male flowers on the same plant), which, in turn, necessitates laborious hand emasculation during F1 hybrid seed production. Thus, there is a need to develop monoecio...

  16. Multimodal Sex-Related Differences in Infant and in Infant-Directed Maternal Behaviors during Months Three through Twelve of Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fausto-Sterling, Anne; Crews, David; Sung, Jihyun; García-Coll, Cynthia; Seifer, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Using the concepts of sensory and affective experience, this work relates the concepts of socialization and cognitive development to the embodiment of gender in the human infant. Evidence obtained from biweekly observations from 30 children and their mothers observed from age 3 months to age 12 months revealed measurable sex-related differences in…

  17. Multimodal Sex-Related Differences in Infant and in Infant-Directed Maternal Behaviors during Months Three through Twelve of Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fausto-Sterling, Anne; Crews, David; Sung, Jihyun; Garca-Coll, Cynthia; Seifer, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Using the concepts of sensory and affective experience, this work relates the concepts of socialization and cognitive development to the embodiment of gender in the human infant. Evidence obtained from biweekly observations from 30 children and their mothers observed from age 3 months to age 12 months revealed measurable sex-related differences in

  18. Are There Gender-Specific Pathways from Early Adolescence Psychological Distress Symptoms toward the Development of Substance Use and Abnormal Eating Behavior?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beato-Fernandez, Luis; Rodriguez-Cano, Teresa; Pelayo-Delgado, Esther; Calaf, Myralys

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present longitudinal community study was to test whether psychological distress at 13 years of age predicted reported substance use problems in boys and abnormal eating behavior in girls 2 years later. The sample consisted of 500 male and 576 female students. The use of substances was evaluated using a semi-structured interview,…

  19. Sex moderates associations between prenatal glucocorticoid exposure and human fetal neurological development.

    PubMed

    Glynn, Laura M; Sandman, Curt A

    2012-09-01

    Maternal cortisol levels (at 15, 19, 25, 31 and 37 weeks' gestation) and fetal movement response to vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS; at 25, 31 and 37 weeks) were assessed in 190 mother-fetus pairs. Fetuses showed a response to the VAS at 25 weeks and there was evidence of increasing maturation in the response at 31 and 37 weeks. Early elevations in cortisol predicted a failure to respond to the VAS at 25 weeks and later elevations in cortisol were associated with a larger response among fetuses when assessed near term. The associations between cortisol and VAS emerged earlier and were more apparent among female fetuses than among the males. The findings provide support for the role of prenatal glucocorticoids in shaping human fetal CNS development. PMID:22925508

  20. Sex Stereotyping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western European Education, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents the Norwegian Ministry of Education's recommendations to the Council of Europe for reforming European education to prevent sex discrimination against women at the elementary and secondary levels. (AM)

  1. VEGF, Ang-2 and SRIF associated abnormal postnatal development of the retinal capillary network in the Royal College of Surgeons rat.

    PubMed

    Prokosch, Verena; Fink, Jürgen; Heiduschka, Peter; Melkonyan, Harutyun; Thanos, Solon

    2011-02-01

    To examine retinal angiogenesis in the Royal College of Surgeons rat (RCS) serving as a model for ischemic proliferative retinopathies at morphological, proteomic and mRNA levels in order to evaluate the interplay of morphological and molecular changes in the course of the disease. Photoreceptor degeneration was confirmed by histological cross-sections and optical coherence tomography. The capillary retinal network was visualized in RCS rats aged between 14 and 45 days (P14-P45) by perfusion with high molecular weight fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran and compared with corresponding Sprague-Dawley rats. Vascular crosstalks within central areas to peripheral retinal eccentricities were analyzed. The expression of vascular growth-associated factors and their receptors in the course of the abnormal vascular development, namely vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor subtype 1 (VEGF-R1) and -2 (VEGF-R2), somatostatin (SRIF), somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (Sstr-2), angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) and tyrosine kinase with immunoglobulin-like and EGF-like domains 2 (Tie-2), was analyzed by immunohistochemistry, western blotting and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Underperfused areas without capillarization were found in the middle and peripheral retinal eccentricities of RCS rats until P29. Through the course of vascularization previously low perfused areas became completely perfused, but were characterized by significantly increased neovascularizations. Western blotting revealed specific expression of growth-associated factors and their receptors in the course of capillary development. VEGF was significantly increased until P29 in RCS rats, while SRIF was significantly upregulated at P21 and P29 at proteomic level in SD rats. At mRNA level Ang-2 was significantly upregulated in RCS rats at P29, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 at P36 and SRIF at P36. Initial incomplete perfusion is followed by aberrant vessel formation. VEGF, SRIF, Ang-2 and their receptors are regulated at protein and mRNA levels, providing therapeutic possibilities for treating ischemic proliferative retinopathies in the course of the disease. PMID:21147101

  2. Relational development in children with cleft lip and palate: influence of the waiting period prior to the first surgical intervention and parental psychological perceptions of the abnormality

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The birth of a child with a cleft lip, whether or not in association with a cleft palate, is a traumatic event for parents. This prospective, multidisciplinary and multi-centre study aims to explore the perceptions and feelings of parents in the year following the birth of their child, and to analyse parent–child relationships. Four inclusion centres have been selected, differing as to the date of the first surgical intervention, between birth and six months. The aim is to compare results, also distinguishing the subgroups of parents who were given the diagnosis in utero and those who were not. Methods/Design The main hypothesis is that the longer the time-lapse before the first surgical intervention, the more likely are the psychological perceptions of the parents to affect the harmonious development of their child. Parents and children are seen twice, when the child is 4 months (T0) and when the child is one year old (T1). At these two times, the psychological state of the child and his/her relational abilities are assessed by a specially trained professional, and self-administered questionnaires measuring factors liable to affect child–parent relationships are issued to the parents. The Alarme Détresse BéBé score for the child and the Parenting Stress Index score for the parents, measured when the child reaches one year, will be used as the main criteria to compare children with early surgery to children with late surgery, and those where the diagnosis was obtained prior to birth with those receiving it at birth. Discussion The mental and psychological dimensions relating to the abnormality and its correction will be analysed for the parents (the importance of prenatal diagnosis, relational development with the child, self-image, quality of life) and also, for the first time, for the child (distress, withdrawal). In an ethical perspective, the different time lapses until surgery in the different protocols and their effects will be analysed, so as to serve as a reference for improving the quality of information during the waiting period, and the quality of support provided for parents and children by the healthcare team before the first surgical intervention. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00993993. PMID:22682069

  3. Sex education in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Frade, A; Vilar, D

    1991-05-01

    The article on sex education in Portugal covers background, the educational system, the clashes of the 1960's over sex education, the Committee for the Study of Sexuality and Education (CSSE), the policies, politics and social movements during the period 1974 - 1984, the discussions in Parliament, the 1988 Reform of the Educational System, the Family Planning Association (FPA) and sex education, and the future role of the FPA. It was not until the institution of the multiparity parliamentary system in 1974 that discussing social and political changes was possible, culminating in 1984 with new legislation on abortion, family planning, and sex education. School reform came in 1987/8 with the Ministry of Education primarily responsible for curricula. The 1960's brought with it the influence of the Catholic Church. Change came in the form of progressivism among Catholics who replaced dogma with dialogue and listening. Sex education was considered as preparation for marriage, but masturbation, contraception, and prostitution were also discussed. In addition, the founder of FPA chaired the CSSE in 1971 and opened up debate on sex issues and drafted a bill to establish co-education in Portuguese schools. The revolution of 1974 brought an end to censorship and brought forth a policy of developing family planning. Changed in the Family Code gave women greater equality. UNFPA supported teacher training in non-sexist education. With human reproduction included in the natural sciences, there was still no school sex education policy and contraception was only sometimes represented in the biology curriculum. The focus of FPA was on contraception and abortion. Finally in the 1980's, the first sex education programs were developed for out-of-school youth. Even though in the 1970's there were leftists groups promoting sex education, it took leftist parliamentary power to get legislation on sex education in the schools adopted. The Ministry of Education however was pressured by the Catholic Church. As in 1973, committees were formed but no action was taken. Sex education activity increased nonetheless - the first FPA document on school education prepared. In 1986 Personal and Social Education was approved by parliament providing an alternative (due to the Catholic Church) to Religious Education, but even with FPA support documents, the implementation did not begin until the end of 1990. In brief the FPA's emphasis was on the body, sexuality, sex and interpersonal relationships, and sexual reproduction. The role of FPA continues at the grass roots level in stimulating discussion; cooperating with schools, students and parents; and acting as a resource center. PMID:12343180

  4. Visual abnormalities with multiple trauma.

    PubMed

    Elisevich, K V; Ford, R M; Anderson, D P; Stratford, J G; Richardson, P M

    1984-12-01

    The diversity of pathogenetic mechanisms involved in posttraumatic visual impairment was reviewed in a study of the hospital records of 24 patients admitted with multiple injuries. Most major visual abnormalities occurred in young people (average age 33 years) who presented with a wide range of overall severity of injury (injury severity score 13-47) and involvement of the central nervous system (Glasgow coma scale 5-15). Bilateral or monocular blindness developed in 63% of patients. Seventy percent of the injuries involved the anterior visual pathways with damage to the optic nerve alone accounting for 35%. Fractures of the sphenoid bone, particularly of the body, accompanied optic nerve and chiasmal injuries and some cases of traumatic carotid-cavernous fistulas. Pathogenetic mechanisms varied according to the site of injury and included vitreous hemorrhage and optic atrophy secondary to raised intracranial pressure, retinal hypoxia from carotid-cavernous fistulas, shearing and compression injuries of the optic nerve, traumatic chiasmal syndrome, temporoparietal and occipital contusions, and transtentorial herniation with occipital infarction. Visual abnormalities varied in severity from moderately reduced visual acuity and diverse hemianopias and scotomas to blindness. The incidence of posttraumatic residual visual abnormalities is likely to increase in the wake of improved acute care of the traumatized victim. PMID:6495169

  5. Attitudes about Sex Selection and Sex Preference in Iranian Couples Referred for Sex Selection Technology

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Seyedeh Fatemeh; Shirzad, Mahdi; Kamali, Koorosh; Ranjbar, Fahimeh; Behjati-Ardakani, Zohreh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background Gender preference is prevalent in some communities and using medical techniques to choose the baby's sex may cause the gender discrimination and gender imbalance in communities. Therefore, evaluating the gender preferences and attitudes towards using sex selection technologies seems to be necessary. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in Avicenna Fertility Center. Participants were 100 women with one child who were referred for sex selection. Data were collected through self-developed questionnaires. The questions were designed by the researchers at the experts’ panel. To determine the validity of the questionnaire, the viewpoints of professors specialized in these issues were obtained. The statistical analysis of the data was performed using SPSS software (Version 11.5), and p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results Tendency toward the male was more than female sex (55.5% male, 15.5% female and 28.5% no tendency). Majority of participants agreed with sex selection with medical reason and sex selection in order to balance the family. Women's level of education had positive effect on agreements to fetal sex selection with medical and non-medical reasons (p < 0.001). Conclusion Although gender preferences were toward the male sex but this preference was not very strong. Most participants agreed with non-medical sex selection for balancing the sex composition of their children. It doesn't seem that non-medical sex selection for family balancing causes severe sex imbalance in Iran. PMID:25717434

  6. Analysis of the multiple roles of gld-1 in germline development: Interactions with the sex determination cascade and the glp-1 signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, R.; Schedl, T.; Maine, E.

    1995-02-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans gene gld-1 is essential for oocyte development; in gld-1 (null) hermaphrodites, a tumor forms where oogenesis would normally occur. We use genetic epistasis analysis to demonstrate that tumor formation is dependent on the sexual fate of the germline. When the germline sex determination pathway is set in the female mode (terminal fem/fog genes inactive), gld-1 (null) germ cells exit meiotic prophase and proliferate to form a tumor, but when the pathway is et in the male mode, they develop into sperm. We conclude that the gld-1 (null) phenotype is cell-type specific and that gld-1(+) acts at the end of the cascade to direct oogenesis. We also use cell ablation and epistasis analysis to examine the dependence of tumor formation on the glp-1 signaling pathway. Although glp-1 activity promotes tumor growth, it is not essential for tumor formation by gld-1 (null) germ cells. These data also reveal that gld-1(+) plays a nonessential (and sex nonspecific) role in regulating germ cell proliferation before their entry into meiosis. Thus gld-1(+) may negatively regulate proliferation at two distinct points in germ cell development: before entry into meiotic prophase in both sexes (nonessential premeiotic gld-1 function) and during meiotic prophase when the sex determination pathway is set in the female mode (essential meiotic gld-1 function). 46 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Analysis of the Multiple Roles of Gld-1 in Germline Development: Interactions with the Sex Determination Cascade and the Glp-1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Francis, R.; Maine, E.; Schedl, T.

    1995-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans gene gld-1 is essential for oocyte development; in gld-1 (null) hermaphrodites, a tumor forms where oogenesis would normally occur. We use genetic epistasis analysis to demonstrate that tumor formation is dependent on the sexual fate of the germline. When the germline sex determination pathway is set in the female mode (terminal fem/fog genes inactive), gld-1 (null) germ cells exit meiotic prophase and proliferate to form a tumor, but when the pathway is set in the male mode, they develop into sperm. We conclude that the gld-1 (null) phenotype is cell-type specific and that gld-1 (+) acts at the end of the cascade to direct oogenesis. We also use cell ablation and epistasis analysis to examine the dependence of tumor formation on the glp-1 signaling pathway. Although glp-1 activity promotes tumor growth, it is not essential for tumor formation by gld-1 (null) germ cells. These data also reveal that gld-1 (+) plays a nonessential (and sex nonspecific) role in regulating germ cell proliferation before their entry into meiosis. Thus gld-1 (+) may negatively regulate proliferation at two distinct points in germ cell development: before entry into meiotic prophase in both sexes (nonessential premeiotic gld-1 function) and during meiotic prophase when the sex determination pathway is set in the female mode (essential meiotic gld-1 function). PMID:7713420

  8. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in centenarians: impact on survival

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The centenarian population is gradually increasing, so it is becoming more common to see centenarians in clinical practice. Electrocardiogram abnormalities in the elderly have been reported, but several methodological biases have been detected that limit the validity of their results. The aim of this study is to analyse the ECG abnormalities in a prospective study of the centenarian population and to assess their impact on survival. Method We performed a domiciliary visit, where a medical history, an ECG and blood analysis were obtained. Barthel index (BI), cognitive mini-exam (CME) and Charlson index (ChI) were all determined. Patients were followed up by telephone up until their death. Results A total of 80 centenarians were studied, 26 men and 64 women, mean age 100.8 (SD 1.3). Of these, 81% had been admitted to the hospital at least once in the past, 81.3% were taking drugs (mean 3.3, rank 0–11). ChI was 1.21 (SD 1.19). Men had higher scores both for BI (70 -SD 34.4- vs. 50.4 -SD 36.6-, P = .005) and CME (16.5 -SD 9.1- vs. 9.1 –SD 11.6-, P = .008); 40.3% of the centenarians had anaemia, 67.5% renal failure, 13% hyperglycaemia, 22.1% hypoalbuminaemia and 10.7% dyslipidaemia, without statistically significant differences regarding sex. Only 7% had a normal ECG; 21 (26.3%) had atrial fibrillation (AF), 30 (37.5%) conduction defects and 31 (38.8%) abnormalities suggestive of ischemia, without sex-related differences. A history of heart disease was significantly associated with the presence of AF (P = .002, OR 5.2, CI 95% 1.8 to 15.2) and changes suggestive of ischemia (P = .019, OR 3.2, CI 95% 1.2-8.7). Mean survival was 628 days (SD 578.5), median 481 days. Mortality risk was independently associated with the presence of AF (RR 2.0, P = .011), hyperglycaemia (RR 2.2, P = .032), hypoalbuminaemia (RR 3.5, P < .001) and functional dependence assessed by BI (RR 1.8, P = .024). Conclusion Although ECG abnormalities are common in centenarians, they are not related to sex, functional capacity or cognitive impairment. The only abnormality that has an impact on survival is AF. PMID:22520618

  9. The Image of Women in Abnormal Psychology: Professionalism versus Psychopathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Ben; Lightner, Jean

    1980-01-01

    A survey of sex stereotyping in photographs was made of major current-edition textbooks of abnormal psychology published in the United States. In photographs of contributors to the field women were significantly underrepresented, amounting to less that 5 percent of the contributors pictured. (Author)

  10. Personality and Examination Score Correlates of Abnormal Psychology Course Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauker, Jerome D.

    The relationship between the ratings students assigned to an evening undergraduate abnormal psychology class and their scores on objective personality tests and course examinations was investigated. Students (N=70) completed the MMPI and made global ratings of the course; these scores were correlated separately by sex with the T scores of 13 MMPI…

  11. Evaluating and Refining the Construct of Sexual Quality With Item Response Theory: Development of the Quality of Sex Inventory.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Amanda M; Rogge, Ronald D

    2016-02-01

    This study took a critical look at the construct of sexual quality. The 65 items of four well-validated self-report measures of sexual satisfaction (the Index of Sexual Satisfaction [ISS], Hudson, Harrison, & Crosscup, 1981; the Global Measure of Sexual Satisfaction [GMSEX], Lawrance & Byers, 1995; the Pinney Sexual Satisfaction Inventory [PSSI], Pinney, Gerrard, & Denney, 1987; the Young Sexual Satisfaction Scale [YSSS], Young, Denny, Luquis, & Young, 1998) and an additional 74 potential sexual quality items were given to 3060 online participants. Using Item Response Theory (IRT), we demonstrated that the ISS, YSSS, and PSSI scales provided suboptimal levels of precision in assessing sexual quality, particularly given the length of those scales. Exploratory factor analyses, IRT, differential item functioning analyses, and longitudinal responsiveness analyses were used to develop and evaluate the Quality of Sex Inventory. Results suggested that, in comparison to existing scales, the QSI (1) offers investigators and clinicians more theoretically focused scales, (2) distinguishes sexual satisfaction from sexual dissatisfaction, and (3) offers greater precision and power for detecting differences with (4) comparably high levels of responsiveness for detecting change over time despite being notably shorter than most of the existing scales. The QSI-satisfaction subscales demonstrated strong convergent validity with other measures of sexual satisfaction and excellent construct validity with anchor scales from the nomological net surrounding that construct, suggesting that they continue to assess the same theoretical construct as prior scales. Implications for research are discussed. PMID:26728053

  12. Developing a Conceptual Framework of Seroadaptive Behaviors in HIV-Diagnosed Men Who Have Sex With Men

    PubMed Central

    Rönn, Minttu; White, Peter J.; Hughes, Gwenda; Ward, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Background. Seroadaptive behaviors are strategies employed by men who have sex with men (MSM) to reduce the transmission risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It has been suggested that they contribute to the increasing diagnoses of sexually transmitted infections in HIV-diagnosed MSM. To understand the context in which the reemerging sexually transmitted infections appear, we developed a social epidemiological model incorporating the multiple factors influencing seroadaptive behaviors. Methods. A literature review of seroadaptive behaviors in HIV-diagnosed MSM was conducted. The literature was synthesized using a social epidemiological perspective. Results. Seroadaptive behaviors are adopted by MSM in high-income countries and are a way for HIV-diagnosed men to manage and enjoy their sexual lives. Influences are apparent at structural, community, interpersonal, and intrapersonal levels. There is little evidence of whether and when the behavior forms part of a premeditated strategy; it seems dependent on the social context and on time since HIV diagnosis. Social rules of HIV disclosure and perception of risk depend on the setting where partners are encountered. Conclusions. Seroadaptive behaviors are strongly context dependent and can reduce or increase transmission risk for different infectious diseases. Further data collection and mathematical modeling can help us explore the specific conditions in more detail. PMID:25381379

  13. The effects of female sex steroids on the development of autoimmune thyroiditis in thymectomized and irradiated rats.

    PubMed

    Ansar Ahmed, S; Young, P R; Penhale, W J

    1983-11-01

    Female PVG/c strain rats are more susceptible to the induction of autoimmune thyroiditis initiated by thymectomy and irradiation (Tx-X) than similarly treated males. Pre-pubertal ovariectomy was found to further augment this susceptibility. The administration of oestrogen or progesterone to groups of 4 week old ovariectomized Tx-X animals over a period of 15 weeks significantly altered the course of the events leading to the induction of this condition. Thus oestrogen administered repeatedly at dose levels of 1 microgram and 10 micrograms/100 g body weight resulted in partial suppression of thyroiditis with a corresponding change in the incidence of antibodies to thyroglobulin. Similarly, oestrogen administered by a single implantation had a suppressive effect on the development of autoimmunity in ovariectomized Tx-X females. Oestrogen given by either of these procedures also reduced the incidence of both thyroiditis and autoantibody induction in orchidectomized male Tx-X rats. In contrast to the inhibitory effects of oestrogen, the repeated administration of progesterone at a dose of 250 ng and 1,500 micrograms/100 g body weight appeared to augment the levels of autoimmunity. It is concluded that the differential susceptibility to the induction of autoimmunity by thymectomy and irradiation is the direct consequence of sex hormonal influences. Furthermore, the higher incidence of the disease in the female would appear to be determined by the balance between the activity of oestrogen and progesterone which would further appear to have antagonistic influences in this particular situation. PMID:6360435

  14. Role of sex steroids and their receptors in human preterm infants: Impacts on future treatment strategies for cerebral development.

    PubMed

    Hbner, Stephanie; Reich, Bettina; Heckmann, Matthias

    2015-12-15

    Preterm birth is a major risk factor for cerebral complications, such as hemorrhage or periventricular leukomalacia, which lead to lifelong neurodevelopmental deficits. Hypoxia/ischemia, inflammation, hyperoxia, and prematurity itself contribute to the extent of impaired neurodevelopment. Preterm birth leads to disruption of the placental supply of estrogens and progesterone. Postnatally, the plasma levels of estrogens and progesterone drop 100-fold. Preterm infants are deprived of the placental supply of these hormones for up to sixteen weeks. Thus, supplementation of estradiol and progesterone to mimic intrauterine conditions may potentially improve a premature infant?s extrauterine development and help protect the brain against neurological complications. However, preliminary clinical studies did not find improved outcomes except for a trend towards less cerebral palsy. The decrease in estrogen and progesterone concentrations is accompanied by persistent, high postnatal production of fetal zone steroids, mainly dehydroepiandrosterone, which serve as precursors for maternal estrogen synthesis during pregnancy. This commentary will combine knowledge from endocrinology, pharmacology, and neonatology to explain the discrepancies between promising animal models and clinical findings. Most important targets will be classical and non-classical estrogen receptors, which interact differently-not only with estrogens but also with fetal zone steroids. The fetal zone is unique among humans and higher primates. Therefore, a clearly defined model is required to study the role of sex steroids and their receptors before further clinical studies begin. PMID:26300058

  15. Transcriptomic Analysis for Different Sex Types of Ricinus communis L. during Development from Apical Buds to Inflorescences by Digital Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Meilian; Xue, Jianfeng; Wang, Lei; Huang, Jiaxiang; Fu, Chunling; Yan, Xingchu

    2016-01-01

    The castor plant (Ricinus communis L.) is a versatile industrial oilseed crop with a diversity of sex patterns, its hybrid breeding for improving yield and high purity is still hampered by genetic instability of female and poor knowledge of sex expression mechanisms. To obtain some hints involved in sex expression and provide the basis for further insight into the molecular mechanisms of castor plant sex determination, we performed DGE analysis to investigate differences between the transcriptomes of apices and racemes derived from female (JXBM0705P) and monoecious (JXBM0705M) lines. A total of 18 DGE libraries were constructed from the apices and racemes of a wild monoecious line and its isogenic female derivative at three stages of apex development, in triplicate. Approximately 5.7 million clean tags per library were generated and mapped to the reference castor genome. Transcriptomic analysis showed that identical dynamic changes of gene expression were indicated in monoecious and female apical bud during its development from vegetation to reproduction, with more genes expressed at the raceme formation and infant raceme stages compare to the early leaf bud stage. More than 3000 of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected in Ricinus apices at three developmental stages between two different sex types. A number of DEGs involved in hormone response and biosynthesis, such as auxin response and transport, transcription factors, signal transduction, histone demethylation/methylation, programmed cell death, and pollination, putatively associated with sex expression and reproduction were discovered, and the selected DEGs showed consistent expression between qRT-PCR validation and the DGE patterns. Most of those DEGs were suppressed at the early leaf stage in buds of the mutant, but then activated at the following transition stage (5-7-leaf stage) of buds in the mutant, and ultimately, the number of up-regulated DEGs was equal to that of down-regulation in the small raceme of the mutant. In this study, a large number of DEGs and some suggestions involved in sex expression and reproduction were discovered using DGE analysis, which provides large information and valuable hints for next insights into the molecular mechanism of sex determination. It is useful for other further studies in Ricinus. PMID:26904031

  16. Transcriptomic Analysis for Different Sex Types of Ricinus communis L. during Development from Apical Buds to Inflorescences by Digital Gene Expression Profiling.

    PubMed

    Tan, Meilian; Xue, Jianfeng; Wang, Lei; Huang, Jiaxiang; Fu, Chunling; Yan, Xingchu

    2015-01-01

    The castor plant (Ricinus communis L.) is a versatile industrial oilseed crop with a diversity of sex patterns, its hybrid breeding for improving yield and high purity is still hampered by genetic instability of female and poor knowledge of sex expression mechanisms. To obtain some hints involved in sex expression and provide the basis for further insight into the molecular mechanisms of castor plant sex determination, we performed DGE analysis to investigate differences between the transcriptomes of apices and racemes derived from female (JXBM0705P) and monoecious (JXBM0705M) lines. A total of 18 DGE libraries were constructed from the apices and racemes of a wild monoecious line and its isogenic female derivative at three stages of apex development, in triplicate. Approximately 5.7 million clean tags per library were generated and mapped to the reference castor genome. Transcriptomic analysis showed that identical dynamic changes of gene expression were indicated in monoecious and female apical bud during its development from vegetation to reproduction, with more genes expressed at the raceme formation and infant raceme stages compare to the early leaf bud stage. More than 3000 of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected in Ricinus apices at three developmental stages between two different sex types. A number of DEGs involved in hormone response and biosynthesis, such as auxin response and transport, transcription factors, signal transduction, histone demethylation/methylation, programmed cell death, and pollination, putatively associated with sex expression and reproduction were discovered, and the selected DEGs showed consistent expression between qRT-PCR validation and the DGE patterns. Most of those DEGs were suppressed at the early leaf stage in buds of the mutant, but then activated at the following transition stage (5-7-leaf stage) of buds in the mutant, and ultimately, the number of up-regulated DEGs was equal to that of down-regulation in the small raceme of the mutant. In this study, a large number of DEGs and some suggestions involved in sex expression and reproduction were discovered using DGE analysis, which provides large information and valuable hints for next insights into the molecular mechanism of sex determination. It is useful for other further studies in Ricinus. PMID:26904031

  17. An implicit test of the associations between children and sex in pedophiles.

    PubMed

    Gray, Nicola S; Brown, Anthony S; MacCulloch, Malcolm J; Smith, Jennifer; Snowden, Robert J

    2005-05-01

    Pedophiles are motivated to disguise their thoughts and feelings about their sexual beliefs and attraction toward children. New developments using implicit measures of associations have been successful in accessing socially stigmatic beliefs, even in cases in which the participant is resistant to this disclosure. Using an implicit measure, the authors show that pedophiles have an association between children and sex, whereas nonpedophilic offenders have an association between adults and sex. The task can therefore identify a core cognitive abnormality that may underpin some pedophilic deviant sexual behavior. PMID:15869360

  18. Juvenile Sex Offenders.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Eileen P; Otonichar, Joseph M

    2016-07-01

    Sexual offending by juveniles accounts for a sizable percentage of sexual offenses, especially against young children. In this article, recent research on female juvenile sex offenders (JSOs), risk factors for offending in juveniles, treatment, and the ways in which these youth may differ from general delinquents will be reviewed. Most JSOs do not go on to develop paraphilic disorders or to commit sex offenses during adulthood, and as a group, they are more similar to nonsexual offending juvenile delinquents than to adult sex offenders. Recent research has elucidated some differences between youth who commit sex offenses and general delinquents in the areas of atypical sexual interests, the use of pornography, and early sexual victimization during childhood. PMID:27222141

  19. X-linked Christianson syndrome: heterozygous female Slc9a6 knockout mice develop mosaic neuropathological changes and related behavioral abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Jakub; Leddy, Jennifer; Gulinello, Maria; Walkley, Steven U.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Christianson syndrome (CS) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental and neurological disorder characterized in males by core symptoms that include non-verbal status, intellectual disability, epilepsy, truncal ataxia, postnatal microcephaly and hyperkinesis. CS is caused by mutations in the SLC9A6 gene, which encodes a multipass transmembrane sodium (potassium)-hydrogen exchanger 6 (NHE6) protein, functional in early recycling endosomes. The extent and variability of the CS phenotype in female heterozygotes, who presumably express the wild-type and mutant SLC9A6 alleles mosaically as a result of X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), have not yet been systematically characterized. Slc9a6 knockout mice (Slc9a6 KO) were generated by insertion of the bacterial lacZ/β-galactosidase (β-Gal) reporter into exon 6 of the X-linked gene. Mutant Slc9a6 KO male mice have been shown to develop late endosomal/lysosomal dysfunction associated with glycolipid accumulation in selected neuronal populations and patterned degeneration of Purkinje cells (PCs). In heterozygous female Slc9a6 KO mice, β-Gal serves as a transcriptional/XCI reporter and thus facilitates testing of effects of mosaic expression of the mutant allele on penetrance of the abnormal phenotype. Using β-Gal, we demonstrated mosaic expression of the mutant Slc9a6 allele and mosaically distributed lysosomal glycolipid accumulation and PC pathology in the brains of heterozygous Slc9a6 KO female mice. At the behavioral level, we showed that heterozygous female mice suffer from visuospatial memory and motor coordination deficits similar to but less severe than those observed in X-chromosome hemizygous mutant males. Our studies in heterozygous Slc9a6 KO female mice provide important clues for understanding the likely phenotypic range of Christianson syndrome among females heterozygous for SLC9A6 mutations and might improve diagnostic practice and genetic counseling by helping to characterize this presumably underappreciated patient/carrier group. PMID:26515654

  20. X-linked Christianson syndrome: heterozygous female Slc9a6 knockout mice develop mosaic neuropathological changes and related behavioral abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Jakub; Leddy, Jennifer; Gulinello, Maria; Walkley, Steven U

    2016-01-01

    Christianson syndrome (CS) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental and neurological disorder characterized in males by core symptoms that include non-verbal status, intellectual disability, epilepsy, truncal ataxia, postnatal microcephaly and hyperkinesis. CS is caused by mutations in the SLC9A6 gene, which encodes a multipass transmembrane sodium (potassium)-hydrogen exchanger 6 (NHE6) protein, functional in early recycling endosomes. The extent and variability of the CS phenotype in female heterozygotes, who presumably express the wild-type and mutant SLC9A6 alleles mosaically as a result of X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), have not yet been systematically characterized. Slc9a6 knockout mice (Slc9a6 KO) were generated by insertion of the bacterial lacZ/β-galactosidase (β-Gal) reporter into exon 6 of the X-linked gene. Mutant Slc9a6 KO male mice have been shown to develop late endosomal/lysosomal dysfunction associated with glycolipid accumulation in selected neuronal populations and patterned degeneration of Purkinje cells (PCs). In heterozygous female Slc9a6 KO mice, β-Gal serves as a transcriptional/XCI reporter and thus facilitates testing of effects of mosaic expression of the mutant allele on penetrance of the abnormal phenotype. Using β-Gal, we demonstrated mosaic expression of the mutant Slc9a6 allele and mosaically distributed lysosomal glycolipid accumulation and PC pathology in the brains of heterozygous Slc9a6 KO female mice. At the behavioral level, we showed that heterozygous female mice suffer from visuospatial memory and motor coordination deficits similar to but less severe than those observed in X-chromosome hemizygous mutant males. Our studies in heterozygous Slc9a6 KO female mice provide important clues for understanding the likely phenotypic range of Christianson syndrome among females heterozygous for SLC9A6 mutations and might improve diagnostic practice and genetic counseling by helping to characterize this presumably underappreciated patient/carrier group. PMID:26515654

  1. MMPI Profiles of Males with Abnormal Sex Chromosome Complements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, M.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Nine males with Klinefelter's syndrome (XXY) and seven XYY males, located primarily in prisons and psychiatric hospitals, were administered the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. (Author/KW)

  2. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed. PMID:25903257

  3. Temporal Lobe Volume Abnormalities Precede the Prodrome: A Study of Children Presenting Antecedents of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Alexis E.

    2013-01-01

    Distributed abnormalities of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) volume characterize individuals experiencing their first episode of schizophrenia. Regions of abnormality are present already, albeit less extensively, during the prodromal phase of illness. This study aimed to determine whether putatively at-risk children, aged 9–12 years, who present multiple antecedents of schizophrenia (ASz), display GM and WM volume abnormalities relative to typically developing (TD) children presenting no antecedents. Structural magnetic resonance images were acquired for 20 ASz children and 20 TD children matched on age, sex, and IQ. Whole-brain differences in GM and WM volume were determined using voxel-based morphometry. Relative to the TD group, ASz children showed significantly decreased GM volume in the right middle temporal gyrus (MTG) and increased GM volume in the left superior-middle temporal gyri (P < 0.05, cluster correction). WM volume was significantly increased in ASz children relative to TD children in a cluster encompassing the left inferior parietal lobe, occipital lobe, and superior temporal gyrus. Post-hoc analyses indicated that these abnormalities were not limited to ASz children who self-reported auditory hallucinations on questionnaire. Our findings suggest that children aged 9–12 years who present multiple ASz are characterized by abnormalities of GM and WM volume in the temporal lobes, comprising a subset of the regions affected in first-episode schizophrenia and in the prodromal phase of illness. These preliminary findings indicate that structural brain abnormalities associated with schizophrenia may be detected in putatively at-risk, preprodromal children. Prospective studies following the brain development of at-risk children are needed. PMID:23135906

  4. Female predisposition to cranial neural tube defects is not because of a difference between the sexes in the rate of embryonic growth or development during neurulation.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, F A; Estibeiro, J P; Copp, A J

    1994-01-01

    The susceptibility of females to anencephaly is well established and has been suggested to result from a slower rate of growth and development of female embryos during cranial neurulation. We have tested this hypothesis by measuring the rates of growth and development, both in utero and in vitro, of male and female embryos of the curly tail (ct) mutant mouse strain, in which cranial neural tube defects occur primarily in females. Embryonic growth was assessed by increase in protein content, while development progression was judged from increase in somite number and morphological score. Embryos were sexed by use of the polymerase chain reaction to amplify a DNA sequence specific to the Y chromosome, and by sex chromatin analysis. We find that, during neurulation (between 8.5 and 10.5 days of gestation), males are advanced in growth and development relative to their female litter mates, but that the rates of growth and development do not differ between the sexes during this period. We conclude that rate of embryonic growth and development is unlikely to determine susceptibility to cranial neural tube defects. It seems more likely that male and female embryos differ in some specific aspect(s) of the neurulation process that increases the susceptibility of females to development of anencephaly. Images PMID:8064816

  5. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  6. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  7. Anatomical Abnormalities in Autism?

    PubMed

    Haar, Shlomi; Berman, Sigal; Behrmann, Marlene; Dinstein, Ilan

    2016-04-01

    Substantial controversy exists regarding the presence and significance of anatomical abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The release of the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (∼1000 participants, age 6-65 years) offers an unprecedented opportunity to conduct large-scale comparisons of anatomical MRI scans across groups and to resolve many of the outstanding questions. Comprehensive univariate analyses using volumetric, thickness, and surface area measures of over 180 anatomically defined brain areas, revealed significantly larger ventricular volumes, smaller corpus callosum volume (central segment only), and several cortical areas with increased thickness in the ASD group. Previously reported anatomical abnormalities in ASD including larger intracranial volumes, smaller cerebellar volumes, and larger amygdala volumes were not substantiated by the current study. In addition, multivariate classification analyses yielded modest decoding accuracies of individuals' group identity (<60%), suggesting that the examined anatomical measures are of limited diagnostic utility for ASD. While anatomical abnormalities may be present in distinct subgroups of ASD individuals, the current findings show that many previously reported anatomical measures are likely to be of low clinical and scientific significance for understanding ASD neuropathology as a whole in individuals 6-35 years old. PMID:25316335

  8. Sex differences in effects on sexual development in rat offspring after pre- and postnatal exposure to triphenyltin chloride.

    PubMed

    Grote, Konstanze; Hobler, Carolin; Andrade, Anderson J M; Grande, Simone Wichert; Gericke, Christine; Talsness, Chris E; Appel, Klaus E; Chahoud, Ibrahim

    2009-06-16

    Consumers are exposed to organotin compounds (OTCs) via contaminated fish and seafood due to the accumulation of these compounds in marine organisms. Certain OTCs are immunotoxic and may also have endocrine disrupting properties resulting in adverse effects on the reproductive tract in mollusks and mammals. Since effects of in utero exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals on the reproductive system are dependent on the critical window of exposure during its development, we conducted a comprehensive study with the aim to identify the most sensitive window of exposure to TPTCl and to investigate the effects of pre- and postnatal treatment on sexual development in rats. Male and female offspring rats were exposed to 2 or 6 mg TPTCl/kg b.w. and day either in utero and during lactation (gestation day 6 until weaning on PND 21) or from gestation day 6 until termination. As previously reported, offspring in the 6 mg TPTCl dose group exhibited high perinatal mortality and therefore no further evaluation was carried out at this dose level (Grote, K., Hobler, C, Andrade, A.J.M., Wichert Grande, S., Gericke, C., Talsness, C.E., Appel, K.E., Chahoud, I., 2007. Effects of in utero and lactational exposure to triphenyltin chloride on pregnancy outcome and postnatal development in rat offspring. Toxicology 238, 177-185). In the present paper, results on postnatal development obtained from surviving offspring of dams exposed to 2mg TPTCl/kg b.w. are reported. Male offspring were sacrificed on PND 64 or 65 and female offspring at first estrus after PND 58. A clear sex difference in response to treatment was observed. Male postnatal development was severely affected with decreases in body weight gain, reproductive organ weights and testosterone concentration as well as a significant delay in the age at preputial separation. In contrast, females exhibited a precocious completion of vaginal opening while all other endpoints were unaffected. Most of these effects were already present in animals that were only exposed until weaning indicating that these effects may be irreversible and continued treatment until termination had contributed less than expected to the severity of the observed effects. The results of the present study suggest that the sensitive window for the evaluated endpoints seems to be the period of prenatal development and that male offspring rats were more susceptible to treatment. PMID:19464569

  9. Development, Sex Steroid Regulation, and Phenotypic Characterization of RFamide-Related Peptide (Rfrp) Gene Expression and RFamide Receptors in the Mouse Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Poling, Matthew C.; Kim, Joshua; Dhamija, Sangeeta

    2012-01-01

    Arginine-phenylalanine-amide (RFamide)-related peptide 3 (RFRP-3, encoded by the Rfrp gene) is the mammalian ortholog of gonadotropin-inhibiting hormone and can inhibit GnRH neuronal activity and LH release. However, the development and regulation of the RFRP-3 system in both sexes is poorly understood. Using in situ hybridization, we examined changes in Rfrp-expressing neurons in mice of both sexes during development and under different adulthood hormonal milieus. We found no sex differences in Rfrp expression or cell number in adult mice. Interestingly, we identified two interspersed subpopulations of Rfrp cells (high Rfrp-expressing, HE; low Rfrp-expressing, LE), which have unique developmental and steroidal regulation characteristics. The number of LE cells robustly decreases during postnatal development, whereas HE cell number increases significantly before puberty. Using Bax knockout mice, we determined that the dramatic developmental decrease in LE Rfrp cells is not due primarily to BAX-dependent apoptosis. In adults, we found that estradiol and testosterone moderately repress Rfrp expression in both HE and LE cells, whereas the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone has no effect. Using double-label in situ hybridization, we determined that approximately 25% of Rfrp neurons coexpress estrogen receptor-α in each sex, whereas Rfrp cells do not readily express androgen receptor in either sex, regardless of hormonal milieu. Lastly, when we looked at RFRP-3 receptors, we detected some coexpression of Gpr147 but no coexpression of Gpr74 in GnRH neurons of both intact and gonadectomized males and females. Thus, RFRP-3 may exert its effects on reproduction either directly, via Gpr147 in a subset of GnRH neurons, and/or indirectly, via upstream regulators of GnRH. PMID:22355072

  10. Molecular characterization of the gene feminizer in the stingless bee Melipona interrupta (Hymenoptera: Apidae) reveals association to sex and caste development.

    PubMed

    Brito, Diana V; Silva, Carlos Gustavo N; Hasselmann, Martin; Viana, Luciana S; Astolfi-Filho, Spartaco; Carvalho-Zilse, Gislene A

    2015-11-01

    In highly eusocial insects, development of reproductive traits are regulated not only by sex determination pathway, but it also depends on caste fate. The molecular basis of both mechanisms in stingless bees and possible interaction with each other is still obscure. Here, we investigate sex determination in Melipona interrupta, focusing on characterization and expression analysis of the feminizer gene (Mi-fem), and its association to a major component of caste determination, the juvenile hormone (JH). We present evidence that Mi-fem mRNA is sex-specifically spliced in which only the female splice variant encodes the full length protein, following the same principle known for other bee species. We quantified Mi-fem expression among developmental stages, sexes and castes. Mi-fem expression varies considerably throughout development, with higher expression levels in embryos. Also, fem levels in pupae and newly emerged adults were significantly higher in queens than workers and males. Finally, we ectopically applied JH in cocoon spinning larvae, which correspond to the time window where queen/worker phenotypes diverge. We observed a significantly increase in Mi-fem expression compared to control groups. Since up to 100% of females turn into queens when treated with JH (while control groups are composed mainly of workers), we propose that fem might act to regulate queens' development. Our findings provide support for the conserved regulatory function of fem in Melipona bees and demonstrate a significant correlation between key elements of sex and caste determination pathways, opening the avenue to further investigate the molecular basis of these complex traits. PMID:26393998

  11. Ethical principles and recommendations for the medical management of differences of sex development (DSD)/intersex in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ude-Koeller, Susanne; Sinnecker, Gernot H. G.; Thyen, Ute

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The medical management of differences of sex development (DSD)/intersex in early childhood has been criticized by patients’ advocates as well as bioethicists from an ethical point of view. Some call for a moratorium of any feminizing or masculinizing operations before the age of consent except for medical emergencies. No exhaustive ethical guidelines have been published until now. In particular, the role of the parents as legal representatives of the child is controversial. In the article, we develop, discuss, and present ethical principles and recommendations for the medical management of intersex/DSD in children and adolescents. We specify three basic ethical principles that have to be respected and substantiate them. The article includes a critical discussion of the best interest of the child and of family privacy. The argumentation draws upon recommendations by the working group “Bioethics and Intersex” within the German Network DSD/Intersex, which are presented in detail. Unlike other recommendations with regard to intersex, these guidelines represent a comprehensive view of the perspectives of clinicians, patients, and their families. Conclusion The working group identified three leading ethical principles that apply to DSD management: (1) to foster the well-being of the child and the future adult, (2) to uphold the rights of children and adolescents to participate in and/or self-determine decisions that affect them now or later, and (3) to respect the family and parent–child relationships. Nine recommendations for the management of DSD indicate how these ethical principles can spelled out and balanced against each other in the clinical setting. PMID:19841941

  12. [Gene abnormalities in thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Namba, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2007-11-01

    A number of genetic abnormalities in oncogenes or anti-oncogenes have been identified in association with thyroid carcinogenesis. Especially, oncogenes such as ras mutation, ret/PTC and Braf mutation that constitutively activate MAP kinase pathway a refrequently found in papillary thyroid cancer. The p53 mutation aggravates differentiated thyroid cancers to anaplastic thyroid cancer. These gene alterations are studied not only to understand basically the mechanisms of oncogenesis but also to develop clinically genetic diagnosis or molecular target therapy. In this article, we review the genetic diagnostic methods and phenotype-genotype relationship of human thyroid cancers. PMID:18018556

  13. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  14. Study on sex-organ development. Oestrogen-receptor translocation in the developing chick Müllerian duct.

    PubMed Central

    Teng, C S; Teng, C T

    1976-01-01

    After oestradiol administration in vivo, 87-95% of the initial concentration of oestradiol receptor in the cytoplasm of the embryonic-chick Müllerian-duct cell was translocated into the nucleus. The process of translocation depends on the amount of oestardiol administered in vivo. At 6 h after oestradiol administration in vivo, about 30% replenishment of the initial content of the cytosol receptor was observed in the cytoplasm. The Müllerian-duct nuclei, after exposure to non-radioactive oestradiol, exhibit saturable exchange with [3H]oestradiol in vitro. The exchange of oestradiol is temperature- and time-dependent. The optimal temperature and time for exchange are 37-41 degrees C and 2h respectively. The [3H]oestradiol-receptor complex extracted from the exchanged nuclei is present in 5-6S form, and its isoelectric point is 6.8. The number of nuclear oestradiol-binding sites of the developing Müllerian duct are 1.66, 2.22, 2.63, and 2.50 pmol/mg of DNA respectively for embryos of 10, 12, 15 and 18 days. The dissociation constants of the nuclear oestradiol receptor of the four observed developmental stages range from 3.0 to 3.1 nM. PMID:179536

  15. Clinical evaluation study of the German network of disorders of sex development (DSD)/intersexuality: study design, description of the study population, and data quality

    PubMed Central

    Lux, Anke; Kropf, Siegfried; Kleinemeier, Eva; Jürgensen, Martina; Thyen, Ute

    2009-01-01

    Background The German Network of Disorders of Sex Development (DSD)/Intersexuality carried out a large scale clinical evaluation study on quality of life, gender identity, treatment satisfaction, coping, and problems associated with diagnoses and therapies in individuals with disorders of sex development (DSD). DSD are a heterogeneous group of various genetic disorders of sex determination or sex differentiation, all of which are rare conditions. In about half of all cases the molecular genetic diagnosis is unknown and diagnosis rests on clinical features. Methods and design The multi-centre clinical evaluation study includes short-term follow-up in some and cross-sectional assessments in all age and diagnostic groups fitting the criteria of DSD. Recruitment was from January 2005 until December 2007 in whole Germany and, additionally, in 2007 in Austria and German-speaking Switzerland. The study consists of a psychosocial inquiry for children, adolescents and their parents, and adults with standardized instruments and the collection of DSD-specific medical data by the attending physician. The main goal was the description of clinical outcomes and the health-care situation of individuals with DSD using a broad generic definition of DSD including all conditions with a mismatch of chromosomal, gonadal and phenotypical sex. 439 children and adolescents, their parents and adults with DSD participated. Discussion The clinical evaluation study represents the most comprehensive study in this clinical field. The paper discusses the study protocol, the data management and data quality as well as the classification used, and it describes the study population. Given the lack of large datasets in rare conditions such as DSD and often biased results from small scale clinical case series, the study aims to generate concrete hypotheses for evidence-based guidelines, which should be tested in further studies. PMID:19383134

  16. Caffeine exposure during rat brain development causes memory impairment in a sex selective manner that is offset by caffeine consumption throughout life.

    PubMed

    Ardais, Ana Paula; Rocha, Andréia S; Borges, Maurício Felisberto; Fioreze, Gabriela T; Sallaberry, Cássia; Mioranzza, Sabrina; Nunes, Fernanda; Pagnussat, Natália; Botton, Paulo Henrique S; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Porciúncula, Lisiane de Oliveira

    2016-04-15

    Caffeine is the psychostimulant most consumed worldwide. In moderate doses, it affords a beneficial effect in adults and upon aging, but has a deleterious effect during brain development. We now tested if caffeine consumption by rats (0.1, 0.3, 1.0g/L in the drinking water, only during active cycle and weekdays) during adulthood could revert the potentially negative effects of caffeine during early life. Thus, we compared caffeine intake starting 15 days before mating and lasting either up to weaning (development) or up to adulthood, on behavior and synaptic proteins in male and female rats. Recognition memory was impaired only in female rats receiving caffeine (0.3 and 1.0g/L) during development, coincident with increased proBDNF and unchanged BDNF levels in the hippocampus. Caffeine in both treatment regimens caused hyperlocomotion only in male rats, whereas anxiety-related behavior was attenuated in both sexes by caffeine (1.0g/L) throughout life. Both caffeine treatment regimens decreased GFAP (as an astrocyte marker) and SNAP-25 (as a nerve terminals marker) in the hippocampus from male rats. TrkB receptor was decreased in the hippocampus from both sexes and treatment regimens. These findings revealed that caffeine intake during a specific time window of brain development promotes sex-dependent behavioral outcomes related to modification in BDNF signaling. Furthermore, caffeine throughout life can overcome the deleterious effects of caffeine on recognition memory during brain development in female rats. PMID:26774980

  17. Learning Disabilities in Children with Sex Chromosome Anomalies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Bruce F.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Results obtained from 44 children (ages 7 through 16) with sex chromosome abnormalities and from 17 chromosomally normal siblings demonstrated that children in the former group have an increased risk of encountering learning problems. (MP)

  18. Young women with a disorder of sex development: learning to share information with health professionals, friends and intimate partners about bodily differences and infertility

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Caroline; Carter, Bernie; Lwin, Rebekah

    2015-01-01

    Aim To understand the experiences of young women with a disorder of sex development when sharing information about their body with healthcare professionals, friends and intimate partners. Background Disorders of sex development are lifelong conditions that create bodily difference such as absence of reproductive organs which can impact on young women’s fertility and sexual experiences. Design Interpretive phenomenological analysis with thirteen young women (14-19 years old) with a disorder of sex development. Methods The young women chose to participate in either a face-to-face semi-structured interview or to complete a paper diary between 2011–2012. Results A superordinate theme focusing on the meaning bodily differences held for these young women is presented through three themes: self-awareness and communicating this to others; actualizing intimacy; and expressing meaning of altered fertility to self or professionals or partners. During early adolescence, the young women were guarded and reticent about sharing personal information about their disorder of sex development but as they moved towards adulthood, some of the young women learnt to engage in conversations with more confidence. Frustrations about their bodily differences and the limitations of their bodies were talked about as factors which limited physical spontaneity, impacted on their perceived sexual fulfilment and challenged the development or sustainability of close friendships or intimate partnerships. The young women wanted empathic, sensitive support from knowledgeable health professionals to help them understand their bodies. Conclusion Attachment and a ‘sense of being’ were the concepts that were closely linked to the young women’s development of a secure identity. PMID:25893820

  19. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2 Contributes to Sex Differences in the Development of Obesity Hypertension in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Manisha; Thatcher, Sean E.; Boustany-Kari, Carine M.; Shoemaker, Robin; Yiannikouris, Frederique; Zhang, Xuan; Karounos, Michael; Cassis, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Obesity promotes hypertension, but it is unclear if sex differences exist in obesity-related hypertension. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) converts angiotensin II (AngII) to angiotensin-(1–7) (Ang-[1–7]), controlling peptide balance. We hypothesized that tissue-specific regulation of ACE2 by high-fat (HF) feeding and sex hormones contributes to sex differences in obesity-hypertension. Methods and Results HF-fed females gained more body weight and fat mass than males. HF-fed males exhibiting reduced kidney ACE2 activity had increased plasma angiotensin II levels and decreased plasma Ang-(1–7) levels. In contrast, HF-fed females exhibiting elevated adipose ACE2 activity had increased plasma Ang-(1–7) levels. HF-fed males had elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressure that were abolished by losartan. In contrast, HF-fed females did not exhibit increased systolic blood pressure until females were administered the Ang-(1–7) receptor antagonist, D-Ala-Ang-(1–7). Deficiency of ACE2 increased systolic blood pressure in HF-fed males and females, which was abolished by losartan. Ovariectomy of HF-fed female mice reduced adipose ACE2 activity and plasma Ang-(1–7) levels, and promoted obesity-hypertension. Finally, estrogen, but not other sex hormones, increased adipocyte ACE2 mRNA abundance. Conclusions These results demonstrate that tissue-specific regulation of ACE2 by diet and sex hormones contributes to sex differences in obesity-hypertension. PMID:22460555

  20. Abnormal intestinal permeability in Crohn's disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Christopher W; Dieleman, Levinus A; Meddings, Jon B

    2012-07-01

    Increased small intestinal permeability is a longstanding observation in both Crohn's disease patients and in their healthy, asymptomatic first-degree relatives. However, the significance of this compromised gut barrier function and its place in the pathogenesis of the disease remains poorly understood. The association between abnormal small intestinal permeability and a specific mutation in the NOD2 gene, which functions to modulate both innate and adaptive immune responses to intestinal bacteria, suggests a common, genetically determined pathway by which an abnormal gut barrier could result in chronic intestinal inflammation. Furthermore, rodent colitis models show that gut barrier defects precede the development of inflammatory changes. However, it remains possible that abnormal permeability is simply a consequence of mucosal inflammation. Further insight into whether abnormal barrier function is the cause or consequence of chronic intestinal inflammation will be crucial to understanding the role of intestinal permeability in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. PMID:22731729