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Sample records for abordaje coronal estudio

  1. CORONAL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheeley, N. R. Jr.; Warren, H. P. E-mail: harry.warren@nrl.navy.mil

    2012-04-10

    We have recently noticed cellular features in Fe XII 193 A images of the 1.2 MK corona. They occur in regions bounded by a coronal hole and a filament channel, and are centered on flux elements of the photospheric magnetic network. Like their neighboring coronal holes, these regions have minority-polarity flux that is {approx}0.1-0.3 times their flux of majority polarity. Consequently, the minority-polarity flux is 'grabbed' by the majority-polarity flux to form low-lying loops, and the remainder of the network flux escapes to connect with its opposite-polarity counterpart in distant active regions of the Sun. As these regions are carried toward the limb by solar rotation, the cells disappear and are replaced by linear plumes projecting toward the limb. In simultaneous views from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft, these plumes project in opposite directions, extending away from the coronal hole in one view and toward the hole in the other view, suggesting that they are sky-plane projections of the same radial structures. We conclude that these regions are composed of closely spaced radial plumes, extending upward like candles on a birthday cake and visible as cells when seen from above. We suppose that a coronal hole has this same discrete, cellular magnetic structure, but that it is not seen until the encroachment of opposite-polarity flux closes part or all of the hole.

  2. Coronal and Prominence Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poland, Arthur I. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Various aspects of solar prominences and the solar corona are discussed. The formation of prominences, prominence diagnostics and structure, prominence dissappearance, large scale coronal structure, coronal diagnostics, small scale coronal structure, and non-equilibrium/coronal heating are among the topics covered.

  3. Can coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madjarska, M. S.; Vanninathan, K.; Doyle, J. G.

    2011-08-01

    Aims: The present study aims to provide observational evidence of whether coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures. Methods: We combine multi-instrument co-observations obtained with the SUMER/SoHO and with the EIS/SOT/XRT/Hinode. Results: The analysed three large spicules were found to be comprised of numerous thin spicules that rise, rotate, and descend simultaneously forming a bush-like feature. Their rotation resembles the untwisting of a large flux rope. They show velocities ranging from 50 to 250 kms-1. We clearly associated the red- and blue-shifted emissions in transition region lines not only with rotating but also with rising and descending plasmas. Our main result is that these spicules although very large and dynamic, are not present in the spectral lines formed at temperatures above 300 000 K. Conclusions: In this paper we present the analysis of three Ca ii H large spicules that are composed of numerous dynamic thin spicules but appear as macrospicules in lower resolution EUV images. We found no coronal counterpart of these and smaller spicules. We believe that the identification of phenomena that have very different origins as macrospicules is due to the interpretation of the transition region emission, and especially the He ii emission, wherein both chromospheric large spicules and coronal X-ray jets are present. We suggest that the recent observation of spicules in the coronal AIA/SDO 171 Å and 211 Å channels probably comes from the existence of transition region emission there. Movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Episodic coronal heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Dixon, W. W.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Antiochos, S. K.

    1990-01-01

    A study is made of the observational consequences of the hypothesis that there is no steady coronal heating, the solar corona instead being heated episodically, such that each short burst of heating is followed by a long period of radiative cooling. The form of the resulting contribution to the differential emission measure (DEM), and to a convenient related function (the differential energy flux, DEF) is calculated. Observational data for the quiet solar atmosphere indicate that the upper branch of the DEM, corresponding to temperatures above 100,000 K, can be interpreted in terms of episodic energy injection at coronal temperatures.

  5. Episodic coronal heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Dixon, W. W.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Antiochos, S. K.

    1990-06-01

    A study is made of the observational consequences of the hypothesis that there is no steady coronal heating, the solar corona instead being heated episodically, such that each short burst of heating is followed by a long period of radiative cooling. The form of the resulting contribution to the differential emission measure (DEM), and to a convenient related function (the differential energy flux, DEF) is calculated. Observational data for the quiet solar atmosphere indicate that the upper branch of the DEM, corresponding to temperatures above 100,000 K, can be interpreted in terms of episodic energy injection at coronal temperatures.

  6. Global Coronal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. F.

    2016-02-01

    After the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) was launched in 1996, the aboard Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) observed a global coronal wave phenomenon, which was initially named ``EIT wave" after the telescope. The bright fronts are immediately followed by expanding dimmings. It has been shown that the brightenings and dimmings are mainly due to plasma density increase and depletion, respectively. Such a spectacular phenomenon sparked long-lasting interest and debates. The debates were concentrated on two topics, one is about the driving source, and the other is about the nature of this wavelike phenomenon. The controversies are most probably because there may exist two types of large-scale coronal waves that were not well resolved before the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was launched: one is a piston-driven shock wave straddling over the erupting coronal mass ejection (CME), and the other is an apparently propagating front, which may correspond to the CME frontal loop. Such a two-wave paradigm was proposed more than 13 years ago, and now is being recognized by more and more colleagues. In this paper, we review how various controversies can be resolved in the two-wave framework and how important it is to have two different names for the two types of coronal waves.

  7. Solar wind and coronal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withbroe, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    Spectroscopic diagnostic techniques used to determine the coronal source region of the solar wind, and results of preliminary applications are examined. The topics reviewed are magnetic fields, coronal mass ejections, coronal holes, flow velocities, coronal temperatures, fine spatial structure, and future observational programs. The physical mechanisms responsible for plasma heating, solar-wind acceleration, the transport of mass momentum and energy, and the spatial differentiation of chemical abundances are also discussed. Among the data presented are Skylab's white-light coronagraph photograph of a coronal transient, X-ray photographs of the corona, and spectroheliograms showing bright points overlying polar plumes, and macrospicules.

  8. Coronal mass ejections and coronal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildner, E.; Bassi, J.; Bougeret, J. L.; Duncan, R. A.; Gary, D. E.; Gergely, T. E.; Harrison, R. A.; Howard, R. A.; Illing, R. M. E.; Jackson, B. V.

    1986-01-01

    Research on coronal mass ejections (CMF) took a variety of forms, both observational and theoretical. On the observational side there were: case studies of individual events, in which it was attempted to provide the most complete descriptions possible, using correlative observations in diverse wavelengths; statistical studies of the properties CMEs and their associated activity; observations which may tell us about the initiation of mass ejections; interplanetary observations of associated shocks and energetic particles even observations of CMEs traversing interplanetary space; and the beautiful synoptic charts which show to what degree mass ejections affect the background corona and how rapidly (if at all) the corona recovers its pre-disturbance form. These efforts are described in capsule form with an emphasis on presenting pictures, graphs, and tables so that the reader can form a personal appreciation of the work and its results.

  9. Coronal mass ejections

    SciTech Connect

    Steinolfson, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are now recognized as an important component of the large-scale evolution of the solar corona. Some representative observations of CMEs are reviewed with emphasis on more recent results. Recent observations and theory are examined as they relate to the following aspects of CMEs: (1) the role of waves in determining the white-light signature; and (2) the mechanism by which the CME is driven (or launched) into the corona.

  10. Chromospheres of Coronal Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.

    1996-01-01

    We summarize the main results obtained from the analysis of ultraviolet emission line profiles of coronal late-type stars observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The excellent GHRS spectra provide new information on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena in the chromospheres and transition regions of these stars. One exciting new result is the discovery of broad components in the transition region lines of active stars that we believe provide evidence for microflare heating in these stars.

  11. CORONAL RAIN AS A MARKER FOR CORONAL HEATING MECHANISMS

    SciTech Connect

    Antolin, P.; Vissers, G.; Shibata, K. E-mail: g.j.m.vissers@astro.uio.n

    2010-06-10

    Reported observations in H{alpha}, Ca II H, and K or other chromospheric lines of coronal rain trace back to the days of the Skylab mission. Corresponding to cool and dense plasma, coronal rain is often observed falling down along coronal loops in active regions. A physical explanation for this spectacular phenomenon has been put forward thanks to numerical simulations of loops with footpoint-concentrated heating, a heating scenario in which cool condensations naturally form in the corona. This effect has been termed 'catastrophic cooling' and is the predominant explanation for coronal rain. In this work, we further investigate the link between this phenomenon and the heating mechanisms acting in the corona. We start by analyzing observations of coronal rain at the limb in the Ca II H line performed by the Hinode satellite, and derive interesting statistical properties concerning the dynamics. We then compare the observations with 1.5-dimensional MHD simulations of loops being heated by small-scale discrete events concentrated toward the footpoints (that could come, for instance, from magnetic reconnection events), and by Alfven waves generated at the photospheric level. Both our observation and simulation results suggest that coronal rain is a far more common phenomenon than previously thought. Also, we show that the structure and dynamics of condensations are far more sensitive to the internal pressure changes in loops than to gravity. Furthermore, it is found that if a loop is predominantly heated from Alfven waves, coronal rain is inhibited due to the characteristic uniform heating they produce. Hence, coronal rain may not only point to the spatial distribution of the heating in coronal loops but also to the agent of the heating itself. We thus propose coronal rain as a marker for coronal heating mechanisms.

  12. Modeling Coronal Jets with FLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmeler, L. A.; Pariat, E.; Antiochos, S. K.; Deforest, C. E.

    2008-05-01

    We report on a comparative study of coronal jet formation with and without reconnection using two different simulation strategies. Coronal jets are features on the solar surface that appear to have some properties in common with coronal mass ejections, but are less energetic, massive, and broad. Magnetic free energy is built up over time and then suddenly released, which accelerates plasma outward in the form of a coronal jet. We compare results from the ARMS adaptive mesh and FLUX reconnection-less codes to study the role of reconnection in this system. This is the first direct comparison between FLUX and a numerical model with a 3D spatial grid.

  13. Coronal and chromospheric physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, J. T.; Landman, D. A.; Orrall, F. Q.

    1983-01-01

    Achievements and completed results are discussed for investigations covering solar activity during the solar maximum mission and the solar maximum year; other studies of solar activity and variability; infrared and submillimeter photometry; solar-related atomic physics; coronal and transition region studies; prominence research; chromospheric research in quiet and active regions; solar dynamics; eclipse studies; and polarimetry and magnetic field measurements. Contributions were also made in defining the photometric filterograph instrument for the solar optical telescope, designing the combined filter spectrograph, and in expressing the scientific aims and implementation of the solar corona diagnostic mission.

  14. Active region coronal evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.; Noci, G.; Poletto, G.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    Scaling relations between coronal base pressure and longitudinal photospheric magnetic field strength are tested for the case of a single active region observed for five solar rotations from Skylab. The evolution of measureable quantities, such as coronal thermal energy content, total longitudinal photospheric magnetic flux, region scale size, and peak energy density, is traced throughout the five rotations observed. The theoretically derived scaling law of Golub et al. (1980) is found to provide an acceptable fit to the data throughout the entire evolutionary history of the region from an age of about 3 days to the fully evolved state in which the mature active region merges into the general large-scale structure of the quiet corona. An alternative scaling law obtained by including the results of Galeev et al. (1981), however, is found to provide a somewhat better fit to the data. The study is seen as providing additional justification for the belief that magnetic field-related heating is the operative mechanism in the solar corona.

  15. Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Petrie, Gordon J. D.; Riley, Pete

    2015-07-01

    Coronal magnetic field models use photospheric field measurements as boundary condition to model the solar corona. We review in this paper the most common model assumptions, starting from MHD-models, magnetohydrostatics, force-free and finally potential field models. Each model in this list is somewhat less complex than the previous one and makes more restrictive assumptions by neglecting physical effects. The magnetohydrostatic approach neglects time-dependent phenomena and plasma flows, the force-free approach neglects additionally the gradient of the plasma pressure and the gravity force. This leads to the assumption of a vanishing Lorentz force and electric currents are parallel (or anti-parallel) to the magnetic field lines. Finally, the potential field approach neglects also these currents. We outline the main assumptions, benefits and limitations of these models both from a theoretical (how realistic are the models?) and a practical viewpoint (which computer resources to we need?). Finally we address the important problem of noisy and inconsistent photospheric boundary conditions and the possibility of using chromospheric and coronal observations to improve the models.

  16. The Geometric Spreading of Coronal Plumes and Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Poletto, G.; Wang, A. - H.; Wu, S. T.; Cuseri, I.

    1997-01-01

    The geometric spreading in plumes and in the interplume region in coronal holes is calculated, using analytic and numerical theoretical models, between 1.0 and 5.0 solar radius. We apply two scale approximation that permits the rapid local spreading at the base of plumes to be evaluated separately from the global spreading imposed by coronal hole geometry. We show that fl can be computed from a potential field model and fg can be computed from global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of coronal structure. The approximations are valid when the plasma beta is small with respect to unity and for a plume separation small with respect to a solar radius.

  17. The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczyk, S.; Landi, E.; Zhang, J.; Lin, H.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields are arguably the most important observables required for advances in our understanding of the processes responsible for coronal heating, coronal dynamics and the generation of space weather that affects communications, GPS systems, space flight, and power transmission. The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory (COSMO) is a proposed ground-based suite of instruments designed for routine study of coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields and their environment, and to understand the formation of coronal mass ejections (CME) and their relation to other forms of solar activity. This new facility will be operated by the High Altitude Observatory of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (HAO/NCAR) with partners at the University of Michigan, the University of Hawaii and George Mason University in support of the solar and heliospheric community. It will replace the current NCAR Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (http://mlso.hao.ucar.edu). COSMO will enhance the value of existing and new observatories on the ground and in space by providing unique and crucial observations of the global coronal and chromospheric magnetic field and its evolution. The design and current status of the COSMO will be reviewed.

  18. The coronal fricative problem

    PubMed Central

    Dinnsen, Daniel A.; Dow, Michael C.; Gierut, Judith A.; Morrisette, Michele L.; Green, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines a range of predicted versus attested error patterns involving coronal fricatives (e.g. [s, z, θ, ð]) as targets and repairs in the early sound systems of monolingual English-acquiring children. Typological results are reported from a cross-sectional study of 234 children with phonological delays (ages 3 years; 0 months to 7;9). Our analyses revealed different instantiations of a putative developmental conspiracy within and across children. Supplemental longitudinal evidence is also presented that replicates the cross-sectional results, offering further insight into the life-cycle of the conspiracy. Several of the observed typological anomalies are argued to follow from a modified version of Optimality Theory with Candidate Chains (McCarthy, 2007). PMID:24790247

  19. The coronal fricative problem.

    PubMed

    Dinnsen, Daniel A; Dow, Michael C; Gierut, Judith A; Morrisette, Michele L; Green, Christopher R

    2013-07-01

    This paper examines a range of predicted versus attested error patterns involving coronal fricatives (e.g. [s, z, θ, ð]) as targets and repairs in the early sound systems of monolingual English-acquiring children. Typological results are reported from a cross-sectional study of 234 children with phonological delays (ages 3 years; 0 months to 7;9). Our analyses revealed different instantiations of a putative developmental conspiracy within and across children. Supplemental longitudinal evidence is also presented that replicates the cross-sectional results, offering further insight into the life-cycle of the conspiracy. Several of the observed typological anomalies are argued to follow from a modified version of Optimality Theory with Candidate Chains (McCarthy, 2007). PMID:24790247

  20. Waves in Solar Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T. J.

    2016-02-01

    The corona is visible in the optical band only during a total solar eclipse or with a coronagraph. Coronal loops are believed to be plasma-filled closed magnetic flux anchored in the photosphere. Based on the temperature regime, they are generally classified into cool, warm, and hot loops. The magnetized coronal structures support propagation of various types of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) waves. This chapter reviews the recent progress made in studies based on observations of four types of wave phenomena mainly occurring in coronal loops of active regions, including: flare-excited slow-mode waves; impulsively excited kink-mode waves; propagating slow magnetoacoustic waves; and ubiquitous propagating kink (Alfvénic) waves. This review not only comprehensively discusses these waves and coronal seismology but also topics that are newly emerging or hotly debated in order to provide the reader with useful guidance on further studies.

  1. Dynamical behaviour in coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, Bernhard M.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid variability has been found in two active region coronal loops observed by the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) and the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS) onboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). There appear to be surprisingly few observations of the short-time scale behavior of hot loops, and the evidence presented herein lends support to the hypothesis that coronal heating may be impulsive and driven by flaring.

  2. Solar and stellar coronal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.

    1985-01-01

    Progress made in describing and interpreting coronal plasma processes and the relationship between the solar corona and its stellar counterparts is reported. Topics covered include: stellar X-ray emission, HEAO 2 X-ray survey of the Pleiades, closed coronal structures, X-ray survey of main-sequence stars with shallow convection zones, implications of the 1400 MHz flare emission, and magnetic field stochasticity.

  3. Coronal structure and the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelof, E. C.

    1974-01-01

    Aspects concerning the open coronal structure and geomagnetic disturbances are considered along with the general coronal emission characteristics and relations between the open coronal structure and the interplanetary field. The nonstatistical indicators of coronal structure are examined and questions are investigated regarding the accuracy obtained in the determination of the emission latitude and longitude in the high corona for plasma, fields, and particles. Attention is given to the problem of particle population organization by low-coronal neutral line structures in the absence of a high coronal polarity structure.

  4. The Geometric Spreading of Coronal Plumes and Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Poletto, G.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Cuseri, I.

    1998-01-01

    The geometric spreading in plumes and in the interplume region in coronal holes is calculated, using analytic and numerical theoretical models, between 1.0 and 5.0 solar radius. We apply a two-scale approximation that permits the rapid local spreading at the base of plumes (f(sub t)) to be evaluated separately from the global spreading (f(sub g)) imposed by coronal hole geometry. We show that f(sub t) can be computed from a potential-field model and f(sub g) can be computed from global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of coronal structure. The approximations are valid when the plasma beta is mail with respect to unity and for a plume separation small with respect to a solar radius.

  5. Geometry of solar coronal rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, B. P.; Martsenyuk, O. V.; Platov, Yu. V.; Den, O. E.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal helmet streamers are the most prominent large-scale elements of the solar corona observed in white light during total solar eclipses. The base of the streamer is an arcade of loops located above a global polarity inversion line. At an altitude of 1-2 solar radii above the limb, the apices of the arches sharpen, forming cusp structures, above which narrow coronal rays are observed. Lyot coronagraphs, especially those on-board spacecrafts flying beyond the Earth's atmosphere, enable us to observe the corona continuously and at large distances. At distances of several solar radii, the streamers take the form of fairly narrow spokes that diverge radially from the Sun. This radial direction displays a continuous expansion of the corona into the surrounding space, and the formation of the solar wind. However, the solar magnetic field and solar rotation complicate the situation. The rotation curves radial streams into spiral ones, similar to water streams flowing from rotating tubes. The influence of the magnetic field is more complex and multifarious. A thorough study of coronal ray geometries shows that rays are frequently not radial and not straight. Coronal streamers frequently display a curvature whose direction in the meridional plane depends on the phase of the solar cycle. It is evident that this curvature is related to the geometry of the global solar magnetic field, which depends on the cycle phase. Equatorward deviations of coronal streamers at solar minima and poleward deviations at solar maxima can be interpreted as the effects of changes in the general topology of the global solar magnetic field. There are sporadic temporal changes in the coronal rays shape caused by remote coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagating through the corona. This is also a manifestation of the influence of the magnetic field on plasma flows. The motion of a large-scale flux rope associated with a CME away from the Sun creates changes in the structure of surrounding field

  6. Key aspects of coronal heating

    PubMed Central

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2015-01-01

    We highlight 10 key aspects of coronal heating that must be understood before we can consider the problem to be solved. (1) All coronal heating is impulsive. (2) The details of coronal heating matter. (3) The corona is filled with elemental magnetic stands. (4) The corona is densely populated with current sheets. (5) The strands must reconnect to prevent an infinite build-up of stress. (6) Nanoflares repeat with different frequencies. (7) What is the characteristic magnitude of energy release? (8) What causes the collective behaviour responsible for loops? (9) What are the onset conditions for energy release? (10) Chromospheric nanoflares are not a primary source of coronal plasma. Significant progress in solving the coronal heating problem will require coordination of approaches: observational studies, field-aligned hydrodynamic simulations, large-scale and localized three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and possibly also kinetic simulations. There is a unique value to each of these approaches, and the community must strive to coordinate better. PMID:25897094

  7. Solar and stellar coronal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1989-01-01

    Progress in observational, theoretical, and radio studies of coronal plasmas is summarized. Specifically work completed in the area of solar and stellar magnetic fields, related photospheric phenomena and the relationships between magnetism, rotation, coronal and chromospheric emission in solar-like stars is described. Also outlined are theoretical studies carried out in the following areas, among others: (1) neutral beams as the dominant energy transport mechanism in two ribbon-flares; (2) magneto hydrodynamic and circuit models for filament eruptions; and (3) studies of radio emission mechanisms in transient events. Finally, radio observations designed for coronal activity studies of the sun and of solar-type coronae are described. A bibliography of publications and talks is provided along with reprints of selected articles.

  8. Solar Coronal Structure Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitta, Nariaki; Bruner, Marilyn E.; Saba, Julia; Strong, Keith; Harvey, Karen

    2000-01-01

    The subject of this investigation is to study the physics of the solar corona through the analysis of the EUV and UV data produced by two flights (12 May 1992 and 25 April 1994) of the Lockheed Solar Plasma Diagnostics Experiment (SPDE) sounding rocket payload, in combination with Yohkoh and ground-based data. Each rocket flight produced both spectral and imaging data. These joint datasets are useful for understanding the physical state of various features in the solar atmosphere at different heights ranging from the photosphere to the corona at the time of the, rocket flights, which took place during the declining phase of a solar cycle, 2-4 years before the minimum. The investigation is narrowly focused on comparing the physics of small- and medium-scale strong-field structures with that of large-scale, weak fields. As we close th is investigation, we have to recall that our present position in the understanding of basic solar physics problems (such as coronal heating) is much different from that in 1995 (when we proposed this investigation), due largely to the great success of SOHO and TRACE. In other words, several topics and techniques we proposed can now be better realized with data from these missions. For this reason, at some point of our work, we started concentrating on the 1992 data, which are more unique and have more supporting data. As a result, we discontinued the investigation on small-scale structures, i.e., bright points, since high-resolution TRACE images have addressed more important physics than SPDE EUV images could do. In the final year, we still spent long time calibrating the 1992 data. The work was complicated because of the old-fashioned film, which had problems not encountered with more modern CCD detectors. After our considerable effort on calibration, we were able to focus on several scientific topics, relying heavily on the SPDE UV images. They include the relation between filaments and filament channels, the identification of hot

  9. CORONAL FOURIER POWER SPECTRA: IMPLICATIONS FOR CORONAL SEISMOLOGY AND CORONAL HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Ireland, J.; McAteer, R. T. J.; Inglis, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of regions of the solar corona are investigated using Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 Å and 193 Å data. The coronal emission from the quiet Sun, coronal loop footprints, coronal moss, and from above a sunspot is studied. It is shown that the mean Fourier power spectra in these regions can be described by a power law at lower frequencies that tails to a flat spectrum at higher frequencies, plus a Gaussian-shaped contribution that varies depending on the region studied. This Fourier spectral shape is in contrast to the commonly held assumption that coronal time series are well described by the sum of a long timescale background trend plus Gaussian-distributed noise, with some specific locations also showing an oscillatory signal. The implications of the observed spectral shape on the fields of coronal seismology and the automated detection of oscillations in the corona are discussed. The power-law contribution to the shape of the Fourier power spectrum is interpreted as being due to the summation of a distribution of exponentially decaying emission events along the line of sight. This is consistent with the idea that the solar atmosphere is heated everywhere by small energy deposition events.

  10. Heating Profiles of Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plowman, Joseph; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Martens, Petrus C.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the temperature and density profiles of coronal loops, as a function of their length, using data from SDO/AIA and Hinode/EIS. The analysis considers the location of the heating along the loop's length, and we conduct a more throrough investigation of our previous preliminary result that heating is concentrated near the loop footpoints. The work now features a larger selection of coronal loops, compared to our previous presentations, and examines their scale-height temperatures to ascertain the extent to which they are hydrostatic.

  11. Coronal Metallicities of Active Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, V.; Drake, J. J.; Pease, D. O.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    1998-09-01

    We analyze EUV and X-ray data on a sample of X-ray active binary stars to determine coronal abundances. EUVE spectrometer data are used to obtain line fluxes, which are then used to determine Differential Emission Measures (DEMs). The continuum emission predicted for these DEMs (constrained at high temperatures by measurements in the X-ray regime where available) are then compared with EUVE/DS counts to derive coronal metallicities. These measurements indicate whether the coronae on these stars are metal deficient (the ``MAD Syndrome'') or subject to the FIP-effect (low First Ionization Potential elements have enhanced abundances relative to the photospheres).

  12. CORONAL EMISSION LINES AS THERMOMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Judge, Philip G.

    2010-01-10

    Coronal emission-line intensities are commonly used to measure electron temperatures using emission measure and/or line ratio methods. In the presence of systematic errors in atomic excitation calculations and data noise, the information on underlying temperature distributions is fundamentally limited. Increasing the number of emission lines used does not necessarily improve the ability to discriminate between different kinds of temperature distributions.

  13. An equatorial coronal hole at solar minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromage, B. J. I.; DelZanna, G.; DeForest, C.; Thompson, B.; Clegg, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    The large transequatorial coronal hole that was observed in the solar corona at the end of August 1996 is presented. It consists of a north polar coronal hole called the 'elephant's trunk or tusk'. The observations of this coronal hole were carried out with the coronal diagnostic spectrometer onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The magnetic field associated with the equatorial coronal hole is strongly connected to that of the active region at its base, resulting in the two features rotating at almost the same rate.

  14. Coronal Seismology: The Search for Propagating Waves in Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, Thomas A.; Seeley, D.; Keil, S. L.; Tomczyk, S.

    2007-05-01

    We report on Doppler observations of the solar corona obtained in the Fe XeXIII 1074.7nm coronal emission line with the HAO Coronal Multi-Channel Polarimeter (CoMP) mounted on the NSO Coronal One Shot coronagraph located in the Hilltop Facility of NSO/Sacramento Peak. The COMP is a tunable filtergraph instrument that records the entire corona from the edge of the occulting disk at approximately 1.03 Rsun out to 1.4 Rsun with a spatial resolution of about 4” x 4”. COMP can be rapidly scanned through the spectral line while recording orthogonal states of linear and circular polarization. The two dimensional spatial resolution allows us to correlate temporal fluctuations observed in one part of the corona with those seen at other locations, in particular along coronal loops. Using cross spectral analysis we find that the observations reveal upward propagating waves that are characterized by Doppler shifts with rms velocities of 0.3 km/s, peak wave power in the 3-5 mHz frequency range, and phase speeds 1-3 Mm/s. The wave trajectories are consistent with the direction of the magnetic field inferred from the linear polarization measurements. We discuss the phase and coherence of these waves as a function of height in the corona and relate our findings to previous observations. The observed waves appear to be Alfvenic in character. "Thomas Schad was supported through the National Solar Observatory Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) site program, which is co-funded by the Department of Defense in partnership with the National Science Foundation REU Program." Daniel Seeley was supported through the National Solar Observatory Research Experience for Teachers (RET) site program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation RET program.

  15. HEATCVB: Coronal heating rate approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2015-06-01

    HEATCVB is a stand-alone Fortran 77 subroutine that estimates the local volumetric coronal heating rate with four required inputs: the radial distance r, the wind speed u, the mass density ρ, and the magnetic field strength |B0|. The primary output is the heating rate Qturb at the location defined by the input parameters. HEATCVB also computes the local turbulent dissipation rate of the waves, γ = Qturb/(2UA).

  16. The Coronal Loop Inventory Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.; Christian, G. M.; Dhaliwal, R. S. S.; Paul, K. S.

    2015-11-01

    Most coronal physicists now seem to agree that loops are composed of tangled magnetic strands and have both isothermal and multithermal cross-field temperature distributions. As yet, however, there is no information on the relative importance of each of these categories, and we do not know how common one is with respect to the other. In this paper, we investigate these temperature properties for all loop segments visible in the 171-Å image of AR 11294, which was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on 2011 September 15. Our analysis revealed 19 loop segments, but only 2 of these were clearly isothermal. Six additional segments were effectively isothermal, that is, the plasma emission to which AIA is sensitive could not be distinguished from isothermal emission, within measurement uncertainties. One loop had both isothermal transition region and multithermal coronal solutions. Another five loop segments require multithermal plasma to reproduce the AIA observations. The five remaining loop segments could not be separated reliably from the background in the crucial non-171-Å AIA images required for temperature analysis. We hope that the direction of coronal heating models and the efforts modelers spend on various heating scenarios will be influenced by these results.

  17. Impulsively generated fast coronal pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwin, P. M.; Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid oscillations in the corona are discussed from a theoretical standpoint, developing some previous work on ducted, fast magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium. In the theory, impulsively (e.g., flare) generated mhd (magnetohydrodynamic) waves are ducted by regions of low Alfven speed (high density) such as coronal loops. Wave propagation in such ducts is strongly dispersive and closely akin to the behavior of Love waves in seismology, Pekeris waves in oceanography and guided waves in fiber optics. Such flare-generated magnetoacoustic waves possess distinctive temporal signatures consisting of periodic, quasi-periodic and decay phases. The quasi-periodic phase possesses the strongest amplitudes and the shortest time scales. Time scales are typically of the order of a second for inhomogeneities (coronal loop width) of 1000 km and Alfven speeds of 1000/kms, and pulse duration times are of tens of seconds. Quasi-periodic signatures have been observed in radio wavelengths for over a decade and more recently by SMM. It is hoped that the theoretical ideas outlined may be successfully related to these observations and thus aid the interpretation of oscillatory signatures recorded by SMM. Such signatures may also provide a diagnostic of coronal conditions. New aspects of the ducted mhd waves, for example their behavior in smoothly varying as opposed to tube-like inhomogeneities, are currently under investigation. The theory is not restricted to loops but applied equally to open field regions.

  18. The Structure of Coronal Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2009-01-01

    It is widely believed that the simple coronal loops observed by XUV imagers, such as EIT, TRACE, or XRT, actually have a complex internal structure consisting of many (perhaps hundreds) of unresolved, interwoven "strands". According to the nanoflare model, photospheric motions tangle the strands, causing them to reconnect and release the energy required to produce the observed loop plasma. Although the strands, themselves, are unresolved by present-generation imagers, there is compelling evidence for their existence and for the nanoflare model from analysis of loop intensities and temporal evolution. A problem with this scenario is that, although reconnection can eliminate some of the strand tangles, it cannot destroy helicity, which should eventually build up to observable scales. we consider, therefore, the injection and evolution of helicity by the nanoflare process and its implications for the observed structure of loops and the large-scale corona. we argue that helicity does survive and build up to observable levels, but on spatial and temporal scales larger than those of coronal loops. we discuss the implications of these results for coronal loops and the corona, in general .

  19. Cavernomas de la región temporal mesial: Anatomía microquirúrgica y abordajes

    PubMed Central

    Campero, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Objetivo: Describir la anatomía microquirúrgica y los abordajes a la región temporal mesial (RTM), en relación a cavernomas de dicho sector. Materiales y Método: Cinco cabezas de cadáveres adultos, fijadas en formol e inyectadas con silicona coloreada, fueron estudiadas. Además, desde enero de 2007 a junio de 2014, 7 pacientes con cavernomas localizados en la RTM fueron operados por el autor. Resultados: Anatomia: La RTM fue dividida en 3 sectores: Anterior, medio y posterior. Pacientes: 7 enfermos con cavernomas de la RTM fueron operados por el autor. De acuerdo a la ubicacion en la RTM, 4 cavernomas se ubicaron en el sector anterior, 2 cavernomas se localizaron en el sector medio y 1 cavernoma se ubico en el sector posterior. Para el sector anterior de la RTM se utilizo un abordaje transsilviano-transinsular; para el sector medio de la RTM se utilizo un abordaje transtemporal (lobectomia temporal anterior); y para el sector posterior de la RTM se utilizo un abordaje supracerebeloso-transtentorial. Conclusión: Dividir la RTM en 3 sectores nos permite adecuar el abordaje en función a la localización de la lesión. Así, el sector anterior es bien abordable a través de la fisura silviana; el sector medio a través de una vía transtemporal; y el sector posterior por un abordaje supracerebeloso. PMID:26600986

  20. Coronal abundances determined from energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.

    1995-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) provide a measurement of coronal element abundances that is highly independent of the ionization states and temperature of the ions in the source plasma. The most complete measurements come from large 'gradual' events where ambient coronal plasma is swept up by the expanding shock wave from a coronal mass ejection. Particles from 'impulsive' flares have a pattern of acceleration-induced enhancements superimposed on the coronal abundances. Particles accelerated from high-speed solar wind streams at corotating shocks show a different abundance pattern corresponding to material from coronal holes. Large variations in He/O in coronal material are seen for both gradual and impulsive-flare events but other abundance ratios, such as Mg/Ne, are remarkably constant. SEP measurements now include hundreds of events spanning 15 years of high-quality measurement.

  1. EUV Coronal Dimming and its Relationship to Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, James

    2016-05-01

    As a coronal mass ejection (CME) departs from the inner solar atmosphere, it leaves behind a void. This region of depleted plasma results in a corresponding decrease in coronal emissions that can be observed by instruments tuned to measure the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) part of the electromagnetic spectrum. These coronal dimmings can be observed with EUV imagers and EUV spectral irradiance instruments. Onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) provide complementary observations; together they can be used to obtain high spatial and spectral resolution. AIA provides information about the location, extent, and spatial evolution of the dimming while EVE data are important to understand plasma temperature evolution. Concurrent processes with similar timescales to mass-loss dimming also impact the observations, which makes a deconvolution method necessary for the irradiance time series in order to have a “clean” mass-loss dimming light curve that can be parameterized and compared with CME kinematics. This presentation will first provide background on these various physical processes and the deconvolution method developed. Two case studies will then be presented, followed by a semi-statistical study (~30 events) to establish a correlation between dimming and CME parameters. In particular, the slope of the deconvolved irradiance dimming light curve is representative of the CME speed, and the irradiance dimming depth can serve as a proxy for CME mass. Finally, plans and early results from a more complete statistical study of all dimmings in the SDO era, based on an automated detection routine using EVE data, will be described and compared with independently derived dimmings automatically detected with AIA data.

  2. The relationship between coronal streamers and CMEs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jinsheng; Tong, Yi; Yang, Jing; Eselevich, V. G.

    1999-06-01

    The variation of the polarization brightness of coronal streamer in Carrington Rotations 1591 - 1592 is investigated. The distribution of the polarization brightness along streamer belts is inhomogeneous; the degree of the inhomogeneity is 10% - 50%. In the absence of coronal mass ejection (CME) influence, the distribution of coronal streamers along the streamer belts can persist stable during nearly two Carrington Rotations. The rise velocity of the top of the cusp region in a coronal streamer may be more than 2 km/s, if the longitude angular size is more than 27° associated with a CME occurrence.

  3. On Recurrent/Homologous Coronal Jets Emission: Coronal Geyser Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razvan Paraschiv, Alin; Donea, Alina

    2016-05-01

    Active region 11302 has shown a vast display of solar jets during its lifetime. We examine the emission mechanism responsible for multiple coronal jet events occurring at the center-east side of the active region. Identified jet events were detected in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV), hard X-ray (HXR) and radio emissions, observed by dedicated instruments such as SDO's AIA and HMI, STEREO's EUVI and WAVES, and RHESSI, respectively. We report the detection of a base-arch structure in the lower atmosphere. The site was labelled "Coronal Geyser". The structure had emitted jets quasi-periodically for the entire time the AR was visible in SDO'S field of view. The jets expand into the corona with an apparent line of sight velocity of ~200-300$ km/s. To our knowledge the long time-scale behaviour of jet recurrence and base geyser structure was not previously discussed and data analysis of this phenomena will provide new information for theoretical modelling and data interpretation of jets.

  4. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CORONAL DIMMING AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Reinard, A. A.

    2009-11-01

    Coronal dimmings are closely related to the footpoints of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and, as such, offer information about CME origins and evolution. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between CME and dimming properties. In particular, we compare CME quantities for events with and without associated dimmings. We find that dimming-associated CMEs, on average, have much higher speeds than non-dimming-associated events. In fact, CMEs without an associated dimming do not appear to travel faster than 800 km s{sup -1}, i.e., the fast solar wind speed. Dimming-associated events are also more likely to be associated with flares, and those flares tend to have the highest magnitudes. We propose that each of these phenomena is affected by the energy available in the source region. Highly energetic source regions produce fast CMEs that are accompanied by larger flares and visible dimmings, while less energetic source regions produce slow CMEs that are accompanied by smaller flares and may or may not have dimmings. The production of dimmings in the latter case may depend on a number of factors including initiation height of the CME, source region magnetic configuration, and observational effects. These results have important implications for understanding and predicting CME initiations.

  5. Photospheric and coronal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sheeley, N.R., Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on small-scale and large-scale photospheric and coronal magnetic fields during 1987-1990 is reviewed, focusing on observational studies. Particular attention is given to the new techniques, which include the correlation tracking of granules, the use of highly Zeeman-sensitive infrared spectral lines and multiple lines to deduce small-scale field strength, the application of long integration times coupled with good seeing conditions to study weak fields, and the use of high-resolution CCD detectors together with computer image-processing techniques to obtain images with unsurpassed spatial resolution. Synoptic observations of large-scale fields during the sunspot cycle are also discussed. 101 refs.

  6. Fishing in the Coronal Graveyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, T. R.; Brown, A.; Harper, G. M.; Bennett, P. D.; Linsky, J. L.; Carpenter, K. G.; Robinson, R. D.

    1996-12-01

    Hot coronae (T ~ 10(6) K) are thought to be rare among single giant stars to the right of the ``Linsky--Haisch dividing line'' near K0 in the H--R diagram. K and M giants are such slow rotators that absence of dynamo generated magnetic activity would be natural. Nevertheless, gamma Dra (K5 III) unexpectedly was detected in FUV coronal proxies---hot lines Si IV lambda 1393 and C IV lambda 1548---by HST /GHRS during Science Verification, and subsequently was discovered as a faint X-ray source in a deep ROSAT /PSPC pointing. Is gamma Dra anomalous, or is the lack of coronal detections among the K giants simply a matter of insufficient sensitivity? We have used the GHRS low resolution mode to search for additional examples of hot lines among inactive single red giants. Si IV provides a clean diagnostic of subcoronal material because it falls near the peak sensitivity of the G140L mode and does not suffer from abundance depletions that can affect C IV in red giants. X-ray/Si IV ratios are such that HST can reach to much fainter limiting ``coronal'' magnitudes than even very deep ROSAT pointings. In every target so far examined, we find weak---but statistically significant---Si IV emission. These include: the ancient red giant Arcturus (alpha Boo: K1 III), recorded at the end of Cycle 5; and epsilon Crv (K2.5 III) and epsilon Sco (K2 III) observed in Cycle 6. X-ray/Si IV ratios of red giants (for which measurements, or upper limits, of both diagnostics are available) fall on a uniform track, extending downward from active K0 ``Clump'' giants like beta Ceti all the way to Arcturus itself, in the depths of the ``coronal graveyard.'' The systematic behavior argues that magnetic dynamo action continues even when long term angular momentum loss has slowed the stellar spin to a crawl. This work was supported by grant GO-06066.01-94A from STScI.

  7. Anomalous transmission of a coronal "EIT wave" through a nearby coronal hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, David; Perez-Suarez, David; Valori, Gherardo

    2016-05-01

    Observations of reflection at coronal hole boundaries and transmission through the coronal hole suggest that "EIT waves" may be interpreted as freely--propagating wave--pulses initially driven by the rapid expansion of a coronal mass ejection (CME) in the low corona. An "EIT wave" observed on 2012 July 07 is seen to impact an adjacent coronal hole. However, rather than reappearing at the far edge of the coronal hole as with previous observations, the "EIT wave" was subsequently observed to reappear ~360 Mm away in the quiet Sun. The non-typical evolution of the "EIT wave" is examined using a combination of observations of the eruption from SDO/AIA and STEREO-A/EUVI as well as extrapolations of the global magnetic field. The observed "jump" in position of the "EIT wave" is shown to be due to the wave pulse traveling along hot coronal loops connecting the edge of the coronal hole with the quiet Sun.

  8. Meterwave observations of a coronal hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Z.; Schmahl, E. J.; Kundu, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    Meter-wave maps are presented showing a coronal hole at 30.9, 50.0, and 73.8 MHz using the Clark Lake Radioheliograph in October 1984. The coronal hole seen against the disk at all three frequencies shows interesting similarities to, and significant differences from its optical signatures in HeI lambda10830 spectroheliograms. The 73.8 MHz coronal hole, when seen near disk center, appears to coincide with the HeI footprint of the hole. At the lower frequencies, the emission comes from higher levels of the corona, and the hole appears to be displaced, probably due to the non-radial structure of the coronal hole. The contrast of the hole relative to the quiet Sun is much greater than reported previously for a coronal hole observed at 80 MHz. The higher contrast is certainly real, due to the superior dynamic range, sensitivity, and calibration of the Clark Lake instrument. Using a coronal hole model, the electron density is derived from radio observations of the brightness temperature. A very large discrepancy is found between the derived density and that determined from Skylab EUV observations of coronal holes. This discrepancy suggests that much of the physics of coronal holes has yet to be elucidated.

  9. SPINNING MOTIONS IN CORONAL CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.; Stenborg, G. E-mail: guillermo.stenborg.ctr.ar@nrl.navy.mi

    2010-08-20

    In movies made from Fe XII 19.5 nm images, coronal cavities that graze or are detached from the solar limb appear as continually spinning structures, with sky-plane projected flow speeds in the range 5-10 km s{sup -1}. These whirling motions often persist in the same sense for up to several days and provide strong evidence that the cavities and the immediately surrounding streamer material have the form of helical flux ropes viewed along their axes. A pronounced bias toward spin in the equatorward direction is observed during 2008. We attribute this bias to the poleward concentration of the photospheric magnetic flux near sunspot minimum, which leads to asymmetric heating along large-scale coronal loops and tends to drive a flow from higher to lower latitudes; this flow is converted into an equatorward spinning motion when the loops pinch off to form a flux rope. As sunspot activity increases and the polar fields weaken, we expect the preferred direction of the spin to reverse.

  10. Coronal manifestations of preflare activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, E. J.; Webb, D. F.; Woodgate, B.; Waggett, P.; Bentley, R.; Hurford, G.; Schadee, A.; Schrijver, J.; Harrison, R.; Martens, P.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of coronal manifestations of precursors or preheating for flares are discussed. Researchers found that almost everyone with a telescope sees something before flares. Whether an all-encompassing scenario will ever be developed is not at all clear at present. The clearest example of preflare activity appears to be activated filaments and their manifestations, which presumably are signatures of a changing magnetic field. But researchers have seen two similar eruptions, one without any evidence of emerging flux (Kundu et al., 1985) and the other with colliding poles (Simon et al., 1984). While the reconnection of flux is generally agreed to be required to energize a flare, the emergence of flux from below (at least on short timescales and in compact regions) does not appear to be a necessary condition. In some cases the cancelling of magnetic flux (Martin, 1984) by horizontal motions instead may provide the trigger (Priest, 1985) Researchers found similarities and some differences between these and previous observations. The similarities, besides the frequent involvement of filaments, include compact, multiple precursors which can occur both at and near (not at) the flare site, and the association between coronal sources and activity lower in the atmosphere (i.e., transition zone and chromosphere).

  11. Initiation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a synopsis of the initiation of the strong-field magnetic explosions that produce large, fast coronal mass ejections. Cartoons based on observations are used to describe the inferred basic physical processes and sequences that trigger and drive the explosion. The magnetic field that explodes is a sheared-core bipole that may or may not be embedded in surrounding strong magnetic field, and may or may not contain a flux rope before it starts to explode. We describe three different mechanisms that singly or in combination trigger the explosion: (1) runaway internal tether-cutting reconnection, (2) runaway external tether-cutting reconnection, and (3) ideal MHD instability or loss or equilibrium. For most eruptions, high-resolution, high-cadence magnetograms and chromospheric and coronal movies (such as from TRACE and/or Solar-B) of the pre-eruption region and of the onset of the eruption and flare are needed to tell which one or which combination of these mechanisms is the trigger. Whatever the trigger, it leads to the production of an erupting flux rope. Using a simple model flux rope, we demonstrate that the explosion can be driven by the magnetic pressure of the expanding flux rope, provided the shape of the expansion is "fat" enough.

  12. Coronal seismology using transverse loop oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verwichte, E.; Foullon, C.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Smith, H. M.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2009-12-01

    Coronal seismology exploits the properties of magnetohydrodynamics in the corona of the Sun to diagnose the local plasma. Therefore, seismology complements direct diagnostic techniques, which suffer from line-of-sight integration or may not give access to all physical quantities. In particular, the seismological exploitation of fast magnetoacoustic oscillations in coronal loops provides information about the global magnetic and density structuring of those loops acting as wave guides. From the oscillation period and damping time it is shown how to obtain information about the local coronal magnetic field as well as the longitudinal and transverse structuring. Furthermore, such studies motivate the development of coronal wave theories, which are also relevant to the coronal heating problem.

  13. Network Coronal Bright Points: Coronal Heating Concentrations Found in the Solar Magnetic Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D.

    1997-01-01

    We examine the magnetic origins of coronal heating in quiet regions by combining SOHO/EIT Fe XII coronal images and Kitt Peak magnetograms. Spatial filtering of the coronal images shows a network of enhanced structures on the scale of the magnetic network in quiet regions. Superposition of the filtered coronal images on maps of the magnetic network extracted from the magnetograms shows that the coronal network does indeed trace and stem from the magnetic network. Network coronal bright points, the brightest features in the network lanes, are found to have a highly significant (8 sigma above random chance) coincidence with polarity dividing lines (neutral lines) in the network, and are often at the feet of enhanced coronal structures that stem from the network and reach out over the cell interiors. These results indicate that, similar to the close linkage of neutral-line core fields with coronal heating in active regions, low-lying core fields encasing neutral lines in the magnetic network often drive noticeable coronal heating both within themselves (the network coronal bright points) and on more extended fields lines rooted around them. This behavior favors the possibility that active core fields in the network are the main drivers of the heating of the bulk of the quiet corona, on scales much larger than the network lanes and cells.

  14. Network Coronal Bright Points: Coronal Heating Concentrations Found in the Solar Magnetic Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.

    1998-01-01

    We examine the magnetic origins of coronal heating in quiet regions by combining SOHO/EIT Fe xii coronal images and Kitt Peak magnetograms. Spatial filtering of the coronal images shows a network of enhanced structures on the scale of the magnetic network in quiet regions. Superposition of the filtered coronal images on maps of the magnetic network extracted from the magnetograms shows that the coronal network does indeed trace and stem from the magnetic network. Network coronal bright points, the brightest features in the network lanes, are found to have a highly significant coincidence with polarity dividing lines (neutral lines) in the network and are often at the feet of enhanced coronal structures that stem from the network and reach out over the cell interiors. These results indicate that, similar to the close linkage of neutral-line core fields with coronal heating in active regions (shown in previous work), low-lying core fields encasing neutral lines in the magnetic network often drive noticeable coronal heating both within themselves (the network coronal bright points) and on more extended field lines rooted around them. This behavior favors the possibility that active core fields in the network are the main drivers of the heating of the bulk of the quiet corona, on scales much larger than the network lanes and cells.

  15. Fast magnetoacoustic wave trains in coronal holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Kupriyanova, E. G.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Rapidly propagating coronal EUV disturbances recently discovered in the solar corona are interpreted in terms of guided fast magnetoacoustic waves. Fast magnetoacoustic waves experience geometric dispersion in waveguides, which causes localised, impulsive perturbations to develop into quasi-periodic wave trains. Aims: We consider the formation of fast wave trains in a super-radially expanding coronal hole modelled by a magnetic funnel with a field-aligned density profile that is rarefied in comparison to the surrounding plasma. This kind of structure is typical of coronal holes, and it forms a fast magnetoacoustic anti-waveguide as a local maximum in the Alfvén speed. Methods: We performed 2D MHD numerical simulations for impulsively generated perturbations to the system. Both sausage and kink perturbations are considered and the role of the density contrast ratio investigated. Results: The anti-waveguide funnel geometry refracts wave energy away from the structure. However, in this geometry the quasi-periodic fast wave trains are found to appear, too, and so can be associated with the observed rapidly propagating coronal EUV disturbances. The wave trains propagate along the external edge of the coronal hole. The fast wave trains generated in coronal holes exhibit less dispersive evolution than in the case of a dense waveguide. Conclusions: We conclude that an impulsive energy release localised in a coronal plasma inhomogeneity develops into a fast wave train for both kink and sausage disturbances and for both waveguide and anti-waveguide transverse plasma profiles.

  16. FORWARD: A toolset for multiwavelength coronal magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Sarah; Kucera, Therese; White, Stephen; Dove, James; Fan, Yuhong; Forland, Blake; Rachmeler, Laurel; Downs, Cooper; Reeves, Katharine

    2016-03-01

    Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma -- i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  17. Stability Study of Coronal Cavities and Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Toma, Giuliana; Gibson, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    Cavity/prominence systems are large-scale coronal structures that can live for many weeks and even months and often end their life in the form of large coronal eruptions. To determine the role of the surrounding ambient coronal field in stabilizing thesesystems against eruption, we examined the extent to which the decline with height of the external coronal magnetic field influences their evolution and likelihood to erupt. We selected coronal cavities observed with SDO/AIA during the rising phase of cycle 24 and divided them in two groups, eruptive and non-eruptive. The height of the cavity, both at the cavity center and top, was directly measured from the SDO/AIA images. The ambient coronal field was derived from a PFSS extrapolation of SDO/HMI magnetograms. We find that the decay index of the potential field above the coronal cavity varies significantly in value for both eruptive and non-eruptive cases but stable cavity systems have, on average, a lower decay index and less complex topology than the eruptive ones.

  18. FORWARD: A Toolset for Multiwavelength Coronal Magnetometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Sarah E.; Kucera, Therese A.; White, Stephen M.; Dove, James B.; Fan, Yuhong; Forland, Blake C.; Rachmeler, Laurel A.; Downs, Cooper; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  19. Coronal Structure: Legacy of EUVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, Andrea K,

    1999-01-01

    During this past school year, the Smithsonian Predoctoral student, Jorge Sanz-Forcada, began work on this Ph.D. thesis research which will focus on the coronal structure of active cool binary stars. He developed a semi-automatic algorithm to derive the emission measure distribution from EUVE spectra using the latest atomic parameters. To date, he has modeled our long EUVE pointing on lambda And that occurred in the fall of 1998, and has reduced and modeled spectra from EUVE pointings on AR Lac and UX Ari. Some of these observations were made simultaneous with the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Physics (ASCA) satellite, and the results reported at the HEAD meeting in Spring 1999.

  20. Coronal Diagnostics from Cometary Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryans, Paul; Pesnell, William D; Seaton, Daniel B; West, Matthew J

    2014-06-01

    The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission observed from sungrazing comets as they pass through the solar atmosphere can be used to infer the properties of the corona. In this paper we will discuss several of these properties that can be estimated from the EUV observations of Comet Lovejoy from AIA/SDO and SWAP/PROBA2. The longevity of the emission allows us to constrain the coronal electron density through which the comet passes. We will also discuss how dispersion of the emitting cometary material we can be used to estimate the local Alfven speed in the corona. Finally, measuring the deformation of the magnetic field as it is impacted by the comet can be used to estimate the magnetic field strength in this location. In the absence of the comet, none of these parameters are directly measurable in the corona. Sungrazing comets are thus unique probes of the solar atmosphere.

  1. Recent advances in coronal heating.

    PubMed

    De Moortel, Ineke; Browning, Philippa

    2015-05-28

    The solar corona, the tenuous outer atmosphere of the Sun, is orders of magnitude hotter than the solar surface. This 'coronal heating problem' requires the identification of a heat source to balance losses due to thermal conduction, radiation and (in some locations) convection. The review papers in this Theo Murphy meeting issue present an overview of recent observational findings, large- and small-scale numerical modelling of physical processes occurring in the solar atmosphere and other aspects which may affect our understanding of the proposed heating mechanisms. At the same time, they also set out the directions and challenges which must be tackled by future research. In this brief introduction, we summarize some of the issues and themes which reoccur throughout this issue. PMID:25897095

  2. The coronal-sounding experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, M. K.; Asmar, S. W.; Brenkle, J. P.; Edenhofer, P.; Paetzold, M.; Volland, H.

    1992-01-01

    The main science objective of the Ulysses Solar Corona Experiment is to derive the plasma parameters of the solar atmosphere using established coronal-sounding techniques. Applying appropriate model assumptions, the 3D electron density distribution will be determined from dual-frequency ranging and Doppler measurements recorded at the NASA Deep Space Network during the solar conjunctions. Multi-station observations will be used to derive the plasma bulk velocity at solar distances where the solar wind is expected to undergo its greatest acceleration. As a secondary objective profiting from the favorable geometry during Jupiter encounter, radio-sounding measurements will yield a unique cross-scan of the electron density in the Io Plasma Torus.

  3. Recent advances in coronal heating

    PubMed Central

    De Moortel, Ineke; Browning, Philippa

    2015-01-01

    The solar corona, the tenuous outer atmosphere of the Sun, is orders of magnitude hotter than the solar surface. This ‘coronal heating problem’ requires the identification of a heat source to balance losses due to thermal conduction, radiation and (in some locations) convection. The review papers in this Theo Murphy meeting issue present an overview of recent observational findings, large- and small-scale numerical modelling of physical processes occurring in the solar atmosphere and other aspects which may affect our understanding of the proposed heating mechanisms. At the same time, they also set out the directions and challenges which must be tackled by future research. In this brief introduction, we summarize some of the issues and themes which reoccur throughout this issue. PMID:25897095

  4. Fishing in the Coronal Graveyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas

    1996-07-01

    We propose a far-UV spectroscopic survey of K2-K4 giants. Hotcoronae (T> 10^6 K) are rare or absent in single giant starsto the right of a boundary in the H-R diagram near K0(``Linsky-Haisch dividing line''). The early-K giants aresuch slow rotators that the absence of Dynamo-generatedmagnetic activity is natural. Nevertheless, Gamma Draconis(K5 III) unexpectedly was detected in the coronal proxy C IVby HST/GHRS, and subsequently was discovered as a faintX-ray source in a deep ROSAT pointing. The basis for thecoronal emission is unknown, given the presumed lack of Dynamoaction. However, the X-ray/C IV ratio of Gamma Dra falls on acontinuum of values; extending from the active K0 ``Clump''giants like Beta Ceti, down to the old red giant Alpha Boo (K1III) in the depths of the ``coronal graveyard.'' GHRS/G140Lreconnaissance of high-excitation FUV emissions (Si IV, C IV,and N V) can be conducted at sensitivity levels orders ofmagnitude better than possible prior to HST. Such a surveyof single red giants would provide a unique perspective on thebreadth of activity to the right of the L-H boundary. Italso would record the fluoresced 4th-positive system of CO,a key tracer of thermal inhomogeneities in late-typeatmospheres. Seven candidates fall in the magnitude rangeV < 3. Three--Beta UMi, Epsilon Sco, and Epsilon Crv--willbe observed, consistent with the TAC allocation.

  5. Initiation of a coronal transient

    SciTech Connect

    Low, B.C.; Munro, R.H.; Fisher, R.R.

    1982-03-01

    This paper analyzes the coronal transient/eruptive prominence event of 1980 August 5 observed by the Mauna Loa experiment system. This event yielded data on the early development of the transient in the low corona between 1.2 R/sub sun/ and 2.2 R/sub sun/, information which was not available when earlier attempts were made to explain transient phenomena. The transient's initial appearance in the form of a rising density-depleted structure, prior to the eruption of the associated prominence, can be explained as an effect of magnetic buoyancy. The data indicate that this transient has a density depletion of 17% to 33% relative to an undisturbed corona which is approximately isothermal with a temperature of 1.5 x 10/sup 6/ K and a coronal density of 1.0 x 10/sup 9/ cm/sup -3/ at the base of the corona. The height versus base length relationship of the evolving transient resembles, remarkably well, the theoretical predictions obtained from a quasi-static model of a margnetically buoyant loop system. By matching this relationship with the theoretical model, we estimate the magnetic field at the base of the transient to be between 2 and 3 gauss. It is also shown that the initial, nearly constant speed of the top of the transient, 80 +- 20 km s/sup -1/, is consistent with a theoretical estimate calculated from the quasi-static model. These results suggest that some transients are not initiated impulsively, the initial stage of the development being driven by a quasi-static response to a slow change in magnetic field conditions at the base of the corona.

  6. Solar Cycle Variations of Coronal Hole Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, M. P.; Cranmer, S. R.; Kohl, J. L.

    2005-05-01

    As of early 2005, we have measured with the SOHO Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) the physical properties of at least 136 large coronal holes that produced a variety of high-speed solar wind conditions at 1 AU. UVCS has been used to observe O VI (103.2 and 103.7 nm) and H I Lyman alpha (121.6 nm) emission lines as a function of heliocentric distance in coronal holes since 1996. The analysis of their spectroscopic parameters allows us to identify similarities and differences among coronal holes at different phases of the solar cycle. From such measurements we can derive plasma parameters (densities, temperatures, velocity distribution anisotropies, and outflow speeds) for O5+ and protons as a function of heliocentric distance in the coronal holes. These properties, combined with other observed quantities such as white-light polarization brightness and the more-or-less unipolar magnetic fluxes measured on-disk, let us map out the "allowed parameter space" of coronal hole plasma properties more fully than ever before. We will present the solar cycle dependence of the above plasma parameters from the last solar minimum in 1996 to present and compare them, where possible, with the in situ solar wind properties. We will also present an update on the pattern that is beginning to emerge, i.e., coronal holes with lower densities at a given heliocentric distance tend to exhibit faster ion outflow and higher ion temperatures. This information will thus be used to set firm empirical constraints on coronal heating and solar wind acceleration in coronal holes. In 2005, the polar coronal holes have not yet evolved to the fully quiescent minimum state seen in 1996-1997, though the next solar minimum is expected to occur in about 1.5 to 2 years. This work is supported by NASA under Grant NNG04GE84G to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by the Italian Space Agency, and by PRODEX (Swiss contribution).

  7. Slipping magnetic reconnection in coronal loops.

    PubMed

    Aulanier, Guillaume; Golub, Leon; Deluca, Edward E; Cirtain, Jonathan W; Kano, Ryouhei; Lundquist, Loraine L; Narukage, Noriyuki; Sakao, Taro; Weber, Mark A

    2007-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection of solar coronal loops is the main process that causes solar flares and possibly coronal heating. In the standard model, magnetic field lines break and reconnect instantaneously at places where the field mapping is discontinuous. However, another mode may operate where the magnetic field mapping is continuous but shows steep gradients: The field lines may slip across each other. Soft x-ray observations of fast bidirectional motions of coronal loops, observed by the Hinode spacecraft, support the existence of this slipping magnetic reconnection regime in the Sun's corona. This basic process should be considered when interpreting reconnection, both on the Sun and in laboratory-based plasma experiments. PMID:18063789

  8. LOW-LATITUDE CORONAL HOLES, DECAYING ACTIVE REGIONS, AND GLOBAL CORONAL MAGNETIC STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.; Haislmaier, K. J.

    2013-10-01

    We study the relationship between decaying active-region magnetic fields, coronal holes, and the global coronal magnetic structure using Global Oscillations Network Group synoptic magnetograms, Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory extreme-ultraviolet synoptic maps, and coronal potential-field source-surface models. We analyze 14 decaying regions and associated coronal holes occurring between early 2007 and late 2010, 4 from cycle 23 and 10 from cycle 24. We investigate the relationship between asymmetries in active regions' positive and negative magnetic intensities, asymmetric magnetic decay rates, flux imbalances, global field structure, and coronal hole formation. Whereas new emerging active regions caused changes in the large-scale coronal field, the coronal fields of the 14 decaying active regions only opened under the condition that the global coronal structure remained almost unchanged. This was because the dominant slowly varying, low-order multipoles prevented opposing-polarity fields from opening and the remnant active-region flux preserved the regions' low-order multipole moments long after the regions had decayed. Thus, the polarity of each coronal hole necessarily matched the polar field on the side of the streamer belt where the corresponding active region decayed. For magnetically isolated active regions initially located within the streamer belt, the more intense polarity generally survived to form the hole. For non-isolated regions, flux imbalance and topological asymmetry prompted the opposite to occur in some cases.

  9. Relating magnetic reconnection to coronal heating

    PubMed Central

    Longcope, D. W.; Tarr, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    It is clear that the solar corona is being heated and that coronal magnetic fields undergo reconnection all the time. Here we attempt to show that these two facts are related—i.e. coronal reconnection generates heat. This attempt must address the fact that topological change of field lines does not automatically generate heat. We present one case of flux emergence where we have measured the rate of coronal magnetic reconnection and the rate of energy dissipation in the corona. The ratio of these two, , is a current comparable to the amount of current expected to flow along the boundary separating the emerged flux from the pre-existing flux overlying it. We can generalize this relation to the overall corona in quiet Sun or in active regions. Doing so yields estimates for the contribution to coronal heating from magnetic reconnection. These estimated rates are comparable to the amount required to maintain the corona at its observed temperature. PMID:25897089

  10. Solar cycle variations of coronal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loucif, M. L.; Koutchmy, S.

    1989-01-01

    Using eclipse pictures of the solar corona, properly scaled drawings have been prepared to constitute a short atlas of coronal structures. These drawings have been used to extract 2 parameters which are further considered with respect to the sunspot number and the sunspot cycle: the extension of polar regions free of coronal streamers and the average radial deviation of large streamers. The flattening index deduced from the photometric analysis of a larger number of eclipse pictures is also considered. The out-of-phase behavior of several coronal parameters is confirmed. The results are discussed in the light of the analysis of the green-line activity as observed during 30 years at the Pic du Midi Observatory. The N-S asymmetric behavior of the activity in different solar hemispheres and the occurrence of a powerful secondary maximum of coronal activity are discussed.

  11. Aug. 31, 2012 Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Video Gallery

    This two part movie shows an Aug. 31 coronal mass ejection (CME) from the sun , the same event that caused depletion and refilling of the radiation belts just after the Relativistic Electron-Proton...

  12. Coronal Magnetism and Forward Solarsoft Idl Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    The FORWARD suite of Solar Soft IDL codes is a community resource for model-data comparison, with a particular emphasis on analyzing coronal magnetic fields. FORWARD may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare to existing data. FORWARD works with numerical model datacubes, interfaces with the web-served Predictive Science Inc MAS simulation datacubes and the Solar Soft IDL Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) package, and also includes several analytic models (more can be added). It connects to the Virtual Solar Observatory and other web-served observations to download data in a format directly comparable to model predictions. It utilizes the CHIANTI database in modeling UV/EUV lines, and links to the CLE polarimetry synthesis code for forbidden coronal lines. FORWARD enables "forward-fitting" of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties.

  13. Sept. 28, 2012 Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Video Gallery

    This Sept. 28 coronal mass ejection (CME) from the sun, captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), is the event which caused the near total annihilation of the new radiation belt and sl...

  14. Solar Coronal Cells as Seen by STEREO

    NASA Video Gallery

    The changes of a coronal cell region as solar rotation carries it across the solar disk as seen with NASA's STEREO-B spacecraft. The camera is fixed on the region (panning with it) and shows the pl...

  15. Observational Consequences of Coronal Heating Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan C.; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The coronal heating problem remains unsolved today, 80 years after its discovery, despite 50 years of suborbital and orbital coronal observatories. Tens of theoretical coronal heating mechanisms have been suggested, but only a few have been able to be ruled out. In this talk, we will explore the reasons for the slow progress and discuss the measurements that will be needed for potential breakthrough, including imaging the solar corona at small spatial scales, measuring the chromospheric magnetic fields, and detecting the presence of high temperature, low emission measure plasma. We will discuss three sounding rocket instruments developed to make these measurements: the High resolution Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP), and the Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS).

  16. Coronal magnetic fields and the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newkirk, G., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Current information is presented on coronal magnetic fields as they bear on problems of the solar wind. Both steady state fields and coronal transient events are considered. A brief critique is given of the methods of calculating coronal magnetic fields including the potential (current free) models, exact solutions for the solar wind and field interaction, and source surface models. These solutions are compared with the meager quantitative observations which are available at this time. Qualitative comparisons between the shapes of calculated magnetic field lines and the forms visible in the solar corona at several recent eclipses are displayed. These suggest that: (1) coronal streamers develop above extended magnetic arcades which connect unipolar regions of opposite polarity; and (2) loops, arches, and rays in the corona correspond to preferentially filled magnetic tubes in the approximately potential field.

  17. Results of coronal hole research: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    An overview of the last 10 years of coronal hole research, in particular since 1970, is presented. The findings of the early investigations and the more recent results obtained with Skylab/Apollo Telescope Mount instrumentation are discussed.

  18. Interpretive Tools for Analysis of Coronal Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, Leon

    2004-01-01

    Contents include list of publications resulting from grant: Magneto-Hydrodynamic Model of the Solar Corona and Interplanetary Medium. Coronal magnetic field topology and source of fast solar wind. Geophysical Importance of Global Magnetic Field Geometry and Density Distribution in Solar Wind Modeling. Empirical Model of the Corona-Solar Wind with Multiple Current Sheets. Model of the Solar Wind and its Comparison with ULYSSES. Physical properties of a coronal hole from a coronal diagnostic spectrometer, Mauna Loa Coronagraph, and LASCO observations during the Whole Sun Month. Semi-Empirical 2-D MHD Model of the Solar corona and Solar Wind: Energy Flow in the Corona. Source Region of High and Low Speed Wind during the Spartan. Three-dimensional coronal density structure. Cone Model for Halo CME's: Application to Space Weather Forecasting.

  19. Energy conversion in the coronal plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, P. C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Solar and stellar X-ray emission are the observed waste products of the interplay between magnetic fields and the motion of stellar plasma. Theoretical understanding of the process of coronal heating is of utmost importance, since the high temperature is what defines the corona in the first place. Most of the research described deals with the aspects of the several rivalling theories for coronal heating. The rest of the papers deal with processes of energy conversion related to flares.

  20. Dynamic simulation of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.; Wu, S. T.

    1980-01-01

    A model is developed for the formation and propagation through the lower corona of the loop-like coronal transients in which mass is ejected from near the solar surface to the outer corona. It is assumed that the initial state for the transient is a coronal streamer. The initial state for the streamer is a polytropic, hydrodynamic solution to the steady-state radial equation of motion coupled with a force-free dipole magnetic field. The numerical solution of the complete time-dependent equations then gradually approaches a stationary coronal streamer configuration. The streamer configuration becomes the initial state for the coronal transient. The streamer and transient simulations are performed completely independent of each other. The transient is created by a sudden increase in the pressure at the base of the closed-field region in the streamer configuration. Both coronal streamers and coronal transients are calculated for values of the plasma beta (the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure) varying from 0.1 to 100.

  1. MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODELING OF CORONAL RAIN DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2013-07-10

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  2. Multidimensional Modeling of Coronal Rain Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2013-07-01

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  3. Characteristics of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukder, F.; Marchese, A. K.; Tulsee, T.

    2014-12-01

    A coronal mass ejection (CME) is a release of charged particles resulting from solar activity. These charged particles can affect electronics on spacecraft, airplanes, global positioning systems, and communication satellites. The purpose of this research was to study CME data from satellites and correlate these to other properties. Solar wind data collected by STEREO A/B and ACE satellites were analyzed. The data consisted of solar wind flux for various elements (helium through iron), as well as the components of the interplanetary magnetic field. CME events are known to cause a surge in the helium flux, as well as other particles. It is hypothesized that a CME event will cause an increase in the number of lighter elements relative to heavier particles. This is because for a given input of energy, lighter elements are expected to be accelerated to a greater extent than heavier elements. A significant increase was observed in the ratio between helium to oxygen (He/O) prior to intense CMEs. A CME event on November 4, 2003 caused an eleven-fold increase in the He/O ratio, while for another event on April 2, 2001 the He/O ratio increased from 80 to 700. A significant increase in He/O ratio is not observed during weaker CMEs. Furthermore, it was also observed that not all increases in the ratio were accompanied by CMEs. The increase in He/O ratio prior to the CME arrival might be used as a way to predict future events.

  4. Composition of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurbuchen, T. H.; Weberg, M.; von Steiger, R.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Lepri, S. T.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the physical origin of plasmas that are ejected from the solar corona. To address this issue, we perform a comprehensive analysis of the elemental composition of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) using recently released elemental composition data for Fe, Mg, Si, S, C, N, Ne, and He as compared to O and H. We find that ICMEs exhibit a systematic abundance increase of elements with first ionization potential (FIP) < 10 eV, as well as a significant increase of Ne as compared to quasi-stationary solar wind. ICME plasmas have a stronger FIP effect than slow wind, which indicates either that an FIP process is active during the ICME ejection or that a different type of solar plasma is injected into ICMEs. The observed FIP fractionation is largest during times when the Fe ionic charge states are elevated above Q Fe > 12.0. For ICMEs with elevated charge states, the FIP effect is enhanced by 70% over that of the slow wind. We argue that the compositionally hot parts of ICMEs are active region loops that do not normally have access to the heliosphere through the processes that give rise to solar wind. We also discuss the implications of this result for solar energetic particles accelerated during solar eruptions and for the origin of the slow wind itself.

  5. The Global Coronal Structure Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, Leon

    1998-02-01

    During the past year we have completed the changeover from the NIXT program to the new TXI sounding rocket program. The NIXT effort, aimed at evaluating the viability of the remaining portions of the NIXT hardware and design, has been finished and the portions of the NIXT which are viable and flightworthy, such as filters, mirror mounting hardware, electronics and telemetry interface systems, are now part of the new rocket payload. The backup NIXT multilayer-coated x-ray telescope and its mounting hardware have been completely fabricated and are being stored for possible future use in the TXI rocket. The H-alpha camera design is being utilized in the TXI program for real-time pointing verification and control via telemetry. A new H-alpha camera has been built, with a high-resolution RS170 CCD camera output. Two papers, summarizing scientific results from the NIXT rocket program, have been written and published this year: 1. "The Solar X-ray Corona," by L. Golub, Astrophysics and Space Science, 237, 33 (1996). 2. "Difficulties in Observing Coronal Structure," Keynote Paper, Proceedings STEPWG1 Workshop on Measurements and Analyses of the Solar 3D Magnetic Field, Solar Physics, 174, 99 (1997).

  6. The Global Coronal Structure Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1998-01-01

    During the past year we have completed the changeover from the NIXT program to the new TXI sounding rocket program. The NIXT effort, aimed at evaluating the viability of the remaining portions of the NIXT hardware and design, has been finished and the portions of the NIXT which are viable and flightworthy, such as filters, mirror mounting hardware, electronics and telemetry interface systems, are now part of the new rocket payload. The backup NIXT multilayer-coated x-ray telescope and its mounting hardware have been completely fabricated and are being stored for possible future use in the TXI rocket. The H-alpha camera design is being utilized in the TXI program for real-time pointing verification and control via telemetry. A new H-alpha camera has been built, with a high-resolution RS170 CCD camera output. Two papers, summarizing scientific results from the NIXT rocket program, have been written and published this year: 1. "The Solar X-ray Corona," by L. Golub, Astrophysics and Space Science, 237, 33 (1996). 2. "Difficulties in Observing Coronal Structure," Keynote Paper, Proceedings STEPWG1 Workshop on Measurements and Analyses of the Solar 3D Magnetic Field, Solar Physics, 174, 99 (1997).

  7. Coronal Structures in Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Dupree, Andrea K.

    2004-01-01

    Many papers have been published that further elucidate the structure of coronas in cool stars as determined from EUVE, HST, FUSE, Chandra, and XMM-Newton observations. In addition we are exploring the effects of coronas on the He I 1083081 transition that is observed in the infrared. Highlights of these are summarized below including publications during this reporting period and presentations. Ground-based magnetic Doppler imaging of cool stars suggests that active stars have active regions located at high latitudes on their surface. We have performed similar imaging in X-ray to locate the sites of enhanced activity using Chandra spectra. Chandra HETG observations of the bright eclipsing contact binary 44i Boo and Chandra LETG observations for the eclipsing binary VW Cep show X-ray line profiles that are Doppler-shifted by orbital motion. After careful analysis of the spectrum of each binary, a composite line-profile is constructed by adding the individual spectral lines. This high signal-to-noise ratio composite line-profile yields orbital velocities for these binaries that are accurate to 30 km/sec and allows their orbital motion to be studied at higher time resolutions. In conjunction with X-ray lightcurves, the phase-binned composite line-profiles constrain coronal structures to be small and located at high latitudes. These observations and techniques show the power of the Doppler Imaging Technique applied to X-ray line emission.

  8. Comparing semilunar coronally positioned flap to standard coronally positioned flap using periodontal clinical parameters.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Carlos Augusto; da Silva, Wilson Aparecido Dias; Tonet, Karine; Secundes, Mayron Barros; Nassar, Patricia Oehlmeyer

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of 2 surgical root coverage techniques--semilunar coronally positioned flap and coronally advanced flap--using the clinical parameters of periodontal tissues from patients with Miller Class I gingival recession. Twenty patients (20-50 years of age) were selected. Basic periodontal treatment was performed, and plaque index, gingival index, probing depth, clinical attachment level, and height of the attached gingiva were determined. Each patient was placed into 1 of 2 groups: Group 1 patients underwent the semilunar coronally positioned flap technique, and Group 2 patients underwent the coronally advanced flap technique. Patients were assessed for 180 days. Both groups showed significant reduction of plaque and gingival indices and an improvement in clinical attachment levels and probing depth. However, results showed the standard coronally positioned flap technique was deemed more effective due to significant clinical attachment level gains. PMID:24598495

  9. Observational characteristics of coronal mass ejections without low-coronal signatures

    SciTech Connect

    D'Huys, E.; Seaton, D. B.; Berghmans, D.; Poedts, S.

    2014-11-01

    Solar eruptions are usually associated with a variety of phenomena occurring in the low corona before, during, and after the onset of eruption. Though easily visible in coronagraph observations, so-called stealth coronal mass ejections (CMEs) do not obviously exhibit any of these low-coronal signatures. The presence or absence of distinct low-coronal signatures can be linked to different theoretical models to establish the mechanisms by which the eruption is initiated and driven. In this study, 40 CMEs without low-coronal signatures occurring in 2012 are identified. Their observational and kinematic properties are analyzed and compared to those of regular CMEs. Solar eruptions without clear on-disk or low-coronal signatures can lead to unexpected space weather impacts, since many early warning signs for significant space weather activity are not present in these events. A better understanding of their initiation mechanism(s) will considerably improve the ability to predict such space weather events.

  10. Blind Stereoscopy of the Coronal Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Malanushenko, Anna

    2015-10-01

    We test the feasibility of 3D coronal-loop tracing in stereoscopic EUV image pairs, with the ultimate goal of enabling efficient 3D reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field that drives flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We developed an automated code designed to perform triangulation of coronal loops in pairs (or triplets) of EUV images recorded from different perspectives. The automated (or blind) stereoscopy code includes three major tasks: i) automated pattern recognition of coronal loops in EUV images, ii) automated pairing of corresponding loop patterns from two different aspect angles, and iii) stereoscopic triangulation of 3D loop coordinates. We perform tests with simulated stereoscopic EUV images and quantify the accuracy of all three procedures. In addition we test the performance of the blind-stereoscopy code as a function of the spacecraft-separation angle and as a function of the spatial resolution. We also test the sensitivity to magnetic non-potentiality. The automated code developed here can be used for analysis of existing Solar TErrestrial RElationship Observatory (STEREO) data, but primarily serves for a design study of a future mission with dedicated diagnostics of non-potential magnetic fields. For a pixel size of 0.6^'' (corresponding to the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/ Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) spatial resolution of 1.4^''), we find an optimum spacecraft-separation angle of αs ≈5°.

  11. Solar Cycle Dependence of Coronal Hole Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, M. P.

    2005-07-01

    The SOHO Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) has been used to measure the properties of hundreds of large coronal holes, that produced a variety of high-speed solar wind streams, during the past nine years. In the cases where UVCS and in situ measurements were made of the same coronal-hole plasma, high speeds in excess of 600 km/s were found in interplanetary space. UVCS has been used to observe O VI (103.2 and 103.7 nm) and H I Lyman alpha (121.6 nm) emission lines as a function of heliocentric distance. The analysis of their spectroscopic parameters allows us to identify similarities and differences among coronal holes at different phases of the solar cycle. From such measurements we can derive plasma parameters (densities, temperatures, velocity distribution anisotropies, and outflow speeds) for O5+ and protons as a function of heliocentric distance in the coronal holes. These properties, combined with other observed quantities such as white-light polarization brightness and the magnetic fluxes measured on-disk, let us analyze the coronal hole plasma properties more fully than ever before. We will present the solar cycle dependence of the above plasma parameters from the last solar minimum in 1996 to present and compare them, where possible, with the in situ solar wind properties. This work is supported by NASA under Grant NNG04GE84G to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by the Italian Space Agency, and by PRODEX (Swiss contribution).

  12. Modeling eruptive coronal magnetohydrodynamic systems with FLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmeler, L. A.

    In this dissertation I explore solar coronal energetic eruptions in the context of magnetic reconnection, which is commonly thought to be a required trigger mechanism for solar eruptions. Reconnection is difficult to directly observe in the corona, and current numerical methods cannot model reconnectionless control cases. Thus, it is not possible to determine if reconnection is a necessary component of these eruptions. I have executed multiple controlled simulations to determine the importance of reconnection for initiation and evolution of several eruptive systems using FLUX, a numerical model that uses the comparatively new fluxon technique. I describe two types of eruptions modeled with FLUX: a metastable confined flux rope theory for coronal mass ejection (CME) initiation, and symmetrically twisted coronal jets in a uniform vertical background field. In the former, I identified an ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability that allows metastable twisted flux rope systems to suddenly lose stability and erupt even in the absence of reconnection, contradicting previous conjecture. The CME result is in contrast to the azimuthally symmetric coronal jet initiation model, where jet-like behavior does not manifest without reconnection. My work has demonstrated that some of the observed eruptive phenomena may be triggered by non-reconnective means such as ideal MHD instabilities, and that magnetic reconnection is not a required element in all coronal eruptions.

  13. Coronal magnetic field modeling using stereoscopy constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chifu, I.; Inhester, B.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2015-05-01

    Aims: Nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation has been used extensively in the past to extrapolate solar surface magnetograms to stationary coronal field models. In theoretical tests with known boundary conditions, the nonlinear boundary value problem can be solved reliably. However, if the magnetogram is measured with errors, the extrapolation often yields field lines that disagree with the shapes of simultaneously observed and stereoscopically reconstructed coronal loops. We here propose an extension to an NLFFF extrapolation scheme that remedies this deficiency in that it incorporates the loop information in the extrapolation procedure. Methods: We extended the variational formulation of the NLFFF optimization code by an additional term that monitors and minimizes the difference of the local magnetic field direction and the orientation of 3D plasma loops. We tested the performance of the new code with a previously reported semi-analytical force-free solution. Results: We demonstrate that there is a range of force-free and divergence-free solutions that comply with the boundary measurements within some error bound. With our new approach we can obtain the solution out of this set the coronal fields which is well aligned with given loops. Conclusions: We conclude that the shape of coronal loops reconstructed by stereoscopy may lead to an important stabilization of coronal NLFFF field solutions when, as is typically the case, magnetic surface measurements with limited precision do not allow determining the solution solely from photospheric field measurements.

  14. Direct Observation of Solar Coronal Magnetic Fields by Vector Tomography of the Coronal Emission Line Polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramar, M.; Lin, H.; Tomczyk, S.

    2016-03-01

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments.

  15. Free Magnetic Energy and Coronal Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy; Moore, Ron; Falconer, David

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the coronal X-ray luminosity of an active region increases roughly in direct proportion to the total photospheric flux of the active region's magnetic field (Fisher et al. 1998). It is also observed, however, that the coronal luminosity of active regions of nearly the same flux content can differ by an order of magnitude. In this presentation, we analyze 10 active regions with roughly the same total magnetic flux. We first determine several coronal properties, such as X-ray luminosity (calculated using Hinode XRT), peak temperature (calculated using Hinode EIS), and total Fe XVIII emission (calculated using SDO AIA). We present the dependence of these properties on a proxy of the free magnetic energy of the active region

  16. The Fundamental Structure of Coronal Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy; Warren, Harry; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly; Golub, Leon; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DePontieu, Bart; Title, Alan; Weber, Mark

    2012-01-01

    During the past ten years, solar physicists have attempted to infer the coronal heating mechanism by comparing observations of coronal loops with hydrodynamic model predictions. These comparisons often used the addition of sub ]resolution strands to explain the observed loop properties. On July 11, 2012, the High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi ]C) was launched on a sounding rocket. This instrument obtained images of the solar corona was 0.2 ]0.3'' resolution in a narrowband EUV filter centered around 193 Angstroms. In this talk, we will compare these high resolution images to simultaneous density measurements obtained with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) on Hinode to determine whether the structures observed with Hi ]C are resolved.

  17. MHD shocks in coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this research program is the study of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks and nonlinear simple waves produced as a result of the interaction of ejected lower coronal plasma with the ambient corona. The types of shocks and nonlinear simple waves produced for representative coronal conditions and disturbance velocities were determined. The wave system and the interactions between the ejecta and ambient corona were studied using both analytic theory and numerical solutions of the time-dependent, nonlinear MHD equations. Observations from the SMM coronagraph/polarimeter provided both guidance and motivation and are used extensively in evaluating the results. As a natural consequence of the comparisons with the data, the simulations assisted in better understanding the physical interactions in coronal mass ejections (CME's).

  18. A contemporary view of coronal heating.

    PubMed

    Parnell, Clare E; De Moortel, Ineke

    2012-07-13

    Determining the heating mechanism (or mechanisms) that causes the outer atmosphere of the Sun, and many other stars, to reach temperatures orders of magnitude higher than their surface temperatures has long been a key problem. For decades, the problem has been known as the coronal heating problem, but it is now clear that 'coronal heating' cannot be treated or explained in isolation and that the heating of the whole solar atmosphere must be studied as a highly coupled system. The magnetic field of the star is known to play a key role, but, despite significant advancements in solar telescopes, computing power and much greater understanding of theoretical mechanisms, the question of which mechanism or mechanisms are the dominant supplier of energy to the chromosphere and corona is still open. Following substantial recent progress, we consider the most likely contenders and discuss the key factors that have made, and still make, determining the actual (coronal) heating mechanism (or mechanisms) so difficult. PMID:22665900

  19. SUMER Observations of Coronal-Hole Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Klaus

    2012-11-01

    Observations of emission lines in the vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range with calibrated instrumentation provide crucial information on the prevailing plasma temperatures in the solar atmosphere. Coronal-hole temperatures measured by the SUMER spectrometer on SOHO will be presented in this contribution. Electron temperatures can be estimated from the formation temperatures of the observed emission lines. Line-ratio and emission-measure analyses, however, offer higher accuracies. Typical electron temperatures at altitudes of H<200 Mm in coronal holes are below 1 MK in bright structures—the coronal plumes—with higher values in darker areas—the inter-plume regions. Line-width measurements yield effective ion temperatures, which are much higher than the electron temperatures. Observations of line profiles emitted from species with different masses allow a separation of the effective temperatures into ion temperatures and unresolved non-thermal motions along the line of sight.

  20. A unified theory of coronal heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ionson, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Solar coronal heating mechanisms are analyzed within the framework of a unified theory of heating processes. The theory is based on the standing wave equation of Ionson (1982) for the global current driven by emfs from the convection Beta less than 1. The equation has the same form as a driven LRC equation in which the equivalent inductance is scaled with the coronal loop length. The theory is used to classify various heating mechanisms inside the coronal loops. It is shown that the total global current can be obtained from an integration of the local currents, the degree of coherency between local currents being the dominant factor governing the global current amplitude. Active region loops appear to be heated by electrodynamic coupling to p-mode oscillations in the convection Beta less than 1.

  1. Interchange Reconnection and Coronal Hole Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmondson, J. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Lynch, B. J.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of magnetic reconnection between open and closed field, (often referred to as "interchange" reconnection), on the dynamics and topology of coronal hole boundaries. The most important and most prevalent 3D topology of the interchange process is that of a small-scale bipolar magnetic field interacting with a large-scale background field. We determine the evolution of such a magnetic topology by numerical solution of the fully 3D MHD equations in spherical coordinates. First, we calculate the evolution of a small-scale bipole that initially is completely inside an open field region and then is driven across a coronal hole boundary by photospheric motions. Next the reverse situation is calculated in which the bipole is initially inside the closed region and driven toward the coronal hole boundary. In both cases we find that the stress imparted by the photospheric motions results in deformation of the separatrix surface between the closed field of the bipole and the background field, leading to rapid current sheet formation and to efficient reconnection. When the bipole is inside the open field region, the reconnection is of the interchange type in that it exchanges open and closed field. We examine, in detail, the topology of the field as the bipole moves across the coronal hole boundary, and find that the field remains well-connected throughout this process. Our results imply that open flux cannot penetrate deeply into the closed field region below a helmet streamer and, hence, support the quasi-steady models in which open and closed flux remain topologically distinct. Our results also support the uniqueness hypothesis for open field regions as postulated by Antiochos et al. We discuss the implications of this work for coronal observations. Subject Headings: Sun: corona Sun: magnetic fields Sun: reconnection Sun: coronal hole

  2. What triggers coronal mass ejections ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulanier, Guillaume

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large clouds of highly magnetized plasma. They are ac-celerated from the solar atmosphere into interplanetary space by the Lorentz force, which is associated to their strong current-carrying magnetic fields. Both theory and observations lead to the inevitable conclusion that the launch of a CME must result from the sudden release of free magnetic energy, which has slowly been accumulated in the corona for a long time before the eruption. Since the incomplete, but seminal, loss-of-equilibrium model was proposed by van Tend and Kuperus (1978), a large variety of analytical and numerical storage-and-release MHD models has been put forward in the past 20 years or so. All these models rely on the slow increase of currents and/or the slow decrease of the restraining magnetic tension preceding the eruption. But they all put the emphazis on different physical mechanisms to achieve this preeruptive evolution, and to suddenly trigger and later drive a CME. Nevertheless, all these models actually share many common features, which all describe many individual observed aspects of solar eruptions. It is therefore not always clear which of all the suggested mecha-nisms do really account for the triggering of observed CMEs in general. Also, these mechanisms should arguably not be as numerous as the models themselves, owing to the common occurence of CMEs. In order to shed some light on this challenging, but unripe, topic, I will attempt to rediscuss the applicability of the models to the Sun, and to rethink the most sensitive ones in a common frame, so as to find their common denominator. I will elaborate on the idea that many of the proposed triggering mechanisms may actually only be considered as different ways to apply a "last push", which puts the system beyond its eruptive threshold. I will argue that, in most cases, the eruptive threshold is determined by the vertical gradient of the magnetic field in the low-β corona, just like the usual

  3. Pressure structure of solar coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishan, V.

    1987-01-01

    The steady state pressure structure of a coronal loop is discussed in terms of the MHD global invariants of an incompressible plasma. The steady state is represented by the superposition of two Chandrasekhar-Kendall functions corresponding to (n=m=0) and (n=m=1) modes. The relative contribution of the two modes (epsilon) is found to depend on the surface pressure of the coronal loop which is also the pressure of the external medium. The mixed mode state does not exist for high values of the external pressure because epsilon becomes complex.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of Coronal Evolution and Disruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linker, Jon

    2002-01-01

    Flux cancellation, defined observationally as the mutual disappearance of magnetic fields of opposite polarity at the neutral line separating them, has been found to occur frequently at the site of filaments (called prominences when observed on the limb of the Sun). During the second year of this project, we have studied theoretically the role that flux cancellation may play in prominence formation, prominence eruption, and the initiation of coronal mass ejections. This work has been in published in two papers: "Magnetic Field Topology in Prominences" by Lionello, Mikic, Linker, and Amari and "Flux Cancellation and Coronal Mass Ejections" by Linker, Mikic, Riley, Lionello, Amari, and Odstrcil.

  5. Halo Coronal Mass Ejections and Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2009-01-01

    In this letter, I show that the discrepancies in the geoeffectiveness of halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) reported in the literature arise due to the varied definitions of halo CMEs used by different authors. In particular, I show that the low geoeffectiveness rate is a direct consequence of including partial halo CMEs. The geoeffectiveness of partial halo CMEs is lower because they are of low speed and likely to make a glancing impact on Earth. Key words: Coronal mass ejections, geomagnetic storms, geoeffectiveness, halo CMEs.

  6. Initiation and Evolution of Global Coronal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vršnak, B.; Muhr, N.; Žic, T.; Lulić, S.; Kienreich, I. W.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.

    Some essential outcomes of a detailed analysis of the formation and evolution of the coronal EUV wave of 15 February 2011 are presented, focused on the relationship between the source region expansion, wave kinematics, and the evolution of the wave amplitude. The observations are explained in terms of the results of the numerical MHD simulations, providing new insights into the physical background of coronal waves, especially considering the nature of the relationship of the wave amplitude and propagation velocity in different phases of the wave evolution.

  7. On the theory of coronal heating mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuperus, M.; Ionson, J. A.; Spicer, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical models describing solar coronal heating mechanisms are reviewed in some detail. The requirements of chromospheric and coronal heating are discussed in the context of the fundamental constraints encountered in modelling the outer solar atmosphere. Heating by acoustic processes in the 'nonmagnetic' parts of the atmosphere is examined with particular emphasis on the shock wave theory. Also discussed are theories of heating by electrodynamic processes in the magnetic regions of the corona, either magnetohydrodynamic waves or current heating in the regions with large electric current densities (flare type heating). Problems associated with each of the models are addressed.

  8. Observation of coronal loop torsional oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaqarashvili, T. V.

    2003-02-01

    We suggest that the global torsional oscillation of solar coronal loop may be observed by the periodical variation of a spectral line width. The amplitude of the variation must be maximal at the velocity antinodes and minimal at the nodes of the torsional oscillation. Then the spectroscopic observation as a time series at different heights above the active region at the solar limb may allow to determine the period and wavelength of global torsional oscillation and consequently the Alfvén speed in corona. From the analysis of early observation (Egan & Schneeberger \\cite{egan}) we suggest the value of coronal Alfvén speed as ~ 500 km s-1.

  9. Coronal Fractures of the Scaphoid: A Review.

    PubMed

    Slutsky, David J; Herzberg, Guillaume; Shin, Alexander Y; Buijze, Geert A; Ring, David C; Mudgal, Chaitanya S; Leung, Yuen-Fai; Dumontier, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Coronal (or frontal plane) fractures of the scaphoid are distinctly uncommon. There are few published reports of coronal fractures of the scaphoid. This fracture is often missed on the initial X-ray films. A high index of suspicion should exist when there is a double contour of the proximal scaphoid pole on the anteroposterior X-ray view. A computed tomography scan is integral in making the diagnosis. Early recognition is key in salvaging the scaphoid fracture and in preventing articular damage. Level of Evidence IV. Retrospective case series. PMID:27574573

  10. Stereoscopy and Tomography of Coronal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Patoul, J.

    2012-04-01

    The hot solar corona consists of a low density plasma, which is highly structured by the magnetic field. To resolve and study the corona, several solar Ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray telescopes are operated with high spatial and temporal resolution. EUV (Extreme UV) image sequences of the lower solar corona have revealed a wide variety of structures with sizes ranging from the Sun's diameter to the limit of the angular resolution. Active regions can be observed with enhanced temperature and density, as well as 'quiet' regions, coronal holes with lower density and numerous other transient phenomena such as plumes, jets, bright points, flares, filaments, coronal mass ejections, all structured by the coronal magnetic field. In this work, we analyze polar plumes in a sequence of Solar EUV images taken nearly simultaneously by the three telescopes on board of the spacecraft STEREO/SECCHI A and B, and SOHO/EIT. Plumes appear in EUV images as elongated objects starting on the surface of the Sun extending super-radially into the corona. Their formation and contribution to the fast solar wind and other coronal phenomena are still under debate. Knowledge of the polar plume 3-D geometry can help to understand some of the physical processes in the solar corona. In this dissertation we develop new techniques for the characterization of polar plume structures in solar coronal images (Part II) then we analyze these structures using the techniques (Part III): We design a new technique capable of automatically identifying plumes in solar EUV images close to the limb at 1.01-1.39 Ro. This plume identification is based on a multi-scale Hough-wavelet analysis. We show that the method is well adapted to identifying the location, width and orientation of plumes. Starting from Hough-wavelet analysis, we elaborate on two other techniques to determine 3-D plume localization and structure: (i) tomography employing data from a single spacecraft over more than half a rotation and (ii) stereoscopy

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of a Streamer Beside a Realistic Coronal Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Wu, S. T.; Wang, A. H.; Poletto, G.

    1994-01-01

    Existing models of coronal streamers establish their credibility and act as the initial state for transients. The models have produced satisfactory streamer simulations, but unsatisfactory coronal hole simulations. This is a consequence of the character of the models and the boundary conditions. The models all have higher densities in the magnetically open regions than occur in coronal holes (Noci, et al., 1993).

  12. Simulating coronal condensation dynamics in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschou, S. P.; Keppens, R.; Xia, C.; Fang, X.

    2015-12-01

    We present numerical simulations in 3D settings where coronal rain phenomena take place in a magnetic configuration of a quadrupolar arcade system. Our simulation is a magnetohydrodynamic simulation including anisotropic thermal conduction, optically thin radiative losses, and parametrised heating as main thermodynamical features to construct a realistic arcade configuration from chromospheric to coronal heights. The plasma evaporation from chromospheric and transition region heights eventually causes localised runaway condensation events and we witness the formation of plasma blobs due to thermal instability, that evolve dynamically in the heated arcade part and move gradually downwards due to interchange type dynamics. Unlike earlier 2.5D simulations, in this case there is no large scale prominence formation observed, but a continuous coronal rain develops which shows clear indications of Rayleigh-Taylor or interchange instability, that causes the denser plasma located above the transition region to fall down, as the system moves towards a more stable state. Linear stability analysis is used in the non-linear regime for gaining insight and giving a prediction of the system's evolution. After the plasma blobs descend through interchange, they follow the magnetic field topology more closely in the lower coronal regions, where they are guided by the magnetic dips.

  13. Coronal behavior before the large flare onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Shinsuke; Bamba, Yumi; Kusano, Kanya

    2014-12-01

    Flares are a major explosive event in our solar system. They are often followed by a coronal mass ejection that has the potential to trigger geomagnetic storms. There are various studies aiming to predict when and where the flares are likely to occur. Most of these studies mainly discuss the photospheric and chromospheric activity before the flare onset. In this paper we study the coronal features before the famous large flare occurrence on 2006 December 13. Using the data from Hinode/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), we discuss the coronal features in the large scale (a few 100″) before the flare onset. Our findings are as follows. (1) The upflows in and around the active region start growing from ˜ 10 to 30 km s-1 a day before the flare. (2) The expanding coronal loops are clearly observed a few hours before the flare. (3) Soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet intensity are gradually reduced. (4) The upflows are further enhanced after the flare. From these observed signatures, we conclude that the outer part of active region loops with low density was expanding a day before the flare onset, and the inner part with high density was expanding a few hours before the onset.

  14. Relating magnetic reconnection to coronal heating.

    PubMed

    Longcope, D W; Tarr, L A

    2015-05-28

    It is clear that the solar corona is being heated and that coronal magnetic fields undergo reconnection all the time. Here we attempt to show that these two facts are related--i.e. coronal reconnection generates heat. This attempt must address the fact that topological change of field lines does not automatically generate heat. We present one case of flux emergence where we have measured the rate of coronal magnetic reconnection and the rate of energy dissipation in the corona. The ratio of these two, [Formula: see text], is a current comparable to the amount of current expected to flow along the boundary separating the emerged flux from the pre-existing flux overlying it. We can generalize this relation to the overall corona in quiet Sun or in active regions. Doing so yields estimates for the contribution to coronal heating from magnetic reconnection. These estimated rates are comparable to the amount required to maintain the corona at its observed temperature. PMID:25897089

  15. Large-scale Globally Propagating Coronal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmuth, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Large-scale, globally propagating wave-like disturbances have been observed in the solar chromosphere and by inference in the corona since the 1960s. However, detailed analysis of these phenomena has only been conducted since the late 1990s. This was prompted by the availability of high-cadence coronal imaging data from numerous spaced-based instruments, which routinely show spectacular globally propagating bright fronts. Coronal waves, as these perturbations are usually referred to, have now been observed in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Many findings have supported the "classical" interpretation of the disturbances: fast-mode MHD waves or shocks that are propagating in the solar corona. However, observations that seemed inconsistent with this picture have stimulated the development of alternative models in which "pseudo waves" are generated by magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an expanding coronal mass ejection. This has resulted in a vigorous debate on the physical nature of these disturbances. This review focuses on demonstrating how the numerous observational findings of the last one and a half decades can be used to constrain our models of large-scale coronal waves, and how a coherent physical understanding of these disturbances is finally emerging.

  16. Coronal Mass Ejections and Their Heliospheric Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2011-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have been recognized as the most energetic phenomenon in the heliosphere, deriving their energy from the stressed magnetic fields on the Sun. The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission has accumulated a wealth of information on CMEs with unprecedented extent, clarity, and uniformity. The CME data base has been useful in confirming results from past missions and obtaining a number of new results on the initiation, propagation, and heliospheric consequences of CMEs. This paper highlights some of the recent results on the morphological, physical, and kinematic properties of CMEs observed during solar cycle 23. White-light signatures of CMEs and their utility in inferring coronal magnetic fields near the Sun will be discussed. Presence of coronal holes near eruption regions have been shown to significantly modify the trajectories of CMEs. New results on the interaction of CMEs with large-scale structures such as coronal holes and other CMEs will be presented. Finally, the CME consequences in the heliosphere such as interplanetary shocks, type II radio bursts, energetic particles, geomagnetic storms, and cosmic ray modulation will be discussed

  17. The Inconvenient Truth About Coronal Dimmings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Scott W.

    2009-03-01

    We investigate the occurrence of a coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven coronal dimming using unique high-resolution spectral images of the corona from the Hinode spacecraft. Over the course of the dimming event, we observe the dynamic increase of nonthermal line broadening in the 195.12 Å emission line of Fe XII as the corona opens. As the corona begins to close, refill and brighten, we see a reduction of the nonthermal broadening toward the pre-eruption level. We propose that the dynamic evolution of the nonthermal broadening is the result of the growth of Alfvén wave amplitudes in the magnetically open rarefied dimming region, compared to the dense closed corona prior to the CME. We suggest, based on this proposition, that, as open magnetic regions, coronal dimmings must act just as coronal holes and be sources of the fast solar wind, but only temporarily. Further, we propose that such a rapid transition in the thermodynamics of the corona to a solar wind state may have an impulsive effect on the CME that initiates the observed dimming. This last point, if correct, poses a significant physical challenge to the sophistication of CME modeling and capturing the essence of the source region thermodynamics necessary to correctly ascertain CME propagation speeds, etc.

  18. Modeling Eruptive Coronal Magnetohydrodynamic Systems with FLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmeler, Laurel

    2010-05-01

    I explore solar coronal energetic eruptions in the context of magnetic reconnection, which is commonly thought to be a required trigger mechanism for solar eruptions. Reconnection is difficult to observe in the corona, and current numerical methods cannot model reconnectionless control cases. Thus, it is not possible to determine if it is a necessary component. I have executed multiple controlled simulations to determine the importance of reconnection for initiation and evolution of several eruptive systems using FLUX, a numerical model that uses the comparatively new fluxon technique. I describe two types of eruptions modeled with FLUX: a confined flux rope theory for CME initiation, and symmetrically twisted coronal jets in a uniform vertical background field. In the former, I identified an ideal MHD instability that allows metastable twisted flux rope systems to suddenly lose stability and erupt even in the absence of reconnection, contradicting previous conjecture. The CME result is in contrast to the azimuthally symmetric coronal jet initiation model, where jet-like behavior does not manifest without reconnection. I demonstrate that some eruptive phenomena may be triggered by non-reconnective means such as ideal MHD instabilities, and that magnetic reconnection is not a required element in all coronal eruptions.

  19. Magnetic Topology of Coronal Hole Linkages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. A.; Lionello, R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    In recent work, Antiochos and coworkers argued that the boundary between the open and closed field regions on the Sun can be extremely complex with narrow corridors of open ux connecting seemingly disconnected coronal holes from the main polar holes, and that these corridors may be the sources of the slow solar wind. We examine, in detail, the topology of such magnetic configurations using an analytical source surface model that allows for analysis of the eld with arbitrary resolution. Our analysis reveals three important new results: First, a coronal hole boundary can join stably to the separatrix boundary of a parasitic polarity region. Second, a single parasitic polarity region can produce multiple null points in the corona and, more important, separator lines connecting these points. Such topologies are extremely favorable for magnetic reconnection, because it can now occur over the entire length of the separators rather than being con ned to a small region around the nulls. Finally, the coronal holes are not connected by an open- eld corridor of finite width, but instead are linked by a singular line that coincides with the separatrix footprint of the parasitic polarity. We investigate how the topological features described above evolve in response to motion of the parasitic polarity region. The implications of our results for the sources of the slow solar wind and for coronal and heliospheric observations are discussed.

  20. Coronal bright points associated with minifilament eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Li, Haidong; Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan

    2014-12-01

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  1. The topological description of coronal magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Mitchell A.

    1986-01-01

    Determining the structure and behavior of solar coronal magnetic fields is a central problem in solar physics. At the photosphere, the field is believed to be strongly localized into discrete flux tubes. After providing a rigorous definition of field topology, how the topology of a finite collection of flux tubes may be classified is discussed.

  2. Modified Coronal Index of the Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukáč, B.; Rybanský, M.

    2010-05-01

    The original coronal index of the solar activity (CI) has been constructed on the basis of ground-based measurements of the intensities of the coronal line of 530.3 nm (Rybanský in Bull. Astron. Inst. Czechoslov., 28, 367, 1975; Rybanský et al. in J. Geophys. Res., 110, A08106, 2005). In this paper, CI is compared with the EUV measurements on the CELIAS/SEM equipment based on the same idea as the original idea of the coronal index. The correlation is very good for the period 1996 - 2005 ( r=0.94 for daily values). The principal result of this paper is the introduction of the modified coronal index (MCI) which in all uses and contexts can replace the existing CI index. Daily MCI values extend over a time period of six solar activity cycles. Future MCI measurements will be derived from more reliable measurements made by space-based observatories that are not influenced by the weather. MCI measurements are and will continue to be archived at the web site of the Slovak Central Observatory in Hurbanovo ( http://www.suh.sk/obs/vysl/MCI.htm ).

  3. Can Thermal Nonequilibrium Explain Coronal Loops?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.; Karpen, Judy T.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-01-01

    Any successful model of coronal loops must explain a number of observed properties. For warm (approx. 1 MK) loops, these include: 1. excess density, 2. flat temperature profile, 3. super-hydrostatic scale height, 4. unstructured intensity profile, and 5. 1000-5000 s lifetime. We examine whether thermal nonequilibrium can reproduce the observations by performing hydrodynamic simulations based on steady coronal heating that decreases exponentially with height. We consider both monolithic and multi-stranded loops. The simulations successfully reproduce certain aspects of the observations, including the excess density, but each of them fails in at least one critical way. -Xonolithic models have far too much intensity structure, while multi-strand models are either too structured or too long-lived. Storms of nanoflares remain the only viable explanation for warm loops that has been proposed so far. Our results appear to rule out the widespread existence of heating that is both highly concentrated low in the corona and steady or quasi-steady (slowly varying or impulsive with a rapid cadence). Active regions would have a very different appearance if the dominant heating mechanism had these properties. Thermal nonequilibrium may nonetheless play an important role in prominences and catastrophic cooling e(veen.gts..,coronal rain) that occupy a small fraction of the coronal volume. However, apparent inconsistencies between the models and observations of cooling events have yet to be understood.

  4. CAN THERMAL NONEQUILIBRIUM EXPLAIN CORONAL LOOPS?

    SciTech Connect

    Klimchuk, James A.; Karpen, Judy T.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-05-10

    Any successful model of coronal loops must explain a number of observed properties. For warm ({approx}1 MK) loops, these include (1) excess density, (2) flat temperature profile, (3) super-hydrostatic scale height, (4) unstructured intensity profile, and (5) 1000-5000 s lifetime. We examine whether thermal nonequilibrium can reproduce the observations by performing hydrodynamic simulations based on steady coronal heating that decreases exponentially with height. We consider both monolithic and multi-stranded loops. The simulations successfully reproduce certain aspects of the observations, including the excess density, but each of them fails in at least one critical way. Monolithic models have far too much intensity structure, while multi-strand models are either too structured or too long-lived. Our results appear to rule out the widespread existence of heating that is both highly concentrated low in the corona and steady or quasi-steady (slowly varying or impulsive with a rapid cadence). Active regions would have a very different appearance if the dominant heating mechanism had these properties. Thermal nonequilibrium may nonetheless play an important role in prominences and catastrophic cooling events (e.g., coronal rain) that occupy a small fraction of the coronal volume. However, apparent inconsistencies between the models and observations of cooling events have yet to be understood.

  5. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark; De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan; Hansteen, Viggo; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig

    2013-06-10

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

  6. The evolution of coronal magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, E. R.; Forbes, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    Slow photospheric motions can produce flow speeds in the corona which are fast enough to violate quasi-static evolution. Therefore, high-speed flows observed in the corona are not necessarily due to a loss of equilibrium or stability. This paper presents an example where the flow speed increases indefinitely with height while the coronal magnetic energy increases quadratically with time.

  7. MAGNETIC TOPOLOGY OF CORONAL HOLE LINKAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. A.; Lionello, R.; Antiochos, S. K. E-mail: mikicz@predsci.com E-mail: lionel@predsci.com

    2011-04-20

    In recent work, Antiochos and coworkers argued that the boundary between the open and closed field regions on the Sun can be extremely complex with narrow corridors of open flux connecting seemingly disconnected coronal holes from the main polar holes and that these corridors may be the sources of the slow solar wind. We examine, in detail, the topology of such magnetic configurations using an analytical source surface model that allows for analysis of the field with arbitrary resolution. Our analysis reveals three new important results. First, a coronal hole boundary can join stably to the separatrix boundary of a parasitic polarity region. Second, a single parasitic polarity region can produce multiple null points in the corona and, more important, separator lines connecting these points. It is known that such topologies are extremely favorable for magnetic reconnection, because they allow this process to occur over the entire length of the separators rather than being confined to a small region around the nulls. Finally, the coronal holes are not connected by an open-field corridor of finite width, but instead are linked by a singular line that coincides with the separatrix footprint of the parasitic polarity. We investigate how the topological features described above evolve in response to the motion of the parasitic polarity region. The implications of our results for the sources of the slow solar wind and for coronal and heliospheric observations are discussed.

  8. The Role of Active Region Coronal Magnetic Field in Determining Coronal Mass Ejection Propagation Direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Ying D.; Dai, Xinghua; Yang, Zhongwei; Huang, Chong; Hu, Huidong

    2015-11-01

    We study the role of the coronal magnetic field configuration of an active region (AR) in determining the propagation direction of a coronal mass ejection (CME). The CME occurred in the AR 11944 (S09W01) near the disk center on 2014 January 7 and was associated with an X1.2 flare. A new CME reconstruction procedure based on a polarimetric technique is adopted, which shows that the CME changed its propagation direction by around 28° in latitude within 2.5 {R}⊙ and 43° in longitude within 6.5 {R}⊙ with respect to the CME source region. This significant non-radial motion is consistent with the finding of Möstl et al. We use nonlinear force-free field and potential field source surface extrapolation methods to determine the configurations of the coronal magnetic field. We also calculate the magnetic energy density distributions at different heights based on the extrapolations. Our results show that the AR coronal magnetic field has a strong influence on the CME propagation direction. This is consistent with the “channeling” by the AR coronal magnetic field itself, rather than deflection by nearby structures. These results indicate that the AR coronal magnetic field configuration has to be taken into account in order to determine CME propagation direction correctly.

  9. CORONAL SEISMOLOGY USING EIT WAVES: ESTIMATION OF THE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    West, M. J.; Zhukov, A. N.; Dolla, L.; Rodriguez, L.

    2011-04-01

    Coronal EIT waves have been observed for many years. The nature of EIT waves is still contentious, however, there is strong evidence that some of them might be fast magnetosonic waves, or at least have a fast magnetosonic wave component. The fast magnetosonic wave speed is formed from two components; the Alfven speed (magnetic) and the sound speed (thermal). By making measurements of the wave speed, coronal density and temperature it is possible to calculate the quiet-Sun coronal magnetic field strength through coronal seismology. In this paper, we investigate an EIT wave observed on 2009 February 13 by the SECCHI/EUVI instruments on board the STEREO satellites. The wave epicenter was observed at disk center in the STEREO B (Behind) satellite. At this time, the STEREO satellites were separated by approximately 90 deg., and as a consequence the STEREO A (Ahead) satellite observed the wave on the solar limb. These observations allowed us to make accurate speed measurements of the wave. The background coronal density was derived through Hinode/Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer observations of the quiet Sun and the temperature was estimated through the narrow temperature response in the EUVI bandpasses. The density, temperature, and speed measurements allowed us to estimate the quiet-Sun coronal magnetic field strength to be approximately 0.7 {+-} 0.7 G.

  10. Differential Emission Measure Studies of Solar Coronal Loops for AIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, D.; Weber, M. A.; Sette, A. L.

    2004-12-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamic Observatory scheduled to launch in 2008 will provide an unprecedented quantity of information about the solar corona at rapid cadence in 6 EUV channels. We discuss the study of coronal loops through differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of coronal plasma using mock AIA observations. We select a loop structure in the coronal model and evaluate various DEM estimation methods (including background subtraction) against the known loop properties. We find that coronal loops can be successfully identified by their DEM signatures. Such signatures provide observational data essential to furthering our understanding of hot coronal plasmas.

  11. A Two-Fluid, MHD Coronal Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Steven T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Poletto, G.; McComas, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    We describe first results from a numerical two-fluid MHD model of the global structure of the solar corona. The model is two-fluid in the sense that it accounts for the collisional energy exchange between protons and electrons. As in our single-fluid model, volumetric heat and momentum sources are required to produce high speed wind from coronal holes, low speed wind above streamers, and mass fluxes similar to the empirical solar wind. By specifying different proton and electron heating functions we obtain a high proton temperature in the coronal hole and a relatively low proton temperature in the streamer (in comparison with the electron temperature). This is consistent with inferences from SOHO/UVCS, and with the Ulysses/SWOOPS proton and electron temperature measurements which we show from the fast latitude scan. The density in the coronal hole between 2 solar radii and 5 solar radii (2RS and 5RS) is similar to the density reported from SPARTAN 201-01 measurements by Fisher and Guhathakurta. The proton mass flux scaled to 1 AU is 2.4 x 10(exp 8)/sq cm s, which is consistent with Ulysses observations. Inside the closed field region, the density is sufficiently high so that the simulation gives equal proton and electron temperatures due to the high collision rate. In open field regions (in the coronal hole and above the streamer) the proton and electron temperatures differ by varying amounts. In the streamer, the temperature and density are similar to those reported empirically by Li et al and the plasma beta is larger than unity everywhere above approx. 1.5 R(sub s), as it is in all other MHD coronal streamer models.

  12. Management of distal humeral coronal shear fractures

    PubMed Central

    Yari, Shahram S; Bowers, Nathan L; Craig, Miguel A; Reichel, Lee M

    2015-01-01

    Coronal shear fractures of the distal humerus are rare, complex fractures that can be technically challenging to manage. They usually result from a low-energy fall and direct compression of the distal humerus by the radial head in a hyper-extended or semi-flexed elbow or from spontaneous reduction of a posterolateral subluxation or dislocation. Due to the small number of soft tissue attachments at this site, almost all of these fractures are displaced. The incidence of distal humeral coronal shear fractures is higher among women because of the higher rate of osteoporosis in women and the difference in carrying angle between men and women. Distal humeral coronal shear fractures may occur in isolation, may be part of a complex elbow injury, or may be associated with injuries proximal or distal to the elbow. An associated lateral collateral ligament injury is seen in up to 40% and an associated radial head fracture is seen in up to 30% of these fractures. Given the complex nature of distal humeral coronal shear fractures, there is preference for operative management. Operative fixation leads to stable anatomic reduction, restores articular congruity, and allows initiation of early range-of-motion movements in the majority of cases. Several surgical exposure and fixation techniques are available to reconstruct the articular surface following distal humeral coronal shear fractures. The lateral extensile approach and fixation with countersunk headless compression screws placed in an anterior-to-posterior fashion are commonly used. We have found a two-incision approach (direct anterior and lateral) that results in less soft tissue dissection and better outcomes than the lateral extensile approach in our experience. Stiffness, pain, articular incongruity, arthritis, and ulnohumeral instability may result if reduction is non-anatomic or if fixation fails. PMID:25984515

  13. Structure and Dynamics of Coronal Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1998-01-01

    Brief summaries of the four published papers produced within the present performance period of NASA Grant NAGW-4081 are presented. The full text of the papers are appended to the report. The first paper titled "Coronal Structures Observed in X-rays and H-alpa Structures" was published in the Kofu Symposium proceedings. The study analyzes cool and hot behavior of two x-ray events, a small flare and a surge. It was found that a large H-alpha surge appears in x-rays as a very weak event, while a weak H-alpha feature corresponds to the brightest x-ray emission on the disk at the time of the observation. Calculations of the heating necessary to produce these signatures, and implications for the driving and heating mechanisms of flares vs. surges are presented. The second paper "Differential Magnetic Field Shear in an Active Region" has been published in The Astrophysical Journal. The study compared the three dimensional extrapolation of magnetic fields with the observed coronal structure in an active region. Based on the fit between observed coronal structure throughout the volume of the region and the calculated magnetic field configurations, the authors propose a differential magnetic field shear model for this active region. The decreasing field shear in the outer portions of the AR may indicate a continual relaxation of the magnetic field with time, corresponding to a net transport of helicity outward. The third paper "Difficulties in Observing Coronal Structure" has been published in the journal Solar Physics. This paper discusses the evidence that the temperature and density structure of the corona are far more complicated than had previously been thought. The discussion is based on five studies carried out by the group on coronal plasma properties, showing that any one x-ray instrument does see all of the plasma present in the corona, that hot and cool material may appear to be co-spatial at a given location in the corona, and that simple magnetic field

  14. Magnetism and the Invisible Man: The mysteries of coronal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Magnetism defines the complex and dynamic solar corona. Twists and tangles in coronal magnetic fields build up energy and ultimately erupt, hurling plasma into interplanetary space. These coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are transient riders on the ever-outflowing solar wind, which itself possesses a three-dimensional morphology shaped by the global coronal magnetic field. Coronal magnetism is thus at the heart of any understanding of the origins of space weather at the Earth. However, we have historically been limited by the difficulty of directly measuring the magnetic fields of the corona, and have turned to observations of coronal plasma to trace out magnetic structure. This approach is complicated by the fact that plasma temperatures and densities vary among coronal magnetic structures, so that looking at any one wavelength of light only shows part of the picture. In fact, in some regimes it is the lack of plasma that is a significant indicator of the magnetic field. Such a case is the coronal cavity: a dark, elliptical region in which strong and twisted magnetism dwells. I will elucidate these enigmatic features by presenting observations of coronal cavities in multiple wavelengths and from a variety of observing vantages, including unprecedented coronal magnetic field measurements now being obtained by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP). These observations demonstrate the presence of twisted magnetic fields within cavities, and also provide clues to how and why cavities ultimately erupt as CMEs.

  15. Solar Coronal Jets: Observations, Theory, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raouafi, N. E.; Patsourakos, S.; Pariat, E.; Young, P. R.; Sterling, A. C.; Savcheva, A.; Shimojo, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; DeVore, C. R.; Archontis, V.; Török, T.; Mason, H.; Curdt, W.; Meyer, K.; Dalmasse, K.; Matsui, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Coronal jets represent important manifestations of ubiquitous solar transients, which may be the source of significant mass and energy input to the upper solar atmosphere and the solar wind. While the energy involved in a jet-like event is smaller than that of "nominal" solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), jets share many common properties with these phenomena, in particular, the explosive magnetically driven dynamics. Studies of jets could, therefore, provide critical insight for understanding the larger, more complex drivers of the solar activity. On the other side of the size-spectrum, the study of jets could also supply important clues on the physics of transients close or at the limit of the current spatial resolution such as spicules. Furthermore, jet phenomena may hint to basic process for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind; consequently their study gives us the opportunity to attack a broad range of solar-heliospheric problems.

  16. Empirical scaling laws for coronal heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.

    1983-01-01

    The origins and uses of scaling laws in studies of stellar outer atmospheres are reviewed with particular emphasis on the properties of coronal loops. Some evidence is presented for a fundamental structuring of the solar corona and the thermodynamics of scaling laws are discussed. It is found that magnetic field-related scaling laws can be obtained by relating coronal pressure, temperature, and magnetic field strength. Available data validate this method. Some parameters of the theory, however, must be treated as adjustable, and it is considered necessary to examine data from other stars in order to determine the validity of the parameters. Using detailed observational data, the applicability of single loop models is examined.

  17. Geometrical Properties of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremades, Hebe; Bothmer, Volker

    Based on the SOHO/LASCO dataset, a collection of "structured" coronal mass ejections (CMEs) has been compiled within the period 1996-2002, in order to analyze their three-dimensional configuration. These CME events exhibit white-light fine structures, likely indicative of their possible 3D topology. From a detailed investigation of the associated low coronal and photospheric source regions, a generic scheme has been deduced, which considers the white-light topology of a CME projected in the plane of the sky as being primarily dependent on the orientation and position of the source region's neutral line on the solar disk. The obtained results imply that structured CMEs are essentially organized along a symmetry axis, in a cylindrical manner. The measured dimensions of the cylinder's base and length yield a ratio of 1.6. These CMEs seem to be better approximated by elliptic cones, rather than by the classical ice cream cone, characterized by a circular cross section.

  18. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections detected by HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Alejandro

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is being constructed at the volcano Sierra Negra (4100 m a.s.l.) in Mexico. HAWC’s primary purpose is the study of both: galactic and extra-galactic sources of high energy gamma rays. HAWC will consist of 300 large water Cherenkov detectors (WCD), instrumented with 1200 photo-multipliers. The Data taking has already started while construction continues, with the completion projected for late 2014. The HAWC counting rate will be sensitive to cosmic rays with energies above the geomagnetic cutoff of the site (˜ 8 GV). In particular, HAWC will detect solar energetic particles known as Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs), and the effects of Coronal Mass Ejections on the galactic cosmic ray flux, known as Forbush Decreases. In this paper, we present a description of the instrument and its response to interplanetary coronal mass ejections, and other solar wind large scale structures, observed during the August-December 2013 period.

  19. Sunquake Generation by Coronal Magnetic Restructuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, A. J. B.; Mooney, M.; Leake, J. E.; Hudson, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections are powered by major restructurings of the coronal magnetic field, which appear to strongly perturb the magnetic field in the photosphere as well. Could the associated Lorentz forces generate sunquakes, as suggested by Hudson et al. 2008? Here, we present the first MHD simulations of sunquake generation by magnetic field perturbations, and explore the details of this mechanism. The downgoing magnetic field change is modelled as an Alfven wave, which propagates into the lower atmosphere. When it reaches the vicinity of the beta=1 layer (where the Alfven and sound speeds are equal), non-linear coupling excites a downgoing acoustic wave, which we interpret as a sunquake. The amplitude of the acoustic wave increases nonlinearly with the amplitude of the magnetic perturbation, reaching a limit where around 35% of the injected Poynting flux is transferred to the seismic wave - enough energy to match sunquake observations.

  20. Solar Energetic Particles: Sampling Coronal Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1998-05-01

    In the large solar energetic particle (SEP) events, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) drive shock waves out through the corona that accelerate elements of the ambient material to MeV energies in a fairly democratic, temperature-independent manner. These events provide the most complete source of information on element abundances in the corona. Relative abundances of 22 elements from H through Zn display the well-known dependence on the first ionization potential (FIP) that distinguishes coronal and photospheric material. For most elements, the main abundance variations depend upon the gyrofrequency, and hence on the charge-to-mass ratio, Q/A, of the ion. Abundance variations in the dominant species, H and He, are not Q/A dependent, presumably because of non-linear wave-particle interactions of H and He during acceleration. Impulsive flares provide a different sample of material that confirms the Ne:Mg:Si and He/C abundances in the corona.

  1. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections During 1996 - 2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2007-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections, the interplanetary counterparts of coronal mass ejections at the Sun, are the major drivers of interplanetary shocks in the heliosphere, and are associated with modulations of the galactic cosmic ray intensity, both short term (Forbush decreases caused by the passage of the shock, post-shock sheath, and ICME), and possibly with longer term modulation. Using several in-situ signatures of ICMEs, including plasma temperature, and composition, magnetic fields, and cosmic ray modulations, made by near-Earth spacecraft, we have compiled a "comprehensive" list of ICMEs passing the Earth since 1996, encompassing solar cycle 23. We summarize the properties of these ICMEs, such as their occurrence rate, speeds and other parameters, the fraction of ICMEs that are classic magnetic clouds, and their association with solar energetic particle events, halo CMEs, interplanetary shocks, geomagnetic storms, shocks and cosmic ray decreases.

  2. Loop observations and the coronal heating problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Fuentes, M. C.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    Coronal heating continues to be one of the fundamental problems of solar physics. In recent years, instrumental advances and the availability of data from space observatories produced important progress, imposing restrictions to the models proposed. However, since the physical processes occur at spatial scales below the present instrumental resolution, definitive answers are still due. Since the corona is strongly dominated by the magnetic field, active region plasma is confined in closed structures or loops. These are the basic observable blocks of the corona, so the analysis of their structure and evolution is essential to understand the heating. In this report, mainly addressed to astronomers not necessarily familiarized with the subject, we review some of the proposed heating models and we pay special attention to the sometimes confusing and apparently contradictory observations of coronal loops. We discuss the consequences of these observations for some of the heating models proposed, in particular those based on impulsive events known as nanoflares.

  3. Solar Cycle Changes of Coronal Streamer Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, L.; Baham, M.; Miralles, M.; Panasyuk, A.

    2003-12-01

    We have measured UV spectroscopic parameters, as a function of height for more than 30 coronal streamers in order to identify similarities between streamers at different phases of the solar cycle. For the period from 1996-2002, we provide line intensities, line widths, and line ratios for the O VI 1032/1037 doublet and intensities and line widths for the H I Ly-alpha line for these streamers. From such measurements we can derive plasma parameters (densities, temperatures, and outflow velocities) for O5+ and protons as a function of heliocentric height (1.5 > r/Ro > 5) in the streamers. This information is useful for setting empirical constraints on coronal heating and solar wind acceleration in streamers. This work is supported by NASA Grant NAG5-12781 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and NASA subcontract OGSP21010200061SAO awarded to SAO through a grant to Southern Universty at Baton Rouge.

  4. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lionello, Roberto; Downs, Cooper; Linker, Jon A.; Török, Tibor; Riley, Pete; Mikić, Zoran E-mail: cdowns@predsci.com E-mail: tibor@predsci.com E-mail: mikic@predsci.com

    2013-11-01

    We describe a new MHD model for the propagation of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) in the solar wind. Accurately following the propagation of ICMEs is important for determining space weather conditions. Our model solves the MHD equations in spherical coordinates from a lower boundary above the critical point to Earth and beyond. On this spherical surface, we prescribe the magnetic field, velocity, density, and temperature calculated typically directly from a coronal MHD model as time-dependent boundary conditions. However, any model that can provide such quantities either in the inertial or rotating frame of the Sun is suitable. We present two validations of the technique employed in our new model and a more realistic simulation of the propagation of an ICME from the Sun to Earth.

  5. Longitudinal asymmetries of the coronal line intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xanthakis, J.; Petropoulos, B.; Tritakis, V. P.; Mavromichalaki, H.; Marmatsuri, L.

    The analysis of the daily measurements of the coronal green line intensity which have been collected by the Pic-du-Midi Observatory during the period 1944-1974 has led to some very interesting results. The main finding of this analysis is a permanent longitudinal asymmetry of the green line intensity which has been determined all along the data record. In an effort to make this asymmetry certain E-W intensity differences very close to the solar equator where the rotation rate for coronal features is equal to 25.35 days on the average are examined. When these data are examined every 25 days, namely data which almost correspond to the same points of the solar disk, it confirms the above mentioned longitudinal asymmetry.

  6. STATISTICAL STUDY OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS WITH AND WITHOUT DISTINCT LOW CORONAL SIGNATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, S.; Attrill, G. D. R.; Golub, L.; Lin, J.

    2010-10-10

    Taking advantage of the two viewpoints of the STEREO spacecraft, we present a statistical study of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) with and without distinct low coronal signatures (LCSs) from 2009 January 1 to August 31. During this period, the lines of sight from STEREO A and B are almost perpendicular and nearly a quarter of the Sun was observed by both. We identified 34 CMEs that originated from around this area and find that (1) about 1 out of 3 CMEs that were studied during 8 months of solar minimum activity are stealth CMEs; a CME is stealth if no distinct LCS (such as coronal dimming, coronal wave, filament eruption, flare, post-eruptive arcade) can be found on the disk. (2) The speeds of the stealth CMEs without LCSs are typically below 300 km s{sup -1}. Comparing with the slow CMEs with LCSs, the stealth CMEs did not show any clear differences in their velocity and acceleration evolution. (3) The source regions of the stealth CMEs are usually located in the quiet Sun rather than active regions. Detailed study indicates that more than half of the stealth CMEs in this paper showed some faint change of the coronal structures (likely parts of flux ropes) when they could be observed over the solar limb before or during the CME evolution. Finally, we note that space weather detection systems based on LCSs totally independent of coronagraph data may fail to detect a significant proportion of CMEs.

  7. Structure and dynamics of coronal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Progress for the period July 1995 - June 1996 included work on the differential magnetic field shear in an active region; observations and modeling of the solar chromosphere seen in soft X-ray absorption by NIXT; and modeling magnetic flux emergence. These were the subjects of three papers. The plans for the current year include projects on a converging flux model for point-like brightenings around sunspots, and difficulties in observing coronal structure.

  8. The Near-Infrared Coronal Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, J. R.; Penn, M. J.; Mann, I.

    1996-01-01

    Sensitive measurements of the near-infrared coronal spectrum were obtained from the 1994 total solar eclipse. A new [S IX] emission line at 1.25249 +/- 0.00003 mu m has been detected, and a bright, potentially important diagnostic, [Si X] line at 1.43 mu m has been confirmed. Upper limits on the intensity of several other predicted IR emission lines have been established. Also, diffuse He I emission, perhaps geocoronal, has been observed with a significant heliocentric redshift.

  9. Coronal Plumes in the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velli, Marco; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    The expansion of a coronal hole filled with a discrete number of higher density coronal plumes is simulated using a time-dependent two-dimensional code. A solar wind model including an exponential coronal heating function and a flux of Alfven waves propagating both inside and outside the structures is taken as a basic state. Different plasma plume profiles are obtained by using different scale heights for the heating rates. Remote sensing and solar wind in situ observations are used to constrain the parameter range of the study. Time dependence due to plume ignition and disappearance is also discussed. Velocity differences of the order of approximately 50 km/s, such as those found in microstreams in the high-speed solar wind, may be easily explained by slightly different heat deposition profiles in different plumes. Statistical pressure balance in the fast wind data may be masked by the large variety of body and surface waves which the higher density filaments may carry, so the absence of pressure balance in the microstreams should not rule out their interpretation as the extension of coronal plumes into interplanetary space. Mixing of plume-interplume material via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability seems to be possible within the parameter ranges of the models defined here, only at large di stances from the Sun, beyond 0.2-0.3 AU. Plasma and composition measurements in the inner heliosphere, such as those which will become available with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, should therefore definitely be able to identify plume remnants in the solar wind.

  10. Structure and dynamics of coronal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1995-01-01

    The Normal Incidence X-ray Telescope (NIXT) obtained a unique set of high resolution full disk solar images which were exposed simultaneously by X-rays in a passband at 63.5 A and by visible light. The perfect alignment of a photospheric visible light image with a coronal X-ray image enables us to present observations of X-ray intensity vs an accurately determined height above the visible limb. The height at which the observed X-ray intensity peak varies from 4000 km in active regions to 9000 km in quiet regions of the sun. The interpretation of the observations stems from the previously established fact that, for the coronal loops, emission in the NIXT bandpass peaks sharply just above the footpoints. Because there is not a sharp peak in the observed X-ray intensity vs off limb height, we conclude that the loop footpoints, when viewed at the limb, are obscured by absorption in chromospheric material along the line of sight. We calculate the X-ray intensity vs height predicted by a number of different idealizations of the solar atmosphere, and we compare these calculations with the observed X-ray intensity vs height. The calculations use existing coronal and chromospheric models. In order for the calculations to reproduce the observed off limb X-ray intensities, we are forced to assume an atmosphere in which the footpoints of coronal loops are interspersed along the line of sight with cooler chromospheric material extending to heights well above the loop footpoints. We argue that the absorption coefficient for NIXT X-rays by chromospheric material is roughly proportional to the neutral hydrogen density, and we estimate an average neutral hydrogen density and scale height implied by the data.

  11. Equilibrium and Stability of Coronal Helmet Streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhov, Vyacheslav Sergeevich

    1997-05-01

    Equilibrium states and stability of partially open magentic field structures in the solar corona are studied. Soft X-ray observations of the birth and evolution of a giant coronal helmet streamer suggest that the energy source responsible for the X-ray manifestation of the structure is most probably located in the lower corona. The downward heat flux is the indication that a significant part of the source's energy is transported to the top of the structure and converted there to a disposable form. It is shown that by applying the thermodynamic equilibrium model of the corona to the two-dimensional X-ray data it is possible to reconstruct the three-dimensional form of the coronal helmet. The general significance of the projective geometry effects for the observation of the solar corona is discussed. The hypothesis of thermal pressure increase as the cause of the observed helmet expansion is verified numerically. It is shown that in the solar corona a relatively small variations of the pressure distribution in the closed field region can cause huge variations in the geometry of a coronal helmet streamer. Numerical simulations of the morphology and energy accumulation in helmet-like structures subject to photospheric shear motion show that the magnetic field surrounding a partially open structure can inhibit catastrophic expansion of the structure as its energy grows. Stability of a coronal streamer in the framework of the neutral current sheet model is studied theoretically. It is shown that effects of viscosity and the finite Larmor radius dominate effects of inertial fluid motion in the tearing mode instability of a neutral current sheet. Two new regimes of the instability are discovered. It is proven that in the solar corona the rates of growth of the neutral current sheet instability are much smaller than previously believed. Implications of the obtained results are discussed.

  12. The transition region and coronal explorer (TRACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, Alan; Bruner, M.; Jurcevich, B.; Lemen, J.; Strong, K.; Tarbell, Ted; Wolfson, C. Jacob; Golub, L.; Bookbinder, J.; Fisher, R.

    1995-01-01

    The transition region and coronal explorer (TRACE) NASA small explorer mission and instrument are presented. The TRACE scientific investigation explores the relationships between fine-scale magnetic fields and the associated solar plasma structures. The instrument collects images of solar plasmas at temperatures from 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 7) K with one arcsec spatial resolution. The design specifications of the trace instrument are presented.

  13. CORONAL PLUMES IN THE FAST SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Velli, Marco; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran E-mail: lionel@predsci.com E-mail: mikicz@predsci.com

    2011-07-20

    The expansion of a coronal hole filled with a discrete number of higher density coronal plumes is simulated using a time-dependent two-dimensional code. A solar wind model including an exponential coronal heating function and a flux of Alfven waves propagating both inside and outside the structures is taken as a basic state. Different plasma plume profiles are obtained by using different scale heights for the heating rates. Remote sensing and solar wind in situ observations are used to constrain the parameter range of the study. Time dependence due to plume ignition and disappearance is also discussed. Velocity differences of the order of {approx}50 km s{sup -1}, such as those found in microstreams in the high-speed solar wind, may be easily explained by slightly different heat deposition profiles in different plumes. Statistical pressure balance in the fast wind data may be masked by the large variety of body and surface waves which the higher density filaments may carry, so the absence of pressure balance in the microstreams should not rule out their interpretation as the extension of coronal plumes into interplanetary space. Mixing of plume-interplume material via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability seems to be possible within the parameter ranges of the models defined here, only at large distances from the Sun, beyond 0.2-0.3 AU. Plasma and composition measurements in the inner heliosphere, such as those which will become available with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, should therefore definitely be able to identify plume remnants in the solar wind.

  14. Coronal microleakage: an online study guide.

    PubMed

    2008-05-01

    The Editorial Board of the Journal of Endodontics has developed a literature-based study guide of topical areas related to endodontics. This study guide is intended to give the reader a focused review of the essential endodontic literature and does not cite all possible articles related to each topic. Although citing all articles would be comprehensive, it would defeat the idea of a study guide. This section will cover coronal microleakage. PMID:18457692

  15. EIT Observations of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurman, J. B.; Fisher, Richard B. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Before the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we had only the sketchiest of clues as to the nature and topology of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) below 1.1 - 1.2 solar radii. Occasionally, dimmings (or 'transient coronal holes') were observed in time series of soft X-ray images, but they were far less frequent than CME's. Simply by imaging the Sun frequently and continually at temperatures of 0.9 - 2.5 MK we have stumbled upon a zoo of CME phenomena in this previously obscured volume of the corona: (1) waves, (2) dimmings, and (3) a great variety of ejecta. In the three and a half years since our first observations of coronal waves associated with CME's, combined Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) and extreme ultra-violet imaging telescope (EIT) synoptic observations have become a standard prediction tool for space weather forecasters, but our progress in actually understanding the CME phenomenon in the low corona has been somewhat slower. I will summarize the observations of waves, hot (> 0.9 MK) and cool ejecta, and some of the interpretations advanced to date. I will try to identify those phenomena, analysis of which could most benefit from the spectroscopic information available from ultraviolet coronograph spectrometer (UVCS) observations.

  16. The Coronal X-ray Deficiency Syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    Something strange happens to M ~ 3 M(sun) stars during their post-MS evolution through the Hertzsprung gap (F--G0), on their way ultimately to the post-helium-flash ``Clump (G8--K0). The subcoronal emissions of the H-gap stars (traced by Mg II and C IV) appear to be normal for fast-rotating giants, but their coronal X-ray luminosities are depressed by an order of magnitude or more. The nearby binary Capella is the archetype: the G0 secondary has a C IV flux 10 times that of the G8 primary, and rotates faster by a similar factor. Yet, evidence points to near equality of the coronal X-ray fluxes. We propose to continue our broad-reaching exploration of the dichotomy (and its implications for coronal heating and the evolution of Dynamo action) through EUVE spectroscopy of key stars along the post-Main-Sequence trajectories connecting the Hertzsprung gap and the Clump.

  17. Fast Waves in Smooth Coronal Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopin, I.; Nagorny, I.

    2015-03-01

    This work investigates the effect of transverse density structuring in coronal slab-like waveguides on the properties of fast waves. We generalized previous results obtained for the exponential and Epstein profiles to the case of an arbitrary transverse density distribution. The criteria are given to determine the possible (trapped or leaky) wave regime, depending on the type of density profile function. In particular, there are plasma slabs with transverse density structuring that support pure trapped fast waves for all wavelengths. Their phase speed is nearly equal to the external Alfvén speed for the typical parameters of coronal loops. Our findings are obtained on the basis of Kneser’s oscillation theorem. To confirm the results, we analytically solved the wave equation evaluated at the cutoff point and the original wave equation for particular cases of transverse density distribution. We also used the WKB method and obtained approximate solutions of the wave equation at the cutoff point for an arbitrary transverse density profile. The analytic results were supplemented by numerical solutions of the obtained dispersion relations. The observed high-quality quasi-periodic pulsations of flaring loops are interpreted in terms of the trapped fundamental fast-sausage mode in a slab-like coronal waveguide.

  18. Coronal structure of low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Pauline; Jardine, Moira; Donati, Jean-François; Morin, Julien; Vidotto, Aline

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the change in stellar magnetic topology across the fully convective boundary and its effects on coronal properties. We consider both the magnitude of the open flux that influences angular momentum loss in the stellar wind and X-ray emission measure. We use reconstructed maps of the radial magnetic field at the stellar surface and the potential-field source surface method to extrapolate a 3D coronal magnetic field for a sample of early-to-mid M dwarfs. During the magnetic reconstruction process it is possible to force a solution towards field geometries that are symmetric or antisymmetric about the equator but we demonstrate that this has only a modest impact on the coronal tracers mentioned above. We find that the dipole component of the field, which governs the large-scale structure, becomes increasingly strong as the stellar mass decreases, while the magnitude of the open (wind-bearing) magnetic flux is proportional to the magnitude of the reconstructed magnetic flux. By assuming a hydrostatic and isothermal corona, we calculate X-ray emission measures (in magnitude and rotational modulation) for each star and, using observed stellar densities as a constraint, we reproduce the observed X-ray saturation at Ro≤ 0.1. We find that X-ray rotational modulation is not a good indicator of magnetic structure as it shows no trend with Rossby number but can be useful in discriminating between different assumptions on the field geometry.

  19. Coronal Heating Observed with Hi-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy R.

    2013-01-01

    The recent launch of the High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) as a sounding rocket has offered a new, different view of the Sun. With approx 0.3" resolution and 5 second cadence, Hi-C reveals dynamic, small-scale structure within a complicated active region, including coronal braiding, reconnection regions, Alfven waves, and flows along active region fans. By combining the Hi-C data with other available data, we have compiled a rich data set that can be used to address many outstanding questions in solar physics. Though the Hi-C rocket flight was short (only 5 minutes), the added insight of the small-scale structure gained from the Hi-C data allows us to look at this active region and other active regions with new understanding. In this talk, I will review the first results from the Hi-C sounding rocket and discuss the impact of these results on the coronal heating problem.

  20. Thermal Analysis of CDS Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, J. A.; Schmelz, J. T.; Nasraoui, K.; Rightmire, L. A.; Andrews, J. M.; Cirtain, J. W.

    2008-05-01

    The coronal loop data used for this analysis was obtained using the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory on 2003 January 17 at 14:24:43 UT. We use the Chianti atomic physics database and the hybrid coronal abundances to determine temperatures and densities for positions along several loops. We chose six pixels along each loop as well as background pixels. The intensities of the background pixels are subtracted from each loop pixel to isolate the emission from the loop pixel, and then spectral lines with significant contributions to the loop intensities are selected. The loops were then analyzed with a forward folding process to produce differential emission measure (DEM) curves. Emission measure loci plots and DEM automatic inversions are then used to verify those conclusions. We find different results for each of these loops. One appears to be isothermal at each loop position, and the temperature does not change with height. The second appears to be multithermal at each position and the third seems to be consistent with two DEM spikes, which might indicate that there are two isothermal loops so close together, that they are not resolved by CDS. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by a Hinode subcontract from NASA/SAO as well as NSF ATM-0402729.

  1. Forward Modeling of a Coronal Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, T. A.; Gibson, S. E.; Schmit, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    We apply a forward model of emission from a coronal cavity in an effort to determine the temperature and density distribution in the cavity. Coronal cavities are long, low-density structures located over filament neutral lines and are often seen as dark elliptical features at the solar limb in white light, EUV and X-rays. When these structures erupt they form the cavity portions of CMEs The model consists of a coronal streamer model with a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel length. Temperature and density can be varied as a function of altitude both in the cavity and streamer. We apply this model to a cavity observed in Aug. 2007 by a wide array of instruments including Hinode/EIS, STEREO/EUVI and SOHO/EIT. Studies such as these will ultimately help us understand the the original structures which erupt to become CMEs and ICMES, one of the prime Solar Orbiter objectives.

  2. On the structure of coronal streamer belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eselevich, V. G.

    1998-02-01

    In an attempt to separate the temporal and spatial variations in polarization brightness (plasma density) along the coronal streamer belt, a study is made of the parts of the belt which are longitudinally aligned with the west or east limb of the sun. It is shown that the brightness distribution along streamer belts is inhomogeneous with relative brightness variations of about 1.1-2.0. Streamer belts consist of a sequence of coronal rays (streamers), each of which at distances of greater than 3 solar radii from the solar center has a cross section with a typical angular size of about 10-70 deg along the belt and about 10-30 deg across the belt with neighboring rays separated by L of about 10-70. Examples from CRs 1591 and 1592 show that in the absence of the influence of coronal mass ejection, the distribution of streamer rays along the streamer belt can be stable for nearly two complete Carrington rotations.

  3. THE CORONAL ABUNDANCE ANOMALIES OF M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Brian E.; Laming, J. Martin; Karovska, Margarita

    2012-07-01

    We analyze Chandra X-ray spectra of the M0 V+M0 V binary GJ 338. As quantified by X-ray surface flux, these are the most inactive M dwarfs ever observed with X-ray grating spectroscopy. We focus on measuring coronal abundances, in particular searching for evidence of abundance anomalies related to first ionization potential (FIP). In the solar corona and wind, low-FIP elements are overabundant, which is the so-called FIP effect. For other stars, particularly very active ones, an 'inverse FIP effect' is often observed, with low-FIP elements being underabundant. For both members of the GJ 338 binary, we find evidence for a modest inverse FIP effect, consistent with expectations from a previously reported correlation between spectral type and FIP bias. This amounts to strong evidence that all M dwarfs should exhibit the inverse FIP effect phenomenon, not just the active ones. We take the first step toward modeling the inverse FIP phenomenon in M dwarfs, building on past work that has demonstrated that MHD waves coursing through coronal loops can lead to a ponderomotive force that fractionates elements in a manner consistent with the FIP effect. We demonstrate that in certain circumstances this model can also lead to an inverse FIP effect, pointing the way to more detailed modeling of M dwarf coronal abundances in the future.

  4. The Coronal Abundance Anomalies of M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian E.; Laming, J. Martin; Karovska, Margarita

    2012-07-01

    We analyze Chandra X-ray spectra of the M0 V+M0 V binary GJ 338. As quantified by X-ray surface flux, these are the most inactive M dwarfs ever observed with X-ray grating spectroscopy. We focus on measuring coronal abundances, in particular searching for evidence of abundance anomalies related to first ionization potential (FIP). In the solar corona and wind, low-FIP elements are overabundant, which is the so-called FIP effect. For other stars, particularly very active ones, an "inverse FIP effect" is often observed, with low-FIP elements being underabundant. For both members of the GJ 338 binary, we find evidence for a modest inverse FIP effect, consistent with expectations from a previously reported correlation between spectral type and FIP bias. This amounts to strong evidence that all M dwarfs should exhibit the inverse FIP effect phenomenon, not just the active ones. We take the first step toward modeling the inverse FIP phenomenon in M dwarfs, building on past work that has demonstrated that MHD waves coursing through coronal loops can lead to a ponderomotive force that fractionates elements in a manner consistent with the FIP effect. We demonstrate that in certain circumstances this model can also lead to an inverse FIP effect, pointing the way to more detailed modeling of M dwarf coronal abundances in the future.

  5. Coronal heating in multiple magnetic threads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, K. V.; Hood, A. W.; Browning, P. K.; Cargill, P. J.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Heating the solar corona to several million degrees requires the conversion of magnetic energy into thermal energy. In this paper, we investigate whether an unstable magnetic thread within a coronal loop can destabilise a neighbouring magnetic thread. Aims: By running a series of simulations, we aim to understand under what conditions the destabilisation of a single magnetic thread can also trigger a release of energy in a nearby thread. Methods: The 3D magnetohydrodynamics code, Lare3d, is used to simulate the temporal evolution of coronal magnetic fields during a kink instability and the subsequent relaxation process. We assume that a coronal magnetic loop consists of non-potential magnetic threads that are initially in an equilibrium state. Results: The non-linear kink instability in one magnetic thread forms a helical current sheet and initiates magnetic reconnection. The current sheet fragments, and magnetic energy is released throughout that thread. We find that, under certain conditions, this event can destabilise a nearby thread, which is a necessary requirement for starting an avalanche of energy release in magnetic threads. Conclusions: It is possible to initiate an energy release in a nearby, non-potential magnetic thread, because the energy released from one unstable magnetic thread can trigger energy release in nearby threads, provided that the nearby structures are close to marginal stability.

  6. Solar origins of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    The large scale properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), such as morphology, leading edge speed, and angular width and position, have been cataloged for many events observed with coronagraphs on the Skylab, P-78, and SMM spacecraft. While considerable study has been devoted to the characteristics of the SMEs, their solar origins are still only poorly understood. Recent observational work has involved statistical associations of CMEs with flares and filament eruptions, and some evidence exists that the flare and eruptive-filament associated CMEs define two classes of events, with the former being generally more energetic. Nevertheless, it is found that eruptive-filament CMEs can at times be very energetic, giving rise to interplanetary shocks and energetic particle events. The size of the impulsive phase in a flare-associated CME seems to play no significant role in the size or speed of the CME, but the angular sizes of CMEs may correlate with the scale sizes of the 1-8 angstrom x-ray flares. At the present time, He 10830 angstrom observations should be useful in studying the late development of double-ribbon flares and transient coronal holes to yield insights into the CME aftermath. The recently available white-light synoptic maps may also prove fruitful in defining the coronal conditions giving rise to CMEs.

  7. Solar Sources of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) originate in the solar corona.Due to recent ample solar images from space missions, especially the STEREO mission, we know that CMEs initiate not only from flaring active regions of strong magnetic field, prominence (filaments) in decayed active regions, but also from coronal structures in higher coronaover regions no apparent strong magnetic fields on the solar disk. Regardless the differences of their appearances, these regionsmust all include non-potential magnetic field or free magnetic energy in order to produce CMEs. When an energized magnetic structure erupts, the free magnetic energy converts to kinetic energy and few other types ofenergy, and the magnetic structure leaves the corona and propagates into the interplanetary space. At the source regions, the initiations of CMEs often accompany with solar flares, filament eruptions, coronalEUV dimmings and waves, and post eruption loop brightennings. Studying the CME source regions and the processes is essential for the understanding of CME initiation and their interplanetary consequences.

  8. Simulations of Emerging Magnetic Flux. II. The Formation of Unstable Coronal Flux Ropes and the Initiation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leake, James E.; Linton, Mark G.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the emergence of a twisted convection zone flux tube into a pre-existing coronal dipole field. As in previous simulations, following the partial emergence of the sub-surface flux into the corona, a combination of vortical motions and internal magnetic reconnection forms a coronal flux rope. Then, in the simulations presented here, external reconnection between the emerging field and the pre-existing dipole coronal field allows further expansion of the coronal flux rope into the corona. After sufficient expansion, internal reconnection occurs beneath the coronal flux rope axis, and the flux rope erupts up to the top boundary of the simulation domain (approximately 36 Mm above the surface).We find that the presence of a pre-existing field, orientated in a direction to facilitate reconnection with the emerging field, is vital to the fast rise of the coronal flux rope. The simulations shown in this paper are able to self-consistently create many of the surface and coronal signatures used by coronal mass ejection (CME) models. These signatures include surface shearing and rotational motions, quadrupolar geometry above the surface, central sheared arcades reconnecting with oppositely orientated overlying dipole fields, the formation of coronal flux ropes underlying potential coronal field, and internal reconnection which resembles the classical flare reconnection scenario. This suggests that proposed mechanisms for the initiation of a CME, such as "magnetic breakout," are operating during the emergence of new active regions.

  9. Simulations of emerging magnetic flux. II. The formation of unstable coronal flux ropes and the initiation of coronal mass ejections

    SciTech Connect

    Leake, James E.; Linton, Mark G.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2014-05-20

    We present results from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the emergence of a twisted convection zone flux tube into a pre-existing coronal dipole field. As in previous simulations, following the partial emergence of the sub-surface flux into the corona, a combination of vortical motions and internal magnetic reconnection forms a coronal flux rope. Then, in the simulations presented here, external reconnection between the emerging field and the pre-existing dipole coronal field allows further expansion of the coronal flux rope into the corona. After sufficient expansion, internal reconnection occurs beneath the coronal flux rope axis, and the flux rope erupts up to the top boundary of the simulation domain (∼36 Mm above the surface). We find that the presence of a pre-existing field, orientated in a direction to facilitate reconnection with the emerging field, is vital to the fast rise of the coronal flux rope. The simulations shown in this paper are able to self-consistently create many of the surface and coronal signatures used by coronal mass ejection (CME) models. These signatures include surface shearing and rotational motions, quadrupolar geometry above the surface, central sheared arcades reconnecting with oppositely orientated overlying dipole fields, the formation of coronal flux ropes underlying potential coronal field, and internal reconnection which resembles the classical flare reconnection scenario. This suggests that proposed mechanisms for the initiation of a CME, such as 'magnetic breakout', are operating during the emergence of new active regions.

  10. A CORONAL HOLE'S EFFECTS ON CORONAL MASS EJECTION SHOCK MORPHOLOGY IN THE INNER HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B. E.; Wu, C.-C.; Howard, R. A.; Socker, D. G.; Rouillard, A. P.

    2012-08-10

    We use STEREO imagery to study the morphology of a shock driven by a fast coronal mass ejection (CME) launched from the Sun on 2011 March 7. The source region of the CME is located just to the east of a coronal hole. The CME ejecta is deflected away from the hole, in contrast with the shock, which readily expands into the fast outflow from the coronal hole. The result is a CME with ejecta not well centered within the shock surrounding it. The shock shape inferred from the imaging is compared with in situ data at 1 AU, where the shock is observed near Earth by the Wind spacecraft, and at STEREO-A. Shock normals computed from the in situ data are consistent with the shock morphology inferred from imaging.

  11. TRACE observation of damped coronal loop oscillations: implications for coronal heating

    PubMed

    Nakariakov; Ofman; DeLuca; Roberts; Davila

    1999-08-01

    The imaging telescope on board the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) spacecraft observed the decaying transversal oscillations of a long [(130 +/- 6) x 10(6) meters], thin [diameter (2.0 +/- 0.36) x 10(6) meters], bright coronal loop in the 171 angstrom Fe(IX) emission line. The oscillations were excited by a solar flare in the adjacent active region. The decay time of the oscillations is 14.5 +/- 2.7 minutes for an oscillation with a frequency 3.90 +/- 0.13 millihertz. The coronal dissipation coefficient is estimated to be eight to nine orders of magnitude larger than the theoretically predicted classical value. The larger dissipation coefficient may solve existing difficulties with wave heating and reconnection theories. PMID:10436148

  12. A unified theory of electrodynamic coupling in coronal magnetic loops - The coronal heating problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ionson, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The coronal heating problem is studied, and it is demonstrated that Ionson's (1982) LRC approach results in a unified theory of coronal heating which unveils a variety of new heating mechanisms and which links together previously proposed mechanisms. Ionson's LRC equation is rederived, focusing on various aspects that were not clarified in the original article and incorporating new processes that were neglected. A parameterized heating rate is obtained. It is shown that Alfvenic surface wave heating, stochastic magnetic pumping, resonant electrodynamic heating, and dynamical dissipation emerge as special cases of a much more general formalism. This generalized theory is applied to solar coronal loops and it is found that active region and large scale loops are underdamped systems. Young active region loops and (possibly) bright points are found to be overdamped systems.

  13. Recent VLA Observations of Coronal Faraday Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, P. D.; Buffo, J. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Proposed mechanisms for coronal heating and acceleration of the fast solar wind, such as Joule heating by coronal currents or dissipation of Alfvén waves, depend on the magnetic field structure and plasma characteristics of the corona within heliocentric distances of 5 solar radii. Faraday rotation observations can provide unique information on the magnetic field in this region of the corona. We report on sensitive full-polarization observations of the radio galaxy 3C228 through the solar corona at heliocentric distances of 4.6 - 5.0 solar radii. The observations were made with the VLA in August of 2011. We performed these observations at 5.0 and 6.1 GHz (each with a bandwidth of 128 MHz), permitting measurements deeper in the corona than previous VLA observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. While the measured Faraday rotation was lower than our a priori expectations, we can understand the magnitude of the observed Faraday rotation in terms of observed properties of the corona on the day of observation. For coronal remote sensing, an advantage of using extended extragalactic radio sources such as 3C228 is that such observations provide multiple lines of sight through the corona. Our data provide two lines of sight (separated by 46″, 33,000 km in the corona), one to a northern hotspot and the other to a southern hotspot with fractional polarizations of 14% and 8% respectively. We detected three periods over the eight-hour observing session during which there appeared to be a difference in the Faraday rotation between these two closely spaced lines of sight. These measurements yield an estimate of 2 - 4 GA for coronal currents. We did not directly detect rotation measure fluctuations. Our data impose upper limits on rotation measure fluctuations caused by coronal waves. The observed upper limits were 3.3 and 6.4 rad/m2 and are comparable to and not inconsistent with some models for Alfvén wave heating. This research was supported at the University of Iowa by grants ATM09

  14. Structure and Dynamics of Coronal Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1997-01-01

    During the past year this grant has funded research in the interaction between magnetic fields and the hot plasma in the solar outer atmosphere. The following is a brief summary of the published papers, abstracts and talks which have been supported. The paper 'Coronal Structures Observed in X-rays and H-alpha Structures' was published in the Kofu Symposium proceedings. The study analyzes cool and hot behavior of two x-ray events, a small flare and a surge. We find that a large H-alpha surge appears in x-rays as a very weak event, while a weak H-alpha feature corresponds to the brightest x-ray emission on the disk at the time of the observation. Calculations of the heating necessary to produce these signatures, and implications for the driving and heating mechanisms of flares vs. surges are presented. A copy of the paper is appended to this report. The paper 'Differential Magnetic Field Shear in an Active Region' has been published in The Astrophysical Journal. We have compared the 3D extrapolation of magnetic fields with the observed coronal structure in an active region. Based on the fit between observed coronal structure throughout the volume of the region and the calculated magnetic field configurations, we propose a differential magnetic field shear model for this active region. The decreasing field shear in the outer portions of the AR may indicate a continual relaxation of the magnetic field with time, corresponding to a net transport of helicity outward. The paper 'Difficulties in Observing Coronal Structure' has been accepted for publication in the journal Solar Physics. In this paper we discuss the evidence that the temperature and density structure of the corona are far more complicated than had previously been thought. The discussion is based on five studies carried out by our group on coronal plasma properties, showing that any one x-ray instrument does see all of the plasma present in the corona, that hot and cool material may appear to be co

  15. Spatial and Temporal Scales of Coronal Magnetic Restructuring in the Development of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yayuan; Wang, Jingxiu; Maia, Dalmiro Jorge Filipe; Zhang, Yuzong; Zhao, Hui; Zhou, Guiping

    2006-12-01

    It has been commonly accepted that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) result from the restructuring or reconfiguring of large-scale coronal magnetic fields. In this paper, we analyzed four CME events using Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH) images and the experiments onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft to understand the coronal restructuring leading to CME initiation. We investigated the onset, duration, and position of the radio emissions in relation to EUV dimming and the inferred CME onset. It has been identified that the early CME development on the solar disk is characterized by a series of distinct radio bursts. These nonthermal radio sources appeared in phase with coronal dimming shown by SOHO-EIT images and are located within the EUV dimming or ongoing dimming regions. Three time scales are identified: the duration, the separation of individual radio bursts, and the overall time scale of all of the nonthermal sources. They fall in the ranges of approximately tens of seconds to three minutes, one to three minutes, and 15 20 minutes, respectively. The individual radio emission seems to shift and expand at the speed of the fast magnetoacoustic waves in the corona; while the nonthermal radio emissions as a whole appear episodically to correspond to the successive coronal restructuring. If we define the triggering speed by dividing the overall spatial scale by the temporal scale of all the radio bursts, then the triggering speed falls in the range of 300 400 km s-1. This implies that the general process of coronal restructuring and reconfiguring takes place at a speed slower than either the Alvfenic or acoustic speed in the corona. This is a type of speed of “topology waves,” i. e., the speed of successive topology changes from closed to open field configuration.

  16. THE COOLING OF CORONAL PLASMAS. IV. CATASTROPHIC COOLING OF LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Cargill, P. J.; Bradshaw, S. J.

    2013-07-20

    We examine the radiative cooling of coronal loops and demonstrate that the recently identified catastrophic cooling is due to the inability of a loop to sustain radiative/enthalpy cooling below a critical temperature, which can be >1 MK in flares, 0.5-1 MK in active regions, and 0.1 MK in long tenuous loops. Catastrophic cooling is characterized by a rapid fall in coronal temperature, while the coronal density changes by a small amount. Analytic expressions for the critical temperature are derived and show good agreement with numerical results. This effect considerably limits the lifetime of coronal plasmas below the critical temperature.

  17. The cooling and condensation of flare coronal plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    A model is investigated for the decay of flare heated coronal loops in which rapid radiative cooling at the loop base creates strong pressure gradients which, in turn, generate large (supersonic) downward flows. The coronal material cools and 'condenses' onto the flare chromosphere. The features which distinguish this model from previous models of flare cooling are: (1) most of the thermal energy of the coronal plasma may be lost by mass motion rather than by conduction or coronal radiation; (2) flare loops are not isobaric during their decay phase, and large downward velocities are present near the footpoints; (3) the differential emission measure q has a strong temperature dependence.

  18. Evidence linking coronal transients to the evolution of coronal holes. [solar X-ray observations on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, D. F.; Nolte, J. T.; Solodyna, C. V.; Mcintosh, P. S.

    1978-01-01

    The positions of X-ray coronal transients outside of active regions observed during Skylab were superposed on H-alpha synoptic charts and coronal hole boundaries for seven solar rotations. A detailed spatial association between the transients and neutral lines was confirmed. It was found that most of the transients were related to large-scale changes in coronal hole area and tended to occur on the borders of evolving equatorial holes.

  19. Computerized tomography myelography with coronal and oblique coronal view for diagnosis of nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background The authors describe a new computerized tomography (CT) myelography technique with coronal and oblique coronal view to demonstrate the status of the cervical nerve rootlets involved in brachial plexus injury. They discuss the value of this technique for diagnosis of nerve root avulsion compared with CT myelography with axial view. Methods CT myelography was performed with penetration of the cervical subarachnoid space by the contrast medium. Then the coronal and oblique coronal reconstructions were created. The results of CT myelography were evaluated and classified with presence of pseudomeningocele, intradural ventral nerve rootlets, and intradural dorsal nerve rootlets. The diagnosis was by extraspinal surgical exploration with or without spinal evoked potential measurements and choline acetyl transferase activity measurement in 25 patients and recovery by a natural course in 3 patients. Its diagnostic accuracy was compared with that of CT myelography with axial view, correlated with surgical findings or a natural course in 57 cervical roots in 28 patients. Results Coronal and oblique coronal views were superior to axial views in visualization of the rootlets and orientation of the exact level of the root. Sensitivity and specificity for coronal and oblique coronal views of unrecognition of intradural ventral and dorsal nerve root shadow without pseudomeningocele in determining pre-ganglionic injury were 100% and 96%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between coronal and oblique coronal views and axial views. Conclusion The information by the coronal and oblique coronal slice CT myelography enabled the authors to assess the rootlets of the brachial plexus and provided valuable data for helping to decide whether to proceed with exploration, nerve repair, primary reconstruction. PMID:17651476

  20. Impact of the growing use of narrative verdicts by coroners on geographic variations in suicide: analysis of coroners' inquest data

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, R.; Hawton, K.; Kapur, N.; Bennewith, O.; Gunnell, D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Coroners' death certificates form the basis of suicide statistics in England and Wales. Recent increases in coroners' use of narrative verdicts may affect the reliability of local and national suicide rates. Method We used Ministry of Justice data on inquests held between 2008 and 2009 and Local Authority suicide data (2001–02 and 2008–09) to investigate variations between coroners in their use of narrative verdicts and the impact of these on suicide rates, using ‘other’ verdicts (79% of which are narratives) as a proxy for narrative verdicts. Results There was wide geographic variation in Coroners' use of ‘other’ (mainly narrative) verdicts—they comprised between 0 and 50% (median = 9%) of verdicts given by individual coroners in 2008–09. Coroners who gave more ‘other’ verdicts gave fewer suicide verdicts (r = − 0.41; P< 0.001). In the 10 English Coroners' jurisdictions where the highest proportion of ‘other’ verdicts were given, the incidence of suicide decreased by 16% between 2001–02 and 2008–09, whereas it did not change in areas served by the 10 coroners who used narratives the least. Conclusions Variation in Coroners' use of narrative verdicts influences the validity of reported regional suicide rates. Small-area suicide rates, and changes in these rates over time in the last decade, should be interpreted with caution. PMID:22085685

  1. Solar Jet-Coronal Hole Collision and a Closely Related Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang

    2016-03-01

    Jets are defined as impulsive, well-collimated upflows, occurring in different layers of the solar atmosphere with different scales. Their relationship with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), another type of solar impulsive events, remains elusive. Using high-quality imaging data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory, we show a well-observed coronal jet event, in which the part of the jet with embedding coronal loops runs into a nearby coronal hole (CH) and gets bounced in the opposite direction. This is evidenced by the flat shape of the jet front during its interaction with the CH and the V-shaped feature in the time-slice plot of the interaction region. About a half-hour later, a CME with an initially narrow and jet-like front is observed by the LASCO C2 coronagraph propagating along the direction of the post-collision jet. We also observe some 304 Å dark material flowing from the jet-CH interaction region toward the CME. We thus suggest that the jet and the CME are physically connected, with the jet-CH collision and the large-scale magnetic topology of the CH being important in defining the eventual propagating direction of this particular jet-CME eruption.

  2. MxCSM: A massively-multiplexed coronal spectropolarimetric magnetometer for spaced-based coronal magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Haosheng

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the conceptual design of a new coronal spectropolarimeter that employs large-scale multiplexing strategy to enable small coronagraphs to perform high-sensitivity measurements of the polarizations of multiple coronal emission lines (CELs) of the whole corona. The massively multiplexed coronal spectropolarimetric magnetometer (mxCSM) is a 25 cm catadioptric off-axis Gregorian coronagraph equipped with two 3-wavelength, 100-slit spectrographs to measure the polarization of six CELs simultaneously at 100 slits over a 1.2 degree x 1.0 degree (2.4 Rsun x 2.0 Rsun ) field of view. The large multiplexing capability of this design allows small coronagraphs to perform high sensitivity spectropolarimetric observations over a large FOV that until now is possible only with large aperture telescopes. Therefore, this design is ideally suited for space missions in which payload size and weight are important considerations. Future space missions with multiple mxCSMs in circumsolar orbits can provide polarization measurements of CELs from multiple lines of sight to enable true tomographic inversion of the coronal magnetic fields.

  3. Standing Slow-Mode Waves in Hot Coronal Loops: Observations, Modeling, and Coronal Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongjiang

    2011-07-01

    Strongly damped Doppler shift oscillations are observed frequently associated with flarelike events in hot coronal loops. In this paper, a review of the observed properties and the theoretical modeling is presented. Statistical measurements of physical parameters (period, decay time, and amplitude) have been obtained based on a large number of events observed by SOHO/SUMER and Yohkoh/BCS. Several pieces of evidence are found to support their interpretation in terms of the fundamental standing longitudinal slow mode. The high excitation rate of these oscillations in small- or micro-flares suggest that the slow mode waves are a natural response of the coronal plasma to impulsive heating in closed magnetic structure. The strong damping and the rapid excitation of the observed waves are two major aspects of the waves that are poorly understood, and are the main subject of theoretical modelling. The slow waves are found mainly damped by thermal conduction and viscosity in hot coronal loops. The mode coupling seems to play an important role in rapid excitation of the standing slow mode. Several seismology applications such as determination of the magnetic field, temperature, and density in coronal loops are demonstrated. Further, some open issues are discussed.

  4. Coronal Loops: Evolving Beyond the Isothermal Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Cirtain, J. W.; Allen, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    Are coronal loops isothermal? A controversy over this question has arisen recently because different investigators using different techniques have obtained very different answers. Analysis of SOHO-EIT and TRACE data using narrowband filter ratios to obtain temperature maps has produced several key publications that suggest that coronal loops may be isothermal. We have constructed a multi-thermal distribution for several pixels along a relatively isolated coronal loop on the southwest limb of the solar disk using spectral line data from SOHO-CDS taken on 1998 Apr 20. These distributions are clearly inconsistent with isothermal plasma along either the line of sight or the length of the loop, and suggested rather that the temperature increases from the footpoints to the loop top. We speculated originally that these differences could be attributed to pixel size -- CDS pixels are larger, and more `contaminating' material would be expected along the line of sight. To test this idea, we used CDS iron line ratios from our data set to mimic the isothermal results from the narrowband filter instruments. These ratios indicated that the temperature gradient along the loop was flat, despite the fact that a more complete analysis of the same data showed this result to be false! The CDS pixel size was not the cause of the discrepancy; rather, the problem lies with the isothermal approximation used in EIT and TRACE analysis. These results should serve as a strong warning to anyone using this simplistic method to obtain temperature. This warning is echoed on the EIT web page: ``Danger! Enter at your own risk!'' In other words, values for temperature may be found, but they may have nothing to do with physical reality. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NASA grant NAG5-9783. This research was funded in part by the NASA/TRACE MODA grant for Montana State University.

  5. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Narrow Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzycka, D.; Raymond, J. C.; Biesecker, D. A.; Li, J.; Ciaravella, A.

    2003-05-01

    We present Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) observations of five narrow coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that were among 15 narrow CMEs originally selected by Gilbert and coworkers. Two events (1999 March 27, April 15) were ``structured,'' i.e., in white-light data they exhibited well-defined interior features, and three (1999 May 9, May 21, June 3) were ``unstructured,'' i.e., appeared featureless. In UVCS data the events were seen as 4°-13° wide enhancements of the strongest coronal lines H I Lyα and O VI λλ1032, 1037. We derived electron densities for several of the events from the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (LASCO) C2 white-light observations. They are comparable to or smaller than densities inferred for other CMEs. We modeled the observable properties of examples of the structured (1999 April 15) and unstructured (1999 May 9) narrow CMEs at different heights in the corona between 1.5 and 2 Rsolar. The derived electron temperatures, densities, and outflow speeds are similar for those two types of ejections. They were compared with properties of polar coronal jets and other CMEs. We discuss different scenarios of narrow CME formation as either a jet formed by reconnection onto open field lines or a CME ejected by expansion of closed field structures. Overall, we conclude that the existing observations do not definitively place the narrow CMEs into the jet or the CME picture, but the acceleration of the 1999 April 15 event resembles acceleration seen in many CMEs, rather than constant speeds or deceleration observed in jets.

  6. Coronal Heating, Spicules, and Solar-B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Porter, Jason; Hathaway, David; Yamauchi, Yohei

    2003-01-01

    Falconer et al. investigated the heating of the quiet corona by measuring the increase of coronal luminosity with the amount of the magnetic flux in the underlying network at solar minimum when there were no active regions on the face of the Sun. The coronal luminosity was measured from Fe IX/X - Fe XII pairs of coronal images from SOHO/EIT, under the assumption that practically all of the coronal luminosity in these very quiet regions came from plasma in the temperature range 0.9 x 10(exp 6) K is less than or equal to T is less than or equal to 1.3 x 10(exp 6) K. The network magnetic flux content was measured from SOHO/MDI magnetograms. It was found that luminosity of the corona in these quiet regions increased roughly in proportion to the square root of the magnetic flux content of the network and roughly in proportion to the length of the perimeter of the network flux clumps. From 1) this result; 2) the observed occurrence of many fine-scale explosive events (e.g., spicules) at the edges of network flux clumps; and 3) a demonstration that it is energetically feasible for the heating of the corona in quiet regions to be driven by explosions of granule-sized sheared-core magnetic bipoles embedded in the edges of the network flux clumps, Falconer et al. infer that in quiet regions that are not influenced by active regions the corona is mainly heated by such magnetic activity in the edges of the network flux clumps. From their observational results together with their feasibility analysis, Falconer et al. predict that 1) At the edges of the network flux clumps there are many transient sheared core bipoles of the size and lifetime of granules and having transverse field strengths greater than approx. 100 G; 2) Approx. 30 of these bipoles are present per supergranule; and 3) Most spicules are produced by explosions of these bipoles. The photospheric vector magnetograms, chromospheric filtergrams, and EUV spectra from Solar-B are expected to have sufficient sensitivity

  7. Coronal plasma diagnostics from eclipse observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Habbal, S. R.; Tomczyk, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this talk we will discuss the diagnostic potential of observationsof visible spectral lines formed in the extended solar corona that canbe obtained during eclipses. We will discuss the possible diagnosticapplications of visible eclipse observations to measure the physicalparameters of the extended corona, to understand solar wind origin andacceleration, and to determine the evolution of Coronal Mass Ejectionsduring onset.We will first review the mechanisms of formation of spectral lineintensities, we will then illustrate their diagnostic applications,and show some results from recent eclipse observations. We will alsoreview the spectral lines that are most likely to be observed inthe extended solar corona during the upcoming 2017 eclipse in thecontinental United States.

  8. Interacting active regions and coronal holes: implications for coronal outflows and solar wind structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culhane, J. Leonard; Baker, Deborah; Rouillard, Alexis; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia

    When active regions are adjacent to coronal holes a variety of magnetic field interactions can result. These may include the interchange reconnection between the closed active region (AR) fields and the open field of the coronal hole (CH), leading to fast and significant evolution of coronal hole boundaries. Outcomes may include variability of -or changes in, active region-associated hot plasma outflows seen with Hinode/EIS and the modulation of the solar wind flows on open field lines. Depending on their relative positions on the Sun, the AR-CH interactions may have their signatures embedded in co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs) or rarefaction regions. During two intervals -8/11 January, 2008 and 7/9 December, 2008, we have made observations with Hinode of two oppositely configured situations on the Sun. For 8/11 January, the coronal hole leads the active region while for 7/9 December the order is reversed. The Hinode EIS instrument is used to locate outflows and measure their velocities while the XRT is used to image the source regions, including the variable nature of the outflows. SOHO EIT imaging is used to follow the longer-term evolution of the coronal hole boundaries while MDI is used to observe changes in the magnetic field. STEREO imaging and in-situ data are also employed -as are ACE observations, to assess the resulting impacts on interplanetary solar wind structures. The contrasting behaviour that results from magnetic interactions in the two different configurations is described and assessed.

  9. Observaciones de la corona solar interior con un coronógrafo de espejo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenborg, G.; Schwenn, R.; Francile, C.; Rovira, M.

    El plasma de la corona solar es un buen indicador de las líneas de fuerza del campo magnético. Por lo tanto, el análisis de estructuras coronales cuasiestacionarias en la corona da importante información sobre el campo magnético y la actividad asociada. Se trata de poner límites a los modelos teóricos existentes mediante el estudio de distintas estructuras en la corona interior. En agosto de 1997 comenzó a operar el coronógrafo solar (MICA) en El Leoncito como parte del Observatorio Solar Alemán-Argentino. Desde su instalación obtiene imágenes de la corona solar (1.05 a 2.0 radios solares) en 2 líneas espectrales correspondientes a la emisión de Fe XIV y Fe X. El instrumento puede obtener imágenes cada minuto por lo que es ideal para estudiar procesos rápidos. Presentamos observaciones recientes que muestran la capacidad del coronógrafo así como la evolución de algunos eventos dinámicos observados por MICA.

  10. NASA’s SDO Spies an Elongated Coronal Hole

    NASA Video Gallery

    A long coronal hole can be seen right down the middle of the sun in this video captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory on March 23-25, 2016. Coronal holes are areas on the sun where the solar...

  11. GALEX Observes Nearby Cool Stars: Constraints on Ultraviolet Coronal Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, Jonathan; Welsh, Barry

    2016-01-01

    The GALEX ultraviolet mission (1350-2800A) has detected many late-type dwarf stars. Numerous M-type dwarf stars exhibit flaring and coronal activity; we use GALEX UV photometry to measure the variability of coronal emission in the GALEX NUV and FUV wavebands.

  12. Magnetism Matters: Coronal Magnetometry Using Multi-Wavelength Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Sarah E.

    2015-08-01

    The solar coronal magnetic field is key both to solving fundamental problems in solar physics such as coronal heating and solar wind acceleration, and to predicting the internal magnetic structure and thus space-weather impact of coronal mass ejections. I will describe the current state of the art in coronal magnetometry, and present results from the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) at Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO), which since 2011 has taken polarimetric observations of the solar corona in the near-infrared on a near-daily basis. I will discuss work in progress that utilizes forward modeling to synthesize polarimetric data at multiple heights and vantage points, and at wavelengths from radio to infrared to visible to ultraviolet. The goal is to use such synthetic testbeds to determine the ideal set of observations for constraining the coronal magnetic field, and to establish a Data-Optimized Coronal Field Model (DOC-FM) that efficiently incorporates these data into global magnetic models. This work will provide essential tools and motivation for the planning and implementation of future coronal polarimetric projects and missions spanning a broad range of wavelengths.

  13. Particle Heating Resulting from Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Suman; Sundar De, Syam; Guha, Gautam

    2016-07-01

    Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is a continuous phenomena occurring from the entire solar coronal zone responsible for the outflow of solar masses, viz., protons, electrons, neutrons and solar wind in the form of plasma. These perturb the Earth's atmosphere via magnetopause. Very high temperature plasma generator in the solar atmosphere produces huge magnetic dipoles with intense magnetic field. It traps the energetic charged particles released from the solar corona. These particles gyrate along the magnetic field lines and are gradually elongated outwards from the Sun. Due to this, the field lines get detached at some critical limit thereby enhancing the magnetic reconnection with the interplanetary magnetic field releasing huge energy in the form of X-rays and γ-rays. This perturbs the Earth's atmosphere. In this work, the situation has been investigated by momentum balance equation, energy balance equation along with the equations of continuity and states. From the analyses, the dispersive nature of the thermospheric medium is studied. Variation of normalized electron temperature with dimensionless time has been critically contemplated. The altitude dependent electric field in the medium is also investigated.

  14. Coronal loops - Current-based heating processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaufume, P.; Coppi, B.; Golub, L.

    1992-01-01

    Based on new observations, a theoretical model of magnetic-field related heating processes in the solar corona is given. In this model, field-aligned currents are induced along coronal loops in thin current sheaths. Excitation of instabilities involving magnetic reconnection converts the energy associated with the current-related magnetic field directly into particle energy, where the heating process proceeds via short bursts corresponding to an intermittent disruption of the current sheath configuration. Because of the relatively low transverse thermal conduction, only a small fraction of the loop volume is heated to a much higher temperature than the average value. This is consistent with experimental observations of low filling factors of hot plasmas in coronal loops. Thus the model involves a repeated sequence of dynamic events taking into account the observed loop topology, the differential emission measure distribution in the 10 exp 6 - 10 exp 7 K range, the energy balance requirements in the loop, and the probable duty cycles involved in the heating processes.

  15. Streamer Waves Driven by Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Song, H. Q.; Li, B.; Xia, L. D.; Wu, Z.; Fu, H.; Li, Xing

    2010-05-01

    Between 2004 July 5 and July 7, two intriguing fast coronal mass ejection (CME)-streamer interaction events were recorded by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph. At the beginning of the events, the streamer was pushed aside from its equilibrium position upon the impact of the rapidly outgoing and expanding ejecta; then, the streamer structure, mainly the bright streamer belt, exhibited elegant large-scale sinusoidal wavelike motions. The motions were apparently driven by the restoring magnetic forces resulting from the CME impingement, suggestive of magnetohydrodynamic kink mode propagating outward along the plasma sheet of the streamer. The mode is supported collectively by the streamer-plasma sheet structure and is therefore named "streamer wave" in the present study. With the white light coronagraph data, we show that the streamer wave has a period of about 1 hr, a wavelength varying from 2 to 4 solar radii, an amplitude of about a few tens of solar radii, and a propagating phase speed in the range 300-500 km s-1. We also find that there is a tendency for the phase speed to decline with increasing heliocentric distance. These observations provide good examples of large-scale wave phenomena carried by coronal structures and have significance in developing seismological techniques for diagnosing plasma and magnetic parameters in the outer corona.

  16. Low-coronal Sources of Stealth CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzate, Nathalia; Morgan, Huw

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are eruptions in the solar atmosphere which expand and propagate into space. They are generally associated with eruptive phenomena in the lower corona such as solar flares, filament eruptions, EUV waves or jets, known as low-coronal signatures (LCS). Recent studies have observed CMEs without a LCS which have been referred to as stealth CMEs. Through new image processing applied to EUV images we find clear evidence of LCS leading to stealth CMEs. In this work, the new processing methods are applied to some of the data identified to contain stealth CMEs in previous studies to investigate the possible existence of observable LCS. The LCS of stealth CMEs are fairly sizeable yet faint eruptions with structure consistent with a rising flux tube, possibly formed higher in the corona in regions of weaker magnetic field. We believe these flux tubes are formed mostly in polar regions due to the larger shear resulting from the slowly-rotating lower atmosphere below the more rapidly rotating corona. This would allow the formation of large flux tubes in weaker field regions, leading to low-energy and low-density flux tube eruptions.

  17. Chromospheric and Coronal Emission in DM Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampapa, Mark S.

    We propose to obtain low dispersion, large aperture LWP spectra of the Mg II h+k chromospheric resonance lines for a volume limited sample of mainly single dM (i.e., nondMe) stars for which X-ray data are available. The combination of the IUE data-set we propose herein to obtain and the previously acquired X-ray data-set (Bookbinder 1985) will yield further insights on the nature of chromospheric and coronal heating in the ordinary, inactive (quiescent) dM stars. In particular, if the X-ray heating hypothesis for the source of chromospheric heating in the dMe stars, as advanced by Cram (1982), is also applicable to the dM stars then we would expect to find a linear correlation between the luminosity in the Mg II lines and the X-ray luminosity. In general, if a common source of in situ heating in the chromospheres and coronae of the dM stars is present then we would expect to find a linear relationship between the observed Mg II emission and the X-ray emission. Conversely, if the sources of chromospheric and coronal heating are different between these atmospheric regions in the dM stars then we expect to find a departure from a simple linear relationship. The results to be obtained in this program will yield critical observational constraints on the possible mechanisms for atmospheric heating in the dM stars.

  18. Multi-instrument observations of coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Jason Terrence

    This document exhibits results of analysis from data collected with multiple EUV satellites (SOHO, TRACE, STEREO, Hinode, and SDO). The focus is the detailed observation of coronal loops using multiple instruments, i.e. filter imagers and spectrometers. Techniques for comparing the different instruments and deriving loop parameters are demonstrated. Attention is given to the effects the different instruments may introduce into the data and their interpretation. The assembled loop parameters are compared to basic energy balance equations and scaling laws. Discussion of the blue-shifted, asymmetric, and line broadened spectral line profiles near the footpoints of coronal loops is made. The first quantitative analysis of the anti-correlation between intensity and spectral line broadening for isolated regions along loops and their footpoints is presented. A magnetic model of an active region shows where the separatrices meet the photospheric boundary. At the boundary, the spectral data reveal concentrated regions of increased blue-shifted outflows, blue wing asymmetry, and line broadening. This is found just outside the footpoints of bright loops. The intensity and line broadening in this region are anti-correlated. A comparison of the similarities in the spectroscopic structure near the footpoints of the arcade loops and more isolated loops suggests the notion of consistent structuring for the bright loops forming an apparent edge of an active region core.

  19. BAYESIAN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SEISMOLOGY OF CORONAL LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Arregui, I.; Asensio Ramos, A. E-mail: aasensio@iac.es

    2011-10-10

    We perform a Bayesian parameter inference in the context of resonantly damped transverse coronal loop oscillations. The forward problem is solved in terms of parametric results for kink waves in one-dimensional flux tubes in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations. For the inverse problem, we adopt a Bayesian approach to infer the most probable values of the relevant parameters, for given observed periods and damping times, and to extract their confidence levels. The posterior probability distribution functions are obtained by means of Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations, incorporating observed uncertainties in a consistent manner. We find well-localized solutions in the posterior probability distribution functions for two of the three parameters of interest, namely the Alfven travel time and the transverse inhomogeneity length scale. The obtained estimates for the Alfven travel time are consistent with previous inversion results, but the method enables us to additionally constrain the transverse inhomogeneity length scale and to estimate real error bars for each parameter. When observational estimates for the density contrast are used, the method enables us to fully constrain the three parameters of interest. These results can serve to improve our current estimates of unknown physical parameters in coronal loops and to test the assumed theoretical model.

  20. STREAMER WAVES DRIVEN BY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Song, H. Q.; Li, B.; Xia, L. D.; Wu, Z.; Fu, H.; Li Xing

    2010-05-01

    Between 2004 July 5 and July 7, two intriguing fast coronal mass ejection (CME)-streamer interaction events were recorded by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph. At the beginning of the events, the streamer was pushed aside from its equilibrium position upon the impact of the rapidly outgoing and expanding ejecta; then, the streamer structure, mainly the bright streamer belt, exhibited elegant large-scale sinusoidal wavelike motions. The motions were apparently driven by the restoring magnetic forces resulting from the CME impingement, suggestive of magnetohydrodynamic kink mode propagating outward along the plasma sheet of the streamer. The mode is supported collectively by the streamer-plasma sheet structure and is therefore named 'streamer wave' in the present study. With the white light coronagraph data, we show that the streamer wave has a period of about 1 hr, a wavelength varying from 2 to 4 solar radii, an amplitude of about a few tens of solar radii, and a propagating phase speed in the range 300-500 km s{sup -1}. We also find that there is a tendency for the phase speed to decline with increasing heliocentric distance. These observations provide good examples of large-scale wave phenomena carried by coronal structures and have significance in developing seismological techniques for diagnosing plasma and magnetic parameters in the outer corona.

  1. Low-Coronal Sources of Stealth CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzate, Nathalia; Morgan, Huw

    2016-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are eruptions in the solar atmosphere, which expand and propagate into space. They are generally associated with eruptive phenomena in the lower corona such as solar flares, filament eruptions, EUV waves or jets, known as low-coronal signatures (LCS). Recent studies have observed CMEs without a LCS and these have been referred to as stealth CMEs. Through new image processing applied to EUV images we find clear evidence of LCS leading to stealth CMEs. In this work, the new processing methods are applied to some of the data identified to contain stealth CMEs in previous studies to investigate the possible existence of observable LCS. The LCS of stealth CMEs are fairly sizeable yet faint eruptions with structure consistent with a rising flux tube, possibly formed higher in the corona in regions of weaker magnetic field. We believe these flux tubes are formed mostly in polar regions due to the larger shear resulting from the more slowly rotating lower atmosphere below the more rapidly rotating corona. This would allow the formation of large flux tubes in weaker field regions, leading to low-energy and low-density flux tube eruptions

  2. Interplanetary Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2011-01-01

    Although more than ten thousand coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are produced during each solar cycle at the Sun, only a small fraction hits the Earth. Only a small fraction of the Earth-directed CMEs ultimately arrive at Earth depending on their interaction with the solar wind and other large-scale structures such as coronal holes and CMEs. The interplanetary propagation is essentially controlled by the drag force because the propelling force and the solar gravity are significant only near the Sun. Combined remote-sensing and in situ observations have helped us estimate the influence of the solar wind on the propagation of CMEs. However, these measurements have severe limitations because the remote-sensed and in-situ observations correspond to different portions of the CME. Attempts to overcome this problem are made in two ways: the first is to model the CME and get the space speed of the CME, which can be compared with the in situ speed. The second method is to use stereoscopic observation so that the remote-sensed and in-situ observations make measurements on the Earth-arriving part of CMEs. The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission observed several such CMEs, which helped understand the interplanetary evolution of these CMEs and to test earlier model results. This paper discusses some of these issues and updates the CME/shock travel time estimates for a number of CMEs.

  3. Coronal disturbances and their terrestrial effects /Tutorial Lecture/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment is undertaken of recent approaches to the prediction of the interplanetary consequences of coronal disturbances, with attention to the relationships of shocks and energetic particles to coronal transients, of proton events to gamma-ray and microwave bursts, of geomagnetic storms to filament eruptions, and of solar wind increases to the flare site magnetic field direction. A discussion is given concerning the novel phenomenon of transient coronal holes, which appear astride the long decay enhancements of 2-50 A X-ray emission following H-alpha filament eruptions. These voids in the corona are similar to long-lived coronal holes, which are the sources of high speed solar wind streams. The transient coronal holes may also be associated with transient solar wind speed increases.

  4. Small-Scale Magnetic Reconnection at Equatorial Coronal Hole Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Derek; DeForest, C. E.

    2011-05-01

    Coronal holes have long been known to be the source of the fast solar wind at both high and low latitudes. The equatorial extensions of polar coronal holes have long been assumed to have substantial magnetic reconnection at their boundaries, because they rotate more rigidly than the underlying photosphere. However, evidence for this reconnection has been sparse until very recently. We present some evidence that reconnection due to the evolution of small-scale magnetic fields may be sufficient to drive coronal hole boundary evolution. We hypothesize that a bias in the direction of that reconnection is sufficient to give equatorial coronal holes their rigid rotation. We discuss the prospects for investigating this using FLUX, a reconnection-controlled coronal MHD simulation framework. This work was funded by the NASA SHP-GI program.

  5. A DATA-DRIVEN MODEL FOR THE GLOBAL CORONAL EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xueshang; Jiang Chaowei; Xiang Changqing; Zhao Xuepu; Wu, S. T. E-mail: cwjiang@spaceweather.ac.cn E-mail: xpzhao@sun.stanford.edu

    2012-10-10

    This work is devoted to the construction of a data-driven model for the study of the dynamic evolution of the global corona that can respond continuously to the changing of the photospheric magnetic field. The data-driven model consists of a surface flux transport (SFT) model and a global three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) coronal model. The SFT model is employed to produce the global time-varying and self-consistent synchronic snapshots of the photospheric magnetic field as the input to drive our 3D numerical global coronal AMR-CESE-MHD model on an overset grid of Yin-Yang overlapping structure. The SFT model and the 3D global coronal model are coupled through the boundary condition of the projected characteristic method. Numerical results of the coronal evolution from 1996 September 4 to October 29 provide a good comparison with multiply observed coronal images.

  6. A Data-driven Model for the Global Coronal Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xueshang; Jiang, Chaowei; Xiang, Changqing; Zhao, Xuepu; Wu, S. T.

    2012-10-01

    This work is devoted to the construction of a data-driven model for the study of the dynamic evolution of the global corona that can respond continuously to the changing of the photospheric magnetic field. The data-driven model consists of a surface flux transport (SFT) model and a global three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) coronal model. The SFT model is employed to produce the global time-varying and self-consistent synchronic snapshots of the photospheric magnetic field as the input to drive our 3D numerical global coronal AMR-CESE-MHD model on an overset grid of Yin-Yang overlapping structure. The SFT model and the 3D global coronal model are coupled through the boundary condition of the projected characteristic method. Numerical results of the coronal evolution from 1996 September 4 to October 29 provide a good comparison with multiply observed coronal images.

  7. Determination of coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1993-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the second year of the contract entitled 'Determination of Coronal Magnetic Fields from Vector Magnetograms,' NASW-4728, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period January 1, 1993 to December 31, 1993. Under this contract SAIC has conducted research into the determination of coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograms, including the development and application of algorithms to determine force-free coronal fields above selected observations of active regions. The contract began on June 30, 1992 and has a completion date of December 31, 1994. This contract is a continuation of work started in a previous contract, NASW-4571, which covered the period November 15, 1990 to December 14, 1991. During this second year we have concentrated on studying additional active regions and in using the estimated coronal magnetic fields to compare to coronal features inferred from observations.

  8. SEISMOLOGY OF TRANSVERSELY OSCILLATING CORONAL LOOPS WITH SIPHON FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Terradas, J.; Arregui, I.; Verth, G.; Goossens, M.

    2011-03-10

    There are ubiquitous flows observed in the solar atmosphere of sub-Alfvenic speeds; however, after flaring and coronal mass ejection events flows can become Alfvenic. In this Letter, we derive an expression for the standing kink mode frequency due to siphon flow in coronal loops, valid for both low and high speed regimes. It is found that siphon flow introduces a linear, spatially dependent phase shift along coronal loops and asymmetric eigenfunctions. We demonstrate how this theory can be used to determine the kink and flow speed of oscillating coronal loops with reference to an observational case study. It is shown that the presence of siphon flow can cause the underestimation of magnetic field strength in coronal loops using the traditional seismological methods.

  9. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, M.; Hiremath, K. M.; Doddamani, Vijayakumar H.; Gurumath, Shashanka R.

    2015-09-01

    Present study probes temporal changes in the area and radiative flux of near equatorial coronal hole associated with solar wind parameters such as wind speed, density, magnetic field and temperature. Using high temporal resolution data from SDO/AIA for the two wavelengths 193 Å and 211 Å, area and radiative flux of coronal holes are extracted and are examined for the association with high speed solar wind parameters. We find a strong association between different parameters of coronal hole and solar wind. For both the wavelength bands, we also compute coronal hole radiative energy near the earth and it is found to be of similar order as that of solar wind energy. However, for the wavelength 193 Å, owing to almost similar magnitudes of energy emitted by coronal hole and energy due to solar wind, it is conjectured that solar wind might have originated around the same height where 193 Å line is formed in the corona.

  10. Low-latitude Coronal Holes during Solar Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, M.; Cranmer, S.; Kohl, J.

    Analyses of in situ observations have shown that some small coronal holes are sources of slow solar wind near solar maximum when polar coronal holes become smaller and disappear. However, not all coronal holes at solar maximum produce slow wind. The Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) aboard SOHO has been used to observe large low-latitude coronal holes during solar maximum that produced fast solar wind. UVCS observations show that large equatorial holes at solar maximum have plasma properties that seem to bridge the gap between solar minimum polar coronal holes and streamers. The ion kinetic temperatures in equatorial holes are about 2 times larger than those in a solar minimum equatorial streamer, and about a factor of 2 smaller than those in polar coronal holes above 2 R . The outflow speeds for the large equatorial holes observed by UVCS are only about 100 km s-1 , a factor of 4 smaller than those in polar holes, at 3 R . However, in situ data corresponding to these equatorial coronal holes showed asymptotic wind speeds of 600-700 km s-1 . These wind speeds are similar to those observed over polar coronal holes at solar minimum. In contrast to the polar coronal holes, the bulk of the solar wind acceleration in large equatorial coronal holes at solar maximum must occur above 3 R . Thus, the combination of spectroscopic measurements in the extended corona, where the primary solar wind acceleration occurs, and in situ measurements made in the solar wind can be used to obtain the solar wind acceleration as a function of heliocentric distance. These observations provide detailed empirical constraints for theoretical models and may be key to understanding how the various types of solar wind plasma are heated and accelerated. This work is supported by NASA under Grant NAG5-11420 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by the Italian Space Agency and by PRODEX (Swiss contribution).

  11. Coronal Heating and the Magnetic Flux Content of the Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Previously, from analysis of SOHO coronal images in combination with Kitt Peak magnetograms, we found that the quiet corona is the sum of two components: the large-scale corona and the coronal network. The large-scale corona consists of all coronal-temperature (T approximately 10(exp 6) K) structures larger than supergranules (greater than approximately 30,000 kilometers). The coronal network (1) consists of all coronal-temperature structures smaller than supergranules, (2) is rooted in and loosely traces the photospheric magnetic network, (3) has its brightest features seated on polarity dividing lines (neutral lines) in the network magnetic flux, and (4) produces only about 5% of the total coronal emission in quiet regions. The heating of the coronal network is apparently magnetic in origin. Here, from analysis of EIT coronal images of quiet regions in combination with magnetograms of the same quiet regions from SOHO/MDI and from Kitt Peak, we examine the other 95% of the quiet corona and its relation to the underlying magnetic network. We find: (1) Dividing the large-scale corona into its bright and dim halves divides the area into bright "continents" and dark "oceans" having spans of 2-4 supergranules. (2) These patterns are also present in the photospheric magnetograms: the network is stronger under the bright half and weaker under the dim half. (3) The radiation from the large-scale corona increases roughly as the cube root of the magnetic flux content of the underlying magnetic network. In contrast, the coronal radiation from an active region increases roughly linearly with the magnetic flux content of the active region. We assume, as is widely held, that nearly all of the large-scale corona is magnetically rooted in the network. Our results suggest that either the coronal heating in quiet regions has a large non-magnetic component, or, if the heating is predominantly produced via the magnetic field, the mechanism is significantly different than in active

  12. SOLAR CYCLE VARIATIONS OF CORONAL NULL POINTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE MAGNETIC BREAKOUT MODEL OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, G. R.; Mackay, D. H.; Nandy, Dibyendu E-mail: duncan@mcs.st-and.ac.u

    2009-10-20

    In this paper, we investigate the solar cycle variation of coronal null points and magnetic breakout configurations in spherical geometry, using a combination of magnetic flux transport and potential field source surface models. Within the simulations, a total of 2843 coronal null points and breakout configurations are found over two solar cycles. It is found that the number of coronal nulls present at any time varies cyclically throughout the solar cycle, in phase with the flux emergence rate. At cycle maximum, peak values of 15-17 coronal nulls per day are found. No significant variation in the number of nulls is found from the rising to the declining phase. This indicates that the magnetic breakout model is applicable throughout both phases of the solar cycle. In addition, it is shown that when the simulations are used to construct synoptic data sets, such as those produced by Kitt Peak, the number of coronal nulls drops by a factor of 1/6. The vast majority of the coronal nulls are found to lie above the active latitudes and are the result of the complex nature of the underlying active region fields. Only 8% of the coronal nulls are found to be connected to the global dipole. Another interesting feature is that 18% of coronal nulls are found to lie above the equator due to cross-equatorial interactions between bipoles lying in the northern and southern hemispheres. As the majority of coronal nulls form above active latitudes, their average radial extent is found to be in the low corona below 1.25 R {sub sun} (175, 000 km above the photosphere). Through considering the underlying photospheric flux, it is found that 71% of coronal nulls are produced though quadrupolar flux distributions resulting from bipoles in the same hemisphere interacting. When the number of coronal nulls present in each rotation is compared to the number of bipoles emerging, a wide scatter is found. The ratio of coronal nulls to emerging bipoles is found to be approximately 1/3. Overall

  13. Determination of Coronal Magnetic Fields from Vector Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1997-01-01

    During the course of the present contract we developed an 'evolutionary technique' for the determination of force-free coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograph observations. The method can successfully generate nonlinear force- free fields (with non-constant-a) that match vector magnetograms. We demonstrated that it is possible to determine coronal magnetic fields from photospheric measurements, and we applied it to vector magnetograms of active regions. We have also studied theoretical models of coronal fields that lead to disruptions. Specifically, we have demonstrated that the determination of force-free fields from exact boundary data is a well-posed mathematical problem, by verifying that the computed coronal field agrees with an analytic force-free field when boundary data for the analytic field are used; demonstrated that it is possible to determine active-region coronal magnetic fields from photospheric measurements, by computing the coronal field above active region 5747 on 20 October 1989, AR6919 on 15 November 1991, and AR7260 on 18 August 1992, from data taken with the Stokes Polarimeter at Mees Solar Observatory, University of Hawaii; started to analyze active region 7201 on 19 June 1992 using measurements made with the Advanced Stokes Polarimeter at NSO/Sac Peak; investigated the effects of imperfections in the photospheric data on the computed coronal magnetic field; documented the coronal field structure of AR5747 and compared it to the morphology of footpoint emission in a flare, showing that the 'high- pressure' H-alpha footpoints are connected by coronal field lines; shown that the variation of magnetic field strength along current-carrying field lines is significantly different from the variation in a potential field, and that the resulting near-constant area of elementary flux tubes is consistent with observations; begun to develop realistic models of coronal fields which can be used to study flare trigger mechanisms; demonstrated that

  14. A gigantic coronal jet ejected from a compact active region in a coronal hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibata, K.; Nitta, N.; Strong, K. T.; Matsumoto, R.; Yokoyama, T.; Hirayama, T.; Hudson, H.; Ogawara, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A gigantic coronal jet greater than 3 x 10(exp 5) km long (nearly half the solar radius) has been found with the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on board the solar X-ray satellite, Yohkoh. The jet was ejected on 1992 January 11 from an 'anemone-type' active region (AR) appearing in a coronal hole and is one of the largest coronal X-ray jets observed so far by SXT. This gigantic jet is the best observed example of many other smaller X-ray jets, because the spatial structures of both the jet and the AR located at its base are more easily resolved. The range of apparent translational velocities of the bulk of the jet was between 90 and 240 km s(exp -1), with the corresponding kinetic energy estimated to be of order of 10(exp 28) ergs. A detailed analysis reveals that the jet was associated with a loop brightening (a small flare) that occurred in the active region. Several features of this observation suggest and are consistent with a magnetic reconnection mechanism for the production of such a 'jet-loop-brightening' event.

  15. Magnetic Topology of Active Regions and Coronal Holes: Implications for Coronal Outflows and the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Culhane, J. L.; Baker, D.; Démoulin, P.; Mandrini, C. H.; DeRosa, M. L.; Rouillard, A. P.; Opitz, A.; Stenborg, G.; Vourlidas, A.; Brooks, D. H.

    2012-11-01

    During 2 - 18 January 2008 a pair of low-latitude opposite-polarity coronal holes (CHs) were observed on the Sun with two active regions (ARs) and the heliospheric plasma sheet located between them. We use the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) to locate AR-related outflows and measure their velocities. Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) imaging is also employed, as are the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) in-situ observations, to assess the resulting impacts on the solar wind (SW) properties. Magnetic-field extrapolations of the two ARs confirm that AR plasma outflows observed with EIS are co-spatial with quasi-separatrix layer locations, including the separatrix of a null point. Global potential-field source-surface modeling indicates that field lines in the vicinity of the null point extend up to the source surface, enabling a part of the EIS plasma upflows access to the SW. We find that similar upflow properties are also observed within closed-field regions that do not reach the source surface. We conclude that some of plasma upflows observed with EIS remain confined along closed coronal loops, but that a fraction of the plasma may be released into the slow SW. This suggests that ARs bordering coronal holes can contribute to the slow SW. Analyzing the in-situ data, we propose that the type of slow SW present depends on whether the AR is fully or partially enclosed by an overlying streamer.

  16. A gigantic coronal jet ejected from a compact active region in a coronal hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, K.; Nitta, N.; Strong, K. T.; Matsumoto, R.; Yokoyama, T.; Hirayama, T.; Hudson, H.; Ogawara, Y.

    1994-08-01

    A gigantic coronal jet greater than 3 x 105 km long (nearly half the solar radius) has been found with the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on board the solar X-ray satellite, Yohkoh. The jet was ejected on 1992 January 11 from an 'anemone-type' active region (AR) appearing in a coronal hole and is one of the largest coronal X-ray jets observed so far by SXT. This gigantic jet is the best observed example of many other smaller X-ray jets, because the spatial structures of both the jet and the AR located at its base are more easily resolved. The range of apparent translational velocities of the bulk of the jet was between 90 and 240 km s-1, with the corresponding kinetic energy estimated to be of order of 1028 ergs. A detailed analysis reveals that the jet was associated with a loop brightening (a small flare) that occurred in the active region. Several features of this observation suggest and are consistent with a magnetic reconnection mechanism for the production of such a 'jet-loop-brightening' event.

  17. COMBINING PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND CORONAL HEATING VIA DATA-CONSTRAINED CALCULATIONS OF NANOFLARES IN CORONAL LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Gontikakis, C.; Efthymiopoulos, C.; Georgoulis, M. K.; Patsourakos, S.; Anastasiadis, A.

    2013-07-10

    We model nanoflare heating of extrapolated active-region coronal loops via the acceleration of electrons and protons in Harris-type current sheets. The kinetic energy of the accelerated particles is estimated using semi-analytical and test-particle-tracing approaches. Vector magnetograms and photospheric Doppler velocity maps of NOAA active region 09114, recorded by the Imaging Vector Magnetograph, were used for this analysis. A current-free field extrapolation of the active-region corona was first constructed. The corresponding Poynting fluxes at the footpoints of 5000 extrapolated coronal loops were then calculated. Assuming that reconnecting current sheets develop along these loops, we utilized previous results to estimate the kinetic energy gain of the accelerated particles. We related this energy to nanoflare heating and macroscopic loop characteristics. Kinetic energies of 0.1-8 keV (for electrons) and 0.3-470 keV (for protons) were found to cause heating rates ranging from 10{sup -6} to 1 erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -3}. Hydrodynamic simulations show that such heating rates can sustain plasma in coronal conditions inside the loops and generate plasma thermal distributions that are consistent with active-region observations. We concluded the analysis by computing the form of X-ray spectra generated by the accelerated electrons using the thick-target approach. These spectra were found to be in agreement with observed X-ray spectra, thus supporting the plausibility of our nanoflare-heating scenario.

  18. Coronal Holes During the Past Solar Cycle [Invited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, M. P.

    2003-06-01

    Analyses of UVCS/SOHO observations during different phases of Solar Cycle 23 have shown marked variations of ion properties in the acceleration region of the high-speed solar wind in large coronal holes. In 1996--1997 at solar minimum, UVCS observations revealed fast, hot flows coming from polar coronal holes. Around solar maximum, UVCS observations showed slower, cooler flows coming from coronal holes at the Sun's equator. In 2001 and 2002, UVCS observations evidenced the reappearance of the coronal holes at the north and south poles for the next solar cycle. We present empirical models for the physical properties of large coronal holes and the acceleration of the associated high-speed solar wind derived from ultraviolet coronagraphic spectroscopy. We discuss the role of solar cycle trends and the variation of ambient coronal-hole properties (e.g., magnetic field, geometry, density). We use these observations to test phenomenological models of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. This work is supported by NASA under Grant NAG5-11420 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by the Italian Space Agency and by PRODEX (Swiss contribution).

  19. Global Acceleration of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Lara, Alejandro; Lepping, Ronald; Kaiser, Michael; Berdichevsky, Daniel; St. Cyr, O. Chris; Lazarus, Al

    1999-01-01

    Using the observed relation between speeds of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) near the Sun and in the solar wind, we estimate a global acceleration acting on the CMEs. Our study quantifies the qualitative results of Gosling [1997] and numerical simulations that CMEs at 1 AU with speeds closer to the solar wind. We found a linear relation between the global acceleration and the initial speed of the CMEs and the absolute value of the acceleration is similar to the slow solar wind acceleration. Our study naturally divides CMEs into fast and slow ones, the dividing line being the solar wind speed. Our results have important implications to space weather prediction models which need to incorporate this effect in estimating the CME arrival time at 1 AU. We show that the arrival times of CMEs at 1 AU are drastically different from the zero acceleration case.

  20. Solar wind origin in coronal funnels.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chuan-Yi; Zhou, Cheng; Marsch, Eckart; Xia, Li-Dong; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Jing-Xiu; Wilhelm, Klaus

    2005-04-22

    The origin of the solar wind in solar coronal holes has long been unclear. We establish that the solar wind starts flowing out of the corona at heights above the photosphere between 5 megameters and 20 megameters in magnetic funnels. This result is obtained by a correlation of the Doppler-velocity and radiance maps of spectral lines emitted by various ions with the force-free magnetic field as extrapolated from photospheric magnetograms to different altitudes. Specifically, we find that Ne7+ ions mostly radiate around 20 megameters, where they have outflow speeds of about 10 kilometers per second, whereas C3+ ions with no average flow speed mainly radiate around 5 megameters. Based on these results, a model for understanding the solar wind origin is suggested. PMID:15845846

  1. Solar Eruptions: Coronal Mass Ejections and Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This lecture introduces the topic of Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, collectively known as solar eruptions. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. Flares can be eruptive or confined. Eruptive flares accompany CMEs, while confined flares hav only electromagnetic signature. CMEs can drive MHD shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. CMEs heading in the direction of Earth arrive in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currnts that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines

  2. Coronal Loops: New Insights from EIS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, G.; Bradshaw, S. J.

    2009-12-01

    Multi-instrument observations of coronal loops of different active regions have been studied. The general features discussed in Del Zanna (2003) and Del Zanna and Mason (2003) based on SOHO/CDS are confirmed. Hinode/EIS high-cadence observations clearly show how dynamic loops are at all temperatures. This clearly reflects the fast changes in the photospheric magnetic fields measured by SOT over a minute timescale. Despite that, persistent patterns are present. In particular, the pattern of Doppler shifts and non-thermal widths, found for the first time in NOAA 10926 (cf. Del Zanna 2007, 2008), is actually a common feature in all active regions. It is likely that the majority of cool (0.5--1 MK) loops are observed during their radiatively cooling phase.

  3. Differential flow: Locally Generated or Coronal Artifact?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alterman, B. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Stevens, M. L.; Szabo, A.; Koval, A.

    2015-12-01

    Alpha particles and proton beams differentially flow in the solar wind with respect to the proton core by about an Alfvén speed. Whether differential flow is an artifact of coronal physics or a signature of local acceleration as the solar wind propagates earthward is undetermined. A new analysis of Wind spacecraft observations in the solar wind combines Faraday Cup ion distribution functions with vector magnetic field measurements to characterize the bulk properties of the proton core, proton beam, and alpha particles with 92s time resolution. We utilize this data set to examine the occurrence of differential flow at 1 AU as a function of solar wind conditions and other parameters. We discuss the implications of observed trends on our understanding of differential flow's origin.

  4. On the theory of coronal heating mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuperus, M.; Ionson, J. A.; Spicer, D. S.

    1981-01-01

    The present state-of-the-art of two classes of theories of coronal heating is examined: (1) heating by acoustic processes in the 'nonmagnetic' parts of the atmosphere (the shock-wave theory is an example); and (2) heating by electrodynamic processes in the magnetic regions of the corona (beta much less than 1) either by MHD waves or current heating in regions with high electric current densities (flare-type heating). It is concluded that the mechanism of the heating of the solar chromosphere and corona remains an open question, especially in explaining detailed atmospheric structures. The acoustic theory might be correct with little modification for most of the chromosphere, but as soon as the atmosphere shows a high degree of structure as in the corona and transition layer the magnetic field must play a dominant role. It appears that the current heating theories have a small range of applicability, while the MHD-wave theories are the most promising.

  5. Characteristics of polar coronal hole jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrashekhar, K.; Bemporad, A.; Banerjee, D.; Gupta, G. R.; Teriaca, L.

    2014-01-01

    Context. High spatial- and temporal-resolution images of coronal hole regions show a dynamical environment where mass flows and jets are frequently observed. These jets are believed to be important for the coronal heating and the acceleration of the fast solar wind. Aims: We studied the dynamics of two jets seen in a polar coronal hole with a combination of imaging from EIS and XRT onboard Hinode. We observed drift motions related to the evolution and formation of these small-scale jets, which we tried to model as well. Methods: Stack plots were used to find the drift and flow speeds of the jets. A toymodel was developed by assuming that the observed jet is generated by a sequence of single reconnection events where single unresolved blobs of plasma are ejected along open field lines, then expand and fall back along the same path, following a simple ballistic motion. Results: We found observational evidence that supports the idea that polar jets are very likely produced by multiple small-scale reconnections occurring at different times in different locations. These eject plasma blobs that flow up and down with a motion very similar to a simple ballistic motion. The associated drift speed of the first jet is estimated to be ≈27 km s-1. The average outward speed of the first jet is ≈171 km s-1, well below the escape speed, hence if simple ballistic motion is considered, the plasma will not escape the Sun. The second jet was observed in the south polar coronal hole with three XRT filters, namely, C-poly, Al-poly, and Al-mesh filters. Many small-scale (≈3″-5″) fast (≈200-300 km s-1) ejections of plasma were observed on the same day; they propagated outwards. We observed that the stronger jet drifted at all altitudes along the jet with the same drift speed of ≃7 km s-1. We also observed that the bright point associated with the first jet is a part of sigmoid structure. The time of appearance of the sigmoid and that of the ejection of plasma from the bright

  6. Reduced Coronal Emission Above Large Isolated Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, B. I.; Gary, D. E.; Peterova, N. G.; Shibasaki, K.; Topchilo, N. A.

    2015-01-01

    We analysed specific regions of reduced soft X-ray and microwave emission in five large isolated sunspots. The Nobeyama Radioheliograph 17 GHz observations reveal a local depression of microwave brightness in the peripheral area of the sunspots. The depression regions appear light (weak absorption) in the He 10830 Å line in areas with extended (open) field lines, as indicated by potential field source surface model (PFSS) extrapolations up to 1.5 R⊙. The observed depressions of 3 - 8 % in ordinary mode at 17 GHz are interpreted as resulting from free-free emission when the plasma density is lower by 5 - 10 %. Our model estimates show that the decrease in density in both the coronal and the lower layers above the depression region accounts for the depression. These depression regions lend themselves well to marking the location of outward plasma motions.

  7. Possible evidence for coronal Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, J. V.; Bird, M. K.; Volland, H.; Edenhofer, P.; Stelzried, C. T.; Seidel, B. L.

    1982-01-01

    A statistical ray analysis is used to analyze observed electron content and Faraday rotation fluctuations in the 2.29 GHz S band carrier signals of the two Helios spacecraft probing the magnetic and density structures of the solar corona inside 0.05 AU. It is found that (1) the observed Faraday rotation fluctuations cannot be due only to electron density fluctuations in the corona, unless the coronal magnetic field is about five times stronger than suggested by current estimates; and (2) the observed Faraday rotation fluctuations are consistent with the hypothesis that the sun radiates Alfven waves whose energies are great enough to heat and accelerate high-speed solar wind streams.

  8. Driving mechanisms for coronal mass ejections.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    Mass ejections are new bright features observed in white-light that give the appearance of outward moving material. An acknowledged key ingredient in both the ejection and its progenitor is the magnetic field, although the precise nature of its role, particularily in the driving mechanism, remains unclear. The author begins by reviewing analyses of coordinated data sets that establish the relative time sequence and spatial location of individually identified phenomena (such as the flare impulsive phase, eruptive prominence, CME trajectory, etc.) that better define potential drivers. Some of the models and numerical simulations that have been developed with the intent of determining the physical interactions in the driving mechanism and coronal mass ejection are then considered.

  9. Low-coronal Sources of Stealth CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzate, N.; Morgan, H.

    2015-10-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) usually exhibit lower-corona dynamics such as flares, magnetic reconfiguration, EUV waves, jets or filaments. Recent studies have observed CMEs without a lowcoronal signatures (LCS) which have been referred to as stealth CMEs. Through new image processing applied to EUV images we find clear evidence of LCS leading to stealth CMEs. The LCS of stealth CMEs are fairly sizeable yet faint eruptions with structure consistent with a rising flux tube, possibly formed higher in the corona in regions of weaker magnetic field. We believe these flux tubes are formed mostly in polar regions due to the large shear resulting from the slowly-rotating lower atmosphere below the more rapidly rotating corona. This would allow the formation of large flux tubes in weaker field regions, leading to low-energy and low-density flux tube eruptions.

  10. Turbulent resistive heating of solar coronal arches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, G.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility that coronal heating occurs by means of anomalous Joule heating by electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is examined, with consideration given to currents running from foot of a loop to the other. It is assumed that self-fields generated by the currents are absent and currents follow the direction of the magnetic field, allowing the plasma cylinder to expand radially. Ion and electron heating rates are defined within the cylinder, together with longitudinal conduction and convection, radiation and cross-field transport, all in terms of Coulomb and turbulent effects. The dominant force is identified as electrostatic ion cyclotron instability, while ion acoustic modes remain stable. Rapid heating from an initial temperature of 10 eV to 100-1000 eV levels is calculated, with plasma reaching and maintaining a temperature in the 100 eV range. Strong heating is also possible according to the turbulent Ohm's law and by resistive heating.

  11. Coronal Mass Ejections: From Sun to Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsourakos, S.

    2016-06-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are gigantic expulsions of magnetized plasmas from the solar corona into the interplanetary (IP) space. CMEs spawn ~ 1015 gr of mass and reach speeds ranging between several hundred to a few thousand km/s (e.g., Gopalswamy et al. 2009; Vourlidas et al. 2010). It takes 1-5 days for a CME to reach Earth. CMEs are one of the most energetic eruptive manifestations in the solar system and are major drivers of space weather via their magnetic fields and energetic particles, which are accelerated by CME-driven shocks. In this review we give a short account of recent, mainly observational, results on CMEs from the STEREO and SDO missions which include the nature of their pre-eruptive and eruptive configurations and the CME propagation from Sun to Earth. We conclude with a discussion of the exciting capabilities in CME studies that will soon become available from new solar and heliospheric instrumentation.

  12. A catastrophe mechanism for coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, T. G.; Isenberg, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    The ideal-MHD equations are used to show that a coronal current filament can suddenly lose equilibrium if its magnetic energy exceeds a critical value. The loss of equilibrium in the configuration results from an imbalance between magnetic tension and compression, and this imbalance ejects the filament upwards. Near the critical value, the equilibrium configuration develops a vertical current sheet attached to the photosphere at the point directly below the filament. When equilibrium is lost, field lines anchored to the photosphere are stretched upwards, and the current sheet rapidly grows longer. Without reconnection in the current sheet, the filament travels only a short distance before reaching a new equilibrium, and the net magnetic energy released is less than 1 percent of the stored magnetic energy. However, with reconnection, the filament travels upwards indefinitely, and all of the stored energy is released.

  13. A magnetohydrodynamic theory of coronal loop transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, T.

    1982-01-01

    The physical and geometrical characteristics of solar coronal loop transients are described in an MHD model based on Archimedes' MHD buoyancy force. The theory was developed from interpretation of coronagraphic data, particularly from Skylab. The brightness of a loop is taken to indicate the electron density, and successive pictures reveal the electron enhancement in different columns. The forces which lift the loop off the sun surface are analyzed as an MHD buoyancy force affecting every mass element by imparting an inertial force necessary for heliocentrifugal motion. Thermal forces are responsible for transferring the ambient stress to the interior of the loop to begin the process. The kinematic and hydrostatic buoyancy overcome the gravitational force, and a flux rope can then curve upward, spiralling like a corkscrew with varying cross section around the unwinding solar magnetic field lines.

  14. FOXSI-2 Observations and Coronal Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, S.; Glesener, L.; Krucker, S.; Ramsey, B.; Ishikawa, S. N.; Buitrago Casas, J. C.; Takahashi, T.; Foster, N.

    2015-12-01

    Energy release and particle acceleration on the Sun is a frequent occurrence associated with a number of different solar phenomenon including but not limited to solar flares, coronal mass ejections and nanoflares. The exact mechanism through which particles are accelerated and energy is released is still not well understood. This issue is related to the unsolved coronal heating problem, the mystery of the heating mechanism for the million degree solar corona. One prevalent theory posits the existence of a multitude of small flares, dubbed nanoflares. Recent observations of active region AR11890 by IRIS (Testa et al. 2014) are consistent with numerical simulations of heating by impulsive beams of nonthermal electrons, suggesting that nanoflares may be similar to large flares in that they accelerate particles. Furthermore, observations by the EUNIS sounding rocket (Brosius et al. 2014) of faint Fe XIX (592.2 Angstrom) emission in an active region is indicative of plasma at temperatures of at least 8.9 MK providing further evidence of nanoflare heating. One of the best ways to gain insight into accelerated particles on the Sun and the presence of hot plasma is by observing the Sun in hard X-rays (HXR). We present on observations taken during the second successful flight of the Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI-2). FOXSI flew on December 11, 2014 with upgraded optics as well as new CdTe strip detectors. FOXSI-2 observed thermal emission (4-15 keV) from at least three active regions (AR#12234, AR#12233, AR#12235) and observed regions of the Sun without active regions. We present on using FOXSI observations to test the presence of hot temperatures in and outside of active regions.

  15. A Model for Stealth Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Benjamin J.; Masson, Sophie; Li, Yan; DeVore, C. Richard; Luhmann, Janet; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Fisher, George H.

    2016-05-01

    Stealth coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are events in which there are almost no observable signatures of the CME eruption in the low corona but often a well-resolved slow flux rope CME observed in the coronagraph data. We present results from a three-dimensional numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of the 2008 June 1-2 slow streamer blowout CME that Robbrecht et al. [2009] called “the CME from nowhere.” We model the global coronal structure using a 1.4 MK isothermal solar wind and a low-order potential field source surface representation of the Carrington Rotation 2070 magnetogram synoptic map. The bipolar streamer belt arcade is energized by simple shearing flows applied in the vicinity of the helmet streamer’s polarity inversion line. The slow expansion of the energized helmet-streamer arcade results in the formation of a radial current sheet. The subsequent onset of expansion-driven flare reconnection initiates the stealth CME while gradually releasing ~1.5E+30 erg of stored magnetic energy over the 20+ hour eruption duration. We show the energy flux available for flare heating and flare emission during the eruption is approximately two orders of magnitude below the energy flux required to heat the ambient background corona, thus confirming the “stealth” character of the 2008 June 1-2 CME’s lack of observable on disk signatures. We also present favorable comparisons between our simulation results and the multi-viewpoint SOHO-LASCO and STEREO-SECCHI coronagraph observations of the pre-eruption streamer structure and the initiation and evolution of the stealth streamer blowout CME.

  16. Numerical Simulation of DC Coronal Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlburg, Russell B.; Einaudi, G.; Taylor, Brian D.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry; Rappazzo, A. F.; Velli, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Recent research on observational signatures of turbulent heating of a coronal loop will be discussed. The evolution of the loop is is studied by means of numerical simulations of the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations using the HYPERION code. HYPERION calculates the full energy cycle involving footpoint convection, magnetic reconnection, nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. The footpoints of the loop magnetic field are convected by random photospheric motions. As a consequence the magnetic field in the loop is energized and develops turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets: energy is deposited at small scales where heating occurs. Dissipation is non-uniformly distributed so that only a fraction of thecoronal mass and volume gets heated at any time. Temperature and density are highly structured at scales which, in the solar corona, remain observationally unresolved: the plasma of the simulated loop is multi thermal, where highly dynamical hotter and cooler plasma strands are scattered throughout the loop at sub-observational scales. Typical simulated coronal loops are 50000 km length and have axial magnetic field intensities ranging from 0.01 to 0.04 Tesla. To connect these simulations to observations the computed number densities and temperatures are used to synthesize the intensities expected in emission lines typically observed with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. These intensities are then employed to compute differential emission measure distributions, which are found to be very similar to those derived from observations of solar active regions.

  17. The Dynamics of Coronal-Hole Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginson, A. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Wyper, P. F.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2015-12-01

    The source of the slow solar wind at the Sun is the subject of intense debate in solar and heliospheric physics. Because the majority of the solar wind observed at Earth is slow wind, understanding its origin is essential for understanding and predicting Earth's space weather environment. In-situ and remote observations show that, compared to the fast wind, the slow solar wind corresponds to higher freeze-in temperatures, as indicated by charge-state ratios, and more corona-like elemental abundances. These results indicate that the most likely source for the slow wind is the hot plasma in the closed-field corona; however, the release mechanism for the wind from the closed-field regions is far from understood. Here we present the first fully dynamic, 3D MHD simulations of a coronal-hole boundary driven by photospheric convective flows. We determine in detail the opening and closing of coronal flux due to photospheric motions at the base of a helmet streamer. These changes should lead to the release of plasma from the closed magnetic field at the edge of the streamer. Our analysis demonstrates that the bulk of the release is due to interchange reconnection. We calculate the effective of numerical Lundquist number on the dynamics and discuss the implications of our results for theories of slow-wind origin, in particular the S-Web model. We also discuss the implications of our results for observations, in particular from the upcoming Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions. This work was supported by the NASA SR&T and TR&T Programs.

  18. Measurements of EUV coronal holes and open magnetic flux

    SciTech Connect

    Lowder, C.; Qiu, J.; Leamon, R.; Liu, Y.

    2014-03-10

    Coronal holes are regions on the Sun's surface that map the footprints of open magnetic field lines. We have developed an automated routine to detect and track boundaries of long-lived coronal holes using full-disk extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images obtained by SOHO/EIT, SDO/AIA, and STEREO/EUVI. We measure coronal hole areas and magnetic flux in these holes, and compare the measurements with calculations by the potential field source surface (PFSS) model. It is shown that, from 1996 through 2010, the total area of coronal holes measured with EIT images varies between 5% and 17% of the total solar surface area, and the total unsigned open flux varies between (2-5)× 10{sup 22} Mx. The solar cycle dependence of these measurements is similar to the PFSS results, but the model yields larger hole areas and greater open flux than observed by EIT. The AIA/EUVI measurements from 2010-2013 show coronal hole area coverage of 5%-10% of the total surface area, with significant contribution from low latitudes, which is under-represented by EIT. AIA/EUVI have measured much enhanced open magnetic flux in the range of (2-4)× 10{sup 22} Mx, which is about twice the flux measured by EIT, and matches with the PFSS calculated open flux, with discrepancies in the location and strength of coronal holes. A detailed comparison between the three measurements (by EIT, AIA-EUVI, and PFSS) indicates that coronal holes in low latitudes contribute significantly to the total open magnetic flux. These low-latitude coronal holes are not well measured with either the He I 10830 line in previous studies, or EIT EUV images; neither are they well captured by the static PFSS model. The enhanced observations from AIA/EUVI allow a more accurate measure of these low-latitude coronal holes and their contribution to open magnetic flux.

  19. Effects of Large-Scale Flows on Coronal Abundances: Multispecies Models and TRACE Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, D. D.

    2003-05-01

    Understanding coronal abundances is crucial for interpreting coronal observations and for understanding coronal physical processes and heating. Bulk flows and gravity, both unmistakably present in the corona, significantly affect abundances. We present multispecies simulations of long-lived coronal structures and compare model results with TRACE observations, focusing on abundance variations and flows.

  20. Atlas of Skylab ATM/S056 coronal hole observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    An atlas of coronal hole observations (Patrol Long and Single Frame Long Filter 3) recorded by the Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount/SO56 X-ray Telescope during the first two manned missions is presented. A total of 279 operations (excluding super long frames) were determined. Comparisons are made between coronal hole observations performed in the first manned mission and those in the second manned mission, and between a super long filter 3 image and a typical single frame (or Patrol) long image. Additional studies to enhance the S056 coronal hole observations and perhaps to extend coverage into the last manned mission are suggested. The data presented are in preliminary form.

  1. Guided MHD waves as a coronal diagnostic tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    A description is provided of how fast magnetoacoustic waves are ducted along regions of low Alfven velocity (high density) in the corona, exhibiting a distinctive wave signature which may be used as a diagnostic probe of in situ coronal conditions (magnetic field strength, density inhomogeneity, etc.). Some observational knowledge of the start time of the impulsive wave source, possibly a flare, the start and end times of the generated wave event, and the frequency of the pulsations in that event permits a seismological deduction of the physical properties of the coronal medium in which the wave propagated. With good observations the theory offers a new means of probing the coronal atmosphere.

  2. Unilateral coronal craniosynostosis in Abraham Lincoln and his family.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Ronald S

    2010-09-01

    Premature closure of one coronal skull suture produces a characteristic arching or relative elevation of the superior orbital rim on the involved side. This sign is associated with facial asymmetry, and both signs are usually the most conspicuous features in patients with mild unilateral coronal craniosynostosis. Photographs suggest that at least 9 individuals over 5 generations of the Abraham Lincoln family had premature closure of 1 coronal suture. In 8 males, there was involvement of the left side; in 1 female, there was involvement of the right side. PMID:20856045

  3. EUV Coronal Waves: Atmospheric and Heliospheric Connections and Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsourakos, S.

    2015-12-01

    Since their discovery in late 90's by EIT on SOHO, the study EUV coronal waves has been a fascinating andfrequently strongly debated research area. While it seems as ifan overall consensus has been reached about the nurture and nature of this phenomenon,there are still several important questions regarding EUV waves. By focusing on the most recentobservations, we will hereby present our current understanding about the nurture and nature of EUV waves,discuss their connections with other atmospheric and heliospheric phenomena (e.g.,flares and CMEs, Moreton waves, coronal shocks, coronal oscillations, SEP events) and finallyassess their possible energetic contribution to the overall budget of relatederuptive phenomena.

  4. Temperature, Density, and Heating Profiles of Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plowman, Joseph; Martens, P. C.; Kankelborg, C.; Ritchie, M.; Scott, J.; Sharma, R.

    2013-07-01

    We show detailed results of a combined DEM and density-sensitive line ratio analysis of coronal loops observed simultaneously by EIS and AIA. The temperature and density profiles of the loop are compared to and isolated from those of the surrounding material, and these properties are fit to an analytic strand heating model developed by Martens (2010). This research builds on our previously reported work by analyzing a number of coronal loops (including one observed by the Hi-C rocket), improved background subtraction and loop fitting. These improvements allow us to place significant constraints on the heating distribution of coronal loops.

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic waves and coronal seismology: an overview of recent results.

    PubMed

    De Moortel, Ineke; Nakariakov, Valery M

    2012-07-13

    Recent observations have revealed that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves and oscillations are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere, with a wide range of periods. We give a brief review of some aspects of MHD waves and coronal seismology that have recently been the focus of intense debate or are newly emerging. In particular, we focus on four topics: (i) the current controversy surrounding propagating intensity perturbations along coronal loops, (ii) the interpretation of propagating transverse loop oscillations, (iii) the ongoing search for coronal (torsional) Alfvén waves, and (iv) the rapidly developing topic of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flares. PMID:22665899

  6. Long-term Trend of Solar Coronal Hole Distribution from 1975 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, K.; Tokumaru, M.; Hayashi, K.; Satonaka, D.; Hakamada, K.

    2016-08-01

    We developed an automated prediction technique for coronal holes using potential magnetic field extrapolation in the solar corona to construct a database of coronal holes appearing from 1975 February to 2015 July (Carrington rotations from 1625 to 2165). Coronal holes are labeled with the location, size, and average magnetic field of each coronal hole on the photosphere and source surface. As a result, we identified 3335 coronal holes and found that the long-term distribution of coronal holes shows a similar pattern known as the magnetic butterfly diagram, and polar/low-latitude coronal holes tend to decrease/increase in the last solar minimum relative to the previous two minima.

  7. HINODE/XRT AND STEREO OBSERVATIONS OF A DIFFUSE CORONAL 'WAVE'-CORONAL MASS EJECTION-DIMMING EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Attrill, Gemma D. R.; Engell, Alexander J.; Wills-Davey, Meredith J.; Grigis, Paolo; Testa, Paola

    2009-10-20

    We report on observations of the first diffuse coronal wave detected by Hinode/XRT. The event occurred near the west solar limb on 2007 May 23, originating from active region (AR) 10956 and was associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME) and coronal dimmings. The bright emission forming the coronal wave expanded predominantly to the east and south of the AR. We use X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and STEREO Behind (B) data combined with a potential magnetic field extrapolation to derive an understanding of the global magnetic field connectivity. We attribute the brightening to the east of the AR to compression and channeling of the plasma along large-scale loops. The brightening to the south of the AR expands across the quiet Sun, making the southern component a likely candidate for identification as a diffuse coronal wave. We analyze the bright front in STEREO/EUVI (B) 171, 195, and 284 A images, as well as in XRT data, finding the strongest components to be largely cospatial in all bandpasses. We also exploit the near-limb location of this event by combining STEREO/COR1 and Extreme Ultra-Violet Imaging Telescope (EUVI) data. Using all the data, we derive a full picture of the low-coronal development of the eruption. The COR1 data show that the southernmost outer edge of the CME is progressively displaced southward during the expansion. EUVI data below the COR1 occulting disk show that the CME is significantly distorted in the low corona as a result of the associated filament eruption. The core coronal dimmings map to the core of the CME; the secondary coronal dimmings map to the CME cavity; and the diffuse coronal wave maps to the outermost edge of the expanding CME shell. The analysis of this near-limb event has important implications for understanding earlier eruptions originating from the same AR on 2007 May 16, 19, and 20.

  8. Coronal heating experiments of the Williams College Group at Mukandgarh Fort, Rajasthan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; Diaz, S.; Reardon, K. P.; Kutner, E. R.

    The authors report on the Williams College expedition to Mukandgarh Fort, Rajasthan, for the total solar eclipse of 24 October 1995. The main experiments were a search for 1 Hz oscillations in coronal loops as an indication of magnetohydrodynamic theories of coronal heating and a mapping of the coronal temperature through comparison of images at specific ultraviolet wavelengths, measuring the difference between the photospheric and coronal continuum. The authors also obtained a variety of coronal images.

  9. The helium chromosphere, coronal holes, and stellar X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1975-01-01

    The solar chromosphere at the limb seen in D3 is an irregular bright band 1000 km thick with a dark band 1000 km thick beneath. The D3 chromosphere disappears in coronal holes. It is shown that the D3 emission, as well as the other He I and He II lines, can be explained quantitatively by photoionization by coronal back-radiation. A Chapman layer with N(He)H = 5 times 10 to the 17th power is formed near tau = 1 in the He I and He II continua. The chromospheric He emission or absorption is weak in coronal holes because there is no coronal back-radiation. Based on this model, the soft X-ray flux from stars with He 10830-A absorption lines is estimated as proportional to the 10830-A equivalent width and the apparent area.

  10. Energy released by the interaction of coronal magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Comparisons between coronal spectroheliograms and photospheric magnetograms are presented to support the idea that as coronal magnetic fields interact, a process of field-line reconnection usually takes place as a natural way of preventing magnetic stresses from building up in the lower corona. This suggests that the energy which would have been stored in stressed fields is continuously released as kinetic energy of material being driven aside to make way for the reconnecting fields. However, this kinetic energy is negligible compared with the thermal energy of the coronal plasma. Therefore, it appears that these slow adjustments of coronal magnetic fields cannot account for even the normal heating of the corona, much less the energetic events associated with solar flares.