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1

Did Legalized Abortion Lower Crime?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Changes in homicide and arrest rates were compared among cohorts born before and after legalization of abortion and those who were unexposed to legalized abortion. It was found that legalized abortion improved the lives of many women as they could avoid unwanted births.

Joyce, Ted

2004-01-01

2

The Impact of Legalized Abortion on Crime  

Microsoft Academic Search

We offer evidence that legalized abortion has contributed significantly to recent crime reductions. Crime began to fall roughly 18 years after abortion legalization. The 5 states that allowed abortion in 1970 experienced declines earlier than the rest of the nation, which legalized in 1973 with Roe v. Wade. States with high abortion rates in the 1970s and 1980s experienced greater

John J. Donohue; Steven D. Levitt

2000-01-01

3

The Impact Of Legalized Abortion On Crime  

Microsoft Academic Search

We offer evidence that legalized abortion has contributed significantly to recent crime reductions. Crime began to fall roughly eighteen years after abortion legalization. The five states that allowed abortion in 1970 experienced declines earlier than the rest of the nation, which legalized in 1973 with Roe v. Wade. States with high abortion rates in the 1970s and 1980s experienced greater

John J. Donohue; Steven D. Levitt

2001-01-01

4

Abortion in Iranian legal system: a review.  

PubMed

Abortion traditionally means, "to miscarry" and is still known as a problem which societies has been trying to reduce its rate by using legal means. Despite the pregnant women and fetuses have being historically supported; abortion was firstly criminalized in 1926 in Iran, 20 years after establishment of modern legal system. During next 53 years this situation changed dramatically, so in 1979, the time of Islamic Revolution, aborting fetuses before 12 weeks and therapeutic abortion (TA) during all the pregnancy length was legitimate, based on regulations that used medical justification. After 1979 the situation changed into a totally conservative and restrictive approach and new Islamic concepts as "Blood Money" and "Ensoulment" entered the legal debates around abortion. During the next 33 years, again a trend of decriminalization for the act of abortion has been continuing. Reduction of punishments and omitting retaliation for criminal abortions, recognizing fetal and maternal medical indications including some immunologic problems as legitimate reasons for aborting fetuses before 4 months and omitting the fathers' consent as a necessary condition for TA are among these changes. The start point for this decriminalization process was public and professional need, which was responded by religious government, firstly by issuing juristic rulings (Fatwas) as a non-official way, followed by ratification of "Therapeutic Abortion Act" (TAA) and other regulations as an official pathway. Here, we have reviewed this trend of decriminalization, the role of public and professional request in initiating such process and the rule-based language of TAA. PMID:24338232

Abbasi, Mahmoud; Shamsi Gooshki, Ehsan; Allahbedashti, Neda

2014-02-01

5

Abortion Legalization and Life-Cycle Fertility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The early-1970s abortion legalization led to a significant drop in fertility. We investigate whether this decline represented a delay in births or a permanent reduction in fertility. We combine Census and Vital Statistics data to compare the lifetime fertility of women born in early-legalizing states, whose peak childbearing years occurred in the…

Ananat, Elizabeth Oltmans; Gruber, Jonathan; Levine, Phillip

2007-01-01

6

The Impact of Legalized Abortion on Child Health Outcomes and  

E-print Network

EA 4272 The Impact of Legalized Abortion on Child Health Outcomes and Abandonment. Evidence from,version1-7Apr2010 #12;The Impact of Legalized Abortion on Child Health Outcomes and Abandonment. Evidence and a unique census of institutionalized children to analyze the impact of abortion legalization in Romania

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

7

Effects of Abortion Legalization in Nepal, 2001–2010  

PubMed Central

Background Abortion was legalized in Nepal in 2002, following advocacy efforts highlighting high maternal mortality from unsafe abortion. We sought to assess whether legalization led to reductions in the most serious maternal health consequences of unsafe abortion. Methods We conducted retrospective medical chart review of all gynecological cases presenting at four large public referral hospitals in Nepal. For the years 2001–2010, all cases of spontaneous and induced abortion complications were identified, abstracted, and coded to classify cases of serious infection, injury, and systemic complications. We used segmented Poisson and ordinary logistic regression to test for trend and risks of serious complications for three time periods: before implementation (2001–2003), early implementation (2004–2006), and later implementation (2007–2010). Results 23,493 cases of abortion complications were identified. A significant downward trend in the proportion of serious infection, injury, and systemic complications was observed for the later implementation period, along with a decline in the risk of serious complications (OR 0.7, 95% CI 0.64, 0.85). Reductions in sepsis occurred sooner, during early implementation (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.47, 0.75). Conclusion Over the study period, health care use and the population of reproductive aged women increased. Total fertility also declined by nearly half, despite relatively low contraceptive prevalence. Greater numbers of women likely obtained abortions and sought hospital care for complications following legalization, yet we observed a significant decline in the rate of serious abortion morbidity. The liberalization of abortion policy in Nepal has benefited women’s health, and likely contributes to falling maternal mortality in the country. The steepest decline was observed after expansion of the safe abortion program to include midlevel providers, second trimester training, and medication abortion, highlighting the importance of concerted efforts to improve access. Other countries contemplating changes to abortion policy can draw on the evidence and implementation strategies observed in Nepal. PMID:23741391

Henderson, Jillian T.; Puri, Mahesh; Blum, Maya; Harper, Cynthia C.; Rana, Ashma; Gurung, Geeta; Pradhan, Neelam; Regmi, Kiran; Malla, Kasturi; Sharma, Sudha; Grossman, Daniel; Bajracharya, Lata; Satyal, Indira; Acharya, Shridhar; Lamichhane, Prabhat; Darney, Philip D.

2013-01-01

8

Making legal abortion available in Brazil: partnerships in practice.  

PubMed

This article describes the participation of feminist groups who work in the area of women's reproductive health and rights in campaigns for the provision of legal abortion in public hospitals in Brazil. Brazilian criminal law permits therapeutic abortion in cases where pregnancy is the result of rape or poses a serious risk to the life of the woman. Today, as a result of the combined efforts of feminists, health professionals and policymakers, more than 20 hospitals in Brazil are officially permitted to perform therapeutic abortions within the existing law. A model programme has also been developed to train service providers to do legal abortions, where the agreement of a hospital board can be obtained. This training has also improved care for illegally obtained, incomplete abortions in those hospitals but not in hospitals where doctors have not been trained. Problems with lack of access and concerns about the lack of public acceptance of abortion remain. Women not only need the right to abortion but also more services and health professionals who are trained to perform abortions across the whole country. PMID:11424253

Villela, W V; Araújo, M J

2000-11-01

9

A comparative study of induced abortions before and after legalization of abortions.  

PubMed

Abortion was legalized in many states in India in April 1972. This study deals with 2 groups of patients admitted to P.G.I., Chadigarh, with problems of induced septic abortion. Group 1 consisted of 88 patients admitted during the 2 1/2 year period from 1 July 1969 to 31 December 1971, before the legalization of abortion. Group 2 consists of 133 patients admitted during the 2 1/2 year period from 1 July 1973 to 31 December 1975. 1 year after the new abortion law had been in force. Not only has there been an increase in the total number of patients, there has been an increase in the severity of infection. Evidently, the liberalization of the law has encouraged more patients to seek abortions and has encouraged more doctors, lacking proper qualifications, to perform them. The morbidity and mortality with induced septic abortion can only be reduced if enough public propaganda makes the people especially in rural areas conscious of the hazards of induced abortion by "dais" and unqualified personnel, simultaneously making them aware of the provision of law and facilities available at different centers. Meanwhile, the law against unskilled and untrained personnel should be rigorously enforced. PMID:12335919

Malhotra, S; Devi, P K

1979-06-01

10

Trends in public attitudes toward legal abortion, 1972-1978.  

PubMed

Trends in public attitudes toward legal abortion were analyzed for 1972 and 1978. Data were drawn from seven independent probability samples (N = 10,652) of English-speaking persons 18 years of age or older living in noninstitutional arrangements within the continental United States. Attitudes were derived from responses to six items asking whether it should be possible for a pregnant woman to obtain a legal abortion under six different conditions. Guttman Scalogram Analysis revealed two predominant patterns; approval for all six reasons and approval only for the hard reasons (safeguarding the woman's health, preventing birth of a deformed child, or treating rape). Two major shifts were noted in the level of approval; a considerable increase in 1973 for each reason and a sharp decline in 1978 for all but woman's health and rape. These shifts paralleled the introduction of laws pertaining to abortion. PMID:3852356

Moldanado, S A

1985-09-01

11

Legal and Ethical Issues in Evaluating Abortion Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focuses on ethical and legal issues that arose in the evaluation of abortion services. Discusses the development of decision rules and tradeoffs in dealing with these issues to reach rational and objective decisions. Places the discussion in the context of balancing usefulness and propriety with respect to informed consent and privacy and makes…

Ferris, Lori E.

2000-01-01

12

Latin American women's experiences with medical abortion in settings where abortion is legally restricted.  

PubMed

Abortion is legally restricted in most of Latin America where 95% of the 4.4 million abortions performed annually are unsafe. Medical abortion (MA) refers to the use of a drug or a combination of drugs to terminate pregnancy. Mifepristone followed by misoprostol is the most effective and recommended regime. In settings where mifepristone is not available, misoprostol alone is used.Medical abortion has radically changed abortion practices worldwide, and particularly in legally restricted contexts. In Latin America women have been using misoprostol for self-induced home abortions for over two decades.This article summarizes the findings of a literature review on women's experiences with medical abortion in Latin American countries where voluntary abortion is illegal.Women's personal experiences with medical abortion are diverse and vary according to context, age, reproductive history, social and educational level, knowledge about medical abortion, and the physical, emotional, and social circumstances linked to the pregnancy. But most importantly, experiences are determined by whether or not women have the chance to access: 1) a medically supervised abortion in a clandestine clinic or 2) complete and accurate information on medical abortion. Other key factors are access to economic resources and emotional support.Women value the safety and effectiveness of MA as well as the privacy that it allows and the possibility of having their partner, a friend or a person of their choice nearby during the process. Women perceive MA as less painful, easier, safer, more practical, less expensive, more natural and less traumatic than other abortion methods. The fact that it is self-induced and that it avoids surgery are also pointed out as advantages. Main disadvantages identified by women are that MA is painful and takes time to complete. Other negatively evaluated aspects have to do with side effects, prolonged bleeding, the possibility that it might not be effective, and the fact that some women eventually need to seek medical care at a hospital where they might be sanctioned for having an abortion and even reported to the police. PMID:23259660

Zamberlin, Nina; Romero, Mariana; Ramos, Silvina

2012-01-01

13

Latin American women’s experiences with medical abortion in settings where abortion is legally restricted  

PubMed Central

Abortion is legally restricted in most of Latin America where 95% of the 4.4 million abortions performed annually are unsafe. Medical abortion (MA) refers to the use of a drug or a combination of drugs to terminate pregnancy. Mifepristone followed by misoprostol is the most effective and recommended regime. In settings where mifepristone is not available, misoprostol alone is used. Medical abortion has radically changed abortion practices worldwide, and particularly in legally restricted contexts. In Latin America women have been using misoprostol for self-induced home abortions for over two decades. This article summarizes the findings of a literature review on women’s experiences with medical abortion in Latin American countries where voluntary abortion is illegal. Women’s personal experiences with medical abortion are diverse and vary according to context, age, reproductive history, social and educational level, knowledge about medical abortion, and the physical, emotional, and social circumstances linked to the pregnancy. But most importantly, experiences are determined by whether or not women have the chance to access: 1) a medically supervised abortion in a clandestine clinic or 2) complete and accurate information on medical abortion. Other key factors are access to economic resources and emotional support. Women value the safety and effectiveness of MA as well as the privacy that it allows and the possibility of having their partner, a friend or a person of their choice nearby during the process. Women perceive MA as less painful, easier, safer, more practical, less expensive, more natural and less traumatic than other abortion methods. The fact that it is self-induced and that it avoids surgery are also pointed out as advantages. Main disadvantages identified by women are that MA is painful and takes time to complete. Other negatively evaluated aspects have to do with side effects, prolonged bleeding, the possibility that it might not be effective, and the fact that some women eventually need to seek medical care at a hospital where they might be sanctioned for having an abortion and even reported to the police. PMID:23259660

2012-01-01

14

The Impact of Legalized Abortion on High School Graduation through Selection and Composition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This analysis examines whether the legalization of abortion changed high school graduation rates among the children selected into birth. Unless women in all socio-economic circumstances sought abortions to the same extent, increased use of abortion must have changed the distribution of child development inputs. I find that higher abortion ratios…

Whitaker, Stephan

2011-01-01

15

Legal Abortions, SocioeconomicStatus, and Measured Intelligence in the United States  

E-print Network

Legal Abortions, SocioeconomicStatus, and Measured Intelligence in the United States Joel E. Cohen practice of therapeutic abortions in the United States. Unless otherwise specified, all abortions dscussed constructionof an asso- ciation between frequency of abortions and meaared intelligence. If the frequencies of

Cohen, Joel E.

16

Adolescent autonomy and minors' legal rights: contraception and abortion.  

PubMed

During adolescence, dependent children grow into independent and autonomous adults, and it is necessary to make difficult policy judgements about children's rights. Questions that arise include: shoudl minors have the right to work, to marry, to make legal contracts, and to obtain medical care without parental consent; or should parental consent be required by the state in order to protect minors and to preserve parental authority. This discussion focuses upon the area of family planning, a topic of special interest to policymakers because they now face many questions about minor's contraceptive and abortion rights in Congress, in state legislatures, and in the courts. comprehensive response to policy questions about family planning rights for minors would require information about adolescent development, maturity, and autonomy; about teenagers' sexual and contraceptive attitudes and behavior; about the nature of parent-child communication regarding sexual and contraceptive questions; and about politics and values. Many from the legal system want help in answering questions about minors' rights. As little research has been conducted, policymakers can obtain only limited guidance from social scientists. As the policy issue is fundamentally tied to developmental issues, the better the knowledge about the development of cognitive competence, social competence, and autonomy, the easier it will be to make the difficult legal and policy judgements about minor's rights. Regarding minors' access to contraceptives, the situation is somewhat cloudy. There is only 1 state statute that requires parental consent for access to contraceptive medical services, passed in Utah in 1981, and pertaining to services provided with public funds. Yet, common law requires parental consent for any medical treatment (with exceptions for emancipated or mature minors) and "physicians often hesitate to serve young people without first obtaining parental consent because they fear civil liability." The situation is even more cloudy in the case of abortion. The Supreme Court's present position seems to grant emancipated and mature minors access to abortion without a requirement for parental consent or notification, but states may place some requirements for parental involvement upon other minors, as long as these minors have an alternative route to abortion. A thorough search of the literature on adolescent development reveals that the policy questions loom larger than the alternatives. 2 policy alternatives are: to single out a reasonable age below which minors require either parental consent or some form of adult involvement; or treat family planning and fertility control as basic rights which cannot be abridged because of age. PMID:12266643

Rodman, H; Griffith, S B

1982-01-01

17

Abortion, metaphysics and morality: a review of Francis Beckwith's defending life: a moral and legal case against abortion choice.  

PubMed

In Defending Life: A Moral and Legal Case Against Abortion Choice (2007) and an earlier article in this journal, "Defending Abortion Philosophically"(2006), Francis Beckwith argues that fetuses are, from conception, prima facie wrong to kill. His arguments are based on what he calls a "metaphysics of the human person" known as "The Substance View." I argue that Beckwith's metaphysics does not support his abortion ethic: Moral, not metaphysical, claims that are part of this Substance View are the foundation of the argument, and Beckwith inadequately defends these moral claims. Thus, Beckwith's arguments do not provide strong support for what he calls the "pro-life" view of abortion. PMID:21597083

Nobis, Nathan

2011-06-01

18

[Abortion].  

PubMed

The historical and current (1969) abortion laws in France as well as those in other Western countries are analyzed. France has had a series of punitive abortion codes since the Napoleonic Code of 1810 prescribing solitary confinement for the woman. The reforms of 1920 and 1923 made provocation of abortion or contraceptional propaganda a "crime" (felony), later a "delit" (misdemeanor), called for trial before magistr ate instead of jury, but resulted in only about 200 convictions a year. The decree of 1939 extended the misdemeanor to women who aborted even if they were not pregnant, and provided for professional licenses such as that of surgeon or pharmacist to be suspended. The law of 1942 made abortion a social crime and increased the maximum penalty to capital punishment, which was exercised in 2 cases. About 4000 per year were convicted from 1942-1944. Now the law still applies to all who intend to abort, whether or not pregnant or successful, but punishemnt is limited to 1-5 years imprisonment, and 72,000 francs fine, or suspension of medical practice for 5 years. About 500 have been convicted per year. Since 1955 legal abortion has been available (to about 130 women over 4 years) if it is the only means to save the woman's life. Although pregnancy tests are controlled, the population desregards the law by resorting to clandestine abortion. The wealthy travel to Switzerland (where 68% of legal abortions are done on French women) or to England. Numbers are estimated by the French government at 250,000-300,000 per year, or 1 for every 2 live births, but by hospital statistics at 400,000-1,000,000 per year. The rest of the review covers abortion laws in Scandinavian, Central European, and individual US states as of 1969. PMID:12333138

Dourlen-rollier, A M

1971-01-01

19

Further Evidence that Legalized Abortion Lowered Crime: A Reply to Joyce  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Joyce's failure to uncover a negative relationship between crime and abortion was because of his decision to concentrate on a non-representative six-year period. Evidence supporting the claims that the crack-cocaine epidemic hit the high-abortion early-legalizing states earlier and more severely than other states of the U.S in 1970 is presented.

Donohue, John J., III; Levitt, Steven D.

2004-01-01

20

‘Lonely, tragic, but legally necessary pilgrimages’: Transnational Abortion Travel in the 1970s  

Microsoft Academic Search

: This article explores the work of the Calgary Birth Control Association with a particular focus on their referral service to help Albertan women obtain abortions in Seattle. The fact that Canadian women were travelling to the United States for abortions highlights the shortcomings of the Canadian health-care system and the legal changes in the 1969 omnibus bill. Cross-border travel

Beth Palmer

2011-01-01

21

[Rape-related pregnancy in Brazil: the experience of women seeking legal abortion].  

PubMed

In Brazil, abortion is permitted by law in cases of rape-related pregnancy. This study reports on various aspects in the experience of women that have been sexually assaulted: diagnosis of the pregnancy, seeking legal abortion, and hospitalization in a university hospital. This was a qualitative study that interviewed ten women 18 to 38 years of age, with at least eight years of schooling, one to five years after legal abortion. The women had been previously unaware of their right to a legal abortion, were ashamed about the sexual assault, kept it secret, and had not sought immediate care. The diagnosis of pregnancy provoked anxiety and the wish to undergo an abortion. Women treated through private health plans received either insufficient orientation or none at all. Respectful treatment by the healthcare staff proved relevant for the women to cope with the abortion. The study highlights the need to publicize the right to abortion in cases of rape-related pregnancy and the healthcare services that perform legal abortion, in addition to training healthcare and law enforcement teams to handle such cases. PMID:25760168

Machado, Carolina Leme; Fernandes, Arlete Maria Dos Santos; Osis, Maria José Duarte; Makuch, Maria Yolanda

2015-02-01

22

Access to safe legal abortion in Malaysia: women's insights and health sector response.  

PubMed

Malaysia has an abortion law, which permits termination of pregnancy to save a woman's life and to preserve her physical and mental health (Penal Code Section 312, amended in 1989). However, lack of clear interpretation and understanding of the law results in women facing difficulties in accessing abortion information and services. Some health care providers were unaware of the legalities of abortion in Malaysia and influenced by their personal beliefs with regard to provision of abortion services. Accessibility to safer abortion techniques is also an issue. The development of the 2012 Guidelines on Termination of Pregnancy and Guidelines for Management of Sexual and Reproductive Health among Adolescents in Health Clinics by the Ministry of Health, Malaysia, is a step forward toward increasing women's accessibility to safe abortion services in Malaysia. This article provides an account of women's accessibility to abortion in Malaysia and the health sector response in addressing the barriers. PMID:25452590

Low, Wah-Yun; Tong, Wen-Ting; Wong, Yut-Lin; Jegasothy, Ravindran; Choong, Sim-Poey

2015-01-01

23

Legal Barriers to Second-Trimester Abortion Provision and Public Health Consequences  

PubMed Central

Many women need access to abortion care in the second trimester. Most of this care is provided by a small number of specialty clinics, which are increasingly targeted by regulations including bans on so-called partial birth abortion and requirements that the clinic qualify as an ambulatory surgical center. These regulations cause physicians to change their clinical practices or reduce the maximum gestational age at which they perform abortions to avoid legal risks. Ambulatory surgical center requirements significantly increase abortion costs and reduce the availability of abortion services despite the lack of any evidence that using those facilities positively affects health outcomes. Both types of laws threaten to further reduce access to and quality of second-trimester abortion care. PMID:19197087

Jones, Bonnie Scott

2009-01-01

24

“Sometimes they used to whisper in our ears”: health care workers’ perceptions of the effects of abortion legalization in Nepal  

PubMed Central

Background Unsafe abortion has been a significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in Nepal. Since legalization in 2002, more than 1,200 providers have been trained and 487 sites have been certified for the provision of safe abortion services. Little is known about health care workers’ views on abortion legalization, such as their perceptions of women seeking abortion and the implications of legalization for abortion-related health care. Methods To complement a quantitative study of the health effects of abortion legalization in Nepal, we conducted 35 in-depth interviews with physicians, nurses, counsellors and hospital administrators involved in abortion care and post-abortion complication treatment services at four major government hospitals. Thematic analysis techniques were used to analyze the data. Results Overall, participants had positive views of abortion legalization – many believed the severity of abortion complications had declined, contributing to lower maternal mortality and morbidity in the country. A number of participants indicated that the proportion of women obtaining abortion services from approved health facilities was increasing; however, others noted an increase in the number of women using unregulated medicines for abortion, contributing to rising complications. Some providers held negative judgments about abortion patients, including their reasons for abortion. Unmarried women were subject to especially strong negative perceptions. A few of the health workers felt that the law change was encouraging unmarried sexual activity and carelessness around pregnancy prevention and abortion, and that repeat abortion was becoming a problem. Many providers believed that although patients were less fearful than before legalization, they remained hesitant to disclose a history of induced abortion for fear of judgment or mistreatment. Conclusions Providers were generally positive about the implications of abortion legalization for the country and for women. A focus on family planning and post-abortion counselling may be welcomed by providers concerned about multiple abortions. Some of the negative judgments of women held by providers could be tempered through values-clarification training, so that women are supported and comfortable sharing their abortion history, improving the quality of post-abortion treatment of complications. PMID:22520231

2012-01-01

25

The impact of legalized abortion on child health outcomes and abandonment. Evidence from Romania.  

PubMed

We use household survey data and a unique census of institutionalized children to analyze the impact of abortion legalization in Romania. We exploit the lift of the abortion ban in December 1989, when communist dictator Ceausescu and his regime were removed from power, to understand its impact on children's health at birth and during early childhood and whether the lift of the ban had an immediate impact on child abandonment. We find insignificant estimates for health at birth outcomes and anthropometric z-scores at age 4 and 5, except for the probability of low birth weight which is slightly higher for children born after abortion became legal. Additionally, our findings suggest that the lift of the ban had decreased the number of abandoned children. PMID:21889810

Mitrut, Andreea; Wolff, François-Charles

2011-12-01

26

Abortion in a Progressive Legal Environment: The Need for Vigilance in Protecting and Promoting Access to Safe Abortion Services in South Africa  

PubMed Central

The importance of South Africa as a model for reproductive self-determination in Africa cannot be underestimated. Abortion has been legal since 1996, and the country has some of the most developed government systems for the provision of abortion care on the continent. Yet in the same way opponents of abortion in the United States have whittled away at access with increased bureaucracy, South Africa faces similar assaults that leave women without safe care and threaten to turn back achievements made during the past 16 years. I explore the history of the law, subsequent legal challenges, and new threats to women’s access to abortion services, including service delivery issues that may influence the future of public health in the country. PMID:23327279

Magwentshu, Makgoale

2013-01-01

27

Critical notice—Defending life: a moral and legal case against abortion choice by Francis J Beckwith  

Microsoft Academic Search

Francis Beckwith’s Defending life: a moral and legal case against abortion choice defends the pro-life position on moral, legal and political grounds. In this critical notice I consider three key issues and argue that Beckwith’s treatment of each of them is unpersuasive. The issues are: (1) whether abortion is politically justified by the principle that we should err on the

D Stretton

2008-01-01

28

Abortion  

MedlinePLUS

An abortion is a procedure to end a pregnancy. It uses medicine or surgery to remove the embryo or ... personal. If you are thinking of having an abortion, most healthcare providers advise counseling.

29

Implementation of legal abortion in Nepal: a model for rapid scale-up of high-quality care  

PubMed Central

Unsafe abortion's significant contribution to maternal mortality and morbidity was a critical factor leading to liberalization of Nepal's restrictive abortion law in 2002. Careful, comprehensive planning among a range of multisectoral stakeholders, led by Nepal's Ministry of Health and Population, enabled the country subsequently to introduce and scale up safe abortion services in a remarkably short timeframe. This paper examines factors that contributed to rapid, successful implementation of legal abortion in this mountainous republic, including deliberate attention to the key areas of policy, health system capacity, equipment and supplies, and information dissemination. Important elements of this successful model of scaling up safe legal abortion include: the pre-existence of postabortion care services, through which health-care providers were already familiar with the main clinical technique for safe abortion; government leadership in coordinating complementary contributions from a wide range of public- and private-sector actors; reliance on public-health evidence in formulating policies governing abortion provision, which led to the embrace of medical abortion and authorization of midlevel providers as key strategies for decentralizing care; and integration of abortion care into existing Safe Motherhood and the broader health system. While challenges remain in ensuring that all Nepali women can readily exercise their legal right to early pregnancy termination, the national safe abortion program has already yielded strong positive results. Nepal's experience making high-quality abortion care widely accessible in a short period of time offers important lessons for other countries seeking to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity from unsafe abortion and to achieve Millennium Development Goals. PMID:22475782

2012-01-01

30

ABORTION DECISIONS AND THE DUTY TO SCREEN: CLINICAL, ETHICAL, AND LEGAL IMPLICATIONS OF PREDICTIVE RISK FACTORS OF POST-ABORTION MALADJUSTMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

* Abortion defies categorization. It is a moral, religious, legal, political, health, and human rights issue. People concerned about population control, environmentalism, national security, international law, race relations, education, economics, bioengineering, sociology, and psychology — to name but a few—all approach the issue from different perspectives. The great number of ways in which this controversial subject can be viewed always

David C. Reardon

31

Shaping legal abortion provision in Ghana: using policy theory to understand provider-related obstacles to policy implementation  

PubMed Central

Background Unsafe abortion is a major public health problem in Ghana; despite its liberal abortion law, access to safe, legal abortion in public health facilities is limited. Theory is often neglected as a tool for providing evidence to inform better practice; in this study we investigated the reasons for poor implementation of the policy in Ghana using Lipsky’s theory of street-level bureaucracy to better understand how providers shape and implement policy and how provider-level barriers might be overcome. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with 43 health professionals of different levels (managers, obstetricians, midwives) at three hospitals in Accra, as well as staff from smaller and private sector facilities. Relevant policy and related documents were also analysed. Results Findings confirm that health providers’ views shape provision of safe-abortion services. Most prominently, providers experience conflicts between their religious and moral beliefs about the sanctity of (foetal) life and their duty to provide safe-abortion care. Obstetricians were more exposed to international debates, treaties, and safe-abortion practices and had better awareness of national research on the public health implications of unsafe abortions; these factors tempered their religious views. Midwives were more driven by fundamental religious values condemning abortion as sinful. In addition to personal views and dilemmas, ‘social pressures’ (perceived views of others concerning abortion) and the actions of facility managers affected providers’ decision to (openly) provide abortion services. In order to achieve a workable balance between these pressures and duties, providers use their ‘discretion’ in deciding if and when to provide abortion services, and develop ‘coping mechanisms’ which impede implementation of abortion policy. Conclusions The application of theory confirmed its utility in a lower-middle income setting and expanded its scope by showing that provider values and attitudes (not just resource constraints) modify providers’ implementation of policy; moreover their power of modification is constrained by organisational hierarchies and mid-level managers. We also revealed differing responses of ‘front line workers’ regarding the pressures they face; whilst midwives are seen globally as providers of safe-abortion services, in Ghana the midwife cadre displays more negative attitudes towards them than doctors. These findings allow the identification of recommendations for evidence-based practice. PMID:23829555

2013-01-01

32

State obligations to implement African abortion laws: employing human rights in a changing legal landscape.  

PubMed

Women in the African region are overburdened with unsafe abortion. Abortion regimes that fail to translate any given abortion rights into tangible access are partly to blame. Historically, African abortion laws have been highly restrictive. However, the post-independence era has witnessed a change toward liberalizing abortion law, even if incremental for many jurisdictions. Furthermore, Article 14 of the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa has significantly augmented the regional trend toward liberalization by recognizing abortion as a human right in given circumstances. However, states are failing to implement abortion laws. The jurisprudence that is emerging from the European Court of Human Rights and United Nations treaty bodies is a tool that can be used to render African governments accountable for failure to implement domestic abortion laws. PMID:22944215

Ngwena, Charles G

2012-11-01

33

Personal Beliefs and Professional Responsibilities: Ethiopian Midwives' Attitudes toward Providing Abortion Services after Legal Reform.  

PubMed

In 2005, Ethiopia liberalized its abortion law and subsequently authorized midwives to offer abortion services. Using a 2013 survey of 188 midwives and 12 interviews with third-year midwifery students, this cross-sectional research examines midwives' attitudes toward abortion to understand their decisions about service provision. Most midwives were willing to provide abortion services. This willingness was positively and significantly related to clinical experience with abortion, but negatively and significantly related to religiosity, belief that providers have the right to refuse to provide services, and care of patients from periurban as opposed to rural areas. No significant relationship was found with perceptions of abortion stigma, years of work as a midwife, or knowledge of the law. Interview data suggest complex dynamics underlying midwives' willingness to offer services, including conflicts between professional norms and religious beliefs. Findings can inform Ethiopia's efforts to reduce maternal mortality through task-shifting to midwives and can aid other countries that are confronting provider shortages and high levels of maternal mortality and morbidity, particularly due to unsafe abortion. PMID:25753060

Holcombe, Sarah Jane; Berhe, Aster; Cherie, Amsale

2015-03-01

34

Invoking health and human rights to ensure access to legal abortion: the case of a nine-year-old girl from Nicaragua.  

PubMed

Human rights and public health advocates working to compel states to guarantee access to legal abortion services face obstacles. We describe the challenges faced by "Rosa", a nine-year old Nicaraguan girl, whose pregnancy following rape sparked international controversy. The health and human rights arguments utilized either to support or undermine her family's petition for access to legal abortion are explored. Rosa's case highlights how laws that narrowly restrict abortion and make access contingent upon health care providers' approval undermine human rights principles. The article analyzes the strengths, limitations, and complementarity of health and human rights approaches for achieving access to safe, legal services in restrictive contexts. The importance of strategic alliances and implications for future cases are considered. PMID:17265755

McNaughton Reyes, Heathe Luz; Hord, Charlotte E; Mitchell, Ellen M H; Blandon, Marta Maria

2006-01-01

35

Does state-level context matter for individuals' knowledge about abortion, legality and health? Challenging the 'red states v. blue states' hypothesis.  

PubMed

Recently, the hypothesis that state-level political context influences individuals' cultural values - the 'red states v. blue states' hypothesis - has been invoked to explain the hyper-polarisation of politics in the USA. To test this hypothesis, we examined individuals' knowledge about abortion in relation to the political context of their current state of residence. Drawing from an internet-survey of 586 reproductive-age individuals in the USA, we assessed two types of abortion knowledge: health-related and legality. We found that state-level conservatism does not modify the existing relationships between individual predictors and each of the two types of abortion knowledge. Hence, our findings do not support the 'red states' versus 'blue states' hypothesis. Additionally, we find that knowledge about abortion's health effects in the USA is low: 7% of our sample thought abortion before 12 weeks gestation was illegal. PMID:25622191

Bessett, Danielle; Gerdts, Caitlin; Littman, Lisa L; Kavanaugh, Megan L; Norris, Alison

2015-06-01

36

Reproductive Justice and the Pace of Change: Socioeconomic Trends in US Infant Death Rates by Legal Status of Abortion, 1960-1980.  

PubMed

US infant death rates for 1960 to 1980 declined most quickly in (1) 1970 to 1973 in states that legalized abortion in 1970, especially for infants in the lowest 3 income quintiles (annual percentage change?=?-11.6; 95% confidence interval?=?-18.7, -3.8), and (2) the mid-to-late 1960s, also in low-income quintiles, for both Black and White infants, albeit unrelated to abortion laws. These results imply that research is warranted on whether currently rising restrictions on abortions may be affecting infant mortality. PMID:25713932

Krieger, Nancy; Gruskin, Sofia; Singh, Nakul; Kiang, Mathew V; Chen, Jarvis T; Waterman, Pamela D; Gottlieb, Jillian; Beckfield, Jason; Coull, Brent A

2015-04-01

37

Can policy analysis theories predict and inform policy change? Reflections on the battle for legal abortion in Indonesia  

PubMed Central

The relevance and importance of research for understanding policy processes and influencing policies has been much debated, but studies on the effectiveness of policy theories for predicting and informing opportunities for policy change (i.e. prospective policy analysis) are rare. The case study presented in this paper is drawn from a policy analysis of a contemporary process of policy debate on legalization of abortion in Indonesia, which was in flux at the time of the research and provided a unique opportunity for prospective analysis. Applying a combination of policy analysis theories, this case study provides an analysis of processes, power and relationships between actors involved in the amendment of the Health Law in Indonesia. It uses a series of practical stakeholder mapping tools to identify power relations between key actors and what strategic approaches should be employed to manage these to enhance the possibility of policy change. The findings show how the moves to legalize abortion have been supported or constrained according to the balance of political and religious powers operating in a macro-political context defined increasingly by a polarized Islamic-authoritarian—Western-liberal agenda. The issue of reproductive health constituted a battlefield where these two ideologies met and the debate on the current health law amendment became a contest, which still continues, for the larger future of Indonesia. The findings confirm the utility of policy analysis theories and stakeholder mapping tools for predicting the likelihood of policy change and informing the strategic approaches for achieving such change. They also highlight opportunities and dilemmas in prospective policy analysis and raise questions about whether research on policy processes and actors can or should be used to inform, or even influence, policies in ‘real-time’. PMID:21183461

Surjadjaja, Claudia; Mayhew, Susannah H

2011-01-01

38

Can policy analysis theories predict and inform policy change? Reflections on the battle for legal abortion in Indonesia.  

PubMed

The relevance and importance of research for understanding policy processes and influencing policies has been much debated, but studies on the effectiveness of policy theories for predicting and informing opportunities for policy change (i.e. prospective policy analysis) are rare. The case study presented in this paper is drawn from a policy analysis of a contemporary process of policy debate on legalization of abortion in Indonesia, which was in flux at the time of the research and provided a unique opportunity for prospective analysis. Applying a combination of policy analysis theories, this case study provides an analysis of processes, power and relationships between actors involved in the amendment of the Health Law in Indonesia. It uses a series of practical stakeholder mapping tools to identify power relations between key actors and what strategic approaches should be employed to manage these to enhance the possibility of policy change. The findings show how the moves to legalize abortion have been supported or constrained according to the balance of political and religious powers operating in a macro-political context defined increasingly by a polarized Islamic-authoritarian-Western-liberal agenda. The issue of reproductive health constituted a battlefield where these two ideologies met and the debate on the current health law amendment became a contest, which still continues, for the larger future of Indonesia. The findings confirm the utility of policy analysis theories and stakeholder mapping tools for predicting the likelihood of policy change and informing the strategic approaches for achieving such change. They also highlight opportunities and dilemmas in prospective policy analysis and raise questions about whether research on policy processes and actors can or should be used to inform, or even influence, policies in 'real-time'. PMID:21183461

Surjadjaja, Claudia; Mayhew, Susannah H

2011-09-01

39

Abortion Before & After Roe  

PubMed Central

We use unique data on abortions performed in New York State from 1971–1975 to demonstrate that women travelled hundreds of miles for a legal abortion before Roe. A100- mile increase in distance for women who live approximately 183 miles from New York was associated with a decline in abortion rates of 12.2 percent whereas the same change for women who lived 830 miles from New York lowered abortion rates by 3.3 percent. The abortion rates of nonwhites were more sensitive to distance than those of whites. We found a positive and robust association between distance to the nearest abortion provider and teen birth rates but less consistent estimates for other ages. Our results suggest that even if some states lost all abortion providers due to legislative policies, the impact on population measures of birth and abortion rates would be small as most women would travel to states with abortion services. PMID:23811233

Joyce, Ted; Tan, Ruoding; Zhang, Yuxiu

2013-01-01

40

Women's experiences with the use of medical abortion in a legally restricted context: the case of Argentina.  

PubMed

This article presents the findings of a qualitative study exploring the experiences of women living in Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area, Argentina, with the use of misoprostol for inducing an abortion. We asked women about the range of decisions they had to make, their emotions, the physical experience, strategies they needed to use, including seeking health care advice and in dealing with a clandestine medical abortion, and their overall evaluation of the experience. An in-depth interview schedule was used. The women had either used misoprostol and sought counselling or care at a public hospital (n=24) or had used misoprostol based on the advice of a local hotline, information from the internet or from other women (n=21). Four stages in the women's experiences were identified: how the decision to terminate the pregnancy was taken, how the medication was obtained, how the tablets were used, and reflections on the outcome whether or not they sought medical advice. Safety and privacy were key in deciding to use medical abortion. Access to the medication was the main obstacle, requiring a prescription or a friendly drugstore. Correct information about the number of pills to use and dosage intervals was the least easy to obtain and caused concerns. The possibility of choosing a time of privacy and having the company of a close one was highlighted as a unique advantage of medical abortion. Efforts to improve abortion law, policy and service provision in Argentina in order to ensure the best possible conditions for use of medical abortion by women should be redoubled. PMID:25702064

Ramos, Silvina; Romero, Mariana; Aizenberg, Lila

2015-02-01

41

Abortion and Selection  

E-print Network

Abortion legalization in the early 1970s led to dramatic changes in fertility. Some research has suggested that it altered cohort outcomes, but this literature has been limited and controversial. In this paper, we provide ...

Gruber, Jonathan

42

Late-term abortion.  

PubMed

Recent proposed federal legislation banning certain abortion procedures, particularly intact dilatation and extraction, would modify the US Criminal Code such that physicians performing these procedures would be liable for monetary and statutory damages. Clarification of medical procedures is important because some of the procedures used to induce abortion prior to viability are identical or similar to postviability procedures. This article reviews the scientific and medical information on late-term abortion and late-term abortion techniques and includes data on the prevalence of late-term abortion, abortion-related mortality and morbidity rates, and legal issues regarding fetal viability and the balance of maternal and fetal interests. According to enacted American Medical Association (AMA) policy, the use of appropriate medical terminology is critical in defining late-term abortion procedures, particularly intact dilatation and extraction, which is a variant of but distinct from dilatation and evacuation. The AMA recommends that the intact dilatation and extraction procedure not be used unless alternative procedures pose materially greater risk to the woman and that abortions not be performed in the third trimester except in cases of serious fetal anomalies incompatible with life. Major medical societies are urged to collaborate on clinical guidelines on late-term abortion techniques and circumstances that conform to standards of good medical practice. More research on the advantages and disadvantages of specific abortion procedures would help physicians make informed choices about specific abortion procedures. Expanded ongoing data surveillance systems estimating the prevalence of abortion are also needed. PMID:9728645

Epner, J E; Jonas, H S; Seckinger, D L

1998-08-26

43

France: late abortion.  

PubMed

In France, under the terms of a law passed by Parliament in 1975, a woman may have an abortion up to 12 weeks of pregnancy if she is a French resident and, in the event that she is a minor, she has parental consent. The woman must also have 2 medical consultations, a week apart. The woman is reimbursed by the state up to 70% of the cost of the abortion. After 12 weeks, abortion, except for therapeutic abortion, under the terms of Article 317 of the Criminal Code, is a crime, punishable by 6 months to 10 years in prison, a fine of between 1800 and 250,000 Francs, and loss of professional license. Moreover, Article 647 of the Health Code bans any advertising, incitement or propaganda for abortion or abortion-inducing products. Many French women go to Britain or Holland for abortions after 12 weeks, but they face the financial burden of traveling as well as the difficulties of getting help in a strange country and the stigma of having done something illegal. The Mouvement Francais pour le Planning Familial, which won the legalization of contraception in 1967, is now fighting for legal abortion as well as the distribution of information about sexuality, contraception, and abortion in the schools. 2 charges of incitement to abortion have been brought against the organization. PMID:12315825

Gaudry, D; Sadan, G

1989-01-01

44

Abortion in Hawaii.  

PubMed

Abortion experience in Hawaii, which was the first state to legalize induce abortion (in March 1970), at the request of the patient, is reviewed after its first year in terms of the number of abortions performed, the demographic and social characteristics of women seeking abortion, implementation of the law, and medical and legal complications. 3643 abortions were performed in 15 hospitals during the first year of legalized abortion. The ratio of abortions to live births was 1:45. Of the patients, 42.9% had been born and lived in Hawaii, 19.8% had lived in the state for less than 1 year, and the 90-day residency requirement was unfulfilled by 13.0%. Comparisons of women seeking abortions in Hawaii are similar to the statistics for the U.S. as a whole as reported by the Joint Program for the Study of Abortion. 20% were teenagers, 51% had no prior pregnancies, and 54% had never been married although 71% indicated involvement in a continuing relationship. Ethnic distribution showed 47% Caucasians, 21% Japanese, 10% Hawaiian or part-Hawaiian, 8.4% Filipino and 5.0% Chinese. Marital status by ethnic origin at the time of conception suggested that Filipin o women are more likely to use abortion to limit family size (69% were married) than the others. The abortion patients were considerably better educated than the state's population of women of childbearing age although 66.5% of the women reported lack of contraceptive use as the reason for having to seek abortion to terminate their pregnancies. This figure suggests a group of women in need of contraceptive information and services. Most frequent complications were cervical laceration (22.5% of all complications), hemorrhage (19.5%), and infection (16%). Hawaii's law stipulates that abortion must be performed in hospitals by licensed physicians prior to viability of the fetus (undefined but generally regarded as after the twentieth week of gestation). Women under 18 experienced the most frequent frustration in delay, largely because of the required parental consent. Legal and financial barriers appeared to be the greatest cause of delays with most other patients. Average abortion costs were about $350, and 57.5% of the abortions were paid for by personal funds or loans obtained by the patients. Recommendations based on the year's experience suggest greater assistance to the patient through state and private agencies in covering abortion costs either through subsidies or low-interest loans with minim al delay. Improved procedures to provide lowest cost service while maintaining standards of good health and increased efforts in disseminating information on family planning, contraception and sex education are also necessary. PMID:4805720

Diamond, M; Palmore, J A; Smith, R G; Steinhoff, P G

1973-01-01

45

Abortion - surgical  

MedlinePLUS

Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... Surgical abortion uses a vacuum to remove the fetus and related pregnancy material from the uterus. The procedure is ...

46

Abortion: a reader's guide.  

PubMed

This review traces the discussion of abortion in the US through 10 of the best books published on the subject in the past 25 years. The first book considered is Daniel Callahan's "Abortion: Law, Choice and Morality," which was published in 1970. Next is book of essays also published in 1970: "The Morality of Abortion: Legal and Historical Perspectives," which was edited by John T. Noonan, Jr., who became a prominent opponent to the Roe decision. It is noted that Roman Catholics would find the essay by Bernard Haring especially interesting since Haring supported the Church's position on abortion but called for acceptance of contraception. Third on the list is historian James C. Mohr's review of "Abortion in America: The Origins and Evolution of National Policy," which was printed five years after the Roe decision. Selection four is "Enemies of Choice: The Right-to-Life Movement and Its Threat to Abortion" by Andrew Merton. This 1981 publication singled out a concern about sexuality as the overriding motivator for anti-abortion groups. Two years later, Beverly Wildung Harrison published a ground-breaking, feminist, moral analysis of abortion entitled "Our Right to Choose: Toward a New Ethic of Abortion. This was followed by a more empirical and sociopolitical feminist analysis in Kristin Luker's 1984 "Abortion and the Politics of Motherhood." The seventh book is by another feminist, Rosalind Pollack Petchesky, whose work "Abortion and Women's Choice: The State, Sexuality, and Reproductive Freedom" was first published in 1984 and reprinted in 1990. The eighth important book was "Abortion and Catholicism: The American Debate," edited by Thomas A. Shannon and Patricia Beattie Jung. Rounding out the list are the 1992 work "Life Itself: Abortion in the American Mind" by Roger Rosenblatt and Ronald Dworkin's 1993 "Life's Dominion: An Argument About Abortion, Euthanasia, and Individual Freedom." PMID:12178914

Hisel, L M

1996-01-01

47

Abortion: a history.  

PubMed

This review of abortion history considers sacred and secular practice and traces abortion in the US, the legacy of the 19th century, and the change that occurred in the 20th century. Abortion has been practiced since ancient times, but its legality and availability have been threatened continuously by forces that would denigrate women's fundamental rights. Currently, while efforts to decrease the need for abortion through contraception and education continue, access to abortion remains crucial for the well-being of millions of women. That access will never be secure until profound changes occur in the whole society. Laws that prohibit absolutely the practice of abortion are a relatively recent development. In the early Roman Catholic church, abortion was permitted for male fetuses in the first 40 days of pregnancy and for female fetuses in the first 80-90 days. Not until 1588 did Pope Sixtus V declare all abortion murder, with excommunication as the punishment. Only 3 years later a new pope found the absolute sanction unworkable and again allowed early abortions. 300 years would pass before the Catholic church under Pius IX again declared all abortion murder. This standard, declared in 1869, remains the official position of the church, reaffirmed by the current pope. In 1920 the Soviet Union became the 1st modern state formally to legalize abortion. In the early period after the 1917 revolution, abortion was readily available in state operated facilities. These facilities were closed and abortion made illegal when it became clear that the Soviet Union would have to defend itself against Nazi Germany. After World War II women were encouraged to enter the labor force, and abortion once again became legal. The cases of the Catholic church and the Soviet Union illustrate the same point. Abortion legislation has never been in the hands of women. In the 20th century, state policy has been determined by the rhythms of economic and military expansion, the desire for cheap labor, and greater consumerism. The legal history of abortion in the US illustrates dramatically that it was doctors, not women, who defined the morality surrounding abortion. Women continue to have to cope with the legacy of this fact. The seemingly benign 2-sphere family of the 19th century cut a deep wound in the human community. Men had public power and authority and were encouraged to be sexual. Women were offered the alternative of being powerful only as sexual beings who could thus enforce a domestic moral order. The legacy of the 2-sphere family continues, but much has changed. By 1973 pressure for reform had led 14 states to liberalize their existing abortin laws, and the US Supreme Court finally ruled that abortion is a private matter between a woman and her doctor. The current problem is that despite new laws and new attitudes toward women and abortion, male dominated and male defined institutions still determine what is possible. Women's right to abortion will never be safe and secure as long as this situation continues. PMID:12340403

Hovey, G

1985-01-01

48

Induced Abortion  

MedlinePLUS

What is induced abortion? An induced abortion is a procedure that is done to end a pregnancy. Most induced abortions are done in ... What are the risks of this type of abortion? Abortion is a low-risk procedure; however, on ...

49

Abortion law reform in Nepal.  

PubMed

Across four decades of political and social action, Nepal changed from a country strongly enforcing oppressive abortion restrictions, causing many poor women's long imprisonment and high rates of abortion-related maternal mortality, into a modern democracy with a liberal abortion law. The medical and public health communities supported women's rights activists in invoking legal principles of equality and non-discrimination as a basis for change. Legislative reform of the criminal ban in 2002 and the adoption of an Interim Constitution recognizing women's reproductive rights as fundamental rights in 2007 inspired the Supreme Court in 2009 to rule that denial of women's access to abortion services because of poverty violated their constitutional rights. The government must now provide services under criteria for access without charge, and services must be decentralized to promote equitable access. A strong legal foundation now exists for progress in social justice to broaden abortion access and reduce abortion stigma. PMID:24890742

Upreti, Melissa

2014-08-01

50

Abortion in Poland.  

PubMed

As of July 1991 abortion is still legal in Poland. Currently the Polish Parliament has taken a break from the debate because the issue is so important that any decision must not be made in past. There is strong pressure from the Catholic Church to eliminate access to abortion. In the fall the Polish people will vote for and elect their first truly democratic Parliament. Abortion does not seem to be playing as important a role as other political issues. In 1956 a law was passed that allowed a woman to have an abortion for medical or social reasons. This law resulted in allowing women in Poland to use abortion as their primary form of contraception. The vast majority of the abortions were performed under the social justification. Then, when democracy same to Poland with the help of the Catholic Church, an unprecedented debate in the mass media, churches, and educational institutions was stirred up. The government attempted to stay out of the debate at first. But as people from different side of the debate saw that they had an opportunity to influence things in their favor, they began to politicize the issue. Currently there are 4 different drafts of the new Polish abortion law. 3 of them radically condemn abortion while the 4th condemns it as a method of family planning, but allows to terminate pregnancies in order to save the life of the mother. PMID:1777450

Szawarski, Z

1991-12-01

51

Psychosocial aspects of abortion  

PubMed Central

The literature on psychosocial aspects of abortion is confusing. Individual publications must be interpreted in the context of cultural, religious, and legal constraints obtaining in a particular society at a given time, with due attention to the status and availability of alternatives to abortion that might be chosen by a woman with an “unwanted” pregnancy. A review of the literature shows that, where careful pre- and post-abortion assessments are made, the evidence is that psychological benefit commonly results, and serious adverse emotional sequelae are rare. The outcome of refused abortion seems less satisfactory, with regrets and distress frequently occurring. Research on the administration of abortion services suggests that counselling is often of value, that distress is frequently caused by delays in deciding upon and in carrying out abortions, and by unsympathetic attitudes of service providers. The phenomenon of repeated abortion seeking should be seen in the context of the availability and cost of contraception and sterilization. The place of sterilization with abortion requires careful study. A recommendation is made for observational descriptive research on populations of women with potentially unwanted pregnancies in different cultures, with comparisons of management systems and an evaluation of their impact on service users. PMID:1085671

Illsley, Raymond; Hall, Marion H.

1976-01-01

52

Unsafe abortion: the preventable pandemic.  

PubMed

Ending the silent pandemic of unsafe abortion is an urgent public-health and human-rights imperative. As with other more visible global-health issues, this scourge threatens women throughout the developing world. Every year, about 19-20 million abortions are done by individuals without the requisite skills, or in environments below minimum medical standards, or both. Nearly all unsafe abortions (97%) are in developing countries. An estimated 68 000 women die as a result, and millions more have complications, many permanent. Important causes of death include haemorrhage, infection, and poisoning. Legalisation of abortion on request is a necessary but insufficient step toward improving women's health; in some countries, such as India, where abortion has been legal for decades, access to competent care remains restricted because of other barriers. Access to safe abortion improves women's health, and vice versa, as documented in Romania during the regime of President Nicolae Ceausescu. The availability of modern contraception can reduce but never eliminate the need for abortion. Direct costs of treating abortion complications burden impoverished health care systems, and indirect costs also drain struggling economies. The development of manual vacuum aspiration to empty the uterus, and the use of misoprostol, an oxytocic agent, have improved the care of women. Access to safe, legal abortion is a fundamental right of women, irrespective of where they live. The underlying causes of morbidity and mortality from unsafe abortion today are not blood loss and infection but, rather, apathy and disdain toward women. PMID:17126724

Grimes, David A; Benson, Janie; Singh, Susheela; Romero, Mariana; Ganatra, Bela; Okonofua, Friday E; Shah, Iqbal H

2006-11-25

53

Abortion in Sri Lanka: the double standard.  

PubMed

In Sri Lanka, women do not have access to legal abortion except under life-saving circumstances. Clandestine abortion services are, however, available and quite accessible. Although safe specialist services are available to women who can afford them, others access services under unsafe and exploitative conditions. At the time of this writing, a draft bill that will legalize abortion in instances of rape, incest, and fetal abnormalities awaits approval, amid opposition. In this article, I explore the current push for legal reform as a solution to unsafe abortion. Although a welcome effort, this amendment alone will be insufficient to address the public health consequences of unsafe abortion in Sri Lanka because most women seek abortions for other reasons. Much broader legal and policy reform will be required. PMID:23327236

Kumar, Ramya

2013-03-01

54

Abortion in Sri Lanka: The Double Standard  

PubMed Central

In Sri Lanka, women do not have access to legal abortion except under life-saving circumstances. Clandestine abortion services are, however, available and quite accessible. Although safe specialist services are available to women who can afford them, others access services under unsafe and exploitative conditions. At the time of this writing, a draft bill that will legalize abortion in instances of rape, incest, and fetal abnormalities awaits approval, amid opposition. In this article, I explore the current push for legal reform as a solution to unsafe abortion. Although a welcome effort, this amendment alone will be insufficient to address the public health consequences of unsafe abortion in Sri Lanka because most women seek abortions for other reasons. Much broader legal and policy reform will be required. PMID:23327236

2013-01-01

55

The Abortion Law Homepage  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This privately posted page offers extensive and highly credible information on legislation and jurisprudence relating to abortion in the US. The site offers thoroughly linked discussions of constitutional law, Roe v. Wade, Planned Parenthood v. Casey, state and federal abortion laws, including partial-birth abortion laws, and much more. The hypertext links are to primary documents including court decisions, texts of legislation, court briefs, and oral argument transcripts. There is also an index to primary documents for ease of access. We found the page to have no political agenda. As the author states, "this page is being constructed to help people, regardless of their political bent, understand the background and state of abortion law in America, and access related legal material--especially that which is less available and less well known."

56

Induced abortion in Indonesia.  

PubMed

Induced abortion is one of the most difficult sociomedical problems facing the Indonesian government. While well-known in traditional society, the practice was discouraged by all Indonesian religious groups, and forbidden by the Dutch colonial authorities. Although abortion was technically illegal under the criminal code, a judicial interpretation in the early 1970s permitted medical professionals to offer the procedure so long as they were discreet and careful. The numbers of medical abortions carried out in Indonesia rose dramatically, and there was evidence of matching declines in the incidence of morbidity and mortality caused by dangerous illegal procedures. Medical and community groups campaigned for a more liberal abortion law to protect legal practitioners and stamp out illegal traditional practices. Their efforts appeared to bear fruit in the draft Health Law, but when the law was passed by the legislature in late 1992, the issue was again clouded by contradictions and inconsistencies. PMID:8212094

Hull, T H; Sarwono, S W; Widyantoro, N

1993-01-01

57

Undue burden of abortion.  

PubMed

In Planned Parenthood vs. Casey, the US Supreme Court upheld all but 1 provision of Pennsylvania law that further restricts access to abortion. The law has a 24-hour waiting period, parental consent for minors with a judicial bypass, husband notification, and the circumstances of each abortion are to be reported to the state for statistical purposes. The Court overturned the husband notification provision even though it had a bypass procedure. The most important aspect of the decision was the change from the strict scrutiny in which abortion was to be left alone unless the state could show a compelling need to regulate it to an undue burden test in which the state is allowed to regulate abortion so long as it does not place an undue burden on women trying to seek abortion services. The 24-hour waiting period was upheld; however, it was also acknowledged that since 83% of women live in counties without abortion services, this may turn out to be an undue burden and it is open to review at later date when statistical evidence is available. The Opinion was written by Justices O'Connor, Kennedy, and Souter. Chief Justice Rehnquist and Justices Scalia, White, and Thomas dissented saying that the undue burden standard was unprecedented in constitutional law and undefinable in practice. It is likely now that the Court will begin writing abortion policy as it clarifies each specific point of the law rather than ruling on fundamental legal principles. PMID:1351612

Charo, A

1992-07-01

58

Human rights and abortion laws  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human rights protections have developed to resist governmental intrusion in private life and choices. Abortion laws have evolved in legal practice to protect not fetuses as such but state interests, particularly in prenatal life. National and international tribunals are increasingly called upon to resolve conflicts between state enforcement of continuation of pregnancy against women's wishes and women's reproductive choices. Legal

R. J Cook; B. M Dickens

1999-01-01

59

Abortion law and practice in China: An overview with comparisons to the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article utilizes legal documents, policy statements and ethnographic data to compare abortion law and practice in China and the United States. It outlines Chinese abortion law from ancient to modern times, identifies categories of reasons for aborting, and describes both folk remedies and the most common methods of modern medicine for inducing abortion. The contemporary incidence of abortion is

Susan M. Rigdon

1996-01-01

60

Safe abortion: WHO technical and policy guidance.  

PubMed

In 2003, the World Health Organization published its well referenced handbook Safe Abortion: Technical and Policy Guidance for Health Systems to address the estimated almost 20 million induced abortions each year that are unsafe, imposing a burden of approximately 67 thousand deaths annually. It is a global injustice that 95% of unsafe abortions occur in developing countries. The focus of guidance is on abortion procedures that are lawful within the countries in which they occur, noting that in almost all countries, the law permits abortion to save a woman's life. The guidance treats unsafe abortion as a public health challenge, and responds to the problem through strategies concerning improved clinical care for women undergoing procedures, and the appropriate placement of necessary services. Legal and policy considerations are explored, and annexes present guidance to further reading, international consensus documents on safe abortion, and on manual vacuum aspiration and post-abortion contraception. PMID:15207687

Cook, R J; Dickens, B M; Horga, M

2004-07-01

61

Women's perspectives on abortion in Romania.  

PubMed

Romanian women have commonly used abortion (both legal and clandestine) to prevent unwanted births. We introduce this paper with a brief summary of the recent history of abortion in Romania, then we combine quantitative data from a previous report ([1] Johnson et al., Lancet 341, 875, 1993) of the research with women's own words about the following issues: their decisions to have an abortion, the impact of abortion restrictions under the Ceau?escu government, and their needs and desires for improved reproductive health services. We also present gynaecologists' views of abortion restrictions and needs for improved family-planning services to make a compelling case for the need for safe, legal, comprehensive abortion care in Romania and elsewhere. PMID:8643978

Johnson, B R; Horga, M; Andronache, L

1996-02-01

62

Abortion in adolescence: a four-country comparison.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to conduct a comparison, using qualitative analytic methodology, of perceptions concerning abortion among health care providers and administrators, along with politicians and anti-abortion activists (total n = 75) in Great Britain, Sweden, The Netherlands, and the United States. In none of these countries was there consensus about abortion prior to legalization, and, in all countries, public discussion continues to be present. In general, after legalization of abortion has no longer made it a volatile issue European countries have refocused their energy into providing family planning services, education, and more straightforward access to abortion compared with similar activities in the United States. PMID:11275509

Welsh, P; McCarthy, M; Cromer, B

2001-01-01

63

In Chile, therapeutic abortion still a crime. September 28: Latin American Day for Decriminalization of Abortion.  

PubMed

In September 1993, a two-day symposium on abortion legalization was held in Chile, where abortion, which had been legal since the 1930s, was banned by the outgoing military junta in 1989. Organizers of the symposium labeled the ban "a law to punish and to be flaunted," and, indeed, each year approximately 200,000 Chilean women resort to abortion and more than 30,000 are hospitalized for abortion complications. It has been estimated that one woman has died of abortion complications in Chile each week for the past five years. Legislation proposed in 1991 to reinstate therapeutic abortion has stalled because of broad spectrum political opposition, pressure from the Roman Catholic Church, and upcoming elections. In this politically hostile climate, 43% of respondents in a poll said abortion should be permitted in certain cases, 3% said it should be available to all women, and nearly 53% upheld the ban. Research on public support for abortion has indicated that opinions about abortion depend upon the phrasing of the questions and that women's attitudes towards abortion are shaped by their experiences and those of their relatives and friends rather than by legal or religious prohibitions. PMID:12179718

1993-01-01

64

Bodies, rights and abortion.  

PubMed

The issue of abortion is discussed with reference to the claim that people have a right of control over their own bodies. Do people "own" their own bodies? If so, what would be entailed? These questions are discussed in commonsense terms and also in relation to the jurisprudence of Hohfeld, Honore, Munzer and Waldron. It is argued that whether or not women are morally and/or should be legally entitled to have abortions, such entitlements cannot be derived from a general moral entitlement to do what we will with our own bodies since there is no such entitlement. Whether or not we "own" them, we can have rights duties, liabilities, restrictions and disadvantages as well as rights concerning our own bodies. PMID:9220332

McLachlan, H V

1997-06-01

65

Why women are dying from unsafe abortion: narratives of Ghanaian abortion providers.  

PubMed

In Ghana, despite the availability of safe, legally permissible abortion services, high rates of morbidity and mortality from unsafe abortion persist. Through interviews with Ghanaian physicians on the front lines of abortion provision, we begin to describe major barriers to widespread safe abortion. Their stories illustrate the life-threatening impact that stigma, financial restraints, and confusion regarding abortion law have on the women of Ghana who seek abortion. They posit that the vast majority of serious abortion complications arise in the setting of clandestine or self-induced second trimester attempts, suggesting that training greater numbers of physicians to perform second trimester abortion is prerequisite to reducing maternal mortality. They also recognized that an adequate supply of abortion providers alone is a necessary but insufficient step toward reducing death from unsafe abortion. Rather, improved accessibility and cultural acceptability of abortion are integral to the actual utilization of safe services. Their insights suggest that any comprehensive plan aimed at reducing maternal mortality must consider avenues that address the multiple dimensions which influence the practice and utilization of safe abortion, especially in the second trimester. PMID:24069757

Payne, Carolyn M; Debbink, Michelle Precourt; Steele, Ellen A; Buck, Caroline T; Martin, Lisa A; Hassinger, Jane A; Harris, Lisa H

2013-06-01

66

Contraception and abortion in Romania.  

PubMed

After the downfall of the Ceausescu regime in December, 1989, the new Government of Romania abolished the law that prohibited abortions on request. Subsequently, the rate of legally induced abortions increased significantly while the rate of maternal mortality declined dramatically. Despite the large number of women who request induced abortions, most women and gynaecologists say that they would prefer to prevent unwanted pregnancies through the use of modern contraception. In this paper we examine factors that contribute to the disparity between women's desire to use modern contraception to prevent unwanted pregnancies and their practice of having induced abortions to prevent unwanted births. The results show that women (and suggest that men) need a wide choice of dependably available high-quality contraceptives; they need to be able to obtain information, counselling, and methods from a wide range of sources/health-care providers; both women's and men's perceptions about, and use of, modern contraception could be positively affected through sexual education started in secondary school; and, to reduce repeat abortions, women's post-abortion family-planning needs must not be neglected. PMID:8096575

Johnson, B R; Horga, M; Andronache, L

1993-04-01

67

Irish women who seek abortions in England.  

PubMed

In 1991, 4158 women from Ireland and 1766 from Northern Ireland traveled to England for abortions. This situation has been ignored by Irish authorities. The 1992 case of the 14-year old seeking an abortion in England finally caught legal attention. This study attempts to help define who these abortion seekers are. Questionnaires from 200 Irish abortion seeking women attending private Marie Stopes clinics in London and the British Pregnancy Advisory Services clinic in Liverpool between September 1988 and December 1990 were analyzed. Findings pertain to demographic characteristics, characteristics of first intercourse, family discussion of sexual activity, and contraceptive use. From this limited sample, it appears that Irish women are sexually reserved and without access to modern methods of birth control and abortion. Sex is associated with shame and guilt. 23% had intercourse before the age of 18 years and 42% after the age of 20. 76% were single and 16% were currently married. 95% were Catholic; 33% had been to church the preceding Sunday and 68% within the past month. Basic information about menstruation is also limited and procedures such as dilatation and curettage may be performed selectively. 28% of married women were uninformed about menstruation prior to its onset. Only 24% had been using birth control around the time of pregnancy. The reason for nonuse was frequently the unexpectedness of intercourse. 62% of adults and 66% of women believe in legalizing abortion in Ireland. British groups have tried to break through the abortion information ban by sending telephone numbers of abortion clinics to Irish firms for distribution to employees. On November 25, 1992, in the general election, there was approval of constitutional amendments guaranteeing the right to travel for abortions and to receive information on abortion access. The amendment to allow abortion to save the life of the mother was not accepted. PMID:1483530

Francome, C

1992-01-01

68

ACOG Committee Opinion No. 613: Increasing access to abortion.  

PubMed

Safe, legal abortion is a necessary component of women's health care. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists supports the availability of high-quality reproductive health services for all women and is committed to improving access to abortion. Access to abortion is threatened by state and federal government restrictions, limitations on public funding for abortion services and training, stigma, violence against abortion providers, and a dearth of abortion providers. Legislative restrictions fundamentally interfere with the patient-provider relationship and decrease access to abortion for all women, and particularly for low-income women and those living long distances from health care providers. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists calls for advocacy to oppose and overturn restrictions, improve access, and mainstream abortion as an integral component of women's health care. PMID:25437742

2014-11-01

69

The abortion battle: the Canadian scene.  

PubMed

In January 1988 the Supreme Court of Canada struck down the country's archaic abortion law on the ground that it imposed arbitrary delays and unfair disparities in access to abortion across the country. Since then, the conservative government of Canada has made a few attempts to introduce a new abortion policy, but it did not get passed in the parliament because the revised bills failed to protect women's right to 'life, liberty, and security of the person' within the meaning of the Canadian Charter. Canada has been without an abortion law for over four years and there has been a wide range of provincial policies and confusion in the country. Despite the legal vacuum, Canadian women are not frenziedly having abortions. However, the militancy of the anti-abortion groups has steadily intensified with continued assault on a woman's right to make reproductive choices. Since no law, short of banning abortions altogether, is going to satisfy abortion opponents, the abortion battle will rage on in Canada. PMID:8065237

Sachdev, P

1994-01-01

70

Abortion Law Around the World: Progress and Pushback  

PubMed Central

There is a global trend toward the liberalization of abortion laws driven by women’s rights, public health, and human rights advocates. This trend reflects the recognition of women’s access to legal abortion services as a matter of women’s rights and self-determination and an understanding of the dire public health implications of criminalizing abortion. Nonetheless, legal strategies to introduce barriers that impede access to legal abortion services, such as mandatory waiting periods, biased counseling requirements, and the unregulated practice of conscientious objection, are emerging in response to this trend. These barriers stigmatize and demean women and compromise their health. Public health evidence and human rights guarantees provide a compelling rationale for challenging abortion bans and these restrictions. PMID:23409915

2013-01-01

71

[Decriminalization of abortion: a common purpose in Latin America].  

PubMed

In the conviction that abortion is a fundamental right of women and that its illegal practice constitutes a serious threat to life, several Latin American women's groups have united to work for decriminalization. The groups have been attempting to increase public awareness of the consequences of illegal abortion. Official silence on the topic appears to deny the existence of a problem. Proposals in the different Latin American countries are adapted to their political and legal circumstances. In Argentina, a campaign has been underway for nearly two years to collect signatures for a petition for a law concerning contraception and abortion. The National Network for Women's Health and other groups have held regional and national workshops on the issue. In Bolivia, radio and television programs have been broadcast in Spanish and indigenous languages on the right to choose, reproductive health, and sex education. Abortion was debated in Brazil during the process of constitutional reform, but it remains illegal. Illegal abortion continues to be a reality and women's groups are lobbying for decriminalization. Abortion is considered a crime in Colombia's penal code. Attempts to legalize abortion have been rejected by the legislature without debate. The practice of abortion under the circumstances has become a lucrative business whose lack of regulation has resulted in a growing number of maternal deaths. Attempts are underway in Costa Rica to legalize abortion in cases of rape or incest. Studies show that illegal abortion is the third most important cause of maternal death. A bill to legalize abortion is under study in Chile's Parliament but has not been approved. Abortion is illegal but common in Ecuador. Efforts are underway in Mexico and Nicaragua to encourage debate on abortion. Peru's Health Commission was recently prevented from classifying abortion for any reason other than grave congenital anomaly as homicide. Abortion has been legal in Puerto Rico since 1974, but amendments and laws to limit this right are under study. A bill to legalize abortion is under study in Venezuela and is being promoted by feminist groups. PMID:12287891

1993-12-01

72

A Global Review of Laws on Induced Abortion, 1985-1997  

Microsoft Academic Search

Context: The legal status of induced abortion helps determine the availability of safe, afford- able abortion services in a country, which in turn influences rates of maternal mortality and mor- bidity. It is important, therefore, for health professionals to know both the current status of abor- tion laws worldwide and the extent to which those laws are changing. Methods: Abortion-related

Anika Rahman; Laura Katzive; Stanley K. Henshaw

73

Protest Motherhood: Pregnancy Decision-Making Behavior and Attitudes Towards Abortion.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The document describes research on womens' attitudes toward abortion and their decision-making when pregnant leading to either birth or abortion. The objective was "to explore how womens' perceptions of the option of legal abortion have affected their pregnancy decision-making behavior" and to note the impact of their particular choices on their…

Chesney-Lind, Meda

74

[History of induced abortion in Denmark from 1200 to 1979].  

PubMed

History of induced abortion in Denmark from 1200 to 1979 is reviewed. The 1st Danish law of 1200 did not touch upon the question of induced abortion. From the beginning of the 13th century to Religious Reformation in 1536, Roman Catholic law influenced every aspect of Danish life including induced abortion. In 1683 in King Christian V's constitution called Dansk Lov induced abortion was discussed. Immoral women who aborted fetuses or killed newborn babies were decapitated. In Copenhagen in the years 1624-1632 and 1638-1663 17 women were executed because of induced abortion or murder of newborn babies. Although Dansk Lov was effective till 1866, Danish kings came to treat female criminals less severely since about 1780-1800. For example, between 1855 and 1866 42 women convicted of murder of newborn babies or abortion were given pardon (12 years of imprisonment instead of life sentence). In 1866, abortion and murder of babies were treated separately in the Danish criminal law. Induced abortion meant up to 8 years of imprisonment and labor. In 1930 life sentence was abolished; induced abortion called for only up to 2 years of imprisonment, while those who assisted for money were punished more severely (up to 8 years in prison). In 1937 the Danes legalized induced abortion for medical, ethical, (e.g. rape case) and eugenic reasons. By 1973 legalized abortion was available, free of charge, to every Danish female resident within 12 weeks of pregnancy. In 1980 abortion rate was about 41% of total births. It is estimated 2/3 of Danish women experience abortion. Lastly, illegitimate births and miscarriages are on the rise due to changes in women's social status and role. PMID:6759731

Manniche, E

1982-10-01

75

Perceptions of misoprostol among providers and women seeking post-abortion care in Zimbabwe.  

PubMed

In Zimbabwe, abortions are legally restricted and complications from unsafe abortions are a major public health concern. This study in 2012 explored women's and providers' perspectives in Zimbabwe on the acceptability of the use of misoprostol as a form of treatment for complications of abortion in post-abortion care. In-depth interviews were conducted with 115 participants at seven post-abortion care facilities. Participants included 73 women of reproductive age who received services for incomplete abortion and 42 providers, including physicians, nurses, midwives, general practitioners and casualty staff. Only 29 providers had previously used misoprostol with their own patients, and only 21 had received any formal training in its use. Nearly all women and providers preferred misoprostol to surgical abortion methods because it was perceived as less invasive, safer and more affordable. Women also generally preferred the non-surgical method, when given the option, as fears around surgery and risk were high. Most providers favoured removing legal restrictions on abortion, particularly medical abortion. Approving use of misoprostol for post-abortion care in Zimbabwe is important in order to reduce unsafe abortion and its related sequelae. Legal, policy and practice reforms must be accompanied by effective reproductive health curricula updates in medical, nursing and midwifery schools, as well as through updated training for current and potential providers of post-abortion care services nationwide. Our findings support the use of misoprostol in national post-abortion care programmes, as it is an acceptable and potentially life-saving treatment option. PMID:25702065

Maternowska, M Catherine; Mashu, Alexio; Moyo, Precious; Withers, Mellissa; Chipato, Tsungai

2015-02-01

76

Abortion in the United States, 1977-1978.  

PubMed

There were 1.32 million legal abortions in the United States in 1977 and a projected 1.37 million in 1978, an increase of four percent between 1977 and 1978 compared with one of 12 percent between 1976 and 1977. In 1978, 29 percent of pregnant women chose to terminate their pregnancies by abortion. Almost three percent of U.S. women of reproductive age obtained an abortion in 1978. From 1967 through 1978, approximately six million women obtained almost eight million legal abortions; about one in eight U.S. women of reproductive age has had a legal abortion. The number of hospitals reporting that they provided abortion services dropped slightly from 1,695 in 1976 to 1,661 in 1977, but the number of nonhospital abortion clinics increased from 448 to 522, and the number of physicians who reported performing abortions in their offices grew from 424 to 533. Between 1976 and 1977, the average number of abortions per hospital facility decreased from 246 to 237, while the average number per nonhospital provider increased from 875 to 879. The percentage of abortions performed in hospitals declined from 35 in 1976 to 30 in 1977, while the percentage reported by free-standing clinics increased from 61 to 66; the percentage performed in physicians' offices remained at four. Ninety-five percent of abortions in 1977 occurred in metropolitan areas, where 75 percent of the women in need of abortion services live. In 1977, there were identified abortion providers in only 23 percent of U.S. counties. Nine percent (more than 118,000) of the women who obtained abortions in 1977 had to travel to another state for services, and many traveled to other, often distant, counties in their home states. One in three abortions in 1977 were obtained by teenagers, and three in four were obtained by unmarried women. Twenty-eight percent of the women estimated to be in need of abortion services in 1977, and 26 percent in 1978, were unable to obtain them. In FY 1977, before Hyde amendment restrictions on government financing of abortions for poor women, 133,000 of the estimated 427,000 Medicaid-eligible women in need of publicly funded abortion services were unable to obtain them.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:401078

Forrest, J D; Sullivan, E; Tietze, C

1979-01-01

77

[Toward constructing a research agenda: the threat posed by induced abortion in Latin America].  

PubMed

This work calls attention to the need for constructing a research agenda on induced abortion, which constitutes a serious pubic health problem in Latin America because of its illegality, clandestine practice, and ramifications for women's health, their families, and the health services. The incidence of abortion in Latin America is estimated, in the absence of reliable statistics, at 4-6 million annually. Over half the women in some countries are believed to resort to abortion during their reproductive lives. The concept of reproductive health emerged in the past decade from two distinct sources, the field of health and the feminist movement, as contraception became an increasingly accepted component of primary care. Reproductive aspects acquired a central role in the expanded concept of women's health, and reproductive health was converted into a new objective of service programs. The World Health Organization in 1988 for the first time unofficially defined reproductive health, and in 1994 an official definition was proposed. The definition did not mention abortion directly. Abortion is increasingly a topic of political debate in Latin America, where it is legal only in Cuba. The resolute opposition of the Catholic Church undoubtedly affects health policies. The feminist movement is perhaps alone in raising the issue and seeking means of legalizing abortion, based on human rights and public health considerations. The new definition of reproductive health challenges researchers from many disciplines to provide reliable information on poorly known aspects of abortion. The ultimate goal of the research is to reduce the frequency of abortion and eliminate morbidity and mortality caused by illegal abortions. Recommended topics for research include the incidence of abortion, undesired adolescent pregnancy and abortion, abortion and working women, the influence of cultural and social patterns on abortion, the role of men in reproductive decisions and abortion, the relation of abortion and contraception, costs of abortion, attitude of abortion practitioners and illegal abortionists, evaluations of the legal status of abortion, and models of risk detection and prevention. PMID:12347892

Mundigo, A

1994-01-01

78

Space Shuttle ascent aborts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Specific guidance functions and trajectory design of return to launch site (RTLS) and transoceanic abort landing (TAL) intact abort profiles, as well as the increasing emphasis on contingency aborts, are presented. Various systems failures including Space Shuttle main engine failures and detailed technical analyses, including the design of powered flight abort trajectories, are considered. The most critical of flight abort situations is the RTLS, while TAL is the preferred abort when uphill capability is no longer available. It is concluded that one principle must remain to ensure continuing success of Space Shuttle flights: namely that intact and contingency aborts necessitate development to ensure safe return of the vehicle, payload, and crew whenever possible.

Schmidgall, Richard A.

1989-09-01

79

Bills to decriminalize abortion in Brazil.  

PubMed

The National Congress in Brazil is currently considering 9 abortion bills, 2 of which were introduced by women. In this interview, the women senators--Jandira Feghall of the Communist Party and Eva Blay of the Social Democrat Party--discuss the likely outcome of the abortion debate. Although the Roman Catholic Church has announced its intentions to oppose any liberalization of the abortion law, there are divisions within the Church as evidenced by the existence of groups such as Catholics for a Free Choice. Both senators agree that decriminalization of abortion will depend upon the societal response and an effort must be made to reach the many people who are confused and undecided about the issue. Although the present debate fits within the broader current debate on population policies, it has been the insistence of the feminist movement that put abortion reform on the agenda. Blay's bill calls for the legalization of abortion on demand until the 12th week of pregnancy and in cases of rape or risk to the woman's life after that point. A controversial aspect of Feghall's bill is the inclusion of maternal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection as a condition for abortion. Feghall notes that this is an option rather than a requirement, but she will eliminate this condition if it engenders discrimination against HIV-infected women. PMID:12318722

1994-01-01

80

International developments in abortion law from 1988 to 1998.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: In 2 successive decades since 1967, legal accommodation of abortion has grown in many countries. The objective of this study was to assess whether liberalizing trends have been maintained in the last decade and whether increased protection of women's human rights has influenced legal reform. METHODS: A worldwide review was conducted of legislation and judicial rulings affecting abortion, and legal reforms were measured against governmental commitments made under international human rights treaties and at United Nations conferences. RESULTS: Since 1987, 26 jurisdictions have extended grounds for lawful abortion, and 4 countries have restricted grounds. Additional limits on access to legal abortion services include restrictions on funding of services, mandatory counseling and reflection delay requirements, third-party authorizations, and blockades of abortion clinics. CONCLUSIONS: Progressive liberalization has moved abortion laws from a focus on punishment toward concern with women's health and welfare and with their human rights. However, widespread maternal mortality and morbidity show that reform must be accompanied by accessible abortion services and improved contraceptive care and information. PMID:10191808

Cook, R J; Dickens, B M; Bliss, L E

1999-01-01

81

A note on "An economic approach to abortion demand.".  

PubMed

Donna S. Rothstein analyzed the socioeconomic factors which affect the demand for abortion using a cross-section of 1985 data for the fifty states of the US and Washington, D.C. The dependent variable was the percentage of pregnancies of women aged 15-44 which are terminated through legal abortion. Rothstein found that the average cost of abortions and the unemployment rate had significant negative effects upon the demand for abortion, while disposable personal per capita income, the availability of Medicaid funding for abortion, the percentage of unmarried women aged 15 and older, the states which are located in the far west, and the divorce rate had significant positive effects upon the demand for abortion. Educational status had no significant effect upon abortion. The author re-estimated Rothstein's abortion demand model using a continuous abortion price variable instead of a dummy variable to find that the abortion price and Medicaid funding have insignificant effects upon demand for abortion. Policy implications are discussed. PMID:12292333

Sun, W

1995-01-01

82

International developments in abortion laws: 1977-88.  

PubMed

International developments in abortion laws have been diverse, but the general thrust of legislation and court decisions has been towards decriminalization and liberalization of laws and the reduction of legal barriers to access to therapuetic abortion services presented by spousal and parental authorization requirements. Most legislation has extended abortion eligibility through traditional indications such as danger to maternal health or fetal handicap, but other indications have also been created, such as adolescence, advanced maternal age, family circumstances and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome or Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection. Several jurisdictions established stages of early gestation within which abortion could be undertaken with minimal legal scrutiny. In Canada, the entire prohibition of abortion was held unconstitutional for violating women's integrity and security. Under medical and public health guidance, several countries have amended their constitutions to recognize and protect human life from contraception. Cyprus, Italy, and Taiwan have created an indication for abortion of welfare of the women's family, while France and the Netherlands recognize the women's distress and Hungary cites cases where the women is single or separated for 6 months, where appropriate housing is lacking or where she is 35 years or older and has had 3 deliveries. National health services and insurance schemes vary in their coverage of abortion costs, but generally tend to fund the major park of lawful services. In Britain, France, Israel, the US and Yugoslavia husband's claims to veto abortions have been rejected. Courts have also established that mature adolescents, although legally minors, may give autonomous consent to abortion and are entitled to confidentiality. Few countries' laws define when criminal abortion liability commences or when conception occurs, but the law has moved to restrict abortion in Israel, Honduras, Romania and Finland. PMID:12315868

Cook, R J; Dickens, B M

1989-08-01

83

Against the law: Irish women and abortion.  

PubMed

In both the Republic of Ireland and the North of Ireland, it is impossible to obtain a legal abortion unless the life of the mother would otherwise be lost. Thus, an estimated 10-12,000 women travel from Ireland to England each year to have an abortion. These women can receive support from the Irish Women's Abortion Support Group (IWASG) which is made up of volunteer women who are Irish or of Irish descent. The IWASG provides accommodations, emotional and practical support, and information about how to obtain an abortion in the UK. It makes appointments, negotiates fees, and monitors services offered. The group can also provide financial assistance to women in need. IWASG liaises with pro-choice groups in Ireland, such as the underground Women's Information Network (WIN), which has branches in Dublin, Galway, and Cork. WIN provides confidential, nondirective counseling to women in need. Abortion is a very difficult choice for Irish women because of the legal strictures and because of the guilt which often results from government and religious propaganda. The prospect of finding their way around London is often as daunting to the Irish women as the procedure itself, and many of the women travel to England absolutely alone with no one at home even aware of what they are doing. IWASG is seeking new members to help them support these women. For information, write IWASG, 52 Featherstone Street, London ECIY 8RT. PMID:12222519

1995-02-01

84

Abortion politics in the United States, 1972-1994: from single issue to ideology.  

PubMed

This paper discusses issues of legal abortion and women's rights in the US. Abortion has been a political issue since the 1970s in the US. Following the Supreme Court's decision in the case of Roe vs. Wade, conservatives and liberals were divided based on their stand on abortion laws. Moreover, gender affects the range of opinions. Gender gap in abortion attitudes is most evident among conservatives. Conservative and extremely conservative women are against legal abortion more strongly than men with those same political views. Liberal and extremely liberal women have about the same amount of support for legal abortion as liberal men do. Labor force participation, marriage, education, and religion have impact on women and men's attitudes toward abortion; yet none of these explain the politicization of abortion. The change in support for legal abortion by political views and time period (1974-93) is shown in this paper. Women's rights are at the core when issues on abortion are to be discussed; the circumstances of the pregnancy and not the fetus become the focus. Although some women¿s groups support this stand, it faces a continuing debate with pro-life groups. The prevailing ideologies attempt to accommodate the new ideas expressed by the movement, while some of its stronger views are tempered in order to win a measure of political success. PMID:12349270

Hout, M

1999-01-01

85

National crisis, supranational opportunity: the Irish construction of abortion as a European service.  

PubMed

In the late 1980s, the anti-abortion movement successfully sought injunctions against pregnancy counselling centres and students' unions in Ireland, preventing them from distributing information on how to obtain an abortion abroad. One of the defensive arguments that the students' unions employed was to claim that the distribution of abortion information was protected as an aspect of the free movement of services under European Community law. This paper addresses the implications of categorising abortion as a supranational economic service for feminist legal strategy. The advantages of categorising abortion as a service to which women have access as consumers are that it legitimates abortion and it provides a new strategy for making abortion claims. The disadvantages are that a woman's legal interest in abortion is based on her capacity to buy the service, fetal life is rendered devoid of value, and the service supplier has as much say about the abortion transaction as the woman consumer. If feminist legal strategy is to successfully use the legal construction of abortion as an economic service, it must work to minimise such negative implications. PMID:11424248

Fletcher, R

2000-11-01

86

Delivering Medical Abortion at Scale: A Study of the Retail Market for Medical Abortion in Madhya Pradesh, India  

PubMed Central

Background Medical abortion (mifepristone and misoprostol) has the potential to contribute to reduced maternal mortality but little is known about the provision or quality of advice for medical abortion through the private retail sector. We examined the availability of medical abortion and the practices of pharmacists in India, where abortion has been legal since 1972. Methods We interviewed 591 pharmacists in 60 local markets in city, town and rural areas of Madhya Pradesh. One month later, we returned to 359 pharmacists with undercover patients who presented themselves unannounced as genuine customers seeking a medical abortion. Results Medical abortion was offered to undercover patients by 256 (71.3%) pharmacists and 24 different brands were identified. Two thirds (68.5%) of pharmacists stated that abortion was illegal in India. Only 106 (38.5%) pharmacists asked clients the timing of the last menstrual period and 38 (13.8%) requested to see a doctor’s prescription – a legal requirement in India. Only 59 (21.5%) pharmacists correctly advised patients on the gestational limit for medical abortion, 97 (35.3%) provided correct information on how many and when to take the tablets in a combination pack, and 78 (28.4%) gave accurate advice on where to seek care in case of complications. Advice on post-abortion family planning was almost nonexistent. Conclusions The retail market for medical abortion is extensive, but the quality of advice given to patients is poor. Although the contribution of medical abortion to women’s health in India is poorly understood, there is an urgent need to improve the practices of pharmacists selling medical abortion. PMID:25822656

Powell-Jackson, Timothy; Acharya, Rajib; Filippi, Veronique; Ronsmans, Carine

2015-01-01

87

Abortive segmental perineal hemangioma  

E-print Network

spine, abdomen, and pelvis were normal. Histopathology None Discussion Abortive hemangiomasspine, and pelvis, was negative. We report a unique case of an ulcerated, segmental abortive hemangiomaspine, abdomen, and pelvis. For patients over three months old, any lumbar hemangioma

Tlougan, Brook E; Gonzalez, Mercedes E; Orlow, Seth J

2011-01-01

88

Attitudes to abortion in the era of reform: evidence from the Abortion Law Reform Association correspondence.  

PubMed

This article examines letters sent by members of the general public to the Abortion Law Reform Association (ALRA) in the decade immediately before the 1967 Abortion Act. It shows how a voluntary organisation, in their aim of supporting a specific cause of unclear legality, called forth correspondence from those in need. In detailing the personal predicaments of those facing an unwanted pregnancy, this body of correspondence was readily deployed by ALRA in their efforts to mobilise support for abortion law reform, thus exercising a political function. A close examination of the content of the letters and the epistolary strategies adopted by their writers reveals that as much as they were a lobbying tool for changes in abortion law, these letters were discursively shaped by debates surrounding that very reform. PMID:21751480

Jones, Emma L

2011-01-01

89

Abortion among Adolescents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the current status of abortion laws pertaining to adolescents worldwide, examining questions raised by parental consent laws in the United States and by the relevant psychological research (risk of harm from abortion, informed consent, consequences of parental involvement in the abortion decision, and current debate). Discusses issues…

Adler, Nancy E.; Ozer, Emily J.; Tschann, Jeanne

2003-01-01

90

United Nations World Abortion Policies 1999  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The United Nations Population Information Network (POPIN) has recently published a collection of data tables that outline the abortion policies for regions and nations around the world. The tables display the grounds on which abortion is legally permitted, as well as national and international data on abortion rates, total fertility rates (births per woman), maternal mortality ratio (per 100,000 live births), and the rate of contraceptive use by married women. The data are divided into six regional tables (Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, Northern America, and Oceania). Each regional table is organized by geographic area (e.g., Eastern Asia, Southeastern Asia, South Central Asia, and Western Asia) to facilitate comparisons.

1999-01-01

91

Irish abortion ban strengthened as information is censored and seized.  

PubMed

In Ireland it is illegal to distribute information about abortion services. This means that magazines like Cosmopolitan have to remove ads for abortion clinics from the magazines printed for Ireland. A BBC television show about abortion was aired in Ireland with the names of the clinics blacked out. Even the phone books of foreign cities have removed because they contain the phone numbers of abortion clinics. Currently the only price where women can get information about abortion clinics is from a very small network of priests, doctors, and activists. Some activists have resorted to writing the phone numbers of abortion clinics in England on the public bathroom walls. Officially there are 4000 Irish women who travel to England for abortions every year. That figure only represents the women that give Irish addresses. The real figure is estimated to be about 8000 annually. 14 students were arrested for distributing leaflets with information about abortion clinics in England. They lost their case in both the Irish and European courts and have been fined, undisclosed amounts. Ireland is 85% Catholic and the Catholic Church still has a great deal of influence in Irish politics. The head of the Irish Family Planning Association said that the Catholic Church has moved Ireland back into the Dark Ages. Abortion was made illegal in Ireland in 1986. Contraception was legalized in 1980 and in 1985 condoms were allowed to be sold without a doctors prescription. PMID:12317129

1992-01-01

92

Ray of hope: opportunities for reducing unsafe abortions!  

PubMed

Unsafe abortion is one of the leading causes of maternal mortality and morbidity which impede the nation in achieving the targets of MDG 5. In the developing world, it is estimated that 13% of all maternal deaths are due to unsafe abortions. Despite having certain liberty in the law and religion, Pakistan has a relatively high prevalence of unsafe abortion. Poverty, unintended pregnancies, ineffective use of contraceptive methods and unawareness about the law are the root causes for the rise in the number of women seeking abortions. Nonetheless, with all these opening points of having permission in the law and religion could direct us that if we just follow them we can reduce the number of unsafe and illegal abortions.Therefore, there is a strong interventions would be required in health and legal aspects, which would decrease maternal mortality and morbidity. PMID:23865142

Khowaja, Shaneela Sadruddin; Pasha, Aneeta; Begum, Shamshad; Mustafa, Mehr-un-Nisa

2013-01-01

93

The harassment of U.S. abortion providers.  

PubMed

In 1985, 47 percent of abortion providers experienced antiabortion harassment. The approximately 1,250 facilities that were affected served 83 percent of all abortion patients. Nonhospital facilities performing 400 or more abortions a year were the most likely targets of antiabortion activity; 88 percent reported at least one type of harassment during the year. Picketing occurred at 80 percent of these facilities. Only six percent experienced picketing alone; the average facility was subjected to five different types of activity. Seventy-three percent of the facilities were the target of at least one illegal activity. A number of problems that made abortions more difficult or costly to provide were significantly related to the occurrence of antiabortion activity: increased expenditures for security and for legal services, loss of fire and casualty insurance, new licensing requirements and problems hiring staff. However, harassment did not appear to have affected the average number of abortions performed at large nonhospital facilities or the fee charged. PMID:3556539

Forrest, J D; Henshaw, S K

1987-01-01

94

Debate on abortion in Colombia and Uruguay.  

PubMed

Colombia and Uruguay are the sites of active movements aimed at decriminalizing abortion. The Colombian Network for Women's Sexual and Reproductive Rights supported a decriminalization bill that was based on operationalization of rights guaranteed in the country's Constitution as well as United Nations resolutions adopted by the Republic; however, the bill lacked sufficient public and legislative support to be presented. Although Colombia's Constitution acknowledges the right of couples to determine their family size, there is no sex education and effective methods of contraception are not available. In Uruguay, representatives of the four political parties have introduced a bill that permits abortion in the first trimester, although the reason for pregnancy termination must be stipulated and the father must agree. Second-trimester abortions would be legal only if necessary to save the life of the mother or in cases of fetal deformities. Specific regulations are outlined for adolescents and the disabled. Finally, physicians with moral objections to abortion are excused from performing the procedure. The observance of a Day of Action to Decriminalize Abortion in Latin America and the Caribbean (September 28, 1994) is indicative of the growing strength of the pro-choice movement. PMID:12318725

1994-01-01

95

[Psychopathology and abortion].  

PubMed

The author explores the possible relationship between psychopathology and abortion. The paper starts with the updating of epidemiological data regarding the incidence of abortion, especially in the current Spanish society. In this partnership there are three sections in the study of these possible relations between the abortion and the psychopathology: (a) in the new emerging sexual behaviour, especially among young people, and psychopathological factors possibly determining their sexual behaviour; (b) in the psychological and psychopathological context that makes the decision to abort, in regard to the factors of the couple and their families of origin and social context, and (c) in the frequent psychopathological disorders that seem to arise from the abortion, according to recent data reported by many researchers in the international scientific community. The study of the so-called Post-Abortion Syndrome (PAS) puts an end to this cooperation, distinguishing psychopathological profile characteristic that distinguishes the various stages of this syndrome. PMID:19799478

Polaino Lorente, Aquilino

2009-01-01

96

Comparison of medical abortion with surgical vacuum aspiration: women's preferences and acceptability of treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES--To assess women's preferences for, and the acceptability of, medical abortion and vacuum aspiration in the early first trimester. DESIGN--Patient centred, partially randomised trial. Medical abortion was performed with mifepristone 600 mg followed 48 hours later by gemeprost 1 mg vaginal pessary. Vacuum aspiration was performed under general anaesthesia. SETTING--Teaching hospital in Scotland. PATIENTS--363 women undergoing legal induced abortion at

R C Henshaw; S A Naji; I T Russell; A A Templeton

1993-01-01

97

Supreme Court Rulings on Abortion: Roe v. Wade and Selected Progeny  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Abortion is one of the most controversial and contentious issues of our time. Few topics generate as much public debate or leave as little room for political compromise. This article presents a discussion of selected United States Supreme Court decisions on abortion and the legal reasoning supporting those decisions. It should be noted initially…

Uerling, Donald F.

2006-01-01

98

Opinions of decision-makers on the liberalization of abortion laws in Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. In the last decade, important advances were made in the struggle for reproductive rights in Mexico. The goal of this study was to discover the opinions of decision-makers about the grounds for legal abortion as well as to explore their perceptions about further liberalization of abortion laws countrywide. Material and Methods. In-depth inter - views were conducted with eight

Marieke G van Dijk; Diana Lara; Sandra G García

2007-01-01

99

Trends in the Characteristics of Women Obtaining Abortions, 1974 to 2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

n Overall rates of abortion in the United States peaked soon after the procedure was legalized in 1973, remained fairly constant through the 1980s, and have declined steadily since then. However, the overall rate masks large differences and varying patterns across time for demo- graphic subgroups. n A substantial drop in the abortion rates of teenagers and women aged 20-24

Stanley K. Henshaw; Kathryn Kost

2008-01-01

100

Uneasy allies: pro-choice physicians, feminist health activists and the struggle for abortion rights  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abortion represents a particularly interesting subject for a social movements analysis of healthcare issues because of the involvement of both feminist pro-choice activists and a segment of the medical profession. Although both groups have long shared the same general goal of legal abortion, the alliance has over time been an uneasy one, and in many ways a contradictory one. This

C. E. Joffe; T. A. Weitz; C. L. Stacey

2004-01-01

101

INDUCED ABORTION FROM AN ISLAMIC PERSPECTIVE: IS IT CRIMINAL OR JUST ELECTIVE?  

PubMed Central

Background: Induced Abortion for social reasons is spreading all over the world. It is estimated that globally 50 million unborn babies are killed annually, resulting in the deaths of 200,000 pregnant women and the suffering of millions. The complications of illegal abortion are very serious. Abortion is still used in many countries as a means of family planning. The medical reasons for abortion are limited and con-sti-tute a small proportion of all abortion cases. This paper discusses the different views on abortion, its history, its evolution over time, and the present legal circumstances. The emphasis is on the situation in Islamic countries and the effect of Islamic Fatwas on abortion. PMID:23008648

Albar, Mohammed A.

2001-01-01

102

Legal writing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Skills, Ethics and Values for Legal Practice is the second edition of Wolski, Legal Skills: A Practical Guide for Students. The text has been completely revised, with a greater focus on ethics and values. The second edition assists readers to develop the skills required to interview and advise clients proficiently, conduct legal research, analyse and solve legal problems, write effective

David Field

2009-01-01

103

Legal Bytes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Legal Bytes, provided by the firm of George, Donaldson & Ford, L.L.P, of Austin, Texas, is a "periodic publication" of "summaries and brief discussions of emerging legal issues in the field of computer law." Recent issues have included articles on the Communications Decency Act, ownership of "real-time" sports information, legal risks of on-line advertising, and copyright law, among others. Note that Legal Bytes is not intended to "be relied upon as legal advice."

104

30th anniversary of the 1967 Abortion Act. UK news.  

PubMed

On the 30th anniversary of the 1967 Abortion Act, October 27, 1997, Lord David Steel of Aikwood KBE, architect of the Act, reminded people that whatever one thinks about abortion, if it is going to happen, it's better that it be safe and legal than illegal and dangerous. The event received extensive coverage by the press and broadcast media which mostly discussed abortion as a necessary and legitimate part of reproductive health care, rather than as a controversial moral issue. Many of the articles and broadcasts were based upon material from two pro-choice books published to mark the anniversary: "Voices for Change" (by the National Abortion Campaign and Marie Stopes International) and "Abortion Law Reformers: Pioneers of Change" (by Birth Control Trust). One Parliamentary Early Day Motion (EDM) commemorated the Act and its benefits for women, while another called for the Act to be liberalized and extended to Northern Ireland. The anti-choice lobby argues that Britain has elected the most pro-choice parliament in its history. The major UK anti-choice groups had little public impact, with the Catholic Church voicing the most significant opposition to legal abortion. PMID:12321441

1998-01-01

105

Teen Motherhood and Abortion Access  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors investigate the effect of abortion access on teen birthrates using county-level panel data. Past research suggested that prohibiting abortion led to higher teen birthrates. Perhaps surprisingly, the authors find that more recent restrictions in abortion access, including the closing of abortion clinics and restrictions on Medicaid funding, had the opposite effect. Small declines in access were related to

Thomas J Kane; Douglas Staiger

1996-01-01

106

Contesting the cruel treatment of abortion-seeking women.  

PubMed

This article draws on legal arguments made by civil society organisations to challenge the legal reasoning that apparently produced the decision in the Ms Y case in Ireland in August 2014. I show how legal standards of reasonableness and practicality ought to be interpreted in ways that are respectful of the patient's wishes and rights. The case concerned a decision by the Health Service Executive, the Irish public health authority, to refuse an abortion to a pregnant asylum seeker and rape survivor on the grounds that a caesarean section and early live delivery were practicable and reasonable alternatives justified by the need to protect fetal life. I argue that the abortion refusal may not have been a reasonable decision, as required by the terms of relevant legislation, for four different reasons. First, the alternative of a caesarean section and early live delivery was not likely to avert the risk of suicide, and in fact did not do so. Second, the consent to the caesarean section alternative may not have been a real consent in the legal sense if it was not voluntary. Third, an abortion refusal and forcible treatment fall below the norms of good medical practice as interpreted through a patient-centred perspective. Fourth, an abortion refusal that entails forms of cruel, inhumane and degrading treatment ought not to be a reasonable action under the legislation. PMID:25555759

Fletcher, Ruth

2014-11-01

107

Demand for abortion and post abortion care in Ibadan, Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background While induced abortion is considered to be illegal and socially unacceptable in Nigeria, it is still practiced by many women in the country. Poor family planning and unsafe abortion practices have daunting effects on maternal health. For instance, Nigeria is on the verge of not meeting the Millennium development goals on maternal health due to high maternal mortality ratio, estimated to be about 630 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. Recent evidences have shown that a major factor in this trend is the high incidence of abortion in the country. The objective of this paper is, therefore, to investigate the factors determining the demand for abortion and post-abortion care in Ibadan city of Nigeria. Methods The study employed data from a hospital-based/exploratory survey carried out between March to September 2010. Closed ended questionnaires were administered to a sample of 384 women of reproductive age from three hospitals within the Ibadan metropolis in South West Nigeria. However, only 308 valid responses were received and analysed. A probit model was fitted to determine the socioeconomic factors that influence demand for abortion and post-abortion care. Results The results showed that 62% of respondents demanded for abortion while 52.3% of those that demanded for abortion received post-abortion care. The findings again showed that income was a significant determinant of abortion and post-abortion care demand. Women with higher income were more likely to demand abortion and post-abortion care. Married women were found to be less likely to demand for abortion and post-abortion care. Older women were significantly less likely to demand for abortion and post-abortion care. Mothers’ education was only statistically significant in determining abortion demand but not post-abortion care demand. Conclusion The findings suggest that while abortion is illegal in Nigeria, some women in the Ibadan city do abort unwanted pregnancies. The consequence of this in the absence of proper post-abortion care is daunting. There is the need for policymakers to intensify public education against indiscriminate abortion and to reduce unwanted pregnancies. In effect, there is need for effective alternative family planning methods. This is likely to reduce the demand for abortion. Further, with income found as a major constraint, post abortion services should be made accessible to both the rich and poor alike so as to prevent unnecessary maternal deaths as a result of abortion related complications. PMID:25024929

2014-01-01

108

Abortion: Approaches from Virtue  

E-print Network

Abortion: Approaches from Virtue Eric M. Rovie Washington University in St. Louis It is a platitude that the issue of abortion polarizes people into extreme positions. In this paper, I explore the oft-neglected gray area between the pro...-life stance and pro-choice views. In particular, I am interested in the fact that some defenders of abortion rights claim that they could or would never have one themselves. Similarly, I am struck by the fact that advocates of the right to choose often...

Rovie, Eric M.

109

[Sexual violence in Congo-Kinshasa: necessity of decriminalizing abortion].  

PubMed

The sexual violence's committed in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) are from their scales and consequences on women, real public health, politico-legal, and socio-economical challenges. More than a million of women have been victims of sexual violence on a period of less than fifteen years. Systematic rapes of women were used as war weapon by different groups involved in the Congolese war. Sexual violence against women has impacted public health by spreading sexually transmissible diseases including HIV/AIDS, causing unwanted pregnancies, leading to the gynaecological complications of rape-related injuries, and inflicting psychological trauma on the victims. Despite high level of unwanted pregnancies observed, the Congolese law is very restrictive and interdict induced abortion. This paper presents three arguments which plead in favour of legalizing abortion in DRC: 1) a restrictive law on abortion forces women to use unsafe abortion and increase incidence of injuries and maternal mortality ; 2) DRC has ratified the universal Declaration of human rights, the African union charter, and has than to promote equality between sexes, in this is included women reproductive rights; 3) an unwanted birth is an additional financial charge for a woman, a factor increasing poverty and psychologically unacceptable in case of rape. From the politico-legal point of view, ending rape impunity and decriminalizing abortion are recommended. Decriminalizing abortion give women choice and save victims and pregnant women from risks related to the pregnancy, a childbirth, or an eventual unsafe abortion. These risks increase the maternal mortality already high in DRC (between 950 and 3000 for 100000 live births). PMID:23167138

Kalonda, J C Omba

2012-01-01

110

The "gag rule" revisited: physicians as abortion gatekeepers.  

PubMed

In this article, I explore this failure [of the therapeutic exception as a compromise device in federal abortion counseling regulations] with an eye toward its broader lessons about the social uses of medical discretion and the difficulty of achieving an abortion compromise in America. I begin by examining the legal underpinning beneath the widespread belief that the "gag rule" imposed a near-absolute ban on discussion of the abortion option. This conventional wisdom, I conclude, collapses on careful inspection. It fails utterly to account for the strong support to be found in the Title X regulations and their larger legal context for a therapeutic exception unconstrained by administrative or judicial definition. Next, I observe that this legal unboundedness would have empowered Title X clinic physicians (and perhaps others who do counseling) to exercise broad discretion over abortion access, under the rubric of medical indication.... By so doing, however, physicians would have become abortion gatekeepers. This would have raised difficult ethical and clinical questions about the extent to which medical judgment should be allowed to incorporate (and shield) socially-disputed moral choices. I briefly consider some of these questions, along with the countervailing appeal of preserving a measure of intimate freedom under medical cover. I then conclude by positing some connections between the moral infirmities of medical gatekeeping and the political failure of the therapeutic exception. I suggest, in essence, that this failure was ensured by a strong resonance between the exception's moral infirmities and the fears of the medical leaders, pro-choice activists, and abortion opponents who framed the public debate over the "gag rule." The potential breadth of the therapeutic exception went unrecognized and unexplored because professional and popular understanding of the abortion counseling regulations was molded by the activists who framed the debate... PMID:11651561

Bloche, M Gregg

1992-01-01

111

[A glossary for discussion about abortion].  

PubMed

Abortion and its diverse possible legal regulations is one of the major and toughest social controversies. This debate is even more problematic due to biases, prejudgments, different ideologies, beliefs, religious doctrines and political pressures. Chile has recently begun a new national discussion with an evident confusion, both in juridical and clinical terminology, which makes very difficult to achieve the necessary plural debate for a social and political consensus. The authors structured an academic collaborative project to create a glossary as a contribution for a discussion based on clearly defined notions about the different terms used in the abortion debate. Twenty-two concepts were selected and their definitions were reviewed and discussed by more than 50 different specialists. The final version of this glossary in Spanish language is presented. PMID:25694291

Astete A, Carmen; Beca I, Juan Pablo; Lecaros U, Alberto

2014-11-01

112

Abortion in America: 12 years after Roe v. Wade.  

PubMed

In the US the abortion debate has transcended the realm of medicine, pervaded the public consciousness, and entered national politics. Anti-abortion activists have never been more vocal and visible than in the past 5 years, and some profile activists have resorted to violence. Anti-abortion activists have gained increased influence under the Reagan administration. The President has embraced right-to-life leaders. With the approval of President Reagan, the Justice Department has asked the Supreme Court to overturn the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade decision. The Supreme Court established with that decision that a woman's right to privacy entitles her to a safe, legal abortion, but that this right is not unqualified. It ruled that decisions about abortion in the 1st trimester of pregnancy be left to the woman and her physician and not be regulated by the state. The Court ruled that 2nd trimester abortions could be regulated by the state "in ways that are reasonably related to maternal health" (i.e., restricted to hospitals, but this restriction was eased in the 1983 Supreme Court decisions which affirmed Roe v. Wade). The Court allowed states to regulate, and even proscribe, abortions performed in the "stage subsequent to viability." In its brief, the Justice Department charges that the Roe decision was "a source of instability in the law" to be reconsidered and abandoned, as the principles of the 1973 ruling were so sweeping that they block "modest and reasonable" state and local governmental efforts to control legalized abortions. The brief was filed July 15, 1985 in 2 appeals involving Illinois and Pennsylvania laws that restrict abortions. This request marks the 1st time in 31 years that the government has asked the justices to reverse themselves on a basic constitutional decision. Parties on both sides of the abortion debate agree that it is unlikely that the same justices who voted 6 to 3 in a similar case 2 years ago to reaffirm a woman's right to an abortion would overturn the 7-to-2 Roe decision. In 1981, most abortions were obtained by young women, unmarried women, and white women. About 1.6 million abortions were reported for the US in 1981, representing about 26% of pregnancies that year. The US abortion rate remained essentially stable in 1981 and 1982 after rising each year between 1973 and 1980. The annual increases in the years just prior to 1980 were small. In 1981, as in 1980, 91% of abortions were performed at 12 or fewer weeks past the last menstrual period. Abortion services are most available, and rates are highest on the East and West coasts. 12 years after abortion was made legal in the US, the debate may get louder as prochoice activists launch efforts to match the campaign of the right-to-life movement. PMID:12267463

1985-11-01

113

Methods for induced abortion.  

PubMed

We describe present methods for induced abortion used in the United States. The most common procedure is first-trimester vacuum curettage. Analgesia is usually provided with a paracervical block and is not completely effective. Pretreatment with nonsteroidal analgesics and conscious sedation augment analgesia but only to a modest extent. Cervical dilation is accomplished with conventional tapered dilators, hygroscopic dilators, or misoprostol. Manual vacuum curettage is as safe and effective as the electric uterine aspirator for procedures through 10 weeks of gestation. Common complications and their management are presented. Early abortion with mifepristone/misoprostol combinations is replacing some surgical abortions. Two mifepristone/misoprostol regimens are used. The rare serious complications of medical abortion are described. Twelve percent of abortions are performed in the second trimester, the majority of these by dilation and evacuation (D&E) after laminaria dilation of the cervix. Uterine evacuation is accomplished with heavy ovum forceps augmented by 14-16 mm vacuum cannula systems. Cervical injection of dilute vasopressin reduces blood loss. Operative ultrasonography is reported to reduce perforation risk of D&E. Dilation and evacuation procedures have evolved to include intact D&E and combination methods for more advanced gestations. Vaginal misoprostol is as effective as dinoprostone for second-trimester labor-induction abortion and appears to be replacing older methods. Mifepristone/misoprostol combinations appear more effective than misoprostol alone. Uterine rupture has been reported in women with uterine scars with misoprostol abortion in the second trimester. Fetal intracardiac injection to reduce multiple pregnancies or selectively abort an anomalous twin is accepted therapy. Outcomes for the remaining pregnancy have improved with experience. PMID:15229018

Stubblefield, Phillip G; Carr-Ellis, Sacheen; Borgatta, Lynn

2004-07-01

114

Magnitude and risk factors of abortion among regular female students in Wolaita Sodo University, Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Induced abortion is one of the greatest human rights dilemmas of our time. Yet, abortion is a very common experience in every culture and society. According to the World Health Organization, Ethiopia had the fifth largest number of maternal deaths in 2005 and unsafe abortion was estimated to account for 32% of all maternal deaths in Ethiopia. Youth are disproportionately affected by the consequences of unsafe abortion. The objective of this study was, therefore, to determine the magnitude and identify factors associated with abortion among female Wolaita Sodo University students. Methods A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in Wolaita Sodo University between May and June 2011. Data were collected from 493 randomly selected female students using structured and pre-tested questionnaires. Results The rate of abortion among students was found to be 65 per 1000 women, making it three fold the national rate of abortion for Ethiopia (23/1000 women aged 15–44). Virtually all of the abortions (96.9%) were induced and only half (16) were reported to be safe. Students with history of alcohol use, who are first-year and those enrolled in faculties with no post-Grade 10 Natural Science background had higher risk of abortion than their counterparts. About 23.7% reported sexual experience. Less than half of the respondents (44%) ever heard of emergency contraception and only 35.9% of those who are sexually experienced ever used condom. Conclusions High rate of abortion was detected among female Wolaita Sodo University students and half of the abortions took place/initiated under unsafe circumstances. Knowledge of students on legal and safe abortion services was found to be considerably poor. It is imperative that improved sexual health education, with focus on safe and legal abortion services is rendered and wider availability of Youth Friendly family planning services are realized in Universities and other places where young men and women congregate. PMID:24666926

2014-01-01

115

Women's Awareness of Liberalization of Abortion Law and Knowledge of Place for Obtaining Services in Nepal.  

PubMed

In Nepal, following the liberalization of the abortion law, expansion and scaling up of services proceeded in parallel with efforts to create awareness of the legalization status of abortion and provide women with information about where services are available. This article assesses the effectiveness of these programmatic interventions in the early years of the country's abortion program. Data from a 2006 national survey are analyzed with 2 outcome measures-awareness of the legal status of abortion and knowledge of places to obtain abortion services among women ages 15 to 44 years. The variations in the outcomes are analyzed by ecological-development subregion, residence, education, household wealth quintile, age, and number of living children. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression techniques are used. Overall 32.3% (95% confidence interval = 31.4% to 33.2%) of the respondents were aware of the legal status of abortion and 56.5% (95% confidence interval = 55.5% to 57.4%) knew of a place where they could obtain an abortion. Both outcome measures showed considerable variations by the covariates. Women with secondary or higher level of education had the highest odds ratio of being aware of the law and having knowledge of a source for abortion services. Ecological-development subregions showed the second highest levels of odds ratios. Significant disparities among the population subgroups existed in the diffusion of awareness of the legal status of abortion and having knowledge of a place for abortion services in Nepal. The results point to which population subgroups to focus on and also serve as a baseline for assessing future progress in the diffusion process. PMID:23000795

Thapa, Shyam; Sharma, Sharad K

2015-03-01

116

Brazilian adolescents’ knowledge and beliefs about abortion methods: a school-based internet inquiry  

PubMed Central

Background Internet surveys that draw from traditionally generated samples provide the unique conditions to engage adolescents in exploration of sensitive health topics. Methods We examined awareness of unwanted pregnancy, abortion behaviour, methods, and attitudes toward specific legal indications for abortion via a school-based internet survey among 378 adolescents aged 12–21 years in three Rio de Janeiro public schools. Results Forty-five percent knew peers who had undergone an abortion. Most students (66.0%) did not disclose abortion method knowledge. However, girls (aOR 4.2, 95% CI 2.4-7.2), those who had experienced their sexual debut (aOR1.76, 95% CI 1.1-3.0), and those attending a prestigious magnet school (aOR 2.7 95% CI 1.4-6.3) were more likely to report methods. Most abortion methods (79.3%) reported were ineffective, obsolete, and/or unsafe. Herbs (e.g. marijuana tea), over-the-counter medications, surgical procedures, foreign objects and blunt trauma were reported. Most techniques (85.2%) were perceived to be dangerous, including methods recommended by the World Health Organization. A majority (61.4%) supported Brazil’s existing law permitting abortion in the case of rape. There was no association between gender, age, sexual debut, parental education or socioeconomic status and attitudes toward legal abortion. However, students at the magnet school supported twice as many legal indications (2.7, SE.27) suggesting a likely role of peers and/or educators in shaping abortion views. Conclusions Abortion knowledge and attitudes are not driven simply by age, religion or class, but rather a complex interplay that includes both social spaces and gender. Prevention of abortion morbidity and mortality among adolescents requires comprehensive sexuality and reproductive health education that includes factual distinctions between safe and unsafe abortion methods. PMID:24521075

2014-01-01

117

Alternative pathways for abortion services.  

PubMed

The interests of women seeking abortion and of doctors opposed to abortion are best served by alternative referral abortion facilities. Of 22 area health authorities in England with day-care gynecology in 1977, only 13 had day-care abortion units. The 2 abortion charities were doing about 3 times as many abortions as all National Health Service Hospitals put together. At day-care abortion facilities, part-time nurses and doctors sympathetic to abortion are supportive to women in a vulnerable situation. There is no pressure for valuable hospital beds. Women being treated for infertility are not housed next to abortion patients. Resources are not available for women seeking abortion under the 1967 Abortion Act. In 1 district 66% women succeeded in obtaining their abortion through the National Health Service (NHS). Over half the women in Wessex had to go to another region to obtain abortions. Many local gynecologists have conscientious objections to abortion. Subcontracting or referral of NHS patients to charitable organizations running day-care facilities is one answer to the lack of facilities. PMID:6103449

1980-05-24

118

Legal Engine  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This metasite is a useful starting-point for any search for online legal information, pulling together a wide array of international, federal, state, and organizational resources. Links are organized in numerous sections, including Caselaw, specific Legal Topics (Cyberlaw, Intellectual Property, Family Law, etc.), Reference Aids, Trial Advocacy, and Federal Rules, among others. Legal Engine also features link collections aimed at professors, students, and lawyers, as well as numerous other related search and legal sites. Please note that most linked pages are displayed within a frame at the Legal Engine site.

119

Peri-viable birth: legal considerations.  

PubMed

Peri-viable birth raises an array of complex moral and legal concerns. This article discusses the problem with defining viability, touches on its relationship to abortion jurisprudence, and analyzes a few interesting normative implications of current medical practice at the time of peri-viable birth. PMID:24468570

Sayeed, Sadath A

2014-02-01

120

The Response of Abortion Demand to Changes in Abortion Costs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study uses pooled cross-section time-series data, over the years 1982, 1992 and 2000, to estimate the impact of various restrictive abortion laws on the demand for abortion. This study complements and extends prior research by explicitly including the price of obtaining an abortion in the estimation. The empirical results show that the real…

Medoff, Marshall H.

2008-01-01

121

Men and abortion decisions.  

PubMed

The male sexual partner often has no voice in the decision about whether to go forward with a pregnancy, and the standard view in bioethics is that he ought not to have. The consensus is that the decision to instead have an abortion is and should be exclusively the pregnant woman's. By and large, the pro-choice and pro-life sides are united in this view even though they are divided about the morality of abortion. After all, the developing fetus is in the woman's body; she bears the physical and lifestyle changes involved in being pregnant and the health risks associated with the pregnancy and with either childbirth or abortion. Consequently, so the consensus goes, the decision about having an abortion is her decision, and it is a private decision. Preservation of her privacy can legitimately be used to prevent her partner from knowing about the pregnancy or the decisions being made about it. As if having a baby were the end of the matter. If it were, I would agree that the choice is the pregnant woman's. But pregnancy-inconvenient, uncomfortable, stigmatizing, and even slightly dangerous though it be-is a very small part of what's involved in having a child. We must get over the idea that abortion decisions are simply about whether to have a baby. If the burden of an unplanned pregnancy or even of an unavoidable childbirth (because an abortion is unavailable) is only a small part of the burden of being a parent, then it is no longer clear why the decision about having the child should be hers alone. PMID:25677781

Hardwig, John

2015-03-01

122

Abortion in Chile: the practice under a restrictive regime.  

PubMed

This article examines, from a human rights perspective, the experience of women, and the practices of health care providers regarding abortion in Chile. Most abortions, as high as 100,000 a year, are obtained surreptitiously and clandestinely, and income and connections play a key role. The illegality of abortion correlates strongly with vulnerability, feelings of guilt and loneliness, fear of prosecution, physical and psychological harm, and social ostracism. Moreover, the absolute legal ban on abortion has a chilling effect on health care providers and endangers women's lives and health. Although misoprostol use has significantly helped to prevent greater harm and enhance women's agency, a ban on sales created a black market. Against this backdrop, feminists have taken action in aid of women. For instance, a feminist collective opened a telephone hotline, Linea Aborto Libre (Free Abortion Line), which has been crucial in informing women of the correct and safe use of misoprostol. Chile is at a crossroads. For the first time in 24 years, abortion law reform seems plausible, at least when the woman's life or health is at risk and in cases of rape and fetal anomalies incompatible with life. The political scenario is unfolding as we write. Congressional approval does not mean automatic enactment of a new law; a constitutional challenge is highly likely and will have to be overcome. PMID:25555764

Casas, Lidia; Vivaldi, Lieta

2014-11-01

123

Abortion clinic violence as terrorism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Violence against abortion clinics and other activities directed toward patients and staff of abortion facilities have been termed terrorism by the pro?choice movement. However, the Federal Bureau of Investigation denies that these actions are terrorism. Instances of abortion clinic violence for 1982–1987 were examined in order to determine whether there is a correspondence between these incidents and definitions or models

Michele Wilson; John Lynxwiler

1988-01-01

124

Abortion and compelled physician speech.  

PubMed

Informed consent mandates for abortion providers may infringe the First Amendment's freedom of speech. On the other hand, they may reinforce the physician's duty to obtain informed consent. Courts can promote both doctrines by ensuring that compelled physician speech pertains to medical facts about abortion rather than abortion ideology and that compelled speech is truthful and not misleading. PMID:25846035

Orentlicher, David

2015-03-01

125

Women's knowledge of abortion law and availability of services in Nepal.  

PubMed

This paper assesses women's awareness of the liberalization of abortion law and their knowledge of a place for obtaining abortion services in Nepal. The data are from the 2011 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey. The results are compared with data from a similar survey conducted in 2006. Variations in the two measures among several population sub-groups are analysed by performing logistic regression. Among women aged 15-44, 38.7% (CI: 37.8, 39.6) were aware of the legal status of abortion and 59.8% (CI: 58.9, 60.7) knew of a place to have an abortion. The percentages of both measures varied considerably by various population sub-groups. Over a 5-year period, knowledge of the legality of abortion increased by 6.4 percentage points, and awareness of service delivery sites increased by 3.3 percentage points. The increases in both measures were, however, largely limited to higher wealth quintiles and those with higher educational attainment. The results suggest the need to intensify efforts to educate women in Nepal, particularly the most disadvantaged women, about abortion law, including the conditions under which abortion is permitted, and where to access safe abortion services. PMID:23953960

Thapa, Shyam; Sharma, Sharad K; Khatiwada, Naresh

2014-03-01

126

Abortion and contraceptive failure.  

PubMed

Persona, marketed by Unipath, is a new method of natural family planning which has been on the market since 1996. It works by measuring the hormone levels in a woman's urine and letting her know when she is not fertile and may have sex without using a barrier method of contraception. The British Pregnancy Advisory Service (BPAS) found that their surveyed clients who reported using Persona had 188 abortions in 3 months and concluded that there was a need for better information and more advice for couples who plan to use the method. The other major non-NHS abortion provider, Marie Stopes International, reported similar findings, with about 60 women per month visiting their clinics for abortions after having used the method. The BPAS survey also showed that 43% of the women who had an abortion after using Persona were aged 24 years or younger even though Persona is intended for use by women aged 25-40 years in stable relationships. A similar proportion also reported having sex on days when the method told them that they were most fertile. These latter women were not asked if they used another method of contraception on fertile days. An additional 13% reported ignoring the instructions to wait for 3 natural periods after terminating pill use before beginning to use Persona. PMID:12321444

1998-01-01

127

The role of auxiliary nurse-midwives and community health volunteers in expanding access to medical abortion in rural Nepal.  

PubMed

Medical abortion was introduced in Nepal in 2009, but rural women's access to medical abortion services remained limited. We conducted a district-level operations research study to assess the effectiveness of training 13 auxiliary nurse-midwives as medical abortion providers, and 120 female community health volunteers as communicators and referral agents for expanding access to medical abortion for rural women. Interviews with service providers and women who received medical abortion were undertaken and service statistics were analysed. Compared to a neighbouring district with no intervention, there was a significant increase in the intervention area in community health volunteers' knowledge of the legal conditions for abortion, the advantages and disadvantages of medical abortion, safe places for an abortion, medical abortion drugs, correct gestational age for home use of medical abortion, and carrying out a urine pregnancy test. In a one-year period in 2011-12, the community health volunteers did pregnancy tests for 584 women and referred 114 women to the auxiliary nurse-midwives for abortion; 307 women in the intervention area received medical abortion services from auxiliary nurse-midwives. There were no complications that required referral to a higher-level facility except for one incomplete abortion. Almost all women who opted for medical abortion were happy with the services provided. The study demonstrated that auxiliary nurse-midwives can independently and confidently provide medical abortion safely and effectively at the sub-health post level, and community health volunteers are effective change agents in informing women about medical abortion. PMID:25702073

Puri, Mahesh; Tamang, Anand; Shrestha, Prabhakar; Joshi, Deepak

2015-02-01

128

"Abortion will deprive you of happiness!": Soviet reproductive politics in the post-Stalin era.  

PubMed

This article examines Soviet reproductive politics after the Communist regime legalized abortion in 1955. The regime's new abortion policy did not result in an end to the condemnation of abortion in official discourse. The government instead launched an extensive campaign against abortion. Why did authorities bother legalizing the procedure if they still disapproved of it so strongly? Using archival sources, public health materials, and medical as well as popular journals to investigate the antiabortion campaign, this article argues that the Soviet government sought to regulate gender and sexuality through medical intervention and health "education" rather than prohibition and force in the post-Stalin era. It also explores how the antiabortion public health campaign produced "knowledge" not only about the procedure and its effects, but also about gender and sexuality, subjecting both women and men to new pressures and regulatory norms. PMID:22145180

Randall, Amy E

2011-01-01

129

[Abortion and misoprostol: health practices and scientific controversy].  

PubMed

This article puts into perspective the controversy between the association of the use of misoprostol for abortion and teratogenicity studies of the type found in a case report. The use of herbal medicinal drugs and the medical-obstetric and national and international norms governing the registration and circulation of pharmaceutical products were examined. Official documents of ANVISA, the Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization on the use of misoprostol, as well as 68 articles such as case reports published in national journals, linking abortion, misoprostol and teratogenicity were reviewed, systematically filed and analyzed using the monographic method. The legal prohibition of abortion prevents the proper prescription and use of a drug such as misoprostol that is both safe and effective. Thus, the danger for the health of women is linked not to the intrinsic characteristics of the drug, but to the moral arguments that constitute negligence and disregard for the fundamental rights of women. PMID:22872339

Corrêa, Marilena Cordeiro Dias Villela; Mastrella, Miryam

2012-07-01

130

Family Planning andAbortion: HaveTheyAffected Fertility inTennessee?  

Microsoft Academic Search

InTennessee between 1975and1978, birth rates amongteenagers decreased whiletheyincreased amongolder agegroups. Thistrendwasunlike previous years andcoincided temporally withtheincreased availabil- ityoflegal abortion services inTennessee andthespecial efforts toprevent unwanted pregnancies amongteenagers. Increased useoffamily planning services wassignificantly associated withthedropinthefertility rateforBlack teenagers; legal abortion usewassignificantly associated withthechange inthefertility rate forBlack females aged20 years orolder. (AmJPublic Health 1982; 72:608-610.)

HANIK. ATRASH; DAVIDT. ALLEN

1982-01-01

131

Spontaneous abortion and occupation.  

PubMed

Occupational factors in spontaneous abortion were studied in the current and previous pregnancies of 56,012 women interviewed in 11 Montreal maternity departments, 1982 to 1984. Ratios of observed to expected abortions (RR), after allowance for nonoccupational confounders, were significantly increased (P less than .05) among nursing assistants and attendants (RR 1.24 in current and 1.13 in previous pregnancies), food and beverage servers (RR 1.31 in current and 1.11 in previous pregnancies) and sales persons (RR 1.18 in current and 1.12 in previous pregnancies). Women whose work entailed heavy lifting, other physical effort, long hours, exposure to noise, and exposure to cold had also significantly increased risk ratios. However, when occupational groups were ranked according to work demands, thus avoiding potential bias from prior knowledge of outcome, increased risks were associated consistently only with heavy lifting and other physical effort. PMID:3806263

McDonald, A D; Armstrong, B; Cherry, N M; Delorme, C; Diodati-Nolin, A; McDonald, J C; Robert, D

1986-12-01

132

Legal Framing  

E-print Network

legal reform) are less likely than other movement actors toa social movement’s grievance, rather than simple reform (movements face a common rhetorical hurdle in portray- ing their constituency as victimized by progressive reforms

Leachman, Gwendolyn

2013-01-01

133

[Current situation with abortion in Colombia: between illegality and reality].  

PubMed

This article discusses the illegality of abortion in Colombia, situating this country within the 0.4% of the world population where abortion is completely banned. Absolute criminalization of abortion turns it into a public health matter and produces social inequality. The Colombian legislation has always disregarded women as individuals and as persons in full possession of their legal rights. In contrast to a comprehensive conceptualization of sexual and reproductive rights, the various abortion bills merely refer either to "morally unacceptable" situations such as pregnancy resulting from rape or to therapeutic motives. Contradictions between illegality and reality give rise to a public discourse that features rejection of abortion practices, in keeping with the prevailing stance of the ecclesiastic hierarchy, while in practice, and at the private level, people resort to voluntary interruption of pregnancy under conditions of safety and confidentiality, at least for women from the higher socioeconomic strata. This situation not only causes social inequality but also reflects how laws lose meaning and create the collective impression of being useless or unnecessary, thus undermining the state's governing role. PMID:15905926

González Vélez, Ana Cristina

2005-01-01

134

The relationship between abortion and child destruction in English law.  

PubMed

An unmarried 21-year old student who received an unshielded x-ray during treatment for an illness was later found to be 18 weeks pregnant and was advised by 2 doctors to have an abortion. The child's father sought to gain an injunction, preventing the girl from getting the abortion and the area health authority from providing it, on grounds that the abortion of an 18-week fetus constituted the crime of child destruction under the terms of the 1929 Infant Life Preservation Act, which defines the crime as any willful act causing the death of a child capable of being born alive. The judge denied the plaintiff's request on the grounds that the abortion of a child born alive but unable to breathe either on its own or on a ventilator did not constitute child destruction. The tacit agreement that viability implies the ability to breathe leaves the legality of abortions performed at 22-25 weeks gestation unsettled, since it is not possible to ascertain pulmonary function in utero. PMID:3231012

Mackay, R D

1988-01-01

135

Abortions in Byzantine times (325-1453 AD).  

PubMed

The legislation and the texts of the most important medical writers of Byzantine times have been studied with reference to abortions, the ethical aspect of this social and medico-legal problem, the theological and the scientific approach. The theoretical basis of the permanent and absolute condemnation of all kinds of abortions except those permitted for medical reasons, is greatly influenced by the spirit of Christianity. In fact, religion supported the view that the reception of the seed in the uterus and the conception of the embryo means the beginning of life and accepted that the foetus is already a living creature. All legislation of Byzantium from the earliest times also condemned abortions. Consequently, foeticide was considered equal to murder and infanticide and the result was severe punishments for all persons who participated in an abortive technique reliant on drugs or other methods. The punishments could extend to exile, confiscation of property and death. The physicians followed the tradition of Ancient Greece, incorporated in the Hippocratic Oath, representative of the ideas of previous philosophers. According to this famous document, it is forbidden them to give a woman "an abortive suppository". The Orthodox faith reinforced this attitute, protective of every human life. On the other hand, the Church and the State accepted selective abortion based on medical data, such as prevention of dangerous conditions in pregnancy or anatomical difficulties involved. In conclusion, science, church and legislation had a common attitude to matters concerning abortion and this fact reveals an effort to apply a fair policy for the rights of the embryo and the protection of human life in Byzantine society. PMID:11618574

Poulakou-Rebelakou, E; Lascaratos, J; Marketos, S G

1996-01-01

136

Abortion in a just society.  

PubMed

A female Catholic theologian imagines a just society that does not judge women who decide to undergo an abortion. The Church, practitioners, and the courts must trust that women do make person-enhancing choices about the quality of life. In the last 15 years most progress in securing a woman's right to abortion has been limited to white, well-educated, and middle or upper middle class women. A just society would consider reproductive options a human right. Abortion providers are examples of a move to a just society; they are committed to women's well-being. There are some facts that make one pessimistic about achieving abortion in a just society. The US Supreme Court plans to review important decisions establishing abortion as a civil right. Further, some men insist on suing women who want to make their own reproductive decisions--an anti-choice tactic to wear away women's right to reproductive choice. Bombings of abortion clinics and harassment campaigns by anti-choice groups are common. These behaviors strain pro-choice proponents emotionally, psychically, and spiritually. Their tactics often lead to theologians practicing self-censorship because they fear backlash. Abortion providers also do this. Further, the reaction to AIDS is that sex is bad. Anti-abortion groups use AIDS to further their campaigns, claiming that AIDS is a punishment for sex. Strategies working towards abortion in a just society should be education and persuasion of policymakers and citizens about women's right to choose, since they are the ones most affected by abortion. Moreover, only women can secure their rights to abortion. In a just society, every health maintenance organization, insurance company, and group practice would consider abortion a normal service. A just society provides for the survival needs of the most marginalized. PMID:12178856

Hunt, M E

1993-01-01

137

Everything is not abortion stigma.  

PubMed

The topic of abortion stigma has caught the attention of researchers and activists working on reproductive health and rights around the world. But as research on abortion stigma grows, I fear that the concept is in danger of becoming so large and all-encompassing that it may mask deeply rooted inequalities. In addition, abortion stigma may be seen as too complex and tangled an issue, thereby leading to paralysis. It is important that we become more precise in our understanding of abortion stigma so that we can carry out better research to understand and measure it, design interventions to mitigate it, and evaluate those interventions. PMID:24183406

Kumar, Anuradha

2013-01-01

138

28 CFR 551.23 - Abortion.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.23 Abortion...counseling to aid her in making the decision whether to carry the pregnancy to full term or to have an elective abortion. If an...

2011-07-01

139

28 CFR 551.23 - Abortion.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.23 Abortion...counseling to aid her in making the decision whether to carry the pregnancy to full term or to have an elective abortion. If an...

2012-07-01

140

28 CFR 551.23 - Abortion.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.23 Abortion...counseling to aid her in making the decision whether to carry the pregnancy to full term or to have an elective abortion. If an...

2010-07-01

141

28 CFR 551.23 - Abortion.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.23 Abortion...counseling to aid her in making the decision whether to carry the pregnancy to full term or to have an elective abortion. If an...

2014-07-01

142

28 CFR 551.23 - Abortion.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.23 Abortion...counseling to aid her in making the decision whether to carry the pregnancy to full term or to have an elective abortion. If an...

2013-07-01

143

Adolescent pregnancy: a study of aborters and non-aborters.  

PubMed

In a June 1970 through January 1971 study of 99 single girls seeking abortion and 33 single girls choosing to complete the pregnancy, knowledge of and/or access to contraceptives were not the problem. Emotional factors such as guilt over sexual activity, acting-out disorders (rebellious attitude, hippie lifestyle, indifference toward others), or severe reactions to loss of a love relationship contributed to pregnancy in both groups. The girls who became pregnant, especially the ones who chose to complete the pregnancy, viewed pregnancy and motherhood as a source of gratification and self-esteem. Research on motivational factors in adolescent pregnancy is needed to prevent high recidivism. The majority of state abortion laws requiring phychiatric deficiencies for abortions are misguided, since the girls who chose not to abort were more psychiatrically disturbed than the ones who had abortions. PMID:4742821

Kane, F J; Lachenbruch, P A

1973-10-01

144

The politics of unsafe abortion in Burkina Faso: The interface of local norms and global public health practice  

PubMed Central

In Burkina Faso, abortion is legally restricted and socially stigmatised, but also frequent. Unsafe abortions represent a significant public health challenge, contributing to the country's very high maternal mortality ratio. Inspired by an internationally disseminated public health framing of unsafe abortion, the country's main policy response has been to provide post-abortion care (PAC) to avert deaths from abortion complications. Drawing on ethnographic research, this article describes how Burkina Faso's PAC policy emerged at the interface of political and moral negotiations between public health professionals, national bureaucrats and international agencies and NGOs. Burkinabè decision-makers and doctors, who are often hostile to induced abortion, have been convinced that PAC is ‘life-saving care’ which should be delivered for ethical medical reasons. Moreover, by supporting PAC they not only demonstrate compliance with international standards but also, importantly, do not have to contend with any change in abortion legislation, which they oppose. Rights-based international NGOs, in turn, tactically focus on PAC as a ‘first step’ towards their broader institutional objective to secure safe abortion and abortion rights. Such negotiations between national and international actors result in widespread support for PAC but stifled debate about further legalisation of abortion. PMID:25132157

Storeng, Katerini T.; Ouattara, Fatoumata

2014-01-01

145

A statement on abortion by 100 professors of obstetrics: 40 years later.  

PubMed

In this Journal in 1972, 100 leaders in obstetrics and gynecology published a compelling statement that recognized the legalization of abortion in several states and anticipated the 1973 Supreme Court decision in Roe v Wade. They projected the numbers of legal abortions that likely would be required by women in the United States and described the role of the teaching hospital in meeting that responsibility. They wrote to express their concern for women's health in a new legal and medical era of reproductive control and to define the responsibilities of academic obstetrician-gynecologists. Forty years later, 100 professors examine the statement of their predecessors in light of medical advances and legal changes and suggest a further course of action for obstetrician gynecologists. PMID:23500455

2013-09-01

146

A statement on abortion by 100 professors of obstetrics: 40 years later.  

PubMed

In this Journal in 1972, 100 leaders in obstetrics and gynecology published a compelling statement that recognized the legalization of abortion in several states and anticipated the 1973 Supreme Court decision in Roe v Wade. They projected the numbers of legal abortions that likely would be required by women in the United States and described the role of the teaching hospital in meeting that responsibility. They wrote to express their concern for women's health in a new legal and medical era of reproductive control and to define the responsibilities of academic obstetrician-gynecologists. Forty years later, 100 professors examine the statement of their predecessors in light of medical advances and legal changes and suggest a further course of action for obstetrician gynecologists. PMID:24034806

2013-10-01

147

Abortion as a Policy Issue  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most literature dealing with the attitudes of the mass public toward abortion addresses the question in terms of the individual woman seeking termination. This study attempts to explain attitudes when abortion is framed as a public policy question. Three dependent variables are investigated. These are the issues of public funding, when human life begins, and the Human Life Amendment. This

Jerome S. Legge Jr

1987-01-01

148

The Role of Interpersonal Communication in Preventing Unsafe Abortion in Communities: The Dialogues for Life Project in Nepal  

PubMed Central

Legal, procedural, and institutional restrictions on safe abortion services—such as laws forbidding the practice or policies preventing donors from supporting groups who provide legal services—remain a major access barrier for women worldwide. However, even when abortion services are legal, women face social and cultural barriers to accessing safe abortion services and preventing unwanted pregnancy. Interpersonal communication interventions play an important role in overcoming these obstacles, including as part of broad educational- and behavioral-change efforts. This article presents results from an interpersonal communication behavior change pilot intervention, Dialogues for Life, undertaken in Nepal from 2004 to 2006, after abortion was legalized in 2002. The project aimed to encourage and enable women to prevent unplanned pregnancies and unsafe abortions and was driven by dialogue groups and select community events. The authors’ results confirm that a dialogue-based interpersonal communication intervention can help change behavior and that this method is feasible in a low-resource, low-literacy setting. Dialogue groups play a key role in addressing sensitive and stigmatizing health issues such as unsafe abortion and in empowering women to negotiate for the social support they need when making decisions about their health. PMID:21128150

Bingham, Allison; Drake, Jennifer Kidwell; Goodyear, Lorelei; Gopinath, C. Y.; Kaufman, Anne; Bhattarai, Sanju

2010-01-01

149

Teenage pregnancies and abortion.  

PubMed

The issue of abortion, except when it is rendered moot because the fetus endangers the life of the mother, is not really a medical issue. The physician's role is to help patients achieve and maintain their maximum potential for physical, mental, and social well-being. To accomplish this, the physician must acquire a constantly evolving database of scientific knowledge, must evaluate this information in a critical and ethical manner, and must be prepared to apply what is learned. In the realm of applied ethics, no particular religion, profession, culture, class, or sex should be thought of as having all the answers in the realm of applied ethics. This physician's actions are predicated on the belief that, to a large extent, ethical precepts reflect the broader social and economic issues of the period in which they are articulated. If this is the case, then in today's world the population explosion, the postindustrial society, the women's rights movement, inequality of access, and the ability to perform prenatal diagnosis are all factors which have molded the approach to the issue of abortion. Only the last 3 of these can in any way be considered as medical. When considering the role of a physician in dealing with the issue of abortion in the adolescent, this individual relies on the concept articulated by the World Health Association (WHA): promoting the physical, emotional, and social well-being of one's patients. Each year in the US over 1 million 15-19 year olds become pregnant, resulting in over 600,000 births. Most of these pregnancies are unintentional, yet approximately 90% of the infants are kept in the home by mothers who are ill prepared to be parents. What is most disturbing is that the pregnancy rate for the younger mother, 16 years or under, is accounting for an ever increasing percentage of the total. Studies at the Adolescent Health Center of the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City as well as national studies suggest that the younger teens are more likely to reject the abortion alternative. Vital statistics suggest that, for the most part, it is abortion rather than contraception that exerts an ameliorating effect on the birthrate of the younger mothers. The most disturbing aspect of these statistics is the magnitude of the very real problems associated with children bearing children. 2/3 of all women who have their 1st baby before the age of 20 will be below the poverty level. A correlation exists between poor marital adjustment and early childbearing. The divorce rate is 3 times higher when 1 spouse is younger than age 20. There are also problems for the infant of the teenage mother, including an increase in stillbirths and prematurity, and increase in small for date infants, and physical, psychological and social disadvantages over time for children born to mothers in their early teens. PMID:6608673

Morgenthau, J E

1984-01-01

150

Epidemiology of recurrent spontaneous abortion.  

PubMed

With recent scientific advances leading to better understanding of the immunobiology of recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA), interest has now focused upon the epidemiology of RSA. A cohort of 214 couples with a history of two or more consecutive abortions were studied for the prevalence of etiologic factors and association with other reproductive failures. The prevalence of causes of RSA in this cohort was compared with etiologic factors among 179 couples with a history of three or more consecutive abortions. The obstetrical histories of 214 women with RSA were analyzed for the total number of pregnancies, live births, stillbirths, spontaneous abortions, ectopic pregnancies, and hydatidiform moles. These numbers were compared with the expected frequency of each in the general population. The prevalence of etiologies among 214 with RSA were as follows: chromosomal-6%, anatomic-1%, hormonal-5%, immunologic-65%, and unexplained-23%. No differences in the prevalence of etiologic factors exist when couples with a history of two or more abortions are compared with three or more abortions. When the number of ectopic pregnancies, molar pregnancies, and stillbirths among 214 women with RSA were compared with the expected numbers, the odds ratios were 2.2 for ectopic pregnancies, 6.0 for molar pregnancies, and 2.3 for stillbirths. These data indicate that no difference in the prevalence of etiologies of RSA exist when couples with two or more abortions are compared with three or more and a comorbidity between RSA and other types of reproductive failure exists. PMID:1741935

Coulam, C B

1991-08-01

151

Induced abortion and contraception use  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To determine what proportion of women seeking induced abortion in the Calgary census metropolitan area were immigrants. Design For 2 months, eligible women were asked to complete a questionnaire. Women who refused were asked to provide their country of birth (COB) to assess for selection bias. Setting Two abortion clinics in Calgary, Alta. Participants Women presenting at or less than 15 weeks’ gestational age for induced abortion for maternal indications. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was the proportion of women seeking induced abortion services who were immigrants. Secondary outcomes compared socioeconomic characteristics and contraception use between immigrant and Canadian-born women. Results A total of 752 women either completed a questionnaire (78.6%) or provided their COB (21.4%). Overall, 28.9% of women living in the Calgary census metropolitan area who completed the questionnaire were immigrants, less than the 31.2% background proportion of immigrant women of childbearing age. However, 46.0% of women who provided only COB were immigrants. When these data were combined, 34.2% of women presenting for induced abortion identified as immigrant, a proportion not significantly different from the background proportion (P = .127). Immigrant women presenting for induced abortion tended to be older, more educated, married with children, and have increased parity. They were similar to Canadian-born women in number of previous abortions, income status, and employment status. Conclusion This study suggests that immigrant women in Calgary are not presenting for induced abortion in disproportionately higher numbers, which differs from existing European literature. This is likely owing to differing socioeconomic characteristics among the immigrant women in our study from what have been previously described in the literature (typically lower socioeconomic status). Much still needs to be explored with regard to factors influencing the use of abortion services by immigrant women. PMID:25217694

du Prey, Beatrice; Talavlikar, Rachel; Mangat, Rupinder; Freiheit, Elizabeth A.; Drummond, Neil

2014-01-01

152

Ideology, Propaganda and Legal Discourse in the Argument Culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The issues at the heart of America’s social conflicts are being forced into the choices made by the legal system. Abortion, race, gender, sexuality, marriage and religion are all heated issues around which there is profound disagreement. The cultural conflict these issues generate has produced a vacuum of reasoned, evidence-based discourse in virtually any area of importance. It is difficult

David Barnhizer

2007-01-01

153

Legal Encyclopedia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site, provided by Nolo Press, a publisher of self-help law books and software, is a handy compendium of brief advice on fifteen topics, including small business, patent, copyright & trademark, legal research, wills & estate planning, and real estate. Content is composed of excerpted articles from Nolo books on the topics. Also provided are annotated lists of links related to each topic. While the purpose, of course, is to sell Nolo books and software, there is much useful content here.

154

Abortion work: strains, coping strategies, policy implications.  

PubMed

As a result of the moral and social conflicts surrounding abortion, workers involved in counseling potential abortion recipients are subject to certain strains. The author uses observations made at one abortion clinic to support her conclusion that these strains, as well as the methods of coping developed by staff and administration, must be considered in formulating any policy on abortion. PMID:10244755

Joffe, C

1979-11-01

155

Negligence in Academic Advising and Abortion Counseling: Courts Rulings and Implications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents two court cases to illuminate school counselors' legal responsibilities in academic advising and abortion counseling. The cases are presented to show how appellate court decisions can guide and inform future decision making in a variety of malpractice situations, and to equip professionals to exercise even greater care for their minor…

Stone, Carolyn

2002-01-01

156

Abortion of Defective Fetuses: Attitudes of Mothers of Congenitally Impaired Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared a sample of mothers of children with cystic fibrosis, cerebral palsy, myelodysplasia, and multiple physical handicaps with a probability sample of mothers of children free of disabilities on their attitudes toward the availability of legal abortion. The responses were not distinguishable for the two groups, nor was the specific disability…

Breslau, Naomi

1987-01-01

157

Survey of Freshmen Finds a Decline in Support for Abortion and Casual Sex.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Annual Higher Education Research Institute college freshman survey (n=275,811) at 469 institutions found more eschew political extremes, preferring to call themselves "middle of the road." About half believe abortion should be legal, a decline of 14% since 1990. Freshman did not seem as interested in coursework as they did in previous years, but…

Reisberg, Leo

1999-01-01

158

Abortion incidence in Cambodia, 2005 and 2010.  

PubMed

Although Cambodia now permits elective abortion, scarcity of research on this topic means that information on abortion incidence is limited to regional estimates. This estimation model combines national survey data from Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) with national prospective data of abortion procedures from government health facilities, collected in 2005 and 2010, to calculate the national incidence of safe and unsafe abortion. According to DHS, the proportion of all induced abortions that took place in a health facility in the five years preceding each survey increased from almost 52% to 60%. Projecting from facility-based abortions to national estimates, the national abortion rate increased from 21 to 28 per 1000 women aged 15-44. The abortion ratio also increased from 19 to 28 per 100 live births. This research quantifies an increase in safely induced abortions in Cambodia and provides a deeper understanding of induced abortion trends in Cambodia. PMID:25649162

Fetters, Tamara; Samandari, Ghazaleh

2015-04-01

159

Induced abortion: What's happening in rural Bangladesh  

Microsoft Academic Search

This qualitative study was done in rural Bangladesh among the women seeking abortion-related care at six health facilities in two rural sub-districts of Bangladesh in 1996–1997. It looked at contraceptive use, why women had abortions, who made the abortion decision, who provided the abortions, the complications of abortion that developed, where and how soon the women sought treatment. A majority

Shameem Ahmed; Ariful Islam; Parveen A. Khanum

1999-01-01

160

Antiprogestin drugs: ethical, legal and medical issues.  

PubMed

RU 486 allows women the choice of a medical rather than a surgical abortion, and, for most women, the choice is one of procedure, not of whether to have an abortion. Issues surrounding RU 486 were explored in an American Society of Law and Medicine conference in December 1991 entitled "Antiprogestin Drugs: Ethical, Legal and Medical Issues." An introduction to 14 conference papers provides an overview of the proceedings. Baulieu, the father of RU 486, described updated developments in its use and the medically supervised method of abortion. Bygdeman and Swahn presented their work in Sweden on combining RU 486 with a prostaglandin to make abortion more effective. They suggested that the drug may be an attractive postovulation contraceptive. Greenslad et al. discussed service delivery aspects of the use of RU 486. Holt considered the implications of use of the drug in low-resource settings. A survey of obstetricians and gynecologists, presented by Heilig, indicates that 22% more physicians would perform a medical abortion. Patient perspectives were addressed by David, who stated that measuring acceptability of an abortion technique is difficult; women have historically used whatever method is available. A collaborative research project in India and Cuba on why women chose certain methods was reported by Winikoff et al. (90% of women would choose medical abortion if faced with the choice again). Berer analyzed French data on women's perspectives on medical vs. surgical abortion. The question of adolescent use of the drug was considered by Senderowitz, who lamented the lack of data on the subject and described what is known about adolescent pregnancy. Macklin proposed a framework for ethical analysis and used facts to address ethical questions. Weinstein provided another ethical framework, to analyze whether pharmacists have a right to refuse to provide abortifacient drugs. Buc approached the subject from a legal point of view and concluded that, whereas legal problems are minimal, political problem are of first concern. Boland described differences in introduction of the drug in France and Britain and the US. The theory of "use it or lose it" in patent legislation is applied differently in the US, France, and the UK. Hayhurst, in a complementary legal analysis, noted that Canadian importation would open access to affluent US women. Pine reported on the legal case Benten vs. Kessler, which did not result in successful importation of the drug for personal use, but resulted in some supportive language from the courts. By refusing to apply to the FDA for marketing approval, RU 486's manufacturer may be setting itself up for a boycott. Approaching the problem from these various perspectives addressed the challenge between medical advances and politics and highlighted the need to balance the benefits to women with perceived threats to values. PMID:1434754

Cook, R J; Grimes, D A

1992-01-01

161

Evaluation of a multi-pronged intervention to improve access to safe abortion care in two districts in Jharkhand  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the adoption of the Medical Termination of Pregnancy Act in 1972, access to safe abortion services remains limited in India. Awareness of the legality of abortion also remains low, leading many women to seek services outside the health system. Medical abortion (MA) is an option that has the potential to expand access to safe abortion services. A multi-pronged intervention covering a population of 161,000 in 253 villages in the Silli and Khunti blocks of Jharkhand was conducted between 2007 and 2009, seeking to improve medical abortion services and create awareness at the community level by providing information through community intermediaries and creating an enabling environment through a behavior change communication campaign. The study evaluates the changes in knowledge about abortion-related issues, changes in abortion care-seeking, and service utilization as a result of this intervention. Methods A baseline cross-sectional survey was conducted pre-intervention (n?=?1,253) followed by an endline survey (n?=?1,290) one year after the completion of the intervention phase. In addition, monitoring data from intervention facilities was collected monthly over the study period. Results Nearly 85% of respondents reported being exposed to safe abortion messaging as a result of the intervention. Awareness of the legality of abortion increased significantly from 19.7% to 57.6% for women, as did awareness of the specific conditions for which abortion is allowed. Results were similar for men. There was also a significant increase in the proportion of men and women who knew of a legal and safe provider and place from where abortion services could be obtained. Multivariate analysis showed positive associations between exposure to any component of the intervention and increased knowledge about legality and gestational age limits, however only interpersonal communication was associated with a significant increase in knowledge of where to obtain safe services (OR 4.8, SE 0.67). Utilization of safe abortion services, and in particular MA, increased at all intervention sites over the duration of the intervention with a shift towards women seeking care earlier in pregnancy. Conclusion The evaluation demonstrates the success of the intervention and its potential for replication in similar contexts within India. PMID:24886273

2014-01-01

162

Crew Exploration Vehicle Ascent Abort Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the primary design drivers for NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) is to ensure crew safety. Aborts during the critical ascent flight phase require the design and operation of CEV systems to escape from the Crew Launch Vehicle and return the crew safely to the Earth. To accomplish this requirement of continuous abort coverage, CEV ascent abort modes are being designed and analyzed to accommodate the velocity, altitude, atmospheric, and vehicle configuration changes that occur during ascent. The analysis involves an evaluation of the feasibility and survivability of each abort mode and an assessment of the abort mode coverage. These studies and design trades are being conducted so that more informed decisions can be made regarding the vehicle abort requirements, design, and operation. This paper presents an overview of the CEV, driving requirements for abort scenarios, and an overview of current ascent abort modes. Example analysis results are then discussed. Finally, future areas for abort analysis are addressed.

Davidson, John B., Jr.; Madsen, Jennifer M.; Proud, Ryan W.; Merritt, Deborah S.; Sparks, Dean W., Jr.; Kenyon, Paul R.; Burt, Richard; McFarland, Mike

2007-01-01

163

Conscientious objection and its impact on abortion service provision in South Africa: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Despite abortion being legally available in South Africa after a change in legislation in 1996, barriers to accessing safe abortion services continue to exist. These barriers include provider opposition to abortion often on the grounds of religious or moral beliefs including the unregulated practice of conscientious objection. Few studies have explored how providers in South Africa make sense of, or understand, conscientious objection in terms of refusing to provide abortion care services and the consequent impact on abortion access. Methods A qualitative approach was used which included 48 in-depth interviews with a purposively selected population of abortion related health service providers, managers and policy influentials in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. Data were analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. Results The ways in which conscientious objection was interpreted and practiced, and its impact on abortion service provision was explored. In most public sector facilities there was a general lack of understanding concerning the circumstances in which health care providers were entitled to invoke their right to refuse to provide, or assist in abortion services. Providers seemed to have poor understandings of how conscientious objection was to be implemented, but were also constrained in that there were few guidelines or systems in place to guide them in the process. Conclusions Exploring the ways in which conscientious objection was interpreted and applied by differing levels of health care workers in relation to abortion provision raised multiple and contradictory issues. From providers’ accounts it was often difficult to distinguish what constituted confusion with regards to the specifics of how conscientious objection was to be implemented in terms of the Choice on Termination of Pregnancy Act, and what was refusal of abortion care based on opposition to abortion in general. In order to disentangle what is resistance to abortion provision in general, and what is conscientious objection on religious or moral grounds, clear guidelines need to be provided including what measures need to be undertaken in order to lodge one’s right to conscientious objection. This would facilitate long term contingency plans for overall abortion service provision. PMID:24571633

2014-01-01

164

Abortion and the law: the Supreme Court, privacy, and abortion.  

PubMed

This article examines the impact of the continuing politicization of the abortion issue in the US on the rights of women and on the emerging concept of fetal rights. The introduction 1) attributes the "final and total politicization" of a woman's right to control her reproduction to the "undue burden" standard introduced by the Supreme Court in its 1992 Casey decision and 2) claims that, if unchecked, the concept of fetal rights may give the state's interest in protecting potential life supremacy over women's rights. The next section presents an in-depth discussion of the politicization of the right to abortion that covers such topics as how the courts before Casey became the forum for debating abortion policy, how the "undue burden" standard fails to set definite parameters of acceptable state behavior, how the Casey decision in effect abandons the trimester-based framework of reference provided in Roe vs. Wade, how Casey allows states to subtly coerce women seeking abortions, how the Casey decision failed to reduce the intense politicization of abortion, and how the court failed to protect individual rights to health care and abortion funding from states. Part 3 of the article begins its exploration of the concept of "fetal rights" with a sketch of the history of this concept in the US courts starting in 1884 when damages for miscarriage were denied. Ways in which fetal rights compete with the rights of a pregnant woman are described, the Supreme Court is blamed for allowing states to develop this concept, and issues of patient confidentiality versus reporting requirements are considered. It is concluded that the Supreme Court will have to act to limit fetal rights. PMID:12348324

Marsh, F H

1997-01-01

165

The search for meaning: RU 486 and the law of abortion.  

PubMed Central

The advent of RU 486 (mifepristone), a steroid analogue capable of inducing menses within 8 to 10 weeks of a missed menstrual period, has provoked a firestorm of concern and controversy. When used in conjunction with prostaglandin (RU 486/PG), it is at least 95% effective. Used in France principally to terminate confirmed pregnancies very early in the process of gestation, RU 486 raises many interesting legal questions. This article focuses on whether and how RU 486/PG can be accommodated within the framework of the world's current abortion laws. Four avenues are explored and conclusions drawn. First, it is clear that RU 486/PG can be used readily, if approved, within the regimens established by liberal abortion laws, as has been the experience in France, the United Kingdom, and even China. Second, although unlikely, the introduction of this new technology may inspire a reexamination of restrictive abortion statutes themselves. Third, some of the presently restrictive laws may be interpreted to permit RU 486/PG use as a legal procedure, for a very narrow range of reasons. Finally, in some settings the early use of RU 486/PG (before pregnancy can be confirmed) may fall outside the reach of abortion legislation and hence be acceptable from a legal point of view. PMID:1415870

Banwell, S S; Paxman, J M

1992-01-01

166

Pregnancy Choices: Raising the Baby, Adoption, and Abortion  

MedlinePLUS

... abortion, what should I know about my state’s laws? • What happens during an abortion procedure? • What are ... abortion, what should I know about my state’s laws? State laws vary about access to abortion. Some ...

167

The horror of unsafe abortion: case report of a life threatening complication in a 29-year old woman  

PubMed Central

Background Every year 42 million women with unintended pregnancies choose abortion, and fifty percent of these procedures, 20 million are unsafe. An unsafe abortion is defined as a procedure for terminating an unintended pregnancy carried out either by person lacking the necessary skills or in an environment that does not conform to minimal medical standards or both. Pakistan is the one of the six countries where more than 50% of the world’s all maternal deaths occur. It is estimated that 890,000 induced abortions are performed annually in Pakistan, and estimate an annual abortion rate of 29 per 1000 women aged 15-49. Case presentation Here we present a case report of a 29-year old woman who underwent an unsafe abortion for unintended pregnancy resulting in uterine perforation. The unskilled provider pulled out her bowel through vagina after perforating the uterus, as a result she lost major portion of her small intestine resulting in short bowel syndrome. Conclusion The law of Pakistan only allows abortion during early stages of pregnancy for purpose of saving the life of a mother but does not cater for cases of rape, incest and fetal abnormalities or social reasons. Only legalization of abortion is not sufficient, preventing unintended pregnancy should be the priority of all the nations and for this reason contraception should be widely accessible. Practitioners need to become better trained in safer abortion methods and be to able transfer the patient to health facility when complications occur. PMID:24131627

2013-01-01

168

Remembering Aborted Foetuses in a Japanese Shrine  

E-print Network

In a shrine beside a temple in Kyoto there are a large number of small effigies. They commemorate aborted foetuses. In the absence of proper contraception, the Japanese for centuries have had to use abortion and, in the past, infanticide...

Macfarlane, Alan

2004-07-29

169

Abortable Reader-Writer Locks are No More Complex Than Abortable Mutex Locks  

E-print Network

Abortable Reader-Writer Locks are No More Complex Than Abortable Mutex Locks Dartmouth Computer on designing abortable mutual exclusion locks, and fairly efficient algorithms of O(log n) RMR complexity have). The abort feature is just as important for a reader-writer lock as it is for a mutual exclusion lock

170

Diagnosing Abortion Problems Abortions can represent a significant loss of (potential)  

E-print Network

Diagnosing Abortion Problems Abortions can represent a significant loss of (potential) income- hood of diagnosing the cause of any abortions that may occur. In some situations, the prompt diagnosis of an abortion may help reduce the severity of an impending outbreak. Well-kept records can be very useful

Liskiewicz, Maciej

171

Abortion legislation: exploring perspectives of general practitioners and obstetrics and gynaecology clinicians.  

PubMed

Abortion legislation remains a contentious topic in the UK, which receives much attention from politicians, clinicians and professional bodies alike. In this study, the perspectives of general practitioners and obstetrics and gynaecology clinicians on the Abortion Act 1967 was explored. To this end, a short electronic questionnaire was distributed to all 211 GP and obstetrics and gynaecology clinicians affiliated with the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine. Of the 100 anonymous responses collected, a significant majority felt that abortion law in Northern Ireland should be changed in line with the rest of the UK. The respondents' votes, however, were either opposed to or divided over any other changes to the Abortion Act, including altering the 24 week time limit, clarifying the legal definition of fetal abnormalities, introducing abortion purely on the woman's request, and modifying the requirement for two clinicians to approve any request for abortion. These perspectives were not entirely aligned with the recommendations of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee, or with current medical evidence and demographic data. PMID:25498561

Theodosiou, Anastasia A; Mitchell, Oliver R

2015-02-01

172

Prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion.  

PubMed

The Abortion and Sterilisation Act, 1975, has been in force for 1 year. Experience gained in the Johannesburg area in the operation of the Act with respect to termination of pregnancies for abnormalities of the unborn child, is outlined. Relatively few abortions have, in fact, been carried out for this reason, but the number is likely to increase. Prenatal diagnosis of disease in the fetus, although not possible in all cases, has greatly facilitated the management of families in which a child with a heritable disorder may be born. PMID:137537

Jenkins, T; Kromberg, J G

1976-12-11

173

It's not Just Abortion, Stupid: Progressives and Abortion  

Microsoft Academic Search

:Progressive men and women have found it extremely difficult to address issues of reproductive and sexual behavior-abortion, above all. Reproductive politics, in left circles, is not just about fighting the antiabortion movement or right-wing sexual conservatives for the hearts and minds of \\

Carole Joffe

2005-01-01

174

Abortion, Moral Maturity and Civic Journalism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contributes to rhetoric, moral reasonings scholarship, and journalism scholarship by examining public rhetoric on abortion and American popular media coverage (1940s to 1990s). Finds that the feminine means of moral reasoning has emerged into the foreground of discourse on abortion. Compares emergence of a common-ground rhetoric on abortion with a…

Patterson, Maggie Jones; Hall, Megan Williams

1998-01-01

175

Abortion and Mental Health: Evaluating the Evidence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors evaluated empirical research addressing the relationship between induced abortion and women's mental health. Two issues were addressed: (a) the relative risks associated with abortion compared with the risks associated with its alternatives and (b) sources of variability in women's responses following abortion. This article reflects…

Major, Brenda; Appelbaum, Mark; Beckman, Linda; Dutton, Mary Ann; Russo, Nancy Felipe; West, Carolyn

2009-01-01

176

Aborting a Message Flowing Through Social Communities  

E-print Network

Aborting a Message Flowing Through Social Communities Cindy Hui Rutgers University Piscataway, New that incorporate group structures and the distribution of trust in designing a useful abort mechanism. Index Terms is spreading and we wish to spread a counter rumor. We investigate the aborting of a message that is currently

Magdon-Ismail, Malik

177

Aborting a Message Flowing Through Social Communities  

E-print Network

Aborting a Message Flowing Through Social Communities Cindy Hui, Malik Magdon-Ismail, William A in designing a useful abort mechanism. Index Terms--agent-based simulation, information diffusion, information investigate the aborting of a message that is currently diffusing through a network, with the purpose

Goldberg, Mark

178

ABORTION COST LIST I Hartford Sites  

E-print Network

ABORTION COST LIST I Hartford Sites: 1. Hartford Gyn Center 860-525-1900 Medical- $550 + $30 if Rh for Abortion info/scheduling 1-877-529-3689 www.ppct.org Procedure Sites in Norwich, New Haven, West Hartford. Both, Dr. Byrd and Dr. Flagg are willing to perform therapeutic abortions. Dr. Beverly Byrd 852

Royer, Dana

179

Sociology and abortion: legacies and strategies.  

PubMed

A survey essay sees the sociological view of abortion practice in 1979 appearing as a dense web of philosophical conundrums and at times violent political strategies; with abortion still not typically seen as 1 form of birth control among others. Attention is called to the variety of approaches to abortion in books and articles about its medical, demographic, religious, historical, political, philosophical, psychological, practical, and personal aspects. These include: James C. Mohr's Abortion in America: The Origins and Evolution of National Policy 1800-1900; Abortion, by Potts, Diggory, and Peel; Abortion in Psychosocial Perspective: Trends in Transnational Research, edited by Davis, Friedman, Van der Tak, and Seville; Linda Francke's The Ambivalence of Abortion; Mary K. Zimmerman's Passage Through Abortion: The Personal and Social Reality of Women's Experiences; Abortion Politics: The Hawaii Experience, by Steinhoff and Diamond; John Connery's Abortion: the Development of the Roman Catholic Perspective; Abortion: New Directions for Policy Studies, by Manier, Liu, and Solomon; and Harry Harris' Prenatal Diagnosis and Selective Abortion. PMID:12261937

Imber, J B

1979-11-01

180

The Deprivation Argument Against Abortion  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACTThe most plausible pro-life argument claims that abortion is seriously wrong because it deprives the foetus of something valuable. This paper examines two recent versions of this argument. Don Marquis's version takes the valuable thing to be a ‘future like ours’, a future containing valuable experiences and activities. Jim Stone's version takes the valuable thing to be a future containing

Dean Stretton

2004-01-01

181

A consideration of abortion survivors  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is hypothesized that children who have siblings terminated by abortion have similar psychological conflicts to those children who survive disasters or siblings who die of accident or illness. There is evidence that children are aware of their mother's pregnancy termination. Having been chosen to survive these children may have considerable conflicts regarding their existence. Since their life depended upon

Philip G. Ney

1983-01-01

182

Characteristics and motivations of women receiving abortions.  

PubMed

In March, 1970, Hawaii became the first state to allow abortion on demand. A comparison was made between women receiving abortions and women delivering babies at 2 large medical facilites in Honolulu in the June 1-July 15, 1970, period. Reasons the women cited for wanting an abortion were: 1) age; 2) marital status; 3) employment or student status; and 4) income. The comparison data indicate that the abortion patients were assessing objectively their ability to provide for a child. Definite differences in all these criteria did exist between the aborters and the deliverers. PMID:12333117

Steinhoff, P G; Smith, R G; Diamond, M

1972-01-01

183

Abortion trends from 1996 to 2011 in Estonia: special emphasis on repeat abortion  

PubMed Central

Background The study aimed to describe the overall and age-specific trends of induced abortions from 1996 to 2011 with an emphasis on socio-demographic characteristics and contraceptive use of women having had repeat abortions in Estonia. Methods Data were retrieved from the Estonian Medical Birth and Abortion Registry and Statistics Estonia. Total induced abortion numbers, rates, ratios and age-specific rates are presented for 1996–2011. The percentage change in the number of repeat abortions within selected socio-demographic subgroups, contraception use and distribution of induced abortions among Estonians and non-Estonians for the first, second, third, fourth and subsequent abortions were calculated for the periods 1996–2003 and 2004–2011. Results Observed trends over the 16-year study period indicated a considerable decline in induced abortions with a reduction in abortion rate of 57.1%, which was mainly attributed to younger cohorts. The percentage of women undergoing repeat abortions fell steadily from 63.8% during 1996–2003 to 58.0% during 2004–2011. The percentage of women undergoing repeat abortions significantly decreased over the 16 years within all selected socio-demographic subgroups except among women with low educational attainment and students. Within each time period, a greater percentage of non-Estonians than Estonians underwent repeat abortions and obtained third and subsequent abortions. Most women did not use any contraceptive method prior to their first or subsequent abortion. Conclusion A high percentage of women obtaining repeat abortions reflects a high historical abortion rate. If current trends continue, a rapid decline in repeat abortions may be predicted. To decrease the burden of sexual ill health, routine contraceptive counselling, as standard care in the abortion process, should be seriously addressed with an emphasis on those groups - non-Estonians, women with lower educational attainment, students and women with children - vulnerable with respect to repeat abortion. PMID:25005363

2014-01-01

184

Post-abortion syndrome: creating an affliction.  

PubMed

The contention that abortion harms women constitutes a new strategy employed by the pro-life movement to supplement arguments about fetal rights. David C. Reardon is a prominent promoter of this strategy. Post-abortion syndrome purports to establish that abortion psychologically harms women and, indeed, can harm persons associated with women who have abortions. Thus, harms that abortion is alleged to produce are multiplied. Claims of repression are employed to complicate efforts to disprove the existence of psychological harm and causal antecedents of trauma are only selectively investigated. We argue that there is no such thing as post-abortion syndrome and that the psychological harms Reardon and others claim abortion inflicts on women can usually be ascribed to different causes. We question the evidence accumulated by Reardon and his analysis of data accumulated by others. Most importantly, we question whether the conclusions Reardon has drawn follow from the evidence he cites. PMID:19594725

Dadlez, E M; Andrews, William L

2010-11-01

185

Early abortion in a family planning clinic.  

PubMed

The successful integration of sessions for very early abortion in the Planned Parenthood Clinic of San Francisco is described. Abortion sessions replaced 2 one- half days of contraceptive clinics per week. Flexible Karman cannulas and foot, or electrically-operated vacuum pumps were used. Routine testing for RhD antibody and gonorrhea were done at each abortion. 560 women were aborted during the year and 4 had repeat abortion. Problems encountered were 1.8% failed abortion requiring repeat suction, 1.6% bleeding heavier than a menstrual period, 3% infection in the uterus or surrounding tissues, and 1 ecotopic pregnancy. The abortion service in the Clinic was well accepted by patients, staff, the medical community, and the community at large. PMID:4218815

Goldsmith, S

1974-01-01

186

Abortion returns to haunt US presidential campaign.  

PubMed

The abortion issue has infested national politics since 1973, now it returns to haunt the US presidential election politics. However, rather than serving as a customary rallying cause for Republicans, it is now a millstone around the neck of their candidate, Governor George Bush, who seeks a broad ideological span of voters to win his candidacy. Bush expressed strong anti-abortion sentiments to attract the die-hard right-to-life vote in the hard-fought primary campaign. For many years, the anti-abortion language in the US remains strident, however, it is clear that most voters support, or at least tolerate, the availability of abortion services. In his presidential campaign, Bush shied away from endorsing a constitutional amendment to ban abortion, and declared his opposition to any exceptions to an abortion ban. He is now on the record with numerous anti-abortion declarations, and holds endorsements from the pro-life camp. PMID:10791389

Greenberg, D S

2000-04-01

187

The current state of abortion law and practice in Northern Ireland.  

PubMed

This paper reviews current abortion law and practice in Northern Ireland (NI). It explores the origins of NI's abortion law and its complexity in relation to current practice. It reviews issues relating to women seeking terminations in NI and Great Britain and reviews attempts by the Family Planning Association in NI to require the Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety NI to clarify the current legal basis for termination of pregnancy and to provide guidance for health professionals engaged in this practice. The paper also discusses some of the issues surrounding abortion in NI and seeks to explain why this subject is causing controversy and debate, especially following a judicial review in February and Marie Stopes opening a termination service in Belfast. PMID:23901450

Daniels, Pauline; Campbell, Patricia; Clinton, Alison

188

Procedural abortion rights: Ireland and the European Court of Human Rights.  

PubMed

The Irish Protection of Life During Pregnancy Act seeks to clarify the legal ground for abortion in cases of risk to life, and to create procedures to regulate women's access to services under it. This article explores the new law as the outcome of an international human rights litigation strategy premised on state duties to implement abortion laws through clear standards and procedural safeguards. It focuses specifically on the Irish law reform and the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights, including A. B. and C. v. Ireland (2010). The article examines how procedural rights at the international level can engender domestic law reform that limits or expands women's access to lawful abortion services, serving conservative or progressive ends. PMID:25555760

Erdman, Joanna N

2014-11-01

189

Legal briefing: informed consent in the clinical context.  

PubMed

This issue's "Legal Briefing" column covers recent legal developments involving informed consent.1 We covered this topic in previous articles in The Journal of Clinical Ethics.2 But an updated discussion is warranted. First, informed consent remains a central and critically important issue in clinical ethics. Second, there have been numerous significant legal changes over the past year. We categorize recent legal developments into the following 13 categories: (1) Medical Malpractice Liability, (2) Medical Malpractice Liability in Wisconsin, (3) Medical Malpractice Liability in Novel Situations, (4) Enforcement by Criminal Prosecutors, (5) Enforcement by State Medical Boards, (6) Enforcement through Anti-Discrimination Laws, (7) Statutorily Mandated Disclosures Related to End-of-Life Counseling, (8) Statutorily Mandated Disclosures Related to Aid in Dying, (9) Statutorily Mandated Disclosures Related to Abortion, (10) Statutorily Mandated Disclosures Related to Telemedicine, (11) Statutorily Mandated Disclosures Related to Other Interventions, (12) Statutorily Mandated Gag and Censorship Laws, (13) Informed Consent in the Research Context. PMID:24972066

Pope, Thaddeus Mason; Hexum, Melinda

2014-01-01

190

Departure phase aborts for manned Mars missions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA goals are set on resumption of human activity on the Moon and extending manned missions to Mars. Abort options are key elements of any system designed to safeguard human lives and stated requirements stipulate the provision of an abort capability throughout the mission. The present investigation will focus on the formulation and analysis of possible abort modes during the Earth departure phase of manned Mars interplanetary transfers. Though of short duration, the departure phase encompasses a mission timeline where failures have frequently become manifest in historical manned spacecraft necessitating the inclusion of a departure phase abort capability. Investigated abort modes included aborts to atmospheric entry, and to Earth or Moon orbit. Considered interplanetary trajectory types included conjunction, opposition, and free-return trajectory classes. All abort modes were analyzed for aborts initiated at multiple points along each of these possible departure trajectories across all launch opportunities of the fifteen-year Earth-Mars inertial period. The consistently low departure velocities of the conjunction trajectories facilitated the greatest abort capability. An analysis of Mars transportation architectures was performed to determine the amount of available delta V inherent in each candidate architecture for executing departure aborts. Results indicate that a delta V of at least 4 km/s is required to achieve a continuous departure phase entry abort capability with abort flights less than three weeks duration for all transfer opportunity years. Less demanding transfer years have a corresponding increase in capability. The Earth orbit abort mode does not become widely achievable until more than 6 km/s delta V is provided; a capacity not manifest in any considered architecture. Optimization of the Moon abort mode resulted in slight departure date shifts to achieve improved lunar alignments. The Moon abort mode is only widely achievable for conjunction transfers during the optimum transfer years and delta V values greater than 4 km/s. A lesser delta V potential of 3 km/s is sufficient to enable entry aborts during the least demanding transfer opportunity years. Extensive abort capability is achievable for high delta V capable Mars architectures. Less propulsively capable architectures achieve moderate abort capability during favorable opportunity years.

Dissel, Adam F.

191

Abort Options for Potential Mars Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mars trajectory design options were examined that would accommodate a premature termination of a nominal manned opposition class mission for opportunities between 2010 and 2025. A successful abort must provide a safe return to Earth in the shortest possible time consistent with mission constraints. In this study, aborts that provided a minimum increase in the initial vehicle mass in low Earth orbit (IMLEO) were identified by locating direct transfer nominal missions and nominal missions including an outbound or inbound Venus swing-by that minimized IMLEO. The ease with which these missions could be aborted while meeting propulsion and time constraints was investigated by examining free return (unpowered) and powered aborts. Further reductions in trip time were made to some aborts by the addition or removal of an inbound Venus swing-by. The results show that, although few free return aborts met the specified constraints, 85% of each nominal mission could be aborted as a powered abort without an increase in propellant. Also, in many cases, the addition or removal of a Venus swing-by increased the number of abort opportunities or decreased the total trip time during an abort.

Tartabini, P. V.; Striepe, S. A.; Powell, R. W.

1994-01-01

192

ABORT GAP CLEANING IN RHIC.  

SciTech Connect

During the RHIC Au-run in 2001 the 200 MHz storage cavity system was used for the first time. The rebucketing procedure caused significant beam debunching in addition to amplifying debunching due to other mechanisms. At the end of a four hour store, debunched beam could account for approximately 30%-40% of the total beam intensity. Some of it will be in the abort gap. In order to minimize the risk of magnet quenching due to uncontrolled beam losses at the time of a beam dump, a combination of a fast transverse kicker and copper collimators were used to clean the abort gap. This report gives an overview of the gap cleaning procedure and the achieved performance.

DREES,A.; AHRENS,L.; III FLILLER,R.; GASSNER,D.; MCINTYRE,G.T.; MICHNOFF,R.; TRBOJEVIC,D.

2002-06-03

193

Second-Trimester Abortion Overview  

MedlinePLUS

... have one or more children. xvi Regardless of investments that are made in helping women plan their ... Bartlett LA, Berg CJ, Shulman HB, Zane SB, Green CA, Whitehead S, Atrash HK, Risk factors for legal ...

194

Differential Impact of Abortion on Adolescents and Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared adolescent and adult reactions to abortion among 252 women. Compared to adults, adolescents were significantly more likely to be dissatisfied with choice of abortion and with services received, to have abortions later in gestational period, to feel forced by circumstances to have abortion, to report being misinformed at time of abortion,…

Franz, Wanda; Reardon, David

1992-01-01

195

Abortion Rights in Latin America (NYT) 539 words  

E-print Network

Abortion Rights in Latin America (NYT) 539 words Published: January 6, 2006 For proof that criminalizing abortion doesn't reduce abortion rates and only endangers the lives of women, consider Latin America. In most of the region, abortions are a crime, but the abortion rate is far higher than in Western

Lopez-Carr, David

196

College students’ attitudes toward abortion and commitment to the issue  

Microsoft Academic Search

Male and female participants were surveyed on abortion attitudes, commitment, and abortion experience. Results revealed a normal distribution of abortion attitudes rejecting the notion that the vast majority of the sample would have significantly pro-choice views. No significant difference was found in overall abortion attitudes of males vs. females, however, individuals with direct abortion experience were found to have significantly

Casey L Carlton; Eileen S Nelson; Priscilla K Coleman

2000-01-01

197

Divergent Trends in Abortion and Birth Control Practices in Belarus, Russia and Ukraine  

PubMed Central

Context The last decade witnessed growing differences in abortion dynamics in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine despite demographic, social, and historical similarities of these nations. This paper investigates changes in birth control practices in the three countries and searches for an explanation of the diverging trends in abortion. Methods Official abortion and contraceptive use statistics, provided by national statistical agencies, were analysed. Respective laws and other legal documents were examined and compared between the three countries. To disclose inter-country differences in prevalence of the modern methods of contraception and its association with major demographic and social factors, an analysis of data from national sample surveys was performed, including binary logistic regression. Results The growing gap in abortion rate in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine is a genuine phenomenon, not a statistical artefact. The examination of abortion and prevalence of contraception based on official statistics and three national sample surveys did not reveal any unambiguous factors that could explain differences in abortion dynamics in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine. However, it is very likely that the cause of the inter-country discrepancies lies in contraceptive behavior itself, in adequacies of contraceptive knowledge and practices. Additionally, large differences in government policies, which are very important in shaping contraceptive practices of the population, were detected. Conclusion Since the end of the 1990s, the Russian government switched to archaic ideology in the area of reproductive health and family planning and neglects evidence-based arguments. Such an extreme turn in the governmental position is not observed in Belarus or Ukraine. This is an important factor contributing to the slowdown in the decrease of abortion rates in Russia. PMID:23349656

Denisov, Boris P.; Sakevich, Victoria I.; Jasilioniene, Aiva

2012-01-01

198

What do abortion policies accomplish? : understanding how abortion laws and court cases affect public opinion  

E-print Network

Abortion is a loaded, controversial, and divisive sociocultural and political term, concept, and debate. Yet little empirical research has been conducted to examine what effects abortion rights legislation and court cases ...

Hernandez, Cory D

2014-01-01

199

The experiences of women who face abortions.  

PubMed

Seventy-two Israeli women who were about to have abortions were interviewed. These women experienced intense emotions of sadness, ambivalence, confusion, and fear. To help them deal with this crisis, the women expressed a need for a professional counselor who provides information such as where to go, how to get money for the abortion, and how the operation is performed. The women also wished that the professional counselor would support them emotionally throughout the pregnancy experience and the abortion procedure. PMID:1885339

Slonim-Nevo, V

1991-01-01

200

Abortion, embryonic stem cell research, and waste  

Microsoft Academic Search

Can one consistently deny the permissibility of abortion while endorsing the killing of human embryos for the sake of stem\\u000a cell research? The question is not trivial; for even if one accepts that abortion is prima facie wrong in all cases, there\\u000a are significant differences with many of the embryos used for stem cell research from those involved in abortion—most

David A. Jensen

2008-01-01

201

An AbortAn Abort--Aware Model ofAware Model of Transactional ProgrammingTransactional Programming  

E-print Network

An AbortAn Abort--Aware Model ofAware Model of Transactional ProgrammingTransactional Programming ­ An abort-aware semantics for transactions · Part 2: TSMs = Transactional State Machines ­ A finite-terminating transactions (known) ­ Ignores STM/HTM aborted transactions: for responsiveness, "abort" cannot be equal

Rajamani, Sriram K.

202

Abortion Decision and Ambivalence: Insights via an Abortion Decision Balance Sheet  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Decision ambivalence is a key concept in abortion literature, but has been poorly operationalised. This study explored the concept of decision ambivalence via an Abortion Decision Balance Sheet (ADBS) articulating reasons both for and against terminating an unintended pregnancy. Ninety-six women undergoing an early abortion for psychosocial…

Allanson, Susie

2007-01-01

203

The Concept of Legalization  

Microsoft Academic Search

The subject of this volume is legalization and worldpolitics. World politics in this formulation needs no clari cation, but legalization the real focus of the volume must bemore clearly defined, if only because of its relative unfamiliarity to students ofinternational relations. In the introduction the editors have brieflypreviewed the concept of legalization used throughout the volume, aconcept developed collaboratively by

Kenneth O. W. Abbott; Robert O. Keohane; Andrew Moravcsik; Anne-Marie Slaughter; Duncan Snidal

2000-01-01

204

The Principal's Legal Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The principal is faced with myriad legal issues on a daily basis, making it imperative that he or she keep abreast with developing legal issues. The first of four sections, "Students and the Law," surveys federal statutes and landmark Supreme Court decisions pertaining to the rights of students. It addresses legal issues regarding search and…

Camp, William E., Ed.; And Others

205

21 CFR 884.5050 - Metreurynter-balloon abortion system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-04-01 false Metreurynter-balloon abortion system. 884.5050 Section 884...884.5050 Metreurynter-balloon abortion system. (a) Identification. A metreurynter-balloon abortion system is a device used to...

2014-04-01

206

21 CFR 884.5050 - Metreurynter-balloon abortion system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Metreurynter-balloon abortion system. 884.5050 Section 884...884.5050 Metreurynter-balloon abortion system. (a) Identification. A metreurynter-balloon abortion system is a device used to...

2010-04-01

207

21 CFR 884.5070 - Vacuum abortion system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vacuum abortion system. 884.5070 Section 884.5070...Therapeutic Devices § 884.5070 Vacuum abortion system. (a) Identification. A vacuum abortion system is a device designed to...

2012-04-01

208

21 CFR 884.5050 - Metreurynter-balloon abortion system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Metreurynter-balloon abortion system. 884.5050 Section 884...884.5050 Metreurynter-balloon abortion system. (a) Identification. A metreurynter-balloon abortion system is a device used to...

2011-04-01

209

21 CFR 884.5070 - Vacuum abortion system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vacuum abortion system. 884.5070 Section 884.5070...Therapeutic Devices § 884.5070 Vacuum abortion system. (a) Identification. A vacuum abortion system is a device designed to...

2013-04-01

210

21 CFR 884.5070 - Vacuum abortion system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vacuum abortion system. 884.5070 Section 884.5070...Therapeutic Devices § 884.5070 Vacuum abortion system. (a) Identification. A vacuum abortion system is a device designed to...

2014-04-01

211

21 CFR 884.5070 - Vacuum abortion system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vacuum abortion system. 884.5070 Section 884.5070...Therapeutic Devices § 884.5070 Vacuum abortion system. (a) Identification. A vacuum abortion system is a device designed to...

2010-04-01

212

21 CFR 884.5070 - Vacuum abortion system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vacuum abortion system. 884.5070 Section 884.5070...Therapeutic Devices § 884.5070 Vacuum abortion system. (a) Identification. A vacuum abortion system is a device designed to...

2011-04-01

213

21 CFR 884.5050 - Metreurynter-balloon abortion system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Metreurynter-balloon abortion system. 884.5050 Section 884...884.5050 Metreurynter-balloon abortion system. (a) Identification. A metreurynter-balloon abortion system is a device used to...

2012-04-01

214

ACOG Committee opinion no. 612: Abortion training and education.  

PubMed

Access to safe abortion hinges upon the availability of trained abortion providers. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists supports education for students in health care fields as well as clinical training for residents and advanced practice clinicians in abortion care in order to increase the availability of trained abortion providers. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists supports the expansion of abortion education and an increase in the number and types of trained abortion providers in order to ensure women's access to safe abortions. Integrated medical education and universal opt-out training policies help to lessen the stigma of abortion provision and improve access by increasing the number of abortion providers. This Committee Opinion reviews the current status of abortion education, describes initiatives to ensure the availability of appropriate and up-to-date abortion training, and recommends efforts for integrating and improving abortion education in medical schools, residency programs, and advanced practice clinician training programs. PMID:25437741

2014-11-01

215

J-2X Abort System Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The J-2X is an expendable liquid hydrogen (LH2)/liquid oxygen (LOX) gas generator cycle rocket engine that is currently being designed as the primary upper stage propulsion element for the new NASA Ares vehicle family. The J-2X engine will contain abort logic that functions as an integral component of the Ares vehicle abort system. This system is responsible for detecting and responding to conditions indicative of impending Loss of Mission (LOM), Loss of Vehicle (LOV), and/or catastrophic Loss of Crew (LOC) failure events. As an earth orbit ascent phase engine, the J-2X is a high power density propulsion element with non-negligible risk of fast propagation rate failures that can quickly lead to LOM, LOV, and/or LOC events. Aggressive reliability requirements for manned Ares missions and the risk of fast propagating J-2X failures dictate the need for on-engine abort condition monitoring and autonomous response capability as well as traditional abort agents such as the vehicle computer, flight crew, and ground control not located on the engine. This paper describes the baseline J-2X abort subsystem concept of operations, as well as the development process for this subsystem. A strategy that leverages heritage system experience and responds to an evolving engine design as well as J-2X specific test data to support abort system development is described. The utilization of performance and failure simulation models to support abort system sensor selection, failure detectability and discrimination studies, decision threshold definition, and abort system performance verification and validation is outlined. The basis for abort false positive and false negative performance constraints is described. Development challenges associated with information shortfalls in the design cycle, abort condition coverage and response assessment, engine-vehicle interface definition, and abort system performance verification and validation are also discussed.

Santi, Louis M.; Butas, John P.; Aguilar, Robert B.; Sowers, Thomas S.

2008-01-01

216

Available Motherhood: Legal Technologies, "State of Exception" and the Dekinning of "War-Babies" in Bangladesh  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article takes an ethnographical approach to explore the "state of exception" through which legal technologies of abortion and adoption of "war-babies" (children born as a result of wartime rapes) in the Bangladesh war enabled the dekinning and elimination of certain childhoods while the raped women were rekinned within legitimate heterosexual…

Mookherjee, Nayanika

2007-01-01

217

Road map to scaling-up: translating operations research study’s results into actions for expanding medical abortion services in rural health facilities in Nepal  

PubMed Central

Background Identifying unsafe abortion among the major causes of maternal deaths and respecting the rights to health of women, in 2002, the Nepali parliament liberalized abortion up to 12 weeks of pregnancy on request. However, enhancing women’s awareness on and access to safe and legal abortion services, particularly in rural areas, remains a challenge in Nepal despite a decade of the initiation of safe abortion services. Methods Between January 2011 and December 2012, an operations research study was carried out using quasi-experimental design to determine the effectiveness of engaging female community health volunteers, auxiliary nurse midwives, and nurses to provide medical abortion services from outreach health facilities to increase the accessibility and acceptability of women to medical abortion. This paper describes key components of the operations research study, key research findings, and follow-up actions that contributed to create a conducive environment and evidence in scaling up medical abortion services in rural areas of Nepal. Results It was found that careful planning and implementation, continuous advocacy, and engagement of key stakeholders, including key government officials, from the planning stage of study is not only crucial for successful completion of the project but also instrumental for translating research results into action and policy change. While challenges remained at different levels, medical abortion services delivered by nurses and auxiliary nurse midwives working at rural outreach health facilities without oversight of physicians was perceived to be accessible, effective, and of good quality by the service providers and the women who received medical abortion services from these rural health facilities. Conclusions This research provided further evidence and a road-map for expanding medical abortion services to rural areas by mid-level service providers in minimum clinical settings without the oversight of physicians, thus reducing complications and deaths due to unsafe abortion. PMID:24886393

2014-01-01

218

The road to abortion (II): how government got hooked.  

PubMed

The first part of this series traced close links between eugenics (the effort to breed a "better" human race) and population control throughout the greater part of this century up to the 1960s. It stressed the population work of early eugenicists and eugenics sympathizers such as Frederick Osborn, Margaret Sanger, Gunnar Myrdal, Alan Guttmacher, Garrett Hardin and John D. Rockefeller 3rd. This second and concluding part will show how population controllers, from the 60s onward increasingly added economic and foreign-policy concerns to their original "eugenics" motive of improving human genetic stock. Working in both Democratic and Republican administrations, they gained major government backing for their programs and also played a key role in the legalization of abortion. I will use President Richard Nixon's administration as an example of heavy government involvement. PMID:11881670

Meehan, M

1999-01-01

219

Induced Abortion: An Ethical Conundrum for Counselors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Induced abortion is one of the most controversial moral issues in American culture, but counselor value struggles regarding abortion are seldom addressed in counseling literature. This article considers the conflictual nature of the ethical principles of autonomy, fidelity, justice, beneficence, and nonmaleficence as they can occur within the…

Millner, Vaughn S.; Hanks, Robert B.

2002-01-01

220

Analysis of failure in medical abortion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical abortion opens a new choice to women wishing to terminate a pregnancy. Increasingly, providers in the developing and developed world will begin to offer this option. Yet, the nomenclature and concepts used for measuring failure of surgical abortion are not directly adaptable because of important differences inherent in the method and in the way it is offered in a

Beverly Winikoff; Charlotte Ellertson; Shelley Clark

1996-01-01

221

Group A Streptococcus Endometritis following Medical Abortion  

PubMed Central

Medical abortion is not recognized as a high-risk factor for invasive pelvic infection. Here, we report two cases of group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) endometritis following medical abortions with a protocol of oral mifepristone and misoprostol. PMID:24829245

Gendron, Nicolas; Joubrel, Caroline; Nedellec, Sophie; Campagna, Jennifer; Agostini, Aubert; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Casetta, Anne; Raymond, Josette; Kernéis, Solen

2014-01-01

222

Abortion and Social Change in America.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recently collected data from a survey of the attitudes of 1,843 elite members of both traditional and new institutions towards abortion indicate that, barring a major religious revival, a relatively permissive abortion policy will probably continue whether or not the Supreme Court curtails or overturns Roe vs. Wade. (FMW)

Lerner, Robert; And Others

1990-01-01

223

Violence against abortion increases in US clinics.  

PubMed

In the US, violence against abortion clinics is escalating. In July 1994, a doctor who performed abortions and one of his escorts was gunned down outside of an abortion clinic. In March of 1993, another doctor was killed outside of a clinic. That killing prompted passage of a federal law designed to protect abortion providers and clinics from violence. In addition to the individuals murdered, the number of violent incidents against abortion clinics increased four-fold to 250 in 1993. Some elderly physicians feel compelled to continue to perform the procedure instead of retiring because there are no young practitioners to replace them. These physicians note that the young practitioners have no experience with the deaths and illness which resulted from illegal abortions and have not been properly trained by their medical schools. The US Attorney General has dispatched federal marshalls to guard abortion clinics, and local police are increasing their protection of clinics. Abortion protestors say that the new federal law will cause some formerly peaceful protestors to resort to violence. PMID:7920122

Roberts, J

1994-08-13

224

Myths with Facts: SEX-SELECTIVE ABORTION  

E-print Network

Replacing Myths with Facts: SEX-SELECTIVE ABORTION LAWS IN THE UNITED STATES I N T E R N A T I O N, San Francisco. #12;Replacing Myths with Facts: SEX-SELECTIVE ABORTION LAWS IN THE UNITED STATES JUNE

Butler, Laurie J.

225

Induced abortions and unintended pregnancies in pakistan.  

PubMed

During the past decade, unmet need for family planning has remained high in Pakistan and gains in contraceptive prevalence have been small. Drawing upon data from a 2012 national study on postabortion-care complications and a methodology developed by the Guttmacher Institute for estimating abortion incidence, we estimate that there were 2.2 million abortions in Pakistan in 2012, an annual abortion rate of 50 per 1,000 women. A previous study estimated an abortion rate of 27 per 1,000 women in 2002. After taking into consideration the earlier study's underestimation of abortion incidence, we conclude that the abortion rate has likely increased substantially between 2002 and 2012. Varying contraceptive-use patterns and abortion rates are found among the provinces, with higher abortion rates in Baluchistan and Sindh than in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Punjab. This suggests that strategies for coping with the other wise uniformly high unintended pregnancy rates will differ among provinces. The need for an accelerated and fortified family planning program is greater than ever, as is the need to implement strategies to improve the quality and coverage of postabortion services. PMID:25469930

Sathar, Zeba; Singh, Susheela; Rashida, Gul; Shah, Zakir; Niazi, Rehan

2014-12-01

226

Meeting the need for induced abortion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Induced abortion should be freely available as part of the strategy to prevent unwanted pregnancy and particularly to reduce teenage maternities. The service is an important public health measure and should be easily accessible to all women, especially those who live in socially deprived communities. In the short-term abortion rates may rise and this should be seen as a positive

Sarah H Wilson

2001-01-01

227

Abortion and distortion of justice in the law.  

PubMed

Examples are cited of how the current policy in the U.S. favoring the pro-life philosophy is distorting government and court judgements. Appointment of Supreme Court justices and executive officials higher than assistant cabinet secretaries is subject to political ideology. Pro-life activists oppose wrongful birth tort actions, with the result that handicapped children are denied damages. In contrast they support legal action on behalf of stillborn fetuses. Similarly since "Webster" the pro-life movement disallows wrongful birth suits, so financial expenses cannot be recovered to help pay for a handicapped child. This may paradoxically force couples into abortion if they cannot risk supporting a severely handicapped child. Again, the trend is the same for wrongful life claims where handicapped children as a result of professional negligence seek compensation to provide for their care. Stillborn fetuses in this case can recover damages, resulting in windfall gains to their estate. The possibility of finding on behalf of a stillborn fetus may prompt doctors to induce abortion rather than have to pay damages. Another distortion of the notion of the transcending blessing of life valued more in the abstract than an individual's suffering or insentience is the judgement that comatose persons must continue to receive forced life-support against their family's claim of right to decline care. There have been a few cases where pregnant women have been charged as criminals, forcibly hospitalized and operated on to legally protect the fetus. This trend may cause pregnant women to avoid prenatal care rather than be forced to live a state-prescribed life style. Other examples of misdirected compassion of the pro-life movement are loss of practicing obstetricians, of RU 486 and other contraceptive methods, of fetal tissue research, and potential loss of in vitro fertilization to couples who wish to have 1 or 2 babies only. PMID:2628655

Dickens, B M

1989-01-01

228

Falling sex ratios and emerging evidence of sex-selective abortion in Nepal: evidence from nationally representative survey data  

PubMed Central

Objectives To quantify trends in changing sex ratios of births before and after the legalisation of abortion in Nepal. While sex-selective abortion is common in some Asian countries, it is not clear whether the legal status of abortion is associated with the prevalence of sex-selection when sex-selection is illegal. In this context, Nepal provides an interesting case study. Abortion was legalised in 2002 and prior to that, there was no evidence of sex-selective abortion. Changes in the sex ratio at birth since legalisation would suggest an association with legalisation, even though sex-selection is expressly prohibited. Design Analysis of data from four Demographic and Health Surveys, conducted in 1996, 2001, 2006 and 2011. Setting Nepal. Participants 31?842 women aged 15–49. Main outcome measure Conditional sex ratios (CSRs) were calculated, specifically the CSR for second-born children where the first-born was female. This CSR is where the evidence of sex-selective abortion will be most visible. CSRs were looked at over time to assess the impact of legalisation as well as for population sub-groups in order to identify characteristics of women using sex-selection. Results From 2007 to 2010, the CSR for second-order births where the first-born was a girl was found to be 742 girls per 1000 boys (95% CI 599 to 913). Prior to legalisation of abortion (1998–2000), the same CSR was 1021 (906–1150). After legalisation, it dropped most among educated and richer women, especially in urban areas. Just 325 girls were born for every 1000 boys among the richest urban women. Conclusions The fall in CSRs witnessed post-legalisation indicates that sex-selective abortion is becoming more common. This change is very likely driven by both supply and demand factors. Falling fertility has intensified the need to bear a son sooner, while legal abortion services have reduced the costs and risks associated with obtaining an abortion. PMID:23674444

Frost, Melanie Dawn; Puri, Mahesh; Hinde, Peter Richard Andrew

2013-01-01

229

Ethical and legal aspects of noninvasive prenatal genetic diagnosis.  

PubMed

The new technology that will allow genetic testing of a fetus within the first trimester of pregnancy by isolating cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) in the mother's blood raises a range of ethical and legal issues. Considered noninvasive, this test is safe and reliable, and may avoid alternative genetic testing by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling, which risks causing spontaneous abortion. Ethical and legal issues of cffDNA testing will become more acute if testing expands to fetal whole-genome sequencing. Critical issues include the state of the science or diagnostic art; the appropriateness of offering the test; the implications of denying the test when it is available and appropriate; disclosure and counseling following test results; and management of patients' choices on acquiring test results. A challenge will be providing patients with appropriate counseling based on up-to-date genetic knowledge, and accommodating informed patients' legal choices. PMID:24299974

Dickens, Bernard M

2014-02-01

230

Economics of Cannabis Legalization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Marijuana,legalization,offers an important,advantage,over,decriminalization in that it allows for legal distribution and taxation of cannabis. In the absence of taxation, the free market price of legal marijuana would beextremely low, on the order of five to ten cents per joint. In terms of intoxicating potential, a joint is equivalent to at least $1 or $2 worth of alcohol, the price

Dale Gieringer

231

South Africa plans to liberalise abortion law.  

PubMed

The South African parliament will consider a law that permits abortion on demand until the twelfth week of pregnancy, and, thereafter, under certain conditions (rape and incest). Parental or spousal permission would be unnecessary. Doctors who were unwilling to perform abortions would be required to make referrals to avoid 10 years in jail. The Medical Research Council informed parliament that nearly 45,000 unsafe, "backstreet" abortions (84% to Black women) resulted in admission to public hospitals annually, at a cost of $4.5m (R19m) per year. Present law is restrictive, and White women can afford to pay for abortions. Dr. Nkosazana Diamini-Zuma, the Minister of Health, favors the bill; he describes the 425 deaths from septic abortions as the equivalent of a jumbo jet crash in which all the passengers are killed, most of whom are poor with limited access to family planning and with inadequate support systems for unwanted children. Backstreet abortions may number 400,000 per year. Some hospitals have said they will refuse to allow abortions to be performed, and pro-life and religious groups have argued and demonstrated against the law; however, other religious groups have argued for it. The African National Congress will vote for the bill, in spite of opposition from older members, which ensures passage of the bill; the Catholic church intends to contest the law in a constitutional court, which could delay its implementation. PMID:8898589

Sidley, P

1996-10-26

232

Mid-trimester induced abortion: a review.  

PubMed

Mid-trimester abortion constitutes 10-15% of all induced abortion. The aim of this article is to provide a review of the current literature of mid-trimester methods of abortion with respect to efficacy, side effects and acceptability. There have been continuing efforts to improve the abortion technology in terms of effectiveness, technical ease of performance, acceptability and reduction of side effects and complications. During the last decade, medical methods for mid-trimester induced abortion have shown a considerable development and have become safe and more accessible. The combination of mifepristone and misoprostol is now an established and highly effective method for termination of pregnancy (TOP). Advantages and disadvantages of medical versus surgical methods are discussed. Randomized studies are lacking, and more studies on pain treatment and the safety of any method used in patients with a previous uterine scar are debated, and data are scarce. Pain management in abortion requires special attention. This review highlights the need for randomized studies to set guidelines for mid-trimester abortion methods in terms of safety and acceptability as well as for better analgesic regimens. PMID:17050523

Lalitkumar, S; Bygdeman, M; Gemzell-Danielsson, K

2007-01-01

233

Ascent abort capability for the HL-20  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The HL-20 has been designed with the capability for rescue of the crew during all phases of powered ascent from on the launch pad until orbital injection. A launch-escape system, consisting of solid rocket motors located on the adapter between the HL-20 and the launch vehicle, provides the thrust that propels the HL-20 to a safe distance from a malfunctioning launch vehicle. After these launch-escape motors have burned out, the adapter is jettisoned and the HL-20 executes one of four abort modes. In three abort modes - return-to-launch-site, transatlantic-abort-landing, and abort-to-orbit - not only is the crew rescued, but the HL-20 is recovered intact. In the ocean-landing-by-parachute abort mode, which occurs in between the return-to-launch-site and the transatlantic-abort-landing modes, the crew is rescued, but the HL-20 would likely sustain damage from the ocean landing. This paper describes the launch-escape system and the four abort modes for an ascent on a Titan III launch vehicle.

Naftel, J. C.; Talay, T. A.

1993-10-01

234

USA aborts international family planning.  

PubMed

The US Agency for International Development (USAID) has been a leader in international family planning for almost 30 years, accounting for 46% of all funds in international family planning provided by OECD countries during 1991. Moreover, relative to other donor countries, the US supplies worldwide a disproportionate amount of contraceptives. While international family planning activities received $546 million in 1995, the budget was slashed in 1996 to $72 million. This unprecedented cut will have a profound effect upon the reproductive health and family planning choices of tens of millions of people in developing countries. Millions of additional unintended pregnancies and maternal and child deaths may result. 1996 began with the White House and Congress in political gridlock, with negotiations on foreign aid stalled on the issue of abortion. The Republican-led House of Representatives wanted to bar support of any nongovernmental organization (NGO) which also provided information on abortion, while Democratic President Bill Clinton affirmed that he would veto such legislation. At the end of January, the House passed the Balanced Budget and Down Payment Act (HR 2880) containing clauses which cut the aid budget by 35% and barring new money in the area of family planning until July 1. Spending was limited to the allocation of 6.5% of the total budget each month. Some social marketing programmers who distribute condoms and oral contraceptives are already feeling the pinch, and some programs will simply run out of contraceptives. This cut in funding also bodes ill for achieving the goals of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development. There is, however, hope that the cuts will be reversed for the next fiscal year. The author notes survey findings which indicate that US citizens support higher budgets for family planning. PMID:8596311

Potts, M

1996-03-01

235

On Avoiding Spare Aborts in Transactional Memory Idit Keidar  

E-print Network

On Avoiding Spare Aborts in Transactional Memory Idit Keidar Dept. of Electrical Engineering a theory for un- derstanding aborts in transactional memory systems (TMs). Existing TMs may abort many transactions that could, in fact, commit without violating correctness. We call such unnecessary aborts spare

Keidar, Idit

236

Introduction to Orion Pad Abort 1 Flight Test Overview  

E-print Network

#12;2 Agenda · Introduction to Orion · Pad Abort 1 Flight Test Overview · Pad Abort 1 Vehicle Description ­ Launch Abort System ­ Crew Module Simulator · Mission and Timeline · Test Objectives · Mission Success · WSMR Range and Test Day Plan #12;3 Launch Abort System · Safely removes the crew from launch

237

Solo-fast Universal Constructions for Deterministic Abortable Objects  

E-print Network

Solo-fast Universal Constructions for Deterministic Abortable Objects Claire Capdevielle, Colette. In this paper we study efficient implementations for deterministic abortable objects. Deterministic abortable abort to indicate that the operation failed (and did not take effect) when there is contention

Johnen, Colette

238

The Impact of State Abortion Policies on Teen Pregnancy Rates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The availability of abortion provides insurance against unwanted pregnancies since abortion is the only birth control method which allows women to avoid an unwanted birth once they are pregnant. Restrictive state abortion policies, which increase the cost of obtaining an abortion, may increase women's incentive to alter their pregnancy avoidance…

Medoff, Marshall

2010-01-01

239

Reproductive health information and abortion services: standards developed by the European Court of Human Rights.  

PubMed

In 3 recent judgments, the European Court of Human Rights addressed the issue of access to abortion and related reproductive health services. In 2 of the judgments, the Court declared that the state violated women's rights by obstructing access to legal health services, including abortion. In so doing, it referred to the state's failure to implement domestic norms on prenatal testing and conscientious objection, and recognized the relevance of international medical guidelines. This illustrates that domestic and international medical standards can serve as critical guidance to human rights courts. In the third case, the Court showed its unwillingness to declare access to abortion a human right per se, which is troubling from the perspective of women's right to health and dignity. The present article outlines the relevance of these cases for the reproductive health profession and argues that medical professional societies can influence human rights courts by developing and enforcing medical standards, not only for the benefit of abortion rights domestically but also for the advancement of women's human rights worldwide. PMID:23773435

Westeson, Johanna

2013-08-01

240

A prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial on the use of mifepristone with sublingual or vaginal misoprostol for medical abortions of less than 9 weeks gestation  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: A combination of mifepristone and misoprostol provides an effective method of medical abortion for early pregnancy. This is the first randomized trial comparing the use of sublingual misoprostol with vaginal misoprostol in combination with mifepristone for termination of early pregnancies up to 63 days. METHODS: A total of 224 women who requested legal termination of pregnancy up to 63

Oi Shan Tang; Carina C. W. Chan; Ernest H. Y. Ng; Sharon W. H. Lee; Pak Chung Ho

2003-01-01

241

Abort Gap Cleaning for LHC Run 2  

E-print Network

To minimise the beam losses at the moment of an LHC beam dump the 3 ?s long abort gap should contain as few particles as possible. Its population can be minimised by abort gap cleaning using the LHC transverse damper system. The LHC Run 1 experience is briefly recalled; changes foreseen for the LHC Run 2 are presented. They include improvements in the observation of the abort gap population and the mechanism to decide if cleaning is required, changes to the hardware of the transverse dampers to reduce the detrimental effect on the luminosity lifetime and proposed changes to the applied cleaning algorithms.

Uythoven, J; Bravin, E; Goddard, B; Hemelsoet, GH; Höfle, W; Jacquet, D; Kain, V; Mazzoni, S; Meddahi, M; Valuch, D

2015-01-01

242

The Marquis de Sade and induced abortion.  

PubMed Central

In 1795 the Marquis de Sade published his La Philosophic dans le boudoir, in which he proposed the use of induced abortion for social reasons and as a means of population control. It is from this time that medical and social acceptance of abortion can be dated, although previously the subject had not been discussed in public in modern times. It is suggested that it was largely due to de Sade's writing that induced abortion received the impetus which resulted in its subsequent spread in western society. PMID:6990001

Farr, A D

1980-01-01

243

Permissibility of prenatal diagnosis and abortion for fetuses with severe genetic disorder: type 1 spinal muscular atrophy.  

PubMed

Abortion has been largely avoided in Muslim communities. However, Islamic jurists have established rigorous parameters enabling abortion of fetuses with severe congenital abnormalities. This decision-making process has been hindered by an inability to predict the severity of such prenatally-diagnosed conditions, especially in genetic disorders with clinical heterogeneity, such as spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Heterogeneous phenotypes of SMA range from extremely severe type 1 to very mild type 4. Advances in molecular genetics have made it possible to perform prenatal diagnosis and to predict the types of SMA with its potential subsequent severity. Such techniques will make it possible for clinicians working in predominantly Muslim countries to counsel their patients accurately and in harmony with their religious beliefs. In this paper, we discuss and postulate that with our current knowledge of determining SMA types and severity with great accuracy, abortion is legally applicable for type 1 SMA. PMID:21060155

Sasongko, Teguh H; Salmi, Abd Razak; Zilfalil, Bin Alwi; Albar, Mohammed Ali; Mohd Hussin, Zabidi Azhar

2010-01-01

244

Chimeras, moral status, and public policy: implications of the abortion debate for public policy on human/nonhuman chimera research.  

PubMed

Researchers are increasingly interested in creating chimeras by transplanting human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into animals early in development. One concern is that such research could confer upon an animal the moral status of a normal human adult but then impermissibly fail to accord it the protections it merits in virtue of its enhanced moral status. Understanding the public policy implications of this ethical conclusion, though, is complicated by the fact that claims about moral status cannot play an unfettered role in public policy. Arguments like those employed in the abortion debate for the conclusion that abortion should be legally permissible even if abortion is not morally permissible also support, to a more limited degree, a liberal policy on hESC research involving the creation of chimeras. PMID:20579247

Streiffer, Robert

2010-01-01

245

LEGAL FICTIONS REVISTED Frederick Schauer*  

E-print Network

Such defenses of legal fictions are increasingly rare, however, and the accusation of using a "legal fiction has going back to Roman Law is P.J.J. Olivier, Legal Fictions in Practice and Legal Science (Rotterdam 1975). Also useful is L. Harmon, "Falling Off the Vine: Legal Fictions and the Doctrine of Substituted

Wintner, Shuly

246

Public Legal Reason  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay develops an ideal of public legal reason--a normative theory of legal reasons that is appropriate for a society characterized by religious and moral pluralism. One of the implications of this theory is that normative theorizing about public and private law should eschew reliance on the deep premises of deontology or consequentialism and should instead rely on what the

Lawrence B. Solum

2006-01-01

247

Accreditation's Legal Landscape  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Like most issues in higher education, the accreditation paradigm in the United States is defined in large measure by the legal and political climate in which the academy finds itself. In the case of accreditation in particular, the legal substrate is of particular importance given the central role of accreditation in a college's ability to receive…

Graca, Thomas J.

2009-01-01

248

Database Reviews: Legal Information.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Detailed reviews of two legal information databases--"Laborlaw I" and "Legal Resource Index"--are presented in this paper. Each database review begins with a bibliographic entry listing the title; producer; vendor; cost per hour contact time; offline print cost per citation; time period covered; frequency of updates; and size of file. A detailed…

Seiser, Virginia

249

A Legal Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication was developed by the Cincinnati (Ohio) Public Schools for use as a resource in adult basic education classes. It presents, in simple format, the basic legal rights of citizens of the United States and points out legal problem areas that average adults may encounter in daily life. The book is organized into nine parts containing 2…

Cincinnati Public Schools, OH.

250

Development of Legal Expertise  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a comprehensive empirical investigation (N = 71,405) we analyzed the development of legal expertise in a critical 1-year period of academic legal training in which advanced law students start practicing to solve complex cases. We were particularly interested in the functional form of the learning curve and inter-individual differences in…

Glöckner, Andreas; Towfigh, Emanuel; Traxler, Christian

2013-01-01

251

Age Patterns of Unsafe Abortion in Developing Country Regions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Globally, 19 million women are estimated to undergo unsafe abortions each year. Age patterns of unsafe abortion are critical for tailoring effective interventions to prevent unsafe abortion and for providing post-abortion care. This paper estimates the incidence and the rate of unsafe abortion among women aged 15–44 in the Africa, Asia (excluding Eastern Asia), and Latin America\\/Caribbean regions, where a

Iqbal Shah; Elisabeth Åhman

2004-01-01

252

"Abortion--it is my own body": women's narratives about influences on their abortion decisions in Ghana.  

PubMed

Globally, abortion has emerged as a critical determinant of maternal morbidity and mortality. The Ghana government amended the country's abortion law in 1985 to promote safe abortion. This article discusses the findings of a qualitative study that explored the decision-making experiences of 28 female abortion seekers aged between 15 and 30 years in Ghana. Key findings from the study are that individuals claimed autonomy in their abortion decisions; underlying the abortion decisions were pragmatic concerns such as economic difficulties, child spacing, and fear of parental reaction. In conclusion, we examine the health implications of Ghanaian women's abortion decisions. PMID:24785835

Oduro, Georgina Yaa; Otsin, Mercy Nana Akua

2014-01-01

253

Safety, efficacy and acceptability of outpatient mifepristone-misoprostol medical abortion through 70 days since last menstrual period in public sector facilities in Mexico City.  

PubMed

Extensive evidence exists regarding the efficacy and acceptability of medical abortion through 63 days since last menstrual period (LMP). In Mexico City's Secretariat of Health (SSDF) outpatient facilities, mifepristone-misoprostol medical abortion is the first-line approach for abortion care in this pregnancy range. Recent research demonstrates continued high rates of complete abortion through 70 days LMP. To expand access to legal abortion services in Mexico City (where abortion is legal through 12 weeks LMP), this study sought to assess the efficacy and acceptability of the standard outpatient approach through 70 days in two SSDF points of service. One thousand and one women seeking pregnancy termination were enrolled and given 200 mg mifepristone followed by 800 ?g misoprostol 24-48 hours later. Women were asked to return to the clinic one week later for evaluation. The great majority of women (93.3%; 95% CI: 91.6-94.8) had complete abortions. Women with pregnancies ?8 weeks LMP had significantly higher success rates than women in the 9th or 10th weeks (94.9% vs. 90.5%; p = 0.01). The difference in success rates between the 9th and 10th weeks was not significant (90.0% vs. 91.2%; p = 0.71). The majority of women found the side effects (82.9%) and the use of misoprostol (84.4%) to be very acceptable or acceptable. This study provides additional evidence supporting an extended outpatient medical abortion regimen through 10 weeks LMP. PMID:25702071

Sanhueza Smith, Patricio; Peña, Melanie; Dzuba, Ilana G; Martinez, María Laura García; Peraza, Ana Gabriela Aranguré; Bousiéguez, Manuel; Shochet, Tara; Winikoff, Beverly

2015-02-01

254

TRIHALOMETHANES IN DRINKING WATER AND SPONTANEOUS ABORTIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

A limited number of epidemiological studies have evaluated the potential association between exposure to DBPs in drinking water and adverse reproductive outcomes. Reproductive effects that have been studied include, for example, spontaneous abortions, congenital defects, low birt...

255

Lumbosacral abortive hemangioma with intradural extension.  

PubMed

Abortive hemangioma (AH) is a true hemangioma of infancy that expresses glucose transporter-1 protein in the endothelial cells, with an arrested growth cycle. We present the rare case of a lumbosacral AH with intramedullary extension. PMID:24117617

Martínez-Criado, Yolanda; Fernández-Pineda, Israel; Merchante, Elena; Bernabeu-Wittel, Jose

2014-01-01

256

Surgical abortion in the second trimester.  

PubMed

The development of dilatation and evacuation (D&E) as a method of second trimester surgical abortion occurred soon after abortion law reform took place in the 1960s and 1970s in Europe and the United States. Today, D&E is the predominant method of second trimester abortion in many parts of the world. Debate still exists as to whether surgical or medical methods are optimal for second trimester pregnancy termination. A continuing challenge to provision of D&E is the availability of a large enough pool of skilled providers. This article reviews the current surgical methods used in second trimester abortion, as well as their safety, advantages and disadvantages, acceptability and associated complications. Methods used to ensure safe and efficient surgical termination of second trimester pregnancies such as cervical preparation and ultrasound guidance are also reviewed. PMID:18772096

Lohr, Patricia A

2008-05-01

257

Spiral Kicker for the beam abort system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The feasibility of a special kicker to produce a damped spiral beam at the beam dump for the beam abort system was determined. There appears to be no problem with realizing this concept at a reasonably low cost.

Martin, R. L.

258

Bovine abortion associated with Nocardia farcinica.  

PubMed

Nocardia spp. are recognized as a cause of bovine mastitis, cutaneous or subcutaneous abscesses, pneumonia, and disseminated disease. Abortion caused by Nocardia spp. is uncommon, and only a few sporadic cases have been reported in horses, pigs, and cattle. In all previous reports, of nocardial abortion, the causative agent was identified as Nocardia asteroides. The current report describes an aborted bovine fetus that was infected with Nocardia farcinica. Placenta, abomasal fluid, lung, liver, and kidney specimens from a late-term bovine abortion were submitted to the Kansas State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. The gross findings included purulent exudate in the placenta and numerous abscesses in lung. Histologically, there was necrotizing and suppurative placentitis, pyogranulomatous pneumonia, and nephritis with numerous intralesional branching and filamentous, Gram-positive bacteria. Nocardia farcinica was isolated by bacteriology, and the bacteriology result was confirmed by 2 established polymerase chain reaction protocols and by DNA sequencing. PMID:20093696

Bawa, Bhupinder; Bai, Jianfa; Whitehair, Mike; Purvis, Tanya; Debey, Brad M

2010-01-01

259

Abortion and the search for public policy.  

PubMed

The social policy towards abortion determined by the Roe vs. Wade decision can be overturned at any time depending upon how the US Supreme Court reacts to challenges to its earlier ruling. Roe vs. Wade was decided by a 7 to 2 vote, and the members of the Supreme Court appointed by Presidents Reagan and Bush were chosen to uphold a conservative (anti-abortion) ideology. Although more than half of the present Court was appointed by these presidents, President Clinton now has the opportunity to appoint 2 more Justices. The public policy positions which are currently available to the Supreme Court or to Congress can be ranked on a chart from liberal to conservative. In this article, 7 different positions are described in detail, and the public policy implications of the implementation of each position are described. The first position considered is the extreme conservative position of "no abortion; no exceptions" as defined by author and Roman Catholic theologian Gerald Kelly. The only procedures allowed which would end the life of a fetus would be those to remove an ovary or fallopian tube in the case of an extrauterine pregnancy (permissible under the doctrine of double effect). In the most extreme interpretation of this situation (which Kelly does not seem to hold), those who perform abortions would be prosecuted for murder. The next position considered is the most liberal position, which is espoused by Michael Tooley, and which holds that abortion and early infanticide are both permissible. The third position is that which allows no abortion but has limited exceptions in cases of rape or incest. The appropriate consideration for abortion presented next is that of the late Joseph Fletcher who believed that whatever love requires is the proper response to the situation. Philosopher Dan Callahan espouses the notion that abortion should be performed for compelling reasons only (after effective counseling). The trimester approach to the problem of abortion is that set forth by Justice Harry Blackmun in Roe vs. Wade. This approach gives a woman freedom to decide to have an abortion during the first 2 trimesters of her pregnancy only. This approach has essentially dictated public policy in the US since 1973. The last position considered is that which maintains that a woman's right to equality demands that she have sole control over whether or not to have an abortion. PMID:8118140

McIntyre, R L

1993-01-01

260

Receiving versus being denied an abortion and subsequent tobacco use.  

PubMed

The negative health consequences of tobacco use are well documented. Some research finds women receiving abortions are at increased risk of subsequent tobacco use. This literature has methodological problems, most importantly, inappropriate comparison groups. This study uses data from the Turnaway Study, a longitudinal study of women who all sought, but did not all receive, abortions at 30 facilities across the United States. Participants included women presenting just before an abortion facility's gestational age limit who received abortions (Near Limit Abortion Group, n = 452), just after the gestational limit who were denied abortions (Turnaways, n = 231), and who received first trimester abortions (First Trimester Abortion Group, n = 273). This study examined the association between receiving versus being denied an abortion and subsequent tobacco use over 2-years. Trajectories of tobacco use over 2 years were compared using multivariate mixed effects regression. Women receiving abortion maintained their level of tobacco use over 2 years. Women denied abortion initially had lower levels of tobacco use than women receiving abortion, but increased their tobacco use from 1 week through 12-18 months post-abortion seeking and then decreased their use by 2 years post-abortion seeking. Baseline parity modified these associations. Receiving an abortion was not associated with an increase in tobacco use over time. Overall, women who carry unwanted pregnancies to term appear to demonstrate similar cessation and resumption patterns to other pregnant women. PMID:24880251

Roberts, Sarah C M; Foster, Diana Greene

2015-03-01

261

Beam dumping system and abort gap  

E-print Network

The performance of the beam dumping systems and the abort gap cleaning are reviewed in the context of the general machine protection system. Details of the commissioning experience and setting up, encountered equipment problems, the experience with and status of the eXternal Post Operational Checks (XPOC) and the importance of operational procedures are presented for the beam dumping system. The brief experience with the abort gap cleaning is also presented.

Uythoven, J

2010-01-01

262

Complications of abortion performed under local anesthesia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. To assess the incidence of complications of abortion performed under local anesthesia.Design. Prospective study.Setting. A family planning center in the Paris area.Population. Eight hundred and fifty-eight women admitted for abortion under local anesthesia.Main outcome measures. Incidence of immediate (the day of vacuum aspiration) and delayed complications (at the follow-up visit 2 weeks after the procedure).Results. Among the 858 women

Patrick Thonneau; Beatrice Fougeyrollas; Beatrice Ducot; Dominique Boubilley; Jouda Dif; Martine Lalande; Catherine Soulat

1998-01-01

263

Movement and counter-movement: a history of abortion law reform and the backlash in Colombia 2006-2014.  

PubMed

In 2006, the Constitutional Court of Colombia issued Decision C-355/2006, which liberalized the country's abortion law. The reform was groundbreaking in its argumentation, being one of the first judicial decisions in the world to uphold abortion rights on equality grounds, and the first by a constitutional court to rule on the constitutionality of abortion within a human rights framework. It was also the first of a series of reforms that would liberalize the abortion regulation in four other Latin American countries. The Colombian case is also notable for the process of strategic litigation carried out by feminist organizations after the Court's decision, in order to ensure its implementation and counter the opposition from conservative actors working in State institutions, as well as for the active role played by the Court in that process. Based on fieldwork carried out in Colombia in 2013, this article analyzes the process of progressive implementation and reactionary backlash after Decision C-355/2006, with an emphasis on strategic litigation by the feminist movement and subsequent decisions by the Constitutional Court, which consolidated its jurisprudence in the field of abortion rights. It highlights the role of both feminists and of conservative activists within State institutions as opposing social movements, and the dynamics of political and legal mobilization and counter-mobilization in that process. PMID:25555762

Ruibal, Alba

2014-11-01

264

‘Miscarriage or abortion?’ Understanding the medical language of pregnancy loss in Britain; a historical perspective  

PubMed Central

Clinical language applied to early pregnancy loss changed in late twentieth century Britain when doctors consciously began using the term ‘miscarriage’ instead of ‘abortion’ to refer to this subject. Medical professionals at the time and since have claimed this change as an intuitive empathic response to women's experiences. However, a reading of medical journals and textbooks from the era reveals how the change in clinical language reflected legal, technological, professional and social developments. The shift in language is better understood in the context of these historical developments, rather than as the consequence of more empathic medical care for women who experience miscarriage. PMID:23429567

Moscrop, Andrew

2013-01-01

265

Legal Writing Institute  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For those not familiar with its nuances and requirements, legal writing can be a taxing affair at first. Fortunately, the Legal Writing Institute's homepage is a good place to start learning more about the basics of legal writing. First-time visitors can begin by looking over the "About" section, which offers up a host of materials about the Institute, including a most useful FAQ guide and information about their listservs. After that, visitors will want to move to the "Resources" section. Here they will find a collection of syllabi, resources on plagiarism, and an "Idea Bank" which will be quite a boon to legal writing instructors. The site is rounded out by an "Employment Listings" area and information about the Institute's conferences.

2001-01-01

266

Global Legal Information Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Legal scholars and those with an interest in the law will definitely want to take a look at the Global Legal Information Network (GLIN) website. Here visitors can search official full text legal documents, including judicial decisions, legislation, and laws. The database is provided courtesy of the Law Library of the United States Congress, and it draws from countries from around the world who wish to provide access to their own legal documents. Some of the countries who participate in the program include Brazil, Costa Rica, Kuwait, Peru, and Romania. Visitors will find that the ways to search the database are extremely helpful. Options include searching by jurisdiction, publication date, subject terms, and language. The site is rounded out by a section that provides answers to frequently asked questions about using the database.

2005-01-01

267

American Legal Ethics Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Part of the Cornell Law School's Legal Information Institute site (LII), the American Legal Ethics Library contains rules or codes, ethics opinions, judicial conduct codes, legal commentaries, and other materials relating to the law governing lawyers. Codes or rules are available for most of the nation's 50 states. Currently, the site also offers eleven commentaries on the "law of lawyering" for eleven different jurisdictions, written by legal scholars and major law firms in each jurisdiction's area. Another twelve narratives are in progress, including one for the European community. Accessible by topic or jurisdiction, the information is also available on CD-ROM. The hypertext format makes it easy to link from commentaries to relevant codes and rules. Roger C. Cramton, the Robert S. Stevens Professor of Law at Cornell, directs the project.

268

Legal Q & A.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article addresses the legal issues surrounding internships. From equal employment opportunity laws to noncompete agreements, this column offers an interpretation of state and federal statutes that are applicable to experiential education programs. (GCP)

NACE Journal, 2003

2003-01-01

269

AIDS--legal issues.  

PubMed

Legal issues worldwide prompted by the AIDS epidemic are discussed, in a general way, since legal systems vary widely in different countries and localities. WHO publishes a tabulation of legal instruments dealing with AIDS and HIV infection. Criminal laws intended to protect people from harm from HIV infection have been enacted, such as a penalty for unprotected sexual intercourse by infected persons, in some Australian states. Knowing spread of HIV already amounts to a crime in many systems. The U.S. Supreme Court has already ruled that states do not violate the constitution for punishing homosexuals for consensual sodomy, nor the Army for discharging homosexuals. Quarantine law is a civil matter, but may provide penalties stricter than criminal penalties, without as much protection. No quarantines against AIDS have been enacted, although some countries require screening of immigrants. Legal issues regarding screening, liability of suppliers of blood products, and tracing of sexual partners are much discussed. Stigmatization of minority and alienated groups such as homosexuals, prostitutes, migrants, drug users and prisoners is a tricky legal problem. The apparent failure of the criminalization of drug users and how to contain the spread of AIDS into the drug free population may prompt drastic new solutions. Other legal issues drawing attention include regulation of health insurance, changes in family law, pre-marriage HIV tests, screening for HIV ostensibly to detect HIV-associated dementia, liability protection for developers and testers of vaccines, and euthanasia and the treatment of the deceased. The legal system tends to lag behind medicine. In the case of AIDS, it cannot afford to delay, therefore effective legal strategies will include effective media presentation of AIDS information to the general public; ready and cheap supply of condoms; and a new approach to illegal drugs. PMID:3147672

Kirby, M

1988-01-01

270

Serbian gynaecologists' views on contraception and abortion.  

PubMed

Objectives To examine Serbian gynaecologists' attitudes and practices related to contraception and abortion, as the principal alternative to contraception. Methods A self-reported questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of gynaecologists attending educational meetings of a medical society from October 2012 to October 2013. The data gathered were assessed by means of univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Almost half of the respondents had ethical objections and would refuse to provide certain contraceptives to patients. Two thirds of the gynaecologists (63%) considered fertility awareness methods to be a poor option for most women. Twenty-three percent objected to abortion. Those who objected to contraceptives were less likely to object to abortions (OR: 0.422). This attitude was more prevalent in Southern and Eastern Serbia, where gynaecologists were more likely to object (OR: 4.892) and to refuse to prescribe contraceptives (OR: 4.161), but less likely to object to abortion (OR: 0.278) than in other regions. Conclusions A large proportion of Serbian gynaecologists objected to some contraceptive methods and were more in favour of abortions, especially in the least developed regions. PMID:25431888

Milosavljevic, Jelena; Krajnovic, Dusanka; Bogavac-Stanojevic, Natasa; Mitrovic-Jovanovic, Ana

2015-04-01

271

Report: a study of morbidity of induced abortion data from women belonging to Karachi, Pakistan.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the morbidity of induced abortion in relation to facilities, service providers and social responses of general population of women, from Karachi, Pakistan. Cross-sectional survey, conducted from February to December 2010, through a researcher-administered questionnaire from 61 randomly selected women, who underwent for Induced Abortion, aged 18-50 years. The questionnaire included open and closed ended questions, regarding demography, facilities, service providers and various complications observed. Overall, 98 immediate health problems were reported by 40 (65.5%) of the respondents, 153 late adverse effects or chronic by 46 (75.4%); while 101 mental complications had been reported by 45 (73.8%) of the 61 aborting women; respectively. Private clinics surfaced as the most frequently adopted source as reported by 40.7% of the respondents. Two third majorities had the procedure in satisfactory, good hygienic conditions by skilled professionals. Around 59% of the aborting women were aware of the religious perspective of the subject. Marked incidence of complications had been registered, regardless of type of method adopted, hygienic condition of the procedure or skill of the provider. Although, awareness of religious perspective of the subject was there, still quite a lot opted for abortion. This suggests that strong socioeconomic factors influence women to take peril of such an attempt. It also reveals the existence of a big gap for the awareness services for educating the risks involved to the women's health. Study revealed that services are easily accessible; without any legal, religious or social barriers. Semi or un-educated women, mostly from low socioeconomic sector are opting the procedure in majority, being less aware and stalwartly influenced by environmental factors; hence excessive availability of abortion services should be revisited. Lack of deep awareness of the consequences also contributes for deteriorating future reproductive and mental health. Awareness and counseling services for aborting women, for their health risks, as well as about human perspective of the issue, needs to be initiated, for better management of their reproductive health and rights. PMID:25553703

Aslam, Farah; Aslam, Muhammad

2015-01-01

272

A prospective study of complications from comprehensive abortion care services in Nepal  

PubMed Central

Background In March 2002, Nepal's Parliament approved legislation to permit abortion on request up to 12 weeks of pregnancy. Between 2004 and 2007, 176 comprehensive abortion care (CAC) service sites were established in Nepal, leading to a rise in safe, legal abortions. Though monitoring systems have been developed, reporting of complications has not always been complete or accurate. The purpose of this study was to report the frequency and type of abortion complications arising from CAC procedures in different types of facilities in Nepal. Methods A total of 7,386 CAC clients from a sample of facilities across Nepal were enrolled over a three-month period in 2008. Data collection included an initial health questionnaire at the time of abortion care and a follow-up questionnaire assessing complications, administered two weeks after the abortion procedure. A total of 7,007 women (95%) were successfully followed up. Complication rates were assessed overall and by facility type. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association between experiencing a complication and client demographic and facility characteristics. Results Among the 7,007 clients who were successfully followed, only 1.87% (n = 131) experienced signs and symptoms of complications at the two-week follow up, the most common being retained products of conception (1.37%), suspected sepsis (0.39%), offensive discharge (0.51%) and moderate bleeding (0.26%). Women receiving care at non-governmental organization (NGO) facilities were less likely to experience complications than women at government facilities, adjusting for individual and facility characteristics (AOR = 0.18; 95% CI: 0.08-0.40). Compared to women receiving CAC at 4-5 weeks gestation, women at 10-12 weeks gestation were more likely to experience complications, adjusting for individual and facility characteristics (AOR = 4.21; 95% CI: 1.38-12.82). Conclusions The abortion complication rate in Nepali CAC facilities is low and similar to other settings; however, significant differences in complication rates were observed by facility type and gestational age. Interventions such as supportive supervision to improve providers' uterine evacuation skills and investment in equipment for infection control may lower complication rates in government facilities. In addition, there should be increased focus on early pregnancy detection and access to CAC services early in pregnancy in order to prevent complications. PMID:22221895

2012-01-01

273

THE ECONOMICS OF DRUG LEGALIZATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is no published economic analysis of the potential impact of drug legalization on Social Welfare. This paper treats legal and illegal drugs as different qualities of the same good, and uses price theory to analyse the social welfare effects of drug legalization and the optimal price of legal drugs. Both of these are shown to depend in an intuitive

Andrew E. Clark

274

Embryonic discourse: abortion, stem cells and cloning.  

PubMed

This Article interprets the debate about abortion and the debate about embryonic research and therapeutic cloning as aspects of a larger history of ideas. The Article suggests that embryos increasingly stand for different truths in discourse about abortion on the one-hand and about embryonic stem cell research and therapeutic cloning on the other. More specifically, the Article suggests that the contemporary debate about the meaning of the embryo in the context both of abortion and of embryonic research bespeaks a widespread transformation in Western, and especially American, society during the last three or four decades. At base, that transformation involves displacement of an understanding of personhood, particularly in domestic settings that depended on the submersion of individualism with an understanding of personhood that values autonomous individuality and that envisions community as the consequence of individuals' distinct choices rather than as a pre-existing, hierarchically structured whole. PMID:15124522

Dolgin, Janet L

2004-01-01

275

The abortion ethos: pervasive but not persuasive.  

PubMed

The history of the past 16 years has borne out pro-life predictions that abortion would be the precursor of an even wider assault on helpless people. The unborn initially were the victim of choice because they were, in 1973, outside our customary line of moral vision. But as a dress rehearsal for a pattern of discretionary killing what was most significant about abortion was its explicit rejection of the Declaration of Independence's principle holding that our right to life is "inalienable." Abortion taught us that the lives of some are alienable and raised the question, why not the lives of others? Contrary to stereotype, the pro-life movement is a classic reform movement, inbued with a fierce belief in the inherent worth and equality of mankind. PMID:10294688

Andrusko, D

1989-01-01

276

Ethical considerations on methods used in abortions.  

PubMed

There is a fundamental inconsistency in Western society's treatment of non-human animals on the one hand, and of human foetuses on the other. While most Western countries allow the butchering of animals and their use in experimentation, this must occur under carefully controlled conditions that are intended to minimize their pain and suffering as much as possible. At the same time, most Western countries permit various abortion methods without similar concerns for the developing fetus. The only criteria for deciding which abortion method is used centre in the stage of the pregnancy, the size of the fetus, the health of the pregnant woman and the physician's preference. This is out of step with the underlying ethos of animal cruelty legislation, cannot be justified ethically and should be rectified by adjusting abortion methods to the capacity of the fetus to experience nociception and/or pain. PMID:23076345

Kluge, Eike-Henner W

2015-03-01

277

Paradoxical Parallels in the American and German Abortion Decisions  

E-print Network

In this Article, Professors Levy and Somek engage in a careful comparative analysis of the leading constitutional abortion decisions in the United States and Germany. This analysis is occasioned by the remarkable convergence of the abortion...

Levy, Richard E.; Somek, Alexander

2001-01-01

278

Their Right to an Abortion, Your Right to Know  

MedlinePLUS

... Know Ages & Stages Listen Their Right to an Abortion, Your Right to Know Article Body Only a handful of states grant minors access to abortion without their parents’ knowledge or permission. The majority ...

279

‘The Trial the World is Watching’: The 1972 Prosecution of Derk Crichton and James Watts, Abortion, and the Regulation of the Medical Profession in Apartheid South Africa  

PubMed Central

After its formation in 1910 as a self-governing dominion within the British empire, the Union of South Africa followed a combination of English and Roman-Dutch common laws on abortion that decreed the procedure permissible only when necessary to save a woman’s life. The government continued doing so after South Africa withdrew from the Commonwealth and became a republic in 1961. In 1972 a sensational trial took place in the South African Supreme Court that for weeks placed clandestine abortion on the front pages of the country’s newspapers. Two men, one an eminent doctor and the other a self-taught abortionist, were charged with conspiring to perform illegal abortions on twenty-six white teenagers and young unmarried women. The prosecution of Dr Derk Crichton and James Watts occurred while the National Party government was in the process of drafting abortion legislation and was perceived by legal experts as another test of the judiciary’s stance on the common law on abortion. The trial was mainly intended to regulate the medical profession and ensure doctors ceased helping young white women evade their ‘duty’ to procreate within marriage. Ultimately, the event encapsulated a great deal about elites’ attempt to buttress apartheid culture and is significant for, among other reasons, contributing to the production of South Africa’s extremely restrictive Abortion and Sterilisation Act (1975). PMID:24775430

Klausen, Susanne M.

2014-01-01

280

Reasons women give for abortion: a review of the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim was to identify from empirical research that used quantitative or qualitative methods the reasons women give for having\\u000a an abortion. A search was conducted of peer-reviewed, English language publications indexed in eight computerized databases\\u000a with publication date 1996–2008, using keywords ‘abortion’ and ‘reason’ (Medline: ‘induced abortion’ OR ‘termination of pregnancy’\\u000a OR ‘elective abortion’ and ‘reason’). Inclusion criteria were

Maggie Kirkman; Heather Rowe; Annarella Hardiman; Shelley Mallett; Doreen Rosenthal

2009-01-01

281

The Irrational Woman: Informed Consent and Abortion Decision-Making  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Gonzales v. Carhart, the Supreme Court upheld a federal ban on a type of second-trimester abortion that many physicians believe is safer for their patients. Carhart presented a watershed moment in abortion law, because it marks the Supreme Court’s first use of the anti-abortion movement’s “woman-protective” rationale to uphold a ban on abortion and the first time since Roe

Maya Manian

2009-01-01

282

Estimating the Level of Abortion In the Philippines and Bangladesh  

Microsoft Academic Search

In countries where data on induced abortion are underreported or nonexistent—such as the Philippines and Bangladesh—indirect estimation techniques may be used to approximate the level of abortion. The collection of data about women hospitalized for abortion complications and the use of such indirect estimation techniques indicates that the abortion rate in the Philip- pines is within the range of 20-30

Susheela Singh; Josefina V. Cabigon; Altaf Hossain; Haidary Kamal; Aurora E. Perez

283

Spontaneous Abortion and the Pathology of Early Pregnancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The medical profession classifi es abortion as induced or spontaneous. The lay public, however, tends to equate the term abortion\\u000a with one that is induced, whether therapeutically, self, or criminal, and to associate the term miscarriage with spontaneous\\u000a abortion (Beard et al. 1985).\\u000a \\u000a Spontaneous abortion is usually defi ned as the involuntary loss of a conceptus before the fetus has

T. Yee Khong

284

Legal highs - legal aspects and legislative solutions.  

PubMed

In recent years the attention of society, the media and politicians has focused on the negative phenomenon of the occurrence of an enormous amount of new psychoactive substances flooding the European market. In Poland and in Europe they are known under the name 'legal highs' or 'smart drugs'. In many countries these compounds present a serious social and health problem. The core of the problem is the fact that in the light of the law these substances are legal, while actually they imitate the eff ect of illegal narcotics. Smart drugs are sold allegedly as 'products not intended for human consumption', under the cover of 'collector's commodities', 'incense sticks' or 'bath salts'. Efforts undertaken by many countries, including Poland, are biased towards gaining control over this pathological phenomenon by placing the subsequent substances on the list of prohibited agents. However, the resilient chemical and pharmaceutical industry still remains one step ahead by introducing new derivatives of already banned products, practically identical in action. The presented article is an attempt to bring closer the problem of smart drugs in Poland, from the occurrence of this alarming phenomenon, through the spread of sales in shops all over Poland, to a series of changes in the Polish anti-narcotic law, drastic actions of closing the shops throughout the entire country, and transferring the sale of smart drugs to the internet. PMID:22216803

Kapka-Skrzypczak, Lucyna; Kulpa, Piotr; Sawicki, Krzysztof; Cyranka, Ma?gorzata; Wojty?a, Andrzej; Kruszewski, Marcin

2011-12-01

285

42 CFR 457.475 - Limitations on coverage: Abortions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Limitations on coverage: Abortions. 457.475 Section 457.475 Public...457.475 Limitations on coverage: Abortions. (a) General rule. FFP under...is not available in expenditures for an abortion, or in expenditures for the...

2011-10-01

286

The Effect of Religious Membership on Teen Abortion Rates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studied abortion rates among teenagers in 1,024 counties in 18 states that report abortion numbers. Results show that counties with high levels of religious membership were more likely to be in a state with a parental involvement law for teenage abortions. Both religious membership level and a parental involvement law were negatively related to…

Tomal, Annette

2001-01-01

287

The Accessibility of Abortion Services In the United States, 2001  

Microsoft Academic Search

RESULTS: A minority of abortion providers offer services before five weeks from the last menstrual period (37%) or after 20 weeks (24% or fewer), but the proportions have increased since 1993. Providers estimate that one-quarter of women having abortions in nonhospital facilities travel 50 miles or more for services, and that 7% are initially unsure of their abortion decision. The

Stanley K. Henshaw; Lawrence B. Finer

2003-01-01

288

42 CFR 457.475 - Limitations on coverage: Abortions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-10-01 false Limitations on coverage: Abortions. 457.475 Section 457.475 Public...457.475 Limitations on coverage: Abortions. (a) General rule. FFP under...is not available in expenditures for an abortion, or in expenditures for the...

2014-10-01

289

42 CFR 457.475 - Limitations on coverage: Abortions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Limitations on coverage: Abortions. 457.475 Section 457.475 Public...457.475 Limitations on coverage: Abortions. (a) General rule. FFP under...is not available in expenditures for an abortion, or in expenditures for the...

2012-10-01

290

42 CFR 457.475 - Limitations on coverage: Abortions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Limitations on coverage: Abortions. 457.475 Section 457.475 Public...457.475 Limitations on coverage: Abortions. (a) General rule. FFP under...is not available in expenditures for an abortion, or in expenditures for the...

2010-10-01

291

42 CFR 457.475 - Limitations on coverage: Abortions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Limitations on coverage: Abortions. 457.475 Section 457.475 Public...457.475 Limitations on coverage: Abortions. (a) General rule. FFP under...is not available in expenditures for an abortion, or in expenditures for the...

2013-10-01

292

The Global Politics of Abortion. Worldwatch Paper 97.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Locating the issue of abortion in a global public policy context, with the array of public health, human rights, and social questions that are implicated, is the aim of this paper. Abortion laws around the world have been liberalized since the 1950s, with a resultant decrease in abortion-related mortality among women. The proportion of the world's…

Jacobson, Jodi L.

293

The FIGO initiative for the prevention of unsafe abortion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unsafe abortion is a recognized public health problem that contributes significantly to maternal mortality. At least 13% of maternal mortality is caused by unsafe abortion, mostly in poor and marginalized women. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) launched an initiative in 2007 to prevent unsafe abortion and its consequences, building on its work on other major causes of

Dorothy Shaw

2010-01-01

294

Review article Recent advances on ovine chlamydial abortion  

E-print Network

Review article Recent advances on ovine chlamydial abortion Annie Rodolakisa Jesus Salinasb John on ovine chlamydial abortion. Concerning chlamy- dial taxonomy, with the recent advances due, with the kinetics of placental col- onization and placental pathology leading to abortion in ruminants. Studies

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

295

Review article Lelystad virus and the porcine epidemic abortion  

E-print Network

Review article Lelystad virus and the porcine epidemic abortion and respiratory syndrome G abortion and respiratory syndrome and porcine reproduc- tive and respiratory syndrome. The virus is a small pigs. Clinical signs of an infection with Le- lystad virus are characterized by late term abortions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

296

Article de synthse DIAGNOSTIC DE LA CHLAMYDIOSE ABORTIVE  

E-print Network

Article de synthèse DIAGNOSTIC DE LA CHLAMYDIOSE ABORTIVE Annie RODOLAKIS INRA, centre de ToursI abortive infections of ruminants are presented in this review. Plan 1. Diagnostic indirect 1.1. Diagnostic commencent également à être appliquées en médecine vétérinaire pour le diagnostic de la chlamydiose abortive

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

297

DIAGNOSTIC ALLERGIQUE DE LA CHLAMYDIOSE ABORTIVE DE LA CHEVRE  

E-print Network

DIAGNOSTIC ALLERGIQUE DE LA CHLAMYDIOSE ABORTIVE DE LA CHEVRE Annie RODOLAKIS, J. DUFRENOY A (France) Summary ALLERGIC DIAGNOSIS OF ABORTIVE CHLAMYDIAL INFECTION IN THE GOAT. ― A delayed. Introduction. Le diagnostic immunologique de la Chla- mydiose abortive est réalisé tant chez la chèvre que chez

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

298

Schedulability Analysis of CAN with Non-abortable Transmission Requests  

E-print Network

Schedulability Analysis of CAN with Non-abortable Transmission Requests Dawood A. Khan INRIA / INPL, in reality, CAN controllers may have some characteristics, such as non- abortable transmit buffers, which may break this assumption. This paper provides analysis for networks that contain nodes with non-abortable

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

299

Powered Safe Abort for Autonomous Rendezvous of Spacecraft  

E-print Network

Powered Safe Abort for Autonomous Rendezvous of Spacecraft Louis Breger and Jonathan P. How MIT-optimized rendezvous trajectories. These trajectories guarantee the existence of known powered abort trajectories the existence of known active safe abort trajectories for a large class of possible spacecraft anomalies

How, Jonathan P.

300

Resets vs. Aborts in Linear Temporal Logic Roy Armoni1  

E-print Network

Resets vs. Aborts in Linear Temporal Logic Roy Armoni1 , Doron Bustan2 , Orna Kupferman3 of Pnueli's LTL. Both ForSpec and Sugar 2.0 directly support reset/abort signals, in which a check for a property may be terminated and declared successful by a reset/abort sig- nal, provided the check has

Kupferman, Orna

301

ABORTED FRUITS OF OPUNTIA MICRODASYS (CACTACEAE): INSURANCE AGAINST REPRODUCTIVE FAILURE  

E-print Network

ABORTED FRUITS OF OPUNTIA MICRODASYS (CACTACEAE): INSURANCE AGAINST REPRODUCTIVE FAILURE 1 N, but plantlet provenance did not. The high fruit abortion rate resulting from environmental and maternal effects provided suitable conditions for establishment of plantlets. Key words: clonal propagation; fruit abortion

Mandujano, María del Carmen

302

Solo-fast Universal Constructions for Deterministic Abortable Objects  

E-print Network

Solo-fast Universal Constructions for Deterministic Abortable Objects Claire Capdevielle, Colette.lastname@labri.fr) Abstract. In this paper we study efficient implementations for deter- ministic abortable objects. Deterministic abortable objects behave like ordinary objects when accessed sequentially, but they may return

Johnen, Colette

303

Estimates of the abortion demand of young and older teenagers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study estimates the demand for abortion by younger (ages 15–17) and older (ages 18–19) teenagers. The empirical results show, for both age groups, abortion demand is price inelastic and a normal good with respect to income. Teenage abortion demand is also found to be positively related to labor force participation and state Medicaid funding and negatively related to religiosity

Marshall H. Medoff

1998-01-01

304

Deprivation and variations in teenage conceptions and abortions in England  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are substantial variations between local authorities in the conception rate of teenagers and the proportion of these that end in abortion. This study builds two deprivation models that explain part of the variation in conceptions and abortions. It then identifies outliers, local authorities with teenage conception and abortion rates that are above or below those predicted by the model.

Jonathan Bradshaw; Naomi Finch; Jeremy N V Miles

2005-01-01

305

First trimester abortion with mifepristone and vaginal misoprostol  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assessed the efficacy and side effects of first trimester medical abortion using mifepristone and vaginally administered misoprostol. Medical abortion was first introduced in Denmark in December 1997, and the acceptability of this new approach in a Danish population was evaluated. The study included the first 100 women seeking medical abortion. The gestational age was from 33 to 56

Ulla Breth Knudsen

2001-01-01

306

Miscarriage, abortion or criminal feticide: understandings of early pregnancy loss in Britain, 1900-1950.  

PubMed

This paper explores the close links in medical understandings of miscarriage and abortion in the first half of the twentieth century in Britain. In the absence of a clear legal framework for abortion, and the secrecy surrounding the practice, medical literature suggests contradictory and confused views about women presenting with clinical signs of pregnancy loss. On one hand, there was a lack of clarity as to whether pregnancy loss was natural or induced, with a clear tendency to assume that symptoms of miscarriage were the result of criminal interference gone wrong. On the other hand, women who did not present for treatment when miscarriage was underway were accused of neglecting their unborn children. The paper suggests that discourses around pregnancy loss were class-based, distrustful of female patients, and shaped by the wider context of fertility decline and concerns about infant mortality. The close historical connection between miscarriage and abortion offers some insight into why both the pro-life movement and miscarriage support advocates today draw on similar imagery and rhetoric about early fetal loss. PMID:24594057

Elliot, Rosemary

2014-09-01

307

Basic Legal Citation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For law students, learning about the world of legal citations is key. For many years, the standard reference work on legal citation was a manual known as "The Bluebook". This work has been revised numerous times over the years, and this online version appeared in May 2007. It is offered here as a public service, by the Legal Information Institute (LII) at Cornell University's Law School, and it will be helpful for those looking for a quick online reference work. It is worth noting that this particular introduction is focused on the forms of citation used in processional practice rather that those used in journal publication. Visitors can search through the contents at their leisure, and they can also jump around to sections that cover the use of underlining, italics, and citation principles.

Martin, Peter W., 1939-

308

Legal Portraits Online  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Harvard Law School Library has quite an impressive collection of legal art and visual materials, and as of late, they have been working to digitize these works and place them online for the web-browsing public. The collection includes images of jurists, political figures, legal thinkers, and lawyers that date from the Middle Ages all the way up to the late twentieth century. As the website notes, the collection is quite strong in its coverage of eighteenth and nineteenth century British and American lawyers, including such luminaries as Jeremy Bentham and John Marshall. Visitors can search the collection at their leisure, and they can also look at the online exhibition titled "The Legal Portrait Project Online", if they wish to do so.

2003-01-01

309

Cytogenetic and histologic analyses of spontaneous abortions  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a study of spontaneous abortions the correlations between karyotype (166 cases), anamnestic data, and macroscopic and histologic findings in placentas (107 cases) and embryos (73 cases) were analyzed. The main results were: 1. The rate of chromosomal aberrations was 39%. Trisomies predominated (60%), followed by monosomy X (20%), triploidies (14%), and structural aberrations (6%). 2. In trisomies a clear

M. Geisler; J. Kleinebrecht

1978-01-01

310

Abortions in Cattle Max Irsik DVM, MAB  

E-print Network

Virus Diarrhea (BVD) is caused by a viral agent. There are multiple strains of the BVD virus. Some of the more common infectious agents causing abortions in cattle will be briefly reviewed: Bovine. It is spread by aerosol or contact especially from persistently infected cattle. BVD is usually associated

Watson, Craig A.

311

Women's hidden transcripts about abortion in Brazil.  

PubMed

Two folk medical conditions, "delayed" (atrasada) and "suspended" (suspendida) menstruation, are described as perceived by poor Brazilian women in Northeast Brazil. Culturally prescribed methods to "regulate" these conditions and provoke menstrual bleeding are also described, including ingesting herbal remedies, patent drugs, and modern pharmaceuticals. The ingestion of such self-administered remedies is facilitated by the cognitive ambiguity, euphemisms, folklore, etc., which surround conception and gestation. The authors argue that the ethnomedical conditions of "delayed" and "suspended" menstruation and subsequent menstrual regulation are part of the "hidden reproductive transcript" of poor and powerless Brazilian women. Through popular culture, they voice their collective dissent to the official, public opinion about the illegality and immorality of induced abortion and the chronic lack of family planning services in Northeast Brazil. While many health professionals consider women's explanations of menstrual regulation as a "cover-up" for self-induced abortions, such popular justifications may represent either an unconscious or artful manipulation of hegemonic, anti-abortion ideology expressed in prudent, unobtrusive and veiled ways. The development of safer abortion alternatives should consider women's hidden reproductive transcripts. PMID:9194245

Nations, M K; Misago, C; Fonseca, W; Correia, L L; Campbell, O M

1997-06-01

312

Debate: Should Abortion Be Available on Request?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two physicians debate whether abortions should be available on request regardless of medical indications. The crux of the issue is whether the fetus should be considered body tissue over which the woman has complete control or whether society has an interest in the embryo and should protect it. (Author/BY)

Nathanson, Bernard; Lawrence, George

1971-01-01

313

Common vnmr commands aa--abort acquisition  

E-print Network

Common vnmr commands aa--abort acquisition ai--absolute intensity mode aph--automatic phase correction at--acquisition time (sec) axis--scale units: axis='h' or axis='p' bc--baseline correction bs--plot scale pw--pulse width pwd--present working directory ra--resume acquisition (stopped by sa) rl

Stoltz, Brian M.

314

Why Abortion is Seriously Wrong: Two Views  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The purpose of this essay is to compare the substantial identity argument for the wrongness of abortion to the future of value\\u000a argument for its wrongness. Both arguments take for granted the standard moral judgment that it is wrong intentionally to\\u000a end the lives of innocent post-natal children and adults.

Donald Marquis

315

State abortion policy, geographic access to abortion providers and changing family formation.  

PubMed

This study examined whether new barriers to abortion access are likely to contribute to increased female headship in the US. State and country fixed effects models are estimated for the impact of geographic access to abortion providers, notification requirements, parental consent, and Medicaid funding restrictions. Data were obtained from county records from summary tape files of the 1980 and 1990 censuses; abortion provider information from the Alan Guttmacher Institute; and physicians active in OB-GYN patient care data from the Bureau of Health Professionals Area Resource File. Pooled data amounted to 6132 observations for 3066 counties. The data included nonmarital births without a marriage and marital births followed by separation or divorce. Sensitivity analysis accounted for local divorce rates. Fixed effects controls accounted for unobserved variables. Population-weighted descriptive statistics are provided for dependent and key independent variables. Abortion provider declines ranged from 13% to 19%. Findings indicate that declines in geographic access accounted for a small, but significant, decline in increased female headship. About 50% of the increase among Black female headship was accounted for by restrictions on Medicaid funding. A modest amount of the rise in White female headship was due to state parent notification requirements. The difference in the estimated impact of abortion providers in the state and county specific models supported findings of Kane and Staiger. Sensitivity models did not alter the effects of access to abortion providers and physicians. Findings suggest conflicting or competing public policy goals. PMID:9859019

Lichter, D T; McLaughlin, D K; Ribar, D C

1998-01-01

316

Abortion in Canada: religious and ideological dimensions of women's attitudes.  

PubMed

This paper examines a number of demographic and sociocultural factors (e.g., age, marital status, family size, religion, religious assiduity, sex-role ideology) as predictors of women's attitudes toward abortion, using data from the Canadian Fertility Survey of 1984. The findings suggest that women's abortion attitudes are to a greater extent based on ideological positions. It appears that anti-abortion stance affects those women who are religious, presumably by increasing the relationship between their general sex-role ideological stances and abortion attitudes. Abortion attitudes also vary according to a woman's education, her size, and province/region of residence. PMID:1801205

Krishnan, V

1991-01-01

317

Crew Exploration Vehicle Service Module Ascent Abort Coverage  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) is required to maintain continuous abort capability from lift off through destination arrival. This requirement is driven by the desire to provide the capability to safely return the crew to Earth after failure scenarios during the various phases of the mission. This paper addresses abort trajectory design considerations, concept of operations and guidance algorithm prototypes for the portion of the ascent trajectory following nominal jettison of the Launch Abort System (LAS) until safe orbit insertion. Factors such as abort system performance, crew load limits, natural environments, crew recovery, and vehicle element disposal were investigated to determine how to achieve continuous vehicle abort capability.

Tedesco, Mark B.; Evans, Bryan M.; Merritt, Deborah S.; Falck, Robert D.

2007-01-01

318

Legal Challenges and Opportunities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For legal issues in the field of disability compliance, this is an exciting time in postsecondary education. The twentieth anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) signals a reawakening of the commitment to provide equal access to individuals with disabilities. This chapter explores three of the compliance issues that will be of…

Heyward, Salome

2011-01-01

319

Euthanasia: Some Legal Considerations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several sections of the Criminal Code of Canada which are relevant to the issue of euthanasia are discussed. In addition, the value placed on the sanctity of life by the law, the failure to recognize motive in cases of euthanasia, and disparate legal and medical definitions of death are also considered. (Author)

Koza, Pamela

1976-01-01

320

Minimally legally invasive dentistry.  

PubMed

One disadvantage of the rapid advances in modern dentistry is that treatment options have never been more varied or confusing. Compounded by a more educated population greatly assisted by online information in an increasingly litigious society, a major concern in recent times is increased litigation against health practitioners. The manner in which courts handle disputes is ambiguous and what is considered fair or just may not be reflected in the judicial process. Although legal decisions in Australia follow a doctrine of precedent, the law is not static and is often reflected by community sentiment. In medical litigation, this has seen the rejection of the Bolam principle with a preference towards greater patient rights. Recent court decisions may change the practice of dentistry and it is important that the clinician is not caught unaware. The aim of this article is to discuss legal issues that are pertinent to the practice of modern dentistry through an analysis of legal cases that have shaped health law. Through these discussions, the importance of continuing professional development, professional association and informed consent will be realized as a means to limit the legal complications of dental practice. PMID:25160114

Lam, R

2014-12-01

321

Legal Issues in Testing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Digest overviews legal challenges in five areas of test use for decision-making in schools: ability tracking, placement in special education classes, test scores as college admissions criteria, test disclosure, and teacher competency testing. Cases illustrating these challenges are described and include: Hobson v. Hansen (1967), Moses v.…

ERIC Clearinghouse on Tests, Measurement, and Evaluation, Princeton, NJ.

322

Legal Aid Network of Kentucky  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by a group of Kentucky's legal service providers, the focus of the Legal Aid Network of Kentucky's website is to provide helpful information about legal services available to specific "groups of vulnerable Kentuckians". These groups include people who meet certain income guidelines, people 60 years and older, and in some cases, those people who are victims of domestic violence. Visitors will find that the site has five primary sections, including "Find Legal Help", "Self-Help Forms", and "Law Library". Visitors can use the "Find Legal Help" area to look up local legal services from across the state or by using an interactive map provided here. The "Video Library" area offers short videos about bankruptcy, eviction, and foreclosure. It is important to remember that these videos provide legal information, and do not constitute legal advice. Finally, visitors can also use the search engine here to look for information on specific topics.

323

Legal Dimensions of School Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As school activities proliferate, questions surface about educators' legal responsibilities. Litigants must establish evidence regarding recognizable legal duty, breach of a recognizable duty, proximate cause, or injury. Principals are responsible for providing adequate supervision; employing competent, efficient personnel; instructing adequately;…

Permuth, Steve; Permuth, Rachel S.

2000-01-01

324

Legal Disclosure of HIV Status  

MedlinePLUS

... Legal Disclosure Translate Text Size Print Legal Disclosure HIV Disclosure Policies and Procedures If your HIV test ... aids.gov • facing.aids.gov • providertools.aids.gov • HIV/AIDS Service Locator Locator Widgets • Instructions • API Find ...

325

Understanding Financial and Legal Matters  

MedlinePLUS

... articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Understanding Financial and Legal Matters Find out about things you ... who can help you navigate the legal and financial systems. Advance Directives An advance health care directive ...

326

Analysis - what is legal medicine?  

PubMed

Legal medicine addresses the interface between medicine and law in health care. The Australian College of Legal Medicine (ACLM) established itself as the peak body in legal and forensic medicine in Australia. It helped establish the Expert Witness Institute of Australia (EWIA), the legal medicine programme at Griffith University and contributes to government enquiries. Public health, disability assessment, competing priorities of privacy verses notification and determination of fitness for a host of pursuits are aspects of legal medicine. Complementing the EWIA, the ACLM runs training programmes emphasising legal medicine skills additional to clinical practice, advocating clinical relevance. Assessment of athletes' fitness and ensuring that prohibited substances are not inadvertently prescribed represent a growing area of legal medicine. Ethical consideration of health care should respect legal medicine principles rather than armchair commentary. International conventions must be respected by legal medicine and dictate physicians' obligations. The NSW courts imposed a duty to provide emergency medical care. Migration and communicable diseases are aspects of legal medicine. Police surgeons provide a face to legal medicine (which incorporates forensic medicine) underpinning its public perception of specialty recognition. Legal medicine deserves its place as a medical specialty in its own right. PMID:18313010

Beran, Roy G

2008-04-01

327

Women's Legal History  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Women's Legal History website is the home of a searchable database of articles and papers on pioneering women lawyers in the United States. The site contains sections that include the WLH Biography Project and the index and bibliographic notes from "Woman Lawyer: The Trial of Clara Foltz" by Barbara Babcock. In the WLH Biography Project, visitors can look over the life stories of women in the legal profession, such as Agnes Sagebiel, Marge Wagner, and Julia Jennings. There are over 1,000 profiles that visitors can browse alphabetically or search by name, year, ethnicity, or law school. Additionally, the site contains detailed information about Babcock's recent work, along with media clips related to the subject of women lawyers

2013-01-01

328

Robotrust and Legal Responsibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper examines some aspects of today’s debate on trust and e-trust and, more specifically, issues of legal responsibility\\u000a for the production and use of robots. Their impact on human-to-human interaction has produced new problems both in the fields\\u000a of contractual and extra-contractual liability in that robots negotiate, enter into contracts, establish rights and obligations\\u000a between humans, while reshaping matters

Ugo Pagallo

2010-01-01

329

Legal Ethics and Depression  

E-print Network

Legal Ethi cs and Depression By Michael H. Hoeflich "no" in many, if not most cases. And herein lies the problem. Recent scientific studies have made it very clear that most forms of major depression have definite physical pathologies... that often involve progressive chemical and physical changes to the brain.5 Further, a substantial number of those individ- uals who suffer from major depression have a genetic predis- position to do so. In addition, stress, particularly stress that also...

Hoeflich, Michael H.

2005-09-01

330

Abortions bring economic pressure to bear on hospitals.  

PubMed

The current abortion controversy has serious potential economic consequences for U.S. hospitals, from boycotts and other political actions, but also because of lack of reimbursement for procedures performed on indigent women. An example was given of a threatened boycott of a private hospital in Washington state by evangelical residents and their physicians. Another example of boycott of hospital blood donations was cited. 1078, or 28.7%, of 3752 U.S. hospitals that are equipped to perform abortions do so. 90% of abortions are done by 31% of U.S. hospitals. 90% of these are 1st trimester abortions, costing $200-300. Many employer-sponsored health insurance plans pay for abortions, but Medicaid programs pay for limited numbers of abortions: all abortions for poor women in 13 states, but only those need to save the woman's life in most states. The federal government paid $62,235 for 84 abortions in 13 states in 1988. California and New York have extensive abortion programs for the poor. Hospitals keep a low profile about abortion services, declining to advertise their activity. PMID:10303809

Taravella, S

1989-08-25

331

Estimating abortion incidence in Burkina Faso using two methodologies.  

PubMed

Abortion is illegal in Burkina Faso except in cases of incest, rape, fetal defect, or when the woman's life or physical health is endangered. As a result, abortion procedures are often conducted illegally and unsafely and measuring incidence proves difficult. We estimate incidence of abortion and associated morbidity using two methodologies. The first is the Abortion Incidence Complications Method (AICM), which uses information on women hospitalized for abortion-related complications as well as health professionals' assessments of the proportion of women who seek treatment for complications from unsafe abortions. The second is the Anonymous Third Party Reporting (ATPR) method, which entails surveying women about their confidantes' abortions. We conclude that the AICM yields a more accurate result. We estimate that 87,200 abortion procedures were carried out in 2008, representing 25 for every 1,000 women aged 15-49. More than one in four procedures resulted in complications treated at a health facility. The abortion rate estimated using the ATPR approach was 72 percent of that estimated with the AICM. The ATPR method yields information on the characteristics of the women who have abortions as well as the providers and methods they use. PMID:21972666

Sedgh, Gilda; Rossier, Clémentine; Kaboré, Idrissa; Bankole, Akinrinola; Mikulich, Meridith

2011-09-01

332

Induced abortion among Brazilian female sex workers: a qualitative study.  

PubMed

Prostitutes are vulnerable to unplanned pregnancies and abortions. In Brazil, abortion is a crime and there is no data about unsafe abortions for this population. The study describes how prostitutes perform illegal abortions and the health consequences thereof. Semi-structured interviews with 39 prostitutes from three cities in Brazil with previous induced abortion experience were conducted. Sixty-six abortions, with between one and eight occurrences per woman, were recorded. The majority of the cases resulted from sexual activity with clients. The inconsistent use of condoms with regular clients and the consumption of alcohol during work were indicated as the main causes of unplanned pregnancies. The main method to perform abortion was the intravaginal and oral use of misoprostol, acquired in pharmacies or on the black market. Invasive measures were less frequently reported, however with more serious health complications. The fear of complaint to the police meant that most women do not inform the health team regarding induced abortion. The majority of prostitutes aborted with the use of illegally-acquired misoprostol, ending abortion in a public hospital with infection and hemorrhagic complications. The data indicate the need for a public policy focusing on the reproductive health of prostitutes. PMID:25715152

Madeiro, Alberto Pereira; Diniz, Debora

2015-02-01

333

The Relationship between Neutralization Techniques and Induced Abortion  

PubMed Central

Background: Induced abortion is not only a serious threat for women’s health, but also a controversial topic for its ethical and moral problems. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between neutralization techniques and attempting to commit abortion in married women with unintended pregnancy. Methods: After in-depth interviews with some women who had attempted abortion, neutralization themes were gathered. Next, to analyze the data quantitatively, a questionnaire was created including demographic and psychosocial variables specifically related to neutralization. The participants were divided into two groups (abortion and control) of unintended pregnancy and were then compared. Results: Analysis of psychosocial variables revealed a significant difference in the two groups at neutralization, showing that neutralization in the control group (56.97±10.24) was higher than that in the abortion group (44.19±12.44). To evaluate the findings more accurately, we examined the causal factors behind the behaviors of the abortion group. Binary logistic regression showed that among psychosocial factors, neutralization significantly affected abortion (95% CI=1.07-1.35). Conclusion: Despite the network of many factors affecting induced abortion, neutralization plays an important role in reinforcing the tendency to attempt abortion. Furthermore, the decline of religious beliefs, as a result of the secular context of the modern world, seems to have an important role in neutralizing induced abortion. PMID:25349851

Kalateh Sadati, Ahmad; Tabei, Seyed Ziaaddin; Salehzadeh, Hamzeh; Rahnavard, Farnaz; Namavar Jahromi, Bahia; Hemmati, Soroor

2014-01-01

334

Legal Information Institute  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Cornell University's Law School has an international reputation for scholarly activity, and Scout Report readers will be glad to learn about the online resources afforded by its Legal Information Institute (LII). Founded in 1992 by co-directors Thomas R. Bruce and Peter W. Martin, the LII publishes electronic versions of "core materials in numerous areas of the law". Some of the key materials that users will find here include Supreme Court decisions, decisions of the U.S. Court of Appeals, decisions of the New York Court of Appeals, and the U.S. Code. For those more casual or first-time users, the site has a well-written introduction to basic legal citation and a lexicon of basic legal terms. The homepage of the site also features a selection of recent law events that have made the news, complete with hypertext links to the complete decisions. The "Law aboutâ?¦" area is helpful, as visitors can browse around to find information about various sectors of law including enterprise law, criminal law, and constitutional law.

335

Genetic abortion: considerations for patient care.  

PubMed

Women who receive abnormal prenatal diagnosis results potentially face two emotionally difficult decisions. In this article, the first decision--whether or not to terminate the pregnancy--is presented with a discussion of the factors that may influence a women's choice. Women who choose to terminate the pregnancy face a second decision when more than one type of abortion procedure is available. Two second trimester abortion procedures--dilation and evacuation and labor induction--are compared and contrasted to delineate potential advantages and disadvantages of each. The decision-making process is examined, emphasizing the individual ways in which women may weigh this information to make a fully informed decision. In addition, a number of recommendations are offered to health care providers in the role of discussing options and supporting women in their choices. PMID:10818853

Bourguignon, A; Briscoe, B; Nemzer, L

1999-09-01

336

Orion Launch Abort System (LAS) Propulsion on Pad Abort 1 (PA-1)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This presentation provides a concise overview of the highly successful Orion Pad Abort 1 (PA-1) flight test, and the three rocket motors that contributed to this success. The primary purpose of the Orion PA-1 flight was to help certify the Orion Launch Abort System (LAS), which can be utilized in the unlikely event of an emergency on the launchpad or during mission vehicle ascent. The PA-1 test was the first fully integrated flight test of the Orion LAS, one of the primary systems within the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). The Orion MPCV is part of the architecture within the Space Launch System (SLS), which is being designed to transport astronauts beyond low-Earth orbit for future exploration missions. Had the Orion PA-1 flight abort occurred during launch preparations for a real human spaceflight mission, the PA-1 LAS would have saved the lives of the crew. The PA-1 flight test was largely successful due to the three solid rocket motors of the LAS: the Attitude Control Motor (ACM); the Jettison Motor (JM); and the Abort Motor (AM). All three rocket motors successfully performed their required functions during the Orion PA-1 flight test, flown on May 6, 2010 at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, culminating in a successful demonstration of an abort capability from the launchpad.

Jones, Daniel S.

2015-01-01

337

Towards safe abortion access: an exploratory study of medical abortion in Cambodia.  

PubMed

In 2010, following its approval by the Ministry of Health, the medical abortion combination pack Medabon (containing mifepristone and misoprostol) was made available at pharmacies and in a restricted number of health facilities in Cambodia. The qualitative study presented in this paper was conducted in 2012 as a follow-up to longer-term ethnographical research related to reproductive health and fertility regulation between 2008 and 2012. Observations were carried out at several clinic and pharmacy sites and in-depth interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 20 women who attended two MSI Cambodia centres and 10 women identified through social networks; six men (women's male partners); eight health care providers at the two MSI centres and four pill sellers at private or informal pharmacies (who also provided health care services in private clinics). Although the level of training among the drug sellers and providers varied, their knowledge about medical abortion regimens, correct usage and common side effects was good. Overall, women were satisfied with the services provided. Medical abortion was not always a women-only process in this study as some male partners were also involved in the care process. The study illustrates positive steps forward being taken in making abortion safe and preventing and reducing unsafe abortion practices in Cambodia. PMID:25702068

Petitet, Pascale Hancart; Ith, Leakhena; Cockroft, Melissa; Delvaux, Thérèse

2015-02-01

338

Three More Arguments Against Early Abortion  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The main purpose of this chapter is to examine three arguments – from Hare, Marquis and Harman – that, whether by design or\\u000a not, place the permissibility of the early abortion in doubt. Each of the three arguments is grounded in positions that seem\\u000a to assign at least some moral significance to the loss incurred by a merely possible person

Melinda A. Roberts

339

Abortion: Strong’s counterexamples fail  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis’s argument against abortion fail. Strong’s basic idea is that there are cases—for example, terminally ill patients—where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally wrong even though that human being is not being deprived of a “valuable future”. So

E Di Nucci

2009-01-01

340

RU 486: an alternative to surgical abortion.  

PubMed

After 5 years of use in more than 100,000 European women, RU 486, an antiprogestin medication used as a medical abortifacient, has recently come under scrutiny in the United States. This article discusses the current and potential uses of RU 486. Also addressed are the history, advantages, and disadvantages of medical abortion (including the acceptability of the method from a woman-centered perspective); new clinical trials; and ethical issues. PMID:7996306

Donaldson, K; Briggs, J; McMaster, D

1994-09-01

341

CONTINUOUS ABORT GAP CLEANING AT RHIC.  

SciTech Connect

Since the RHIC Au-Au run in the year 2001 the 200 MHz cavity system was used at storage and a 28 MHz system during injection and acceleration. The rebucketing procedure potentially causes a higher debunching rate of heavy ion beams in addition to amplifying debunching due to other mechanisms. At the end of a four hour store, debunched beam can easily account for more than 50% of the total beam intensity. This effect is even stronger with the achieved high intensities of the RHIC Au-Au run in 2004. A beam abort at the presence of a lot of debunched beam bears the risk of magnet quenching and experimental detector damage due to uncontrolled beam losses. Thus it is desirable to avoid any accumulation of debunched beam from the beginning of each store, in particular to anticipate cases of unscheduled beam aborts due to a system failure. A combination of a fast transverse kickers and the new 2-stage copper collimator system are used to clean the abort gap continuously throughout the store with a repetition rate of 1 Hz. This report gives. an overview of the new gap cleaning procedure and the achieved performance.

DREES,A.FLILLER,R.III.FU,W.MICHNOFF,R.

2004-07-05

342

Chromosome heteromorphisms and early recurrent abortions.  

PubMed

In order to identify the role played by heterochromatic polymorphisms in miscarriage, an analysis was carried out on 257 couples, 137 of them with two or more abortions and 120 serving as a control. All couples were taken from two Italian populations: 77 cases and 70 controls came from an exogamic population whilst 60 cases and 50 controls came from an almost endogamic one. Out of the 137 cases, six couples in the exogamic and five in the endogamic groups were excluded because at least one partner had balanced chromosomal aberrations. Four controls from the exogamic group were also excluded for the same reason. The remaining 126 cases were analysed to detect the presence of chromosomal heteromorphism in one or both partners. The results suggested that chromosomal heteromorphism does not induce miscarriage. In fact, only one heteromorphism, inv(9)(p11q12), seems to be marginally related to recurrent abortion and only in the exogamic population. In addition no differences were found in the distribution of chromosomal heteromorphism in the couples analysed in relation to the number of abortions, i.e. two or more than two. PMID:8314973

Del Porto, G; D'Alessandro, E; Grammatico, P; Coghi, I M; DeSanctis, S; Giambenedetti, M; Vaccarella, C; Fabi, R; Marcaino, M F; Nicotra, M

1993-05-01

343

Legal and regulatory issues surrounding carrier testing.  

PubMed

Genetic testing has arrived, probably earlier than patients and physicians need. For the moment, professional societies are taking the lead in monitoring the quality of physician education and laboratory services. The federal government will soon take over the role of monitoring the quality of genetic test kits themselves, but the most significant development will be the evolving physician-patient relationship in the context of primary and prenatal care. As of 1992, it is probably not necessary for physicians to educate their patients about the availability of genetic tests unless there is a specific indication of genetic disease in the family. However, should a patient ask for such information or testing, today's physician would have a duty to know enough about the current status of carrier testing to be able to respond to the requests or make a proper referral. In addition, as the reliability of such tests increase and their costs decrease, physicians may arrive at a moment when some sort of patient education is required, at least for the most common disorders. The recent court decisions securing the right to abortion mean that patients will continue to have the moral and legal right to assert their privilege to plan their families and, where possible, to avoid genetic impairments in their children. Physicians will have the sensitive task of helping patients to achieve their personal goals regarding such family planning, while not overwhelming patients with confusing or frightening information. PMID:8403605

Charo, R A

1993-09-01

344

Full-Envelope Launch Abort System Performance Analysis Methodology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The implementation of a new dispersion methodology is described, which dis-perses abort initiation altitude or time along with all other Launch Abort System (LAS) parameters during Monte Carlo simulations. In contrast, the standard methodology assumes that an abort initiation condition is held constant (e.g., aborts initiated at altitude for Mach 1, altitude for maximum dynamic pressure, etc.) while dispersing other LAS parameters. The standard method results in large gaps in performance information due to the discrete nature of initiation conditions, while the full-envelope dispersion method provides a significantly more comprehensive assessment of LAS abort performance for the full launch vehicle ascent flight envelope and identifies performance "pinch-points" that may occur at flight conditions outside of those contained in the discrete set. The new method has significantly increased the fidelity of LAS abort simulations and confidence in the results.

Aubuchon, Vanessa V.

2014-01-01

345

Abortion in sheep caused by a nonclassified, anaerobic, flagellated bacterium.  

PubMed

Twenty-eight pregnant ewes were inoculated IV with approximately 6 X 10(8) nonclassified, anaerobic, flagellated bacteria (NAFB) that had been isolated from an aborted lamb. Abortion occurred in 3 of the ewes and 1 ewe gave birth to a weak lamb. The remaining 24 ewes and 3 other ewes inoculated orally with NAFB did not develop clinical signs of illness. Suppuration and vasculitis were seen in the placentas of the 3 aborted lambs, 1 of which had necropurulent hepatitis indistinguishable from that usually attributed to Campylobacter fetus infection. The NAFB was isolated from fetal placenta, abomasal content, or internal organs of 2 aborted lambs and the weak lamb. A morphologically similar organism was seen in the abomasal content of the other aborted lamb, but the organism did not grow on bacteriologic culture medium. Therefore, in susceptible pregnant ewes, NAFB can cause fetal placentitis and hepatitis and subsequent birth of weak lambs or abortion. PMID:3954201

Kirkbride, C A; Gates, C E; Collins, J E

1986-02-01

346

Sensationalized Philosophy: A Reply to Marquis's "Why Abortion is Immoral"  

E-print Network

Journal of Philosophy, Inc. Sensationalized Philosophy: A Reply to Marquis's "Why Abortion is Immoral" Author(s): Ann E. Cudd Source: The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 87, No. 5 (May, 1990), pp. 262-264 Published by: Journal of Philosophy, Inc. Stable... access to The Journal of Philosophy. http://www.jstor.org 262 THE JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY COMMENTS AND CRITICISM SENSATIONALIZED PHILOSOPHY: A REPLY TO MARQUIS'S "WHY ABORTION IS IMMORAL"* I N a recent article, Don Marquis' claims to show "Why Abortion...

Cudd, Ann E.

1990-01-01

347

A case of Candida guilliermondii abortion in an Arab mare  

PubMed Central

Ascending infections of equine uterus frequently result in placentitis and abortions; most of these infections are bacterial and are less commonly due to fungi. This report describes an abortion case in an Arab mare due to Candida guilliermondii that was diagnosed via cytological, histological, cultural and biomolecular assays. The histological lesions found were severe necrotizing placentitis associated with fetal pneumonia. To our knowledge this is the first case of C. guilliermondii abortion reported in equine species. PMID:24707460

Stefanetti, Valentina; Marenzoni, Maria Luisa; Lepri, Elvio; Coletti, Mauro; Casagrande Proietti, Patrizia; Agnetti, Francesco; Crotti, Silvia; Pitzurra, Lucia; Del Sero, Andrea; Passamonti, Fabrizio

2014-01-01

348

Launch Architecture Impact on Ascent Abort and Crew Survival  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was performed to assess the effect of booster configuration on the ascent abort process. A generic abort event sequence was created and booster related risk drivers were identified. Three model boosters were considered in light of the risk drivers: a solid rocket motor configuration, a side mount combination solid and liquid configuration, and a stacked liquid configuration. The primary risk drivers included explosive fireball, overpressure, and fragment effects and booster-crew module re-contact. Risk drivers that were not specifically booster dependent were not addressed. The solid rocket configuration had the most benign influence on an abort while the side mount architecture provided the most challenging abort environment.

Mathias, Donovan L.; Lawrence, Scott L.

2006-01-01

349

The Impact of State Laws Protecting Abortion Clinics and Reproductive Rights on Crimes Against Abortion Providers: Deterrence, Backlash, or Neither?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since Roe v. Wade, most states have passed laws either restricting or further protecting reproductive rights. During a wave of anti-abortion\\u000a violence in the early 1990s, several states also enacted legislation protecting abortion clinics, staff, and patients. One\\u000a hypothesis drawn from the theoretical literature predicts that these laws provide a deterrent effect and thus fewer anti-abortion\\u000a crimes in states that

William Alex Pridemore; Joshua D. Freilich

2007-01-01

350

Are all abortions equal? Should there be exceptions to the criminalization of abortion for rape and incest?  

PubMed

Politics, public discourse, and legislation restricting abortion has settled on a moderate orthodoxy: restrict abortion, but leave exceptions for pregnancies that result from rape and incest. I challenge that consensus and suggest it may be much harder to defend than those who support the compromise think. From both Pro-Life and Pro-Choice perspectives, there are good reasons to treat all abortions as equal. PMID:25846041

Cohen, I Glenn

2015-03-01

351

Semantic Indexing of Legal Documents  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Automated semantic indexing may be the answer to insufficient recall of legal information systems. The semantic web has created\\u000a powerful tools for mark-up and ontological representation. Re-use in legal applications remains low due to inappropriate knowledge\\u000a structuring and lack of automated knowledge acquisition. This paper describes the state of the art and proposes a dynamic\\u000a electronic legal commentary.

Erich Schweighofer

2010-01-01

352

19 CFR 145.52 - Literature concerning devices for unlawful abortion.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Literature concerning devices for unlawful abortion. 145.52 Section 145.52 Customs...Literature concerning devices for unlawful abortion. Mail articles containing literature...concerning devices to produce unlawful abortions, are prohibited from the...

2012-04-01

353

3 CFR 13535 - Executive Order 13535 of March 24, 2010. Ensuring Enforcement and Implementation of Abortion...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Ensuring Enforcement and Implementation of Abortion Restrictions in the Patient Protection...Ensuring Enforcement and Implementation of Abortion Restrictions in the Patient Protection...ensure that Federal funds are not used for abortion services (except in cases of...

2011-01-01

354

45 CFR 156.280 - Segregation of funds for abortion services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Segregation of funds for abortion services. 156.280 Section 156.280... § 156.280 Segregation of funds for abortion services. (a) State opt-out of abortion coverage. A QHP issuer must comply...

2012-10-01

355

19 CFR 145.52 - Literature concerning devices for unlawful abortion.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Literature concerning devices for unlawful abortion. 145.52 Section 145.52 Customs...Literature concerning devices for unlawful abortion. Mail articles containing literature...concerning devices to produce unlawful abortions, are prohibited from the...

2011-04-01

356

19 CFR 145.52 - Literature concerning devices for unlawful abortion.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Literature concerning devices for unlawful abortion. 145.52 Section 145.52 Customs...Literature concerning devices for unlawful abortion. Mail articles containing literature...concerning devices to produce unlawful abortions, are prohibited from the...

2013-04-01

357

19 CFR 145.52 - Literature concerning devices for unlawful abortion.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Literature concerning devices for unlawful abortion. 145.52 Section 145.52 Customs...Literature concerning devices for unlawful abortion. Mail articles containing literature...concerning devices to produce unlawful abortions, are prohibited from the...

2010-04-01

358

75 FR 15597 - Ensuring Enforcement and Implementation of Abortion Restrictions in the Patient Protection and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Ensuring Enforcement and Implementation of Abortion Restrictions in the Patient Protection...Ensuring Enforcement and Implementation of Abortion Restrictions in the Patient Protection...ensure that Federal funds are not used for abortion services (except in cases of rape...

2010-03-29

359

45 CFR 156.280 - Segregation of funds for abortion services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Segregation of funds for abortion services. 156.280 Section 156.280... § 156.280 Segregation of funds for abortion services. (a) State opt-out of abortion coverage. A QHP issuer must comply...

2013-10-01

360

45 CFR 156.280 - Segregation of funds for abortion services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-10-01 false Segregation of funds for abortion services. 156.280 Section 156.280... § 156.280 Segregation of funds for abortion services. (a) State opt-out of abortion coverage. A QHP issuer must comply...

2014-10-01

361

19 CFR 145.52 - Literature concerning devices for unlawful abortion.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Literature concerning devices for unlawful abortion. 145.52 Section 145.52 Customs...Literature concerning devices for unlawful abortion. Mail articles containing literature...concerning devices to produce unlawful abortions, are prohibited from the...

2014-04-01

362

Pathways to legal immigration  

PubMed Central

In this paper we use the New Immigrant Survey Pilot Study (NISP) to describe the amount and kind of experience that immigrants accumulate in the United States before they become permanent resident aliens. The NISP surveyed a representative sample of legal immigrants who acquired residence papers during July and August of 1996, yielding a completed sample of 1,135 adults. Our analysis revealed that roughly two-thirds of these newly arrived immigrants had prior experience in the United States within one of six basic categories: illegal border-crossers, visa abusers, non-resident visitors, non-resident workers, students or exchange visitors, and refugees/asylees. Each of these pathways to legal immigration was associated with a different profile with respect to nationality, social background, and economic status. Using simple earnings regressions we demonstrate how these differences can yield misleading conclusions about the process of immigrant adaptation and assimilation, even if measured effects are reasonably accurate. We suggest that social scientists should change the way they think and ask about immigrants’ arrival in the United States. PMID:20830313

MASSEY, DOUGLAS S.; MALONE, NOLAN

2010-01-01

363

World Legal Systems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Visitors pick your language! This University of Ottawa website can be read in six different languages, including Arabic, Russian, Chinese and English. The "About JuriGlobe" link, on the left hand side menu of any page, explains the three main goals of the site. Visitors will learn that the law professors who formed this site feel there should be more recognition and consideration of "the diversity of the various legal systems, their languages and their economic and demographic importance in the world." Once visitors choose their language, they will be redirected to a map that shows the different types of law that govern the countries of the world. Across the top of the map are links to explanations of the different types of law, as well as which countries have a combination of laws or a unified system of laws. The types of law represented on the map are "Civil Law", "Common Law", "Muslim Law", "Customary Law", and "Mixed Systems". The "Demographic Distribution" link on the left hand side menu illustrates with graphs and tables the percentage in which the world population is represented by the various legal systems.

364

Screening: the legal view.  

PubMed

Screening has become central to the effective prevention of several diseases, but implementation suffers from difficulties with targeting and rates of compliance. Such issues are also complicated by the need to consider legal provisions regarding confidentiality of patients and other human rights issues. Screening has been an inexact science in relation to, e.g., faecal occult blood testing for colorectal cancer, false positive and false negative tests for HIV, and there have been inadequate quality controls in breast cancer screening programmes. The public need to be made aware of what the screening programmes really offer, balanced against the expectations they may have. There needs to be a clearer understanding of the nature of the contractual and other legal rights of patients/consumers as against providers. A positive screening test may carry adverse consequences as well as benefits. It could alert an insurance company to a risk and lead to additional weighting or even outright rejection for life insurance policies. Job prospects may also be affected for employees. The method of informing patients in relation to screening and screening failure has already been considered by the courts. Realistic information about both screening and treatment efficiency needs to be offered to patients so that they can have a real understanding of what can and cannot be achieved by current science. The development of understanding of the human genome makes the need for clearer legislation in this are more urgent. PMID:11429719

Eaden, J; Mayberry, M K; Sherr, A; Mayberry, J F

2001-05-01

365

Argumentation in Legal Reasoning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A popular view of what Artificial Intelligence can do for lawyers is that it can do no more than deduce the consequences from a precisely stated set of facts and legal rules. This immediately makes many lawyers sceptical about the usefulness of such systems: this mechanical approach seems to leave out most of what is important in legal reasoning. A case does not appear as a set of facts, but rather as a story told by a client. For example, a man may come to his lawyer saying that he had developed an innovative product while working for Company A. Now Company B has made him an offer of a job, to develop a similar product for them. Can he do this? The lawyer firstly must interpret this story, in the context, so that it can be made to fit the framework of applicable law. Several interpretations may be possible. In our example it could be seen as being governed by his contract of employment, or as an issue in Trade Secrets law.

Bench-Capon, Trevor; Prakken, Henry; Sartor, Giovanni

366

After-birth abortion: the intuition argument.  

PubMed

The argument advanced by Giubilini and Minerva is an important one, but it suffers from some shortcomings. I briefly criticise their reasoning and method and argue that after birth abortion should be limited largely to infants with disabilities. My argument is based not on solid scientific evidence or cold rational reasoning but on intuition, something that has long been discounted as irrelevant in biomedical discourse. I end with a recommendation to all of us: in order to make a change, one should not only choose one's battles, but also one's weapon and mode of attack. PMID:23637457

Lederman, Zohar

2013-05-01

367

Legality Principle of Crimes and Punishments in Iranian Legal System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Principle of legality of crimes and punishments (nullum crimen, nulla poena sine lege) refers to the fact that an act is not considered a crime and deserves no punishment, unless the Legislator determines and announces the criminal title and its penalty before. The legality principle protects individual security by ensuring basic individual…

Habibzadeh, Mohammad Ja'far

2006-01-01

368

Regulating Abortion: Impact on Patients and Providers in Texas  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The State of Texas began enforcement of the Woman's Right to Know (WRTK) Act on January 1, 2004. The law requires that all abortions at or after 16 weeks' gestation be performed in an ambulatory surgical center (ASC). In the month the law went into effect, not one of Texas's 54 nonhospital abortion providers met the requirements of a surgical…

Colman, Silvie; Joyce, Ted

2011-01-01

369

Abortion in Young Women and Subsequent Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The extent to which abortion has harmful consequences for mental health remains controversial. We aimed to examine the linkages between having an abortion and mental health outcomes over the interval from age 15-25 years. Methods: Data were gathered as part of the Christchurch Health and Development Study, a 25-year longitudinal study…

Fergusson, David M.; Horwood, L. John; Ridder, Elizabeth M.

2006-01-01

370

Abortion in the U.S.: Utilization, Financing, and Access  

MedlinePLUS

... services has been subject to ethical and political debates. Federal and state policies have a substantial impact on women’s access to abortion services. This fact sheet provides an overview of the use of abortion services in the U.S. and ...

371

Anniversary Reactions and Due Date Responses Following Abortion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Of 83 women who responded to surveys exploring postabortion coping, 30 women reported anniversary reactions associated with the abortion or due date. Women in the anniversary reaction group more often reported ambivalence about the decision to abort (p < 0.007). This group also acknowledged fewer suicidal thoughts and attempts, but expressed more concern about verbally abusing their children (p <

Kathleen Franco; Nancy Campbell; Marijo Tamburrino; Steve Jurs; Judith Pentz; Cynthia Evans

1989-01-01

372

Protection of the LHC against Unsynchronised Beam Aborts  

Microsoft Academic Search

An unsynchronised beam abort in the LHC could damage downstream accelerator components, in particular the extraction septum magnets, the experimental low-beta triplet magnet apertures and the tertiary collimators. Although the LHC beam dumping system includes design features to minimise their frequency, such unsynchronised aborts cannot be excluded. A system of protection devices comprising fixed and moveable diluters and collimators will

B Goddard; R W Assmann; E Carlier; J Uythoven; J Wenninger; W Weterings

2006-01-01

373

Space shuttle three main engine return to launch site abort  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Return-to-Launch-Site (RTLS) abort with three Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) operational was examined. The results are trajectories and main engine cutoff conditions that are approximately the same as for a two SSME case. Requiring the three SSME solution to match the two SSME abort eliminates additional crew training and is accomplished with negligible software impact.

Carter, J. F.; Bown, R. L.

1975-01-01

374

Pressure politics revisited: the anti-abortion campaign.  

PubMed

Focus is on the anti-abortion campaign in the United States as an extreme example of the operations of pressure groups. The history of the abortion controversy is reviewed, and recent activities of anti-abortion groups in the state of Pennsylvania are assessed. Abortion -- an extremely divisive issue -- is irresolvable by ordinary political process. 2 positions, fundamentally opposed to each other, are supported by uncompromising moral commitment to abstract principle. The People Concerned for the Unborn Child (PCUC) directs its political focus exclusively toward the abortion issue, backing whatever parties or candidates take the appropriate pro-life stances on that issue. PCUC has over 7000 dues-paying members in 12 chapters in Western Pennsylvania. It maintains contact and coordinates its activities with other state-based pro-life organizations. PCUC and its allies have claimed responsibility for some successes in the areas of passage of legislation to restrict access to abortions and passage of a human life amendment to forbid abortions. The primary characteristics of the politics of the pro-life movement is its central focus on the abortion issue, and maintaining such a narrow focus has some organizational advantages. There are notable parallels between the current campaign for a human life amendment and the earlier prohibition campaign. PMID:11632726

Margolis, M; Neary, K

1980-01-01

375

Illinois, Massachusetts: governors veto restrictions on state funds for abortion.  

PubMed

Within a 24-hour period Governor James R. Thompson (Republican) of Illinois and Governor Michael S. Dukakis (Democrat) of Massachusetts vetoed bills which would have prohibited use of state funds to pay for abortion unless the woman's life were in danger. Since the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that neither the Constitution nor federal law requires states to pay Medicaid benefits for nonherapeutic abortions, many states have adopted similar restrictive policies. As of September 25, 1977, a total of 30 states had discontinued payment for abortion while 13 of the remaining 20 have committed themselves to continuing abortion payments. For fiscal year 1976 about 261,000-274,000 poor women received abortions paid for at least in part by federal or state funds. The total public expense was $60 million. 75% of these abortions were in California, Illinois, Michigan, New Jersey, New YOrk, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Texas. 3 of these states have cut off public funding. The average cost of a nonpublic abortion is $280, which is $42 more than the average monthly welfare payment for an entire family. It, thus seems unlikely that poor women will be able to afford abortion. PMID:12308832

1977-10-01

376

Repeat abortion and use of primary care health services.  

PubMed

One-third (34%) of 2,001 women who sought an abortion in 1991-1992 in Wichita, Kansas, were repeat-abortion patients. Compared with first-time abortion patients, repeat-abortion patients were significantly older, more often black, and younger at their first pregnancy (p < .001). The two groups did not vary significantly by income or age at first intercourse. However, repeat-abortion patients were significantly more likely than first-time patients to have been using a contraceptive method at the time of conception (65% compared with 59%) and more likely to say they always or almost always used a method (63% and 53%, respectively). More than 40% of women in each group reported they had no personal physician. Further, 34% of repeat-abortion patients said they had no follow-up examination after their previous abortion, and 28% said they received no contraceptive counseling. Only half of women whose pregnancy was confirmed by their personal physician obtained an abortion referral from that physician. PMID:7589358

Westfall, J M; Kallail, K J

1995-01-01

377

Day of Launch Profile Selection for Pad Abort Guidance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A day of launch selection approach that involves choosing from an array of pitch profiles of varying loft was analyzed with the purpose of reducing the risk of a land landing failure during a pad abort. It was determined that selecting from three pitch profiles can reduce the number of waterline abort performance requirement failures approximately in half without compromising other performance metrics.

Whitley, Ryan J.

2010-01-01

378

Mourning and Guilt among Greek Women Having Repeated Abortions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Conducted clinical study concerning bereavement process of Greek women after abortion. Found strong identificatory tendencies on both mother and father images. Argues that, in cases of repeated abortion, mourning and guilt do not only refer to murdered and lost "person-fetus" but principally to death and loss of object of ambiguous desire.…

Naziri, D.; Tzavaras, A.

1993-01-01

379

Sexual and Reproductive Health 4 Unsafe abortion: the preventable pandemic  

E-print Network

health, and vice versa, as documented in Romania during the regime of President Nicolae Ceausescu. The availability of modern contraception can reduce but never eliminate the need for abortion. Direct costs of treating abortion complications burden impoverished health care systems, and indirect costs

David A Grimes; Janie Benson; Susheela Singh; Mariana Romero; Bela Ganatra; Friday E Okonofua; Iqbal H Shah

380

Reducing Unplanned Pregnancy and Abortion in Zimbabwe Through Postabortion Contraception  

Microsoft Academic Search

In many countries, women treated for complications from spontaneous or unsafely induced abortion lack access to contraceptive services. As a result, many of them soon have a subsequent unplanned pregnancy or a repeat abortion, placing their health at increased risk. This report presents the results of a prospective intervention study on postabortion family planning conducted in the two largest public

Brooke R. Johnson; Singatsho Ndhlovu; Sherry L. Farr; Tsungai Chipato

2002-01-01

381

Medical marijuana: legal considerations.  

PubMed

In 1998, Washington State passed a law, Initiative 692 (I-692), that gives individuals who are charged with possession of marijuana for medical purposes a possible affirmative defense. The law lets these individuals provide a note from their doctor or a copy of their medical records stating they have a condition that may benefit from the use of marijuana. I-692 does not legalize the medical use of marijuana and does not affect Federal law, which makes obtaining, possessing, and growing marijuana illegal. The Washington law limits the amount of marijuana a patient can possess to a 60-day supply and defines the conditions for which medical marijuana may be used. These conditions include HIV, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and epilepsy. PMID:11366751

Schouten, J T

1999-01-01

382

20 CFR 404.733 - Evidence you are the legally adopting parent or legally adopted child.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Evidence you are the legally adopting parent or legally adopted child. 404.733...Evidence Evidence for Child's and Parent's Benefits § 404.733 Evidence you are the legally adopting parent or legally adopted child. If you...

2011-04-01

383

20 CFR 404.733 - Evidence you are the legally adopting parent or legally adopted child.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Evidence you are the legally adopting parent or legally adopted child. 404.733...Evidence Evidence for Child's and Parent's Benefits § 404.733 Evidence you are the legally adopting parent or legally adopted child. If you...

2012-04-01

384

20 CFR 404.733 - Evidence you are the legally adopting parent or legally adopted child.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Evidence you are the legally adopting parent or legally adopted child. 404.733...Evidence Evidence for Child's and Parent's Benefits § 404.733 Evidence you are the legally adopting parent or legally adopted child. If you...

2010-04-01

385

20 CFR 404.733 - Evidence you are the legally adopting parent or legally adopted child.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Evidence you are the legally adopting parent or legally adopted child. 404.733...Evidence Evidence for Child's and Parent's Benefits § 404.733 Evidence you are the legally adopting parent or legally adopted child. If you...

2014-04-01

386

20 CFR 404.733 - Evidence you are the legally adopting parent or legally adopted child.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Evidence you are the legally adopting parent or legally adopted child. 404.733...Evidence Evidence for Child's and Parent's Benefits § 404.733 Evidence you are the legally adopting parent or legally adopted child. If you...

2013-04-01

387

28 CFR 543.11 - Legal research and preparation of legal documents.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Activities § 543.11 Legal research and preparation of legal...materials in the inmate law library available whenever...assignment), to do legal research and to prepare legal...materials in each inmate law library are kept intact and...

2010-07-01

388

Feinberg on Absolute Legal Rights  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although the author wished that there were absolute rights, as Joel Feinberg has argued there are, he presented an argument to the contrary. Among the points he attempted to establish was that there is no hard and fast distinction between legal rights and legal privileges as Feinberg has maintained. (Author/RK)

James, Gene G.

1976-01-01

389

Legal Aspects of the Web.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a literature review that covers the following topics related to legal aspects of the Web: copyright; domain names and trademarks; linking, framing, caching, and spamdexing; patents; pornography and censorship on the Internet; defamation; liability; conflict of laws and jurisdiction; legal deposit; and spam, i.e., unsolicited mails.…

Borrull, Alexandre Lopez; Oppenheim, Charles

2004-01-01

390

Legalism and Decisionism in Crisis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the years since September 11, 2001, scholars have advocated two main positions on the role of law and the proper balance of powers among the branches of government in emergencies. This Article critiques these two approaches-which could be called Legalism and Decisionism-and offers a third way. Debates between Legalism and Decisionism turn on (1) whether emergencies can be governed

Noa Ben-Asher

2010-01-01

391

Planetary protection - some legal questions  

Microsoft Academic Search

When we legally investigate the topic of Planetary Protection, we have to realise that there are primarily two very distinct parts of our juridical work: We have to study lex lata, the existing applicable Law, especially Space Law, and also lex ferenda, what should be the law. With this in mind, we have to deliberate the legal meaning of \\

E. Fasan

2002-01-01

392

Planetary protection – some legal questions  

Microsoft Academic Search

When we legally investigate the topic of Planetary Protection, we have to realise that there are primarily two very distinct parts of our juridical work: We have to study lexlata, theexistingapplicableLaw, especially Space Law, and also lexferenda, whatshouldbethelaw. With this in mind, we have to deliberate the legal meaning of the notions “Planetary”, and “Protection”.About “Planetary”: Our own Earth is

E. Fasan

2004-01-01

393

Harvard Prison Legal Assistance Project  

E-print Network

Harvard Prison Legal Assistance Project 40th Anniversary Celebration April 20th & 21st · 2012 Office, Suite 5107 ~ PANEL DISCUSSION "The Long Road for Prison Justice: PLAP's Lasting Impact" April 21, Prisoners' Legal Services Sharon Dolovich '98, Visiting Professor of Law, Harvard Law School and Professor

Wolfe, Patrick J.

394

Understanding why women seek abortions in the US  

PubMed Central

Background The current political climate with regards to abortion in the US, along with the economic recession may be affecting women’s reasons for seeking abortion, warranting a new investigation into the reasons why women seek abortion. Methods Data for this study were drawn from baseline quantitative and qualitative data from the Turnaway Study, an ongoing, five-year, longitudinal study evaluating the health and socioeconomic consequences of receiving or being denied an abortion in the US. While the study has followed women for over two full years, it relies on the baseline data which were collected from 2008 through the end of 2010. The sample included 954 women from 30 abortion facilities across the US who responded to two open ended questions regarding the reasons why they wanted to terminate their pregnancy approximately one week after seeking an abortion. Results Women’s reasons for seeking an abortion fell into 11 broad themes. The predominant themes identified as reasons for seeking abortion included financial reasons (40%), timing (36%), partner related reasons (31%), and the need to focus on other children (29%). Most women reported multiple reasons for seeking an abortion crossing over several themes (64%). Using mixed effects multivariate logistic regression analyses, we identified the social and demographic predictors of the predominant themes women gave for seeking an abortion. Conclusions Study findings demonstrate that the reasons women seek abortion are complex and interrelated, similar to those found in previous studies. While some women stated only one factor that contributed to their desire to terminate their pregnancies, others pointed to a myriad of factors that, cumulatively, resulted in their seeking abortion. As indicated by the differences we observed among women’s reasons by individual characteristics, women seek abortion for reasons related to their circumstances, including their socioeconomic status, age, health, parity and marital status. It is important that policy makers consider women’s motivations for choosing abortion, as decisions to support or oppose such legislation could have profound effects on the health, socioeconomic outcomes and life trajectories of women facing unwanted pregnancies. PMID:23829590

2013-01-01

395

The PEP-II abort kicker system  

SciTech Connect

The PEP-II project has two storage rings. The HER (High Energy Ring) has up to 1.48 A of electron beam at 9 GeV, and the LER (Low Energy Ring) has up to 2.14 A of positron beam at 3.1 GeV. To protect the HER and LER beam lines in the event of a ring component failure, each ring has an abort kicker system which directs the beam into a dump when a failure is detected. Due to the high current of the beams, the beam kick is tapered from 100% to 80% in 7.33 uS (the beam transit time around the time). This taper distributes the energy evenly across the window which separates the ring from the beam dump such that the window is not damaged. The abort kicker trigger is synchronized with the ion clearing gap of the beam allowing for the kicker field to rise from 0-80% in 370 nS. This report discusses the design of the system controls, interlocks, power supplies, and modulator.

Lamare, J de; Donaldson, A.; Kulikov, A. Lipari, J.

1997-07-01

396

The PEP_II Abort Kicker System.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The PEP-II project has two storage rings. The HER (High Energy Ring) has 1 A of electron beam at 9 GeV, and the LER (Low Energy Ring) has 3 A of positron beam at 3.1 GeV. To protect the HER and LER beam lines in the event of a ring component failure, each ring has an abort kicker system which directs the beam into a dump when a failure is detected. Due to the high current of the beams, the beam kick is tapered from 100% to 80% in 7.33? S (the beam transit time around the ring). This taper distributes the energy evenly across the window which separates the ring from the beam dump such that the window is not damaged. The abort kicker trigger is synchronized with the ion clearing gap of the beam allowing for the kicker field to rise from 0-80% in 370nS. This report discusses the design of the system controls, interlocks, power supplies, and modulator.

de Lamare, J.; Donaldson, A.; Lipari, J.; Kulikov, A.

1997-05-01

397

Letter: On abortion and right to life.  

PubMed

Recently, I read Dr. C. Arden Miller's Presidential Address which was published in your January 1976 issue. A distressing contradiction appears because he states that the 1973 Supreme Court ruling on abortion was an important step to establish rights to health services. He fails to mention the right of the unborn to health services yet quotes from Edith Hamilton. His very significant quote is as follows: ''a world in which no individual shall be sacrificed for an end, but in which each will be willing to sacrifice himself for the end of working for the good of others in the spirit of love with the God who is love.'' Each child whether unborn or born is an individual and should not be sacrificed for an end. The good of others is preservation of human life in the spirit of love for each other. The Supreme Court ruling liberalized the destruction of life and did not recognize the human rights of the unborn to health services. The American Public Health Association (APHA) cannot derive strength from its diversity when its members advocate abortion under the guise of concern for the well being of people. The work of APHA should be societal change for the sake of human right to life and not for any purpose which will not serve that right. PMID:961961

Kirsch, E J

1976-09-01

398

Autonomous Intact Abort System for the X-34  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Autonomous algorithms are developed which provide trajectory guidance for horizontally landing vehicles such as the X-34 under a variety of abort conditions. The nominal guidance system of the X-34 is incapable of directing the vehicle to a safe landing for many possible situations in which trajectory is far away from nominal conditions (as in the case of an engine failure). To minimize the risk of losing the vehicle, the autonomous intact abort system considers multiple landing sites and redesigns certain guidance inputs in order to adapt to the new conditions presented by the abort. The abort system design is demonstrated in a high-fidelity simulation to prove the feasibility of the concept for various engine-out These abort algorithms are being incorporated into the X-34 vehicle to flight test this new technology as a part of the Future X Pathfinder Flight Demonstration Program.

Tragesser, Steven G.; Barton, Gregg H.

1999-01-01

399

CRIMINAL ABORTION—A Consideration of Ways to Reduce Incidence  

PubMed Central

The problem of criminal abortion in the United States is of enormous magnitude, both in terms of incidence and of resultant morbidity and mortality. Several studies suggest that one of every five pregnancies terminates in criminal abortion, or a total of more than one million abortions for 1960, with a possibility of more than 5,000 deaths resulting therefrom. The inadequate laws regarding therapeutic abortion in most jurisdictions contribute much to the problem. Tracing the origins of these laws provides additional clues concerning the development of this enigma. Suggested answers to the problem include: (1) Broadening and clarifying therapeutic abortion laws to reflect current medical practice, yet provide stringent controls; (2) prevention of unwanted pregnancy through consultation centers for women, encouragement of contraceptive research and education of the public. PMID:13755105

Kummer, Jerome M.; Leavy, Zad

1961-01-01

400

Waiving legal rights in research.  

PubMed

The US federal research regulations prohibit informed consent, whether written or oral, from including provisions in which human subjects waive or appear to waive legal rights. We argue that policies that prevent human subjects from waiving legal rights in research can be ethically justified under the rationale of group, soft paternalism. These policies protect competent adults from making adverse decisions about health and legal matters that they may not understand fully. However,this rationale is less defensible if there is a comprehensive compensation for injury programme available in which subjects are asked to waive some legal rights in order to participate in the programme. In this situation, subjects should be allowed to waive some legal rights to obtain the benefits of the programme. PMID:23893867

Resnik, David B; Parasidis, Efthimios

2014-07-01

401

The uneasy case for a national law on abortion.  

PubMed

The abortion debate is currently in a period of transition as in moves from the courts to the legislative branches. All across the country, state legislatures are reviewing their abortion laws and many are preparing to enact restrictions. Congress may be a good avenue to ensure abortion rights by passing national legislation. There is a risk involved because all legislation is passed through a process of compromise and the pro-choice side should be very careful about what they give up in the process. It is possible that concessions will have to be made that previously would never have been considered. Further, if the national legislation gives away too much, it will restrict states that want to ensure liberal access to abortion. Attempts to arrive at a compromised minimum level, may be too low to ensure the protection of many women. To illustrate the variety of issues involved with abortion legislation, the support of certain justifications for abortion varies greatly. In a 1990 National Opinion Research Center poll, 89% approved of abortion to save the life of the mother, 81% in cases of rape, 78% if there was a strong chance of birth defect, 43% if the woman is married and does not want any more children, 43% if the woman is single and does not want to marry the man, and 42% if she wanted an abortion for any reason. In a time magazine survey, 69% of the people agreed with the idea that even in cases where they thought in immoral to have an abortion, the government should not have the right to prevent her from having it. Also, 69% of the people agreed that if a state does institute restrictions, it should not be judges or government officials, but rather the women's doctor who decides if the abortion should be restricted. PMID:12285375

Correia, E O

1991-01-01

402

Increased risk of abortion following neospora caninum abortion outbreaks: a retrospective and prospective cohort study in four dairy herds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Explosive abortion outbreaks in 4 Dutch dairy herds during 1992 to 1994 are reported. In 50 of 51 fetuses submitted during the first 3 wk of the outbreaks characteristic histological lesions compatible for infection with Neospora caninum were seen. Diagnosis of infection was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in 40 fetuses (78%). No evidence for other abortifacients was found.The abortion risk of

A. R. Moen; W. Wouda; M. F. Mul; E. A. M. Graat; T. van Werven

1998-01-01

403

Abortion and politics in Nicaragua: The women's movement in the debate on the Abortion Law Reform 1999–20021  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper analyses discussion on a proposed reform to the abortion law in Nicaragua between 1999 and 2002, as a struggle between different actors—politicians, religious leaders, doctors and feminists—over the meaning of abortion, motherhood and sexuality, and ultimately the value of women's lives. It shows how the interplay of gender discourses and political practices shaped the process of discussion: on

Silke G. Heumann

2007-01-01

404

Induced abortion and anxiety, mood, and substance abuse disorders: isolating the effects of abortion in the national comorbidity survey.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine associations between abortion history and a wide range of anxiety (panic disorder, panic attacks, PTSD, Agoraphobia), mood (bipolar disorder, mania, major depression), and substance abuse disorders (alcohol and drug abuse and dependence) using a nationally representative US sample, the national comorbidity survey. Abortion was found to be related to an increased risk for a variety of mental health problems (panic attacks, panic disorder, agoraphobia, PTSD, bipolar disorder, major depression with and without hierarchy), and substance abuse disorders after statistical controls were instituted for a wide range of personal, situational, and demographic variables. Calculation of population attributable risks indicated that abortion was implicated in between 4.3% and 16.6% of the incidence of these disorders. Future research is needed to identify mediating mechanisms linking abortion to various disorders and to understand individual difference factors associated with vulnerability to developing a particular mental health problem after abortion. PMID:19046750

Coleman, Priscilla K; Coyle, Catherine T; Shuping, Martha; Rue, Vincent M

2009-05-01

405

Insurance/legal matters  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is in the process of finalizing a rule for the requirement of an organized and written Risk Management Program at facilities which may possibly release toxic materials into the air, as mandated in the Clean Air act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990, Section 112(r), No. 7. This Rule is anticipated to be final between November 1994 and June 1995. EPA has estimated that approximately 140,000 facilities nationwide will need to comply with this rule. This discussion includes a description of the required program, the areas of overlap and addition to the previously enacted Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Process Safety Management Standard (PSM), and an overall view of the potential liabilities faced by companies complying with this rule. The CAAA has instituted a process of self-incrimination into the legislation through self-reporting and monitoring requirements. In addition, EPA`s current stance of providing strict and maximum enforcement of environmental laws contributes to the need for careful legal and potential liability review of actions taken in the course of complying with the Risk Management Program Rule. Since the topic for discussion should revolve around insurance issues, the author concludes with a discussion on various insurance products and how the new rule may enhance interest in the products and create potholes in the coverages.

Cameron, N.

1995-12-31

406

Detection of Neospora caninum in ovine abortion in Iran.  

PubMed

The present study was designed to assess the importance of ovine neosporosis in abortion of Iraninan sheep. Seventy aborted foetuses and dams from ovine dairy farms in northwest of Iran were analyzed to investigate the role of Neospora caninum (N. caninum) in ovine abortion. Diagnosis of the infection was determined by serology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A total of 70 aborted dairy ovine were blood sampled and used to evaluate serological status for N. caninum infection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and extracted DNA from the same aborted foetuses were subjected to PCR. Data were compared using Kruscal-Wallis test. From A total of the 70 sheeps, four (5.7 %) of the dams were seropositive. DNA from aborted foetuses was extracted primarily from placenta and CNS tissues. Extracted DNA from foetuses were analyzed using PCR with primers Np21(+) and Np6(+). Out of the 70 ovine fetuses 8.5 % were considered to be infected by PCR. This study confirms the importance of N. caninum as an important cause of ovine abortion in northwest of Iran. PMID:24431549

Asadpour, R; Jafari-Joozani, R; Salehi, N

2013-04-01

407

The heritability of abortion in pedigree Charollais flocks.  

PubMed

Foetal death, or abortion at term, in sheep is of major significance to the livestock industry, accounting for more than £24million lost per annum. We have investigated whether there is a genetic component to abortion within two flocks of pedigree Charollais sheep, one followed from 1989 to 2006, the other from 1992 to 2006. Abortion occurred at a rate of 5.74-8.78% per annum against a total mortality rate of 14-24%. By model covariate analysis we have shown that 15.5% aborting ewes went on to have one or more abortions and that this risk increased with parity (p=0.006). Heritability estimates were approximately 0.08 as calculated by SOLAR, pedigreemm and ASReml3, with sire and dam components of 0.046 and 0.048, respectively. Where the lamb was aborted, heritability estimates were highly variable according to the method employed, 0.046-0.378, with sex of the lamb being a significant covariate. This variability indicated one or more underlying, significant factors that were not measured in these analyses, potentially including infectious agents that may be involved. Nevertheless, the ASReml3 estimate (0.179) resolved to 0.074 variance attributable to the sire and 0.092 attributable to the dam, which, while not significant, was suggestive that genetic variants passed by the dam to the lamb may be of more weight than that from the sire in determining whether a lamb will abort. PMID:25037445

Darlay, Rebecca; Stear, Michael J; Mason, Sam; Smith, Judith; Shaw, Marie-Anne

2014-10-01

408

Neospora caninum - Associated Abortions in Slovak Dairy Farm  

PubMed Central

Background: Neospora caninum is considered one of the major causes of repeated abortions in livestock. This study aimed to determine the seropositivity to N. caninum using indirect ELISA and the influence of the infection on the occurrence of abortions in selected dairy herd in Slovakia. Method: Blood samples were obtained from 490 cattle over a period of two years and were tested for N. caninum antibodies using indirect ELISA. Results: The presence of specific antibodies in the herd was detected in 118 (24.1%) cows. According to selected groups; 117 (41.0%) cows with a history of abortion, 65 (43.3%) heifers and 223 (2.2%) cows without abortions were tested positive to Neospora. Vertical transmission of N. caninum dominated in examined herd and the relative risk (RR) of dam-daughter seropositivity in progenies of seropositive mothers was 2.1 times higher than in progenies of seronegative dams. Molecular analyses of aborted foetuses of seropositive mothers showed the presence of Neospora DNA. However, 23 (28.1%) of heifers born to seronegative cows were seropositive, indicating also the postnatal transmission of the infection from the environment. Conclusion: Study revealed significant correlation between the presence of specific antibodies and the occurrence of abortions, the risk of abortion in seropositive animals was 3.8 times higher than in seronegative ones. Incorrect farm management contributed to spread and circulation of neosporosis in entire dairy herd what could significantly impair the reproduction and economic parameters of breeding.

ŠPILOVSKÁ, Silvia; REITEROVÁ, Katarína; ANTOLOVÁ, Daniela

2015-01-01

409

Effectiveness of Family Planning Policies: The Abortion Paradox  

PubMed Central

Objective The relation between levels of contraceptive use and the incidence of induced abortion remains a topic of heated debate. Many of the contradictions are likely due to the fact that abortion is the end point of a process that starts with sexual activity, contraceptive use (or non-use), followed by unwanted pregnancy, a decision to terminate, and access to abortion. Trends in abortion rates reflect changes in each step of this process, and opposing trends may cancel each other out. This paper aims to investigate the roles played by the dissemination of contraception and the evolving norms of motherhood on changes in abortion rates. Methods Drawing data from six national probability surveys that explored contraception and pregnancy wantedness in France from 1978 through 2010, we used multivariate linear regression to explore the associations between trends in contraceptive rates and trends in (i) abortion rates, (ii) unwanted pregnancy rates, (iii) and unwanted birth rates, and to determine which of these 3 associations was strongest. Findings The association between contraceptive rates and abortion rates over time was weaker than that between contraception rates and unwanted pregnancy rates (p?=?0.003). Similarly, the association between contraceptive rates and unwanted birth rates over time was weaker than that between contraceptive rates and unwanted pregnancy rates (p?=?0.000). PMID:24670784

Bajos, Nathalie; Le Guen, Mireille; Bohet, Aline; Panjo, Henri; Moreau, Caroline

2014-01-01

410

The introduction of first trimester medical abortion in Armenia.  

PubMed

In Armenia, abortion is the main means of fertility regulation; however, before research activities were initiated only surgical methods were available and the quality of services was low in some areas. Our clinical study from 2008-2011 aimed to show that early medical abortion is an acceptable and feasible option. A total of 700 eligible women with pregnancies up to 63 days LMP presenting for abortion were recruited for the study in five locations. Participants took 200 mg mifepristone and 800 ?g buccal misoprostol 24-48 hours later. They returned for a follow-up visit two weeks after mifepristone administration. 95% of the women had successful abortions and 95% were satisfied with the method. In 2012-2013, we conducted a follow-up assessment to examine the ongoing provision and quality of medical abortion services at the former research sites. Medical record reviews, interviews and observations were carried out three times approximately six months apart. The assessment found that all five sites had continued providing medical abortion, with about half of eligible women choosing the medical method. Four of the five sites were achieving high success rates. Staff turnover and the lack of trained providers likely contributed to the higher failure rate at the fifth site. These findings provide evidence that first trimester medical abortion is an acceptable and feasible option for Armenian women and providers, and that high quality services are being delivered. PMID:25702069

Louie, Karmen S; Chong, Erica; Tsereteli, Tamar; Avagyan, Gayane; Vardanyan, Susanna; Winikoff, Beverly

2015-02-01

411

Ronald Dworkin on abortion and assisted suicide.  

PubMed

In the first part of this article, I raise questions about Dworkin's theory of the intrinsic value of life and about the adequacy of his proposal to understand abortion in terms of different ways of valuing life. In the second part of the article, I consider his argument in "The Philosophers' Brief on Assisted Suicide", which claims that the distinction between killing and letting die is morally irrelevant, the distinction between intending and foreseeing death can be morally relevant but is not always so. I argue that the killing/letting die distinction can be relevant in the context of assisted suicide, but also show when it is not. Then I consider why the intention/foresight distinction can be morally irrelevant and conclude by presenting an alternative argument for physician-assisted suicide. PMID:14686321

Kamm, F M

2001-01-01

412

Palaeomagnetic excursions, aborted reversals and transitional fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recordings of palaeomagnetic excursions have revealed apparent field behaviour ranging from rather erratic directional movements and loopings1-4 to single, highly defined events5-7. Excursions of the latter variety show what seems to be a rapid change in direction such that the path of the associated virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) is well constrained in longitude. Such behaviour is not unlike that observed at the onset of some recorded polarity transitions7-9. Indeed, it has been suggested that excursions may occur during unsuccessful, or aborted, reversals2,5-7,10. We show here that available records of palaeomagnetic excursions, together with our present understanding of field behaviour associated with geomagnetic reversals, strongly support this hypothesis.

Hoffman, Kenneth A.

1981-11-01

413

Shuttle abort landing site emergency medical services  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA and DOD studies of medical-planning and logistical problems are reviewed as applicable to providing emergency medical care at remote transoceanic abort landing (TAL) sites. Two options are analyzed including a modified surgical response team and a combination physician/medical technician team. The two concepts are examined in terms of cost-effectiveness, specific types of medical support such as blood procurement, and search-and-rescue requirements. It is found that the physician/technician team is more economically efficient, and the description of the concept permits the development of an effective TAL-site astronaut medical-support system. A balance is struck between the competing problems of cost and medical capability by planning for on-scene medical stabilization and air evacuation to DOD tertiary medical centers.

Mckenas, David K.; Jennings, Richard T.

1991-01-01

414

Space shuttle (ATP configuration) abort staging investigation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A wind tunnel test conducted in a 14-inch trisonic wind tunnel to determine the force and moment characteristics of the ATP Orbiter and modified ATP External Tank/SRB combination during abort staging conditions is discussed. Six component aerodynamic force and moment data were recorded for the orbiter and ET/SRB combination. Pitch polars were obtained for an angle of attack range from minus 10 to plus 10 degrees and orbiter incidence angles (orbiter relative to the ET/SRB combination) of 0 and 2 degrees. A limited amount of yaw data were obtained at 0 degree angle of attack and beta range from minus 10 to plus 10 degrees. In addition, orbiter pitch control effectiveness was determined at several grid points. These force and moment data were obtained for Mach numbers of 0.9, 1.2 and 2.0.

Rampy, J. M.; Blackwell, K. L.; Allen, E. C., Jr.; Fossler, I.

1973-01-01

415

Women's Education Level, Maternal Health Facilities, Abortion Legislation and Maternal Deaths: A Natural Experiment in Chile from 1957 to 2007  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to assess the main factors related to maternal mortality reduction in large time series available in Chile in context of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Methods Time series of maternal mortality ratio (MMR) from official data (National Institute of Statistics, 1957–2007) along with parallel time series of education years, income per capita, fertility rate (TFR), birth order, clean water, sanitary sewer, and delivery by skilled attendants were analysed using autoregressive models (ARIMA). Historical changes on the mortality trend including the effect of different educational and maternal health policies implemented in 1965, and legislation that prohibited abortion in 1989 were assessed utilizing segmented regression techniques. Results During the 50-year study period, the MMR decreased from 293.7 to 18.2/100,000 live births, a decrease of 93.8%. Women's education level modulated the effects of TFR, birth order, delivery by skilled attendants, clean water, and sanitary sewer access. In the fully adjusted model, for every additional year of maternal education there was a corresponding decrease in the MMR of 29.3/100,000 live births. A rapid phase of decline between 1965 and 1981 (?13.29/100,000 live births each year) and a slow phase between 1981 and 2007 (?1.59/100,000 live births each year) were identified. After abortion was prohibited, the MMR decreased from 41.3 to 12.7 per 100,000 live births (?69.2%). The slope of the MMR did not appear to be altered by the change in abortion law. Conclusion Increasing education level appears to favourably impact the downward trend in the MMR, modulating other key factors such as access and utilization of maternal health facilities, changes in women's reproductive behaviour and improvements of the sanitary system. Consequently, different MDGs can act synergistically to improve maternal health. The reduction in the MMR is not related to the legal status of abortion. PMID:22574194

Koch, Elard; Thorp, John; Bravo, Miguel; Gatica, Sebastián; Romero, Camila X.; Aguilera, Hernán; Ahlers, Ivonne

2012-01-01

416

The relative economics of feeding open, aborted, pregnant feedlot heifers  

PubMed Central

A 90-day finishing trial involving 144 feedlot heifers was conducted to compare the performance parameters and carcass characteristics of open heifers, therapeutically aborted heifers, and pregnant heifers. In the first 28 days of the trial, the aborted heifers had reduced (p < 0.05) feed intake (FI), average daily gain (ADG), and feed efficiency (FE) compared to pregnant and open heifers. Over the entire trial, on a live weight basis, the aborted group had reduced (p < 0.05) final weight, ADG, and FE compared to pregnant and open heifers. However, when the data were adjusted for total uterine weight, the aborted and open heifers had improved (p < 0.05) final weight, ADG, and FE compared to pregnant heifers. The aborted and open group had a higher (p < 0.05) carcass weight, rib eye area, dressing percentage, and cutability estimate compared to the pregnant heifers. The aborted group had lower (p < 0.05) carcass weight than the open heifers. Over the entire 90-day feeding period, there were no statistically significant differences among the groups with respect to feed intake (FI), average fat, grade fat, and carcass grades. Also, there were no significant health problems or mortality in any of the groups. In the economic analysis, aborted heifers returned $26.41 per head more than pregnant heifers. Open heifers returned $39.94 per head more than aborted heifers, and $66.35 more than pregnant heifers. Thus, aborting feedlot heifers during the second trimester was determined to be a safe and cost effective management decision. PMID:17423875

Jim, G. Kee; Ribble, Carl S.; Guichon, P. Timothy; Thorlakson, Ben E.

1991-01-01

417

Review Article Abstract: Many plant species abort a large fraction of their em-  

E-print Network

Review Article Abstract: Many plant species abort a large fraction of their em- bryos. It has often abort- ed. Such selective embryo abortion would lead to investment of resources only in the offspring with the highest potential fit- ness. Many studies have shown that otherwise viable embryos are aborted. However

Klinkhamer, Peter

418

Effects of Discontinuities in the DNA Template on Abortive Initiation and Promoter Escape by Escherichia coli  

E-print Network

Effects of Discontinuities in the DNA Template on Abortive Initiation and Promoter Escape of transcript abortion at RNA lengths of 6 and 7 nucleotides and a lower ratio of abortive to productive initiation events was observed for some discontinuous templates, consistent with models attributing abortive

Tullius, Thomas D.

419

Area of Expertise First Name Last Name Contact Information Abortion Jesse Choper 510-642-0339  

E-print Network

Area of Expertise First Name Last Name Contact Information A Abortion Jesse Choper 510-642-0339 jchoper@law.berkeley.edu Abortion Kristin Luker 510-642-8332 kluker@law.berkeley.edu Abortion Marjorie Shultz 510-642-1921 mshultz@law.berkeley.edu Abortion Franklin Zimring 510-642-0854 fzimring

Kammen, Daniel M.

420

EFFICACY OF A LONG-ACTING OXYTETRACYCLINE* AGAINST CHLAMYDIAL OVINE ABORTION  

E-print Network

EFFICACY OF A LONG-ACTING OXYTETRACYCLINE* AGAINST CHLAMYDIAL OVINE ABORTION Annie RODOLAKIS1 A ABORTIVE OVINE. ― Le traitement de la chlamydiose abortive ovine par la Terramycine/L A 200 a été-bas. La transposition d'un tel traitement à la pratique et son intérêt sont discutés. Chlamydial abortion

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

421

ORIGINAL PAPER Fruit abortion in the Chihuahuan-Desert endemic cactus  

E-print Network

ORIGINAL PAPER Fruit abortion in the Chihuahuan-Desert endemic cactus Opuntia microdasys Hugo H to explain fruit abortion. To assess whether abortion in Opuntia microdasys was due to resource and/or pollen treatments. On the other hand, to test whether fruit abortion was irreversible, due to pollen

Mandujano, María del Carmen

422

Implications of the Federal Abortion Ban for Women's Health in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2007, the US Supreme Court upheld the Partial Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003, also known as the Federal Abortion Ban or ''the Ban.'' The decision undermines decades of established US abortion law that had recognised the preservation of the health of women as a paramount consideration. The Ban asserts that the state's interests in how an abortion is

Tracy A Weitz; Susan Yanowb

423

Implications of the Federal Abortion Ban for Women's Health in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2007, the US Supreme Court upheld the Partial Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003, also known as the Federal Abortion Ban or “the Ban.” The decision undermines decades of established US abortion law that had recognised the preservation of the health of women as a paramount consideration. The Ban asserts that the state's interests in how an abortion is

Tracy A Weitz; Susan Yanow

2008-01-01

424

Abortion denied--outcome of mothers and babies.  

PubMed

A consistent argument favoring therapeutic abortions has been that mothers who are denied abortions will seek "illegal" help elsewhere, often in less than optimal conditions. Yet, a review of published reports on women who had been denied abortion and were followed up shows that 70.67% of the 6298 women completed their pregnancies and only 13.2% had an abortion elsewhere. Several studies have shown that the incidence of Complications of pregnancy is no greater in mothers denied abortion than in paired controls. The results of a prospective study by Laukaran and Van Den Berg showed a higher incidence of maternal accidental injury, a borderline increase of maternal accidental injury, a borderline increase in the prevalence of congenital anomalies, and a higher incidence of infection and hemorrhage during the puerperium in women who had been denied abortion. They concluded that maternal attitude and psychosocial stress had little effect on the progress of the pregnancy and labor. Published reports on the psychological effects on the children of women who had been denied abortion are few, mainly because longterm follow-up is required. In 1966 Forssman and Thuwe described the results of their study of 120 children whose mothers had been denied abortion. The children had been followed up until their 21st birthdays. The controls had been carefully paired. The proportion of children who had been placed in foster and children's homes was significantly higher among the "unwanted" children than among the controls (50% versus 18%). There was no statistically significant difference in the rates of drunken misconduct, crime, or "educational mental subnormality" between the 2 groups, but the incidence rates of delinquency and psychiatric consultation were 10% and 13% higher respectively among the unwanted children than among the controls. There have been virtually no objective studies on the psychologic and social well-being of women who have been denied abortion. The literature shows a generally comparable outcome of pregnancy, delivery, and puerperium between women who were denied abortion and controls; no evidence that a continued unwanted pregnancy will endanger the mother's mental health; good acceptance of the infant by the mother, especially if she has the father's support; and minimal to moderate psychosocial disadvantages for the child. Physicians must take a more scientific approach to unwanted pregnancies and realize that abortion is not the answer to social ills. The children of women who have been denied an abortion are at risk of certain disadvantages, but such problems could be alleviated by better adoption and social programs. PMID:6692231

Del Campo, C

1984-02-15

425

Coverage of abortion controversial in both public and private plans.  

PubMed

During 1995-96, 17 of 50 US states used their own resources, either voluntarily or under state court order, to pay for all or most abortions for low-income women. Alaska, Maryland, New York, and Washington are the only states to voluntarily pay for these abortions. Anti-choice legislators in California, Illinois, New York, and West Virginia tried unsuccessfully to cut funding for these abortions. Arkansas is the only state to circumvent direct payment for abortions for low-income women. Alabama, Mississippi, and South Dakota still are not complying with the court order but remain in the Medicaid program. Massachusetts has passed legislation to allow health insurance to cover abortions for state and city employees, thereby undoing a 17-year ban on the use of public funds for abortions for employees or their spouses. On the other hand, Virginia's governor has unilaterally, via an executive order, eliminated health insurance coverage for most abortions for state employees and their dependents. Anti-choice legislators have shepherded legislation that prohibit private insurance coverage for abortion unless women pay an extra premium in Idaho, Kentucky, Missouri, and North Dakota. Legislators in Illinois and Minnesota have passed state subsidized health care reform programs that exclude abortion from coverage except when the mother's life is endangered. There appears to be a loophole in the MinnesotaCare program that allows women to obtain state-financed abortions for other reasons, so antifunding lawmakers will introduce a bill in 1997 to close the loophole. The loophole is a result of a conflict between state and federal laws as a result of a 1995 federal waiver granted to Minnesota. The waiver allows pregnant women who earn up to 275% of the federal poverty level to be eligible for either MinnesotaCare or Medicaid. Abortion-rights legislators find MinnesotaCare's exclusion of abortion coverage to be a violation of the court order. They plan to submit a bill in 1997 to repeal this prohibition. PMID:12347485

Sollom, T

1996-09-01

426

Analysis of beam loss induced abort kicker instability  

SciTech Connect

Through more than a decade of operation, we have noticed the phenomena of beam loss induced kicker instability in the RHIC beam abort systems. In this study, we analyze the short term beam loss before abort kicker pre-fire events and operation conditions before capacitor failures. Beam loss has caused capacitor failures and elevated radiation level concentrated at failed end of capacitor has been observed. We are interested in beam loss induced radiation and heat dissipation in large oil filled capacitors and beam triggered thyratron conduction. We hope the analysis result would lead to better protection of the abort systems and improved stability of the RHIC operation.

Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Ahrens, L.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mi, J.; Pai, C.; Tan, Y.

2012-05-20

427

[Increased use of certification by 2 doctors, more abortions in general practice].  

PubMed

Swedish abortion statistics for the year 1973 compared with 1972 are discussed. The number of abortions increased 7.8%. 87% of the candidates for abortion were granted abortions. In 1973, 85.4% of the abortions performed were granted by certification of 2 doctors, compared with 81.0% in 1972. The percentage of tennage abortions was constant. 30.0% of the abortions in 1973 were performed in an open ward compared with 24.7% in 1972. The sale of oral contraceptives decreased, and the sale of condoms and IUDs increased. PMID:4837222

1974-01-23

428

The legal business of dentistry.  

PubMed

Upon graduation and licensure, most dentists anticipate going into the profession of providing dental heath care to patients in an office or clinic setting. The profession is also the business of dentistry. Failure to appreciate documentation requirements for the business of dentistry can result in legal battles that are time-consuming and emotionally draining. This article provides an introduction, issue spotting, and tips to avoid those legal battles. PMID:19810643

Barrabee, Steve; Kowalski, Michael

2009-09-01

429

[Biopiracy: about its legal meanings].  

PubMed

This article explores the legal meanings of biopiracy concept, linked to subjects such as intellectual property rights on genetic resources, bioprospecting contracts, right to food, and food security. It overcomes the critical function of biopiracy concept related to world-wide extended tendencies: privatization and technification. Likewise, protectionism shows the opportunity that biopiracy concept represents for the enrichment of the legal interpretation related to the bioethical statue of biotech developments. PMID:19507915

Ramírez García, Hugo Saúl

2009-01-01

430

Integrating Mobile Phones into Medical Abortion Provision: Intervention Development, Use, and Lessons Learned From a Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Background Medical abortion is legal in South Africa but access and acceptability are hampered by the current protocol requiring a follow-up visit to assess abortion completion. Objective To assess the feasibility and efficacy of information and follow-up provided via mobile phone after medical abortion in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Methods Mobile phones were used in three ways in the study: (1) coaching women through medical abortion using short message service (SMS; text messages); (2) a questionnaire to assess abortion completion via unstructured supplementary service data (USSD, a protocol used by GSM mobile telephones that allows the user to interact with a server via text-based menus) and the South African mobile instant message and social networking application Mxit; and (3) family planning information via SMS, mobisite and Mxit. A needs and context assessment was done to learn about women’s experiences undergoing medical abortion and their use of mobile phones. After development, the mobile interventions were piloted. Recruitment was done by field workers at the clinics. In the RCT, women were interviewed at baseline and exit. Computer logs were also analyzed. All study participants received standard of care at the clinics. Results In the RCT, 234 women were randomized to the intervention group. Eight did not receive the intervention due to invalid numbers, mis-registration, system failure, or opt-out, leaving 226 participants receiving the full intervention. Of the 226, 190 returned and were interviewed at their clinic follow-up visit. The SMSs were highly acceptable, with 97.9% (186/190) saying that the SMSs helped them through the medical abortion. In terms of mobile phone privacy, 86.3% (202/234) said that it was not likely or possible that someone would see SMSs on their phone, although at exit, 20% (38/190) indicated that they had worried about phone privacy. Having been given training at baseline and subsequently asked via SMS to complete the self-assessment questionnaire, 90.3% (204/226) attempted it, and of those, 86.3% (176/204) reached an endpoint of the questionnaire. For the family planning information, a preference for SMS was indicated by study clients, although the publicly available Mxit/mobisite was heavily used (813,375 pages were viewed) over the study duration. Conclusions SMS provided a good medium for timed, "push" information that guided and supported women through medical abortion. Women were able to perform a self-assessment questionnaire via mobile phones if provided training and prompted by SMS. Phone privacy needs to be protected in similar settings. This study may contribute to the successful expansion of medical abortion provision aided by mobile phones. Trial Registration Pan African Clinical Trials Registry (PACTR): PACTR201302000427144; http://www.pactr.org/ATMWeb/appmanager/atm/atmregistry?dar=true&tNo=PACTR201302000427144 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6N0fnZfzm). PMID:25098569

Constant, Deborah

2014-01-01

431

Legal Concerns of Web Site Reverse Engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

Researchers involved in Web site reverse engineering are often not aware of potential legal implications of using someone else's Web site for experimentation. Even if researchers are concerned with legal problems, there is little guidance available. This paper explores the legality of Web site reverse engineering with the intent to raise awareness among researchers about this issue. The discussed legal

Holger M. Kienle; Daniel M. Germán; Hausi A. Müller

2004-01-01

432

Legalism as an Obstacle to School Quality.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the most serious impediments to the development of high quality education in the United States is excessive legalism. This legalism takes two forms: administrative legalism is the trend toward ritualistic conformity to increasingly detailed, bureaucratic rules and regulations; judicial legalism is the tendency to cast all social issues and…

Daniel, George H.

433

Optimal Law Enforcement with Legal Aid  

Microsoft Academic Search

The economic literature on enforcement is generally pessimistic concerning the use of legal aid. In this paper we show that legal aid can be a part of optimal law enforcement. The rationale behind our result is that with legal aid, in a system with legal or judicial error both guilty and innocent individuals are better off, because the marginal cost

Nuno Garoupa; Frank H Stephen

2004-01-01

434

Expertise and Scottish abortion practice: understanding healthcare professionals’ accounts   

E-print Network

Current UK abortion law has been subjected to extensive feminist critique because of the relationships that it constructs between healthcare professionals (HCPs) and women with unwanted pregnancies. The law allows HCPs ...

Beynon-Jones, Siân M.

2010-01-01

435

Parental occupational exposure and spontaneous abortions in Finland  

SciTech Connect

Spontaneous abortions were analyzed by the occupational exposure of women and their husbands, with data from the Finnish hospital discharge register and the national census. The occupations were grouped according to presumed exposure into seven categories: exposure to solvent; automobile exhaust fumes; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; other chemicals; metals; textile dust; and animal microorganisms. The relative risks of spontaneous abortion were estimated with logistic regression analysis to adjust for potentially confounding factors. The broad exposure categories appeared, at most, to be weak risk factors of spontaneous abortion, because the relative risks of abortion were not significantly increased in any of the parental exposure groups. The analysis of detailed occupational categories showed some female and male occupations with an increased risk. The observations of increased risk related to laboratory work supported earlier findings. The high number of textile occupations with increased risk is also worth noting, and further investigations are necessary to confirm whether this is due to occupational hazards or other factors.

Lindbohm, M.L.; Hemminki, K.; Kyyroenen, P.

1984-09-01

436

Foetus or child? Abortion discourse and attributions of humanness.  

PubMed

Due to moral, religious, and cultural sensibilities, the topic of abortion still gives rise to controversy. The ongoing public debate has become visibly polarized with the usage of the pro-life versus pro-choice rhetoric. The aim of the current research was to investigate whether the language used in abortion discourse can affect people's attitudes by changing their attributions of humanity to unborn. Across three experimental studies we showed that participants who read about a 'foetus', compared to a 'child' declared higher support for elective abortion (Study 1; N = 108), this effect can be explained by greater humanness, as reflected in human nature traits, attributed to the child (vs. the foetus; Study 2; N = 121). The effect is mediated uniquely by attribution of human nature, but not by human uniqueness traits (Study 3; N = 120). These findings serve as a starting point for discussion of the role of language in shaping attitudes on abortion and other morally ambiguous issues. PMID:25418861

Miko?ajczak, Ma?gorzata; Bilewicz, Micha?

2014-11-24

437

Skewed X Chromosome Inactivation and Trisomic Spontaneous Abortion: No Association  

PubMed Central

Several studies suggest that highly skewed X chromosome inactivation (HSXI) is associated with recurrent spontaneous abortion. We hypothesized that this association reflects an increased rate of trisomic conceptions due to anomalies on the X chromosome that lead both to HSXI and to a diminished oocyte pool. We compared the distribution of X chromosome inactivation (XCI) skewing percentages (range: 50%–100%) among women with spontaneous abortions in four karyotype groups—trisomy (n = 154), chromosomally normal male (n = 43), chromosomally normal female (n = 38), nontrisomic chromosomally abnormal (n = 61)—to the distribution for age-matched controls with chromosomally normal births (n = 388). In secondary analyses, we subdivided the nontrisomic chromosomally abnormal group, divided trisomies by chromosome, and classified women by reproductive history. Our data support neither an association of HSXI with all trisomies nor an association of HSXI with chromosomally normal male spontaneous abortions. We also find no association between HSXI and recurrent abortion (n = 45). PMID:19646676

Warburton, Dorothy; Kline, Jennie; Kinney, Ann; Yu, Chih-yu; Levin, Bruce; Brown, Stephen

2009-01-01

438

Integrated Flight Performance Analysis of a Launch Abort System Concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes initial flight performance analyses conducted early in the Orion Project to support concept feasibility studies for the Crew Exploration Vehicle s Launch Abort System (LAS). Key performance requirements that significantly affect abort capability are presented. These requirements have implications on sizing the Abort Motor, tailoring its thrust profile to meet escape requirements for both launch pad and high drag/high dynamic pressure ascent aborts. Additional performance considerations are provided for the Attitude Control Motor, a key element of the Orion LAS design that eliminates the need for ballast and provides performance robustness over a passive control approach. Finally, performance of the LAS jettison function is discussed, along with implications on Jettison Motor sizing and the timing of the jettison event during a nominal mission. These studies provide an initial understanding of LAS performance that will continue to evolve as the Orion design is matured.

Tartabini, Paul V.

2007-01-01

439

The spread of 'Post Abortion Syndrome' as social diagnosis.  

PubMed

This paper examines the content of Post Abortion Syndrome (PAS) claims, the social actors involved and how this social diagnosis bypassed professional dissent and diffused into public policy in the United States. Previous works on the spread of PAS focus on almost exclusively on anti-abortion think tanks and policymakers. Missing from these analyses, however, is an emphasis on the grassroots-level actions undertaken by evangelical crisis pregnancy center (CPC) activists in introducing and circulating PAS claims. The CPC movement introduced PAS claims and provided the fodder for anti-abortion think tanks to construct evidence of pro-life claims. Despite dissent from health professionals and academic researchers, CPC PAS claims successfully diffused into federal and state abortion policy. I draw upon Brown et al.'s social diagnosis framework and Armstrong's five-stage model of diagnosis development to frame this account. PMID:24565137

Kelly, Kimberly

2014-02-01

440

Knowledge and perceptions of medical abortion among potential users.  

PubMed

Nearly two-thirds of 73 women aged 18-34 who participated in focus groups on medical abortion conducted in three cities had heard about this new abortion method, but only a few could describe it accurately. Once the method was described to them, they cited its potential advantages over vacuum aspiration as being fewer major complications, the absence of surgery, a greater "naturalness," and its use earlier in pregnancy. Women listed as disadvantages the multiple visits needed for medical abortion, the unknown aspects of the new technology, especially regarding the expulsion of the conceptus, and concern that mifepristone would make an abortion too easy and lead some women to take the decision lightly. More than one-third of discussants said they would choose mifepristone if the method were available. PMID:9104607

Harvey, S M; Beckman, L J; Castle, M A; Coeytaux, F

1995-01-01

441

The World Health Organization’s Safe Abortion Guidance Document  

PubMed Central

We discuss the history of the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) development of guidelines for governments on providing safe abortion services, which WHO published as Safe Abortion: Technical and Policy Guidance for Health Systems in 2003 and updated in 2012. We show how the recognition of the devastating impact of unsafe abortion on women’s health and survival, the impetus of the International Conference on Population and Development and its five-year follow-up, and WHO’s progressive leadership at the end of the century enabled the organization to elaborate guidance on providing safe abortion services. Guideline formulation involved extensive review of published evidence, an international technical expert meeting to review the draft document, and a protracted in-house review by senior WHO management. PMID:23409886

Van Look, Paul F. A.; Cottingham, Jane

2013-01-01

442

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Pad Abort 1  

E-print Network

at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range near Las Cruces, N.M. Although Orion is a component that ignites the LAS abort motor. The motor will burn for approximately six seconds, with the highest impulse

443

Launch Abort System Pathfinder Arrival - Duration: 1:48.  

NASA Video Gallery

The Orion Launch Abort System, or LAS, pathfinder returned home to NASA Langley on Oct. 18 on its way to NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The hardware was built at Langley and was used in preparation f...

444

Commercial Crew Program: Launch Abort Systems - Duration: 5:36.  

NASA Video Gallery

NASA's work in the next generation of launch abort systems (LAS) is significantly different from past programs. Instead of designing a specific system for a given spacecraft or rocket, engineers ar...

445

Polyploidies in abortion material decrease with maternal age  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among 639 spontaneous abortions between the 8th and 14th week of gestation 342 (53.5%) revealed an abnormal karyotype. While the rate of trisomies distinctly increased with advancing maternal age, a decrease in the rate of 45,X conceptuses and polyploidies was observed among abortions from older women. The overall relation of XXXX:XXYY among the tetraploidies was 14:11 and that of XXX:XXY:XYY

Miriam Neuber; Helga Rehder; Cornelia Zuther; Reinhardt Lettau; Eberhard Schwinger I

1993-01-01

446

Influence of past reproductive performance on risk of spontaneous abortion  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To investigate the incidence of spontaneous abortion in a population of women in order to establish their risk of spontaneous abortion and the obstetric factors predisposing to it. DESIGN--Prospective study of women recruited by radio and poster appeal and from hospital outpatient clinics. SETTING--English provincial community. PATIENTS--630 Women from the general population intending to become pregnant. INTERVENTIONS--The viability of the

L. Regan; P. R. Braude; P. L. Trembath

1989-01-01

447

Hobi-Like Pestivirus in Aborted Bovine Fetuses  

PubMed Central

An outbreak of abortion affecting multiparous cows was associated with Hobi-like pestivirus infection. Viral RNA and antigens were detected in the tissues of two aborted fetuses. Molecular assays for other common abortogenic agents tested negative. At the genetic level, the Hobi-like pestivirus displayed the closest relatedness to Italian, Australian, and South American viruses, whereas it diverged from the prototype Thai isolate. These findings may have important implications for the pestivirus control/eradication programs in cattle herds. PMID:22162547

Lucente, Maria Stella; Mari, Viviana; Sciarretta, Rossana; Pinto, Pierfrancesco; Buonavoglia, Domenico; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio

2012-01-01

448

Spontaneous abortion and work with visual display units  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To determine whether women who work with visual display units are at increased risk of spontaneous abortion. DESIGN--Case-control study. SETTING--Women were recruited during the three years 1987-9 from the Royal Berkshire Hospital in Reading, and from a large group practice situated within the hospital's catchment area. SUBJECTS--Cases were 150 nulliparous working women with a clinically diagnosed spontaneous abortion and controls

E Roman; V Beral; M Pelerin; C Hermon

1992-01-01

449

A strategic assessment of abortion and contraception in Romania.  

PubMed

The history of fertility regulation in Romania illustrates the complex interactions between politics, women's reproductive health and rights and access to high quality care. This paper describes the current situation of abortion and contraception in Romania, based on national statistics, recent reproductive health surveys and the findings of a strategic assessment led by the Ministry of Health in late 2001. This rapid assessment employed a participatory, qualitative methodology. Over 500 people were interviewed from 145 institutions in 25 cities, towns and villages in Romania, about the range of actions needed to prevent unwanted pregnancies, reduce abortion-related morbidity and mortality and improve the quality, accessibility and availability of abortion and contraceptive services. Although much progress has been made in contraceptive services over the past ten years, improvements in abortion care have lagged considerably The assessment played an important role in raising team members' awareness and motivation to take action. Some of the issues identified are already being addressed by the institutions that took part. National standards and guidelines for comprehensive abortion care have been developed, contraceptive services have been expanded at primary health care level, sexual and reproductive health education provided by classroom teachers has been introduced in schools, and a study to test a model of comprehensive abortion care services for Romania is planned. PMID:15938172

Johnson, Brooke R; Horga, Mihai; Fajans, Peter

2004-11-01

450

Five-Segment Booster (FSB) Abort to Orbit (ATO) Studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Five Segment Booster (FSB) concept has been evolving for a number of years as a means to enhance the overall safety and reliability of the Space Shuttle system by minimizing the need to fly the more challenging Return to Launch Site (RTLS) and Transoceanic Abort Landing (TAL) abort profiles. The initial evaluation of the FSB concept was conducted in 1996 to determine the feasibility of the FSB in achieving transatlantic abort leading TAL from the pad, thus eliminating the return to launch site (RTLS) abort mode. The initial study was conducted by ATK Thiokol and did show the potential for the FSB to eliminate the RTLS abort mode. Later Rockwell (now Boeing) conducted a similar study utilizing FSB performance characteristics and verified that the FSB could indeed achieve TAL from the pad, thereby eliminating the necessity for the RTLS abort. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the details of the enhancements achieved through the internally funded study conducted by Boeing and ATK Thiokol. To better understand the enhancements that were addressed as part of this follow-on study, some background on what was achieved in the Phase A study is appropriate.

Tobias, Mark; Sauvageau, Donald R.; Hines, Mark; Geiser, Norman L.; Cash, Steve (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

451

Early medical abortion in Cairns, Queensland: July 2006 - April 2007.  

PubMed

Mifepristone (RU486), which is used for early medical abortion, can only be obtained in Australia under the Authorised Prescriber legislation (Section 19[5] of the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989 [Cwlth]); two of the authors have permission to obtain, prescribe and administer this drug in Cairns, Queensland. From July 2006 to April 2007, 10 women who fulfilled the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) criteria of "life-threatening or otherwise serious" indications underwent medical abortion with mifepristone/misoprostol, and 12 women conforming with abortion requirements of Queensland law, but not TGA legislation for mifepristone administration, had medical abortions with the less preferable methotrexate/misoprostol combination. Although it is now more than a year since the cross-party vote in federal Parliament in February 2006 confirmed wide support for the right of Australian women to a medical abortion, we believe we are at present the only medical practitioners in Australia with permission to use mifepristone. Obtaining Authorised Prescriber status from the TGA is of necessity a complex and protracted process, involving ethics committee approval and auditing, and regular reporting to the TGA. Because of the current restrictions, we believe that women seeking medical abortion in Australia face barriers not experienced by women in other comparable countries, and that drug manufacturing and distributing companies may be discouraged from seeking to market mifepristone in Australia. PMID:17680745

de Costa, Caroline M; Russell, Darren B; de Costa, Naomi R; Carrette, Michael; McNamee, Heather M

2007-08-01

452

Pine needle abortion biomarker detected in bovine fetal fluids.  

PubMed

Pine needle abortion is a naturally occurring condition in free-range cattle caused by the consumption of pine needles from select species of cypress, juniper, pine, and spruce trees. Confirmatory diagnosis of pine needle abortion has previously relied on a combined case history of pine needle consumption and detection of isocupressic acid in a sample from the dam. Stable metabolites of isocupressic acid include agathic acid, dihydroagathic acid, and tetrahydroagathic acid, which have been shown to be present in the serum of mature animals for a few days following consumption of pine needles. As maternal serum is infrequently submitted for diagnosis of cattle abortions, a diagnostic assay capable of confirming isocupressic acid exposure in other matrices would be desirable. To the authors' knowledge, no previous investigations have indicated whether these stable metabolites of isocupressic acid cross the placenta or are detectable in fetal tissues. Therefore, the presence of agathic acid, dihydroagathic acid, and tetrahydroagathic acid was evaluated using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy on fetal thoracic fluid and stomach contents collected from 2 aborted bovine fetuses with a recent herd history of pine needle consumption by the dams and a subsequent abortion outbreak in the herd. Only tetrahydroagathic acid was detected in the fetal thoracic fluid and fetal stomach contents. The current study encourages diagnosticians to collect fetal thoracic fluids to permit the detection of tetrahydroagathic acid in cases of suspected pine needle abortion. PMID:25428187

Snider, Douglas B; Gardner, Dale R; Janke, Bruce H; Ensley, Steven M

2015-01-01

453

Safety, efficacy, and acceptability of medical abortion in China, Cuba, and India: A comparative trial of mifepristone-misoprostol versus surgical abortion  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: We investigated safety, efficacy, and acceptability of an oral regimen of medical abortion compared with surgical abortion in three developing countries.STUDY DESIGN: Women (n = 1373) with amenorrhea ?56 days chose either surgical abortion (as provided routinely) or 600 mg of mifepristone followed after 48 hours by 400 ?g of misoprostol. This is the appropriate design for studying safety,

Beverly Winikoff; Irving Sivin; Kurus J. Coyaji; Evelio Cabezas; Xiao Bilian; Gu Sujuan; Du Ming-kun; Usha R. Krishna; Andrea Eschen; Charlotte Ellertson

1997-01-01

454

Continuous Improvements to East Coast Abort Landings for Space Shuttle Aborts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Improvement initiatives in the areas of guidance, flight control, and mission operations provide increased capability for successful East Coast Abort Landings (ECAL). Automating manual crew procedures in the Space Shuttle's onboard guidance allows faster and more precise commanding of flight control parameters needed for successful ECALs. Automation also provides additional capability in areas not possible with manual control. Operational changes in the mission concept allow for the addition of new landing sites and different ascent trajectories that increase the regions of a successful landing. The larger regions of ECAL capability increase the safety of the crew and Orbiter.

Butler, Kevin D.

2003-01-01

455

Geomagnetic excursions reflect an aborted polarity state  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geomagnetic excursions represent short episodes of a few thousand years at most during which the field considerably exceeds its normal range of variability during a polarity state. Paleomagnetic records have now been obtained with extremely high temporal resolution which have improved our knowledge of these short events. We have compiled the most detailed records of excursions that had occurred during the Brunhes and Matuyama chrons. We show that virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) of at least one record of each event are able to reach the opposite polarity. In the next step, we have computed different simulations of excursions during which the dipole progressively vanishes before growing back without reversing. This scenario produces very few reversed directions which are only visible at some latitudes. We infer that it is impossible to reach the ratio of reversed to intermediate VGPs present in the paleomagnetic records if the excursions were not associated with a short period of reversed dipole field. Therefore, excursions should be regarded as two successive reversals bracketing an aborted polarity interval. We propose that the same underlying mechanisms prevail in both situations (excursions or reversals) and that below a certain strength the field reaches an unstable position which preludes either the achievement of a reversal or its return to the former polarity.

Valet, Jean-Pierre; Plenier, Guillaume; Herrero-Bervera, E.

2008-10-01

456

Abortion in Latin America is a matter of desperation.  

PubMed

For North Americans, the abortion debate is one of rights: the fetus' right to be born versus the mother's right to control her body. But for Latin American women, debating rights is a luxury that has little to do with the brutal reality of becoming pregnant and knowing it will be impossible to feed yet another child, says Sylvia Marcos. A Mexican psychotherapist who has taught at Harvard University, Marcos works with women in squatters' camps throughout Mexico. "If you want to end abortion in Latin America, you will have to change the whole economic system," said Marcos in an interview. Unfortunately, Marcos said, abortion foes have failed to come up with answers to the poverty that drives Latin American women to have what she estimates are 12 million illegal abortions a year. Women in Latin America, most of them Catholic, are expected to marry young and have many children. Most women choose abortion only after having many children and deciding it would be impossible to feed another, Marcos said. The combination of Catholicism and culture--extolling the virtues of large families--and women's utter lack of means to provide is devastating psychologically and physically, she said. Furthermore, about 1/2 of all Latin American women are raising children alone. "It's so unjust," said Marcos. The 12 million abortions reflect desperation--not an anti-life orientation, she said. "When you are hungry, you do not debate the ethics of when life begins," said Marcos. "If we had enough to eat, then we could care." Women who have abortions continue to call themselves Catholic but often quit going to communion. "Not only do they have a hard time recovering physically from illegal abortions, but they are denied spiritual enjoyment," Marcos said. Trapped in desperate situations, women ignore church teachings about abortion--particularly if they are Indians who still identify strongly with traditions that uphold different ideas about when life begins. Both prochoice and prolife forces in North America, said Marcos, have tended to look at the abortion issue from a North American perspective and have not formed a broader analysis that takes into account the concrete realities of poor women--the majority in Latin America. "It's very American to start with an abstract moral principle," she said. PMID:12178836

Martinez, D

1990-01-01

457

Should living wills be legalized?  

PubMed Central

Living wills allow patients to state their wish to die and not be kept alive through the use of medications, artificial means or "heroic" measures. They have been made legal documents in 38 states in the United States. Living wills permit advance expression of a patient's wishes, promote effective communication and demonstrate respect for the patient as a person. Problems with legal recognition of such wills include the need for agreement on fundamental terms, possible restriction of patients' rights, limitation of options in decision-making and possible negative effects on the physician-patient relationship. Before legislation is enacted, public and professional attitudes toward the care of terminally ill patients should be assessed. All health care professionals should receive better education in this area, and palliative care services should be made more widely available. Only if these measures fail should living wills be made legal documents in Canada. PMID:1688397

Fisher, R H; Meslin, E M

1990-01-01

458

Accountable care organizations: legal concerns.  

PubMed

The Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) shared savings program has serious concerns about anti-trust and anti-fraud laws. Additionally, ACOs present several other legal concerns relating to the duties and responsibilities of the physician-hospital partnership. The federal regulations hold physicians who participate in the ACO shared savings program to the highest standards of care without offering them protection from liability. The structure and procedures required of ACOs may be detrimental and may significantly impact the liability of its contracting physicians. Therefore, it behooves physicians to obtain legal advice regarding one's estate planning and legal asset protection or wealth management techniques, and to thoroughly review the agreement with one's attorney before signing a contract with an ACO. PMID:22413414

Sanbar, S Sandy

2011-01-01

459

Ethical & Legal Issues in School Counseling. Chapter 3: Legal Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains chapter 3 (7 articles) of a collection of 35 articles primarily from American Association for Counseling and Development (AACD) publications on the most important legal and ethical topics about which all school counselors need to be informed. "The Law and Ethical Practices in Elementary and Middle Schools" (Theodore P.…

Remley, Theodore P., Jr.; And Others

460

An inheritance study of the abortive terminal mutation in cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L?  

E-print Network

: Dr. R. J. Eohel A nautant was observed in an Eg population of (T-S6 x TM-1). This mutant failed to develop apica' growth and vras named abortive terminal. It was possible to partially summarize the in- heritance of the abortive terminal character... terminal population 20 Progeny test with remnant seeds from the original abortive terminal population 21 F (T-86 x TM-1) progeny test 1 Progeny test of plants for abortive terminal segregation 23 24 F2 segregation of abortive terminal Fl abortive...

Quisenberry, Jerry Edwin

1969-01-01

461

Free Legal Services - Attracting Legal Talent for Public Involvement Groups  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the public service responsibilities of lawyers, and how they can fulfill the annual goal of performing pro bono services by serving certain public involvement groups, including organization involved in Constitutional issues and environmental protection matters. Public involvement groups should consider their needs for legal services and consider soliciting lawyers to serve on their boards or to volunteer legal services which will assist those lawyers in fulfilling their professional obligations under Rules of Professional Conduct. The group should identify specific activities and tasks that require the skills and training of a lawyer, including corporate governance issues; conflict-of-interest questions; the statutory construction of laws, regulations and ordinances; or analysis of potential liability. The addition of a lawyer to advisory boards for governmental agencies and for non-profit boards of charitable, religious, civic, community, environmental and educational organizations may provide those boards with knowledge, analytical approaches and insights that complement the abilities of other board members. Rules of Professional Conduct applicable to lawyers include admonitions for lawyers to provide 'Public Service'. Representative of many rules, the American Bar Association Model Rule 6.1, entitled 'Voluntary Pro Bono Publico Service' addresses every lawyer's professional responsibility to provide legal services to those 'unable to pay'. This Model Rule exhorts each lawyer to provide fifty (50) hours of legal services without fee or expectation of fee to persons of limited means or charitable, religious or civic, community, governmental and educational organizations or to individuals, groups or organizations seeking 'to secure or protect civil rights, civil liberties, or public rights, or charitable, religious, civic, community, governmental and educational organizations in matters in furtherance of their purposes, where the payment of standard legal fees would significantly deplete the organisation's economic resources'. This Public Service rule sets forth a goal that lawyers should aspire to meet; the rule is without disciplinary penalties for its violation. (authors)

Domby, A.H. [Troutman Sanders LLP, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

2007-07-01

462

Collision avoidance for aircraft in abort landing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the collision avoidance between two aircraft flying in the same vertical plane: a host aircraft on a glide path and an intruder aircraft on a horizontal trajectory below that of the host aircraft and heading in the opposite direction. Assuming that the intruder aircraft is uncooperative, the host aircraft executes an optimal abort landing maneuver: it applies maximum thrust setting and maximum angle of attack lifting the flight path over the original path, thereby increasing the timewise minimum distance between the two aircraft and, in this way, avoiding the potential collision. In the presence of weak constraints on the aircraft and/or the environment, the angle of attack must be brought to the maximum value and kept there until the maximin point is reached. On the other hand, in the presence of strong constraints on the aircraft and the environment, desaturation of the angle of attack might have to take place before the maximin point is reached. This thesis includes four parts. In the first part, after an introduction and review of the available literature, we reformulate and solve the one-subarc Chebyshev maximin problem as a two-subarc Bolza-Pontryagin problem in which the avoidance and the recovery maneuvers are treated simultaneously. In the second part, we develop a guidance scheme (gamma guidance) capable of approximating the optimal trajectory in real time. In the third part, we present the algorithms employed to solve the one-subarc and two-subarc problems. In the fourth