Sample records for abortion medical procedures

  1. Abortion - medical

    MedlinePLUS

    Therapeutic medical abortion; Elective medical abortion; Induced abortion; Nonsurgical abortion ... A medical, or nonsurgical, abortion can be done within 7 weeks from the first day of the woman's last ...

  2. First trimester procedural abortion in family medicine.

    PubMed

    Lyus, Richard John; Gianutsos, Paul; Gold, Marji

    2009-01-01

    Unintended pregnancy is common, and in the United States almost one-third [corrected] of all women will have at least one abortion during their lifetime. The majority of abortions are performed in the first trimester. Although advances have been made in the provision of medical abortion in the family medicine setting, procedural methods remain the cornerstone of abortion care. We present a step-wise review of first trimester procedural abortion using the manual vacuum aspirator to demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating this service into a primary care setting. PMID:19264940

  3. Group A Streptococcus Endometritis following Medical Abortion

    PubMed Central

    Gendron, Nicolas; Joubrel, Caroline; Nedellec, Sophie; Campagna, Jennifer; Agostini, Aubert; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Casetta, Anne; Raymond, Josette; Kernéis, Solen

    2014-01-01

    Medical abortion is not recognized as a high-risk factor for invasive pelvic infection. Here, we report two cases of group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) endometritis following medical abortions with a protocol of oral mifepristone and misoprostol. PMID:24829245

  4. Medical abortion: the hidden revolution.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Phil

    2015-07-01

    While the medical abortion (MA) drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol, have radically altered reproductive health practices around the world, there has been little field research on the sales and use of these drugs, especially in developing countries. This leaves the family planning community with many unanswered questions. While good profiles of contraceptive use are available for many countries and we have good technical data on the MA drugs' efficacy, dosages and regimens such as home dosage of misoprostol versus clinic dosage, we have very little information about the quantities of MA drugs sold, how they are used, where they are used, and, in the case of misoprostol, for what purposes. Sales data are available from one excellent commercial survey and from social marketing sales of mifepristone and misoprostol and these are presented. Acknowledging the sensitivity of the issue, especially in countries where abortion is severely restricted, the author makes a plea for careful additional research to shed light on an important and growing part of the international reproductive health picture. PMID:26106105

  5. Analysis of failure in medical abortion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beverly Winikoff; Charlotte Ellertson; Shelley Clark

    1996-01-01

    Medical abortion opens a new choice to women wishing to terminate a pregnancy. Increasingly, providers in the developing and developed world will begin to offer this option. Yet, the nomenclature and concepts used for measuring failure of surgical abortion are not directly adaptable because of important differences inherent in the method and in the way it is offered in a

  6. Abortion

    MedlinePLUS

    An abortion is a procedure to end a pregnancy. It uses medicine or surgery to remove the embryo or ... personal. If you are thinking of having an abortion, most healthcare providers advise counseling.

  7. [Reintroduction of medical abortion in Denmark].

    PubMed

    Olsen, C D; Wittendorff, H E; Jørgensen, J J

    2000-03-20

    Medical termination of early pregnancy with mifepristone (RU 486) followed by a prostaglandin analogue (Cervagem) is a fairly new abortion method in surgical and gynaecological departments in Denmark. Sixty-two patients were evaluated during the period December 1, 1997 to the June 10, 1998 at Kalundborg hospital. The success rate was 97%. Side effects were rare. The study illustrates the need for strong analgesics in half of the patients. In conclusion RU 486 followed by a prostaglandin analogue provides an efficient and attractive alternative to surgical abortion methods. PMID:10766656

  8. Medical Students’ Attitudes toward Abortion Education: Malaysian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tey, Nai-peng; Yew, Siew-yong; Low, Wah-yun; Su’ut, Lela; Renjhen, Prachi; Huang, M. S. L.; Tong, Wen-ting; Lai, Siow-li

    2012-01-01

    Background Abortion is a serious public health issue, and it poses high risks to the health and life of women. Yet safe abortion services are not readily available because few doctors are trained to provide such services. Many doctors are unaware of laws pertaining to abortion. This article reports survey findings on Malaysian medical students’ attitudes toward abortion education and presents a case for including abortion education in medical schools. Methods and Results A survey on knowledge of and attitudes toward abortion among medical students was conducted in two public universities and a private university in Malaysia in 2011. A total of 1,060 students returned the completed questionnaires. The survey covered about 90% of medical students in Years 1, 3, and 5 in the three universities. About 90% of the students wanted more training on the general knowledge and legal aspects of abortion, and pre-and post-abortion counseling. Overall, 75.9% and 81.0% of the students were in favor of including in medical education the training on surgical abortion techniques and medical abortion, respectively. Only 2.4% and 1.7% were opposed to the inclusion of training of these two methods in the curriculum. The remaining respondents were neutral in their stand. Desire for more abortion education was associated with students’ pro-choice index, their intention to provide abortion services in future practice, and year of study. However, students’ attitudes toward abortion were not significantly associated with gender, type of university, or ethnicity. Conclusions Most students wanted more training on abortion. Some students also expressed their intention to provide abortion counseling and services in their future practice. Their desire for more training on abortion should be taken into account in the new curriculum. Abortion education is an important step towards making available safe abortion services to enable women to exercise their reproductive rights. PMID:23300600

  9. The public funding of abortion in Canada: going beyond the concept of medical necessity.

    PubMed

    Kaposy, Chris

    2009-08-01

    This article defends the public funding of abortion in the Canadian health care system in light of objections by opponents of abortion that the procedure should be denied public funding. Abortion opponents point out that women terminate their pregnancies most often for social reasons, that the Canadian health care system only requires funding for medically necessary procedures, and that abortion for social reasons is not medically necessary care. I offer two lines of response. First, I briefly present an argument that characterizes abortion sought for social reasons as medically necessary care, directly contesting the anti-abortion position. Second, and more substantially, I present a justice argument that shows that even if abortion is not regarded as medically necessary care, the reasons that typically motivate women to seek abortion are sufficiently weighty from the moral perspective that it would be unjust to deny them public funding. I finish by drawing the more general conclusion that health care funding decisions should be guided by a broader concept of necessary care, rather than by a narrow concept of specifically medical necessity. A broad concept of necessary care has been debated in health care policy in the Netherlands, and I suggest that such a concept would be a more just and defensible guide for funding decisions than the concept of medical necessity. PMID:18751904

  10. Medical abortion and manual vacuum aspiration for legal abortion protect women's health and reduce costs to the health system: findings from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Maria Isabel; Mendoza, Willis Simancas; Guerra-Palacio, Camilo; Guzman, Nelson Alvis; Tolosa, Jorge E

    2015-02-01

    The majority of abortions in Colombia continue to take place outside the formal health system under a range of conditions, with the majority of women obtaining misoprostol from a thriving black market for the drug and self-administering the medication. We conducted a cost analysis to compare the costs to the health system of three approaches to the provision of abortion care in Colombia: post-abortion care for complications of unsafe abortions, and for legal abortions in a health facility, misoprostol-only medical abortion and vacuum aspiration abortion. Hospital billing records from three institutions, two large maternity hospitals and one specialist reproductive health clinic, were analysed for procedure and complication rates, and costs by diagnosis. The majority of visits (94%) were to the two hospitals for post-abortion care; the other 6% were for legal abortions. Only one minor complication was found among the women having legal abortions, a complication rate of less than 1%. Among the women presenting for post-abortion care, 5% had complications during their treatment, mainly from infection or haemorrhage. Legal abortions were associated not only with far fewer complications for women, but also lower costs for the health system than for post-abortion care. We calculated based on our findings that for every 1,000 women receiving post-abortion care instead of a legal abortion within the health system, 16 women experienced avoidable complications, and the health system spent US $48,000 managing them. Increasing women's access to safe abortion care would not only reduce complications for women, but would also be a cost-saving strategy for the health system. PMID:25702076

  11. Delivering Medical Abortion at Scale: A Study of the Retail Market for Medical Abortion in Madhya Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    Powell-Jackson, Timothy; Acharya, Rajib; Filippi, Veronique; Ronsmans, Carine

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical abortion (mifepristone and misoprostol) has the potential to contribute to reduced maternal mortality but little is known about the provision or quality of advice for medical abortion through the private retail sector. We examined the availability of medical abortion and the practices of pharmacists in India, where abortion has been legal since 1972. Methods We interviewed 591 pharmacists in 60 local markets in city, town and rural areas of Madhya Pradesh. One month later, we returned to 359 pharmacists with undercover patients who presented themselves unannounced as genuine customers seeking a medical abortion. Results Medical abortion was offered to undercover patients by 256 (71.3%) pharmacists and 24 different brands were identified. Two thirds (68.5%) of pharmacists stated that abortion was illegal in India. Only 106 (38.5%) pharmacists asked clients the timing of the last menstrual period and 38 (13.8%) requested to see a doctor’s prescription – a legal requirement in India. Only 59 (21.5%) pharmacists correctly advised patients on the gestational limit for medical abortion, 97 (35.3%) provided correct information on how many and when to take the tablets in a combination pack, and 78 (28.4%) gave accurate advice on where to seek care in case of complications. Advice on post-abortion family planning was almost nonexistent. Conclusions The retail market for medical abortion is extensive, but the quality of advice given to patients is poor. Although the contribution of medical abortion to women’s health in India is poorly understood, there is an urgent need to improve the practices of pharmacists selling medical abortion. PMID:25822656

  12. [Abortion].

    PubMed

    Dourlen-rollier, A M

    1971-01-01

    The historical and current (1969) abortion laws in France as well as those in other Western countries are analyzed. France has had a series of punitive abortion codes since the Napoleonic Code of 1810 prescribing solitary confinement for the woman. The reforms of 1920 and 1923 made provocation of abortion or contraceptional propaganda a "crime" (felony), later a "delit" (misdemeanor), called for trial before magistr ate instead of jury, but resulted in only about 200 convictions a year. The decree of 1939 extended the misdemeanor to women who aborted even if they were not pregnant, and provided for professional licenses such as that of surgeon or pharmacist to be suspended. The law of 1942 made abortion a social crime and increased the maximum penalty to capital punishment, which was exercised in 2 cases. About 4000 per year were convicted from 1942-1944. Now the law still applies to all who intend to abort, whether or not pregnant or successful, but punishemnt is limited to 1-5 years imprisonment, and 72,000 francs fine, or suspension of medical practice for 5 years. About 500 have been convicted per year. Since 1955 legal abortion has been available (to about 130 women over 4 years) if it is the only means to save the woman's life. Although pregnancy tests are controlled, the population desregards the law by resorting to clandestine abortion. The wealthy travel to Switzerland (where 68% of legal abortions are done on French women) or to England. Numbers are estimated by the French government at 250,000-300,000 per year, or 1 for every 2 live births, but by hospital statistics at 400,000-1,000,000 per year. The rest of the review covers abortion laws in Scandinavian, Central European, and individual US states as of 1969. PMID:12333138

  13. The law, the AMA, and partial-birth abortion. American Medical Association.

    PubMed

    Benshoof, J

    1999-07-01

    The three articles by Dr. Gans Epner, Drs. Sprang and Neerhof, and Dr. Grimes centered around the issue that criminal laws against so-called partial-birth abortion go beyond banning any one abortion procedure or just "late-term" procedures. It is noted that even the authors gave different definitions of "late term". In addition, neither the phrase "late term" nor "intact dilation" and evacuation is present or defined in any of the partial-birth abortion laws passed in 27 states or in the federal bill. Evidence shows that 17 courts across the US have blocked partial-birth abortion laws as unconstitutional, finding such laws could, at any point in a pregnancy, outlaw an abortion performed using the most common and safest procedures. In these terms, the endorsement of the federal partial-birth abortion law by the American Medical Association gave credibility to the deception that partial-birth abortion legislation is a ban on the intact dilation and extraction procedure. Moreover, it has endorsed government intrusion in a private medical decision and sanctioned a law that subjects physicians to criminal prosecution for providing necessary health care. PMID:10404899

  14. Medical Student Procedure Guide

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    20132014 O.H.S.U. Medical Student Procedure Guide #12;2013-2014 Medical Student Procedure Guide 1 Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine - Medical Student Procedure Guide Welcome This is an exciting time to be in medicine. Advances in the sciences basic to the study and practice of medicine

  15. Late Presentation of Unsafe Abortion after 5 Years of Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Prasanta Kumar; Mitra, Subarna; Padma, Alaganandam; Agrawal, Sarita

    2014-01-01

    A majority of the unsafe abortions are performed by untrained birth attendants or quacks leading to complications in a large proportion of these cases. Complications like bowel injury, bladder injury, uterine perforation, and septic abortion are mostly caused by unskilled hands and are detected immediately or within few days of the procedure, owing to the need for tertiary level care. Here we present a very interesting case of unsafe abortion induced by a Ryle's tube in a 32-year-old lady, which was diagnosed five years after the procedure. Considering its atypical presentation, it is the first case of its kind in the literature. The details of the case and its management are described along with appropriate pictures. PMID:24649386

  16. Medication Abortion within a Student Health Care Clinic: A Review of the First 46 Consecutive Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Emily M.; Bordoloi, Anita; Moorthie, Mydhili; Pela, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Medication abortion with mifepristone and misoprostol has been available in the United States since 2000. The authors reviewed the first 46 medication abortion cases conducted at a university-based student health care clinic to determine the safety and feasibility of medication abortion in this type of clinical setting. Participants:…

  17. Abortion - surgical

    MedlinePLUS

    Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... Surgical abortion uses a vacuum to remove the fetus and related pregnancy material from the uterus. The procedure is ...

  18. Investigation of abort procedures for space shuttle-type vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, R. W.; Eide, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation has been made of abort procedures for space shuttle-type vehicles using a point mass trajectory optimization program known as POST. This study determined the minimum time gap between immediate and once-around safe return to the launch site from a baseline due-East launch trajectory for an alternate space shuttle concept which experiences an instantaneous loss of 25 percent of the total main engine thrust.

  19. Comparison of medical abortion with surgical vacuum aspiration: women's preferences and acceptability of treatment.

    PubMed

    Henshaw, R C; Naji, S A; Russell, I T; Templeton, A A

    1993-09-18

    In Scotland, physicians compared women's preferences for and acceptability of medical abortion and vacuum aspiration in the early 1st trimester of pregnancy among 363 patients at the Maternity Hospital in Aberdeen. They measured acceptability 2 weeks after the abortion. The 4 groups included 73 women who chose a medical abortion (600 mg RU-486 followed 48 hours later by a vaginal pessary of 1 mg gemeprost), 95 women who chose vacuum aspiration, 99 women randomly allocated to medical abortion, and 96 women randomly allocated to vacuum aspiration. 23% had had a previous legal abortion. Almost all the women who had a preference for an abortion method accepted their chosen method (95% for medical abortion and 90% for vacuum aspiration). Just 4% from either group would choose another method if the need would arise in the future. Women randomized to medical abortion were significantly more likely to choose vacuum aspiration in the future than were those randomized to vacuum aspiration who would choose medical abortion in the future (22% vs. 2%; p .001). The only predictor of acceptability before the abortion among women randomly allocated to medical abortion was gestational age. Specifically, 95% of the women who considered medical abortion to be unacceptable underwent medical abortion at 50 or more days gestation. At gestations under 50 days, acceptability between the 2 randomly allocated groups was the same. The 2 groups did not differ in pain rating scores, indicating that preferences were likely to be more significant than pain. All 4 groups rated the quality of nursing care to be positive in 11 of the 12 bipolar adjectives. Women who preferred medical abortion rated treatment considerably higher on 4 scores (p .05). These 4 bipolar adjectives were relaxed-stressed, soft-hard, sympathetic-unsympathetic, and gentle-harsh. PMID:8401094

  20. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Private Medical Practitioners in Calabar towards Post-Abortion Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SJ Etuk; FE Okonofua

    This study examined the knowledge, attitude and practice of private medical practitioners in Calabar on abortion, post- abortion care and post-abortion family planning. Forty eight private practitioners who were proprietors of private clinics in the city were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. The results showed that 22.9% of the doctors routinely terminate unwanted pregnancies when requested to do so by

  1. An effective regimen for early medical abortion: a report of 2000 consecutive cases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. W. Ashok; G. C. Penney; G. M. M. Flett; A. Templeton

    A combination of the anti-progesterone mifepristone and gemeprost provides an effective non-surgical method for the induction of abortion at gestations up to 63 days, achieving complete abortion rates of over 95%. We report our experience with an alternate regimen, comprising a reduced dose of mifepristone in combination with vaginal misoprostol. A consecutive series of 2000 women requesting early medical abortion

  2. Significant adverse events and outcomes after medical abortion.

    E-print Network

    Creinin, Mitchell David

    2013-01-01

    of health centers provided abortion care, and nearly all ofthe largest provider of abortion care in the United States,abortion from different sources including routine follow-up visits, reports from clinicians providing care

  3. Medical Students and Abortion: Reconciling Personal Beliefs and Professional Roles at One Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dans, Peter E.

    1992-01-01

    Surveys of first- and fourth-year Johns Hopkins University (Maryland) medical students found little change in attitudes about abortion over four years. Attitudes correlated most strongly with personal beliefs about when a fetus is considered human life and somewhat with student gender. Results are used in a medical ethics course to illuminate…

  4. Making Abortions Safe: A Matter of Good Public Health Policy and Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marge Berer

    2002-01-01

    Globally, abortion mortality constitutes at least 13% of maternal mortality. Unsafe abortion procedures, untrained abortion providers, restrictive abortion laws and high mortality and morbidity from abortion tend to occur together. Preventing abortion mortality and morbidity in countries where they remain high is a matter of good public health policy, based on good medical practice, and an important part of initiatives

  5. Rape as a legal indication for abortion: implications and consequences of the medical examination requirement.

    PubMed

    Teklehaimanot, K I; Smith, C Hord

    2004-01-01

    A number of countries adopt abortion laws recognizing rape as a legal ground for access to safe abortion service. As rape is a crime, these abortion laws carry with them criminal and health care elements that in turn result in the involvement of legal and medical expertise. The most common objective of the laws should be providing safe abortion services to women survivors of rape. Depending on purposes of a given abortion law, the laws usually require women to undergo a medical examination to qualify for a legal abortion. Some abortion laws are so vague as to result in uncertainties regarding the steps health personnel must follow in conducting medical examination. Another group of abortion laws do not leave room for regulation and remain too rigid to respond to changing socio-economic circumstances. Still others require medical examination as a prerequisite for abortion. As a result, a number of abortion laws remain on the books. The paper attempts to analyze legal and practical issues related to medical examination in rape cases. PMID:15163078

  6. Comparison of medical abortion with surgical vacuum aspiration: women's preferences and acceptability of treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R C Henshaw; S A Naji; I T Russell; A A Templeton

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess women's preferences for, and the acceptability of, medical abortion and vacuum aspiration in the early first trimester. DESIGN--Patient centred, partially randomised trial. Medical abortion was performed with mifepristone 600 mg followed 48 hours later by gemeprost 1 mg vaginal pessary. Vacuum aspiration was performed under general anaesthesia. SETTING--Teaching hospital in Scotland. PATIENTS--363 women undergoing legal induced abortion at

  7. Safety, efficacy, and acceptability of medical abortion in China, Cuba, and India: A comparative trial of mifepristone-misoprostol versus surgical abortion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beverly Winikoff; Irving Sivin; Kurus J. Coyaji; Evelio Cabezas; Xiao Bilian; Gu Sujuan; Du Ming-kun; Usha R. Krishna; Andrea Eschen; Charlotte Ellertson

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated safety, efficacy, and acceptability of an oral regimen of medical abortion compared with surgical abortion in three developing countries.STUDY DESIGN: Women (n = 1373) with amenorrhea ?56 days chose either surgical abortion (as provided routinely) or 600 mg of mifepristone followed after 48 hours by 400 ?g of misoprostol. This is the appropriate design for studying safety,

  8. Provider practice models for and costs of delivering medication abortion — evidence from 11 US abortion care settings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aimee Afable-Munsuz; Heather Gould; Felicia Stewart; Kathryn A. Phillips; Stephanie L. Van Bebber; Charlie Moore

    2007-01-01

    PurposeUnderstanding practice models and provider costs for medication abortion (MAB) provision may elucidate ways to facilitate MAB integration into a larger arena of health care services. This study provides descriptive data on the diverse MAB practice models currently being utilized by US health care providers and the costs associated with the components of those models.

  9. Medically indigent women seeking abortion prior to legalization: New York City, 1969-1970.

    PubMed

    Belsky, J E

    1992-01-01

    If the efforts now underway to limit access to abortion services in the United States are successful, their greatest impact will be on women who lack the funds to obtain abortions elsewhere. There is little published information, however, about the experience of medically indigent women who sought abortions under the old, restrictive state laws. This article details the psychiatric evaluation of 199 women requesting a therapeutic abortion at a large municipal hospital in New York City under a restrictive abortion law. Thirty-nine percent had tried to abort the pregnancy. Fifty-seven percent had concrete evidence of serious psychiatric disorder. Forty-eight percent had been traumatized by severe family disruption, gross emotional deprivation or abuse during childhood. Seventy-nine percent lacked emotional support from the man responsible for the pregnancy, and the majority were experiencing overwhelming stress from the interplay of multiple problems exacerbated by their unwanted pregnancy. PMID:1628716

  10. Emotional Sequelae of Abortion: Implications for Clinical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemkau, Jeanne Parr

    1988-01-01

    Summarizes literature on normative reactions to abortion and factors that increase risk of negative emotional sequelae. Discusses characteristics of woman, social support and cultural milieu around the abortion, the medical environment and abortion procedure itself, and events subsequent to abortion which may cause conflict. Discusses implications…

  11. ABORTION COST LIST I Hartford Sites

    E-print Network

    Royer, Dana

    ABORTION COST LIST I Hartford Sites: 1. Hartford Gyn Center 860-525-1900 Medical- $550 + $30 if Rh for Abortion info/scheduling 1-877-529-3689 www.ppct.org Procedure Sites in Norwich, New Haven, West Hartford. Both, Dr. Byrd and Dr. Flagg are willing to perform therapeutic abortions. Dr. Beverly Byrd 852

  12. Informed consent or institutionalized eugenics? How the medical profession encourages abortion of fetuses with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Darrin P

    2008-01-01

    Many women are unprepared to make prenatal decisions about fetuses diagnosed with Down Syndrome because of societal pressures to have "normal" children, a negative view of persons with disabilities by many in society, a fear of legal liability by those in the medical community, the lack of genuine informed consent before undergoing genetic testing and abortion, and the failure of non-directive pre-abortion counseling in the medical community. Moreover, medical professionals fail to communicate correct and unbiased information before and during the genetic screening, diagnostic testing, and abortion decision-making process. This article addresses the contributing factors and causes that ultimately lead to a lack of informed consent and a very high abortion rate for fetuses diagnosed with Down Syndrome. PMID:18771038

  13. [Abortion in Colombia. Medical, legal and socioeconomic aspects].

    PubMed

    Umaña, A O

    1973-01-01

    Abortion is a social problem and criminal sanctions are very ineffective in limiting it and are seldom applied (133 legal actions vs. 65,600 cases of induced abortion in 1965). Abortion is a social disease, as are prostitution, juvenile delinquency, drug abuse, and so far has been an insoluble problem. Colombian laws should be modified to reflect reality. Sex education must be emphasized, because ignorance is one of the main causes of abortion. Leniency should be applied toward women who cooperate with the authorities in identifying the person who performed an abortion. Legalization of abortion and enforcement of strict laws against it are considered as possible solutions, but both are rejected. The former is regarded as morally unacceptable and as imposing an excessive burden on scarce health services, the latter as even worse, imposing an equivalent burden on the court system, without s olving either health or social problems. The best and probably only solution is to improve education in family planning, to promote knowledge and motivation to enable the population to make sound and responsible decisions. PMID:4804875

  14. Management of incomplete abortion as an outpatient procedure.

    PubMed

    Allen, A; Philpott, R H

    1971-05-01

    To alleviate crowding in the gynecological wards, 350 of 410 cases of incomplete abortion seen between February and July, 1969, were treated as outpatients with analgesia instead of anesthesia. Patients with sepsis, severe anemia, septicemia or hypovolaemic shock, or who aborted as a result of serious illness were treated as inpatients. 74.4% of the patients were discharged within 12 hours. Paracervical block in combination with pethidine and valium administered intravenously or premedication with pethidine was more effective than paracervical block alone. PMID:5112599

  15. Laboratory Procedures for Medical Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Pauline

    The purpose of the manual is to provide the medical assisting student a text which presents the common laboratory procedures in use today in physician's offices. The procedures for performing a complete urinalysis are outlined, along with those for carrying out various hematological tests. Information is also presented to help the student learn to…

  16. “You can't do that 'round here”: a case study of the introduction of medical abortion care at a University Medical Center

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence Leeman; Eve Espey

    2005-01-01

    Mifepristone medical abortion was introduced in 2002 into the University of New Mexico Medical Center clinic system through a joint effort of the departments of Family Medicine and Obstetrics and Gynecology. A stepwise approach to the integration of medical abortion, manual vacuum uterine aspiration, and first trimester obstetric ultrasound was successful in overcoming a series of educational, political, economic and

  17. Abortion laws and medical developments: a medico-legal anomaly in Queensland.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Kerry

    2011-03-01

    In October 2010 the District Court sitting in Cairns, Queensland, found Tegan Leach not guilty of attempting to procure her own abortion and Sergie Brennan not guilty of supplying Leach with the drugs Mifepristone and Misoprostol to procure an abortion. Brennan obtained the drugs from his sister in the Ukraine through the regular postal system. R v Brennan and Leach was the first case in Queensland's history where a woman was charged with procuring her own abortion. The drugs are accepted by the medical profession worldwide for medical abortions. A prosecution witness gave evidence that Mifepristone is not harmful or injurious to the health of a woman and it is listed as an essential medicine by the World Health Organisation and approved for use by the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration. The jury found the defendants not guilty because they were not satisfied beyond reasonable doubt that the combination of the drugs Mifepristone and Misoprostol was a "noxious" substance under the Criminal Code (Old). This article concludes that there is no regulatory miracle which will stop the traffic of Mifepristone and Misoprostol into Australia and therefore an intelligent regulatory response is required which would make it unnecessary for women to seek Mifepristone and Misoprostol from overseas networks and the internet. Among other things, this would include the repeal of confusing, inappropriate and ineffective abortion laws. PMID:21528743

  18. Reduction in Infection-Related Mortality since Modifications in the Regimen of Medical Abortion

    PubMed Central

    Trussell, James; Nucatola, Deborah; Fjerstad, Mary; Lichtenberg, E Steve

    2014-01-01

    Background From 2001 to March 2006 Planned Parenthood health centers throughout the United States provided medical abortion by a regimen of oral mifepristone followed 24 to 48 hours later by vaginal misoprostol. In response to concerns about serious infections, in early 2006 Planned Parenthood changed the route of misoprostol administration to buccal and required either routine antibiotic coverage or universal screening and treatment for chlamydia; in July 2007, Planned Parenthood began requiring routine antibiotic coverage for all medical abortions. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of Planned Parenthood cases assessing the rates of mortality caused by infection following medical abortion during a time period when misoprostol was administered vaginally (2001 through March 2006), as compared with the rate from April 2006 to the end of 2012 after a change to buccal administration of misoprostol and after initiation of new infection-reduction strategies. Results The mortality rate dropped significantly in the 81-month period after the joint change to 1) buccal misoprostol replacing vaginal misoprostol and 2) either sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening or routine preventative antibiotic coverage (15 month period) or universal routine preventative antibiotic coverage as part of the medical abortion (66 month period), from 1.37/100,000 to 0.00/100,000, p=0.013 (difference=1.37/100,000, 95% CI 0.47-4.03 per 100,000). Conclusion The infection-caused mortality rate following medical abortion declined by 100% following a change from vaginal to buccal administration of misoprostol combined with screen-and-treat or, far more commonly, routine antibiotic coverage. PMID:24405798

  19. Combatting the "partial-birth abortion" myth.

    PubMed

    1998-11-01

    Despite the efforts of pro-choice activists in the US to point out the critical differences between so-called "partial-birth abortions" and late-term abortions, the public remains confused about the issue. Proposed federal legislation banning "partial-birth abortions" excludes any language defining late-term abortions (time period or fetal viability). Thus, such a ban would apply to any abortion at any stage of pregnancy. Only the states of Kansas and Utah have passed legislation that limit the ban to late-term abortions. The term "partial-birth abortion" also has no independent meaning: it is not a medical term nor does it refer to a medical procedure. The correct term, "intact dilation and extraction," is never mentioned in most proposed legislation, much of which is written in broad enough language to outlaw all abortions. Most states that passed bans on "partial-birth abortions," in fact, had previously banned late-term abortions. In Georgia, a court order revised a "partial-birth abortion" law by limiting it to post-viability dilation and extraction and insisting on exceptions to protect the pregnant women's life and health. The courts have severely limited or enjoined "partial-birth abortion" legislation in 19 of the 20 states where challenges were mounted. Because an educated public overwhelmingly rejects the bans, reproductive rights activists are attempting to educate the public despite the inability or unwillingness of the media to make the crucial distinction. PMID:12294330

  20. Safe, accessible medical abortion in a rural Tamil Nadu clinic, India, but what about sexual and reproductive rights?

    PubMed

    Sri, Subha B; Ravindran, T K Sundari

    2015-02-01

    Women's control over their own bodies and reproduction is a fundamental prerequisite to the achievement of sexual and reproductive health and rights. A woman's ability to terminate an unwanted pregnancy has been seen as the exercise of her reproductive rights. This study reports on interviews with 15 women in rural South India who had a medical abortion. It examines the circumstances under which they chose to have an abortion and their perspectives on medical abortion. Women in this study decided to have an abortion when multiple factors like lack of spousal support for child care or contraception, hostile in-laws, economic hardship, poor health of the woman herself, spousal violence, lack of access to suitable contraceptive methods, and societal norms regarding reproduction and sexuality converged to oppress them. The availability of an easy and affordable method like medical abortion pills helped the women get out of a difficult situation, albeit temporarily. Medical abortion also fulfilled their special needs by ensuring confidentiality, causing least disruption of their domestic schedule, and dispensing with the need for rest or a caregiver. The study concludes that medical abortion can help women in oppressive situations. However, this will not deliver gender equality or women's empowerment; social conditions need to change for that. PMID:25702077

  1. The law, the AMA, and partial-birth abortion. American Medical Association.

    PubMed

    Lauster, M; Spear, S J

    1999-07-01

    In Drs. Sprang and Neerhof's article regarding the partial-birth abortion law, it is noted that proposed federal legislation would ban only the intact dilatation and extraction (D&X) procedure. Such an argument is fallacious, since the wording of the proposed federal legislation about D&X is vague when compared with the ACOG definition of intact D&X. This may be because intact D&X, described for the public in a graphic and disturbing text, is being used by the anti-choice movement to achieve its desired outcome of criminalization of all abortion procedures. In these terms, the question as to why the precise ACOG definition of intact D&X is not used in the language of the legislation is asked. Moreover, it is believed that the authors of the article have disregarded the woman's health and well-being because of their obsession with the fetus's rights. Overall, it is suggested that real efforts must be made to care for women whether that entails helping them find ways out of abusive relationships, assisting them in nurturing children, or providing them with effective birth control, including abortion. PMID:10404902

  2. Women's experiences with the use of medical abortion in a legally restricted context: the case of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Silvina; Romero, Mariana; Aizenberg, Lila

    2015-02-01

    This article presents the findings of a qualitative study exploring the experiences of women living in Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area, Argentina, with the use of misoprostol for inducing an abortion. We asked women about the range of decisions they had to make, their emotions, the physical experience, strategies they needed to use, including seeking health care advice and in dealing with a clandestine medical abortion, and their overall evaluation of the experience. An in-depth interview schedule was used. The women had either used misoprostol and sought counselling or care at a public hospital (n=24) or had used misoprostol based on the advice of a local hotline, information from the internet or from other women (n=21). Four stages in the women's experiences were identified: how the decision to terminate the pregnancy was taken, how the medication was obtained, how the tablets were used, and reflections on the outcome whether or not they sought medical advice. Safety and privacy were key in deciding to use medical abortion. Access to the medication was the main obstacle, requiring a prescription or a friendly drugstore. Correct information about the number of pills to use and dosage intervals was the least easy to obtain and caused concerns. The possibility of choosing a time of privacy and having the company of a close one was highlighted as a unique advantage of medical abortion. Efforts to improve abortion law, policy and service provision in Argentina in order to ensure the best possible conditions for use of medical abortion by women should be redoubled. PMID:25702064

  3. Integration of Post-Abortion Care: The Role of Township Medical Officers and Midwives in Myanmar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thein Thein Htay; Josephine Sauvarin; Saba Khan

    2003-01-01

    Complications of unsafe abortion are a significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in Myanmar, and are recognised by the Ministry of Health as a priority. The Department of Health developed a strategy to address the problem of abortion complications by integrating post-abortion care and contraceptive services into the existing township health system. The quality of post-abortion care was assessed

  4. Youth often risk unsafe abortions.

    PubMed

    Barnett, B

    1993-10-01

    The topic of this article is the use of unsafe abortion for unwanted pregnancies among adolescents. The significance of unsafe abortion is identified as a high risk of serious health problems, such as infection, hemorrhage, infertility, and mortality, and as a strain on emergency room services. The World Health Organization estimates that at least 33% of all women seeking hospital care for abortion complications are aged under 20 years. 50 million abortions are estimated to be induced annually, of which 33% are illegal and almost 50% are performed outside the health care system. Complications are identified as occurring due to the procedure itself (perforation of the uterus, cervical lacerations, or hemorrhage) and due to incomplete abortion or introduction of bacteria into the uterus. Long-term complications include an increased risk of ectopic pregnancy, chronic pelvic infection, and infertility. Mortality from unsafe abortion is estimated at 1000/100,000 procedures. Safe abortion mortality is estimated at 0.6/100,000. When infertility results, some cultures ascribe an outcast status or marriages are prevented or prostitution is assured. The risk of complications is considered higher for adolescents. Adolescents tend to delay seeking an abortion, lack knowledge on where to go for a safe procedure, and delay seeking help for complications. Peer advice may be limited or inadequate knowledge. Five studies are cited that illustrate the impact of unsafe abortion on individuals and health care systems. Abortions may be desired due to fear of parental disapproval of the pregnancy, abandonment by the father, financial and emotional responsibilities of child rearing, expulsion from school, or inability to marry if the child is out of wedlock. Medical, legal, and social barriers may prevent women and girls from obtaining safe abortion. Parental permission is sometimes a requirement for safe abortion. Fears of judgmental or callous health personnel may be barriers to seeking safe abortion. Some countries lack adequately trained medical personnel and supplies. Mortality and morbidity declines are considered possible with legalization, more trained health personnel, and family planning programs for youth and education for parents. PMID:12287144

  5. Availability of Medical Abortion Pills and the Role of Chemists: A Study from Bihar and Jharkhand, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bela Ganatra; Vinoj Manning; Suranjeen Prasad Pallipamulla

    2005-01-01

    The clinical safety, efficacy and acceptability of mifepristone and misoprostol in the Indian context have been well studied, but little is known about how they are being used, who is using them, how women access them or how providers, chemists, women and their partners perceive medical abortion. This paper reports on part of a study on these issues, a survey

  6. Road map to scaling-up: translating operations research study’s results into actions for expanding medical abortion services in rural health facilities in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying unsafe abortion among the major causes of maternal deaths and respecting the rights to health of women, in 2002, the Nepali parliament liberalized abortion up to 12 weeks of pregnancy on request. However, enhancing women’s awareness on and access to safe and legal abortion services, particularly in rural areas, remains a challenge in Nepal despite a decade of the initiation of safe abortion services. Methods Between January 2011 and December 2012, an operations research study was carried out using quasi-experimental design to determine the effectiveness of engaging female community health volunteers, auxiliary nurse midwives, and nurses to provide medical abortion services from outreach health facilities to increase the accessibility and acceptability of women to medical abortion. This paper describes key components of the operations research study, key research findings, and follow-up actions that contributed to create a conducive environment and evidence in scaling up medical abortion services in rural areas of Nepal. Results It was found that careful planning and implementation, continuous advocacy, and engagement of key stakeholders, including key government officials, from the planning stage of study is not only crucial for successful completion of the project but also instrumental for translating research results into action and policy change. While challenges remained at different levels, medical abortion services delivered by nurses and auxiliary nurse midwives working at rural outreach health facilities without oversight of physicians was perceived to be accessible, effective, and of good quality by the service providers and the women who received medical abortion services from these rural health facilities. Conclusions This research provided further evidence and a road-map for expanding medical abortion services to rural areas by mid-level service providers in minimum clinical settings without the oversight of physicians, thus reducing complications and deaths due to unsafe abortion. PMID:24886393

  7. Achieving transparency in implementing abortion laws.

    PubMed

    Cook, R J; Erdman, J N; Dickens, B M

    2007-11-01

    National and international courts and tribunals are increasingly ruling that although states may aim to deter unlawful abortion by criminal penalties, they bear a parallel duty to inform physicians and patients of when abortion is lawful. The fear is that women are unjustly denied safe medical procedures to which they are legally entitled, because without such information physicians are deterred from involvement. With particular attention to the European Court of Human Rights, the UN Human Rights Committee, the Constitutional Court of Colombia, the Northern Ireland Court of Appeal, and the US Supreme Court, decisions are explained that show the responsibility of states to make rights to legal abortion transparent. Litigants are persuading judges to apply rights to reproductive health and human rights to require states' explanations of when abortion is lawful, and governments are increasingly inspired to publicize regulations or guidelines on when abortion will attract neither police nor prosecutors' scrutiny. PMID:17889879

  8. 32 CFR 564.40 - Procedures for obtaining medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2009-07-01 true Procedures for obtaining medical care. 564.40 Section 564.40...RESERVES NATIONAL GUARD REGULATIONS Medical Attendance and Burial § 564.40 Procedures for obtaining medical care. (a) When a...

  9. 32 CFR 564.40 - Procedures for obtaining medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Procedures for obtaining medical care. 564.40 Section 564.40...RESERVES NATIONAL GUARD REGULATIONS Medical Attendance and Burial § 564.40 Procedures for obtaining medical care. (a) When a...

  10. 32 CFR 564.40 - Procedures for obtaining medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Procedures for obtaining medical care. 564.40 Section 564.40...RESERVES NATIONAL GUARD REGULATIONS Medical Attendance and Burial § 564.40 Procedures for obtaining medical care. (a) When a...

  11. 29 CFR 1611.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... false Special procedures: Medical records. 1611.6 Section 1611...1611.6 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event the Commission...pursuant to § 1611.3 for access to medical records (including...

  12. 37 CFR 102.26 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... false Special procedures: Medical records. 102.26 Section 102...102.26 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) No response to any request for access to medical records by an individual will be...

  13. 12 CFR 1403.6 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 1403.6 Section 1403.6 Banks and Banking...REGULATIONS § 1403.6 Special procedures for medical records. Medical records in the custody of the Farm Credit System...

  14. 19 CFR 201.27 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...false Special procedures: Medical records. 201.27 Section 201...27 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) While an individual...which pertain to him or her, medical and psychological records merit special...

  15. 22 CFR 215.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... false Special procedures: Medical records. 215.6 Section 215.6...215.6 Special procedures: Medical records. If the Assistant Director...directly to the individual of medical records maintained by the...

  16. 5 CFR 2504.6 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...false Special procedures for medical records. 2504.6 Section 2504...6 Special procedures for medical records. (a) When the Privacy...individual for access to those official medical records which belong to the...

  17. 12 CFR 1403.6 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 1403.6 Section 1403.6 Banks and Banking...REGULATIONS § 1403.6 Special procedures for medical records. Medical records in the custody of the Farm Credit System...

  18. 29 CFR 1410.5 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1410.5 Section 1410.5 Labor ...PRIVACY § 1410.5 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which,...

  19. 12 CFR 603.325 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 603.325 Section 603.325 Banks and...REGULATIONS § 603.325 Special procedures for medical records. Medical records in the custody of the Farm Credit...

  20. 29 CFR 1410.5 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1410.5 Section 1410.5 Labor ...PRIVACY § 1410.5 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which,...

  1. 19 CFR 201.27 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...false Special procedures: Medical records. 201.27 Section 201...27 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) While an individual...which pertain to him or her, medical and psychological records merit special...

  2. 12 CFR 1102.104 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Special procedure: Medical records. 1102.104 Section... Special procedure: Medical records. (a) Statement...individual requests access to records pertaining to the individual that include medical and/or...

  3. 12 CFR 261a.7 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 261a.7 Section 261a.7 Banks... § 261a.7 Special procedures for medical records. If you request medical or psychological records pursuant to § 261a.5, we...

  4. 29 CFR 1611.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false Special procedures: Medical records. 1611.6 Section 1611...1611.6 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event the Commission...pursuant to § 1611.3 for access to medical records (including...

  5. 5 CFR 2412.7 - Special procedures; medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Special procedures; medical records. 2412.7 Section 2412.7 Administrative...PRIVACY § 2412.7 Special procedures; medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which,...

  6. 5 CFR 2412.7 - Special procedures; medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Special procedures; medical records. 2412.7 Section 2412.7 Administrative...PRIVACY § 2412.7 Special procedures; medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which,...

  7. 5 CFR 2504.6 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...false Special procedures for medical records. 2504.6 Section 2504...6 Special procedures for medical records. (a) When the Privacy...individual for access to those official medical records which belong to the...

  8. 29 CFR 1410.5 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1410.5 Section 1410.5 Labor ...PRIVACY § 1410.5 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which,...

  9. 37 CFR 102.26 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... false Special procedures: Medical records. 102.26 Section 102...102.26 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) No response to any request for access to medical records by an individual will be...

  10. 12 CFR 261a.7 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 261a.7 Section 261a.7 Banks... § 261a.7 Special procedures for medical records. If you request medical or psychological records pursuant to § 261a.5, we...

  11. 12 CFR 1403.6 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 1403.6 Section 1403.6 Banks and Banking...REGULATIONS § 1403.6 Special procedures for medical records. Medical records in the custody of the Farm Credit System...

  12. 7 CFR 1.115 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... false Special procedures: Medical records. 1.115 Section 1.115...115 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event an agency receives...pursuant to § 1.112 for access to medical records (including...

  13. 5 CFR 2504.6 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...false Special procedures for medical records. 2504.6 Section 2504...6 Special procedures for medical records. (a) When the Privacy...individual for access to those official medical records which belong to the...

  14. 29 CFR 1611.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... false Special procedures: Medical records. 1611.6 Section 1611...1611.6 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event the Commission...pursuant to § 1611.3 for access to medical records (including...

  15. 22 CFR 215.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... false Special procedures: Medical records. 215.6 Section 215.6...215.6 Special procedures: Medical records. If the Assistant Director...directly to the individual of medical records maintained by the...

  16. 7 CFR 1.115 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... false Special procedures: Medical records. 1.115 Section 1.115...115 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event an agency receives...pursuant to § 1.112 for access to medical records (including...

  17. 32 CFR 319.7 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 319.7 Section 319.7 National Defense...PRIVACY PROGRAM § 319.7 Special procedures: Medical records. Medical records, requested pursuant to § 319.5 of this...

  18. 12 CFR 603.325 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 603.325 Section 603.325 Banks and...REGULATIONS § 603.325 Special procedures for medical records. Medical records in the custody of the Farm Credit...

  19. 5 CFR 2412.7 - Special procedures; medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Special procedures; medical records. 2412.7 Section 2412.7 Administrative...PRIVACY § 2412.7 Special procedures; medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which,...

  20. 7 CFR 1.115 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... false Special procedures: Medical records. 1.115 Section 1.115...115 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event an agency receives...pursuant to § 1.112 for access to medical records (including...

  1. 12 CFR 261a.7 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 261a.7 Section 261a.7 Banks... § 261a.7 Special procedures for medical records. If you request medical or psychological records pursuant to § 261a.5, we...

  2. 19 CFR 201.27 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...false Special procedures: Medical records. 201.27 Section 201...27 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) While an individual...which pertain to him or her, medical and psychological records merit special...

  3. 5 CFR 2412.7 - Special procedures; medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Special procedures; medical records. 2412.7 Section 2412.7 Administrative...PRIVACY § 2412.7 Special procedures; medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which,...

  4. 29 CFR 1611.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... false Special procedures: Medical records. 1611.6 Section 1611...1611.6 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event the Commission...pursuant to § 1611.3 for access to medical records (including...

  5. 37 CFR 102.26 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... false Special procedures: Medical records. 102.26 Section 102...102.26 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) No response to any request for access to medical records by an individual will be...

  6. 5 CFR 2504.6 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...false Special procedures for medical records. 2504.6 Section 2504...6 Special procedures for medical records. (a) When the Privacy...individual for access to those official medical records which belong to the...

  7. 7 CFR 1.115 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... false Special procedures: Medical records. 1.115 Section 1.115...115 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event an agency receives...pursuant to § 1.112 for access to medical records (including...

  8. 12 CFR 603.325 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 603.325 Section 603.325 Banks and...REGULATIONS § 603.325 Special procedures for medical records. Medical records in the custody of the Farm Credit...

  9. 29 CFR 1611.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... false Special procedures: Medical records. 1611.6 Section 1611...1611.6 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event the Commission...pursuant to § 1611.3 for access to medical records (including...

  10. 12 CFR 603.325 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 603.325 Section 603.325 Banks and...REGULATIONS § 603.325 Special procedures for medical records. Medical records in the custody of the Farm Credit...

  11. 12 CFR 261a.7 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 261a.7 Section 261a.7 Banks and Banking...Pertains § 261a.7 Special procedures for medical records. Medical or psychological records requested...

  12. 29 CFR 1410.5 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1410.5 Section 1410.5 Labor ...PRIVACY § 1410.5 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which,...

  13. 12 CFR 1403.6 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 1403.6 Section 1403.6 Banks and Banking...REGULATIONS § 1403.6 Special procedures for medical records. Medical records in the custody of the Farm Credit System...

  14. 32 CFR 319.7 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 319.7 Section 319.7 National Defense...PRIVACY PROGRAM § 319.7 Special procedures: Medical records. Medical records, requested pursuant to § 319.5 of this...

  15. 22 CFR 215.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... false Special procedures: Medical records. 215.6 Section 215.6...215.6 Special procedures: Medical records. If the Assistant Director...directly to the individual of medical records maintained by the...

  16. 32 CFR 319.7 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 319.7 Section 319.7 National Defense...PRIVACY PROGRAM § 319.7 Special procedures: Medical records. Medical records, requested pursuant to § 319.5 of this...

  17. 32 CFR 319.7 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 319.7 Section 319.7 National Defense...PRIVACY PROGRAM § 319.7 Special procedures: Medical records. Medical records, requested pursuant to § 319.5 of this...

  18. 22 CFR 215.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... false Special procedures: Medical records. 215.6 Section 215.6...215.6 Special procedures: Medical records. If the Assistant Director...directly to the individual of medical records maintained by the...

  19. 12 CFR 261a.7 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 261a.7 Section 261a.7 Banks... § 261a.7 Special procedures for medical records. If you request medical or psychological records pursuant to § 261a.5, we...

  20. 19 CFR 201.27 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...false Special procedures: Medical records. 201.27 Section 201...27 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) While an individual...which pertain to him or her, medical and psychological records merit special...

  1. 7 CFR 1.115 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... false Special procedures: Medical records. 1.115 Section 1.115...115 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event an agency receives...pursuant to § 1.112 for access to medical records (including...

  2. 29 CFR 1410.5 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1410.5 Section 1410.5 Labor ...PRIVACY § 1410.5 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which,...

  3. 19 CFR 201.27 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...false Special procedures: Medical records. 201.27 Section 201...27 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) While an individual...which pertain to him or her, medical and psychological records merit special...

  4. 12 CFR 1403.6 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 1403.6 Section 1403.6 Banks and Banking...REGULATIONS § 1403.6 Special procedures for medical records. Medical records in the custody of the Farm Credit System...

  5. 5 CFR 2412.7 - Special procedures; medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Special procedures; medical records. 2412.7 Section 2412.7 Administrative...PRIVACY § 2412.7 Special procedures; medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which,...

  6. 5 CFR 2504.6 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...false Special procedures for medical records. 2504.6 Section 2504...6 Special procedures for medical records. (a) When the Privacy...individual for access to those official medical records which belong to the...

  7. 37 CFR 102.26 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... false Special procedures: Medical records. 102.26 Section 102...102.26 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) No response to any request for access to medical records by an individual will be...

  8. 12 CFR 603.325 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 603.325 Section 603.325 Banks and...REGULATIONS § 603.325 Special procedures for medical records. Medical records in the custody of the Farm Credit...

  9. Partial-birth abortion: the final frontier of abortion jurisprudence.

    PubMed

    Bopp, J; Cook, C R

    1998-01-01

    Partial-birth abortion bans patterned after the federal bill passed by both houses of Congress are constitutional. The clear legislative definition can be easily distinguished from other abortion procedures. Abortion precedents do not apply to such bans because the abortion right pertains to unborn human beings, not to those partially delivered. Such bans are also rationally-related to legitimate state interests. Even if abortion jurisprudence is deemed to apply in the partial-birth abortion context, a ban is still constitutional under Casey because a ban on partial-birth abortions does not impose an undue burden on the abortion right. PMID:9707939

  10. Medical Office Laboratory Procedures: Course Proposal. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eleanor

    A proposal is presented for a Community College of Philadelphia course, entitled "Medical Office Laboratory Procedures," which provides a laboratory introduction to microscopic and chemical analysis of blood and urine as performed in the physician's office. Following a standard cover form, a statement of the purpose of the course discusses course…

  11. Parity is a major determinant of success rate in medical abortion: a retrospective analysis of 3161 consecutive cases of early medical abortion treated with reduced doses of mifepristone and vaginal gemeprost.

    PubMed

    Bartley, J; Tong, S; Everington, D; Baird, D T

    2000-12-01

    The antiprogesterone mifepristone in combination with a suitable prostaglandin provides an effective method for induction of abortion in early pregnancy up to 63 days of gestation. The combination of 600 mg mifepristone followed by 1 mg of gemeprost vaginal pessary 48 h later is one of the standard regimens in practice, which is registered in several countries in Europe. In 1995, we reduced the doses for both mifepristone and gemeprost to 200 mg and 0.5 mg respectively, as this was shown to decrease significantly the incidence of side effects whilst maintaining a high efficacy. In this article, we report our experience with this regimen in routine clinical practice by analysing 3161 consecutive medical abortions retrospectively. Twelve case notes (0.4%) were not available, and for 310 (9.8%) women, the outcome was not known with certainty as they did not return for their follow up visit. Of the remaining 2839 women, 2732 (96.2%) had a complete abortion following their treatment. One-hundred-two (3.6%) women required an evacuation of the uterus: for incomplete abortion in 63 (2.2%) and ongoing pregnancy in 39 (1.4%). Three women had to undergo surgery for ectopic pregnancies. The surgical intervention rate was significantly higher at gestation of >49 days compared to < or = 49 days (5.7% vs. 2.6%, p = 0.002) and at >56 days than among those at < or = 56 days (6.7% vs. 3.1%; p <0.001). However, for incomplete abortion a significant increase was only seen at gestation >49 days compared to < or = 49 days (3% vs. 1.6%, p = 0.017). The incidence of ongoing pregnancies increased significantly only after 56 days of gestation compared to < or = 56 days (3.8% vs. 0.9%; p <0.001). Parity was related to the outcome with parous women having significantly more incomplete/ongoing abortions compared to nulliparous women (5.4% vs. 2.0%; p <0.001), although parous women did present earlier in pregnancy for termination than nulliparous women (p = 0.01). The incidence of complications was low: 165 (5.8%) women were given antibiotics for presumed genital infection and severe haemorrhage occurred in 11 (0.4%) women, of whom only two required blood transfusion. In summary, the recommended regimen with the reduced doses of mifepristone and gemeprost is highly effective, meeting the anticipated efficacy with a complete abortion rate of >95%. We have concluded from the data that gestation and parity are strong predictors for clinicians to anticipate the probability of a successful medical termination of pregnancy. PMID:11239616

  12. [Abortion and conscientious objection].

    PubMed

    Czarkowski, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Polish laws specify the parties responsible for lawful medical care in the availability of abortion differently than the Resolution of the Council of Europe. According to Polish regulations they include all Polish doctors while according to the Resolution, the state. Polish rules should not discriminate against anyone in connection with his religion or belief, even more so because the issue of abortion is an example of an unresolved ethical dispute. The number of lawful abortion in Poland does not exceed 1000 per year and can be carried out by only a few specialists contracted by the National Health Fund. Sufficient information and assistance should be provided to all pregnant women by the National Health Fund. The participation of all physicians in the informing process is not necessary, as evidenced by the lack of complaints to provide information on where in vitro fertilization treatment can be found - until recently only available when paid for by the individual and performed in much larger numbers than abortion. Entities performing this paid procedure made sure to provide information on their own. The rejection of the right to the conscientious objection clause by negating the right to refuse information may lead some to give up the profession or cause the termination of certain professionals on the basis of the professed worldview. Meanwhile, doctors are not allowed to be discriminated against on the basis of their conscience or religion. PMID:25815623

  13. Peri-Abortion Contraceptive Choices of Migrant Chinese Women: A Retrospective Review of Medical Records

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sally B. Rose; Zhang Wei; Annette J. Cooper; Beverley A. Lawton

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundMigrant Asian women reportedly have low levels of contraceptive use and high rates of abortion in New Zealand. Chinese make up the largest proportion of migrant Asian in New Zealand. This study aimed to describe the contraceptive choices of Chinese women seeking abortion; to examine method choice in relation to demographic characteristics (including length of stay) and to determine whether

  14. 12 CFR 1070.55 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Special procedures for medical records. 1070.55 Section 1070...Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION The Privacy...Special procedures for medical records. If an individual...

  15. 12 CFR 1070.55 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Special procedures for medical records. 1070.55 Section 1070...Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION The Privacy...Special procedures for medical records. If an individual...

  16. 12 CFR 1070.55 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Special procedures for medical records. 1070.55 Section 1070...Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION The Privacy...Special procedures for medical records. If an individual...

  17. 11 CFR 1.6 - Special procedure: Medical records. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special procedure: Medical records. [Reserved] 1.6 Section 1.6 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRIVACY ACT § 1.6 Special procedure: Medical records....

  18. 11 CFR 1.6 - Special procedure: Medical records. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Special procedure: Medical records. [Reserved] 1.6 Section 1.6 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRIVACY ACT § 1.6 Special procedure: Medical records....

  19. 11 CFR 1.6 - Special procedure: Medical records. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Special procedure: Medical records. [Reserved] 1.6 Section 1.6 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRIVACY ACT § 1.6 Special procedure: Medical records....

  20. 11 CFR 1.6 - Special procedure: Medical records. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special procedure: Medical records. [Reserved] 1.6 Section 1.6 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRIVACY ACT § 1.6 Special procedure: Medical records....

  1. 11 CFR 1.6 - Special procedure: Medical records. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Special procedure: Medical records. [Reserved] 1.6 Section 1.6 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRIVACY ACT § 1.6 Special procedure: Medical records....

  2. Abortion in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Sedgh, Gilda; Ball, Haley

    2008-09-01

    Each year in Indonesia, millions of women become pregnant unintentionally, and many choose to end their pregnancies, despite the fact that abortion is generally illegal. Like their counterparts in many developing countries where abortion is stigmatized and highly restricted, Indonesian women often seek clandestine procedures performed by untrained providers, and resort to methods that include ingesting unsafe substances and undergoing harmful abortive massage. Though reliable evidence does not exist, researchers estimate that about two million induced abortions occur each year in the country and that deaths from unsafe abortion represent 14-16% of all maternal deaths in Southeast Asia. Preventing unsafe abortion is imperative if Indonesia is to achieve the fifth Millennium Development Goal of improving maternal health and reducing maternal mortality. Current Indonesian abortion law is based on a national health bill passed in 1992. Though the language on abortion was vague, it is generally accepted that the law allows abortion only if the woman provides confirmation from a doctor that her pregnancy is life-threatening, a letter of consent from her husband or a family member, a positive pregnancy test result and a statement guaranteeing that she will practice contraception afterwards. This report presents what is currently known about abortion in Indonesia. The findings are derived primarily from small-scale, urban, clinic-based studies of women's experiences with abortion. Some studies included women in rural areas and those who sought abortions outside of clinics, but none were nationally representative. Although these studies do not give a full picture of who is obtaining abortions in Indonesia or what their experiences are, the evidence suggests that abortion is a common occurrence in the country and that the conditions under which abortion takes place are often unsafe. PMID:19035004

  3. Knowledge and attitudes about the differences between emergency contraception and medical abortion among middle-class women and men of reproductive age in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Gould, Heather; Ellertson, Charlotte; Corona, Georgina

    2002-12-01

    Two reproductive technologies--emergency contraception and medical abortion--have the potential to reduce unintended pregnancy significantly in Latin America. Lack of knowledge and negative attitudes about the methods may limit their impact, however. Results from focus group discussions with middle-class men and women of reproductive age residing in Mexico City indicate that knowledge about emergency contraception and medical abortion is low. After being informed about both methods, participants supported emergency contraception but tied their support for medical abortion to its legal status. Participants remained concerned about the methods' efficacy, mechanism of action, and potential to encourage sexual risk-taking. While almost all desired greater dissemination of information about and access to both methods in Mexico, participants cited religious and cultural concerns, as well as barriers in communication with providers and within families, as significant challenges. Participants hoped, however, that both emergency contraception and medical abortion might play important roles in preventing unwanted pregnancy and abortion-related morbidity and mortality in Mexico in the future. PMID:12499034

  4. Obsessive-compulsive disorder apparently related to abortion.

    PubMed

    McCraw, R K

    1989-04-01

    This case study presents a young woman who developed a severe obsessive-compulsive disorder after a routine medical procedure. It is suggested that this procedure brought back repressed guilt from three abortions and thus led to the onset of symptoms. The case is discussed in relationship to available research and theory. PMID:2751012

  5. Unintended Consequences: Abortion Training in the Years After Roe v Wade

    PubMed Central

    Fein, Lydia; Ketterer, Em; Young, Emily; Backus, Lois

    2013-01-01

    The US Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v Wade decision had clear implications for American women’s reproductive rights and physician ability to carry out patient choices. Its effect on physician abortion training was less apparent. In an effort to increase patient access to abortions after Roe, provision shifted from hospitals to nonhospital clinics. However, these procedures and patients were taken out of the medical education realm, and physicians became vulnerable to intimidation. The consequent provider shortage created an unexpected barrier to abortion access. Medical Students for Choice was founded in 1993 to increase abortion-training opportunities for medical students and residents. Its mission ensures that motivated medical students will learn and a growing number of physicians will commit to comprehensive abortion provision. PMID:23327239

  6. Reproducing inequalities: abortion policy and practice in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Abortion is illegal in Thailand, except in cases when it is considered necessary for a woman's health or in the case of rape. Yet abortions remain common and an important public health issue for women in Thailand. Based upon eight months' ethnographic research carried out in Northeast Thailand, this paper presents findings from a survey of 164 women of reproductive age in rural villages and from interviews with 19 women who have had illegal abortions. A range of techniques to induce abortions are used, including the consumption of abortifacients, massage, and uterine injections by untrained practitioners, and procedures carried out by trained medical personnel. This paper examines the effects of the current laws through the experiences of women who have undergone illegal abortions. Within the restrictive legal context, risk is stratified along economic lines. Poorer women have little choice but to resort to abortions by untrained practitioners. There is evidence of wide public support for the reform of the abortion laws to widen the circumstances under which abortion is legal. An ongoing movement, led by women's groups, medical and legal professionals, seeks to reform the law. PMID:12216989

  7. Advanced medical life support procedures in vitally compromised children by a helicopter emergency medical service

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bastiaan M Gerritse; Annelies Schalkwijk; Ben J Pelzer; Gert J Scheffer; Jos M Draaisma

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To determine the advanced life support procedures provided by an Emergency Medical Service (EMS) and a Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) for vitally compromised children. Incidence and success rate of several procedures were studied, with a distinction made between procedures restricted to the HEMS-physician and procedures for which the HEMS is more experienced than the EMS. METHODS: Prospective study

  8. Complications of unsafe abortion: a case study and the need for abortion law reform in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oye-Adeniran, Boniface A; Umoh, Augustine V; Nnatu, Steve N N

    2002-05-01

    Complications of unsafe abortion account for 30-40% of maternal deaths in Nigeria. This paper reports a case of unsafe abortion by dilatation and curettage, carried out by a medical practitioner in a private clinic on a 20-year-old single girl in Lagos, Nigeria. The girl was 16 weeks pregnant. She suffered complications consisting of perforation of the vaginal wall through the utero-vesical space into the abdominal cavity with gangrenous loops of small intestine herniating through it. Information was obtained from her case notes and the operating theatre register. She had a resection and anastomosis of the small intestine and had to remain in hospital, where she made a full recovery, for two weeks. Unsafe abortion is fraught with many complications, including pelvic sepsis, septicaemia, haemorrhage, renal failure, uterine perforation and other genital tract injuries, and gastro-intestinal tract injuries. Where expert, emergency treatment for these is not available, women die. Unsafe abortion procedures, untrained abortion service providers, restrictive laws and high morbidity and mortality from abortion tend to occur together. We advocate for a review of the existing restrictive laws in Nigeria in order to reduce the high morbidity and mortality from unsafe abortion. PMID:12369323

  9. Fitness to practise procedures for medical students.

    PubMed

    David, Timothy J; Ellson, Sarah

    2015-07-01

    Medical students who exhibit severe forms of adverse behaviour (including criminal matters), sometimes accompanied by mental health problems, are likely to be seen by their medical school's fitness to practise committee, a topic explained in this review. PMID:26140559

  10. Sex Differences in Career Goals, Family Plans, and Abortion Attitudes of Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, Joy W.; Koester, Lynne Sanford

    Women have historically been under-represented in the medical profession in part because the norms of feminine behavior have deviated from behavior expected of physicians. To determine the career and family expectations of current medical students, 320 medical students were surveyed. Results confirmed the hypothesis that even sex-role-modern women…

  11. A “Cookbook” Cost Analysis Procedure for Medical Information Systems*

    PubMed Central

    Torrance, Janice L.; Torrance, George W.; Covvey, H. Dominic

    1983-01-01

    A costing procedure for medical information systems is described. The procedure incorporates state-of-the-art costing methods in an easy to follow “cookbook” format. Application of the procedure consists of filling out a series of Mac-Tor EZ-Cost forms. The procedure and forms have been field tested by application to a cardiovascular database system. This article describes the major features of the costing procedure. The forms and other details are available upon request.

  12. Medical Service Clinical Laboratory Procedures--Bacteriology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    This manual presents laboratory procedures for the differentiation and identification of disease agents from clinical materials. Included are procedures for the collection of specimens, preparation of culture media, pure culture methods, cultivation of the microorganisms in natural and simulated natural environments, and procedures in…

  13. Unsafe abortion and abortion care in Khartoum, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Kinaro, Joyce; Ali, Tag Elsir Mohamed; Schlangen, Rhonda; Mack, Jessica

    2009-11-01

    Unsafe abortion in Sudan results in significant morbidity and mortality. This study of treatment for complications of unsafe abortion in five hospitals in Khartoum, Sudan, included a review of hospital records and a survey of 726 patients seeking abortion-related care from 27 October 2007 to 31 January 2008, an interview of a provider of post-abortion care and focus group discussions with community leaders. Findings demonstrate enormous unmet need for safe abortion services. Abortion is legally restricted in Sudan to circumstances where the woman's life is at risk or in cases of rape. Post-abortion care is not easily accessible. In a country struggling with poverty, internal displacement, rural dwelling, and a dearth of trained doctors, mid-level providers are not allowed to provide post-abortion care or prescribe contraception. The vast majority of the 726 abortion patients in the five hospitals were treated with dilatation and curettage (D&C), and only 12.3% were discharged with a contraceptive method. Some women waited long hours before treatment was provided; 14.5% of them had to wait for 5-8 hours and 7.3% for 9-12 hours. Mid-level providers should be trained in safe abortion care and post-abortion care to make these services accessible to a wider community in Sudan. Guidelines should be developed on quality of care and should mandate the use of manual vacuum aspiration or misoprostol for medical abortion instead of D&C. PMID:19962640

  14. Mass-Produced, Assembly-Line Abortion—A Prime Example of Unethical, Unscientific Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ford, James H.

    1972-01-01

    The incidence of psychologic sequelae associated with abortion cannot be established scientifically, and so continues to be disputed. Since there are no truly scientific criteria on which to make a prediction as to the psychologic outcome, it seems only proper that elective abortion be labeled “experimental,” rather than “therapeutic.” This uncertainty as to therapeutic benefit is compounded by the fact that adequate studies and information about physical sequelae are also lacking. Furthermore, preliminary statistics from the Population Council indicate that the morbidity rate of abortion performed even under proper medical auspices is unacceptably high. Viewed in this light and in relation to our own ethical code, the current practice of performing innumerable, mechanized, elective abortions can only be considered unethical. If it is argued that abortion can be ethically validated merely by surrounding it with the same controls used in other experimental procedures, then the medical profession should insist on such controls forthwith. PMID:4638411

  15. [Family planning--the role of general practitioner in abortion prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Skrzypulec, Violetta; Drosdzol, Agnieszka; Nowosielski, Krzysztof; Rozmus-Warcholi?ska, Wioletta; Walaszek, Aneta; Piela, Bogus?awa; Zdun, Dariusz

    2004-01-01

    According to World Health Organization, abortion is defined as an induced termination of pregnancy by use of medications or surgical interventions after implantation of the embryo and before the fetus is able to survive outside the maternal organism (before 22nd week of pregnancy). More than 75 millions of women experience unwanted pregnancy every year. Contraception for that group was either unavailable or the information about contraceptives use possibility was not efficient. Lack of conversation about family planning with the partner, rapes and inefficiency of contraceptives (8 to 30 millions women a year) might be other reasons. More than two-third such pregnancies are terminated by abortions. The number of women in reproductive age (15-44) is 1.38 million. Most of them are sexually active but not willing to have progeny. The decision of abortion is taken every year by 35 per 100 females (26 millions of legal abortions each year, 20 millions of illegal). By 1986, 36 countries introduced liberal abortion law that gives permission for abortion only for social, medical and personal reasons. The main law regulating the permission of abortion in Poland is a resolution of Family planning, embryo protection and conditions for conducting pregnancy termination from 1993, modified in 1997. In 1999, 151 abortion procedures were performed and that number is decreasing gradually. The development of so called "abortion basement", where unsafe abortion is usually performed, is a consequence of restrictive policy about the abortion law. In the last few years the holistic and individual approach to the patient has started to play an important role. Unfortunately, in the case of sexual education and knowledge of conscious family planning, medical services, and medical doctors especially, play only the minimal role. It seems to be essential in gynecological and general medicine practice to give information about different methods of family planning and protection against sexual transmitted diseases as well as to control patient's health when using contraceptives. PMID:15884260

  16. Real-time haptic simulation of medical procedures

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Real-time haptic simulation of medical procedures involving deformations and device to be Ph.D. co-advisor with him. Many thanks to St´ephane Cotin for sharing his passion of medical at the perspectives at the end of the document and go back to work because there is still a lot of work to do

  17. Protection in eye of beholder. Courts send mixed messages about the sanctity of medical files in the face of federal subpoenas for patients' abortion records.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark

    2004-04-01

    With three trials under way on lawsuits challenging the Partial Birth Abortion Act, hospitals have been dragged into a drama involving medical-record privacy. It's providing a lesson on how little protection HIPAA offers in court. "We sought to find a way to produce those records in a way that would not embarrass our patients," said a counsel for the University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers, left. PMID:15095491

  18. Soviet immigration in Israel: consequences for family planning and abortion services.

    PubMed

    Sabatello, E F

    1991-09-01

    The massive influx of Soviet immigrants to Israel is expected to significantly increase the number of application for a legal abortion (AFLA). In 1990, about 200,000 people, most of them from the USSR, immigrated to Israel. This group included almost 50,000 women of childbearing age. In the USSR, abortion is extremely frequent. Estimates of the number of legal and illegal abortions for 1988 range from 9.5-11 million. An average Soviet women has close to 5 abortions during her lifetime. Some of the reasons for such a high rate of abortion include the lack of available contraceptives, the exaggeration of the possible dangers of modern contraceptives on the part of Soviet physicians, and the social and psychological acceptance of abortion by Soviet women as a routine medical procedure. Considering the number of AFLA from earlier Soviet immigrants, requests for abortions will increase. Data from 1988 indicates that USSR-born Israeli women (who arrived during a wave of immigration in the 1970s) had a general rate of AFLA 26% higher than the total rate for Jewish Israeli women. And for women age 20-29, the AFLA rate was 50% higher for USSR-born women than for Israeli women. The article estimates that the wave of new arrivals will lead to a 10% increase in the number of AFLA. The new wave of Soviet immigrants means that the government will need to expand its family planning services. The immediate implication of the family planning services. The immediate implication of the influx, though, is that the government will need to establish additional abortion medical committees to guarantee fair access to abortion. But since many of the would be aborting Soviet women are married, many will not meet the current abortion law criteria, and this will lead to an increase in the number of illegal abortions. PMID:12284556

  19. Medical Tourism: The Trend toward Outsourcing Medical Procedures to Foreign Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Diane

    2008-01-01

    The rising costs of medical treatment in the United States are fueling a movement to outsource medical treatment. Estimates of the number of Americans traveling overseas for treatment range from 50,000 to 500,000. Charges for common procedures such as heart bypass can be $11,000 in Thailand compared to $130,000 in the United States. Knee…

  20. 29 CFR 2400.7 - Special procedures for requesting medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Special procedures for requesting medical records. 2400.7 Section 2400...Special procedures for requesting medical records. (a) Upon an individual's request for access to his medical records, including psychological...

  1. 32 CFR 1901.31 - Special procedures for medical and psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Special procedures for medical and psychological records. 1901.31 Section...Special procedures for medical and psychological records. (a) In general...or amendment involves medical or psychological records and when the...

  2. 32 CFR 1901.31 - Special procedures for medical and psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Special procedures for medical and psychological records. 1901.31 Section...Special procedures for medical and psychological records. (a) In general...or amendment involves medical or psychological records and when the...

  3. 32 CFR 1901.31 - Special procedures for medical and psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Special procedures for medical and psychological records. 1901.31 Section...Special procedures for medical and psychological records. (a) In general...or amendment involves medical or psychological records and when the...

  4. 29 CFR 2400.7 - Special procedures for requesting medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Special procedures for requesting medical records. 2400.7 Section 2400...Special procedures for requesting medical records. (a) Upon an individual's request for access to his medical records, including psychological...

  5. 29 CFR 2400.7 - Special procedures for requesting medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Special procedures for requesting medical records. 2400.7 Section 2400...Special procedures for requesting medical records. (a) Upon an individual's request for access to his medical records, including psychological...

  6. 32 CFR 1901.31 - Special procedures for medical and psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Special procedures for medical and psychological records. 1901.31 Section...Special procedures for medical and psychological records. (a) In general...or amendment involves medical or psychological records and when the...

  7. 32 CFR 1901.31 - Special procedures for medical and psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Special procedures for medical and psychological records. 1901.31 Section...Special procedures for medical and psychological records. (a) In general...or amendment involves medical or psychological records and when the...

  8. 29 CFR 2400.7 - Special procedures for requesting medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Special procedures for requesting medical records. 2400.7 Section 2400...Special procedures for requesting medical records. (a) Upon an individual's request for access to his medical records, including psychological...

  9. 29 CFR 2400.7 - Special procedures for requesting medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Special procedures for requesting medical records. 2400.7 Section 2400...Special procedures for requesting medical records. (a) Upon an individual's request for access to his medical records, including psychological...

  10. Estimating the probability of spontaneous abortion in the presence of induced abortion and vice versa.

    PubMed Central

    Hammerslough, C R

    1992-01-01

    An integrated approach to estimate the total number of pregnancies that begin in a population during one calendar year and the probability of spontaneous abortion is described. This includes an indirect estimate of the number of pregnancies that result in spontaneous abortions. The method simultaneously takes into account the proportion of induced abortions that are censored by spontaneous abortions and vice versa in order to estimate the true annual number of spontaneous and induced abortions for a population. It also estimates the proportion of pregnancies that women intended to allow to continue to a live birth. The proposed indirect approach derives adjustment factors to make indirect estimates by combining vital statistics information on gestational age at induced abortion (from the 12 States that report to the National Center for Health Statistics) with a life table of spontaneous abortion probabilities. The adjustment factors are applied to data on induced abortions from the Alan Guttmacher Institute Abortion Provider Survey and data on births from U.S. vital statistics. For the United States in 1980 the probability of a spontaneous abortion is 19 percent, given the presence of induced abortion. Once the effects of spontaneous abortion are discounted, women in 1980 intended to allow 73 percent of their pregnancies to proceed to a live birth. One medical benefit to a population practicing induced abortion is that induced abortions avert some spontaneous abortions, leading to a lower mean gestational duration at the time of spontaneous abortion. PMID:1594736

  11. Medical Certification Procedure Outline the procedure for operating vehicles at University of Michigan (U-M) that require

    E-print Network

    Kirschner, Denise

    Medical Certification Procedure Objective Outline the procedure for operating vehicles at University of Michigan (U-M) that require medical certification according to State of Michigan law. Medical than 10,000 pounds, you are required to have a current valid DOT medical card. 2. Or if you are towing

  12. Safe abortion: WHO technical and policy guidance.

    PubMed

    Cook, R J; Dickens, B M; Horga, M

    2004-07-01

    In 2003, the World Health Organization published its well referenced handbook Safe Abortion: Technical and Policy Guidance for Health Systems to address the estimated almost 20 million induced abortions each year that are unsafe, imposing a burden of approximately 67 thousand deaths annually. It is a global injustice that 95% of unsafe abortions occur in developing countries. The focus of guidance is on abortion procedures that are lawful within the countries in which they occur, noting that in almost all countries, the law permits abortion to save a woman's life. The guidance treats unsafe abortion as a public health challenge, and responds to the problem through strategies concerning improved clinical care for women undergoing procedures, and the appropriate placement of necessary services. Legal and policy considerations are explored, and annexes present guidance to further reading, international consensus documents on safe abortion, and on manual vacuum aspiration and post-abortion contraception. PMID:15207687

  13. Partial-birth abortion, Congress, and the Constitution.

    PubMed

    Annas, G J

    1998-07-23

    In the US, a new antiabortion strategy of using legislative and judicial forums to change the rhetoric of abortion rather than using abortion rhetoric to change the law arose out of disappointment when the 1992 Casey decision failed to overturn Roe. This new approach is crystallized by the 1995 introduction of federal legislation (vetoed by the President) to ban so-called "partial-birth" abortions. Opponents to this late-term procedure undertaken to preserve a women's life or health distinguish intact dilatation and extraction from induced labor to terminate a nonviable pregnancy (failing to recognize the lack of ethical difference) and make inaccurate political statements linking the abortion procedure to infanticide. When the ban was reintroduced to Congress in 1997, the previously silent American Medical Association agreed to support the bill if two "physician-friendly" amendments were added, but the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists made it clear that it is "inappropriate, ill advised, and dangerous" for legislative bodies to intervene into medical decision-making. The new version of the bill shifted the focus to all abortions after viability unless they are necessary to protect the mother from grievous harm to her physical (not mental) health, thus limiting the reach of the Roe decision. Clinton vetoed this bill also. Such legislation would be unlikely to prevent even one abortion, and its importance rests in its view of the proper role of government in regulating health care. This follows previous efforts to reframe the abortion debate by creating a dichotomy that marginalizes either women or fetuses and shifts the focus to another issue. PMID:9673308

  14. How women perceive abortion care: A study focusing on healthy women and those with mental and posttraumatic stress.

    PubMed

    Wallin Lundell, Inger; Öhman, Susanne Georgsson; Sundström Poromaa, Inger; Högberg, Ulf; Sydsjö, Gunilla; Skoog Svanberg, Agneta

    2015-06-01

    Objectives To identify perceived deficiencies in the quality of abortion care among healthy women and those with mental stress. Methods This multi-centre cohort study included six obstetrics and gynaecology departments in Sweden. Posttraumatic stress (PTSD/PTSS) was assessed using the Screen Questionnaire-Posttraumatic Stress Disorder; anxiety and depressive symptoms, using the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale; and abortion quality perceptions, using a modified version of the Quality from the Patient's Perspective questionnaire. Pain during medical abortion was assessed in a subsample using a visual analogue scale. Results Overall, 16% of the participants assessed the abortion care as being deficient, and 22% experienced intense pain during medical abortion. Women with PTSD/PTSS more often perceived the abortion care as deficient overall and differed from healthy women in reports of deficiencies in support, respectful treatment, opportunities for privacy and rest, and availability of support from a significant person during the procedure. There was a marginally significant difference between PTSD/PTSS and the comparison group for insufficient pain alleviation. Conclusions Women with PTSD/PTSS perceived abortion care to be deficient more often than did healthy women. These women do require extra support, relatively simple efforts to provide adequate pain alleviation, support and privacy during abortion may improve abortion care. Chinese Abstract ? ?? ?6?(PTSD/PTSS)????? ??16%??22%? ??PTSD/PTSS????????PTSD/PTSS? ??PTSD/PTSS?????. PMID:25666812

  15. Repeat Abortions in Canada, 1975-1993

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wayne J. Millar; Surinder Wadhera; Stanley K. Henshaw

    In Canada, 20% of women who obtained an abortion between 1975 and 1993 had had at least one previous abortion. An analysis of data on 1.2 million abortions shows that the proportion of abortion patients undergoing repeat procedures increased from 9% to 29% over the 19-year period. The proportion was above average (22-28% for all years combined) among women who

  16. Psychosocial aspects of induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Stotland, N L

    1997-09-01

    US anti-abortion groups have used misinformation on the long-term psychological impact of induced abortion to advance their position. This article reviews the available research evidence on the definition, history, cultural context, and emotional and psychiatric sequelae of induced abortion. Notable has been a confusion of normative, transient reactions to unintended pregnancy and abortion (e.g., guilt, depression, anxiety) with serious mental disorders. Studies of the psychiatric aspects of abortion have been limited by methodological problems such as the impossibility of randomly assigning women to study and control groups, resistance to follow-up, and confounding variables. Among the factors that may impact on an unintended pregnancy and the decision to abort are ongoing or past psychiatric illness, poverty, social chaos, youth and immaturity, abandonment issues, ongoing domestic responsibilities, rape and incest, domestic violence, religion, and contraceptive failure. Among the risk factors for postabortion psychosocial difficulties are previous or concurrent psychiatric illness, coercion to abort, genetic or medical indications, lack of social supports, ambivalence, and increasing length of gestation. Overall, the literature indicates that serious psychiatric illness is at least 8 times more common among postpartum than among postabortion women. Abortion center staff should acknowledge that the termination of a pregnancy may be experienced as a loss even when it is a voluntary choice. Referrals should be offered to women who show great emotional distress, have had several previous abortions, or request psychiatric consultation. PMID:9328746

  17. Emergency Physician Awareness of Prehospital Procedures and Medications

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Rachel; Sixsmith, Diane M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Maintaining patient safety during transition from prehospital to emergency department (ED) care depends on effective handoff communication between providers. We sought to determine emergency physicians’ (EP) knowledge of the care provided by paramedics in terms of both procedures and medications, and whether the use of a verbal report improved physician accuracy. Methods We conducted a 2-phase observational survey of a convenience sample of EPs in an urban, academic ED. In this large ED paramedics have no direct contact with physicians for non-critical patients, giving their report instead to the triage nurse. In Phase 1, paramedics gave verbal report to the triage nurse only. In Phase 2, a research assistant (RA) stationed in triage listened to this report and then repeated it back verbatim to the EPs caring for the patient. The RA then queried the EPs 90 minutes later regarding their patients’ prehospital procedures and medications. We compared the accuracy of these 2 reporting methods. Results There were 163 surveys completed in Phase 1 and 116 in Phase 2. The oral report had no effect on EP awareness that the patient had been brought in by ambulance (86% in Phase 1 and 85% in Phase 2.) The oral report did improve EP awareness of prehospital procedures, from 16% in Phase 1 to 45% in Phase 2, OR=4.28 (2.5–7.5). EPs were able to correctly identify all oral medications in 18% of Phase 1 cases and 47% of Phase 2 cases, and all IV medications in 42% of Phase 1 cases and 50% of Phase 2 cases. The verbal report led to a mild improvement in physician awareness of oral medications given, OR=4.0 (1.09–14.5), and no improvement in physician awareness of IV medications given, OR=1.33 (0.15–11.35). Using a composite score of procedures plus oral plus IV medications, physicians had all three categories correct in 15% of Phase 1 and 39% of Phase 2 cases (p<0.0001). Conclusion EPs in our ED were unaware of many prehospital procedures and medications regardless of the method used to provide this information. The addition of a verbal hand-off report resulted in a modest improvement in overall accuracy. PMID:25035759

  18. A mapping of the positions of adults in Toulouse, France, regarding induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Sastre, Maria Teresa; Petitfils, Charlotte; Sorum, Paul Clay; Mullet, Etienne

    2015-06-01

    Background Are people's views on abortion as polarised as is suggested by the 'marches for life' that regularly take place in Paris and other capitals? Objective To map French people's positions regarding the acceptability of induced abortion. Methods One hundred and fifty-nine participants were presented with stories composed according to a three within-subject design: Reason for abortion (e.g., the woman's life is endangered) × Gestational age × Woman's age. They assessed the extent to which abortion would be, in each case, an acceptable medical/surgical procedure. Results Five qualitatively different positions were identified: (i) always acceptable, irrespective of circumstances (31% of the sample), (ii) strictly depends on the reason for abortion (27%), (iii) legalist (23%), (iv) depends on the reason and on the gestational age (18%), and (v) always unacceptable (1%). Conclusions Only one-fifth of the participants agreed with the part of the French law that permits abortion on request when gestational age does not exceed ten weeks. The others disagreed either because they thought that abortion on demand should never be permitted or because they thought that the age limit should be extended. This divide in people's opinions guarantees that the debate over induced abortions will continue. Chinese Abstract ?"??? ? 159????????? ?1???31%??2??27%??3??23%??4??18%??5?? 10??????. PMID:25545288

  19. Hope Medical Group for Women v. Edwards.

    PubMed

    1998-09-11

    The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit invalidated a Louisiana law which restricted Medicaid reimbursement for abortion to instances where the pregnancy threatened the life of the mother. Although the revised 1994 Hyde Amendment permitted federal Medicaid funding for the abortion of pregnancies resulting from rape or incest, the Fifth Circuit held that the Hyde Amendment did not require states to fund these procedures. Instead, the court relied on the purposes of Medicaid to provide health-sustaining medical care and held that Louisiana's statute impermissibly restricted a women's right to abortion where medically necessary. Louisiana was enjoined from enforcing the law to the extent it restricted Medicaid reimbursement for the medically necessary abortion of pregnancies resulting from rape or incest. The court held that the state's interest in normal childbirth is not sufficient to sustain the abortion funding restriction. PMID:11648424

  20. Women's Medical Professional Corporation v. Taft.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    Court Decision: 353 Federal Reporter, 3d Series 436; 2003 Dec 17 (date of decision). The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit reversed a lower court decision and held that Ohio's partial-birth abortion law was constitutional because the law permitted the procedure in the event of significant maternal health risk and did not prohibit dilation and evacuation (a lawful abortion procedure). Women's Medical Professional Corporation challenged the constitutionality of Ohio's ban on partial-birth abortion, claiming that the law did not contain an adequate exception for maternal health and that it unduly burdened a woman's right to abort a nonviable fetus by dilation and evacuation (D&E). The Sixth Circuit held that the law's maternal health exception was valid under the Fourteenth Amendment because it allowed partial-birth abortion when there is significant maternal health risk. The court rejected the plaintiff's assertion that partial-birth abortion should be allowed at any physician's discretion and noted that precedent allows states to "restrict an abortion procedure except when the procedure is necessary to prevent a significant health risk." The court also held that the law did not ban D&E, the most common second-trimester abortion procedure, because the law explicitly tracked the medical differences between D&E and partial-birth abortion, it provided an exception for D&E, and it focused on other distinctions between D&E and partial-birth abortion. For these reasons, Ohio's partial-birth abortion ban did not unduly burden a woman's right to terminate a pregnancy and was therefore constitutional. PMID:16477714

  1. Medical diagnoses and procedures associated with Clostridium difficile colitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna M Buchner; Amnon Sonnenberg

    2001-01-01

    Objectives:The aim of this study was to examine the associations of Clostridium difficile colitis with other comorbid conditions and procedural interventions among hospitalized patients.Methods:The Patient Treatment File of the Department of Veterans Affairs contains the computerized records of all inpatients treated in 172 Veterans Affairs hospitals distributed throughout the United States. The computerized medical records of 15,091 cases with C.

  2. Medical diagnoses and procedures associated with Clostridium difficile colitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna M. Buchner; Amnon Sonnenberg

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:The aim of this study was to examine the associations of Clostridium difficile colitis with other comorbid conditions and procedural interventions among hospitalized patients.METHODS:The Patient Treatment File of the Department of Veterans Affairs contains the computerized records of all inpatients treated in 172 Veterans Affairs hospitals distributed throughout the United States. The computerized medical records of 15,091 cases with C.

  3. Brazilian adolescents’ knowledge and beliefs about abortion methods: a school-based internet inquiry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Internet surveys that draw from traditionally generated samples provide the unique conditions to engage adolescents in exploration of sensitive health topics. Methods We examined awareness of unwanted pregnancy, abortion behaviour, methods, and attitudes toward specific legal indications for abortion via a school-based internet survey among 378 adolescents aged 12–21 years in three Rio de Janeiro public schools. Results Forty-five percent knew peers who had undergone an abortion. Most students (66.0%) did not disclose abortion method knowledge. However, girls (aOR 4.2, 95% CI 2.4-7.2), those who had experienced their sexual debut (aOR1.76, 95% CI 1.1-3.0), and those attending a prestigious magnet school (aOR 2.7 95% CI 1.4-6.3) were more likely to report methods. Most abortion methods (79.3%) reported were ineffective, obsolete, and/or unsafe. Herbs (e.g. marijuana tea), over-the-counter medications, surgical procedures, foreign objects and blunt trauma were reported. Most techniques (85.2%) were perceived to be dangerous, including methods recommended by the World Health Organization. A majority (61.4%) supported Brazil’s existing law permitting abortion in the case of rape. There was no association between gender, age, sexual debut, parental education or socioeconomic status and attitudes toward legal abortion. However, students at the magnet school supported twice as many legal indications (2.7, SE.27) suggesting a likely role of peers and/or educators in shaping abortion views. Conclusions Abortion knowledge and attitudes are not driven simply by age, religion or class, but rather a complex interplay that includes both social spaces and gender. Prevention of abortion morbidity and mortality among adolescents requires comprehensive sexuality and reproductive health education that includes factual distinctions between safe and unsafe abortion methods. PMID:24521075

  4. How risky are second trimester clandestine abortions in Cameroon: a retrospective descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Complications of clandestine abortions increase with gestational age. The aim of this study was to identify complications of second trimester clandestine abortions (STA) and those of first trimester clandestine abortions (FTA). Methods This retrospective descriptive study was conducted between March 1st and August 31st, 2012 in the University Teaching Hospital and the Central Hospital, Yaoundé (Cameroon). The files of women with clandestine abortions carried out outside our units, but received in our settings for some complications were reviewed. Variables studied were maternal age, parity, marital status, gestational age at the time of abortion, the abortion provider and the method used, the duration of antibiotic coverage, the time interval between abortion and consultation, the complications presented and the duration of hospital stay. Data of 20 women with STA (?13 weeks 1 day) and those of 74 women with FTA (?13 complete weeks) were analyzed and compared. The t-test was used to compare continuous variables. P value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Women with STA had high parities (P?=?0.0011). STAs were mostly performed by nurses and were usually done by dilatation and curettage or dilatation and evacuation, manual vacuum aspiration, intramuscular injection of an unspecified medication, transcervical foreign body insertion, amniotomy and misoprostol. STA complications were severe anemia, hypovolemic shock, uterine perforation and maternal death. Conclusions Clandestine abortions, especially second trimester abortions, are associated with risks of maternal morbidity and mortality especially when done by nurses. Therefore, women should seek for help directly from trained health personnel (Gynecologists & Obstetricians). Moreover, nurses should be trained in uterine evacuation procedures. They should also refer women who want to carry out STA to Gynecologists and Obstetricians. Finally, to reduce the prevalence of abortion in general, the government should make contraception available to all women, as well as use public media to sensitize women on the dangers of abortion and on the need to use family planning services. PMID:25199407

  5. Abortion trends from 1996 to 2011 in Estonia: special emphasis on repeat abortion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The study aimed to describe the overall and age-specific trends of induced abortions from 1996 to 2011 with an emphasis on socio-demographic characteristics and contraceptive use of women having had repeat abortions in Estonia. Methods Data were retrieved from the Estonian Medical Birth and Abortion Registry and Statistics Estonia. Total induced abortion numbers, rates, ratios and age-specific rates are presented for 1996–2011. The percentage change in the number of repeat abortions within selected socio-demographic subgroups, contraception use and distribution of induced abortions among Estonians and non-Estonians for the first, second, third, fourth and subsequent abortions were calculated for the periods 1996–2003 and 2004–2011. Results Observed trends over the 16-year study period indicated a considerable decline in induced abortions with a reduction in abortion rate of 57.1%, which was mainly attributed to younger cohorts. The percentage of women undergoing repeat abortions fell steadily from 63.8% during 1996–2003 to 58.0% during 2004–2011. The percentage of women undergoing repeat abortions significantly decreased over the 16 years within all selected socio-demographic subgroups except among women with low educational attainment and students. Within each time period, a greater percentage of non-Estonians than Estonians underwent repeat abortions and obtained third and subsequent abortions. Most women did not use any contraceptive method prior to their first or subsequent abortion. Conclusion A high percentage of women obtaining repeat abortions reflects a high historical abortion rate. If current trends continue, a rapid decline in repeat abortions may be predicted. To decrease the burden of sexual ill health, routine contraceptive counselling, as standard care in the abortion process, should be seriously addressed with an emphasis on those groups - non-Estonians, women with lower educational attainment, students and women with children - vulnerable with respect to repeat abortion. PMID:25005363

  6. Supreme Court issues limited ruling in challenge to Utah abortion ban.

    PubMed

    1996-06-28

    A law passed in Utah in 1991 which prohibited abortion except in cases of life endangerment, rape, incest, risk of grave damage to a woman's medical health, or grave fetal defects. The exceptions for women who had been sexually abused were eliminated after 20 weeks gestation. In December 1992, US District Court Judge J. Thomas Greene found the ban unconstitutional as applied to abortions prior to 20 weeks but upheld it as applied to procedures after that point in pregnancy. A three-judge appellate panel later reversed the district court decision in August 1995 on the argument that the prohibition on post-20-week abortions could not stand independent of the ban on earlier procedures. The appeals court also struck down a requirement that physicians performing those abortions allowed after viability use the method most likely to give the fetus the best chance of survival, unless it would endanger a woman's life or cause grave damage to her medical health. In an unsigned opinion issued on June 17, 1996, the US Supreme Court reversed the appeals court decision which struck down Utah's original 1991 ban on abortions. Five justices ruling in Leavitt v. Jane L. found that the US Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit misapplied Utah precedent when it found that the criminal abortion statute could not be divided into two separate abortion bans, one before and one after 20 weeks gestation. Health care providers will now argue that the ban on post-20-week abortions should be struck down on constitutional grounds. This is the first challenge to a state abortion law to come under High Court review since Planned Parenthood v. Casey in 1992. PMID:12291525

  7. Improving abortion access in Canada.

    PubMed

    Kaposy, Chris

    2010-03-01

    Though abortion is legal in Canada, policies currently in place at various levels of the health care system, and the individual actions of medical professionals, can inhibit access to abortion. This paper examines the various extra-legal barriers to abortion access that exist in Canada, and argues that these barriers are unjust because there are no good reasons for the restrictions on autonomy that they present. The paper then outlines the various policy measures that could be taken to improve access. PMID:18821017

  8. The horror of unsafe abortion: case report of a life threatening complication in a 29-year old woman

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Every year 42 million women with unintended pregnancies choose abortion, and fifty percent of these procedures, 20 million are unsafe. An unsafe abortion is defined as a procedure for terminating an unintended pregnancy carried out either by person lacking the necessary skills or in an environment that does not conform to minimal medical standards or both. Pakistan is the one of the six countries where more than 50% of the world’s all maternal deaths occur. It is estimated that 890,000 induced abortions are performed annually in Pakistan, and estimate an annual abortion rate of 29 per 1000 women aged 15-49. Case presentation Here we present a case report of a 29-year old woman who underwent an unsafe abortion for unintended pregnancy resulting in uterine perforation. The unskilled provider pulled out her bowel through vagina after perforating the uterus, as a result she lost major portion of her small intestine resulting in short bowel syndrome. Conclusion The law of Pakistan only allows abortion during early stages of pregnancy for purpose of saving the life of a mother but does not cater for cases of rape, incest and fetal abnormalities or social reasons. Only legalization of abortion is not sufficient, preventing unintended pregnancy should be the priority of all the nations and for this reason contraception should be widely accessible. Practitioners need to become better trained in safer abortion methods and be to able transfer the patient to health facility when complications occur. PMID:24131627

  9. 49 CFR 390.115 - Procedure for removal from the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...from the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners. 390.115 Section 390...GENERAL National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners § 390.115 Procedure for...from the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners. (a) Voluntary...

  10. 49 CFR 390.115 - Procedure for removal from the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...from the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners. 390.115 Section 390...GENERAL National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners § 390.115 Procedure for...from the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners. (a) Voluntary...

  11. 49 CFR 390.115 - Procedure for removal from the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...from the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners. 390.115 Section 390...GENERAL National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners § 390.115 Procedure for...from the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners. (a) Voluntary...

  12. Abortion ethics.

    PubMed

    Fromer, M J

    1982-04-01

    Nurses have opinions about abortion, but because they are health professionals and their opinions are sought as such, they are obligated to understand why they hold certain views. Nurses need to be clear about why they believe as they do, and they must arrive at a point of view in a rational and logical manner. To assist nurses in this task, the ethical issues surrounding abortion are enumerated and clarified. To do this, some of the philosophic and historic approaches to abortion and how a position can be logically argued are examined. At the outset some emotion-laden terms are defined. Abortion is defined as the expulsion of a fetus from the uterus before 28 weeks' gestation, the arbitrarily established time of viability. This discussion is concerned only with induced abortion. Since the beginning of recorded history women have chosen to have abortions. Early Jews and Christians forbade abortion on practical and religious grounds. A human life was viewed as valuable, and there was also the practical consideration of the addition of another person to the population, i.e., more brute strength to do the necessary physical work, defend against enemies, and ensure the continuation of the people. These kinds of pragmatic reasons favoring or opposing abortion have little to do with the Western concept of abortion in genaeral and what is going on in the U.S. today in particular. Discussion of the ethics of abortion must rest on 1 or more of several foundations: whether or not the fetus is a human being; the rights of the pregnant woman as opposed to those of the fetus, and circumstances of horror and hardship that might surround a pregnancy. Viability is relative. Because viability is not a specific descriptive entity, value judgments become part of the determination, both of viability and the actions that might be taken based on that determination. The fetus does not become a full human being at viability. That occurs only at conception or birth, depending on one's view of ensoulment. The fetus is owed some moral obligations because of its greatly increased potentiality. After a certain point it deserves legal and moral protection. A woman would have the right to be relieved of carrying the fetus, but she would not have the right to the death of the fetus. A significant moral difference exists in these 2 concepts, and it is this issue that forms the basis of the debate concerning the conflict between maternal and fetal rights. When the rights of the fetus and those of the pregnant woman come into direct conflict the rights of the fetus are always subordinated to those of the women. The 3rd ethical foundation of the abortion debate, that of circumstances of horror and hardship surrounding the pregnancy, is really a combination of the first two. A fetus that is known to suffer from disease or deformity has as many or as few rights vis-a-vis the pregnant woman as does a perfectly healthy fetus. The assignment and hierarchy of fetal rights is not dependent upon the circumstances of conception. The next concern is whether the state can enter the private social spheres to regulate the personal activities of individuals. The Supreme court has never made a statement regarding the moral permissibility of abortion. The Court simply has prevented individual states from interfering with a woman's action based on her personal convictions. This is an important difference, and no step should be taken to abrogate this fundamental civil right. PMID:7041095

  13. 29 CFR 1913.10 - Rules of agency practice and procedure concerning OSHA access to employee medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...procedure concerning OSHA access to employee medical records. 1913.10 Section 1913...PROCEDURE CONCERNING OSHA ACCESS TO EMPLOYEE MEDICAL RECORDS § 1913.10 Rules of agency...procedure concerning OSHA access to employee medical records. (a) General policy....

  14. Enablers of and Barriers to Abortion Training

    PubMed Central

    Guiahi, Maryam; Lim, Sahnah; Westover, Corey; Gold, Marji; Westhoff, Carolyn L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the legalization of abortion services in the United States, provision of abortions has remained a controversial issue of high political interest. Routine abortion training is not offered at all obstetrics and gynecology (Ob-Gyn) training programs, despite a specific training requirement by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Previous studies that described Ob-Gyn programs with routine abortion training either examined associations by using national surveys of program directors or described the experience of a single program. Objective We set out to identify enablers of and barriers to Ob-Gyn abortion training in the context of a New York City political initiative, in order to better understand how to improve abortion training at other sites. Methods We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 22 stakeholders from 7 New York City public hospitals and focus group interviews with 62 current residents at 6 sites. Results Enablers of abortion training included program location, high-capacity services, faculty commitment to abortion training, external programmatic support, and resident interest. Barriers to abortion training included lack of leadership continuity, leadership conflict, lack of second-trimester abortion services, difficulty obtaining mifepristone, optional rather than routine training, and antiabortion values of hospital personnel. Conclusions Supportive leadership, faculty commitment, and external programmatic support appear to be key elements for establishing routine abortion training at Ob-Gyn residency training programs. PMID:24404266

  15. Evidence mounts for sex-selective abortion in Asia.

    PubMed

    Westley, S B

    1995-01-01

    In Korea, China, and Taiwan--countries where son preference persists--the availability of prenatal screening techniques and induced abortion has produced an imbalance in the naturally occurring sex ratios of 104-107 male births for every 100 female births. Policy responses to sex-selective abortion were the focus of a 1994 International Symposium on Sex Preference for Children in the Rapidly Changing Demographic Dynamics in Asia sponsored by the United Nations Population Fund and the Government of the Republic of Korea. Modern technology (i.e., amniocentesis, ultrasound, and chorionic villi sampling) enables couples to control both family size and sex selection. According to data from the 1990 Korean Census, 80,000 female fetuses were aborted from 1986-90 as a result of son preference. In the late 1980s, the Governments of Korea, China, and India imposed bans on the use of medical technology for prenatal sex determination, but many observers maintain that regulations have served only to make the procedures clandestine and more expensive. To remedy the problems underlying sex-selective abortion, the Symposium recommended the following government actions: 1) implement policies and programs to diminish gender discrimination; 2) establish guidelines for the monitoring and regulation of prenatal testing; 3) utilize mass and folk media, interpersonal channels, and school curricula to promote gender equality; 4) strengthen the ethics curriculum of medical schools to address son preference; and 5) increase the capability of statistical and research organizations to collect gender-disaggregated data. PMID:12319402

  16. 18 CFR 701.306 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...psychological information may name a medical doctor or other person to act as his agent...individual has not named a medical doctor as agent, the Council may determine, after consultation with a medical doctor, that disclosure of the...

  17. 18 CFR 701.306 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...psychological information may name a medical doctor or other person to act as his agent...individual has not named a medical doctor as agent, the Council may determine, after consultation with a medical doctor, that disclosure of the...

  18. Spontaneous Abortion and the Pathology of Early Pregnancy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Yee Khong

    The medical profession classifi es abortion as induced or spontaneous. The lay public, however, tends to equate the term abortion\\u000a with one that is induced, whether therapeutically, self, or criminal, and to associate the term miscarriage with spontaneous\\u000a abortion (Beard et al. 1985).\\u000a \\u000a Spontaneous abortion is usually defi ned as the involuntary loss of a conceptus before the fetus has

  19. Creation of an innovative inpatient medical procedure service and a method to evaluate house staff competency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Christopher Smith; Craig E. Gordon; David Feller-Kopman; Grace C. Huang; Saul N. Weingart; Roger B. Davis; Armin Ernst; Mark D. Aronson

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Training residents in medical procedures is an area of growing interest. Studies demonstrate that internal medicine residents\\u000a are inadequately trained to perform common medical procedures, and program directors report residents do not master these\\u000a essential skills. The American Board of Internal Medicine requires substantiation of competence in procedure skills for all\\u000a internal medicine residents; however, for most procedures, standards

  20. Abortion under Greek law: parental consent for a minor's abortion.

    PubMed

    Mavroforou, Anna; Giannoukas, Athanasios; Michalodimitrakis, Emmanuel

    2003-01-01

    As medical abortion becomes more widely used and available in Greece, several issues are emerging and require clarification. Health care providers often face a dilemma when dealing with an adolescent requesting abortion. Parents' consent is mandatory before delivering any kind of treatment to minors. However, as it appears in the case presented here, the circumstances are not always straightforward. A critical review of the Greek legal framework in relation to the current social context is attempted through an interesting case aiming to elicit potential defects of the law that should be addressed by the legislator. PMID:12889646

  1. Improving induced abortion care in Scotland: enablers and constraints

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lale Say; Robbie Foy

    2005-01-01

    BackgroundInduced abortion is the most common gynaecological procedure in Scotland. Despite several recent initiatives to improve the quality of abortion care, inappropriate variations in care remain.ObjectiveTo identify and explore factors that enable or constrain the provision of high-quality induced abortion care in Scotland.MethodsInterviews with a range of key informants with differing perspectives and levels of involvement in abortion care. The

  2. Unsafe abortion in adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. A Olukoya; A Kaya; B. J Ferguson; C AbouZahr

    2001-01-01

    Every year, an estimated 2.0–4.4 million adolescents resort to abortion. In comparison with adults, adolescents are more likely to delay the abortion, resort to unskilled persons to perform it, use dangerous methods and present late when complications arise. Adolescents are also more likely to experience complications. Consequently, adolescents seeking abortion or presenting with complications of abortion should be considered as

  3. Complications of Unsafe Abortion: A Case Study and the Need for Abortion Law Reform in Nigeria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boniface A Oye-Adeniran; Augustine V Umoh; Steve NN Nnatu

    2002-01-01

    Complications of unsafe abortion account for 30-40% of maternal deaths in Nigeria. This paper reports a case of unsafe abortion by dilatation and curettage, carried out by a medical practitioner in a private clinic on a 20- year-old single girl in Lagos, Nigeria. The girl was 16 weeks pregnant. She suffered complications consisting of per- foration of the vaginal wall

  4. Disposal of Hazardous Medical Waste Policy and Procedures Commencement Date: 27 November, 1996

    E-print Network

    Disposal of Hazardous Medical Waste Policy and Procedures Commencement Date: 27 November, 1996 medical waste generated by Schools of the University must be safely and correctly disposed. 6. OBJECTIVES's policy on the Disposal of Hazardous Medical Waste within their Schools. 7.1.2 Protective Clothing

  5. Thomson, the right to life, and partial birth abortion or two MULES* for Sister Sarah

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Alward

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that Thomson's famous attempt to reconcile the fetus's putative right to life with robust abortion rights is not tenable. Given her view, whether or not an abortion violates the fetus's right to life depends on the abortion procedure utilised. And I argue that Thomson's view implies that any late term abortion that involves feticide is

  6. Rhode Island Medical Society v. Whitehouse.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    The United States District Court for the District of Rhode Island, on 30 August 1999, enjoined enforcement of Rhode Island's partial-birth abortion ban act. The act defined partial-birth abortion as "an abortion in which the person performing the abortion vaginally delivers a living human fetus before killing the infant and completing the delivery." The act also provided that a physician could perform an aborton on a viable fetus if necessary to save the mother's life only if "no other medical procedure would suffice for that purpose." The United States District Court found Rhode Island's statute to be constitutionally flawed in four respects. First, the court ruled that the definition of partial-birth abortion was unconstitutionally vague within the meaning of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution since it implicitly banned the legally protected D & E procedure along with the impermissible D & X procedure. Secondly, following the United States Supreme Court precedent, the court invalidated the statute because it lacked a provision that would permit a partial-birth abortion to preserve the mother's health. Thirdly, the court concluded that the section of the statute permitting a partial-birth abortion to save the mother's life was inadequate. Finally, the court found that the statute placed an undue burden on a woman's right to an abortion within the meaning of the Fourteenth Amendment. Its provision for a civil action against an abortion provider by the father of a fetus or by a minor's parents could involve third parties in the abortion decision against a woman's will. PMID:15584139

  7. Improving technologies to reduce abortion-related morbidity and mortality.

    PubMed

    Rogo, K

    2004-06-01

    This article reviews the technologies used to diagnose pregnancy and manage abortion in developing countries. The author discusses methods of diagnosing pregnancy--including physical examination, laboratory and home testing, and ultrasound--as well as methods for performing safe abortions. Due to manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) advances, vacuum aspiration has become safer and more feasible in low-resource settings. The discussion of medical abortion includes the advantages and limitations of mifepristone, misoprostol-only regimens, methotrexate, and other methods. The author stresses the importance of post-abortion care and post-abortion contraception and, in the conclusion, identifies six areas in which technology can reduce abortion-related morbidity and mortality: pregnancy prevention, early diagnosis of pregnancy, accurate assessment of gestation, standardization and supply of MVA technology, and simple and affordable regimens for medical abortion. PMID:15147856

  8. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures 41.01.01.V0.01 Use of Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic

    E-print Network

    Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures 41.01.01.V0.01 Use of Texas A&M Veterinary Scheduled Review: March 29, 2015 Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 41.01.01.V0.01 Use of Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Facilities Page 1 of 2 PROCEDURE STATEMENT

  9. Prevalence of Abortion and Contraceptive Practice among Women Seeking Repeat Induced Abortion in Western Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Lamina, Mustafa Adelaja

    2015-01-01

    Background. Induced abortion contributes significantly to maternal mortality in developing countries yet women still seek repeat induced abortion in spite of availability of contraceptive services. The aim of this study is to determine the rate of abortion and contraceptive use among women seeking repeat induced abortion in Western Nigeria. Method. A prospective cross-sectional study utilizing self-administered questionnaires was administered to women seeking abortion in private hospitals/clinics in four geopolitical areas of Ogun State, Western Nigeria, from January 1 to December 31 2012. Data were analyzed using SPSS 17.0. Results. The age range for those seeking repeat induced abortion was 15 to 51 years while the median age was 25 years. Of 2934 women seeking an abortion, 23% reported having had one or more previous abortions. Of those who had had more than one abortion, the level of awareness of contraceptives was 91.7% while only 21.5% used a contraceptive at their first intercourse after the procedure; 78.5% of the pregnancies were associated with non-contraceptive use while 17.5% were associated with contraceptive failure. The major reason for non-contraceptive use was fear of side effects. Conclusion. The rate of women seeking repeat abortions is high in Nigeria. The rate of contraceptive use is low while contraceptive failure rate is high.

  10. Shuttle Abort Flight Management (SAFM) - Application Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Howard; Straube, Tim; Madsen, Jennifer; Ricard, Mike

    2002-01-01

    One of the most demanding tasks that must be performed by the Space Shuttle flight crew is the process of determining whether, when and where to abort the vehicle should engine or system failures occur during ascent or entry. Current Shuttle abort procedures involve paging through complicated paper checklists to decide on the type of abort and where to abort. Additional checklists then lead the crew through a series of actions to execute the desired abort. This process is even more difficult and time consuming in the absence of ground communications since the ground flight controllers have the analysis tools and information that is currently not available in the Shuttle cockpit. Crew workload specifically abort procedures will be greatly simplified with the implementation of the Space Shuttle Cockpit Avionics Upgrade (CAU) project. The intent of CAU is to maximize crew situational awareness and reduce flight workload thru enhanced controls and displays, and onboard abort assessment and determination capability. SAFM was developed to help satisfy the CAU objectives by providing the crew with dynamic information about the capability of the vehicle to perform a variety of abort options during ascent and entry. This paper- presents an overview of the SAFM application. As shown in Figure 1, SAFM processes the vehicle navigation state and other guidance information to provide the CAU displays with evaluations of abort options, as well as landing site recommendations. This is accomplished by three main SAFM components: the Sequencer Executive, the Powered Flight Function, and the Glided Flight Function, The Sequencer Executive dispatches the Powered and Glided Flight Functions to evaluate the vehicle's capability to execute the current mission (or current abort), as well as more than IS hypothetical abort options or scenarios. Scenarios are sequenced and evaluated throughout powered and glided flight. Abort scenarios evaluated include Abort to Orbit (ATO), Transatlantic Abort Landing (TAL), East Coast Abort Landing (ECAL) and Return to Launch Site (RTLS). Sequential and simultaneous engine failures are assessed and landing footprint information is provided during actual entry scenarios as well as hypothetical "loss of thrust now" scenarios during ascent.

  11. Abortion Before & After Roe

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Ted; Tan, Ruoding; Zhang, Yuxiu

    2013-01-01

    We use unique data on abortions performed in New York State from 1971–1975 to demonstrate that women travelled hundreds of miles for a legal abortion before Roe. A100- mile increase in distance for women who live approximately 183 miles from New York was associated with a decline in abortion rates of 12.2 percent whereas the same change for women who lived 830 miles from New York lowered abortion rates by 3.3 percent. The abortion rates of nonwhites were more sensitive to distance than those of whites. We found a positive and robust association between distance to the nearest abortion provider and teen birth rates but less consistent estimates for other ages. Our results suggest that even if some states lost all abortion providers due to legislative policies, the impact on population measures of birth and abortion rates would be small as most women would travel to states with abortion services. PMID:23811233

  12. [Is abortion murder?].

    PubMed

    Werning, C

    1995-09-01

    Discussions about Paragraph 218 of the German federal abortion law have spawned antithetical opinions: on the one hand, the full right of the mother or parents to decide about the incipient human life; and on the other hand, under the dogma of abortion is murder, providing abortion is rejected even when the pregnancy is the result of rape and it is unwanted. Two questions are closely related to this issue: 1) what makes human beings human and 2) when does human life begin. From a medical point of view the function of the brain is fundamentally linked to being human. The brain controls almost all functions of the body and determines its psychological makeup, such as intellect and, in a theological sense, the soul. Without the brain such functioning is not possible, since brain death means the death of human life. Children born with anencephaly and microencephaly can never live a human life. At the end of life various diseases (stroke, Alzheimer disease) can severely damage the brain. In these cases normal living is also no longer possible. Yet ethically it is untenable to actively kill these human beings. But when one considers that life-threatening diseases can require life-support intervention, then often the pragmatic intervention is not far removed from active euthanasia. The other question related to the beginning of human life is even more difficult to answer. It is the fertilization of the egg cells; but a conglomeration of cells in the early phase of pregnancy can hardly be characterized as a human person. The human identity, personality, and worth is associated with the functioning of the brain, so only when the brain is fully developed can there be any talk about an unborn human being. PMID:7476658

  13. Assigning appropriate primary cause of death and indication for medical procedures.

    PubMed

    Ngene, Nnabuike Chibuoke; Moodley, Jagidesa

    2015-07-01

    The most appropriate primary cause of death in a patient who had multiple medical conditions is that medical condition which initiated the chain of events that led to the other medical conditions that resulted in death. In clinical practice, there are deceased patients who had several medical conditions that could lead to death (primary causes of death) without biological plausibility that any of the medical conditions initiated the chain of events that resulted in the other medical conditions. To assign the single most appropriate primary cause of death to such a deceased patient is challenging. Under such circumstances, the International classification of diseases and related health problems, tenth revision (ICD-10) guidelines recommend that the medical practitioner certifying the death should decide on the primary cause to be assigned. The ICD-10 also acknowledges that the recommendation is arbitrary. Similar difficulty is also encountered when a single indication is being assigned to a patient for a medical procedure when there are multiple indications for such a procedure. The ICD-10 and its clinical modification (ICD-10-CM) which provides the guidelines for assigning indication for a medical procedure use criteria that are insufficient. In the present article, comprehensive, easy and objective clinicopathological criteria on how to assign the single most appropriate primary cause of death or indication for a medical procedure are recommended. The new criteria (referred to NJ model II) may be used to improve the ICD-10. PMID:25892489

  14. Thomson, the right to life, and partial birth abortion or two MULES for Sister Sarah.

    PubMed

    Alward, P

    2002-04-01

    In this paper, I argue that Thomson's famous attempt to reconcile the fetus's putative right to life with robust abortion rights is not tenable. Given her view, whether or not an abortion violates the fetus's right to life depends on the abortion procedure utilised. And I argue that Thomson's view implies that any late term abortion that involves feticide is impermissible. In particular, this would rule out the partial birth abortion technique which has been so controversial of late. PMID:11934938

  15. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 33.99.01.V0.03 Employment Verification

    E-print Network

    Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 33.99.01.V0.03 Employment Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 33.99.01.V0.03 Employment Verification Page 1 of 2 PROCEDURE STATEMENT The Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL

  16. Right to abortion: the courts versus the legislatures.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, A H

    1980-01-01

    The U.S. Supreme Court found the right of privacy in various amendments to the Constitution so that a competent woman in the first trimester has an unrestricted right to an abortion if she can find a licensed, willing doctor to perform the procedure. The Court ruled that a state may not adopt legislation to impede the implementation of this desire. National, state, and city governments, however, have tried to block or restrict the right to abortion by imposing conditions. However, 1 in every 11 women of reproductive age had a legal abortion between 1969-77. More than a million abortions were performed in 1975. Few rural hospitals offer abortion. No Catholic institutions permit them, and less than one-third of all non-Catholic, short-term general hospitals do. Most abortions are conducted in clinics. New York and California account for 1 of every 3 abortions. The Supreme Court did not include a government obligation to pay for abortions. When Medicaid was adopted in 1965, nontherapeutic abortions were illegal, therefore, the Court found no reason to cover elective abortions. The Danforth court majority in 1976 concluded that parental consent could not be required of a minor prior to abortion. State laws must offer an alternative procedure, without parental involvement, in which the minor may show that she is mature and responsible enough to make her own decision. PMID:6985600

  17. Family planning is reducing abortions.

    PubMed

    Clinton, H R

    1997-01-01

    This news brief presents the US President's wife's statement on the association between use of family planning and a decline in abortions worldwide. Hillary Rodham Clinton attended the Sixth Conference of Wives of Heads of State and Government of the Americas held in La Paz, Bolivia. The conference was suitably located in Bolivia, a country with the highest rates of maternal mortality in South America. Bolivia has responded by launching a national family planning campaign coordinated between government, nongovernmental, and medical organizations. Half of Bolivian women experience pregnancy and childbirth without the support of trained medical staff. Mortality from abortion complications account for about half of all maternal deaths in Bolivia. Voluntary family planning workers teach women about the benefits of child spacing, breast feeding, nutrition, prenatal and postpartum care, and safe deliveries. Bolivia has succeeded in increasing its contraceptive use rates and decreasing the number of safe and unsafe abortions. Bolivia's program effort was supported by USAID. USAID provided technical assistance and funds for the establishment of a network of primary health care clinics. Mrs. Clinton visited one such clinic in a poor neighborhood in La Paz, which in its first six months of operation provided 2200 consultations, delivered 200 babies, registered 700 new family planning users, and immunized 2500 children. Clinics such as this one will be affected by the US Congress's harsh cuts in aid, which reduce funding by 35% and delay program funding by 9 months. These US government cuts in foreign aid are expected to result in an additional 1.6 million abortions, over 8000 maternal deaths, and 134,000 infant deaths in developing countries. An investment in population assistance represents a sensible, cost-effective, and long-term strategy for improving women's health, strengthening families, and reducing abortion. PMID:12293000

  18. Estimates of demand for abortion among Soviet immigrants in Israel.

    PubMed

    Sabatello, E F

    1992-01-01

    In 1990, more than 185,000 Soviet Jews emigrated to Israel, increasing Israel's population by 4 percent; 148,000 more arrived in 1991. Given the fertility and abortion patterns prevailing among Soviet women in their native country, this article inquires about the short-range expected increase in abortion demand in Israel engendered by this large migratory inflow. Estimation techniques based on the abortion experience of an earlier wave of Soviet-born immigrants in Israel reveal that the increase in requests for abortion brought about by the 1990 immigrants may reach up to 14 percent, and as high as 24 percent for the combined immigration waves of 1990 and 1991. The expanded demand for abortions in Israel engendered by the new Soviet immigrants necessitates an expansion of both family planning services and of the medical committees entitled to grant a legal abortion. A failure in these fields would benefit illegal abortion. PMID:1412599

  19. Public opinion on abortion.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    This brief article reports on an opinion poll conducted by Gallup for the "Sunday Telegraph" in 1997, on the eve of the 30th anniversary of the 1967 Abortion Act. The poll revealed that 59% of women thought the current law should be adjusted to allow abortions only up to 10 weeks' gestation. However, this response may be misleading due to pollsters' comparison of the British and French abortion law and the misinformation about French provisions. In fact, France allows abortions up to 10 weeks on request, and under special circumstances thereafter. 79% supported the provision of abortions through the National Health Service. A poll conducted by the Institute of Economic Affairs found that 56% agreed, 28% disagreed, and 16% neither agreed nor disagreed that "abortion should be legally available on demand for all." Parliamentarians should be informed that 59% of Conservative voters, 59% of Labor voters, and 53% of Liberal Democrat voters agreed with support for legal abortion. 27% of Conservative voters, 26% of Labor voters, and 33% of Liberal Democrat voters disagreed with legal abortion. A poll commissioned for Baraclough Carey, a television production company, found that people were generally well-informed about the gestation age at which abortions were usually performed. 58% answered correctly that abortions were performed under 13 weeks' gestation. 15% believed that abortions were performed between 13 and 19 weeks' gestation; 6% believed they were performed between 20 and 26 weeks. 20% did not know at what gestational age abortions were performed. PMID:12321443

  20. Abortion among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Nancy E.; Ozer, Emily J.; Tschann, Jeanne

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the current status of abortion laws pertaining to adolescents worldwide, examining questions raised by parental consent laws in the United States and by the relevant psychological research (risk of harm from abortion, informed consent, consequences of parental involvement in the abortion decision, and current debate). Discusses issues…

  1. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 21.01.08.V0.02 Vehicle Inscriptions

    E-print Network

    Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 21.01.08.V0.02 Vehicle Inscriptions&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 21.01.08.V0.02 Vehicle Inscriptions Page 1 of 1 FOR PROCEDURE This procedure provides guidance to units for obtaining and installing Texas A&M Veterinary

  2. The role of human drug self-administration procedures in the development of medications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. D. Comer; J. B. Ashworth; R. W. Foltin; C. E. Johanson; J. P. Zacny; S. L. Walsh

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to illustrate the utility and value of employing human self-administration procedures in medication development, including abuse liability assessments of novel medications and evaluation of potential pharmacotherapies for substance use disorders. Traditionally, human abuse liability testing has relied primarily on subjective reports describing drug action by use of questionnaires; similarly, drug interactions between putative treatment

  3. Undergraduate Medical Education (UME) Program Objectives A. PATIENT CARE AND PROCEDURE SKILLS

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Undergraduate Medical Education (UME) Program Objectives A. PATIENT CARE AND PROCEDURE SKILLS Core Competency: Demonstrate compassionate, appropriate, and effective care for the treatment of health problems and the promotion of health. 1. Obtain an accurate history, covering essential medical, personal, and socioeconomic

  4. Development of Website for the Operating Procedure of Software Contained in Medical Devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yeou-Jiunn Chen; A. T. Liu; P. J. Chen; Y. T. Chen; U. Z. Hsieh; K. S. Cheng

    Fault or failure of software contained in medical devices will seriously endanger users and should be considered to reduce\\u000a risk. In software development process, the risk analysis and risk control are very important for software contained in medical\\u000a devices. In order to promote the quality of software contained in medical devices, a website is designed to provide the operating\\u000a procedure

  5. Estimating abortion incidence in Burkina Faso using two methodologies.

    PubMed

    Sedgh, Gilda; Rossier, Clémentine; Kaboré, Idrissa; Bankole, Akinrinola; Mikulich, Meridith

    2011-09-01

    Abortion is illegal in Burkina Faso except in cases of incest, rape, fetal defect, or when the woman's life or physical health is endangered. As a result, abortion procedures are often conducted illegally and unsafely and measuring incidence proves difficult. We estimate incidence of abortion and associated morbidity using two methodologies. The first is the Abortion Incidence Complications Method (AICM), which uses information on women hospitalized for abortion-related complications as well as health professionals' assessments of the proportion of women who seek treatment for complications from unsafe abortions. The second is the Anonymous Third Party Reporting (ATPR) method, which entails surveying women about their confidantes' abortions. We conclude that the AICM yields a more accurate result. We estimate that 87,200 abortion procedures were carried out in 2008, representing 25 for every 1,000 women aged 15-49. More than one in four procedures resulted in complications treated at a health facility. The abortion rate estimated using the ATPR approach was 72 percent of that estimated with the AICM. The ATPR method yields information on the characteristics of the women who have abortions as well as the providers and methods they use. PMID:21972666

  6. [Abortion in Brazil: a household survey using the ballot box technique].

    PubMed

    Diniz, Debora; Medeiros, Marcelo

    2010-06-01

    This study presents the first results of the National Abortion Survey (PNA, Pesquisa Nacional de Aborto), a household random sample survey fielded in 2010 covering urban women in Brazil aged 18 to 39 years. The PNA combined two techniques, interviewer-administered questionnaires and self-administered ballot box questionnaires. The results of PNA show that at the end of their reproductive health one in five women has performed an abortion, with abortions being more frequent in the main reproductive ages, that is, from 18 to 29 years old. No relevant differentiation was observed in the practice of abortion among religious groups, but abortion was found to be more common among people with lower education. The use of medical drugs to induce abortion occurred in half of the abortions, and post-abortion hospitalization was observed among approximately half of the women who aborted. Such results lead to conclude that abortion is a priority in the Brazilian public health agenda. PMID:20640252

  7. ABORT GAP CLEANING IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    DREES,A.; AHRENS,L.; III FLILLER,R.; GASSNER,D.; MCINTYRE,G.T.; MICHNOFF,R.; TRBOJEVIC,D.

    2002-06-03

    During the RHIC Au-run in 2001 the 200 MHz storage cavity system was used for the first time. The rebucketing procedure caused significant beam debunching in addition to amplifying debunching due to other mechanisms. At the end of a four hour store, debunched beam could account for approximately 30%-40% of the total beam intensity. Some of it will be in the abort gap. In order to minimize the risk of magnet quenching due to uncontrolled beam losses at the time of a beam dump, a combination of a fast transverse kicker and copper collimators were used to clean the abort gap. This report gives an overview of the gap cleaning procedure and the achieved performance.

  8. Reduced overnight consolidation of procedural learning in chronic medicated schizophrenia is related to specific sleep stages

    E-print Network

    Manoach, Dara S.

    Reduced overnight consolidation of procedural learning in chronic medicated schizophrenia Keywords: Sleep Schizophrenia Procedural learning Motor skill Memory Consolidation a b s t r a c t We previously reported that patients with schizophrenia failed to demonstrate normal sleep-dependent improvement

  9. Improving technologies to reduce abortion-related morbidity and mortality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Rogo

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the technologies used to diagnose pregnancy and manage abortion in developing countries. The author discusses methods of diagnosing pregnancy—including physical examination, laboratory and home testing, and ultrasound—as well as methods for performing safe abortions. Due to manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) advances, vacuum aspiration has become safer and more feasible in low-resource settings. The discussion of medical abortion

  10. Distress Behavior in Children With Leukemia Undergoing Medical Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Ernest R.

    Improving prognosis for many forms of childhood cancer has resulted in increased attention on the quality-of-life experience. Conditioned anxiety and pain associated with recurrent diagnostic and treatment procedures have been identified as major sources of distress in children with malignant disease. To evaluate the efficacy of various…

  11. Frequency and collective dose of medical procedures in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Korir, Geoffrey K; Wambani, Jeska S; Korir, Ian K; Tries, Mark; Kidali, Mike M

    2013-12-01

    The first comprehensive national survey on frequency and radiation dose imparted to the population from radiological procedures was carried out in Kenya and reported here. This survey involved assessment of frequency, typical patient radiation exposure, and collective effective dose from general radiography, fluoroscopy, interventional procedures (IPs), mammography, and computed tomography. About 300 x-ray facilities across the country were invited to participate in the survey, and a 31% response was recorded. The individual and collective radiation burdens of more than 62 types of pediatric and adult radiological examinations were quantified using effective and collective dose. The average effective dose for each radiological examination was assessed from the x-ray efficiency performance tests and patient data from over 30 representative radiological facilities. The results found indicated that over 3 million x-ray procedures were performed in 2011, resulting in an annual collective effective dose of 2,157 person-Sv and an annual effective dose per capita of 0.05 mSv. The most frequent examinations were general radiography (94%), computed tomography (3.3%), and fluoroscopy (2.5%). Although the contribution of computed tomography was small in terms of frequency, this procedure accounted for 36% of the effective dose per capita. General radiography was the most frequent type of examination with a contribution of 55% of the effective dose per capita. PMID:24162056

  12. Clandestine abortion in Latin America: provider perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, K; Strickler, J

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the results of in-depth interviews with ten clandestine abortion providers in urban Latin America. Three related issues are addressed: how abortion providers come to this line of work; their major difficulties; and their sources of job satisfaction. A variety of paths bring health professionals to the practice of abortion; common elements are a sense of calling, a desire to help women, personal experience with abortion, and a commitment to political change. Providers describe difficulties that include a lack of medical support, the need for secrecy, and threats of violence, extortion, and prosecution. In spite of difficulties, all providers report a great deal of fulfillment in their work, based on their satisfaction in saving women's lives, maintaining supportive relationships with colleagues, and empowering women. PMID:10374808

  13. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 33.99.16.V0.01 Contract Workforce Page 1 of 3 Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures

    E-print Network

    Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 33.99.16.V0.01 Contract Workforce Page 1 of 3 Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures 33.99.16.V0.01 Contract Workforce, it may be more cost effective for the Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL

  14. [History of induced abortion in Denmark from 1200 to 1979].

    PubMed

    Manniche, E

    1982-10-01

    History of induced abortion in Denmark from 1200 to 1979 is reviewed. The 1st Danish law of 1200 did not touch upon the question of induced abortion. From the beginning of the 13th century to Religious Reformation in 1536, Roman Catholic law influenced every aspect of Danish life including induced abortion. In 1683 in King Christian V's constitution called Dansk Lov induced abortion was discussed. Immoral women who aborted fetuses or killed newborn babies were decapitated. In Copenhagen in the years 1624-1632 and 1638-1663 17 women were executed because of induced abortion or murder of newborn babies. Although Dansk Lov was effective till 1866, Danish kings came to treat female criminals less severely since about 1780-1800. For example, between 1855 and 1866 42 women convicted of murder of newborn babies or abortion were given pardon (12 years of imprisonment instead of life sentence). In 1866, abortion and murder of babies were treated separately in the Danish criminal law. Induced abortion meant up to 8 years of imprisonment and labor. In 1930 life sentence was abolished; induced abortion called for only up to 2 years of imprisonment, while those who assisted for money were punished more severely (up to 8 years in prison). In 1937 the Danes legalized induced abortion for medical, ethical, (e.g. rape case) and eugenic reasons. By 1973 legalized abortion was available, free of charge, to every Danish female resident within 12 weeks of pregnancy. In 1980 abortion rate was about 41% of total births. It is estimated 2/3 of Danish women experience abortion. Lastly, illegitimate births and miscarriages are on the rise due to changes in women's social status and role. PMID:6759731

  15. Test Procedure for 170.302.e Maintain active medication allergy list APPROVED Version 1.1 September 24, 2010

    E-print Network

    Test Procedure for §170.302.e Maintain active medication allergy list APPROVED Version 1.1 September 24, 2010 1 Test Procedure for §170.302 (e) Maintain active medication allergy list This document and Human Services (HHS) on July 28, 2010. §170.302 (e) Maintain active medication allergy list. Enable

  16. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 21.01.08.V0.04 Vehicle Compulsory Inspection

    E-print Network

    Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 21.01.08.V0.04 Vehicle Compulsory&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 21.01.08.V0.04 Vehicle Compulsory Inspection Page 1 of 2 operating a Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL) vehicle on the highways of this state

  17. REGULATED MEDICAL WASTE POLICY Procedure: 2.12 Created: 2008 Version: 2.0 Revised: 11/21/2013

    E-print Network

    Jia, Songtao

    's contracted provider of RMW disposal services. #12;REGULATED MEDICAL WASTE POLICY Procedure: 2.12 CreatedREGULATED MEDICAL WASTE POLICY Procedure: 2.12 Created: 2008 Version: 2.0 Revised: 11/21/2013 Environmental Health & Safety Page 1 of 8 A. Purpose Regulated Medical Waste (RMW) is material that may

  18. Informatics-based Medical Procedure Assistance during Space Missions

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, M S; Carruth, T N; Florez-Arango, J; Dunn, K

    2008-01-01

    Currently, paper-based and/or electronic together with telecommunications links to Earth-based physicians are used to assist astronaut crews perform diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions during space travel. However, these have limitations, especially during long duration missions in which telecommunications to earth-based physicians can be delayed. We describe an experimental technology called GuideView in which clinical guidelines are presented in a structured, interactive, multi-modal format and, in each step, clinical instructions are provided simultaneously in voice, text, pictures video or animations. An example application of the system to diagnosis and treatment of space Decompression Sickness is presented. Astronauts performing space walks from the International Space Station are at risk for decompression sickness because the atmospheric pressure of the Extra-vehicular Activity space- suit is significantly less that that of the interior of the Station. PMID:19048089

  19. Complications of Unsafe Abortion: A Case Study and the Need for Abortion Law Reform in Nigeria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boniface A Oye-Adeniran; Augustine V Umoh; Steve NN Nnatu

    2002-01-01

    Complications of unsafe abortion account for 30–40% of maternal deaths in Nigeria. This paper reports a case of unsafe abortion by dilatation and curettage, carried out by a medical practitioner in a private clinic on a 20-year-old single girl in Lagos, Nigeria. The girl was 16 weeks pregnant. She suffered complications consisting of perforation of the vaginal wall through the

  20. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures 61.01.02.V0.01 Public Information

    E-print Network

    Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures 61.01.02.V0.01 Public Information Approved: September 29, 2009 Revised: February 26, 2013 Next Scheduled Review: February 26, 2015 Texas A&M Veterinary STATEMENT This procedure establishes procedures for Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory

  1. Developing Physiologic Models for Emergency Medical Procedures Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Nigel; OQuinn, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    Several technological enhancements have been made to METI's commercial Emergency Care Simulator (ECS) with regard to how microgravity affects human physiology. The ECS uses both a software-only lung simulation, and an integrated mannequin lung that uses a physical lung bag for creating chest excursions, and a digital simulation of lung mechanics and gas exchange. METI's patient simulators incorporate models of human physiology that simulate lung and chest wall mechanics, as well as pulmonary gas exchange. Microgravity affects how O2 and CO2 are exchanged in the lungs. Procedures were also developed to take into affect the Glasgow Coma Scale for determining levels of consciousness by varying the ECS eye-blinking function to partially indicate the level of consciousness of the patient. In addition, the ECS was modified to provide various levels of pulses from weak and thready to hyper-dynamic to assist in assessing patient conditions from the femoral, carotid, brachial, and pedal pulse locations.

  2. Developing Physiologic Models for Emergency Medical Procedures Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Nigel; O'Quinn, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    Several technological enhancements have been made to METI's commercial Emergency Care Simulator (ECS) with regard to how microgravity affects human physiology. The ECS uses both a software-only lung simulation, and an integrated mannequin lung that uses a physical lung bag for creating chest excursions, and a digital simulation of lung mechanics and gas exchange. METI s patient simulators incorporate models of human physiology that simulate lung and chest wall mechanics, as well as pulmonary gas exchange. Microgravity affects how O2 and CO2 are exchanged in the lungs. Procedures were also developed to take into affect the Glasgow Coma Scale for determining levels of consciousness by varying the ECS eye-blinking function to partially indicate the level of consciousness of the patient. In addition, the ECS was modified to provide various levels of pulses from weak and thready to hyper-dynamic to assist in assessing patient conditions from the femoral, carotid, brachial, and pedal pulse locations.

  3. Abortion and Postabortion Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrzej Kulczycki

    \\u000a After reading this chapter and answering the discussion questions that follow, you should be able to\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Critically analyze the history, incidence, and reasons for abortion from a global perspective.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Identify and discuss differences in implementation of abortion laws and policies across different countries, and the public\\u000a health implications with particular attention to unsafe abortion and abortion-related mortality and

  4. The abortion debate in the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    Faced with a situation in which an estimated 60,000 illegal abortions (a major cause of maternal mortality) were performed annually, the Dominican Republic has adopted a new Health Code which contains a chapter dedicated to maternal health. Included in the new code are cases in which abortion is allowed: 1) when 2 specialists affirm that the pregnancy or childbirth constitutes a risk to the mother's health or life; 2) if the medical history of the parents and 2 doctors confirm the likelihood of the baby being born seriously disabled or deformed; or 3) if the mother's mental health is put in jeopardy by continuing the pregnancy. Despite the disapproval of church representatives, the legalization of abortion was unanimously approved by the Congress. The debate which surrounded the process was increased by a petition signed by more than 260 women decrying the lack of input that women had in the decision-making process. Women's action groups have been trying to widen the context in which the political discussion is taking place to stress the importance of viewing abortion from a reproductive rights perspective. The women's groups wish to prevent a situation in which the discussion surrounding the issue will be limited to legislators and church leaders. The women have pointed out that women should make the decisions about their lives and their bodies. In the meantime, the president of the Congress predicts that illegal abortion will continue in the Dominican Republic regardless of the current provisions for legal abortion. PMID:12286344

  5. It Is Time to Integrate Abortion Into Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Roe v Wade decision made safe abortion available but did not change the reality that more than 1 million women face an unwanted pregnancy every year. Forty years after Roe v Wade, the procedure is not accessible to many US women. The politics of abortion have led to a plethora of laws that create enormous barriers to abortion access, particularly for young, rural, and low-income women. Family medicine physicians and advanced practice clinicians are qualified to provide abortion care. To realize the promise of Roe v Wade, first-trimester abortion must be integrated into primary care and public health professionals and advocates must work to remove barriers to the provision of abortion within primary care settings. PMID:23153160

  6. A learning agenda for abortion stigma: recommendations from the Bellagio expert group meeting.

    PubMed

    Hessini, Leila

    2014-01-01

    Stigma discredits individuals, communities, and institutions and marks them as inferior. The stigma surrounding abortion plays a critical role in its social, medical, and legal marginalization around the world. Based on the existing field of knowledge, in June 19, 2012, researchers, practitioners, and advocates from 11 countries participated in an intensive meeting on abortion stigma to refine a conceptual framework for abortion stigma and set a future learning agenda to guide research and programmatic efforts to address abortion stigma. PMID:25062399

  7. Use of simulator-based medical procedural curriculum: the learner's perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Simulation is increasingly used for teaching medical procedures. The goal of this study was to assess learner preferences for how simulators should be used in a procedural curriculum. Methods A 26-item survey was constructed to assess the optimal use of simulators for the teaching of medical procedures in an internal medicine residency curriculum. Survey domains were generated independently by two investigators and validated by an expert panel (n = 7). Final survey items were revised based on pilot survey and distributed to 128 internal medicine residents. Results Of the 128 residents surveyed, 106 (83%) responded. Most responders felt that simulators should be used to learn technical skills (94%), refine technical skills (84%), and acquire procedural teaching skills (87%). Respondents felt that procedures most effectively taught by simulators include: central venous catheterization, thoracentesis, intubation, lumbar puncture, and paracentesis. The majority of learners felt that teaching should be done early in residency (97%). With regards to course format, 62% of respondents felt that no more than 3-4 learners per simulator and an instructor to learner ratio of 1:3-4 would be acceptable. The majority felt that the role of instructors should include demonstration of technique (92%), observe learner techniques (92%), teach evidence behind procedural steps (84%) and provide feedback (89%). Commonly cited barriers to procedural teaching were limitations in time, number of instructors and simulators, and lack of realism of some simulators. Conclusions Our results suggest that residents value simulator-based procedural teaching in the form of small-group sessions. Simulators should be an integral part of medical procedural education. PMID:21059253

  8. Psychosocial aspects of abortion

    PubMed Central

    Illsley, Raymond; Hall, Marion H.

    1976-01-01

    The literature on psychosocial aspects of abortion is confusing. Individual publications must be interpreted in the context of cultural, religious, and legal constraints obtaining in a particular society at a given time, with due attention to the status and availability of alternatives to abortion that might be chosen by a woman with an “unwanted” pregnancy. A review of the literature shows that, where careful pre- and post-abortion assessments are made, the evidence is that psychological benefit commonly results, and serious adverse emotional sequelae are rare. The outcome of refused abortion seems less satisfactory, with regrets and distress frequently occurring. Research on the administration of abortion services suggests that counselling is often of value, that distress is frequently caused by delays in deciding upon and in carrying out abortions, and by unsympathetic attitudes of service providers. The phenomenon of repeated abortion seeking should be seen in the context of the availability and cost of contraception and sterilization. The place of sterilization with abortion requires careful study. A recommendation is made for observational descriptive research on populations of women with potentially unwanted pregnancies in different cultures, with comparisons of management systems and an evaluation of their impact on service users. PMID:1085671

  9. Abortion Training in Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency Programs in the United States, 1991-1992

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Trent MacKay; Andrea Phillips MacKay

    112 programs to formally train residents in abortion procedures and in the manage- ment of complications from spontaneous and elective abortions. Nevertheless, shortly after the 1973 Supreme Court decision in Roe v. Wade, a survey of residency programs found that most university departments of obstetrics and gynecology were not providing rou- tine abortion training in their programs. 3 A subsequent

  10. Debate: Should Abortion Be Available on Request?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Bernard; Lawrence, George

    1971-01-01

    Two physicians debate whether abortions should be available on request regardless of medical indications. The crux of the issue is whether the fetus should be considered body tissue over which the woman has complete control or whether society has an interest in the embryo and should protect it. (Author/BY)

  11. Walking the abortion tightrope.

    PubMed

    Simms, M

    1971-03-01

    The abortion controversy in England was partially resolved on February 23, 1971, when Sir Keith Joseph, Secretary of State for Social Services, announced that an inquiry into the 1967 Abortion Act would be established, but one which would be concerned with the way the Act was working rather than the principles underlying it. Regional inequalities exist in the implementation of the Act (as with substandard services in Birmingham, Liverpool and Sheffield) due to opposition of the local gynecological establishment and a genuine shortage of facilities. These can be eliminated only through time and retirement and with public finance for more equal abortion facilities. The addition of a consultant clause into the Act would probably reduce the number of abortions in smaller private nursing homes, flood the National Health Service with abortion requests, and drive women back to criminal abortionists. PMID:12256288

  12. Legal abortion in Finland.

    PubMed

    Turpeinen, K

    1971-01-01

    The 1950 abortion law in Finland allowed the operation in cases where pregnancy threatened maternal health, where women were criminally raped, or were under 16, or where hereditary disease was present. From 1951 to 1969, the number of abortions per 1000 births increased from 32.2 to 121.2. The new abortion law of 1970 expanded the old law by permitting the operation if delivery and care of child would strain family resources, if the mother was under 17, or if she was over 40 and had 4 children. The number of abortions has doubled from 1969 to 1970. The consent for abortion has increased from 54.5 percent to 83.8 percent of the applications. PMID:12256202

  13. A Failure of Sleep-Dependent Procedural Learning in Chronic, Medicated Schizophrenia

    E-print Network

    Manoach, Dara S.

    with the amount of stage 2 non-REM sleep in the latter quartile of the night (Smith and MacNeill 1994; Walker et al 2002), although one study found the improvement to be associated with REM sleep (Fischer et alA Failure of Sleep-Dependent Procedural Learning in Chronic, Medicated Schizophrenia Dara S

  14. A Stress Inoculation Program for Parents Whose Children Are Undergoing Painful Medical Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jay, Susan M.; Elliott, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    Compared program efficacy in helping parents cope with children's painful medical procedures. Parents (n=72) of pediatric leukemia patients participated in either stress inoculation program or observed child participating in cognitive behavior therapy. Found parents in stress inoculation program reported lower anxiety scores and higher positive…

  15. Should therapeutic abortion be legal in Nicaragua: the response of Nicaraguan obstetrician-gynaecologists.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, Heathe Luz; Blandón, Marta Maria; Altamirano, Ligia

    2002-05-01

    Abortion is legal in Nicaragua only to save the life of the woman. In 2002, amendments to the Penal Code to change the penalties for obtaining and providing illegal abortions and regulations on the authorization of legal abortions are due to be debated in the legislature. In a context of extensive media coverage and debate between women's health and rights groups and a powerful movement to make all abortions illegal, medical professionals have also been effective in influencing law and policy. In May 2001, the Nicaraguan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology presented the results of a study of the views of 198 obstetrician-gynaecologists on pending legislation regulating therapeutic abortion and the medical and ethical implications of providing therapeutic abortion services. All but nine of the 198 participants in the study, who comprised 76% of all registered obstetrician-gynaecologists in Nicaragua, believed that therapeutic abortion should not be criminalized and over 90% believed that there were cases in which therapeutic abortion was necessary to save women's lives. Some also supported legislative reform to allow abortion in cases of rape and fetal malformation. These results countered claims by the Nicaraguan Medical Association (AMN), taken up by the Church and anti-abortion legislators and groups, that therapeutic abortion was no longer necessary due to modern medicine. The election of anti-abortion politicians to powerful positions in early 2002 has created a formidable challenge when the proposed revisions to the Penal Code are debated. PMID:12369313

  16. [Vasospastic angina pectoris following abortion induced by prostaglandin analogue].

    PubMed

    Lindhardt, T B; Walker, L R; Colov, N S; Hansen, P S

    2000-11-27

    A case of vasospastic angina pectoris with loss of consciousness, bradycardia and seizures induced by medical abortion following administration of mifepristone and gemeprost is reported. The patient had a history of smoking and migraine, and former treatment with ergot alkaloids or serotonin agonists had also resulted in chest pain and lipothymia. The case underlines the importance of obtaining a detailed history of vasospastic disorders in women referred for medical abortion. PMID:11187221

  17. Unsafe abortion and abortion care in Khartoum, Sudan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joyce Kinaro; Tag Elsir Mohamed Ali; Rhonda Schlangen; Jessica Mack

    2009-01-01

    Unsafe abortion in Sudan results in significant morbidity and mortality. This study of treatment for complications of unsafe abortion in five hospitals in Khartoum, Sudan, included a review of hospital records and a survey of 726 patients seeking abortion-related care from 27 October 2007 to 31 January 2008, an interview of a provider of post-abortion care and focus group discussions

  18. Multi-Quadratic Dynamic Programming Procedure of - Preserving Denoising for Medical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, C. T.; Kopylov, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present a computationally efficient technique for edge preserving in medical image smoothing, which is developed on the basis of dynamic programming multi-quadratic procedure. Additionally, we propose a new non-convex type of pair-wise potential functions, allow more flexibility to set a priori preferences, using different penalties for various ranges of differences between the values of adjacent image elements. The procedure of image analysis, based on the new data models, significantly expands the class of applied problems, and can take into account the presence of heterogeneities and discontinuities in the source data, while retaining high computational efficiency of the dynamic programming procedure and Kalman filterinterpolator. Comparative study shows, that our algorithm has high accuracy to speed ratio, especially in the case of high-resolution medical images.

  19. Scientific evaluation and pricing of medical devices and associated procedures in France.

    PubMed

    Gilard, Martine; Debroucker, Frederique; Dubray, Claude; Allioux, Yves; Aper, Eliane; Barat-Leonhardt, Valérie; Brami, Michèle; Carbonneil, Cédric; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Coqueblin, Claire; Fare, Sandrine; Giri, Isabelle; Goehrs, Jean-Marie; Levesque, Karine; Maugendre, Philippe; Parquin, François; Sales, Jean-Patrick; Szwarcensztein, Karine

    2013-01-01

    Medical devices are many and various, ranging from tongue spatulas to implantable or invasive devices and imaging machines; their lifetimes are short, between 18 months and 5 years, due to incessant incremental innovation; and they are operator-dependent: in general, the clinical user performs a fitting procedure (hip implant or pacemaker), a therapeutic procedure using a non-implantable invasive device (arrhythmic site ablation probe, angioplasty balloon, extension spondyloplasty system, etc.) or follow-up of an active implanted device (long-term follow-up of an implanted cardiac defibrillator or of a deep brain stimulator in Parkinson's patients). A round-table held during the XXVIII(th) Giens Workshops meeting focused on the methodology of scientific evaluation of medical devices and the associated procedures with a view to their pricing and financing by the French National Health Insurance system. The working hypothesis was that the available data-set was sufficient for and compatible with scientific evaluation with clinical benefit. Post-registration studies, although contributing to the continuity of assessment, were not dealt with. Moreover, the focus was restricted to devices used in health establishments, where the association between devices and technical medical procedures is optimally representative. An update of the multiple regulatory protocols governing medical devices and procedures is provided. Issues more specifically related to procedures as such, to non-implantable devices and to innovative devices are then dealt with, and the proposals and discussion points raised at the round-table for each of these three areas are presented. PMID:23981256

  20. Brazilians have different views on when abortion should be legal, but most do not agree with imprisoning women for abortion.

    PubMed

    Faúndes, Aníbal; Duarte, Graciana Alves; de Sousa, Maria Helena; Soares Camargo, Rodrigo Paupério; Pacagnella, Rodolfo Carvalho

    2013-11-01

    Unsafe abortions remain a major public health problem in countries with very restrictive abortion laws. In Brazil, parliamentarians - who have the power to change the law - are influenced by "public opinion", often obtained through surveys and opinion polls. This paper presents the findings from two studies. One was carried out in February-December 2010 among 1,660 public servants and the other in February-July 2011 with 874 medical students from three medical schools, both in São Paulo State, Brazil. Both groups of respondents were asked two sets of questions to obtain their opinion about abortion: 1) under which circumstances abortion should be permitted by law, and 2) whether or not women in general and women they knew who had had an abortion should be punished with prison, as Brazilian law mandates. The differences in their answers were enormous: the majority of respondents were against putting women who have had abortions in prison. Almost 60% of civil servants and 25% of medical students knew at least one woman who had had an illegal abortion; 85% of medical students and 83% of civil servants thought this person(s) should not be jailed. Brazilian parliamentarians who are currently reviewing a reform in the Penal Code need to have this information urgently. PMID:24315072

  1. Teen Motherhood and Abortion Access

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas J Kane; Douglas Staiger

    1996-01-01

    The authors investigate the effect of abortion access on teen birthrates using county-level panel data. Past research suggested that prohibiting abortion led to higher teen birthrates. Perhaps surprisingly, the authors find that more recent restrictions in abortion access, including the closing of abortion clinics and restrictions on Medicaid funding, had the opposite effect. Small declines in access were related to

  2. Test Procedure for 170.302.j Medication Reconciliation APPROVED Version 1.1 September 24, 2010

    E-print Network

    Test Procedure for §170.302.j Medication Reconciliation APPROVED Version 1.1 September 24, 2010 1 Test Procedure for §170.302 (j) Medication Reconciliation This document describes the test in 45 CFR Part 170 Subpart C of the Final Rule for Health Information Technology: Initial Set

  3. Test Procedure for 170.302.d Maintain Active Medication List APPROVED Version 1.1 September 24, 2010

    E-print Network

    Test Procedure for §170.302.d Maintain Active Medication List APPROVED Version 1.1 September 24, 2010 1 Test Procedure for §170.302 (d) Maintain Active Medication List This document describes criteria defined in 45 CFR Part 170 Subpart C of the Final Rule for Health Information Technology: Initial

  4. Demand for abortion and post abortion care in Ibadan, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While induced abortion is considered to be illegal and socially unacceptable in Nigeria, it is still practiced by many women in the country. Poor family planning and unsafe abortion practices have daunting effects on maternal health. For instance, Nigeria is on the verge of not meeting the Millennium development goals on maternal health due to high maternal mortality ratio, estimated to be about 630 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. Recent evidences have shown that a major factor in this trend is the high incidence of abortion in the country. The objective of this paper is, therefore, to investigate the factors determining the demand for abortion and post-abortion care in Ibadan city of Nigeria. Methods The study employed data from a hospital-based/exploratory survey carried out between March to September 2010. Closed ended questionnaires were administered to a sample of 384 women of reproductive age from three hospitals within the Ibadan metropolis in South West Nigeria. However, only 308 valid responses were received and analysed. A probit model was fitted to determine the socioeconomic factors that influence demand for abortion and post-abortion care. Results The results showed that 62% of respondents demanded for abortion while 52.3% of those that demanded for abortion received post-abortion care. The findings again showed that income was a significant determinant of abortion and post-abortion care demand. Women with higher income were more likely to demand abortion and post-abortion care. Married women were found to be less likely to demand for abortion and post-abortion care. Older women were significantly less likely to demand for abortion and post-abortion care. Mothers’ education was only statistically significant in determining abortion demand but not post-abortion care demand. Conclusion The findings suggest that while abortion is illegal in Nigeria, some women in the Ibadan city do abort unwanted pregnancies. The consequence of this in the absence of proper post-abortion care is daunting. There is the need for policymakers to intensify public education against indiscriminate abortion and to reduce unwanted pregnancies. In effect, there is need for effective alternative family planning methods. This is likely to reduce the demand for abortion. Further, with income found as a major constraint, post abortion services should be made accessible to both the rich and poor alike so as to prevent unnecessary maternal deaths as a result of abortion related complications. PMID:25024929

  5. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures 25.99.09.V0.01 Cellular Communication Devices and Services

    E-print Network

    Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures 25.99.09.V0.01 Cellular Communication&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 25.99.09.V0.01 Cellular Communication Devices and Services Page 1 of 2 PROCEDURE STATEMENT This procedure provides the Texas A&M Veterinary Medical

  6. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 34.07.99.V0.01 Emergency Management

    E-print Network

    Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 34.07.99.V0.01 Emergency Management Approved: July 16, 2012 Next Scheduled Review: July 16, 2014 Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL) will follow (on­campus locations in accordance with section

  7. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures 15.02.99.V1.01 Export Controls

    E-print Network

    Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures 15.02.99.V1.01 Export Controls Approved: January 24, 2013 Next Scheduled Review: January 24, 2015 Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic&M University System (System) Policy 15.02, Export Controls, Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory

  8. Conservative management of spontaneous abortions. Women's experiences.

    PubMed Central

    Wiebe, E.; Janssen, P.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe women's experiences with expectant management of spontaneous abortions. DESIGN: Descriptive survey using questionnaires with fixed-choice and open-ended questions. The latter were analyzed for themes, using qualitative methods. SETTING: Urban and suburban private primary care family practices. PARTICIPANTS: A convenience sample of family practice patients (59 of 80 eligible) pregnant for less than 12 weeks who had spontaneous abortions without surgery. Response rate was 84.7%; 50 questionnaires were received from the 59 women. METHOD: Women were asked about their physical experiences, including amount of pain and bleeding; emotional effects; their satisfaction with medical care; and their suggestions for improving care. MAIN FINDINGS: The mean worst pain experienced during a spontaneous abortion on an 11-point scale was 5.9. Bleeding varied, but was often very heavy. Satisfaction rate was 92.9% with family physician care and 84.6% with hospital care. Women described the emotional effect of "natural" spontaneous abortions and made recommendations for improving care. CONCLUSIONS: A better understanding of the physical and emotional experiences of the women in this study might help physicians better prepare and support patients coping with expectant management of spontaneous abortions. PMID:10540695

  9. Abortion Performance and Politics

    E-print Network

    Candelario, Rosemary

    2012-01-01

    Performing abortion” typically refers to what health carecare. Certainly the dimming of the conse- quences of illegal abortionabortion bills and ballot initiatives. 8 Legislators capitalized on urgent debates on health care

  10. The Abortion Law Homepage

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This privately posted page offers extensive and highly credible information on legislation and jurisprudence relating to abortion in the US. The site offers thoroughly linked discussions of constitutional law, Roe v. Wade, Planned Parenthood v. Casey, state and federal abortion laws, including partial-birth abortion laws, and much more. The hypertext links are to primary documents including court decisions, texts of legislation, court briefs, and oral argument transcripts. There is also an index to primary documents for ease of access. We found the page to have no political agenda. As the author states, "this page is being constructed to help people, regardless of their political bent, understand the background and state of abortion law in America, and access related legal material--especially that which is less available and less well known."

  11. Abortion and Selection

    E-print Network

    Gruber, Jonathan

    Abortion legalization in the early 1970s led to dramatic changes in fertility. Some research has suggested that it altered cohort outcomes, but this literature has been limited and controversial. In this paper, we provide ...

  12. Virtual Reality as an Adjunctive Non-pharmacologic Analgesic for Acute Burn Pain During Medical Procedures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hunter G. Hoffman; Gloria T. Chambers; Walter J. Meyer III; Lisa L. Arceneaux; William J. Russell; Eric J. Seibel; Todd L. Richards; Sam R. Sharar; David R. Patterson

    2011-01-01

    Introduction  Excessive pain during medical procedures is a widespread problem but is especially problematic during daily wound care of\\u000a patients with severe burn injuries.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Burn patients report 35–50% reductions in procedural pain while in a distracting immersive virtual reality, and fMRI brain\\u000a scans show associated reductions in pain-related brain activity during VR. VR distraction appears to be most effective for\\u000a patients

  13. 'Partial-Birth Abortion\\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samuel W. Calhoun

    2010-01-01

    In explaining his constitutional objection to Wisconsin’s partial-birth abortion ban, Judge Richard Posner contrasts killing during “normal labor” with partial-birth abortion. The former can be constitutionally prohibited, but the latter cannot. Why the distinction? For Posner, the former involves “killing a live baby that is half-born,” whereas the latter does not. This article will show that Judge Posner is correct

  14. Radiological health risks to astronauts from space activities and medical procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Leif E.; Nachtwey, D. Stuart

    1990-01-01

    Radiation protection standards for space activities differ substantially from those applied to terrestrial working situations. The levels of radiation and subsequent hazards to which space workers are exposed are quite unlike anything found on Earth. The new more highly refined system of risk management involves assessing the risk to each space worker from all sources of radiation (occupational and non-occupational) at the organ level. The risk coefficients were applied to previous space and medical exposures (diagnostic x ray and nuclear medicine procedures) in order to estimate the radiation-induced lifetime cancer incidence and mortality risk. At present, the risk from medical procedures when compared to space activities is 14 times higher for cancer incidence and 13 times higher for cancer mortality; however, this will change as the per capita dose during Space Station Freedom and interplanetary missions increases and more is known about the risks from exposure to high-LET radiation.

  15. 31.03.99.Q0.01: Deployment/Redeployment Allowance and Medical Travel Allow. Administrative Procedures Page 1 of 3 STANDARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE

    E-print Network

    travel from Qatar, as well as personal leave periods and business travel periods outside Qatar. 2.2 A leg31.03.99.Q0.01: Deployment/Redeployment Allowance and Medical Travel Allow. Administrative and Medical Travel Allowance Administrative Procedures Approved December 20, 2005 Revised November 8, 2010

  16. Catholic attitudes toward abortion.

    PubMed

    Smith, T W

    1984-01-01

    In the US attitudes toward abortion in the 1980s seem to have reached a more liberal plateau, much more favored than in the 1960s or earlier, but not longer moving in a liberal direction. Catholic attitudes basically have followed the same trend. Traditionally Catholic support has been slightly lower than Protestant, and both are less inclined to support abortion than Jews or the nonreligious. During the 1970s support among non-black Catholics averaged about 10 percentage points below non-black Protestants. Blacks tend to be anti-abortion and thereby lower support among Protestants as a whole. A comparison of Protestants and Catholics of both races shows fewer religious differences -- about 7 percentage points. There are some indications that this gap may be closing. In 1982, for the 1st time, support for abortions for social reasons, such as poverty, not wanting to marry, or not wanting more children, was as high among Catholics as among Protestants. 1 of the factors contributing to this narrowing gap has been the higher level of support for abortion among younger Catholics. Protestants show little variation on abortion attitudes, with those over age 65 being slightly less supportive. Among Catholics, support drops rapidly with age. This moderate and possibly vanishing difference between Catholics and Protestants contrasts sharply with the official positions of their respective churches. The Catholic Church takes an absolute moral position against abortion, while most Protestant churches take no doctrinaire position on abortion. Several, such as the Unitarians and Episcopalians, lean toward a pro-choice position as a matter of social policy, though fundamentalist sects take strong anti-abortion stances. Few Catholics agree with their church's absolutist anti-abortion position. The big split on abortion comes between what are sometimes termed the "hard" abortion reasons -- mother's health endangered, serious defect in fetus, rape, or incest. Support among Catholics for "hard" reasons ranges from about 80-88%. Abortion for social reasons such as poverty or not wanting additional children ranges from 35-50%. Catholic support for abortion also varies by geographical region, community type, and ethnic group. Support tends to be strongest in the Northeast, in large cities, and among descendants of immigrants from Italy, Eastern Europe, and France. Support is weakest among Catholics in the Southwest, in small towns or rural areas, and among the Irish and Hispanics, especially Mexican-Americans. Among Catholics, many factors cause opinion to deviate from the national average. A 2nd major political implication is the comparative dedication or commitment of supporters and opponents. Analysis of election returns in 1978 in particular failed to demonstrate any measurable anti-abortion vote, but this does not mean that in a particular constituency it could not be made a serious issue. PMID:12178931

  17. Abortion applicants in Arkansas.

    PubMed

    Henker, F O

    1973-03-01

    The article reports upon the characteristics of 300 abortion applicants in Arkansas manifesting significant stress from unwanted pregnancy between May 1, 1970 and June 30, 1971. The sample is limited by the fact that all of these women had been willing to seek medical aid. Patients ranged from ages 13-47, 131 of them ages 17-21. 35% had had some college education; another 29% were high school graduates. 50.6%, 20.6%, and 27.3% were single, divorced, and married, respectively. 59.6% of the patients were primiparas. 18.3%, 9.6%, and 12.3% were classified as being neurotic, having psychophysiologic tendencies (gastrointestinal problems, obesity, chronic headaches), and having sociopathic features (passive-aggressive, frankly rebellious, delinquent, antisocial, alcoholic), respectively. 12 women had noticeable schizoid features; 4 women had mildly active schizophrenia. Fathers of the women were usually blue-collar workers (55.3%) or white-collar workers (24.6%). The most frequent ordinal sibling position among the women was oldest child (38%). Parental instability (1 or both parents lost through death, divorce, father usually away working, chronic alcoholism, etc.) was reported by 39.6% of the patients. Patients' attitudes toward the unwanted pregnancy included dislike of inexpediency of the situation (82.6%), self-depreciation (55.6%), and aversion (28.6%). Precipitated psychiatric disorders were for the greatest part mild. Manifesting symptoms included depression (66.7%), anxiety (21%), and mixed anxiety and depression (12.2%). Suicidal threats and gestures were made by 22 and 8 patients, respectively. In summary, the study reveals a group of predominantly Caucasian women from unstable, middle-class urban families who were going through an adjustment reaction to adolescence or adult life. PMID:4265812

  18. Commercial availability of misoprostol and induced abortion in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, S H

    1998-12-01

    In Brazil, abortion is only permitted to save the woman's life or in cases of rape. The principal effect of legal restrictions is not to make induced abortion practice less prevalent but to force poor women to resort to abortions performed under unhygienic conditions or attempt self-induced abortion. Within this context, misoprostol, a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin E1, was introduced in the country in 1986. Purchased over the counter in pharmacies, misoprostol has became a popular abortifacient method among Brazilian women. By 1990, about 70% of women hospitalized with abortion-related diagnoses reported use of the drug. In 1991, the Ministry of Health restricted the sale of misoprostol, and in some states its use was totally banned. While the proportion of abortions induced with misoprostol has decreased, the drug continues to be sold on the black market at an inflated value. Research indicates that women have acquired more experience with the drug over time, resulting in lower doses and more effective administration. Several studies show that the rate and severity of complications are significantly less among women who used misoprostol compared with women who used invasive methods. Research also suggests that about half of the women have complete abortion with misoprostol, but seek medical care as soon as they have vaginal bleeding. The experience of Brazilian women with misoprostol is an example of how women when faced with unwanted pregnancy will resort to illegal abortion whatever the costs are to their health. PMID:10075223

  19. Medicine and abortion law: complicating the reforming profession.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, Sheelagh; Thomson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The complicated intra-professional rivalries that have contributed to the current contours of abortion law and service provision have been subject to limited academic engagement. In this article, we address this gap. We examine how the competing interests of different specialisms played out in abortion law reform from the early twentieth-century, through to the enactment of the Abortion Act 1967, and the formation of the structures of abortion provision in the early 1970s. We demonstrate how professional interests significantly shaped the landscape of abortion law in England, Scotland, and Wales. Our analysis addresses two distinct and yet related fields where professional interests were negotiated or asserted in the journey to law reform. Both debates align with earlier analysis that has linked abortion law reform with the market development of the medical profession. We argue that these two axes of debate, both dominated by professional interests, interacted to help shape law's treatment of abortion, and continue to influence the provision of abortion services today. PMID:25995361

  20. The effect of abortion restrictions on the timing of abortions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marianne Bitler; Madeline Zavodny

    2001-01-01

    This paper uses data on the distribution of abortions by weeks of gestation to examine the relationship between abortion restrictions and the timing of abortions. State-level data from 1974 to 1997 indicate that adoption of parental involvement laws for minors or enforcement of mandatory waiting periods is positively associated with the post-first trimester percentage of abortions. However, autocorrelation-corrected specifications indicate

  1. The Response of Abortion Demand to Changes in Abortion Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medoff, Marshall H.

    2008-01-01

    This study uses pooled cross-section time-series data, over the years 1982, 1992 and 2000, to estimate the impact of various restrictive abortion laws on the demand for abortion. This study complements and extends prior research by explicitly including the price of obtaining an abortion in the estimation. The empirical results show that the real…

  2. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures 31.99.01.V0.01 Employees Registering as Students

    E-print Network

    Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures 31.99.01.V0.01 Employees Registering A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 31.99.01.V0.01 Employees Registering as Students Page 1 of 2 PROCEDURE STATEMENT Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL

  3. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures 33.04.01.V0.01 Use of Agency Resources for External Employment

    E-print Network

    Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures 33.04.01.V0.01 Use of Agency Resources&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures 33.04.01.A0.01 Use of Agency Resources for External Employment Resources for External Employment, and this procedure, Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory

  4. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 15.01.03.V1.01 Financial Conflict of Interest in Research

    E-print Network

    Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 15.01.03.V1.01 Financial Conflict, 2014 Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 15.01.03.V1.01 Financial Conflict of Interest in Research Page 1 of 3 PROCEDURE STATEMENT Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory

  5. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures 25.06.01.V0.01 Contracts with Historically Underutilized Businesses

    E-print Network

    Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures 25.06.01.V0.01 Contracts with Historically 28, 2014 Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 25.06.01.V0.01 Contracts with Historically Underutilized Businesses Page 1 of 2 PROCEDURE STATEMENT The Texas A&M Veterinary Medical

  6. Space Shuttle Abort Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Edward M.; Nguyen, Tri X.

    2011-01-01

    This paper documents some of the evolutionary steps in developing a rigorous Space Shuttle launch abort capability. The paper addresses the abort strategy during the design and development and how it evolved during Shuttle flight operations. The Space Shuttle Program made numerous adjustments in both the flight hardware and software as the knowledge of the actual flight environment grew. When failures occurred, corrections and improvements were made to avoid a reoccurrence and to provide added capability for crew survival. Finally some lessons learned are summarized for future human launch vehicle designers to consider.

  7. Did Legalized Abortion Lower Crime?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Ted

    2004-01-01

    Changes in homicide and arrest rates were compared among cohorts born before and after legalization of abortion and those who were unexposed to legalized abortion. It was found that legalized abortion improved the lives of many women as they could avoid unwanted births.

  8. Locus of pain control associated with medication adherence behaviors among patients after an orthopedic procedure

    PubMed Central

    Porto, Thaisy Mendes; Machado, Daniele Caferatti; Martins, Rafael Olívio; Galato, Dayani; Piovezan, Anna Paula

    2014-01-01

    Background Locus of pain control (LPC) is characterized by the behavior of people coping with their health problems, as a result of their own actions (internal control) or external factors or other people (external control). This parameter can be associated with medication adherence, in addition to other psychosocial factors that may also influence this behavior. This study was performed to investigate the influence of the LPC on medication adherence in patients undergoing an orthopedic procedure. Subjects and methods We conducted a prospective cohort study on patients who attended an orthopedic clinic for arthroscopy treatment. The patients’ LPC and pain intensity data were obtained on the day of admission through the use of the LPC scale and the visual analog scale (VAS), respectively, both being validated tools. After arthroscopic surgery, the patients received drug prescriptions and were reassessed after 15 days regarding treatment adherence, using the Morisky test. A P-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results We assessed 79 individuals from both the internal LPC group (n=35) and external LPC group (n=44) and found that there were no group differences in sex, affected limb, cause of injury, repetitive strain injury, duration of pain, or pain intensity. However, there was a higher proportion of patients in the external LPC group that adhered to the prescribed medication compared with the internal LPC group (P<0.01). Conclusion The results showed that among patients who underwent an orthopedic procedure, there was a higher adherence rate to prescribed medication in the external LPC group compared with the internal LPC group. PMID:25075178

  9. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures 31.01.10.V0.01 Service Awards

    E-print Network

    Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures 31.01.10.V0.01 Service Awards Approved: June 15, 2009 Revised: December 28, 2012 Next Scheduled Review: December 28, 2014 Texas A&M Veterinary The Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL) service awards program is designed

  10. Abortion in late Imperial China: routine birth control or crisis intervention?

    PubMed

    Sommer, Matthew H

    2010-01-01

    In late imperial China, a number of purported methods of abortion were known; but who actually attempted abortion and under what circumstances? Some historians have suggested that abortion was used for routine birth control, which presupposes that known methods were safe, reliable, and readily available. This paper challenges the qualitative evidence on which those historians have relied, and presents new evidence from Qing legal sources and modern medical reports to argue that traditional methods of abortion (the most common being abortifacient drugs) were dangerous, unreliable, and often cost a great deal of money. Therefore, abortion in practice was an emergency intervention in a crisis: either a medical crisis, in which pregnancy threatened a woman's health, or a social crisis, in which pregnancy threatened to expose a woman's extramarital sexual relations. Moreover, abortion was not necessarily available even to women who wanted one. PMID:21328808

  11. Observations on abortion in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Castle, M A; Likwa, R; Whittaker, M

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the findings of a preliminary investigation of women who sought treatment for abortion from the Gynecological Emergency Ward at the University Teaching Hospital (UTH) in Lusaka, Zambia. Barriers to obtaining legal abortions are identified and the harsh experiences of women seeking treatment for complications of illegally induced abortion are discussed. The data contribute to an understanding of the intensity of abortion for Zambian women and draw attention to the value of small-scale, qualitative research on women's reproductive health care needs. It is suggested that a study be planned at UTH to determine how health care delivery can be improved for women who seek abortion. PMID:2219228

  12. Soft Tissue Infection Caused by Rapid Growing Mycobacterium following Medical Procedures: Two Case Reports and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Sen; Lee, Chin-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Non-tubecrulosis mycobacterium infections were increasingly reported either pulmonary or extrapulmonary in the past decades. In Taiwan, we noticed several reports about the soft tissue infections caused by rapid growing mycobacterium such as Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium chelonae, on newspaper, magazines, or the multimedia. Most of them occurred after a plastic surgery, and medical or non-medical procedures. Here, we reported two cases of these infections following medical procedures. We also discussed common features and the clinical course of the disease, the characteristics of the infected site, and the treatment strategy. The literatures were also reviewed, and the necessity of the treatment guidelines was discussed. PMID:24882980

  13. Soft Tissue Infection Caused by Rapid Growing Mycobacterium following Medical Procedures: Two Case Reports and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Sen; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Jang, Tsrang-Neng

    2014-04-01

    Non-tubecrulosis mycobacterium infections were increasingly reported either pulmonary or extrapulmonary in the past decades. In Taiwan, we noticed several reports about the soft tissue infections caused by rapid growing mycobacterium such as Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium chelonae, on newspaper, magazines, or the multimedia. Most of them occurred after a plastic surgery, and medical or non-medical procedures. Here, we reported two cases of these infections following medical procedures. We also discussed common features and the clinical course of the disease, the characteristics of the infected site, and the treatment strategy. The literatures were also reviewed, and the necessity of the treatment guidelines was discussed. PMID:24882980

  14. Racial differences in the elderly's use of medical procedures and diagnostic tests.

    PubMed Central

    Escarce, J J; Epstein, K R; Colby, D C; Schwartz, J S

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study sought to examine racial differences in the use of medical procedures and diagnostic tests by elderly Americans. METHODS. We used 1986 physician claims data for a 5% national sample of Medicare enrollees aged 65 years and older to study 32 procedures and tests. For each service, we calculated the age- and sex-adjusted rate of use by race and the corresponding White-Black relative risk. RESULTS. Whites were more likely than Blacks to receive 23 services, and for many of these services, the differences in use were substantial. In contrast, Blacks were more likely than Whites to receive seven services. Whites had a particular advantage in access to higher-technology or newer services. Racial differences in use persisted among elders who had Medicaid in addition to Medicare coverage and increased among rural elders. CONCLUSIONS. There are pervasive racial differences in the use of medical services by elderly Americans that cannot be explained by differences in the prevalence of specific clinical conditions. Financial barriers to care do not fully account for these findings. Race may exacerbate the impact of other barriers to access. PMID:8328615

  15. Abortion and Islam: policies and practice in the Middle East and North Africa.

    PubMed

    Hessini, Leila

    2007-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of legal, religious, medical and social factors that serve to support or hinder women's access to safe abortion services in the 21 predominantly Muslim countries of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, where one in ten pregnancies ends in abortion. Reform efforts, including progressive interpretations of Islam, have resulted in laws allowing for early abortion on request in two countries; six others permit abortion on health grounds and three more also allow abortion in cases of rape or fetal impairment. However, medical and social factors limit access to safe abortion services in all but Turkey and Tunisia. To address this situation, efforts are increasing in a few countries to introduce post-abortion care, document the magnitude of unsafe abortion and understand women's experience of unplanned pregnancy. Religious fat?wa have been issued allowing abortions in certain circumstances. An understanding of variations in Muslim beliefs and practices, and the interplay between politics, religion, history and reproductive rights is key to understanding abortion in different Muslim societies. More needs to be done to build on efforts to increase women's rights, engage community leaders, support progressive religious leaders and government officials and promote advocacy among health professionals. PMID:17512379

  16. Contraceptive use among women seeking repeat abortion in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Prata, Ndola; Holston, Martine; Fraser, Ashley; Melkamu, Yilma

    2013-12-01

    Limited access to modern contraceptives in populations that desire smaller families can lead to repeat unintended pregnancy and repeat abortions. We conducted an analysis of the medical records of 1,200 women seeking abortion-related services in public and private facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia from October 2008 to February 2009. We examined the characteristics of initial and repeat abortion clients including prior contraceptive use and subsequent method selection. The incidence of repeat abortion was 30%. Compared with women seeking their first abortion, significantly more repeat abortion clients had ever used contraceptives and they were nearly twice as likely to leave the facility with a method. However, repeat abortion clients were significantly more likely to have ever used short-term reversible methods and to choose short-term methods post-abortion. Contraceptive counseling services for repeat abortion clients' should address reasons for previous contraceptive failure, discontinuation, or non-use. Post-abortion family planning services should be strengthened to help decrease repeat abortion. PMID:24558782

  17. Estimation of the collective dose in the Portuguese population due to medical procedures in 2010.

    PubMed

    Teles, Pedro; Carmen de Sousa, M; Paulo, Graciano; Santos, Joana; Pascoal, Ana; Cardoso, Gabriela; Lança, Isabel; Matela, Nuno; Janeiro, Luís; Sousa, Patrick; Carvoeiras, Pedro; Parafita, Rui; Santos, Ana Isabel; Simãozinho, Paula; Vaz, Pedro

    2013-05-01

    In a wide range of medical fields, technological advancements have led to an increase in the average collective dose in national populations worldwide. Periodic estimations of the average collective population dose due to medical exposure is, therefore of utmost importance, and is now mandatory in countries within the European Union (article 12 of EURATOM directive 97/43). Presented in this work is a report on the estimation of the collective dose in the Portuguese population due to nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures and the Top 20 diagnostic radiology examinations, which represent the 20 exams that contribute the most to the total collective dose in diagnostic radiology and interventional procedures in Europe. This work involved the collaboration of a multidisciplinary taskforce comprising representatives of all major Portuguese stakeholders (universities, research institutions, public and private healthcare providers, administrative services of the National Healthcare System, scientific and professional associations and private service providers). This allowed us to gather a comprehensive amount of data necessary for a robust estimation of the collective effective dose to the Portuguese population. The methodology used for data collection and dose estimation was based on European Commission recommendations, as this work was performed in the framework of the European wide Dose Datamed II project. This is the first study estimating the collective dose for the population in Portugal, considering such a wide national coverage and range of procedures and consisting of important baseline reference data. The taskforce intends to continue developing periodic collective dose estimations in the future. The estimated annual average effective dose for the Portuguese population was of 0.080±0.017 mSv caput(-1) for nuclear medicine exams and of 0.96±0.68 mSv caput(-1) for the Top 20 diagnostic radiology exams. PMID:23045717

  18. "Reclaiming the white daughter's purity": Afrikaner nationalism, racialized sexuality, and the 1975 Abortion and Sterilization Act in apartheid South Africa.

    PubMed

    Klausen, Susanne M

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the struggle over abortion law reform that preceded the enactment in 1975 of the first statutory law on abortion in South Africa. The ruling National Party government produced legislation intended to eliminate access to doctors willing to procure abortions in an attempt to prevent young, unmarried white women from engaging in premarital (hetero) sexual activity. It was also aimed at strictly regulating the medical profession’s actions with regards to abortion. The production of the abortion legislation was directly influenced by international struggles for accessible abortion and, more broadly, sexual liberation. The regime believed South Africa was being infiltrated by Western "immorality" and the abortion law was an attempt to buttress racist heteropatriarchal apartheid culture. Examining the abortion controversy highlights the global circulation of ideas about reproduction in the twentieth century and foregrounds a neglected dimension of the history of sexual regulation in apartheid South Africa: the disciplining and regulation of white female reproductive sexuality. PMID:20857591

  19. Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 1997. 105 H.R. 1122.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    This document contains the full text of the "Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 1997" passed by the US Congress and vetoed by President Clinton. This Act prohibits "partial-birth" abortions except in cases when such an abortion is necessary to save the life of a mother. The Act defines a partial-birth as an abortion during which a living fetus is partially vaginally delivered and then killed before the delivery is complete. This procedure is further defined as "deliberately and intentionally" delivering "into the vagina a living fetus... for the purpose of performing a procedure the physician knows will kill the fetus." The Act gives the father of the fetus or the parents of a minor mother the right to sue for damages unless the father or parents consented to the abortion. The Act protects women who undergo a partial-birth abortion from prosecution. PMID:9707940

  20. Jannin P, Grova C, Maurer C. Model for designing and reporting reference based validation procedures in medical image processing. Int Journ. Comput. Assisted Radiol and Surg. 2006

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    procedures in medical image processing. Int Journ. Comput. Assisted Radiol and Surg. 2006 1(2)2:1001-115 1 procedures in medical image processing. Int Journ. Comput. Assisted Radiol and Surg. 2006 1(2)2:1001-115 2 Model for defining and reporting Reference- based Validation Protocols in Medical Image Processing

  1. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 21.01.08.V0.01 Vehicle Titles, License Plates, Registration, and

    E-print Network

    Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 21.01.08.V0.01 Vehicle Titles Scheduled Review: March 26, 2015 Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 21.01.08.V0 by transfer of title, the Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL) Finance Office

  2. Procedures for skin diseases performed by physicians in 1993 and 1994: Analysis of data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan B. Fleischer; Steven R. Feldman; Richard E. White; Barry Leshin; Robert Byington

    1997-01-01

    Background: The provision of ambulatory dermatologic procedural care is not well characterized. Objective: Our purpose was to determine the frequency that different cutaneous procedures are performed by different physician specialties and the diagnoses corresponding to these procedures. Methods: Outpatient dermatologic procedures recorded in the 1993 and 1994 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey were analyzed. To define dermatologic procedures and diagnoses,

  3. [Management of chemical burns and inhalation poisonings in acute medical care procedures of the State Fire Service].

    PubMed

    Chomoncik, Mariusz; Nitecki, Jacek; Ogonowska, Dorota; Ciso?-Apanasewicz, Urszula; Potok, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Emergency Medical Services (EMS) were founded by the government to perform tasks aimed at providing people with help in life-threatening conditions. The system comprises two constituent parts. The first one is public administrative bodies which are to organise, plan, coordinate and supervise the completion of the tasks. The other constituent is EMS units which keep people, resources and units in readiness. Supportive services, which include: the State Fire Service (SFS) and the National Firefighting and Rescue System (NFRS), are of great importance for EMS because they are eligible for providing acute medical care (professional first aid). Acute medical care covers actions performed by rescue workers to help people in life-threatening conditions. Rescue workers provide acute medical care in situations when EMS are not present on the spot and the injured party can be accessed only with the use of professional equipment by trained workers of NFRS. Whenever necessary, workers of supportive services can assist paramedics' actions. Cooperation of all units of EMS and NFRS is very important for rescue operations in the integrated rescue system. Time is a key aspect in delivering first aid to a person in life-threatening conditions. Fast and efficient first aid given by the accident's witness, as well as acute medical care performed by a rescue worker can prevent death and minimise negative effects of an injury or intoxication. It is essential that people delivering first aid and acute medical care should act according to acknowledged and standardised procedures because only in this way can the process of decision making be sped up and consequently, the number of possible complications following accidents decreased. The present paper presents an analysis of legal regulations concerning the management of chemical burn and inhalant intoxication in acute medical care procedures of the State Fire Service. It was observed that the procedures for rescue workers entitled to provide acute medical care should be correlated with the procedures for emergency medical teams. PMID:24466708

  4. Are partners available for post-abortion contraceptive counseling? A pilot study in a Baltimore City clinic.

    PubMed

    Beenhakker, Britta; Becker, Stan; Hires, Stephanie; Molano Di Targiana, Nell; Blumenthal, Paul; Huggins, George

    2004-05-01

    About half of the 1.2 million abortions each year in the United States are repeat abortions. While most abortion providers counsel women about contraception, one reason for the high repeat rate could be failure to take into account the social context of the women--in particular, the male partner. To assess whether there might be a window of opportunity for a contraceptive intervention that includes the male partner at the time of the abortion, we undertook a pilot study at an urban abortion clinic to examine the role of the male partner among women receiving abortions. Between May 2001 and August 2002, two questionnaires were administered to 109 women receiving abortions in a Baltimore City clinic. On the procedure day, women were more likely to be accompanied by a male partner upon arrival (30%) or when leaving (34%) than by any other individual. The majority of women receiving abortions reported that their partners played positive decision-making and support roles throughout the abortion process. A significant proportion of couples could be available for contraceptive counseling following an abortion, providing rationale for couples' post-abortion contraceptive counseling for women whose partners are already actively and positively involved in the abortion process. Such an intervention may help to reduce repeat abortions. PMID:15105066

  5. Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Family Planning Education among Third Year Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kimberly G.; Gilliam, Melissa L.; Leboeuf, Mathieu; Neustadt, Amy; Stulberg, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the current study is to explore third- year medical students’ interest in learning about family planning, exposure to family planning (contraception and abortion) and perceived barriers and benefits to family planning education in their obstetrics and gynecology rotation. Method: We conducted four focus groups with 27 third-year medical students near the end of their rotation in obstetrics and gynecology. Results: Students desired education in family planning but perceived limited exposure during their rotation. Most students were aware of abortion but lacked factual information and abortion procedural skills. They felt systemic and faculty-related barriers contributed to limited exposure. Students discussed issues such as lack of time for coverage of contraception and abortion in the curricula and rotation itself. Perceived benefits of clinical instruction in family planning included increased knowledge of contraceptive management and abortion the ability to care for and relate to patients, opportunity for values clarification, and positive changes in attitudes towards family planning. Conclusions: Medical students who desire full education in family planning during their obstetrics and gynecology rotation may face barriers to obtaining that education. Given that many medical students will eventually care for reproductive-age women, greater promotion of opportunities for exposure to family planning within obstetrics and gynecology rotations is warranted. PMID:20165534

  6. Living Through Some Giant Change: The Establishment of Abortion Services

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This article traces the establishment of abortion clinics following Roe v Wade. Abortion clinics followed one of two models: (1) a medical model in which physicians emphasized the delivery of high quality medical services, contrasting their clinics with the back-alley abortion services that had sent many women to hospital emergency rooms prior to legalization, or (2) a feminist model in which clinics emphasized education and the dissemination of information to empower women patients and change the structure of women’s health care. Male physicians and feminists came together in the newly established abortion services and argued over the priorities and characteristics of health care delivery. A broad range of clinics emerged, from feminist clinics to medical offices run by traditional male physicians to for-profit clinics. The establishment of the National Abortion Federation in the mid-1970s created a national forum of health professionals and contributed to the broadening of the discussion and the adoption of compromises as both feminists and physicians influenced each other's practices. PMID:23327251

  7. CONTINUOUS ABORT GAP CLEANING AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    DREES,A.FLILLER,R.III.FU,W.MICHNOFF,R.

    2004-07-05

    Since the RHIC Au-Au run in the year 2001 the 200 MHz cavity system was used at storage and a 28 MHz system during injection and acceleration. The rebucketing procedure potentially causes a higher debunching rate of heavy ion beams in addition to amplifying debunching due to other mechanisms. At the end of a four hour store, debunched beam can easily account for more than 50% of the total beam intensity. This effect is even stronger with the achieved high intensities of the RHIC Au-Au run in 2004. A beam abort at the presence of a lot of debunched beam bears the risk of magnet quenching and experimental detector damage due to uncontrolled beam losses. Thus it is desirable to avoid any accumulation of debunched beam from the beginning of each store, in particular to anticipate cases of unscheduled beam aborts due to a system failure. A combination of a fast transverse kickers and the new 2-stage copper collimator system are used to clean the abort gap continuously throughout the store with a repetition rate of 1 Hz. This report gives. an overview of the new gap cleaning procedure and the achieved performance.

  8. Repeat abortion: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Törnbom, M; Möller, A

    1999-03-01

    In a qualitative study of 20 women seeking a repeat abortion, interviews lasting for 1.5-2 hours were conducted after the first appointment with a gynecologist when the abortion was planned. The women were aged 20-29 years and had experienced one to five abortion(s) during the previous 5 years. The aim of the study was to attain understanding of the phenomenon of repeat abortion. The women were asked to express their thoughts related to their situation and their choices. The following categories were found: psychosocial background factors, reactions to previous abortion(s), reflections on fertility, sexuality, psychological factors, social factors, contraceptive use, the present pregnancy, motives for the planned abortion, feelings about the planned abortion and risk-taking process. Most of the women seemed to have a psychological vulnerability with many current and previous problems, as well as problems regarding sexuality. It was evident that insecurity was present in the use of contraceptives and in relation to sexual activities and to sexual partners. The main reason for an unplanned pregnancy is not a lack of information or even a lack of knowledge, but rather a failure to integrate the knowledge with situational, intrapsychic and social factors. PMID:10212884

  9. Virtual Reality as an Adjunctive Non-pharmacologic Analgesic for Acute Burn Pain During Medical Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Gloria T.; Meyer, Walter J.; Arceneaux, Lisa L.; Russell, William J.; Seibel, Eric J.; Richards, Todd L.; Sharar, Sam R.; Patterson, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Excessive pain during medical procedures is a widespread problem but is especially problematic during daily wound care of patients with severe burn injuries. Methods Burn patients report 35–50% reductions in procedural pain while in a distracting immersive virtual reality, and fMRI brain scans show associated reductions in pain-related brain activity during VR. VR distraction appears to be most effective for patients with the highest pain intensity levels. VR is thought to reduce pain by directing patients’ attention into the virtual world, leaving less attention available to process incoming neural signals from pain receptors. Conclusions We review evidence from clinical and laboratory research studies exploring Virtual Reality analgesia, concentrating primarily on the work ongoing within our group. We briefly describe how VR pain distraction systems have been tailored to the unique needs of burn patients to date, and speculate about how VR systems could be tailored to the needs of other patient populations in the future. PMID:21264690

  10. Induced abortion in Thailand: current situation in public hospitals and legal perspectives.

    PubMed

    Warakamin, Suwanna; Boonthai, Nongluk; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj

    2004-11-01

    Abortion is illegal in Thailand unless the woman's health is at risk or pregnancy is due to rape. This study, carried out in 1999 in 787 government hospitals, examined the magnitude and profile of abortion in Thailand, using data collected prospectively through a review of 45,990 case records (of which 28.5% were classified as induced and 71.5% as spontaneous abortions) and face-to-face interviews with a sub-set of 1854 women patients. The estimated induced abortion ratio was 19.5 per 1000 live births. Almost half the induced abortions were in young women under 25 years of age, many of whom had little or no access to contraception. Socio-economic reasons accounted for 60.2% of abortions. Serious complications were observed in almost a third of cases, especially following abortions performed by non-health personnel. Government physicians' current provision of induced abortion went beyond the provisions of the law in almost half of cases, most commonly for intrauterine death and for congenital anomalies. The paper proposes a framework for policy discussions of the grey areas of maternal and fetal indications leading to legal reform, in order to facilitate safe abortion. A recommendation to amend the abortion law has been proposed to the Ministry of Public Health and the Thai Medical Council. PMID:15938168

  11. Complicated illegal induced abortions at a tertiary health institution in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ikeanyi, Maduabuchi Eugene; Okonkwo, Chukwunwendu Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Globally it is estimated that 26-53 million induced abortions occur annually. An estimated 20 million of these are unsafe especially in countries with restrictive abortion laws. Approximately 48% of all abortions worldwide were unsafe and more than 97% of these are in developing countries. Our objective was to find out complications of illegal induced abortions in a tertiary care institution. Methods : All cases of complicated induced abortion, seen over a 5 year period were reviewed. Relevant data relating to the socio-demographic profile of the patients, clinical presentation, abortion service providers and facilities and mode of termination of pregnancy were extracted. Results: One hundred and nineteen patients, constituting 3.4% of gynaecological admissions were studied. The mean age of the patients was 23.5±6.6 years with over 80% single. The mean gestational age at abortion was 12.8± 4.1 weeks. Incomplete abortion and postabortal sepsis formed the major indication for admission. About a fifth of the cases had abdominal visceral involvement. Twenty (18%) had laparotomy and 10(9%) had renal dialysis. Over 75% of patients were discharged in stable state. Conclusion: This study highlights the pressing need for an organised program for reproductive health education especially for the adolescents and unmarried who were most affected by abortion complications. In addition training and continuing medical education for doctors favourably disposed to abortion services is highly indicated from this study. PMID:25674146

  12. The role of Advanced Nurse Practitioners in the availability of abortion services.

    PubMed

    Kishen, Meera; Stedman, Yvonne

    2010-10-01

    Despite the legalisation of abortion in many countries worldwide, access to abortion is often restricted in many ways. Lack of availability of trained and willing physicians, inadequate and poor infrastructure as well as affordability are issues that are still contributing to poor access to abortion for many women living in countries that have legalised abortion. Improving access to early abortion despite the declining number of doctors willing to provide abortions is being addressed in some countries by expanding the role of advanced nurse-midwife practitioners in this field. There is good evidence to suggest that the outcome of first-trimester abortions performed by suitably trained non-medical practitioners is comparable in terms of safety and efficacy to abortions performed by doctors. These mid-level practitioners also have a key role in providing post-abortion care and contraception to women. We need to address outdated laws and regulations as well as political challenges that restrict both the ability of advanced nurse-midwife practitioners to provide abortion care and the opportunities to train them appropriately. PMID:20385513

  13. Clients' reports on postabortion family planning services provided in Mexico City's public sector legal abortion program

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Davida; Díaz-Olavarrieta, Claudia; Garcia, Sandra G.; Harper, Cynthia C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective First trimester abortion was decriminalized in Mexico City in 2007. We studied client views of family planning services provided during abortion care at public facilities and acceptance of postabortion contraception. Methods We surveyed 402 clients seeking first trimester abortion care in Mexico City. We used logistic regression to test whether postabortion contraception varied by abortion visit characteristics or client sociodemographics. Results Most participants (81.6%) reported being offered contraception at their visit and 89.5% selected a contraceptive method postabortion, with 58.9% selecting the IUD. Surgical abortion clients were more likely to report being offered contraception than medical abortion clients (p<.001), as were clients attended by a female physician (p<.05). Clients at the general hospital were less likely to report being offered contraception (p<.001). Conclusion Public sector facilities in Mexico City are providing a generally high level of postabortion family planning care and uptake of postabortion contraception is high. PMID:23499047

  14. The evolution of Mexico City's abortion laws: from public morality to women's autonomy.

    PubMed

    Madrazo, Alejandro

    2009-09-01

    Before 2000, Mexico City's criminal laws prohibited induced abortion to maintain public morality. The Criminal Code considered abortion by accident or in cases of rape not criminal, and criminal but excusable-and therefore not punishable-in certain cases not endangering public morality, such as medical necessity to save the woman's life. In 2000, the Criminal Code was reformed expanding exceptions from criminal liability, particularly in cases of danger to a woman's health or where fetal survival was at risk. In 2004, Mexico City enacted its own law, effectively decriminalizing consensual abortion in cases of rape, fetal malformation, and risk to the woman's health. A 2007 reform further decriminalized all consensual abortion within the first 12 weeks of pregnancy, and required public hospitals to provide abortion and family planning services. In August 2008, the Supreme Court of Mexico ruled Mexico City's 2007 liberalization of abortion law constitutional. PMID:19545866

  15. 28 CFR 551.23 - Abortion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Abortion. 551.23 Section 551.23 Judicial Administration...Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.23 Abortion. (a) The inmate has the responsibility...

  16. 28 CFR 551.23 - Abortion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Abortion. 551.23 Section 551.23 Judicial Administration...Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.23 Abortion. (a) The inmate has the responsibility...

  17. 28 CFR 551.23 - Abortion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Abortion. 551.23 Section 551.23 Judicial Administration...Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.23 Abortion. (a) The inmate has the responsibility...

  18. 28 CFR 551.23 - Abortion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Abortion. 551.23 Section 551.23 Judicial Administration...Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.23 Abortion. (a) The inmate has the responsibility...

  19. 28 CFR 551.23 - Abortion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.23 Abortion...counseling to aid her in making the decision whether to carry the pregnancy to full term or to have an elective abortion. If an...

  20. Roe v. Wade and "partial birth abortion" bans.

    PubMed

    1998-01-22

    The US Supreme Court crafted its Roe vs. Wade ruling based on privacy protections embedded in the US Constitution and the competing interests of the states to protect maternal health and potential life. In its later Casey decision, the Court allowed states to promote their interest in potential life by surrounding abortion with obstacles as long as these did not pose an "undue burden" on the woman's privacy rights. Recent "partial-birth" abortion bans enacted by 17 states seek to weaken Roe by 1) including such broad definitions that they in effect ban all abortions, 2) seeking to create constitutional rights for fetuses, and 3) forwarding states' interests not recognized by Roe. In addition, "partial-birth" abortion bans that outlaw medically-accepted abortion methods do not further any state interest recognized by Roe because 1) they are not designed to dissuade the woman, 2) fetal survival is impossible, and 3) they undermine protection of maternal health. Such bans ignore the distinction between pre- and postviability abortions called for in Roe and flout Roe's protection of the life and health of women. In effect, such bans attack every important aspect of the Roe vs. Wade ruling. PMID:12293726

  1. The struggle for abortion law reform in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Andrea

    2002-05-01

    In Thailand abortion is against the law except in cases of risk to a woman's health or if the pregnancy is the result of rape or other sexual crimes. This paper presents an overview of the history of the abortion debate in Thailand based upon research conducted from 1997-2001 for an ethnographic and historical study. Information was taken from media reports from 1950 in the Thai and English language press, a review of parliamentary records and interviews with 10 key informants. The debate over legal reform started in 1973. A reform bill was passed in 1981 in the House of Representatives but defeated in the Senate, primarily due to the lobbying efforts of Chamlong Srimuang, the leader of a broad-based religious coalition, who has been central in the anti-reform movement since then. The current democratically elected government in Thailand offers the best hope yet for reform, though abortion remains a politically sensitive issue, sensationalized in the press to counter reform efforts. A new advocacy network has recently been formed, including a range of women's organisations, public health advocates, academics and journalists. Current proposals from governmental and medical profession bodies may make abortions available to some women, but most, who seek abortions due to socio-economic and family planning reasons, will continue to have to find abortions by whatever means they can. PMID:12369331

  2. 12 CFR 792.57 - Special procedures: Information furnished by other agencies; medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...furnished by other agencies; medical records. 792.57 Section 792...furnished by other agencies; medical records. (a) When a request for...the system manager. (b) Medical records may be disclosed on request...

  3. 45 CFR 5b.6 - Special procedures for notification of or access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...for notification of or access to medical records. 5b.6 Section 5b.6...for notification of or access to medical records. (a) General. An individual...notification of or access to his medical records, including psychological...

  4. 12 CFR 792.57 - Special procedures: Information furnished by other agencies; medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...furnished by other agencies; medical records. 792.57 Section 792...furnished by other agencies; medical records. (a) When a request for...the system manager. (b) Medical records may be disclosed on request...

  5. 45 CFR 5b.6 - Special procedures for notification of or access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...for notification of or access to medical records. 5b.6 Section 5b.6...for notification of or access to medical records. (a) General. An individual...notification of or access to his medical records, including psychological...

  6. 45 CFR 5b.6 - Special procedures for notification of or access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...for notification of or access to medical records. 5b.6 Section 5b.6...for notification of or access to medical records. (a) General. An individual...notification of or access to his medical records, including psychological...

  7. 45 CFR 5b.6 - Special procedures for notification of or access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...for notification of or access to medical records. 5b.6 Section 5b.6...for notification of or access to medical records. (a) General. An individual...notification of or access to his medical records, including psychological...

  8. 12 CFR 792.57 - Special procedures: Information furnished by other agencies; medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...furnished by other agencies; medical records. 792.57 Section 792...furnished by other agencies; medical records. (a) When a request for...the system manager. (b) Medical records may be disclosed on request...

  9. 45 CFR 5b.6 - Special procedures for notification of or access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...for notification of or access to medical records. 5b.6 Section 5b.6...for notification of or access to medical records. (a) General. An individual...notification of or access to his medical records, including psychological...

  10. Bowel perforation secondary to illegally induced abortion: a tertiary hospital experience in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bowel perforation though rarely reported is a serious complication of induced abortion, which is often performed illegally by persons without any medical training in developing countries. A sudden increase in the number of patients in our centre in recent years prompted the authors to analyze this problem. The study was conducted to describe our own experiences in the surgical management of these patients. Methods This was a retrospective study involving patients who were jointly managed by the surgical and gynecological teams at Bugando Medical Centre (BMC) for bowel perforation secondary to illegally induced abortion from January 2002 to December 2011. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 17.0. Results A total of 68 patients (representing 4.2% of cases) were enrolled in the study. Their ages ranged from 14 to 45 years with a median age of 21 years. Majority of patients were, secondary school students/leavers (70.6%), unmarried (88.2%), nulliparous (80.9%), unemployed (82.4%) and most of them were dependent member of the family. Previous history of contraceptive use was reported in only 14.7% of cases. The majority of patients (79.4%) had procured the abortion in the 2nd trimester. Dilatation and curettage (82.4%) was the most common reported method used in procuring abortion. The interval from termination of pregnancy to presentation in hospital ranged from 1 to 14 days (median 6 days ). The ileum (51.5%) and sigmoid colon (22.1%) was the most common portions of the bowel affected. Resection and anastomosis with uterine repair was the most common (86.8%) surgical procedure performed. Complication and mortality rates were 47.1% and 10.3% respectively. According to multivariate logistic regression analysis, gestational age at termination of pregnancy, delayed presentation, delayed surgical treatment and presence of complications were significantly associated with mortality (P<0.001). The overall median length of hospital stay (LOS) was 18 days (1day to 128 days ). Patients who developed complications stayed longer in the hospital, and this was statistically significant (P=0.012). Conclusion Bowel perforation following illegally induced abortion is still rampant in our environment and constitutes significantly to high maternal morbidity and mortality. Early recognition of the diagnosis, aggressive resuscitation and early institution of surgical management is of paramount importance if morbidity and mortality associated with bowel perforation are to be avoided. PMID:22938178

  11. Adolescent pregnancy: a study of aborters and non-aborters.

    PubMed

    Kane, F J; Lachenbruch, P A

    1973-10-01

    In a June 1970 through January 1971 study of 99 single girls seeking abortion and 33 single girls choosing to complete the pregnancy, knowledge of and/or access to contraceptives were not the problem. Emotional factors such as guilt over sexual activity, acting-out disorders (rebellious attitude, hippie lifestyle, indifference toward others), or severe reactions to loss of a love relationship contributed to pregnancy in both groups. The girls who became pregnant, especially the ones who chose to complete the pregnancy, viewed pregnancy and motherhood as a source of gratification and self-esteem. Research on motivational factors in adolescent pregnancy is needed to prevent high recidivism. The majority of state abortion laws requiring phychiatric deficiencies for abortions are misguided, since the girls who chose not to abort were more psychiatrically disturbed than the ones who had abortions. PMID:4742821

  12. Operational and Medical Procedures for a Declared Contingency Shuttle (CSCS) Shuttle Mission Due to a Failure that Precludes a Safe Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Adrien; Patlach, Bob; Duchense, Ted; Chandler, Mike; Stepaniak, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    This poster paper outlines the operational and medical procedures for a shuttle mission that has a failure that precludes a safe return to Earth. Information about the assumptions, procedures and limiting consumables is included.

  13. Abortion: Approaches from Virtue

    E-print Network

    Rovie, Eric M.

    uses the example of a woman pregnant with a Down's syndrome child and her decision whether or not to go through with the pregnancy. If the choice is between having a Down's child but no others (at least in part due to the stresses of raising... criticize women for repeatedly using abortion as a substitute for birth control. It is also commonly held that an ethics of virtue can have little or nothing to say about issues involving the need for action guidance. I will argue that virtue ethics...

  14. Appeals court finds Utah late abortion restrictions unconstitutional.

    PubMed

    1995-09-15

    In an opinion issued on August 2, 1995, a three judge panel of the US Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit found invalid several portions of Utah's 1991 criminal abortion ban that applied to pregnancy terminations after the twentieth week as well as prohibiting fetal diagnosis and treatment. The unanimous decision marks the first time that a federal appellate panel has applied the US Supreme Court's 1992 decision in Planned Parenthood vs. Casey to restrictions on abortions performed late in pregnancy. In December 1992, Judge Thomas Greene of the US District Court for the District of Utah relied upon Casey to find unconstitutional the Utah legislature's 1991 attempt to ban virtually all abortions. At the same time, however, the district court rewrote the abortion ban to prohibit procedures after the twentieth week of pregnancy except to save a woman's life, to prevent grave damage to her health, in cases of rape or incest, or to prevent the birth of a child with grave defects. The district court also upheld a ban on fetal experimentation and a requirement that physicians performing later abortions use the method most likely to give the fetus the best chance of survival. Judge Greene's decision was stayed pending negotiations over possible settlement and plaintiffs' appeal in the case. Overturning the lower court's holdings, the appeals court found that Judge Greene's revision of the abortion ban was an improper use of judicial power; that the prohibition on so-called fetal experimentation is unconstitutionally vague; and that the restrictions on post-viability abortions are invalid because they constitute an undue burden. In a separate opinion, the appeals court reversed Judge Greene's unprecedented 1993 order awarding attorneys fees to the State of Utah and sanctioning plaintiffs in Jane L. vs. Bangerter for raising alternative legal claims under which the abortion ban might have been found unconstitutional. PMID:12320245

  15. Birth, meaningful viability and abortion.

    PubMed

    Jensen, David

    2015-06-01

    What role does birth play in the debate about elective abortion? Does the wrongness of infanticide imply the wrongness of late-term abortion? In this paper, I argue that the same or similar factors that make birth morally significant with regard to abortion make meaningful viability morally significant due to the relatively arbitrary time of birth. I do this by considering the positions of Mary Anne Warren and José Luis Bermúdez who argue that birth is significant enough that the wrongness of infanticide does not imply the wrongness of late-term abortion. On the basis of the relatively arbitrary timing of birth, I argue that meaningful viability is the point at which elective abortion is prima facie morally wrong. PMID:25012846

  16. Nurses’ perspectives on supporting children during needle-related medical procedures

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Katarina; Rydström, Ingela; Enskär, Karin; Englund, Ann-Charlotte Dalheim

    2014-01-01

    Children state that among their worst fears during hospitalization are those related to various nursing procedures and to injections and needles. Nurses thus have a responsibility to help children cope with needle-related medical procedures (NRMP) and the potentially negative effects of these. The aim of the study is to describe the lived experience of supporting children during NRMP, from the perspective of nurses. Fourteen nurses took part in the study, six of whom participated on two occasions thus resulting in 20 interviews. A reflective lifeworld research approach was used, and phenomenological analysis was applied. The result shows that supporting children during NRMP is characterized by a desire to meet the child in his/her own world and by an effort to reach the child's horizon of understanding regarding these actions, based on the given conditions. The essential meaning of the phenomenon is founded on the following constituents: developing relationships through conversation, being sensitive to embodied responses, balancing between tact and use of restraint, being the child's advocate, adjusting time, and maintaining belief. The discussion focuses on how nurses can support children through various types of conversation and by receiving help from the parents’ ability to be supportive, and on whether restraint can be supportive or not for children during NRMP. Our conclusion is that nurses have to see each individual child, meet him/her in their own world, and decide on supportive actions while at the same time balancing their responsibility for the completion of the NRMP. This work can be described as “balancing on a tightrope” in an unpredictable situation. PMID:24646473

  17. Making legal abortion accessible in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Faúndes, Anibal; Leocádio, Elcylene; Andalaft, Jorge

    2002-05-01

    Abortion is legal in Brazil if it is the only means to save the woman's life or if the pregnancy is the result of rape. Although this has been the law for over 60 years, it has almost never been applied until recent years. In the past five years, the number of hospitals providing care to women victims of sexual violence has increased from 4 to 63, of which 40 are currently providing legal abortions. This paper describes a sensitization project and advocacy work carried out from within the obstetric and gynaecology establishment which has succeeded in motivating many key individuals and hospital staff to provide services for pregnancy termination in cases of rape. The dialogue between medical leaders and women's rights advocates and the emphasis on comprehensive care of women who have suffered sexual violence are key elements in the success of this initiative. The support of medical professionals, the organization and strength of the women's health and rights movement, the political support at federal, state and city government levels, including from the Federal Ministry of Health, and ongoing advocacy within the medical establishment have all been important elements in making the provision of services a reality. PMID:12369314

  18. A Bayesian Procedure for File Linking to Analyze End-of-Life Medical Costs

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, Roee; Afendulis, Christopher C.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    End-of-life medical expenses are a significant proportion of all health care expenditures. These costs were studied using costs of services from Medicare claims and cause of death (CoD) from death certificates. In the absence of a unique identifier linking the two datasets, common variables identified unique matches for only 33% of deaths. The remaining cases formed cells with multiple cases (32% in cells with an equal number of cases from each file and 35% in cells with an unequal number). We sampled from the joint posterior distribution of model parameters and the permutations that link cases from the two files within each cell. The linking models included the regression of location of death on CoD and other parameters, and the regression of cost measures with a monotone missing data pattern on CoD and other demographic characteristics. Permutations were sampled by enumerating the exact distribution for small cells and by the Metropolis algorithm for large cells. Sparse matrix data structures enabled efficient calculations despite the large dataset (?1.7 million cases). The procedure generates m datasets in which the matches between the two files are imputed. The m datasets can be analyzed independently and results combined using Rubin's multiple imputation rules. Our approach can be applied in other file linking applications. PMID:23645944

  19. Contraceptive use among clients of the Atlanta Feminist Women's Health Center at three to five weeks post-abortion.

    PubMed

    Moslin, Trisha A; Rochat, Roger W

    2011-08-01

    Little is known about women's contraceptive use and sexual activity in the immediate post-abortion period although effective contraceptive use is paramount during this time because fertility returns almost immediately. This study sought to learn more about women's contraceptive use and sexual behaviors to inform abortion providers and help them serve their clients better, potentially leading to a decline in the rates of unintended pregnancy and repeat abortion. Abortion clients of an Atlanta, GA clinic were surveyed over the telephone 3-5 weeks post-abortion. Background information was collected from clinic medical charts. Simple and stratified frequencies and logistic regression were used to describe women's sexual activity and contraceptive use in the immediate post-abortion period and to determine if variables known at the time of the abortion could predict contraceptive use 3-5 weeks post-abortion. 54.2% (n = 39) of women had engaged in sexual intercourse in the immediate post-abortion period. Of these, 30.8% (n = 12) were not using a contraceptive method or were not using it effectively. Women who said they did not want or need information about birth control on their medical history form were less likely to be using contraception 3-5 weeks post abortion. Emphasizing the rapid return of fertility and risk of conception in pre-abortion counseling sessions could prevent future unintended pregnancies among abortion clients. Further research could explore the interaction between a willingness to talk about contraceptive methods at the time of abortion and method use post-abortion. PMID:20602161

  20. Medical termination of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Christin-Maitre, S; Bouchard, P; Spitz, I M

    2000-03-30

    This review focuses on advances in the medical termination of pregnancy during the early period of the first trimester, when most abortions are performed. The drugs are used to terminate pregnancy act by inhibiting the synthesis of progesterone, inducing myometrial contractions, antagonizing the action of progesterone, or inhibiting trophoblast development. Among the drugs used in medical abortion are epostane, prostaglandins (including misoprostol and gameprost), combined methotrexate and misoprostol, tamoxifen-misoprostol regimen, mifepristone and prostaglandin, and antiprogestin and prostaglandins. The efficacy, side effects, and contraindications of these drugs in the medical termination of pregnancy are discussed. In general, medical abortion is associated with higher rates of prolonged bleeding, nausea, vomiting, and pain as compared to surgical abortion. However, medical termination of pregnancy has a high rate of efficacy in women with early pregnancies. In addition, medical abortion is safe and acceptable to women, and it does not require anesthesia. Lastly, women who choose medical abortion must have access to a center where suction curettage is available, should heavy bleeding occur and blood transfusion is required. PMID:10738054

  1. Age, parity, history of abortion and contraceptive choices affect the risk of repeat abortion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oskari Heikinheimo; Mika Gissler; Satu Suhonen

    2008-01-01

    BackgroundThe rate of repeat induced abortion varies from 30% to 38% in northern Europe. Thus, repeat abortion is an important public health issue. However, risk factors as regards repeat abortion are poorly understood. We characterized risk factors related to sociodemographic characteristics, history of abortion and post-abortal contraception.

  2. Prevention of infection after induced abortion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharon L. Achilles; Matthew F. Reeves

    2011-01-01

    One known complication of induced abortion is upper genital tract infection, which is relatively uncommon in the current era of safe, legal abortion. Currently, rates of upper genital tract infection in the setting of legal induced abortion in the United States are generally less than 1%. Randomized controlled trials support the use of prophylactic antibiotics for surgical abortion in the

  3. The Impact of Legalized Abortion on Crime

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John J. Donohue; Steven D. Levitt

    2000-01-01

    We offer evidence that legalized abortion has contributed significantly to recent crime reductions. Crime began to fall roughly 18 years after abortion legalization. The 5 states that allowed abortion in 1970 experienced declines earlier than the rest of the nation, which legalized in 1973 with Roe v. Wade. States with high abortion rates in the 1970s and 1980s experienced greater

  4. British gynaecologists' attitudes in 2008 to the provision of legal abortion.

    PubMed

    Savage, W; Francome, C

    2011-05-01

    In 2008, we investigated the attitudes and practice of British consultant gynaecologists towards induced abortion, and made comparisons with our similar survey in 1989. A random sample of one in six (217) was selected from the register of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG). The response to the postal questionnaire was 70% (152). Satisfaction with the way the 1967 Abortion Act is operating was expressed by 59% (76% in 1989) and an upper limit of 24 weeks was supported by 50% (77% in 1989). Abortion after 20 weeks was approved to protect health by 92%; after rape by 60% and for serious fetal handicap by 87%. A change in the regulations to require the signature of only one doctor (rather than two) to certify the need for abortion was supported by 65%. Only a minority (41%) provided 2nd trimester abortion in person; 61% would separate abortion provision from general gynaecology; 57% suggested there should be separate abortion units for gestations over 13 weeks and 56% felt that fertility control should become be a sub-specialty. Satisfaction with the Abortion Act 1967 has decreased during the last 20 years. Gynaecologists' attitudes to the indications for 2nd trimester abortion remain wide, with clear implications for women seeking abortion. The service to women would be improved if abortion on request was permitted in the 1st trimester and after only one medical signature in the 2nd trimester. Our view is that the decision to end a pregnancy should be made by the woman and that abortion should be decriminalised. PMID:21534755

  5. Induced abortion and contraception use

    PubMed Central

    du Prey, Beatrice; Talavlikar, Rachel; Mangat, Rupinder; Freiheit, Elizabeth A.; Drummond, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine what proportion of women seeking induced abortion in the Calgary census metropolitan area were immigrants. Design For 2 months, eligible women were asked to complete a questionnaire. Women who refused were asked to provide their country of birth (COB) to assess for selection bias. Setting Two abortion clinics in Calgary, Alta. Participants Women presenting at or less than 15 weeks’ gestational age for induced abortion for maternal indications. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was the proportion of women seeking induced abortion services who were immigrants. Secondary outcomes compared socioeconomic characteristics and contraception use between immigrant and Canadian-born women. Results A total of 752 women either completed a questionnaire (78.6%) or provided their COB (21.4%). Overall, 28.9% of women living in the Calgary census metropolitan area who completed the questionnaire were immigrants, less than the 31.2% background proportion of immigrant women of childbearing age. However, 46.0% of women who provided only COB were immigrants. When these data were combined, 34.2% of women presenting for induced abortion identified as immigrant, a proportion not significantly different from the background proportion (P = .127). Immigrant women presenting for induced abortion tended to be older, more educated, married with children, and have increased parity. They were similar to Canadian-born women in number of previous abortions, income status, and employment status. Conclusion This study suggests that immigrant women in Calgary are not presenting for induced abortion in disproportionately higher numbers, which differs from existing European literature. This is likely owing to differing socioeconomic characteristics among the immigrant women in our study from what have been previously described in the literature (typically lower socioeconomic status). Much still needs to be explored with regard to factors influencing the use of abortion services by immigrant women. PMID:25217694

  6. Western juniper-induced abortions in beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective—To determine if the bark from western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis) will induce late term abortions in cattle. Animals—6 two-year-old Angus heifers. Procedures—Bark from western juniper trees was collected, dried, and finely ground. Pregnant cows were dosed starting on day 250 of gesta...

  7. A Foreign Body in the Cervix after Spontaneous Abortion: A Rare Case of a Traumatic Fetal Decapitation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although incomplete spontaneous abortions are common in early pregnancy, fetal decapitation does not specifically appear in the medical literature as a known complication of spontaneous abortion. We present a rare and unusual case of an incomplete spontaneous abortion occurring at home with the mother presenting to the emergency department (ED) with a decapitated fetus and a retained fetal head in the cervical os. PMID:25180106

  8. Using Functional Analysis Procedures To Monitor Medication Effects in an Outpatient and School Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Mark T.; Vu, Chau; Derby, K. Mark; Goris, Mary; McLaughlin, T. F.

    2002-01-01

    Functional analysis methods were used to monitor medication used to reduce vocal and physical tics of a child with Tourettes Syndrome. Post-medication results demonstrated a reduced level of tics by the participant. Although preliminary, the findings suggest that functional analysis methods can be used to monitor the effects of medication in…

  9. Measuring Unsafe Abortion-Related Mortality: A Systematic Review of the Existing Methods

    PubMed Central

    Gerdts, Caitlin; Vohra, Divya; Ahern, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Background The WHO estimates that 13% of maternal mortality is due to unsafe abortion, but challenges with measurement and data quality persist. To our knowledge, no systematic assessment of the validity of studies reporting estimates of abortion-related mortality exists. Study Design To be included in this study, articles had to meet the following criteria: (1) published between September 1st, 2000-December 1st, 2011; (2) utilized data from a country where abortion is “considered unsafe”; (3) specified and enumerated causes of maternal death including “abortion”; (4) enumerated ?100 maternal deaths; (5) a quantitative research study; (6) published in a peer-reviewed journal. Results 7,438 articles were initially identified. Thirty-six studies were ultimately included. Overall, studies rated “Very Good” found the highest estimates of abortion related mortality (median 16%, range 1–27.4%). Studies rated “Very Poor” found the lowest overall proportion of abortion related deaths (median: 2%, range 1.3–9.4%). Conclusions Improvements in the quality of data collection would facilitate better understanding global abortion-related mortality. Until improved data exist, better reporting of study procedures and standardization of the definition of abortion and abortion-related mortality should be encouraged. PMID:23341939

  10. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 15.99.01.V0.01 Human Participants in Research

    E-print Network

    Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 15.99.01.V0.01 Human Participants in Research Approved: March 26, 2013 Next Scheduled Review: March 26, 2015 Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Participants in Research, Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL) will comply with all

  11. States, Congress confront abortion services under Medicaid, health care plan.

    PubMed

    1994-01-13

    Abortion coverage under various health care reform proposals has dominated the political reproductive rights debate, while poor women's access to abortion under Medicaid presents a current practical concern. Under the Clinton administration's proposed Health Security Act, abortion would be covered under "services for pregnant women," and Medicaid would eventually be incorporated into the national health plan. A final version is a long way off. For now, the Hyde amendment, limiting Medicaid coverage of abortion, controls the issue. Congress has made only negligible progress in freeing federal funds for Medicaid abortions: only in situations of life endangerment, rape, or incest. States are required to cover abortions that are medically necessary under the new guidelines, which now include pregnancy arising from rape and incest. The federal policy defers to state law on the definition of rape and incest, allowing for reasonable reporting or documentation requirements, while disallowing unduly burdensome regulations by allowing the treating physician reimbursement when the physician certifies that the patient was unable for physical or psychological reasons to comply with the requirement. States disagreeing with the new abortion policy immediately registered their opposition. Utah's health department, which has a "life only" law, has pledged not to implement the new federal policy until there is further clarification. The Health Care Financing Administrator responded by writing that "the decision to implement this policy nationwide was not discretionary." Congress chose not to add statutory language deferring to the states, and under U.S. Constitutional law, where state law or policy conflicts with federal law, federal law takes precedence. The next battle will certainly center on attempts to amend the Hyde amendment itself as well as health care legislation along the "states' option" lines. PMID:12345518

  12. Probable Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus transmission occurred after aerosol-generating medical procedures in Russia: nosocomial cluster.

    PubMed

    Pshenichnaya, Natalia Yurievna; Nenadskaya, Svetlana Alexeevna

    2015-04-01

    We report here a fatal case of laboratory confirmed Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF), which caused nosocomial infection in eight health care workers (HCWs), who had provided medical care for the patient. All the HCWs survived. The report demonstrates that airborne transmission of CCHF is a real risk, at least when the CCHF patient is in a ventilator. During performance of any aerosol-generating medical procedures for any CCHF patient airborne precautions should always be added to standard precautions, in particular, airway protective N95 mask or equivalent standard, eye protection, single airborne precaution room, or a well-ventilated setting. PMID:25576827

  13. Size Selective Characterization and Particle Emission Rates during a Simulated Medical Laser Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Ramon

    A laboratory-based simulated surgical procedure was designed to characterize the medical laser-generated air contaminant (LGAC) particles generated during surgical procedures and to estimate exposures in theoretical rooms. Laser operational parameter settings were varied between levels to investigate the influence of parameter settings on LGAC generation. Two medical lasers, the carbon dioxide at a wavelength of 10,600 nanometers (CO2, lambda =10,600 nm) and the holmium yttrium aluminum garnet (Ho:YAG) laser at the wavelength of 2100 nanometers (Ho:YAG, lambda =2100 nm) were used, varying three operational parameters (beam diameter, pulse-repetition frequency [PRF], and power) between two levels and the resultant plume was collected using two real-time size selective particle counters in a laboratory emission chamber. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine the influence of operational parameter settings on size-specific particle emission rate. Particles from a limited number of experiments were also collected on polycarbonate filters and imaged using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in backscatter mode to study the particle characteristics and if mechanism of formation could be determined. Particles on each filter were counted and a determination on shape (irregular versus homogenous) and diameter was made. Size-specific particle emission rates were then used to demonstrate potential concentration range using a two-zone exposure model. Results indicate power and beam diameter were statistically significant influential parameters for both lasers and for all particle size ranges, but pulse repetition frequency was only a statistically significant influential parameter for the smallest particles generated. An increase in power and decrease in beam diameter led to an increase in particle emission for the Ho:YAG laser. For the CO2 laser, higher power led to a decrease in emission rates of small particles and an increase for large particles while a smaller beam diameter led to an increase of particle emissions for most size ranges (<10microm). Beam diameter was the most influential variable in the generation of laser-generated particles at all sizes, and the three operational parameters we tested had the most influence on the generation of the smallest particle size ranges. Particle size varied, with the Ho:YAG laser producing particles in the 1--10 microm range and the CO2 laser producing particles between 1 and 50 microm in diameter. Particle shape was variable, with fibers, foam, and conglomerate particles present in our samples. Modeled concentrations for the near-field ranged between 0.03 and 0.5 mg/m3 and between 0.01 and 0.4 mg/m3 in the far-field. Results indicate concentrations in the simulated scenarios were similar to those obtained from previously reported field assessments conducted in hospital operating rooms (ORs). The methods used in this study provide a foundation for future investigations to better estimate particle-size dependent emission rates for additional laser operational parameters in order to inform occupational exposure control strategies.

  14. Effects of paternal occupational exposure on spontaneous abortions.

    PubMed Central

    Lindbohm, M L; Hemminki, K; Bonhomme, M G; Anttila, A; Rantala, K; Heikkilä, P; Rosenberg, M J

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Paternal exposure to mutagenic agents has been suggested to affect pregnancy outcome adversely. METHODS: A nationwide data base of medically diagnosed spontaneous abortions and other pregnancies and national census data was used to evaluate the effects of men's occupational exposures on risk of spontaneous abortion in 99,186 pregnancies in Finland. Census data from the years 1975 and 1980 provided information about the occupation, industry, and socioeconomic status. A job-exposure classification was developed to classify women and their husbands according to possible occupational exposures on the basis of their occupational title and industry. RESULTS: In 10% of the pregnancies, the husband was exposed to one or more of the mutagens, and the rate of spontaneous abortion was unaffected (OR = 1.0). Of the 25 specific mutagenic exposures evaluated, paternal exposure to four (ethylene oxide, rubber chemicals, solvents used in refineries, and solvents used in the manufacturing of rubber products) was associated with an increased relative risk of spontaneous abortion. In addition, the risk of spontaneous abortion was higher among wives of rubber products workers than among unexposed men. CONCLUSIONS: Although there is some biological rationale for the findings of this study, these findings need to be confirmed by studies in which individual exposures can be measured directly. PMID:1853994

  15. The abortion decision: fantasy processes.

    PubMed

    Allanson, S; Astbury, J

    1996-09-01

    This paper considers that features intrinsic to pregnancy and to an unwanted pregnancy/abortion decision heighten the likelihood of the occurrence, and the importance, of fantasy in the decision-maker's thinking. In addition, investigation of fantasy or non-rational processes in an abortion decision emphasizes the complexity of decision-making in a way which may challenge ideas of decision-making in general. The results of a pilot study using a short fantasy inventory with 20 women facing an abortion decision are presented to highlight fantasy, not as irrational or pathological, but as legitimately coexisting with logical, reasoning, non-fantasy thought in the abortion decision. The clinical value of the fantasy inventory is explored. PMID:8892162

  16. Aborting a Malformed Fetus: A Debatable Issue in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alaiyan, Saleh; AlFaleh, Khalid M.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital anomalies contribute a significant proportion of infant morbidity and mortality, as well as fetal mortality. They are generally grouped into three major categories: structural/metabolic, congenital infections, and other conditions. The most prevalent conditions include congenital heart defects, orofacial clefts, Down syndrome, and neural tube defects. Several prenatal diagnostic procedures have been introduced, both cytogenetic (such as chorion biopsy, amniocentesis and funiculocentesis) and biophysical (ultrasound 2-D, 3-D and 4-D, ultrasonography with Doppler, etc.). Insufficient data are currently available from Saudi Arabia on the epidemiology of the lethal congenital abnormalities which should be a priority due to high rate of consanguineous marriages among first cousins and their association with congenital anomalies. In terms of consanguinity and birth defects, a significant positive association has been consistently demonstrated between consanguinity and morbidity, and congenital defects with a complex etiology appear to be both more prevalent in consanguineous families and have a greater likelihood of recurrence. A debate regarding aborting a malformed fetus still exists among the senior Islamic scholars in many of the Islamic countries. The progressive interpretations of Islam have resulted in laws allowing for early abortion on request in two countries; six others permit abortion on health grounds and three more also allow abortion in cases of rape or fetal impairment. In Saudi Arabia, efforts to legalize abortion in certain circumstances have been recently discussed among Senior Religious Scholars and specialized physicians to permit abortions in certain circumstances. In this mini-review we discuss the current debate regarding aborting a malformed fetus in Saudi Arabia with a focus on the Islamic perspective. PMID:24027674

  17. Aborting a malformed fetus: a debatable issue in saudi arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Alaiyan, Saleh; Alfaleh, Khalid M

    2012-01-01

    Congenital anomalies contribute a significant proportion of infant morbidity and mortality, as well as fetal mortality. They are generally grouped into three major categories: structural/metabolic, congenital infections, and other conditions. The most prevalent conditions include congenital heart defects, orofacial clefts, Down syndrome, and neural tube defects. Several prenatal diagnostic procedures have been introduced, both cytogenetic (such as chorion biopsy, amniocentesis and funiculocentesis) and biophysical (ultrasound 2-D, 3-D and 4-D, ultrasonography with Doppler, etc.). Insufficient data are currently available from Saudi Arabia on the epidemiology of the lethal congenital abnormalities which should be a priority due to high rate of consanguineous marriages among first cousins and their association with congenital anomalies. In terms of consanguinity and birth defects, a significant positive association has been consistently demonstrated between consanguinity and morbidity, and congenital defects with a complex etiology appear to be both more prevalent in consanguineous families and have a greater likelihood of recurrence. A debate regarding aborting a malformed fetus still exists among the senior Islamic scholars in many of the Islamic countries. The progressive interpretations of Islam have resulted in laws allowing for early abortion on request in two countries; six others permit abortion on health grounds and three more also allow abortion in cases of rape or fetal impairment. In Saudi Arabia, efforts to legalize abortion in certain circumstances have been recently discussed among Senior Religious Scholars and specialized physicians to permit abortions in certain circumstances. In this mini-review we discuss the current debate regarding aborting a malformed fetus in Saudi Arabia with a focus on the Islamic perspective. PMID:24027674

  18. Pitch Guidance Optimization for the Orion Abort Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stillwater, Ryan Allanque

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration created the Constellation program to develop the next generation of manned space vehicles and launch vehicles. The Orion abort system is initiated in the event of an unsafe condition during launch. The system has a controller gains schedule that can be tuned to reduce the attitude errors between the simulated Orion abort trajectories and the guidance trajectory. A program was created that uses the method of steepest descent to tune the pitch gains schedule by an automated procedure. The gains schedule optimization was applied to three potential abort scenarios; each scenario tested using the optimized gains schedule resulted in reduced attitude errors when compared to the Orion production gains schedule.

  19. The genesis of the ACNM 1971 Statement on Abortion.

    PubMed

    Summers, L

    1992-01-01

    In 1971, the Board of Directors of the American College of Nurse-Midwives approved a statement that prohibited certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) from performing abortions. In 1990, the statement was superseded by a second "Statement on Abortion," which essentially reworded the 1971 statement with no substantive change. In 1991, 20 years after the first statement was adopted, a resolution was approved at the Annual Meeting recommending that the Board of Directors rescind the statement, thereby allowing individual CNMs to utilize the guidelines for the incorporation of new procedures into nurse-midwifery practice if she/he decides to provide abortions. This article describes the historical basis for the initial 1971 statement in the hope that an understanding of that history will assist nurse-midwives as they reconsider the statement. PMID:1602328

  20. Women's right to health and Ireland's abortion laws.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Maeve

    2015-07-01

    The provision of the Irish Constitution that guarantees "the unborn" a right to life equal to that of a pregnant woman has consequences for access to abortion and the care of women in pregnancy generally. Long-awaited legislation to give effect to the narrow constitutional right to abortion was enacted into law in 2013. In 2014, a guidance document for health professionals' implementation of the legislation was published. However, the legislation and guidance document fall far short of international human rights bodies' recommendations: they fail to deliver effective procedural rights to all of the women eligible for lawful abortion within the state and create new legal barriers to women's reproductive rights. At the same time, cases continue to highlight that the Irish Constitution imposes an unethical and rights-violating legal regime in non-abortion-related contexts. Recent developments suggest that both the failure to put guidelines in place and the development of guidelines that are not centered on women or based on rights further reduce women's access to rights and set unacceptable limitations on women's reproductive autonomy. Nevertheless, public and parliamentary scrutiny of cases involving Ireland's abortion laws is increasingly focusing on the need for reform. PMID:25939525

  1. Evaluating newly acquired authority of nurse practitioners and physician assistants for reserved medical procedures in the Netherlands: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    De Bruijn-Geraets, Daisy P; Van Eijk-Hustings, Yvonne JL; Vrijhoef, Hubertus JM

    2014-01-01

    Aim The study protocol is designed to evaluate the effects of granting independent authorization for medical procedures to nurse practitioners and physician assistants on processes and outcomes of health care. Background Recent (temporarily) enacted legislation in Dutch health care authorizes nurse practitioners and physician assistants to indicate and perform specified medical procedures, i.e. catheterization, cardioversion, defibrillation, endoscopy, injection, puncture, prescribing and simple surgical procedures, independently. Formerly, these procedures were exclusively reserved to physicians, dentists and midwives. Design A triangulation mixed method design is used to collect quantitative (surveys) and qualitative (interviews) data. Methods Outcomes are selected from evidence-based frameworks and models for assessing the impact of advanced nursing on quality of health care. Data are collected in various manners. Surveys are structured around the domains: (i) quality of care; (ii) costs; (iii) healthcare resource use; and (iv) patient centredness. Focus group and expert interviews aim to ascertain facilitators and barriers to the implementation process. Data are collected before the amendment of the law, 1 and 2·5 years thereafter. Groups of patients, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, supervising physicians and policy makers all participate in this national study. The study is supported by a grant from the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport in March 2011. Research Ethics Committee approval was obtained in July 2011. Conclusion This study will provide information about the effects of granting independent authorization for medical procedures to nurse practitioners and physician assistants on processes and outcomes of health care. Study findings aim to support policy makers and other stakeholders in making related decisions. The study design enables a cross-national comparative analysis. PMID:24684631

  2. Repeat abortions in new york city, 2010.

    PubMed

    Toprani, Amita

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to describe factors associated with the number of past abortions obtained by New York City (NYC) abortion patients in 2010. We calculated rates of first and repeat abortion by age, race/ethnicity, and neighborhood-level poverty and the mean number of self-reported past abortions by age, race/ethnicity, neighborhood-level poverty, number of living children, education, payment method, marital status, and nativity. We used negative binomial regression to predict number of past abortions by patient characteristics. Of the 76,614 abortions reported for NYC residents in 2010, 57 % were repeat abortions. Repeat abortions comprised >50 % of total abortions among the majority of sociodemographic groups we examined. Overall, mean number of past abortions was 1.3. Mean number of past abortions was higher for women aged 30-34 years (1.77), women with ?5 children (2.50), and black non-Hispanic women (1.52). After multivariable regression, age, race/ethnicity, and number of children were the strongest predictors of number of past abortions. This analysis demonstrates that, although socioeconomic disparities exist, all abortion patients are at high risk for repeat unintended pregnancy and abortion. PMID:25779755

  3. A Two Step Solution Procedure to a Fuzzy Medical Waste Disposal Facility Location Problem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Ziya Ulukan; Yesim Kop

    2009-01-01

    This paper handles the medical waste disposal facility location problem in Istanbul by using fuzzy TOPSIS (FETOPSIS) to select the adequate place between some candidate points that are obtained from the Ishii's undesirable facility location algorithm. Medical waste must be disposed without damaging environment and human health, complying with new regulations. The aim is to provide an alternative method to

  4. Induced abortion and associated factors in health facilities of Guraghe zone, southern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, Gezahegn; Hambisa, Mitiku Teshome; Semahegn, Agumasie

    2014-01-01

    Unsafe abortion is one of the major medical and public health problems in developing countries including Ethiopia. However, there is a lack of up-to-date and reliable information on induced abortion distribution and its determinant factors in the country. This study was intended to assess induced abortion and associated factors in health facilities of Guraghe zone, Southern Ethiopia. Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted in eight health facilities in Guraghe zone. Client exit interview was conducted on 400 patients using a structured questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with induced abortion. Out of 400 women, 75.5% responded that the current pregnancy that ended in abortion is unwanted. However, only 12.3% of the respondents have admitted interference to the current pregnancy. Having more than four pregnancies (AOR = 4.28, CI: (1.24-14.71)), age of 30-34 years (AOR = 0.15, CI: (0.04-0.55)), primary education (AOR = 0.26, CI: (0.13-0.88)), and wanted pregnancy (AOR = 0.44, CI: (0.14-0.65)) were found to have association with induced abortion. The study revealed high level of induced abortion which is underpinned by high magnitude of unwanted pregnancy. There is requirement for widespread expansion of increased access to high quality family planning service and post-abortion care. PMID:24800079

  5. Induced Abortion and Associated Factors in Health Facilities of Guraghe Zone, Southern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Hambisa, Mitiku Teshome; Semahegn, Agumasie

    2014-01-01

    Unsafe abortion is one of the major medical and public health problems in developing countries including Ethiopia. However, there is a lack of up-to-date and reliable information on induced abortion distribution and its determinant factors in the country. This study was intended to assess induced abortion and associated factors in health facilities of Guraghe zone, Southern Ethiopia. Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted in eight health facilities in Guraghe zone. Client exit interview was conducted on 400 patients using a structured questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with induced abortion. Out of 400 women, 75.5% responded that the current pregnancy that ended in abortion is unwanted. However, only 12.3% of the respondents have admitted interference to the current pregnancy. Having more than four pregnancies (AOR?=?4.28, CI: (1.24–14.71)), age of 30–34 years (AOR?=?0.15, CI: (0.04–0.55)), primary education (AOR?=?0.26, CI: (0.13–0.88)), and wanted pregnancy (AOR?=?0.44, CI: (0.14–0.65)) were found to have association with induced abortion. The study revealed high level of induced abortion which is underpinned by high magnitude of unwanted pregnancy. There is requirement for widespread expansion of increased access to high quality family planning service and post-abortion care. PMID:24800079

  6. Factors associated with choice of post-abortion contraception in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Prata, Ndola; Bell, Suzanne; Holston, Martine; Gerdts, Caitlin; Melkamu, Yilma

    2011-09-01

    The high demand for abortion related services in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia indicates a reliance on abortion to control fertility and highlights an opportunity to increase access to contraceptives and improve post-abortion care. We analyzed the medical records of 1,200 women seeking abortion related services. Logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with use of modern or long-acting contraceptive post-abortion. Multivariate results illustrate that women aged 40-44, students, employed women, receipt of services in private clinics, number of children, and number of previous abortions were significantly associated with the odds of adopting any modern contraceptive post-abortion. The odds of choosing a long-active contraceptive method were significantly and positively associated with being age 25-29, attaining secondary or higher education, and number of children. Improved services and information along with reliable access to modern and long-acting contraceptives can reduce the need to use abortion to control fertility among women in Addis. PMID:22574492

  7. House subcmte. tightens abortion language.

    PubMed

    1978-05-10

    Medicaid would help pay for abortion in fewer circumstances under the fiscal 1979 Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW), appropriations bill approved May 4, 1978, by the House HEW Appropriations Subcommittee than it did in 1978. The new language would permit the funding only if the mother's life would be endangered if the pregnancy were carried to term. Current law permits abortion payments for this reason; if pregnancy results from rape or incest, or if the birth would cause the mother severe and long-lasting physical damage. Behind the scenes pressure probably will be applied to resolve the issue quickly this year since all House members are up for reelection and do not want to have such a sensitive issue intruding on their campaigns. 1 strategy being discussed is the inclusion of riders that would directly or indirectly provide federal funds for abortions in other appropriation measures such as funding for the Defense Department and federal employees health benefits. The House will have to contend with Senator Brooke (R-Massachusetts) ranking minority member on the Senate HEW Appropriations Subcommittee, who is determined to stand firm in favor of liberal abortion funding. With only minimal opposition for his Senate seat this year, Senate staffers say Brooke is not concerned with the possibility of abortion becoming a major campaign issue. It was Brooke who forced the House's hand last year and obtained a more relaxed abortion curb, much to the chagrin of the Carter Administration. The White House, with the President's popularity at a low ebb, would prefer not to be put in a position of taking sides publicly although it prefers the strict curbs. Carter is currently deciding which House members to assist during the campaign and such a no-win issue would only serve to complicate matters. He will have enough of a problem reconciling health spending increases without the added burden of abortion. PMID:12335662

  8. The politics of unsafe abortion in Burkina Faso: The interface of local norms and global public health practice

    PubMed Central

    Storeng, Katerini T.; Ouattara, Fatoumata

    2014-01-01

    In Burkina Faso, abortion is legally restricted and socially stigmatised, but also frequent. Unsafe abortions represent a significant public health challenge, contributing to the country's very high maternal mortality ratio. Inspired by an internationally disseminated public health framing of unsafe abortion, the country's main policy response has been to provide post-abortion care (PAC) to avert deaths from abortion complications. Drawing on ethnographic research, this article describes how Burkina Faso's PAC policy emerged at the interface of political and moral negotiations between public health professionals, national bureaucrats and international agencies and NGOs. Burkinabè decision-makers and doctors, who are often hostile to induced abortion, have been convinced that PAC is ‘life-saving care’ which should be delivered for ethical medical reasons. Moreover, by supporting PAC they not only demonstrate compliance with international standards but also, importantly, do not have to contend with any change in abortion legislation, which they oppose. Rights-based international NGOs, in turn, tactically focus on PAC as a ‘first step’ towards their broader institutional objective to secure safe abortion and abortion rights. Such negotiations between national and international actors result in widespread support for PAC but stifled debate about further legalisation of abortion. PMID:25132157

  9. Reproductive choice for women and men living with HIV: contraception, abortion and fertility.

    PubMed

    Delvaux, Thérèse; Nöstlinger, Christiana

    2007-05-01

    From a policy and programmatic point of view, this paper reviews the literature on the fertility-related needs of women and men living with HIV and how the entry points represented by family planning, sexually transmitted infection and HIV-related services can ensure access to contraception, abortion and fertility services for women and men living with HIV. Most contraceptive methods are safe and effective for HIV positive women and men. The existing range of contraceptive options should be available to people living with HIV, along with more information about and access to emergency contraception. Potential drug interaction must be considered between hormonal contraception and treatment for tuberculosis and certain antiretroviral drugs. Couples living with HIV who wish to use a permanent contraceptive method should have access to female sterilisation and vasectomy in an informed manner, free of coercion. How to promote condoms and dual protection and how to make them acceptable in long term-relationships remains a challenge. Both surgical and medical abortion are safe for women living with HIV. To reduce risk of vertical transmission of HIV and in cases of infertility, people with HIV should have access to sperm washing and other assisted conception methods, if these are available. Simple and cost-effective procedures to reduce risk of vertical transmission should be part of counselling for women and men living with HIV who intend to have children. Support for the reproductive rights of people with HIV is a priority. More operations research on best practices is needed. PMID:17531748

  10. Medical tongue piercing – development and evaluation of a surgical protocol and the perception of procedural discomfort of the participants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A system providing disabled persons with control of various assistive devices with the tongue has been developed at Aalborg University in Denmark. The system requires an activation unit attached to the tongue with a small piercing. The aim of this study was to establish and evaluate a safe and tolerable procedure for medical tongue piercing and to evaluate the expected and perceived procedural discomfort. Methods Four tetraplegic subjects volunteered for the study. A surgical protocol for a safe insertion of a tongue barbell piercing was presented using sterilized instruments and piercing parts. Moreover, post-procedural observations of participant complications such as bleeding, edema, and infection were recorded. Finally, procedural discomforts were monitored by VAS scores of pain, changes in taste and speech as well as problems related to hitting the teeth. Results The piercings were all successfully inserted in less than 5 min and the pain level was moderate compared with oral injections. No bleeding, infection, embedding of the piercing, or tooth/gingival injuries were encountered; a moderate edema was found in one case without affecting the speech. In two cases the piercing rod later had to be replaced by a shorter rod, because participants complained that the rod hit their teeth. The replacements prevented further problems. Moreover, loosening of balls was encountered, which could be prevented with the addition of dental glue. No cases of swallowing or aspiration of the piercing parts were recorded. Conclusions The procedure proved simple, fast, and safe for insertion of tongue piercings for tetraplegic subjects in a clinical setting. The procedure represented several precautions in order to avoid risks in these susceptible participants with possible co-morbidity. No serious complications were encountered, and the procedure was found tolerable to the participants. The procedure may be used in future studies with tongue piercings being a prerequisite for similar systems, and this may include insertion in an out-patient setting. PMID:24684776

  11. Hypnosis Reduces Distress and Duration of an Invasive Medical Procedure for Children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa D. Butler; Barbara K. Symons; Shelly L. Henderson; Linda D. Shortliffe; David Spiegel

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) is a commonly performed radiologic procedure in children that can be both painful and frightening. Given the distress that some children experience during the VCUG and the need for children to be alert and cooperative during the procedure, finding a psychologi- cal intervention that helps children to manage anxiety, distress, and pain is clearly desirable. This

  12. Automated construction of three dimensional image processing procedures by pictorial example with application to medical images

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Shimizu; Xiang-Rong Zhou; J. Hasegawa; J. Toriwaki

    1996-01-01

    Presents an expert system for three dimensional image processing. In analyzing three dimensional gray images, e.g. CT images, a process for extraction of interest regions from each image is frequently required. However, it is difficult to construct all extinction procedure with parameters optimized for each purpose. The proposed system can automatically construct a three dimensional object extraction procedure based on

  13. Exporting abortion politics: the battle over international family planning assistance.

    PubMed

    Lasher, C

    1991-01-01

    Congressional legislation seeking to overturn US government restrictions on international family planning assistance face a possible presidential veto. Dating back to the Reagan years, the 1984 Mexico City Policy prohibits foreign nongovernmental organizations (NGO) receiving US money from performing or actively promoting abortion as a family planning method. Even if abortion is legal in that particular country, the agency involved may not even discuss abortion as one of the medical options of a pregnant woman. In line with the Mexico City Policy, the US has withdrawn funding from both the International Planned Parenthood Federation, the largest NGO in the population field, and the Family Planning International Assistance, the international division of the Planned Parenthood federation of America. One of the effects of the Mexico City Policy has been to make family planning more controversial, and to increase opposition to birth control. In addition to the Mexico City Policy, the Reagan years also saw the implementation of a policy that denies funding to the UNFPA, charged by the US of "co-managing" China's population program that engages in coercive abortion and involuntary sterilization. The UNFPA has denied such charges. So far, President George Bush -- previously a supporter of family planning programs -- has sided with opponents of abortion, and has threatened a veto threat may soon be tested, since Congress has drafted a foreign aid appropriations bill that has includes a measure saying that NGOs should be treated in the same manner as their governments, which are exempt from the Mexico City Policy so long as US funds are not used to support abortions. PMID:12178849

  14. [The problem of abortions and enhancement of analysis of reproductive behavior of women].

    PubMed

    Maksimova, T M; Belov, V B; Lushkina, N P; Nikitina, S Iu; Redina, M A

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with the study of actual rate of abortions in Russia. It is established that multi-aspect statistical information is needed to compare with the data of international organizations. The regular monitoring is important to control the different characteristics of population reproductive behavior abortion prevalence and the all-inclusive participation in the reporting activity of all medical institutions involved independently of property forms and sectorial membership. PMID:23373335

  15. Diagnosing Abortion Problems Abortions can represent a significant loss of (potential)

    E-print Network

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Diagnosing Abortion Problems Abortions can represent a significant loss of (potential) income- hood of diagnosing the cause of any abortions that may occur. In some situations, the prompt diagnosis of an abortion may help reduce the severity of an impending outbreak. Well-kept records can be very useful

  16. Abortable Reader-Writer Locks are No More Complex Than Abortable Mutex Locks

    E-print Network

    Abortable Reader-Writer Locks are No More Complex Than Abortable Mutex Locks Dartmouth Computer on designing abortable mutual exclusion locks, and fairly efficient algorithms of O(log n) RMR complexity have). The abort feature is just as important for a reader-writer lock as it is for a mutual exclusion lock

  17. Achievements of the FIGO Initiative for the Prevention of Unsafe Abortion and its Consequences in South-Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Shahida; Begum, Ferdousi; Tank, Jaydeep; Chaudhury, Pushpa; Yasmin, Haleema; Dissanayake, Mangala

    2014-07-01

    Since 2008, the FIGO Initiative for the Prevention of Unsafe Abortion and its Consequences has contributed to ensuring the substitution of sharp curettage by manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) and medical abortion in selected hospitals in participating countries of South-Southeast Asia. This initiative facilitated the registration of misoprostol in Pakistan and Bangladesh, and the approval of mifepristone for "menstrual regulation" in Bangladesh. The Pakistan Nursing Council agreed to include MVA and medical abortion in the midwifery curriculum. The Bangladesh Government has approved the training of nurses and paramedics in the use of MVA to treat incomplete abortion in selected cases. The Sri Lanka College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, in collaboration with partners, has presented a draft petition to the relevant authorities appealing for them to liberalize the abortion law in cases of rape and incest or when lethal congenital abnormalities are present. Significantly, the initiative has introduced or strengthened the provision of postabortion contraception. PMID:24743025

  18. Getting the story straight. The press and "partial-birth abortion".

    PubMed

    Farmer, A

    2000-06-01

    This paper discusses the controversy of the banning of ¿partial-birth abortion¿ in the state of Nebraska. This controversy arises as a result of how several major news sources described the Nebraska statute--that is, as a pre-viability abortion ban, and not a ban on late-term abortion procedures. This issue did not only occur in Nebraska, but also in Michigan when abortion opponents simultaneously initiated a publicity scheme to mislead the public into believing the ban was about ¿gruesome¿ late-term procedures. The deceptive term ¿partial-birth abortion¿, also seemed to suggest abortions performed on viable fetuses and the language describing the ban was confusing and slippery. In response to this controversy, Janet Benshoof, the president of the Center for Reproductive Law and Policy (CRLP) immediately made a statement to counteract the allegation imposed by abortion opponents. Also, CRLP Communications Deputy Director Margie Kelly spends a considerable amount of time informing the press of the extreme measures of the laws. PMID:12322529

  19. Roe v. Wade. On abortion.

    PubMed

    French, M

    1998-01-01

    In ancient Assyria, fathers held the right of life or death over their newborn infants, but women found to have performed an abortion on themselves or others were impaled and denied burial. This punishment was otherwise reserved for crimes against the state such as high treason or assault on the king. Likewise, in Babylon if a wife arranged her husband's death so that she could marry another man, she was convicted of treason and impaled or crucified. Thus, ancient thought paralleled the husband-wife relationship with that of the state-subject. The small group of men who generally dominate institutions such as the state, the church, or a corporation have a primary demand for obedience and deference to their supreme authority from their underlings. These groups did not condemn abortion because it involved questions of life or death. After all, many states have permitted infanticide, many still sanction execution, and all are willing to sacrifice the lives of their soldiers in war. Patriarchs condemn abortion because they consider it treasonous for a woman to assert the right to use her own judgement and to treat her body as if it were her own and not the property of her husband. This denies the supremacy of the male, which is the first principle of patriarchs. Because patriarchal institutions depend upon the subjection of women, women's bodies become important markers in the struggle for human freedom. This explains why patriarchal institutions in the US have continuously attacked women's right to abortion by fragmenting the statute allowing abortion and attempting to render the fragments illegal. While US women have won other rights that can be protected legally, women require the right to abortion in order to possess the right to physical integrity and to be able to undo what men have done to them. Otherwise, men would be able to create a set-back in women's human rights by forcing women into motherhood. PMID:12178880

  20. Planning and Optimization Algorithms for Image-Guided Medical Procedures Ron Alterovitz

    E-print Network

    Alterovitz, Ron

    to a variety of minimally invasive 1 #12;procedures, from biopsies to cancer treatments such as cryotherapy.1.1 Target Localization in Deformable Tissues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.1.2 Motion Planning for Rigid

  1. Medical Tests and Procedures for Finding and Treating Heart and Blood Vessel Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cue-TAYN-ee-us) coronary intervention (PCI) or balloon angioplasty, is a procedure used to remove a ... brain (carotid angioplasty). A small tube with a balloon attached is threaded into the narrowed or blocked ...

  2. 12 CFR 792.57 - Special procedures: Information furnished by other agencies; medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Special procedures: Information furnished by other...Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION...OF THE NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REQUESTS FOR INFORMATION UNDER THE FREEDOM...Federal agencies, the system manager...

  3. 12 CFR 792.57 - Special procedures: Information furnished by other agencies; medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Special procedures: Information furnished by other...Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION...OF THE NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REQUESTS FOR INFORMATION UNDER THE FREEDOM...Federal agencies, the system manager...

  4. From medical invention to clinical practice: the reimbursement challenge facing new device procedures and technology--part 2: coverage.

    PubMed

    Raab, G Gregory; Parr, David H

    2006-10-01

    This paper, the second of 3 that discuss the reimbursement challenges facing new medical device technology in various issues of this journal, explains the key aspects of coverage that affect the adoption of medical devices. The process Medicare uses to make coverage determinations has become more timely and open over the past several years, but it still lacks the predictability that product innovators prefer. The continued uncertainty surrounding evidence requirements undermines the predictability needed for optimal product planning and innovation. Recent steps taken by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to provide coverage in return for evidence development should provide patients with access to promising new technologies and procedures while generating important evidence concerning their effectiveness. PMID:17412167

  5. Gynaecologists and abortion in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Francome, C

    1994-07-01

    The evidence from gynaecologists in Northern Ireland shows confusion in interpretation and practice of abortion law, with some women even being denied abortion after rape. Over two-thirds of gynaecologists supported a change in the law which would leave the abortion decision to the woman and her doctor, but less than half wanted the introduction of the British law. PMID:7929486

  6. Safe abortion: WHO technical and policy guidance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J Cook; B. M Dickens; M Horga

    2004-01-01

    In 2003, the World Health Organization published its well referenced handbook Safe Abortion: Technical and Policy Guidance for Health Systems to address the estimated almost 20 million induced abortions each year that are unsafe, imposing a burden of approximately 67 thousand deaths annually. It is a global injustice that 95% of unsafe abortions occur in developing countries. The focus of

  7. Abortion and Mental Health: Evaluating the Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Major, Brenda; Appelbaum, Mark; Beckman, Linda; Dutton, Mary Ann; Russo, Nancy Felipe; West, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    The authors evaluated empirical research addressing the relationship between induced abortion and women's mental health. Two issues were addressed: (a) the relative risks associated with abortion compared with the risks associated with its alternatives and (b) sources of variability in women's responses following abortion. This article reflects…

  8. Aborting a Message Flowing Through Social Communities

    E-print Network

    Magdon-Ismail, Malik

    Aborting a Message Flowing Through Social Communities Cindy Hui Rutgers University Piscataway, New that incorporate group structures and the distribution of trust in designing a useful abort mechanism. Index Terms is spreading and we wish to spread a counter rumor. We investigate the aborting of a message that is currently

  9. Aborting a Message Flowing Through Social Communities

    E-print Network

    Goldberg, Mark

    Aborting a Message Flowing Through Social Communities Cindy Hui, Malik Magdon-Ismail, William A in designing a useful abort mechanism. Index Terms--agent-based simulation, information diffusion, information investigate the aborting of a message that is currently diffusing through a network, with the purpose

  10. Abortion, Moral Maturity and Civic Journalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Maggie Jones; Hall, Megan Williams

    1998-01-01

    Contributes to rhetoric, moral reasonings scholarship, and journalism scholarship by examining public rhetoric on abortion and American popular media coverage (1940s to 1990s). Finds that the feminine means of moral reasoning has emerged into the foreground of discourse on abortion. Compares emergence of a common-ground rhetoric on abortion with a…

  11. Abortions in Cattle Max Irsik DVM, MAB

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    Abortions in Cattle Max Irsik DVM, MAB Beef Cattle Extension Veterinarian University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine Abortion is the premature expulsion of the fetus from the dam and usually have died in-utero due to disease and was expelled. Depending upon the cause of "abortion" a cow may

  12. Vagal nerve stimulation for refractory epilepsy: the surgical procedure and complications in 100 implantations by a single medical center.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Gilad; Amit, Moran; Fried, Itzhak; Neufeld, Miri Y; Sharf, Liad; Kramer, Uri; Fliss, Dan M

    2013-01-01

    In 1997, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of intermittent stimulation of the left vagal nerve as adjunctive therapy for seizure control. Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) has since been considered a safe and effective treatment for medically intractable seizures. The objective of this study is to present our experience with the surgical procedure and outcomes after VNS insertion in the first 100 consecutive patients treated at the Tel-Aviv "Sourasky" Medical Center (TASMC). All patients who underwent VNS device implantation by the authors at TASMC between 2005 and 2011 were studied. The collected data included age at onset of epilepsy, seizure type, duration of epilepsy, age at VNS device implantation, seizure reduction, surgical complications, and adverse effects of VNS over time. Fifty-three males and 47 females, age 21.2 ± 11.1 years, underwent VNS implantation. Indications for surgery were medically refractory epilepsy. The most common seizure type was focal (55 patients, 55 %). Seizure duration until implantation was 14.4 ± 9 years. Mean follow-up time after device insertion was 24.5 ± 22 months. Complications were encountered in 12 patients. The most common complication was local infection (6 patients, 6 %). Six devices were removed-four due to infection and two due to loss of clinical effect. Currently, 63 patients remain in active long-term follow-up; of these, 35 patients have >50 % reduction in frequency of attacks.VNS is a well-tolerated and effective therapeutic alternative in the management of medically refractory epilepsy. The surgical procedure is safe and has a low complication rate. PMID:22836871

  13. Learning the facts in medical school is not enough: which factors predict successful application of procedural knowledge in a laboratory setting?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical knowledge encompasses both conceptual (facts or “what” information) and procedural knowledge (“how” and “why” information). Conceptual knowledge is known to be an essential prerequisite for clinical problem solving. Primarily, medical students learn from textbooks and often struggle with the process of applying their conceptual knowledge to clinical problems. Recent studies address the question of how to foster the acquisition of procedural knowledge and its application in medical education. However, little is known about the factors which predict performance in procedural knowledge tasks. Which additional factors of the learner predict performance in procedural knowledge? Methods Domain specific conceptual knowledge (facts) in clinical nephrology was provided to 80 medical students (3rd to 5th year) using electronic flashcards in a laboratory setting. Learner characteristics were obtained by questionnaires. Procedural knowledge in clinical nephrology was assessed by key feature problems (KFP) and problem solving tasks (PST) reflecting strategic and conditional knowledge, respectively. Results Results in procedural knowledge tests (KFP and PST) correlated significantly with each other. In univariate analysis, performance in procedural knowledge (sum of KFP+PST) was significantly correlated with the results in (1) the conceptual knowledge test (CKT), (2) the intended future career as hospital based doctor, (3) the duration of clinical clerkships, and (4) the results in the written German National Medical Examination Part I on preclinical subjects (NME-I). After multiple regression analysis only clinical clerkship experience and NME-I performance remained independent influencing factors. Conclusions Performance in procedural knowledge tests seems independent from the degree of domain specific conceptual knowledge above a certain level. Procedural knowledge may be fostered by clinical experience. More attention should be paid to the interplay of individual clinical clerkship experiences and structured teaching of procedural knowledge and its assessment in medical education curricula. PMID:23433202

  14. Specific Disgust Sensitivities Differentially Predict Interest in Careers of Varying Procedural-Intensity among Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consedine, Nathan S.; Windsor, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Mismatches between the needs of public health systems and student interests have led to renewed study on the factors predicting career specializations among medical students. While most work examines career and lifestyle values, emotional proclivities may be important; disgust sensitivity may help explain preferences for careers with greater and…

  15. Contesting the cruel treatment of abortion-seeking women.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Ruth

    2014-11-01

    This article draws on legal arguments made by civil society organisations to challenge the legal reasoning that apparently produced the decision in the Ms Y case in Ireland in August 2014. I show how legal standards of reasonableness and practicality ought to be interpreted in ways that are respectful of the patient's wishes and rights. The case concerned a decision by the Health Service Executive, the Irish public health authority, to refuse an abortion to a pregnant asylum seeker and rape survivor on the grounds that a caesarean section and early live delivery were practicable and reasonable alternatives justified by the need to protect fetal life. I argue that the abortion refusal may not have been a reasonable decision, as required by the terms of relevant legislation, for four different reasons. First, the alternative of a caesarean section and early live delivery was not likely to avert the risk of suicide, and in fact did not do so. Second, the consent to the caesarean section alternative may not have been a real consent in the legal sense if it was not voluntary. Third, an abortion refusal and forcible treatment fall below the norms of good medical practice as interpreted through a patient-centred perspective. Fourth, an abortion refusal that entails forms of cruel, inhumane and degrading treatment ought not to be a reasonable action under the legislation. PMID:25555759

  16. Estimating the Annual Incidence of Abortions in Iran Applying a Network Scale-up Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rastegari, Azam; Baneshi, Mohammad Reza; Haji-maghsoudi, Saiedeh; Nakhaee, Nowzar; Eslami, Mohammad; Malekafzali, Hossein; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Abortions are of major public health concern in developing countries. In settings in which abortion is highly prohibited, the direct interview is not a reliable method to estimate the abortion rate. The indirect estimation methods to measure the rate of abortion might overcome this dilemma; They are practical methods to estimate the size of the hidden group who do not agree to participate in a direct interview. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the practicality of an indirect method for estimating the abortion rate , Known as Network Scale-up, and to provide an estimate about the episode of abortion with and without medical indications (AWMI+ and AWMI-) in Iran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 31 provinces of Iran in 2012. A random sample between 200 and 1000 was selected in each province by the multistage sampling method that 75% of the data were collected from the capital and 25% from one main city. We selected samples from urban people more than 18 years old (12960) and we asked them about the number of abortion in women they knew who had experienced the medical and non-medical abortions in the past year. A range for the transparency factor was estimated based on the expert opinion. Results: The range of the transparency factors for AWMI+ and AWOMI- were 0.43-0.75 and 0.2-0.34, respectively. Regarding the AWMI+, our minimum and maximum estimations (per 1000 pregnancies) were 70.54 and 116.9, respectively. The corresponding figures for AWMI- were 93.18, and 148.7. Conclusions: The frequency rates for AWMI+ and AWMI- were relatively high. Therefore, the system has to address to this hidden problem using the appropriate preventive policies. PMID:25558379

  17. Decision Rightness and Emotional Responses to Abortion in the United States: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Corinne H.; Kimport, Katrina; Roberts, Sarah C. M.; Gould, Heather; Neuhaus, John; Foster, Diana G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Arguments that abortion causes women emotional harm are used to regulate abortion, particularly later procedures, in the United States. However, existing research is inconclusive. We examined women’s emotions and reports of whether the abortion decision was the right one for them over the three years after having an induced abortion. Methods We recruited a cohort of women seeking abortions between 2008-2010 at 30 facilities across the United States, selected based on having the latest gestational age limit within 150 miles. Two groups of women (n=667) were followed prospectively for three years: women having first-trimester procedures and women terminating pregnancies within two weeks under facilities’ gestational age limits at the same facilities. Participants completed semiannual phone surveys to assess whether they felt that having the abortion was the right decision for them; negative emotions (regret, anger, guilt, sadness) about the abortion; and positive emotions (relief, happiness). Multivariable mixed-effects models were used to examine changes in each outcome over time, to compare the two groups, and to identify associated factors. Results The predicted probability of reporting that abortion was the right decision was over 99% at all time points over three years. Women with more planned pregnancies and who had more difficulty deciding to terminate the pregnancy had lower odds of reporting the abortion was the right decision (aOR=0.71 [0.60, 0.85] and 0.46 [0.36, 0.64], respectively). Both negative and positive emotions declined over time, with no differences between women having procedures near gestational age limits versus first-trimester abortions. Higher perceived community abortion stigma and lower social support were associated with more negative emotions (b=0.45 [0.31, 0.58] and b=-0.61 [-0.93, -0.29], respectively). Conclusions Women experienced decreasing emotional intensity over time, and the overwhelming majority of women felt that termination was the right decision for them over three years. Emotional support may be beneficial for women having abortions who report intended pregnancies or difficulty deciding. PMID:26154386

  18. Should doctors be the judges? Ambiguous policies on legal abortion in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, Heathe Luz; Mitchell, Ellen M H; Blandon, Marta Maria

    2004-11-01

    Nicaragua's Penal Code permits "therapeutic abortion" without defining the circumstances that warrant it. In the absence of a legally clear definition, therapeutic abortion is variously considered legal only to save the woman's life or also to protect the health of the woman, and in cases of fetal malformation and rape. This paper presents a study of the theory and practice of therapeutic abortion in Nicaragua within this ambiguous legal framework. Through case studies, a review of records and a confidential enquiry into maternal deaths, it shows how ambiguity in the law leads to inconsistent access to legal abortions. Providers based decisions on whether to do an abortion on women's contraceptive behaviour, length of pregnancy, compliance with medical advice, assessment of women's credibility and other criteria tangential to protecting women's health. The Nicaraguan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology aimed to clarify the law by developing a consensus among its members on the definition and indications for therapeutic abortion. If the law designates doctors as the gatekeepers to legal abortion, safeguards are needed to ensure that their decisions are based on those indications, and are consistent and objective. In all cases, women should be the ultimate arbiters of decisions about their reproductive lives, to guarantee their human right to life and health. PMID:15938154

  19. The Statistical Precision of Medical Screening Procedures: Application to Polygraph and AIDS Antibodies Test Data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph L. Gastwirth

    1987-01-01

    The increased use of screening tests for drug use or antibodies to the HTLV-III (AIDS) virus, as well as pre-employment polygraph testing, has raised concerns about the reliability of the results of these procedures. This paper reviews the mathematical model underlying the analysis of data from screening tests. In addition to the known formulas for the proportion of positive (negative)

  20. Attitudes toward organ donation and transplantation : A model for understanding reactions to medical procedures after death

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margareta Sanner

    1994-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to reach a deeper understanding of factors influencing the attitudes toward organ donation and other procedures with the dead body. From a survey of 400 inhabitants of Uppsala, a city in the middle of Sweden, concerning attitudes toward transplantation issues, 38 individuals with different attitudes toward donation of their own organs were selected

  1. Behavioral Distress in Children with Cancer Undergoing Medical Procedures: Developmental Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Ernest R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The amount of anxiety suggested the need for clinical intervention to reduce procedure-related distress in children with cancer. Younger children exhibited consistently higher levels of distress than older children and displayed a greater variety of anxious responses over a longer time span. (Author/BEF)

  2. LHC abort gap cleaning studies during luminosity operation

    E-print Network

    Bartmann, W; Bracco, C; Bravin, E; Goddard, B; Höfle, W; Jacquet, D; Jeff, A; Kain, V; Meddahi, M; Roncarolo, F; Uythoven, J; Valuch, D; Gianfelice-Wendt, E

    2012-01-01

    The presence of significant intensities of un-bunched beam is a potentially serious issue in the LHC. Procedures using damper kickers for cleaning both the Abort Gap (AG) and the buckets targeted for injection, are currently in operation at flat bottom. Recent observations of relatively high population of the AG during physics runs brought up the need for AG cleaning during luminosity operation. In this paper the results of experimental studies performed in October 2011 are presented.

  3. LHC Abort Gap Cleaning Studies During Luminosity Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; /Fermilab; Bartmann, W.; Boccardi, A.; Bracco, C.; Bravin, E.; Goddard, B.; Hofle, W.; Jacquet, D.; Jeff, A.; Kain, V.; Meddahi, M.; /CERN

    2012-05-11

    The presence of significant intensities of un-bunched beam is a potentially serious issue in the LHC. Procedures using damper kickers for cleaning both the Abort Gap (AG) and the buckets targeted for injection, are currently in operation at flat bottom. Recent observations of relatively high population of the AG during physics runs brought up the need for AG cleaning during luminosity operation. In this paper the results of experimental studies performed in October 2011 are presented.

  4. Costs and consequences of abortions to women and their households: a cross-sectional study in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Ilboudo, Patrick G C; Greco, Giulia; Sundby, Johanne; Torsvik, Gaute

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the costs and consequences of abortions to women and their households. Our aim was to study both costs and consequences of induced and spontaneous abortions and complications. We carried out a cross-sectional study between February and September 2012 in Ouagadougou, the capital city of Burkina Faso. Quantitative data of 305 women whose pregnancy ended with either an induced or a spontaneous abortion were prospectively collected on sociodemographic, asset ownership, medical and health expenditures including pre-referral costs following the patient’s perspective. Descriptive analysis and regression analysis of costs were performed. We found that women with induced abortion were often single or never married, younger, more educated and had earlier pregnancies than women with spontaneous abortion. They also tended to be more often under parents’ guardianship compared with women with spontaneous abortion. Women with induced abortion paid much more money to obtain abortion and treatment of the resulting complications compared with women with spontaneous abortion: US$89 (44 252 CFA ie franc of the African Financial Community) vs US$56 (27 668 CFA). The results also suggested that payments associated with induced abortion were catastrophic as they consumed 15% of the gross domestic product per capita. Additionally, 11–16% of total households appeared to have resorted to coping strategies in order to face costs. Both induced and spontaneous abortions may incur high expenses with short-term economic repercussions on households’ poverty. Actions are needed in order to reduce the financial burden of abortion costs and promote an effective use of contraceptives. PMID:24829315

  5. Reality Augmentation for Medical Procedures: System Architecture, Single Camera Marker Tracking, and System Evaluation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sebastian Vogt; Ali Khamene; Frank Sauer

    2006-01-01

    Augmented Reality is an emerging technology that seeks to enhance a user’s view by overlaying graphical information. We developed\\u000a a prototype AR system geared for medical applications. It is built around a stereoscopic head-mounted display of the video-see-through\\u000a variety. The newest generation of this prototype system exhibits high performance on a standard PC platform. Stereoscopic\\u000a video images are augmented with

  6. Contraceptive knowledge and attitudes among women seeking induced abortion in Kathmandu, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Berin, Emilia; Sundell, Micaela; Karki, Chanda; Brynhildsen, Jan; Hammar, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Objective To map the knowledge about and attitudes toward birth control methods among women in Kathmandu, Nepal, and to compare the results between women seeking an induced abortion and a control group. Method This was a cross-sectional cohort study with matched controls. Women aged 15–49 years seeking medical care at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics at Kathmandu Medical College were included and interviewed. A case was defined as a woman who sought an elective medical or surgical abortion. A control was defined as a woman who sought medical care at the outpatient department or had already been admitted to the ward for reasons other than elective abortion. A questionnaire developed for the study – dealing with different demographic characteristics as well as knowledge about and attitudes toward contraceptives – was filled out based on the interview. Results A total of 153 women were included: 64 women seeking an abortion and 89 controls. Women seeking an abortion had been pregnant more times than the control group and were more likely to have been informed about contraceptives. Women with higher education were less likely to seek an abortion than women with lower education. There was no significant difference in knowledge about and attitudes toward contraceptives between cases and controls. The women considered highest possible effectiveness to be the most important feature when deciding on a birth control method. Conclusion Women seeking abortion in Kathmandu had shorter education and a history of more pregnancies and deliveries than women in the control group. Education and counseling on sex and reproduction as well as on contraceptive methods probably need to be improved in Nepal to avoid unwanted pregnancies. Attitudes about contraceptives need to be further investigated to develop better and more effective methods to educate women about family planning in order to increase reproductive health. PMID:24672261

  7. Multicenter study "Medical-Occupational Rehabilitation Procedure Skin--optimizing and quality assurance of inpatient-management (ROQ)".

    PubMed

    Skudlik, Christoph; Weisshaar, Elke; Scheidt, Reginald; Wulfhorst, Britta; Diepgen, Thomas Ludwig; Elsner, Peter; Schönfeld, Michael; John, Swen Malte

    2009-02-01

    Scientifically based prevention and patient management concepts in occupational dermatology have substantially improved during recent years. Currently the public statutory employers' liability insurance bodies fund a multi-step intervention approach designed to provide quick preventive help for all levels of severity of occupational dermatoses. An administrative guideline (hierarchical multi-step intervention procedure for occupational skin diseases--"Stufenverfahren Haut") insures professional support and optimal patient orientation by the statutory insurers' representatives. For secondary prevention, the so-called dermatologist's procedure ("Hautarztverfahren") was recently updated in order to provide more rapid dermatologic consultations which are covered for by the public statutory employers' liability insurance bodies. Additionally, combined outpatient dermatologic and health-educational intervention seminars ("secondary individual prevention"[SIP]) are offered to affected employees in a nationwide scheme. For those cases of occupational dermatoses in which these outpatient prevention measures are not successful, interdisciplinary inpatient rehabilitation measures have been developed ("tertiary individual prevention"[TIP]). TIP requires 3 weeks inpatient treatment including intensive health care instruction and psychological counseling, followed by outpatient treatment by the local dermatologist. In 2005, a German prospective cohort multicenter study ("Medical-Occupational Rehabilitation Procedure Skin--optimizing and quality assurance of inpatient-management"-"Medizinisch-Berufliches Rehabilitationsverfahren Haut--Optimierung und Qualitätssicherung des Heilverfahrens"[ROQ]) started which will further standardize TIP and evaluate scientific sustainability in depth (3-year dermatological follow-up of 1,000 patients). The study is being funded by the German Statutory Accident Insurance (Deutsche Gesetzliche Unfallversicherung [DGUV]). PMID:18759737

  8. An obligation to provide abortion services: what happens when physicians refuse?

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, C; Woods, R D

    1996-01-01

    Access to abortion services in the United States continues to decline. It does so not because of significant changes in legislation or court rulings but because fewer and fewer physicians wish to perform abortions and because most states now have "conscientious objection" legislation that makes it easy for physicians to refuse to do so. We argue in this paper that physicians have an obligation to perform all socially sanctioned medical services, including abortions, and thus that the burden of justification lies upon those who wish to be excused from that obligation. That is, such persons should have to show how requiring them to perform abortions would represent a serious threat to their fundamental moral or religious beliefs. We use current California law as an example of legislation that does not take physicians' obligations into account and thus allows them too easily to declare conscientious objection. PMID:8731539

  9. [Emergency procedures for taking care of the victims of bomb attacks: logistical and medical aspects].

    PubMed

    Giard, R W M; Overbeke, A J P M

    2006-07-01

    In The Netherlands the threat of terrorist attacks also exist. Both doctors and hospitals alike should be prepared for such attacks both on the logistical as well as the medical level. Most terrorist attacks are carried out with explosives. This results in many victims and in cases of explosions in closed or semi-closed areas, often results in complex medical problems in many of the victims. An explosion that occurs as the result ofa bomb detonating can result in 4 patterns of injury: the primary explosion injury caused by the pressure of the blast, the secondary injuries caused by flying debris, the tertiary injuries caused by the explosion wind, and the quaternary caused by heat and fire. Common injuries seen following an explosion include: lung damage, neurological damage, abdominal injuries, bone fractures and skeletal damage and crush-syndrome. The triage occurs at the site of the explosion as well as on arrival in hospital. One especially important aspect of this is the sorting and selecting between victims who are likely to develop complex problems and who therefore need to receive aggressive treatment in a specially equipped centre and those patients for whom the nearest emergency department will suffice their needs. The triage should be repeated considering the possibility that initial estimates on these points may have been wrong. Epidemiological research should be carried out for each attack in order to make an inventory of the number of victims, the injuries incurred, the assessment of the effects of the medical help received and an assessment of the effectiveness of the total aid received. PMID:16892611

  10. Religion and abortion: Roman Catholicism lost in the pelvic zone.

    PubMed

    Kissling, F

    1993-01-01

    The Roman Catholic Church has held the most absolute and extreme position against abortion taken by any religious group. Opposition to abortion by US Catholic bishops has been unflagging since Roe vs. Wade was decided. The current strategy embraced by the bishops is to restrict access to abortion as a prelude to attaining a complete ban on the procedure. The bishops, of course, have a political and constitutional right to champion public policy issues. This ability is limited only by the laws regarding tax-exempt status which make it impossible for the bishops to endorse political candidates. Opponents of the positions of the bishops, in turn, have a right to challenge their positions. The bishops, acting jointly as the United States Catholic Conference (USCC), express their own opinions, not the opinions of the 53 million US Catholics and have been criticized by both conservative and progressive groups in the church. Since women can not become Catholic bishops, or even priests, they are excluded from meetings of the USCC. Catholic lay groups have expressed the view that there is more than one legitimate Catholic position regarding abortion and have even filed briefs in favor of retaining the decision reached in Roe vs. Wade. The bishops, however, are able to draw on a multitude of institutions to further their view and have enhanced the operations of their 28 statewide lobbying offices as the abortion battle has shifted to the states. The Webster decision signaled a return of the bishops to a prominent position in the anti-abortion campaign. Prior to Webster, they kept their distance from the Protestant religious right. With Webster, the bishops felt the time was right to press hard to further restrictions to access to abortion. As they began to apply pressure, a pro-choice backlash developed, with leading Catholic politicians adopting strong pro-choice positions. The bishops reacted by taking such aggressive actions as denouncing certain politicians by name. This behavior caused even more alienation of middle-of-the-road Catholics from the bishops' position. The bishops tried to recover by hiring a professional public relations firm and the pollster used by the Reagan administration. The public relations firm was dismissed within a year. Religious observers wonder why the church is so adamantly against abortion in every circumstance, despite the beliefs of its members. In fact, in 1974, the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith noted the church's opposition to abortion but fell short of calling it murder and was honest about the church's ambiguity over the personhood of a fetus or at what stage in development the creator endows a fetus with a soul. This question has been debated by theologians since the early centuries of the church. Even the current Pope favors the term "that which is in the process of becoming" when discussing a fetus. In addition, church history and positions regarding the possibility of a "just war" make the church's adherence to the impossibility of a "just abortion" hard to justify. This hard-line position has removed the church from a position in which it could help women and society understand the values which must underly every decision to have an abortion. PMID:8274867

  11. Supreme Court upholds abortion rights. Decision underscores "partial-birth" ruse.

    PubMed

    Farmer, A

    2000-01-01

    On June 28, 2000, the US Supreme Court issued a decision that rejects Nebraska's ban on "partial-birth abortions." The decision affirmed that this abortion ban, and others like it, are extreme, deceptive and unconstitutional violations of the landmark decision that guaranteed women the liberty to choose abortion 27 years ago. While proponents of the Nebraska statute had attempted to convince the Court that the law only covered a particular abortion procedure known as dilation and extraction (D&X), the majority of judges agreed that the statute was written so broadly, it would affect other abortion procedures as well. Pro-choice organizations are elated by the decision; however, there are still some causes for concern. It is stated that while the Court's decision is a victory for women's rights to choose abortion, it also demonstrates how fragile this right is, as shown in the 5-4 decision. Still, even with only a small margin, this court decision will have immediate effect on rendering all similar statutes unconstitutional. PMID:12322632

  12. RHIC Abort Kicker Prefire Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Y.; Perlstein, S.

    2014-07-07

    In an attempt to discover any pattern to prefire events, abort prefire kicker data from 2007 to the present day have been recorded. With the 2014 operations concluding, this comprises 8 years of prefire data. Any activities that the Pulsed Power Group did to decrease prefire occurrences were recorded as well, but some information may be missing. The following information is a compilation of the research to date.

  13. Abortion Rights in Latin America (NYT) 539 words

    E-print Network

    Lopez-Carr, David

    Abortion Rights in Latin America (NYT) 539 words Published: January 6, 2006 For proof that criminalizing abortion doesn't reduce abortion rates and only endangers the lives of women, consider Latin America. In most of the region, abortions are a crime, but the abortion rate is far higher than in Western

  14. Differential Impact of Abortion on Adolescents and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, Wanda; Reardon, David

    1992-01-01

    Compared adolescent and adult reactions to abortion among 252 women. Compared to adults, adolescents were significantly more likely to be dissatisfied with choice of abortion and with services received, to have abortions later in gestational period, to feel forced by circumstances to have abortion, to report being misinformed at time of abortion,…

  15. One death and a cluster of febrile complications related to saline abortions.

    PubMed

    Berger, G S; Gibson, J J; Harvey, R P; Tyler, C W; Pakter, J

    1973-07-01

    Case history of a 17-year-old Arkansas girl who died following a saline abortion performed in a New York City hospital in September, 1971, and a report of the subsequent investigation revealing possible contaminating techniques by the attending physician are given. The young woman was single, nulliparous, and at 16 weeks gestation when the abortion was performed by exchange of hypertonic saline and amniotic fluid. The procedure was uneventful, but febrile conditions developed 8 hours after delivery. Despite antibiotic treatment the fever continued and blood cultures later revealed an infection of Staphylococcus aureus. The patient died 12 days after the abortion. An epidemiologic investigation was conducted at the hospital that the girl had attended. Records of 911 patients receiving saline abortions between July 1971 and February 1972 were examined, revealing the development of fever in 44 cases. 57% of these febrile cases occurred in a 3-week period and were associated with 2 physicians whose patients' postinstillation fever rates were 17% compared with 2.5% for all other physicians in the hospital. There was no correlation between the incidence of fever and the patients' age, race, duration of retained placenta or operative removal of the placenta. It is concluded from epidemiologic evidence and direct observation of the physician's procedure that the infection was probably introduced through breaks in sterile technique at the time of fluid exchange. Rigorous aseptic procedures should be followed carefully in all saline abortion procedures. PMID:4720192

  16. What do abortion policies accomplish? : understanding how abortion laws and court cases affect public opinion

    E-print Network

    Hernandez, Cory D

    2014-01-01

    Abortion is a loaded, controversial, and divisive sociocultural and political term, concept, and debate. Yet little empirical research has been conducted to examine what effects abortion rights legislation and court cases ...

  17. Abortion in Sri Lanka: the double standard.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramya

    2013-03-01

    In Sri Lanka, women do not have access to legal abortion except under life-saving circumstances. Clandestine abortion services are, however, available and quite accessible. Although safe specialist services are available to women who can afford them, others access services under unsafe and exploitative conditions. At the time of this writing, a draft bill that will legalize abortion in instances of rape, incest, and fetal abnormalities awaits approval, amid opposition. In this article, I explore the current push for legal reform as a solution to unsafe abortion. Although a welcome effort, this amendment alone will be insufficient to address the public health consequences of unsafe abortion in Sri Lanka because most women seek abortions for other reasons. Much broader legal and policy reform will be required. PMID:23327236

  18. Characterization of size-specific particulate matter emission rates for a simulated medical laser procedure--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Ramon; Lacey, Steven E; Lippert, Julia F; Liu, Li C; Esmen, Nurtan A; Conroy, Lorraine M

    2015-05-01

    Prior investigation on medical laser interaction with tissue has suggested device operational parameter settings influence laser generated air contaminant emission, but this has not been systematically explored. A laboratory-based simulated medical laser procedure was designed and pilot tested to determine the effect of laser operational parameters on the size-specific mass emission rate of laser generated particulate matter. Porcine tissue was lased in an emission chamber using two medical laser systems (CO2, ? = 10,600 nm; Ho:YAG, ? = 2100 nm) in a fractional factorial study design by varying three operational parameters (beam diameter, pulse repetition frequency, and power) between two levels (high and low) and the resultant plume was measured using two real-time size-selective particle counters. Particle count concentrations were converted to mass emission rates before an analysis of variance was used to determine the influence of operational parameter settings on size-specific mass emission rate. Particle shape and diameter were described for a limited number of samples by collecting particles on polycarbonate filters, and photographed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to examine method of particle formation. An increase in power and decrease in beam diameter led to an increase in mass emission for the Ho:YAG laser at all size ranges. For the CO2 laser, emission rates were dependent on particle size and were not statistically significant for particle ranges between 5 and 10 µm. When any parameter level was increased, emission rate of the smallest particle size range also increased. Beam diameter was the most influential variable for both lasers, and the operational parameters tested explained the most variability at the smallest particle size range. Particle shape was variable and some particles observed by SEM were likely created from mechanical methods. This study provides a foundation for future investigations to better estimate size-specific mass emission rates and particle characteristics for additional laser operational parameters in order to estimate occupational exposure, and to inform control strategies. PMID:25587187

  19. An AbortAn Abort--Aware Model ofAware Model of Transactional ProgrammingTransactional Programming

    E-print Network

    Rajamani, Sriram K.

    An AbortAn Abort--Aware Model ofAware Model of Transactional ProgrammingTransactional Programming ­ An abort-aware semantics for transactions · Part 2: TSMs = Transactional State Machines ­ A finite-terminating transactions (known) ­ Ignores STM/HTM aborted transactions: for responsiveness, "abort" cannot be equal

  20. Does dedicated pre-abortion contraception counselling help to improve post-abortion contraception uptake?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmed S Yassin; Diane Cordwell

    2005-01-01

    ObjectiveMany studies have shown a disappointing periabortion contraceptive uptake. This study investigated whether the provision of dedicated and targeted contraception counselling at the pre-abortion assessment visit can improve the post-abortion contraception uptake.MethodsThe study comprised a 3-month prospective reaudit of the abortion clinic.ResultsOf the 104 women seen during the re-audit period, 96% received post-abortion contraception. The majority (73%) of the women

  1. Peri-abortion contraceptive care: Can we reduce the incidence of repeat abortions?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Malini Garg; Madan Singh; Diana Mansour

    2001-01-01

    IntroductionIt is of great importance for repeat unwanted pregnancies to be prevented rather than aborted. We therefore sought to: determine the reasons for contraceptive failure in women seeking repeat abortions; audit the peri-abortion contraception services offered at our hospital, and make recommendations regarding peri-abortion contraception services based on the above findings.MethodA self-administered questionnaire was used to determine the contraceptive practices

  2. [Diseases and procedures apt to conflict with patients: an analysis of medical malpractice litigation cases].

    PubMed

    Echigo, Junko

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore effective ways to prevent conflicts between patients and healthcare professionals by analyzing 836 malpractice cases. The analysis revealed two points that especially influence court decisions: disease prognosis and inadequate informed consent. Regarding prognosis, decisions are more in favor of the defendant (medical institution) in diseases with poor prognoses, such as sepsis and anaphylaxis, than in diseases with typically good prognoses, such as acute epiglottitis and strangulation ileus. Regarding insufficient informed consent, the cases fell into two groups, emergency and non-emergency. The non-emergency group consisted of cases such as preventative treatments for brain aneurysms and acute pancreatitis-related endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), where essential information to consent to treatment, especially the prognosis with no treatment, was not given, despite sufficient time. The emergency group consisted of cases, such as acute coronary syndrome, especially treated by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), where there was not sufficient time to provide to patients information about treatments. This is the most difficult type of case and a subject for future efforts at clinical sites. PMID:25154246

  3. Changes in Association between Previous Therapeutic Abortion and Preterm Birth in Scotland, 1980 to 2008: A Historical Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Oliver-Williams, Clare; Fleming, Michael; Monteath, Kirsten; Wood, Angela M.; Smith, Gordon C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have demonstrated that therapeutic termination of pregnancy (abortion) is associated with an increased risk of subsequent preterm birth. However, the literature is inconsistent, and methods of abortion have changed dramatically over the last 30 years. We hypothesized that the association between previous abortion and the risk of preterm first birth changed in Scotland between 1 January 1980 and 31 December 2008. Methods and Findings We studied linked Scottish national databases of births and perinatal deaths. We analysed the risk of preterm birth in relation to the number of previous abortions in 732,719 first births (?24 wk), adjusting for maternal characteristics. The risk (adjusted odds ratio [95% CI]) of preterm birth was modelled using logistic regression, and associations were expressed for a one-unit increase in the number of previous abortions. Previous abortion was associated with an increased risk of preterm birth (1.12 [1.09–1.16]). When analysed by year of delivery, the association was strongest in 1980–1983 (1.32 [1.21–1.43]), progressively declined between 1984 and 1999, and was no longer apparent in 2000–2003 (0.98 [0.91–1.05]) or 2004–2008 (1.02 [0.95–1.09]). A statistical test for interaction between previous abortion and year was highly statistically significant (p<0.001). Analysis of data for abortions among nulliparous women in Scotland 1992–2008 demonstrated that the proportion that were surgical without use of cervical pre-treatment decreased from 31% to 0.4%, and that the proportion of medical abortions increased from 18% to 68%. Conclusions Previous abortion was a risk factor for spontaneous preterm birth in Scotland in the 1980s and 1990s, but the association progressively weakened and disappeared altogether by 2000. These changes were paralleled by increasing use of medical abortion and cervical pre-treatment prior to surgical abortion. Although it is plausible that the two trends were related, we could not test this directly as the data on the method of prior abortions were not linked to individuals in the cohort. However, we speculate that modernising abortion methods may be an effective long-term strategy to reduce global rates of preterm birth. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:23874161

  4. Post abortion contraception and its effect on repeat abortions in Auckland, New Zealand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helen Roberts; Martha Silva; Sylvia Xu

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundMany misconceptions still prevail about the appropriateness of use of the intrauterine device (IUD), particularly for younger women. This study examines the factors associated with post abortion IUD use as compared to the combined oral contraceptive pill (COC). It then examines the effect of type of post abortion contraception with the likelihood of seeking subsequent abortions.

  5. Abortion Decision and Ambivalence: Insights via an Abortion Decision Balance Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allanson, Susie

    2007-01-01

    Decision ambivalence is a key concept in abortion literature, but has been poorly operationalised. This study explored the concept of decision ambivalence via an Abortion Decision Balance Sheet (ADBS) articulating reasons both for and against terminating an unintended pregnancy. Ninety-six women undergoing an early abortion for psychosocial…

  6. Just another reproductive technology? The ethics of human reproductive cloning as an experimental medical procedure.

    PubMed

    Elsner, D

    2006-10-01

    Human reproductive cloning (HRC) has not yet resulted in any live births. There has been widespread condemnation of the practice in both the scientific world and the public sphere, and many countries explicitly outlaw the practice. Concerns about the procedure range from uncertainties about its physical safety to questions about the psychological well-being of clones. Yet, key aspects such as the philosophical implications of harm to future entities and a comparison with established reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilisation (IVF) are often overlooked in discussions about HRC. Furthermore, there are people who are willing to use the technology. Several scientists have been outspoken in their intent to pursue HRC. The importance of concerns about the physical safety of children created by HRC and comparisons with concerns about the safety of IVF are discussed. A model to be used to determine when it is acceptable to use HRC and other new assisted reproductive technologies, balancing reproductive freedom and safety concerns, is proposed. Justifications underpinning potential applications of HRC are discussed, and it is determined that these are highly analogous to rationalisations used to justify IVF treatment. It is concluded that people wishing to conceive using HRC should have a prima facie negative right to do so. PMID:17012502

  7. Pattern and Outcome of Induced Abortion in Abakaliki, Southeast of Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ikeako, LC; Onoh, R; Ezegwui, HU; Ezeonu, PO

    2014-01-01

    Background: Unsafe abortion accounts for a greater proportion of maternal deaths, yet it is often not adequately considered in discussions around reducing maternal mortality. Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the pattern of unsafe abortion and the extent to which unsafe abortion contributes to maternal morbidity and mortality in our setting as well as assess the impact of post-abortion care. Subjects and Methods: A descriptive study of patients who were admitted for complications following induced abortions between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2008 at the Federal Medical Center, Abakaliki South East of Nigeria with data obtained from case records. Results: Out of the 1,562 gynecogical admissions, a total of 83 patients presented with the complications arising from induced abortion. The age group 20-24 years was mostly affected and adolescents constituted 32.5% (27/83). Nearly 15.7% (13/83) of these patients died while the remaining 84.3% (70/83) had various complications, which were mainly septicemia 59.0% (49/83), anemia 47.0% (39/83), peritonitis 41.0% (34/83), hemorrhages 34.9% (29/83) and uterine perforation 30.1% (25/83). During the study, there were 38 gynecological deaths and abortion related death accounted for 34.2% (13/38) of these gynecological deaths. 84.3% (70/83) of the patients had no documented evidence of counseling on family planning and 59.0% (49/83) were not aware of the different methods of contraception. Conclusion: Unsafe abortion remains one of the most neglected sexual and reproductive health problems in developing countries today despite its significant contribution to maternal mortality and morbidity. Solutions and remedies include prevention of unplanned and unwanted pregnancies by sex education and access to safe and sustainable family planning methods. PMID:24971223

  8. The effect of contraceptive pills on the measured blood loss in medical termination of pregnancy by mifepristone and misoprostol: a randomized placebo controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oi Shan Tang; Jieshuang Xu; Linan Cheng; Sharon W. H. Lee; Pak Chung Ho

    BACKGROUND: A prospective randomized placebo controlled trial was performed to assess the immediate use of oral contraceptive (OC) on the amount of blood loss in the post-abortion period in women undergoing medical abortion by mifepristone and misoprostol. METHODS: One hundred women were randomized by computer to receive either OC pills or placebo, immediately after medical abortion. RESULTS: There was no

  9. Cytogenetics of recurrent spontaneous aborters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. P. McManus; M. A. de Arce

    1986-01-01

    Summary  Cytogenetic studies were performed on both partners of 84 couples with a history of two or more spontaneous abortions. A gross\\u000a chromosomal abnormality was identified in five of these couples. Four balanced translocation carriers were detected (46,XY,t(6:14),\\u000a 46,XX,t(10:17), 46,XX,t(2:7) and 45XX,t (14:21) plus one female with sex chromosome mosaicism 46,XX\\/47,XXX.

  10. Introduction of abortion technologies: a quality of care management approach.

    PubMed

    Greenslade, F C; Winkler, J; Leonard, A H

    1992-01-01

    Development of antiprogestins for use to induce early abortion clearly advances reproductive health to a higher level. A heated debate has arisen over the appropriateness of its being introduced in health care settings, however. Since the introduction of new contraceptive technologies into health care and family planning programs has produced serious shortcomings, some abortion care specialists propose a management approach to introducing RU-486/prostaglandin which stresses women's needs and preferences. This quality of care framework is based on 20 years of experience of introducing manual vacuum aspiration into developing countries. It takes into consideration that decisions about introducing RU-486/prostaglandin are country-specific and often program- or clinic-specific. Decision makers need to look at preparedness of local policy and service delivery infrastructure to take on the specific responsibilities of integrating it into ongoing programs and how this new technology will affect quality of care. The quality of care framework consists of those elements appropriate to women' access to care which include appropriate abortion care technology; technical competence of all members of the health care team at all levels of the health system; interactions between women and providers/staff (respect and support for women and nonjudgemental attitudes); comprehensive information and counseling; quality and accessible postabortion family planning and reproductive health care; and equipment, supplies, and medication. Decision makers need to consider whether RU-486/prostaglandin is acceptable to women and providers, manufactured to high standards, consistent with relevant regulatory requirements and appropriate to specific service delivery settings. PMID:1434757

  11. A qualitative investigation of low-income abortion clients' attitudes toward public funding for abortion.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Adrianne; Manski, Ruth; Dennis, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    We explored how low-income abortion clients in states where public funding was and was not available perceived the role of public funding for abortion. From October 2010 through February 2011, we conducted 71 semi-structured in-depth telephone interviews with low-income abortion clients in Arizona, Florida, New York, and Oregon. Women reported weighing numerous factors when determining which circumstances warranted public funding. Though most women generally supported coverage, they deviated from their initial support when asked about particular circumstances. Respondents felt most strongly that abortion should not be covered when a woman could not afford another child or was pregnant outside of a romantic relationship. Participants used disparaging language to describe the presumed behavior of women faced with unintended pregnancies. In seeking to discredit "other" women's abortions, women revealed the complex nature of abortion stigma. We propose that women's abortion experiences and subsequent opinions on coverage indicated three distinct manifestations of abortion stigma: women (1) resisted the prominent discourse that marks women who have had abortions as selfish and irresponsible; (2) internalized societal norms that stereotype women based on the circumstances surrounding the abortion; and (3) reproduced stigma by distancing themselves from the negative stereotypes associated with women who have had abortions. PMID:25068780

  12. Lower house of Polish Parliament moves to consider liberalized abortion law.

    PubMed

    1996-04-01

    On March 13, the Sejm, the lower house of the Polish Parliament, voted to reject a motion to kill legislation which would liberalize the country's restrictive abortion law. Current law in Poland restricts abortion to cases in which a woman's life or health is in danger, the pregnancy is the result of reported rape or incest, or the fetus has a serious and irremediable defect. Violators are subject to criminal prosecution and prison sentences of up to two years. The proposed legislation, introduced March 1 in the Polish Parliament, would allow abortions during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy if a woman has a difficult life situation or difficult personal circumstances. The woman seeking abortion would be required to delay three days after receiving state-mandated counseling by a physician other than the abortion provider. The proposed legislation would also rescind the existing ban upon the provision of abortion services outside public hospitals, allowing a woman to obtain the procedure in a private hospital or doctor's office. PMID:12291166

  13. Safe abortion: a right for refugees?

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Aimee

    2002-05-01

    Thanks to initiatives since 1994, most reproductive health programmes for refugee women now include family planning and safe delivery care. Emergency contraception and post-abortion care for complications of unsafe abortion are recommended, but provision of these services has lagged behind, while services for women who wish to terminate an unwanted pregnancy are almost non-existent. Given conditions in refugee settings, including high levels of sexual violence, unwanted pregnancies are of particular concern. Yet the extent of need for abortion services among refugee women remains undocumented. UNFPA estimates that 25-50% of maternal deaths in refugee settings are due to complications of unsafe abortion. Barriers to providing abortion services may include internal and external political pressure, legal restrictions, or the religious affiliation of service providers. Women too may be pressured to continue pregnancies and are often unable to express their needs or assert their rights. Abortion advocacy efforts should highlight the specific needs of refugee women and encourage provision of services where abortion is legally indicated, especially in cases of rape or incest, and risk to a woman's physical and mental health. Implementation of existing guidelines on reducing the occurrence and consequences of sexual violence in refugee settings is also important. Including refugee women in international campaigns for expanded access to safe abortion is critical in addressing the specific needs of this population. PMID:12369319

  14. Labor induction abortion in the second trimester

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynn Borgatta; Nathalie Kapp

    2011-01-01

    Labor induction abortion is effective throughout the second trimester. Patterns of use and gestational age limits vary by locality. Earlier gestations (typically 12 to 20 weeks) have shorter abortion times than later gestational ages, but differences in complication rates within the second trimester according to gestational age have not been demonstrated. The combination of mifepristone and misoprostol is the most

  15. Safe Abortion: A Right for Refugees?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aimee Lehmann

    2002-01-01

    Thanks to initiatives since 1994, most reproductive health programmes for refugee women now include family planning and safe delivery care. Emergency contraception and post-abortion care for complications of unsafe abortion are recommended, but provision of these services has lagged behind, while services for women who wish to terminate an unwanted pregnancy are almost non-existent. Given conditions in refugee settings, including

  16. Women's perceptions of abortion in Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dale Huntington; Laila Nawar; Dalia Abdel-Hady

    1997-01-01

    A rapidly implemented qualitative study was conducted to investigate the perceptions of women about abortion in Egypt using in-depth interviews with hospitalised patients and focus group discussions with family planning clients and non-contracepting women. The most salient issue confronting the patients (whether the abortion had been spontaneous or induced) was their physical survival. The necessity to return immediately to their

  17. Adolescents and Abortion: Choice in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Rebecca

    This publication seeks to explain the many facets of adolescent abortion: teenagers' need for access to safe abortion; the need for confidentiality in order to ensure safety; the real intent and effect of parental involvement laws; and the roles of parents and the state in safeguarding the health of pregnant teenagers. The first section looks at…

  18. Induced Abortion: An Ethical Conundrum for Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millner, Vaughn S.; Hanks, Robert B.

    2002-01-01

    Induced abortion is one of the most controversial moral issues in American culture, but counselor value struggles regarding abortion are seldom addressed in counseling literature. This article considers the conflictual nature of the ethical principles of autonomy, fidelity, justice, beneficence, and nonmaleficence as they can occur within the…

  19. Myths with Facts: SEX-SELECTIVE ABORTION

    E-print Network

    Butler, Laurie J.

    Replacing Myths with Facts: SEX-SELECTIVE ABORTION LAWS IN THE UNITED STATES I N T E R N A T I O N, San Francisco. #12;Replacing Myths with Facts: SEX-SELECTIVE ABORTION LAWS IN THE UNITED STATES JUNE

  20. A pilot study to determine medical laser generated air contaminant emission rates for a simulated surgical procedure.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Julia F; Lacey, Steven E; Lopez, Ramon; Franke, John; Conroy, Lorraine; Breskey, John; Esmen, Nurtan; Liu, Li

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that half a million health-care workers are exposed to laser surgical smoke each year. The purpose of this study was to establish a methodology to (1) estimate emission rates of laser-generated air contaminants (LGACs) using an emission chamber, and to (2) perform a screening study to differentiate the effects of three laser operational parameters. An emission chamber was designed, fabricated, and assessed for performance to estimate the emission rates of gases and particles associated with LGACs during a simulated surgical procedure. Two medical lasers (Holmium Yttrium Aluminum Garnet [Ho:YAG] and carbon dioxide [CO2]) were set to a range of plausible medical laser operational parameters in a simulated surgery to pyrolyze porcine skin generating plume in the emission chamber. Power, pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and beam diameter were evaluated to determine the effect of each operational parameter on emission rate using a fractional factorial design. The plume was sampled for particulate matter and seven gas phase combustion byproduct contaminants (benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, formaldehyde, hydrogen cyanide, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide): the gas phase emission results are presented here. Most of the measured concentrations of gas phase contaminants were below their limit of detection (LOD), but detectable measurements enabled us to determine laser operation parameter influence on CO2 emissions. Confined to the experimental conditions of this screening study, results indicated that beam diameter was statistically significantly influential and power was marginally statistically significant to emission rates of CO2 when using the Ho:YAG laser but not with the carbon dioxide laser; PRF was not influential vis-a-vis emission rates of these gas phase contaminants. PMID:24498966

  1. Department of Defense--Implementation of the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services; Amendment No. 4. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1980-06-27

    This amendment extends benefits under the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS) for abortion services, and adds an exclusion in the provisions for cosmetic, reconstructive, and/or plastic surgery procedures. This amendment also implements language contained in Public Law 96-154, Department of Defense Appropriations Act of 1980, and Public Law 96-173, effective October 1, 1979, which deletes the CHAMPUS exclusion of benefits for Military Service-connected disabilities. PMID:10247433

  2. Image analysis and processing methods in verifying the correctness of performing low-invasive esthetic medical procedures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Efficacy and safety of various treatments using fractional laser or radiofrequency depend, to a large extent, on precise movement of equipment head across the patient’s skin. In addition, they both depend on uniform distribution of emitted pulses throughout the treated skin area. The pulses should be closely adjacent but they should not overlap. Pulse overlapping results in amplification of irradiation dose and carries the danger of unwanted effects. Methods Images obtained in infrared mode (Flir SC5200 thermovision camera equipped with photon detector) were entered into Matlab environment. Thermal changes in the skin were forced by CO2RE laser. Proposed image analysis and processing methods enable automatic recognition of CO2RE laser sites of action, making possible to assess the correctness of performed cosmetic procedures. Results 80 images were acquired and analyzed. Regions of interest (ROI) for the entire treatment field were determined automatically. In accordance with the proposed algorithm, laser-irradiated Li areas (ROI) were determined for the treatment area. On this basis, error values were calculated and expressed as percentage of area not covered by any irradiation dose (?o) and as percentage area which received double dose (?z). The respective values for the analyzed images were ?o=17.87±10.5% and ?z=1.97±1.5%, respectively. Conclusions The presented method of verifying the correctness of performing low-invasive esthetic medical (cosmetic) procedures has proved itself numerous times in practice. Advantages of the method include: automatic determination of coverage error values ?o and ?z, non-invasive, sterile and remote-controlled thermovisual mode of measurements, and possibility of assessing dynamics of patient’s skin temperature changes. PMID:23758786

  3. Impact of Counseling on Repeated Unplanned Pregnancy and Contraceptive Behavior in Low SES Abortion Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnhill, Michael S.; And Others

    High numbers of repeat abortions at a medical school clinic prompted clinic personnel to develop an experimental fertility control counseling program. Counseling objectives included the following: (1) to engender rapport and trust; (2) to assess the patient's past contraceptive use and psychosocial history; (3) to improve patient's knowledge of…

  4. [Therapeutic abortion, unjustified absence in health policy].

    PubMed

    Chávez-Alvarado, Susana

    2013-07-01

    Although abortion for health reasons is not considered a crime in Peru, the State does not allow its inclusion in public policy, thus violating women's right to terminate a pregnancy when it affects their health. When examining the article in the Criminal Code which decriminalizes this type of abortion, provisions are identified which protect women and set the conditions to offer this type of service. This document sets the debate about the arguments used by the Peruvian State for not approving a therapeutic abortion protocol which would regulate the provision and financing of therapeutic abortion in public services, and explains why this obligation should be complied with, based on the conceptual framework of "health exception" In addition, it presents two cases brought before the judicial court in which the Peruvian State was found guilty of violating the human rights of two adolescents to whom a therapeutic abortion was denied. PMID:24100828

  5. Effective analgesic dose of dexamethasone after painless abortion

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Zhe-Feng; Tian, Ming; Chi, Ping; Li, Xin; He, Hai-Li

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Dexamethasone is known to produce analgesic effects, but the optimal analgesic dosage of dexamethasone remains unclear, especially in patients without postoperative use of other analgesics. The purpose of this study was to explore the effective analgesic dose of dexamethasone in day surgery patients undergoing painless abortion. Methods: 287 patients undergoing painless abortion were randomly assigned to one of four groups: control group receiving saline and dexamethasone groups receiving 0.1, 0.15, or 0.2 mg/kg dexamethasone. Drugs were intravenously injected 30 min before induction of anesthesia. All patients underwent the same anesthesia procedure using propofol and remifentan. The visual analogue scale (VAS) scores and occurrence of nausea, vomiting and drug-induced side effects were recorded at 1, 2 and 24 h after operation. Results: There were no significant differences in patient’s clinical characteristics, surgical features and frequency of occurrence of nausea and vomiting among the four groups (P > 0.05). The VAS scores at rest and during coughing at 2 h after operation (time of discharge from the hospital) were significantly lower in patients receiving 0.2 mg/kg dexamethasone compared with control patients (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Intravenous injection of 0.2 mg/kg dexamethasone before induction of anesthesia can significantly reduce the VAS scores at 2 h after painless abortion. PMID:25232399

  6. Evaluation of a multi-pronged intervention to improve access to safe abortion care in two districts in Jharkhand

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the adoption of the Medical Termination of Pregnancy Act in 1972, access to safe abortion services remains limited in India. Awareness of the legality of abortion also remains low, leading many women to seek services outside the health system. Medical abortion (MA) is an option that has the potential to expand access to safe abortion services. A multi-pronged intervention covering a population of 161,000 in 253 villages in the Silli and Khunti blocks of Jharkhand was conducted between 2007 and 2009, seeking to improve medical abortion services and create awareness at the community level by providing information through community intermediaries and creating an enabling environment through a behavior change communication campaign. The study evaluates the changes in knowledge about abortion-related issues, changes in abortion care-seeking, and service utilization as a result of this intervention. Methods A baseline cross-sectional survey was conducted pre-intervention (n?=?1,253) followed by an endline survey (n?=?1,290) one year after the completion of the intervention phase. In addition, monitoring data from intervention facilities was collected monthly over the study period. Results Nearly 85% of respondents reported being exposed to safe abortion messaging as a result of the intervention. Awareness of the legality of abortion increased significantly from 19.7% to 57.6% for women, as did awareness of the specific conditions for which abortion is allowed. Results were similar for men. There was also a significant increase in the proportion of men and women who knew of a legal and safe provider and place from where abortion services could be obtained. Multivariate analysis showed positive associations between exposure to any component of the intervention and increased knowledge about legality and gestational age limits, however only interpersonal communication was associated with a significant increase in knowledge of where to obtain safe services (OR 4.8, SE 0.67). Utilization of safe abortion services, and in particular MA, increased at all intervention sites over the duration of the intervention with a shift towards women seeking care earlier in pregnancy. Conclusion The evaluation demonstrates the success of the intervention and its potential for replication in similar contexts within India. PMID:24886273

  7. The story of abortion law in Poland.

    PubMed

    Chazan, B

    1996-12-01

    Poland's 1956 abortion law permitted abortion on demand without state control or reporting mechanisms. It has been estimated that this liberal law resulted in as many as 400,000 abortions in 1962 alone. After the Communist regime ended, a new law was passed in March 1993 to provide legal protection to "conceived children." This law allowed abortion only when the pregnancy constitutes a threat to the life or a serious threat to the health of the mother, the fetus is irreversibly damaged, or the pregnancy resulted from rape or incest. Opponents of this law predicted it would result in prosecution of a huge number of women and that it would have an adverse effect on maternal mortality rates. However, there have been only a few court cases to date, and maternal mortality is decreasing. The discussion surrounding this new law has resulted in growing awareness that the fetus is a human being rather than a mass of tissue. Interest in modern contraceptive methods is also increasing. Public opinion polls indicate that most Poles approve of abortions only in the cases indicated by the law and that only 42% of respondents also support availability of abortion for social reasons. However, a law passed in October 1996 will allow women to request abortions for social reasons after counseling and a waiting period. PMID:12222282

  8. Anxiety Around Medical Procedures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Kidney/Wilms Tumor Liver Cancer Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Thyroid ... Tumor Liver Cancer Lymphoma (non-Hodgkin) Lymphoma (Hodgkin) Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Retinoblastoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma ...

  9. Unsafe Abortion: Global and Regional Incidence, Trends, Consequences, and Challenges

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Iqbal Shah; Elisabeth Åhman

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This review aims to provide the latest global and regional estimates of the incidence and trends in induced abortion, both safe and unsafe. A related objective is to document maternal mortality due to unsafe abortion. The legal context of abortion and the international discourse on preventing unsafe abortion are reviewed to highlight policy implications and challenges in preventing unsafe

  10. A Biopsychosocial Model of Training in Abortion Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara A. Gawinski; Patricia A. Bennett; Sally J. Rousseau; Eric Schaff

    2002-01-01

    Given the national decline in availability of abortion, training additional abortion providers is essential. This article describes the critical components of a family medicine training program for abortion providers, in which the biopsychosocial model provides the philosophical foundation. The integration of all aspects of the biopsychosocial model insures that trainees consider the personal and professional impact of becoming an abortion

  11. On Avoiding Spare Aborts in Transactional Memory Idit Keidar

    E-print Network

    Keidar, Idit

    On Avoiding Spare Aborts in Transactional Memory Idit Keidar Dept. of Electrical Engineering a theory for un- derstanding aborts in transactional memory systems (TMs). Existing TMs may abort many transactions that could, in fact, commit without violating correctness. We call such unnecessary aborts spare

  12. Solo-fast Universal Constructions for Deterministic Abortable Objects

    E-print Network

    Johnen, Colette

    Solo-fast Universal Constructions for Deterministic Abortable Objects Claire Capdevielle, Colette. In this paper we study efficient implementations for deterministic abortable objects. Deterministic abortable abort to indicate that the operation failed (and did not take effect) when there is contention

  13. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Pad Abort 1

    E-print Network

    NASAfacts National Aeronautics and Space Administration Pad Abort 1 Ensuring Astronaut Safety NASA are safe for human use. Pad Abort 1, a flight test being conducted to validate the Orion crew exploration vehicle's launch abort system, will be conducted at the Orion Abort Flight Test launch complex 32E

  14. Introduction to Orion Pad Abort 1 Flight Test Overview

    E-print Network

    #12;2 Agenda · Introduction to Orion · Pad Abort 1 Flight Test Overview · Pad Abort 1 Vehicle Description ­ Launch Abort System ­ Crew Module Simulator · Mission and Timeline · Test Objectives · Mission Success · WSMR Range and Test Day Plan #12;3 Launch Abort System · Safely removes the crew from launch

  15. The Impact of State Abortion Policies on Teen Pregnancy Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medoff, Marshall

    2010-01-01

    The availability of abortion provides insurance against unwanted pregnancies since abortion is the only birth control method which allows women to avoid an unwanted birth once they are pregnant. Restrictive state abortion policies, which increase the cost of obtaining an abortion, may increase women's incentive to alter their pregnancy avoidance…

  16. Abort Gap Cleaning for LHC Run 2

    E-print Network

    Uythoven, J; Bravin, E; Goddard, B; Hemelsoet, GH; Höfle, W; Jacquet, D; Kain, V; Mazzoni, S; Meddahi, M; Valuch, D

    2015-01-01

    To minimise the beam losses at the moment of an LHC beam dump the 3 ?s long abort gap should contain as few particles as possible. Its population can be minimised by abort gap cleaning using the LHC transverse damper system. The LHC Run 1 experience is briefly recalled; changes foreseen for the LHC Run 2 are presented. They include improvements in the observation of the abort gap population and the mechanism to decide if cleaning is required, changes to the hardware of the transverse dampers to reduce the detrimental effect on the luminosity lifetime and proposed changes to the applied cleaning algorithms.

  17. [Abortions in Hajdu-Bihar County].

    PubMed

    Tatar, S

    1991-07-01

    The author examines the frequency of abortion in Hajdu-Binar County, Hungary. From 1981 to 1989, the number of abortions increased for all age groups of females, but large differences are noted among age groups. Surgical abortions increased the most among those 19 years and younger. This is attributed in part to early sexual experience but also to the lack of sex education and of information on contraception. The author strongly associates recent increases with uncertain socioeconomic conditions, weakening marital relations, and low levels of sexual and health knowledge. PMID:12343523

  18. Triangular Assessment of the Etiology of Induced Abortion in Iran: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Motaghi, Zahra; Keramat, Afsaneh; Shariati, Mohammad; Yunesian, Masud

    2013-01-01

    Background About 46 million induced abortions occur in the world annually. The studies have reported 80000 cases of induced abortions in Iran annually. Objectives This qualitative study was conducted to identify the causes of unsafe abortion in Iran from the standpoint of three groups of experts, women with a history of abortion or unwanted pregnancy and service providers. Patients and Methods A total of 72 in-depth semi structured interviews were conducted in 2012 in Tehran and Shahroud. After coordination with 8 experts, sampling from them was done using the Snowballing method in their offices. Sampling from 28 married and 10 engaged women with a history of unwanted pregnancy or unsafe abortion and 12 providers was done in health care centers and a in number of gynecologists’ and midwives’ offices. Sampling from women with a history of unwanted pregnancy or unsafe abortion such as single women, HIV positive women and drug users, and women who had sexual intercourse for money was started by referring to the social rehabilitation center for women and continued using the snowballing method due to difficulties in accessing them. Participants were from different ethnic groups including Fars, Gilaks, Mazandarani, Arab, Azerbaijani, and Lor. Content analysis was performed on collected data. Results Based on the results of the interviews, participants have abortion for following reasons: 1. Wanted pregnancy (sub categories: fetal abnormalities, Concern about fetal health and lack of trust to prenatal diagnostic methods, Fetal sex, Lack of independent and free decision making regarding pregnancy in women, 2. Unwanted pregnancy (sub-categories: Socio-economic factors, Beliefs and feelings, Lack of information about family planning) 3. Predisposing factors (sub-categories: Lack of information on religious aspects of abortion, Easy access to easy abortion methods). Some people, despite having unwanted pregnancy due to social, economic, cultural and family grounds, continued their pregnancy and did not have an abortion for the following reasons: Religious beliefs, Beliefs (fear of punishment in the afterlife and believing in fate) , Attachment to the unborn baby, Influence of the other people’s opinions (physician, mother or spouse) Late diagnosis of pregnancy, Unsuccessful abortion attempts (Self-treatment, Unsuccessful medical abortion), Economic weakness and arbitrary treatment. Conclusions In the present study, women who continued their pregnancy despite being unwanted were also interviewed. Although they had the same social, economic, cultural, and family problems as women with a history of unsafe abortion and had easy access to abortion, analysis showed that the difference in religious beliefs between the two groups was the most important factor that led women to choose two different approaches. The authors believe that in-depth analysis of people’s beliefs and opinions in this regard and correction of false beliefs plays a crucial role in decreasing the rate of unsafe abortion. PMID:24719694

  19. Preventing Abortion and Repeat Abortion with the Gynefix Intrauterine Implant System — Preliminary Results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Batar; D. Wildemeersch; M. Vrijens; W. Delbarge; M. Temmerman; B. A. Gbolade

    1998-01-01

    The provision of immediate post-abortal contraception is important to reduce the number of unplanned pregnancies and the number of repeat abortions. Immediate post-abortal insertion of an IUD has many advantages and is an acceptable and safe method. However, side-effects and expulsion of conventional IUDs remain a problem. In an attempt to minimize these problems, the frameless intrauterine implant (IUI) was

  20. Induced Abortion and Relevant Factors among Women Seeking Abortion in Nanjing, China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shenghui Wu; Linwei Tian; Fei Xu

    2011-01-01

    Aims: This study aimed to determine the sociological characteristics of abortion seekers according to marital status and previous induced abortions in a major regional hospital in Nanjing, China. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted through face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire in women seeking abortion at Nanjing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital in China in 2003. Results: The average

  1. The effect of food location, heat load, and intrusive medical procedures on brushing activity in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Mandel, R; Whay, H R; Nicol, C J; Klement, E

    2013-10-01

    Animals allocate time and effort to a range of core (e.g., sleeping, feeding, drinking) and "luxury" (e.g., playing, exploring) activities. A luxury activity is characterized by low resilience and, as such, will be reduced when time or energy resources are limited, including under conditions of stress or discomfort. One seemingly luxurious activity available to cows on an increasing number of dairy farms is rubbing against an automated brush. The current study examined the effect of distance from food, heat load, and an intrusive medical procedure (i.e., artificial insemination and transrectal pregnancy examination) on the resilience of brush usage. The probability of using the brush decreased significantly when food was located distantly from the brush (mean=0.53) compared with days when food was located closer to the brush (mean=0.81). Brush usage also decreased at high temperature and humidity levels, with an average decrease of 0.062 brushing events for an increase of 1 temperature-humidity index unit (95% confidence interval=-0.93-0.030). In addition, a significant reduction of approximately 50% in brushing activity was observed on days of artificial insemination compared with the preceding 3d and the following 3d. These findings show that brush usage is a low resilience activity that reduces under a range of conditions. It may thus have the potential to be used as an indicator of a range of health and welfare problems in cows. Further research should be conducted to assess the sensitivity and specificity of this suggested tool and its possible contribution to the early detection of morbidity. PMID:23958014

  2. Experiences of abortion: A narrative review of qualitative studies

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Mabel LS; Robson, Stephen C; May, Carl R

    2008-01-01

    Background Although abortion or termination of pregnancy (TOP) has become an increasingly normalized component of women's health care over the past forty years, insufficient attention has been paid to women's experiences of surgical or medical methods of TOP. Objective To undertake a narrative review of qualitative studies of women's experiences of TOP and their perspectives on surgical or medical methods. Methods Keyword searches of Medline, CINAHL, ISI, and IBSS databases. Manual searches of other relevant journals and reference lists of primary articles. Results Qualitative studies (n = 18) on women's experiences of abortion were identified. Analysis of the results of studies reviewed revealed three main themes: experiential factors that promote or inhibit the choice to seek TOP; experiences of TOP; and experiential aspects of the environment in which TOP takes place. Conclusion Women's choices about TOP are mainly pragmatic ones that are related to negotiating finite personal and family and emotional resources. Women who are well informed and supported in their choices experience good psychosocial outcomes from TOP. Home TOP using mifepristone appears attractive to women who are concerned about professionals' negative attitudes and lack of privacy in formal healthcare settings but also leads to concerns about management and safety. PMID:18637178

  3. TRIHALOMETHANES IN DRINKING WATER AND SPONTANEOUS ABORTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A limited number of epidemiological studies have evaluated the potential association between exposure to DBPs in drinking water and adverse reproductive outcomes. Reproductive effects that have been studied include, for example, spontaneous abortions, congenital defects, low birt...

  4. Changes in the law on abortion.

    PubMed

    Hall, M H

    1990-11-17

    In light of liberalized abortion legislation, the author considers the potential for increased 3rd-trimester abortion rates in England. The paper refers specifically to the Human Fertilization and Embryology Bill passed by the House of Lords on October 18, 1990. The Bill allows abortion during the 1st 24 weeks of pregnancy if risk is posed to the mother or existing children's physical or mental health. The 24-week limit is not, however, applicable when the mother is a risk of grave permanent injury or death, or in the case of substantial risk of serious handicap in the child. 3rd-trimester abortion rates will not change in the former cases, while the latter involve more complex ethics and decision-making on the part of the mother and obstetrician. While screening for malformation should provide relatively definite diagnoses within 24 weeks, some structural abnormalities may only be discovered incidentally much later in term. Incurable, yet not necessarily lethal conditions such as osteochondrodysplasias, central nervous system malformation, inborn errors of metabolism, and chromosomal anomalies may present intervention dilemmas, yet remain legal grounds for abortion within the 24-week period at the wish of the mother. 3rd-trimester abortion, however, demands consideration of the expected severity of physical and mental impairment,the child's life expectation, gestation at diagnosis, the mother's obstetric history, and that active steps such as intra-cardiac injection will be needed to kill the fetus. The pediatrician, geneticist, or surgeon are recommended for inclusion in counseling. Finally, comparing England's 1989 experience with 3rd- trimester abortions to Scotland's, where restrictive legislation has not been in effect, abortion law liberalization is not expected to extensively increase the number of late terminations. PMID:2252917

  5. Abortion and Health Care Chaplaincy in Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lindsay B. Carey; Christopher Newell

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results gained from quantitative and qualitative research involving 327 Australian health care chaplains\\u000a with regard to their involvement in abortion issues within the health care context. The findings indicate that approximately\\u000a 20% of surveyed chaplains had provided some form of pastoral intervention to patients and\\/or their families dealing with issues\\u000a of abortion and that approximately 10%

  6. The triviality of abortion in Greece.

    PubMed

    Naziri, D

    1991-09-01

    In Greece modern contraceptive methods are used only in a very limited manner and abortion is the primary form of birth control. There are several social and psychological issues that are considered to be responsible. A 1985 study done for the Family Planning Center of Thessaloniki found that the ratio of live births is 1.3 and the ratio of abortion is 1.8/woman. 88% of women in the study had had an abortion while practicing coitus interruptus. 90% of the women never bought condoms. In a 1989 study only 6% of women had a positive attitude about condoms. Abortion is used as the primary method of birth control regardless of a woman's socioeconomic status. Further it was found that abortion did not correlate with other modern attitudes or the emancipation of women. The decision to abort was related to difficulties and constraints inherent in bring up a child. However positive attitudes toward contraception were related to educational and occupational levels. To complicate matters the information concerning contraceptives was problematic and related to the women's own lack of initiative to find out, and a lack of correct information offered from gynecologists. A 1990 study on knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and practices in relation to HIV infection indicated that the most favored method of contraception was condoms, but 60.8% of the men reported use versus 33.7% of the women. However these figures are not very representative because the survey was given in the context of HIV prevention and no attempt was made to distinguish between regular and irregular use patterns. Abortions is not a moral issue in Greece. It was legalized in 1986 only because it came to the attention of the government that the previous prohibition was being completely ignored. Abortion is strongly affected by social and psychological factors that are complex and result from cultural view points about fertility, maternal value, and life itself that are unique to the Greek culture. PMID:12284544

  7. Unsafe abortion - the current global scenario.

    PubMed

    Faúndes, Anibal

    2010-08-01

    Unsafe abortion is prevalent in many developing countries, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and South and Southeast Asia, where abortion laws are more restrictive, the unmet need for contraception high and the status of women in society low. The main interventions for reducing the prevalence of unsafe abortion are known: better and more widely available family planning services, comprehensive sex education, improved access to safe abortion and high-quality post-abortion care, including contraceptive counselling and on-site services. Although these proposals have been included in statements and recommendations drawn up at several international conferences and adopted by the vast majority of nations, they have either been inadequately implemented or not implemented at all in the countries in which the need is greatest. A well-coordinated effort by both national and international organisations and agencies is required to put these recommendations into practice; however, the most important factor determining the success of such efforts is the commitment of governments towards preventing unsafe abortion and reducing its prevalence and consequences. PMID:20227350

  8. Abortion and anxiety: what's the relationship?

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Julia Renee; Russo, Nancy F

    2008-07-01

    Using data from the United States National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) and the National Comorbidity Survey (NCS), we conducted secondary data analyses to examine the relationship of abortion, including multiple abortions, to anxiety after first pregnancy outcome in two studies. First, when analyzing the NSFG, we found that pre-pregnancy anxiety symptoms, rape history, age at first pregnancy outcome (abortion vs. delivery), race, marital status, income, education, subsequent abortions, and subsequent deliveries accounted for a significant association initially found between first pregnancy outcome and experiencing subsequent anxiety symptoms. We then tested the relationship of abortion to clinically diagnosed generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and social anxiety disorder, using NCS data. Contrary to findings from our analyses of the NSFG, in the NCS analyses we did not find a significant relationship between first pregnancy outcome and subsequent rates of GAD, social anxiety, or PTSD. However, multiple abortions were found to be associated with much higher rates of PTSD and social anxiety; this relationship was largely explained by pre-pregnancy mental health disorders and their association with higher rates of violence. Researchers and clinicians need to learn more about the relations of violence exposure, mental health, and pregnancy outcome to avoid attributing poor mental health solely to pregnancy outcomes. PMID:18468755

  9. Handling of BLM abort thresholds in the LHC

    E-print Network

    Nebot Del Busto, E; Holzer, EB; Zamantzas, C; Kruk, G; Nordt, A; Sapinski, M; Nemcic, M; Orecka, A; Jackson, S; Roderick, C; Skaugen, A

    2011-01-01

    The Beam Loss Monitoring system (BLM) for the LHC consists of about 3600 Ionization Chambers (IC) located around the ring. Its main purpose is to request a beam abort when the measured losses exceed a certain threshold. The BLM detectors integrate the measured signals in 12 different time intervals (running from 40us to 83.8s) enabling for a different set of abort thresholds depending on the duration of the beam loss. Furthermore, 32 energy levels running from 450GeV to 7TeV account for the fact that the energy density of a particle shower increases with the energy of the primary particle, i.e. the beam energy. Thus, a set of ! 3600 × 12 × 32 = 1.3 · 106 thresholds must be handled. These thresholds are highly critical for the safety of the machine and depend to a large part on human judgment, which cannot be replaced by automatic test procedures. The BLM team has defined well established procedures to compute, set and check new BLM thresholds, in order to avoid and/or find non-conformities due to manipulat...

  10. RB-ARD: A proof of concept rule-based abort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Richard; Marinuzzi, John

    1987-01-01

    The Abort Region Determinator (ARD) is a console program in the space shuttle mission control center. During shuttle ascent, the Flight Dynamics Officer (FDO) uses the ARD to determine the possible abort modes and make abort calls for the crew. The goal of the Rule-based Abort region Determinator (RB/ARD) project was to test the concept of providing an onboard ARD for the shuttle or an automated ARD for the mission control center (MCC). A proof of concept rule-based system was developed on a LMI Lambda computer using PICON, a knowdedge-based system shell. Knowdedge derived from documented flight rules and ARD operation procedures was coded in PICON rules. These rules, in conjunction with modules of conventional code, enable the RB-ARD to carry out key parts of the ARD task. Current capabilities of the RB-ARD include: continuous updating of the available abort mode, recognition of a limited number of main engine faults and recommendation of safing actions. Safing actions recommended by the RB-ARD concern the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) limit shutdown system and powerdown of the SSME Ac buses.

  11. Identification, assessment and treatment of women suffering from post traumatic stress after abortion.

    PubMed

    Bagarozzi, D A

    1994-01-01

    Abortion has been reported to cause post-traumatic stress disorders in women. The manifestation of these disorders is usually delayed, and the causative effect of abortion is largely denied. Such denial is a major contributing factor to the development of the stress. This paper seeks to provide a model for assessment, treatment, and evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness that can be used when post-traumatic stress is diagnosed as a result of abortion. The possibilities of a delayed stress reaction should be examined when clients experience 1) flashbacks of the surgical procedure, people involved, or physical surroundings; 2) nightmares of being trapped in a man-made disaster and being unable to help others who are suffering from, participating in, or witnessing a terrorist act, ritual murder, or human sacrifice; 3) the sudden onset of sadomasochistic interactions or accident proneness where the client receives punishment/pain to alleviate hidden guilt; 4) sexual dysfunctions with no physiological basis; 5) uncharacteristic emotional outbursts; 6) the sudden onset of psychosomatic symptoms, and 7) impacted grief reactions. A detailed case study is presented to illustrate a number of clinical issues relevant to the treatment of a couple which had unresolved feelings about the wife's abortion before she met the husband and the abortion of the husband's girlfriend before he met his wife. Clinical experience suggests that the resolution of this conflict can be accomplished through short-term therapy, and further research is being conducted to determine how well treatment gains are being maintained. PMID:12288495

  12. Psychosocial aspects of repeat abortions in Singapore--a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, W F; Ratnam, S S; Tay, G E

    1984-04-01

    The rate of repeat abortions in Singapore has risen from 10% of all abortions in 1975 to 42% in 1982. This study sought to identify psychosocial characteristics of 100 Chinese women 15-44 years of age who requested a repeat abortion; 100 antenatal patients and 100 1st-time abortees, matched with subjects for age and race, were used as controls. There were no significant differences between cases and controls in most of the variables analyzed. Educational and socioeconomic status, personality components (extroversion, neuroticism, psychoticism), and mood were similar in women from all 3 groups. However, repeat abortees had more prior pregnancies and more living children. Repeat abortees had an average of 4.27 prior pregnancies and 1.94 living children compared with 2.07 pregnancies and 0.88 living children among antenatal patients and 2.67 pregnancies and 1.52 living children among 1st-time abortees. Contraceptive methods reported most commonly among repeat abortees included a combination of methods (27%), condom (21%), and rhythm (15%); these were the 3 methods most frequently reported by 1st-time abortees as well. The Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale was administered to all abortion patients before abortion and 6 weeks after the procedure. The mean score before abortion was 39.04 among 1st-time abortees and 41.25 among repeat abortees--well below the mean of 60 found among clinically depressed patients. 6 weeks after the procedure, the depression score had declined to 34.46 among 1st-time abortees and to 35.14 among repeat abortees. PMID:6474200

  13. [Glimpses from the history of abortion].

    PubMed

    Holmdahl, B

    1992-05-01

    For a long time in human history, global population growth was checked by infant mortality, which ranged from 30-50% and did not start sinking until the beginning of the 1800s in the west. Child murder in the west was prohibited by law around the 1100-1200s, but it continued secretly. Among private people, induced abortion was allowed. In the holy scripts of Hinduism and Brahminism, abortion was prohibited. Hippocrates wrote that doctors should not give women abortifacient. The church father Augustinus stated that it was not within human power to discern when the soul entered the body, a circumstance that forbid abortion. A church meeting in 305 A.D. distanced itself from abortion, and this has been the stand of the Catholic Church ever since. In Sweden, exposing a child to the elements was practiced until the end of the 1200s, when it became prohibited. Protestants punished child murder by death. During 1759-78, 217 women were executed for child-killing. From the 1400s, church law punished abortion, and later, capital and punishment was meted out for it, but a distinction was made if the fetus was alive or stillborn. The law in 1734 punished abortion by the death of all concerned. The death penalty was abolished in 1864. In 1896, Anna Linholm reported to the policy in Uppsala that a midwife had been practicing clandestine abortions. Some of her patients were admitted to hospital for hemorrhaging. She was sentenced to hard labor. During 1851-1903, a total of 1408 abortions were reported to the health service. 90% of these became known because of death caused by obduction. Phosphorus was used for abortion in 1271 cases, arsenic in 62, and mechanical aids in 8 cases. About 1//2 of all female suicides at the end of the 1800s was performed by pregnant women who ate phosphorus. Almost all were unmarried, and 56% carried it out after the 5th month of pregnancy. In 1901, phosphorus was prohibited in Swedish homes. In 1875, free abortions became available. However, the ethical question about whether and when a fetus has a soul is more contemporary and relevant than ever. PMID:1618684

  14. A simplified method for differential staining of aborted and non-aborted pollen grains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to use chemical staining to discriminate aborted from non-aborted pollen grains has well-known practical applications in agriculture. A commonly used technique for assessing pollen vitality, Alexander’s stain, uses chloral hydrate, phenol and mercuric chloride, all of which are highly to...

  15. Family Planning Evaluation. Abortion Surveillance Report--Legal Abortions, United States, Annual Summary, 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Disease Control (DHEW/PHS), Atlanta, GA.

    This report summarizes abortion information received by the Center for Disease Control from collaborators in state health departments, hospitals, and other pertinent sources. While it is intended primarily for use by the above sources, it may also interest those responsible for family planning evaluation and hospital abortion planning. Information…

  16. [Legal abortion. A prospective study of outpatient legal abortion in the Municipal hospital in Arhus during a 1 year period].

    PubMed

    Moller, B R; Diederich, P; Hansen, J T; Oram, V

    1976-02-01

    Results are presented of outpatient induced abortion performed on 608 women 14-46 years of age during the year after the revision of Denmark's abortion law in October 1973. After counseling and testing, the patients were given 10 mg Stesolid iv and a paracervical block of 10 ml lidocaine, 1% adrenalin was applied on each side. After 10 minutes dilation of the cervix a.m. Hegar nr. 9 and deeper to Hegar nr. 11. The uteral cavity was emptied by vacuum aspiration, followed up with a half sharp curette. After 1 hour of observation, the patients could go home. 56% of the patients were 25-years-old or under, a marked increase from the 1969-1971 period. 50% of the patients were in the 8th or less week of pregnancy, compared with .3-36% in various studies in the period 1961-1972. 1.3% of the patients experienced complications, a sharp decrease from previous studies. 62.7% of the patients found the procedure acceptable. The procedure is considered suitable for use in out patient clinics. PMID:1251504

  17. Abortion attitudes as determinants of perceptions regarding male involvement in abortion decisions.

    PubMed

    Coleman, P K; Nelson, E S

    1999-01-01

    Abortion decisions have a potentially meaningful effect on the lives of men. Previous research suggests that both men and women generally believe that men have the right to be involved in such decisions. However, very little research attention has been devoted to identifying individual difference correlates of discrepant levels of endorsement for male involvement in abortion decisions. The extent to which abortion attitudes (on a pro-choice to pro-life continuum), conceptualization of abortion as strictly a female issue, and interest in the issue operate as effective predictors of the appropriate level of male involvement in abortion decisions was examined in a sample of 1,387 college students. Results of a multiple regression analysis revealed that 44% of the variance in male involvement scores was explained by the predictor variables. PMID:9919847

  18. A cross-cultural history of abortion.

    PubMed

    Shain, R N

    1986-03-01

    Abortion is a universal phenomenon, occurring throughout recorded history and at all levels of societal organization. Techniques are highly varied, as are the circumstances under which it is practised. The status of and attitudes towards abortion in Western civilization are variable and have, in most cases, been changing. As of 1982, 10% and 18% of the world's population respectively, lived in countries where abortion was totally prohibited or where it was permitted only to save the mother's life. In the USA, various national surveys indicate liberalization of public attitudes towards pregnancy termination between 1965 and the years immediately following the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision (1973) which legalized abortion. More recent polls demonstrate little attitudinal change since 1972-1973: between 80% and 90% of Americans approve of abortion in the case of poor health, a seriously defective fetus, or rape, and between 40% and 50% indicate approval for all other reasons as well. Only 10% of the American population would like to see abortion prohibited under all circumstances. Sociodemographic analyses indicate that individuals who disapprove of abortion differ from those who approve of its availability in that they are more likely to be Roman Catholic or fundamentalist Protestant; are, in general, more strongly committed to organized religion; are on the traditional/conservative end of the spectrum with regard to women's role in life, premarital sex, sex education and civil liberties; and tend to have achieved a relatively low educational level. 'Pro-life' and 'pro-choice' activists tend to be women who are completely different from one another in sociodemographic characteristics and in overall values, particularly as these relate to traditional versus modern female roles. PMID:3519038

  19. Dezocine for anesthesia and stress reduction in induced abortion

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mengliang; Guo, Yanru; Shan, Shiqiang; Yang, Sen

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of dezocine with regard to analgesic and stress reduction outcomes in women undergoing induced abortion. Methods A total of 126 women in early pregnancy (up to 14 weeks’ gestation) who underwent induced abortion at Cangzhou Central Hospital from May 2012 to May 2013 were randomly assigned to a control (propofol) group (n=63) or an intervention (propofol + dezocine) group (n=63). Wake-up time, orientation force recovery time, incidence of adverse reactions, postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) score, analgesic effect, and respiratory and circulatory monitoring before the operation, 5 minutes into the operation, and 5 minutes after the operation were compared between the two groups. Results The surgical procedure and anesthesia were performed successfully in all patients. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and oxyhemoglobin saturation in the intervention group were significantly higher than in the control group; however, heart rate was significantly lower in the intervention group than in the control group 5 minutes into the operation (all P<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in these parameters before surgery and after recovery. The postoperative VAS score (2.82±0.72), Ramsay score (2.65±0.65), and anesthetic effect in the intervention group were better than in the control group (3.90±0.84 and 2.21±0.49, respectively), and all differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The wake-up time (3.41±0.79 minutes) and orientation force recovery time (4.28±0.92 minutes) were all significantly shorter (P<0.05) in the intervention group than in the control group, as was the incidence of adverse reactions (7.94% versus 26.98%, respectively). Conclusion Adverse reactions of propofol combined with dezocine in painless induced abortion are less while the analgesic effect is better. PMID:25784792

  20. The use of an integrated care pathway for evidence-based practice and clinical governance in abortion care.

    PubMed

    Graham, O; Jayadeva, P; Guthrie, K

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effectiveness of an integrated care pathway (ICP) for delivery of evidence-based practice in abortion care. All women re-admitted after an abortion had their records audited for adherence to national and local guidelines using information in the ICP and general gynaecology case notes. A total of 100 women were re-admitted into the gynaecological wards of hospitals in Hull and East Riding of Yorkshire after an abortion, between January 2000 and December 2006. Out of 8,476 medical or surgical induced abortions undertaken at 14 weeks gestation or under, the overall readmission rate was 1.2%. The ICP showed that 97% of women had chlamydia screening prior to the abortion; all women had a contraceptive discussion and 43% left using a long-acting reversible method of contraception (LARC). However, data outside the care pathway was not documented, and hence the standard of care given on readmission was difficult to locate and variable in quality. The ICP clinical record is demonstrated to be a useful tool for high quality record-keeping and ensuring all patients receive the same standard of pre-assessment care. Although this service has an acceptably low-risk profile in terms of re-admission, we propose the addition of a re-admission episode to the current ICP to further enhance clinical care post-abortion. PMID:20455726

  1. Protocol to the African Charter on the Rights of Women: implications for access to abortion at the regional level.

    PubMed

    Ngwena, Charles G

    2010-08-01

    Article 14(2)(c) of the Protocol to the African Charter on the Rights of Women enjoins States Parties to take appropriate measures "to protect the reproductive rights of women by authorising medical abortion in cases of sexual assault, rape, incest, and where continued pregnancy endangers the mental and physical health of the mother or the life of the mother or the foetus." This paper considers the implications of Article 14 for access to safe, legal abortion. It is submitted that Article 14 has the potential to impact positively on regional abortion law, policy, and practice in 3 main areas. First, it takes forward the global consensus on combating abortion as a major public health danger. Second, it provides African countries with not just an incentive, but also an imperative for reforming abortion laws in a transparent manner. Third, if implemented in the context of a treaty that centers on the equality and non-discrimination of women, Article 14 has the potential to contribute toward transforming access to abortion from a crime and punishment model to a reproductive health model. PMID:20546748

  2. Abortion and maternal mortality in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Okonofua, Friday

    2006-11-01

    Unsafe abortion is an important public health problem, accounting for 13% of maternal mortality in developing countries. Of an estimated annual 70,000 deaths from unsafe abortion worldwide, over 99% occur in the developing countries of sub-Saharan Africa, Central and Southeast Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean. Factors associated with increased maternal mortality from unsafe abortion in developing countries include inadequate delivery systems for contraception needed to prevent unwanted pregnancies, restrictive abortion laws, pervading negative cultural and religious attitudes towards induced abortion, and poor health infrastructures for the management of abortion complications. The application of a public health approach based on primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention can reduce morbidity and mortality associated with unsafe abortion in developing countries. Primary prevention includes the promotion of increased use of contraception by women (and by men) at risk for unwanted pregnancy; secondary prevention involves the liberalization of abortion laws and the development of programs to increase access to safe abortion care in developing countries. In contrast, tertiary prevention includes the integration and institutionalization of post-abortion care for incomplete abortion and the early and appropriate treatment of more severe complications of abortion. Efforts to address these problems will contribute both to reducing maternal mortality associated with induced abortion and to achieving the Millennium Development Goals in developing countries. PMID:17169222

  3. Caffeine consumption during pregnancy and spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    Fenster, L; Eskenazi, B; Windham, G C; Swan, S H

    1991-05-01

    We conducted a case-control study of spontaneous abortion in Santa Clara County, California between 1986 and 1987. We analyzed data on 607 cases and 1,284 controls to evaluate the potential association between caffeine consumption during the first trimester of pregnancy and spontaneous abortion. About 70% of the women consumed caffeinated coffee, tea, and/or soda; 7% of the women consumed more than an average of 300 mg of caffeine daily. The crude odds ratio (OR) for heavy caffeine consumption (greater than 300 mg/day) was 1.55 (95% CI: 1.04-2.31), which decreased to 1.22 (95% CI: 0.80-1.87) after controlling for confounding factors. For these heavy users, nausea modified the association of spontaneous abortion and caffeine; heavy caffeine consumers reporting nausea had a doubled risk for spontaneous abortion (adjusted OR = 2.10, 95% CI: 1.20-3.70), in contrast to those who did not report nausea (adjusted OR = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.27-1.04). Heavy caffeine consumers who decreased their caffeine intake early in pregnancy had a risk of spontaneous abortion similar to that of nonconsumers. PMID:2054397

  4. [Pregnancy and induced abortion among teenagers].

    PubMed

    Tado, S

    1985-11-01

    The number of pregnancies and induced abortions among Japanese teenagers has recently increased. 2 of 5 pregnant single women whom social workers assist are teenagers. The teenagers fall into 2 groups: those under 18, who are in a sexually awakening period, or 18 and older, who are maturing. Those under 18, despite a strong tendency toward sexual activity, are predominantly insecure and run away from home to escape adversity and seek friendship among members of the opposite sex. After becoming pregnant, they go home only to embarrass their parents. Ultimately, they choose abortion or, because of their own inability, their babies are taken care of by their families or in foster homes. Those 18 or older, despite their knowledge of the relationship between sexual intercourse and pregnancy, typically did not take it seriously. Consequently, their reaction to their pregnancies tends toward shock and panic. Many try to keep their pregnancy from their parents. Though they do not want abortion, their circumstances may force them to it. Behind the increase of unexpected pregnancy and unwanted abortion in both age groups are several factors: the lack of sexual education suitable to their level of their physical maturity; a lack of responsibility by the male teenagers, who cannot relate their own actions to their partners' pregnancies; and the ignorance of pregnant teenagers, who cannot see that abortions may hurt them not only physically but mentally in the long run. PMID:3854863

  5. Medical procedures and outcomes of Japanese patients with trisomy 18 or trisomy 13: Analysis of a nationwide administrative database of hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Ishitsuka, Kazue; Matsui, Hiroki; Michihata, Nobuaki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Nakamura, Tomoo; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2015-08-01

    The choices of aggressive treatment for trisomy 18 (T18) and trisomy 13 (T13) remain controversial. Here, we describe the current medical procedures and outcomes of patients with T18 and T13 from a nationwide administrative database of hospitalized patients in Japan. We used the database to identify eligible patients with T18 (n?=?438) and T13 (n?=?133) who were first admitted to one of 200 hospitals between July 2010 and March 2013. Patients were divided into admission at day <7 (early neonatal) and admission at day ?7 (late neonatal and post neonatal) groups, and we described the medical intervention and status at discharge for each group. In the day <7 groups, surgical interventions were performed for 56 (19.9%) T18 patients and 22 (34.4%) T13 patients, including pulmonary artery banding, and procedures for esophageal atresia and omphalocele. None received intracardiac surgery. The rate of patients discharged to home was higher in the day ?7 groups than the day <7 groups (T18: 72.6 vs. 38.8%; T13: 73.9 vs. 21.9%, respectively). Our data show that a substantial number of patients with trisomy received surgery and were then discharged home, but, of these, a considerable number required home medical care. This included home oxygen therapy, home mechanical ventilation, and tube feeding. These findings will be useful to clinicians or families who care for patients with T18 and T13. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25847518

  6. 42 CFR 457.475 - Limitations on coverage: Abortions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...abortion is necessary to save the life of the mother. (2) Rape or incest. FFP is available in expenditures for abortion services performed to terminate a pregnancy resulting from an act of rape or incest. (c) Partial Federal funding...

  7. 42 CFR 457.475 - Limitations on coverage: Abortions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...abortion is necessary to save the life of the mother. (2) Rape or incest. FFP is available in expenditures for abortion services performed to terminate a pregnancy resulting from an act of rape or incest. (c) Partial Federal funding...

  8. Therapeutic abortion and its psychological implications: the Canadian experience.

    PubMed

    Greenglass, E R

    1975-10-18

    Approximately 9 months after a legal therapeutic abortion, 188 Canadian women were interviewed. One half were single and the rest were married, separated or divorced. They were matched closely for a number of demographic variables with control women who had not had abortions. Neurotic disturbance in several areas of personality functioning was assessed from questionnaire responses. Out of 27 psychological scales, differences between the abortion and control groups were found on only 3: in general, women who had had abortions were more rebellious than control women, abortion tended to be associated with somewhat greater depression in married women, and single women who had had abortions scored higher on the shallow-affect scale. However, all the personality scores were well within the normal range. Perceived social support was strongly associated with favourable psychological reactions after abortion. Use of contraceptives improved greatly after the abortion, when over 90% of women reported using contraceptives regularly. PMID:803127

  9. Their Right to an Abortion, Your Right to Know

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Size Email Print Share Their Right to an Abortion, Your Right to Know Article Body Only a handful of states grant minors access to abortion without their parents’ knowledge or permission. The majority ...

  10. Paradoxical Parallels in the American and German Abortion Decisions

    E-print Network

    Levy, Richard E.; Somek, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    In this Article, Professors Levy and Somek engage in a careful comparative analysis of the leading constitutional abortion decisions in the United States and Germany. This analysis is occasioned by the remarkable convergence of the abortion...

  11. United Nations World Abortion Policies 1999

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1999-01-01

    The United Nations Population Information Network (POPIN) has recently published a collection of data tables that outline the abortion policies for regions and nations around the world. The tables display the grounds on which abortion is legally permitted, as well as national and international data on abortion rates, total fertility rates (births per woman), maternal mortality ratio (per 100,000 live births), and the rate of contraceptive use by married women. The data are divided into six regional tables (Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, Northern America, and Oceania). Each regional table is organized by geographic area (e.g., Eastern Asia, Southeastern Asia, South Central Asia, and Western Asia) to facilitate comparisons.

  12. 32 CFR 806b.48 - Disclosing the medical records of minors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...age of majority. (a) The Air Force must obey state laws protecting medical records of drug or alcohol abuse treatment, abortion, and birth control. If you manage medical records, learn the local laws and coordinate proposed local policies with...

  13. 32 CFR 806b.48 - Disclosing the medical records of minors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...age of majority. (a) The Air Force must obey state laws protecting medical records of drug or alcohol abuse treatment, abortion, and birth control. If you manage medical records, learn the local laws and coordinate proposed local policies with...

  14. 32 CFR 806b.48 - Disclosing the medical records of minors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...age of majority. (a) The Air Force must obey state laws protecting medical records of drug or alcohol abuse treatment, abortion, and birth control. If you manage medical records, learn the local laws and coordinate proposed local policies with...

  15. 32 CFR 806b.48 - Disclosing the medical records of minors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...a) The Air Force must obey state laws protecting medical records of drug or alcohol abuse treatment, abortion, and birth control. If you manage medical records, learn the local laws and coordinate proposed local policies with the servicing...

  16. 32 CFR 806b.48 - Disclosing the medical records of minors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...a) The Air Force must obey state laws protecting medical records of drug or alcohol abuse treatment, abortion, and birth control. If you manage medical records, learn the local laws and coordinate proposed local policies with the servicing...

  17. Abortion in cattle due to infection with Staphylococcus lugdunensis.

    PubMed

    Ardigò, Paolo; D'Incau, Mario; Pongolini, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    An aborted fetus of 7 months gestation, the associated placenta, and a single blood sample from the dam were submitted for diagnostic investigation to the diagnostic laboratory of the Lombardy and Emilia-Romagna Experimental Zooprophylactic Institute in Parma, Italy. The serum was negative for Neospora caninum, Coxiella burnetii, Chlamydophila abortus, Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), Brucella abortus, and Brucella melitensis. Fetal tissues and placental cotyledons were pooled and tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of BHV-1, Bovine herpesvirus 4, BVDV, N. caninum, C. burnetii, Chlamydophila spp., Schmallemberg virus, and Leptospira interrogans. All PCR assays were negative. Bacteriological examinations performed on the fetal organs revealed a pure growth of Staphylococcus lugdunensis in all organs cultured. In human beings, S. lugdunensis is responsible for community-acquired and nosocomial infections, in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. In veterinary medicine, the pathogenic potential of S. lugdunensis has not been fully investigated. The incidence of S. lugdunensis is regarded as being underreported because it could be easily misidentified as Staphylococcus aureus. The current report documents the ability of S. lugdunensis to cause abortion in cattle, indicating the need for accurate diagnostic procedures to identify this emerging and zoonotic pathogen whose incidence is likely underestimated in both human and veterinary medicine. PMID:25292193

  18. Abortion and Neonaticide: Ethics, Practice and Policy in Four Nations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael L. Gross

    2002-01-01

    Abortion, particularly late-term abortion, and neonaticide, selective non-treatment of newborns, are feasible management strategies for fetuses or newborns diagnosed with severe abnormalities. However, policy varies considerably among developed nations. This article examines abortion and neonatal policy in four nations: Israel, the US, the UK and Denmark. In Israel, late-term abortion is permitted while non-treatment of newborns is prohibited. In the

  19. Post-abortion complications after interruption of pregnancy with misoprostol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Faúndes; L. C. Santos; M. Carvalho; C. Gras

    1996-01-01

    The high incidence of abortion in Brazil and the increased use of misoprostol among women having clandestine\\/unsafe abortions has led to an interest in evaluating whether there is an association between the use of misoprostol and the incidence of septic complications post-abortion. To test this association, a retrospective cohort study was conducted with 1840 women treated post-abortion at the Instituto

  20. Sociodemographic Factors Associated With Obstacles to Abortion Care: Findings From a Survey of Abortion Patients in Mexico City

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Davida Becker; Claudia Diaz-Olavarrieta; Clara Juarez; Sandra G. Garcia; Patricio Sanhueza Smith; Cynthia C. Harper

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundFirst-trimester abortion was legalized in Mexico City in 2007, and services are now provided at public and private sites throughout the city. However, little is known about the obstacles women face when seeking abortion care.

  1. Sex Selective Abortions, Fertility and Birth Spacing Claus C Portner

    E-print Network

    Silver, Whendee

    Sex Selective Abortions, Fertility and Birth Spacing Claus C P¨ortner Department of Economics under the title "The Determinants of Sex Selective Abortions." #12;Abstract Previous research on sex selective abortions has ignored the interactions between fertility, birth spacing and sex selection

  2. The validity of survey responses on abortion: evidence from Estonia.

    PubMed

    Anderson, B A; Katus, K; Puur, A; Silver, B D

    1994-02-01

    This paper presents results of a validation survey of abortion conducted in Tallinn, Estonia in April and May 1992. The sample was drawn from patient records in a maternity hospital. Women who had an abortion in that hospital in 1991 were asked about recent abortions as part of a survey about women's health. More than 80% of the respondents reported having a recent abortion. Some respondents misreported their abortion as a miscarriage. Moreover, some variation in reporting was associated with respondents' characteristics. Ethnic Estonians were less likely to report their abortion than were Russians, women over age 40 were less likely to report the abortion than younger women, and women who had the abortion late in the first trimester were less likely to report that abortion. There was some evidence that unmarried women were less likely than married women to report their abortion, and that women who had borne three or more children were less likely to report their abortion than women who had borne fewer children. These differences probably stem from the extent to which pregnancy or abortion is considered stigmatizing for women in different situations. PMID:8005338

  3. Increased contraceptive use one year post-abortion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Kero; A. Lalos

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of abortion on contraceptive use, partner rela- tionship and sexual satisfaction. METHODS: In a longitudinal study, 58 women answered a pre-abortion question- naire and participated in two interviews, one in connection with the abortion and a second 1 year later. RESULTS: Most women (40\\/58) had retained the same partner

  4. Abortion and Maternal Mortality in the Developing World

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Friday Okonofua

    Unsafe abortion is an important public health problem, accounting for 13% of maternal mortality in developing countries. Of an estimated annual 70 000 deaths from unsafe abortion worldwide, over 99% occur in the developing countries of sub-Saharan Africa, Central and Southeast Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean. Factors associated with increased maternal mortality from unsafe abortion in developing countries

  5. The Psychosocial Factors of the Abortion Experience: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shusterman, Lisa Roseman

    1976-01-01

    Due to faulty methodology no general statements can be made about psychosocial factors for women receiving illegal abortions. Women receiving therapeutic abortions experienced favorable psychological consequences more often than negative consequences. New abortion patients are mostly young, unmarried women who are not in a social position to care…

  6. The Effect of Religious Membership on Teen Abortion Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomal, Annette

    2001-01-01

    Studied abortion rates among teenagers in 1,024 counties in 18 states that report abortion numbers. Results show that counties with high levels of religious membership were more likely to be in a state with a parental involvement law for teenage abortions. Both religious membership level and a parental involvement law were negatively related to…

  7. ABORTED FRUITS OF OPUNTIA MICRODASYS (CACTACEAE): INSURANCE AGAINST REPRODUCTIVE FAILURE

    E-print Network

    Mandujano, María del Carmen

    ABORTED FRUITS OF OPUNTIA MICRODASYS (CACTACEAE): INSURANCE AGAINST REPRODUCTIVE FAILURE 1 N, but plantlet provenance did not. The high fruit abortion rate resulting from environmental and maternal effects provided suitable conditions for establishment of plantlets. Key words: clonal propagation; fruit abortion

  8. Solo-fast Universal Constructions for Deterministic Abortable Objects

    E-print Network

    Johnen, Colette

    Solo-fast Universal Constructions for Deterministic Abortable Objects Claire Capdevielle, Colette.lastname@labri.fr) Abstract. In this paper we study efficient implementations for deter- ministic abortable objects. Deterministic abortable objects behave like ordinary objects when accessed sequentially, but they may return

  9. Abortions in Cattle, a Review Max Irsik DVM, MAB

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    Abortions in Cattle, a Review Max Irsik DVM, MAB Beef Cattle Extension Veterinarian University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine Abortion is the premature expulsion of the fetus from the dam have died in-utero due to disease and was expelled. Depending upon the cause of "abortion" a cow may

  10. Article de synthse DIAGNOSTIC DE LA CHLAMYDIOSE ABORTIVE

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Article de synthèse DIAGNOSTIC DE LA CHLAMYDIOSE ABORTIVE Annie RODOLAKIS INRA, centre de ToursI abortive infections of ruminants are presented in this review. Plan 1. Diagnostic indirect 1.1. Diagnostic commencent également à être appliquées en médecine vétérinaire pour le diagnostic de la chlamydiose abortive

  11. 42 CFR 457.475 - Limitations on coverage: Abortions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Limitations on coverage: Abortions. 457.475 Section 457.475 Public...457.475 Limitations on coverage: Abortions. (a) General rule. FFP under...is not available in expenditures for an abortion, or in expenditures for the...

  12. 42 CFR 457.475 - Limitations on coverage: Abortions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Limitations on coverage: Abortions. 457.475 Section 457.475 Public...457.475 Limitations on coverage: Abortions. (a) General rule. FFP under...is not available in expenditures for an abortion, or in expenditures for the...

  13. Resets vs. Aborts in Linear Temporal Logic Roy Armoni1

    E-print Network

    Kupferman, Orna

    Resets vs. Aborts in Linear Temporal Logic Roy Armoni1 , Doron Bustan2 , Orna Kupferman3 of Pnueli's LTL. Both ForSpec and Sugar 2.0 directly support reset/abort signals, in which a check for a property may be terminated and declared successful by a reset/abort sig- nal, provided the check has

  14. 42 CFR 457.475 - Limitations on coverage: Abortions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Limitations on coverage: Abortions. 457.475 Section 457.475 Public...457.475 Limitations on coverage: Abortions. (a) General rule. FFP under...is not available in expenditures for an abortion, or in expenditures for the...

  15. DIAGNOSTIC ALLERGIQUE DE LA CHLAMYDIOSE ABORTIVE DE LA CHEVRE

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DIAGNOSTIC ALLERGIQUE DE LA CHLAMYDIOSE ABORTIVE DE LA CHEVRE Annie RODOLAKIS, J. DUFRENOY A (France) Summary ALLERGIC DIAGNOSIS OF ABORTIVE CHLAMYDIAL INFECTION IN THE GOAT. ― A delayed. Introduction. Le diagnostic immunologique de la Chla- mydiose abortive est réalisé tant chez la chèvre que chez

  16. The Impact of Legalized Abortion on Child Health Outcomes and

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    EA 4272 The Impact of Legalized Abortion on Child Health Outcomes and Abandonment. Evidence from,version1-7Apr2010 #12;The Impact of Legalized Abortion on Child Health Outcomes and Abandonment. Evidence and a unique census of institutionalized children to analyze the impact of abortion legalization in Romania

  17. Powered Safe Abort for Autonomous Rendezvous of Spacecraft

    E-print Network

    How, Jonathan P.

    Powered Safe Abort for Autonomous Rendezvous of Spacecraft Louis Breger and Jonathan P. How MIT-optimized rendezvous trajectories. These trajectories guarantee the existence of known powered abort trajectories the existence of known active safe abort trajectories for a large class of possible spacecraft anomalies

  18. Schedulability Analysis of CAN with Non-abortable Transmission Requests

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Schedulability Analysis of CAN with Non-abortable Transmission Requests Dawood A. Khan INRIA / INPL, in reality, CAN controllers may have some characteristics, such as non- abortable transmit buffers, which may break this assumption. This paper provides analysis for networks that contain nodes with non-abortable

  19. The Accessibility of Abortion Services In the United States, 2001

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stanley K. Henshaw; Lawrence B. Finer

    2003-01-01

    RESULTS: A minority of abortion providers offer services before five weeks from the last menstrual period (37%) or after 20 weeks (24% or fewer), but the proportions have increased since 1993. Providers estimate that one-quarter of women having abortions in nonhospital facilities travel 50 miles or more for services, and that 7% are initially unsure of their abortion decision. The

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Arsenic Exposure and Risk of Spontaneous Abortion,

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Arsenic Exposure and Risk of Spontaneous Abortion, Stillbirth, and Infant out during 2002­2004 in Matlab, Bangladesh. Spontaneous abortion was evaluated in relation to urinary of spontaneous abortion was 1.4 (95% confi- dence interval CI 0.96­2.2) among women with urine arsenic