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Sample records for abrikosov gluon vortices

  1. Abrikosov Gluon Vortices in Color Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Efrain J.

    2011-09-01

    In this talk I will discuss how the in-medium magnetic field can influence the gluon dynamics in a three-flavor color superconductor. It will be shown how at field strengths comparable to the charged gluon Meissner mass a new phase can be realized, giving rise to Abrikosov's vortices of charged gluons. In that phase, the inhomogeneous gluon condensate anti-screens the magnetic field due to the anomalous magnetic moment of these spin-1 particles. This paramagnetic effect can be of interest for astrophysics, since due to the gluon vortex antiscreening mechanism, compact stars with color superconducting cores could have larger magnetic fields than neutron stars made up entirely of nuclear matter. I will also discuss a second gluon condensation phenomenon connected to the Meissner instability attained at moderate densities by two-flavor color superconductors. In this situation, an inhomogeneous condensate of charged gluons emerges to remove the chromomagnetic instability created by the pairing mismatch, and as a consequence, the charged gluonic currents induce a magnetic field. Finally, I will point out a possible relation between glitches in neutron stars and the existence of the gluon vortices.

  2. Single Abrikosov vortices as quantized information bits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golod, T.; Iovan, A.; Krasnov, V. M.

    2015-10-01

    Superconducting digital devices can be advantageously used in future supercomputers because they can greatly reduce the dissipation power and increase the speed of operation. Non-volatile quantized states are ideal for the realization of classical Boolean logics. A quantized Abrikosov vortex represents the most compact magnetic object in superconductors, which can be utilized for creation of high-density digital cryoelectronics. In this work we provide a proof of concept for Abrikosov-vortex-based random access memory cell, in which a single vortex is used as an information bit. We demonstrate high-endurance write operation and two different ways of read-out using a spin valve or a Josephson junction. These memory cells are characterized by an infinite magnetoresistance between 0 and 1 states, a short access time, a scalability to nm sizes and an extremely low write energy. Non-volatility and perfect reproducibility are inherent for such a device due to the quantized nature of the vortex.

  3. Single Abrikosov vortices as quantized information bits

    PubMed Central

    Golod, T.; Iovan, A.; Krasnov, V. M.

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting digital devices can be advantageously used in future supercomputers because they can greatly reduce the dissipation power and increase the speed of operation. Non-volatile quantized states are ideal for the realization of classical Boolean logics. A quantized Abrikosov vortex represents the most compact magnetic object in superconductors, which can be utilized for creation of high-density digital cryoelectronics. In this work we provide a proof of concept for Abrikosov-vortex-based random access memory cell, in which a single vortex is used as an information bit. We demonstrate high-endurance write operation and two different ways of read-out using a spin valve or a Josephson junction. These memory cells are characterized by an infinite magnetoresistance between 0 and 1 states, a short access time, a scalability to nm sizes and an extremely low write energy. Non-volatility and perfect reproducibility are inherent for such a device due to the quantized nature of the vortex. PMID:26456592

  4. Gamma-ray superconducting detector based on Abrikosov vortices: Principle of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Lisitskiy, M. P.

    2009-11-15

    The high atomic number of some superconducting elements such as niobium (Z=41) and tantalum (Z=73) and a high material thickness (e.g., t=300 mum) are emphasized as essential properties for development of a gamma-ray solid state detector with high intrinsic detection efficiency in the energy range up to 100 keV. To exploit these properties, a new detection principle based on the interaction of a single gamma-ray photon with Abrikosov vortex is proposed. The interaction of gamma-ray photon with a superconductor is discussed in terms of the photoelectric absorption and a hot-spot formation, the last acts as a short-time pinning center on an Abrikosov vortex and activates its motion, namely, a jump or damped vibration. Both types of vortex motion lead to variation (either static or dynamic) in the magnetic field on the absorber surface. The high sensitivity of the Josephson tunneling to weak magnetic field can be exploited for revealing the magnetic field variation and to make the readout of the detector. Main intrinsic properties of a gamma-ray detector based on Abrikosov vortices are evaluated, including the possibility to measure the energy deposited in the detector. A single Josephson tunnel junction configuration or a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) configuration is proposed and discussed as possible realization of working gamma-ray detector both in the counter operation mode and in the radiation spectroscopy operation mode.

  5. Current induced decomposition of Abrikosov vortices in p-n layered superconductors and heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Rakhmanov, A L; Savel'ev, Sergey; Kusmartsev, F V

    2008-11-01

    We describe the decomposition of Abrikosov vortices into decoupled pancake vortices in superconductors having both electron and hole charge carriers. We estimate the critical current of such a decomposition, at which a superconducting-normal state transition occurs, and find that it is very sensitive to the magnetic field and temperature. The effect can be observed in recently synthesized self-doped high-Tc layered superconductors with electrons and holes coexisting in different Cu-O planes and in artificial p-n superconductor heterostructures. The sensitivity of the critical current to a magnetic field may be used for sensors and detectors of a magnetic field, which can be built up from the superconductor heterostructures. PMID:19113298

  6. DC to AC converter on Abrikosov vortices in a washboard pinning potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklovskij, Valerij A.; Dobrovolskiy, Oleksandr V.

    2014-05-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of Abrikosov vortices in a cosine dc-biased washboard pinning potential at nonzero temperature is theoretically investigated. The problem is treated relying upon the exact solution of the Langevin equation for non-interacting vortices by using the Fokker-Planck method combined with the scalar continued fractions technique. The time variation of the local mean vortex velocity v(t) is calculated. The time voltage E(t) ~ v(t) is predicted to oscillate with a dc current-dependent frequency and a tunable pulse shape. Formulas for v(t) are discussed as functions of dc transport current and temperature, in a wide range of the corresponding dimensionless parameters. The derived expressions can be adapted for a number of physical applications utilizing the overdamped motion of a Brownian particle in a tilted cosine potential, e.g., the resistively shunted Josephson junction model.

  7. Experimental estimation of the hot spot size in Nb-based Josephson tunnel junctions using Abrikosov vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Cristiano, R.; Frunzio, L.; Pagano, S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Lisitskii, M.P.

    1997-11-01

    We report on a new experimental approach to the size estimation of the hot spot induced by ionizing particles in a Josephson tunnel junction. Here, in contrast to the case of a superconducting strip, it is possible to investigate the hot spot dynamics in absence of effects due to the heating induced by the bias current. The reported experiment is based on the motion of Abrikosov vortices, trapped in the thin films constituting the junction electrodes, under 5.6 MeV {alpha}-particle irradiation. The fast time evolution of a hot spot, combined with the presence of Abrikosov vortices, produces a change of the static magnetic field in the junction area and thus a change of the critical current value, I{sub c}. Measurements of I{sub c} during the {alpha}-particle irradiation and in presence of trapped Abrikosov vortices allow to determine the rate of appearance of those I{sub c} changes. The behavior of the average appearance rate as function of the Abrikosov vortices density provides a direct determination of the maximum hot spot area. The experiment is performed on a high quality Nb/Al{endash}AlO{sub x}/Nb junction of circular geometry and with {open_quotes}small{close_quotes} dimensions with respect to the Josephson penetration depth. A value of 4.7{plus_minus}1.2{mu}m{sup 2} is found for the maximum hot spot area. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. HTSC cuprate films doped with nanoparticles and their electrodynamics, determined by Abrikosov vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flis, V. S.; Kalenyuk, A. A.; Kasatkin, A. L.; Moskalyuk, V. O.; Rebikov, A. I.; Svechnikov, V. L.; Tret'yachenko, K. G.; Pan, V. M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a comprehensive study of the relationship of the structural and electrodynamic characteristics of quasi-single-crystal films of the HTSC cuprate YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) with various concentrations (several mass percent) of nanosize inclusions of the perovskitelike phase of BaZrO3 (BZO). High-resolution electron microscopy is used to investigate the nanostructure of the fabricated films and to determine the main types of defects that cause strong pinning of Abrikosov vortices and, accordingly, large critical current densities. The results of theoretically modelling the genesis of the defect nanostructure that appears in such films and its influence on the critical current are presented. The magnetic and transport properties of HTSC films made from YBCO(BZO) have been experimentally studied. The temperature, magnetic-field, and magnetic-orientation dependences of the critical current density of the test films are found. The results of an experimental investigation of the high-frequency properties of YBZO(BZO) films—the surface microwave impedance of the films in the linear and nonlinear regimes—are also given. The experimental results are discussed, and the influence of the nanostructure of the impurity phase on the electrodynamic characteristics of the HTSC films is analyzed.

  9. Chiral vortical wave and induced flavor charge transport in a rotating quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yin; Huang, Xu-Guang; Liao, Jinfeng

    2015-10-01

    We show the existence of a new gapless collective excitation in a rotating fluid system with chiral fermions, named the chiral vortical wave (CVW). The CVW has its microscopic origin at the quantum anomaly and macroscopically arises from interplay between vector and axial charge fluctuations induced by vortical effects. The wave equation is obtained both from hydrodynamic current equations and from chiral kinetic theory, and its solutions show nontrivial CVW-induced charge transport from different initial conditions. Using the rotating quark-gluon plasma in heavy ion collisions as a concrete example, we show the formation of an induced flavor quadrupole in quark-gluon plasma and estimate the elliptic flow splitting effect for Λ baryons that may be experimentally measured.

  10. Numerical calculations of the driving force on an Abrikosov vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.-X.; Pardo, E.; Sanchez, A.

    2010-05-01

    The driving force on an Abrikosov vortex is calculated numerically from the London equation and involved energies for a vortex perpendicular to the screening current near the surface of a superconductor. Compared with previous analytical derivation of the total force, the partial magnetic, kinematic, and external forces are also obtained so that the nature of the driving force may be deeply discussed. It is shown that the force is neither a Lorentz force nor a Magnus force as often believed and that in order to get a correct result, the image effects and the work done by the applied field must be taken into account. A name of London force is suggested for the driving force. A deep understanding of the nature of the driving force on Abrikosov vortices may also be important in the study of vortex pinning and dynamics in type-II superconductors.

  11. Vortices in normal part of proximity system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kogan, V. G.

    2015-05-26

    It is shown that the order parameter Δ induced in the normal part of superconductor-normal-superconductor proximity system is modulated in the magnetic field differently from vortices in bulk superconductors. Whereas Δ turns zero at vortex centers, the magnetic structure of these vortices differs from that of Abrikosov's.

  12. Hierarchy of gaps and magnetic minibands in graphene in the presence of the Abrikosov vortex lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Fal'ko, Vladimir I.

    2016-01-01

    We determine the bands and gaps in graphene subjected to the magnetic field of an Abrikosov lattice of vortices in the underlying superconducting film. The spectrum features one nondispersive magnetic miniband at zero energy, separated by the largest gaps in the miniband spectrum from a pair of minibands resembling a slightly broadened first Landau level in graphene, suggesting the persistence of ν =±2 and ±6 quantum Hall effect states. Also, we identify an occasional merging point of magnetic minibands with a Dirac-type dispersion at the miniband edges.

  13. Superconducting vortices in semilocal models.

    PubMed

    Forgács, Péter; Reuillon, Sébastien; Volkov, Mikhail S

    2006-02-01

    It is shown that the SU(2) semilocal model--the Abelian Higgs model with two complex scalars--admits a new class of stationary, straight string solutions carrying a persistent current and having finite energy per unit length. In the plane orthogonal to their direction they correspond to a nontrivial deformation of the embedded Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen (ANO) vortices by the current flowing through them. The new solutions bifurcate with the ANO vortices in the limit of vanishing current. They can be either static or stationary. In the stationary case, the relative phase of the two scalars rotates at constant velocity, giving rise to an electric field and angular momentum, while the energy remains finite. The new static vortex solutions have lower energy than the ANO vortices and could be of considerable importance in various physical systems (from condensed matter to cosmic strings). PMID:16486806

  14. Melting of the Abrikosov flux lattice in anisotropic superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, R. G.; Farrell, D. E.; Rice, J. P.; Ginsberg, D. M.; Kogan, V. G.

    1992-01-01

    It has been proposed that the Abrikosov flux lattice in high-Tc superconductors is melted over a significant fraction of the phase diagram. A thermodynamic argument is provided which establishes that the angular dependence of the melting temperature is controlled by the superconducting mass anisotropy. Using a low-frequency torsional-oscillator technique, this relationship has been tested in untwinned single-crystal YBa2Cu3O(7-delta). The results offer decisive support for the melting proposal.

  15. Interaction of half-quantized vortices in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Minoru; Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Nitta, Muneto; Takeuchi, Hiromitsu; Tsubota, Makoto

    2011-06-15

    We study the asymptotic interaction between two half-quantized vortices in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates. When two vortices in different components are placed at distance 2R, the leading order of the force between them is found to be (lnR/{xi}-1/2)/R{sup 3}, in contrast to 1/R between vortices placed in the same component. We derive it analytically using the Abrikosov ansatz and the profile functions of the vortices, confirmed numerically with the Gross-Pitaevskii model. We also find that the short-range cutoff of the intervortex potential linearly depends on the healing length.

  16. Nielsen-Olesen vortices for large Ginzburg-Landau parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burzlaff, Jürgen; Navarro-Lérida, F.

    2010-12-01

    Using analytic and numerical techniques Nielsen-Olesen vortices, which in the context of Ginzburg-Landau theory are known as Abrikosov vortices of type-II superconductors, are studied for large Ginzburg-Landau parameter λ. We show that their energy is equal to (πn2/2)log⁡λ to leading order, where n is the winding number of the vortex, and find that the limit of the gauge field can be expressed in terms of the modified Bessel function K1. The leading terms of the asymptotic expansion of the solution are given, and the different contributions to the energy are analyzed.

  17. Stirring vortices with vorticity holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Fuentes, Oscar

    2012-11-01

    A vorticity hole is a region with, in absolute value, significantly lower vorticity than its surroundings. Here we discuss the dynamics of a Rankine vortex with two equal circular holes. If a symmetric initial condition is assumed, the evolution depends on three parameters: the vorticity drop, the hole size and the distance between the holes. We computed the evolution with a contour-dynamics model and quantified the stirring of fluid particles using finite-time Lyapunov exponents and Melnikov's method. The vorticity holes evolve similarly to a pair of vortices in an otherwise quiescent fluid, although they are additionally affected by their interaction with the boundary of the Rankine vortex. The strongest stirring occurs when the holes interact elastically and then always in the center of the vortex. This result contradicts the generally accepted notion that vortices are regions of null to weak stirring.

  18. Beyond the simple hexagonal Abrikosov vortex lattice in layered superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, D.; Ettouhami, A. M.

    1993-01-01

    In layered superconductors as high-Tc materials but also organic superconductors, chalcogenides and superlattices, the simple concept of an distorted hexagonal lattice of straight vortices becomes unsufficient. Due to anisotropy and short coherence lengths, quite new vortex structures may arise. Some of them, as staircase vortices, simply add a modulation in the direction of vortex lines. This phenomenon is reviewed, together with the resulting lock-in transition, especially when the effects of the layered structure are weak. More exotic structures like a decomposed vortex lattice can also occur in specific situations: they involve two perpendicular sublattices, one parallel and one normal to the layers. We propose that extended defects as twin boundaries or irradiation tracks can trigger such a structure even in moderately anisotropic compounds as Y:123.

  19. Monopoles and fractional vortices in chiral superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Volovik, G. E.

    2000-01-01

    I discuss two exotic objects that must be experimentally identified in chiral superfluids and superconductors. These are (i) the vortex with a fractional quantum number (N = 1/2 in chiral superfluids, and N = 1/2 and N = 1/4 in chiral superconductors), which plays the part of the Alice string in relativistic theories and (ii) the hedgehog in the ^l field, which is the counterpart of the Dirac magnetic monopole. These objects of different dimensions are topologically connected. They form the combined object that is called a nexus in relativistic theories. In chiral superconductors, the nexus has magnetic charge emanating radially from the hedgehog, whereas the half-quantum vortices play the part of the Dirac string. Each half-quantum vortex supplies the fractional magnetic flux to the hedgehog, representing 1/4 of the “conventional” Dirac string. I discuss the topological interaction of the superconductor's nexus with the ‘t Hooft–Polyakov magnetic monopole, which can exist in Grand Unified Theories. The monopole and the hedgehog with the same magnetic charge are topologically confined by a piece of the Abrikosov vortex. Such confinement makes the nexus a natural trap for the magnetic monopole. Other properties of half-quantum vortices and monopoles are discussed as well, including fermion zero modes. PMID:10716980

  20. Properties of gluon jets

    SciTech Connect

    Sugano, K.

    1986-09-01

    The properties of gluon jets are reviewed from an experimental point of view. The measured characteristics are compared to theoretical expectations. Although neither data nor models for the gluon jets are in the mature stage, there are remarkable agreements and also intriguing disagreements between experiment and theory. Since much interesting data have begun to emerge from various experiments and the properties of gluon jets are deeply rooted in the basic structure of non-Abelian gauge theory, the study of gluon jets casts further light on our understanding of QCD. Finally, the future prospects are discussed.

  1. A single Abrikosov vortex trapped in a mesoscopic superconducting cylindrical surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carapella, G.; Sabatino, P.; Costabile, G.

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the behaviour of a single Abrikosov vortex trapped in a mesoscopic superconducting cylindrical surface with a magnetic field applied transverse to its axis. In the framework of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau formalism we show that, provided the transport current and the magnetic field are not large, the vortex behaves as an overdamped quasi-particle in a tilted washboard potential. The cylindrical thin strip with the trapped vortex exhibits E(J) curves and time-dependent electric fields very similar to the ones exhibited by a resistively shunted Josephson weak link.

  2. Stellar and Jovian vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, T.E.; Spiegel, E.A. )

    1990-12-01

    The characteristics of 'Jovian' vortices (the large vortices observed in the atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune) are summarized, and the existence of similar structures in the atmospheres of stars is considered theoretically. The problem of vortex maintenance is addressed, including potential vorticity, numerical simulations of Jovian vortices, and cyclones and anticyclones; the Great Red Spot of Jupiter is described on the basis of Voyager data; the evidence for convective generation of vertical vorticity in the sun is examined; the possibly vortical nature of the large spots of RS CVn stars is discussed; and models of spots on rapidly rotating hot stars are surveyed. 62 refs.

  3. Gluon Vortices and Induced Magnetic Field in Compact Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, Efrain J.

    2007-10-26

    The natural candidates for the realization of color superconductivity are the extremely dense cores of compact stars, many of which have very large magnetic fields, especially the so called magnetars. In this paper we discuss how a color superconducting core can serve to generate and enhance the stellar magnetic field without appealing to a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo mechanism.

  4. Defining coherent vortices objectively from the vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, G.; Hadjighasem, A.; Farazmand, M.; Huhn, F.

    2016-05-01

    Rotationally coherent Lagrangian vortices are formed by tubes of deforming fluid elements that complete equal bulk material rotation relative to the mean rotation of the deforming fluid volume. We show that initial positions of such tubes coincide with tubular level surfaces of the Lagrangian-Averaged Vorticity Deviation (LAVD), the trajectory integral of the normed difference of the vorticity from its spatial mean. LAVD-based vortices are objective, i.e., remain unchanged under time-dependent rotations and translations of the coordinate frame. In the limit of vanishing Rossby numbers in geostrophic flows, cyclonic LAVD vortex centers are precisely the observed attractors for light particles. A similar result holds for heavy particles in anticyclonic LAVD vortices. We also establish a relationship between rotationally coherent Lagrangian vortices and their instantaneous Eulerian counterparts. The latter are formed by tubular surfaces of equal material rotation rate, objectively measured by the Instantaneous Vorticity Deviation (IVD). We illustrate the use of the LAVD and the IVD to detect rotationally coherent Lagrangian and Eulerian vortices objectively in several two- and three-dimensional flows.

  5. Gluon polarization in nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahveh, Abolfazl; Taghavi-Shahri, Fatemeh; Arash, Firooz

    2010-07-01

    In the context of the so-called valon model, we calculate δg/g and show that although it is small and compatible with the measured values, the gluon contribution to the spin of nucleon can be sizable. The smallness of δg/g in the measured kinematical region should not be interpreted as δg being small. In fact, δg itself at small x, and the first moment of the polarized gluon distribution in the nucleon, Δg (Q2), are large.

  6. Gluon TMD studies at EIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boer, Daniël

    2016-03-01

    A high-energy Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would offer a most promising tool to study in detail the transverse momentum distributions of gluons inside hadrons. This applies to unpolarized as well as linearly polarized gluons inside unpolarized protons, and to left-right asymmetric distributions of gluons inside transversely polarized protons, the so-called gluon Sivers effect. The inherent process dependence of these distributions can be studied by comparing to similar, but often complementary observables at LHC.

  7. Macroscopic evidence for Abrikosov-type magnetic vortexes in MnSi A-phase

    PubMed Central

    Lobanova, I. I.; Glushkov, V. V.; Sluchanko, N. E.; Demishev, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsic phase coherence between individual topologically stable knots in spin arrangement – skyrmions – is known to induce the crystalline-like structure in the A-phase of non-centrosymmetric MnSi with chiral spin-orbit interaction. Here we report the experimental evidence for two types of the skyrmion lattice (SL) inside the A-phase of MnSi, which are distinguished by different coupling to the anisotropic magnetic interactions. The transition between these SLs is shown to induce a change in magnetic scattering between isotropic MR discovered in the area inside the A-phase (the A-phase core) and anisotropic MR found on the border of the A-phase. We argue that the SL in the A-phase core corresponds to the dense skyrmion state built from individual skyrmions in a way similar to Abrikosov-type magnetic vortexes. PMID:26915818

  8. Macroscopic evidence for Abrikosov-type magnetic vortexes in MnSi A-phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanova, I. I.; Glushkov, V. V.; Sluchanko, N. E.; Demishev, S. V.

    2016-02-01

    Intrinsic phase coherence between individual topologically stable knots in spin arrangement - skyrmions - is known to induce the crystalline-like structure in the A-phase of non-centrosymmetric MnSi with chiral spin-orbit interaction. Here we report the experimental evidence for two types of the skyrmion lattice (SL) inside the A-phase of MnSi, which are distinguished by different coupling to the anisotropic magnetic interactions. The transition between these SLs is shown to induce a change in magnetic scattering between isotropic MR discovered in the area inside the A-phase (the A-phase core) and anisotropic MR found on the border of the A-phase. We argue that the SL in the A-phase core corresponds to the dense skyrmion state built from individual skyrmions in a way similar to Abrikosov-type magnetic vortexes.

  9. Confined vortices in topologically massive U (1 )×U (1 ) theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anber, Mohamed M.; Burnier, Yannis; Sabancilar, Eray; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2015-09-01

    We report on a new topological vortex solution in U (1 )×U (1 ) Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory. The existence of the vortex is envisaged by analytical means, and a numerical solution is obtained by integrating the equations of motion. These vortices have a long-range force because one of the U(1)'s remains unbroken in the infrared, which is guarded by the Coleman-Hill theorem. The sum of the winding numbers of an ensemble of vortices has to vanish; otherwise the system would have a logarithmically divergent energy. In turn, these vortices exhibit classical confinement. We investigate the rich parameter space of the solutions, and show that one recovers the Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen, U(1) Maxwell-Chern-Simons, U(1) pure Chern-Simons, and global vortices as various limiting cases. Unlike these limiting cases, the higher winding solutions of our vortices carry noninteger charges under the broken U(1). This is the first vortex solution exhibiting such behavior.

  10. Constraining gluon poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikin, I. V.; Teryaev, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    In this letter, we revise the QED gauge invariance for the hadron tensor of Drell-Yan type processes with the transversely polarized hadron. We perform our analysis within the Feynman gauge for gluons and make a comparison with the results obtained within the light-cone gauge. We demonstrate that QED gauge invariance leads, first, to the need of a non-standard diagram and, second, to the absence of gluon poles in the correlators < ψ bar γ⊥A+ ψ > related traditionally to dT (x , x) / dx. As a result, these terms disappear from the final QED gauge invariant hadron tensor. We also verify the absence of such poles by analyzing the corresponding light-cone Dirac algebra.

  11. Gluon density in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, A.L.; Ducati, M.B.G.; Levin, E.M.

    1996-10-01

    In this talk we present our detailed study (theory and numbers) on the shadowing corrections to the gluon structure functions for nuclei. Starting from rather controversial information on the nucleon structure function which is originated by the recent HERA data, we develop the Glauber approach for the gluon density in a nucleus based on Mueller formula and estimate the value of the shadowing corrections in this case. Then we calculate the first corrections to the Glauber approach and show that these corrections are big. Based on this practical observation we suggest the new evolution equation which takes into account the shadowing corrections and solve it. We hope to convince you that the new evolution equation gives a good theoretical tool to treat the shadowing corrections for the gluons density in a nucleus and, therefore, it is able to provide the theoretically reliable initial conditions for the time evolution of the nucleus-nucleus cascade. The initial conditions should be fixed both theoretically and phenomenologically before to attack such complicated problems as the mixture of hard and soft processes in nucleus-nucleus interactions at high energy or the theoretically reliable approach to hadron or/and parton cascades for high energy nucleus-nucleus interaction. 35 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Galileon Higgs vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagoya, Javier; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2016-02-01

    Vortex solutions are topologically stable field configurations that can play an important role in condensed matter, field theory, and cosmology. We investigate vortex configuration in a 2+1 dimensional Abelian Higgs theory supplemented by higher order derivative self-interactions, related with Galileons. Our vortex solutions have features that make them qualitatively different from well-known Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen configurations, since the derivative interactions turn on gauge invariant field profiles that break axial symmetry. By promoting the system to a 3+1 dimensional string configuration, we study its gravitational backreaction. Our results are all derived within a specific, analytically manageable system, and might offer indications for understanding Galileonic interactions and screening mechanisms around configurations that are not spherically symmetric, but only at most cylindrically symmetric.

  13. Constraining the double gluon distribution by the single gluon distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golec-Biernat, Krzysztof; Lewandowska, Emilia; Serino, Mirko; Snyder, Zachary; Staśto, Anna M.

    2015-11-01

    We show how to consistently construct initial conditions for the QCD evolution equations for double parton distribution functions in the pure gluon case. We use to momentum sum rule for this purpose and a specific form of the known single gluon distribution function in the MSTW parameterization. The resulting double gluon distribution satisfies exactly the momentum sum rule and is parameter free. We also study numerically its evolution with a hard scale and show the approximate factorization into product of two single gluon distributions at small values of x, whereas at large values of x the factorization is always violated in agreement with the sum rule.

  14. Annihilation of strained vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yoshifumi

    2014-11-01

    As an initial stage of vortex reconnection, approach of nearly anti-parallel vortices has often been observed experimentally and studied numerically. Inspired by the recent experiment by Kleckner and Irvine on the dynamics of knotted vortices, we have studied the motion of two anti-parellel Burgers vortices driven by an axisymmetric linear straining field. We first extend the Burgers vortex solution which is a steady exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equation to a time-dependent exact solution. Then by superposing two such solutions, we investigate the annihilation process analytically. We can demonstrate that during the annihilation process the total vorticity decays exponentially on a time-scale proportional to the inverse of the rate of strain, even as the kinematic viscosity tends to 0. The analytic results are compared with the numerical simulations of two strained vortices with the vortex-vortex nonlinear interaction by Buntine and Pullin.

  15. The cool potential of gluons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshier*, André; Giovannoni, Dino

    2016-01-01

    We put forward the idea that the quark-gluon plasma might exist way below the usual confinement temperature Tc. Our argument rests on the possibility that the plasma produced in heavy-ion collisions could reach a transient quasi-equilibrium with ‘over-occupied’ gluon density, as advocated by Blaizot et al. Taking further into account that gluons acquire an effective mass by interaction effects, they can have a positive chemical potential and therefore behave similarly to non-relativistic bosons. Relevant properties of this dense state of interacting gluons, which we dub serried glue, can then be inferred on rather general grounds from Maxwell's relation.

  16. Quark Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-05-07

    Matter is malleable and can change its properties with temperature. This is most familiar when comparing ice, liquid water and steam, which are all different forms of the same thing. However beyond the usual states of matter, physicists can explore other states, both much colder and hotter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the hottest known state of matter – a state that is so hot that protons and neutrons from the center of atoms can literally melt. This form of matter is called a quark gluon plasma and it is an important research topic being pursued at the LHC.

  17. Quark and Gluon Relaxation in Quark-Gluon Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiselberg, H.; Pethick, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    The quasiparticle decay rates for quarks and gluons in quark-gluon plasmas are calculated by solving the kinetic equation. Introducing an infrared cutoff to allow for nonperturbative effects, we evaluate the quasiparticle lifetime at momenta greater than the inverse Debye screening length to leading order in the coupling constant.

  18. Crossflow vorticity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Holmes, Harlan K. (Inventor); Moore, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A crossflow vorticity sensor for the detection of crossflow vorticity characteristics is described. The sensor is comprised of crossflow sensors which are noninvasively adhered to a swept wing laminar surface either singularly, in multi-element strips, in polar patterns, or in orthogonal patterns. These crossflow sensors are comprised of hot-film sensor elements which operate as a constant temperature anemometer circuit to detect heat transfer rate changes. Accordingly, crossflow vorticity characteristics are determined via cross-correlation. In addition, the crossflow sensors have a thickness which does not exceed a maximum value h in order to avoid contamination of downstream crossflow sensors.

  19. The distribution of vorticity in a large vortical motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disimile, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation into the distribution of vorticity in the large scale vortical motions which are found in free shear layers was undertaken. Using hot-wire anemometry, both quasi-instantaneous and phase averaged transverse vorticity were acquired. These results appear to indicate that the transverse vorticity in a large scale vortical motion is distributed in a marble cake manner and not in laminated sheets spooled up into a coil or helical spring. Also, levels of vorticity were found to vary by as much as an order of magnitude in these concentrated vortical cores.

  20. Unitarity bound for gluon shadowing

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Levin, E.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2009-06-15

    Although at small Bjorken x gluons originated from different nucleons in a nucleus overlap in the longitudinal direction, most of them are still well separated in the transverse plane and therefore cannot fuse. For this reason the gluon density in nuclei cannot drop at small x below a certain bottom bound, which we evaluated in a model independent manner assuming the maximal strength of gluon fusion. We also calculated gluon shadowing in the saturated regime using the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation and found the nuclear ratio to be well above the unitarity bound. The recently updated analysis of parton distributions in nuclei, including BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) data on high-p{sub T} hadron production at forward rapidities, led to strong gluon shadowing. Such strong shadowing and therefore the interpretation of the nuclear modification of the p{sub T} spectra in dA collisions at RHIC seem to be inconsistent with this unitarity bound.

  1. Effect of fluctuations on the NMR relaxation beyond the Abrikosov vortex state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatz, A.; Galda, A.; Varlamov, A. A.

    2015-08-01

    The effect of fluctuations on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation rate W =T1-1 is studied in a complete phase diagram of a two-dimensional superconductor above the upper critical field line Hc 2(T ) . In the region of relatively high temperatures and low magnetic fields, the relaxation rate W is determined by two competing effects. The first one is its decrease in the result of suppression of the quasiparticle density of states (DOS) due to formation of fluctuation Cooper pairs (FCPs). The second one is a specific, purely quantum relaxation process of the Maki-Thompson (MT) type, which for low field leads to an increase of the relaxation rate. The latter describes particular fluctuation processes involving self-pairing of a single electron on self-intersecting trajectories of a size up to phase-breaking length ℓϕ which becomes possible due to an electron spin-flip scattering event at a nucleus. As a result, different scenarios with either growth or decrease of the NMR relaxation rate are possible upon approaching the normal-metal-type-II superconductor transition. The character of fluctuations changes along the line Hc 2(T ) from the thermal long-wavelength type in weak magnetic fields to the clusters of rotating FCPs in fields comparable to Hc 2(0 ) . We find that below the well-defined temperature T0*≈0.6 Tc 0 , the MT process becomes ineffective even in the absence of intrinsic pair breaking. The small scale of the FCP rotations ξxy in such high fields impedes formation of long (≲ℓϕ) self-intersecting trajectories, causing the corresponding relaxation mechanism to lose its efficiency. This reduces the effect of superconducting fluctuations in the domain of high fields and low temperatures to just the suppression of quasiparticle DOS, analogous to the Abrikosov vortex phase below the Hc 2(T ) line.

  2. Vortices in Atomic Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, Joseph H ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The time-dependent Schrodinger equation describes dynamical processes of one-electron species in terms of a complex wave function. The function is inherently complex, therefore zeros occur only when both the real and imaginary parts of the wave function vanish. If this happens at isolated points rather than on a nodal surface one can show the zero must correspond to a vortex. An imaging theorem is given which shows how such vortices can be seen experimentally. Since the theorem requires time propagation from microscopic to macroscopic scales, a method is developed that does just that. Examples of vortices that emerge in dynamical processes are given. The vortices that we nd are linked to the hydrodynamic interpretation of Schrodinger's time-dependent equation.

  3. Relaminarization under stationary vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breidenthal, Robert

    2005-11-01

    Flow visualization reveals that a turbulent boundary layer is relaminarized when stationary streamwise vortices are introduced. Following a suggestion of Balle, the vortices are stabilized by large streamwise ``Karman'' grooves in a wavy wall. In a water tunnel, upstream vortex generators place a large streamwise vortex in the middle of each groove, at the stationary point where Prandtl's vortex force vanishes. According to a theory by Cotel, the wall fluxes of a turbulent boundary layer should decline to laminar values under such ``persistent'' vortices. The observed relaminarization is consistent with this theory and with previous measurements of heat transfer by Touel and Balle. However, the structure of the transverse flow resembles the cats-eye pattern of a temporal shear layer rather than the anticipated von Karman wake. The cats-eye pattern corresponds to the forced shear layers of Oster-Wygnanski and Roberts, who found that the Reynolds stresses and mixing rate also decline to laminar values.

  4. Do Vortices Entangle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson Reichhardt, C. J.; Hastings, M. B.

    2004-04-01

    We propose an experiment for directly constructing and locally probing topologically entangled states of superconducting vortices which can be performed with present-day technology. Calculations using an elastic string vortex model indicate that as the pitch (the winding angle divided by the vertical distance) increases, the vortices approach each other. At values of the pitch higher than a maximum value the entangled state becomes unstable to collapse via a singularity of the model. We provide predicted experimental signatures for both vortex entanglement and vortex cutting. The local probe we propose can also be used to explore a wide range of other quantities.

  5. Continuously tailored Taylor vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, M. A.; Weidman, P. D.

    2009-11-01

    Modified axisymmetric, finite-length Taylor-Couette (TC) cells with stationary outer cylinder and rotating inner cylinder are designed in an effort to produce simultaneous onset of toroidal vortices of continuously varying wavelength along the gap. For a given axial variation in the inner radius, the axial variation in the outer radius can be chosen such that at every axial position, the criterion for the onset of Taylor vortices in a corresponding classical TC cell is met. In one scenario, a conical inner cylinder is chosen and the shape of the outer cylinder is then determined by locally satisfying the onset criterion. In another scenario, the inner and outer radii are chosen such that the onset criterion is locally satisfied and the axial rate of change in the classical onset wave number is held constant. In both cases, the modified cells possess a large-scale meridional circulation wrought by the finite Ekman (Bödewadt) pumping on the inner (outer) cylinder walls. Using direct numerical simulation, it is found that for sufficiently large aspect ratio, there exists a critical rotation rate for the simultaneous transition from the base flow to counter-rotating toroidal vortices throughout the varying-radius region. The vortices propagate in the direction of decreasing gap width with a phase speed that decreases with increasing aspect ratio.

  6. One gluon, two gluon: multigluon production via high energy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2006-11-01

    We develop an approach for calculating the inclusive multigluon production within the JIMWLK high energy evolution. We give a formal expression of multigluon cross section in terms of a generating functional for arbitrary number of gluons n. In the dipole limit the expression simplifies dramatically. We recover the previously known results for single and double gluon inclusive cross section and generalize those for arbitrary multigluon amplitude in terms of Feynman diagramms of Pomeron - like objects coupled to external rapidity dependent field s(η). We confirm the conclusion that the AGK cutting rules in general are violated in multigluon production. However we present an argument to the effect that for doubly inclusive cross section the AGK diagramms give the leading contribution at high energy, while genuine violation only occurs for triple and higher inclusive gluon production. We discuss some general properties of our expressions and suggest a line of argument to simplify the approach further.

  7. Shining a gluon beam through quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesler, Paul M.; Ho, Ying-Yu; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2012-06-01

    We compute the energy density radiated by a quark undergoing circular motion in strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma. If it were in vacuum, this quark would radiate a beam of strongly coupled radiation whose angular distribution has been characterized and is very similar to that of synchrotron radiation produced by an electron in circular motion in electrodynamics. Here, we watch this beam of gluons getting quenched by the strongly coupled plasma. We find that a beam of gluons of momenta ˜q≫πT is attenuated rapidly, over a distance ˜q1/3(πT)-4/3 in a plasma with temperature T. As the beam propagates through the plasma at the speed of light, it sheds trailing sound waves with momenta ≲πT. Presumably these sound waves would thermalize in the plasma if they were not hit soon after their production by the next pulse of gluons from the lighthouselike rotating quark. At larger and larger q, the trailing sound wave becomes less and less prominent. The outward-going beam of gluon radiation itself shows no tendency to spread in angle or to shift toward larger wavelengths, even as it is completely attenuated. In this regard, the behavior of the beam of gluons which we analyze is reminiscent of the behavior of jets produced in heavy ion collisions at the LHC which lose a significant fraction of their energy without appreciable change in their angular distribution or their momentum distribution as they plow through the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma produced in these collisions.

  8. Scale evolution of gluon TMDPDFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarria, Miguel G.; Kasemets, Tomas; Mulders, Piet J.; Pisano, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    By applying the effective field theory machinery we factorize the transverse momentum spectrum of Higgs boson production, where the main hadronic quantities are the gluon transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDPDFs). We properly define those quantities, showing explicitly, in the case of an unpolarized hadron, that they are free from rapidity divergences, and extract their evolution properties. It turns out that the evolution for all eight (un-)polarized leading-twist gluon TMDPDFs is driven by the same evolution kernel, for which we derive the necessary ingredients to obtain a resummation of large logarithms at next-tonext-to-leading-logarithmic accuracy. We make predictions for the contribution of linearly polarized gluons to the Higgs boson qT -spectrum.

  9. Vorticity production in shock diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, M.; Takayama, K.

    2003-03-01

    The production of vorticity or circulation production in shock wave diffraction over sharp convex corners has been numerically simulated and quantified. The corner angle is varied from 5° to 180°. Total vorticity is represented by the circulation, which is evaluated by integrating the velocity along a path enclosing the perturbed region behind a diffracting shock wave. The increase of circulation in unit time, or the rate of circulation production, depends on the shock strength and wall angle if the effects of viscosity and heat conductivity are neglected. The rate of vorticity production is determined by using a solution-adaptive code, which solves the Euler equations. It is shown that the rate of vorticity production is independent of the computational mesh and numerical scheme by comparing solutions from two different codes. It is found that larger wall angles always enhance the vorticity production. The vorticity production increases sharply when the corner angle is varied from 15° to 45°. However, for corner angles over 90°, the rate of vorticity production hardly increases and reaches to a constant value. Strong shock waves produce vorticity faster in general, except when the slipstream originating from the shallow corner attaches to the downstream wall. It is found that the vorticity produced by the slipstream represents a large proportion of the total vorticity. The slipstream is therefore a more important source of vorticity than baroclinic effects in shock diffraction.

  10. Untangling Superfluid Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleckner, Dustin; Scheeler, Martin W.; Proment, Davide; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-03-01

    What is the role of topology, or knottedness, in superfluid phase defects (quantum vortices)? In ideal classical fluids, vortex knots may never untie, and so there is an associated conserved quantity - helicity - which measures how tangled a flow is. One might expect a similar robustness for superfluid defects, however, simulations of the Gross-Pitevskii equation demonstrate that vortex knots and links spontaneously untie and unlink. Nonetheless, the topology dramatically affects the vortex evolution, and a component of the initial helicity is transferred to helical coils as the knots unravel. These effects are remarkably similar to the behavior of tangled vortices in viscous fluids, suggesting they are universal features of non-ideal fluids.

  11. Vorticity in analog gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cropp, Bethan; Liberati, Stefano; Turcati, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    In the analog gravity framework, the acoustic disturbances in a moving fluid can be described by an equation of motion identical to a relativistic scalar massless field propagating in curved space-time. This description is possible only when the fluid under consideration is barotropic, inviscid, and irrotational. In this case, the propagation of the perturbations is governed by an acoustic metric that depends algebrically on the local speed of sound, density, and the background flow velocity, the latter assumed to be vorticity-free. In this work we provide a straightforward extension in order to go beyond the irrotational constraint. Using a charged—relativistic and nonrelativistic—Bose–Einstein condensate as a physical system, we show that in the low-momentum limit and performing the eikonal approximation we can derive a d’Alembertian equation of motion for the charged phonons where the emergent acoustic metric depends on flow velocity in the presence of vorticity.

  12. Tailored Taylor vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, M. A.; Weidman, P. D.; Macumber, S.; Fischer, P. F.

    2008-01-01

    The stability of circular Couette flow in discontinuous axisymmetric geometries is investigated using numerical simulations and physical experiments. By contouring the geometry of the inner cylinder, Taylor vortices can be made to appear in discrete sections along the length of the cylinder while adjoining sections remain stable. The disparate flows are connected by transition regions that arise from the stability of the axially nonuniform base flow state. The geometry of the inner cylinder can be tailored to produce the simultaneous onset of Taylor vortices of different wavelength in neighboring sections. In another variant, a stack of inner cylinders of common radius are made to rotate independently to produce adjacent regions of stable and unstable flow.

  13. Toward modeling wingtip vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, O.

    1993-01-01

    Wingtip vortices are generated by lifting airfoils; their salient features are compactness and relatively slow rate of decay. The principal motivation for studying the far field evolution of wingtip vortices is the need to understand and predict the extent of the vortex influence during aircraft take-off or landing. On submarines a wingtip vortex ingested into a propeller can be a source of undesirable noise. The main objectives of this research are (1) to establish theoretical understanding of the principal mechanisms that govern the later (diffusive) stages of a turbulent vortex, (2) to develop a turbulence closure model representing the basic physical mechanisms that control the vortex diffusive stage, and further (3) to investigate coupling between the near and far field evolutions; in other words, to study the effect of initial conditions on the vortex lifetime and the ultimate state.

  14. Vortices in turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, A. E.; Chong, M. S.; Lim, T. T.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental results of studies to determine the flow parameters and structures of plane mixing layers are reported. Smoke visualization, combined with hot-wire anemometry, sheets of laser light, and photography were used to gather data from the wall flow. The behavior of vortex rods was examined, noting that the rods persisted only if new vortex energy was supplied from the sublayer. A power spectral density was defined for the velocity fluctuations, as was a hierarchy of velocity scales for geometrically similar vortices. The length scale grows linearly with downstream distance, where the flow structures are fed by longitudinal vortices. A model is developed for vortex pairing in sequential order from the bottom of the mixing layer outward in a repetitive process involving vortex stretching. The model is actually a migration strategy that satisfies the flow self-preservation constraints.

  15. On the need for a phenomenological theory of P-vortices, or does the spaghetti confinement pattern admit condensed-matter analogues?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, A. D.; Morozov, A.; Tomaras, T. N.

    2005-08-01

    Usually the intuition from condensed-matter physics is used to provide ideas for possible confinement mechanisms in gauge theories. Today, with a clear but puzzling ``spaghetti'' confinement pattern, arising after a decade of lattice computer experiments, which implies formation of a fluctuating net of peculiar magnetic vortices rather than condensation of the homogeneously distributed magnetic monopoles, the time is coming to reverse the logic and search for similar patterns in condensed matter systems. The main thing to look for in a condensed matter setup is the simultaneous existence of narrow tubes ($P$-vortices or 1-branes) of direction-changing electric field and broader tubes (Abrikosov lines) of magnetic field, a pattern dual to the one, presumably underlying confinement in gluodynamics. As a possible place for this search we suggest systems with coexisting charge-density waves and superconductivity.

  16. Dynamic Melting of Driven Abrikosov Lattices in an Amorphous MoxGe1-x Film in Tilted Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochi, Aguri; Kawamura, Yasuki; Inoue, Toshiki; Kaji, Tetsuya; Mihaly, Dobroka; Kaneko, Shin-ichi; Kokubo, Nobuhito; Okuma, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    We report a comparative study of the dynamic melting of driven vortex lattices in magnetic field tilted (by θ = 36°) from the normal to the film surface and that of a driven Abrikosov lattice in untilted field (θ = 0). From the mode-locking (ML) resonance, we confirm that vortex lattices in tilted field are stretched in the tilt direction and that, with increasing dc velocity at ML, the shape and orientation of the driven lattice change. Associated with this structural change, the dynamic melting field at which the driven lattice melts also changes. Our results show that, regardless of the lattice shape and orientation, dynamic melting occurs as the shorter side of the distorted lattices reaches close to the side at which the isotropic lattice melts dynamically.

  17. Model independent approach to studies of the confining dual Abrikosov vortex in SU(2) lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Haymaker, Richard W.; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2007-01-01

    We address the problem of determining the type I, type II or borderline dual superconductor behavior in maximal Abelian gauge SU(2) through the study of the dual Abrikosov vortex. We find that significant electric currents in the simulation data call into question the use of the dual Ginzburg-Landau Higgs model in interpreting the data. Further, two definitions of the penetration depth parameter take two different values. The splitting of this parameter into two is intricately connected to the existence of electric currents. It is important in our approach that we employ definitions of flux and electric and magnetic currents that respect Maxwell equations exactly for lattice averages independent of lattice spacings. Applied to specific Wilson loop sizes, our conclusions differ from those that use the dual GLH model.

  18. Axisymmetric Vortices with Swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elcrat, A.

    2007-11-01

    This talk is concerned with finding solutions of the Euler equations by solving elliptic boundary value problems for the Bragg-Hawthorne equation L u= -urr -(1/r)ur - = r^2f (u) + h(u). Theoretical results have been given for previously (Elcrat and Miller, Differential and Integral Equations 16(4) 2003, 949-968) for problems with swirl and general classes of profile functions f, h by iterating Lu(n+1)= rf(u)n)) + h(u(n)), and showing u(n) converges montonically to a solution. The solutions obtained depend on the initial guess, which can be thought of as prescribing level sets of the vortex. When a computational program was attempted these monotone iterations turned out to be numerically unstable, and a stable computation was acheived by fixing the moment of the cross section of a vortex in the merideanal plane. (This generalizes previous computational results in Elcrat, Fornberg and Miller, JFM 433 2001, (315-328) We obtain famillies of vortices related to vortex rings with swirl, Moffatt's generalization of Hill's vortex and tubes of vorticity with swirl wrapped around the symmetry axis. The vortices are embedded in either an irrotational flow or a flow with shear, and we deal with the transition form no swirl in the vortex to flow with only swirl, a Beltrami flow.

  19. Vorticity in the solar photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelyag, S.; Keys, P.; Mathioudakis, M.; Keenan, F. P.

    2011-02-01

    Aims: We use magnetic and non-magnetic 3D numerical simulations of solar granulation and G-band radiative diagnostics from the resulting models to analyse the generation of small-scale vortex motions in the solar photosphere. Methods: Radiative MHD simulations of magnetoconvection are used to produce photospheric models. Our starting point is a non-magnetic model of solar convection, where we introduce a uniform magnetic field and follow the evolution of the field in the simulated photosphere. We find two different types of photospheric vortices, and provide a link between the vorticity generation and the presence of the intergranular magnetic field. A detailed analysis of the vorticity equation, combined with the G-band radiative diagnostics, allows us to identify the sources and observational signatures of photospheric vorticity in the simulated photosphere. Results: Two different types of photospheric vorticity, magnetic and non-magnetic, are generated in the domain. Non-magnetic vortices are generated by the baroclinic motions of the plasma in the photosphere, while magnetic vortices are produced by the magnetic tension in the intergranular magnetic flux concentrations. The two types of vortices have different shapes. We find that the vorticity is generated more efficiently in the magnetised model. Simulated G-band images show a direct connection between magnetic vortices and rotary motions of photospheric bright points, and suggest that there may be a connection between the magnetic bright point rotation and small-scale swirl motions observed higher in the atmosphere.

  20. Gluon polarization in the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Steven D.; Casey, Andrew; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2011-03-15

    We combine heavy-quark renormalization group arguments with our understanding of the nucleon's wave function to deduce a bound on the gluon polarization {Delta}g in the proton. The bound is consistent with the values extracted from spin experiments at COMPASS and RHIC.

  1. Interaction of Atmospheric Plasma Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izhovkina, N. I.; Artekha, S. N.; Erokhin, N. S.; Mikhailovskaya, L. A.

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric electric fields, connected with the ionization of particles and plasma processes, occur in the fields of pressure gradients of mosaic mesh topology. Atmospheric aerosol particles play a significant role in the vortex generation. The Coriolis force and the motion of charged particles in the geomagnetic field lead to gyrotropy of the atmosphere and ionosphere. Occurrence of plasma vortices is stochastically determined for such an inhomogeneous gyrotropic medium. The geomagnetic field influences the change of structures of inhomogeneous media in the process of excitation of plasma vortices and their interaction. If colliding vortices are centered on the one geomagnetic line, the merge of vortices and the generation of a joint powerful vortex are possible. If a collision of vortices with centers at different geomagnetic field lines occurs, then the emergence of areas of heating and jet streams and the generation of new vortices are possible.

  2. Interaction of Atmospheric Plasma Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izhovkina, N. I.; Artekha, S. N.; Erokhin, N. S.; Mikhailovskaya, L. A.

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric electric fields, connected with the ionization of particles and plasma processes, occur in the fields of pressure gradients of mosaic mesh topology. Atmospheric aerosol particles play a significant role in the vortex generation. The Coriolis force and the motion of charged particles in the geomagnetic field lead to gyrotropy of the atmosphere and ionosphere. Occurrence of plasma vortices is stochastically determined for such an inhomogeneous gyrotropic medium. The geomagnetic field influences the change of structures of inhomogeneous media in the process of excitation of plasma vortices and their interaction. If colliding vortices are centered on the one geomagnetic line, the merge of vortices and the generation of a joint powerful vortex are possible. If a collision of vortices with centers at different geomagnetic field lines occurs, then the emergence of areas of heating and jet streams and the generation of new vortices are possible.

  3. Gluon mass generation without seagull divergences

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, Arlene C.; Papavassiliou, Joannis

    2010-02-01

    Dynamical gluon mass generation has been traditionally plagued with seagull divergences, and all regularization procedures proposed over the years yield finite but scheme-dependent gluon masses. In this work we show how such divergences can be eliminated completely by virtue of a characteristic identity, valid in dimensional regularization. The ability to trigger the aforementioned identity hinges crucially on the particular Ansatz employed for the three-gluon vertex entering into the Schwinger-Dyson equation governing the gluon propagator. The use of the appropriate three-gluon vertex brings about an additional advantage: one obtains two separate (but coupled) integral equations, one for the effective charge and one for the gluon mass. This system of integral equations has a unique solution, which unambiguously determines these two quantities. Most notably, the effective charge freezes in the infrared, and the gluon mass displays power-law running in the ultraviolet, in agreement with earlier considerations.

  4. Defining and Computing Vortices Objectively from the Vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, George; Hadjighasem, Alireza; Farazmand, Mohammad; Huhn, Florian

    2015-11-01

    We introduce the notion of rotationally coherent Lagrangian vortices as tubular material surfaces in which fluid elements complete equal bulk material rotation relative to the mean rotation of the fluid. We find that initial positions of such tubes coincide with tubular level surfaces of the Lagrangian-Averaged Vorticity Deviation (LAVD), the trajectory integral of the normed difference of the vorticity from its spatial mean. LAVD-based vortices turn out to be objective, i.e., invariant under time-dependent rotations and translations of the reference frame. In the limit of vanishing Rossby numbers in geostrophic flows, cyclonic LAVD vortex centers can be proven to coincide with the observed attractors for light particles. A similar result holds for heavy particles in anticyclonic LAVD vortices. We also discuss a relationship between rotationally coherent Lagrangian vortices and their instantaneous Eulerian counterparts. The latter are formed by tubular surfaces of equal material rotation rate, objectively measured by the Instantaneous Vorticity Deviation (IVD). We show how the LAVD and the IVD detect rotationally coherent Lagrangian and Eulerian vortices objectively in analytic flow models and numerical flow data.

  5. Control of Flap Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David

    2005-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was carried out on a semi-span wing model to assess the feasibility of controlling vortices emanating from outboard flaps and tip-flaps by actively varying the degree of boundary layer separation. Separation was varied by means of perturbations produced from segmented zero-efflux oscillatory blowing slots, while estimates of span loadings and vortex sheet strengths were obtained by integrating wing surface pressures. These estimates were used as input to inviscid rollup relations as a means of predicting changes to the vortex characteristics resulting from the perturbations. Surveys of flow in the wake of the outboard and tip-flaps were made using a seven-hole probe, from which the vortex characteristics were directly deduced. Varying the degree of separation had a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size for both outboard and tip-flaps. Qualitative changes in vortex characteristics were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations, while the failure to account for viscosity was presumed to be the main reason for observed discrepancies. Introducing perturbations near the outboard flap-edges or on the tip-flap exerted significant control over vortices while producing negligible lift excursions.

  6. Gluon TMDs in Quarkonium Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signori, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    I report on our investigations into the impact of (un)polarized transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMD PDFs or TMDs) for gluons at hadron colliders, especially at A Fixed Target Experiment at the LHC (AFTER@LHC). In the context of high energy proton-proton collisions, we look at final states with low mass (e.g. η _b ) in order to investigate the nonperturbative part of TMD PDFs. We study the factorization theorem for the q_T spectrum of η _b produced in proton-proton collisions relying on the effective field theory approach, defining the tools to perform phenomenological investigations at next-to-next-to-leading log and next-to-leading order accuracy in the perturbation theory. We provide predictions for the unpolarized cross section and comment on the possibility of extracting nonperturbative information about the gluon content of the proton once data at low transverse momentum are available.

  7. Gluon TMDs in Quarkonium Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signori, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    I report on our investigations into the impact of (un)polarized transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMD PDFs or TMDs) for gluons at hadron colliders, especially at A Fixed Target Experiment at the LHC (AFTER@LHC). In the context of high energy proton-proton collisions, we look at final states with low mass (e.g. η _b) in order to investigate the nonperturbative part of TMD PDFs. We study the factorization theorem for the q_T spectrum of η _b produced in proton-proton collisions relying on the effective field theory approach, defining the tools to perform phenomenological investigations at next-to-next-to-leading log and next-to-leading order accuracy in the perturbation theory. We provide predictions for the unpolarized cross section and comment on the possibility of extracting nonperturbative information about the gluon content of the proton once data at low transverse momentum are available.

  8. Dynamics of vortices in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Weinan, E.

    1992-12-31

    We study the dynamics of vortices in type-II superconductors from the point of view of time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations. We outline a proof of existence, uniqueness and regularity of strong solutions for these equations. We then derive reduced systems of ODEs governing the motion of the vortices in the asymptotic limit of large Ginzburg-Landau parameter.

  9. Quantised vortices in polariton lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berloff, Natalia

    2015-11-01

    The first comprehensive treatment of quantised vorticity in the light of research on vortices in modern fluid mechanics appeared in Russell Donnelly seminal research papers and summarized in his 1991 book ``Quantized Vortices in Helium II''. Recently quantized vortices have been studied in polariton condensates. Polaritons are the mixed light-matter quasi-particles that are formed in the strong exciton-photon coupling regime. Under non-resonant optical excitation rapid relaxation of carriers and bosonic stimulation result in the formation of a non-equilibrium polariton condensate characterized by a single many-body wave-function, therefore, naturally possessing quantized vortices. Polariton condensates can be imprinted into any two-dimensional lattice by spatial modulation of the pumping laser and form vortices via interacting outfows from the pumping sites. Optically pumped polariton condensates can be injected in lattice configurations with arbitrary density profiles offering the possibility to control the kinetics of the condensate and therefore the number and location of vortices. I will present some new developments in theoretical and experimental studies of quantized vortices in polariton condensates and discuss possible practical implementations of polariton lattices.

  10. Flame propagation through periodic vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Dold, J.W.; Kerr, O.S.; Nikolova, I.P.

    1995-02-01

    The discovery of a new class of Navier-Stokes solutions representing steady periodic stretched vortices offers a useful test-bed for examining interactions between flames and complex flow-fields. After briefly describing these vortex solutions and their wide-ranging parameterization in terms of wavelength and amplitude, this article examines their effect on flames of constant normal propagation speed as observed through numerical solutions of an eikonal equation. Over certain ranges of vortex amplitude and flame-speed, a corridor of enhanced flame passage is seen to be created as a leading flame-tip managers to leap-frog between successive vortices. However, for large enough amplitudes of vorticity or small enough flame-speeds, the flame fails to be able to benefit from the advection due to the vortices. It is shown that the leading tips of such flames are effectively trapped by the stretched vortices.

  11. Vorticity flux from active dimples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeon, Beverley; Sherwin, Spencer; Morrison, Jonathan

    2004-11-01

    The effect of surface depressions, or dimples, in reducing drag on golf balls is well-known. Here this concept is extended to using ``active" dimples to manipulate vorticity flux at the wall. Surface vorticity flux is governed by surface accelerations, pressure and shear stress gradients, and surface curvature. ``Active" (or vibrating) dimples may generate vorticity flux by each of these terms, making them an excellent candidate for a basic study of flux manipulation, by which flow control may be achieved. Flow over an active dimple in fully-developed laminar channel flow is simulated with velocity boundary conditions developed from a linearized perturbation method imposed at the wall. This simple model cannot capture flow separation, but gives insight into the most straightforward means of flux generation from the concave surface. Vorticity flux due to dimple geometry and motion is quantified, and enhancements of two to three orders of magnitude in peak vorticity over the static dimple case are observed.

  12. Potential vorticity in magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; Mace, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    A version of Noether's second theorem using Lagrange multipliers is used to investigate fluid relabelling symmetries conservation laws in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). We obtain a new generalized potential vorticity type conservation equation for MHD which takes into account entropy gradients and the J × B force on the plasma due to the current J and magnetic induction B. This new conservation law for MHD is derived by using Noether's second theorem in conjunction with a class of fluid relabelling symmetries in which the symmetry generator for the Lagrange label transformations is non-parallel to the magnetic field induction in Lagrange label space. This is associated with an Abelian Lie pseudo algebra and a foliated phase space in Lagrange label space. It contains as a special case Ertel's theorem in ideal fluid mechanics. An independent derivation shows that the new conservation law is also valid for more general physical situations.

  13. A study of vorticity formation in high energy nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becattini, F.; Inghirami, G.; Rolando, V.; Beraudo, A.; Del Zanna, L.; De Pace, A.; Nardi, M.; Pagliara, G.; Chandra, V.

    2015-09-01

    We present a quantitative study of vorticity formation in peripheral ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at GeV by using the ECHO-QGP numerical code, implementing relativistic dissipative hydrodynamics in the causal Israel-Stewart framework in dimensions with an initial Bjorken flow profile. We consider different definitions of vorticity which are relevant in relativistic hydrodynamics. After demonstrating the excellent capabilities of our code, which proves to be able to reproduce Gubser flow up to 8 fm/ c, we show that, with the initial conditions needed to reproduce the measured directed flow in peripheral collisions corresponding to an average impact parameter fm and with the Bjorken flow profile for a viscous Quark Gluon Plasma with fixed, a vorticity of the order of some /fm can develop at freeze-out. The ensuing polarization of baryons does not exceed 1.4 % at midrapidity. We show that the amount of developed directed flow is sensitive to both the initial angular momentum of the plasma and its viscosity.

  14. Gluon Contribution To The Nucleon Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, Firooz; Taghavi-Shahri, Fatemeh; Shahveh, Abolfazl

    2011-07-01

    Gluon polarization in Nucleon is evaluated in the valon representation of hadrons. It is shown that although δg/g is small at the currently measured kinematics, it does not imply that the gluon contribution to the nucleon spin is small. In fact the first moment of gluon polarization in the nucleon, Δg(Q2), is sizable. We also notice that the majority of Δg is concentrated at around x = 0.08.

  15. Quark ACM with topologically generated gluon mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Ishita Dutta; Lahiri, Amitabha

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the effect of a small, gauge-invariant mass of the gluon on the anomalous chromomagnetic moment (ACM) of quarks by perturbative calculations at one-loop level. The mass of the gluon is taken to have been generated via a topological mass generation mechanism, in which the gluon acquires a mass through its interaction with an antisymmetric tensor field Bμν. For a small gluon mass ( < 10 MeV), we calculate the ACM at momentum transfer q2 = -M Z2. We compare those with the ACM calculated for the gluon mass arising from a Proca mass term. We find that the ACM of up, down, strange and charm quarks vary significantly with the gluon mass, while the ACM of top and bottom quarks show negligible gluon mass dependence. The mechanism of gluon mass generation is most important for the strange quarks ACM, but not so much for the other quarks. We also show the results at q2 = -m t2. We find that the dependence on gluon mass at q2 = -m t2 is much less than at q2 = -M Z2 for all quarks.

  16. Asymptocic Freedom of Gluons in Hamiltonian Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Rocha, María; Głazek, Stanisław D.

    2016-07-01

    We derive asymptotic freedom of gluons in terms of the renormalized SU(3) Yang-Mills Hamiltonian in the Fock space. Namely, we use the renormalization group procedure for effective particles to calculate the three-gluon interaction term in the front-form Yang-Mills Hamiltonian using a perturbative expansion in powers of g up to third order. The resulting three-gluon vertex is a function of the scale parameter s that has an interpretation of the size of effective gluons. The corresponding Hamiltonian running coupling constant exhibits asymptotic freedom, and the corresponding Hamiltonian {β} -function coincides with the one obtained in an earlier calculation using a different generator.

  17. On Multiple-Layered Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    2011-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to find ways to make vortex flow fields decompose more quickly, photographs and observations are presented of vortex flow fields that indicate the presence of multiple layers of fluid rotating about a common axis. A survey of the literature indicates that multiple-layered vortices form in waterspouts, tornadoes and lift-generated vortices of aircraft. An explanation for the appearance of multiple-layered structures in vortices is suggested. The observations and data presented are intended to improve the understanding of the formation and persistence of vortex flow fields.

  18. Gluon Evolution and Saturation Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, L.D.

    2010-05-26

    Almost 40 years ago, Gribov and colleagues at the Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute developed the ideas that led to the Dokhsitzer-Gribov-Altarelli-Parisi the Baltisky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov equations. These equations describe the evolution of the distributions for quarks and gluon inside a hadron to increased resolution scale of a probe or to smaller values of the fractional momentum of a hadronic constituent. I motivate and discuss the generalization required of these equations needed for high energy processes when the density of constituents is large. This leads to a theory of saturation realized by the Color Glass Condensate

  19. Ordering Multiple Soft Gluon Emissions.

    PubMed

    Ángeles Martínez, René; Forshaw, Jeffrey R; Seymour, Michael H

    2016-05-27

    We present an expression for the QCD amplitude for a general hard scattering process with any number of soft gluon emissions, to one-loop accuracy. The amplitude is written in two different but equivalent ways: as a product of operators ordered in dipole transverse momentum and as a product of loop-expanded currents. We hope that these results will help in the development of an all-orders algorithm for multiple emissions that includes the full color structure and both the real and imaginary contributions to the amplitude. PMID:27284651

  20. Vorticity Transfer in Shock Wave Interactions with Turbulence and Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agui, J. H.; Andreopoulos, J.

    1998-11-01

    Time-dependent, three-dimensional vorticity measurements of shock waves interacting with grid generated turbulence and concentrated tip vortices were conducted in a large diameter shock tube facility. Two different mesh size grids and a NACA-0012 semi-span wing acting as a tip vortex generator were used to carry out different relative Mach number interactions. The turbulence interactions produced a clear amplification of the lateral and spanwise vorticity rms, while the longitudinal component remained mostly unaffected. By comparison, the tip vortex/shock wave interactions produced a two fold increase in the rms of longitudinal vorticity. Considerable attention was given to the vorticity source terms. The mean and rms of the vorticity stretching terms dominated by 5 to 7 orders of magnitude over the dilitational compression terms in all the interactions. All three signals of the stretching terms manifested very intermittent, large amplitude peak events which indicated the bursting character of the stretching process. Distributions of these signals were characterized by extremely large levels of flatness with varying degrees of skewness. These distribution patterns were found to change only slightly through the turbulence interactions. However, the tip vortex/shock wave interactions brought about significant changes in these distributions which were associated with the abrupt structural changes of the vortex after the interaction.

  1. Dynamics of magnetic vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolaou, N.; Tomaras, T. N.

    1991-08-01

    The canonical conservation laws of linear and angular momentum in the ferromagnetic continuum have been known to be plagued by certain ambiguities which are resolved in this paper by constructing conservation laws as suitable moments of a topological density. The resulting canonical structure is then shown to be analogous to that encountered in the familiar Hall effect and explains the unusual features of the dynamics of magnetic vortices without resorting to a detailed solution of the underlying nonlinear equations. Thus, in the absence of external magnetic fields, a magnetic vortex is shown to be spontaneously pinned around a fixed guiding center. The guiding center would drift in a direction perpendicular to an applied magnetic field gradient, provided that dissipation can be neglected, with a Hall velocity that is calculated explicitly in terms of the initial configuration of the vortex. In the presence of dissipation, the vortex undergoes skew deflection at an angle δ ≠ 90° with respect to the applied field gradient. The angle δ is related to the winding number of the vortex according to the well-known golden rule of bubble dynamics.

  2. Consequences Of Fully Dressing Quark-Gluon Vertex Function With Two-Point Gluon Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Hrayr Matevosyan; Anthony Thomas; Peter Tandy

    2007-06-18

    We extend recent studies of the effects of quark-gluon vertex dressing upon the solutions of the Dyson-Schwinger equation for the quark propagator. A momentum delta function is used to represent the dominant infrared strength of the effective gluon propagator so that the resulting integral equations become algebraic. The guark-gluon vertex is constructed from the complete set of diagrams involving only 2-point gluon lines. The additional diagrams, including those with crossed gluon lines, are shown to make an important contribution to the DSE solutions for the quark propagator, because of their large color factors and the rapid growth in their number.

  3. Gluon Spin Contribution to The Nucleon Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, Firooz; Shahveh, Abolfazl; Taghavi-Shahri, Fateme

    2010-10-01

    We have calculated δg/ g in the nucleon at all measured kinematics. The smallness of δg/ g in the measured kinematics should not be interpreted as the the gluon contribution to the nucleon spin is small. In fact the first moment of gluon polarization in the nucleon, Δ g( Q2) can be sizable.

  4. HUNTING THE QUARK GLUON PLASMA.

    SciTech Connect

    LUDLAM, T.; ARONSON, S.

    2005-04-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) construction project was completed at BNL in 1999, with the first data-taking runs in the summer of 2000. Since then the early measurements at RHIC have yielded a wealth of data, from four independent detectors, each with its international collaboration of scientists: BRAHMS, PHENIX, PHOBOS, and STAR [1]. For the first time, collisions of heavy nuclei have been carried out at colliding-beam energies that have previously been accessible only for high-energy physics experiments with collisions of ''elementary'' particles such as protons and electrons. It is at these high energies that the predictions of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory that describes the role of quarks and gluons in nuclear matter, come into play, and new phenomena are sought that may illuminate our view of the basic structure of matter on the sub-atomic scale, with important implications for the origins of matter on the cosmic scale. The RHIC experiments have recorded data from collisions of gold nuclei at the highest energies ever achieved in man-made particle accelerators. These collisions, of which hundreds of millions have now been examined, result in final states of unprecedented complexity, with thousands of produced particles radiating from the nuclear collision. All four of the RHIC experiments have moved quickly to analyze these data, and have begun to understand the phenomena that unfold from the moment of collision as these particles are produced. In order to provide benchmarks of simpler interactions against which to compare the gold-gold collisions, the experiments have gathered comparable samples of data from collisions of a very light nucleus (deuterium) with gold nuclei, as well as proton-proton collisions, all with identical beam energies and experimental apparatus. The early measurements have revealed compelling evidence for the existence of a new form of nuclear matter at extremely high

  5. Jupiter's Great Red Spot and other vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, Philip S.

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical explanation of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) as the self-organization of vorticity in turbulence is presented. A number of properties of the GRS and other Jovian vortices that are unambiguous from the data are listed. The simplest possible model that explains these properties one at a time rather than in a difficult all-encompassing planetary global circulation model is presented. It is shown that Jovian vortices reflect the behavior of quasi-geostrophic (QG) vortices embedded in an east-west wind with bands of uniform potential vorticity. It is argued that most of the properties of the Jovian vortices can be easily explained and understood with QG theory. Many of the signatures of QG vortices are apparent on Voyager images. In numerical and laboratory experiments, QG vortices relax to approximately steady states like the Jovian vortices, rather than oscillating or rotating Kida ellipses.

  6. Filamentation with nonlinear Bessel vortices.

    PubMed

    Jukna, V; Milián, C; Xie, C; Itina, T; Dudley, J; Courvoisier, F; Couairon, A

    2014-10-20

    We present a new type of ring-shaped filaments featured by stationary nonlinear high-order Bessel solutions to the laser beam propagation equation. Two different regimes are identified by direct numerical simulations of the nonlinear propagation of axicon focused Gaussian beams carrying helicity in a Kerr medium with multiphoton absorption: the stable nonlinear propagation regime corresponds to a slow beam reshaping into one of the stationary nonlinear high-order Bessel solutions, called nonlinear Bessel vortices. The region of existence of nonlinear Bessel vortices is found semi-analytically. The influence of the Kerr nonlinearity and nonlinear losses on the beam shape is presented. Direct numerical simulations highlight the role of attractors played by nonlinear Bessel vortices in the stable propagation regime. Large input powers or small cone angles lead to the unstable propagation regime where nonlinear Bessel vortices break up into an helical multiple filament pattern or a more irregular structure. Nonlinear Bessel vortices are shown to be sufficiently intense to generate a ring-shaped filamentary ionized channel in the medium which is foreseen as opening the way to novel applications in laser material processing of transparent dielectrics. PMID:25401574

  7. How rotational vortices enhance transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffani, D.; Rognon, P.; Metzger, B.; Einav, I.

    2013-09-01

    Inspired by recent observations of granular flow, we examine how rotational vortices contribute to heat or mass transfer enhancement in a fluid. We use a tracer method to simulate both diffusion and advection in systems of differing intrinsic diffusivities D0, vortex sizes R, vortex rotation frequencies f, and vortex lifetimes ℓ. The results reveal that these systems exhibit an effective diffusive behavior, characterized by an effective diffusivity Deff. A striking finding is the existence of two regimes, dichotomised by the Péclet number Pe = R2f/D0. When the Péclet number is less than one, there is no transfer enhancement, Deff = D0. For higher values, vortices produce some transfer enhancement with a corresponding power law Deff/D0 ≈ Pen. The power n ranges from a lower bound of 0.5 for stationary vortices of lifetime infinity, to an upper bound of 1 for vortices of lifetimes shorter than half a rotation. This difference is attributed to two different internal mechanisms involving the coupling of diffusion and advection. These results could provide new insights on the transfer properties of fluid systems comprising rotational vortices, such as granular materials, suspensions, foams, and emulsions, as well as low Reynolds number stirred flows.

  8. Gluons and the NJL coupling constant

    SciTech Connect

    Braghin, Fábio L.; Barros Jr, Ednaldo; Paulo Jr, Ademar

    2014-11-11

    The QCD origin of the NJL model is re-analysed by considering the gluon condensate of order two . The key point is the treatment of the gluon interactions. To linearize the action the auxiliary variable method is employed to introduce a scalar variable φ(x) that yield such condensate by means of its value in the vacuum, and then another auxiliary variable that corresponds to an antisymmetric gluon configuration φ(x). For that, besides that, two different possible limits of the fourth order non local quark interaction that may contribute to the NJL coupling are compared.

  9. Froissart bound and gluon number fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang Wenchang

    2010-05-01

    We study the effect of gluon number fluctuations (Pomeron loops) on the impact parameter behavior of the scattering amplitude in the fixed coupling case. We demonstrate that the dipole-hadron cross section computed from gluon number fluctuations saturates the Froissart bound and the growth of the radius of the black disk with rapidity is enhanced by an additional term as compared to the single event case. We find that the physical amplitude has a Gaussian impact parameter dependence once the gluon number fluctuations are included. This indicates that the fluctuations may be the microscopic origin for the Gaussian impact parameter dependence of the scattering amplitude.

  10. Quark and gluon condensates in isospin matter

    SciTech Connect

    He Lianyi; Jiang Yin; Zhuang Pengfei

    2009-04-15

    By applying the Hellmann-Feynman theorem to a charged pion gas, the quark and gluon condensates at low isospin density are determined by precise pion properties. At intermediate density around f{sub {pi}}{sup 2}m{sub {pi}}, from both the estimation for the dilute pion gas and the calculation with the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, the quark condensate is strongly and monotonously suppressed, while the gluon condensate is enhanced and can be larger than its vacuum value. This unusual behavior of the gluon condensate is universal for Bose condensed matter of mesons. Our results can be tested by lattice calculations at finite isospin density.

  11. Hairpin Vortices: Autogeneration and Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatino, Daniel; Maharjan, Rijan; Sanders, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    The regeneration of hairpin vortices is examined in a free-surface water channel where vortices are artificially generated by means of injection in a laminar boundary layer. The process is visualized with dye and hydrogen bubble-wire techniques. The strength of an isolated hairpin required to begin the autogeneration process is established by means of PIV measurements on the symmetry plane. Because hairpins are in close proximity in a fully-turbulent boundary layer, two hairpins are generated at different streamwise locations and allowed to interact at different stages of development. The relative position, strength and maturity of the interacting hairpins that generate secondary vortices are examined. The morphology of the generation process and of the resulting secondary hairpin for both the isolated and interacting cases are discussed and compared to previous work. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant CBET-1040236.

  12. Higgs boson production via gluon fusion: Soft-gluon resummation including mass effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Timo; Spira, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We analyze soft and collinear gluon resummation effects at the N3LL level for Standard Model Higgs boson production via gluon fusion g g →H and the neutral scalar and pseudoscalar Higgs bosons of the minimal supersymmetric extension at the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-log (N3LL ) and next-to-next-to-leading-log (NNLL) level, respectively. We introduce refinements in the treatment of quark mass effects and subleading collinear gluon effects within the resummation. Soft and collinear gluon resummation effects amount to up to about 5% beyond the fixed-order results for scalar and pseudoscalar Higgs boson production.

  13. Transport properties of quark and gluon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Heiselberg, H.

    1993-12-01

    The kinetic properties of relativistic quark-gluon and electron-photon plasmas are described in the weak coupling limit. The troublesome Rutherford divergence at small scattering angles is screened by Debye screening for the longitudinal or electric part of the interactions. The transverse or magnetic part of the interactions is effectively screened by Landau damping of the virtual photons and gluons transferred in the QED and QCD interactions respectively. Including screening a number of transport coefficients for QCD and QED plasmas can be calculated to leading order in the interaction strength, including rates of momentum and thermal relaxation, electrical conductivity, viscosities, flavor and spin diffusion of both high temperature and degenerate plasmas. Damping of quarks and gluons as well as color diffusion in quark-gluon plasmas is, however, shown not to be sufficiently screened and the rates depends on an infrared cut-off of order the ``magnetic mass,`` m{sub mag} {approximately} g{sup 2}T.

  14. Gluon saturation in a saturated environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2011-07-15

    A bootstrap equation for self-quenched gluon shadowing leads to a reduced magnitude of broadening for partons propagating through a nucleus. Saturation of small-x gluons in a nucleus, which has the form of transverse momentum broadening of projectile gluons in pA collisions in the nuclear rest frame, leads to a modification of the parton distribution functions in the beam compared with pp collisions. In nucleus-nucleus collisions all participating nucleons acquire enhanced gluon density at small x, which boosts further the saturation scale. Solution of the reciprocity equations for central collisions of two heavy nuclei demonstrate a significant, up to several times, enhancement of Q{sub sA}{sup 2}, in AA compared with pA collisions.

  15. Gluon saturation in a saturated environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2011-07-01

    A bootstrap equation for self-quenched gluon shadowing leads to a reduced magnitude of broadening for partons propagating through a nucleus. Saturation of small-x gluons in a nucleus, which has the form of transverse momentum broadening of projectile gluons in pA collisions in the nuclear rest frame, leads to a modification of the parton distribution functions in the beam compared with pp collisions. In nucleus-nucleus collisions all participating nucleons acquire enhanced gluon density at small x, which boosts further the saturation scale. Solution of the reciprocity equations for central collisions of two heavy nuclei demonstrate a significant, up to several times, enhancement of QsA2, in AA compared with pA collisions.

  16. The gluon Sivers distribution: Status and future prospects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boer, Daniël; Lorcé, Cédric; Pisano, Cristian; Zhou, Jian

    2015-06-28

    In this study, we review what is currently known about the gluon Sivers distribution and what are the opportunities to learn more about it. Because single transverse spin asymmetries in p↑p → πX provide only indirect information about the gluon Sivers function through the relation with the quark-gluon and tri-gluon Qiu-Sterman functions, current data from hadronic collisions at RHIC have not yet been translated into a solid constraint on the gluon Sivers function.

  17. Role of monopoles in a gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ratti, Claudia; Shuryak, Edward

    2009-08-01

    We study the role of magnetic monopoles at high enough temperature T>2T{sub c}, when they can be considered heavy, rare objects embedded into matter consisting mostly of the usual 'electric' quasiparticles, quarks, and gluons. We review available lattice results on monopoles at finite temperatures. Then we proceed to classical and quantum charge-monopole scattering, solving the problem of gluon-monopole scattering for the first time. The explicit calculations are performed in the framework of the Georgi-Glashow model; the results that we obtain are nevertheless quite general. Connections to QCD are carefully discussed. We find that, while the gluon-monopole scattering hardly influences thermodynamic quantities, it does produce a large transport cross section, significantly exceeding that for pQCD gluon-gluon scattering up to quite high T. Thus, in spite of their relatively small density at high T, monopoles are extremely important for quark-gluon plasma transport properties, keeping viscosity small enough for hydrodynamics to work at the LHC.

  18. Adiabatic dynamics of magnetic vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolaou, N.

    1994-03-01

    We formulate a reasonably detailed adiabatic conjecture concerning the dynamics of skew deflection of magnetic vortices in a field gradient, which is expected to be valid at sufficiently large values of the winding number. The conjecture is consistent with the golden rule used to describe the dynamics of realistic magnetic bubbles and is verified here numerically within the 2-D isotropic Heisenberg model.

  19. Paraboloids and Vortices in Hydrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, John M.

    1969-01-01

    Describes an apparatus designed to demonstrate vortical flow of a fluid. The apparatus consists of a transparent acrylic cylinder, with a drain hole, and mounted so that it can be rotated about its axis at speeds up to 1000 rpm. Experimental observations with water as the fluid under study are reported. (LC)

  20. Combustor with multistage internal vortices

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer Yu; Harrington, R.E.

    1987-05-01

    A fluidized bed combustor is provided with a multistage arrangement of vortex generators in the freeboard area. The vortex generators are provided by nozzle means which extend into the interior of the freeboard for forming vortices within the freeboard areas to enhance the combustion of particulate material entrained in product gases ascending into the freeboard from the fluidized bed. Each of the nozzles are radially inwardly spaced from the combustor walls defining the freeboard to provide for the formation of an essentially vortex-free, vertically extending annulus about the vortices whereby the particulate material centrifuged from the vortices against the inner walls of the combustor is returned through the annulus to the fluidized bed. By adjusting the vortex pattern within the freeboard, a significant portion of the full cross-sectional area of the freeboard except for the peripheral annulus can be contacted with the turbulent vortical flow for removing the particulate material from the gaseous products and also for enhancing the combustion thereof within the freeboard. 2 figs.

  1. Combustor with multistage internal vortices

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer Y.; Harrington, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    A fluidized bed combustor is provided with a multistage arrangement of vortex generators in the freeboard area. The vortex generators are provided by nozzle means which extend into the interior of the freeboard for forming vortices within the freeboard area to enhance the combustion of particulate material entrained in product gases ascending into the freeboard from the fluidized bed. Each of the nozzles are radially inwardly spaced from the combustor walls defining the freeboard to provide for the formation of an essentially vortex-free, vertically extending annulus about the vortices whereby the particulate material centrifuged from the vortices against the inner walls of the combustor is returned through the annulus to the fluidized bed. By adjusting the vortex pattern within the freeboard, a significant portion of the full cross-sectional area of the freeboard except for the peripheral annulus can be contacted with the turbulent vortical flow for removing the particulate material from the gaseous products and also for enhancing the combustion thereof within the freeboard.

  2. Stochastic Vorticity and Associated Filtering Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Amirdjanova, A.; Kallianpur, G.

    2002-12-19

    The focus of this work is on a two-dimensional stochastic vorticity equation for an incompressible homogeneous viscous fluid. We consider a signed measure-valued stochastic partial differential equation for a vorticity process based on the Skorohod-Ito evolution of a system of N randomly moving point vortices. A nonlinear filtering problem associated with the evolution of the vorticity is considered and a corresponding Fujisaki-Kallianpur-Kunita stochastic differential equation for the optimal filter is derived.

  3. Quark gluon bags as reggeons

    SciTech Connect

    Bugaev, K. A.; Petrov, V. K.; Zinovjev, G. M.

    2009-05-15

    The influence of the medium-dependent finite width of quark gluon plasma (QGP) bags on their equation of state is analyzed within an exactly solvable model. It is argued that the large width of the QGP bags not only explains the observed deficit in the number of hadronic resonances but also clarifies the reason why the heavy QGP bags cannot be directly observed as metastable states in a hadronic phase. The model allows us to estimate the minimal value of the width of QGP bags being heavier than 2 GeV from a variety of the lattice QCD data and get that the minimal resonance width at zero temperature is about 600 MeV, whereas the minimal resonance width at the Hagedorn temperature is about 2000 MeV. As shown, these estimates are almost insensitive to the number of the elementary degrees of freedom. The recent lattice QCD data are analyzed and it is found that in addition to the {sigma}T{sup 4} term the lattice QCD pressure contains T-linear and T{sup 4}lnT terms in the range of temperatures between 240 and 420 MeV. The presence of the last term in the pressure bears almost no effect on the width estimates. Our analysis shows that at high temperatures the average mass and width of the QGP bags behave in accordance with the upper bound of the Regge trajectory asymptotics (the linear asymptotics), whereas at low temperatures they obey the lower bound of the Regge trajectory asymptotics (the square root one). Since the model explicitly contains the Hagedorn mass spectrum, it allows us to remove an existing contradiction between the finite number of hadronic Regge families and the Hagedorn idea of the exponentially growing mass spectrum of hadronic bags.

  4. Vorticity from Isocurvature in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopherson, Adam J.; Malik, Karim A.

    2015-01-01

    Vorticity is ubiquitous in nature however, to date, studies of vorticity in cosmology and the early universe have been quite rare. In this paper, based on a talk in session CM1 of the 13th Marcel Grossmann Meeting, we consider vorticity generation from scalar cosmological perturbations of a perfect fluid system. We show that, at second order in perturbation theory, vorticity is sourced by a coupling between energy density and entropy gradients, thus extending a well-known feature of classical fluid dynamics to a relativistic cosmological framework. This induced vorticity, sourced by isocurvature perturbations, may prove useful in the future as an additional discriminator between inflationary models.

  5. Potential Vorticity Structure of the Mars Polar Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzewich, S.; Toigo, A. D.; Waugh, D.; Montabone, L.; Greybush, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The increasing sophistication of Mars general circulation models (MGCMs) and the availability of regular atmospheric observations have allowed several teams to begin to assimilate these observations into their MGCMs and produce atmospheric reanalyses that enable, among other things, the potential vorticity (PV) structure of the Martian polar vortices to be examined. Here we perform such an analysis using the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA, Montabone et al., 2013) and the Ensembles Mars Reanalysis System (EMARS, Greybush et al., 2012) reanalyses together with free-running MGCM simulations. Monthly-mean fields from the reanalyses and MGCMs show strong westerly winds in northern mid-high latitudes during NH winter, with near-zero PV at and equatorward of the maximum winds (jet core) and steep meridional PV gradients poleward of the jet core. Furthermore, in the lower atmosphere the maximum PV occurs off the pole and monthly-mean maps show a continuous ring (annulus) of high PV. On shorter (e.g., daily) time scales a different picture emerges, with maps showing multiple small-scale coherent regions of high PV that rotate around the pole, and only when averaged over monthly times does a high PV annulus appear. A PV budget analysis is performed to examine the cause of the annulus of high PV. We also relate the ring of small-scale vortices to the stability of the PV annulus, and discuss the implications on meridional transport between mid and high latitudes.

  6. Jupiter's closed cyclones and anticyclones vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legarreta, J.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2003-05-01

    We have measured the motions and derived de velocity field tracking the cloud elements present in Jovian large-scale cyclones and anticyclones. We have used very high spatial resolution images obtained by the Voyager 1 and 2 (in 1979) and the Galileo (1997-1999) spacecrafts. In total we measured motions in 13 vortices covering a range of latitudes from -59 deg to + 41 deg. The tangential component of the velocity as a function of the distance to the vortex centre and position angle is used to retrieve the vorticity field. Then, we compare each vortex mean vorticity with the ambient and planetary vorticities (i. e. with latitude). For most cases studied (11), the vortex vorticity is greater than the ambient vorticity, although two types of vortices showed the same vorticity than the ambient, suggesting that their periphery motions can be entrained by the ambient shear. We present an analysis of the correlations between the mean vorticity and mean zonal motion of each vortex, and the relationship between the ambient to intrinsic vorticity versus the zonal to meridional size ratio. This is used to demonstrate that most vortices do not follow the Kida type vortex relationship. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the Spanish MCYT PNAYA 2000-0932 and Grupos-UPV/EHU. We acknowledge the access to the Voyager and Galileo images through the NASA - PDS Atmospheric node at NMSU.

  7. Mechanical Control of Individual Superconducting Vortices.

    PubMed

    Kremen, Anna; Wissberg, Shai; Haham, Noam; Persky, Eylon; Frenkel, Yiftach; Kalisky, Beena

    2016-03-01

    Manipulating individual vortices in a deterministic way is challenging; ideally, manipulation should be effective, local, and tunable in strength and location. Here, we show that vortices respond to local mechanical stress applied in the vicinity of the vortex. We utilized this interaction to move individual vortices in thin superconducting films via local mechanical contact without magnetic field or current. We used a scanning superconducting quantum interference device to image vortices and to apply local vertical stress with the tip of our sensor. Vortices were attracted to the contact point, relocated, and were stable at their new location. We show that vortices move only after contact and that more effective manipulation is achieved with stronger force and longer contact time. Mechanical manipulation of vortices provides a local view of the interaction between strain and nanomagnetic objects as well as controllable, effective, and reproducible manipulation technique. PMID:26836018

  8. Mechanical Control of Individual Superconducting Vortices

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Manipulating individual vortices in a deterministic way is challenging; ideally, manipulation should be effective, local, and tunable in strength and location. Here, we show that vortices respond to local mechanical stress applied in the vicinity of the vortex. We utilized this interaction to move individual vortices in thin superconducting films via local mechanical contact without magnetic field or current. We used a scanning superconducting quantum interference device to image vortices and to apply local vertical stress with the tip of our sensor. Vortices were attracted to the contact point, relocated, and were stable at their new location. We show that vortices move only after contact and that more effective manipulation is achieved with stronger force and longer contact time. Mechanical manipulation of vortices provides a local view of the interaction between strain and nanomagnetic objects as well as controllable, effective, and reproducible manipulation technique. PMID:26836018

  9. Constituent gluons and the static quark potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greensite, Jeff; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2016-04-01

    We suggest that Hamiltonian matrix elements between physical states in QCD might be approximated, in Coulomb gauge, by "lattice-improved" tree diagrams; i.e. tree diagram contributions with dressed ghost, transverse gluon, and Coulomb propagators obtained from lattice simulations. Such matrix elements can be applied to a truncated-basis treatment of hadronic states which include constituent gluons. As an illustration, we apply this hybrid approach to the heavy quark potential, for quark-antiquark separations up to 2.4 fm. The Coulomb string tension in SU(3) gauge theory is about a factor of 4 times greater than the asymptotic string tension. In our approach we show that a single constituent gluon is in principle sufficient, up to 2.4 fm, to reduce this overshoot by the factor required. The static potential remains linear, although the precise value of the string tension depends on details of the Couloumb gauge ghost and gluon propagators in the infrared regime. In this connection we present new lattice results for the transverse gluon propagator in position space.

  10. Dynamical equation of the effective gluon mass

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, A. C.; Binosi, D.; Papavassiliou, J.

    2011-10-15

    In this article, we derive the integral equation that controls the momentum dependence of the effective gluon mass in the Landau gauge. This is accomplished by means of a well-defined separation of the corresponding ''one-loop dressed'' Schwinger-Dyson equation into two distinct contributions, one associated with the mass and one with the standard kinetic part of the gluon. The entire construction relies on the existence of a longitudinally coupled vertex of nonperturbative origin, which enforces gauge invariance in the presence of a dynamical mass. The specific structure of the resulting mass equation, supplemented by the additional requirement of a positive-definite gluon mass, imposes a rather stringent constraint on the derivative of the gluonic dressing function, which is comfortably satisfied by the large-volume lattice data for the gluon propagator, both for SU(2) and SU(3). The numerical treatment of the mass equation, under some simplifying assumptions, is presented for the aforementioned gauge groups, giving rise to a gluon mass that is a nonmonotonic function of the momentum. Various theoretical improvements and possible future directions are briefly discussed.

  11. Vortices in vibrated granular rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neicu, Toni; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2002-03-01

    We report the first experimental observation of vortex patterns in granular rods inside a container that is vibrated vertically . The experiments were carried out with an anodized aluminum circular container which is rigidly attached to an electromagnetic shaker and the patterns are imaged using a high-frame rate digital camera. At low rod numbers and driving amplitudes, the rods are observed to lie horizontally. Above a critical number or packing fraction of rods, moving domains of vertical rods are spontaneously observed to form which coexist with horizontal rods. These small domains of vertical rods coarsen over time to form a few large vortices. The size of the vortices increases with the number of rods. We are able to track the ends of the vertical rods and obtain the velocity fields of the vortices. The mean azimuthal velocity as a function of distance from the center of the vortex is obtained as a function of the packing fraction. We will report the phase diagram of the various patterns observed as function of number of rods and driving amplitude. The mechanism for the formation and motion of the domains of vertical rods will be also discussed.

  12. Breathers on quantized superfluid vortices.

    PubMed

    Salman, Hayder

    2013-10-18

    We consider the propagation of breathers along a quantized superfluid vortex. Using the correspondence between the local induction approximation (LIA) and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we identify a set of initial conditions corresponding to breather solutions of vortex motion governed by the LIA. These initial conditions, which give rise to a long-wavelength modulational instability, result in the emergence of large amplitude perturbations that are localized in both space and time. The emergent structures on the vortex filament are analogous to loop solitons but arise from the dual action of bending and twisting of the vortex. Although the breather solutions we study are exact solutions of the LIA equations, we demonstrate through full numerical simulations that their key emergent attributes carry over to vortex dynamics governed by the Biot-Savart law and to quantized vortices described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The breather excitations can lead to self-reconnections, a mechanism that can play an important role within the crossover range of scales in superfluid turbulence. Moreover, the observation of breather solutions on vortices in a field model suggests that these solutions are expected to arise in a wide range of other physical contexts from classical vortices to cosmological strings. PMID:24182275

  13. Breathers on Quantized Superfluid Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Hayder

    2013-10-01

    We consider the propagation of breathers along a quantized superfluid vortex. Using the correspondence between the local induction approximation (LIA) and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we identify a set of initial conditions corresponding to breather solutions of vortex motion governed by the LIA. These initial conditions, which give rise to a long-wavelength modulational instability, result in the emergence of large amplitude perturbations that are localized in both space and time. The emergent structures on the vortex filament are analogous to loop solitons but arise from the dual action of bending and twisting of the vortex. Although the breather solutions we study are exact solutions of the LIA equations, we demonstrate through full numerical simulations that their key emergent attributes carry over to vortex dynamics governed by the Biot-Savart law and to quantized vortices described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The breather excitations can lead to self-reconnections, a mechanism that can play an important role within the crossover range of scales in superfluid turbulence. Moreover, the observation of breather solutions on vortices in a field model suggests that these solutions are expected to arise in a wide range of other physical contexts from classical vortices to cosmological strings.

  14. Buoyancy-Induced, Columnar Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Mark; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    Free buoyancy-induced, columnar vortices (dust devils) that are driven by thermal instabilities of ground-heated, stratified air in areas with sufficient insolation convert the potential energy of low-grade heat in the surface air layer into a vortex flow with significant kinetic energy. A variant of the naturally-occurring vortex is deliberately triggered and anchored within an azimuthal array of vertical, stator-like flow vanes that form an open-top enclosure and impart tangential momentum to the radially entrained air. This flow may be exploited for power generation by coupling the vortex to a vertical-axis turbine. The fundamental mechanisms associated with the formation, evolution, and dynamics of an anchored, buoyancy-driven columnar vortex within such a facility are investigated experimentally using a heated ground plane. Specific emphasis is placed on the manipulation of the vortex formation and structure and the dependence of the vorticity production and sustainment mechanisms on the thermal resources and characteristic scales of the anchoring flow vanes using stereo-PIV. It is shown that manipulation of the formation and advection of vorticity concentrations within the enclosure can be exploited for increasing the available kinetic energy. Supported by ARPA-E.

  15. Ion-induced quark-gluon implosion.

    PubMed

    Frankfurt, L; Strikman, M

    2003-07-11

    We investigate nuclear fragmentation in the central proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the energies of CERN LHC. Within the semiclassical approximation we argue that because of the fast increase with energy of the cross sections of soft and hard interactions each nucleon is stripped in the average process off "soft" partons and fragments into a collection of leading quarks and gluons with large p(t). Valence quarks and gluons are streaming in the opposite directions when viewed in the c.m. of the produced system. The resulting pattern of the fragmentation of the colliding nuclei leads to an implosion of the quark and gluon constituents of the nuclei. The nonequilibrium state produced at the initial stage in the nucleus fragmentation region is estimated to have densities >/=50 GeV/fm(3) at the LHC energies and probably >/=10 GeV/fm(3) at BNL RHIC. PMID:12906475

  16. Quarks and gluons at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Bodek, A.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    Data from proton-antiproton collisions at high energy provide important information on constraining the quark and gluon distributions in the nucleon and place limits on quark substructure. The S asymmetry data constrains the slope of the d/u quark distributions and significantly reduces the systematic error on the extracted value of the W mass. Drell-Yan data at high invariant mass provides strong limits on quark substructure. Information on {alpha}{sub s} and the gluon distributions can be extracted from high P{sub T} jet data and direct photons.

  17. Amplitude for N-Gluon Superstring Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Stieberger, Stephan; Taylor, Tomasz R.

    2006-11-24

    We consider scattering processes involving N gluonic massless states of open superstrings with a certain Regge slope {alpha}{sup '}. At the semiclassical level, the string world-sheet sweeps a disk and N gluons are created or annihilated at the boundary. We present exact expressions for the corresponding amplitudes, valid to all orders in {alpha}{sup '}, for the so-called maximally helicity violating configurations, with N=4, 5 and N=6. We also obtain the leading O({alpha}{sup '2}) string corrections to the zero-slope N-gluon Yang-Mills amplitudes.

  18. High multiplicity study and gluon dominance model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokoulina, E. S.

    2016-01-01

    Study of high multiplicity events in proton-proton interactions is carried out at the U-70 accelerator (IHEP, Protvino). These events are extremely rare. Usually, Monte Carlo codes underestimate topological cross sections in this region. The gluon dominance model (GDM) was offered to describe them. It is based on QCD and a phenomenological scheme of a hadronization stage. This model indicates a recombination mechanism of hadronization and a gluon fission. Future program of the SVD Collaboration is aimed at studying a long-standing puzzle of excess soft photon yield and its connection with high multiplicity at the U-70 and Nuclotron facility at JINR, Dubna.

  19. Dynamics of vortices in polariton quantum fluids : From full vortices, to half vortices and vortex pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveaud-Plédran, Benoit

    2012-02-01

    Polariton quantum fluids may be created both spontaneously through a standard phase transition towards a Bose Einstein condensate, or may be resonantly driven with a well-defined speed. Thanks to the photonic component of polaritons, the properties of the quantum fluid may be accessed rather directly with in particular the possibility of detained interferometric studies. Here, I will detail the dynamics of vortices, obtained with a picosecond time resolution, in different configurations, with in particular their phase dynamics. I will show in particular the dynamics the dynamics of spontaneous creation of a vortex, the dissociation of a full vortex into two half vortices as well as the dynamics of the dissociation of a dark soliton line into a street of pairs of vortices. Work done at EPFL by a dream team of Postdocs PhD students and collaborators: K. Lagoudakis, G. Nardin, T. Paraiso, G. Grosso, F. Manni, Y L'eger, M. Portella Oberli, F. Morier-Genoud and the help of our friend theorists V, Savona, M. Vouters and T. Liew.

  20. Jet calculus beyond leading order for the gluon sector

    SciTech Connect

    Gunion, J.F.; Kalinowski, J.

    1984-04-01

    We report results for the order-C/sub A/ /sup 2/..cap alpha../sub s/ /sup 2/ jet calculus three-, two-, and one-gluon distributions of the pure gluon singlet channel. Included is an independent calculation of the C/sub A/ /sup 2/ part of the gluon..-->..gluon inclusive distribution which has been a subject of controversy for several years. We confirm the results of Furmanski and Petronzio for scheme-independent observables.

  1. Plane mixing layer vortical structure kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the current project was to experimentally investigate the structure and dynamics of the streamwise vorticity in a plane mixing layer. The first part of this research program was intended to clarify whether the observed decrease in mean streamwise vorticity in the far-field of mixing layers is due primarily to the 'smearing' caused by vortex meander or to diffusion. Two-point velocity correlation measurements have been used to show that there is little spanwise meander of the large-scale streamwise vortical structure. The correlation measurements also indicate a large degree of transverse meander of the streamwise vorticity which is not surprising since the streamwise vorticity exists in the inclined braid region between the spanwise vortex core regions. The streamwise convection of the braid region thereby introduces an apparent transverse meander into measurements using stationary probes. These results corroborated with estimated secondary velocity profiles in which the streamwise vorticity produces a signature which was tracked in time.

  2. Two applications of potential vorticity thinking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Walter A.

    1987-01-01

    The phenomena of dissipative destabilization of external Rossby waves and the acceleration of the zonal mean jet during baroclinic life cycles are described in terms of potential vorticity. The main principle of the potential temperature variations at rigid boundaries have the same effect on the interior flow as do sheets of potential vorticity located just within the boundaries. It is noted that the potential vorticity theory is useful for understanding the dynamical behavior of meterological phenomena.

  3. SU(3) Landau gauge gluon and ghost propagators using the logarithmic lattice gluon field definition

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgenfritz, Ernst-Michael; Menz, Christoph; Mueller-Preussker, Michael; Schiller, Arwed; Sternbeck, Andre

    2011-03-01

    We study the Landau gauge gluon and ghost propagators of SU(3) gauge theory, employing the logarithmic definition for the lattice gluon fields and implementing the corresponding form of the Faddeev-Popov matrix. This is necessary in order to consistently compare lattice data for the bare propagators with that of higher-loop numerical stochastic perturbation theory. In this paper we provide such a comparison, and introduce what is needed for an efficient lattice study. When comparing our data for the logarithmic definition to that of the standard lattice Landau gauge we clearly see the propagators to be multiplicatively related. The data of the associated ghost-gluon coupling matches up almost completely. For the explored lattice spacings and sizes discretization artifacts, finite size, and Gribov-copy effects are small. At weak coupling and large momentum, the bare propagators and the ghost-gluon coupling are seen to be approached by those of higher-order numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  4. Recent COMPASS results on the gluon polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Quintans, Catarina

    2009-03-23

    The spin structure of the nucleon is studied in the COMPASS experiment at CERN/SPS, from the collisions of 160 GeV polarized muon beam with a {sup 6}LiD target. The data collected from 2002 to 2006 provide an accurate measurement of longitudinal double spin cross-section asymmetries. The latest results on the gluon polarization, accessed from two independent analyses of photon-gluon fusion selected events, are presented. The study of the open-charm production allows to extract the gluon polarization (in LO QCD) from the measurement of the asymmetry, the value obtained being {delta}g/g -0.49{+-}0.27(stat){+-}0.11(syst), at an average x{sub g} 0.11{sub -0.05}{sup +0.11} and a scale <{mu}{sup 2}> = 13(GeV/c){sup 2}. An alternative and independent way to study the gluon polarization, by studying the high transverse momentum hadron pairs produced, leads to a value {delta}g/g 0.08{+-}0.10(stat){+-}0.05(syst), at x{sub g}{sup a{nu}} 0.082{sub -0.027}{sup +0.041} and <{mu}{sup 2}> = 3(GeV/c){sup 2}.

  5. Sambamurti Memorial Lecture: Spotlight on the Gluon

    ScienceCinema

    Michael Begelas

    2010-09-01

    Begel uses results from the Fermilab D0 and E706 experiments to explain how the production rate and energy spectrum of photons produced during proton collisions helped to clarify how the energy inside the proton is shared between quarks and gluons.

  6. Exploring Quarks, Gluons and the Higgs Boson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. Erik

    2013-01-01

    With real particle collision data available on the web, the amazing dynamics of the fundamental particles of the standard model can be explored in classrooms. Complementing the events from the ATLAS experiment with animations of the fundamental processes on the quark and gluon level makes it possible to better understand the invisible world of…

  7. Squeezed colour states in gluon jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilin, S. YA.; Kuvshinov, V. I.; Firago, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    The possibility of the formation of squeezed states of gluon fields in quantum chromodynamics due to nonlinear nonperturbative self interaction during jet evolution in the process of e(+)e(-) annihilation into hadrons, which are analogous to the quantum photon squeezed states in quantum electrodynamics, is demonstrated. Additionally, the squeezing parameters are calculated.

  8. Quark-gluon plasma (Selected Topics)

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, V. I.

    2012-09-15

    Introductory lectures to the theory of (strongly interacting) quark-gluon plasma given at the Winter School of Physics of ITEP (Moscow, February 2010). We emphasize theoretical issues highlighted by the discovery of the low viscosity of the plasma. The topics include relativistic hydrodynamics, manifestations of chiral anomaly in hydrodynamics, superfluidity, relativistic superfluid hydrodynamics, effective stringy scalars, holographic models of Yang-Mills theories.

  9. Aircraft trailing vortices: an introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquin, Laurent

    2005-05-01

    Flow momentum that is deflected in a persistent way by a wing, or by another flow, becomes organised in coherent and energetic vortex structures. This phenomenon is briefly introduced here by comparison with other phenomena such as the production of vortices by impulsive forces (e.g. during animal flight), or the production of turbulence by jets. These considerations aim at underlining the fundamental nature of this strange mechanism, which is usually hidden behind engineering models produced by aerodynamic science. The control of these mechanisms, for applications to the safety of the airplanes for example, opens a vast multidisciplinary field of research. To cite this article: L. Jacquin, C. R. Physique 6 (2005).

  10. Making sound vortices by metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Liping; Qiu, Chunyin; Lu, Jiuyang; Tang, Kun; Jia, Han; Ke, Manzhu; Peng, Shasha; Liu, Zhengyou

    2016-08-01

    Based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle, a metasurface structure is designed to generate a sound vortex beam in airborne environment. The metasurface is constructed by a thin planar plate perforated with a circular array of deep subwavelength resonators with desired phase and amplitude responses. The metasurface approach in making sound vortices is validated well by full-wave simulations and experimental measurements. Potential applications of such artificial spiral beams can be anticipated, as exemplified experimentally by the torque effect exerting on an absorbing disk.

  11. Vortices on surfaces with cylindrical ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopalan, Sushmita

    2015-12-01

    We consider Riemann surfaces obtained from nodal curves with infinite cylinders in the place of nodal and marked points, and study the space of finite energy vortices defined on these surfaces. To compactify the space of vortices, we need to consider stable vortices - these incorporate breaking of cylinders and sphere bubbling in the fibers. In this paper, we prove that the space of gauge equivalence classes of stable vortices representing a fixed equivariant homology class is compact and Hausdorff under the Gromov topology. We also show that this space is homeomorphic to the moduli space of quasimaps defined by Ciocan-Fontanine et al. (2014).

  12. Quantized vortices around wavefront nodes, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschfelder, J. O.; Goebel, C. J.; Bruch, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    Quantized vortices can occur around nodal points in wavefunctions. The derivation depends only on the wavefunction being single valued, continuous, and having continuous first derivatives. Since the derivation does not depend upon the dynamical equations, the quantized vortices are expected to occur for many types of waves such as electromagnetic and acoustic. Such vortices have appeared in the calculations of the H + H2 molecular collisions and play a role in the chemical kinetics. In a companion paper, it is shown that quantized vortices occur when optical waves are internally reflected from the face of a prism or particle beams are reflected from potential energy barriers.

  13. Tunneling decay of false vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; MacKenzie, Richard; Paranjape, M. B.; Yajnik, U. A.; Yeom, Dong-han

    2013-10-01

    We consider the decay of vortices trapped in the false vacuum of a theory of scalar electrodynamics in 2+1 dimensions. The potential is inspired by models with intermediate symmetry breaking to a metastable vacuum that completely breaks a U(1) symmetry, while in the true vacuum, the symmetry is unbroken. The false vacuum is unstable through the formation of true vacuum bubbles; however, the rate of decay can be extremely long. On the other hand, the false vacuum can contain metastable vortex solutions. These vortices contain the true vacuum inside in addition to a unit of magnetic flux and the appropriate topologically nontrivial false vacuum outside. We numerically establish the existence of vortex solutions which are classically stable; however, they can decay via tunneling. In general terms, they tunnel to a configuration which is a large, thin-walled vortex configuration that is now classically unstable to the expansion of its radius. We compute an estimate for the tunneling amplitude in the semiclassical approximation. We believe our analysis would be relevant to superconducting thin films or superfluids.

  14. Atmospheric Vortices in Shallow Convection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, G. D.; Spillane, K. T.; Lourensz, R. S.

    1988-03-01

    Observations of funnel clouds over Port Phillip Bay, Victoria, Australia, indicate that they occur during outbreaks of cool air from the Southern Ocean advecting over the relatively warm bay waters. These clouds act as tracers for shallow convection vortices with dynamics similar to large dust devils. The related phenomena of waterspouts and tornadoes differ from these vortices by requiring deep convection and downdraft and updraft interactions associated with rain processes.Deardorff (1978a) suggests that a necessary condition for the formation of dust devils is /L of the order of 100 or more, where h is the convective boundary layer height and L the Obukhov length. Calculations of /L over the bay and over land for the days of observation are consistent with this suggestion. They indicate that significant rotation may occur at /L as low as 50. This information, if confirmed, may make it possible to use boundary layer numerical models to forecast likely conditions of dust devil occurrence over mesoscale regions, which would be of benefit to pilots of light aircraft and helicopters.

  15. Analytic Structure of the Landau-Gauge Gluon Propagator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Stefan; Fischer, Christian S.; Kellermann, Christian

    2012-12-01

    The analytic structure of the nonperturbative gluon propagator contains information on the absence of gluons from the physical spectrum of the theory. We study this structure from numerical solutions in the complex momentum plane of the gluon and ghost Dyson-Schwinger equations in Landau gauge Yang-Mills theory. The resulting ghost and gluon propagators are analytic apart from a distinct cut structure on the real, timelike momentum axis. The propagator violates the Osterwalder-Schrader positivity condition, confirming the absence of gluons from the asymptotic spectrum of the theory.

  16. Analytic structure of the Landau-gauge gluon propagator.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Stefan; Fischer, Christian S; Kellermann, Christian

    2012-12-21

    The analytic structure of the nonperturbative gluon propagator contains information on the absence of gluons from the physical spectrum of the theory. We study this structure from numerical solutions in the complex momentum plane of the gluon and ghost Dyson-Schwinger equations in Landau gauge Yang-Mills theory. The resulting ghost and gluon propagators are analytic apart from a distinct cut structure on the real, timelike momentum axis. The propagator violates the Osterwalder-Schrader positivity condition, confirming the absence of gluons from the asymptotic spectrum of the theory. PMID:23368451

  17. Discussion on the complete-form vorticity equation and slantwise vorticity development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiuming; Zhou, Xiaogang; Tao, Zuyu; Liu, Hua

    2016-02-01

    The complete form of the vertical vorticity tendency equation (the complete-form vorticity equation) is derived from the Ertel potential vorticity equation to contain thermodynamic factors. In this study, a new complete-form vorticity equation, which has the same form as the original complete-form vorticity equation, is deduced from the absolute vorticity vector equation combined with the continuity equation and the expression of three-dimensional (3D) entropy gradient. By comparing the complete-form vorticity equation with the classical vertical vorticity equation, it is found that regardless of whether or not the isentropic surface is tilting, the two vorticity equations are in essence the same. The "baroclinic term" of the complete-form vorticity equation is exactly equal to the solenoidal term of the classical one, and there is a significant amount of cancellation between the two baroclinic items (the "slantwise term" and the horizontal vorticity change term) in the complete-form vorticity equation. In operational weather analysis, the tilt of the isentropic surface can be diagnosed according to the density of the isotherm on the upper-level isobaric map. For synoptic-scale motion, the vertical vorticity produced by the tilt of the isentropic surface is due to the contribution of atmospheric baroclinicity, which is measured by the solenoid. The 3D solenoid is parallel to the isentropic surface, so the more tilted the isentropic surface, the bigger the projection of the 3D solenoid in the vertical direction. The baroclinic contribution can be interpreted based on the PV thinking theory, but the relationship between the vorticity field and the potential vorticity field is not immediate.

  18. On relevance of triple-gluon fusion in hadroproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motyka, Leszek; Sadzikowski, Mariusz

    2015-05-01

    A contribution to hadroproduction is analyzed in which the meson production is mediated by three-gluon partonic state, with two gluons coming from the target and one gluon from the projectile. This mechanism involves double gluon density in one of the protons, hence this contribution enters at a non-leading twist. It is, however, relevant due to an enhancement factor coming from large double gluon density at small . We calculate the three-gluon contribution to hadroproduction within perturbative QCD in the -factorization framework. Results are obtained for differential -dependent cross sections for all polarizations and for the sum over the polarization components. The rescattering contribution is found to provide a significant correction to the standard leading twist cross section at the energies of the Tevatron or the LHC at moderate . We suggest production in proton-nucleus collision as a possible probe of the triple-gluon mechanism.

  19. On generating counter-rotating streamwise vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winoto, S. H.; Mitsudharmadi, H.; Budiman, A. C.; Hasheminejad, S. M.; Nadesan, T.; Tandiono; Low, H. T.; Lee, T. S.

    2015-09-01

    Counter-rotating streamwise vortices are known to enhance the heat transfer rate from a surface and also to improve the aerodynamic performance of an aerofoil. In this paper, some methods to generate such counter-rotating vortices using different methods or physical conditions will be briefly considered and discussed.

  20. Flute vortices in nonuniform magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, M.Y.; Shukla, P.K.; Varma, R.K.

    1985-09-01

    Localized double vortices associated with the flute modes are shown to exist. Special emphasis is given to the effect of the convective variation of the fluid magnetic moment. It is shown that the latter effect considerably modifies the existence regions of the vortices.

  1. Optical vortices generation using the Wollaston prism

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzynowski, Piotr; Wozniak, Wladyslaw A.; Fraczek, Ewa

    2006-10-20

    A new setup of interferometers is proposed in which the set of specific optical markers - optical vortices - could be generated. The classical Mach-Zender two-beam interferometer has been modernized using the Wollaston prism. In this setup, the optical vortices could be obtained for a wide range of both beam parameters. The numerical analysis and experiments confirm our theoretical predictions.

  2. Nonquasineutral electron vortices in nonuniform plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Angus, J. R.; Richardson, A. S.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Schumer, J. W.; Ottinger, P. F.

    2014-11-15

    Electron vortices are observed in the numerical simulation of current carrying plasmas on fast time scales where the ion motion can be ignored. In plasmas with nonuniform density n, vortices drift in the B × ∇n direction with a speed that is on the order of the Hall speed. This provides a mechanism for magnetic field penetration into a plasma. Here, we consider strong vortices with rotation speeds V{sub ϕ} close to the speed of light c where the vortex size δ is on the order of the magnetic Debye length λ{sub B}=|B|/4πen and the vortex is thus nonquasineutral. Drifting vortices are typically studied using the electron magnetohydrodynamic model (EMHD), which ignores the displacement current and assumes quasineutrality. However, these assumptions are not strictly valid for drifting vortices when δ ≈ λ{sub B}. In this paper, 2D electron vortices in nonuniform plasmas are studied for the first time using a fully electromagnetic, collisionless fluid code. Relatively large amplitude oscillations with periods that correspond to high frequency extraordinary modes are observed in the average drift speed. The drift speed W is calculated by averaging the electron velocity field over the vorticity. Interestingly, the time-averaged W from these simulations matches very well with W from the much simpler EMHD simulations even for strong vortices with order unity charge density separation.

  3. Electrothermal blinking vortices for chaotic mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loire, Sophie; Kauffmann, Paul; Gimenez, Paul; Meinhart, Carl; Mezic, Igor

    2012-11-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of electrothermal chaotic mixing using blinking of asymmetric 2D electrothermal vortices. Electrothermal flows are modelled with 2D finite element method using COMSOL software based on an enhanced electrothermal model. Velocities in top-view and side-view devices are measured by micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV). The experimentally reconstructed velocity profile shows a dramatic asymmetry between the two vortices, in good agreement with the FEM model. The separation line between the two vortices is shifted and tilted making the blinking vortices overlap. We use the mix-variance coefficient (MVC) on experimental particle detection data and numerical trajectory simulations to evaluate mixing at different scales including the layering of fluid interfaces by the flow, a keypoint for efficient mixing. The blinking vortices method greatly improve mixing efficiency. Theoretical, experimental and simulation results of the mixing process will be presented.

  4. Relative equilibria of vortices in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Palmore, J I

    1982-01-01

    An old problem of the evolution of finitely many interacting point vortices in the plane is shown to be amenable to investigation by critical point theory in a way that is identical to the study of the planar n-body problem of celestial mechanics. For any choice of positive circulations of the vortices it is shown by critical point theory applied to Kirchhoff's function that there are many relative equilibria configurations. Each of these configurations gives rise to a stationary configuration of the vortices in a suitably chosen rotating coordinate system. A sharp lower bound on the number of stationary vortex configurations for the problem of point vortices interacting in the plane is given. The problem of point vortices in a circular disk is defined and it is shown that these estimates hold for stationary configurations of small size. PMID:16593155

  5. Vorticity generation by contoured wall injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waitz, Ian A.; Marble, Frank E.; Zukoski, Edward E.

    1992-01-01

    A class of contoured wall fuel injectors was designed to enable shock-enhancement of hypervelocity mixing for supersonic combustion ramjet applications. Previous studies of these geometries left unresolved questions concerning the relative importance of various axial vorticity sources in mixing the injectant with the freestream. The present study is a numerical simulation of two generic fuel injectors which is aimed at elucidating the relative roles of axial vorticity sources including: baroclinic torque through shock-impingement, cross-stream shear, turning of boundary layer vorticity, shock curvature, and diffusive flux. Both the magnitude of the circulation, and the location of vorticity with respect to the mixing interface were considered. Baroclinic torque and cross-stream shear were found to be most important in convectively mixing the injectant with the freestream, with the former providing for deposition of vorticity directly on the fuel/air interface.

  6. Turbulent vortices in stratified fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, A. M.; Bilanin, A. J.; Hirsh, J. E.; Snedeker, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    In the present paper, calculations, made with the finite difference axisymmetric WAKE computer code, of the influence of turbulence and stratification on the behavior of vortex rings are compared with experimental data. Calculations, made with the two-dimensional version of the code, are used to study the behavior of vortex pairs in stably stratified atmospheres for a range of Froude numbers. Stratification is shown to have a profound effect on the radius of a vortex ring descending into a stably stratified fluid. The separation of the vortices of a vortex pair remains nearly constant or decreases monotonically with increasing penetration of a stably stratified fluid, depending on whether the stratification is discontinuous or linear. An analysis based on an energy balance is used to assess the maximum descent of a vortex pair in a stably stratified fluid.

  7. Twist Helicity in Classical Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeler, Martin W.; Kedia, Hridesh; Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experimental work has demonstrated that a partial measure of fluid Helicity (the sum of linking and writhing of vortex tubes) is conserved even as those vortices undergo topology changing reconnections. Measuring the total Helicity, however, requires additional information about how the vortex lines are locally twisted inside the vortex core. To bridge this gap, we have developed a novel technique for experimentally measuring twist Helicity. Using this method, we are able to measure the production and eventual decay of twist for a variety of vortex evolutions. Remarkably, we observe twist dynamics capable of conserving total Helicity even in the presence of rapidly changing writhe. This work was supported by the NSF MRSEC shared facilities at the University of Chicago (DMR-0820054) and an NSF CAREER award (DMR-1351506). W.T.M.I. further acknowledges support from the A.P. Sloan Foundation and the Packard Foundation.

  8. Running coupling corrections to inclusive gluon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, W. A.; Kovchegov, Y. V.

    2011-12-01

    We calculate running coupling corrections for the lowest-order gluon production cross section in high energy hadronic and nuclear scattering using the BLM scale-setting prescription. At leading order, there are three powers of fixed coupling; in our final answer, these three couplings are replaced by seven factors of running coupling: five in the numerator and two in the denominator, forming a 'septumvirate' of running couplings, analogous to the 'triumvirate' of running couplings found earlier for the small-x BFKL/BK/JIMWLK evolution equations. It is interesting to note that the two running couplings in the denominator of the 'septumvirate' run with complex-valued momentum scales, which are complex conjugates of each other, such that the production cross section is indeed real. We use our lowest-order result to conjecture how running coupling corrections may enter the full fixed-coupling kT-factorization formula for gluon production which includes nonlinear small-x evolution.

  9. Quarks and gluons in hadrons and nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Close, F.E. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN )

    1989-12-01

    These lectures discuss the particle-nuclear interface -- a general introduction to the ideas and application of colored quarks in nuclear physics, color, the Pauli principle, and spin flavor correlations -- this lecture shows how the magnetic moments of hadrons relate to the underlying color degree of freedom, and the proton's spin -- a quark model perspective. This lecture reviews recent excitement which has led some to claim that in deep inelastic polarized lepton scattering very little of the spin of a polarized proton is due to its quarks. This lecture discusses the distribution functions of quarks and gluons in nucleons and nuclei, and how knowledge of these is necessary before some quark-gluon plasma searches can be analyzed. 56 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Quark and Gluon Tagging at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallicchio, Jason; Schwartz, Matthew D.

    2011-10-01

    Being able to distinguish light-quark jets from gluon jets on an event-by-event basis could significantly enhance the reach for many new physics searches at the Large Hadron Collider. Through an exhaustive search of existing and novel jet substructure observables, we find that a multivariate approach can filter out over 95% of the gluon jets while keeping more than half of the light-quark jets. Moreover, a combination of two simple variables, the charge track multiplicity and the pT-weighted linear radial moment (girth), can achieve similar results. Our study is only Monte Carlo based, so other observables constructed using different jet sizes and parameters are used to highlight areas that deserve further theoretical and experimental scrutiny. Additional information, including distributions of around 10 000 variables, can be found at http://jets.physics.harvard.edu/qvg/.

  11. Generation and Growth of Single Hairpin Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji-Haidari, Ahmad

    The behavior of selectively generated single hairpin vortices are examined within a laminar boundary layer environment over a range of Reynolds numbers, the hairpin vortices are experimentally generated by means of controlled fluid injection from a streamwise slot. Flow visualization using both dye and hydrogen bubble wire is employed in conjunction with hot film anemometry to investigate the growth characteristics and evolution of these single hairpin vortices. Qualitatively, it is established that hairpin vortices form by local destabilization at the interface between the low-speed fluid introduced through the slot and the higher speed boundary layer flow. Kinematical considerations of the hairpin vortex are established. It is observed that a hairpin vortex generally displays visualization and velocity signatures characteristic of those observed for a turbulent boundary layer. Hydrogen-bubble wire visualization results specifically indicate that hairpin vortices generate two purely turbulent-like flow patterns. The first is a low-speed streak pattern developing immediately adjacent to the surface due to surface interaction by the counter -rotating legs of the hairpin vortex; the second pattern is a turbulent pocket-like pattern farther removed from the surface. It is determined from the visualization data that hairpin vortices manifest the necessary flow characteristics which give rise to the regenerative and sustained process required for maintenance of turbulence. The regeneration and the growth process takes place through the formation of similar hairpin-like vortices by one of two means. The first is an inviscid lateral propagation of the initial disturbance which gives rise to outboard (subsidiary), vortices which cause the lateral spreading of the structure. A more complicated and eruptive process occurs by means of viscous-inviscid interactions which give rise to trailing vortices (secondary), which cause the streamwise elongation of the disturbance. A

  12. Vorticity in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei-Tian; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-06-01

    We study the event-by-event generation of flow vorticity in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Au +Au collisions and CERN Large Hadron Collider Pb +Pb collisions by using the hijing model. Different definitions of the vorticity field and velocity field are considered. A variety of properties of the vorticity are explored, including the impact parameter dependence, the collision energy dependence, the spatial distribution, the event-by-event fluctuation of the magnitude and azimuthal direction, and the time evolution. In addition, the spatial distribution of the flow helicity is also studied.

  13. Hollow vortices in weakly compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Vikas; Crowdy, Darren

    2014-11-01

    In a two-dimensional, inviscid and steady fluid flow, hollow vortices are bounded regions of constant pressure with non-zero circulation. It is known that for an infinite row of incompressible hollow vortices, analytical solutions for the flow field and the shape of the hollow vortex boundary can be obtained using conformal mapping methods. In this talk, we show how to derive analytical expressions for a weakly compressible hollow vortex row. This is done by introducing a new method based on the Imai-Lamla formula. We will also touch upon how to extend these results to a von-Karman street of hollow vortices.

  14. Hollow vortices in weakly compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Vikas; Crowdy, Darren

    2015-11-01

    In a two-dimensional, inviscid and steady fluid flow, hollow vortices are bounded regions of constant pressure with non-zero circulation. It is known that for an infinite row of incompressible hollow vortices, analytical solutions for the flow field and the shape of the hollow vortex boundary can be obtained using conformal mapping methods. In this talk, we show how to derive analytical expressions for a weakly compressible hollow vortex row. This is done by introducing a new method based on the Imai-Lamla formula. We will also touch upon how to extend these results to a von-Karman street of hollow vortices.

  15. Measurement of vorticity diffusion by NMR microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer R; Callaghan, Paul T

    2010-05-01

    In a Newtonian fluid, vorticity diffuses at a rate determined by the kinematic viscosity. Here we use rapid NMR velocimetry, based on a RARE sequence, to image the time-dependent velocity field on startup of a fluid-filled cylinder and therefore measure the diffusion of vorticity. The results are consistent with the solution to the vorticity diffusion equation where the angular velocity on the outside surface of the fluid, at the cylinder's rotating wall, is fixed. This method is a means of measuring kinematic viscosity for low viscosity fluids without the need to measure stress. PMID:20189854

  16. Vortices and turbulence in trapped atomic condensates

    PubMed Central

    White, Angela C.; Anderson, Brian P.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2014-01-01

    After more than a decade of experiments generating and studying the physics of quantized vortices in atomic gas Bose–Einstein condensates, research is beginning to focus on the roles of vortices in quantum turbulence, as well as other measures of quantum turbulence in atomic condensates. Such research directions have the potential to uncover new insights into quantum turbulence, vortices, and superfluidity and also explore the similarities and differences between quantum and classical turbulence in entirely new settings. Here we present a critical assessment of theoretical and experimental studies in this emerging field of quantum turbulence in atomic condensates. PMID:24704880

  17. Vortices in magnetically coupled superconducting layered systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, Roman G.; Kogan, Vladimir G.; Clem, John R.

    2000-01-01

    Pancake vortices in stacks of thin superconducting films or layers are considered. It is stressed that in the absence of Josephson coupling topological restrictions upon possible configurations of vortices are removed and various examples of structures forbidden in bulk superconductors are given. In particular, it is shown that vortices may skip surface layers in samples of less than a certain size R{sub c} which might be macroscopic. The Josephson coupling suppresses R{sub c} estimates. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  18. Transonic interactions of unsteady vortical flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccroskey, W. J.; Srinivasan, G. R.

    1984-01-01

    Unsteady interactions of strong concentrated vortices, distributed gusts, and sharp-edged gusts with stationary airfoils were analyzed in two-dimensional transonic flow. A simple and efficient method for introducing such vortical disturbances was implemented in numerical codes that range from inviscid transonic small disturbance to thin-layer Navier Stokes. The numerical results demonstrate the large distortions in the overall flow field and in the surface air loads that are produced by various vortical interactions. The results of the different codes are in excellent qualitative agreement, but, as might expected, the transonic small-disturbance calculations are deficient in the important region near the leading edge.

  19. Diphoton excess at 750 GeV: gluon-gluon fusion or quark-antiquark annihilation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2016-06-01

    Recently, ATLAS and CMS collaborations reported an excess in the measurement of diphoton events, which can be explained by a new resonance with a mass around 750 GeV. In this work, we explored the possibility of identifying if the hypothetical new resonance is produced through gluon-gluon fusion or quark-antiquark annihilation, or tagging the beam. Three different observables for beam tagging, namely the rapidity and transverse-momentum distribution of the diphoton, and one tagged bottom-jet cross section, are proposed. Combining the information gained from these observables, a clear distinction of the production mechanism for the diphoton resonance is promising.

  20. Atmospheric Vortices near Guadalupe Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    These MISR images from June 11, 2000 (Terra orbit 2569) demonstrate a turbulent atmospheric flow pattern known as the von Karman vortex street. This phenomenon is named after aerodynamicist Theodore von Karman, who theoretically derived the conditions under which it occurs. The alternating double row of vortices can form in the wake of an obstacle, in this instance the eastern Pacific island of Guadalupe. The rugged terrain of this volcanic Mexican island reaches a maximum elevation of 1.3 kilometers. The island is about 35 kilometers long and is located 260 kilometers west of Baja California.

    The vortex pattern is made visible by the marine stratocumulus clouds around Guadalupe Island. The upper image is a color view obtained by MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. North is toward the left. The orientation of the vortex street indicates that the wind direction is from lower left to upper right (northwest to southeast). The areas within the vortex centers tend to be clear because the rotating motions induce a vertical wind component that can break up the cloud deck.

    The lower view is a stereo picture generated from data acquired by MISR's fore- and aft-viewing 70-degree cameras. A 3-D effect is obtained by viewing the image with red/blue glasses and placing the red filter over your left eye. Note how the downwelling atmospheric motion (change in elevation from high to low) is accompanied by a clearing in the center of the first vortex. As the vortices propagate downstream, their rotational velocities weaken. As a consequence, the induced vertical motion and cloud-clearing effect weakens as well.

    Theodore von Karman was a Professor of Aeronautics at Caltech and Director of Caltech's Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory from 1930-1949. He was one of the principal founders of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra

  1. Nonperturbative gluon and ghost propagators in d = 3

    SciTech Connect

    Papavassiliou, Joannis

    2011-05-23

    We study the nonperturbative gluon and ghost propagators in d = 3 Yang-Mills, using the Schwinger-Dyson equations of the pinch technique. The use of the Schwinger mechanism leads to the dynamical generation of a gluon mass, which, in turn, gives rise to an infrared finite gluon propagator and ghost dressing function. The propagators obtained are in very good agreement with the results of SU(2) lattice simulations.

  2. Universality of Unintegrated Gluon Distributions at small x

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Fabio; Marquet, Cyrille; Xiao, Bowen; Yuan, Feng

    2011-01-04

    We systematically study dijet production in various processes in the small-x limit and establish an effective kt-factorization for hard processes in a system with dilute probes scattering on a dense target. In the large-Nc limit, the unintegrated gluon distributions involved in different processes are shown to be related to two widely proposed ones: the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution and the dipole gluon distribution.

  3. Regional eddy vorticity transport and the equilibrium vorticity budgets of a numerical model ocean circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. E.; Holland, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    A mean vorticity budget analysis is presented of Holland's (1978) numerical ocean general circulation experiment. The stable budgets are compared with classical circulation theory to emphasize the ways in which the mesoscale motions of the model alter (or leave unaltered) classical vorticity balances. The basinwide meridional transports of vorticity by the mean flow and by the mesoscale flow in the mean are evaluated to establish the role(s) of the mesoscale in the larger scale equilibrium vorticity transports. The vorticity equation for this model fluid system is presented and the budget analysis method is described. Vorticity budgets over the selected regions and on a larger scale are given, and a summary of budget results is provided along with remarks about the utility of this type of analysis.

  4. Gluon spectrum in the glasma from JIMWLK evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappi, T.

    2011-09-01

    The JIMWLK equation with a "daughter dipole" running coupling is solved numerically, starting from an initial condition given by the McLerran-Venugopalan model. The resulting Wilson line configurations are then used to compute the spectrum of gluons comprising the glasma initial state of a high energy heavy ion collision. The development of a geometrical scaling region makes the spectrum of produced gluons harder. Thus the ratio of the mean gluon transverse momentum to the saturation scale grows with energy. Also the total gluon multiplicity increases with energy slightly faster than the saturation scale squared.

  5. Semirelativistic potential model for three-gluon glueballs

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Vincent; Semay, Claude; Silvestre-Brac, Bernard

    2008-05-01

    The three-gluon glueball states are studied with the generalization of a semirelativistic potential model giving good results for two-gluon glueballs. The Hamiltonian depends only on 3 parameters fixed on two-gluon glueball spectra: the strong coupling constant, the string tension, and a gluon size which removes singularities in the potential. The Casimir scaling determines the structure of the confinement. Our results are in good agreement with other approaches and lattice calculation for the odderon trajectory but differ strongly from lattice in the J{sup +-} sector. We propose a possible explanation for this problem.

  6. Combustion enhancement by axial vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, E.; Schadow, K. C.; Parr, T. P.; Parr, D. M.; Wilson, K. J.

    1987-06-01

    A tapered slot jet was studied experimentally in nonreacting and reacting tests using hot-wire anemometry, water-tunnel flow visualization, and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF). The tapered slot jet is a modified elliptic jet which has a conical contraction leading to its outlet. The added contraction changes the entire flow field. The jet spread in the major axis plane is larger than in the minor axis plane, which is the opposite behavior of an elliptic jet. Consequently, no axes switching, typical to an elliptic jet, is observed. The turbulence amplification in the jet core is higher than in circular and elliptic jets. The different behavior is attributed to the change in flow direction, inside the nozzle, from the conical section to the slot outlet. During this transition, the flow acquires angular momentum thereby generating axial vorticity. The influence of the contraction angle and the outlet aspect ratio were investigated. The effect of the augmented turbulence on reactive flow was tested in a premixed flame. The combustion rate was augmented in both the core and edges of the flame relative to a circular burner.

  7. Vorticity matching in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, David C.

    1991-12-01

    Recent experiments have rekindled interest in high Reynolds number flows using superfluid helium. In a continuing series of experiments, the flow of helium II through various devices (smooth pipes, corrugated pipes, valves, venturies, turbine flowmeters, and coanda flowmeters for example) was investigated. In all cases, the measured values (typically, mass flow rates and pressure drops) were found to be well described by classical relations for high Reynolds flows. This is unexpected since helium II consists of two interpenetrating fluids; one fluid with nonzero viscosity (the normal fluid) and one with zero viscosity (the superfluid). Only the normal fluid component should directly obey classical relations. Since the experiments listed above only measure the external behavior of the flow (i.e., pressure drops over devices), there is a great deal of room for interpretation of their results. One possible interpretation is that in turbulent flows the normal fluid and the superfluid velocity fields are somehow 'locked' together, presumably by the mutual friction force between the superfluid vortex filaments and the normal fluid. We refer to this locking together of the two fluids as 'vorticity matching.'

  8. Tornadoes and other atmospheric vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, R. G.

    1976-01-01

    The growth of random vortices in an atmosphere with buoyant instability and vertical wind shear is studied along with the velocities in a single gravity-driven vortex; a frictionless adiabatic model which is supported by laboratory experiments is first considered. The effects of axial drag, heat transfer, and precipitation-induced downdrafts are then calculated. Heat transfer and axial drag tend to have stabilizing effects; they reduce the downdrafts of updrafts due to buoyancy. It is found that downdrafts or tornadic magnitude might occur in negatively-buoyant columns. The radial-inflow velocity required to maintain a given maximum tangential velocity in a tornado is determined by using a turbulent vortex model. Conditions under which radial-inflow velocities become sufficiently large to produce tangential velocities of tornadic magnitude are determined. The radial velocities in the outer regions, as well as the tangential velocities in the inner regions may be large enough to cause damage. The surface boundary layer, which is a region where large radial inflows can occur, is studied, and the thickness of the radial-inflow friction layer is estimated. A tornado model which involves a rotating parent cloud, as well as buoyancy and precipitation effects, is discussed.

  9. Vortices in simulations of solar surface convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, R.; Cameron, R. H.; Schüssler, M.

    2011-09-01

    We report on the occurrence of small-scale vortices in simulations of the convective solar surface. Using an eigenanalysis of the velocity gradient tensor, we find the subset of high-vorticity regions in which the plasma is swirling. The swirling regions form an unsteady, tangled network of filaments in the turbulent downflow lanes. Near-surface vertical vortices are underdense and cause a local depression of the optical surface. They are potentially observable as bright points in the dark intergranular lanes. Vortex features typically exist for a few minutes, during which they are moved and twisted by the motion of the ambient plasma. The bigger vortices found in the simulations are possibly, but not necessarily, related to observations of granular-scale spiraling pathlines in "cork animations" or feature tracking. Three movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Rotationally induced vortices in optical cavity modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habraken, Steven J. M.; Nienhuis, Gerard

    2009-09-01

    We show that vortices appear in the modes of an astigmatic optical cavity when it is put into rotation about its optical axis. We study the properties of these vortices and discuss numerical results for a specific realization of such a set-up. Our method is exact up to first order in the time-dependent paraxial approximation and involves bosonic ladder operators in the spirit of the quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillator.

  11. Atmospheric Columnar Vortices (Paper 7R0104)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, John T.

    1987-04-01

    The family of atmospheric columnar vortices includes tornadoes, waterspouts, firewhirls, dust devils and a variety of other whirlwinds. Each member of the family is characterized by the presence of a relatively tall, concentrated vortical core. Descriptions of such swirling flows are inherently complex, reflecting the presence of a multiplicity of length and velocity scales. In many cases, the flow is both three-dimensional and unsteady.

  12. Compactlike kinks and vortices in generalized models

    SciTech Connect

    Bazeia, D.; Hora, E. da; Menezes, R.; Oliveira, H. P. de; Santos, C. dos

    2010-06-15

    This work deals with the presence of topological defects in k-field models, where the dynamics is generalized to include higher order power in the kinetic term. We investigate kinks in (1, 1) dimensions and vortices in (2, 1) dimensions, focusing on some specific features of the solutions. In particular, we show how the kinks and vortices change to compactlike solutions, controlled by the parameter used to introduce the generalized models.

  13. Potential Vorticity as a Diagnostic of Transport into the Martian Polar Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnochie, Timothy H.; Conrath, B. J.; Gierasch, P. J.; Banfield, D.; Smith, M. D.

    2009-09-01

    Polar vortices dominate the dynamics of the winter mid- and polar latitudes in the martian atmosphere as well as in the terrestrial stratosphere. Polar vortices have also been observed on Venus (Taylor, 2002), Jupiter (Orton, 2002), Saturn (Fletcher, 2008), and Titan (Teanby, 2008). Potential vorticity is the analysis quantity of choice for the terrestrial polar vortices because its vertical component distills the most important features of the wind and temperature fields into a single scalar variable; because it is a conserved tracer under adiabatic conditions; because it serves as the medium for Rossby waves; and because steep potential vorticity gradients are observed to be correlated with steep gradients in the concentrations of chemical species. Using potential vorticity derived from Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) temperature soundings, we find that the northern martian winter polar vortex, just like its terrestrial conterpart, is bounded by a region of very steep potential vorticity gradients and is surrounded by a "surf zone", a region of low potential vorticity and very low potential vorticity gradients. The surf zone concept, as first described for the terrestrial stratosphere by McIntyre and Palmer (1983), implies persistent Rossby wave breaking. In the vicinity of the northern polar vortex, the TES data set provides some examples of local gradient reversals that are suggestive of wave breaking. There is also one case of large-scale wave breaking accompanied by an abrupt polar warming. We also find that the martian southern polar vortex lacks a distinct boundary between the polar vortex and a surf zone. Instead, the potential vorticity field is highly disorganized with local gradient reversals throughout the middle and polar latitudes. In the zonal mean, the southern winter potential vorticity gradient ends up being relatively uniform, although it is somewhat enhanced near 60 degrees latitude.

  14. Strongly coupled quark gluon plasma (SCQGP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannur, Vishnu M.

    2006-07-01

    We propose that the reason for the non-ideal behaviour seen in lattice simulation of quark gluon plasma (QGP) and ultrarelativistic heavy ion collision experiments is that the QGP near Tc and above is a strongly coupled plasma (SCP), i.e., a strongly coupled quark gluon plasma (SCQGP). It is remarkable that the widely used equation of state of SCP in QED (quantum electrodynamics) very nicely fits lattice results on all QGP systems, with proper modifications to include colour degrees of freedom and the running coupling constant. Results on pressure in pure gauge, 2-flavours and 3-flavours QGP can all be explained by treating QGP as SCQGP, as demonstrated here. Energy density and speed of sound are also presented for all three systems. We further extend the model to systems with finite quark mass and reasonably good fits to lattice results are obtained for (2+1)-flavours and 4-flavours QGP. Hence it is a unified model, namely SCQGP, to explain the non-ideal QGP seen in lattice simulations with just two system dependent parameters.

  15. EXPLORING THE POLARIZATION OF GLUONS IN THE NUCLEON.

    SciTech Connect

    STRATMANN,M.; VOGELSANG,W.

    2007-10-22

    We give an overview of the current status of investigations of the polarization of gluons in the nucleon. We describe some of the physics of the spin-dependent gluon parton distribution and its phenomenology in high-energy polarized hadronic scattering. We also review the recent experimental results.

  16. An approach to fast fits of the unintegrated gluon density

    SciTech Connect

    Knutsson, Albert; Bacchetta, Alessandro; Kutak, Krzyzstof; Jung, Hannes

    2009-01-01

    An approach to fast fits of the unintegrated gluon density has been developed and used to determine the unintegrated gluon density by fits to deep inelastic scatting di-jet data from HERA. The fitting method is based on the determination of the parameter dependence by help of interpolating between grid points in the parameter-observable space before the actual fit is performed.

  17. Gluon production in the Lipatov effective action formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, M. A.; Pozdnyakov, S. S.; Salykin, M. Yu.; Vyazovsky, M. I.

    2013-09-01

    Gluon production on two scattering centers is studied in the formalism of reggeized gluons. Different contributions to the inclusive cross section are derived with the help of the Lipatov effective action. The AGK relations between these contributions are established. The inclusive cross section found is compared to the one in the dipole picture and demonstrated to be the same.

  18. Numerical simulation of baroclinic Jovian vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achterberg, R. K.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    1994-02-01

    We examine the evolution of baroclinic vortices in a time-dependent, nonlinear numerical model of a Jovian atmosphere. The model uses a normal-mode expansion in the vertical, using the barotropic and first two baroclinic modes. Results for the stability of baroclinic vortices on an f plane in the absence of a mean zonal flow are similar to results of Earth vortex models, although the presence of a fluid interior on the Jovian planets shifts the stability boundaries to smaller length scales. The presence of a barotropic mean zonal flow in the interior stabilizes vortices against instability and significantly modifies the finite amplitude form of baroclinic instabilities. The effect of a zonal flow on a form of barotropic instability produces periodic oscillations in the latitude and longitude of the vortex as observed at the level of the cloud tops. This instability may explain some, but not all, observations of longitudinal oscillations of vortices on the outer planets. Oscillations in aspect ratio and orientation of stable vortices in a zonal shear flow are observed in this baroclinic model, as in simpler two-dimensional models. Such oscillations are also observed in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Neptune. The meridional propagation and decay of vortices on a beta plane is inhibited by the presence of a mean zonal flow. The direction of propagation of a vortex relative to the mean zonal flow depends upon the sign of the meridional potential vorticity gradient; combined with observations of vortex drift rates, this may provide a constraint on model assumption for the flow in the deep interior of the Jovian planets.

  19. A procedure for calculating vorticity boundary conditions in the stream-function-vorticity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, R. J.; Carey, G. F.; Murray, P.

    1990-01-01

    A superconvergent projection formula is constructed for determining vorticity boundary data in the stream-function-vorticity method. The approach applies to both straight and curved boundaries and can be used for either finite-element or finite-difference computations.

  20. Initial Circulation and Peak Vorticity Behavior of Vortices Shed from Airfoil Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendt, Bruce J.; Biesiadny, Tom (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An extensive parametric study of vortices shed from airfoil vortex generators has been conducted to determine the dependence of initial vortex circulation and peak vorticity on elements of the airfoil geometry and impinging flow conditions. These elements include the airfoil angle of attack, chord length, span, aspect ratio, local boundary layer thickness, and free stream Mach number. In addition, the influence of airfoil-to-airfoil spacing on the circulation and peak vorticity has been examined for pairs of co-rotating and counter-rotating vortices. The vortex generators were symmetric airfoils having a NACA-0012 cross-sectional profile. These airfoils were mounted either in isolation, or in pairs, on the surface of a straight pipe. The turbulent boundary layer thickness to pipe radius ratio was about 17 percent. The circulation and peak vorticity data were derived from cross-plane velocity measurements acquired with a seven-hole probe at one chord-length downstream of the airfoil trailing edge location. The circulation is observed to be proportional to the free-stream Mach number, the angle-of-attack, and the span-to-boundary layer thickness ratio. With these parameters held constant, the circulation is observed to fall off in monotonic fashion with increasing airfoil aspect ratio. The peak vorticity is also observed to be proportional to the free-stream Mach number, the airfoil angle-of-attack, and the span-to-boundary layer thickness ratio. Unlike circulation, however, the peak vorticity is observed to increase with increasing aspect ratio, reaching a peak value at an aspect ratio of about 2.0 before falling off again at higher values of aspect ratio. Co-rotating vortices shed from closely spaced pairs of airfoils have values of circulation and peak vorticity under those values found for vortices shed from isolated airfoils of the same geometry. Conversely, counter-rotating vortices show enhanced values of circulation and peak vorticity when compared to values

  1. Thermalization of gluons with Bose-Einstein condensation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhe; Zhou, Kai; Zhuang, Pengfei; Greiner, Carsten

    2015-05-01

    We study the thermalization of gluons far from thermal equilibrium in relativistic kinetic theory. The initial distribution of gluons is assumed to resemble that in the early stage of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. Only elastic scatterings in static, nonexpanding gluonic matter are considered. At first we show that the occurrence of condensation in the limit of vanishing particle mass requires a general constraint for the scattering matrix element. Then the thermalization of gluons with Bose-Einstein condensation is demonstrated in a transport calculation. We see a continuously increasing overpopulation of low energy gluons, followed by a decrease to the equilibrium distribution, when the condensation occurs. The times of the completion of the gluon condensation and of the entropy production are calculated. These times scale inversely with the energy density. PMID:26000996

  2. 3D Vortices in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Samy; Barranco, Joseph; Marcus, Philip

    2010-11-01

    Like the atmosphere of Jupiter, protoplanetary disks (thin disks of gas & dust in orbit around newly-formed stars) are characterized by rapid rotation and intense shear, inspiring proposals that disks may also be populated with long-lived, robust storms analogous to the Great Red Spot. Such vortices may play key roles in the formation of stars and planets by transporting angular momentum, as well as trapping and concentrating dust grains, seeding the formation of planetesimals, the "building blocks" of planets. In our previous work (Barranco & Marcus 2005), we showed via numerical simulation (with an anelastic spectral code) that vortices near the midplane of the disk suffer an antisymmetric instability and are destroyed. However, internal gravity waves propagate away from the midplane, amplify and break, creating bands of vorticity that roll-up into new long-lived, stable vortices above and below the midplane. We will present new results on 3D vortex dynamics in protoplanetary disks, exploring the role of factors unique to this context: the Coriolis parameter f, the shear rate σ, and the Brunt-Väisälä frequency N are all of the same order of magnitude. In the region around the midplane Nf. This leads to strong refraction of internal gravity waves, causing the waves to amplify and break, generating vorticity.

  3. Interaction of vortices with flexible piezoelectric beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goushcha, Oleg; Akaydin, Huseyin Dogus; Elvin, Niell; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2012-11-01

    A cantilever piezoelectric beam immersed in a flow is used to harvest fluidic energy. Pressure distribution induced by naturally present vortices in a turbulent fluid flow can force the beam to oscillate producing electrical output. Maximizing the power output of such an electromechanical fluidic system is a challenge. In order to understand the behavior of the beam in a fluid flow where vortices of different scales are present, an experimental facility was set up to study the interaction of individual vortices with the beam. In our set up, vortex rings produced by an audio speaker travel at specific distances from the beam or impinge on it, with a frequency varied up to the natural frequency of the beam. Depending on this frequency both constructive and destructive interactions between the vortices and the beam are observed. Vortices traveling over the beam with a frequency multiple of the natural frequency of the beam cause the beam to resonate and larger deflection amplitudes are observed compared to excitation from a single vortex. PIV is used to compute the flow field and circulation of each vortex and estimate the effect of pressure distribution on the beam deflection. Sponsored by NSF Grant: CBET #1033117.

  4. Dynamics of Tab-Wake Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W.; Meng, H.

    1999-11-01

    The dynamics of vortex structures in the wake of surface-mounted trapezoidal tab at Re=600 based on tab height was studied in detail using time-series, 2D particle image velocimetry. From a total of over 20,000 PIV realizations acquired in x-y, x-z, and y-z planes, we successfully identified vortex structures using the methods proposed by Jeong and Hussain (JFM, vol 285, 1995) and proposed by Chong, Perry, and Cantwell (Phys. Fluids A2, 1990), and cross-checked them with conventional velocity subtraction. Similar to prior measurement at Re=2080, secondary vortices, reverse vortices, and tertiary vortices were observed frequently in the present study. Higher PIV spatial resolution and higher temporal resolution (relative to the flow periodicity) allow us to investigate these dynamical phenomena in much greater detail and confidence. Furthermore, y-z measurements demonstrate that hairpin vortex legs, taking the shape of streamwise vortices, pair with their neighbor counterparts while traveling downstream, and possibly merge with each other. Circulation distribution of the hairpin vortex heads along the x direction shows that it increases at the very near-tab region with the help of pressure induced counter-rotating vortex pairs, but gradually decreases very slowly with the increasing downstream distance, indicating that hairpin vortices are long-lived vortex structures.

  5. Gluon-initiated production of a Kaluza-Klein gluon in a bulk Randall-Sundrum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, Benjamin C.; Mahmoudi, Farvah; Skittrall, Jordan P.; Sridhar, K.

    2010-03-01

    In the Bulk Randall-Sundrum model, the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the gauge bosons are the primary signatures. In particular, the search for the Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitation of the gluon at hadron colliders is of great importance in testing this model. At the leading order in QCD, the production of this KK-gluon proceeds only via qbar q -initial states. We study the production of KK-gluons from gluon initial states at next-to-leading order in QCD. We find that, even after including the sub-dominant KK-gluon loops at this order, the next-to-leading order (NLO) cross-section is tiny compared to the leading order cross-section and unlikely to impact the searches for this resonance at hardon colliders.

  6. Chiral magnetic and vortical effects in high-energy nuclear collisions-A status report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharzeev, D. E.; Liao, J.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wang, G.

    2016-05-01

    The interplay of quantum anomalies with magnetic field and vorticity results in a variety of novel non-dissipative transport phenomena in systems with chiral fermions, including the quark-gluon plasma. Among them is the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME)-the generation of electric current along an external magnetic field induced by chirality imbalance. Because the chirality imbalance is related to the global topology of gauge fields, the CME current is topologically protected and hence non-dissipative even in the presence of strong interactions. As a result, the CME and related quantum phenomena affect the hydrodynamical and transport behavior of strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma, and can be studied in relativistic heavy ion collisions where strong magnetic fields are created by the colliding ions. Evidence for the CME and related phenomena has been reported by the STAR Collaboration at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL, and by the ALICE Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The goal of the present review is to provide an elementary introduction into the physics of anomalous chiral effects, to describe the current status of experimental studies in heavy ion physics, and to outline the future work, both in experiment and theory, needed to eliminate the existing uncertainties in the interpretation of the data.

  7. Longitudinal vortices imbedded in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. D.; Shabaka, I. M. M.; Shibl, A.; Bradshaw, P.

    1983-01-01

    The attenuation of skew-induced longitudinal vortices by turbulent or viscous stresses is studied for the case of pure, artificially-generated longitudinal vortices entrained into initially two-dimensional boundary layers in nominally zero pressure gradients. Three types of vortex-boundary interactions are studied in detail: (1) an isolated vortex in a two-dimensional boundary layer; (2) a vortex pair in a turbulent boundary layer with the common flow between the vortices moving away from the surface; (3) a vortex pair in a boundary layer with the common flow moving towards the surface. Detailed mean flow and turbulence measurements are made, showing that the eddy viscosities defined for the different shear-stress components behave in different and complicated ways. Terms in the Reynolds stress transport equations, notably the triple products that effect turbulent diffusion of Reynolds stress, also fail to obey simple rules.

  8. Identification of vortices in complex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, P.; Balachandar, S.; Adrian, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    Dating back to Leonardo da Vinci's famous sketches of vortices in turbulent flows, fluid dynamicists for over five centuries have continued to visualize and interpret complex flows in terms of motion of vortices. Nevertheless, much debate surrounds the question of how to unambiguously define vortices in complex flows. This debate has resulted in the availability of many vortex identification criteria---mathematical statements of what constitutes a vortex. Here we review the popularly used local or point- wise vortex identification criteria. Based on local flow kinematics, we describe a unified framework to interpret the similarities and differences in the usage of these criteria. We discuss the limitations on the applicability of these criteria when there is a significant component of vortex interactions. Finally, we provide guidelines for applying these criteria to geophysical flows.

  9. Moduli of Vortices and Grassmann Manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Indranil; Romão, Nuno M.

    2013-05-01

    We use the framework of Quot schemes to give a novel description of the moduli spaces of stable n-pairs, also interpreted as gauged vortices on a closed Riemann surface Σ with target {Mat_{r × n}({C})}, where n ≥ r. We then show that these moduli spaces embed canonically into certain Grassmann manifolds, and thus obtain natural Kähler metrics of Fubini-Study type. These spaces are smooth at least in the local case r = n. For abelian local vortices we prove that, if a certain "quantization" condition is satisfied, the embedding can be chosen in such a way that the induced Fubini-Study structure realizes the Kähler class of the usual L 2 metric of gauged vortices.

  10. A Note on Trapping Moving Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Hsiao C.

    2000-01-01

    The topic of stationary configurations of point vortices, also known as vortex equilibrium, has received considerable attention in recent years. By observing numerical results, it is found that a "counterpart" of this system also exists, in which moving vortices may be "trapped" by an inlet-like device to form a stationary pattern with no translational motion. After an intuitive explanation for the process, vortex trajectory maps based on numerical results are presented. These maps exhibit two stationary points under the present conditions, which are the focal points of vortex trajectories. A vortex upstream of these points, if within a certain offset range, will move towards these points spontaneously and be captured there. This proposed device is also capable of trapping spinning vortex pairs and triads. It is possible to impose a uniform stream at infinity, as long as the flow field is still dominated by the moving vortices.

  11. Measurements of Supersonic Wing Tip Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Michael K.; Kalkhoran, Iraj M.; Benston, James

    1994-01-01

    An experimental survey of supersonic wing tip vortices has been conducted at Mach 2.5 using small performed 2.25 chords down-stream of a semi-span rectangular wing at angle of attack of 5 and 10 degrees. The main objective of the experiments was to determine the Mach number, flow angularity and total pressure distribution in the core region of supersonic wing tip vortices. A secondary aim was to demonstrate the feasibility of using cone probes calibrated with a numerical flow solver to measure flow characteristics at supersonic speeds. Results showed that the numerically generated calibration curves can be used for 4-hole cone probes, but were not sufficiently accurate for conventional 5-hole probes due to nose bluntness effects. Combination of 4-hole cone probe measurements with independent pitot pressure measurements indicated a significant Mach number and total pressure deficit in the core regions of supersonic wing tip vortices, combined with an asymmetric 'Burger like' swirl distribution.

  12. Vorticity, defects and correlations in active turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Thampi, Sumesh P.; Golestanian, Ramin; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a numerical investigation of a continuum model of an active nematic, concentrating on the regime of active turbulence. Results are presented for the effect of three parameters, activity, elastic constant and rotational diffusion constant, on the order parameter and flow fields. Defects and distortions in the director field act as sources of vorticity, and thus vorticity is strongly correlated to the director field. In particular, the characteristic length of decay of vorticity and order parameter correlations is controlled by the defect density. By contrast, the decay of velocity correlations is determined by a balance between activity and dissipation. We highlight the role of microscopic flow generation mechanisms in determining the flow patterns and characteristic scales of active turbulence and contrast the behaviour of extensile and contractile active nematics. PMID:25332382

  13. Characterization of reconnecting vortices in superfluid helium.

    PubMed

    Bewley, Gregory P; Paoletti, Matthew S; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R; Lathrop, Daniel P

    2008-09-16

    When two vortices cross, each of them breaks into two parts and exchanges part of itself for part of the other. This process, called vortex reconnection, occurs in classical and superfluids, and in magnetized plasmas and superconductors. We present the first experimental observations of reconnection between quantized vortices in superfluid helium. We do so by imaging micrometer-sized solid hydrogen particles trapped on quantized vortex cores and by inferring the occurrence of reconnection from the motions of groups of recoiling particles. We show that the distance separating particles on the just-reconnected vortex lines grows as a power law in time. The average value of the scaling exponent is approximately 1/2, consistent with the self-similar evolution of the vortices. PMID:18768790

  14. Vortical mechanism for generation of astrophysical jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamyan, M. G.

    2008-04-01

    A vortical mechanism for generation of astrophysical jets is proposed based on exact solutions of the hydrodynamic equations with a generalized Rankine vortex. It is shown that the development of a Rankine vortex in the polar layer of a rotating gravitating body creates longitudinal fluxes of matter that converge toward the vortex trunk, providing an exponential growth in the angular rotation velocity of the trunk and a pressure drop on its axis. The increased rotational velocity of the vortex trunk and the on-axis pressure drop cease when the discontinuity in the azimuthal velocity at the surface of the trunk reaches the sound speed. During this time, ever deeper layers of the gravitating body are brought into the vortical motion, while the longitudinal velocity of the flow along the vortex trunk builds up, producing jet outflows of mass from its surface. The resulting vortices are essentially dissipationless.

  15. Center vortices as composites of monopole fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deldar, S.; Nejad, S. M. Hosseini

    2016-01-01

    We study the relation between the flux of a center vortex obtained from the center vortex model and the flux formed between monopoles from the Abelian gauge fixing method. Motivated by the Monte Carlo simulations which have shown that almost all monopoles are sitting on the top of vortices, we construct the fluxes of center vortices for SU (2) and SU (3) gauge groups using fractional fluxes of monopoles. Then, we compute the potentials in the fundamental representation induced by center vortices and fractional fluxes of monopoles. We show that by combining the fractional fluxes of monopoles one can produce the center vortex fluxes for SU (3) gauge group in a "center vortex model". Comparing the potentials, we conclude that the fractional fluxes of monopoles attract each other.

  16. How center vortices break chiral symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Manfried; Höllwieser, Roman

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the chiral properties of near-zero modes for thick classical center vortices in SU(2) lattice gauge theory as examples of the phenomena which may arise in a vortex vacuum. In particular we analyze the creation of near-zero modes from would-be zero modes of various topological charge contributions from center vortices. We show that classical colorful spherical vortex and instanton ensembles have almost identical Dirac spectra and the low-lying eigenmodes from spherical vortices show all characteristic properties for chiral symmetry breaking. We further show that also vortex intersections are able to give rise to a finite density of near-zero modes, leading to chiral symmetry breaking via the Banks-Casher formula. We discuss the mechanism by which center vortex fluxes contribute to chiral symmetry breaking.

  17. Potential Vorticity Analysis of Tropical Cyclone Intensification.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, John; Skubis, Steven; Vollaro, David; Alsheimer, Frank; Willoughby, Hugh E.

    1998-08-01

    The interaction of marginal Tropical Storm Danny (1985) with an upper-tropospheric positive potential vorticity anomaly was examined. The intensification mechanism proposed earlier for mature Hurricane Elena appears to be valid for Danny as well, despite significant differences in the synoptic-scale environment and in the stage of the tropical cyclone prior to the interaction. Both storms experienced rapid pressure falls as a relatively small-scale positive upper potential vorticity anomaly began to superpose with the low-level tropical cyclone center.The interaction is described in terms of a complex interplay between vertical wind shear, diabatic heating, and mutual advection among vortices at and below the level of the outflow anticyclone. Despite this complexity, the superposition principle appears to be conceptually useful to describe the intensification of tropical cyclones during such interactions.

  18. Vorticity and divergence in the solar photosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, YI; Noyes, Robert W.; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Title, Alan M.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied an outstanding sequence of continuum images of the solar granulation from Pic du Midi Observatory. We have calculated the horizontal vector flow field using a correlation tracking algorithm, and from this determined three scalar field: the vertical component of the curl; the horizontal divergence; and the horizontal flow speed. The divergence field has substantially longer coherence time and more power than does the curl field. Statistically, curl is better correlated with regions of negative divergence - that is, the vertical vorticity is higher in downflow regions, suggesting excess vorticity in intergranular lanes. The average value of the divergence is largest (i.e., outflow is largest) where the horizontal speed is large; we associate these regions with exploding granules. A numerical simulation of general convection also shows similar statistical differences between curl and divergence. Some individual small bright points in the granulation pattern show large local vorticities.

  19. Characterization of reconnecting vortices in superfluid helium

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Gregory P.; Paoletti, Matthew S.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    When two vortices cross, each of them breaks into two parts and exchanges part of itself for part of the other. This process, called vortex reconnection, occurs in classical and superfluids, and in magnetized plasmas and superconductors. We present the first experimental observations of reconnection between quantized vortices in superfluid helium. We do so by imaging micrometer-sized solid hydrogen particles trapped on quantized vortex cores and by inferring the occurrence of reconnection from the motions of groups of recoiling particles. We show that the distance separating particles on the just-reconnected vortex lines grows as a power law in time. The average value of the scaling exponent is approximately ½, consistent with the self-similar evolution of the vortices. PMID:18768790

  20. Gluon Polarization and Jet Production at STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Djawotho, Pibero

    2009-12-17

    I will discuss the most recent measurements of the inclusive jet longitudinal spin asymmetry A{sub LL} in polarized proton-proton collisions. STAR collected its largest data sample thus far, 4.7 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at an average beam polarization of {approx}57%, during the 2006 run at a center-of-mass energy of 200 GeV. I will also present previous STAR inclusive jet A{sub LL} and cross section measurements. The results are compared with theoretical calculations of A{sub LL} based on polarized distribution functions in the nucleon with a range of different contributions from the gluon polarization, {delta}G. The STAR data place significant constraints on {delta}G for 0.02

  1. Gluon Green functions free of quantum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athenodorou, A.; Boucaud, Ph.; De Soto, F.; Rodríguez-Quintero, J.; Zafeiropoulos, S.

    2016-09-01

    This letter reports on how the Wilson flow technique can efficaciously kill the short-distance quantum fluctuations of 2- and 3-gluon Green functions, remove the ΛQCD scale and destroy the transition from the confining non-perturbative to the asymptotically-free perturbative sector. After the Wilson flow, the behavior of the Green functions with momenta can be described in terms of the quasi-classical instanton background. The same behavior also occurs, before the Wilson flow, at low-momenta. This last result permits applications as, for instance, the detection of instanton phenomenological properties or a determination of the lattice spacing only from the gauge sector of the theory.

  2. On The Quark-Gluon Vertex

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, A.; Gutierrez-Guerrero, L. X.; Tejeda-Yeomans, M. E

    2008-07-02

    There has been growing evidence that the infra-red enhancement of the form factors defining the quark-gluon vertex plays an important role both in dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and confinement, thus providing an intrinsic link between the the two inherently non-perturbative phenomena. Both lattice and Schwinger-Dyson equation studies have begun to calculate these form factors in various kinematical regimes of momenta involved. A natural consistency check for these studies is that they should match onto the perturbative predictions for large momenta where non-perturbative effects mellow down. In this article, we study this matching by carrying out a numerical analysis of the one loop result for the central Ball-Chiu form factor.

  3. Weak quark couplings induced by gluon corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavela, M. B.; Le Yaouanc, A.; Oliver, L.; Pène, O.; Raynal, J. C.

    1980-12-01

    We compute the quark couplings in flavor-changing semileptonic transitions induced by lowest-order gluon corrections. We investigate the consequences of these radiative corrections for the quark axial-vector coupling, the deviations from Cabibbo universality for the axial-vector relative to the vector current, and the induced couplings (first-class pseudoscalar and anomalous magnetic moment, and second-class scalar and pseudotensor). The correction lowers the axial-vector coupling and increases the magnetic moment. We study the dependence of the couplings on the quark mass difference. Some of these results, true to all orders in αs, generalize the theorem of Ademollo and Gatto. The effective current is pure V-A to a very good approximation for transitions of heavy quarks (m>~5 GeV).

  4. Check of the gluon-reggeization condition in the next-to-leading order: Gluon part

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, M. G. Reznichenko, A. V. Fadin, V. S.

    2012-04-15

    The last bootstrap condition whose validity has not been verified to date is considered. This condition is an indispensable element in the unitarity-relation-based proof of themulti-Regge form of highenergy gluon-exchange QCD amplitudes in the next-to-leading-logarithm approximation. The approach used here relies on the s-channel unitarity and makes it possible to reproduce successively, in all orders of perturbation theory, themulti-Regge form of the amplitude, provided that specific nonlinear relations, called bootstrap conditions, hold. All of them were derived, and all, with the exception of one, were tested. An explicit verification of fulfillment of the last condition (the bootstrap condition for the inelastic amplitude of the production of one gluon inmulti-Regge kinematics) is performed. In our preceding study, we performed such a verification for purely fermion contributions, while, in the present study, we complete it for one-loop gluon corrections to the components of the condition being considered.

  5. Aerodynamics and vortical structures in hovering fruitflies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xue Guang; Sun, Mao

    2015-03-01

    We measure the wing kinematics and morphological parameters of seven freely hovering fruitflies and numerically compute the flows of the flapping wings. The computed mean lift approximately equals to the measured weight and the mean horizontal force is approximately zero, validating the computational model. Because of the very small relative velocity of the wing, the mean lift coefficient required to support the weight is rather large, around 1.8, and the Reynolds number of the wing is low, around 100. How such a large lift is produced at such a low Reynolds number is explained by combining the wing motion data, the computed vortical structures, and the theory of vorticity dynamics. It has been shown that two unsteady mechanisms are responsible for the high lift. One is referred as to "fast pitching-up rotation": at the start of an up- or downstroke when the wing has very small speed, it fast pitches down to a small angle of attack, and then, when its speed is higher, it fast pitches up to the angle it normally uses. When the wing pitches up while moving forward, large vorticity is produced and sheds at the trailing edge, and vorticity of opposite sign is produced near the leading edge and on the upper surface, resulting in a large time rate of change of the first moment of vorticity (or fluid impulse), hence a large aerodynamic force. The other is the well known "delayed stall" mechanism: in the mid-portion of the up- or downstroke the wing moves at large angle of attack (about 45 deg) and the leading-edge-vortex (LEV) moves with the wing; thus, the vortex ring, formed by the LEV, the tip vortices, and the starting vortex, expands in size continuously, producing a large time rate of change of fluid impulse or a large aerodynamic force.

  6. Vorticity Confinement Applied to Turbulent Wing Tip Vortices for Wake-Integral Drag Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierson, Kristopher; Povitsky, Alex

    2013-11-01

    In the current study the vorticity confinement (VC) approach was applied to tip vortices shed by edges of stationary wings in order to predict induced drag by far-field integration in Trefftz plane. The VC parameter was evaluated first by application to convection of vortices in 2-D uniform flow and then to tip vortices shed in 3-D simulation of finite-aspect ratio rectangular wing in subsonic flight. Dependence of VC parameter on the flight Mach number and the angle of attack was evaluated. The aerodynamic drag results with application of VC to prevent numerical diffusion are much closer to analytic lifting line theory compared to integration over surface of wing while the viscous profile drag is more accurately evaluated by surface integration. To apply VC to viscous and turbulent flows, it is shown that VC does not affect the physical rate of dissipation of vortices in viscous/turbulent flows at time scales corresponding to convection of vortices from the wing to Trefftz plane of integration. To account for turbulent effects on tip vortices, VC was applied in combination with Spalart-Allmaras, k- ɛ, and six Reynolds stresses models of turbulence. The results are compared to experiments to validate the physical dissipation of tip vortex. This research was supported by The Dayton Area Graduate Studies Institute (DAGSI) and US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) grants in 2009-2013, US Army Research Office (ARO) in 2012-2013 and ASEE/AFRL summer faculty grant.

  7. Noise from two-dimensional vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, N. D.; Stockman, N. O.

    1972-01-01

    The fluctuating flow in an idealized model of a turbulent shear layer composed of many discrete vortices is analyzed. Computer solutions reveal irregular motions which are similar in many respects to observed flows in turbulent three-dimensional layers. The model is further simplified to a pair of equal co-rotating vortices and the noise generation is analyzed in terms of equivalent quadrupole oscillations. Results of the analysis in a uniform medium are consistent with Lighthill's results. New results are obtained for the effects of mean velocity gradients, compressibility, temperature inhomogenities, and gradients of the mean Mach number.

  8. Conditions for laminar flow in geophysical vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Brian H.

    1989-01-01

    The sufficient condition for inviscid, helical instability at large wavenumbers is applied to solutions for columnar vortices arising from the vortical flow of an end-wall boundary layer. The end-wall vortex arising from the laminar boundary layer under a potential vortex will be unstable at sufficiently high Reynolds number. Hoewever, if the end-wall boundary layer is turbulent, the end-wall vortex can be stable and laminar even at very high Reynolds number; therefore, stable, laminar tornadoes and waterspouts are suggested as theoretical possibilities.

  9. Linear phase distribution of acoustical vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Lu; Zheng, Haixiang; Ma, Qingyu; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong

    2014-07-14

    Linear phase distribution of phase-coded acoustical vortices was theoretically investigated based on the radiation theory of point source, and then confirmed by experimental measurements. With the proposed criterion of positive phase slope, the possibility of constructing linear circular phase distributions is demonstrated to be determined by source parameters. Improved phase linearity can be achieved at larger source number, lower frequency, smaller vortex radius, and/or longer axial distance. Good agreements are observed between numerical simulations and measurement results for circular phase distributions. The favorable results confirm the feasibility of precise phase control for acoustical vortices and suggest potential applications in particle manipulation.

  10. Spatially-partitioned many-body vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaiman, S.; Alon, O. E.

    2016-02-01

    A vortex in Bose-Einstein condensates is a localized object which looks much like a tiny tornado storm. It is well described by mean-field theory. In the present work we go beyond the current paradigm and introduce many-body vortices. These are made of spatially- partitioned clouds, carry definite total angular momentum, and are fragmented rather than condensed objects which can only be described beyond mean-field theory. A phase diagram based on a mean-field model assists in predicting the parameters where many-body vortices occur. Implications are briefly discussed.

  11. Quark-gluon vertex model and lattice-QCD data

    SciTech Connect

    Bhagwat, M.S.; Tandy, P.C.

    2004-11-01

    A model for the dressed-quark-gluon vertex, at zero gluon momentum, is formed from a nonperturbative extension of the two Feynman diagrams that contribute at one loop in perturbation theory. The required input is an existing ladder-rainbow model Bethe-Salpeter kernel from an approach based on the Dyson-Schwinger equations; no new parameters are introduced. The model includes an Ansatz for the triple-gluon vertex. Two of the three vertex amplitudes from the model provide a pointwise description of the recent quenched-lattice-QCD data. An estimate of the effects of quenching is made.

  12. Chromohydrodynamic approach to the unstable quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, Cristina; Mrówczyński, Stanisław

    2006-11-01

    We derive hydrodynamic-like equations that are applicable to short-time-scale color phenomena in the quark-gluon plasma. The equations are solved in the linear response approximation, and the gluon polarization tensor is derived. As an application, we study the collective modes in a two-stream system and find plasma instabilities when the fluid velocity is larger than the speed of sound in the plasma. The chromohydrodynamic approach, discussed here in detail, should be considered as simpler over other approaches and well-designed for numerical studies of the dynamics of an unstable quark-gluon plasma.

  13. Evidence for polarization of gluons in the proton.

    PubMed

    de Florian, Daniel; Sassot, Rodolfo; Stratmann, Marco; Vogelsang, Werner

    2014-07-01

    We discuss the impact of recent high-statistics Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider data on the determination of the gluon polarization in the proton in the context of a global QCD analysis of polarized parton distributions. We find evidence for a nonvanishing polarization of gluons in the region of momentum fraction and at the scales mostly probed by the data. Although information from low momentum fractions is presently lacking, this finding is suggestive of a significant contribution of gluon spin to the proton spin, thereby limiting the amount of orbital angular momentum required to balance the proton spin budget. PMID:25032920

  14. A factor involved in efficient breakdown of supersonic streamwise vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiejima, Toshihiko

    2015-03-01

    Spatially developing processes in supersonic streamwise vortices were numerically simulated at Mach number 5.0. The vortex evolution largely depended on the azimuthal vorticity thickness of the vortices, which governs the negative helicity profile. Large vorticity thickness greatly enhanced the centrifugal instability, with consequent development of perturbations with competing wavenumbers outside the vortex core. During the transition process, supersonic streamwise vortices could generate large-scale spiral structures and a number of hairpin like vortices. Remarkably, the transition caused a dramatic increase in the total fluctuation energy of hypersonic flows, because the negative helicity profile destabilizes the flows due to helicity instability. Unstable growth might also relate to the correlation length between the axial and azimuthal vorticities of the streamwise vortices. The knowledge gained in this study is important for realizing effective fuel-oxidizer mixing in supersonic combustion engines.

  15. Evolution of a barotropic shear layer into elliptical vortices.

    PubMed

    Guha, Anirban; Rahmani, Mona; Lawrence, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    When a barotropic shear layer becomes unstable, it produces the well-known Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). The nonlinear manifestation of the KHI is usually in the form of spiral billows. However, a piecewise linear shear layer produces a different type of KHI characterized by elliptical vortices of constant vorticity connected via thin braids. Using direct numerical simulation and contour dynamics, we show that the interaction between two counterpropagating vorticity waves is solely responsible for this KHI formation. We investigate the oscillation of the vorticity wave amplitude, the rotation and nutation of the elliptical vortex, and straining of the braids. Our analysis also provides a possible explanation for the formation and evolution of elliptical vortices appearing in geophysical and astrophysical flows, e.g., meddies, stratospheric polar vortices, Jovian vortices, Neptune's Great Dark Spot, and coherent vortices in the wind belts of Uranus. PMID:23410439

  16. The Boltzmann equation for gluons at early times after a heavy ion collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, A. H.

    2000-03-01

    A Boltzmann equation is given for the early stages of evolution of the gluon system produced in a head-on heavy ion collision. The collision term is taken from gluon-gluon scattering in the one-gluon approximation. and are evaluated as a function of time using initial conditions taken from the McLerran-Venugopalan model.

  17. Hairpin vortices in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eitel-Amor, G.; Flores, O.; Schlatter, P.

    2014-04-01

    The present work addresses the question whether hairpin vortices are a dominant feature of near-wall turbulence and which role they play during transition. First, the parent-offspring mechanism is investigated in temporal simulations of a single hairpin vortex introduced in a mean shear flow corresponding to turbulent channels and boundary layers up to Reτ = 590. Using an eddy viscosity computed from resolved simulations, the effect of a turbulent background is also considered. Tracking the vortical structure downstream, it is found that secondary hairpins are created shortly after initialization. Thereafter, all rotational structures decay, whereas this effect is enforced in the presence of an eddy viscosity. In a second approach, a laminar boundary layer is tripped to transition by insertion of a regular pattern of hairpins by means of defined volumetric forces representing an ejection event. The idea is to create a synthetic turbulent boundary layer dominated by hairpin-like vortices. The flow for Reτ < 250 is analysed with respect to the lifetime of individual hairpin-like vortices. Both the temporal and spatial simulations demonstrate that the regeneration process is rather short-lived and may not sustain once a turbulent background has formed. From the transitional flow simulations, it is conjectured that the forest of hairpins reported in former DNS studies is an outer layer phenomenon not being connected to the onset of near-wall turbulence.

  18. Cosmological perturbations: Vorticity, isocurvature and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopherson, Adam J.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, I review some recent, interlinked, work undertaken using cosmological perturbation theory — a powerful technique for modeling inhomogeneities in the universe. The common theme which underpins these pieces of work is the presence of nonadiabatic pressure, or entropy, perturbations. After a brief introduction covering the standard techniques of describing inhomogeneities in both Newtonian and relativistic cosmology, I discuss the generation of vorticity. As in classical fluid mechanics, vorticity is not present in linearized perturbation theory (unless included as an initial condition). Allowing for entropy perturbations, and working to second order in perturbation theory, I show that vorticity is generated, even in the absence of vector perturbations, by purely scalar perturbations, the source term being quadratic in the gradients of first order energy density and isocurvature, or nonadiabatic pressure perturbations. This generalizes Crocco's theorem to a cosmological setting. I then introduce isocurvature perturbations in different models, focusing on the entropy perturbation in standard, concordance cosmology, and in inflationary models involving two scalar fields. As the final topic, I investigate magnetic fields, which are a potential observational consequence of vorticity in the early universe. I briefly review some recent work on including magnetic fields in perturbation theory in a consistent way. I show, using solely analytical techniques, that magnetic fields can be generated by higher order perturbations, albeit too small to provide the entire primordial seed field, in agreement with some numerical studies. I close this paper with a summary and some potential extensions of this work.

  19. Experimental Study of Lift-Generated Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The flow fields of vortices, whether bouyancy-driven or lift-generated, are fascinating fluid-dynamic phenomena which often possess intense swirl velocities and complex time-dependent behavior. As part of the on-going study of vortex behavior, this paper presents a historical overview of the research conducted on the structure and modification of the vortices generated by the lifting surfaces of subsonic transport aircraft. It is pointed out that the characteristics of lift-generated vortices are related to the aerodynamic shapes that produce them and that various arrangements of surfaces can be used to produce different vortex structures. The primary purpose of the research to be described is to find a way to reduce the hazard potential of lift-generated vortices shed by subsonic transport aircraft in the vicinity of airports during landing and takeoff operations. It is stressed that lift-generated vortex wakes are so complex that progress towards a solution requires application of a combined theoretical and experimental research program because either alone often leads to incorrect conclusions. It is concluded that a satisfactory aerodynamic solution to the wake-vortex problem at airports has not yet been found but a reduction in the impact of the wake-vortex hazard on airport capacity may become available in the foreseeable future through wake-vortex avoidance concepts currently under study. The material to be presented in this overview is drawn from aerospace journals that are available publicly.

  20. Temporal stability of multiple-cell vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, M. R.; Grosch, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    The temporal stability of multiple cell vortices is studied with a staggered Chebyshev spectral collocation technique. It is shown that cell multiplicity in the vortex core has a drastic effect on the stability characteristics. While validating the spectral collocation algorithm, two new viscous modes of instability for Batchelor's (1964) vortex were found. These modes are discussed in detail.

  1. Long Term Changes in the Polar Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2016-04-01

    As the amount of halogens in the stratosphere is slowly declining and the ozone layer slowly recovers it is of interest to see how the meteorological conditions in the vortex develop over the long term since such changes might alter the foreseen ozone recovery. In conjunction with the publication of the WMO Antarctic and Arctic Ozone Bulletins, WMO has acquired the ERA Interim global reanalysis data set for several meteorological parameters. This data set goes from 1979 - present. These long time series of data can be used for several useful studies of the long term development of the polar vortices. Several "environmental indicators" for vortex change have been calculated, and a climatology, as well as trends, for these parameters will be presented. These indicators can act as yardsticks and will be useful for understanding past and future changes in the polar vortices and how these changes affect polar ozone depletion. Examples of indicators are: vortex mean temperature, vortex minimum temperature, vortex mean PV, vortex "importance" (PV*area), vortex break-up time, mean and maximum wind speed. Data for both the north and south polar vortices have been analysed at several isentropic levels from 350 to 850 K. A possible link between changes in PV and sudden stratospheric warmings will be investigated, and the results presented. The unusual meteorological conditions of the 2015 south polar vortex and the 2010/11 and 2015/16 north polar vortices will be compared to other recent years.

  2. Hairpin vortices in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eitel-Amor, G.; Örlü, R.; Schlatter, P.; Flores, O.

    2015-02-01

    The present work presents a number of parallel and spatially developing simulations of boundary layers to address the question of whether hairpin vortices are a dominant feature of near-wall turbulence, and which role they play during transition. In the first part, the parent-offspring regeneration mechanism is investigated in parallel (temporal) simulations of a single hairpin vortex introduced in a mean shear flow corresponding to either turbulent channels or boundary layers (Reτ ≲ 590). The effect of a turbulent background superimposed on the mean flow is considered by using an eddy viscosity computed from resolved simulations. Tracking the vortical structure downstream, it is found that secondary hairpins are only created shortly after initialization, with all rotational structures decaying for later times. For hairpins in a clean (laminar) environment, the decay is relatively slow, while hairpins in weak turbulent environments (10% of νt) dissipate after a couple of eddy turnover times. In the second part, the role of hairpin vortices in laminar-turbulent transition is studied using simulations of spatial boundary layers tripped by hairpin vortices. These vortices are generated by means of specific volumetric forces representing an ejection event, creating a synthetic turbulent boundary layer initially dominated by hairpin-like vortices. These hairpins are advected towards the wake region of the boundary layer, while a sinusoidal instability of the streaks near the wall results in rapid development of a turbulent boundary layer. For Reθ > 400, the boundary layer is fully developed, with no evidence of hairpin vortices reaching into the wall region. The results from both the parallel and spatial simulations strongly suggest that the regeneration process is rather short-lived and may not sustain once a turbulent background is developed. From the transitional flow simulations, it is conjectured that the forest of hairpins reported in former direct numerical

  3. Two-dimensional vortices and accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauta, Michiel Doede

    2000-01-01

    Observations show that there are disks around certain stars that slowly rain down on the central (compact) object: accretion disks. The rate of depletion of the disk might be slow but is still larger than was expected on theoretical grounds. That is why it has been suggested that the disks are turbulent. Because the disk is thin and rotating this turbulence might be related to two-dimensional (2D) turbulence which is characterized by energy transfers towards small wave numbers and the formation of 2D-vortices. This hypothesis is investigated in this thesis by numerical simulations. After an introduction, the numerical algorithm that was inplemented is discussed together with its relation to an accretion disk. It performs well under the absence of discontinuities. The code is used to study 2D-turbulence under the influence of background rotation with compressibility and a shearing background flow. The first is found to be of little consequence but the shear flow alters 2D-turbulence siginificantly. Only prograde vortices of enough strength are able to withstand the shear flow. The size of the vortices in the cross stream direction is also found to be smaller than the equivalent of the thickness of an accretion disk. These circulstances imply that the assumption of two-dimensionality is questionable so that 2D-vortices might not abound in accretion disks. However, the existence of such vortices is not ruled out and one such a cortex is studied in detail in chapter 4. The internal structure of the vortex is well described by a balance between Coriolis, centrifugal and pressure forces. The vortex is also accompanied by two spiral compressible waves. These are not responsible for the azimuthal drift of the vortex, which results from secondary vortices, but they might be related to the small radial drift that is observed. Radial drift leads to accretion but it is not very efficient. Multiple vortex interactions are the topic of tha last chapter and though interesting the

  4. Controlled Manipulation of Individual Vortices in a Superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Straver, E.W.J.

    2010-04-05

    We report controlled local manipulation of single vortices by low temperature magnetic force microscope (MFM) in a thin film of superconducting Nb. We are able to position the vortices in arbitrary configurations and to measure the distribution of local depinning forces. This technique opens up new possibilities for the characterization and use of vortices in superconductors.

  5. Bilinear relative equilibria of identical point vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref, Hassan; Beelen, Peter; Brøns, Morten

    2011-11-01

    A new class of bilinear relative equilibria of identical point vortices in which the vortices are constrained to be on two perpendicular lines, taken to be the x- and y-axes of a cartesian coordinate system, is introduced and studied. In general we have m vortices on the y-axis and n on the x- axis. We define generating polynomials q (z) and p (z) , respectively, for each set of vortices. A second order, linear ODE for p (z) given q (z) is derived. Several results relating the general solution of the ODE to relative equilibrium configurations are established. Our strongest result, obtained using Sturm's comparison theorem, is that if p (z) satisfies the ODE for a given q (z) with its imaginary zeros symmetric relative to the x-axis, then it must have at least n - m + 2 simple, real zeros. For m = 2 this provides a complete characterization of all zeros, and we study this case in some detail. In particular, we show that given q (z) =z2 +η2 , where η is real, there is a unique p (z) of degree n, and a unique value of η2 =An , such that the zeros of q (z) and p (z) form a relative equilibrium of n + 2 point vortices. We show that An ~2/3 n +1/2 , as n --> ∞ , where the coefficient of n is determined analytically, the next order term numerically. Supported in part by the Danish National Research Foundation through a Niels Bohr visiting professorship.

  6. An eddy closure for potential vorticity

    SciTech Connect

    Ringler, Todd D

    2009-01-01

    The Gent-McWilliams (GM) parameterization is extended to include a direct influence in the momentum equation. The extension is carried out in two stages; an analysis of the inviscid system is followed by an analysis of the viscous system. In the inviscid analysis the momentum equation is modified such that potential vorticity is conserved along particle trajectories following a transport velocity that includes the Bolus velocity in a manner exactly analogous to the continuity and tracer equations. In addition (and in contrast to traditional GM closures), the new formulation of the inviscid momentum equation results in a conservative exchange between potential and kinetic forms of energy. The inviscid form of the eddy closure conserves total energy to within an error proportional to the time derivative of the Bolus velocity. The hypothesis that the viscous term in the momentum equation should give rise to potential vorticity being diffused along isopycnals in a manner analogous to other tracers is examined in detail. While the form of the momentum closure that follows from a strict adherence to this hypothesis is not immediately interpretable within the constructs of traditional momentum closures, three approximations to this hypothesis results in a form of dissipation that is consistent with traditional Laplacian diffusion. The first two approximations are that relative vorticity, not potential vorticity, is diffused along isopyncals and that the flow is in approximate geostrophic balance. An additional approximation to the Jacobian term is required when the dissipation coefficient varies in space. More importantly, the critique of this hypothesis results in the conclusion that the viscosity parameter in the momentum equation should be identical to the tradition GM closure parameter {Kappa}. Overall, we deem the viscous form of the eddy closure for potential vorticity as a viable closure for use in ocean circulation models.

  7. Veneziano ghost, modified gluon propagator, and gauge copies in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudal, D.; Guimaraes, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    In this short note, we come back to the recent proposal put forward by Kharzeev and Levin [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 242001 (2015)], in which they phenomenologically couple the nonperturbative Veneziano ghost to the perturbative gluon, leading to a modified gluon propagator (the "glost") of the Gribov type, with complex poles. As such, a possible link was made between the QCD topological θ -vacuum (Veneziano ghost) and color confinement (no physically observable gluons). We discuss some subtleties concerning gauge (Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tuytin) invariance of this proposal, related to the choice of Feynman gauge. We draw particular attention to the incompatibility in the longitudinal sector with available nonperturbative results for the linear covariant gauge. We furthermore provide an example in the Landau gauge of a similar phenomenological vertex that also describes the necessary Veneziano ghost but does not affect the Landau gauge gluon propagator.

  8. Resummation and the gluon damping rate in hot QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Pisarski, R.D.

    1990-08-01

    At high temperature a consistent perturbative expansion requires the resummation of an infinite subset of loop corrections into an effective expansion. This effective exansion is used to compute the gluon damping rate at leading order. 25 refs.

  9. Rapidity evolution of gluon TMD from low to moderate x

    SciTech Connect

    Balitsky, Ian; Tarasov, A.

    2015-10-05

    In this article, we study how the rapidity evolution of gluon transverse momentum dependent distribution changes from nonlinear evolution at small $x \\ll 1$ to linear evolution at moderate $x \\sim 1$.

  10. Gluon TMD in particle production from low to moderate x

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Balitsky, I.; Tarasov, A.

    2016-06-28

    Here, we study the rapidity evolution of gluon transverse momentum dependent distributions appearing in processes of particle production and show how this evolution changes from small to moderate Bjorken x.

  11. Rapidity evolution of gluon TMD from low to moderate x

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Balitsky, Ian; Tarasov, A.

    2015-10-05

    In this article, we study how the rapidity evolution of gluon transverse momentum dependent distribution changes from nonlinear evolution at smallmore » $$x \\ll 1$$ to linear evolution at moderate $$x \\sim 1$$.« less

  12. Probing the Gluon Self-Interaction in Light Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Christian S.; Williams, Richard

    2009-09-18

    We investigate masses and decay constants of light mesons from a coupled system of Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter equations. We explicitly take into account dominant non-Abelian contributions to the dressed quark-gluon vertex stemming from the gluon self-interaction. We construct the corresponding Bethe-Salpeter kernel that satisfies the axial-vector Ward-Takahashi identity. Our numerical treatment fully includes all momentum dependencies with all equations solved completely in the complex plane. This approach goes well beyond the rainbow-ladder approximation and permits us to investigate the influence of the gluon self-interaction on the properties of mesons. As a first result we find indications of a nonperturbative cancellation of the gluon self-interaction contributions and pion cloud effects in the mass of the rho meson.

  13. Gluon TMD in particle production from low to moderate x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balitsky, I.; Tarasov, A.

    2016-06-01

    We study the rapidity evolution of gluon transverse momentum dependent distributions appearing in processes of particle production and show how this evolution changes from small to moderate Bjorken x.

  14. Schwinger-Dyson Equations and Dynamical gluon mass generation

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, A.C.; Natale, A.A.

    2004-12-02

    We obtain a solution for the gluon propagador in Landau gauge within two distinct approximations for the Schwinger-Dyson equations (SDE). The first, named Mandelstam's approximation, consist in neglecting all contributions that come from fermions and ghosts fields while in the second, the ghosts fields are taken into account leading to a coupled system of integral equations. In both cases we show that a dynamical mass for the gluon propagator can arise as a solution.

  15. Colored plasmons in a quark-gluon plasma near equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Ulrich; Siemens, Philip J.

    1985-08-01

    Within a kinetic theory for QCD plasmas we study the color response function near thermodynamic equilibrium. Its poles yield a longitudinal and a transverse collective mode, both starting at the plasma frequency. Due to the gluon contribution there is no Landau damping for these modes, and creation of gluon or q- overlinep pairs is the dominant damping mechanism. In an electron plasma the generally quoted Landau damping near threshold is shown to be an artifact of the non-relativistic approximation.

  16. Physics of the gluon-helicity contribution to proton spin.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiangdong; Zhang, Jian-Hui; Zhao, Yong

    2013-09-13

    The total gluon helicity in a polarized proton, measurable in high-energy scattering, is shown to be the large momentum limit of a gauge-invariant but nonlocal, frame-dependent gluon spin E × A⊥ in QCD. This opens a door for a nonperturbative calculation of this quantity in lattice QCD and also justifies using free-field expressions in the light-cone gauge as physical observables. PMID:24074075

  17. Measuring vortical flows in the solar interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfellner, Jan

    2015-09-01

    This thesis focuses on observations of the effects of rotation on solar convection at the length scales of supergranulation and larger (>30 Mm). Rotation drives vortical flows through the Coriolis force and causes anisotropic velocity correlations that are believed to influence the large-scale solar dynamics. We obtain horizontal flows using photospheric Doppler velocity and continuum intensity images from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) spacecraft via the techniques of time-distance helioseismology (TD) and local correlation tracking (LCT) of granules. In time-distance helioseismology, the local vertical vorticity can be measured by taking the difference between wave travel times measured in the anti-clockwise and clockwise directions along a closed contour. The agreement between the TD and LCT methods is excellent up to ±60° latitude, provided that a center-to-limb correction is applied. Averaging over longitude, one finds that there is a small but significant correlation between the horizontal divergence and the vertical vorticity component of supergranular flows away from the solar equator. By comparison to a noise model, we find that the TD technique can be used to probe the vertical vorticity of flows on spatial scales larger than about 15 Mm, thus including supergranules and also giant cells. We also find that the vertical vorticity signal is much easier to measure using SDO/HMI observations than previous observations. The impact of the Sun's rotation on supergranulation is studied in detail by making spatial maps of the vertical vorticity of the flows associated with the average supergranule. The average supergranule is constructed by co-aligning thousands of individual supergranules in a given latitude band. For the first time, we are able to spatially resolve vorticity associated with inflows and outflow regions. In the northern hemisphere, outflows are on average associated with a clockwise

  18. Recovering the vorticity of a light beam after scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salla, Gangi Reddy; Perumangattu, Chithrabhanu; Prabhakar, Shashi; Anwar, Ali; Singh, Ravindra P.

    2015-07-01

    We generate optical vortices and scatter them through a rough surface. However, the scattered light passing through a lens shows the same vorticity when probed at the Fourier plane. The vorticity is measured using a nonseparable state of polarization and orbital angular momentum of light as it cannot be confirmed by the standard interferometric technique. The observed vorticity is found to be independent of the amount of scattered light collected. Therefore, vortices can be used as information carriers even in the presence of scattering media. The experimental results are well supported by the theoretical results.

  19. Recovering the vorticity of a light beam after scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salla, Gangi Reddy Perumangattu, Chithrabhanu; Anwar, Ali; Prabhakar, Shashi; Singh, Ravindra P.

    2015-07-13

    We generate optical vortices and scatter them through a rough surface. However, the scattered light passing through a lens shows the same vorticity when probed at the Fourier plane. The vorticity is measured using a nonseparable state of polarization and orbital angular momentum of light as it cannot be confirmed by the standard interferometric technique. The observed vorticity is found to be independent of the amount of scattered light collected. Therefore, vortices can be used as information carriers even in the presence of scattering media. The experimental results are well supported by the theoretical results.

  20. Inclusive two-gluon and valence-quark-gluon production in DIS and pA collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Kovchegov, Yuri V.

    2004-12-01

    We calculate production cross sections of a forward quark-gluon pair and of two gluons at midrapidity in deep inelastic scattering and in high energy proton-nucleus collisions. The calculation is performed in the framework of the color glass condensate formalism. We first calculate the cross sections in the quasiclassical approximation, which includes multiple rescatterings in the target. We then proceed to include the effects of nonlinear small-x evolution in the production cross sections. It is interesting to note that our result for the two-gluon production cross section appears to be in direct violation of Abramovsky-Gribov-Kanchelli cutting rules, which is the first example of such violation in QCD. The calculated quark-gluon and gluon-gluon production cross sections can be used to construct theoretical predictions for two-particle azimuthal correlations at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and LHC (I{sup p(d)A}) as well as for deep inelastic scattering experiments at the Hadron Electron Ring Accelerator and the Electron-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  1. Instability of isolated hollow vortices with zero circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiejima, Toshihiko

    2016-04-01

    Inviscid linear stability analysis and numerical simulations are used to investigate how temporal disturbances evolve in double-annular hollow vortices with an opposite-signed vorticity (the total circulation is zero). Two extrema exist in the vorticity profile and constitute a factor of instability. The dispersion relation is expressed as a simple cubic equation. The results show that the instabilities of vortices are strongly enhanced by the hollow effect of the annular vorticity. In addition, the growth rate of the dominant modes significantly increases with decreasing negative-vorticity thickness. During the initial stage, the dominant unstable modes obtained from simulations are consistent with those obtained from the linear analysis. In nonlinear developments, the flow field stretches out in one direction depending on the motion of the plural vortex pair formed by rolling up the positive and negative vorticities. Once such structures in the vortex are generated, the vortex immediately breaks down and does not become metastable.

  2. Intensity of vortices: from soap bubbles to hurricanes

    PubMed Central

    Meuel, T.; Xiong, Y. L.; Fischer, P.; Bruneau, C. H.; Bessafi, M.; Kellay, H.

    2013-01-01

    By using a half soap bubble heated from below, we obtain large isolated single vortices whose properties as well as their intensity are measured under different conditions. By studying the effects of rotation of the bubble on the vortex properties, we found that rotation favors vortices near the pole. Rotation also inhibits long life time vortices. The velocity and vorticity profiles of the vortices obtained are well described by a Gaussian vortex. Besides, the intensity of these vortices can be followed over long time spans revealing periods of intensification accompanied by trochoidal motion of the vortex center, features which are reminiscent of the behavior of tropical cyclones. An analysis of this intensification period suggests a simple relation valid for both the vortices observed here and for tropical cyclones. PMID:24336410

  3. Development and Interaction of Artificially Generated Hairpin Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatino, Daniel; McKenna, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    The development and interaction of hairpin vortices are examined and categorized to better understand their role in fully turbulent boundary layers. Hairpin vortices are generated within an otherwise laminar boundary layer using a free surface water channel. Direct injection is the primary generation method and the behavior of the vortices is first examined using flow visualization. Hydrogen bubble wire is combined with dye injection to help clarify the role of the vorticity in the fluid immediately surrounding the hairpin vortex. PIV data is also used to classify the development and maturity of the vortices for a range of free stream and injection conditions. The interactions of two hairpin vortices of varying maturity are characterized to investigate the potential mechanisms for the formation of hairpin packets beyond autogeneration. Finally, the behavior of hairpin vortices generated with a new technique that uses a transient hemispherical protrusion is also examined. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant CBET-1040236.

  4. Intensity of vortices: from soap bubbles to hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meuel, T.; Xiong, Y. L.; Fischer, P.; Bruneau, C. H.; Bessafi, M.; Kellay, H.

    2013-12-01

    By using a half soap bubble heated from below, we obtain large isolated single vortices whose properties as well as their intensity are measured under different conditions. By studying the effects of rotation of the bubble on the vortex properties, we found that rotation favors vortices near the pole. Rotation also inhibits long life time vortices. The velocity and vorticity profiles of the vortices obtained are well described by a Gaussian vortex. Besides, the intensity of these vortices can be followed over long time spans revealing periods of intensification accompanied by trochoidal motion of the vortex center, features which are reminiscent of the behavior of tropical cyclones. An analysis of this intensification period suggests a simple relation valid for both the vortices observed here and for tropical cyclones.

  5. Emergent vortices in populations of colloidal rollers.

    PubMed

    Bricard, Antoine; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Das, Debasish; Savoie, Charles; Chikkadi, Vijayakumar; Shitara, Kyohei; Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Peruani, Fernando; Saintillan, David; Bartolo, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Coherent vortical motion has been reported in a wide variety of populations including living organisms (bacteria, fishes, human crowds) and synthetic active matter (shaken grains, mixtures of biopolymers), yet a unified description of the formation and structure of this pattern remains lacking. Here we report the self-organization of motile colloids into a macroscopic steadily rotating vortex. Combining physical experiments and numerical simulations, we elucidate this collective behaviour. We demonstrate that the emergent-vortex structure lives on the verge of a phase separation, and single out the very constituents responsible for this state of polar active matter. Building on this observation, we establish a continuum theory and lay out a strong foundation for the description of vortical collective motion in a broad class of motile populations constrained by geometrical boundaries. PMID:26088835

  6. Shear-Layer Effects on Trailing Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Z. C.; Baek, K.

    1998-01-01

    Crosswind shear can influence the trailing vortex trajectories significantly, according to both field measurement and numerical simulations. Point vortex models are used in this paper to study the fluid dynamic mechanism in the interactions between trailing vortex pair and shear layers. It has been shown that the shear-layer deformation causes the vortex descent history difference in the two vortices of the vortex pair. When a shear layer is below the vortex pair with the same sign as the left vortex, the right vortex descends less than the left vortex. When the same shear layer is above the vortex pair, the right vortex descends more. The descent altitudes of the two vortices are the same when they go through a constant, non-deformed shear layer. Those trends are in agreement with Navier-Stokes simulations.

  7. Emergent vortices in populations of colloidal rollers

    PubMed Central

    Bricard, Antoine; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Das, Debasish; Savoie, Charles; Chikkadi, Vijayakumar; Shitara, Kyohei; Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Peruani, Fernando; Saintillan, David; Bartolo, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Coherent vortical motion has been reported in a wide variety of populations including living organisms (bacteria, fishes, human crowds) and synthetic active matter (shaken grains, mixtures of biopolymers), yet a unified description of the formation and structure of this pattern remains lacking. Here we report the self-organization of motile colloids into a macroscopic steadily rotating vortex. Combining physical experiments and numerical simulations, we elucidate this collective behaviour. We demonstrate that the emergent-vortex structure lives on the verge of a phase separation, and single out the very constituents responsible for this state of polar active matter. Building on this observation, we establish a continuum theory and lay out a strong foundation for the description of vortical collective motion in a broad class of motile populations constrained by geometrical boundaries. PMID:26088835

  8. Trailing vortices from low speed flyers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldman, Rye; Kudo, Jun; Breuer, Kenneth

    2009-11-01

    The structure and strength of the vortex wake behind a airplane or animal flying with a fixed or flapping wing contains valuable information about the aerodynamic load history. However, the amount of vorticity measured in the trailing vortex is not always in agreement with the known lift generated, and the behavior of these vortices at relatively low Reynolds numbers is also not well-understood. We present the results from a series of wind tunnel PIV experiments conducted behind a low-aspect ratio rectangular wing at a chord-Reynolds numbers of 30,000. In addition to wake PIV measurements measured in the cross-stream (Trefftz) plane, we measure the lift and drag directly using a six-axis force-torque transducer. We discuss how vortex size, shape, strength and position vary in time and downstream location, as well as the challenges associated with the use of PIV wake measurements to accurate determine aerodynamic forces.

  9. Exact Solitary Water Waves with Vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Vera Mikyoung

    2008-05-01

    The solitary water wave problem is to find steady free surface waves which approach a constant level of depth in the far field. The main result is the existence of a family of exact solitary waves of small amplitude for an arbitrary vorticity. Each solution has a supercritical parameter value and decays exponentially at infinity. The proof is based on a generalized implicit function theorem of the Nash-Moser type. The first approximation to the surface profile is given by the “KdV” equation. With a supercritical value of the surface tension coefficient, a family of small amplitude solitary waves of depression with subcritical parameter values is constructed for an arbitrary vorticity.

  10. Motion of vortices outside a cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulu, Serdar; Yilmaz, Oguz

    2010-12-01

    The problem of motion of the vortices around an oscillating cylinder in the presence of a uniform flow is considered. The Hamiltonian for vortex motion for the case with no uniform flow and stationary cylinder is constructed, reduced, and constant Hamiltonian (energy) curves are plotted when the system is shown to be integrable according to Liouville. By adding uniform flow to the system and by allowing the cylinder to vibrate, we model the natural vibration of the cylinder in the flow field, which has applications in ocean engineering involving tethers or pipelines in a flow field. We conclude that in the chaotic case forces on the cylinder may be considerably larger than those on the integrable case depending on the initial positions of vortices and that complex phenomena such as chaotic capture and escape occur when the initial positions lie in a certain region.