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Sample records for abscesses

  1. Abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse ... compress by wetting a washcloth with warm — not hot — water and placing it over the abscess for ...

  2. Abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... abscesses resolve quickly once appropriately treated. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is a strain of "staph" bacteria resistant to antibiotics in the penicillin family, which have been the ...

  3. Brain abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... with certain heart disorders, may receive antibiotics before dental or other procedures to help reduce the risk of infection. Alternative Names Abscess - brain; Cerebral abscess; CNS abscess Images Amebic brain ...

  4. Perirenal abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... The biggest risk factor for perirenal abscess is kidney stones , by blockage of urine flow. This provides a ... perirenal abscess should lead to a good outcome. Kidney stones must be treated to avoid further infections. In ...

  5. Pancreatic abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Most people with pancreatic abscesses have had pancreatitis. However, the complication often takes 7 or more days to develop. Signs of an abscess can be seen on: CT scan of the abdomen MRI of the abdomen Ultrasound of the abdomen

  6. Hepatic abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, S.; Langer, V.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic abscesses are potentially lethal diseases if early diagnosis and treatment are not instituted. They are prevalent all over the globe and pyogenic abscesses are predominant over amoebic. With better control of intra abdominal and systemic infections by a spectrum of antibiotics, aetiology of pyogenic abscesses are secondary to interventions and diseases in the biliary tree to a large extent today. The common organisms isolated are the Gram negative group. Amoebic abscesses continue to plague some regions of the world where hygiene and sanitation are questionable. Over the years, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis have evolved remarkably. Imaging modalities like ultrasonography and CT scan have become the cornerstone of diagnosis. The absence of ionizing radiation makes MRI an attractive alternative in patients who require multiple follow up scans. Serological testing in amoebic abscesses has become more reliable. Though antibiotics have remained the principal modality of management, percutaneous drainage of abscesses have vastly improved the chances of cure and bring down the morbidity drastically in pyogenic abscesses. Amoebic abscesses respond well to medical treatment with nitroimidazoles, and minimally invasive surgical drainage is an option in cases where open surgery is indicated. PMID:24532886

  7. Perirenal abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection. Causes Most perirenal abscesses are caused by urinary tract infections that start in the bladder. They then spread ... develop: Abdominal pain Burning with urination Chills Fever Urinary tract infection Prevention If you have kidney stones, ask your ...

  8. Peritonsillar Abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... person's tonsil toward the uvula (the dangling fleshy object at the back of the mouth). If this happens, it can become hard to swallow, speak, and maybe even breathe. If you think you have an abscess in the back of ...

  9. Brain abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Brain abscesses commonly occur when bacteria or fungi infect part of the brain. As a result, swelling and irritation (inflammation) develop. Infected brain cells, white blood cells, live and dead bacteria, ...

  10. Skin abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... abscesses may occur after: A bacterial infection (often staphylococcus) A minor wound or injury Boils Folliculitis (infection ... Daum RS. Staphylococcus aureus . In: Long SS, ed. Principles and Practice ... Diseases. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012: ...

  11. Peritonsillar abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... obstruction Cellulitis of the jaw, neck, or chest Endocarditis (rare) Fluid around the lungs ( pleural effusion ) Inflammation ... chap 196. Read More Abscess Breathing difficulty Cellulitis Endocarditis Pericarditis Pleural effusion Pneumonia - adults (community acquired) Retropharyngeal ...

  12. Peritonsillar abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of bacteria called group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus . Peritonsillar abscess most often occurs in older children, adolescents, and young adults. The condition is rare now that antibiotics are used to treat tonsillitis.

  13. Anorectal abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the rectum Fatigue, fever , night sweats, and chills Redness, painful and hardened tissue in the area ... other symptoms of anorectal abscess You have fever, chills, or other new symptoms after being treated for ...

  14. Pituitary abscess.

    PubMed

    Rudwan, M A

    1977-05-28

    Three cases of pituitary abscess are presented. The history of recurrent attacks of aseptic meningitis, together with radiological and clinical features suggestive of pituitary tumor, appear to form a fairly typical picture of the condition. Long follow-up was possible in two of the cases. There are no radiological features which distinguish the lesion from pituitary tumor, hence the importance of recognizing the significance of such a clinical presentation with radiological evidence of sellar enlargement. Pituitary abscesses seem to occur in preexisting pituitary tumors. The possible relationship with pituitary infarction is discussed. PMID:865667

  15. Epidural abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections Boils especially on the back or scalp Bone infections of the spine (vertebral osteomyelitis) People who inject drugs are also at increased ... Complications Complications may include: Brain abscess Brain damage Bone infection (osteomyelitis) Chronic back pain Meningitis Nerve damage Return ...

  16. Subareolar abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland. The areolar gland is located in the breast under or below the areola (colored area around the nipple). ... an ultrasound or other imaging test of the breast is recommended. A blood count and a culture of the abscess, if drained, may be ordered.

  17. Pyogenic liver abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Liver abscess; Bacterial liver abscess ... There are many potential causes of liver abscesses, including: Abdominal infection, such as appendicitis , diverticulitis , or a perforated bowel Infection in the blood Infection of the bile draining tubes ...

  18. Amebic liver abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatic amebiasis; Extraintestinal amebiasis; Abscess - amebic liver ... Amebic liver abscess is caused by Entamoeba histolytica. This parasite causes amebiasis , an intestinal infection that is also called ...

  19. Abscess - abdomen or pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... infected fluid and pus located inside the belly (abdominal cavity). This type of abscess can be located near ... abdominal abscesses: Abdominal x-ray Ultrasound of the abdomen and pelvis CT scan of the abdomen and ...

  20. Abscess in the Lungs

    MedlinePlus

    ... abscesses are streptococci and staphylococci, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which is a serious infection. Obstruction ... night sweats. In contrast, lung abscesses caused by Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA can be fatal within days, ...

  1. Abscess scan - radioactive

    MedlinePlus

    Radioactive abscess scan; Abscess scan; Indium Scan; Indium-labelled white blood cell scan ... the white blood cells are tagged with a radioactive substance called indium. The cells are then injected ...

  2. Spinal cord abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... abscess is caused by an infection inside the spine. An abscess of the spinal cord itself is ... by a staphylococcus infection that spreads through the spine. It may be caused by tuberculosis in some ...

  3. Abscess - abdomen or pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your abscess will be treated with antibiotics and drainage of the pus. At first, you will likely ... of your antibiotics, even if you feel better. DRAINAGE Your abscess needs to be drained of pus. ...

  4. Multiple brain abscesses.

    PubMed

    Burke, L P; Ho, S U; Cerullo, L J; Kim, K S; Harter, D H

    1981-12-01

    A young woman with 12 separate brain abscesses was treated medically after aspiration of one abscess for diagnostic bacteriological examination. She made an excellent recovery with only minimal residual neurological dysfunction. Surgical aspiration for detailed bacteriological studies followed by appropriate antimicrobial therapy is an effective way of treating multiple brain abscesses in the neurologically stable patient. PMID:7330768

  5. Primary Neonatal Diaphragmatic Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Zouari, Mohamed; Jallouli, Mohamed; Ben Thabet, Afef; Ben Dhaou, Mahdi; Gargouri, Abdellatif; Mhiri, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal diaphragmatic abscesses are extremely rare and they usually develop by direct extension from a liver abscess. The first case of primary diaphragmatic abscess in a neonate is reported and the difficulties of diagnosing this rare entity are discussed. PMID:26023529

  6. Tropical liver abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, K. G.; Yap, I.; Wong, S. T.; Wee, A.; Guan, R.; Kang, J. Y.

    1997-01-01

    Forty-one consecutive cases of liver abscesses seen at the National University Hospital, Singapore from 1988 to 1994 were reviewed. Twenty-seven cases (65%) were pyogenic, six (15%) amoebic, two (5%) tuberculous and six (15%) indeterminate. The predominance of pyogenic abscesses is in marked contrast to previous studies from the region a decade ago in which amoebic abscesses were the commonest type. The commonest pathogen causing pyogenic abscess was Klebsiella pneumoniae. Two cases were due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and this organism needs to be actively looked for in smears and cultures of aspirated material. As the majority of organisms isolated were resistant to ampicillin, empirical antibiotic treatment for suspected pyogenic abscess should include gentamicin or a cephalosporin. Percutaneous needle aspiration of the abscess was performed for 85% of pyogenic abscesses and surgery was necessary in only two cases because of complications. We found that percutaneous aspiration of liver abscess is helpful to confirm the diagnosis, provides a better bacteriological culture yield, gives a good outcome, and may uncover clinically unsuspected conditions like malignancy and tuberculoma which may mimic the presentation of liver abscesses. We recommend routine cytological examination of aspirated abscess material as well as stains and cultures for acid-fast bacilli. PMID:9122104

  7. Fusobacterium Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Buelow, Ben D.; Lambert, Joelle M.; Gill, Ryan M.

    2013-01-01

    Fusobacterium is well characterized as an oropharyngeal pathogen that may induce a septic thrombophlebitis by direct extension of abscess into an adjacent neck vessel (Lemierre's syndrome); its potential for visceral abscess formation, however, remains under-recognized. A 65-year-old man with a recent history of multiple rim-enhancing liver lesions presented to the emergency room with fever and abdominal pain. Based on interval increase in the size of the lesions, abscess was suspected. A liver biopsy was performed, and although no organism could be identified on routine microscopy, Warthin-Starry stain revealed Gram-negative bacilli consistent with an anaerobic Fusobacterium species as the underlying etiology of liver abscess formation. Subsequent anaerobic culture results confirmed the diagnosis. This case highlights the importance of consideration for Fusobacterium infection in the setting of liver abscess if anaerobic organisms have not yet been excluded on initial culture evaluation. PMID:24348321

  8. Fusobacterium liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Buelow, Ben D; Lambert, Joelle M; Gill, Ryan M

    2013-01-01

    Fusobacterium is well characterized as an oropharyngeal pathogen that may induce a septic thrombophlebitis by direct extension of abscess into an adjacent neck vessel (Lemierre's syndrome); its potential for visceral abscess formation, however, remains under-recognized. A 65-year-old man with a recent history of multiple rim-enhancing liver lesions presented to the emergency room with fever and abdominal pain. Based on interval increase in the size of the lesions, abscess was suspected. A liver biopsy was performed, and although no organism could be identified on routine microscopy, Warthin-Starry stain revealed Gram-negative bacilli consistent with an anaerobic Fusobacterium species as the underlying etiology of liver abscess formation. Subsequent anaerobic culture results confirmed the diagnosis. This case highlights the importance of consideration for Fusobacterium infection in the setting of liver abscess if anaerobic organisms have not yet been excluded on initial culture evaluation. PMID:24348321

  9. Bacterial Brain Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Significant advances in the diagnosis and management of bacterial brain abscess over the past several decades have improved the expected outcome of a disease once regarded as invariably fatal. Despite this, intraparenchymal abscess continues to present a serious and potentially life-threatening condition. Brain abscess may result from traumatic brain injury, prior neurosurgical procedure, contiguous spread from a local source, or hematogenous spread of a systemic infection. In a significant proportion of cases, an etiology cannot be identified. Clinical presentation is highly variable and routine laboratory testing lacks sensitivity. As such, a high degree of clinical suspicion is necessary for prompt diagnosis and intervention. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging offer a timely and sensitive method of assessing for abscess. Appearance of abscess on routine imaging lacks specificity and will not spare biopsy in cases where the clinical context does not unequivocally indicate infectious etiology. Current work with advanced imaging modalities may yield more accurate methods of differentiation of mass lesions in the brain. Management of abscess demands a multimodal approach. Surgical intervention and medical therapy are necessary in most cases. Prognosis of brain abscess has improved significantly in the recent decades although close follow-up is required, given the potential for long-term sequelae and a risk of recurrence. PMID:25360205

  10. Parapharyngeal abscess is frequently associated with concomitant peritonsillar abscess.

    PubMed

    Klug, Tejs Ehlers; Fischer, Anne Sophie Lind; Antonsen, Christine; Rusan, Maria; Eskildsen, Helle; Ovesen, Therese

    2014-06-01

    To characterize patients with parapharyngeal abscess admitted to a Danish tertiary care centre and evaluate our management. This is a retrospective chart review. All records of patients with parapharyngeal abscess admitted to the Ear-Nose-Throat Department at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, from January 2001 through December 2011 were reviewed. In total, 63 patients (41 males), aged 4-89 years (median, 45 years) were included in the study. The mean annual incidence of parapharyngeal abscess was 0.9 cases/100,000 population. Thirty-three (52%) patients had concomitant peritonsillar abscess. In two patients the parapharyngeal abscess was accompanied by necrotizing fasciitis. The most frequent surgical approach used was intrapharyngeal incision in combination with tonsillectomy. The most commonly used antibiotic regimen was benzylpenicillin plus metronidazole. Seven (13%) patients returned to the operating theatre due to post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage or insufficient abscess drainage. Tonsillectomy and internal incision of the abscess in combination with a narrow-spectrum intravenous penicillin and metronidazole is a safe and efficient approach for managing parapharyngeal abscesses. This approach, however, carries a relatively high complication rate, requiring close surveillance in the early post-operative period. This is especially true for parapharyngeal abscess patients without peritonsillar abscess. In our series, these patients were more ill, more likely to experience complications, require intensive care, intubation, and tracheotomy, than parapharyngeal abscess patients with concurrent peritonsillar abscess. The frequent co-existence of parapharyngeal abscess and peritonsillar abscess favours careful consideration of addition of tonsillectomy to intrapharyngeal incision. PMID:23982668

  11. Neonatal iliopsoas abscess.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Atsushi; Kameoka, Kazuhiro; Kuwabara, Jun; Watanabe, Yuji; Kawakami, Sanae; Tauchi, Hisamichi; Ishii, Eiichi

    2012-10-01

    Iliopsoas abscess (IPA) is rare in children, particularly in neonates. A male neonate was born at 38 weeks of gestation with a weight of 2915 g. On day 22 after birth, his family noticed that his right thigh was swollen. Abdominal computed tomography showed a mass extending to the right iliopsoas from the right thigh with thick septa. Puncture to the right groin yielded purulent fluid, and so a diagnosis of abscess was made. The puncture was followed by surgical drainage through a small inguinal incision, and the abscess cavity was irrigated thoroughly using normal saline. Culture of abscess fluid was positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae, so intravenous ABPC infusion was continued. The postoperative magnetic resonance imaging indicate that the IPA was derived from arthritis of the hip, and the patients received Riemenbügel for the incomplete hip dislocation. He is doing well at 2 years of age. PMID:23005905

  12. Idiopathic thyroid abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, Shamir O.; Hassranah, Dale; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Thyroid abscesses are uncommon because the gland is relatively resistant to developing infection due to its rich blood supply, well-developed capsule and high iodine content. However, clinicians must be aware of this differential to make an early diagnosis. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present the case of a patient who required urgent operative resection as definitive treatment for a thyroid abscess secondary to infection with Staphylococcus aureus. DISCUSSION Although this is rare, a thyroid abscess left untreated can lead to serious morbidity. Therefore, clinicians must be aware of the presenting features and therapeutic options. CONCLUSION Thyroid abscess is an uncommon diagnosis but can lead to significant morbidity. Therefore clinicians must be aware of the diagnosis in order to institute early aggressive management. PMID:24981167

  13. [Brain abscess - overview].

    PubMed

    Sveinsson, Olafur Arni; Asgeirsson, Hilmir; Olafsson, Ingvar H

    2013-01-01

    Brain abscess is a life threatening illness, demanding rapid diagnosis and treatment. Its development requires seeding of an organism into the brain parenchyma, often in an area of damaged brain tissue or in a region with poor microcirculation. The lesion evolves from a cerebritis stage to capsule formation. Brain abscesses can be caused by contiguous or haematogenous spread of an infection, or by head trauma/ neurosurgical procedure. The most common presentation is that of headache and vomiting due to raised intracranial pressure. Seizures have been reported in up to 50% of cases. Focal neurological deficits may be present, depending on the location of the lesion. Treatment of a brain abscess involves aspiration or excision, along with parenteral antibiotic therapy. The outcome has improved dramatically in the last decades due to improvement in diagnostic techniques, neurosurgery, and broad-spectrum antibiotics. The authors provide an overview of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of brain abscesses. PMID:23341403

  14. Amebic liver abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... sanitation exist. Africa, Latin America, Southeast Asia, and India have significant health problems from this disease. Risk ... are the usual treatment for liver abscess. A drug such as paromomycin or diloxanide must also be ...

  15. Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, B.F. III; Weiner, M.H.; McGee, Z.A.

    1982-12-17

    A spinal epidural abscess developed in a renal transplant recipient; results of a serum radioimmunoassay for Aspergillus antigen were positive. Laminectomy disclosed an abscess of the L4-5 interspace and L-5 vertebral body that contained hyphal forms and from which Aspergillus species was cultured. Serum Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay may be a valuable, specific early diagnostic test when systemic aspergillosis is a consideration in an immunosuppressed host.

  16. BRAIN ABSCESS PRESENTING WITH CATATONIA

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Elizabeth J.B.; Borde, Milind; Davis, Rachel

    1995-01-01

    A fifty year old man presented to a psychiatric unit with catatonia. He was later found to have a brain abscess in the left frontal region. Brain abscess has not been previously reported to be associated with catatonia. PMID:21743747

  17. Anaerobic brain abscess

    PubMed Central

    Sudhaharan, Sukanya; Chavali, Padmasri

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Brain abscess remains a potentially fatal central nervous system (CNS) disease, especially in developing countries. Anaerobic abscess is difficult to diagnose because of cumbersome procedures associated with the isolation of anaerobes. Materials and Methods: This is a hospital-based retrospective microbiological analysis of 430 brain abscess materials (purulent aspirates and/or tissue), for anaerobic organisms, that were received between 1987–2014, by the Microbiology Laboratory in our Institute. Results: Culture showed growth of bacteria 116/430 (27%) of the cases of which anaerobes were isolated in 48/116 (41.1%) of the cases. Peptostreptococcus (51.4 %), was the predominant organism isolated in four cases followed by Bacteroides and Peptococcus species. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and detection of these organisms would help in the appropriate management of these patients. PMID:27307977

  18. Brain abscess: Current management

    PubMed Central

    Alvis Miranda, Hernando; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Elzain, Mohammed Awad; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Brain abscess (BA) is defined as a focal infection within the brain parenchyma, which starts as a localized area of cerebritis, which is subsequently converted into a collection of pus within a well-vascularized capsule. BA must be differentiated from parameningeal infections, including epidural abscess and subdural empyema. The BA is a challenge for the neurosurgeon because it is needed good clinical, pharmacological, and surgical skills for providing good clinical outcomes and prognosis to BA patients. Considered an infrequent brain infection, BA could be a devastator entity that easily left the patient into dead. The aim of this work is to review the current concepts regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of BA. PMID:24174804

  19. Brain abscess: Current management.

    PubMed

    Alvis Miranda, Hernando; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Elzain, Mohammed Awad; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2013-08-01

    Brain abscess (BA) is defined as a focal infection within the brain parenchyma, which starts as a localized area of cerebritis, which is subsequently converted into a collection of pus within a well-vascularized capsule. BA must be differentiated from parameningeal infections, including epidural abscess and subdural empyema. The BA is a challenge for the neurosurgeon because it is needed good clinical, pharmacological, and surgical skills for providing good clinical outcomes and prognosis to BA patients. Considered an infrequent brain infection, BA could be a devastator entity that easily left the patient into dead. The aim of this work is to review the current concepts regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of BA. PMID:24174804

  20. Tubercular thyroid abscess.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Awanish; Pahwa, Harvinder Singh; Srivastava, Rohit; Khan, Khursheed Alam

    2013-01-01

    We encountered a patient who presented with neck swelling, difficulty in swallowing, voice change along with systemic features such as evening rise of temperature, chronic cough and weight loss. Ultrasonography of the thyroid gland revealed two cystic swellings. An ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology was suggestive of tubercular abscess. The patient responded well to antigravity aspiration of the swellings and antitubercular treatment. PMID:23814203

  1. Lacrimal duct cyst abscess.

    PubMed

    Dharmasena, Aruna; Sobajo, Cassandra; Irion, Luciane; Ataullah, Sajid

    2014-12-01

    Cystic dilatation within the lacrimal gland is thought to be related to chronic inflammation and scarring of the lacrimal gland ductules. We review the literature and discuss a case and of lacrimal duct cyst suppuration presenting with visual loss, external ophthalmoplegia, proptosis and ptosis. To our knowledge, only one other report of a lacrimal ductal cyst abscess has been reported in the literature so far. PMID:25208223

  2. Therapy of Liver Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Lübbert, Christoph; Wiegand, Johannes; Karlas, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Liver abscess (LA) is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening disease with significant morbidity and mortality. Methods This review comprehensively describes epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of LA, with a strong focus on antimicrobial treatment choices and the impact of multidrug-resistant pathogens. Results In industrialized areas, pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) accounts for over 80% of the cases, whereas Entamoeba histolyticais responsible for up to 10% of the cases, with a higher incidence in tropical areas. Highly virulent strains of Klebsiella pneumoniaehave emerged as a predominant cause of PLA in Asian countries and tend to spread to the USA, Australia, and European countries, therefore requiring special alertness. Most common symptoms of LA are fever, chills, and right upper quadrant abdominal pain, although a broad spectrum of non-specific symptoms may also occur. Conclusion Imaging studies (ultrasound, computed tomography scan) and microbiological findings play a crucial role in the diagnosis of LA. The treatment of choice for PLA is a multimodal approach combining broad-spectrum antibiotics and aspiration or drainage of larger abscess cavities. Amebic LA can be cured by metronidazole therapy without drainage. PMID:26287275

  3. Hematogenous Pasteurella multocida brain abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, M.; Lipsky, B.A.

    1985-10-01

    A case of hematogenously acquired brain abscess caused by Pasteurella multocida is described. CT scans of the head revealed the lesions in a 67 year old man with mild alcoholic liver disease and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Ultrasound examinations of the abdomen and chest and an echocardiogram failed to reveal a source for the abscess. On autopsy examination three encapsulated brain abscesses were found. 34 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  4. Chemical epidural abscess: case report.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, N; Dreyfus, P M

    1971-06-01

    Spinal epidural abscess accompanies blood-borne infection, vertebral osteomyelitis, or an overlying cutaneous source of infection. This report documents the development of non-infective epidural abscess where the inflammatory response was induced by the highly irritant contents (keratin and cholesterol) of an underlying epidermoid. This was associated with aseptic meningitis. PMID:5571318

  5. Pituitary abscess: an unexpected diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Shuster, Anatoly; Gunnarsson, Thorsteinn; Sommer, Doron; Miller, Elka

    2010-02-01

    The pituitary gland can demonstrate a variety of pathologies with different clinical presentations. Amongst them, pituitary abscess is a rare infectious disease for which contrast-enhanced MRI aids the diagnostic pathway. We present a 16-year-old girl with imaging and surgical findings consistent with primary pituitary abscess. PMID:19937240

  6. Chemical epidural abscess: case report

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, N.; Dreyfus, P. M.

    1971-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess accompanies blood-borne infection, vertebral osteomyelitis, or an overlying cutaneous source of infection. This report documents the development of non-infective epidural abscess where the inflammatory response was induced by the highly irritant contents (keratin and cholesterol) of an underlying epidermoid. This was associated with aseptic meningitis. Images PMID:5571318

  7. Pasteurella multocida liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Cortez, J C; Shapiro, M; Awe, R J

    1986-08-01

    A previously healthy 61-year-old woman was seen with an abnormal chest roentgenogram and a 3-week history of fever, chills, malaise, and right upper quadrant pain. Blood cultures revealed Pasteurella multocida sensitive to penicillin. Liver spleen radioisotope scan and CT scan revealed space occupying lesions in the right lobe of the liver. The patient was a gardener with no pets or animal exposure. This case illustrates P. multocida septicemia and a liver abscess in a patient without animal exposure. In addition, the possibility of soil as another reservoir of infection is raised. PMID:3487981

  8. Dental abscess: A microbiological review

    PubMed Central

    Shweta; Prakash, S Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Dental abscess is a frequently occurring infectious process known to the health practice. The fate of the infection depends on the virulence of the bacteria, host resistance factors, and regional anatomy. Serious consequences arising from the spread of a dental abscess lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Acute dental abscess is polymicrobial, comprising of strict anaerobes, such as anaerobic cocci, Prevotella, Fusobacterium species, and facultative anaerobes, such as viridans group streptococci and the Streptococcus anginosus group. Numerous novel, uncultivable and fastidious organisms have been identified as potential pathogens with the use of non-culture techniques. The majority of localized dental abscesses respond to surgical treatment while the use of antimicrobials is limited to severe spreading infections. There is a need for good-quality clinical trials of sufficient size to identify the ideal treatment. The microbiology of the acute dentoalveolar abscess and its treatment in the light of improved culture and diagnostic methods are reviewed. PMID:24348613

  9. Experimental Staphylococcus aureus brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, D R; Britt, R R; Obana, W G; Stuart, J; Murphy-Irwin, K

    1986-01-01

    The virulent organism Staphylococcus aureus produced brain abscesses that were quantitatively and qualitatively different from those caused by less virulent organisms. S. aureus abscesses created larger lesions, as earlier ependymitis, delayed progress toward healing, and caused areas of inflammatory escape outside the collagen capsule. Imaging tests revealed similar findings: the abscesses were larger, had more extensive central necrosis, and showed earlier evidence of ependymitis. This virulent organism also demonstrated that white matter is more susceptible than overlying gray matter to destruction by infection. The pattern of spread and other histologic findings suggest that collagen capsule formation has less of an infection "containment" function than was previously thought. PMID:3085444

  10. Huge tricuspid valve abscess.

    PubMed

    Manzano Nieto, Carmen M; Vilacosta, Isidre; Corros, Cecilia; Almería, Carlos; Rodríguez, Enrique

    2009-03-01

    A 60-year-old woman with colorectal adenocarcinoma underwent surgical mass resection in 2003; hepatic segmentectomy due to hepatic metastasis was performed in 2005. A port-a-cath for the administration of chemotherapy was cannulated. In April 2007, the patient developed fever and shivering, and the catheter was removed. Catheter and blood cultures were positive for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. TEE showed a very mobile mass (3 x 2 cm) at the junction of the posterior and anterior leaflets of the tricuspid valve. The mass had large echolucent areas inside, exhibiting an appearance like a 'ball of wool' (Panel B). Cardiac MRI confirmed the presence of a mass attached to the tricuspid valve, as shown in the delayed enhancement sequence. At surgery, a ruptured tendinous cord as well as a large abscess within the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve was found. PMID:19196752

  11. Snapshot in surgery: brain abscess as a complication of a recurrent sigmoid diverticular abscess

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhaowei; Wuppalapati, Siddhartha; Scott, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A 35-year-old man was found to have a cerebral abscess secondary to a recurrent sigmoid diverticular abscess. Both cultures grew Streptococcus anginosus. Brain abscess is a rare but potential complication of sigmoid diverticulitis. Streptococcus anginosus, which is found in human gut flora, is a common cause of brain abscess. PMID:26185659

  12. Pyogenic liver abscess: uncommon presentation.

    PubMed

    Sotto Mayor, Joana; Robalo, Maria Margarida; Pacheco, Ana Paula; Esperança, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscess is a rare entity, but it is fatal when untreated. With a peak incidence in the fifth decade of life, its early recognition and intervention are key to successful treatment and better prognosis of patients. In recent years, its approach has been enhanced by the use of percutaneous drainage, improved imaging techniques and a better microbiological characterisation, allowing for a more appropriate use of antibiotics. Clinical manifestations are variable and depend on the size of the abscess, the condition of the patient, associated diseases and possible complications. Among the most common symptoms that stand out are the pain in the upper quadrants of the abdomen, high fever, nausea and vomiting. The authors present the case of a patient who developed an atrial flutter as the initial presentation of a hepatic abscess that imagiologically mimicked a hepatic tumour. PMID:27170608

  13. Capnocytophaga sputigena primary iliopsoas abscess.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jasper F W; Wong, Samson S Y; Leung, Sally S M; Li, Iris W S; To, Kelvin K W; Cheng, Vincent C C; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2010-11-01

    Iliopsoas abscess is usually secondary to the spread of infection from a contiguous focus. Primary disease is uncommon, except in children where Staphylococcus aureus is the main pathogen. We report a 60-year-old woman who developed a primary iliopsoas abscess as a result of haematogenous spread of Capnocytophaga sputigena from a palatal fistula and chronic sinusitis due to previous treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Pyomyositis due to unusual and fastidious Gram-negative bacilli should be considered in patients with head and neck tumours who have previously received radiotherapy. PMID:20634330

  14. [Subcutaneous abscess following epidural catheterization].

    PubMed

    Radif, Ahmed; Dalsgaard, Lars Bech

    2009-06-01

    A case of subcutaneous abscess and meningitis symptoms after insertion of epidural catheter is presented. The symptoms were pain at the site of insertion two days after insertion, later fever and neck rigidity. Treatment is surgical intervention after appropriate diagnostics by magnetic resonance imaging, and administration of appropriate antibiotics. PMID:19500519

  15. Supra-sellar tubercular abscess.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Vijay P; Agrawal, Amit; Mudkanna, Anand; Rudrakshi, S S; Kelkar, G P

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial tuberculomas are less common lesions; sellar, suprasellar, or parasellar involvement is further rarer with only few case reports in the literature. We describe a case of 44-year-old female, discussing the imaging findings that were managed successfully for tubercular hypothalamic-pituitary abscesses. PMID:27057235

  16. Kawasaki Disease Mimicking Retropharyngeal Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Srividhya, Vazhkudai Sridharan; Vasanthi, Thiruvengadam; Shivbalan, Somu

    2010-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute, self-limiting febrile mucocutaneous vasculitis of infants and young children. Retropharyngeal lymphadenopathy is a rare presentation of Kawasaki disease. We present a case of Kawasaki disease mimicking a retropharyngeal abscess, with upper airway obstruction resulting in delayed diagnosis. PMID:20635457

  17. Supra-sellar tubercular abscess

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vijay P.; Agrawal, Amit; Mudkanna, Anand; Rudrakshi, S. S.; Kelkar, G. P.

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial tuberculomas are less common lesions; sellar, suprasellar, or parasellar involvement is further rarer with only few case reports in the literature. We describe a case of 44-year-old female, discussing the imaging findings that were managed successfully for tubercular hypothalamic-pituitary abscesses. PMID:27057235

  18. Pyogenic psoas abscess: analysis of 27 cases.

    PubMed

    Lin, M F; Lau, Y J; Hu, B S; Shi, Z Y; Lin, Y H

    1999-12-01

    From 1993 to 1998, 29 pyogenic psoas abscesses occurring in 27 patients were seen in Taichung Veterans General Hospital. Their age range was 25 to 85 years. Diabetes mellitus was the leading underlying disease. Fever and pain in the flank area, back and hip were the usual manifestations. The duration of symptoms prior to the diagnosis ranged from 3 days to 6 months. Most abscesses were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) images and proven by abscess cultures, which were divided into primary and secondary types. Eighteen of 29 abscesses were regarded as primary. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen in the primary abscesses, followed by Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli, viridans streptococci, S. epidermidis, and Salmonella spp.. In the secondary abscess category, E. coli was the leading organism in this series, followed by S. aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, viridans streptococci and Candida albicans. The associated conditions included epidural abscess, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, perirenal abscess, pulmonary tuberculosis, empyema, hydronephrosis and trauma history. The initial empiric therapy comprised mostly of cefazolin or oxacillin with or without an aminoglycoside. Thirteen patients underwent percutaneous drainage, while six received surgical debridement, including two with a recurrent abscess. One patient had both drainage and debridement. Others received medical treatment only. Two of the patients with primary abscess died in spite of percutaneous drainage. Therefore, open drainage, besides appropriate antibiotic treatment, is still required to control complex abscesses with sepsis. PMID:10650491

  19. Ovarian Abscess Following Therapeutic Insemination

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Bradford A.; Peters, Albert J.; Kazer, Ralph

    1994-01-01

    Background: Artificial insemination is a commonly performed procedure for the treatment of various forms of infertility. Infectious complications have only rarely been noted as a complication of intrauterine insemination (IUI). Case: In this presentation, we report the first case of an ovarian abscess following IUI with the husband's semen. Despite treatment with triple antibiotics, an oophorectomy was required. Surgical as well as pathological evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of an ovarian abscess. Following surgery, the patient responded well to antibiotic therapy. Conclusion: Since pelvic infections are ascending processes, the violation of the natural cervical barrier with IUI can theoretically place the patient at increased risk for this complication. While few advocate routine cultures of semen samples, the clinician must be acutely alert to potential infectious morbidity following this procedure. Early diagnosis and intervention are necessary to minimize morbidity and optimize treatment. PMID:18472883

  20. Peritonsillar abscess in Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Rothfield, R E; Arriaga, M A; Felder, H

    1990-09-01

    Mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome, Kawasaki disease, is a potentially fatal pediatric disease characterized by prolonged high fever, conjunctivitis, stomatitis. myocarditis, aseptic meningitis and coronary artery vasculitis. We present peritonsillar abscess as a previously unreported otolaryngologic symptom and presentation of Kawasaki disease. A previously healthy 7-year-old boy required hospitalization for a peritonsillar abscess. Despite adequate surgical drainage and appropriate intravenous antibiotics, the patients' systemic symptoms persisted. After the week of hospitalization, the child was transferred to the intensive care unit with acute myocarditis, heart failure and severe arthritis. The diagnosis of Kawasaki disease was confirmed with echocardiographic evidence of coronary artery aneurysms and the development of the characteristic hand and foot desquamation. The patient's symptoms resolved with salicylates and intravenous gamma globulin therapy. He was discharged in good condition after 3 weeks of hospitalization. This is the first report of Kawasaki syndrome presenting with peritonsillar abscess. Although we discuss a unique presentation of this disease. Kawasaki syndrome often exhibits other otolaryngologic findings early in its course. A literature review of the clinical characteristics, pathogenesis and therapy of this disease is presented. PMID:2262296

  1. Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma Masquerading as Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vinit; Arora, Anil; Tyagi, Pankaj; Sharma, Praveen; Bansal, Naresh; Singla, Vikas; Bansal, Rinkesh K.; Gupta, Varun; Kumar, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Malignancy masquerading as liver abscess, and presenting with fever, is mainly described in patients with colorectal cancers with liver metastasis. Primary liver tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma or intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma presenting as non-resolving liver abscess is extremely uncommon and carries a dismal prognosis. We present a rare case of non-resolving liver abscess as a presenting manifestation of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:25941437

  2. Liver abscess caused by Salmonella choleraesuis

    PubMed Central

    Kamatani, Takashi; Okada, Takemichi; Iguchi, Hiroyoshi; Takahashi, Yoshihito; Yokomori, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    A 65-year-old man with long-term alcohol abuse presented with intermittent fever. Abdominal computed tomography revealed multiple masses. Abscess blood and pus cultures conducted after percutaneous catheter drainage with pigtail catheters yielded Salmonella choleraesuis. Antibiotic treatment with meropenem was started using multiple catheters in the liver. Drainage catheters in different locations were exchanged several times with larger-bored catheters. After septicemia was detected, abscesses spread to the peritoneal cavity. Pleural complications developed. Antibiotic treatment, with careful drainage guided by ultrasound or computed tomography, controlled the abscesses and complications. This report describes the difficult clinical course and treatment of a liver abscess from S. choleraesuis. PMID:25945064

  3. Basidiobolus: An unusual cause of lung abscess.

    PubMed

    Chetambath, Ravindran; Deepa Sarma, M S; Suraj, K P; Jyothi, E; Mohammed, Safreena; Philomina, Beena J; Ramadevi, S

    2010-04-01

    Non-resolving pneumonia leading to lung abscess is always a challenge to the treating physician especially in a diabetic patient. Atypical radiological features of lung abscess should raise the suspicion of unusual organisms. This is a case report of a 42 year old diabetic male presented with features suggestive of lung abscess and multiple target organ damage. Subsequent work up revealed that the etiological agent is a rare fungus - Basidiobolus. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case of Basidiobolus lung abscess reported from India. PMID:20616942

  4. Cerebral abscess potentially of odontogenic origin.

    PubMed

    Ben Hadj Hassine, Marouene; Oualha, Lamia; Derbel, Amine; Douki, Nabiha

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic origins are rarely implicated in the formation of brain abscesses. The relative paucity of this kind of infection and the difficulty in matching the causative microorganisms of a brain abscess to an odontogenic source can explain the late management of patients. We herein describe a case of a 46-year-old man with a cerebellar abscess that was probably due to an odontogenic infection. The diagnosis supported by imaging and microscopic identification, mini craniectomy for abscess drainage followed by eradication of all potential dental infectious foci, and an antibiotic regimen based on cephalosporins, metronidazole, and vancomycine contributed to a successful outcome. PMID:25705523

  5. Unusual cervical spine epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Liou, Jr-Han; Su, Yu-Jang

    2015-10-01

    A 48-year-old man presented to the emergency department with complain of severe neck pain and anterior chest pain. Intermittent fever in the recent 2 days was also noted. There is a track maker over his left side of neck. The laboratory examination showed leukocytosis and high C-reactive protein level. Urine drug screen was positive for opiate. Empirical antibiotic administration was given. Blood culture grew gram-positive cocci in chain, and there was no vegetation found by heart echocardiogram. However, progressive weakness of four limbs was noted, and patient even cannot stand up and walk. The patient also complained of numbness sensation over bilateral hands and legs, and lower abdomen. Acute urine retention occurred. We arranged magnetic resonance imaging survey, which showed evidence of inflammatory process involving the retropharyngeal spaces and epidural spaces from the skull base to the bony level of T5. Epidural inflammatory process resulted in compression of the spinal cord and bilateral neural foramen narrowing. Neurosurgeon was consulted. Operation with laminectomy and posterior fusion with bone graft and internal fixation was done. Culture of epidural abscess and 2 sets of blood culture all yielded methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. For epidural abscess, the most common involved spine is lumbar followed by thoracic and cervical spine. Diagnosis and treatment in the drug abusers are still challenging because they lack typical presentation, drug compliance, and adequate follow-up and because it is hard to stop drug abuser habit. Significant improvement of neurological deficit can be expected in most spinal abscess in drug abusers after treatment. PMID:26298050

  6. Microbiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N

    2013-04-01

    Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease. PMID:23554416

  7. Microbiology and Treatment of Acute Apical Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rôças, Isabela N.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease. PMID:23554416

  8. Cutaneous abscess after Conus textile sting.

    PubMed

    Veraldi, Stefano; Violetti, Silvia Alberti; Serini, Stefano Maria

    2011-01-01

    We present a 31-year-old man who, after a Conus textile sting acquired in New Caledonia, developed a cutaneous abscess on a buttock. The abscess was accompanied by pain, paraesthesia, general malaise, and fever. Complete remission was achieved by sodium hypochlorite packs and oral amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, metronidazole, and tramadol. PMID:21539663

  9. Severe pelvic abscess formation following caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Muin, Dana A; Takes, Martin Thanh-Long; Hösli, Irene; Lapaire, Olav

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 24-year-old woman with severe pelvic abscess formation 2 weeks after secondary caesarean section. The isolated pathogens were a mixture of Gardnerella vaginalis, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum. After initial resistance to systemic antibiotic treatment, she underwent radiologically-guided drainage of the abscesses, whereon she had a continuous recovery. PMID:25911355

  10. Obturator internus muscle abscess in children.

    PubMed

    Orlicek, S L; Abramson, J S; Woods, C R; Givner, L B

    2001-01-01

    The authors describe four cases of obturator internus muscle (OIM) abscess in children, including their clinical presentations and treatment. This was a retrospective chart review. Children and adolescents younger than 18 years discharged between July 1, 1985, and September 30, 1998, from Brenner Children's Hospital with the diagnosis of muscle abscess or pelvic abscess were identified. A total of 56 patients were identified with the diagnosis of muscle abscess or pelvic abscess. OIM abscess was defined by radiologic findings of an inflammatory process with fluid collection in the OIM, along with the clinical findings suggestive of an OIM abscess. Four of the patients met the definition of OIM muscle abscess. The common presenting features were fever, limp, and hip pain. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging was diagnostic in all four patients, and Staphylococcus aureus was the causative agent in each. All the patients recovered, one after surgical drainage and the other three after antimicrobial therapy alone or with needle aspiration. The presentation of OIM pyomyositis is similar to that of psoas muscle pyomyositis and other infectious processes of the pelvis and hip. The S. aureus is the most common etiologic agent but not the only one reported. Most patients can be managed without open surgical drainage, but needle aspirations may be helpful both therapeutically and diagnostically. PMID:11675547

  11. Spontaneous lingual abscess in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Kettaneh, Nick; Williamson, Kelly

    2014-05-01

    Acute lingual abscess is a rare yet life-threatening clinical entity. Lingual abscess must be appropriately diagnosed and treated in the emergency department to avoid acute airway compromise. A 68-year-old woman on immunomodulatory medication for rheumatoid arthritis presented to the emergency department with left facial pain and swelling. An anterior lingual abscess was diagnosed on computed tomographic scan. The most common cause of lingual abscess is direct trauma, although immunocompromised state is a predisposing risk factor. Intravenous antibiotics are the primary treatment modality, with consideration given to adjunctive surgical drainage. We present this case to increase awareness surrounding this diagnosis among emergency physicians. Spontaneous lingual abscess should be considered in immunocompromised patients who present to the emergency department with tongue pain and edema even in the absence of lingual trauma. PMID:24332904

  12. Actinomyces meyeri brain abscess following dental extraction.

    PubMed

    Clancy, U; Ronayne, A; Prentice, M B; Jackson, A

    2015-01-01

    We describe the rare occurrence of an Actinomyces meyeri cerebral abscess in a 55-year-old woman following a dental extraction. This patient presented with a 2-day history of hemisensory loss, hyper-reflexia and retro-orbital headache, 7 days following a dental extraction for apical peridonitis. Neuroimaging showed a large left parietal abscess with surrounding empyema. The patient underwent craniotomy and drainage of the abscess. A. meyeri was cultured. Actinomycosis is a rare cause of cerebral abscess. The A. meyeri subtype is particularly rare, accounting for less than 1% of specimens. This case describes an unusually brief course of the disease, which is usually insidious. Parietal lobe involvement is unusual as cerebral abscesses usually have a predilection for the frontal and temporal regions of the brain. Although there are no randomised trials to guide therapy, current consensus is to use a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics, followed by 6-12 months of oral therapy. PMID:25870213

  13. Nerve abscess in primary neuritic leprosy.

    PubMed

    Rai, Dheeraj; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Goel, Madhu Mati; Malhotra, Kiran Preet; Kumar, Vijay; Singh, Arun Kumar; Jain, Amita; Kohli, Neera; Singh, Shailesh Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Nerve abscess is an infrequently reported complication of leprosy. We describe a patient with a pure neuritic type of leprosy with multiple nerve abscesses, who presented with tingling and numbness in the medial aspect of his right forearm and hand. Subsequently he developed pain, redness and swelling over the medial side of his right elbow and the flexor aspect of his right wrist. High-resolution ultrasound showed diffuse thickening of the right ulnar nerve with hypoechoic texture housing a cystic lesion with internal debris suggesting an abscess, at the cubital tunnel. Histopathological examination of the pus and tissue obtained from the abscess revealed presence of granulomas with lepra bacilli. The patient responded to surgery and multidrug therapy. In conclusion, the nerve abscess as the first manifestation of leprosy is uncommon and a high index of suspicion is required to make a correct diagnosis. PMID:24171239

  14. Medical treatment of multiple streptococcal liver abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Matlow, A.; Vellend, H.

    1983-04-01

    We describe four cases of multiple, cryptogenic, and streptococcal liver abscesses which were cured with antibiotic therapy. Two of the patients were referred for medical management as a last resort after open surgical drainage failed to eradicate the suppurative process. The other two patients were treated from the time of diagnosis with antimicrobial agents alone. Blood cultures or needle aspirates of the abscesses yielded a pure growth of streptococci in all instances. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin G. Cryptogenic streptococcal abscesses may represent a subset of multiple hepatic abscesses particularly amenable to successful medical therapy consisting of a minimum of 6 weeks parenteral antibiotic therapy followed by a period of oral antibiotics until clinical, biochemical, and radiological resolution of the abscesses has occurred.

  15. Primary pyogenic abscess of the psoas muscle.

    PubMed

    Wu, T L; Huang, C H; Hwang, D Y; Lai, J H; Su, R Y

    1998-01-01

    During a six-year period, eleven persons with primary pyogenic abscess of the psoas muscle were treated at the Mackay Memorial Hospital. Five were males and six were females and their average age was 47.2 years (range 6-83 years). The abscess was identified by CT in 7 patients, MRI in 2 and ultrasonography in 1. One abscess was found during laparotomy. Treatment included extraperitoneal drainage of the abscess in 7 patients and CT guided aspiration in 3. One patient improved after antibiotic therapy and they all recovered after treatment. The diagnosis of primary pyogenic abscess requires a high index of suspicion and the best treatment is early operative drainage and administration of systemic antibiotics. PMID:9549580

  16. Liver Abscess Formation Following Transarterial Chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei-Fu; Lu, Dong; He, Yu-Sheng; Xiao, Jing-Kun; Zhou, Chun-Ze; Cheng, De-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the clinical features, risk factors, and bacterial spectrum of liver abscess following transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and evaluate the therapeutic effect of percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) on the abscesses. A retrospective review of patient charts was performed in 3613 patients who suffered from liver malignancies (2832 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and 781 with metastatic hepatic tumor) and had undergone 11,054 TACE procedures from January 2005 to October 2013. Liver abscesses were found in 21 patients. PCD was performed in all abscess patients. The clinical features, risk factors, and bacterial spectrum of liver abscess following TACE were investigated and the therapeutic effect of PCD was evaluated. The incidence of liver abscess was 0.58% per patient and 0.19% per procedure. Approximately 57.1% of the patients had a medical history of bilioenteric anastomosis or biliary stent implantation. On computed tomography scans, the abscesses appeared as low-attenuation lesions and high-density iodinate oil scattered in the abscesses. The ultrasound showed the well defined, heterogeneously hypoechoic lesions. Positive microbiological isolates were obtained in all pus cultures and in 47.6% of blood cultures. The most common bacterium was Escherichia coli (52.4%). Twenty patients (95.2%) were cured from abscesses by using PCD, and 1 died of sepsis. Patients with predisposing factors are prone to an increased risk of liver abscess following TACE. Bacterial culture and antibiotic sensitivity tests on pus and blood help on the antibiotics selection. PCD combined with aggressive antibiotics can be recommended as the first-line therapeutic regimen. PMID:27124055

  17. Abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... immune system tries to fight it. White blood cells move through the walls of the blood vessels into the area of the infection and collect in the damaged tissue. During this ... cells, dead tissue, and bacteria or other foreign substances. ...

  18. Abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2006-2013 Logical Images, Inc. All rights reserved. Advertising Notice This Site and third parties who place ... would like to obtain more information about these advertising practices and to make choices about online behavioral ...

  19. Animal model for anaerobic lung abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Kannangara, D W; Thadepalli, H; Bach, V T; Webb, D

    1981-01-01

    There are no satisfactory animal models for the study of anaerobic lung abscess. Aspiration of food, gastric mucin, or hydrochloric acid, or any combination of these, along with oropharyngeal bacteria, is commonly believed to cause aspiration pneumonia and lung abscess. In the animal model described, none of the adjuvants was effective in producing anaerobic lung abscesses. Anaerobic bacteria derived from dental scrapings of a healthy adult (Peptococcus morbillorum, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Eubacterium lentum, and Bacteroides fragilis), when inoculated transtracheally without any adjuvants into New Zealand male white rabbits, consistently produced lung abscesses. Neither B fragilis by itself nor a mixture of P. morbillorum, F. nucleatum, and E. lentum without the addition of B. fragilis produced lung abscesses. The bacterial isolates used in this study were stored in prereduced chopped-meat-glucose medium and subcultured several times and were found effective in reproducing anaerobic lung abscesses repeatedly. This animal model is suitable for the study of pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of B. fragilis-associated anaerobic lung abscess. Images PMID:7216463

  20. Bilateral Psoas Muscle Abscess Associated with Emphysematous Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Ki; Kwon, Jae-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Psoas muscle abscess associated with emphysematous urinary tract infection is very rare. There were very few reports about urinary tract infections such as renal abscess, perinephric abscess, and emphysematous pyelonephritis complicated with psoas muscle abscess; however, psoas muscle abscess associated with emphysematous cystitis has not yet been reported. Here, we report a case of bilateral posas muscle abscess following emphysematous cystitis in an 81-year-old nondiabetic man, who was treated successfully with prolonged antibiotic therapy and supportive care. Early recognition of psoas muscle abscess can prevent aggressive interventional procedure and warrant good prognosis. PMID:25755669

  1. Pancreatic Lesion: Malignancy or Abscess?

    PubMed Central

    Shulik, Oleg; Cavanagh, Yana; Grossman, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 67 Final Diagnosis: Pancreatic abscess Symptoms: Jaundice • fatigue • anorexia • subjective weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration • biliary stenting • endoscopic cholangiopancreatography Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare coexistance of disease or pathology Background: Pancreatic abscesses are rare. They may be seen in patients with pancreatic inflammation or pancreatitis. Patients with pancreatic abscesses may have abdominal pain, fever, chills, and nausea/vomiting or an inability to eat. Presentation with alternate symptomatology is extremely unusual. Case Report: A 67-year-old Asian male presented with painless, afebrile obstructive jaundice and a CA 19-9 of 1732 IU. He was found to have a 3.1×2.4 cm low-density lesion in the head of the pancreas and the right lobe of the liver, suggesting malignancy. Surgical management was considered, however additional diagnostic workup, including an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), was performed to complete staging of the presumed mass. A smooth, 3-cm-long, tapering stricture was found it the common bile duct. It was stented from the common hepatic duct to the duodenum. Subsequent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) evaluation of the pancreatic head lesion revealed a drainable fluid collection that was aspirated and found to contain pyogenic material on pathology. The patient’s symptoms resolved, and he was subsequently managed conservatively. A repeat ERCP confirmed complete resolution of the previously visualized cystic lesion. Interestingly, laboratory values showed concomitant normalization of CA 19-9 to 40 IU. Conclusions: EUS-guided biopsy is not widely regarded as a required step before surgery, in the management of patients with pancreatic masses. It is generally reserved for determination of resectability or staging, and only utilized when clinically indicated. However, this

  2. [Cerebral Aspergillus abscess in immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Pianetti Filho, Geraldo; Pedroso, Enio Roberto Pietra; Giannetti, Alexandre Varela; Darwich, Rogério

    2005-12-01

    We report an unusual case of brain aspergillosis with multiple recurrent abscess in a 40 year-old immunocompetent woman, with good therapeutical outcome. The patient presented a subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by a ruptured pericallosal artery aneurysm and was submitted to a craniotomy for aneurysm surgery. Five months later, she developed multiple Aspergillus cerebral abscess. Two craniotomies and amphotericin B became necessary during treatment. Fourteen years later, she is asymptomatic. Treatment of brain aspergillosis abscess implied the combination of both surgical and drug therapy with amphotericin B. PMID:16400435

  3. Left lobe amoebic liver abscess

    PubMed Central

    Rasaretnam, Rudra; Wijetilaka, Shelton E.

    1976-01-01

    For reasons which are not quite clear amoebic liver abscesses in the left lobe are relatively uncommon. On account of the lesser bulk of the left lobe, and the potentially greater space under the left hemidiaphragm, expansive lesions within it remain less obtrusive than corresponding lesions in the right. Sixteen such cases are analysed and five distinct modes of clinical presentation have been found. Eight of the patients presented late with perforation into either the peritoneal or pleural cavities. In seven of eight remaining cases, an abdominal mass suggestive of a left lobe lesion was present. Anaemia, leucocytosis and a raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate were usually present, and in the five cases seen in the last year a positive reaction was obtained to the indirect fluorescent antibody test. Confirmatory radiological features were present only in advanced cases. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:959101

  4. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Gemella morbillorum

    PubMed Central

    Sumberaz, Alessandro; Testino, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Even though Gemella morbillorum infection (GMI) is rare in humans, it may nevertheless, cause endocarditis, meningitis, brain abscess, pleural empyema, nephritis, mediastinitis, and occasionally, liver abscess. We are describing the case of a 64-years-old Caucasian male admitted with fever and abdominal pain. Laboratory parameters revealed inflammation signs, and instrumental examinations showed the presence of diverticula in the ascending colon. Abdominal ultrasound (US) and computer tomography (CT) showed two focal lesions in the right liver lobe. One had the characteristics of a simple cyst; the second was hypoechoic with a low density area, possibly containing necrotic material. US-guided needle biopsy was found negative for neoplastic cells, showing purulent infiltrate. Pus culture was found positive for GMI. Systemic antibiotic therapy coupled with repeated US-guided needle aspiration, induced the resolution of the hepatic abscess. Few cases have been reported of hepatic abscess caused by GMI in immunocompetent non-cirrhotic subjects. PMID:25100894

  5. Fatal thalamic abscess secondary to dental infection.

    PubMed

    Basyuni, Shadi; Sharma, Valmiki; Santhanam, Vijay; Ferro, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of poor neurological recovery and subsequent death secondary to a thalamic abscess in a 53-year-old man. This patient initially presented with sudden dysarthria and left hemiparesis while driving. Neuroimaging showed a multilobular abscess involving the right thalamus with oedema extending to the basal ganglionic region and brainstem. The source of the abscess was initially unknown and it required draining multiple times while the different causes were being explored. The patient's neurological state along with intubation made for a difficult and inconclusive oral examination. It was only after neuroimaging included tooth-bearing areas that it became evident that this patient had extensive periodontal disease with multiple areas of periapical radiolucencies. The patient underwent complete dental clearance alongside repeated drainage of the abscess. Despite initial postoperative improvement, the patient never recovered from the neurological damage and died 3 weeks later. PMID:26678690

  6. Brain abscess: Heuristics, principles, pathobiology, practice.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Manu; Goel, Atul; Muzumdar, Dattatraya

    2015-01-01

    Brain abscess is an uncommon but a compelling reality in neurosurgical practice. Its focal, local, and systemic manifestations conceal its infective and obsessive nature. There are many a lesson that a brain abscess, as a bio-phenomenon, offers to the medical fraternity in general and the neurosurgeons, in particular. From Skt. puyati = to stink, comes the word "pus," meaning something foul, putrid, or rotten. From ab = away, and cedre = to go, comes the term "abscess" which is but nature's ingenious way of creating a fluid-filled cavity that will eventually rupture to an exterior to get rid of the non-self contents and proceed to healing. A brain abscess is special in the sense that it is, in general, more solid than fluid for reasons the human body and brain know best. PMID:26053804

  7. Abscess of the mediastinum: a case report.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, E S; Costa, F; Marchese, L T; Villari Filho, S

    1989-11-01

    In this report a rare case of mediastinal abscess secondary to purulent tonsilitis is reported. Generally this condition is consequent to systemic, cervical, thoracic, or abdominal infections. PMID:2809980

  8. Successful treatment of tuberculous brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Wouters, E F; Hupperts, R M; Vreeling, F W; Greve, L H; Janevski, B; Willebrand, D; Berfelo, W F

    1985-01-01

    A case of tuberculous brain abscess occurred in spite of 4 months' treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis with a triple drug anti-tuberculous regimen. Surgical removal and further chemotherapy were successful. PMID:4020392

  9. Klebsiella pneumoniae Liver Abscess and Metastatic Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jason T.; Lewis, Catherine R.; Danner, Omar K.; Wilson, Kenneth L.; Matthews, L. Ray

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Klebsiella pneumoniae is a well-known cause of liver abscess. Higher rates of liver abscess associated with Klebsiella pneumoniae are seen in Taiwan. Metastatic endophthalmitis is a common complication associated with a poor prognosis despite aggressive therapy. Case Report. We report a case of a 67-year-old Korean female with Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess. The patient developed metastatic endophthalmitis and ultimately succumbed to her disease despite aggressive medical and surgical treatment. Conclusion. Dissemination of Klebsiella pneumoniae is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Liver abscesses preferably should be treated with percutaneous drainage, but surgical treatment is needed in some cases. Metastatic spread to the eye is a common complication that must be treated aggressively with intravenous antibiotics and surgical intervention if necessary. PMID:26788530

  10. [Splenic abscess: etiology, diagnosis and possible therapeutics].

    PubMed

    Burnier, C; Ribordy-Baudat, V; Lamy, O

    2007-10-31

    We report the case of a 28-year-old intravenous drug abuser under quadritherapy for stage C3 AIDS and with past history of infectious endocarditis. He was admitted with a diminished general condition, weight loss, progressive unbearable abdominal pain and vomiting, without fever. An inflammatory syndrome is noted and imaging reveals a voluminous splenic abscess. Conservative treatment is initiated with repetitive drainages and intravenous antibiotics. Aetiologies, diagnosis and possible therapeutics of splenic abscesses are discussed. PMID:18018950

  11. [Psoas abscess caused by Staphylococcus lugdunensis].

    PubMed

    Tamargo Delpón, María; Demelo-Rodríguez, Pablo; Cano Ballesteros, Juan Carlos; Vela de la Cruz, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase-negative staphylococcus of growing importance and atypical behavior. The infections caused by this microorganism are becoming more frequent, having a broader spectrum. Psoas abscesses caused by this germ are rare, with few cases reported in the literature. In this work, we present a case of a psoas abscess caused by S. lugdunensis in a patient suffering from diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis, which was treated with intravenous cloxacillin with a good outcome. PMID:27086257

  12. Imaging of cerebritis, encephalitis, and brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Rath, Tanya J; Hughes, Marion; Arabi, Mohammad; Shah, Gaurang V

    2012-11-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of brain abscess, pyogenic infection, and encephalitis. The role of CT and MRI in the diagnosis and management of pyogenic brain abscess and its complications is reviewed. The imaging appearances of several common and select uncommon infectious encephalitides are reviewed. Common causes of encephalitis in immunocompromised patients, and their imaging appearances, are also discussed. When combined with CSF, serologic studies and patient history, imaging findings can suggest the cause of encephalitis. PMID:23122258

  13. Pyogenic liver abscess: Changing patterns in approach

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ajaz A; Bari, Shams UL; Rouf, Khawaja Abdul; Wani, Khurshid Alam

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To define optimum management of the pyogenic liver abscess and assess new trends in treatment. METHODS: One hundred and sixty nine patients with pyogenic liver abscess managed at Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar, Kashmir (India) from July 2001 to August 2006 were studied to evaluate and define the optimum treatment. RESULTS: Mortality in the surgically treated group of patients was 9.4% (12/119), while those treated non-surgically had a fatality rate of 16.66% (7/42). Multiple liver abscesses treated surgically had a surprisingly low mortality of 30%. The biliary tract (64.97%) was the most common cause of liver abscess. Multiple abscesses, mixed organisms and abscess complications are all associated with a significantly increased mortality. However, the lethality of the primary disease process was the most important factor in determining survival. CONCLUSION: Transperitoneal surgical drainage and antibiotics are the mainstay of treatment. Percutaneous drainage is recommended for high risk patients only. PMID:21206721

  14. Pancreatic Lesion: Malignancy or Abscess?

    PubMed

    Shulik, Oleg; Cavanagh, Yana; Grossman, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pancreatic abscesses are rare. They may be seen in patients with pancreatic inflammation or pancreatitis. Patients with pancreatic abscesses may have abdominal pain, fever, chills, and nausea/vomiting or an inability to eat. Presentation with alternate symptomatology is extremely unusual. CASE REPORT A 67-year-old Asian male presented with painless, afebrile obstructive jaundice and a CA 19-9 of 1732 IU. He was found to have a 3.1×2.4 cm low-density lesion in the head of the pancreas and the right lobe of the liver, suggesting malignancy. Surgical management was considered, however additional diagnostic workup, including an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), was performed to complete staging of the presumed mass. A smooth, 3-cm-long, tapering stricture was found it the common bile duct. It was stented from the common hepatic duct to the duodenum. Subsequent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) evaluation of the pancreatic head lesion revealed a drainable fluid collection that was aspirated and found to contain pyogenic material on pathology. The patient's symptoms resolved, and he was subsequently managed conservatively. A repeat ERCP confirmed complete resolution of the previously visualized cystic lesion. Interestingly, laboratory values showed concomitant normalization of CA 19-9 to 40 IU. CONCLUSIONS EUS-guided biopsy is not widely regarded as a required step before surgery, in the management of patients with pancreatic masses. It is generally reserved for determination of resectability or staging, and only utilized when clinically indicated. However, this practice may be associated with an inherently significant risk of misdiagnosis and subsequent unnecessary surgery, as illustrated by this case. Malignancy was initially suspected in our patient and surgical resection was recommended. Endoscopic measures were only pursued to complete staging. We propose that EUS-guided biopsy may be a crucial diagnostic step in the management algorithm

  15. INFLAMMATORY INDEX AND TREATMENT OF BRAIN ABSCESS

    PubMed Central

    OYAMA, HIROFUMI; KITO, AKIRA; MAKI, HIDEKI; HATTORI, KENICHI; NODA, TOMOYUKI; WADA, KENTARO

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study retrospectively analyzed 12 patients with brain abscesses. Half of the patients were diagnosed inaccurately in the initial stage, and 7.2 days were required to achieve the final diagnosis of brain abscess. The patients presented only with a moderately elevated leukocyte count, serum CRP levels, or body temperatures during the initial stage. These markers changed, first with an increase in the leukocyte count, followed by the CRP and body temperature. The degree of elevation tended to be less prominent, and the time for each inflammatory index to reach its maximum value tended to be longer in the patients without ventriculitis than in those with it. The causative organisms of a brain abscess were detected in 10 cases. The primary causative organisms from dental caries were Streptococcus viridians or milleri, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Nocardia sp. or farcinica were common when the abscess was found in other regions. The primary causative organisms of unrecognized sources of infection were Streptococcus milleri and Prolionibacterium sp. Nocardia is resistant to many antibiotics. However, carbapenem, tetracycline and quinolone were effective for Nocardia as well as many other kinds of bacteria. In summary, the brain abscesses presented with only mildly elevated inflammatory markers of body temperature, leukocyte and CRP. These inflammatory markers were less obvious in the patients without ventriculitis and/or meningitis. The source of infection tended to suggest some specific primary causative organism. It was reasonable to initiate therapy with carbapenem. PMID:23092104

  16. Tongue abscess induced by embedded remnant fishbone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pai-L; Chiang, C-W; Shiao, C-C

    2015-12-01

    The authors reported a 56-year-old man with progressive pain over left bottom of oral cavity involving tongue for 3 days. He had a puncture history of tongue by fishbone, which was immediately removed 3 weeks ago. The subsequent contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan of neck disclosed an abscess formation with a faint linear radiopaque material inside, consisting with remnant fishbone retention. The patient was treated conservatively with intravenous antibiotics, followed by an uneventful course during subsequent follow-up for more than 9 months until now. Tongue abscess is a rare but potentially life threatening clinical entity. Foreign body puncture-related tongue abscess should be listed as a differential diagnosis in cases with acute tongue swelling. PMID:26790560

  17. [Pituitary abscess. A case report (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Guy, G; Jallet, G; Bigorgne, J C

    The case of a patient with apparently primitive pituitary abscess is presented along with a review of the current literature on the subject. Pituitary abscess is rare and should be suspected in patients with hypopituitarism or a febrile chiasma syndrome as well as in the presence of acute or chronic relapsing aseptic meningitis. Diagnosis is based upon radiologic examination particularly tomography of the sella turcica and computerized axial tomography. With early surgical treatment the prognosis is favourable resulting at times in partial or total correction of pituitary function. Twenty-six patients were studied. In twelve of these patients no origin of the abscess was found. Pituitary tumor was found in eight patients and sphenoidal sinusitis in six patients. PMID:6261360

  18. Muscle Abscess due to Salmonella Enterica

    PubMed Central

    Akkoyunlu, Yasemin; Ceylan, Bahadir; Iraz, Meryem; Elmadag, Nuh Mehmet; Aslan, Turan

    2013-01-01

    Non typhoidal Salmonellae spp. causes clinical symptoms especially in neonates, infants, aged and immunocompromised patients. Hematogenous dissemination may occur in complicated cases whereas the formation of abscess is rare. A 61-year old woman presented to our hospital with pain and a mass in her left arm, without fever and leukocytosis. She was using methotrexate, corticosteroids and quinine for rheumatoid arthritis. She had a history of cervix cancer and was given radiotherapy and chemotherapy 3 years ago. Upon physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging, the mass was considered as an abscess and was surgically drained. Salmonella enterica spp. enterica was yielded in the culture of the drainage material. Ceftriaxon 2g/day was started intramuscularly and continued for 4 weeks. Salmonellosis is usually a self-limited disease, generally restricted to gastrointestinal tract and acquired following food poisoning. Management of Salmonella abscess requires a combination of antibiotherapy, surgical drainage and eradication of primary foci. PMID:24396582

  19. Pelvic Endometriosis Presenting as a Supralevator Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Bernard B.; Tuckson, Wayne B.

    1988-01-01

    A 32-year-old woman presented with sepsis nine days after a transrectal incision and drainage of a recurrent supralevator abscess. The findings included a large mass arising from the pelvis containing multiple, leaking, and infected endometrial cysts. After a supracervical hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, sigmoid loop colostomy, appendectomy, and extensive irrigation and debridement, her condition improved with no recurrence at two-year follow-up. This case illustrates the varied presentations of endometriosis, the importance of identifying the source of a perirectal or perianal abscess, and that when a supralevator abscess develops from an intraabdominal process, the process must be addressed to prevent recurrence, fistulization, or other complications. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:3246707

  20. Unusual case of a lung abscess.

    PubMed

    Musa, Duduzile; Godbole, Gauri; Chiodini, Peter L; Phillips, Russell

    2013-01-01

    A 56-year-old Caucasian lady presented with a short history of pleuritic chest pain on the background of a 2-month history of fever, chills, 10-kg weight loss and cough with brown sputum after a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. She had persistent eosinophilia and was diagnosed with a lung abscess as seen on chest x-ray. She did not respond to standard intravenous broad spectrum antibacterial medication and her chest CT scan showed a moderate pleural collection in continuity with the abscess. She also underwent bronchoscopy, the microscopy of the bronchial washings revealing eggs of the trematode Fasciola. The bacterial and fungal cultures of the washings were sterile. She had visited Turkey in the previous year but did not remember consuming any watercress or aquatic plants. She was successfully treated with two doses of the antiparasitic agent triclabendazole. Ectopic Fasciola can be a rare cause of a lung abscess. PMID:23595175

  1. Primary pyogenic psoas abscess in children.

    PubMed

    Kadambari, D; Jagdish, S

    2000-01-01

    Primary pyogenic psoas abscess, although quite a common condition, particularly in the tropics, is often overlooked as a clinical entity, probably because a psoas abscess has been traditionally associated with tuberculous spondylitis. The abscess is easily diagnosed by ultrasonography (US). Treatment by open drainage and antibiotics effective against Staphylococcus aureus results in complete reversal of symptoms and signs. In our series of 55 cases in the pediatric age group (0-12 years), pain and flexion at the hip were the most frequent clinical features at presentation. US was diagnostic in all cases in which it was performed. All except 1 patient showed complete resolution with extraperitoneal drainage, antibiotics, and skin traction. Although 4% of the cases were associated with suppurative external-iliac lymphadenitis, the remaining ones arose de novo in the psoas sheath, suggesting a primary pyomyositis of the psoas muscle. PMID:10955575

  2. Renal Abscess Caused by Salmonella Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Amarjeet; Sarma, Smita; Kumar, Navin; Sengupta, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella typhi is a true pathogen, which is capable of causing both intestinal and extraintestinal infections. Unusual presentations of Salmonella should always be kept in mind as this organism can cause disease in almost any organ of the body. S. typhi has been reported to cause the life-threatening infections such as meningitis, endocarditis, myocarditis, empyema, and hepatic abscess. Renal involvement by S. typhi is a relatively rare presentation. We report a case of renal abscess caused by S. typhi in an afebrile, 10-year-old child who did not have any clinical history of enteric fever. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of isolation of S. typhi from the renal abscess, and interestingly this isolate was found to be resistant to quinolones. PMID:26417164

  3. Brain abscess from a peritonsillar abscess in an immunocompetent child: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sankararaman, Senthilkumar; Riel-Romero, Rosario Maria S; Gonzalez-Toledo, Eduardo

    2012-12-01

    A brain abscess is uncommon but potentially lethal. Common predisposing risk factors include congenital cyanotic heart disease, immunocompromised status, and the presence of septic foci. We describe a left frontal brain abscess accompanied by fever, headache, and weight loss for a 3-month period. The presumptive source of the brain abscess involved a left peritonsillar abscess. To the best of our knowledge, one similar case was reported in the literature in 1929. The specific signs of peritonsillar abscess in our patient included trismus, decreased phonation, and a muffled voice. The peritonsillar abscess was not clinically diagnosed, but incidentally detected on lower axial sections of cranial magnetic resonance imaging. Fever and trismus improved after surgical drainage of the peritonsillar abscess. The cerebral abscess was conservatively treated with intravenous antibiotics. The patient developed hydrocephalus as a sequela to the involvement of the basal meninges. PMID:23127268

  4. Ruptured Liver Abscess in Neonates: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Niyaz Ahmed; Choudhury, SR; Jhanwar, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal hepatic abscess is a rare disease seen mainly in preterm following umbilical catheterisation. Liver abscess in term neonates without any predisposing factor is still rarer and only few cases have been reported in the literature. Here we report two cases of liver abscess in term neonates presenting with abdominal mass due to rupture. PMID:27433449

  5. The conservative management of acute pyogenic iliopsoas abscess in children.

    PubMed

    Tong, C W; Griffith, J F; Lam, T P; Cheng, J C

    1998-01-01

    We describe three cases of acute pyogenic abscess of the iliopsoas in children treated conservatively. Two patients had image-guided aspiration and one was managed with antibiotics alone. All made a complete recovery. Acute pyogenic abscess of the iliopsoas in children can be treated effectively and safely with intravenous antibiotics and image-guided aspiration of the abscess. PMID:9460958

  6. Retroperitoneoscopic drainage of a psoas abscess.

    PubMed

    Katara, Avinash N; Shah, Rasik S; Bhandarkar, Deepraj S; Unadkat, Rajan J

    2004-09-01

    Pyogenic psoas abscess in the pediatric age group is a primary condition caused mostly by Staphylococcus aureus. The preferred treatment is percutaneous or surgical drainage under a cover of systemic antibiotics. Laparoscopic drainage scores over open surgery in terms of minimal invasion, shorter hospital stay, better patient comfort, and more complete drainage compared with the percutaneous approach. The authors report a case of a 4-year-old boy with a psoas abscess that was effectively drained laparoscopically through an extraperitoneal approach. PMID:15359416

  7. Mumps Presenting as a Parotid Abscess.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Seung; Oh, Jong Seok; Kwon, Sam Hyun; Kim, Min Su; Yoon, Yong Joo

    2016-05-01

    Parotid abscess is an uncommon condition in infants. It is frequently associated with prematurity, prolonged gavage feeding, and dehydration. Mumps is a viral disease caused by paramyxovirus. It frequently involves the parotid gland and is only rarely found in the pancreas, testis, or brain. The authors describe a rare case of a 10-month-old infant with mumps who developed the classical manifestations of unilateral acute parotitis progressing to formation of a parotid abscess that responded to 2 rounds of surgical drainage and antibiotic therapy. PMID:27159869

  8. [Report of 2 cases of prostatic abscess].

    PubMed

    Dakir, M; Aboutaieb, R; Dahami, Z; Sarf, I; Zamiati, W; Essakalli, N; el Mrini, M; Meziane, F; Benjelloun, S

    2000-04-01

    Prostatic abscess is a rare disease. In the light of two cases, the authors discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of this disease. Two patients, aged 17 and 55 years, presented nonspecific clinical features. Medical imaging (US, CT) established the diagnosis by showing a loculated cystic prostatic mass. Treatment consisted of transurethral drainage and antibiotics with a favourable course in both cases. Prostatic abscess is a rare disease for which the diagnosis has been facilitated by progress in medical imaging. The treatment of choice remains transurethral endoscopic drainage. PMID:10857153

  9. Proteus mirabilis abscess involving the entire neural axis.

    PubMed

    Kamat, A S; Thango, N S; Husein, M Ben

    2016-08-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord abscesses are rare and potentially devastating lesions usually associated with other infective processes such as bacterial endocarditis, or pulmonary or urogenital infection. We describe a 2-year-old girl who presented with an infected dermal sinus leading to an intraspinal abscess. This abscess eventually spread and involved the entire neural axis leaving her quadriparetic. Drainage of the abscess resulted in recovery and the child regained normal function of her limbs. To our knowledge this is the first documented case of an intramedullary abscess involving the entire neural axis. PMID:26960264

  10. A rare cause of nasal septal abscess.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, David; Hornibrook, Jeremy

    2013-04-01

    We describe a patient with mid-facial pain and nasal obstruction due to a nasal septal abscess (NSA) complicating an occult fungal ball of the sphenoid sinus. We highlight the importance of suspecting unusual pathology in patients with NSA and no trauma history. PMID:23793181

  11. Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall

    PubMed Central

    Tonziello, Gilda; Valentinotti, Romina; Arbore, Enrico; Cassetti, Paolo; Luzzati, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall Symptoms: — Medication: Ciprofloxacin Clinical Procedure:— Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Non-typhoid Salmonella extra-intestinal infections usually develop in infants and in adult patients with pre-existing predisposing conditions. Blood stream infections and urinary tract infections are the most common clinical presentations, but other sites of infection may be involved as well. Case Report: We describe a case of invasive salmonellosis caused by Salmonella typhimurium involving the chest wall in a 73-year-old man. The patient had suffered from gastroenteritis followed by left basal pneumonia with pleural effusion 7 weeks before. The CT scan of the chest wall showed a pericostal abscess with shirt-stud morphology near the left last cartilaginous arch. The abscess was surgically drained and patient was cured after a 40-day ciprofloxacin treatment. Conclusions: A review of the literature on extra-intestinal non-typhoid salmonellosis shows that pleuropulmonary and soft-tissue infections are uncommon. We argue that non-typhoid Salmonella might be considered as a possible cause of chest wall abscess in individuals with recent history of gastroenteritis complicated by pneumonia and pleural effusion. PMID:24298305

  12. Giant horseshoe intra-abdominal abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Altemeier, W A; Culbertson, W R; Fidler, J P

    1975-01-01

    A study of 12 patients with giant horseshoe abscess of the abdominal and pelvic cavities seen at the Surgical Services of the University of Cincinnati Medical Center has emphasized the complexity and bizarre nature of these lesions. These infections represented a huge abscess or series of communicating abscesses extending from one subphrenic space along the corresponding paracolic gutter into the pelvis, up and along the opposite paracolic space, and into the other subphrenic space. Since these lesions occurred infrequently, they were often not recognized until they had become far advanced and had produced profound effects on the patients. The diagnosis was difficult and obscured by various factors including the postoperative state after laparotomy for complex diseases or serious injuries of the biliary tract, the genitourinary tract, or the alimentary tract. An important etiologic component of the formation of these giant abscesses was the continuing escape and collection of large volumes of fluid resulting from lesions of the biliary tract, postoperative hemorrhage, or an unrecognized large perforated peptic ulcer. Nine patients were treated successfully and 3 died. The many diagnostic and therapeutic problems presented by the patients with this interesting and complex lesion have emphasized the importance of earlier and more accurate diagnosis, early and adequate surgical drainage, intelligently applied antibiotic therapy and appropriate supportive treatment. Failure to recognize and drain effectively each of the component sections of this lesion led to continuing sepsis with prolonged morbidity, progressive debility, and death. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:1079447

  13. Management of superior subperiosteal orbital abscess.

    PubMed

    Gavriel, Haim; Jabrin, Basel; Eviatar, Ephraim

    2016-01-01

    A superior subperiosteal orbital abscess (SSPOA) is a collection of purulent material between the periorbit and the superior bony orbital wall, and is typically a complication of frontal sinusitis. SSPOA is characteristically managed by classic external surgical drainage. The aim of our study was to assess the role of surgical intervention in SSPOA. A retrospective medical chart review of patients diagnosed with SSPOA secondary to rhinosinusitis between the year 2005 and 2013 was conducted. Collected data included age, gender, co-morbidity, clinical presentation, prior antibiotic management, CT scans, surgical approach, outcome and complications. Six patients were included in our study, three males and three females with a mean age of 22.8 (range 9-58). Two patients were treated with amoxicillin clavulanic acid for 3 days prior to admission. Only the youngest patient with the smallest abscess responded successfully to conservative treatment, while the rest were managed surgically: three patients were treated successfully by the endonasal endoscopic approach and two patients were treated by utilizing the combined endonasal endoscopic and external approach. In patients who underwent the combined approach, the abscess was located in a more antero-lateral position than those treated endonasal endoscopically only. The location of a SSPOA dictates the surgical approach. The most antero-lateral SSPOAs should be drained by the combined approach, while more posterior abscesses should be approached endoscopically. Furthermore, a small SSPOA is first to be reported to resolve with conservative treatment. Level 4 (case series). PMID:25700832

  14. Multiple intracranial abscesses: Heralding asymptomatic venosus ASD.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Praveen K; Marzook, Rehab Ali; Sulaibeekh, Leena

    2013-10-01

    A case of multiple intracranial abscesses in an immune-competent young girl is reported. She had chicken pox. Two weeks later, she presented with multiple intracranial abscesses. No significant cardiac abnormality was detected on transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE). The condition was treated medically. However, one of the abscesses adjacent to the CSF pathways enlarged on treatment and caused obstructive hydrocephalus that required stereotactic aspiration. Gram stain showed gram positive cocci in chain. Pus was sterile on culture. She was treated with broad spectrum IV antibiotics based on Gram staining report for 6 weeks followed by another 8 weeks of oral antibiotics. She made good recovery and had been leading a normal life. The abscess capsules took 30 months to resolve completely on MRI. A repeat TTE done in the follow up showed enlarged right heart chambers with a suggestion of a venosus ASD. A trans-esophageal echocardiogram (TEE) confirmed the presence of sinus venosus ASD from the SVC side with mainly left to right shunt. There was also partial anomalous drainage of the pulmonary veins. The patient underwent correction of the defect and has been doing well. PMID:24551007

  15. Calcinosis in juvenile dermatomyositis mimicking cold abscess.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Rajendra P; Bharati, Joyita; Sheriff, Abraar; Priyadarshini, Praytusha; Chumber, Sunil; Kabra, S K

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of dystrophic calcification presenting as soft cystic swelling in a patient with juvenile dermatomyositis. A 15-year-old boy with lumbosacral cystic swelling, which was considered a cold abscess clinically, was evaluated for nonresponse to antitubercular therapy. The cystic swelling had liquefied calcium with a well circumscribed calcified wall on imaging, which was subsequently excised. PMID:27586213

  16. Periappendicular Abscess Presenting within an Inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Loberant, Norman; Bickel, Amitai

    2015-01-01

    The presence of the appendix within an inguinal hernia is a rare finding. We present the case of an elderly woman who developed appendicitis within an inguinal hernia, complicated by a supervening periappendicular abscess. She was successfully treated with a combination of antibiotics and percutaneous drainage. PMID:26605128

  17. Recurrent breast abscesses caused by Corynebacterium minutissimum.

    PubMed

    Berger, S A; Gorea, A; Stadler, J; Dan, M; Zilberman, M

    1984-12-01

    A 42-year-old woman developed severe, recurrent breast abscesses caused by Corynebacterium minutissimum. Prior reports of C. minutissimum infection have been limited to erythrasma, a minor dermatosis. The microbiological and clinical features of this species were reviewed. PMID:6520230

  18. Eikenella corrodens from a brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Rina; Marret, Mary J; Hassan, Hamimah; Puthucheary, Savithri D

    2004-06-01

    A 2-year-old boy with underlying congenital cyanotic heart disease presented with seizures and fever and was found to have bilateral parietal cerebral abscesses. Drainage of the pus from the abscesses was done in stages; on the day of admission, four days after admission and 3 weeks after admission. Although the pus from the first drainage did not grow any organisms, the pus from the second drainage on the fourth day of admission yielded a mixed growth of Eikenella corrodens and Streptococcus milleri. Following the second drainage of pus, the child was noted to have mild weakness (grade 3/5) and increased tone in the left upper limb. Three weeks after admission, due to recurring fever, further neurological signs and findings of an enlarging right cerebral abscess on a repeat CT scan, a third drainage was carried out. However no growth was obtained from this specimen. This patient was managed both surgically and with appropriate antibiotics. Over the next four months, serial CT scans revealed gradual resolution of the abscesses with disappearance of the surrounding oedema. The child showed gradual recovery of his left sided weakness with resolution of tone and reflexes to normal. PMID:16190107

  19. Prognostic indications of the failure to treat amoebic liver abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Aguilar, Martín; Morán-Mendoza, Onofre; Herrera-Hernández, Miguel F; Hernández-Sierra, Juan Francisco; Mandeville, Peter B; Tapia-Pérez, J Humberto; Sánchez-Reyna, Martín; Sánchez-Rodríguez, José Juan; Gordillo-Moscoso, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To identify the variables that predict the failure to treat amoebic liver abscesses. Methods We prospectively carried out a case–control study on a cohort of patients who had been diagnosed with amoebic liver abscesses using clinical, ultrasonic, and serologic methods. Patients with pyogenic abscesses, negative ELISA tests for amoebiasis, immunosuppression status, or previous abdominal surgery were excluded. All patients received metronidazole, and those who demonstrated 4 days of unfavorable clinical responses received percutaneous or surgical draining of the abscess. Demographic, laboratory, and ultrasonographic characteristics were assessed as prognostic indications of failure. Results Of 40 patients with amoebic liver abscess, 24 (mean age: 36.7±11.2 years) responded to medical treatment and 16 (41.8±11.6 years) required drainage, including 14 patients who underwent percutaneous drainage and two patients who required surgery. The albumin level, abscess volume, abscess diameter, and alkaline phosphatase level were all statistically significant (P<0.05) on the bivariate analysis. The highest (>99%) sensitivity and negative predictive value were observed for an abscess volume >500 ml and diameter >10 cm, while the best specificity and positive predictive value were achieved with the combination of low serum albumin level, high alkaline phosphatase level, and large abscess volume or diameter. Conclusions The prognostic indications of the failure to treat amoebic liver abscesses include low albumin, high alkaline phosphatase, and large abscess volume or diameter. The combination of these variables is a useful and easy tool for determining appropriate therapy. PMID:23265424

  20. Antibiotic penetration of experimental intra-abdominal abscesses.

    PubMed

    Galandiuk, S; Lamos, J; Montgomery, W; Young, S; Polk, H C

    1995-06-01

    Intra-abdominal abscess is seldom adequately treated by systemic antibiotics alone and often requires surgical or computed tomography-guided drainage for resolution. Abscess penetration of six currently used antibiotics was examined in a murine intra-abdominal abscess model. Ampicillin/sulbactam, cefmetazole, clindamycin, and trospectomycin penetrated intra-abdominal abscesses to a greater degree than cefoxitin and ceftriaxone. Abscess pus antibiotic levels were not significantly higher after multiple doses than after a single dose. Pus antibiotic levels below the MIC90 for Bacteroides and E. coli within intra-abdominal abscess were observed for most antibiotics with the doses used in this study. Selection of antibiotics with a greater ability to penetrate abscess may be important in optimally treating patients with abdominal infection. PMID:7762902

  1. Current trends in the diagnosis and treatment of tuboovarian abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Landers, D.V.; Sweet, R.L.

    1985-04-15

    Tuboovarian abscess is a well-recognized complication of acute salpingitis and has been reported in as many as one third of hospital admissions for acute salpingitis. The incidence of tuboovarian abscess is expected to increase as a result of the current epidemic of sexually transmitted diseases and their sequelae. Patients with tuboovarian abscess most commonly present with lower abdominal pain and an adnexal mass(es). Fever and leukocytosis may be absent. Ultrasound, computed tomographic scans, laparoscopy, or laparotomy may be necessary to confirm the diagnosis. Tuboovarian abscess may be unilateral or bilateral regardless of intrauterine contraceptive device usage. Tuboovarian abscess is polymicrobial with a preponderance of anaerobic organisms. An initial conservative antimicrobial approach to the management of the unruptured tuboovarian abscess is appropriate if the antimicrobial agents used can penetrate abscesses, remain active within the abscess environment, and are active against the major pathogens in tuboovarian abscess, including the resistant gram-negative anaerobes such as Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides bivius. However, if the patient does not begin to show a response within a reasonable amount of time, about 48 to 72 hours, surgical intervention should be undertaken. Suspicion of rupture should remain an indication for immediate operation. Once operation is undertaken, a conservative approach with unilateral adnexectomy for one-side tuboovarian abscess is appropriate if future fertility or hormone production is desired.

  2. [Pasteurella multocida meningitis with cerebral abscesses].

    PubMed

    Nguefack, S; Moifo, B; Chiabi, A; Mah, E; Bogne, J-B; Fossi, M; Fru, F; Mbonda, E; Djientcheu, V-P

    2014-03-01

    Pasteurella multocida is classically responsible for local soft tissue infections secondary to dog bites or cat scratches. It can be responsible for meningitis in infants and elderly persons. We report the case history of a 5-year-old male child admitted to our pediatric unit for meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed an infection with P. multocida. The suspected mode of contamination was either from the saliva of a pet dog or through an unnoticed skull fracture sustained after an accident 1 year prior to the occurrence of meningitis. In spite of the neurologic complication (cerebral abscess), the progression was favorable after drainage of the abscess, 5 weeks of parenteral treatment, and 3 weeks of oral antibiotic therapy. Meningitis due to Pasteurella sp. is rare and can lead to neurologic complications. The notion of bites or scratches can be absent and the mode of contamination is sometimes difficult to unveil. PMID:24457110

  3. Epidural Abscess Masquerading as Lateral Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Brodner, David C.; Cutler, Jeff; Gianoli, Gerard J.; Amedee, Ronald G.

    2000-01-01

    Controversy regarding the use of anticoagulants, the evacuation of the sinus, or the use of medical treatment alone surrounds the treatment of lateral sinus thrombosis. Treatment of an epidural abscess associated with coalescent mastoiditis is much less controversial-drainage is usually recommended. The differing treatments of these complications mandate accurate diagnosis. The advent of more sophisticated radiological studies has facilitated diagnosis of these complications; however, tests are not infallible. We present three cases in which preoperative imaging demonstrates an epidural abscess mimicking lateral sinus thrombosis by compression of the vessel. A false-positive computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study may lead to the wrong diagnosis and, consequently, improper treatment. In light of this possibility, we recommend surgical exploration in all such cases. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171148

  4. Brain abscess caused by Nocardia asiatica

    PubMed Central

    Uneda, Atsuhito; Suzuki, Kenta; Okubo, Shuichi; Hirashita, Koji; Yunoki, Masatoshi; Yoshino, Kimihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nocardia infection of the central nervous system leading to brain abscess is a rare condition but has a high mortality rate. Among the species of Nocardia, only three cases of brain abscess due to Nocardia asiatica infection have been reported. Case Description: A 65-year-old man with a history of autoimmune hemolytic anemia treated with prednisolone presented to our hospital because of occipital headache. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral occipital lesions. The patient underwent craniotomy and resection of the left occipital lobe lesion. N. asiatica was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing of the resected specimen. Treatment with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole led to a complete resolution of the brain lesion. Conclusion: Because of the different antimicrobial sensitivity patterns among Nocardia species, both appropriate subtyping and susceptibility testing of uncommon species such as N. asiatica are required for the successful treatment of nocardial infections. PMID:27563485

  5. DESCENDING NECROTIZING MEDIASTINITIS SECONDARY TO RETROPHARYNGEAL ABSCESS.

    PubMed

    Kovacić, Marijan; Kovacić, Ivan; Dželalija, Boris

    2015-12-01

    Descending necrotizing mediastinitis secondary to a nontraumatic retropharyngeal abscess is very rare. This form of mediastinitis in the era of potent antibiotics often ends up with lethal outcome. It usually occurs in immunocompromised patients and requires intensive multidisciplinary treatment approach. We report a case of nontraumatic retropharyngeal abscess complicated by descending necrotizing mediastinitis in a 70-year-old man with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. The patient was admitted to our hospital after clinical and radiological diagnosis of retropharyngeal abscess. During treatment for retropharyngeal abscess with antibiotic therapy and transoral incision, the patient showed mild clinical improvement but his condition suddenly aggravated on day 4 of hospital stay. He had high fever, chest pain with tachypnea, tachycardia, hypotension, and showed signs of occasional disorientation. Emergency computed tomography (CT) scan of the neck and thorax showed inflammation in the retropharyngeal space, as well as thickening of the upper posterior mediastinum fascia with the presence of air. Emergency surgery including cervicotomy and drainage of the retropharyngeal space and posterior mediastinum was performed. The patient promptly recovered with improvement of the clinical status and laboratory findings. After 16 days of treatment he was discharged from the hospital in good condition. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis can be a serious and life threatening complication of deep neck infection if the diagnosis is not quickly established. Besides inevitable application of antimicrobial drugs, good drainage of the mediastinum is necessary. We believe that transcervical approach can achieve high-quality drainage of the upper mediastinum, especially if it is done timely as in this case. Its efficacy can be verified by intensive monitoring of the patient clinical condition, by CT scan of the thorax, and by laboratory tests. In the case of inefficacy of this type

  6. The microbiota of acute apical abscesses.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, J F; Rôças, I N

    2009-01-01

    As the breadth of bacterial diversity in the oral cavity has been deciphered by molecular studies, several newly identified species/phylotypes have emerged as potential pathogens. We hypothesized that many of these species/phylotypes could also be involved with the etiology of endodontic abscesses. Abscess aspirates from 42 persons were analyzed for the presence of 81 species/phylotypes by means of a reverse-capture checkerboard hybridization assay. Associations between the most frequently detected taxa were calculated. The most prevalent taxa were Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, and Porphyromonas endodontalis. Other frequently found taxa included Olsenella uli, streptococci, Eikenella corrodens, some as-yet-uncultivated phylotypes (Bacteroidetes clone X083 and Synergistes clone BA121), and newly named species (Prevotella baroniae and Dialister invisus). Several positive bacterial associations were disclosed. Findings not only strengthen the association of many cultivable species with abscesses, but also include some newly named species and uncultivated phylotypes in the set of candidate pathogens associated with this disease. PMID:19131319

  7. [Delayed brain abscess after penetrating transorbital injury].

    PubMed

    Hiraishi, Tetsuya; Tomikawa, Masaru; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Kawaguchi, Tadashi

    2007-05-01

    We report a case of brain abscess caused by a penetrating head injury that occurred 9 years earlier. A 14-year-old girl presenting with fever, headache, and stiff neck was admitted to our hospital. She was diagnosed with aseptic meningitis and treated conservatively. Seven days after admission she became stuporous and showed left hemiparesis. Computed tomography (CT) revealed two ring-enhancing masses with perifocal edema in the right frontal lobe. We diagnosed brain abscess and performed right fronto-temporal decompressive craniectomy and stereotactic aspiration, followed by systemic antibiotic therapy. Post-surgery bone window CT revealed a well-defined, low-density foreign body passing from the left orbita to the right frontal lobe through the ethmoid sinus. We learned that the patient had been struck with a plastic chopstick in the left medial eyelid at the age of 5 years. No particular symptoms developed during the following 9 years. After the cerebral edema had diminished over the next 10 days, a second surgery was performed to remove the residual chopstick, repair the fistula at the base of the skull, and perform cranioplasty. The patient was discharged with only slight hyposmia after a 4-week course of antibiotics. This case showed that it is necessary to remove a residual foreign body and to close the dural fistula if there is a possibility of recurrent central nervous system infection. When a child presents with brain abscess, previous penetrating head injury should be considered. PMID:17491344

  8. Melioidosis: A Rare Cause of Liver Abscess.

    PubMed

    Martin, Peter Franz M San; Teh, Catherine S C; Casupang, Ma Amornetta J

    2016-01-01

    Case Presentation. This is a case of a 44-year-old male, farmer, known to be diabetic, presenting with two-week history of vague abdominal pain associated with high grade fever. Abdominal CT scan showed localized liver abscess at segment 8 measuring 7.5 × 6.8 × 6.1 cm. Patient subsequently underwent laparoscopic ultrasound guided pigtail insertion for drainage of abscess. Culture studies showed moderate growth of Burkholderia pseudomallei in which the patient completed seven days of IV Meropenem. On follow-up after 12 weeks of oral Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim, taken twice a day, the patient remained asymptomatic with no residual findings based on the abdominal ultrasound. Discussion. Diagnosis of melioidosis, a known "great masquerader," relies heavily on culture studies. Consensus with regard to the management of liver abscess caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei has not yet been established due to the rarity of cases. Surgical intervention through either a percutaneous or open drainage has shown good outcomes compared to IV antibiotics alone. In Philippines, the possibility of underreporting is highly plausible. This write-up serves not only to report a rare presentation of melioidosis but also to add to the number of cases reported in the country, possibly indicative of disease emergence. PMID:27529039

  9. Intraperitoneal tuberculous abscess: Computed tomography features

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Peng; Chen, Jing-Jing; Wang, Xi-Zhen; Wang, Ya-Qin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the computed tomography (CT) features of intraperitoneal tuberculous abscess (IPTA). METHODS: Eight patients with IPTA confirmed by pathology were analyzed retrospectively. The clinical symptoms, medical images, and surgical findings were evaluated. Involvement of the intestine, peritoneum, viscera, and lymph nodes was also assessed. RESULTS: All 8 patients had a history of abdominal discomfort for 1 to 6 mo. Physical examination revealed a palpable abdominal mass in 6 patients. Three patients had no evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). All IPTAs (11 abscesses) were seen as a multiseptated, peripherally enhanced, hypodense mass with enlarged, rim-enhanced lymph nodes. The largest abscess diameter ranged from 4.5 cm to 12.2 cm. CT showed 2 types of IPTA: Lymph node fusion and encapsulation. Of the 8 patients, one had liver tuberculosis and one had splenic and ovarian tuberculosis. Two cases showed involvement of the terminal ileum and ileocecal junction. Ascites were found in 4 cases. Three patients had peritonitis and mesenteritis. Three patients showed involvement of the omentum. Three patients had histological evidence of caseating granuloma, and 5 had histological evidence of acid-fast bacilli. CONCLUSION: CT is crucial in the detection and characterization of IPTA. Certain CT findings are necessary for correct diagnosis. PMID:26435779

  10. Melioidosis: A Rare Cause of Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Catherine S. C.; Casupang, Ma. Amornetta J.

    2016-01-01

    Case Presentation. This is a case of a 44-year-old male, farmer, known to be diabetic, presenting with two-week history of vague abdominal pain associated with high grade fever. Abdominal CT scan showed localized liver abscess at segment 8 measuring 7.5 × 6.8 × 6.1 cm. Patient subsequently underwent laparoscopic ultrasound guided pigtail insertion for drainage of abscess. Culture studies showed moderate growth of Burkholderia pseudomallei in which the patient completed seven days of IV Meropenem. On follow-up after 12 weeks of oral Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim, taken twice a day, the patient remained asymptomatic with no residual findings based on the abdominal ultrasound. Discussion. Diagnosis of melioidosis, a known “great masquerader,” relies heavily on culture studies. Consensus with regard to the management of liver abscess caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei has not yet been established due to the rarity of cases. Surgical intervention through either a percutaneous or open drainage has shown good outcomes compared to IV antibiotics alone. In Philippines, the possibility of underreporting is highly plausible. This write-up serves not only to report a rare presentation of melioidosis but also to add to the number of cases reported in the country, possibly indicative of disease emergence. PMID:27529039

  11. Four cases of nocardial brain abscess

    PubMed Central

    Tamarit, Martin; Poveda, Pedro; Barón, Manuel; Del Pozo, Jose Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Nocardial brain abscesses are a rare central nervous system infection with high morbidity and mortality. Infection is acquired through inhalation or direct innoculation and then spreads hematogenously. They are usually associated with immunocompromised patients but may appear in otherwise healthy individuals. Treatment is based on surgical aspiration and antibiotics for several months. Case Description: We present four cases of nocardial brain abscesses treated at our institution and review the literature regarding these lesions. Ages ranged from 22 to 71 years. One patient was a healthy individual without any predisposing condition. Patients were treated with surgical evacuation and long term parenteral antibiotics. Two patients made a full recovery; one patient died and one recovered with significant morbidity. In one case malignancy was suspected, probably delaying diagnosis. Conclusions: Nocardial brain abscesses are a rare condition that needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of brain lesions. They are not necessarily associated with predisposing factors such as immunosupresion. Treatment must be started as soon as possible with surgical evacuation and long term parenteral antibiotics in order to avoid significant morbidity. PMID:23050202

  12. Fibrinolytics in loculated abscess cavities - A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Barthwal, MS; Tyagi, Rahul; Kishore, Kislay

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of fibrinolytic therapy in two loculated abscesses is being reported. First case had a postoperative mediastinal abscess in left paraspinal location and the second case had two bilateral tubercular psoas abscesses. Both cases were managed with pig tail catheter drainage of abcesses and fibrinolytic therapy with instillation of urokinase followed by aspiration. Both cases had significant drainage, clinical and radiological resolution. There were no adverse effects in either case.

  13. Luc abscess: an extraordinary complication of acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Er, Anıl; Erdağ, Taner Kemal; Çağlar, Aykut; Kümüş, Özgür; Duman, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Luc abscess is an uncommon suppurative complication of otitis media. Unfamiliarity of this complication leads to delayed diagnosis and treatment. This abscess is usually benign. Infection in the middle ear spreads via anatomic preexisting pathways, and this process results with subperiosteal pus collection. Conservative treatment with drainage under empirical wide spectrum antibiotic is efficient. Here,we present a 9-year-old boy who had left facial swelling after a period of otalgia, diagnosed as Luc abscess without mastoiditis. PMID:26078258

  14. Dynamic computed tomographic scans in experimental brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, D R; Placone, R C; Britt, R H

    1984-01-01

    Dynamic computed tomographic scans were performed in an experimental brain abscess model to establish criteria that could be utilized in abscess staging. The vascular phase of the time-density curves did not differentiate cerebritis and capsule stages. The amount of residual enhancement after the first pass of an intra-arterial contrast bolus differed between major abscess stages, the greater residual enhancement being noted in the capsule stage. PMID:6462439

  15. Liver abscess caused by Brevundimonas vesicularis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seu Hee; Kim, Min Ja; Roh, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Si Hyun; Park, Dae Won; Sohn, Jang Wook; Yoon, Young Kyung

    2012-10-01

    Invasive infections caused by Brevundimonas vesicularis are very rare in humans. We experienced an unusual case of liver abscess due to B. vesicularis in an immunocompetent young male. The patient was successfully treated by liver abscess drainage and with antimicrobial therapy of ceftriaxone followed by ampicillin/sulbactam. The organism found in the aspiration culture of the abscess material was initially reported, by using a VITEK 2 system, as Sphingomonas paucimobilis. However, later, B. vesicularis was confirmed as the true pathogen through 16S rRNA gene sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the first case of liver abscess caused by B. vesicularis. PMID:22767540

  16. Ilio-psoas abscesses: percutaneous drainage under image guidance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Suri, S; Gulati, M; Singh, P

    1997-09-01

    Over a 5-year period, 56 psoas abscesses occurring in 51 patients were managed by image-guided percutaneous drainage, either by needle aspiration (n = 10) or by catheter drainage (n = 46) in conjunction with medical therapy. Twenty-seven patients had tuberculous abscesses (bilateral in five) while 24 patients had pyogenic abscesses. Percutaneous treatment was successful in 16 of the 24 patients (66.7%) with pyogenic abscesses. The reasons for failure were co-existent bowel lesions, phlegmonous involvement of muscle without liquefaction, multiloculated abscess cavity and thick tenacious pus not amenable to percutaneous drainage. Surgery was required in seven patients, either for failed percutaneous drainage or for the management of co-existent disease. Percutaneous drainage was initially successful in all 27 patients of tuberculous psoas abscesses. However, eight patients presented with recurrence requiring repeat intervention. The average duration of catheter drainage was longer in patients with tuberculous abscess (11 days) than in patients with pyogenic abscess (6 days). Percutaneous drainage under image guidance provides an effective and safe alternative to more invasive surgical drainage in most patients with psoas abscesses. PMID:9313737

  17. Nocardial brain abscess in a patient with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Shirani, Kiana; Poulsen, Asger Nyborg; Hakamifard, Atousa

    2015-01-01

    Brain abscesses caused by Nocardia are rare but have a very high mortality and specific requirements of antibiotic treatment. Nocardial brain abscesses are mainly found in patients with predisposing conditions such as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a disease associated with chronic exposure to silica dust. We present a case of multiple nocardial brain abscesses in a man with PAP probably due to long-term occupational exposure to silica dust. Conclusively, in patients presenting brain abscesses and a history of chronic exposure to silica dust, PAP and opportunistic nocardial infection should always be considered as possible diagnoses. PMID:26605224

  18. Nocardial brain abscess in a patient with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Kiana; Poulsen, Asger Nyborg; Hakamifard, Atousa

    2015-01-01

    Brain abscesses caused by Nocardia are rare but have a very high mortality and specific requirements of antibiotic treatment. Nocardial brain abscesses are mainly found in patients with predisposing conditions such as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a disease associated with chronic exposure to silica dust. We present a case of multiple nocardial brain abscesses in a man with PAP probably due to long-term occupational exposure to silica dust. Conclusively, in patients presenting brain abscesses and a history of chronic exposure to silica dust, PAP and opportunistic nocardial infection should always be considered as possible diagnoses. PMID:26605224

  19. Analysis of the Bacterial Diversity in Liver Abscess: Differences Between Pyogenic and Amebic Abscesses.

    PubMed

    Reyna-Fabián, Miriam E; Zermeño, Valeria; Ximénez, Cecilia; Flores, Janin; Romero, Miguel F; Diaz, Daniel; Argueta, Jesús; Moran, Patricia; Valadez, Alicia; Cerritos, René

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that virulence in Entamoeba histolytica is triggered in the presence of both pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria species using in vitro and in vivo experimental animal models. In this study, we examined samples aspirated from abscess material obtained from patients who were clinically diagnosed with amebic liver abscess (ALA) or pyogenic liver abscess (PLA). To determine the diversity of bacterial species in the abscesses, we performed partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In addition, the E. histolytica and Entamoeba dispar species were genotyped using tRNA-linked short tandem repeats as specific molecular markers. The association between clinical data and bacterial and parasite genotypes were examined through a correspondence analysis. The results showed the presence of numerous bacterial groups. These taxonomic groups constitute common members of the gut microbiota, although all of the detected bacterial species have a close phylogenetic relationship with bacterial pathogens. Furthermore, some patients clinically diagnosed with PLA and ALA were coinfected with E. dispar or E. histolytica, which suggests that the virulence of these parasites increased in the presence of bacteria. However, no specific bacterial groups were associated with this effect. Together, our results suggest a nonspecific mechanism of virulence modulation by bacteria in Entamoeba. PMID:26572872

  20. Pituitary abscess: an unusual presentation of "aseptic meningitis".

    PubMed

    Schwartz, I D; Zalles, M C; Foster, J L; Burry, V F

    1995-01-01

    Granulomatous inflammation of the pituitary and pituitary abscesses are rare entities. These conditions are found even more rarely in the pediatric aged population. We report a case of a radiographic and clinical, sterile pituitary abscess with non-caseating granulomatous inflammation in a girl who presented with hypopituitarism, meningeal irritation, and symptoms of pituitary apoplexy. PMID:7584709

  1. Splenic Abscess due to Brucella Melitensis - A Rare Pediatric Complication

    PubMed Central

    Parande, Aisha M; Mantur, B G; Kore, Mahesh; Palled, Eranna

    2010-01-01

    Splenic abscess due to Brucella species is an extremely rare complication especially in acute illness. Here we report a case of splenic abscess caused by Brucella melitensis biotype 1 in a child with acute infection who was successfully treated with only antibiotics. PMID:21346907

  2. Intracranial abscesses associated with chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Seven, Huseyin; Coskun, Berna Uslu; Calis, Asli B; Sayin, Ibrahim; Turgut, Suat

    2005-10-01

    Intracranial abscesses are serious complications of chronic suppurative otitis media (COM). This study included 32 patients presenting with intracranial abscesses from 780 patients hospitalized for treatment of COM. The 32 patients had 59 intracranial complications. Perisinus abscess (13 of 32) was the most common intracranial abscess, followed by temporal lobe abscess (8 of 32), epidural abscess (7 of 32), cerebellar abscess (6 of 32) and subdural empyema (2 of 32). Headache (93%), fever (87%) and altered mental status (62%) were the most common presenting symptoms and signs, along with symptoms of COM. All patients were treated with intravenous antibiotics and canal wall down mastoidectomy. Cholesteatoma with granulation tissue and bony defects at the sinus plate and/or dural plate were seen in most of the patients. Gram negative bacilli and anaerobes were the most common organisms cultured from the abscesses. Three patients had neurological sequels. One patient died. The early diagnosis of these complications requires a high index of suspicion and imaging studies. A multidisciplinary and coordinated approach is important for the management of these patients. PMID:15959795

  3. Isolation of Bordetella bronchiseptica from Blood and a Pancreatic Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Bunce, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a respiratory pathogen rarely encountered in human hosts. We describe a case of bacteremia and pancreatic abscess caused by this organism. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of B. bronchiseptica causing intra-abdominal infection in the form of an abscess. PMID:25740781

  4. Endoscopic transmaxillary drainage of an infratemporal fossa abscess

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Sreetharan Sivapatha; Rajan, Philip; Balasubramanian, Anusha

    2014-01-01

    Infratemporal fossa abscess is a rare and challenging condition to diagnose and manage. A few reported cases have been mostly due to odontogenic infections and were managed by external or intraoral drainage. This is the first reported case of an infratemporal fossa abscess that was successfully managed by endoscopic drainage via a transmaxillary approach. PMID:24980993

  5. Post-traumatic retroperitoneal colonic injury presenting as gluteal abscess.

    PubMed

    Sinha, D D; Sharma, Chetan; Gupta, Vipul; Chaturvedi, V; Sharma, Vinod

    2004-01-01

    We report an 8-year-old boy who sustained blunt retroperitoneal right colonic injury in a vehicular accident and presented with gluteal abscess. Surgical exploration revealed perforated posterior wall of ascending colon with surrounding retroperitoneal abscess communicating with the gluteal region. Right hemicolectomy with drainage of retroperitoneal and gluteal collections resulted in satisfactory recovery. PMID:15333978

  6. Iliopsoas abscess in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Maines, Evelina; Franceschi, Roberto; Cauvin, Vittoria; d’Annunzio, Giuseppe; Pini Prato, Alessio; Castagnola, Elio; Di Palma, Annunziata

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Iliopsoas abscesses have been reported in adult diabetic patients, but only one case has been so far reported in the pediatric diabetic literature. We report three cases of iliopsoas abscesses in three adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus, suggesting that an increased awareness of this condition is required for its early recognition and prompt treatment. PMID:26273460

  7. Lung abscess: a neglected cause of life threatening haemoptysis.

    PubMed Central

    Philpott, N J; Woodhead, M A; Wilson, A G; Millard, F J

    1993-01-01

    Three cases who presented with life threatening haemoptysis are reported, all of whom required surgery to control the bleeding. In all three patients chronic lung abscess was responsible for the haemoptysis. Even in the absence of typical clinical or radiographic features of an abscess this diagnosis should be considered in any patient presenting with life threatening haemoptysis. Images PMID:8346503

  8. Retroperitoneal abscesses in two western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Hahn, Alicia; D'Agostino, Jennifer; Cole, Gretchen A; Raines, Jan

    2014-03-01

    This report describes two cases of retroperitoneal abscesses in female western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). Clinical symptoms included perivulvar discharge, lameness, hindlimb paresis, and general malaise. Retroperitoneal abscesses should be considered as part of a complete differential list in female gorillas with similar clinical signs. PMID:24712182

  9. Candida sepsis originating from bulbar abscess of the penis.

    PubMed

    Huuskonen, J; Aaltomaa, S

    2006-01-01

    We describe a patient with a very unusual penile abscess. Antibiotic treatment for Clostridium sordellii and Candida albicans infection and drainage of pus was curative. We propose that the penile abscess may have been an unusual manifestation of a rectal fistula. PMID:16916779

  10. Clostridium septicum brain abscesses in a premature neonate.

    PubMed

    Sadarangani, Sapna P; Batdorf, Rachel; Buchhalter, Lillian C; Mrelashvili, Anna; Banerjee, Ritu; Henry, Nancy K; Huskins, W Charles; Boyce, Thomas G

    2014-05-01

    Brain abscesses in neonates are typically caused by Gram-negative organisms. There are no previously described cases caused by Clostridium septicum. We present a case of a premature male infant who developed recurrent episodes of suspected necrotizing enterocolitis followed by brain abscesses, cerebritis and ventriculitis caused by C. septicum. PMID:24220230

  11. Otogenic cerebellar abscess: a case report.

    PubMed

    Richter, Gresham T; Smith, Jason A; Dornhoffer, John L

    2009-04-01

    This case report describes the gradual deterioration of a healthy, highly functioning man who initially presented with a draining right ear. The patient's indolent neurologic decline and referral to an otologist ultimately led to the diagnosis and treatment of an otogenic cerebellar abscess, an increasingly rare intracranial complication of otitis media. We report this case to illustrate that severe complications of chronic otitis media still occur in the United States, to stress the importance of clinical suspicion in the postantibiotic era, and to review the literature regarding the most appropriate time to perform the otologic portion of the surgery. PMID:19358116

  12. Tubo-Ovarian Abscess: Pathogenesis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Newton G.

    1986-01-01

    That a female patient with abdominal pain is often considered to have pelvic inflammatory disease until proven otherwise is ubiquitous in the medical literature. This view is dangerous and should be challenged because it has resulted in episodes of ruptured appendix, death from ruptured ectopic pregnancies, and serious morbidity from delayed diagnoses of such entities as diverticulitis and endometriosis. Proper diagnostic steps should be taken for all patients with abdominal pain of unclear etiology. This article reviews the pathogenesis of tubo-ovarian abscesses so as to separate and clearly identify fact from fiction. Diagnostic steps and management guidelines are discussed. PMID:3537321

  13. Metastatic spinal abscesses from diabetic foot osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Shaho, Shang; Khan, Shaila; Huda, M S Bobby; Chowdhury, Tahseen Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    A 66-year-old man with long-standing type 2 diabetes, nephropathy and neuropathy was admitted acutely with an infected left big toe neuropathic ulcer, with underlying osteomyelitis. His condition rapidly deteriorated with sepsis and right lobar pneumonia. Microbiology grew methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Shortly into his admission, he developed flaccid paraparesis, and an MRI showed multiple epidural abscesses with likely cord infarction, not amenable to surgical intervention. His sepsis resolved, but his paraparesis remained severe, requiring spinal rehabilitation. PMID:24920514

  14. [Amoebic liver abscess--case report].

    PubMed

    Marsík, L; Ferko, A; Vacek, Z

    2005-07-01

    The authors present a case of a young male, who suffered with extraintestinal form of amoebiasis-amoebic liver abscesses. The patient traveled to India two month before symptoms onset. The diagnosis based on ultrasonography and computed tomography was definetely confirmed by serological examination. Metronidazol treatment was given initially, followed by percutaneous drainage. Open surgical tretment was indicated due to failure of percutaneous treatment. Patient was discharged home in a good condition one month after surgery. At this time patient is doing well eight months after surgery. PMID:16164088

  15. Citrobacter koseri: an unusual cause of pyogenic liver abscess

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Monica; Sharma, Alka; Singh, Ram; Lehl, S S

    2013-01-01

    Liver abscess is a common pathology in the Indian subcontinent and usually results from amoebic or bacterial infection. Pyogenic abscesses usually occur in those with underlying predisposing factors like intra-abdominal infections, biliary infections or comorbidities like malignancy, immunosuppression, diabetes mellitus and previous biliary surgery or interventional endoscopy. Citrobacter is an unusual cause of pyogenic liver abscess and may occur in the setting of underlying comorbidities. We report a 56-year-old man with diabetes (operated for periampullary carcinoma 20 years ago), who presented with a history of fever for 1 week and on evaluation was found to have Citrobacter koseri-related hepatic abscess. The patient was managed with parenteral antibiotics, repeated aspiration of liver abscess and pigtail drainage. PMID:23505286

  16. Colonic abscess induced by India ink tattooing.

    PubMed

    Bang, Chang Seok; Kim, Yeon Soo; Baik, Gwang Ho; Han, Sang Hak

    2014-07-01

    Endoscopic tattooing with India ink is generally regarded as a safe procedure that enables ready identification of endoluminal cancer from the serosal surface. However, significant complications have been reported, including local inflammatory pseudotumor formation, peritonitis, rectus muscle abscess, small bowel infarction, and phlegmonous gastritis. Although the mechanism of complication is not completely understood, it may be related to the chemical compounds contained in the ink solution and enteric or extraenteric bacterial inoculation by injection needle or the ink itself. Authors encountered a case of a 60-year-old man with a resectable sigmoid colon cancer which was tattooed with India ink for subsequent localization in the intraoperative setting. During the laparoscopic operation, the proximal and distal margin of the lesion appeared edematous with bluish color. The distal resection margin was extended approximately 5 cm more than expected because of long extent of edematous mucosa. Histologic examination of the edematous tattooing area revealed an ink abscess spreading laterally above the muscularis propria. Although tattooing is widely used and relatively safe, the presented case indicates the risk of infection or inflammation by tattooing. PMID:25073671

  17. Psoas abscess secondary to Pott's disease--an unusual presentation in a young child.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Atif; Arshad, Muhammad; Ashraf, Omer

    2006-04-01

    Psoas abscess in neonates and infants are rare. Primary psoas abscesses are said to be more common in young children. Limping, fever and abdominal pain has been described to be the way psoas abscesses usually present. The authors describe the unusual presentation and successful treatment of a young child with a unilateral psoas abscess secondary to advanced spondylodiscitis. PMID:16711345

  18. Tuberculosis as an Etiological Factor in Liver Abscess in Adults.

    PubMed

    Dey, Jaideep; Gautam, Hitender; Venugopal, Shwetha; Porwal, Chhavi; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Gupta, Naresh; Singh, Urvashi B

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis of the liver without active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis is considered as an uncommon diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to determine the etiological role of tuberculosis in adult patients presenting with features of liver abscess. Methods. A total of 40 patients with liver abscess were included in the study. The liver abscess aspirate was subjected to microscopy, culture, and polymerase chain reaction to determine the role of tuberculosis as an etiological factor in liver abscess. Results. Of the 40 patients enrolled, 25% (10/40) were diagnosed with having tubercular liver abscess. In a total of 40 specimens, 2.5% (1/40) were positive for acid fast bacilli by Ziehl-Neelsen method, while 10% (4/40) were positive for M. tuberculosis by culture using BACTEC 460 and the yield increased to 25% (10/40) by polymerase chain reaction for M. tuberculosis. Conclusion. 25% of the patients presenting with liver abscess had tubercular etiology without features of active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis. Liver can act as the primary site of involvement in the absence of activity elsewhere in the body. Tuberculosis should be considered as an important differential diagnosis of liver abscess irrespective of evidence of active tuberculosis elsewhere in the body. PMID:27595021

  19. [Familial brain abscess as a complication of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia].

    PubMed

    Szöts, M; Szapáry, L; Nagy, F; Vetö, F

    2001-10-21

    The hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber disease) is an inherited autosomal dominant disease with angiodysplasia of the skin, mucosa, parenchymal organs, and it can affect the central nervous system. In 40% of the cases neurological complications, most frequently intracerebral abscesses occur. In this study, the case history of a patient with central nervous system manifestation of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia showing familiar aggregation of brain abscess will be presented. A young male patient was admitted to Neurological Department because of his first epileptic seizure and progressive right hemispheric symptoms. His examinations showed frontal abscess, which was surgically removed. The frequent nose-bleeding of the patient and recurrent brain abscess in his brother's history provided the possibility of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. The background of brain abscess were multiple pulmonary arteriovenous malformation, which were embolized by repeated angiography. Familiar brain abscess is very rare. However, in the case of brain abscess especially with familiarity diagnosis of the Rendu-Osler-Weber disease should be considered. PMID:11760648

  20. Transurethral Drainage of Prostatic Abscess: Points of Technique

    PubMed Central

    El-Shazly, Mohamed; El- Enzy, Nawaf; El-Enzy, Khaled; Yordanov, Encho; Hathout, Badawy; Allam, Adel

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of prostatic abscess (PA) has markedly declined with the widespread use of antibiotics and the decreasing incidence of urethral gonococcal infections. Objectives To evaluate different treatment methods for prostatic abscess and to describe technical points that will improve the outcome of transurethral (TUR) drainage of prostatic abscess. Patients and Methods We performed a retrospective study of a series of 11 patients diagnosed with prostatic abscess, who were admitted and treated in Farwaniya Hospital, Kuwait, between February 2008 and November 2010. Drainage was indicated when antibiotic therapy did not cause clinical improvement and after prostatic abscess was confirmed by TRUS (Transrectal ultrasonography) and/or CT computed Tomographyscan. TUR drainage was indicated in 7 cases, ultrasound-guided transrectal drainage was performed in 2 cases, and ultrasound-guided perineal drainage was performed in 2 cases. Results All patients that underwent TUR-drainage had successful outcomes, without the need of secondary treatment or further surgery. Conclusions TUR drainage of a prostatic abscess increases the likelihood of a successful outcome and lowers the incidence of treatment failure or repeated surgery. Less invasive treatment, with perineal or transrectal aspiration, may be preferred as a primary treatment in relatively young patients with localized abscess cavities. PMID:23573466

  1. Tuberculosis as an Etiological Factor in Liver Abscess in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Jaideep; Venugopal, Shwetha; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis of the liver without active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis is considered as an uncommon diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to determine the etiological role of tuberculosis in adult patients presenting with features of liver abscess. Methods. A total of 40 patients with liver abscess were included in the study. The liver abscess aspirate was subjected to microscopy, culture, and polymerase chain reaction to determine the role of tuberculosis as an etiological factor in liver abscess. Results. Of the 40 patients enrolled, 25% (10/40) were diagnosed with having tubercular liver abscess. In a total of 40 specimens, 2.5% (1/40) were positive for acid fast bacilli by Ziehl-Neelsen method, while 10% (4/40) were positive for M. tuberculosis by culture using BACTEC 460 and the yield increased to 25% (10/40) by polymerase chain reaction for M. tuberculosis. Conclusion. 25% of the patients presenting with liver abscess had tubercular etiology without features of active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis. Liver can act as the primary site of involvement in the absence of activity elsewhere in the body. Tuberculosis should be considered as an important differential diagnosis of liver abscess irrespective of evidence of active tuberculosis elsewhere in the body. PMID:27595021

  2. Splenic abscess: clinical features, microbiologic finding, treatment and outcome.

    PubMed

    Sangchan, Apichat; Mootsikapun, Piroon; Mairiang, Pisaln

    2003-05-01

    Splenic abscess is a rare clinical entity but may be underreported. A retrospective study at Srinagarind Hospital revealed 60 cases of splenic abscess between 1992 and 2001. The causative organisms were identified in 41 cases (68.3%). Gram negative bacilli were commonly isolated and Burkholderia pseudomallei was the most predominant. Diabetes mellitus and leukemia were common underlying diseases found in 46.3 per cent and 9.7 per cent of culture confirmed cases, respectively. The patients usually presented with fever, left upper quadrant pain, tenderness and splenomegaly. Multiple abscesses were more commonly found in the melioidosis than in the non-melioidosis group (p = 0.032), but a single abscess was more commonly found in the non-melioidosis than in the melioidosis group (p = 0.032). Concurrent liver abscesses, often multiple, were not different in both groups. Antimicrobials alone were given in 66.7 per cent of cases with melioidosis and 64.7 per cent of non-melioidosis group. Splenectomy and percutaneous aspiration were performed only in 29.3 per cent and 4.9 per cent of cases with splenic abscess. The overall mortality rate of splenic abscess was only 4.9 per cent in the present series. In conclusion, splenic abscess is not uncommon. Burkholderia pseudomalleli is the most common causative agent found in the present series. Therefore, it should be targeted in the initial empirical antibiotic therapy before the culture results are available especially when multiple lesions in the spleen and concurrent multiple liver abscesses are seen. Prolonged treatment with appropriate antimicrobials alone is usually effective. Splenectomy and/or aspiration may be useful in selected patients. PMID:12859100

  3. Oral microbiota species in acute apical endodontic abscesses

    PubMed Central

    George, Noelle; Flamiatos, Erin; Kawasaki, Kellie; Kim, Namgu; Carriere, Charles; Phan, Brian; Joseph, Raphael; Strauss, Shay; Kohli, Richie; Choi, Dongseok; Craig Baumgartner, J.; Sedgley, Christine; Maier, Tom; Machida, Curtis A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Acute apical abscesses are serious endodontic diseases resulting from pulpal infection with opportunistic oral microorganisms. The objective of this study was to identify and compare the oral microbiota in patients (N=18) exhibiting acute apical abscesses, originating from the demographic region in Portland, Oregon. The study hypothesis is that abscesses obtained from this demographic region may contain unique microorganisms not identified in specimens from other regions. Design Endodontic abscesses were sampled from patients at the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) School of Dentistry. DNA from abscess specimens was subjected to polymerase chain reaction amplification using 16S rRNA gene-specific primers and Cy3-dCTP labeling. Labeled DNA was then applied to microbial microarrays (280 species) generated by the Human Oral Microbial Identification Microarray Laboratory (Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA). Results The most prevalent microorganisms, found across multiple abscess specimens, include Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, Megasphaera species clone CS025, Prevotella multisaccharivorax, Atopobium rimae, and Porphyromonas endodontalis. The most abundant microorganisms, found in highest numbers within individual abscesses, include F. nucleatum, P. micra, Streptococcus Cluster III, Solobacterium moorei, Streptococcus constellatus, and Porphyromonas endodontalis. Strong bacterial associations were identified between Prevotella multisaccharivorax, Acidaminococcaceae species clone DM071, Megasphaera species clone CS025, Actinomyces species clone EP053, and Streptococcus cristatus (all with Spearman coefficients >0.9). Conclusions Cultivable and uncultivable bacterial species have been identified in endodontic abscesses obtained from the Portland, Oregon demographic region, and taxa identifications correlated well with other published studies, with the exception of Treponema and Streptococcus cristae, which were not commonly

  4. Palatal Abscess in a Pediatric Patient: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Sumer, A. Pinar; Celenk, Peruze

    2008-01-01

    The palatal mass can pose a difficult diagnostic dilemma for the clinician. In differential diagnosis of the palatal mass, dental causes must be considered because they are so common. The palatal abscess typically represents the palatally directed drainage of an infection of pulpal or periodontal origin. The palatal abscess is often observed in the premolar-molar region and presents as a compressible mass or swelling usually lateral to the midline. This study reports the unusual case of a 5-year-old girl with a palatal abscess adjacent to the midline. PMID:19212536

  5. Cervical Epidural Abscess Mimicking as Stroke - Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Velpula, Jagan Mohana Reddy; Gakhar, Harinder; Sigamoney, Kohilavani; Bommireddy, Rajendra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Stroke is a common provisional diagnosis in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with unilateral neurological deficit. Cervical epidural abscess (CEA) may also present clinically with a unilateral neurological deficit. Objects: To highlight the inherent problems with diagnosing cervical epidural abscess and possible consequences of delay in diagnosis. Case Report: We would like to highlight two cases provisionally diagnosed as stroke. Both cases turned out to be cervical epidural abscesses. The delay in diagnosis and treatment led to suboptimal outcome in both cases. Summary: Cases with suspected stroke who deteriorate while under treatment or whose diagnosis is doubtful should have MRI whole spine in order to avoid potential complications. PMID:24551026

  6. [Renal carbuncle and perirenal abscess in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Steiß, J-O; Hamscho, N; Durschnabel, M; Burchert, D; Hahn, A; Weidner, W; Altinkilic, B

    2014-10-01

    Renal abscesses are rare in childhood. The diagnosis is often complicated by non-specific symptoms and the typical signs of urinary tract infections are frequently absent. The currently available imaging methods are necessary and helpful for a differentiated therapeutic approach; nevertheless, cases are continuously being found in which a renal abscess is only diagnosed intraoperatively. In most patients a combined intravenous therapy including an antibiotic which is effective against staphylococci is sufficient. The therapy is supported if necessary by percutaneous abscess drainage. Open revision or even nephrectomy is rarely required. PMID:25190305

  7. Nocardia cerebral abscess: New concepts in diagnosis, management, and prognosis.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, E; Brophy, B P; Perrett, L V

    1979-01-01

    Three cases of multiple cerebral nocardial abscess are presented. All were cured by a combination of chemotherapy and surgery, a unique experience. Early detection, appropriate chemotherapy, absence of underlying immune malfunction, and surgically remediable disease are good prognostic indices in cerebral nocardiosis. If other adverse prognostic factors are absent, however, multiple abscess formation does not preclude the possibility of cure. Accurate localisation of nocardia cerebral abscesses by computerised axial tomography is a great help in management if multiple lesions are present. Images PMID:501368

  8. Ascariasis as a cause of hepatic abscess: A report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, V; Thakur, S; Rana, B

    2015-01-01

    We receive around 60 cases of hepatic abscess in a year. The commonest diagnosis reached at the time of discharge is amoebic liver abscess. The diagnosis of amoebic liver abscess is mostly presumptive and thus the patients are usually given a mixed treatment with injection ceftriaxone and tablet metronidazole. Here we report three cases of hepatic abscess diagnosed recently, where ascariasis was the probable etiology. Ascariasis may be a much commoner cause of hepatic abscesses in this region than we think. PMID:26068350

  9. Bilateral Orbital Abscesses After Strabismus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Dhrami-Gavazi, Elona; Lee, Winston; Garg, Aakriti; Garibaldi, Daniel C; Leibert, Michelle; Kazim, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Infectious orbital complications after strabismus surgery are rare. Their incidence is estimated to be 1 case per 1,100 surgeries and include preseptal cellulitis, orbital cellulitis, subconjunctival and sub-Tenon's abscesses, myositis, and endophthalmitis. This report describes the case of an otherwise healthy 3-year-old boy who underwent bilateral medial rectus recession and disinsertion of the inferior obliques. A few days after surgery, the patient presented with bilateral periorbital edema and inferotemporal chemosis. A series of CT scans with contrast revealed inferotemporal orbital collections OU. The patient immediately underwent transconjunctival drainage of fibrinous and seropurulent collections in the sub-Tenon's space and experienced rapid improvement a few days later. The patient is reported to be in stable condition in a follow-up examination performed more than a year after the reported events. PMID:24896771

  10. Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm Mimicking Peritonsillar Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Brzost, Jacek; Waniewska, Martyna; Szczepanski, Miroslaw J.

    2015-01-01

    The extracranial internal carotid artery aneurysm (EICAA) is an uncommon arterial lesion. Patients typically present with neurologic symptoms resulting from impaired cerebral perfusion and compression symptoms of cranial nerves. Often EICAA presents as a pulsatile neck mass, which is otherwise asymptomatic. We present a case of an 84-year-old female, who was initially referred to the Emergency Department for Otolaryngology with suspected peritonsillar abscess. The patient had a history of recent upper airway infection and cardiovascular comorbidities, including hypertension and ischaemic stroke complicated by extensive neurologic deficits. Physical examination revealed a compact, nonpulsatile mass in the lateral parapharyngeal space and local erythema of the mucosa. Duplex Doppler Ultrasonography and Computed Tomography revealed an atherosclerotic aneurysm of the right internal carotid artery, measuring 63 × 55 × 88 mm, stretching from the skull base to the angle of the mandible. PMID:26124973

  11. Salmonella Typhi Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Ying Ying; Chen, John L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella vertebral osteomyelitis is an uncommon complication of Salmonella infection. We report a case of a 57-year-old transgender male who presented with lower back pain for a period of one month following a fall. Physical examination only revealed tenderness over the lower back with no neurological deficits. MRI of the thoracic and lumbar spine revealed a spondylodiscitis at T10-T11 and T12-L1 and right posterior epidural collection at the T9-T10 level. He underwent decompression laminectomy with segmental instrumentation and fusion of T8 to L3 vertebrae. Intraoperatively, he was found to have acute-on-chronic osteomyelitis in T10 and T11, epidural abscess, and discitis in T12-L1. Tissue and wound culture grew Salmonella Typhi and with antibiotics susceptibility guidance he was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for a period of six weeks. He recovered well with no neurological deficits. PMID:27034871

  12. Successful Treatment of Multifoci Nocardial Brain Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingsheng; Zhan, Renya; Feng, Yiping; Chen, Jiajia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Brain nocardiosis is a serious opportunistic infection with high mortality. It exists more common in the immunocompromised hosts than the immunocompetent patients. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) has been mostly considered as the choice of the medical treatment. Linezolid is also newly found to be effective to avoid the invasive surgery. The authors reported a case of patient with multifoci nocardial brain abscesses who failed with the combination of linezolid and TMP-SMZ alone but recovered with the surgery intervention and sequential antibiotics for 2 years. The patient lived a high quality life without recurrence and complications during the 30 months follow-up. Through the literature review, we recommend earlier stereotactic aspiration for diagnosis, combination with surgery intervention and prolonged anti-infection therapy would improve the prognosis. PMID:25984673

  13. Splenic Abscesses in a Returning Traveler

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Richard F.; Wong, Frances L.; Perez, Mario L.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia, an aerobic gram-negative rod, is the causative organism behind melioidosis and is a common soil and water organism found predominantly in South-East Asia. We report the case of a 68 year-old man returning from an extended trip to the Philippines, with splenic hypodense lesions on abdominal computer tomography scan, later confirmed to be culture-positive for Burkholderia pseudomallei. The patient was treated with a course of intravenous ceftazidime followed by eradication therapy with oral doxycycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. He recovered with complete resolution of symptoms at follow up. In a returning traveler from an endemic area, melioidosis should be considered as part of the differential for any febrile illness with abscesses. PMID:25874071

  14. Cervical epidural abscess caused by brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Lampropoulos, Christos; Kamposos, Panagiotis; Papaioannou, Ioanna; Niarou, Vasiliki

    2012-01-01

    A 70-year-old Greek lady presented with fever, arthralgias of knees, cervical and lumbar pain during the last month. On clinical examination the patient was found to have tenderness of the cervical and the lumbar spine with great motion restriction. The blood tests revealed high erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein, abnormal liver function tests and a positive rheumatoid factor. Serological test for Brucella was positive while cervical MRI revealed epidural abscess and spondylodiscitis. Conservative treatment with streptomycin (it was substituted by rifampicin after the third week) and doxycyclin for 4 months significantly improved her symptoms. The frequency as well as the diagnosis and management of this manifestation are discussed. PMID:23188848

  15. Pattern of Retropharyngeal Abscess in Nigerian Children

    PubMed Central

    Ijaduola, Taiwo G.A.

    1986-01-01

    A study of cases of retropharyngeal abscess in Nigerian children was carried out. It occurred most commonly in children under the age of 6 months and in more male children than female in a ratio of 5:3. Most children seen at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital were brought in late with the upper airway already obstructed. A diagnostic tool of soft-tissue x-ray examination of the neck is not foolproof. In fact, 22.58 percent of soft-tissue x-ray examinations of the neck in this study produced false-positive results. Factors contributing to these results are discussed. Bacteriology showed the main organisms to be Hemophilus influenzae (45.84 percent) and Streptococcus pyogenes (33.33 percent). All cases were found to be secondary to upper respiratory tract infection. PMID:3950981

  16. [Psoas abscess as a chicken pox complication].

    PubMed

    Larcamon, Jorge E; Juanco, Gabriela; Alvarez, Lionel A; Pebe, Florián V

    2010-06-01

    Chicken pox is the most frequent exantematic illness; usually its course is self-limited and benign. Several bacterial complications are described due to the disruption of the skin as a defensive barrier because of the characteristics of the injuries and the associated inmunodepression. Psoas abscess is a rare illness and it's difficult to diagnose, with a general unspecified clinical presentation. We present the case of a 5-year-old girl, on her fifth day of chicken pox, who consults about a febrile convulsion, from which she recovers without any neurological symptoms, referring to functional impotence of her inferior left limb and pain in the lumbar and gluteal zone, which irradiates to the homolateral hip, making deambulation impossible. The definitive diagnosis was made with a CAT at hospital admission. The germ isolated was community-acquired methricillin-resistant Staphilococcus aureus. Treatment consisted in surgical drainage and endovenous antibiotics. PMID:20544129

  17. [Unusual location of a brain abscess due to Listeria monocytogenes].

    PubMed

    Coste, J-F; Duval, V; Nguyen, Y; Guillard, T; Brasme, L; David, C; Strady, C; Lecuit, M; de Champs, C

    2012-10-01

    Here we report a case of sustentorial brain abscess due to Listeria monocytogenes. Blood culture and procalcitonine blood measurement were negative. L. monocytogenes was isolated from CSF after inoculation in Castañeda medium. PMID:21835558

  18. 9 CFR 311.14 - Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and inner surface of the lips and mouth, when without lymph node involvement, shall be carefully... a carcass which is badly bruised or which is affected by an abscess, or a suppurating sore shall...

  19. 9 CFR 311.14 - Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and inner surface of the lips and mouth, when without lymph node involvement, shall be carefully... a carcass which is badly bruised or which is affected by an abscess, or a suppurating sore shall...

  20. 9 CFR 311.14 - Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and inner surface of the lips and mouth, when without lymph node involvement, shall be carefully... a carcass which is badly bruised or which is affected by an abscess, or a suppurating sore shall...

  1. 9 CFR 311.14 - Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and inner surface of the lips and mouth, when without lymph node involvement, shall be carefully... a carcass which is badly bruised or which is affected by an abscess, or a suppurating sore shall...

  2. 9 CFR 311.14 - Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and inner surface of the lips and mouth, when without lymph node involvement, shall be carefully... a carcass which is badly bruised or which is affected by an abscess, or a suppurating sore shall...

  3. An Easily Overlooked Presentation of Malignant Psoas Abscess: Hip Pain

    PubMed Central

    Askin, Ayhan; Bayram, Korhan Baris; Demirdal, Umit Secil; Korkmaz, Merve Bergin; Gurgan, Alev Demirbilek; Inci, Mehmet Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Psoas abscess is a rare infectious disease with nonspecific clinical presentation that frequently causes a diagnostic difficulty. Its insidious onset and occult characteristics can cause diagnostic delays. It is classified as primary or secondary. Staphylococcus aureus is the most commonly causative pathogen in primary psoas abscess. Secondary psoas abscess usually occurs as a result of underlying diseases. A high index of clinical suspicion, the past and recent history of the patient, and imaging studies can be helpful in diagnosing the disease. The delay of the treatment is related with high morbidity and mortality rates. In this paper, 54-year-old patient with severe hip pain having an abscess in the psoas muscle due to metastatic cervical carcinoma is presented. PMID:25685574

  4. Salmonella Neck Abscess as an Opportunistic Infection in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Stephen G.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella neck infections represent an uncommon cause of focal salmonellosis. While the incidence of nontyphoid salmonellosis is estimated at over 2 million cases annually, extraintestinal manifestations account for less than 1% of cases. This paper describes two patients with Salmonella neck abscesses as the initial presentation of diabetes mellitus. The first patient was diagnosed as having Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis sternocleidomastoid pyomyositis and the second patient Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium parapharyngeal abscess. Both patients had elevated hemoglobin A1c levels and had not been previously diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. Salmonella spp. should be on the differential as a causative pathogen in patients presenting with neck abscesses and poorly controlled glucose levels. Diabetes may be a risk factor for salmonellosis due to decreased gastric acidity and prolonged gastric transit time. Prompt incision and drainage accompanied by antibiotics remains the treatment of choice for infected neck abscesses. PMID:24307959

  5. Subperiosteal abscess in a child. Trueta's osteomyelitis hypothesis undermined?

    PubMed

    Weenders, S G M; Janssen, N E; Landman, G W D; van den Berg, F P

    2015-10-01

    Subperiosteal abscess formation is almost exclusively seen secondary to underlying hematogenous infected osteomyelitis or secondary as a result of a contagious focus. We present an unusual case of a 9-year-old girl with progressive ankle pain due to an isolated subperiosteal abscess of the distal fibula without concomitant osteomyelitis. The subperiosteal abscess was most likely caused by hematogenous spread to the periosteal region of the distal fibula located above the highly vascularized metaphysis. Remarkably, there were no signs of osteomyelitis on either MRI or during surgical inspection. She was successfully treated with debridement and antibiotic therapy. We hypothesize that subperiosteal abscess formation near the metaphysis originates in the periosteal region and not from outward extension from the sinusoidal veins in the intrametaphyseal area to the cortex and subperiosteal region. PMID:26323185

  6. [Acute cholangitis secondary to ascariasis and complicated by liver abscesses].

    PubMed

    Rakotonaivo, A; Ranoharison, H D; Razarimahefa, S H; Rakotozafindrabe, R; Rabenjanahary, T H; Ramanampamonjy, R M

    2015-01-01

    Acute cholangitis secondary to ascariasis is rare and occurs mainly in areas of high endemicity. The clinical presentation is non-specific, sometimes complicated by liver abscess. Abdominal ultrasound plays an important role in diagnosis and therapeutic surveillance. We report the case of a 35-year-old Malagasy woman with an acute cholangitis secondary to ascariasis and complicated by liver abscesses and its course to full recovery under medical treatment. PMID:26742557

  7. A Case of Otogenic Brain Abscess Causing Loss of Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Min Kyu; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Chul Won

    2014-01-01

    Acute or chronic otitis media can cause intracranial complications, one of the most serious being brain abscess. Empirical antibiotic treatment and proper surgical management should be considered to avoid fatal consequences. However, proper extent and optimal timing of surgical intervention are still matters of debate. We present a case of a 31-year-old man who presented with acutely altered mental status, caused by otogenic brain abscess who we treated successfully with antibiotics and otologic surgery and no neurosurgical treatment. PMID:25279229

  8. A Tuboovarian Abscess Associated with a Ruptured Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jennifer S.; Sheele, Johnathan Michael

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of a tuboovarian abscess complicated by a ruptured spleen. Our patient was a 27-year-old female with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who presented to the emergency department (ED) with complaints of urinary symptoms and diarrhea. After being diagnosed with a tuboovarian abscess (TOA), she received antibiotics and was admitted to the gynecology service. Shortly thereafter she developed hemorrhagic shock, necessitating a splenectomy and salpingooophorectomy from a ruptured spleen. PMID:26904315

  9. The Evolving Nature of Hepatic Abscess: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mavilia, Marianna G.; Molina, Marco; Wu, George Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hepatic abscess (HA) remains a serious and often difficult to diagnose problem. HAs can be divided into three main categories based on the underlying conditions: infectious, malignant, and iatrogenic. Infectious abscesses include those secondary to direct extension from local infection, systemic bacteremia, and intra-abdominal infections that seed the portal system. However, over the years, the etiologies and risks factors for HA have continued to evolve. Prompt recognition is important for instituting effective management and obtaining good outcomes. PMID:27350946

  10. Unusual presentation of psoas abscess in a child.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, O; Cohen, Z; Barki, Y; Mares, A J

    2001-12-01

    Primary abscess of the psoas muscle is relatively rare in infants and young children. The clinical presentation of the disease, with limping, fever, and abdominal pain, may be confused with conditions such as septic arthritis of the hip, osteomyelitis, or appendicitis. The authors present an unusual case of a ruptured left psoas abscess presenting as generalized peritonitis in a child. J Pediatr Surg 36:1859-1860. PMID:11733925

  11. Porphyromonas gingivalis causing brain abscess in patient with recurrent periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Rae Yoo, Jeong; Taek Heo, Sang; Kim, Miyeon; Lee, Chang Sub; Kim, Young Ree

    2016-06-01

    We report an extremely rare case of Porphyromonas gingivalis causing brain abscess in a patient with recurrent periodontitis. The patient presented with right-sided homonymous hemianopsia and right hemiparesis. Emergent surgical drainage was performed and antibiotics were administered. P. gingivalis was identified from the anaerobic culture of the abscess. The clinical course of the patient improved with full recovery of the neurologic deficit. PMID:27085200

  12. Scedosporium apiospermum brain abscesses in an immunocompetent man with silicosis.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Heather L; Kennedy, Karina J

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of Scedosporium apiosporum brain abscesses in an immunocompetent 69-year-old man with a history of silicosis. Delayed diagnosis and institution of antifungal therapy was associated with neurological impairment, with subsequent complications resulting in death, highlighting the need for early diagnostic aspiration of brain abscesses non-responsive to antibiotics. We propose that, in the absence of identifiable immunosuppression, silicosis may have been a contributing factor to the development of central nervous system infection. PMID:24432222

  13. Solitary supratentorial Listeria monocytogenes brain abscess in an immunocompromised patient

    PubMed Central

    Onofrio, Anthony R.; Martinez, Lauren C.; Opatowsky, Michael J.; Spak, Cedric W.; Layton, Kennith F.

    2015-01-01

    We describe an 81-year-old man receiving azacitidine monotherapy for myelodysplastic syndrome who was improving from Listeria monocytogenes bacteremia after receiving antibiotic therapy during an earlier hospital admission. Shortly after discharge he developed new-onset seizure activity, with brain imaging on subsequent admissions demonstrating a posterior right frontal lobe mass. Specimen cultures after resection of the mass revealed this to be a cerebral abscess related to L. monocytogenes. Brain abscesses related to this organism are rare. PMID:26130881

  14. Scedosporium apiospermum brain abscesses in an immunocompetent man with silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Heather L.; Kennedy, Karina J.

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of Scedosporium apiosporum brain abscesses in an immunocompetent 69-year-old man with a history of silicosis. Delayed diagnosis and institution of antifungal therapy was associated with neurological impairment, with subsequent complications resulting in death, highlighting the need for early diagnostic aspiration of brain abscesses non-responsive to antibiotics. We propose that, in the absence of identifiable immunosuppression, silicosis may have been a contributing factor to the development of central nervous system infection. PMID:24432222

  15. Surgical Treatment of Spinal Tuberculosis Complicated with Extensive ABSCESS

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Joaquim Soares Do; Tirado, António; Fernandes, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tuberculosis can be responsible for extensive spinal lesions. Despite the efficacy of medical treatment, surgery is indicated to avoid or correct significant deformity, treat spinal instability, prevent neurological compromise, and to eradicate an extensive tuberculous abscess. In this paper we present our experience in the surgical management of spinal tuberculosis complicated with large abscess. Patients and Methods Fifteen patients with spinal tuberculosis complicated with extensive abscess were identified; and nine of those patients had extension of the infection into the epidural space. The average age at treatment was 34 years old. Seven patients had thoracic infection, seven patients had lumbar infection and one had thoracolumbar infection. Six patients had neurological deficit at presentation. All patients were surgically treated with abscess debridement, spinal stabilization and concurrent antituberculous chemotherapy. A single anterior surgical approach was used in three cases, a posterior approach was used in four others and a combined approach was performed in eight patients. Results Surgical management allowed for effective abscess debridement and sspinal stabilization in this cohort. In combination with antituberculous drugs, surgical treatment resulted in infection eradication and bone fusion in all patients at 24 month average follow-up. Satisfactory neurological outcomes with improved American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scores were observed in 100% of patients. Conclusion Surgical treatment for spinal tuberculosis abscess can lead to satisfactory clinical outcomes. PMID:25328472

  16. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Pyogenic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Joel; Singh, Rahul; Varma, Muralidhar; Vidyasagar, Sudha; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are rare with an incidence of 0.5% to 0.8% and are mostly due to hepatobiliary causes (40% to 60%). Most are polymicrobial with less than 10% being caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Of these, few are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and fewer still by a community-acquired strain. Here we present a case study of a patient with a community-acquired MRSA liver abscess. The patient presented with fever since 1 month and tender hepatomegaly. Blood tests revealed elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and neutrophilic leukocytosis. Blood cultures were sterile. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed multiple abscesses, from which pus was drained and MRSA isolated. Computed tomography of the abdomen did not show any source of infection, and an amebic serology was negative. The patient was started on vancomycin for 2 weeks, following which he became afebrile and was discharged on oral linezolid for 4 more weeks. Normally a liver abscess is treated empirically with ceftriaxone for pyogenic liver abscess and metronidazole for amebic liver abscess. However, if the patient has risk factors for a Staphylococcal infection, it is imperative that antibiotics covering gram-positive organisms be added while waiting for culture reports. PMID:27540556

  17. Pituitary abscess: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Apostolos K A; Dimitropoulou, Fotini; Papatheodorou, Athanasios; Lyra, Stavroula; Seretis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary abscess is a rare life-threating entity that is usually misdiagnosed as a pituitary tumor with a definite diagnosis only made postoperatively. Over the last several decades, advances in healthcare have led to a significant decrease in morbidity and mortality due to pituitary abscess. We report a case of a 34-year-old woman who was admitted to our department for investigation of a pituitary mass and with symptoms of pituitary dysfunction, headaches and impaired vision. During her admission, she developed meningitis-like symptoms and was treated with antibiotics. She eventually underwent transsphenoidal surgery for excision of the pituitary mass. A significant amount of pus was evident intraoperatively; however, no pathogen was isolated. Six months later, the patient was well and had full recovery of the anterior pituitary function. Her menses returned, and she was only on treatment with desmopressin for diabetes insipidus that developed postoperatively. Learning points Pituitary abscess is a rare disease and the reported clinical features vary mimicking other pituitary lesions. The diagnosis of pituitary abscess is often very difficult to make and rarely included in the differential. The histological findings of acute inflammatory infiltration confirm the diagnosis of pituitary abscess. Medical and surgical treatment is usually recommended upon diagnosis of a pituitary abscess. PMID:27274845

  18. Differentiation of psoas muscle abscess from septic arthritis of the hip in children.

    PubMed

    Song, J; Letts, M; Monson, R

    2001-10-01

    A 20-year review was conducted of children presenting with psoas abscess at two major pediatric hospitals. Eleven children with psoas abscesses were identified. The extreme variability in the clinical presentation of this condition is shown. Psoas abscess was most difficult to differentiate from septic arthritis of the hip in pediatric patients. This study also shows the often circuitous investigative route traversed before arriving at the diagnosis of psoas abscess. Atypical features, such as femoral nerve neurapraxia or bladder irritability in association with hip pain, should alert the clinician to consider psoas abscess. Based on this study, a diagnostic algorithm to differentiate between psoas abscess and septic hip was formulated. PMID:11603678

  19. Epidural infection: Is it really an abscess?

    PubMed Central

    Avilucea, Frank R.; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We reviewed the literature regarding the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of spinal epidural abscess (SEA). Methods: Utilizing PubMed, we performed a comprehensive review of the literature on SEAs. Results: SEA remains a difficult infectious process to diagnose. This is particularly true in the early stages, when patients remain neurologically intact, and before the classic triad of fever, back pain, and neurologic deficit develop. However, knowledge of risk factors, obtaining serologic markers, and employing magnetic resonance scans facilitate obtaining a prompt and accurate diagnosis. In patients without neurologic deficits, lone medical therapy may prove effective. Conclusions: More prevalent over the previous three decades, SEA remains a rare but deleterious infectious process requiring prompt identification and treatment. Historically, identification of SEA is often elusive, diagnosis is delayed, and clinicians contend that surgical debridement is the cornerstone of treatment. Early surgery leads to more favorable outcomes and preserves neurologic function, particularly in the early stages of disease when minimal or no neurologic deficits are present. The advent of improved imaging modalities, diagnostic techniques, and multidrug antimicrobial agents has enabled medical/spinal surgical consultants to more rapidly diagnose SEA and institute more effective early medical treatment (e.g., data suggest that lone medical therapy may prove effective in the early management of SEA). PMID:23248757

  20. Appendectomy correlates with increased risk of pyogenic liver abscess

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chien, Sou-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Little is known on the association between appendectomy and pyogenic liver abscess. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between appendectomy and the risk of pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan. This population-based retrospective cohort study was conducted using the hospitalization dataset of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 212,530 subjects age 20 to 84 years with newly diagnosed appendectomy as the appendectomy group since 1998 to 2010, and 850,099 randomly selected subjects without appendectomy as the nonappendectomy group. Both appendectomy and nonappendectomy groups were matched with sex, age, comorbidities, and index year of diagnosing appendectomy. The incidence of pyogenic liver abscess at the end of 2011 was estimated in both groups. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was applied to investigate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for risk of pyogenic liver abscess associated with appendectomy and other comorbidities including alcoholism, biliary stone, chronic kidney disease, chronic liver diseases, and diabetes mellitus. The overall incidence of pyogenic liver abscess was 1.73-fold greater in the appendectomy group than that in the nonappendectomy group (3.85 vs 2.22 per 10,000 person-years, 95% CI 1.71, 1.76). The multivariable regression analysis disclosed that the adjusted HR of pyogenic liver abscess was 1.77 for the appendectomy group (95% CI 1.59, 1.97), when compared with the nonappendectomy group. Appendectomy is associated with increased hazard of pyogenic liver abscess. Further studies remain necessary to confirm our findings. PMID:27368018

  1. Primary breast lymphoma presenting as non-healing axillary abscess.

    PubMed

    Anele, Chukwuemeka; Phan, Yih Chyn; Wong, Suanne; Poddar, Anil

    2015-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus with a history consistent with a right axillary abscess, presented to her general practitioner (GP). A diagnosis of folliculitis was made and the GP started a course of flucloxacillin. Despite antibiotics, the patient's symptoms worsened and the abscess increased in size. This prompted her GP to perform an incision and drainage procedure of the abscess. The practice nurse subsequently oversaw the follow-up care of the wound. Two months after the incision and drainage, and after regular wound dressing, the patient was referred to the acute surgical team with a complicated, non-healing right axillary abscess cavity and associated generalised right breast cellulitis. There was no history of breast symptoms prior to the onset of the axillary abscess. The patient underwent wound debridement, washout and application of negative pressure vacuum therapy. Biopsies revealed primary breast lymphoma (B-cell). She underwent radical chemotherapy and is currently in remission. PMID:26446318

  2. Midline extraperitoneal approach for bilateral widespread retroperitoneal abscess originating from anorectal infection

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Koji; Oshima, Yuka; Saito, Kentaro; Uesaka, Takahiro; Terasaki, Yasunobu; Kasai, Hironori; Minagawa, Nozomi; Oshima, Takahiro; Okawa, Yumi; Misawa, Kazuhito

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Anorectal abscess is one of the most common anorectal conditions encountered in practice. However, such abscesses may rarely extend upward and cause life-threatening medical conditions. Presentation of case A 53-year-old woman presented with symptoms of anorectal abscess and evidence of severe inflammatory response and acute kidney injury. Computed tomography revealed a widespread abscess extending to the bilateral retroperitoneal spaces. Surgical drainage was performed via a totally extraperitoneal approach through a lower midline abdominal incision, and the patient had a rapid and uncomplicated recovery. Discussion Although retroperitoneal abscesses originating from the anorectal region are rare, they are life-threating events that require immediate treatment. Percutaneous abscess drainage has been recently evolved; however, surgical drainage is required sometimes that may be challenging, particularly in the case of widespread abscesses, as in our case. Conclusion The midline extraperitoneal approach reported here might be an effective surgical option for patients with bilateral widespread retroperitoneal abscesses. PMID:26701843

  3. Psoas abscess complicated by vesical fistula in a child managed by non-surgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Bandi, Gaurav; Al-Omar, Osama; McLorie, Gordon A

    2005-08-01

    We report an unusual case of a 2-year-old child with a psoas abscess fistulizing to the bladder, managed by non-surgical therapy including urethral catheter drainage, percutaneous abscess drainage and intravenous antibiotics. PMID:18947559

  4. A case of odontogenic brain abscess arising from covert dental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Clifton, T C; Kalamchi, S

    2012-01-01

    Odontogenic infections can spread to any organ of the body and in some cases cause life threatening infections. We report a case of multiple odontogenic brain abscesses resulting from undetected tooth decay. Whereas most odontogenic brain abscesses occur following dental treatment, this report documents brain abscesses prior to dental treatment, signifying the dangers of covert dental infections. This case report updates the literature on the topic of odontogenic brain abscesses. PMID:22524927

  5. Insidious manifestation of pyogenic liver abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius and Micrococcus luteus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Antreas; Xenophontos, Eleni; Karatsi, Alexandra; Petrides, Christos; Kleridou, Maro; Zintilis, Chrysostomos

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are caused by various microorganisms and usually present with fever, abdominal pain, leukocytosis and liver enzyme abnormalities. This case presents the insidious manifestation of a pyogenic liver abscess in a 34-year-old immunocompetent male, where classical manifestations of a liver abscess were absent. The microorganisms cultured from the abscess belonged to oral cavity's and gastrointestinal tract's normal flora. PMID:26770811

  6. Psoas abscess caused by actinomycete together with Escherichia coli infection: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Ding, Wenyuan; Yang, Dalong

    2014-01-01

    Psoas abscesses are classified into primary or secondary according to infectious etiology. However, the psoas abscess caused by actinomycete together with Escherichia coli infection is very rare. Here we report a case of psoas abscess caused by actinomycete together with Escherichia coli infection in a young woman. The disease was treated successfully. A literature review of psoas abscess in relation to its etiology, identification, and difficulties in the treatment is also presented. PMID:25356161

  7. Insidious manifestation of pyogenic liver abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius and Micrococcus luteus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Antreas; Xenophontos, Eleni; Karatsi, Alexandra; Petrides, Christos; Kleridou, Maro; Zintilis, Chrysostomos

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are caused by various microorganisms and usually present with fever, abdominal pain, leukocytosis and liver enzyme abnormalities. This case presents the insidious manifestation of a pyogenic liver abscess in a 34-year-old immunocompetent male, where classical manifestations of a liver abscess were absent. The microorganisms cultured from the abscess belonged to oral cavity's and gastrointestinal tract's normal flora. PMID:26770811

  8. [US-guided transhepatic drainage of a mediastinal abscess].

    PubMed

    Simón-Yarza, I; Viteri-Ramírez, G; García-Lallana, A; Benito, A

    2014-01-01

    Anastomoses often leak after esophageal surgery; if they are not detected in time, leaks can give rise to complications like fluid collections, superinfections, and mediastinitis. Although these complications usually require surgical treatment, different series of patients successfully treated with conservative or minimally invasive approaches have been reported. We present the case of a patient who developed a mediastinal abscess after epiphrenic diverticulectomy. We treated the abscess with US-guided percutaneous transhepatic drainage to avoid surgical reintervention. Although other cases of a transhepatic approach to thoracic lesions have been reported, to our knowledge this is the first report of this technique in mediastinal abscesses. We recommend that transhepatic drainage be considered a therapeutic option in the management of these complications. PMID:22464798

  9. Brain Abscesses Complicating Acute Pneumococcal Meningitis During Etanercept Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kasirye, Yusuf; Epperla, Narendranath; Manne, Janaki Ram; Bapani, Sowjanya; Garcia-Montilla, Romel J

    2012-01-01

    Brain abscess formation as a sequelae of community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis is extremely rare, accounting for less than 1% of all meningitis complications. Although metastatic seeding from a distal peripheral septic focus has been observed, this phenomenon most commonly occurs in the context of ear, nose and throat infections, post-cranial neurosurgical procedures, traumatic open cranial injury, or immunosuppression. We present the case of a man, 61 years old, on etanercept therapy for ankylosing spondylitis who developed multiple brain abscesses as a complication of pneumococcal meningitis. We believe that the predisposition to this extremely rare complication of a particularly aggressive pneumococcal meningitis was most likely due to the underlying immunosuppression resulting from etanercept therapy. As far as we know, this case is the first report linking multiple brain abscess formation in a patient with community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis with etanercept therapy. PMID:22634540

  10. Perinephric abscess caused by ruptured retrocecal appendix: MDCT demonstration

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Nisar Ahmad; Farooq, Mir; Gojwari, Tariq; Kosar, Tasleem

    2010-01-01

    Acute appendicitis may occasionally become extraordinarily complicated and life threatening yet difficult to diagnose. One such presentation is described in a 60-year-old man who was brought to the hospital due to right lumbar pain and fever for the last 15 days. Ultrasonography showed a right perinephric gas and fluid collection. Abdominal computed tomography with multidetector-row CT (MDCT) revealed gas-containing abscess in the right retroperitoneal region involving the perinephric space, extending from the lower pole of the right kidney up to the bare area of the liver. Inflamed retrocecal appendix was seen on thick multiplanar reformat images with its tip at the lower extent of the abscess. Laparotomy and retroperitoneal exploration were performed immediately and a large volume of foul smelling pus was drained. A ruptured retrocecal appendix was confirmed as the cause of the abscess. PMID:20842255

  11. Acute prevertebral abscess secondary to infected pancreatic pseudocyst

    PubMed Central

    Bhandarkar, Ajay M; Pillai, Suresh; Venkitachalam, Shruti; Anand, Aishwarya

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a middle aged, man with diabetes who presented with dysphagia and odynophagia. On evaluation, he was diagnosed to have an acute prevertebral abscess with an unusual aetiology, an infected pseudocyst of pancreas. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed an enhancing collection in the prevertebral space extending to the retrogastric space and communicating with the body of the pancreas via the oesophageal hiatus. Transoral incision and drainage of the prevertebral abscess were performed. Nasogastric tube was placed in the prevertebral space for continuous drainage and daily irrigation. Supportive intravenous broad spectrum antibiotic therapy along with the surgical intervention led to the resolution of the prevertebral abscess and the infected pancreatic pseudocyst. PMID:24408943

  12. Listeria monocytogenes brain abscess in a patient with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Al-Khatti, Adil A; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A

    2010-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an uncommon cause of illness in the general population. Meningoencephalitis is the most common central nervous system (CNS) manifestation of listeriosis. However, brain abscess represents 1-10% of all CNS listeriosis. To our knowledge, L. monocytogenes brain abscess in multiple myeloma patients has not been previously reported. Thus we report a 58-year-old male patient with multiple myeloma who developed a brain abscess due to L. monocytogenes. Due to a history of penicillin allergy, he was treated with intravenous trimethoprim/sulfamoxazole (TMP-SMX) for a total of 12 weeks, and gentamicin for the first two weeks, followed by oral therapy of TMP-SMX for a total of nine months. He is alive six and a half years after the diagnosis of myeloma with occasional brief seizures despite being on two anticonvulsants. PMID:21252468

  13. Groin abscess due to a forgotten midurethral sling connector.

    PubMed

    Yenilmez, A; Baseskioglu, B; Kaya, C

    2013-06-01

    Midurethral slings (MUS) have been used for female stress urinary incontinence throughout the past decade on a worldwide scale. Although this minimally invasive treatment has high success rates, formation of groin abscesses, as well as vaginal and urethral erosions, can occur after the procedure. We report a patient presenting with groin abscess and sinus tract formation after a transobturator tape procedure. The patient exhibited a swollen sinus tract, which drained the abscess at the site of the tape entry to the obturator foramen within her inner left groin. She was referred to our department after unsuccessful medical and surgical treatments. Surgical exploration revealed a forgotten MUS connector located between the mesh and hook within the skin incision. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of such a case. PMID:22875406

  14. Rhodococcal lung abscess in a renal transplant recipient

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Koh-Wei; Thevarajah, Bharathan

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Rhodococcus species are relatively rare human pathogens, but are being increasingly recognized as causes of infection especially in immunosuppressed patients. Case Report: We present a case of Rhodococcus lung abscess in a patient 10 months post-cadaveric renal transplant, successfully treated with a combination of antibiotics. She required a prolonged course of oral antibiotics for 6 months. She did not require surgical intervention. Chest X-rays and CT thorax showed complete resolution of the initial lesion. We also review the medical literature related to Rhodococcus infection in patients with renal transplantation. Rhodococcus infection should be considered as in the differential diagnosis of immunosuppressed patients who present with lung abscess/mass. Conclusions: A literature review indicates this is a potentially fatal condition with disseminated sepsis/abscesses. PMID:23569526

  15. Obturator internus muscle abscess in a child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Manish; Bhaliak, Vijay; Bruce, Colin E

    2008-09-01

    The authors report a case of abscess in the obturator internus muscle, which is a rare occurrence. It was managed with antibiotics and surgical intervention was not necessary. Pyomyositis involving the muscles around the hip needs to be differentiated from septic arthritis and transient synovitis of the hip because these pathologies more commonly afflict this joint. However, when present, abscesses usually affect the psoas or the glutei. Only rarely is the obturator internus involved by the abscess. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging modality of choice to image the obturator internus and to ascertain the diagnosis. Lack of awareness of the existence of this condition leads to a delay in the correct diagnosis. PMID:19471173

  16. Bilateral psoas abscess: atypical presentation of spinal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Goni, Vijay; Thapa, Babu Ram; Vyas, Sameer; Gopinathan, Nirmal Raj; Rajan Manoharan, Sakthivel; Krishnan, Vibhu

    2012-04-01

    Three patients who came to the surgical outpatient department of 'Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research', Chandigarh, India with features suggestive of acute abdomen are presented. On thorough evaluation, they had bilateral psoas abscess and on detailed investigations, tuberculosis was found to be the etiological factor. They were treated conservatively with good follow-up results. Psoas abscess may be clinically difficult to diagnose because of its rarity, insidious onset of the disease, and non-specific clinical presentation which can cause diagnostic delays resulting in high morbidity. Early diagnosis and appropriate management remains a challenge for clinicians. All three patients presented here have recovered following detailed investigation and appropriate management. The diagnosis of spinal tuberculosis should be considered in patients with vertebral osteomyelitis, psoas abscess, and appropriate risk factors such as a history of previous exposure in both developed and developing countries, as tuberculosis is re-emerging as an important etiological factor in spinal pathologies. PMID:22424047

  17. Scedosporium apiospermum causing brain abscess in a renal allograft recipient.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amit; Singh, Divya

    2015-11-01

    Scedosporium apiospermum is the asexual form of a rare fungus Pseudallescheria boydii that is usually present in the soil, sewage and dirty water. In immunocompromised patients, it is a rare infection involving multiple organs. We present a case of renal allograft recipient who developed fever two weeks post renal transplant. He was initially found to have dengue fever. After five days, he became drowsy and developed right-sided hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed multiple irregular masses with associated edema consistent with fungal brain abscesses. Left parietal abscess was drained and he was started on voriconazole. His cyclosporine was stopped. Drained pus revealed fungal hyphae on potassium hydroxide stain and Scedosporium apiospermum on culture. Unfortunately, the patient died after five days. Scedosporium infections should be kept as a possibility in transplant recipients with disseminated infections, especially with a brain abscess. Despite antifungal therapy and surgical drainage, mortality rates are high. PMID:26586067

  18. Lung abscess revisited. A survey of 184 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, J L; Hardy, J D

    1983-01-01

    One hundred eighty-four patients with lung abscess, admitted to the Hospital of the University of Mississippi between 1960 and 1982, were studied with respect to sex (149 men and 35 women), age (mainly fourth to sixth decades), location of abscess(es) (RLL, RUL, and LLL mainly), predisposing factors (aspiration in sensorium disorders, obstruction, gingivo-dental suppuration, immunoincompetence) and nonoperative (89%) and operative (11%) therapy, usually lobectomy. Data from the different decades were compared, but there were few major differences. Mortality rate was 22% in the 1960s, 25% in the 1970s, and 28% in 1980-1982. Major management problems involved massive pulmonary hemorrhage, impaired immune defenses, old-age debility, bronchopleural fistula with empyema, or very large cavity. Anaerobic bacteria predominate and penicillin is the treatment of choice. Incidence of operation is declining, but cases are more often complicated. Prognosis is good in the uncomplicated case. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6859981

  19. Prostatic abscess: diagnosis and management in the modern antibiotic era.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Punit; Pal, Dilip K; Tripathi, Astha; Kumar, Suresh; Vijay, Mukesh; Goel, Amit; Sharma, Pramod; Dutta, Arindam; Kundu, Anup K

    2011-03-01

    This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the clinical findings and therapeutic strategies in 24 patients who were admitted with prostatic abscess, during the period from 1999 to 2008. The diagnosis of prostatic abscesses was made clinically by digital rectal palpation based on the presence of positive fluctuation with tenderness. All cases were confirmed by trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS), and only positive cases were included in this study. The diagnostic work-up included analysis of midstream urine and abscess fluid culture for pathogens. Therapeutic options included endoscopic trans-urethral incision or trans-perineal aspiration under ultrasound guidance, or conservative therapy. Of the 24 patients studied, 45.83% of the cases had a pre-disposing factor, and diabetes mellitus (37.50%) was the most common. Digital rectal palpation revealed fluctuation in 70.83% of the cases. Trans-abdominal ultrasonography missed the condition in 29.16% of the cases. On TRUS, all the study patients showed hypo-echoic zones, while nine others showed internal septations. In most of the cases, the lesion was peripheral. A causative pathogen could be identified in 70.83% of the cases. Surgical drainage of the abscess by trans-urethral deroofing was performed in 17 cases (including one with failed aspiration), trans-perineal aspiration under TRUS guidance was performed in three cases and conservative therapy was followed in five cases. Our data confirms the importance of predisposing factors in the pathogenesis of prostatic abscess. In most of the cases, the clue to diagnosis is obtained by digital rectal palpation. TRUS gives the definite diagnosis and also helps in follow-up of patients. Trans-urethral deroofing is the ideal therapy where the abscess cavity is more than 1 cm, although in some selected cases, TRUS-guided aspiration or conservative therapy does have a role in treatment. PMID:21422629

  20. Sterile Seroma after Drainage of Purulent Muscle Abscess in Crohn's Disease: Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Treitman, Adam; Tabriz, Muhammed

    2016-01-01

    Purulent skeletal muscle abscesses can occur in Crohn's disease. We report a case of a sterile seroma complicating percutaneous drainage of a purulent skeletal muscle abscess in Crohn's ileitis. We compare and contrast this case with a similar case we published earlier. We emphasize the importance of recognition and differentiation from a septic purulent abscess. PMID:27529038

  1. Kocuria varians infection associated with brain abscess: A case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Kocuria, established by Stackebrandt et al., previously was classified into Micrococcus. Only two species, K. rosea and K. kristinae are reported to be associated as pathogenic and found with catheter-related bacteremia and acute cholecystitis. Case presentation We herein report the first case of brain abscess caused by Kocuria varians, a gram-positive microorganism, in a 52-year-old man. Hematogenous spread is the probable pathogenesis. Conclusions This report presents a case of Kocuria varians brain abscess successfully treated with surgical excision combined with antimicrobial therapy. In addition, Vitek 2 system has been used to identify and differentiate between coagulase-negative staphylococcus. PMID:20423506

  2. Balantidium Coli liver abscess: first case report from India.

    PubMed

    Kapur, P; Das, A K; Kapur, P R; Dudeja, M

    2016-03-01

    Protozoal infections are common in the tropics. Amoebic colitis is the commonest of these infections and can lead to liver abscess as a complication. Balantidium coli is a rare free moving protozoal parasite which is known to infest human large intestine causing a type of colitis very similar to that caused by Entamoeba histolytica. However this pathogen is not known to cause liver invasion in humans. We report here a case of liver abscess caused by B. coli, which is probably the first such case reported in Indian literature. PMID:27065613

  3. Gallbladder Fossa Abscess Masquerading as Cholecystitis After Cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Rodrigue, Paul; Fakhri, Asif; Baumgartner, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    We present a case of a 59-y-old woman who had undergone cholecystectomy and was subsequently found to have an abscess within the gallbladder fossa. A hepatobiliary scan using (99m)Tc-diisopropyliminodiacetic acid demonstrated the characteristic rim sign, a photopenic defect surrounded by a rim of mildly increased activity immediately adjacent to the gallbladder fossa. The rim sign was thought to be the result of reactive inflammation in the hepatic tissue adjacent to a postoperative abscess within the gallbladder fossa. PMID:26111711

  4. Treatment of Acute Puerperal Mastitis and Breast Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cantlie, Helene Bertrand

    1988-01-01

    Mastitis is a benign infection of the breast if it is treated early. If two days elapse before treatment is started, it can lead to serious complications such as chronic or recurrent mastitis or breast abscess. Treatment consists in frequent nursing and massaging or stripping the breast to keep it empty of milk or pus, and appropriate antibiotics. Incision and drainage of a breast abscess can be done in the office under local anesthesia, and the drainage continued at home by the mother. PMID:21253250

  5. Aortic root abscess resulting from endocarditis: spectrum of angiographic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.W.; Dinsmore, R.E.

    1984-11-01

    Abscesses in the aortic root are a serious complication of infective endocarditis and require accurate diagnosis for antibiotic and surgical management. Nineteen cases of endocarditis of a native valve or prosthetic valve and adjacent abscess cavities were identified with angiography. Of 6 patients with endocarditis of a native valve, 5 had bicuspid aortic valves and all had severe aortic regurgitation. Of 13 patients with endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve, all had paravalvular regurgitation. Fistulas were detected into the mitral anulus in 8 patients, and into the right ventricle in 3 patients. No complications from the catheterization were recorded during the 48-hour follow-up.

  6. Amebic pericardial effusion: a rare complication of amebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, B V; Somani, P N; Khanna, M N; Srivastava, P K; Jha, B N; Verma, S P

    1975-06-01

    Two rare cases of amebic pericardial effusion as a complication of amoebic liver abscess in the left lobe are described. The pericardial amebiasis should be suspected in a patient presenting with signs and symptoms of pericardial effusion with an evidence of hepatic abscess (in the left lobe) or in a patient with pericardial effusion of uncertain etiology. Aspiration of "anchovy sauce" pus from both the pericardial cavity and the liver should be regarded as confirming the diagnosis of amebic pericarditis secondary to amebic liver abcess because demonstration of Entamoeba hystolytica is seldom possible. Removal of pericardial pus and metronidazole intake were markedly effective in treating our patients. PMID:123716

  7. Gingival abscess removal using a soft-tissue laser.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Soni; Monaco, Edward A; Andreana, Sebastiano

    2011-02-01

    A case of acute inflammatory enlargement of gingival tissue in the form of a gingival abscess is presented in this paper. Its clinical features and histopathologic presentation are described. The etiology of this condition could be a variety of sources such as microbial plaque infection, trauma, and foreign body impaction. In this case, treatment included complete excision by the means of a 810-nm soft-tissue diode laser, which resulted in resolution of the abscess and clinical wound healing within approximately 2 to 3 weeks. Prognosis was excellent due to early diagnosis and immediate treatment. PMID:21400991

  8. Pretracheal Abscess Following Two Weeks of Endotracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Narayan; Schmidt, M. Frances; Gulati, Neerja; Perwaiz, Muhammad; Hammoudeh, Fadi; Kennedy, Eneh; Zahir, Mehjabin; Enriquez, Danilo; Quist, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Pretracheal abscess due to endotracheal intubation has not been reported in literature. We present a case of a female patient who was admitted with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. Patient was initially managed with noninvasive ventilation but eventually was intubated after sustaining a cardiac arrest. She could not be extubated because of poor weaning parameters, so a tracheostomy was planned. During surgery, a pretracheal abscess was found with destruction of the second, third, and fourth tracheal rings and intact posterior tracheal wall. The possible risk factors, mechanism of injury, and preventive strategy of tracheal complication of intubation are discussed. PMID:21451779

  9. Vancomycin penetration of a brain abscess: case report and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.M.; Gutin, P.H.; Baskin, D.S.; Pons, V.G.

    1986-05-01

    A 56-year-old man developed an abscess within a right parietal cystic anaplastic astrocytoma 3 days after removal of iodine-125 sources placed 9 days earlier for interstitial radiation therapy. After treatment with cephalosporin antibiotics proved unsuccessful, the patient was treated with intravenous vancomycin and intermittent percutaneous drainage of the abscess. Vancomycin levels obtained from the brain abscess fluid, both before and during later operative removal of the abscess, were 15 and 18 micrograms/ml, respectively; the serum vancomycin level was 21 micrograms/ml. This is the first report of the excellent penetration of vancomycin into brain abscess fluid.

  10. Multiple large brain abscesses in a newborn that may have resulted from intrauterine infection.

    PubMed

    Celik, Istemi Han; Demirel, Gamze; Erdeve, Omer; Uraş, Nurdan; Dilmen, Uğur

    2011-01-01

    Brain abscess is a focal, intracerebral infection that begins as a localized area of cerebritis and develops into a collection of pus surrounded by a well-vascularized capsule. Here, we report a case with multiple, large brain abscesses diagnosed coincidentally on postnatal day 11. This case is noteworthy because the organized abscesses were present as early as day 11 with no significant neurological signs or symptoms. Brain abscess in newborns is a very rare disease that may not exhibit the expected neurological signs and symptoms. Depending on the radiological organization, an abscess in a neonate in the first weeks may be the result of an intrauterine infection. PMID:22272460

  11. Multiple Medium Amoebic Liver Abscesses Successfully Treated with Medication and Comprehensive Percutaneous Catheter Drainage.

    PubMed

    Kasamatsu, Yu; Shirano, Michinori; Iida, Ko; Shimizu, Sadatoshi; Goto, Tetsushi

    2016-01-01

    Solitary small (<5 cm) amoebic liver abscesses in the right lobe are generally treated using medication alone, while large abscesses are typically treated via a combination of medication and drainage. However, the therapeutic indications for multiple medium (5-10 cm) amoebic liver abscesses remain unclear. We herein report the findings of a 53-year-old woman who was receiving lenalidomide for multiple myeloma and subsequently developed multiple amoebic abscesses. Metronidazole alone was unsuccessful, although metronidazole and repeated percutaneous catheter drainage of the right lobe, left lobe, and thorax proved to ultimately be successful. Therefore, the successful use of medication alone may be associated with the total combined abscess volume. PMID:27523014

  12. Clinical Characteristics Associated with Antibiotic Treatment Failure for Tuboovarian Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Farid, Huma; Lau, Trevin C.; Karmon, Anatte E.; Styer, Aaron K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Although parenteral antibiotic treatment is a standard approach for tuboovarian abscesses, a significant proportion of patients fail therapy and require interventional radiology (IR) guided drainage. The objective of this study is to assess if specific clinical factors are associated with antibiotic treatment failure. Study Design. Retrospective medical record review of patients hospitalized for tuboovarian abscesses from 2001 through 2012 was performed. Clinical characteristics were compared for patients who underwent successful parenteral antibiotic treatment, failed antibiotic treatment necessitating subsequent IR drainage, initial drainage with concurrent antibiotics, and surgery. Results. One hundred thirteen patients admitted for inpatient treatment were identified. Sixty-one (54%) patients were treated with antibiotics alone. Within this group, 24.6% failed antibiotic treatment and required drainage. Mean white blood cell count (K/μL) (18.7 ± 5.94 versus 13.9 ± 5.12) (p = 0.003), mean maximum diameter of tuboovarian abscess (cm) (6.8 ± 2.9 versus 5.2 ± 2.0) (p = 0.03), and length of stay (days) (9.47 ± 7.43 versus 4.59 ± 2.4) (p = 0.002) were significantly greater for patients who failed antibiotic treatment. Conclusions. Admission white blood cell count greater than 16 K/μL and abscess size greater than 5.18 cm are associated with antibiotic treatment failure. These factors may provide guidance for initial selection of IR guided drainage. PMID:26989337

  13. Clinical Characteristics Associated with Antibiotic Treatment Failure for Tuboovarian Abscesses.

    PubMed

    Farid, Huma; Lau, Trevin C; Karmon, Anatte E; Styer, Aaron K

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Although parenteral antibiotic treatment is a standard approach for tuboovarian abscesses, a significant proportion of patients fail therapy and require interventional radiology (IR) guided drainage. The objective of this study is to assess if specific clinical factors are associated with antibiotic treatment failure. Study Design. Retrospective medical record review of patients hospitalized for tuboovarian abscesses from 2001 through 2012 was performed. Clinical characteristics were compared for patients who underwent successful parenteral antibiotic treatment, failed antibiotic treatment necessitating subsequent IR drainage, initial drainage with concurrent antibiotics, and surgery. Results. One hundred thirteen patients admitted for inpatient treatment were identified. Sixty-one (54%) patients were treated with antibiotics alone. Within this group, 24.6% failed antibiotic treatment and required drainage. Mean white blood cell count (K/μL) (18.7 ± 5.94 versus 13.9 ± 5.12) (p = 0.003), mean maximum diameter of tuboovarian abscess (cm) (6.8 ± 2.9 versus 5.2 ± 2.0) (p = 0.03), and length of stay (days) (9.47 ± 7.43 versus 4.59 ± 2.4) (p = 0.002) were significantly greater for patients who failed antibiotic treatment. Conclusions. Admission white blood cell count greater than 16 K/μL and abscess size greater than 5.18 cm are associated with antibiotic treatment failure. These factors may provide guidance for initial selection of IR guided drainage. PMID:26989337

  14. Hypophosphatemic Rickets and Pre-eruptive Spontaneous Dental Abscess.

    PubMed

    Stinton, Natalie M; Uston, Karen A; Davis, Courtney D

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the diagnosis and dental treatment of a medically complex 14-year-old boy with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets who presented with a pre-eruptive abscess on a mandibular molar and facial swelling. PMID:27098722

  15. Multidrug resistant citrobacter: an unusual cause of liver abscess

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prabhat; Ghosh, Soumik; Rath, Deepak; Gadpayle, A K

    2013-01-01

    Liver abscesses are infectious, space occupying lesions in the liver, the two most common abscesses being pyogenic and amoebic. A pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) is a rare condition with a reported incidence of 20 per 100 000 hospital admissions in the western population. The right lobe of the liver is the most common site in both types of liver abscess. Clinical presentation is elusive with complaints of fever, right upper quadrant pain in the abdomen and hepatomegaly with or without jaundice. The aetiology of PLA has changed in the past few decades and may be of biliary, portal, arterial or traumatic origin, but many cases are still cryptogenic. The most common organisms causing PLA are Gram-negative aerobes, especially Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Studies have shown a high degree of antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated organism resulting in an overall lower mortality in PLA. Here, we present a case of PLA caused by multidrug-resistant Citrobacter freundii, which is an unusual organism to be isolated. PMID:23608848

  16. Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess in Clinical Practice: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Al-Hourani, Khalid; Al-Aref, Rami; Mesfin, Addisu

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Narrative review. Objective Upper cervical epidural abscess (UCEA) is a rare surgical emergency. Despite increasing incidence, uncertainty remains as to how it should initially be managed. Risk factors for UCEA include immunocompromised hosts, diabetes mellitus, and intravenous drug use. Our objective is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature including the history, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of UCEA. Methods Using PubMed, studies published prior to 2015 were analyzed. We used the keywords "Upper cervical epidural abscess," "C1 osteomyelitis," "C2 osteomyelitis," "C1 epidural abscess," "C2 epidural abscess." We excluded cases with tuberculosis. Results The review addresses epidemiology, etiology, imaging, microbiology, and diagnosis of this condition. We also address the nonoperative and operative management options and the relative indications for each as reviewed in the literature. Conclusion A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this rare condition with magnetic resonance imaging being the imaging modality of choice. There has been a shift toward surgical management of this condition in recent times, with favorable outcomes. PMID:27190742

  17. Capnocytophaga Lung Abscess in a Patient with Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Thirumala, Raghu; Babady, N. Esther; Kamboj, Mini; Chawla, Mohit

    2012-01-01

    Capnocytophaga species are known commensals of the oral cavity of humans and animals (mainly dogs and cats) and are a rare cause of respiratory tract infections. We report a case of cavitary lung abscess caused by a Capnocytophaga species in a patient with a metastatic neuroendocrine tumor. PMID:22075586

  18. Tuboovarian Abscess Caused by Atopobium vaginae following Transvaginal Oocyte Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Geißdörfer, Walter; Böhmer, Christoph; Pelz, Klaus; Schoerner, Christoph; Frobenius, Wolfgang; Bogdan, Christian

    2003-01-01

    A 39-year-old woman with tubarian sterility fell ill with acute pelvic inflammatory disease 2 months after transvaginal oocyte recovery. Laparotomy revealed a large tuboovarian abscess, from which Atopobium vaginae, an anaerobic gram-positive coccoid bacterium of hitherto unknown clinical significance, was isolated. The microbial etiology and the risk of pelvic infections following transvaginal punctures are discussed. PMID:12791933

  19. Pyogenic Liver Abscess Caused by Acinetobacter lwoffii: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Singh, N Pal; Sagar, Tanu; Nirmal, Kirti; Kaur, I Rajender

    2016-06-01

    Acinetobacter lwoffii is a gram negative aerobic non-fermenter bacilli. It is considered as an important emerging pathogen after Acinetobacter baumannii in patients with impaired immune system and in nosocomial infections. Here, we present a case of community acquired pyogenic liver Abscess caused by Acinetobacter lwoffii in a diabetic patient. PMID:27504286

  20. Efficacy of azithromycin in preventing pulmonary abscesses in foals.

    PubMed

    Venner, Monica; Reinhold, Birte; Beyerbach, Martin; Feige, Karsten

    2009-02-01

    The prophylactic application of azithromycin to prevent pulmonary abscesses in foals was evaluated on a stud with endemic Rhodococcus equi pneumonia. Forty-five foals served as untreated controls in two groups. Twenty-five foals were given azithromycin (10mg/kg) orally once daily for 4 weeks. The foals were examined once a week from birth to the age of 5 months. If clinical signs or leucocytosis were noted and pulmonary sonographic findings (diameter >10 mm) were observed, the diagnosis of abscessing pneumonia was made. The prevalence of pulmonary abscesses was similar in the control groups (31/45 foals), and in the azithromycin group (15/25 foals), but the foals in the azithromycin group were affected significantly later (median: day 83, range 67-123 days) (control groups: day 54, range 52-82; and 46, range 28-86 days). It was concluded that the application of azithromycin for 28 days post-natally does not reduce the prevalence of pulmonary abscesses in foals on a stud with endemic pneumonia. PMID:18023599

  1. Necrotizing fasciitis as the clinical presentation of a retroperitoneal abscess.

    PubMed

    Amitai, Allon; Sinert, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Infections of the retroperitoneal space may present with insidiously vague symptoms and non-specific clinical signs. We report a case of a retroperitoneal abscess presenting as necrotizing fasciitis of the thigh from direct spread over the iliac crest. In cases of necrotizing fasciitis of the thigh with no obvious source, an intra-abdominal nidus of infection may be considered. PMID:17976803

  2. Mycobacterium chelonae Abscesses Associated with Biomesotherapy, Australia, 2008

    PubMed Central

    Dancer, Craig; Koehler, Ann P.; Hobby, Michaela; Lease, Chris

    2013-01-01

    An outbreak of skin abscesses occurred in Adelaide, Australia, in association with biomesotherapy, an alternative therapy practice. Mycobacterium chelonae was identified in 8 patient and 3 environmental samples. Our findings show M. chelonae infection can be associated with alternative therapies when infection-control breaches occur. Tighter regulations of alternative therapy practices are needed. PMID:23968779

  3. Epidural abscess with associated spondylodiscitis following prostatic biopsy.

    PubMed

    Dobson, G; Cowie, C J A; Holliman, D

    2015-07-01

    Spondylodiscitis is often iatrogenic in nature. We report the case of a 69-year-old man presenting with spondylodiscitis and associated epidural abscess following transrectal ultrasonography guided prostate biopsy despite ciprofloxacin cover. To our knowledge, this is the first case of spondylodiscitis secondary to fluoroquinolone resistant Escherichia coli. PMID:26264110

  4. Mycobacterium chelonae abscesses associated with biomesotherapy, Australia, 2008.

    PubMed

    Ivan, Mihaela; Dancer, Craig; Koehler, Ann P; Hobby, Michaela; Lease, Chris

    2013-01-01

    An outbreak of skin abscesses occurred in Adelaide, Australia, in association with biomesotherapy, an alternative therapy practice. Mycobacterium chelonae was identified in 8 patient and 3 environmental samples. Our findings show M. chelonae infection can be associated with alternative therapies when infection-control breaches occur. Tighter regulations of alternative therapy practices are needed. PMID:23968779

  5. Metastatic muscle abscesses complicating infected total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Balato, Giovanni; Ascione, Tiziana; Mariconda, Massimo; Pagliano, Pasquale

    2016-03-01

    A 73-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis presented to our institution with infection of her right total hip arthroplasty. On admission, a draining sinus tract over the hip and a palpable mass in the left lower posterior region of the neck were detected. The contrast CT scan showed a large abscess in the trapezius muscle and multiple abscesses involving muscle of the neck and right shoulder. Intraoperative specimens from the muscle abscess were positive for presumably the same methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus that sustained the prosthetic joint infection. Prolonged intravenous daptomycin led to remission of the muscle abscess and control of the prosthetic joint infection. The patient refused revision total hip arthroplasty and oral cotrimoxazole was prescribed for chronic suppression of the infection. Three years after the primary surgery there was stable remission of the prosthetic joint infection. This rare case demonstrates the severity of prosthetic joint infections sustained by multiresistant bacteria in immunocompromised hosts, which may result in their bacteraemic spread. PMID:27031898

  6. Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess in Clinical Practice: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hourani, Khalid; Al-Aref, Rami; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Narrative review. Objective Upper cervical epidural abscess (UCEA) is a rare surgical emergency. Despite increasing incidence, uncertainty remains as to how it should initially be managed. Risk factors for UCEA include immunocompromised hosts, diabetes mellitus, and intravenous drug use. Our objective is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature including the history, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of UCEA. Methods Using PubMed, studies published prior to 2015 were analyzed. We used the keywords “Upper cervical epidural abscess,” “C1 osteomyelitis,” “C2 osteomyelitis,” “C1 epidural abscess,” “C2 epidural abscess.” We excluded cases with tuberculosis. Results The review addresses epidemiology, etiology, imaging, microbiology, and diagnosis of this condition. We also address the nonoperative and operative management options and the relative indications for each as reviewed in the literature. Conclusion A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this rare condition with magnetic resonance imaging being the imaging modality of choice. There has been a shift toward surgical management of this condition in recent times, with favorable outcomes. PMID:27190742

  7. Clinical characteristics and progression of liver abscess caused by toxocara

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Kyung Ho; Song, Jung Eun; Kim, Byung Seok; Lee, Chang Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical characteristics and progression of liver abscess caused by toxocara. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with serum IgG antibody to Toxocara canis and liver abscess diagnosed using abdominal computed tomography between February 2010 and February 2015. Among 84 patients exhibiting serum IgG antibody to Toxocara canis, 34 patients were diagnosed with liver asbscess and treated with albendazole. A follow-up period of 1 year was conducted. RESULTS: Mean patient age was 53 (34-79) years, with 26 (76.5%) patients being male. Twenty-one (61.7%) patients were moderate or heavy drinkers, 23 (67.6%) patients had a history of eating raw meat or liver and 6 (17.6%) patients owned pet dogs or cats. Main patient symptoms consisted of right upper quadrant pain, fever, and fatigue; 18 (52.9%) patients, however, presented with no symptoms. Lung involvement was detected in 444 (11.7%) patients. The eosinophil count increased in 29 (85.3%) patients at initial diagnosis, and decreased in most patients after albendazole treatment. The initial serum IgE level increased in 25 (73.5%) patients, but exhibited various response levels after albendazole treatment. Liver abscess formation improved in all patients. CONCLUSION: The liver abscess was improved with albendazole treatment. PMID:27366302

  8. Pyogenic Liver Abscess Caused by Acinetobacter lwoffii: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, N. Pal; Nirmal, Kirti; Kaur, I. Rajender

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter lwoffii is a gram negative aerobic non-fermenter bacilli. It is considered as an important emerging pathogen after Acinetobacter baumannii in patients with impaired immune system and in nosocomial infections. Here, we present a case of community acquired pyogenic liver Abscess caused by Acinetobacter lwoffii in a diabetic patient. PMID:27504286

  9. Lung abscess-etiology, diagnostic and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Tsavlis, Drosos; Kioumis, Ioannis; Kosmidis, Christoforos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andrew; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Baloukas, Dimitris; Kuhajda, Danijela

    2015-01-01

    Lung abscess is a type of liquefactive necrosis of the lung tissue and formation of cavities (more than 2 cm) containing necrotic debris or fluid caused by microbial infection. It can be caused by aspiration, which may occur during altered consciousness and it usually causes a pus-filled cavity. Moreover, alcoholism is the most common condition predisposing to lung abscesses. Lung abscess is considered primary (60%) when it results from existing lung parenchymal process and is termed secondary when it complicates another process, e.g., vascular emboli or follows rupture of extrapulmonary abscess into lung. There are several imaging techniques which can identify the material inside the thorax such as computerized tomography (CT) scan of the thorax and ultrasound of the thorax. Broad spectrum antibiotic to cover mixed flora is the mainstay of treatment. Pulmonary physiotherapy and postural drainage are also important. Surgical procedures are required in selective patients for drainage or pulmonary resection. In the current review we will present all current information from diagnosis to treatment. PMID:26366400

  10. Lung abscess-etiology, diagnostic and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Tsavlis, Drosos; Kioumis, Ioannis; Kosmidis, Christoforos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andrew; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Baloukas, Dimitris; Kuhajda, Danijela

    2015-08-01

    Lung abscess is a type of liquefactive necrosis of the lung tissue and formation of cavities (more than 2 cm) containing necrotic debris or fluid caused by microbial infection. It can be caused by aspiration, which may occur during altered consciousness and it usually causes a pus-filled cavity. Moreover, alcoholism is the most common condition predisposing to lung abscesses. Lung abscess is considered primary (60%) when it results from existing lung parenchymal process and is termed secondary when it complicates another process, e.g., vascular emboli or follows rupture of extrapulmonary abscess into lung. There are several imaging techniques which can identify the material inside the thorax such as computerized tomography (CT) scan of the thorax and ultrasound of the thorax. Broad spectrum antibiotic to cover mixed flora is the mainstay of treatment. Pulmonary physiotherapy and postural drainage are also important. Surgical procedures are required in selective patients for drainage or pulmonary resection. In the current review we will present all current information from diagnosis to treatment. PMID:26366400

  11. Eggerthella lenta Bacteremia Complicated by Spondylodiscitis, Psoas Abscess, and Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Korman, T. M.; Junckerstorff, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Eggerthella lenta bacteremia is uncommon and generally associated with abdominal sepsis. The organism and its clinical significance have not been well characterized due to historical difficulties with identification. We report a case of severe infection in a paraplegic man complicated by psoas abscess, osteomyelitis, and meningitis and discuss treatment challenges. PMID:24430458

  12. Acute pyogenic iliopsoas abscess in children in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shah, R K; Singh, R P; Shah, N P

    2004-10-01

    We describe a prospective study of twenty-four cases of acute pyogenic abscess of the iliopsoas in children treated conservatively and operatively. Eight patients were managed conservatively with antibiotics alone while sixteen others were managed operatively by open drainage. All made a complete recovery. PMID:15510959

  13. Sonography of thigh abscess: detection, diagnosis, and drainage.

    PubMed

    vanSonnenberg, E; Wittich, G R; Casola, G; Cabrera, O A; Gosink, B B; Resnick, D L

    1987-10-01

    Sonographic characteristics and percutaneous catheter drainage of thigh abscesses in 18 patients are described. Most of these patients had underlying diseases including osteomyelitis, trauma, diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, leukemia, lymphoma, sepsis, bleeding dyscrasia, and autoimmune disease. Previous procedures on these thigh collections included seven operations and 12 nondiagnostic ward aspirations. All collections were shown by sonography to be either anterior or anterolateral. Two cases referred for drainage were posteromedial; sonography showed these to be mycotic pseudoaneurysms. The abscesses were either anechoic or hypoechoic, and occasionally had debris and septations. Abscesses associated with underlying osteomyelitis abutted the femur; those related to other causes generally were more superficial within muscle or fascial layers. Sonographically guided catheter drainage successfully cured all patients, even those in whom ward aspiration or formal surgery had been unsuccessful. Sonography is a simple and inexpensive method of imaging and guiding the drainage of thigh abscesses. Percutaneous catheter drainage is the treatment of choice in cases in which simple emergency room or ward incision and drainage are inadequate. PMID:3307356

  14. Evaluation of holmium laser for transurethral deroofing of severe and multiloculated prostatic abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chan Ho; Ku, Ja Yoon; Park, Young Joo; Lee, Jeong Zoo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Our objective was to evaluate the use of a holmium laser for transurethral deroofing of a prostatic abscess in patients with severe and multiloculated prostatic abscesses. Materials and Methods From January 2011 to April 2014, eight patients who were diagnosed with prostatic abscesses and who underwent transurethral holmium laser deroofing at Pusan National University Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Results Multiloculated or multifocal abscess cavities were found on the preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan in all eight patients. All patients who underwent transurethral holmium laser deroofing of a prostatic abscess had successful outcomes, without the need for secondary surgery. Of the eight patients, seven underwent holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) for the removal of residual adenoma. Markedly reduced multiloculated abscess cavities were found in the follow-up CT in all patients. No prostatic abscess recurrence was found. Transient stress urinary incontinence was observed in three patients. The stress urinary incontinence subsided within 3 weeks in two patients and improved with conservative management within 2 months in the remaining patient. Conclusions Transurethral holmium laser deroofing of prostatic abscesses ensures successful drainage of the entire abscess cavity. Because we resolved the predisposing conditions of prostatic abscess, such as bladder outlet obstruction and prostatic calcification, by simultaneously conducting HoLEP, there was no recurrence of the prostatic abscesses after surgery. We recommend our method in patients requiring transurethral drainage. PMID:25685303

  15. Splenectomy and risk of renal and perinephric abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Hsien-Feng; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Little epidemiological research is available on the relationship between splenectomy and renal and perinephric abscesses. The purpose of the study was to examine this issue in Taiwan. We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study using the hospitalization dataset of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. A total of 16,426 participants aged 20 and older who were newly diagnosed with splenectomy from 1998 to 2010 were assigned to the splenectomy group, whereas 65,653 sex-matched, age-matched, and comorbidity-matched, randomly selected participants without splenectomy were assigned to the nonsplenectomy group. The incidence of renal and perinephric abscesses at the end of 2011 was measured in both groups. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to measure the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for risk of renal and perinephric abscesses associated with splenectomy and other comorbidities including cystic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, urinary tract infection, and urolithiasis. The overall incidence rate of renal and perinephric abscesses was 2.14-fold greater in the splenectomy group than that in the nonsplenectomy group (2.24 per 10,000 person-years vs 1.05 per 10,000 person-years, 95% CI 2.02, 2.28). After controlling for sex, age, cystic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, urinary tract infection, and urolithiasis, the multivariable regression analysis demonstrated that the adjusted HR of renal and perinephric abscesses was 2.24 for the splenectomy group (95 % CI 1.30, 3.88), when compared with the nonsplenectomy group. In further analysis, the adjusted HR markedly increased to 7.69 for those comorbid with splenectomy and diabetes mellitus (95% CI 3.31, 17.9). Splenectomy is associated with renal and perinephric abscesses, particularly comorbid with diabetes mellitus. In view of its potential morbidity and mortality, clinicians should consider the possibility of renal and perinephric

  16. Hydromyelia secondary to spinal epidural abscess. A case report.

    PubMed

    Saponiero, R; Toriello, A; Locatelli, G; Narciso, N; Posteraro, L; Panza, M P; Napoli, A N; Romano, F; Pugliese, N D

    2010-06-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare condition that can be fatal if untreated. Risk factors are immunocompromised states as well as spinal procedures including epidural anesthesia and spinal surgery. The signs and symptoms of SEA are nonspecific and can range from low back pain to sepsis. The treatment of choice is surgical decompression followed by four to six weeks of antibiotic therapy. The most common causative organism in SEA is staphylococcus aureus and spread is usually haematogenous or contiguous from psoas, paraspinal or retropharyngeal abscesses. The exact mechanism by which an epidural abscess causes spinal cord damage is unclear. In fact, the damage is often out of proportion to the degree of compression demonstrated radiologically. There is only a report of a patient with syrinx formation secondary to epidural abscess. We describe the case of a 48-year-old woman with a two-week history of thoracic back pain and evidence of dorsal SEA probably from contiguous psoas abscess. Neurological examination revealed flaccid paraplegia and loss of sphincter control. A spinal MRI scan with Gd-enhancement revealed focal high intensity signal in the T2-weighted and FLAIR images at the level of the vertebral bodies in segments D3-D11. The patient was treated with posterior decompression and drainage of the SEA, but with a poor outcome. Six weeks after the onset of symptoms, an MRI scan showed a newly-formed hydromyelia formation from D4 to D8. The case reported is the second to describe hydromyelia formation secondary to epidural abscess and a poor outcome, experiencing partial improvement without recovery. For this reason, we confirmed that the essential problem of SEA lies in the need for early diagnosis, because the early signs and symptoms may be vague and the "classic" triad of back pain, fever and variable neurological deficits occur in only 13% of patients by the time of diagnosis. Only timely treatment will avoid or reduce permanent neurological deficits

  17. Comparison of azithromycin, roxithromycin, and cephalexin penetration kinetics in early and mature abscesses.

    PubMed

    Girard, D; Bergeron, J M; Milisen, W B; Retsema, J A

    1993-06-01

    During the process of abscess formation, a myriad of changes are observed histologically that impede the penetration of antimicrobial agents into infection loci. A Staphylococcus aureus foreign body abscess, developed in rats, was employed to evaluate the penetration kinetics of azithromycin, roxithromycin and cephalexin at various stages of abscess development; the progressive patho-histological changes of abscess formation were also characterized in this model. In an early abscess (18 h post-challenge), azithromycin penetration into inflammatory fluid was enhanced (AUC of 351 vs 130 mg.h/kg) and residence prolonged relative to an inflammation control (half-life of 88 vs 27 h). In contrast, roxithromycin and cephalexin penetration into, and residence in, inflammatory fluid were unaltered in the early abscess. However, penetration into, and egress from, a mature abscess (ten days post-challenge) were impeded for all three antimicrobials (P < or = 0.03). The penetration kinetics of azithromycin into inflammatory fluid in an early abscess were independent of the dose regimen, but dependent on the total dose. The persistently high concentrations of azithromycin in inflammatory fluid within abscess were associated with the infiltration of phagocytic cells and encapsulation by fibrous tissue. These data are consistent with a phagocytic delivery mechanism for azithromycin, whereby the presence of high concentrations of azithromycin in inflammatory fluid are a consequence of augmented drug distribution via the release of accumulated intracellular drug from the infiltrating phagocytic cells and fibroblasts associated with abscess formation. PMID:8396089

  18. The aerobic and anaerobic bacteriology of perirectal abscesses.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, I; Frazier, E H

    1997-01-01

    The microbiology of perirectal abscesses in 144 patients was studied. Aerobic or facultative bacteria only were isolated in 13 (9%) instances, anaerobic bacteria only were isolated in 27 (19%) instances, and mixed aerobic and anaerobic flora were isolated in 104 (72%) instances. A total of 325 anaerobic and 131 aerobic or facultative isolates were recovered (2.2 anaerobic isolates and 0.9 aerobic isolates per specimen). The predominant anaerobes were as follows: Bacteroides fragilis group (85 isolates), Peptostreptococcus spp. (72 isolates), Prevotella spp. (71 isolates), Fusobacterium spp. (21 isolates), Porphyromonas spp. (20 isolates), and Clostridium spp. (15 isolates). The predominant aerobic and facultative bacteria were as follows: Staphylococcus aureus (34 isolates), Streptococcus spp. (28 isolates), and Escherichia coli (19 isolates). These data illustrate the polymicrobial aerobic and anaerobic microbiology of perirectal abscesses. PMID:9350771

  19. Primary pituitary abscess in an adolescent boy: a rare occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Samik; Acharyya, Saugata; Acharyya, Kakoli

    2012-01-01

    Primary pituitary abscess is a rare clinical condition at a young age. It is characterised by atypical clinical features which makes the diagnosis difficult. Correct diagnosis and therapy are mandatory due to the potentially lethal outcome. We report the case of a 14–year-old healthy boy. The onset was acute with fever, gait imbalance, slurring of speech and amnesia. MRI brain revealed a hyperintense lesion in T2-weighted image (T2WI) in sellar and suprasellar region, which was hypointense in T1WI. After administration of contrast, there was peripheral rim enhancement suggesting pituitary abscess. The diagnosis was confirmed following evacuation of purulent material, during surgery, through a trans-sphenoidal approach. Postoperatively, the boy needed prolonged intensive care support. He was discharged on day 42 after surgery. Follow-up at 3 months revealed complete motor recovery. He required hormone replacement and was intermittently showing features suggestive of frontal lobe syndrome. PMID:23257693

  20. [Spinal epidural abscess as a complication of a finger infection].

    PubMed

    Ridderikhof, M L; van den Brink, W A; van Dalsen, A D; Kieft, H

    2008-06-21

    An 81-year-old man was treated with intravenous antibiotics for a soft tissue infection in a finger. Despite adequate antibiotic treatment, he developed signs of spinal cord injury caused by a cervical spinal epidural abscess. An emergency laminectomy was performed. The neurological impairment appeared to be irreversible, and the patient died. Spinal epidural abscess is a rare and serious complication ofa bacteraemia. It is often caused by an infection of the skin or soft tissue with Staphylococcus aureus. Given the risk of rapidly progressive and irreversible neurological damage, this complication must be treated as soon as possible. The treatment of choice is surgery. Conservative management with intravenous antibiotics is an option only under strict conditions. PMID:18624007

  1. Paralaryngeal Abscess with Laryngeal Hemiplegia and Fistulation in a Horse

    PubMed Central

    Barber, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    A three year old Thoroughbred filly was examined because of bilateral nasal discharge and external swelling of the left laryngeal area. Endoscopy revealed an enlarged left arytenoid cartilage, left laryngeal hemiplegia and drainage of purulent material into the lumen of the larynx. Radiographs showed a large fluid and gas filled cavity overlying the caudal larynx and cranial trachea. Surgical drainage and debridement of the abscess led to complete healing by secondary intention. Laryngeal ventriculectomy was performed as a treatment for left laryngeal hemiplegia, but a grave prognosis for respiratory soundness was given due to the extensive laryngeal fibrosis. The etiology of the Staphylococcus aureus abscess is unknown but may have originated from oral trauma to the larynx. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:7337917

  2. Nonsurgical resolution of caudal mediastinal paraesophageal abscess in a cat

    PubMed Central

    JUNG, Joohyun; CHOI, Mincheol

    2014-01-01

    A one-year-old, castrated male domestic short hair cat was admitted with a history of anorexia, regurgitation and pyrexia for two days. Fever and leukocytosis were identified. There were a large soft tissue density oval mass in the caudal mediastinum on thoracic radiographs, a fluid-filled oval mass in the caudal mediastinum on ultrasonography, and left-sided and ventrally displaced and compressed esophagus on esophagram. On esophageal endoscopy, there were no esophageal abnormalities. CT findings with a fluid filled mass with rim enhancement indicated a caudal mediastinal paraesophageal abscess. The patient was treated with oral antibiotics, because the owner declined percutaneous drainage and surgery. The patient was admitted on emergency with severe respiratory distress; and ruptured abscess and deteriorated pleuropneumonia were suspected. With intensive hospitalization care and additional antibiotic therapy, the patient had full recovery. PMID:25648207

  3. [Psoas abscess and lumbar spine osteomyelitis: case report].

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana M; Schmalbach, Lauwence A

    2016-10-01

    Psoas abscess is a common disease in children. It can have a nonspecific clinical presentation, insidious onset and sometimes fever. The most common type in children is the primary one; however, it can sometimes be of secondary origin and associated with severe infections such as osteomyelitis so a high index of suspicion is required to detect and treat it promptly. We present an unusual case of psoas abscess with infiltration of the vertebral body of L2 in a 14 year old male patient previously healthy with no history of trauma or fever on admission. X-ray and ultrasound were performed but the diagnosis was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. With positive blood cultures for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus he completed 2 weeks of intravenous antibiotic therapy and 4 weeks of oral antibiotic therapy with blood cultures negativization and resolution of symptoms. PMID:27606657

  4. Nonsurgical resolution of caudal mediastinal paraesophageal abscess in a cat.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joohyun; Choi, Mincheol

    2015-04-01

    A one-year-old, castrated male domestic short hair cat was admitted with a history of anorexia, regurgitation and pyrexia for two days. Fever and leukocytosis were identified. There were a large soft tissue density oval mass in the caudal mediastinum on thoracic radiographs, a fluid-filled oval mass in the caudal mediastinum on ultrasonography, and left-sided and ventrally displaced and compressed esophagus on esophagram. On esophageal endoscopy, there were no esophageal abnormalities. CT findings with a fluid filled mass with rim enhancement indicated a caudal mediastinal paraesophageal abscess. The patient was treated with oral antibiotics, because the owner declined percutaneous drainage and surgery. The patient was admitted on emergency with severe respiratory distress; and ruptured abscess and deteriorated pleuropneumonia were suspected. With intensive hospitalization care and additional antibiotic therapy, the patient had full recovery. PMID:25648207

  5. Neonatal Ilio-Psoas Abscess: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dasmit

    2014-01-01

    Ilio-psoas abscess (IPA) is rare in children and exceptional in the neonate. However, we recently managed two consecutive male neonates with right-sided IPA. The first baby was born two days after rupture of the membranes and had thick meconium-stained amniotic fluid. There was no such high risk factor in the second child. Diagnosis was made by ultrasonography in both the patients. Extraperitoneal surgical drainage was done and systemic antibiotics were given. Delay in presentation and uncontrolled sepsis, led to mortality in the first case. On the contrary, relatively early presentation, prompt drainage of the abscess and good response to higher antibiotics, lead to successful salvage of the second baby. PMID:26023475

  6. Neonatal ilio-psoas abscess: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Sham, Minakshi; Singh, Dasmit

    2014-01-01

    Ilio-psoas abscess (IPA) is rare in children and exceptional in the neonate. However, we recently managed two consecutive male neonates with right-sided IPA. The first baby was born two days after rupture of the membranes and had thick meconium-stained amniotic fluid. There was no such high risk factor in the second child. Diagnosis was made by ultrasonography in both the patients. Extraperitoneal surgical drainage was done and systemic antibiotics were given. Delay in presentation and uncontrolled sepsis, led to mortality in the first case. On the contrary, relatively early presentation, prompt drainage of the abscess and good response to higher antibiotics, lead to successful salvage of the second baby. PMID:26023475

  7. Radiofrequency ablation of a misdiagnosed Brodie’s abscess

    PubMed Central

    Chan, RS; Abdullah, BJJ; Aik, S; Tok, CH

    2011-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) therapy is recognised as a safe and effective treatment option for osteoid osteoma. This case report describes a 27-year-old man who underwent computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous RFA for a femoral osteoid osteoma, which was diagnosed based on his clinical presentation and CT findings. The patient developed worsening symptoms complicated by osteomyelitis after the procedure. His clinical progression and subsequent MRI findings had led to a revised diagnosis of a Brodie’s abscess, which was further supported by the eventual resolution of his symptoms following a combination of antibiotics treatment and surgical irrigations. This case report illustrates the unusual MRI features of osteomyelitis mimicking soft tissue tumours following RFA of a misdiagnosed Brodie’s abscess and highlights the importance of a confirmatory histopathological diagnosis for an osteoid osteoma prior to treatment. PMID:22291860

  8. Mycotic Abdominal Pseudoaneurysm due to Psoas Abscess after Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Dae Woong; Lee, Sam Youn; Lee, Mi Kyung

    2015-01-01

    A 36-year-old man, who had undergone thoracoscopic anterior spinal fusion using the plate system and posterior screw fusion three months previously, presented to our hospital with left flank pain and fever. Computed tomography indicated the presence of a psoas muscle abscess. However, after two days of percutaneous catheter drainage, a mycotic abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm was detected via computed tomography. We performed in situ revascularization using a prosthetic graft with omental wrapping. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was identified on blood and pus culture, and systemic vancomycin was administered for one month. Although the abscess recurred, it was successfully treated with percutaneous catheter drainage and systemic vancomycin administration for three months, without the need for instrumentation removal. The patient remained asymptomatic throughout two years of follow-up. PMID:26665118

  9. Lumbar spine osteomyelitis and epidural abscess formation secondary to acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Godhania, Vinesh

    2016-01-01

    A 39-year-old male with no previous medical history presented with abdominal and low back pain. Based on clinical and radiological findings he was diagnosed with L1/L2 osteomyelitis and epidural abscess. Further history taking revealed recent use of acupuncture for treatment of mechanical back pain. The patient was treated conservatively with an extended course of antibiotics, monitored with repeat MRI scans and had a full recovery with no neurological deficit. This is the first reported case of epidural abscess formation and osteomyelitis after acupuncture in the UK. As acupuncture becomes more commonly used in western countries, it is important to be aware of this rare but serious complication. PMID:26976275

  10. Migratory and misleading abscess of oro-facial region.

    PubMed

    ArunKumar, Kubsad Veerabhadrappa; Deepa, Dhruvakumar

    2015-01-01

    Acute pericoronitis usually presents with severe localized pain, swelling and sometimes trismus. However, chronic pericoronitis and periodontal abscess produce a dull pain, moderate swelling and are occasionally seen migrating into distant sites producing fistulae intra-orally and/or extra-orally. This may quite often cause diagnostic dilemmas necessitating thorough medical and dental history, careful clinical examination and sometimes special investigations to confirm the etiology and or origin of infection. Here, we present three such cases and their management. PMID:26392702

  11. Left main compression by an aortic root abscess.

    PubMed

    Misuraca, Leonardo; De Caro, Francesco; De Carlo, Marco; Barzaghi, Carlo; Scioti, Gianni; Minzioni, Gaetano; Petronio, Anna S

    2012-03-01

    A 79-year-old man with severe aortic stenosis, history of coronary artery disease and a recent hospitalization for sepsis presented at our institution following a syncope and angina at rest. Coronary angiography and aortography showed an aortic root abscess, causing left main coronary artery compression. This life-threatening complication of aortic valve endocarditis is rare and requires immediate surgical correction. PMID:22306781

  12. Recurrent sterile meningitis caused by a pituitary abscess.

    PubMed

    Ford, J; Torres, L F; Cox, T; Hayward, R

    1986-10-01

    The case of a 21 year old woman who presented with recurrent sterile meningitis and bitemporal hemianopia is described. Computed tomographic scan showed a large low density ring enhancing lesion above and within the pituitary fossa which at operation and on histological examination was found to be compatible with an abscess. The visual field defect recovered completely and the scan appearances returned to normal postoperatively. PMID:3774724

  13. Tuberculous pancreatic abscess: an unusual manifestation of HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Desmond, N M; Kingdon, E; Beale, T J; Coker, R J; Tanner, A G; Harris, J W

    1995-01-01

    Pancreatic tuberculosis is unusual occurring in only 2.7% of autopsy studies of persons with miliary disease. Reports of focal pancreatic tuberculosis are rare, even in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in whom abdominal tuberculosis is a frequent feature. We describe two patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who developed tuberculous pancreatic abscesses. In both this was their AIDS-defining illness. Images Figure 1 PMID:7769586

  14. Cerebral venous thrombosis associated with micro-abscesses: case report.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Wataru; Fujita, Keishi; Onuma, Kuniyuki; Kamezaki, Takao; Sakashita, Shingo; Sugita, Shintarou

    2013-01-01

    We present a case that is most likely Lemierre's syndrome. A 19-year-old man presented to us with -common-cold-like symptoms, which he had had for 2 days, such as slight fever, general malaise, anorexia, sore throat, and headache. Eight days after the onset of these symptoms, he died of brain herniation due to cerebral venous thrombosis associated with micro-abscesses detected in pathological examination. PMID:23564158

  15. Delayed Periorbital Abscess after Silicone Implant to Orbital Floor Fracture.

    PubMed

    Dedhia, Raj; Tollefson, Travis T

    2016-06-01

    There is a lack of consensus regarding preferred implant materials for orbital floor fracture reconstruction, leading to surgeon- and institution-dependent preferences. A variety of implants are used for orbital floor fracture reconstruction, each with their own complication profile. Knowledge of different implant materials is critical to identifying complications when they present. We report a delayed periorbital abscess 5 years after orbital floor reconstruction using a silicone implant. PMID:27162580

  16. Calcaneal Osteomyelitis Associated With a Severe Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Memis, Ali; Mutluoglu, Mesut; Öztürk, Sinan; Kara, Kemal; Ay, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO) is a common complication of the diabetic foot and the majority of minor and major amputations are preceded by DFO. The diagnosis and treatment of DFO are both challenging. Early recognition and comprehensive management of diabetic foot infections may obviate DFO, hence the dreadful consequence-resection of the infected bone. Herein, we present the successful management of a patient presenting with DFO and severe abscess formation of the heel. PMID:27104146

  17. Calcaneal Osteomyelitis Associated With a Severe Abscess.

    PubMed

    Memis, Ali; Mutluoglu, Mesut; Öztürk, Sinan; Kara, Kemal; Ay, Hakan

    2014-12-01

    Diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO) is a common complication of the diabetic foot and the majority of minor and major amputations are preceded by DFO. The diagnosis and treatment of DFO are both challenging. Early recognition and comprehensive management of diabetic foot infections may obviate DFO, hence the dreadful consequence-resection of the infected bone. Herein, we present the successful management of a patient presenting with DFO and severe abscess formation of the heel. PMID:27104146

  18. Splenic actinomycotic abscess in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-Y; Chen, Y-C; Tang, J-L; Lin, W-C; Su, I-J; Tien, H-F

    2002-09-01

    Actinomycosis is a gram-positive anaerobic bacterium. Actinomyces organisms are important constituents of the normal flora of mucous membranes and are considered opportunistic pathogens. The three major clinical presentations of actinomycosis include the cervicofacial, thoracic, and abdominopelvic regions. Actinomycosis infection in patients with febrile neutropenia is uncommon and actinomycosis splenic involvement in acute leukemia patients is very rare. We describe a man with acute myeloid leukemia and splenic actinomycotic abscess that developed after chemotherapy following prolonged neutropenia. PMID:12373356

  19. Lemierre's syndrome due to intratumoral abscess of the uvula.

    PubMed

    Rahhal, Hassan; de Campos, Fernando Peixoto Ferraz; Ferreira, Cristiane Rubia; Felipe-Silva, Aloisio

    2015-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome (LS), described in detail in 1936, used to be a life-threatening entity until the advent of antibiotics. Tonsillitis or pharyngitis are the main primary infections and oropharyngeal anaerobic flora is the predominant etiology. However, other primary site infections, as well as other microbiological agents have been reported since the first description. Inflammatory symptoms in the neck and marked findings on physical examination predominate the majority of cases. Nonetheless, the authors report the case of a 54-year-old man with a history of dysphagia followed by cough, purulent expectoration, and fever. The bad condition of his dentition was noteworthy. During the diagnostic work-up, an ulcerated lesion in the uvula and a middle lobe pneumonia were disclosed. Streptococcus viridans was isolated from blood culture. On the fifth day of hospitalization, the patient died after a copious episode of hemoptysis. The autopsy findings depicted an abscess within a squamous cell carcinoma of the uvula, pharyngitis with carotid sheath spreading accompanied by pylephlebitis and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein up to the innominate vein, surrounded by an abscess in the mediastinum. Alveolar hemorrhage and pneumonia were also present. We conclude that the ulcerated carcinoma of the uvula housed an abscess, facilitated by the poor oral hygiene, which triggered LS and the descending mediastinitis. Pulmonary involvement was due to the septic embolism from the internal jugular vein. We would like to highlight the uvula abscess as the primary site of infection in this case of LS with S. viridans as the causative agent. PMID:26558242

  20. The first case report of Raoultella planticola liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Sitaula, Sujata; Shahrrava, Anahita; Al Zoubi, Moamen; Malow, James

    2016-01-01

    Raoultella species are a group of gram-negative, non-motile bacilli commonly isolated from the environment. The group was considered a member of the genus Klebsiella until the late 1990s. Raoultella planticola is a rare cause of human infections. We report the first case of liver abscess caused by this organism. The patient was successfully treated with appropriate antimicrobials combined with operative drainage. PMID:27516968

  1. Propionibacterium Acnes Brain Abscess in an Immunocompetent Man in the Absence of Prior Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Odunukan, Olufunso W; Masannat, Fares; Baka, J Jeff

    2016-02-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a rare, but established, cause of intracranial abscesses. We describe a case of P. acnes brain abscess in an immunocompetent man without prior neurosurgery. A 49-year old man with mild psoriasis presented with a two-week history of gait changes, generalized weakness and a two-day history of headaches, aphasia and confusion. Imaging revealed a left thalamic mass and surgical biopsy suggested a pyogenic abscess. Cultures of biopsy samples of the abscess grew P. acnes alone. MRI and serial neurological exam showed marked clinical improvement with intravenous antibiotics. The significant reduction in the abscess was sustained on MRI obtained at six weeks after completion of antibiotic therapy. In conclusion, P. acnes must be considered as a differential diagnosis in individuals presenting with features suggestive of a brain abscess even in the absence of immunosuppression or previous neurosurgery. PMID:26999913

  2. Use of indium-111-labeled autologous leukocytes in differentiating pancreatic abscess from pseudocyst

    SciTech Connect

    Bicknell, T.A.; Kohatsu, S.; Goodwin, D.A.

    1981-09-01

    Pancreatic abscess is very difficult to diagnose and the differentiate from pancreatic pseudocyst based on clinical findings, laboratory studies and roentgenographic examinations. Eight patients diagnosed as having a pancreatic mass by ultrasonography or computed tomography also underwent indium-111-labeled autologous leukocyte scanning (10 scans) for suspected intraabdominal sepsis. This scan detects migration of labeled leukocytes into abscesses or areas of inflammation. Four patients had abscess and positive scans, and four patients had pseudocyst and negative scans. There was one false-positive scan in a patient with a recurrent pancreatic mass after drainage of an abscess. Since pancreatic abscess requires prompt drainage, and since it may be preferable to delay drainage of a pseudocyst, the differentiation of these two conditions is important. This test appears very effective in diagnosing pancreatic abscess and differentiating it from a pseudocyst.

  3. Multiple large splenic abscesses managed with computed tomography-guided percutaneous catheter drainage in children.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Jung Sook; Park, Ji Sook; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Park, Eun Sil; Lim, Jae-Young; Park, Chan Hoo; Woo, Hyang Ok; Park, Jung Je; Cho, Jae Min; Youn, Hee-Shang

    2013-12-01

    Splenic abscess is a rare finding in children. Splenectomy combined with broad-spectrum antibiotics has been the treatment of choice for multiple splenic abscesses. Herein, we report the case of a 14-year-old girl with multiple large splenic abscesses that were successfully managed after two image-guided percutaneous drainage procedures and administration of intravenous antibiotics. Initially, an abscess located at the periphery in the lower pole of the spleen was aspirated under ultrasound guidance. Finally, another abscess located near the hilum of the spleen was drained under computed tomography guidance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of multiple large splenic abscesses treated with computed tomography-guided percutaneous drainage. PMID:23597527

  4. [A case of multiple liver abscesses associated with Streptococcus salivarius in a patient with chronic periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Kamachi, Saori; Otsuka, Taiga; Tsuji, Chika; Nakashita, Shunya; Ide, Yasushi; Mizuta, Toshihiko

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is an oral commensal bacterium that rarely causes disease in humans. Here, we report a case of liver abscess associated with S. salivarius in a 41-year-old woman who presented with continuous abdominal discomfort, fatigue, and fever. She was diagnosed with multiple liver abscesses; she underwent percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage. Thereafter, S. salivarius was isolated in all bacterial cultures of the drained abscesses, and it was sensitive to penicillins. She made a good recovery after treatment. In the absence of an infective source other than chronic periodontitis, the cause of liver abscesses was attributed to oral S. salivarius. S. salivarius is a normal oral commensal, and oral commensals must be considered if the infective origin of liver abscess cannot be determined. PMID:25100350

  5. Obturator internus muscle abscess in children: report of seven cases and review.

    PubMed

    Viani, R M; Bromberg, K; Bradley, J S

    1999-01-01

    Obturator internus muscle (OIM) abscess is an uncommon entity often mistaken for septic arthritis of the hip. We describe seven children with OIM abscess and review seven previously reported cases. The most common presenting symptoms were hip or thigh pain (14 patients), fever (13), and limp (13). The hip was flexed, abducted, and externally rotated in 11 patients. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography (CT) were diagnostic for OIM abscess in the 14 patients. Associated abscesses were located in the obturator externus muscle (5 patients), psoas muscle (2), and iliac muscle (1). The etiologic agents were Staphylococcus aureus (8 patients), Streptococcus pyogenes (2), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (2), and Enterococcus faecalis (1). Three patients underwent CT-guided percutaneous drainage, and three had surgical drainage. Three patients had ischial osteomyelitis in addition to OIM abscess. The 11 children with uncomplicated OIM abscess were treated for a median of 28 days. All patients had an uneventful recovery. PMID:10028081

  6. Successful neuroendoscopic treatment of intraventricular brain abscess rupture

    PubMed Central

    Nishizaki, Takafumi; Ikeda, Norio; Nakano, Shigeki; Sakakura, Takanori; Abiko, Masaru; Okamura, Tomomi

    2011-01-01

    Intraventricular rupture of a brain abscess is still associated with a high mortality rate. Here, we report such a case in a patient with normal immunity that was treated successfully using neuroendoscopic approach. A 69-year-old man who had presented with headache and fever developed confusion and restlessness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass with ring enhancement extending to the right ventricle. Emergency aspiration of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the spinal canal revealed severe purulent meningitis. Bacterial culture of the CSF and blood was negative. Because of prolonged consciousness disturbance, the patient underwent evacuation of the intraventrcular abscess using a neuroendoscope. The pus was centrifuged and collected for bacterial culture, and this revealed Streptococcus intermedius/milleri. After implantation of a ventricular catheter, gentamicin sulfate was administered twice a day for 9 days. Cefotaxime sodium was also administered intravenously for 14 days, followed by oral administration of cefcapene pivoxil hydrochloride for 10 days. The patient made a complete recovery, and was discharged 31 days after admission. After 20 months of follow-up, he is doing well and has returned to his work. In cases of intraventricular rupture of a brain abscess, a neuroendoscopic approach is useful for evacuation of intraventricular debris or septum, and identification of the causative bacterium for selection of antibiotics, possibly reducing the period of hospitalization. PMID:24765313

  7. Septic arthritis: a unique complication of nasal septal abscess.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Steven M; Koch, Cody A; Ekbom, Dale C

    2015-03-01

    Nasal septal abscesses (NSAs) occur between the mucoperichondrium and the nasal septum. They most often arise when an untreated septal hematoma becomes infected. The most commonly reported sequela is a loss of septal cartilage support, which can result in a nasal deformity. Other sequelae include potentially life-threatening conditions such as meningitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, brain abscess, and subarachnoid empyema. We report the case of a 17-year-old boy who developed an NSA after he had been struck in the face with a basketball. He presented to his primary care physician 5 days after the injury and again the next day, but his condition was not correctly diagnosed. Finally, 7 days after his injury, he presented to an emergency department with more serious symptoms, and he was correctly diagnosed with NSA. He was admitted to the intensive care unit, and he remained hospitalized for 6 days. Among the abscess sequelae he experienced was septic arthritis, which has heretofore not been reported as a complication of NSA. He responded well to appropriate treatment, although he lost a considerable amount of septal cartilage. He was discharged home on intravenous antibiotic therapy, and his condition improved. Reconstruction of the nasal septum will likely need to be pursued in the future. PMID:25738728

  8. Neurobrucellosis presenting as an intra-medullary spinal cord abscess

    PubMed Central

    Vajramani, Girish V; Nagmoti, Mahantesh B; Patil, Chidanand S

    2005-01-01

    Background Of the diverse presentation of neurobrucellosis, intra-medullary spinal cord abscess is extremely rare. Only four other cases have been reported so far. We present a case of spinal cord intra-medullary abscess due to Brucella melitensis. Case presentation A forty-year-old female presented with progressive weakness of both lower limb with urinary incontinence of 6 months duration. She was febrile. Neurological examination revealed flaccid areflexic paraplegia with T10 below sensory impairment including perianal region. An intramedullary mass was diagnosed on Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) scan extending from T12 to L2. At surgery, a large abscess was encountered at the conus medullaris, from which Brucella melitensis was grown on culture. She was started on streptomycin and doxycycline for 1 month, followed by rifampicin and doxycycline for 1 month. At 2-year follow-up, she had recovered only partially and continued to have impaired bladder function. Conclusion Neurobrucellosis, if not treated early, can result in severe neurological morbidity and sequale, which may be irreversible. Hence it is important to consider the possibility of neurobrucellosis in endemic region and treat aggressively. PMID:16168059

  9. Phellinus tropicalis abscesses in a patient with chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Manish; Resnick, Elena; Hui, Yiqun; Maglione, Paul J; Mehta, Harshna; Kattan, Jacob; Bouvier, Nicole M; LaBombardi, Vincent; Victor, Tanya R; Chaturvedi, Sudha; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2014-02-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD), caused by genetic defects in components of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase pathway, leads to recurrent life-threatening bacterial and invasive fungal infections. While a number of unique pathogens have been associated with this disease, the causative organisms may be difficult to identify. Here, we present a 24 year old male with known X-linked CGD who concurrently developed a cervical abscess and an abscess in the subcutaneous tissues of the right hip, both of which were surgically drained. Cultures failed to identify any organisms. He was treated empirically with ertapenem but the hip abscess recurred at the original site and in contiguous dependent areas in the posterior thigh and knee. A filamentous organism was observed microscopically, initially considered a contaminant, but on culture yielded a mold growth, identified as Phellinus tropicalis (synonym: Inonotus tropicalis) based on phenotypic and molecular methods. This is the third case report of human infection with P. tropicalis, all in subjects with CGD. The patient was treated with voriconazole with resolution of his symptoms. PMID:24310980

  10. Psoas abscess diagnosed at a Northern university hospital.

    PubMed

    Maagaard, Anne; Oktedalen, Olav

    2002-01-01

    Abscess of the psoas muscle is an infrequent diagnosis at hospitals in Northern countries. We report on 16 patients who had this diagnosis during the period 1991-2001. Eight patients were immigrants who had previously been healthy and most of them had experienced symptoms for approximately 1 y. MRI or CT scans revealed spondylodiscitis in 6 of these patients and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was identified as the causative agent. With the exception of 1 patient who was exclusively treated with antituberculous agents, all 8 immigrant patients were successfully treated with antituberculous agents in addition to percutaneous drainage. The other 8 patients were Norwegians, 4 of whom had underlying conditions such as diabetes mellitus or drug abuse. The causative microorganisms were Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus spp., with the exception of M. tuberculosis in 1 case. The Norwegian patients had a more acute history of symptoms than the immigrant patients and 2 of them were in a septic condition on admittance. Two of the Norwegians died of serious infection; 5 were successfully treated with percutaneous drainage in addition to antibiotics and 1 was treated exclusively with antibiotic agents. The clinical history and microorganism associated with psoas abscess seemed to depend on whether or not the patient was an immigrant. Owing to increasing immigration, diagnosis of psoas abscess should be taken into account in Northern countries. PMID:12578159

  11. Disseminated necrotic mediastinitis spread from odontogenic abscess: our experience

    PubMed Central

    Filiaci, Fabio; Riccardi, Emiliano; Mitro, Valeria; Piombino, Pasquale; Rinna, Claudio; Agrillo, Alessandro; Ungari, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aims Deep neck infections are rare but potentially fatal complication of pulpal abscess of the teeth. If an infection can progress rapidly from a toothache to a life threatening infection, then it is critical that dentists be able to recognize the danger signs and identify the patients who are at risk. Mediastinitis is a severe inflammatory process involving the connective tissues that fills the intracellular spaces and surrounds the organs in the middle of the chest. This pathology has both an acute and a chronic form and, in most cases, it has an infectious etiology. This study want to expose the experience acquired in the Oral and Maxillo-facial Sciences Department, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, regarding two clinical cases of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis starting from an odontogenic abscess. Methods We report two clinical cases of disseminated necrotic mediastinitis with two different medical and surgical approaches. The radiographic and photographic documentation of the patients was collected in the pre-and post-operatively. All patients underwent a CT scan and MRI. Results Mediastinitis can result from a serious odontogenic abscess, and the extent of its inflammation process must be never underestimated. Dental surgeons play a key role as a correct diagnosis can prevent further increasing of the inflammation process. Conclusions A late diagnosis and an inadequate draining represent the major causes of the elevated mortality rate of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis. PMID:26330907

  12. Comparative imaging in the evaluation of hepatic abscesses in immunocompromised children

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.R.; Starshak, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Three children, two with aplastic anemia and one with chronic granulomatous disease of childhood, were evaluated for hepatic abscess with hepatic scintigraphy (HS), gray-scale sonography (GSS), 67Ga imaging (GA), and computed tomography (CT). Each of the children was found to harbor two abscesses. All were detected with GSS and CT. In the two children imaged with GA, all four abscesses were seen. In two patients imaged twice with HS, 50% of the lesions were missed.

  13. Salmonella typhi Splenic Abscess Following Blunt Abdominal Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sharavanan, Priyadarshini; Palraj, Kennedy Kumar; Antony, Tessa; Thayanidhi, Premamalini

    2016-01-01

    Splenic abscess as a complication of enteric fever due to Salmonella typhi is a rare entity. Here, we are presenting a case of splenic abscess caused by Salmonella typhi with a blunt injury to the abdomen as the predisposing factor. The patient underwent total splenectomy due to failure of conservative management. Splenic abscess is a potential life threatening disease if left untreated. In spite of its rarity, Salmonella typhi has to be considered as a possible pathogen causing the disease.

  14. A left-sided periappendiceal abscess in an adult with intestinal malrotation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Ro; Kim, Jong Hun; Hwang, Yong; Kim, Young Kon

    2006-01-01

    Left-sided periappendiceal abscesses occur in association with two types of congenital anomaly: intestinal malrotation and situs inversus. It is difficult to obtain an accurate preoperative diagnosis of these abscesses due to the abnormal position of the appendix. We present an unusual case of a left-sided periappendiceal abscess in an adult with intestinal malrotation, the diagnosis of which was a challenge. PMID:16981277

  15. New diagnostic and therapeutic techniques in the management of pyogenic liver abscesses.

    PubMed Central

    Ranson, J H; Madayag, M A; Localio, S A; Spencer, F C

    1975-01-01

    An unexplained increase in the frequency of pyogenic liver abscesses of unknown etiology has, fourtunately, been paralleled by significant advances in diagnostic and therapeutic methods. This report reviews experience with 14 patients operated upon at NYU Medical Center since 1971. Eight cases (57%) were cryptogenic. Other abscesses were associated with biliary disease (3); abdominal sepsis (2); and trauma (1). Abscesses were present on hospitalization in 12 patients. Clinical findings included fever (101-108 F); 100%; leucocytosis, 71%; anorexia and vomiting, 50%; localized tenderness and hepatomegaly, 50%; hypoalbuminemia, 86%; hypocholesterolemia, 78%; elevated SGOT, 71%; and elevated aikaline phosphatase, 43%. Technetium hepatic scintiscans showed focal defects in 10 of 12 patients (83%), but did not detect multiple abscesses in 2 of these. Hepatic arteriography performed in 10 patients was highly accurate, outlining single abscesses in 6 and multiple abscesses in 4. Furthermore, in one patient a false positive scintiscan was demonstrated by negative arteriography, confirmed by autopsy. In 4 patients, arteriography indicated an abscess in the posterior-superior area of the right hepatic lobe. With precise anatomical localization, a trans-thoracic approach permitted uncomplicated drainage in each case. This approach provides excellent exposure and direct drainage for abscesses in this area. An additional therapeutic adjunct in two patients, with 4 and 11 abscesses each, was postoperative intraportal infusion of antibiotics through the umbilical vein. Thirteen patients (83%) recovered, one dying from pulmonary embolism. Primary hepatic abscesses occur with increasing frequency. Primary hepatic abscesses occur with increasing frequency. Primary hepatic abscesses occur with increasing frequency. The methods described allow more precise preoperative diagnosis and direct surgical drainage. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:1130869

  16. CT, MRI and DWI Features of a Solid Organizing Hepatic Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Pellizzer, Giampiero; Di Grazia, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Solid organizing hepatic abscess is a rare form of focal infection, which needs differentiation from benign and malignant solid masses. We report a case of a 30-year-old man with a solid organizing hepatic abscess, diagnosed by imaging and ex juvantibus criteria. CT and MRI findings are presented and role of DWI is outlined. Noninvasive diagnosis of a solid organizing hepatic abscess is possible in the appropriate clinical setting; percutaneous or surgical biopsy may be indicated in equivocal cases. PMID:25197604

  17. Cavernosal Abscess due to Streptococcus Anginosus: A Case Report and Comprehensive Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dugdale, Caitlin M.; Tompkins, Andrew J.; Reece, Rebecca M.; Gardner, Adrian F.

    2013-01-01

    Corpus cavernosum abscesses are uncommon with only 23 prior reports in the literature. Several precipitating factors for cavernosal infections have been described including injection therapy for erectile dysfunction, trauma, and priapism. Common causal organisms include Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococci, and Bacteroides. We report a unique case of a corpus cavernosum abscess due to proctitis with hematological seeding and review the literature on cavernosal abscesses. PMID:24917758

  18. Indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphic detection of myocardial abscess formation in patients with endocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Cerqueira, M.D.; Jacobson, A.F.

    1989-05-01

    Myocardial abscess formation in patients with bacterial endocarditis in most clinical settings, especially in patients with prosthetic valves, is a primary indicator for surgical valve replacement. We report the detection of myocardial abscesses using /sup 111/In leukocyte scintigraphy in three patients with prosthetic or native valve endocarditis and nondiagnostic echocardiograms. Leukocyte scintigraphy may allow identification of myocardial abscess formation earlier than other imaging modalities.

  19. Tuberculous cold abscess of breast: an unusual presentation in a male patient

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) of breast is a rare condition especially presentation as a cold abscess. We present a case of male patient with TB of lung and meninges with a cold abscess in the breast. The abscess was incidental finding on the computed tomography (CT) scan. This was further managed by a combination of anti-tuberculous chemotherapy treatment and surgical drainage. We reviewed the current literature related to mammary TB, its presentations and treatment. PMID:27294045

  20. Sporotrichoid pattern of nerve abscesses in borderline tuberculoid leprosy: A Case Report (sporotrichoid like abscesses in leprosy).

    PubMed

    Garg, G; Thami, G P; Mohan, H

    2014-01-01

    Linear distribution of multiple subcutaneous nodules or ulcers along the course of lymphatics, classically seen in lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis, has been observed in a number of other infections like localized cutaneous leishmaniasis, cutaneous tuberculous and non tuberculous mycobacterial infections, Pasteurella tularensis, Scopulariopsis blochi, Nocardia brasiliensis, yaws and syphilis. A case of borderline tuberculoid leprosy with multiple cutaneous nodules corresponding to resolving nerve abscesses in a sporotrichoid pattern is being reported. PMID:26411249

  1. Surgical Treatment of Facial Abscesses and Facial Surgery in Pet Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Capello, Vittorio

    2016-09-01

    Odontogenic facial abscesses associated with periapical infections and osteomyelitis of the jaw represent an important part of the acquired and progressive dental disease syndrome in pet rabbits. Complications such as retromasseteric and retrobulbar abscesses, extensive osteomyelitis of the mandible, and empyemas of the skull are possible sequelae. Standard and advanced diagnostic imaging should be pursued to make a detailed and proper diagnosis, and plan the most effective surgical treatment. This article reviews the surgical anatomy, the pathophysiology, and the classification of abscesses and empyemas of the mandible, the maxilla, and the skull. It also discusses surgical techniques for facial abscesses. PMID:27497207

  2. Stereotactic biopsy and drainage of a brainstem abscess caused by Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Beynon, Christopher; Neumann, Jan-Oliver; Bösel, Julian; Unterberg, Andreas W; Kiening, Karl L

    2013-01-01

    Listerial rhombencephalitis and brain abscesses are rare, but potentially life-threatening conditions. Early initiation of antibiotic therapy is crucial, but establishing the diagnosis of listerial brainstem abscess can be difficult. Stereotactic biopsy and drainage of space-occupying abscesses of the brainstem should be considered especially in cases of rapid clinical deterioration. We successfully performed stereotactic biopsy and drainage of a listerial brainstem abscess in a 42-year-old male patient who deteriorated despite antibiotic treatment, demonstrating that this approach is suitable in such patients. PMID:23615421

  3. Cervical Epidural Abscess: Rare Complication of Bacterial Endocarditis with Streptococcus Viridans: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Shim, Jai-Joon; Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Although many patients with infective endocarditis (IE) complain of joint, muscle, and back pain, infections at these sights are rare. The incidence of spinal abscess in cervical spine complicating endocarditis is very rare. Although the surgical management is the mainstay of treatment, conservative treatment can get success in selected patients. We report a patient with cervical epidural abscess due to Streptococcus viridans endocarditis. Both epidural abscess and IE were managed conservatively with intravenous antibiotics for 8 weeks, with recovery. It is important to remind spinal epidural abscess can occur in those patients with bacterial endocarditis. PMID:25883665

  4. Ultrasonography and indium 111 white blood cell scanning for the detection of intraabdominal abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, B.; Silverman, P.M.; Goodwin, D.A.; McDougall, I.R.

    1981-07-01

    Ultrasound and indium 111 white blood cell scanning were performed on 163 patients with suspected intraabdominal abscesses. In all but one case, intraabdominal abscesses were correctly identified by one or both tests; conversely, no patient was falsely diagnosed by both tests to have an abscess. Sonography was useful in those patients with focal symptoms, and frequently identified nonabscess causes for fever. White cell scanning was valuable when focal signs were absent, and frequently identified extraabdominal sources of sepsis. The two imaging modalities are complementary and provide a highly accurate and sensitive means of intraabdominal abscess detection.

  5. Diffuse large B cell lymphoma presenting as a peri-anal abscess.

    PubMed

    Jayasekera, Hasanga; Gorissen, Kym; Francis, Leo; Chow, Carina

    2014-01-01

    A non-healing peri-anal abscess can be difficult to manage and is often attributed to chronic disease. This case documents a male in his seventh decade who presented with multiple peri-anal collections. The abscess cavity had caused necrosis of the internal sphincter muscles resulting in faecal incontinence. Biopsies were conclusive for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. A de-functioning colostomy was performed and the patient was initiated on CHOP-R chemotherapy. Anal lymphoma masquerading as a peri-anal abscess is rare. A high degree of suspicion must be maintained for an anal abscess which does not resolve with conservative management. PMID:24898408

  6. Enterobius vermicularis: Can it be a possible pathogen in Bartholin gland abscess formation?

    PubMed

    Dönmez, Melahat Emine; Özlü, Tülay; Yılmaz, Fahri; Ayaz, Erol

    2014-01-01

    The most frequent disorders of the Bartholin glands are cysts or abscesses. Bartholin gland abscesses occur generally as a result of polymicrobial infections or agents that cause sexually transmitted diseases. But as far as we know, no parasite has been previously reported among the infectious agents that are detected from the abscesses of the Bartholin gland. Here, we report a 45-year-old woman, in the Bartholin abscess aspirate of whom Enterobius vermicularis eggs were detected in between the inflammatory infiltrate by cytological examination. PMID:24033679

  7. Penile abscess secondary to neglected penile fracture after intracavernosal vasoactive drug injection.

    PubMed

    Song, Wan; Ko, Kwang Jin; Shin, Seung Jea; Ryu, Dong Soo

    2012-12-01

    Penile abscesses are rare, but can develop after trauma, injection therapy, or surgery of the penis, or as an unusual presentation of sexually transmitted diseases. We report a case of penile abscess in a 51-year-old diabetic man, presented 9 days after neglected penile fracture following intracavernosal injection therapy and sexual intercourse. Penile ultrasonography and surgical exploration confirmed the physical examination findings of involvement of the corpus cavernosum. The pus culture from the abscess revealed Enterococcous faecalis. The patient was successfully treated by surgical drainage of the abscess and primary closure of the ruptured tunica albuginea. PMID:23596611

  8. Hepatic abscess induced by foreign body: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Sofia A; Alberto, Sara CF; Cruz, Elsa; Pires, Eduardo; Figueira, Tomás; Coimbra, Élia; Estevez, José; Oliveira, Mário; Novais, Luís; Deus, João R

    2007-01-01

    Hepatic abscess due to perforation of the gastrointestinal tract caused by ingested foreign bodies is uncommon. Pre-operative diagnosis is difficult as patients are often unaware of the foreign body ingestion and symptoms and imagiology are usually non-specific. The authors report a case of 62-year-old woman who was admitted with fever and abdominal pain. Further investigation revealed hepatic abscess, without resolution despite antibiotic therapy. A liver abscess resulting from perforation and intra-hepatic migration of a bone coming from the pilorum was diagnosed by surgery. The literature concerning foreign body-induced perforation of the gastrointestinal tract complicated by liver abscess is reviewed. PMID:17457985

  9. Cervical epidural abscess: rare complication of bacterial endocarditis with streptococcus viridans: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Shim, Jai-Joon; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Doh, Jae-Won

    2015-03-01

    Although many patients with infective endocarditis (IE) complain of joint, muscle, and back pain, infections at these sights are rare. The incidence of spinal abscess in cervical spine complicating endocarditis is very rare. Although the surgical management is the mainstay of treatment, conservative treatment can get success in selected patients. We report a patient with cervical epidural abscess due to Streptococcus viridans endocarditis. Both epidural abscess and IE were managed conservatively with intravenous antibiotics for 8 weeks, with recovery. It is important to remind spinal epidural abscess can occur in those patients with bacterial endocarditis. PMID:25883665

  10. Epidemiologic determinants of aural abscessation in free-living eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina) in Virginia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Justin D; Sleeman, Jonathan M; Elvinger, François

    2003-10-01

    Epidemiologic determinants of 46 cases of aural abscessation in free-living eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina) admitted to the Wildlife Center of Virginia (Virginia, USA) from 1991 to 2000 were evaluated. County human population density, year and season of admission, weight, and sex did not affect the risk for box turtles to develop aural abscessation. Counties with cases of aural abscessation were not randomly distributed, but rather were clustered into two multi-county regions. Geographic location was the only risk factor associated with aural abscessation in box turtles found in this study. Possible etiologies could include chronic infectious disease, malnutrition, or chronic exposure to environmental contamination with organochlorine compounds. PMID:14733291

  11. Hepatic and systemic metabolic responses to aerobic and anaerobic intra-abdominal abscesses in a highly reproducible chronic rat model.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, T; Sato, T; Marzella, L; Hirai, F; Trump, B F; Siegel, J H

    1984-01-01

    A single, uniform abscess was formed in 100% of the animals inoculated with a fecal pellet made of sterile rat feces, agar, and a known number and strain of bacteria. The effects of monoclonal Escherichia coli abscess (83 rats) were compared to those of sterile abscess (34 rats) and sham operation (35 rats without abscess). Bacteroides fragilis was added to the sterile pellet to study the effect of an anaerobic monoclonal abscess (16 rats) or of a biclonal abscess containing both aerobes and anaerobes (32 rats). After inoculation, a peritonitis stage with leucopenia, hypoglycemia, body weight loss, and slight fever was followed by the abscess stage with leucocytosis and a slight hyperglycemia. Mild hepatic energy charge deficiency and hepatic lactic acidosis were observed in sterile abscess rats, and slightly enhanced energy charge was seen in monoclonal E. coli abscess rats. The addition of B. fragilis to the sterile pellet, alone or together with E. coli, produced hepatic energy charge deficiency and hepatic lactic acidosis, which were significantly enhanced compared with the monoclonal E. coli abscess rats. The greatest effect was seen in the biclonal E. coli plus B. fragilis abscess, suggesting that anaerobic or combined aerobe and anaerobe abscesses may produce a greater hepatic injury than an aerobic organism abscess alone. This may account for the apparent synergic interaction between aerobic and anaerobic organisms. PMID:6380793

  12. Unusual Presentation of Recurrent Pyogenic Bilateral Psoas Abscess Causing Bilateral Pulmonary Embolism by Iliac Vein Compression

    PubMed Central

    Ijaz, Mohsin; Sakam, Sailaja; Ashraf, Umair; Marquez, Jose Gomez

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 47 Final Diagnosis: Bilateral psoas abscess • acute lower extremity deep vein thrombosis • bilateral pulmonary embolism Symptoms: Progressive left leg swelling • productive cough with whitish sputum • right flank pain Medication: Antibiotics and anticoagulation Clinical Procedure: CT-guided percutaneous drain placement Specialty: Internal Medicine/Critical Care Objective: Unusual presentation Background: Psoas abscesses are a known cause of back pain, but they have not been reported as a cause of acute lower extremity thromboses and bilateral pulmonary emboli. We report a patient with bilateral psoas abscesses causing extensive pulmonary emboli through compression of the iliac vein. Case Report: A 47-year-old man presented with bilateral leg swelling over 4 weeks. Physical examination revealed a thin male with bilateral leg swelling, extending to the thigh on his left side. He had hemoglobin of 10.5 g/dl, leukocytosis of 16 000/ml, and an elevated D-dimer. A computed tomography (CT) angiogram of his chest showed extensive bilateral pulmonary emboli and infarcts. He remained febrile with vague flank pain, prompting a CT of his abdomen and pelvis that showed large, multiloculated, septated, bilateral psoas abscesses with compression of the left femoral vein by the left psoas abscess and a thrombus distal to the occlusion. Two liters of pus was drained from the left psoas abscess by CT-guidance, and although the Gram staining showed Gram-positive cocci in clusters, cultures from the abscess and blood were negative. A repeat CT showed resolution of the abscesses, and the drain was removed. He was discharged to a nursing home to complete a course of intravenous antibiotics and anticoagulation. Conclusions: Although the infectious complications of psoas abscesses have been described in the literature, the mechanical complications of bilateral psoas abscesses are lacking. It is important to assess for complete resolution of psoas abscesses through

  13. Trimethoprim–Sulfamethoxazole versus Placebo for Uncomplicated Skin Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Talan, David A.; Mower, William R.; Krishnadasan, Anusha; Abrahamian, Fredrick M.; Lovecchio, Frank; Karras, David J.; Steele, Mark T.; Rothman, Richard E.; Hoagland, Rebecca; Moran, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND U.S. emergency department visits for cutaneous abscess have increased with the emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The role of antibiotics for patients with a drained abscess is unclear. METHODS We conducted a randomized trial at five U.S. emergency departments to determine whether trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole (at doses of 320 mg and 1600 mg, respectively, twice daily, for 7 days) would be superior to placebo in outpatients older than 12 years of age who had an uncomplicated abscess that was being treated with drainage. The primary outcome was clinical cure of the abscess, assessed 7 to 14 days after the end of the treatment period. RESULTS The median age of the participants was 35 years (range, 14 to 73); 45.3% of the participants had wound cultures that were positive for MRSA. In the modified intention-to-treat population, clinical cure of the abscess occurred in 507 of 630 participants (80.5%) in the trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole group versus 454 of 617 participants (73.6%) in the placebo group (difference, 6.9 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.1 to 11.7; P = 0.005). In the per-protocol population, clinical cure occurred in 487 of 524 participants (92.9%) in the trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole group versus 457 of 533 participants (85.7%) in the placebo group (difference, 7.2 percentage points; 95% CI, 3.2 to 11.2; P<0.001). Trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole was superior to placebo with respect to most secondary outcomes in the per-protocol population, resulting in lower rates of subsequent surgical drainage procedures (3.4% vs. 8.6%; difference, −5.2 percentage points; 95% CI, −8.2 to −2.2), skin infections at new sites (3.1% vs. 10.3%; difference, −7.2 percentage points; 95% CI, −10.4 to −4.1), and infections in household members (1.7% vs. 4.1%; difference, −2.4 percentage points; 95% CI, −4.6 to −0.2) 7 to 14 days after the treatment period. Trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole was

  14. [Liver abscess and infective endocarditis cases caused by Ruminococcus productus].

    PubMed

    Sucu, Nurgün; Köksal, Iftihar; Yilmaz, Gürdal; Aydin, Kemalettin; Caylan, Rahmet; Aktoz Boz, Gönülden

    2006-10-01

    The genus Ruminococcus which are anaerobe Gram positive cocci, previously classified as Peptostreptococcus, may colonize the upper respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, vagina and skin of humans and animals. In this report a case of liver abscess and a case of infective endocarditis caused by Ruminoccocus productus, which is very rarely encountered in the clinical practice were presented. The first case was a 32 years old male who was admitted to the hospital in 2002, with the complaints of fever lasting for 20 days and pain while breathing. The abdominal ultrasonography revealed the presence of a liver abscess, and the drainage material from the abscess yielded Ruminococcus productus, identified in BACTEC 9200 (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, Md) anaerobe system. As the isolate was found to be sensitive to penicilin, the empirical gentamicin and ampicillin/sulbactam therapy was continued. The second case was a 25 years old male who was admitted to the hospital in 2005, with the signs of fever lasting for 3-4 months, chills, bone and joint pains. As multiple vegetations were detected in echocardiography, blood cultures were collected and empirical therapy with ceftriaxone and gentamicin was initiated with the preliminary diagnosis of infective endocarditis. Bacteria which were isolated from blood cultures by BACTEC 9200 system have been identified as R. productus. As this strain was also sensitive to penicillin, the empirical therapy was changed to penicilin and gentamicin. These two cases indicated that R. productus should be considered in complicated infections even if it is a rarely isolated species from the clinical samples. PMID:17205698

  15. Streptobacillus moniliformis as the Causative Agent in Spondylodiscitis and Psoas Abscess after Rooster Scratches▿

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Damien; Robin, Frédéric; Bouvier, Damien; Delmas, Julien; Bonnet, Richard; Lesens, Olivier; Hennequin, Claire

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of Streptobacillus moniliformis spondylodiscitis accompanied by a psoas abscess in an 80-year-old man scratched by a rooster. S. moniliformis was identified from abscess fluid by use of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. After 18 weeks of antimicrobial therapy, the clinical condition of the patient improved. PMID:18562588

  16. First report of liver abscess caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin.

    PubMed

    Qu, Fen; Fan, Zhenping; Cui, Enbo; Zhang, Wenjin; Bao, Chunmei; Chen, Suming; Mao, Yuanli; Zhou, Dongsheng

    2013-09-01

    This is the first reported case of liver abscess attributable to Salmonella serovar Dublin infection and also the fourth case of Salmonella liver abscess complicated with hepatocellular carcinoma reported since 1990. Drainage combined with intravenous antibiotics resulted in improvement, but recovery regressed again. Subsequent hepatic left lobectomy led to full recovery. PMID:23784127

  17. Encephalitozoon cuniculi Genotype I as a Causative Agent of Brain Abscess in an Immunocompetent Patient▿

    PubMed Central

    Ditrich, Oleg; Chrdle, Aleš; Sak, Bohumil; Chmelík, Václav; Kubále, Jiří; Dyková, Iva; Kváč, Martin

    2011-01-01

    A brain abscess caused by Encephalitozoon cuniculi genotype I together with Streptococcus intermedius occurred in a patient without major immunocompromise and with diabetes. The distinguishing clinical signs were hemiparesis and epilepsy. The microsporidium was observed in the abscess aspirate, and its specific DNA was also detected in stool and urine. The patient was successfully treated with albendazole and mebendazole. PMID:21593268

  18. Presentation of Preauricular Sinus and Preauricular Sinus Abscess in Southwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adegbiji, W. A.; Alabi, B. S.; Olajuyin, O. A.; Nwawolo, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Preauricular sinus abscess is a common congenital external ear disease. This abscess is usually misdiagnosed because it is commonly overlooked during physical examination. In Nigeria, the prevalence was 9.3% in Ilorin, north central Nigeria This study is to determine the distribution and clinical presentation of the preauricular sinus abscess in Ekiti, south west Nigeria. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a prospective hospital based study of all patients with diagnosis of preauricular sinus abscess seen in our clinic carried out between April 2008 to March 2010. Detailed clinical history, administered interviewer’s assisted questionnaires full examination and. Data obtained were collated and analysed. RESULTS: Preauricular sinus were noticed in 184 (4.4%) out of 4170 patients seen during the study period. Preauricular sinus abscess were noticed in 21 (11.4%) of the preauricular sinuses especially in children. Unilateral preauricular sinus abscess accounted for 90.5%. Common presenting complaints were preauricular swelling (81.0%), 90.5% with recurrent earaches, 76.2% with ear discharges. All patients had antibiotic / analgesic while 17 out of 21 (81.0%) had surgical excisions. CONCLUSION: Preauricular sinus abscess were noticed among 11.4% of the preauricular sinuses especially in children, unilateral preauricular sinus abscess accounted for 90.5%. Common complaints were otorrhoea, earaches, and swelling and they were mostly managed surgically. PMID:24711764

  19. Multiple Brain Abscesses due to Streptococcus anginosus: Prediction of Mortality by an Imaging Severity Index Score

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An elderly patient with altered mental status, brain abscesses, ventriculitis, and empyemas died of septic shock and brain abscesses secondary to Streptococcus anginosus despite aggressive treatment. An imaging severity index score with a better prognostic value than the Glasgow coma scale predicted mortality in this patient. PMID:27034878

  20. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Fusobacterium in a 21-year-old immunocompetent male.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zohair; Bansal, Saurabh K; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-03-28

    A 21-year-old male with no significant past medical history, presented with right upper quadrant (RUQ) abdominal pain along with fevers and chills. Lab work revealed leukocytosis, anemia, and slightly elevated alkaline phosphatase. Viral serology for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus were negative and he was immunocompetent. Computed tomography imaging revealed hepatic abscesses, the largest measuring 9.5 cm. Empiric antibiotics were started and percutaneous drains were placed in the abscesses. Anaerobic cultures from the abscesses grew Fusobacterium nucleatum. This is a gram negative anaerobic bacteria; a normal flora of the oral cavity. Fusobacterium is most commonly seen in Lemiere's disease, which is translocation of oral bacteria to the internal jugular vein causing a thrombophlebitis and subsequent spread of abscesses. Our patient did not have Lemiere's, and is the first case described of fusobacterium pyogenic liver abscess in a young immunocompetent male with good oral hygiene. This case was complicated by sepsis, empyema, and subsequent abscesses located outside the liver. These abscesses' have the propensity to flare abruptly and can be fatal. This case not only illustrates fusobacterium as a rare entity for pyogenic liver abscess, but also the need for urgent diagnosis and treatment. It is incumbent on physicians to diagnose and drain any suspicious hepatic lesions. While uncommon, such infections may develop without any overt source and can progress rapidly. Prompt drainage with antibiotic therapy remains the cornerstone of therapy. PMID:25834342

  1. Horner's syndrome as a co-presentation of tuberculous retropharyngeal abscess.

    PubMed

    Raza, Syed Nusrat; Rahat, Z M

    2010-04-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease known to affect any part of the body and to present in many interesting forms. A case of tuberculous retropharyngeal abscess is described here presenting with odynophagia and Horner's syndrome. Horner's syndrome as a presenting feature of tuberculous retropharyngeal abscess has never been reported in Pakistan. PMID:20392409

  2. A Case of Extensive Sacral Decubitus Ulcer Complicated by an Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Mai; Hiratsuka, Munehisa; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We herein report a 62-year-old man with an extensive sacral decubitus ulcer complicated by an epidural abscess. An epidural abscess is a rare disease, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a deep infection with decubitus. Moreover, the diagnosis may be late in such instances and should be carefully considered when a patient has paralysis.

  3. Streptobacillus moniliformis as the causative agent in spondylodiscitis and psoas abscess after rooster scratches.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Damien; Robin, Frédéric; Bouvier, Damien; Delmas, Julien; Bonnet, Richard; Lesens, Olivier; Hennequin, Claire

    2008-08-01

    We report a case of Streptobacillus moniliformis spondylodiscitis accompanied by a psoas abscess in an 80-year-old man scratched by a rooster. S. moniliformis was identified from abscess fluid by use of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. After 18 weeks of antimicrobial therapy, the clinical condition of the patient improved. PMID:18562588

  4. Penile abscess and necrotizing fasciitis secondary to neglected false penile fracture.

    PubMed

    Al-Reshaid, Reshaid Abdullah; Madbouly, Khaled; Al-Jasser, Abdullah

    2010-05-01

    Penile infection and abscess formation have been described in association with priapism, cavernosography, intracavernosal injection therapy, trauma and penile prosthesis. We report a case of penile abscess and necrotizing fasciitis of penile skin in a 37-year-old male, presented 3 weeks after neglected false penile fracture. PMID:20882163

  5. Bacillus cereus bacteremia and multiple brain abscesses during acute lymphoblastic leukemia induction therapy.

    PubMed

    Hansford, Jordan R; Phillips, Marianne; Cole, Catherine; Francis, Joshua; Blyth, Christopher C; Gottardo, Nicholas G

    2014-04-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious infections in immunosuppressed patients. This population may be susceptible to B. cereus pneumonia, bacteremia, cellulitis, and rarely cerebral abscess. Here we report an 8-year-old boy undergoing induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed multifocal B. cereus cerebral abscesses, highlighting the propensity for B. cereus to develop cerebral abscesses. A review of the literature over the past 25 years identified another 11 cases (3 children and 8 adults) of B. cereus cerebral abscess in patients undergoing cancer therapy. B. cereus cerebral abscesses were associated with a high mortality rate (42%) and significant morbidity. Notably, B. cereus bacteremia with concomitant cerebral abscess was associated with induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia in both children and adults (10 of 12 case reports). Our case report and review of the literature highlights the propensity for B. cereus to develop cerebral abscess(es). Therefore, early consideration for neuroimaging should be given for any neutropenic cancer patient identified with B. cereus bacteremia, in particular those with acute leukemia during induction therapy. PMID:23619116

  6. Single-Stage Trans-mastoid Drainage of Otogenic Brain Abscess: A Single-Institution Experience.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Dwaipayan; Das, Chiranjib; Paul, Dipten

    2016-06-01

    Brain abscess is the ultimate otogenic complication, both in severity and difficulty of management. In developing countries with high incidence of cholesteatoma, brain abscess is not a rare complication. In India, brain abscesses constitute about 8 % of all intracranial lesions. The surgical treatment of brain abscess is very controversial. This prospective study was done in ENT department of a tertiary care hospital in Kolkata, during the period from May 2009 to April 2014. 22 such cases of otogenic brain abscess managed by single-stage trans-mastoid drainage along with meticulous mastoid clearance. On the basis of clinical, radiological and operative findings, data of all patients with otogenic brain abscess were analyzed. There was male predominance and 9 (40.91 %) of them were younger than 20 years. 15 (68.18 %) cases were of cerebellar abscess and in 7 (31.82 %) cases were of the temporal abscess. Lateral sinus thrombosis was the most common associated complication found (22.73 %) in our study. All the patients peri-operatively revealed cholesteatoma. All the patients recovered well and there was no recurrence of symptoms on a minimum 15 months follow-up. This approach suits the otologists in clearing the cause and effect of pathology, at the same sitting. This single-stage approach decreases the peri-operative morbidity and mortality of the two-stage procedure. It also decreases the hospital stay and financial burden. PMID:27340633

  7. Incidental Diagnosis of Appendiceal Abscess by Colonoscopy; A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Niknam, Ramin; Fattahi, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoudi, Laleh

    2015-01-01

    Although complicated acute appendicitis is occasionally observed in general practice, the diagnosis of appendiceal abscess by colonoscopy is unusual. We report a case of appendiceal abscess with spontaneous drainage into the lumen of colon diagnosed during colonoscopy and resolved by the time of surgery. PMID:26106469

  8. Pathology of aural abscesses in free-living Eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina).

    PubMed

    Brown, Justin D; Richards, Jean M; Robertson, John; Holladay, Steven; Sleeman, Jonathan M

    2004-10-01

    Aural abscess or abscess of the middle ear is common in free-living Eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina) of Virginia (USA) and elsewhere. Although its etiology remains unknown, hypovitaminosis A has been suggested on the basis of similar lesions occurring in captive chelonians fed diets that are deficient in vitamin A. This hypothesis was supported by significantly greater body burdens of organochlorine compounds (reported disruptors of vitamin A metabolism) and a nonsignificant trend toward lower serum and hepatic vitamin A levels in free-living box turtles with this lesion. The tympanic epithelium was evaluated in 27 box turtles (10 with aural abscesses and 17 without). Lesions of the tympanic epithelium of box turtles with aural abscesses included hyperplasia, squamous metaplasia, hyperemia, cellular sloughing, granulomatous inflammation, and bacterial infection. These changes were more severe in turtles with aural abscesses than in those without and were more severe in tympanic cavities that had an abscess compared to those without when the lesion was unilateral. Organs from 21 box turtles (10 with aural abscesses and 11 without) from the study population were examined for microscopic lesions, and minimal histopathologic changes were found, none of which were similar to those found in the tympanic epithelium. Histopathologic changes in box turtles with aural abscesses were consistent with a syndrome that may involve hypovitaminosis A. PMID:15650088

  9. Effects of Neutrophils on Cefazolin Activity and Penicillin-Binding Proteins in Staphylococcus aureus Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Bamberger, David M.; Herndon, Betty L.; Fitch, Jeffrey; Florkowski, Aaron; Parkhurst, Vera

    2002-01-01

    Bacteria survive within abscesses despite antimicrobial therapy, usually necessitating drainage. Our previous work showed that bacterial killing is diminished within the neutrophils of animals with abscesses. To further assess the role of neutrophils in Staphylococcus aureus survival and the poor activities of β-lactams in abscesses, tissue cage abscess-bearing rats were given polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-depleting antibody prior to and several times following inoculation of the tissue cages with S. aureus. Cefazolin (300 mg/kg of body weight/day) was administered to all animals in appropriately divided doses. After 7 days of antimicrobial therapy, the 17 animals that received anti-PMN serum had significantly fewer abscess neutrophils than the 18 controls and fewer abscess bacteria (5.55 versus 3.79 log10 CFU/ml [P = 0.04]) than the 18 controls. The data were consistent with the premise that cefazolin is more effective in abscesses depleted of neutrophils. To investigate further, S. aureus was incubated with rat peritoneal neutrophils; and bacterial cell membrane proteins were isolated, labeled with biotinylated ampicillin, separated by electrophoresis, blotted onto nitrocellulose, and stained for biotin reactivity. PBP 2 expression was consistently and significantly decreased after a brief, nonkilling PMN exposure. These experiments showed that PMN depletion enhanced the activity of cefazolin in the abscess milieu. Furthermore, altered bacterial cell wall cefazolin targets may be the mechanism by which the PMN diminishes antimicrobial activity, suggesting the importance of the staphylococcus-PMN interaction in the outcome of established infections. PMID:12183241

  10. An uncommon cause of recurrent pyogenic meningitis: pituitary abscess

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Rama; Bhansali, Anil; Dutta, Pinaki; Shanmugasundar, G; Mukherjee, Kanchan Kumar; Upreti, Vimal; Das, Ashim

    2010-01-01

    The authors report a 36-year-old male who presented with headache and hypopituitarism, and MRI revealed a ring enhancing lesion with pituitary stalk thickening. During follow-up, he presented with recurrent pyogenic meningitis with persistence of the lesion, therefore a diagnosis of pituitary abscess was considered. He underwent trans-sphenoidal surgery (TSS) with evacuation of pus and received antibiotic treatment for the same. After this he remarkably improved and had no recurrence of symptoms. He is on levothyroxine, glucocorticoids and testosterone replacement therapy for his respective hormone deficits. PMID:22767626

  11. Frontal lobe abscess of dental origin. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Baddour, H M; Durst, N L; Tilson, H B

    1979-04-01

    A 52-year-old white man came to our hospital with obscure signs of disease. Multiple laboratory tests, radiographs, and examinations ruled out aseptic meningitis, bacterial endocarditis, cerebral artery aneurysm, and other possibilities. A brain abscess was finally diagnosed. The teeth and their surrounding tissues were implicated as the etiologic factors. The importance of odontogenic sources as potential foci of infection is emphasized. This sequel to odontogenic infection is quite rare, but it can be prevented by removal of chronically carious teeth and periapical pathosis. PMID:285397

  12. Pancreatic and Colonic Abscess Formation Secondary to HELLP Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fumia, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia and the variant HELLP syndrome are systemic conditions associated with vascular changes resulting in vasoconstriction. Most commonly, patients present with elevated blood pressure and proteinuria, with a background of complaints such as headache, scotoma, and right upper quadrant pain. The systemic vascular changes experienced can target any organ system, oftentimes with more than one organ system being involved. We present the case of a patient admitted with HELLP syndrome who subsequently developed multisystem organ dysfunction, including placental abruption, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, acute renal failure, colitis, abdominal ascites, pancreatitis, and the development of pancreatic and colonic abscesses. PMID:26064725

  13. A Case of Liver Abscess with Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Koyano, Saho; Tatsuno, Keita; Okazaki, Mitsuhiro; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Sasaki, Takashi; Saito, Ryoichi; Okugawa, Shu; Moriya, Kyoji

    2015-01-01

    Desulfovibrio spp. are gram-negative, sulfate-reducing, and anaerobic bacteria found in the digestive tract of humans. Because Desulfovibrio spp. are infrequent causative agents of infectious diseases and are difficult to isolate and to identify from clinical specimens, the appropriate antibiotic therapy to infection with Desulfovibrio spp. has not been determined. We report the first case of liver abscess with bacteremia due to Desulfovibrio desulfuricans to show the clinical presentation and treatment. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous piperacillin-tazobactam and oral amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. PMID:25632357

  14. Rare Dysuria: Prostatic Abscess due to Disseminated Coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Ansari Pirsaraei, Pedram; Tabsh, Kareem; Lentz, Jacob

    2016-11-01

    We present a case of disseminated coccidioidomycosis with formation of a prostatic abscess in a 28-year-old diabetic male. Though rare, Coccidiodes prostatitis should be included in the differential for patients who have spent time in endemic areas and present with prostatitis or other genitourinary tract symptoms, especially in the setting of immunocompromise. The small number of Coccidiodes prostatitis cases described in the literature previously are reviewed, along with a wider discussion of coccidioidomycosis. Treatment modalities for this challenging fungal disease are also discussed. PMID:27617214

  15. Abscess formation after lip augmentation with silicone: case report.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Westhausen, A M; Frege, J; Reichart, P A

    2004-03-01

    This paper describes the development of an abscess after injection of an alloplastic preparation (silicone) for enhancement of the lower lip. The 56-year-old woman presented with a painful swelling of her lower lip which was incised. Pus drained from the incision. A biopsy was taken. Histology revealed homogeneous foreign body inclusions (silicone) with fibrosis, chronic inflammation and multinuclear giant cells. Healing was uneventful with little deformation of the lower lip. Since the number of persons seeking aesthetic lip augmentation is increasing, oral surgeons and dentists should be familiar with adverse effects to filling agents. PMID:15050078

  16. Nocardia farcinica bacteraemia presenting as a prostate abscess.

    PubMed

    Scorey, Hana; Daniel, Santhosh

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia is characterised as a Gram positive filamentous rod and is found worldwide in soil, decaying vegetable matter and aquatic environments. Localised pulmonary infection is the most common clinical presentation. However, Nocardia can present in a wide variety of clinical manifestations, especially in the immunocompromised individual. We present the first case of a prostate abscess caused by Nocardia farcinica in a man with a history of severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. He had been on long term immunosuppression for this with prednisolone and etanercept. His Nocardia was likely contracted through direct skin inoculation while gardening with haematological dissemination to the prostate. He responded well to long term sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. PMID:27419070

  17. The warm sacroiliac joint. A finding in pelvic abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Slavin, J.D. Jr.; Epstein, N.; Negrin, J.A.; Spencer, R.P. )

    1990-09-01

    Two patients with pain referable to the low back and sacroiliac regions had bone scans with similar findings. In each, one sacroiliac joint was warm (uptake on that side was slightly greater than that in the contralateral area). Ga-67 imaging also demonstrated increased uptake in the same locale. Subsequent CT scanning revealed pelvic abscesses adjacent to the affected joints. Asymmetric uptake of bone imaging agent may have been related to hyperemia and heating of the sacroiliac joint. Rapid defervescence with antibiotics and drainage (and no CT evidence of bone involvement) suggested that osteomyelitis was not involved in these cases.

  18. [Intracerebral abscess after infection with non-toxigenic Vibrio cholerae].

    PubMed

    Torp-Pedersen, Trine; Nielsen, Xiaohui Chen; Olsen, Katharina E P; Barfod, Toke S

    2012-02-20

    We present the first case of intracerebral abscess after blood-borne infection with non-toxigenic Vibrio cholerae (non-01). The patient was a 66 year-old woman who was infected after swimming in Danish seawater during an unusually hot summer. She had predisposing haemochromatosis and a skin lesion on the ankle. We treated the patient with meropenem and ciprofloxacin for six weeks followed by ciprofloxacin for four weeks, and she recovered with hemiparesis and speech impairment. Marine Vibrio species may produce intracranial infection in predisposed individuals, even in temperate climate zones. PMID:22348672

  19. Cutaneous abscess caused by Corynebacterium lactis in a companion dog.

    PubMed

    Antunes, João Marcelo Azevedo de Paula; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Demoner, Larissa de Castro; Ramos, Juliana Nunes; Baio, Paulo Victor Pereira; Simpson-Louredo, Liliane; Santos, Cíntia Silva; Hirata, Raphael; Ferioli, Raquel Beneton; Romera, Adriana Resmond Cruz; Vieira, Verônica Viana; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2015-07-01

    Many new, emerging and re-emerging diseases of humans are caused by pathogens which originate from animals or products of animal origin. Corynebacterium lactis, a recently described species of the genus Corynebacterium, was first isolated from milk of asymptomatic cows. In the present study a cutaneous abscess caused by C. lactis in a dog was recognized by cytologic and histologic examination in addition to 16S rRNA gene analysis of the microorganism. Therefore, C. lactis should be included among other bacterial species recognized as emerging pathogens for companion animals. PMID:25937144

  20. Occult liver abscess following clinically unsuspected ingestion of foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Tsui, B C; Mossey, J

    1997-01-01

    Two uncommon cases of foreign body (a wooden clothespin and a toothpick) perforation of the gur with associated pyogenic liver abscesses are presented. These cases illustrate the difficulties of preoperative diagnosis. The lack of history of ingestion of foreign bodies, variable clinical presentation of the conditions and radiolucent natures of the foreign bodies all play a role in impeding the diagnosis preoperatively. This report emphasizes the role of ultrasound and computed tomographic scan in evaluating similar cases. Any patient with known risk factors for ingestion of foreign body should arouse suspicion and be investigated further. PMID:9286481

  1. Rectal drainage: unusual evolution of a psoas abscess.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, V; Gutierrez, C; Barrios, J E; Lluna, J; Fernandez, M S; Lopez, A; Vila, J J; Roca, A; Garcia-Sala, C

    1998-04-01

    We report two cases of primary psoas abscess in two patients of 15 months and 4 years of age. As the first case showed the natural history of this process the second one was large enough to produce a huge ureterohydronephrosis and to drain through the rectal wall to the rectum spontaneously, although this natural way did not achieve complete drainage. Both were treated by open drainage and systemic antibiotics with good response. They were discharged at the 7th and 12th postoperative day. 5 months later no complication has come up. Etiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of this unusual pathology are reviewed. PMID:9617614

  2. Tattooing: A potential novel risk factor for iliopsoas abscess

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Sweny; Jain, Ankur; Sattari, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Iliopsoas abscess (IPA) is an uncommon infection. The clinical presentation is usually insidious. Most patients present with nonspecific symptoms, leading to difficulty in prompt and accurate diagnosis. Delay in diagnosis can lead to complications, such as sepsis and death. Tattooing has become more popular over the recent years and has been associated with tattooing-related and blood-borne infections. We present two related cases of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus IPA after tattooing and review the epidemiology, etiology, clinical features, and management of IPA. PMID:25232550

  3. Infected retroperitoneal cystic lymphangioma masquerading as psoas abscess.

    PubMed

    Pratap, Akshay; Tiwari, Awadhesh; Sah, Birendra Prasad; Sinha, Arvind Kumar; Shakya, Vikal Chandra; Niels, Koopmans G

    2008-01-01

    A 2-year-old male is described who presented with fever, fixed flexion deformity of the right hip and a tender mass in the right iliac fossa. A clinical diagnosis of psoas abscess was made. Abdominal ultrasound was suggestive of an echogenic retroperitoneal cyst but could not accurately determine the nature of the cyst. A contrast CT scan showed a retroperitoneal cyst. At laparotomy, a large retroperitoneal cyst containing turbid fluid was found and was excised completely. Histopathological examination was suggestive of cystic lymphangioma. Clinical presentation of retroperitoneal lymphangioma may be variable and misleading, therefore complex imaging studies are necessary in the evaluation of this condition. PMID:18480641

  4. [Multiple abscesses after a cruise along the Latin American coast].

    PubMed

    Reynolds, C; Schofer, N; Zengin, E; Lohse, A W; Faiss, S; Schmiedel, S

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of an extracutaneus involvement of pyoderma gangrenosum. The patient initially presented with multiple sterile abscesses of the skin, heart, prostate, and kidney. Extracutaneus involvement in pyoderma gangrenosum is very rare. Confirmation of the diagnosis was only possible after exclusion of other relevant differential diagnoses. Continuous search for microbes proved negative and after an empiric therapeutic attempt with prednisolone, the patient improved quickly. However, each time we reduced the steroids even in combination with methotrexate or with azathioprine the patient relapsed. Only after therapy with the tumor necrosis factor-α-inhibitor infliximab was permanent remission achieved. PMID:26782091

  5. Hepatic abscess caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum after a trip to the dentist.

    PubMed

    Bytyci, Faton; Khromenko, Elena

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old man with no significant medical history was admitted to the hospital, with high-grade fever and right upper quadrant pain. He was found, on abdominal ultrasound, to have a right lobe hepatic cystic lesion. MRI of the abdomen confirmed a hepatic abscess. Cultures obtained under CT guidance showed the abscess to be caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum. This is a rare bacterium that can cause potentially fatal liver abscesses. Following drainage and intravenous antibiotic treatment, the patient improved and was discharged on a 4-week antibiotic course. An abdominal CT, performed 6 weeks after discharge, showed total resolution of the abscess. The patient had, 2 weeks prior to the development of the liver abscess, undergone routine dental cleaning. Neither upper respiratory symptoms nor sore throat had been identified prior to the presentation. PMID:26933183

  6. Enterococcal Cerebellopontine Angle Abscess in a 12-year-old Female.

    PubMed

    Sonavane, Alka; Baradkar, Vasant; Kumar, Simit

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in imaging and antibiotic treatment, brain abscess is still encountered occasionally. Various aerobic and anaerobic bacteria have been reported as causative agents of brain abscess but only a few cases of enterococcal brain abscesses have been reported. Here we report a case of brain abscess in a 12-year-old female patient, who presented with a history of fever, chills, headache, convulsions since seven days and history of altered sensorium and aphasia since the last two days. The patient had chronic suppurative otitis media of both ears following trauma and presented with ear discharge. The diagnosis of brain abscess was done by computerized tomography scan and the pus was aspirated by left suboccipital burr hole operation. Enterococcus species was cultured from the aspirated pus sample. The patient responded to surgical drainage and antibiotic treatment. PMID:20300422

  7. Radiological management of multiple hepatic artery pseudoaneurysms associated with cholangitic abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Ankur; Madhusudhan, Kumble S; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Baruah, Bhaskar; Shalimar; Sharma, Raju

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysms (HAP) are uncommon, occurring mostly as a complication of trauma (accidental or iatrogenic). Liver abscess rarely causes HAP and multiple HAP associated with cholangitic abscesses have not been reported in the literature. We present a patient of acute necrotizing pancreatitis with stent block cholangitis and multiple cholangitic abscesses who developed hemorrhagic output through drainage catheter in the liver abscess. A multiphasic CT angiography demonstrated three HAP, which were treated with a combination of endovascular coil embolization and percutaneous thrombin injection. The fact that cholangitic abscesses may be associated with pseudoaneurysms should not be neglected, considering the potentially catastrophic complication and relatively easy radiological management. CT angiography permits accurate diagnosis and lays down the roadmap for endovascular procedures. PMID:27081232

  8. Nasalseptal hematoma/abscess: management and outcome in a tertiary hospital of a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Nwosu, Jones N; Nnadede, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Background Nasal hematoma/abscess is an uncommon entity, but capable of leading to serious consequences if not handled meticulously, and with urgency. Objective To present the management, and outcome of nasal septal hematoma/abscess in a Nigerian tertiary institution. Method Consecutive patients diagnosed with nasal septal hematoma/abscess over a 10-year period, treated at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria, were prospectively studied. The processes leading to diagnosis, treatment, and outcome were sequentially evaluated. Results Fifty-three patients (37 males and 16 females), age 5–65 years (with mean age of 23.10 years), were included. Surgical drainage of the hematoma/abscess, intranasal packing with insertion of drain was performed with total resolution of problem in all the cases. Conclusion Incision and drainage, and intranasal packing with insertion of drain was effective in treating nasal septal hematoma/abscess. PMID:26251577

  9. Management of lactational mastitis and breast abscesses: review of current knowledge and practice.

    PubMed

    Kataria, Kamal; Srivastava, Anurag; Dhar, Anita

    2013-12-01

    Most breast abscesses develops as a complication of lactational mastitis. The incidence of breast abscess ranges from 0.4 to 11 % of all lactating mothers. The traditional management of breast abscesses involves incision and drainage of pus along with antistaphylococcal antibiotics, but this is associated with prolonged healing time, regular dressings, difficulty in breast feeding, and the possibility of milk fistula with unsatisfactory cosmetic outcome. It has recently been reported that breast abscesses can be treated by repeated needle aspirations and suction drainage. The predominance of Staphylococcus aureus allows a rational choice of antibiotic without having to wait for the results of bacteriological culture. Many antibiotics are secreted in milk, but penicillin, cephalosporins, and erythromycin, however, are considered safe. Where an abscess has formed, aspiration of the pus, preferably under ultrasound control, has now supplanted open surgery as the first line of treatment. PMID:24465097

  10. Facing the danger zone: the use of ultrasound to distinguish cellulitis from abscess in facial infections.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Dywanda L; Butts, Christine J; Moreno-Walton, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Physical exam alone is often insufficient to determine whether or not cellulitis is accompanied by an abscess. Bedside ultrasound can be a valuable tool in ruling out suspected abscess by allowing direct visualization of a fluid collection. The proximity of the infection to adjacent structures can also be determined, thus aiding clinical decision making. Patients with cellulitis near the eye and nose are of particular concern due to the adjacent facial structures and the anatomy of the venous drainage. Accurately determining the presence or absence of an associated abscess in these patients is a crucial step in treatment planning. The purpose of this report is to (1) emphasize the benefits of bedside ultrasound when used in conjunction with the physical exam to rule out abscess; (2) demonstrate the utility of bedside ultrasound in planning a treatment strategy for soft tissue infection; (3) depict an instance where ultrasound detected an abscess when computed tomography (CT) scan did not. PMID:24851189

  11. Potential nosocomial acquisition of epidemic Listeria monocytogenes presenting as multiple brain abscesses resembling nocardiosis.

    PubMed

    Stefanovic, Aleksandra; Reid, James; Nadon, A Celine; Grant, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Listerial brain abscesses are rare, and are found mostly in patients with underlying hematological malignancies or solid-organ transplants. A case of a patient with Crohn's disease and multiple brain abscesses involving the left cerebellum and right sylvian fissure is described. The Gram stain and histopathology of the cerebellar abscess revealed Gram-positive, beaded rods suggestive of Nocardia. However, on culture, Listeria monocytogenes was identified. Listeria may appear Gram-variable and has been misidentified as streptococci, enterococci and diphtheroids. The present case is the first reported case of L monocytogenes resembling Nocardia on both microbiological and histopathological assessment. Reported cases of listerial brain abscesses are sporadic, while the current case was part of a nationwide listerial outbreak linked to consumption of contaminated deli meats. Broad antimicrobial therapy (including antilisterial coverage) in immunosuppressed patients presenting with brain abscess is crucial, until cultures confirm the identification of the organism. PMID:21358887

  12. Ultrasound guided percutaneous treatment for splenic abscesses: The significance in treatment of critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Zerem, Enver; Bergsland, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the results of ultrasound guided percu-taneous needle aspiration (PNA) and percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) in the treatment of splenic abscess. METHODS: Thirty-six patients (14 females and 22 males, with an average age of 54.1 ± 14.1 years) with splenic abscess were treated with ultrasound guided PNA and/or PCD. Patients with splenic abscess < 50 mm in diameter were initially treated by PNA and those with abscess ≥ 50 mm and bilocular abscesses were initially treated by an 8-French catheter drainage. The clinical characteristics, underlying diseases, organism spectra, therapeutic methods, and mortality rates were analyzed. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients had unilocular and 9 bilocular abscess. PNA was performed in 19 patients (52.8%), and 8 of them (42.1%) required PCD because of recurrence of abscess. In 17 patients (47.2%), PCD was performed initially. PCD was performed twice in six patients and three times in two. PNA was definitive treatment for 10 and PCD for 21 patients. One patient with PCD was referred for splenectomy, with successful outcome. In all 4 deceased patients, malignancy was the underlying condition. Twenty-one patients (58.3%) underwent 33 surgical interventions on abdomen before treatment. Cultures were positive in 30 patients (83.3%). Gram-negative bacillus predominated (46.7%). There were no complications related to the procedure. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous treatmnet of splenic abscess is an effective alternative to surgery, allowing preservation of the spleen. This treatment is especially indicative for the patients in critical condition postoperatively. We recommend PNA as primary treatment for splenic abscesses < 50 mm, and PCD for those ≥ 50 mm in diameter and for bilocular abscesses. PMID:17143953

  13. Gas-Forming Pyogenic Liver Abscess with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ishaq, Muhammad K.; Jones, Kellie R.

    2015-01-01

    The pyogenic liver abscess caused by Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is a rare but rapidly fatal infection. The main virulence factor of this pathogen is its α-toxin (lecithinase), which decomposes the phospholipid in cell membranes leading to cell lysis. Once the bacteria are in blood stream, massive intravascular hemolysis occurs. This can present as anemia on admission with evidence of hemolysis as indicated by low serum haptoglobin, high serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), elevated indirect bilirubin, and spherocytosis. The clinical course of C. perfringens septicemia is marked by rapidly deteriorating course with a mortality rate ranging from 70 to 100%. The very rapid clinical course makes it difficult to diagnose on time, and most cases are diagnosed at autopsy. Therefore it is important to consider C. perfringens infection in any severely ill patient with fever and evidence of hemolysis. We present a case of seventy-seven-year-old male with septic shock secondary to pyogenic liver abscess with a brief review of existing literature on C. perfringens. PMID:26090240

  14. Cryptococcal Brainstem Abscess Mimicking Brain Tumors in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Jong Hee; Kim, Jang-Hee; Park, Seoung Woo

    2015-01-01

    Usually fungal infections caused by opportunistic and pathogenic fungi had been an important cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. However clinical data and investigations for immunocompetent pathogenic fungal infections had been rare and neglected into clinical studies. Especially Cryptococcal brainstem abscess cases mimicking brain tumors were also much more rare. So we report this unusual case. This 47-year-old man presented with a history of progressively worsening headache and nausea for 1 month and several days of vomituritions before admission. Neurological and laboratory examinations performed demonstrated no abnormal findings. Previously he was healthy and did not have any significant medical illnesses. A CT and MRI scan revealed enhancing 1.8×1.7×2.0 cm mass lesion in the left pons having central necrosis and peripheral edema compressing the fourth ventricle. And also positron emission tomogram scan demonstrated a hot uptake of fluoro-deoxy-glucose on the brainstem lesion without any evidences of systemic metastasis. Gross total mass resection was achieved with lateral suboccipital approach with neuronavigation system. Postoperatively he recovered without any neurological deficits. Pathologic report confirmed Cryptococcus neoformans and he was successively treated with antifungal medications. This is a previously unreported rare case of brainstem Cryptococcal abscess mimicking brain tumors in immunocompetent host without having any apparent typical meningeal symptoms and signs with resultant good neurosurgical recovery. PMID:25674344

  15. Cellular bases of experimental amebic liver abscess formation.

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, V.; Mena-Lopez, R.; Anaya-Velazquez, F.; Martinez-Palomo, A.

    1984-01-01

    The complete sequence of morphologic events during amebic liver abscess formation in the hamster has been studied, from the lodgement of amebas in the hepatic sinusoids to the development of extensive liver necrosis. Following intraportal inoculation of live amebas, the early stages of the lesion (from 1 to 12 hours) were characterized by acute cellular infiltration composed of an increasingly large number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, which surrounded centrally located trophozoites. Histiocytes and lysed leukocytes were situated on the periphery of the lesions. Hepatocytes close to the early lesions showed degenerative changes which led to necrosis; however, direct contact of liver cells with amebas was very rarely observed. At later stages, the extent of necrosis increased, macrophages and epithelioid cells replaced most leukocytes, and well-organized granulomas developed. Extensive necrosis associated with fused granulomas was present by Day 7. The results suggest that Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites do not produce amebic liver abscesses in hamsters through direct lysis of hepatocytes. Rather, tissue destruction is the result of the accumulation and subsequent lysis of leukocytes and macrophages surrounding the amebas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:6385728

  16. Endoscopic sinus surgery for orbital subperiosteal abscess secondary to sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, D; Sankhla, D; Ganesan, A; Chand, P

    2001-09-01

    Subperiosteal orbital abscess (SPA) is a serious complication of paranasal sinusitis, which can lead to blindness or even death. A quick response is necessary as this condition is treatable. Early surgical intervention is indicated if there is risk of visual loss, or if no improvement is observed within 48 hours of starting medical therapy. Three patients with orbital SPA secondary to sinusitis treated successfully by Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery (FESS) are presented in this case series. The surgical indications were impending visual loss with an abscess and cellulitis impinging on the optic nerve in one child and in the other two patients, a lack of clinical response within 48 hours after starting systemic antibiotic. CT scans, nasal endoscopy, and ophthalmologic examinations are mandatory during the evaluation process. The advantages of FESS in these patients were the avoidance of external ethmoidectomy and its external facial scar, an early drainage of the affected sinuses, SPA, and the eradication of the disease from the fronto-ethmoidal region leading to an enhanced recovery and a reduced hospital stay. FESS is also a safe, convenient and minimally invasive procedure in patients presenting with serious complications of sinusitis. PMID:11721506

  17. Invasive Esophageal Candidiasis with Chronic Mediastinal Abscess and Fatal Pneumomediastinum.

    PubMed

    Aghdam, Mohammad Reza F; Sund, Ståle

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Invasive candidiasis is a potential problem for patients receiving long-term immunosuppressive treatment. Psoriatic arthritis is one of many chronic diseases that can be successfully treated with immunosuppressive drugs, in spite of a documented and accepted risk for infectious complications. Critical awareness of possible infection must be part of the surveillance of such patients. CASE REPORT This is the case of a 68-year-old Norwegian male, treated with long-term immunosuppression for psoriatic arthritis, hospitalized with acute subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema of unknown cause. He died of acute respiratory failure with circulatory collapse shortly after admission. The autopsy revealed mediastinal and subcutaneous emphysema and a mediastinal abscess containing Candida with probable entrance from the esophagus. CONCLUSIONS We consider invasive candidiasis of the esophagus to be the cause of both the chronic abscess and the acute mediastinal emphysema. This case illustrates the importance of awareness of invasive candidiasis as a possible complication in a patient with long-term immunosuppression. PMID:27389822

  18. Invasive Esophageal Candidiasis with Chronic Mediastinal Abscess and Fatal Pneumomediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Aghdam, Mohammad Reza F.; Sund, Ståle

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 68 Final Diagnosis: Invasive esophageal candiasis Symptoms: Chest discomfort Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Invasive candidiasis is a potential problem for patients receiving long-term immunosuppressive treatment. Psoriatic arthritis is one of many chronic diseases that can be successfully treated with immunosuppressive drugs, in spite of a documented and accepted risk for infectious complications. Critical awareness of possible infection must be part of the surveillance of such patients. Case Report: This is the case of a 68-year-old Norwegian male, treated with long-term immunosuppression for psoriatic arthritis, hospitalized with acute subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema of unknown cause. He died of acute respiratory failure with circulatory collapse shortly after admission. The autopsy revealed mediastinal and subcutaneous emphysema and a mediastinal abscess containing Candida with probable entrance from the esophagus. Conclusions: We consider invasive candidiasis of the esophagus to be the cause of both the chronic abscess and the acute mediastinal emphysema. This case illustrates the importance of awareness of invasive candidiasis as a possible complication in a patient with long-term immunosuppression. PMID:27389822

  19. Subacute splenic abscess. Appearance on indium-111 leukocyte, gallium-67, and technetium-99m sulfur colloid imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ammann, W.; Chiu, B.K.; Wright, J.M.

    1986-03-01

    A case of a 23-year-old man with an encapsulated, anaerobic splenic abscess is reported. Both the In-111 leukocyte and Tc-99m sulfur colloid scans demonstrated an intrasplenic defect. The Ga-67 citrate scan revealed uptake in the rim of the abscess only where the abscess cavity was relatively photon-deficient. The combined Tc-99m sulfur colloid/In-111 leukocyte/Ga-67 scan appearance of a subacute splenic abscess has not been described previously. In cases suspected to be splenic abscesses the combined In-111 leukocyte/Tc-99m sulfur colloid imaging is the most useful.

  20. A 10-year retrospective review of pediatric lung abscesses from a single center

    PubMed Central

    Madhani, Kavi; McGrath, Eric; Guglani, Lokesh

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Pediatric lung abscesses can be primary or secondary, and there is limited data regarding response to treatments and patient outcomes. OBJECTIVES: To assess the clinical and microbiologic profile of pediatric patients with lung abscess and assess the differences in outcomes for patients treated with medical therapy or medical plus surgical therapy. METHODS: A retrospective review of all pediatric patients ≤ 18 years of age that were treated as an inpatient for lung abscess between the dates of August 2004 and August 2014 was conducted. Patients were divided into two subgroups based on the need for surgical intervention. RESULTS: A total of 39 patients with lung abscess (30 treated with medical therapy alone, 9 also required surgical interventions) were included. Fever, cough, and emesis were the most common presenting symptoms, and most of the patients had underlying respiratory (31%) or neurologic disorders (15%). Staphylococcus aureus was the most common organism in those that had culture results available, and ceftriaxone with clindamycin was the most common combination of antibiotics used for treatment. Comparison of medical and surgical subgroups identified the duration of fever and abscess size as risk factors for surgical intervention. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric lung abscesses can be managed with medical therapy alone in most cases. Presence of prolonged duration of fever and larger abscess size may be predictive of the need for surgical intervention. Good clinical response to prolonged therapy with ceftriaxone and clindamycin was noted. PMID:27512508

  1. Omentalisation in the treatment of sublumbar abscessation: long-term outcome in 10 dogs.

    PubMed

    Woodbridge, N; Martinoli, S; Cherubini, G B; Caine, A; Nelissen, P; White, R

    The objectives of this study were to report the technique of omentalisation for the management of sublumbar abscessation associated with suspected migrating plant material, the intraoperative and postoperative complications that occurred and the long-term outcome of the cases. A retrospective case series of dogs (n=10) with sublumbar abscessation managed by exploration and drainage combined with omentalisation of the abscess cavity is reported in this study. The sublumbar area was approached through a ventral midline coeliotomy, the abscess was explored, drained, debrided and subsequently packed with omentum. One dog sustained an aortic rupture during exploration of the abscess, the aorta was repaired; there were no postoperative complications. There was long-term (>12 months) resolution of clinical signs in all dogs. Drainage and omentalisation of sublumbar abscesses resulted in complete resolution of signs in all dogs and was associated with a low incidence of complications. Omentalisation is an effective treatment for dogs presenting with sublumbar abscesses associated with suspected migrating plant material. PMID:25319594

  2. The incidence of epidural abscess following epidural analgesia in open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, David; Bright, Elizabeth; London, N J M

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Complications of epidural catheterisation can cause significant morbidity. Epidural abscess following epidural catheterisation is rare and the reported incidence is variable. The purpose of this study was to review the incidence of epidural abscess in patients undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. PATIENTS AND METHODS A retrospective case note review of all patients having open AAA repair over a 5-year period. RESULTS A total of 415 patients underwent open AAA repair between January 2003 and March 2008. Of these, 290 were elective procedures and 125 were for ruptured aneurysms. Six patients underwent postoperative magnetic resonance imaging of the spine for clinical suspicion of an epidural abscess. Two of these (0.48%) had confirmed epidural abscess and two superficial infection at the epidural site. CONCLUSIONS The incidence of epidural abscess following epidural analgesia in patients undergoing open AAA repair within our department was 0.48%. Although a rare complication, epidural abscess can cause significant morbidity. Epidural abscesses rarely develop before the third postoperative day. PMID:19887020

  3. Streptococcus intermedius Bacteremia and Liver Abscess following a Routine Dental Cleaning

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Lachara V.; Perez-Colon, Elimarys

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group of bacteria. This group is part of the normal flora of the oropharynx, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal tracts; however, they have been known to cause a variety of purulent infections including meningitis, endocarditis, and abscesses, even in immunocompetent hosts. In particular, S. intermedius has been associated with the development of liver and brain abscesses. There have been several case reports of S. intermedius liver abscesses with active periodontal infection. To our knowledge, however, there has not been a case following a routine dental procedure. In fact, the development of liver abscesses secondary to dental procedures is very rare in general, and there are only a few case reports in the literature describing this in relation to any pathogen. We present a rare case of S. intermedius bacteremia and liver abscess following a dental cleaning. This case serves to further emphasize that even routine dental procedures can place a patient at risk of the development of bacteremia and liver abscesses. For this reason, the clinician must be sure to perform a detailed history and careful examination. Timely diagnosis of pyogenic liver abscesses is vital, as they are typically fatal if left untreated. PMID:25197585

  4. An intra-cerebral abscess in a patient with Eisenmenger syndrome: An unusual case

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Allan; White, Mark A.J.; Gallo, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We present an unusual case where a large intra-cerebral abscess with severe complications was treated successfully with medical management alone in a patient with Eisenmenger syndrome. Presentation of case A 40 year old patient with Eisenmenger syndrome presented with a seven day history of headache, neck pain and intermittent vomiting and fever. The only neurological examination finding was blurred vision. MRI revealed a large left occipital lobe abscess, which subsequently ruptured into the lateral ventricle with associated ventriculitis and hydrocephalus. This complicated abscess was successfully treated with intravenous antibiotics alone, with complete resolution of the abscess and hydrocephalus on MRI at 13 months post-diagnosis. Discussion Patients with congenital cyanotic heart conditions, like Eisenmenger syndrome, are at increased risk of developing intra-cerebral abscesses. Effectively managing large abscesses with associated intra-ventricular rupture and hydrocephalus in these patients without any form of surgical intervention, including aspiration, is extremely rare. Conclusion Patients with congenital cyanotic heart disease who develop large intra-cerebral abscesses with severe complications, which would normally warrant surgical intervention, have the potential to be successfully treated with antibiotics alone with excellent outcome. PMID:26859871

  5. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Fusobacterium in a 21-year-old immunocompetent male

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zohair; Bansal, Saurabh K; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-01-01

    A 21-year-old male with no significant past medical history, presented with right upper quadrant (RUQ) abdominal pain along with fevers and chills. Lab work revealed leukocytosis, anemia, and slightly elevated alkaline phosphatase. Viral serology for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus were negative and he was immunocompetent. Computed tomography imaging revealed hepatic abscesses, the largest measuring 9.5 cm. Empiric antibiotics were started and percutaneous drains were placed in the abscesses. Anaerobic cultures from the abscesses grew Fusobacterium nucleatum. This is a gram negative anaerobic bacteria; a normal flora of the oral cavity. Fusobacterium is most commonly seen in Lemiere’s disease, which is translocation of oral bacteria to the internal jugular vein causing a thrombophlebitis and subsequent spread of abscesses. Our patient did not have Lemiere’s, and is the first case described of fusobacterium pyogenic liver abscess in a young immunocompetent male with good oral hygiene. This case was complicated by sepsis, empyema, and subsequent abscesses located outside the liver. These abscesses’ have the propensity to flare abruptly and can be fatal. This case not only illustrates fusobacterium as a rare entity for pyogenic liver abscess, but also the need for urgent diagnosis and treatment. It is incumbent on physicians to diagnose and drain any suspicious hepatic lesions. While uncommon, such infections may develop without any overt source and can progress rapidly. Prompt drainage with antibiotic therapy remains the cornerstone of therapy. PMID:25834342

  6. Silent diabetes mellitus, periodontitis and a new case of thalamic abscess

    PubMed Central

    Karageorgiou, Ioannis; Chandler, Christopher; Whyte, Martin Brunel

    2014-01-01

    Brain abscess is an unusual complication of uncontrolled diabetes. A solitary thalamic abscess is an uncommon type of brain abscess. We report a case of thalamic abscess, whereupon diabetes mellitus and periodontitis were diagnosed. The diagnosis and management of thalamic abscess, and the interplay of type 2 diabetes and periodontitis are discussed. A 56-year-old, Caucasian, man with no medical or travel history, presented with 5-day symptoms of meningeal irritation. Body mass index 30.6 kg/m2. CT demonstrated a solitary midline lesion with neoplasia as a differential diagnosis. It was biopsied and cultures grew Streptococcus milleri. He was treated by stereotactic puncture, external drainage and targeted intrathecal and systemic antibiotic therapy. HIV negative but glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) 10.7% (93 mmol/mol). Dental examination revealed a small molar abscess. Radiological resolution of the thalamic abscess occurred within 2 months. Diabetes improved with 7 weeks of insulin, and maintained on metformin, HbA1c 6.9% (51 mmol/mol). There was no residual neurological disability. PMID:25053670

  7. Indium-111-granulocyte scintigraphy in brain abscess diagnosis: Limitations and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, K.G.; Rasmussen, J.W.; Frederiksen, P.B.; Kock-Jensen, C.; Pedersen, N.T. )

    1990-07-01

    The scintigrams and records of 28 patients referred for indium-111-granulocyte scintigraphy (111In-GS) because of a suspected brain abscess were studied retrospectively. The final diagnosis was brain abscess in 8 patients, brain tumor in 18 patients, and infarct and hematoma in 1 patient each. Five patients not on corticosteroid treatment showed intense focal 111In accumulation in abscesses, whereas an abscess patient receiving a high steroid dose showed no uptake. Two patients studied twice showed intense uptake in abscesses when not on steroid therapy or on a low dose, whereas no uptake was seen when they received high or medium doses. Weak or moderate 111In uptake was observed in nine tumors. Microscopically assessed degree of tumor granulocyte infiltration, vessel proliferation, and hemorrhage did not correlate with the outcome of 111In GS. Our results suggest that intense focal cerebral 111In uptake favors the abscess diagnosis. Abscesses may go undetected, however, in patients on high- or medium-dose steroid therapy.

  8. The frequency of dental abscesses increases in periods of low barometric pressure.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Rudolf; Svabik, Otto; Orlik, Alexander; Figl, Michael; Fischer, Michael B; Schicho, Kurt; Wutzl, Arno; Forster, Johannes; Jesch, Philip; Perisanidis, Christos; Undt, Gerhard; Millesi, Werner

    2015-11-01

    Bioclimatic conditions are thought to have an impact on the frequency of dental abscesses but previous studies have suffered from small patient cohorts, methodological obstacles, and restriction to a single site resulting in limited geographic and meteorological variability. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of environmental temperature and barometric pressure on the frequency of dental abscesses. Three maxillofacial and two dental clinics in Vienna retrospectively provided a total of 19,218 patients with dentoalveolar abscesses who were treated by intraoral incision between 1998 and 2011. Daily records from six local meteorological stations were consulted to assess daily meteorological parameters. Univariate and multivariate hurdle count regression models were fitted to estimate the effect of daily average barometric pressure and temperature on registered abscess frequencies. Temporal confounders causing variance of the observed abscess frequencies - such as weekday, business day, and month - were taken into consideration. On days of low barometric pressure a significant rise in dental abscess frequency was observed, even when adjusting for confounders. Environmental temperature, in contrast, did not show any effect. In conclusion, bioclimatic conditions affect health as low barometric pressure increases the number of patients with dental abscesses. PMID:26346764

  9. Aural abscesses in wild-caught box turtles (Terapene carolina): possible role of organochlorine-induced hypovitaminosis A.

    PubMed

    Holladay, S D; Wolf, J C; Smith, S A; Jones, D E; Robertson, J L

    2001-01-01

    Wild-caught box turtles (Terapene carolina carolina) with aural abscesses were observed over a period of several years. Histopathologic evaluation of epithelial tissues (conjunctiva, pharynx, trachea, auditory tube) revealed mucosal hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia, and accumulated keratin-like material in the middle ear cavity. These manifestations suggested the possibility of vitamin A deficiency. A nonsignificant trend toward reduced serum and hepatic vitamin A levels was observed in turtles with abscesses (mean serum and hepatic vitamin A levels 71 and 49% of respective levels in turtles without abscesses). Three organochlorine (OC) compounds (alpha-benzene hexachloride, heptachlor epoxide, and oxychlordane) and total (microg/g) OC compounds were significantly higher in turtles with abscesses compared with turtles without abscesses. No OC compounds were higher in turtles without abscesses compared with turtles with abscesses. These data suggest a possible effect of environmental chemicals on metabolism or utilization of vitamin A in wild box turtles, resulting in hypovitaminosis A. PMID:11161683

  10. Epizootiology of cranial abscess disease in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) of Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, Bradley S.; Belser, Emily H.; Killmaster, Charlie H.; Bowers, John W.; Irwin, Brian J.; Yabsley, Michael J.; Miller, Karl V.

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial abscess disease is a cause of natural mortality for mature male white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Most cases of abscesses are associated with bacterial infection byTrueperella (Arcanobacterium) pyogenes, but a complete understanding of the epidemiology of this disease is lacking. We quantified the effects of individual characteristics, site-specific herd demographics, land cover, and soil variables in estimating the probability of this disease. We examined 7,545 white-tailed deer from 60 sites throughout Georgia US for signs of cranial abscesses, the predecessor of intracranial abscesses, and recorded the presence or absence of cranial abscesses for each individual examined. We detected no cranial abscesses in 2,562 female deer but 91 abscesses in 4,983 male deer examined (1.8%). A generalized linear mixed model, treating site as a random effect, was used to examine several potential explanatory risk factors including site-level landscape and soil characteristics (soil and forest type), demographic factors (deer density and male to female ratio), and individual host factors (deer sex and age). Model results indicated that the probability of a male having a cranial abscess increased with age and that adult sex ratio (male:female) was positively associated with this disease. Site-specific variables for land cover and soil types were not strongly associated with observations of the disease at the scale measured and a large amount of among-site variability remained. Given the demonstrated effect of age, gender, and local sex ratios but the remaining unexplained spatial variability, additional investigation into spatiotemporal variation of the presumed bacterial causative agent of cranial abscesses appears warranted.

  11. A case of pituitary abscess presenting without a source of infection or prior pituitary pathology

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary abscess is a relatively uncommon cause of pituitary hormone deficiencies and/or a suprasellar mass. Risk factors for pituitary abscess include prior surgery, irradiation and/or pathology of the suprasellar region as well as underlying infections. We present the case of a 22-year-old female presenting with a spontaneous pituitary abscess in the absence of risk factors described previously. Her initial presentation included headache, bitemporal hemianopia, polyuria, polydipsia and amenorrhoea. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her pituitary showed a suprasellar mass. As the patient did not have any risk factors for pituitary abscess or symptoms of infection, the diagnosis was not suspected preoperatively. She underwent transsphenoidal resection and purulent material was seen intraoperatively. Culture of the surgical specimen showed two species of alpha hemolytic Streptococcus, Staphylococcus capitis and Prevotella melaninogenica. Urine and blood cultures, dental radiographs and transthoracic echocardiogram failed to show any source of infection that could have caused the pituitary abscess. The patient was treated with 6weeks of oral metronidazole and intravenous vancomycin. After 6weeks of transsphenoidal resection and just after completion of antibiotic therapy, her headache and bitemporal hemianopsia resolved. However, nocturia and polydipsia from central diabetes insipidus and amenorrhoea from hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism persisted. Learning points Pituitary abscesses typically develop in patients who have other sources of infection or disruption of the normal suprasellar anatomy by either surgery, irradiation or pre-existing pathology; however, they can develop in the absence of known risk factors. Patients with pituitary abscesses typically complain of headache, visual changes and symptoms of pituitary hormone deficiencies. As other pituitary neoplasms present with similar clinical findings, the diagnosis of pituitary abscess is often not

  12. [A case of liver abscess due to Streptococcus anginosus infection secondary to a dental extraction].

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Hideyuki; Matsui, Noriaki; Tsukamoto, Shinji; Funakoshi, Sadahiro; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Kabemura, Teppei; Sohda, Tetsuro; Sakisaka, Shotaro

    2015-08-01

    A 74-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of a high fever. He had undergone a dental extraction about 1 month prior to admission because of apical periodontitis. Imaging study revealed liver abscess lesions. Infection with Streptococcus anginosus was confirmed using both stab and blood culture. An adequate selection of antibiotics was administered, and a good outcome was obtained. There have been no case reports of liver abscess caused by intraoral commensal flora related to dental extraction in healthy adults. This case shows that liver abscesses can occur secondary to dental extractions, even in healthy adults. PMID:26250133

  13. Appendicitis and uterine abscess: presentation of an unusual fistula between the gynaecological and gastrointestinal tracts

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Sian Ruth; Bennett, Joanne Elizabeth; Kaloo, Philip; Scott, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 65-year-old woman with clinical and radiological evidence of pelvic sepsis and a medical history of endometrial ablation 20 years previously. She underwent laparotomy after failing to settle with a course of intravenous antibiotics and her appendix was found to have perforated into the uterus with abscess formation which had not discharged vaginally presumably due to widespread intrauterine synechia following her endometrial ablation. She underwent appendectomy and hysterectomy and made a full recovery with no complications. Macroscopic and microscopic examination suggested the appearances are those of an abscess of the uterine fundus with part of the appendix incorporating into the abscess mass. PMID:22984000

  14. Pediatric anaplastic large cell lymphoma misdiagnosed as multiple organ abscesses: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenmin; Zuo, Yunlong; Yang, Yiyu; Tao, Jianping; Hong, Jie; Wu, Zhiyuan; Chen, Feiyan; Dang, Run; Liang, Yufeng; Li, Yang; Liu, Dabo

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 6-year-old male with fever, left maxillofacial swelling, cervical and mediastinal masses, and lymphadenopathy who developed respiratory failure and shock caused by tracheal compression and superior vena cava reflux disorder. The initial diagnosis was maxillary sinus, cervical, and mediastinal abscesses. Initial treatments included maxillary sinus abscess resection, neck abscess incision drainage, and antibiotics. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) was diagnosed ultimately according to pathological and immunohistochemical examination of cervical lesion biopsy tissue. We analyze the reasons for misdiagnosis by comparing clinical and pathological features of ALCL to other systemic illnesses that cause lymphadenopathy. PMID:26770602

  15. Pediatric anaplastic large cell lymphoma misdiagnosed as multiple organ abscesses: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenmin; Zuo, Yunlong; Yang, Yiyu; Tao, Jianping; Hong, Jie; Wu, Zhiyuan; Chen, Feiyan; Dang, Run; Liang, Yufeng; Li, Yang; Liu, Dabo

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 6-year-old male with fever, left maxillofacial swelling, cervical and mediastinal masses, and lymphadenopathy who developed respiratory failure and shock caused by tracheal compression and superior vena cava reflux disorder. The initial diagnosis was maxillary sinus, cervical, and mediastinal abscesses. Initial treatments included maxillary sinus abscess resection, neck abscess incision drainage, and antibiotics. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) was diagnosed ultimately according to pathological and immunohistochemical examination of cervical lesion biopsy tissue. We analyze the reasons for misdiagnosis by comparing clinical and pathological features of ALCL to other systemic illnesses that cause lymphadenopathy. PMID:26770602

  16. Bursae and abscess cavities communicating with the hip: diagnosis using arthrography and CT

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbach, L.S.; Schneider, R.; Goldman, A.B.; Kazam, E.; Ranawat, C.S.; Ghelman, B.

    1985-08-01

    Bursae or abscess cavities communicating with the hip joint were demonstrated by hip arthrography or by computed tomography (CT) in 40 cases. The bursae or abscess cavities were associated with underlying abnormalities in the hip, including painful hip prostheses, infection, and inflammatory or degenerative arthritis. Symptoms may be produced directly as a result of infection or indirectly as a result of inflammation or pressure on adjacent structures. Hip arthrography can confirm a diagnosis of bursae and abscess cavities communicating with the hip joint in patients with hip pain or soft-tissue masses around the groin. Differentiation of enlarged bursae from other abnormalities is important to avoid unnecessary or incorrect surgery.

  17. Brain abscess and subdural empyema. Factors influencing mortality and results of various surgical techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Van Alphen, H A; Dreissen, J J

    1976-01-01

    The authors review the results of various surgical techniques in relation to mortality and morbidity in 100 consecutive cases of brain abscess and subdural empyema. The mortality rate is the same with total excision and fractional drainage of brain abscesses, although in acute and subacute cases slight differences between both techniques are seen. In terms of morbidity, fractional drainage appears to be more favourable than total excision. The authors believe that factors other than surgical procedure influence mortality in cases of brain abscess and subdural empyema. These factors are defined in detail. Images PMID:932767

  18. Eikenella corrodens, a rare cause of pancreatic abscess: two case reports and review.

    PubMed

    Stein, A; Teysseire, N; Capobianco, C; Bricot, R; Raoult, D

    1993-08-01

    Eikenella corrodens, a slowly growing gram-negative bacillus that is a normal inhabitant of dental plaque, has been recognized as an infrequent cause of invasive disease. To date, only one case of pancreatic abscess due to E. corrodens in association with other bacteria from the oropharynx has been described. We report herein two cases of pancreatic abscess due to E. corrodens. In one case E. corrodens and Escherichia coli were found in the abscess specimens; in the other case no other pathogen was associated with E. corrodens. In addition, we review descriptions from the literature of abdominal infections caused by E. corrodens. PMID:8399882

  19. Bilateral iliopsoas abscess associated with right hip septic arthritis in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Al-Zaiem, Maher M; Bajuifer, Salem J; Fattani, Mohammed O; Al-Zaiem, Feras M

    2014-07-01

    Iliopsoas abscess is a very rare pathology in the neonatal period. There is a lack of reports in the literature on bilateral psoas abscess with hip joint arthritis. We report a case of bilateral iliopsoas abscess with concomitant right hip septic arthritis, caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a 28-day-old male infant. The baby presented with bilateral diffuse swelling of the groins and upper thighs. He was treated successfully by ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage along with systemic antibiotic therapy. Clinical improvement was observed within 24-48 hours of drainage. PMID:25028234

  20. Clinical and echocardiographic findings in an 8 year old Brown Swiss cow with myocardial abscess.

    PubMed

    Gerspach, C; Schwarzwald, C C; Hilbe, M; Buczinski, S

    2016-06-01

    Intramyocardial abscesses are rare in cattle and may lead to unspecific clinical signs. This case report describes the clinical and echocardiographic findings in an 8 year old Brown Swiss cow presented with an intramural myocardial abscess. The main clinical findings were anorexia, drop in milk yield, fever, tachycardia, and hyperfibrinogenemia. Neither heart murmurs nor cardiac arrhythmias were present on auscultation. Transthoracic echocardiographic examination revealed a prominent intramural mass embedded in the left ventricular free wall and bulging into the lumen of the left ventricle. Diagnosis was confirmed at necropsy. A culture of the abscess grew Trueperella pyogenes. PMID:26900053

  1. Streptococcus milleri and Recurrent Intra-Abdominal Abscesses: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Gana, Tabitha M.; Awolaran, Olugbenga; Akhtar, Sobia

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of recurrent intra-abdominal abscesses as a postoperative complication following diverticular perforation in which Streptococcus milleri (SM) was isolated. SM is evaluated here as a potent pyogenic organism commonly associated with intra-abdominal abscess especially in the postoperative setting. With the commonly adopted conservative management, the challenges of recurrence and prolonged hospital stay experienced in the indexed case as well as many other previous reports are highlighted. We also present a recommendation of the need for a more intensive approach of SM-related abscess drainage along with areas that would benefit further research. PMID:27313942

  2. [Bifrontal cerebritis and brain abscess caused by Sreptococcus anginosus group: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Matamala, José Manuel; Núñez, Carolina; Ogrodnik, Rosa; Cartier, Luis

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of brain abscesses is mostly polymicrobial. Streptococci and anaerobic bacteria are the most commonly isolated pathogens. We report a previously healthy female without predisposing factors, presenting with a bifrontal cerebritis caused by a Streptococcus anginosus group infection. The patient developed a brain abscess and a subdural collection with severe intracranial hypertension of fatal evolution. The etiologic diagnosis was made culturing the material obtained from the subdural collection. It is presumed that, within the Streptococcus anginosus group, Streptococus intermedius could have been the causing bacteria, given its central nervous system tissue tropism and its predisposition to form brain abscesses. PMID:23732422

  3. Gallium-SPECT in the detection of prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic ring abscess

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, K.; Barnes, D.; Martin, R.H.; Rae, J.R. )

    1991-09-01

    A 52-yr-old man who had a bioprosthetic aortic valve developed Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy he had persistent pyrexia and developed new conduction system disturbances. Echocardiography did not demonstrate vegetations on the valve or an abscess, but gallium scintigraphy using SPECT clearly identified a focus of intense activity in the region of the aortic valve. The presence of valvular vegetations and a septal abscess was confirmed at autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy, using SPECT, provided a useful noninvasive method for the demonstration of endocarditis and the associated valve ring abscess.

  4. Maxillary odontogenic sinusitis, complicated with cerebral abscess--case report.

    PubMed

    Onişor-Gligor, F; Lung, T; Pintea, B; Mureşan, O; Pop, P B; Juncar, M

    2012-01-01

    Maxillary sinus inflammation, when untreated or incorrectly treated, may extend locoregionally, the remaining paranasal sinuses being the first affected anatomical structures. This is why the understanding of the inflammatory pathology of the maxillary sinus, and particularly of the complications it can generate, is extremely important. The purpose of this presentation is to point out that inflammations of the paranasal sinuses are susceptible to develop complications in certain conditions and threaten the patient's life due to the proximity of vital structures. This is the case of a 16 years old male patient who developed a left maxillary and frontal sinusitis, complicated with cerebral abscess. Early detection, multidisciplinary approach and proper indication of surgical treatment, as well as early suspicion of complication, especially in young male adolescents, are extremely important. PMID:22712359

  5. Unusual presentation of filariasis as an abscess: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Mukta; Pruthi, Sonam Kumar; Gupta, Renu; Khare, Pratima

    2016-01-01

    Bancroftian filariasis, a tropical and subtropical disease caused by Wuchereria bancrofti, is transmitted by the culex mosquito. The disease is conventionally diagnosed by the demonstration of microfilaria in peripheral blood smear. Microfilaria and adult filarial worms have been incidentally detected in fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) in various locations. The disease may be missed if one is not aware of the possibility, particularly in cases where eosinophilia is absent. Therefore, clinicians and pathologists need to be more vigilant in the endemic zones for early diagnosis and the treatment of filariasis. We report here an unusual case of filariasis in a 17-year-old female with a swelling in the lower part of the left arm on the flexor surface. This highlights the chances of finding microfilaria in cytology of an unsuspected case at an unusual site. This case, in addition, stresses the fact that microfilaria may be associated with an abscess even in the absence of eosinophilia. PMID:27011444

  6. Recurrent Soft Tissue Abscesses Caused by Legionella cincinnatiensis

    PubMed Central

    Gubler, Jacques G. H.; Schorr, Mirjam; Gaia, V.; Zbinden, R.; Altwegg, M.

    2001-01-01

    Recurrent soft tissue abscesses of the jaw, wrist, and arm developed in a 73-year-old housewife with nephrotic syndrome and immunoglobulin A(κ) gammopathy of unknown etiology. Conventional cultures remained negative, despite visible gram-negative rods on microscopy. Broad-spectrum PCR revealed Legionella cincinnatiensis, which was confirmed by isolation of the organism on special Legionella medium. Infections due to Legionella species outside the lungs are rare. L. cincinnatiensis has been implicated in only four cases of clinical infection; these involved the lungs in three patients and the central nervous system in one patient. We conclude that broad-spectrum PCR can be a valuable tool for the evaluation of culture-negative infections with a high probability of bacterial origin and that Legionella might be an underdiagnosed cause of pyogenic soft tissue infection. PMID:11724886

  7. A pituitary abscess masquerading as recurrent hypernatremia and aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Michael; Marik, Paul Ellis; Khardori, Romesh K; O'Brian, John T

    2012-01-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare condition. In the setting of multiple surgical interventions, the risk of its development increases. A 49-year-old man presented with episodes of altered mental status. He had two surgeries for a recurrent suprasellar arachnoid cyst. The second surgery was complicated by a persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak that required two repairs following which he developed panhypopituitarism and central diabetes insipidus. Twelve months after his last surgery he was diagnosed with aseptic meningitis. This was followed by recurrent hospitalisations for severe hypernatremia blamed on poor medication compliance. He was subsequently hospitalised for the evaluation of a febrile illness. Brain MRI showed ventriculitis and enhancement of the sella. Exploratory surgery revealed a purulent collection in the sella and a mucosal graft which had been used to repair the CSF leak. After drainage of pus and replacement of the graft he recovered completely but requiring life-long hormonal replacement. PMID:22751424

  8. A pituitary abscess masquerading as recurrent hypernatremia and aseptic meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Michael; Marik, Paul Ellis; Khardori, Romesh K; O'Brian, John T

    2012-01-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare condition. In the setting of multiple surgical interventions, the risk of its development increases. A 49-year-old man presented with episodes of altered mental status. He had two surgeries for a recurrent suprasellar arachnoid cyst. The second surgery was complicated by a persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak that required two repairs following which he developed panhypopituitarism and central diabetes insipidus. Twelve months after his last surgery he was diagnosed with aseptic meningitis. This was followed by recurrent hospitalisations for severe hypernatremia blamed on poor medication compliance. He was subsequently hospitalised for the evaluation of a febrile illness. Brain MRI showed ventriculitis and enhancement of the sella. Exploratory surgery revealed a purulent collection in the sella and a mucosal graft which had been used to repair the CSF leak. After drainage of pus and replacement of the graft he recovered completely but requiring life-long hormonal replacement. PMID:22751424

  9. Recurrent periodontal abscess associated with "teeth as a tool".

    PubMed

    Bhat, G Subraya; Singh, Vishal; Bhat, K Mahalinga

    2012-01-01

    We report an unusual case of recurrent periodontal abscess in a 31-year-old male electrician due to his habit of using his teeth as a tool for stripping electrical wires. The patient was not aware of the consequences of this habit. Clinically, there was presence of moderate depth of periodontal pocket around the tooth and, radiographically, there was a vertical defect mesial to the involved teeth. The patient was educated about the consequences of his habit and surgical treatment was undertaken. A papilla preservation flap with regenerative periodontal surgical procedure was done, orthodontic and restorative treatment was planned at the follow-up. This case highlights the importance of eliciting a proper and complete personal history, including occupational details. In our patient these details helped us correlate the destruction of the periodontium to the unusual etiology. PMID:22628975

  10. [Indication for surgical therapy of tubo-ovarian abscess].

    PubMed

    Moldenhauer, M; Link, H

    1978-01-01

    It is reported about the indication to operative therapy, therapy-shape and the going of cure of 30 patients suffering from tuboovarian abscesses. At the beginning there is the conservative therapy with general measures immediately dose of antibiotica without waiting for the germ and resistence determinations. However the well timed operative therapy under conditions as well as possible is deciding. As a rule the abdominal exstirpation of the uterus with both adnexe is practiced in order to come to a complete removal of the infection hearth. --The postoperative cours war only febril in one third of the treated women. In 86,7% the laparotomy scare healed per primam intentionem. We didn't observe an extension of the infection post operationem and there were not any complications with letal exit. PMID:654673

  11. Unusual presentation of filariasis as an abscess: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Mukta; Pruthi, Sonam Kumar; Gupta, Renu; Khare, Pratima

    2016-01-01

    Bancroftian filariasis, a tropical and subtropical disease caused by Wuchereria bancrofti, is transmitted by the culex mosquito. The disease is conventionally diagnosed by the demonstration of microfilaria in peripheral blood smear. Microfilaria and adult filarial worms have been incidentally detected in fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) in various locations. The disease may be missed if one is not aware of the possibility, particularly in cases where eosinophilia is absent. Therefore, clinicians and pathologists need to be more vigilant in the endemic zones for early diagnosis and the treatment of filariasis. We report here an unusual case of filariasis in a 17-year-old female with a swelling in the lower part of the left arm on the flexor surface. This highlights the chances of finding microfilaria in cytology of an unsuspected case at an unusual site. This case, in addition, stresses the fact that microfilaria may be associated with an abscess even in the absence of eosinophilia. PMID:27011444

  12. Symphysis Pubis Osteomyelitis with Bilateral Adductor Muscles Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Saad M.; Gdalevitch, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Osteomyelitis of the pubis symphysis is a rare condition. There have been various reports in the literature of inflammation and osteomyelitis as well as septic arthritis of pubic symphysis. However, due to the fact that these conditions are rare and that the usual presenting symptoms are very nonspecific, osteomyelitis of the pubic symphysis is often misdiagnosed, thus delaying definitive treatment. We present a case that to our knowledge is the first case in literature of osteomyelitis of the pubic symphysis in a 17-year-old boy with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), which was initially misdiagnosed and progressed to bilateral adductor abscesses. A high suspicion of such condition should be considered in a JIA patient who presents with symphysis or thigh pain. PMID:25580335

  13. Minor trauma triggering cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis from odontogenic abscess.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shraddha; Nagpure, Prakash S; Singh, Roohie; Garg, Deepika

    2008-07-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the face and neck is a very rare complication of dental infection. Otolaryngologists and dentists should be familiar with this condition because of its similarity to odontogenic deep neck space infection in the initial stages, its rapid spread, and its life-threatening potential. Trauma has been reported to be an important predisposing factor for NF of the face. In this paper, we describe the presentation and treatment of a 62-year-old man who developed NF of the face and neck following bilateral odontogenic deep neck space abscesses. The disease progressed rapidly, with necrosis of the skin, after the patient inflicted minor trauma in the form of application of heated medicinal leaves. The organism isolated in culture from pus was Acinetobacter sp. The comorbid conditions in our patient were anemia and chronic alcoholism. The patient was managed by immediate and repeated extensive debridements and split-skin grafting. PMID:19561990

  14. Primary Aspergillus sellar abscess simulating pituitary tumor in immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Taohui; Zhang, Na; Wang, Long; Jiao, Jiantong; Zhao, Yiqing; Li, Zheng; Chen, Jian

    2015-03-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with headache, dizziness, and decreased visual acuity. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a sellar mass with sphenoid sinus extension. The result of hormone showed an obviously high prolactin (815 ng/mL). The mass was resected and diagnosed with aspergillosis pathologically. Postoperatively, the level of prolactin dramatically decreased, and the patient received medical treatment with voriconazole and caspofungin. During a 6-month follow-up, the patient's headache and dizziness disappeared, and visual acuity improved. Therefore, aspergillus sellar abscess could result in hyperprolactinemia and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a sellar mass, even in immunocompetent patients. A combination of surgery and antifungal therapy could reduce the hyperprolactinemia and improve symptoms. PMID:25675014

  15. Surgery for Aortic Root Abscess: A 15-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sarikaya, Sabit; Ozen, Yucel; Sacli, Hakan; Basaran, Eylul; Yerlikhan, Ozge Altas; Aydin, Ebuzer; Rabus, Murat Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Aortic root abscess is the most severe sequela of infective endocarditis, and its surgical management is a complicated procedure because of the high risk of morbidity and death. Twenty-seven patients were included in this 15-year retrospective study: 21 (77.8%) with native- and 6 (22.2%) with prosthetic-valve endocarditis. The surgical reconstruction of the aortic root consisted of aortic valve replacement in 19 patients (70.4%) with (11) or without (8) a pericardial patch, or total aortic root replacement in 7 patients (25.9%); 5 of the 27 (18.5%) underwent the modified Bentall procedure with the flanged conduit. Only one patient (3.7%) underwent subaortic pericardial patch reconstruction without valve replacement. A total of 7 patients (25.9%) underwent reoperation: 6 with prior valve surgery, and 1 with prior isolated sinus of Valsalva repair. The mean follow-up period was 6.8 ± 3.7 years. There were 6 (22.2%) in-hospital deaths, 3 (11.1%) of which were perioperative, among patients who underwent emergent surgery. Five patients (23.8%) died during follow-up, and the overall survival rates at 1, 5, and 10 years were 70.3% ± 5.8%, 62.9% ± 6.4%, and 59.2% ± 7.2%, respectively. Two of 21 patients (9.5%) underwent reoperation because of paravalvular leakage and early recurrence of infection during follow-up. After complete resection of the perianular abscess, replacement of the aortic root can be implemented for reconstruction of the aortic root, with or without left ventricular outflow tract injuries. Replacing the aortic root with a flanged composite graft might provide the best anatomic fit. PMID:27047281

  16. Bacillary angiomatosis presenting with facial tumor and multiple abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Markowicz, Mateusz; Käser, Stephanie; Müller, Andreas; Lang, Gerold; Lang, Susanna; Mayerhöfer, Marius; Stanek, Gerold; Rieger, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The clinical manifestation of bacillary angiomatosis (BA) can be limited to one organ, most commonly the skin, but systemic courses can also occur. We report a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patient with a systemic manifestation of BA caused by Bartonella quintana, diagnosed in Vienna, Austria. The pathogen was detected in multiple organs including a facial tumor which is an unusual finding for BA. Furthermore, infections with B quintana are rare in our area and no other autochthonous cases have been reported. Methods and results: The clinical manifestation included multiple papules and nodules on the entire body, several organic abscesses, and a facial tumor influencing the patient's view. The main laboratory finding indicated HIV infection combined with severe immunosuppression with 47 CD4+ cells/μL. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the chest and the abdomen showed multiple and abscesses. Histological examination of the facial tumor confirmed inflammatory process. Bartonella quintana was detected by PCR in blood and in the facial tumor as well as by culture in the skin tissue. Antibiotic treatment with doxycycline and antiretroviral therapy resulted in clinical improvement. Conclusion: Our case shows that rare opportunistic, vector-borne infections, usually associated with poverty, can lead to diagnosis of HIV even in well-developed countries. Furthermore, we provide details on clinical manifestation and diagnostic work-up which might expand the knowledge on disseminated infections with B quintana. As far, tumorous deformations have rarely been reported as consequence of BA. In our patient the pathogen was detected in the facial tumor using PCR techniques. PMID:27428207

  17. [Clinical Analyses of 115 Patients with Peritonsillar Abscess].

    PubMed

    Umibe, Akiko; Anazawa, Utaro; Kessoku, Hisashi; Takaishi, Shinya; Hachisu, Takuya; Masuda, Ayako; Yoshimura, Tsuyoshi; Iino, Takashi; Tanaka, Yasuhiro

    2015-10-01

    The clinical data of 115 patients with peritonsillar abscess (98 men and 17 women) treated between May 2011 and March 2014 were analyzed. We examined 9 items; the age, sex, affected side, duration of hospitalization, method of drainage, smoking history, history of diabetes, antibacterial drugs used, and the isolated bacteria. The disease predominantly affected males in their 30s (27.8% of all the patients). The median duration of hospitalization was 7 days. In regard to the affected side, the right side was affected in 52%, the left side in 44%, and both sides in 4%. The method of drainage used was incision in 63%, and puncture in 37%. In regard to the personal and past medical history, 51% of patients had a history of smoking and 3.5% had a history of diabetes. ABPC/SBT was used as the single-agent antibacterial drug in 75% of cases. The most commonly isolated aerobic bacteria were α-hemolytic streptococci, and the most commonly isolated anaerobic bacteria were Prevotella. The duration of hospitalization showed no significant correlation with the smoking history, drainage method or the antibiotic treatment used (ABPC/SBT single-agent or multiple drug use). On the other hand, the duration of hospitalization was significantly longer in the more than ≥65 years' age group than in the <65 years' age group. Therefore, especially careful interventions for prevention and treatment of peritonsillar abscess are required in the elderly. In relation to antibiotic selection, it may be reasonable to expect sufficient effect with the use of ABPC/SBT as a single agent, as this antibiotic has a broad antibacterial spectrum covering aerobic, anaerobic and drug-resistant bacteria. PMID:26727821

  18. Reversal of tetraplegia in a patient with haematogenous cervical epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Katonis, Pavlos; Souvatzis, Xenia; Tsavalas, Nikolaos; Alpantaki, Kalliopi

    2011-08-01

    Pyogenic haematogenous cervical epidural abscess complicated by tetraplegia is an uncommon entity, but its clinical importance overshadows its rarity. Predisposing risk factors for spinal epidural abscess include diabetes, intravenous drug abuse, liver disease, renal failure, malignancy, HIV, infection elsewhere, rheumatoid conditions, trauma and a number of spinal interventions. Lack of recovery and death are much more frequent when complete paralysis exists since more than 24 to 48 hours. Most authors combine decompressive laminectomy and antibiotics. Anterior decompression and needle aspiration are rarely used, the former more specifically in case of anterior abscess formation. A high index of suspicion along with reliance on gadolinium-enhanced MRI is essential to diagnose the pathology and institute appropriate treatment on an individual basis. The authors report on a diabetic male patient who developed a cervical epidural abscess with tetraplegia after dental extraction. He was treated within six hours by one stage anterior/posterior decompression and fusion, with complete recovery. PMID:21954768

  19. Actinomyces naeslundii and Eikenella corrodens as rare causes of liver abscesses.

    PubMed

    Jaqua, Nathan Thomas; Smith, Adam J; Shin, Terry T; Jahanmir, Jay

    2013-01-01

    A 48-year-old man with an unremarkable medical history was admitted with vague conditions of fever, chills, myalgias and malaise. Physical examination was remarkable for only scleral icterus. Laboratory evaluation revealed elevated aminotransferases, alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin. Imaging demonstrated two masses in the right lobe of his liver, which were ultimately drained and cultures demonstrated Actinomyces and Eikenella. He continued to have fever on broad-spectrum antibiotics until catheter drainage of the abscesses was performed. He was eventually discharged in improved condition on amoxicillin-clavulanate. His aminotransferases, alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin continued to improve and he remained afebrile and asymptomatic. A repeat CT 2 months after discharge demonstrated resolution of the abscesses. Actinomyces and Eikenella are rare causes of liver abscesses and treatment requires drainage and an extended course of antibiotics. The polymicrobial character typical of liver abscesses makes antibiotic therapy challenging when cultures reveal rare organisms such as Actinomyces and Eikenella. PMID:23867879

  20. Recurrent abscesses due to Finegoldia magna, Dermabacter hominis and Staphylococcus aureus in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Martin, J; Bemer, P; Touchais, S; Asseray, N; Corvec, S

    2009-10-01

    A case of recurrent abscesses in an immunocompetent patient is reported, involving the opportunistic human pathogen Dermabacter hominis, the virulent anaerobic pathogen Finegoldia magna and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:19332143

  1. Pontine abscess with initial treatment failure following infectious endocarditis with Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Knudtzen, Fredrikke Christie; Lynge, Maja; Gaini, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 65-year-old man admitted to the department of infectious diseases on suspicion of meningitis with headache, fever and double vision. A cerebral MRI revealed a 17×30 mm pontine abscess with surrounding oedema. The patient had, 2 months prior to admission, been treated for Streptococcus salivarius aortic valve endocarditis. The abscess was not suitable for surgery, and the patient received multidrug antibiotic treatment for 4 weeks. The patient initially responded well clinically, but was readmitted 4 weeks after discontinuation of treatment, with headache and dizziness. A new cerebral MRI showed progression of the abscess. He received an additional 8 weeks of broad spectrum antibiotic treatment, followed by 12 weeks of oral treatment with pivampicillin. His symptoms resolved and a cerebral MRI at discontinuation of treatment showed regression of the abscess to 7.5 mm. PMID:26139646

  2. Clinical Immunology Review Series: An approach to the patient with recurrent superficial abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, S L

    2008-01-01

    ARTICLES PUBLISHED IN THIS CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY REVIEW SERIES allergy in childhood, allergy diagnosis by use of the clinical immunology laboratory, anaphylaxis, angioedema, management of pulmonary disease in primary antibody deficiency, recurrent infections in childhood, recurrent infections in adulthood, recurrent oro-genital ulceration, recurrent superficial abscesses, urticaria, vasculitis/CTD Patients may be referred to the immunology clinic for investigation of recurrent superficial abscess formation. In the majority of adult patients this clinical presentation does not equate with an underlying primary immune deficiency. Nevertheless, recurrent mucocutaneous abscesses can be associated with significant morbidity and long-term complications, including scarring and fistula formation, and may be associated with underlying immune-mediated disease. This review sets out an approach to the patient with recurrent superficial abscesses, focusing on the differential diagnoses, investigation and management of both the common causes and those associated with specific immune deficiency. PMID:18422735

  3. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus presenting as orbital abscess along with superior orbital fissure syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lavaju, Poonam; Badhu, Badri Prasad; Shah, Sangeeta

    2015-01-01

    Orbital abscess and superior orbital fissure syndrome (SOFS) are rare manifestations of herpes zoster ophthalmicus. Herein, we report a case of orbital abscess along with SOFS in a 2.5-year-old-male child secondary to herpes zoster infection. He presented with a 5-day history of proptosis and ptosis of the right eye that had been preceded by vesicular eruptions on the right forehead and scalp. Computed tomography scan of the head and orbit showed orbital abscess and right cavernous sinus thrombosis. A diagnosis of orbital abscess with SOFS secondary to herpes infection was made. The condition subsequently improved following antiviral therapy, intravenous vancomycin and amikacin, and oral corticosteroids. PMID:26632131

  4. Idiopathic granulomatous mastitis with erythema nodosum simulating breast abscess in pregnancy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Gussman, Debra; Polis, Rachael L; Rattigan, Meghan I; Matulewicz, Theodore J

    2013-01-01

    Granulomatous mastitis is a rare benign inflammatory condition of the breast and is known to be associated with pregnancy. A 25-year-old Hispanic G2P1 at 17 weeks gestation presented to the emergency department with findings consistent of a breast abscess. The abscess failed to resolve with incision and drainage followed by multiple courses of antibiotic therapy. A biopsy was then obtained and yielded a diagnosis of granulomatous lobulitis. The patient was treated with steroids and her symptoms resolved. Granulomatous lobulitis may present with characteristics of various clinical entities including neoplasm or, as in this case, abscess. Clinicians should consider a diagnosis of granulomatous mastitis in cases of recalcitrant breast abscess.

  5. Paraspinal and Extensive Epidural Abscess: The Great Masqueraders of Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Andrew; Aung, Thu Thu; Shankar, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Paraspinal and epidural abscesses are rare conditions often diagnosed later in the disease process that can have significant morbidity and mortality. Predisposing risk factors include diabetes, human immunodeficiency virus, intravenous drug abuse, and previous history of spinal surgery or injection. They can threaten the spinal cord by compressive effect, leading to sensory motor deficits and ultimately paralysis and death. Diagnosis may be a challenge due to the delayed presentation of nonspecific back pain or radicular pain such as chest pain or abdominal pain. We present a rare case on a patient with periumbilical pain, constipation, and urinary retention who was ultimately diagnosed with a paraspinal abscess extending into the epidural space from T1 to S2. He underwent decompressive laminectomy with incision and drainage of the abscesses. The patient made an excellent recovery postoperatively, and repeat magnetic resonance imaging at six weeks showed resolution of the abscess. PMID:26770847

  6. Pneumococcal Sepsis Complicated by Splenic Abscesses and Purpura Fulminans in a 15-Month-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Pangonis, Scott; Patamasucon, Pisespong; Fitzpatrick, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an invasive organism that causes a wide range of common diseases, including sinusitis, acute otitis media, and pneumonia. Splenic abscesses and purpura fulminans (PF) are rare complications of pneumococcal disease. Splenic abscesses caused by S pneumoniae have only been reported in the adult literature. PF has been described in the pediatric population as a rare complication in patients with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) with and without underlying immunological disorders such as asplenia. Here, we report a patient with IPD complicated by splenic abscesses and PF. Our patient initially presented with bacteremia, septic shock, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. She subsequently developed PF and splenic abscesses. She survived her illness after receiving a total of 8 weeks of antibiotic therapy. This case highlights 2 rare complications of IPD and demonstrates the need to keep pneumococcal disease in the differential diagnosis even in children whose vaccination status is up to date. PMID:27006958

  7. A brain abscess of probable odontogenic origin in a child with cyanotic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Moskovitz, Moti; Birenboim, Ravit; Katz-Sagi, Hadas; Perles, Zeev; Averbuch, Diana

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present report was to present a rare case of a brain abscess in a child with heterotaxy syndrome, severe cardiac anomalies, and extensive dental caries. The pathogen was Streptococcus intermedius isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid. The source of the pathogen was probably an infection of a primary molar with a dentoalveolar abscess involving the bud of the permanent successor. After a long course of antibiotic regimens followed by a craniotomy with abscess drainage, a shunt, and comprehensive dental treatment, the patient was discharged from the hospital without any neurological sequel. At home, she completed an additional 3 months of oral antibiotics. This is the only known documented case of a toddler with a brain abscess of probable odontogenic origin without previous dental intervention. It emphasizes the importance of collaboration between cardiologists and pediatric dentists, especially in referring children with congenital heart defects for early dental checkups. PMID:23211917

  8. Challenging pyogenic cerebral abscess complicated by subdural empyema. A case report.

    PubMed

    Valencia, M P; Moon, A

    2012-12-20

    Brain abscesses develop in response to a parenchymal infection with pyogenic bacteria, beginning as a localized area of cerebritis and evolving into a suppurative lesion surrounded by a well-vascularized fibrotic capsule. The leading etiologic agents of brain abscess are the streptococcal strains and S. aureus. Abscesses may also be secondary to fungal or parasitic organisms. Brain abscess represents a significant medical problem, accounting for one in every 10,000 hospital admissions in the United States, and remains a serious situation despite recent advances made in detection and therapy. These lesions often produce complex clinical and radiologic findings and require prompt recognition and treatment to avoid a fatal neurologic outcome. Subdural empyema represents an important type of intracranial suppurative infectious-inflammatory disorder. Clinically, these patients initially have signs and symptoms of meningitis, but this course might be complicated later by the development of seizures and focal neurologic signs. PMID:24029180

  9. Detection of a prosthetic aortic valvular abscess with indium-111-labeled leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, E.; Sarno, R.C.

    1988-10-01

    An unsuspected annular abscess at the base of a prosthetic aortic valve in a patient with endocarditis was identified by indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy alone. This highly sensitive and specific technique expediently demonstrated the surgically proven inflammatory focus.

  10. Tree-in-bud pattern of chest CT images for diagnosis of Mycobacterium abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Haiqing; Li, Bing; Zhao, Lan; Huang, Dongdong; Xu, Jinfu; Zhang, Jingbo; Gui, Tao; Xu, Liyun; Luo, Liulin; Zhang, Zhemin; Sun, Xiwen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Changes of chest CT images in Mycobacterium and non-Mycobacterium abscesses in patients with lung disease were with a view to making an early diagnosis. Methods: 124 primary patients diagnosed with non-tuberculosis Mycobacterium infections with a positive sputum acid-fast smear were enrolled in this retrospective study. CT images and clinical data of these patients were analyzed. Results: The 52 Mycobacterium abscess lung disease cases included bronchiectasis 82.7% (43/52), which was more easily detected bilaterally than unilaterally (29/52 vs. 14/52), lung consolidation 44.2% (23/52), nodules 44.2% (22/52), cavities 32.7% (17/52), tree-in-bud pattern 42.3% (22/52) and patchy shadow 63.5% (33/52) in CT images. Tree-in-bud pattern was more common in Mycobacterium abscess compared with non-Mycobacterium abscess lung disease (42.3% vs. 18.1%, P = 0.004). A significant difference of the lung area involved by tree-in-bud in CT was found between non-Mycobacteria abscess and Mycobacterium abscess lung disease (17.0% vs. 7.2%, P < 0.001), and tree-in-bud occurred more readily unilaterally (21.2% vs. 6.9%, P = 0.029), and in the inferior lobe of the right lung (3.2% vs. 0.2%, P = 0.029) in Mycobacterium abscess lung disease. Patchy shadow was more common in non-Mycobacterium abscess lung disease (63.5% vs. 80.1%, P = 0.041). Further multi-factor analysis confirmed that tree-in-bud was an independent predictor of Mycobacterium abscess lung disease. Conclusions: Different CT results existed between non-Mycobacterium abscess and Mycobacterium abscess lung diseases. The tree-in-bud pattern might be helpful to choose a suitable therapy in patients, with an acid-fast bacilli smear-positive diagnosis of lung disease. PMID:26770485

  11. Co-incidental diagnosis of an extradural abscess while siting an extradural catheter for postoperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Mercer, M; McIndoe, A

    1998-06-01

    Extradural abscess is a rare but serious complication of the extradural route of administration of analgesic drugs. We report a case of spontaneous extradural abscess diagnosed during placement of an extradural catheter for analgesia after a negative diagnostic laparotomy. Magnetic resonance imaging is the usual diagnostic tool of choice. This, and subsequent surgery, confirmed the diagnosis suspected after drainage of pus through the Tuohy needle. PMID:9771321

  12. [Cerebral trunk abscess due to Neisseria meningitidis in a 28-year-old immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Faisant, C; Cochin, J P; Rapoport, N; Evreux, F; Vaschalde, Y

    2012-03-01

    Meningococcal disease can manifest in very different clinical situations. Meningococcal meningitis and fulminant meningococcemia (or purpura fulminans) are the most common forms of these infections, but many other manifestations can be seen including septic arthritis, pericarditis, pleurisy and conjunctivitis. Brain abscesses have also been described; they are a rare complication of meningococcal disease. We report the case of a 28-year-old immunocompetent patient who developed meningococcal infection associated with brain abscesses and oligo-arthritis. PMID:22284670

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp. funduliforme Bovine Liver Abscess Isolate B35

    PubMed Central

    Calcutt, Michael J.; Foecking, Mark F.; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G.

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that causes foot rot and liver abscesses in cattle. F. necrophorum subsp. necrophorum and the less virulent organism F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme are recognized. We present here a draft genome sequence of the bovine liver abscess isolate F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme strain B35, which affords a genomic perspective of virulence and bovine adaptation. PMID:24786958

  14. Localization of abscess in adult polycystic kidney by indium-111 leukocyte scan

    SciTech Connect

    Bretan, P.N. Jr.; Price, D.C.; McClure, R.D.

    1988-08-01

    In patients with adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) infected cysts are difficult to localize with current radiographic techniques, especially those dependent on renal function. Indium-111 leukocyte (In-WBC) imaging is both highly sensitive and effective in detecting and localizing abscesses in patients with renal failure. We report on a patient with APKD and sepsis in whom computed tomography, ultrasound, and physical examination failed to locate the renal abscess, which was found by In-WBC scanning.

  15. Group G Streptococci in association with brain abscess: a rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Parimala; Raja, Vidhya; Lingaiah, Bipinchandra Bhagath; Madappa, Beena Prasavangada; Chakravarthy, Hariprakash

    2014-11-01

    Brain abscess is a serious life-threatening infection of the brain parenchyma. We are reporting a rare case of brain abscess caused by Group G Streptococcus in a 12 year-old female child who presented with neurological symptoms. She was diagnosed with congenital anomalies of the heart at birth. She was treated with amoxyclav and ciprofloxacin. The child recovered and was discharged uneventfully. PMID:25390063

  16. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in tubo-ovarian abscess: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Tohru; Ninoi, Teruhisa; Doh, Kunihiko; Hashimoto, Shigeo; Inoue, Yuichi

    2009-12-01

    In this report, we describe the magnetic resonance imaging appearance of tubo-ovarian abscess (TOA) in a patient who underwent diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the pelvis and subsequent histologic analysis. The content of the TOA was markedly high signal intensity relative to the surrounding tissue on DWI, and it showed low signal intensity on the apparent diffusion coefficient map; these findings were consistent with those of published reports on brain and liver abscesses. PMID:20088410

  17. [Primary psoas abscess in a child. Case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Gilio, A E; Pahl, M M; Barbosa, R B; Henriques, C L; Ejzenberg, B; Okay, Y

    1997-01-01

    Primary psoas abscess is an uncommon disease. In children, clinical manifestations is often inspecific leading to diagnostic delay. The authors relate a primary pyogenic abscess of the psoas muscle in a 7-year-old girl with secondary septic arthritis of the hip. Confirmation of diagnosis was established by computerized tomography (CT) of the abdominal and pelvic areas. A review of the literature is presented about clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, differential diagnosis, etiology, diagnostic and therapeutic management of this infrequent entity. PMID:9595782

  18. Fatal cerebritis and brain abscesses following a nontraumatic subdural hematoma in a chronic hemodialyzed patient.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Maria; Damry, Nasroolla; Gazagnes, Marie D

    2008-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of bacteremia in hemodialysis-dependent patients that can lead to metastatic abscesses with poor outcome. We report a case of a 65-year-old chronic hemodialyzed male patient who developed cerebritis and brain abscesses complicating a spontaneous subdural hematoma, following Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia related to infected arteriovenous fistula. In spite of adequate antibiotherapy and several surgical brain drainages, our patient did not survive. Prevention of S. aureus is highly important in hemodialysis patients. PMID:19090864

  19. A Rare Case of Toxic Myocarditis Caused by Bacterial Liver Abscess Mimicking Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yuhai; Lin, Lin; Xiao, Hua; Xiang, Dingcheng

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 66 Final Diagnosis: Toxic myocarditis Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Emergency Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Chills, high fever, right upper abdomen pain, and increased white blood cell count are the main and common clinical features of bacterial liver abscess. It is rare to see bacterial liver abscess present symptoms of myocardial injury first, and this can lead to misdiagnosis. Case Report: We report a case of toxic myocarditis caused by bacterial liver abscess. The patient first presented with chest pain, ST segment elevation, and elevated TNI, which misled us to diagnose myocardial infarction, but the coronary artery had no stenosis or obstructive lesions after emergency coronary angiography. Then we modified the diagnosis to toxic myocarditis. Bacterial liver abscess was the proposed etiology after a series of auxiliary examinations. Finally, antibiotics and percutaneous liver puncture catheter drainage were used to improve the clinical outcome. Conclusions: It is rare that patients with bacterial liver abscess first present symptoms of myocardial injury. Differential diagnosis between myocarditis and myocardial infarction should be careful, as myocarditis is a diagnosis of exclusion, and coronary angiography is necessary to confirm coronary disease. Percutaneous liver puncture catheter drainage can effectively cure bacterial liver abscess. PMID:26726772

  20. High-resolution ultrasound evaluation of experimental brain abscess evolution: comparison with computed tomography and neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, D R; Britt, R H; Lyons, B; Carroll, B; Wilson, D A; Buxton, J

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) and high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) imaging of experimental brain abscess were correlated with neuropathologic findings in nine mongrel dogs. The HRUS scan was more sensitive to different histologic features than the CT scan but both accurately delineated the evolution of the experimental brain abscess. All stages of abscess evolution were characterized by an appearance of an echogenic rim with a hypoechoic center. In the early stages the echogenicity of the abscess was related primarily to marked cellular infiltration, while in the late stages extensive collagen deposition correlated closely with the echo pattern. The size of the abscess in the cerebritis stages appeared smaller on the HRUS scan than on the CT scan because the latter modality detected the extensive cerebritis around the developing necrotic center whereas the HRUS scan did not. This discrepancy disappeared in the capsule stages. The HRUS scan provided a more accurate depiction of the neuropathologic characteristics of the necrotic than did the CT scan. Healing of the abscess, indicated by a decrease in size of the hypoechoic center, was accurately detected by the HRUS scan. PMID:7053556

  1. High-resolution ultrasound evaluation of experimental brain abscess evolution: comparison with computed tomography and neuropathology

    SciTech Connect

    Enzmann, D.R.; Britt, R.H.; Lyons, B.; Carroll, B.; Wilson, D.A.; Buxton, J.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) and high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) imaging of experimental brain abscess were correlated with neuropathologic findings in nine mongrel dogs. The HRUS scan was more sensitive to different histologic features than the CT scan but both accurately delineated the evolution of the experimental brain abscess. All stages of abscess evolution were characterized by an appearance of an echogenic rim with a hypoechoic center. In the early stages the echogenicity of the abscess was related primarily to marked cellular infiltration while in the late stages extensive collagen deposition correlated closely with the echo pattern. The size of the abscess in the cerebritis stages appeared smaller on the HRUS scan than on the CT scan because the latter modality detected the extensive cerebritis around the developing necrotic center whereas the HRUS scan did not. This discrepancy disappeared in the capsule stages. The HRUS scan provided a more accurate depiction of the neuropathologic characteristics of the necrotic center than did the CT scan. Healing of the abscess, indicated by a decrease in size of the hypoechoic center, was accurately detected by the HRUS scan.

  2. Technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime leucocyte scintigraphy in the differential diagnosis of cerebral abscesses.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, F; Sara, R; Milella, M; Ruffini, L; Sterzi, R; Causarano, I R; Sberna, M

    2000-01-01

    The diagnosis of brain abscess is often difficult, as the clinical symptoms are not specific. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are highly sensitive, but different cerebral lesions, especially neoplasms, can have the same ring-like contrast enhancement. Brain abscess is a severe illness requiring rapid diagnosis to choose the most appropriate therapy. Technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO)-labelled leucocyte scintigraphy is commonly used to detect an inflammatory process. The aim of this study was to present the results obtained with leucocyte scintigraphy in 65 patients with intracranial mass lesions and clinical findings compatible to or suggestive of brain abscess. The final diagnosis, based on surgery, clinical findings and stereotatic puncture, was brain abscess in 17 patients, primary brain neoplasm in 22, brain metastasis in 16, lymphoma in 2, cysticercosis in 2, hematoma in 2 and cerebral infarction in 4. 99mTc-HMPAO leucocyte scintigraphy was positive in all abscess cases. The scan was negative in the rest of the patients examined, with the exception of one lesion, which was finally diagnosed as a tumour (1 false-positive). All patients who did not have false-negative scans were treated with steroids. The sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of leucocyte scintigraphy was 100%, 97.8% and 98.4%, respectively. In conclusion, in our experience, leucocyte scintigraphy is a valuable aid in the differential diagnosis between abscess and neoplasm. PMID:10654146

  3. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Pyogenic Liver Abscess: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Joel; Singh, Rahul; Varma, Muralidhar; Vidyasagar, Sudha; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are rare with an incidence of 0.5% to 0.8% and are mostly due to hepatobiliary causes (40% to 60%). Most are polymicrobial with less than 10% being caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Of these, few are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and fewer still by a community-acquired strain. Here we present a case study of a patient with a community-acquired MRSA liver abscess. The patient presented with fever since 1 month and tender hepatomegaly. Blood tests revealed elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and neutrophilic leukocytosis. Blood cultures were sterile. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed multiple abscesses, from which pus was drained and MRSA isolated. Computed tomography of the abdomen did not show any source of infection, and an amebic serology was negative. The patient was started on vancomycin for 2 weeks, following which he became afebrile and was discharged on oral linezolid for 4 more weeks. Normally a liver abscess is treated empirically with ceftriaxone for pyogenic liver abscess and metronidazole for amebic liver abscess. However, if the patient has risk factors for a Staphylococcal infection, it is imperative that antibiotics covering gram-positive organisms be added while waiting for culture reports. PMID:27540556

  4. Safety and Efficacy of Percutaneous CT-Guided Drainage in the Management of Abdominopelvic Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Shahnazi, Makhtoom; Khatami, Alireza; Jamzad, Abbas; Shohitavi, Shomal

    2014-01-01

    Background: Abdominopelvic fluid collection and abscess management and their outcomes have improved in the recent years due to innovation of the image-guided drainage technique and improvement of surgical procedures Objectives: This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of CT-guided percutaneous drainage in treating abdominopelvic abscesses. Patients and Methods: In this study, the data of 41 patients who had abdominal abscess or fluid collections, and underwent treatment by percutaneous CT-guided drainage were analyzed. Treatment was assessed by reduction of collection size, relief of symptoms and signs including abdominal pain and fever and imaging findings. Any morbidity such as wound infection, sepsis, hematoma formation or peritonitis was followed up to six months after the procedure. Results: The average age of the patients was 54 years (range 12 to 79), including 21 (51%) men and 20 (49%) women. The common signs and symptoms were pain (83%) and fever (80.5%). The most prevalent abdominal abscess etiology was previous surgery in 31 cases (75.5%). Abscess diameter ranged between 5 and 12 cm (mean, 7.8 cm). The average hospital stay was 8 days (4-15). Thirty five cases (86%) were successfully treated. Only one case (2.5%) developed complication (peritonitis) after the procedure. Conclusions: According to our findings, CT-guided percutaneous drainage is a safe and effective procedure in the treatment of abdominal abscess and fluid collection. PMID:25763077

  5. Evidence for increasing severity of community-onset boils and abscesses in UK General Practice.

    PubMed

    Shallcross, L J; Hayward, A C; Johnson, A M; Petersen, I

    2015-08-01

    In England, hospital admissions for severe staphylococcal boils and abscesses trebled between 1989 and 2004. We investigated this trend using routine data from primary and secondary care. We used The Health Improvement Network (THIN), a large primary-care database and national data on hospital admissions from Hospital Episode Statistics (HES). Time trends in the incidence of primary-care consultations for boils and abscesses were estimated for 1995-2010. HES data were used to calculate age-standardized hospital admission rates for boils, abscesses and cellulitis. The incidence of boil or abscess was 450 [95% confidence interval (CI) 447-452] per 100 000 person-years and increased slightly over the study period (incidence rate ratio 1·005, 95% CI 1·004-1·007). The rate of repeat consultation for a boil or abscess increased from 66 (95% CI 59-73) per 100 000 person-years in 1995 to peak at 97 (95% CI 94-101) per 100 000 person-years in 2006, remaining stable thereafter. Hospital admissions for abscesses, carbuncles, furuncles and cellulitis almost doubled, from 123 admissions per 100 000 in 1998/1999 to 236 admissions per 100 000 in 2010/2011. Rising hospitalization and recurrence rates set against a background of stable community incidence suggests increased disease severity. Patients may be experiencing more severe and recurrent staphylococcal skin disease with limited treatment options. PMID:25530161

  6. A liver abscess deprived a healthy adult of eyesight: endogenous endophthalmitis associated with a pyogenic liver abscess caused by serotype K1 Klebsiella pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Maruno, Takahisa; Ooiwa, Yoko; Takahashi, Ken; Kodama, Yuzo; Takakura, Shunji; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumonia usually causes urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and other infectious diseases in hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. Among the types of Klebsiella pneumonia, serotype K1 is known to be a highly virulent pathogen. We herein report the case of a healthy 63-year-old man with a pyogenic liver abscess and bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis caused by serotype K1 Klebsiella pneumonia. Although the patient received percutaneous abscess drainage and antibiotic therapy, he lost his eyesight. To improve the poor prognoses of ocular complications, providing both an earlier diagnosis and treatment is critical. PMID:23583997

  7. Carcinoma Cecum Presenting as Right Gluteal Abscess Through Inferior Lumbar Triangle Pathway—Report of a Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, Vilvapathy Senguttuvan; Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Ram, Duvuru; Ali, Sheik Manwar; Velayutham, Sugi Subramaniam Raghavan; Vijayaraghavan, Nandhagopal

    2014-01-01

    Gluteal abscess commonly follows intramuscular injections with contaminated needles. Carcinoma cecum is known to present with pericolic abscess due to microperforations and may rupture intraperitoneally. Gluteal abscess secondary to perforated carcinoma cecum with pericolic abscess is extremely uncommon. A 50-year-old woman who was receiving intramuscular iron injections for anemia presented with a 10 × 10-cm abscess in the right gluteal region and a vague mass in the right iliac fossa. After investigations, a diagnosis of perforated carcinoma cecum with pericolic abscess tracking into the right gluteal region was made, and incision and drainage were done. Fine-needle aspiration cytology from the cecal growth revealed adenocarcinoma. Unfortunately, the patient was not willing to undergo definitive treatment. This case is being reported for its rarity and as an uncommon etiology for a common condition. PMID:25058767

  8. Amebic liver abscess: epidemiology, clinical features, and outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Seeto, R K; Rockey, D C

    1999-01-01

    Amebic liver abscess (ALA) is a serious, but readily treatable form of hepatic infection. In order to understand the clinical features of this condition in the United States, we reviewed the medical histories of 56 patients with ALA at two large San Francisco Hospitals from 1979 to 1994. Patients were divided into the following groups based on the presumed manner in which they had acquired ALA: those born or raised in the United States, with a history of travel to an endemic area (Tr-ALA); those from an endemic area, but living in the United States for less than one year (En-ALA); and those neither from nor having traveled to an endemic area (N-ALA). We found distinct clinical patterns in patients from different epidemiological groups. Patients with Tr-ALA were a decade older than those from endemic regions, were more likely to be male, and tended to have an insidious onset. Furthermore, compared to patients with En-ALA, those with Tr-ALA were more likely to have hepatomegaly (P < 0.0001) and large abscesses (ALA > 10 cm; P < 0.01). One third of the patients studied had no associated travel history or endemic origin as risk factors. Of these, 63% had a condition consistent with severe immunosuppression, such as infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malnourishment with severe hypoalbuminemia, or chronic infection. In patients with N-ALA, the presence of a presumed immunosuppressed state increased significantly, as compared to patients with endemic or travel risk factors for ALA. During the last five years of the study, one third of all patients diagnosed with ALA were HIV positive (including 2 with a new diagnosis of AIDS), many of whom were discovered to be HIV-infected only after presentation with ALA. We conclude that travel to and origin in an endemic area are important risk factors for the development of ALA, and patients in these different epidemiological groups appear to have distinct clinical features. Further, in the absence of recognized

  9. Left Colon Diverticulitis Presenting as Perforated Lumbar Abscess: A Case Report and Review of the Current Literature

    PubMed Central

    Paramythiotis, Daniel; Kofina, Konstantinia; Papadopoulos, Vassileios N.; Michalopoulos, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    Diverticular perforation is a common complication of diverticulitis and can lead to the creation of abscesses. The presence of such abscesses on the abdominal wall is rare and can lead to misdiagnosis. We present the case of a patient with abdominal pain and the formation of a large left lumbar abscess due to perforation of a diverticulum of the left colon and our surgical treatment of choice with favorable results. PMID:26881151

  10. Primary ilio-psoas abscess extending to the thigh in a neonate: US, CT and MR findings.

    PubMed

    Prassopoulos, P K; Giannakopoulou, C A; Apostolaki, E G; Charoulakis, N Z; Gourtsoyiannis, N C

    1998-08-01

    Psoas abscess in children, and especially in neonates, is an uncommon condition which is difficult to diagnose clinically. The US, CT and MR findings of a psoas abscess in a neonate, which extended to the thigh, are reported. Imaging was helpful in revealing the abnormality, in demonstrating its extension and in determining its nature. The child was treated conservatively and the abscess resolved, leaving atrophy of the psoas muscle. PMID:9716633

  11. Novel use of a radiolabelled antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for the detection of occult abscesses in mammals

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, Madhukar L.

    1990-01-01

    The invention discloses improved reagents containing antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 antibodies and improved methods for detection of occult abscess and inflammation using the improved reagents.

  12. [Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis associated with liver abscess: a case report].

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, T; Nakamura, H; Takei, I; Maruyama, H; Kataoka, K; Saruta, T; Kobayashi, Y

    1989-10-01

    We report a rare case of Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis associated with liver abscess, which was successfully treated with cefotaxime (CTX), one of the third-generation cephalosporins. A 53-year-old man was admitted to Keio University Hospital on June 13, 1988, because of a fever and a headache. On June 3, he suddenly started shivering and his temperature rose to 39 degrees C. He then began to complain of polydipsia, polyuria, and a weight loss of 4 kg a week. On June 11, he developed a severe headache. Four years prior to this incident, he had been diagnosed as having diabetes after a routine medical examination, but had neglected to undergo medical treatment. On admission, laboratory data showed leukocytosis, hyperglycemia (394 mg/dl) and ketonuria (4+). A lumbar puncture yielded cloudy cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) containing 500/3 cells/mm8, of which about 70% were neutrophils. A diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis and purulent meningitis was made. A treatment with ampicillin (ABPC) and CTX, (12 g/day, each) was begun. On the third day, cultures of a blood specimen and CSF yielded both K. pneumoniae. The MICs of CTX to K. pneumoniae isolated from blood and CSF were both 0.05 microgram/ml. ABPC was discontinued, gentamicin was administered for 2 days, CTX was continued at the same dosage level and an administration of prednisolone 40 mg daily was begun.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2691713

  13. Central condylar displacement with brain abscess from chronic mandibular osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thomas; Green, Ross; Hsu, Jack

    2013-06-01

    In this case report, we describe a unique long-term complication from undiagnosed mandibular osteomyelitis. A 53-year-old female who underwent a dental extraction complicated by chronic postoperative odontogenic infection and cutaneous parotid fistula formation 2 years earlier presented with acute mental status change, gradual unilateral facial nerve palsy (House-Brackmann score V), and nontraumatic dislocation of the condylar head into the middle cranial fossa. The patient's chronic mandibular osteomyelitis led to glenoid fossa erosion, middle cranial fossa penetration, and temporal lobe abscess formation. A combined middle cranial fossa approach through a burr hole placed in the squamous temporal bone near the zygomatic root and intraoral mandibular approach to ipsilateral condylar head was performed to complete partial mandibulectomy, including condylectomy. The patient was treated with 6 weeks of meropenem perioperatively. Four months after the surgery, the patient had complete resolution of skull base osteomyelitis, parotid fistula, and neurologic deficits and full recovery of facial nerve function (House-Brackmann score of I). PMID:23315680

  14. Pleuritis secondary to pneumonia or lung abscessation in 90 horses.

    PubMed

    Raphel, C F; Beech, J

    1982-10-15

    Of 122 horses with pleural effusion, 90 (73.8%) had pleuritis secondary to pneumonia or lung abscessation. Fifty-one horses died or were euthanatized. The highest prevalence was in Thoroughbred and Standardbred racehorses. Eleven (12.2%) horses were postsurgical patients and 22 (24.4%) horses had been transported over 500 miles. There was no relationship between final outcome and the age, sex, breed, hematologic values, or laboratory findings pertaining to pleural fluid except for the bacterial isolation of Escherichia coli from the pleural fluid, as this was more frequently associated with death. Follow-up on 38 of the 39 horses that survived showed that 18 (46.2%) recovered and were able to return to performance equal to that prior to their illness. Ten (25.6%) were returned for breeding or pleasure use, with no attempt made to return them to racing. Follow-up was not available for 5 horses, 4 horses had just recently been discharged from the hospital, and 2 horses are racing poorer than prior to their illness. PMID:7141978

  15. [Fever and lung abscesses in anorexia nervosa after infusion therapy].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, J; Herzum, M; Maisch, B

    1994-06-01

    A 26 year old female patient was admitted to our hospital because of septic temperatures and chills. In the patient's history renal insufficiency has been known for several years due to agenesia of the right and pyelonephritic renal congestion of the left kidney. Long lasting anorexia nervosa had been treated by psychotherapeutical interventions for years and when failing it necessitated repeated intravenous nutrition by central venous lines. The prominent symptom of the intravenously treated young woman was fever up to 39.7 degrees C and pneumonia, which was considered by the first treating clinic to be caused directly by diminished immunoreactivity in malnutrition and preuremia. The chest X-ray confirmed pneumonia and revealed multiple abscesses in both lungs (Figure 1). After being transferred to our intensive care unit the pathophysiological context became obvious. From inspection (positive jugular pulsation), from auscultation (holosystolic murmur at the left parasternal border) tricuspid incompetence due to infective endocarditis was suspected. This was confirmed immediately by TM and two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography, which showed a large vegetation on the anterior tricuspid valve leaflet (Figures 2a and 2b). Tricuspid regurgitation was also ascertained by color flow echocardiography (Figure 2c). Several blood cultures were positive for staphylococcus aureus. Clinical and laboratory recovery was achieved by antibiotic therapy with vancomycin and cephtazidim for 3 months.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7927123

  16. Renal tuberculosis and iliopsoas abscess: Two case reports

    PubMed Central

    WEI, HONG-LAN; WANG, LEI; DU, XING-GUO; WU, YANG; LI, HUA; CAI, YUAN; SONG, XIAO-HONG; LI, CHENG-XU; DONG, LI-PING; LIU, ZHI-FEN; ZHAO, XIA; DONG, JUN-WU

    2014-01-01

    The urinary system is the second most commonly affected site of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Due to the diverse and atypical clinical manifestations of urinary TB, the disease is easy to misdiagnose. In the present study, two cases of renal TB are reported, which had completely different clinical manifestations. The first case is a female who presented with loin pain and fever. Purified protein derivative (PPD) and TB antibody tests were negative and computed tomography (CT) scans showed a low density focus in the right kidney with an iliopsoas abscess. The typical CT findings indicated renal tuberculosis. Anti-TB drugs were effective proved the diagnosis. The second case is a male who presented with intermittent gross hematuria. Acid-fast bacilli in urine and TB antibody tests were positive. CT scans revealed a low density focus in the unilateral kidney with a slight expansion of the pelvis, calices and ureter. The patients were treated with the anti-TB drugs and the clinical manifestations disappeared. The diagnosis of urinary TB is challenging in certain cases; when there is no response to the usual antibiotics in patients with fever or gross hematuria, TB should be suspected. CT is the mainstay for investigating possible urinary TB. PMID:24926373

  17. Amebic Liver Abscess in Israeli Travelers: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Lachish, Tamar; Wieder-Finesod, Anat; Schwartz, Eli

    2016-05-01

    Amebic liver abscess (ALA) is endemic in developing countries. The epidemiology and clinical characteristics of the disease in developing countries are well described. Travelers from nonendemic countries can serve as a model for the natural history of ALA. Currently, the available literature on travelers is limited. This is a retrospective observational study on Israeli travelers diagnosed with ALA. Data regarding travel history, clinical presentation, imaging, and treatment were collected and analyzed. Among 6,867 ill returning Israeli travelers, amebiasis was diagnosed in 53 travelers (0.77%), of whom 14 were with ALA (0.2%). Twelve ALA cases (86%) had an exposure in the Indian subcontinent. The male to female ratio was 1:1, with no significant clinical differences between the sexes. The average lag period between exposure and onset of symptoms was 17.1 months. The lack of male predominance and the prolonged lag period may imply that behavioral factors are pivotal in the development of ALA. Larger case series of travelers are required. PMID:26928829

  18. Prostatic abscess: Objective assessment of the treatment approach in the absence of guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Elshal, Ahmed M.; Abdelhalim, Ahmed; Barakat, Tamer S.; Shaaban, Atallah A.; Nabeeh, Adel; Ibrahiem, El-Housseiny

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the outcome of the drainage procedure used for treating a prostatic abscess, and to propose a treatment algorithm to reduce the morbidity and the need for re-treatment. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed patients who were admitted and received an interventional treatment for a prostatic abscess. All baseline relevant variables were reviewed. Details of the intervention, laboratory data, duration of hospital stay, follow-up data and re-admissions were recorded. Results A prostatic abscess was diagnosed in 42 patients; 30 were treated by transurethral deroofing and 12 by transrectal needle aspiration. The median (range) size of the abscess was 4.5 (2–23) mL and 2.7 (1.5–7.1) mL in the deroofing and aspiration groups, respectively (P = 0.2). In half of the cases multiple abscesses were evident on imaging before the intervention. The median (range) hospital stay after deroofing and aspiration was 2 (1–11) and 1 (1–19) days, respectively (P = 0.04). Perioperative complications occurred only in the deroofing group, in which two patients developed septic shock requiring intensive care (Clavien 4) and one developed epididymo-orchitis (Clavien 2). There were two late complications in the deroofing group, in which one patient developed a urethral stricture that required endoscopic urethrotomy (Clavien 3a) and one developed a urethral diverticulum and urinary incontinence that required diverticulectomy and a bulbo-urethral sling procedure (Clavien 3b). A urethro-rectal fistula developed after aspiration in one patient. Re-treatment for the abscess was indicated in two (7%) patients in the deroofing group, which was treated by aspiration. Conclusion Transrectal needle aspiration for a prostatic abscess, when done for properly selected cases, could minimise the morbidity of the drainage procedure. PMID:26019960

  19. Outcome of percutaneous continuous drainage of psoas abscess: A clinically guided technique

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Bharat R; Kurupati, Ranganatha Babu; Shah, Dipak; Degulamadi, Devanand; Borgohain, Nitu; Krishnan, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Background: Percutaneous aspiration of abscesses under ultrasonography (USG) and computer tomography (CT) scan has been well described. With recurrence rate reported as high as 66%. The open drainage and percutaneous continuous drainage (PCD) has reduced the recurrence rate. The disadvantage of PCD under CT is radiation hazard and problems of asepsis. Hence a technique of clinically guided percutaneous continuous drainage of the psoas abscess without real-time imaging overcomes these problems. We describe clinically guided PCD of psoas abscess and its outcome. Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine patients with dorsolumbar spondylodiscitis without gross neural deficit with psoas abscess of size >5 cm were selected for PCD. It was done as a day care procedure under local anesthesia. Sequentially, aspiration followed by guide pin-guided trocar and catheter insertion was done without image guidance. Culture sensitivity was done and chemotherapy initiated and catheter kept till the drainage was <10 ml for 48 hours. Outcome assessment was done with relief of pain, successful abscess drainage and ODI (Oswestry Disability Index) score at 2 years. Results: PCD was successful in all cases. Back and radicular pain improved in all cases. Average procedure time was 24.30 minutes, drain output was 234.40 ml, and the drainage duration was 7.90 days. One patient required surgical stabilisation due to progression of the spondylodiscitis resulting in instability inspite of successful drainage of abscess. Problems with the procedure were noticed in six patients. Multiple attempts (n = 2), persistent discharge (n = 1) for 2 weeks, blocked catheter (n = 2) and catheter pull out (n = 1) occurred with no effect on the outcome. The average ODI score improved from 62.47 to 5.51 at 2 years. Conclusions: Clinically guided PCD is an efficient, safe and easy procedure in drainage of psoas abscess. PMID:24600066

  20. Bacterial flora of liver abscesses in feedlot cattle fed tylosin or no tylosin.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, T G; Beharka, A B; Chengappa, M M; Carroll, L H; Raun, A P; Laudert, S B; Parrott, J C

    1999-04-01

    Bacterial flora of liver abscesses from cattle fed tylosin or no tylosin and susceptibilities of the predominant bacterial isolates to tylosin and other antimicrobial compounds were determined. Abscessed livers were collected at slaughter from cattle originating from feedlots that had fed tylosin (n = 36) or no tylosin (n = 41) for at least 2 yr, and segments of livers with one or two intact abscesses were transported to the laboratory. Abscesses were cultured for anaerobic and facultative bacteria. Fusobacterium necrophorum, either as single culture or mixed with other bacteria, was isolated from all abscesses. The incidence of subsp. necrophorum, as part of the mixed infection, was lower (P < .05) in the tylosin group than in the no-tylosin group (33 vs 61%). However, the incidence of Actinomyces pyogenes was higher (P < .01) in the tylosin group than in the no-tylosin group (53 vs 10%). Totals of 119 F. necrophorum and 21 A. pyogenes isolates were used for determinations of susceptibilities to bacitracin, oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, lasalocid, monensin, tylosin, tilmicosin, and virginiamycin. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of antibiotics were determined with a broth microdilution method. The mean MIC of tylosin for F. necrophorum and A. pyogenes were not different between isolates from tylosin and no-tylosin groups. We concluded that continuous feeding of tylosin did not induce resistance in F. necrophorum or A. pyogenes. Also, the higher incidence of mixed infection of F. necrophorum and A. pyogenes in liver abscesses of tylosin-fed cattle suggests a potential synergistic interaction between the two organisms in causing liver abscesses. PMID:10328365

  1. Outcomes of Various Interventions for First-Time Perianal Abscesses in Children

    PubMed Central

    Juth Karlsson, Alexander; Salö, Martin; Stenström, Pernilla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. In children treated surgically for first-time perianal abscesses, discovery and excision of concomitant fistulas may also be warranted. Aim. To evaluate children of varying age after incision and drainage of first-time perianal abscesses, examining recurrences rates with and without search for a fistula. Method. A retrospective review was conducted, analyzing children (ages 0–15 years) treated for first-time perianal abscesses at a tertiary pediatric surgical center, with a minimum follow-up of 6 months. Results. A total of 104 patients subjected to 112 treatments for first-time perianal abscesses were eligible. Surgical procedures constituted 84 (75%) of treatments, searching for fistulas in 49 (58%). In 34 (69%), fistulas were confirmed and treated. In the surgically treated subset, the recurrence rate was higher if no attempt was made to exclude a fistula (46%), as opposed to confirmed absence of a fistula (27%) or concurrent fistulotomy (9%; p = 0.02). Younger patients showed a higher recurrence rate (12/26; 46%), compared with older counterparts (11/58; 19%) (p = 0.002). Conclusion. In children surgically treated for first-time perianal abscess, recurrence rates appear to be lowered by locating and treating coexisting fistulas. PMID:26881235

  2. Transurethral Resection of Prostate Abscess: Is It Different from Conventional Transurethral Resection for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia?

    PubMed Central

    Sankhwar, Satyanarayan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To present our experience of prostate abscess management by modified transurethral resection (TUR) technique. Methods. Seventeen men with prostate abscess undergoing TUR between 2003 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. Details of demography, surgical procedures, complications, and followup were noted. Results. With a mean age of 61.53 ± 8.58 years, all patients had multifocal abscess cavities. Initially, 6 men underwent classical TUR similar to the technique used for benign prostatic enlargement (group 1). Next, 11 men underwent modified TUR (group 2) in which bladder neck and anterior zone were not resected. The abscess cavities resolved completely, and no patient required a second intervention. One patient in group 1 and three in group 2 had postoperative fever requiring parenteral antibiotics (P = 0.916). Three patients in group 1 had transient urinary incontinence, whereas none of the patients in group 2 had this complication (P = 0.055). Four and five men in group 1 and 2 reported retrograde ejaculation, respectively (P = 0.740). Conclusion. The modified technique of prostate resection edges over conventional TURP in the form of reduced morbidity but maintains its high success rate for complete abscess drainage. It alleviates the need for secondary procedures, having an apparent advantage over limited drainage techniques. Use of this technique is emphasized in cases associated with BPH and lack of proper preoperative imaging. PMID:23840969

  3. Concomitant use of corticosteroid and antimicrobials for liver abscesses in patients with chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyung-Sue; Lee, Mu Suk

    2016-04-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare inherited disorder caused by defective nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase enzyme and characterized by recurrent bacterial and fungal infections. Although liver abscess is a common manifestation of CGD, its management in CGD patients is not well-defined. In addition, the generalized guidelines for treating liver abscesses do not necessarily apply to CGD patients. Corticosteroids are commonly used to control granulomatous complications, such as inflammatory gastrointestinal and genitourinary lesions, in patients with CGD, Corticosteroids have also been used in combination with antimicrobials to treat refractory infections in patients with CGD. Because corticosteroids are capable of suppressing symptomatic inflammation, all potential infections must be adequately controlled prior to corticosteroid initiation. We report 3 typical CGD cases with liver abscesses refractory to conventional treatments that were successfully treated with the concomitant use of corticosteroid and antimicrobials. It remains unclear whether corticosteroid therapy is required for liver abscesses in CGD refractory to conventional treatments. However, based on our observations, use of corticosteroids in combination with optimal antimicrobials should be considered for refractory liver abscesses in CGD. PMID:27186231

  4. Predicting abscesses in adults with community-onset monomicrobial Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia: microorganisms matters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Hsun; Lee, Ching-Chi; Hsieh, Chih-Chia; Hong, Ming-Yuan; Chi, Chih-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacteriaceae is a leading pathogen of community-onset bacteremia. This study aims to establish a predictive scoring algorithm to identify adults with community-onset Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia who are at risk for abscesses. Of the total 1262 adults, 152 (12.0%) with abscess occurrence were noted. The 6 risk factors significantly associated with abscess occurrence-liver cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, thrombocytopenia and high C-reactive protein (>100 mg/L) at bacteremic onset, delayed defervescence, and bacteremia-causing Klebsiella pneumoniae-were each assigned +1 point to form the scoring algorithm. In contrast, the elderly, fatal comorbidity (McCabe classification), and bacteremia-causing Escherichia coli were each assigned -1 point, owing to their negative associations with abscess occurrence. Using the proposed scoring algorithm, a cut-off value of +1 yielded a high sensitivity (85.5%) and an acceptable specificity (60.4%). Although the proposed predictive model needs further validation, this simple scoring algorithm may be useful for the early identification of abscesses by clinicians. PMID:26456388

  5. Staged treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis with flow injection abscess.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hao; Zhang, Yupeng; Shen, Xiongjie; Luo, Chengke; Xu, Zhengquan; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Xiangyang; Wang, Xiyang

    2015-01-01

    The study was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of posterior-only approach combining with puncture drainage under CT-guide in staged treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis with flow injection abscess. We retrospectively analyzed 15 patients (came from 72 cases with thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis) with flow injection abscesses underwent surgery from January 2007 to February 2009, and evaluated the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scoring system of nerve function, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), abscess absorption time and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), preoperatively and postoperatively. 15 patients were followed up for 13-37 months, no recurrence of tuberculosis, no fixation loosening and neurologic symptoms aggravated. The flow injection abscesses are absorbed within 3-6 months postoperative operation. In final follow-up, ESR went down to 5.2±2.1 mm/h from preoperative 79.6±14.8 mm/h, CRP decreased from preoperative 49.3±7.5 mg/L to 1.8±0.7 mg/L, ODI changed from 75.13±20.15 to 16.72±8.62, all of them changed significantly (P<0.05). In conclusions, one-stage posterior debridement, interbody fusion, pedicle screw fixation and two-stage CT-guided interventional therapy were safe and effective in treatment of the thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis with flow injection abscess. PMID:26770442

  6. Concomitant use of corticosteroid and antimicrobials for liver abscesses in patients with chronic granulomatous disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mu Suk

    2016-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare inherited disorder caused by defective nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase enzyme and characterized by recurrent bacterial and fungal infections. Although liver abscess is a common manifestation of CGD, its management in CGD patients is not well-defined. In addition, the generalized guidelines for treating liver abscesses do not necessarily apply to CGD patients. Corticosteroids are commonly used to control granulomatous complications, such as inflammatory gastrointestinal and genitourinary lesions, in patients with CGD, Corticosteroids have also been used in combination with antimicrobials to treat refractory infections in patients with CGD. Because corticosteroids are capable of suppressing symptomatic inflammation, all potential infections must be adequately controlled prior to corticosteroid initiation. We report 3 typical CGD cases with liver abscesses refractory to conventional treatments that were successfully treated with the concomitant use of corticosteroid and antimicrobials. It remains unclear whether corticosteroid therapy is required for liver abscesses in CGD refractory to conventional treatments. However, based on our observations, use of corticosteroids in combination with optimal antimicrobials should be considered for refractory liver abscesses in CGD. PMID:27186231

  7. Intra-Abdominal Abscess and Primary Peritonitis Caused by Streptococcus anginosus

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Huseyin Agah; Demiray, Tayfur; Koroglu, Mehmet; Cakmak, Guner; Hakki Ciftci, Ihsan; Ozbek, Ahmet; Altindis, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Streptococcus anginosus group of bacteria are low-virulence bacteria existing as commensals in the oral flora and gastrointestinal tracts of humans. S. anginosus may spread to the blood in individuals with poor oral hygiene in cases of oral infections, such as gingivitis and tooth abscesses, that develop following the loss of mucosal unity. This may lead to infections in the whole body, primarily as brain and liver abscesses. Case Presentation A 32-year-old male patient presented with complaints of nausea, vomiting, and diffuse abdominal pain. Diffuse abdominal tenderness and rebound tenderness were detected particularly in the epigastrium and right upper quadrant. Laboratory assessment revealed a leukocyte count of 20,500/mm3. Free fluid around the liver and heterogeneous areas of abscess formation in the right lateral gallbladder were revealed on abdominal computed tomography. Diffuse adhesions between the bowel and seropurulent free liquid in the abdomen were detected on surgical exploration, and a sample was taken for cultures. The patient was discharged without complications on the sixth postoperative day and his antibiotic course was completed with 4 weeks of oral treatment. We reviewed the literature for similar cases of disseminated pyogenic infections caused by the S. anginosus group. Conclusions It should be kept in mind that the oral flora bacterium S. anginosus may cause transient bacteremia and deep-seated organ abscesses in immunodeficient patients with poor oral hygiene. Such patients with intra-abdominal abscesses should be treated with antibiotics and surgery.

  8. First report of iliacus abscess caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Othmarschen.

    PubMed

    Jha, Babita; Kim, Choon-Mee; Kim, Dong-Min; Chung, Jong-Hoon; Yoon, Na-Ra; Jha, Piyush; Kim, Seok Won; Jang, Sook Jin; Kim, Seon Gyeong; Chung, Jae Keun

    2016-02-01

    The non-typhoidal bacterium Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Othmarschen (Salmonella Othmarschen) is a rare human pathogen. Abscess formation due to non-typhoidal Salmonella infections is a very rare complication in this antibiotic era. We report the first case of iliacus abscess after a short period of gastroenteritis which was caused by non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica belonging to group C1, serovar Othmarschen in a patient without any underlying conditions. A young female presented in our hospital complaining of pain in right hip joint area. She gave a history of watery diarrhea 3 days before the onset of pain. On examination the patient was ill-looking and there was tenderness in the right hip joint area. S. enterica was identified using 16S rRNA gene amplification by PCR and serotyped to be serovar Othmarschen from the pus sample of iliacus abscess. This is the first reported case of iliacus abscess due to Salmonella serover Othmarschen infection. Our case suggests that S. enterica serovar Othmarschen can cause severe focal infections associated with gastroenteritis. The literature on the rare association of Salmonella enterica and abscess formation is reviewed. PMID:26482919

  9. Retroperitoneal metastatic germ cell tumor presenting as a psoas abscess: a diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Dieker, Carrie A; De Las Casas, Luis E; Davis, Brian R

    2013-07-01

    Most testicular neoplasms are germ cell tumors, the vast majority of which represent seminomas. Most seminomas present localized to the testis, whereas nonseminomatous germ cell tumors more often present with lymph node metastases. Psoas abscesses generally arise from a contiguous intra-abdominal or pelvic infectious process, an adjacent focus of osteomyelitis or septic emboli from distant infectious foci. In this study, the case of a 24-year-old man who presented with a right psoas mass presumptively diagnosed as an abscess secondary to fever and leukocytosis is presented. The patient had a history of right testicular seminoma, and normal serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein and human chorionic gonadotropin. Surgical exploration and biopsy demonstrated seminoma metastasis. This case represents an extremely unusual clinical presentation of metastatic germ cell tumor presenting as a psoas abscess. This unique case represents an unusual presentation of a recurrent germ cell tumor mimicking a psoas abscess. Awareness of possible metastatic testicular germ cell neoplasm as a psoas abscess could prevent diagnosis delay before retroperitoneal tumor debulking. PMID:23360792

  10. The occurrence of an abdominal wall abscess 11 years after appendectomy: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, K; Masaki, T; Toyoshima, O; Ono, M; Muto, T

    1999-01-01

    Most complications after appendectomy occur within 10 days; however, we report herein the unusual case of a patient in whom a wound abscess was detected more than 10 years after an appendectomy. A 26-year-old woman presented to our hospital with nausea and vomiting, pain, and a mass in the right lower abdominal wall. She had undergone an appendectomy 11 years previously. Physical examination revealed a tender mass, 5 cm in diameter, under the appendectomy scar. An abdominal ultrasonography demonstrated a low-echoic mass lesion measuring 9.0 x 5.0 x 2.0 cm. Incision of the connective tissue revealed about 3 ml of cream-colored and odorless fluid in the abscess cavity. Fistulography revealed an abscess cavity not communicating with the bowel lumen. Floss was discovered in the connective tissue and removed. Debridement of the abscess wall was performed and a piece of the wall was sent for histologic examination. Pathological examination revealed panniculitis of the subcutaneous tissue, and panniculitis with granulation and granuloma of the abscess wall. This case report demonstrates that a preoperative diagnosis should be based not on one finding, but on all findings collected, inclusively. PMID:10489140

  11. Staged treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis with flow injection abscess

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hao; Zhang, Yupeng; Shen, Xiongjie; Luo, Chengke; Xu, Zhengquan; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Xiangyang; Wang, Xiyang

    2015-01-01

    The study was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of posterior-only approach combining with puncture drainage under CT-guide in staged treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis with flow injection abscess. We retrospectively analyzed 15 patients (came from 72 cases with thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis) with flow injection abscesses underwent surgery from January 2007 to February 2009, and evaluated the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scoring system of nerve function, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), abscess absorption time and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), preoperatively and postoperatively. 15 patients were followed up for 13-37 months, no recurrence of tuberculosis, no fixation loosening and neurologic symptoms aggravated. The flow injection abscesses are absorbed within 3-6 months postoperative operation. In final follow-up, ESR went down to 5.2±2.1 mm/h from preoperative 79.6±14.8 mm/h, CRP decreased from preoperative 49.3±7.5 mg/L to 1.8±0.7 mg/L, ODI changed from 75.13±20.15 to 16.72±8.62, all of them changed significantly (P<0.05). In conclusions, one-stage posterior debridement, interbody fusion, pedicle screw fixation and two-stage CT-guided interventional therapy were safe and effective in treatment of the thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis with flow injection abscess. PMID:26770442

  12. [A case of sigmoid colon cancer liver metastasis accompanied by multiple liver abscesses].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masakazu; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Uemura, Hisashi; Okada, Kaoru; Nakane, Shigeru; Higaki, Naozumi; Hayashida, Hirohito; Oka, Yoshio; Nezu, Riichiro

    2014-11-01

    We describe the case of a patient with sigmoid colon cancer liver metastasis accompanied by multiple liver abscesses. The 59-year-old female patient presented with a fever at a body temperature of 39.0°C. On abdominal computed tomography (CT), multiple liver abscesses were detected, and percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage (PTAD) was performed. The day after the PTAD, the patient's fever subsided and her inflammatory response abated. A lower gastrointestinal examination, performed to identify the origin of her symptoms, revealed a type 1 tumor in the sigmoid colon. A biopsy indicated a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Prior to surgery, a second abdominal CT scan was performed, and a single liver metastasis was detected. Laparoscopic sigmoidectomy and partial liver resection were simultaneously performed. The histopathological diagnosis of the colon cancer was tub2, pN1, pH1, P0, ly1, v1, stage IV. To date, the patient remains free from hepatic abscess and colon cancer recurrence. Gastrointestinal examinations should be performed as early as possible to identify the cause of hepatic abscesses. Moreover, therapeutic decisions should only be made after imaging and examinations have been performed, which will be sufficient to identify the presence of liver metastases. PMID:25731285

  13. The Sacral Hiatus Approach for Drainage of Anterior Lumbo-Sacral Epidural Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, M.S.; Ospina, J.; Suzuki, S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Lumbosacral epidural abscesses are managed either conservatively with IV antibiotics or with open surgery, particularly in the presence of acute neurological symptoms. Their location makes it difficult for image-guided interventional approaches either for biopsy or evacuation. We report the sacral hiatus and canal as a corridor for image-guided minimally invasive abscess of lumbosacral epidural abscess for aspiration. A 56-year-old man presented to the emergency department complaining of six weeks of worsening low back pain. MRI of the patient’s lumbosacral spine showed osteomyelitis involving his L5, S1 vertebrae, L5-S1 discitis, as well as an anterior epidural abscess extending from L4-5 disc space to the S2 vertebral level. Blood cultures grew out gram-positive cocci. For drainage, a 5-French micropuncture kit was utilized to access the hiatus. Under fluoroscopic guidance a microwire was then advanced along the sacral canal. An 18-gauge needle curved to approximate the contours of the sacral canal was then advanced over the guidewire. Once anatomic access was established 2 ml of thick purulent material was aspirated. The patient tolerated the procedure well, and no focal nerve root symptoms were noted following the procedure. Image-guided aspiration of lumbosacral epidural abscesses can thus be carried out in a safe and effective manner using a sacral hiatus approach. PMID:22192554

  14. Prevalence of and risk factors for endogenous endophthalmitis in patients with pyogenic liver abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Park, In Hyung; Jun, Chung Hwan; Wi, Jin Woo; Park, Seon Young; Lee, Wan Sik; Jung, Sook In; Park, Chang Hwan; Joo, Young Eun; Kim, Hyun Soo; Rew, Jong Sun

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Although pyogenic liver abscesses (PLAs) can be successfully treated, the visual prognosis of patients with endogenous endophthalmitis (EE) associated with a PLA is poor. Early diagnosis and prompt intervention may salvage useful vision. Therefore, we investigated risk factors for EE in patients with PLA, to facilitate early diagnosis. Methods Data from 626 patients diagnosed with PLA between January 2004 and July 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were divided into two groups: those with liver abscess-associated endogenous endophthalmitis (LAEE) and non-LAEE. Results The prevalence of EE in PLA patients was 1.92%. The mean age for all patients (373 males, 59.6%) was 62.8 years. Upon multivariate logistic regression, a liver abscess or another systemic infection (odds ratio [OR], 5.52; p = 0.005), an abscess in the right superior segment (OR, 5.26; p = 0.035), and Klebsiella pneumoniae infection (OR, 3.68; p = 0.039), were risk factors for LAEE. The final visual outcomes of patients with LAEE included no light perception in seven, hand motion only in three, and decreased visual acuity in two. Vitrectomy and early intravitreal injections of antibiotics improved visual acuity and preserved useful vision. Conclusions PLA patients with other systemic infections, abscesses in the right superior segment, and K. pneumoniae infection require close monitoring and early intervention to treat LAEE. Intravitreal antibiotic injections or early vitrectomy may salvage useful vision. PMID:26161011

  15. Microbiology of peritonsillar abscess in the South Estonian population

    PubMed Central

    Vaikjärv, Risto; Kasenõmm, Priit; Jaanimäe, Liis; Kivisild, Ave; Rööp, Tiiu; Sepp, Epp; Mändar, Reet

    2016-01-01

    Objective The first aim of this study was to compare the microbiota of different locations (pus, tonsillar fossa, blood) in peritonsillar abscess (PTA) patients in order to optimize the sampling scheme. The second aim was to estimate the occurrence of tonsillitis episodes and macroscopic oropharyngeal signs characteristic of recurrent tonsillitis in PTA patients. Methods The study group consisted of 22 consecutive patients with PTA undergoing bilateral tonsillectomy. The PTA was punctured; pus and tonsillar fossa biopsy samples and the peripheral blood cultures were collected. The index of tonsillitis was calculated by multiplying the number of tonsillitis episodes per year by the morbidity period in years. Macroscopic oropharyngeal signs were evaluated and they were as follows: tonsillar sclerosis, obstruction of the tonsillar crypts, scar tissue on tonsils, cryptic debris, and lymphatic tissue aggregates. Results The cultures of the pus were positive in 16 out of 22 patients and the cultures of the tonsillar fossa samples were positive in all cases. In total, 62 different organisms were found from tonsillar fossa, pus, and blood samples, which belonged to 5 different phyla and 18 different families. In the tonsillar fossa, the most frequent bacteria found were Streptococcus spp. In pus samples, the most frequently found bacteria were Streptococcus spp. and bacteria from the Streptococcus milleri group. Conclusion PTA patients had mixed anaerobic and aerobic microbiota both in the tissue of the tonsillar fossa and the pus of the peritonsillar space. We demonstrated that the tonsillar fossa specimen is a better material for microbiological analyses, because it reveals more bacteria per culture. PTA patients usually have a low number of tonsillitis episodes in their previous history, but a relatively high number of macroscopic oropharyngeal signs, indicating the sclerotic process in palatal tonsils. PMID:27113570

  16. Diabetic foot complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess

    PubMed Central

    Trombetta, Maddalena; Imbriaco, Chiara; Rigolon, Riccardo; Mingolla, Lucia; Zamboni, Federica; Dal Molin, Francesca; Cioccoloni, Dario; Sanga, Viola; Bruti, Massimiliano; Brocco, Enrico; Conti, Michela; Ravenna, Giorgio; Perrone, Fabrizia; Stoico, Vincenzo; Bonora, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Vertebral osteomyelitis (or spondylodiscitis) is steadily increasing in Western countries and often results from hematogenous seeding, direct inoculation during spinal surgery, or contiguous spread from an infection in the adjacent soft tissue. We present the case of a 67-year-old white patient with type 2 diabetes who went to Hospital for high fever, back pain, and worsening of known infected ulcers in the left foot. Despite intravenous antibiotic treatment and surgical debridement of the foot infection, high fever and lower back pain continued. Bone biopsy and two consecutive blood cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus. A spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, revealing serious osteomyelitis in L4 and L5 complicated by an epidural abscess. Contiguous or other distant focuses of infection were not identified. In this case, diabetic foot could be considered as a primary distant focus for vertebral osteomyelitis. Clinicians should consider vertebral osteomyelitis as a ‘possible’ diagnosis in patients with type 2 diabetes complicated by foot infection that is associated with fever and lower back pain. Learning points Vertebral osteomyelitis is increasing in Western countries, especially in patients with type 2 diabetes. The primary focus of infection is the genitourinary tract followed by skin, soft tissue, endocarditis, bursitis, septic arthritis, and intravascular access. Diabetic foot could be a rare primary focus of infection for vertebral osteomyelitis, and, however, vertebral osteomyelitis could be a serious, albeit rare, complication of diabetic foot. Clinicians should keep in mind the many potential complications of diabetic foot ulcerations and consider vertebral osteomyelitis as a “possible” diagnosis in patients with type 2 diabetes and foot ulcers associated with nonspecific symptoms such as lower back pain. Early diagnosis and correct management of vertebral osteomyelitis are crucial to improve clinical outcomes

  17. Staphylococcus massiliensis sp. nov., isolated from a human brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Al Masalma, Mouhamad; Raoult, Didier; Roux, Véronique

    2010-05-01

    Gram-positive, catalase-positive, coagulase-negative, non-motile, non-fermentative and novobiocin-susceptible cocci were isolated from a human brain abscess sample (strain 5402776(T)). This novel strain was analysed by a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The respiratory quinones detected were MK-7 (93 %) and MK-6 (7 %) and the major fatty acids were C(15 : 0) iso (60.5 %), C(17 : 0) iso (8.96 %) C(15 : 0) anteiso (7.93 %) and C(19 : 0) iso (6.78 %). The peptidoglycan type was A3alpha l-Lys-Gly(2-3)-l-Ser-Gly. Based on cellular morphology and biochemical criteria, the new isolate was assigned to the genus Staphylococcus, although it did not correspond to any recognized species. The G+C content of the DNA was 36.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons showed that the new isolate was most closely related to Staphylococcus piscifermentans, Staphylococcus condimenti, Staphylococcus carnosus subsp. carnosus, S. carnosus subsp. utilis and Staphylococcus simulans (97.7 %, 97.6 %, 97.6 %, 97.6 % and 96.5 % sequence similarity, respectively). Comparison of tuf, hsp60, rpoB, dnaJ and sodA gene sequences was also performed. In phylogenetic analysis inferred from tuf, dnaJ and rpoB gene sequence comparisons, strain 5402776(T) clustered with Staphylococcus pettenkoferi (93.7 %, 82.5 % and 89 % sequence similarity, respectively) and on phylogenetic analysis inferred from sodA gene sequence comparisons, it clustered with Staphylococcus chromogenes (82.8 %). On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic data, this isolate represents a novel species for which the name Staphylococcus massiliensis sp. nov. is proposed (type strain 5402776(T)=CCUG 55927(T)=CSUR P23(T)). PMID:19666814

  18. Juxtapontine abscess around a retained wooden fragment following a penetrating eye injury: surgical management via a transtentorial approach.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sunil K; Umredkar, Alok A

    2012-01-01

    Penetrating injury through the orbit with a retained intracranial wooden foreign body is rare. The authors report the case of a child with a juxtapontine brain abscess secondary to a retained foreign body. The pitfalls in diagnosis and the surgical management for removal of the wooden fragment and drainage of the abscess are discussed. PMID:22208330

  19. Percutaneous Transhepatic Drainage of Inaccessible Abdominal Abscesses Following Abdominal Surgery Under Real-Time CT-Fluoroscopic Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakado, Koichiro Takaki, Haruyuki; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Kashima, Masataka; Uraki, Junji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Takeda, Kan

    2010-02-15

    This study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and clinical utility of transhepatic drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses retrospectively under real-time computed tomographic (CT) guidance. For abdominal abscesses, 12 consecutive patients received percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Abscesses were considered inaccessible using the usual access route because they were surrounded by the liver and other organs. The maximum diameters of abscesses were 4.6-9.5 cm (mean, 6.7 {+-} 1.4 cm). An 8-Fr catheter was advanced into the abscess cavity through the liver parenchyma using real-time CT fluoroscopic guidance. Safety, feasibility, procedure time, and clinical utility were evaluated. Drainage catheters were placed with no complications in abscess cavities through the liver parenchyma in all patients. The mean procedure time was 18.8 {+-} 9.2 min (range, 12-41 min). All abscesses were drained. They shrank immediately after catheter placement. In conclusions, this transhepatic approach under real-time CT fluoroscopic guidance is a safe, feasible, and useful technique for use of drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses.

  20. Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Lubbock Strains Isolated from Liver Abscesses of Feedlot Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Amachawadi, Raghavendra G.; Thomas, Milton

    2016-01-01

    The genome sequencing of 13 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Lubbock strains isolated from liver abscesses of feedlot cattle is reported here. The availability of these genomes will help to further understand the etiologic role of Salmonella strains in liver abscesses of cattle and will serve as references in microbial trace-back studies to improve food safety. PMID:27151794

  1. [Fungal mycotic aneurysms and multiple cerebral abscesses caused by Scedosporium apiospermum. Apropos of a case with review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Baudrillard, J C; Rousseaux, P; Lerais, J M; Toubas, O; Scherpereel, B; Gari, M; Comte, P

    1985-04-01

    The authors report a case of intracranial fungal aneurysm and brain abscesses. The compromised host was a young drowned woman. Scedosporium Apiospermum was isolated in fungal culture from abscess. Radiological and clinical pictures are typical of the hyphal form. PMID:3839532

  2. Multiple abscesses of the left brain hemisphere due to Listeria monocytogenes in an immunocompromised patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Matera, Giovanni; Puccio, Rossana; Giancotti, Aida; Quirino, Angela; Guadagnino, Vincenzo; Pardatscher, Kurt; Caroleo, Santo; De Rose, Marisa; Amorosi, Andrea; Liberto, Maria Carla; Focà, Alfredo

    2012-12-01

    We describe a case of brain abscesses in a cirrhotic and diabetic 57-year-old woman showing fever, aphasia, right hemiparesis and seizures. Neuroradiological investigation revealed unilateral cerebritis evolving in multiple abscesses. From blood and surgical drainage samples Listeria monocytogenes grew in pure culture. Despite decompressive craniotomy, the patient died two months after hospital admission. PMID:23299068

  3. [Pituitary abscess. Study of a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Grosskopf, D; Chamouard, J M; Bosquet, F; Billet, R; Poisson, M; Buge, A

    1987-01-01

    The authors report one case of pituitary abscess; the diagnosis of which was particularly difficult due to its association to a multiple sclerosis that began twelve years before. A review of thirty-one pituitary abscess reported in the literature from 1970 to 1985 is made. Opto-chiasmatic compression is observed in fifty-five per cent of the cases, pituitary insufficiency in fifty-five per cent, and meningitis in sixty per cent of the cases. Although the characteristic association of meningitis and pituitary tumor symptoms occur in thirty per cent of the cases, the diagnosis is made at surgery. Pituitary adenoma and craniopharyngioma were the most frequent preoperative misdiagnosis for pituitary abscess. The extended use of cerebral C.T. Scan will allow an easier recognition of this rare entity. The discussion includes life and visual prognosis. The etiology remains unexplained in nearly half of the cases. PMID:3614500

  4. Two Cases of Adrenal Abscesses Following Histoacryl® (N-butyl-2-cyanocrylate) Injection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo Young; Jang, Jae Young; Jeong, Soung Won; Bok, Gene Hyun; Ham, Jeong Ho; Cho, Joo Young; Lee, Joon Seong; Shim, Chan Sup

    2011-06-01

    We report two cases of adrenal abscesses that occurred following a Histoacryl® (N-butyl-2-cyanocrylate) injection for variceal bleeding. Patients had been diagnosed with alcoholic liver cirrhosis and gastric varices bleeding and received a Histoacryl® injection for the variceal bleeding. Patients had fever and abdominal tenderness and were diagnosed with an adrenal abscess at 2 months following the Histoacryl® injection. One patient received open drainage and the other underwent percutaneous drainage. When a patient has previously been injected with Histoacryl® for the treatment of variceal bleeding and presents with fever, an evaluation for an unusual complication such as adrenal abscess is recommended. PMID:21814609

  5. Intramuscular Injection Abscess Due to VRSA: A New Health Care Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Senthil Nathan; Rohinikumar, Ganeshkumar Jayasree; Gul, Arif; Mounasamy, Varatharaj

    2016-01-01

    Abscess formation following intramuscular injections is rare and they are most commonly seen in immunocompromised individuals. In this case series we present a cohort of three patients presented to us in a critically ill condition with an abscess due to intramuscular injection. Vancomycin resistant staphylococcus aureus was isolated from all three patients. These patients posed a major challenge to the healthcare system and the treating physician because of the: severity of illness, virulence and resistance of the organism, rarity of the situation, immune state of the patient, and lack of supporting evidence to properly guide management in the use of health resources. To the best of our knowledge, there is no report available in the English literature on vancomycin resistant staphylococcus aureus associated with intramuscular injection abscess. PMID:27517077

  6. A case of pyogenic liver abscesses in a previously healthy adolescent man

    PubMed Central

    Mentel, Dena A.; Cameron, Danielle B.; Gregg, Shea C.; Cholewczynski, Walter; Savetamal, Alisa; Crombie, Roselle E.; Possenti, Paul P.; Atweh, Nabil A.

    2014-01-01

    An 18-year-old, previously healthy man admitted with abdominal pain, high-grade fevers, nausea and emesis was found to have multiple hepatic abscesses. Aspiration cultures grew Fusobacterium necrophorum, a rare bacterium causing potentially fatal liver abscesses in humans. Following sequential percutaneous drainages and narrowing of antibiotics, the patient was discharged on a 6-week antibiotic course and showed no signs of infection. A week after presentation it was discovered that he had experienced upper respiratory symptoms and sore throat prior to presentation. Because oropharyngeal infections are a potential source of bacteremia, they must be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with hepatic abscesses and no evidence of immunocompromise. PMID:25389131

  7. Lemierre’s disease: a case with bilateral iliopsoas abscesses and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre’s disease is characterized by sepsis, often with an oropharyngeal source, secondary septic emboli and internal jugular vein thrombosis (Lancet 1:701–3, 1936. Clin Microbiol Rev 20(4):622–59, 2007). Septic emboli affecting many bodily sites have been reported, including the lungs, joints, bones, and brain. The case report describes an unusual case of Lemierre’s disease in a 64 year old gentleman causing profound sepsis, acute kidney injury, bilateral iliopsoas abscesses and a right hand abscess. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Lemierre’s disease in the context of bilateral psoas abscesses, and highlights the ambiguity surrounding the definition of Lemierre’s disease. The clinical literature review highlights the difficulty in definitively diagnosing the condition and offers some suggestions for recognising and refining the diagnostic criterion of Lemierre’s. PMID:24904685

  8. A Very Rare Cause of a Relapsing Para-Oesophageal Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Wespi, Simon Peter; Frei, Remus; Sulz, Michael Christian

    2016-01-01

    Oesophageal involvement in Crohn's disease (CD) is uncommon and most often accompanied by involvement of more distal parts. Its presentation is mostly non-specific, and therefore a diagnosis, especially in isolated oesophageal disease, is difficult. We present the case of a 42-year-old male patient who was referred to our gastroenterology department because of a para-oesophageal abscess. Under antibiotic treatment the abscess healed, but despite great diagnostic efforts, its aetiology remained unclear. Three years later the patient was hospitalized again because of an abscess at the same site. Endoscopy showed disseminated ulcerations of the lower oesophagus, raising suspicion of CD. After excluding other possible causes, we made the diagnosis of isolated CD of the oesophagus. We review the available literature on this topic and discuss the clinical presentation, symptoms, endoscopic findings, and histology as well as treatment of oesophageal CD. PMID:27403115

  9. [A Case of Tubercular Prostatic Abscess Following Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Therapy].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Masataka; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Ueda, Norichika; Hirai, Toshiaki; Kishikawa, Hidefumi; Nishimura, Kenji

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of tubercular prostatic abscess. A 65-year-old man had undergone intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy for a non-muscle invasive bladder carcinoma. One year 8 months later, the prostate-specific antigen concentration in serum was elevated (18. 58 ng/ml). Results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pelvis led us to suspect a prostatic abscess, and transurethral resection of the prostate for drainage was performed. A culture of fluid obtained from the latter procedure revealed a tubercular prostatic abscess. We administered the antituberculous agents, isoniazid (300 mg) and rifampicin(450 mg) daily, for 6 months. One year after surgery, the patient had no urinary symptoms or evidence of recurrence. PMID:26699893

  10. Brain abscess caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Case report.

    PubMed

    Guinand Vives, Carlos H; Monsalve Duarte, Guillermo A; Beltrán, Sandra Valderrama; Pinzón, Johanna Osorio

    2009-08-01

    This 24-year-old soldier had a history of polytrauma caused by firearm missiles of a fragmentation weapon. He was referred to the Hospital Militar Central, where multiple shrapnel wounds in the head, face, thorax, and extremities were found. A brain abscess was documented and drained, and a culture grew a multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. An appropriate antibiotic treatment was started but did not lead to a good response, and the patient died. The clinical course of the illness is presented, as is its treatment and the role of A baumannii as an etiological agent of a brain abscess. To the authors' knowledge, there have been no reported cases in the worldwide literature of brain abscess by this infectious agent. PMID:19061347

  11. Laparoscopic drainage of abdominal wall abscess from spilled stones post-cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Vincent; Ram, Rishi

    2015-01-01

    We present a case on abdominal wall abscess from spilled stones post-cholecystectomy and describe laparoscopic drainage as our choice of management. Mr M is a 75-year-old male who presented on multiple occasions to the hospital with right upper quadrant pain and fever post-laparoscopic cholecystectomy. He also required multiple courses of antibiotics. Subsequent computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scan confirmed a number of retained stone with signs of chronic inflammation. Hence, 6 months after his initial laparoscopic cholecystectomy, he proceeded to an exploratory laparoscopy. We found an abscess cavity measuring 3 × 4 cm over the anterior abdominal wall. The cavity was de-roofed, drained and washed out. The tissue culture grew Klebsiella pneumoniae. Laparoscopic approach is optimal as the abscess cavity can be clearly identified, stones visualized and removed under direct vision. Patient does not require a laparotomy. PMID:26183574

  12. Adrenal abscess in a 3-week-old neonate – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Witkowska-Sędek, Ewelina; Warchoł, Stanisław; Dudek-Warchoł, Teresa; Brzewski, Michał; Pyrżak, Beata

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a case of a 6-year-old boy operated on in the 4th week of life because of adrenal abscess. The diagnosis of an adrenal abscess in the neonatal period is challenging due to its rare occurrence and non-specific signs. Adrenal abscesses can develop via two mechanisms: as a result of a hematogenic infection and a spread of bacteria to “normal” adrenal glands or, which is much more common, a complication of an adrenal hematoma. Early and accurate diagnosis is crucial for appropriate therapeutic management. Imaging, including ultrasound, can be problematic. The final diagnosis is frequently established on the basis of a histological examination of a surgical specimen. PMID:26807300

  13. Intraabdominal abscess related fungaemia caused by Rhodotorula glutinis in a non-neutropenic cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Diktas, H; Gulec, B; Baylan, O; Oncul, O; Turhan, V; Acar, A; Gorenek, L

    2013-01-01

    Rhodotorula glutinis is a rare fungal infection that is especially observed in immune-compromised patients. It is common in the skin, faeces, nails, sputum, gastrointestinal system and adenoid tissue. However, the incidence of Rhodotorula glutinis is increased in both local and systemic infections in recent years. Presented here is a case of Rhodotorula glutinis fungaemia that isolated from subhepatic abscess formation and blood in a patient who was operated with Roux-en-Y technique due to gastric adenocarcinoma. Fungal sepsis is an important cause of fever resistant to antibiotic therapy that is often taken into marginal account. It should instead be particularly considered in patients with a history of intraabdominal surgery and non-neutropenic cancer patients. The case described illustrates an episode of systemic infection by Rhodotorula glutinis, correlated with the presence of intraabdominal abscess and without central venous catheters. This is the first case of fungaemia by Rhodotorula glutinis with an intraabdominal abscess source reported from Turkey. PMID:23627198

  14. [Treatment of psoas abscess. Report of a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Solas Beltrán, A; Velasco Sánchez, B; Lendínez, F; Ramírez Huertas, A; Paredes Esteban, R M

    2002-01-01

    Psoas abscess is an infrequent disease. We present a right psoas abscess diagnosed in a thirteen-year-old child. There wasn't a history of known trauma nor immunodeficiency. We didn't find another infection focus so the abscess was described as primary one. This is the most commonly presentation in children. Staphylococcus aureus was the bacteria identified in blood culture. The presenting symptoms were bottom and hip pain, limp and fever. The differential diagnosis was established with suppurative arthritis of the hip. Diagnosis was confirmed by Magnetic Resonance. In regard to treatment the patient was exclusively treated with systemic antibiotics, high spectrum of activity. The patient didn't require percutaneous-drainage. Though surgical drainage wasn't made, evolution was favourable and recurrence wasn't observed. PMID:12025477

  15. Chronic Osteomyelitis of Clavicle in a Neonate: Report of Morbid Complication of Adjoining MRSA Abscess.

    PubMed

    Suranigi, Shishir Murugharaj; Joshi, Manoj; Deniese, Pascal Noel; Rangasamy, Kanagasabai; Najimudeen, Syed; Gnanadoss, James J

    2016-01-01

    Osteomyelitis of clavicle is rare in neonates. Acute osteomyelitis of clavicle accounts for less than 3% of all osteomyelitis cases. It may occur due to contiguous spread, due to hematogenous spread, or secondary to subclavian catheterization. Chronic osteomyelitis may occur as a complication of residual adjoining abscess due to methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) sepsis. We report a newborn female with right shoulder abscess that developed chronic clavicular osteomyelitis in follow-up period after drainage. She required multiple drainage procedures and was later successfully managed with bone curettage and debridement. We report this case to highlight that a MRSA abscess may recur due to residual infection from a chronic osteomyelitis sinus. It may be misdiagnosed as hypergranulation tissue of nonhealing wound leading to inappropriate delay in treatment. High index of suspicion, aggressive initial management, and regular follow-up are imperative to prevent this morbid complication. PMID:27051549

  16. Open evacuation of pus: a satisfactory surgical approach to the problem of brain abscess?

    PubMed Central

    Maurice-Williams, R S

    1983-01-01

    The operative management of intracerebral abscesses remains controversial, with both primary radical excision and repeated aspiration having their advocates. This paper describes a surgical technique which combines the advantages while avoiding the disadvantages of the two surgical approaches. At open operation the abscess is widely incised, all pus removed from within the capsule and any daughter loculi under direct vision and the empty capsule irrigated with antibiotic solution before closure of the wound without drainage. Fifteen cases were treated by this method. There were no deaths, 13 patients made full neurological recoveries and two were left partially disabled. In only one case was a second operation necessary to remove pus which had re-formed after an adequate primary clearance. There were no cases of wound sepsis or of late recurrence of the abscess. Images PMID:6886714

  17. First case of amebic liver abscess 22 years after the first occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Nespola, Benoît; Betz, Valérie; Brunet, Julie; Gagnard, Jean-Charles; Krummel, Yves; Hansmann, Yves; Hannedouche, Thierry; Christmann, Daniel; Pfaff, Alexander W.; Filisetti, Denis; Pesson, Bernard; Abou-Bacar, Ahmed; Candolfi, Ermanno

    2015-01-01

    A 72-year-old man consulted in November 2012 for abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant. The patient had a history of suspected hepatic amebiasis treated in Senegal in 1985 and has not traveled to endemic areas since 1990. Abdominal CT scan revealed a liver abscess. At first, no parasitological tests were performed and the patient was treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. Only after failure of this therapy, serology and PCR performed after liver abscess puncture established the diagnosis of hepatic amebiasis. The patient was treated with metronidazole and tiliquinol-tilbroquinol. Amebic liver abscess is the most frequent extra-intestinal manifestation. Hepatic amebiasis 22 years after the last visit to an endemic area is exceptional and raises questions on the mechanisms of latency and recurrence of these intestinal protozoan parasites. PMID:26088504

  18. Endonasal DCR with Silicon Tube Stents: A Better Management for Acute Lacrimal Abscesses.

    PubMed

    Naik, Sudhir M; Appaji, Mohan K; Ravishankara, S; Mushannavar, Annapurna S; Naik, Sarika S

    2013-08-01

    Acute dacryocystitis, or inflammation of the lacrimal sac with lacrimal abscess, is almost always secondary to nasolacrimal duct obstruction. The standard practice for the treatment is incision and drainage because of concerns about the risks of exacerbation and spread of infection. Here we tried to evaluate primary EnDCR as a treatment for acute dacryocystitis with abscess formation. Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery, KVG Medical College, Sullia. This is comparative case series analysis study done in our medical college hospital during the study period 61 months from January 2007 to November 2011. 31 cases of acute dacryocystitis with lacrimal abscess managed were included in the study. 13 cases were operated primarily with EnDCR. Rest of the 18 cases was managed conventionally by incision and drainage and later by an external approach of DCR. Swelling disappeared intraoperatively in all EnDCR cases while medial canthal edema and erythema completely reduced within 2-3 days post-operatively. While in incision and drainage swelling disappeared partially intraoperatively and repeated draining was needed on the 2nd and 3rd day. The mean VAS score on first post operative day was 3.14 in group A and was 4.64 in group B. Group A had faster pain relief with 92.3% improvement in epiphora while group B had slower pain relief but epiphora remained. Mean intraoperative blood was 65 ml in group A and minimal in group B. Primary EnDCR is successful as a procedure of choice for acute dacryocystitis with abscess preventing further episodes of abscess formation and epiphora in the patients. We recommend EnDCR as the treatment of choice for acute dacryocystitis with lacrimal abscesses. PMID:24427674

  19. High extracellular levels of potassium and trace metals in human brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Daniel; Ivanovic, Jugoslav; Mariussen, Espen; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2015-03-01

    Brain abscesses frequently cause symptoms such as seizures, delirium, paresis and sensory deficits that could reflect brain edema, increased intracranial pressure, or tissue destruction. However, it is also possible that pus constituents could disturb neuronal function in the surrounding brain tissue. In pus from 16 human brain abscesses, extracellular potassium ([K(+)]o) was 10.6 ± 4.8 mmol/L (mean ± SD; maximum value 22.0 mmol/L). In cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), [K(+)]o was 2.7 ± 0.6 mmol/L (N = 14; difference from pus p < 0.001), which is similar to previous control values for [K(+)]o in CSF and brain parenchyma. Zinc and iron were >40-fold higher in pus than in CSF; calcium, copper, manganese, and chromium were also higher, whereas sodium and magnesium were similar. Pus from 10 extracerebral abscesses (empyemas) also had higher [K(+)]o, zinc, iron, calcium, copper, manganese, and chromium than did CSF. Brain abscess [K(+)]o was significantly higher than serum potassium (3.8 ± 0.5 mmol/L; p = 0.0001), indicating that the elevated abscess [K(+)]o originated from damaged cells (e.g. brain cells and leukocytes), not from serum. High [K(+)]o could depolarize neurons, high levels of zinc could inhibit glutamate and GABA receptors, and high levels of iron and copper could cause oxidative damage, all of which could contribute to neuronal dysfunction in brain abscess patients. PMID:25684071

  20. Pilot study to evaluate the role of Mycoplasma species in cat bite abscesses.

    PubMed

    Torres-Henderson, Camille; Hesser, Jeff; Hyatt, Doreene R; Hawley, Jennifer; Brewer, Melissa; Lappin, Michael R

    2014-12-01

    Mycoplasma species are common inhabitants of the feline oral cavity, and so likely contaminate many cat bite abscesses. The objectives of this study were to determine whether Mycoplasma species are common contaminants of cat bite abscesses and whether they are are associated with β-lactam-resistant clinical disease. Twenty-six privately owned cats with clinical evidence of an abscess suspected to be from a cat bite were included in the study. Samples from each cat were evaluated by aerobic and anaerobic culture, as well as Mycoplasma species culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All cats were initially treated with appropriate wound management and were administered an antibiotic of the β-lactam class (amoxicillin, amoxicillin clavulanate or cefovecin sodium). Mycoplasma species DNA was amplified by PCR from 4/26 samples (15.4%); one of these cases was concurrently culture positive. Adequate DNA for sequencing was present for 2/4 positive PCR samples; one was most homologous with Mycoplasma felis, and the other was most homologous with Mycoplasma equigenitalium and Mycoplasma elephantis. Of the 26 cats, 25 responded to the initial treatment by day 7. The cat that failed initial treatment was positive for M equigenitalium or M elephantis DNA on days 0 and 12, and ultimately responded to administration of enrofloxacin and clindamycin. The results suggest that while Mycoplasma species can contaminate cat bite abscesses, routine wound management and β-lactam antibiotic therapy is adequate for treatment in most cases of abscess. However, as Mycoplasma species infections do not respond to β-lactam class antibiotic therapy, these organisms should be on the differential list for cats with abscesses that fail treatment with this antibiotic class. PMID:24643287

  1. Citrobacter koseri Brain Abscess in the Neonatal Rat: Survival and Replication within Human and Rat Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Stacy M.; Pollack, Harvey A.; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Badger, Julie L.

    2003-01-01

    A unique feature of Citrobacter koseri is the extremely high propensity to initiate brain abscesses during neonatal meningitis. Previous clinical reports and studies on infant rats have documented many Citrobacter-filled macrophages within the ventricles and brain abscesses. It has been hypothesized that intracellular survival and replication within macrophages may be a mechanism by which C. koseri subverts the host response and elicits chronic infection, resulting in brain abscess formation. In this study, we showed that C. koseri causes meningitis and brain abscesses in the neonatal rat model, and we utilized histology and magnetic resonance imaging technology to visualize brain abscess formation. Histology and electron microscopy (EM) revealed that macrophages (and not fibroblasts, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, or neurons) were the primary target for long-term C. koseri infection. To better understand C. koseri pathogenesis, we have characterized the interactions of C. koseri with human macrophages. We found that C. koseri survives and replicates within macrophages in vitro and that uptake of C. koseri increases in the presence of human pooled serum in a dose-dependent manner. EM studies lend support to the hypothesis that C. koseri uses morphologically different methods of uptake to enter macrophages. FcγRI blocking experiments show that this receptor primarily facilitates the entry of opsonized C. koseri into macrophages. Further, confocal fluorescence microscopy demonstrates that C. koseri survives phagolysosomal fusion and that more than 90% of intracellular C. koseri organisms are colocalized within phagolysosomes. The ability of C. koseri to survive phagolysosome fusion and replicate within macrophages may contribute to the establishment of chronic central nervous system infection including brain abscesses.   PMID:14500508

  2. Bilateral endogenous Candida albicans subretinal abscess with suspected mixed bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yusuke; Sato, Yukihiro; Yoshida, Atsushi; Kawashima, Hidetoshi; Kaburaki, Toshikatsu; Gomi, Harumi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Candida albicans subretinal abscess is extremely rare. To our knowledge, only one unilateral case has been reported. Herein, we report one bilateral case. Mixed bacterial infection was also suspected based on broad-range real-time polymerase chain reaction. Methods A 64-year-old man being treated with oral corticosteroids for interstitial pneumonia visited us for visual loss in the left eye. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/20 in the right eye and 8/200 in the left eye. Funduscopy revealed round yellowish-white subretinal lesions with retinal hemorrhage in both eyes. Results Broad-range polymerase chain reaction of the vitreous fluid from the left eye showed a high copy count of bacterial 16s ribosome RNA. Despite large doses of antibiotics, the abscess expanded and vision decreased to light perception in the left eye. Exenteration of the left eye was performed followed by microscopic examination showing Gram-negative bacilli, and C. albicans was also cultured. Antibiotics and the maximum doses of antifungal drugs were administered. However, the abscess in the right eye expanded, and BCVA decreased to 2/200. Vitrectomy and silicone oil tamponade were performed. Vitreous fluid culture revealed C. albicans. At 16 months follow-up, BCVA was stable at 4/200 with healing of the subretinal abscess under silicone oil. Conclusion Since C. albicans subretinal abscess is extremely rare and there was a concurrent mixed bacterial infection, diagnostic procedures in our bilateral case were more complicated than usual. C. albicans infection should be included in the differential diagnosis of subretinal abscesses. PMID:25378901

  3. Nonsurgical management of multiple splenic abscesses in an obese patient that underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Schiavo, Luigi; Scalera, Giuseppe; De Sena, Gabriele; Ciorra, Francesca R; Pagliano, Pasquale; Barbarisi, Alfonso

    2015-10-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is a surgical weight-loss procedure. Splenic abscess is a rare complication of SG. Four cases of splenic abscess after SG have been reported, all managed by surgical intervention. We report the first documented case of multiple splenic abscesses following SG managed conservatively by an integrated medical treatment. PMID:26509027

  4. Idiopathic pontine Streptococcus salivarius abscess in an immunocompetent patient: management lessons through case illustration and literature review.

    PubMed

    Mandapat, Aimee Luna; Eddleman, Christopher S; Bissonnette, Mei Lin; Batjer, H Hunt; Zembower, Teresa R

    2011-12-01

    A 55-y-old woman with no previous medical history presented with a 3-day history of progressive headache, nausea, emesis, right-sided facial numbness, and right-sided extremity weakness. Serial magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated rapid enlargement of a left-sided ring-enhancing dorsal pontine lesion with an exophytic portion, raising concern for an abscess. A stereotactically guided left-sided retrosigmoid craniotomy for abscess incision and decompression was performed given the rapid progression of her neurological deficits. Streptococcus salivarius was isolated from the intra-operative samples. After an extensive evaluation, no source for the S. salivarius was identified. Solitary brainstem abscesses are uncommon intracranial infections with high morbidity and mortality. Patients can present with non-specific symptoms and often have no previous medical history. Since 1974, 40 patients with solitary brainstem abscess have survived to hospital discharge. We outline management strategies for solitary brainstem abscess based on a literature review of survivors. PMID:21756019

  5. Successful medical management of multifocal psoas abscess following cesarean section: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Saylam, K; Anaf, V; Kirkpatrick, C

    2002-05-10

    The psoas abscess is a rare complication in obstetric and gynaecology. Two types of psoas abscess are recognized. The primary psoas abscess is generally following haematogenous dissemination of an infectious agent and the source is usually occult. The most frequently isolated pathogen is Staphylococcus aureus. On the other hand, the secondary abscess is the result of local extension of an infectious process near the psoas muscle. We report the case of a patient who develops a bacteremia from an infected cesarean section wound. The complications were thigh and psoas abscesses with left sacroiliitis. Medical management with prolonged antibiotherapy permit clinical, biological and radiological improvement. Although it required a long hospital stay, medical treatment alone was effective. More experience is required to determine which therapeutic option: medical treatment and/or surgery, is the best choice for this type of complication. PMID:11950495

  6. Wernicke's encephalopathy in a patient with masticator and parapharyngeal space abscess: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chin, Young-Jai; Yoon, Kyu-Ho; Park, Kwan-Soo; Park, Jae-An; Woo, Min-Ho

    2016-04-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a fatal neurological disease caused by thiamine deficiency. Many reports indicate that Wernicke's encephalopathy is caused by malnutrition. We report the case of a 79-year-old female patient who had a left masticator space and parapharyngeal space abscess who was diagnosed with Wernicke's encephalopathy. She reported problems while eating due to the presence of the abscess, but the true quantities of food she was ingesting were never assessed. Clinicians have a responsibility to provide adequate nutritional support by ensuring that patients receive adequate nutrition. Clinicians should also keep in mind that Wernicke's encephalopathy may occur in patients who experienced prolonged periods of malnutrition. PMID:27162754

  7. Wernicke's encephalopathy in a patient with masticator and parapharyngeal space abscess: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a fatal neurological disease caused by thiamine deficiency. Many reports indicate that Wernicke's encephalopathy is caused by malnutrition. We report the case of a 79-year-old female patient who had a left masticator space and parapharyngeal space abscess who was diagnosed with Wernicke's encephalopathy. She reported problems while eating due to the presence of the abscess, but the true quantities of food she was ingesting were never assessed. Clinicians have a responsibility to provide adequate nutritional support by ensuring that patients receive adequate nutrition. Clinicians should also keep in mind that Wernicke's encephalopathy may occur in patients who experienced prolonged periods of malnutrition. PMID:27162754

  8. [An unusual jugal abscess after third molar extraction: a complication of hemostatic wax].

    PubMed

    Brignol, L; Guyot, L; Richard, O; Chossegros, C

    2007-04-01

    Bleeding is a common complication after third molar extraction. Hemostatic agents can be helpful in controlling intraoperative bleeding. Infection is another common complication. Horseley's wax is frequently used for bone surgery and less often for dental surgery. We report an unusual case of abscess formation in the jaw after third molar extraction. Surgical exploration of the abscess disclosed the presence of surgical wax in the center of a foreign body granuloma. We discuss the use of surgical wax and other local hemostatic agents and the subsequent risk of complications. PMID:17350058

  9. A middle-aged lady with a pyogenic liver abscess caused by Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Law, Siu-Tong; Lee, Ming Kai

    2012-01-01

    The pyogenic liver abscess caused by Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is a rare, but rapidly fatal infection. It is usually associated with malignancy and immunosuppression. We report the case of 50-year-old lady with the secondary liver metastases from rectal cancer presented with fever and epigastric pain. The identification of Gram-positive bacilli septicaemia, the presence of gas-forming liver abscess and massive intravascular hemolysis should lead to the suspicion of C. perfringens infection. Here we review twenty cases published since 1990 and their clinical features are discussed. The importance of ”an aggressive treatment policy” with multidisciplinary team approach is emphasized. PMID:22993668

  10. Vulvar Abscess Caused by Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) in a Postmenopausal Woman

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Kim, Soo Ah; Heo, Gyeong-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the vulva can present a complex differential to the gynecologist, ranging from superficial skin infections to lifethreatening necrotizing fasciitis. Recognition and timely treatment remain universal to skin and soft-tissue infections as the subcutaneous anatomy of the vulva can facilitate rapid spread to other tissues with significant morbidity and mortality. Employing a multidisciplinary team approach to care for vulvar cellulitis and abscess can guide treatment from antibiotic therapies to more aggressive surgical debridement. In this report, we describe a case of vulvar abscess caused by Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a postmenopausal woman with underlying diseases of bronchiectasis and atelectasis. PMID:27617247

  11. An unnoticed origin of fever: periapical tooth abscess. Three case reports and literature review.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Ferhat; Karagöz, Ergenekon; Arslan, Birsen Yigit; Mert, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Dental infections may lead to severe local or systemic infections such as endocarditis, brain abscesses and mediastinitis. Fever may be the only symptom. We aim to highlight dental/odontogenic abscesses as the occult source of unexplained fever by reporting on three cases and reviewing the relevant literature. Early dental evaluation and referral of patients with persistent fever (even without any oral symptoms) to a dentist plays a critical role in preventing unnecessary, time-consuming and high-cost further diagnostic tests and invasive procedures. A simple panoramic dental radiography may suffice to establish the diagnosis. PMID:27031901

  12. Differentiation of posterior pararenal space infection from psoas abscess by gallium imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, A.; Mishkin, F.; Delgado, J.

    1983-01-01

    Three of four patients whose cases fit the clinical description of psoas abscess proved on gallium imaging to have infection in the posterior pararenal space sparing the psoas muscle. This space provides a route for spread of infection connecting the spine, the anterior abdominal wall, the scrotum, the anterior thigh, and the gluteal region as demonstrated by the cases presented. Clinical differentiation between posterior pararenal space infection and psoas abscesses is difficult and CT studies may not demonstrate the process when the psoas space is not involved.

  13. Diagnosis of brainstem abscess in the cerebritis stage by magnetic resonance imaging--case report.

    PubMed

    Adachi, J; Uki, J; Kazumoto, K; Takeda, F

    1995-07-01

    A 52-year-old male presented with a brainstem abscess manifesting as high fever, diplopia, and left hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid showed the lesion as a ring-like enhanced mass consisting of a necrotic center with surrounding edema, whereas postcontrast computed tomography revealed no such confirmatory findings. He was treated with antibiotics as the lesion had been detected in the acute cerebritis stage. Serial MR images showed that the lesion decreased remarkably in size. MR imaging can detect brain abscess in the earliest inflammatory stage. PMID:7477693

  14. Brain Abscess in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) with a Cephalic Implant

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Mathias; Berry, Kristy; McCort, Holly; Reuter, Jon D

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of brain abscess after craniotomy and the placement of a recording chamber for electrophysiologic records in an adult rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) enrolled in visual research. Approximately 2 wk after surgery, the macaque presented with nonspecific gastrointestinal signs and showed no evidence of fever, neurologic deficits, increased intracranial pressure, suggestive alterations in the CBC, or abnormal changes in the recording chamber. The macaque responded to symptomatic and antibiotic treatment and showed no behavioral or abnormal clinical signs for 3 wk before collapsing suddenly. The macaque was euthanized, and pathologic evaluation revealed a large brain abscess immediately under the original craniotomy. PMID:24209974

  15. Legionellosis and Lung Abscesses: Contribution of Legionella Quantitative Real-Time PCR to an Adapted Followup

    PubMed Central

    Descours, G.; Tellini, C.; Flamens, C.; Philit, F.; Celard, M.; Etienne, J.; Lina, G.; Jarraud, S.

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of severe Legionnaires' disease (LD) complicated by a lung abscess in an immunocompetent patient who required ECMO therapy and thoracic surgery. The results of repeated Legionella quantitative real-time PCR performed on both sera and respiratory samples correlated with the LD severity and the poor clinical outcome. Moreover, the PCR allowed for the detection of Legionella DNA in the lung abscess specimen, which was negative when cultured for Legionella. This case report provides a logical basis for further investigations to examine whether the Legionella quantitative PCR could improve the assessment of LD severity and constitute a prognostic marker. PMID:23862082

  16. Cerebral abscess caused by Capnocytophaga spp in an immunocompetent subject: case report.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, B; Galgani, I; Trezzi, M; Toti, M

    2008-09-01

    Capnocytophaga spp are Gram-negative bacteria commonly identified as oral saprophytes of humans, dogs and cats; they rarely cause invasive infections in immunocompetent subjects. This case report is about a rare case of cerebral abscess caused by Capnocytophaga spp in an immunocompetent subject who had no risk factors for Capnocytophaga invasive infections (oral alterations, traumatic or iatrogenic lesions of pharynx and/or oesophagus, recent dog bite). We also report Capnocytophaga spp naturally resistant to metronidazole, this being the cause of inefficacy of this drug usually included in empiric chemotherapy of cerebral abscess. PMID:18843215

  17. Carotid Sheath Abscess Caused by a Tooth Decay Infection on the Opposite Side

    PubMed Central

    Tuncturk, F. Ruya; Uzun, Lokman; Kalcioglu, M. Tayyar; Egilmez, Oguz Kadir; Timurlenk, Emine; Erguven, Muferet

    2015-01-01

    Deep neck infections are mortal diseases that need emergency treatment. It can occur at any age but usually in pediatric ages. In this report, a left cervical carotid space abscess of a pediatric patient was discussed. It was interesting that the only origin of the left carotid sheath abscess was right inferior first molar tooth decay. Right neck spaces were all clean. Patient had no immunosupression and also there were no congenital masses such as branchial cleft cysts, foreign bodies, or masses suspicious for malignancies in cervical ultrasound and MRI. We discussed this rare condition under the light of the literature. PMID:25878916

  18. Abdominal abscess due to NDM-1-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in Spain.

    PubMed

    Oteo, Jesús; Domingo-García, Diego; Fernández-Romero, Sara; Saez, David; Guiu, Alba; Cuevas, Oscar; Lopez-Brea, Manuel; Campos, José

    2012-06-01

    We describe a clinical case of an abdominal abscess due to NDM-1-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in a 35-year-old Spanish patient after hospitalization in India for perforated appendicitis and peritonitis. The strain belonged to the MLST type 231 and had multiple additional antibiotic resistance genes such as bla(CTX-M-15), armA methylase, aac(6')-Ib-cr, dfrA12, sul1 and qnrB and lack of porin genes ompK35 and ompK36. The patient was cured after abscess drainage. PMID:22383442

  19. First Described Case of Group B Streptococcus Pelvic Abscess in a Patient with No Medical Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Dwarki, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Background. Group B Streptococcus is an organism that commonly infects a wide range of hosts including infants in the first week of life, pregnant women, and older age adults as well as adults with underlying medical comorbidities. Case. Large pelvic abscess in a nonpregnant patient found to be caused by Group B Streptococcus was treated successfully with IR guided drainage and antibiotics. Conclusion. Though rare, GBS can still be a cause of invasive infection even in individuals who are nonpregnant and have no underlying comorbidities. Empiric antibiotic coverage for this organism should be kept in mind when treating an abscess. PMID:27529043

  20. A case of liver abscess with systemic infection caused by Fusobacterium.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Naoki; Okai, Ken; Takahashi, Atsushi; Abe, Kazumichi; Kanno, Yukiko; Hayashi, Manabu; Imaizumi, Hiromichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2016-05-01

    A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of an abnormal shadow on chest X-ray. Blood testing showed elevated levels of C-reactive protein and white blood cells. Computed tomography revealed multilocular masses of the right hepatic lobe, reticulonodular shadowing on both lungs, left kidney masses, and aortic arch aneurysm. Fusobacterium nucleatum was isolated from the hepatic abscess after percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Because of severe dental caries, he was diagnosed with liver abscess caused by dental infection with F. nucleatum. Administration of cefmetazole and meropenem was not effective; however, he showed remarkable improvement after treatment with metronidazole and continuous drainage. PMID:27151479