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Sample records for absolue pour equilibrer

  1. Equilibration of quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrelly, Terry

    2016-07-01

    Finding equilibration times is a major unsolved problem in physics with few analytical results. Here we look at equilibration times for quantum gases of bosons and fermions in the regime of negligibly weak interactions, a setting which not only includes paradigmatic systems such as gases confined to boxes, but also Luttinger liquids and the free superfluid Hubbard model. To do this, we focus on two classes of measurements: (i) coarse-grained observables, such as the number of particles in a region of space, and (ii) few-mode measurements, such as phase correlators. We show that, in this setting, equilibration occurs quite generally despite the fact that the particles are not interacting. Furthermore, for coarse-grained measurements the timescale is generally at most polynomial in the number of particles N, which is much faster than previous general upper bounds, which were exponential in N. For local measurements on lattice systems, the timescale is typically linear in the number of lattice sites. In fact, for one-dimensional lattices, the scaling is generally linear in the length of the lattice, which is optimal. Additionally, we look at a few specific examples, one of which consists of N fermions initially confined on one side of a partition in a box. The partition is removed and the fermions equilibrate extremely quickly in time O(1/N).

  2. Holographic Equilibration of Nonrelativistic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürsoy, Umut; Jansen, Aron; Sybesma, Watse; Vandoren, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    We study far-from-equilibrium physics of strongly interacting plasmas at criticality and zero charge density for a wide range of dynamical scaling exponents z in d dimensions using holographic methods. In particular, we consider homogeneous isotropization of asymptotically Lifshitz black branes with full backreaction. We find stable evolution and equilibration times that exhibit small dependence of z and are of the order of the inverse temperature. Performing a quasinormal mode analysis, we find a corresponding narrow range of relaxation times, fully characterized by the fraction z /(d -1 ). For z ≥d -1 , equilibration is overdamped, whereas for z

  3. Strongly interacting parton matter equilibration

    SciTech Connect

    Ozvenchuk, V.; Linnyk, O.; Bratkovskaya, E.; Gorenstein, M.; Cassing, W.

    2012-07-15

    We study the kinetic and chemical equilibration in 'infinite' parton matter within the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics transport approach. The 'infinite' matter is simulated within a cubic box with periodic boundary conditions initialized at different energy densities. Particle abundances, kinetic energy distributions, and the detailed balance of the off-shell quarks and gluons in the strongly-interacting quarkgluon plasma are addressed and discussed.

  4. Equilibration of quantum systems and subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Anthony J.

    2011-05-01

    We unify two recent results concerning equilibration in quantum theory. We first generalize a proof of Reimann (2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 190403), that the expectation value of 'realistic' quantum observables will equilibrate under very general conditions, and discuss its implications for the equilibration of quantum systems. We then use this to re-derive an independent result of Linden et al (2009 Phys. Rev. E 79 061103), showing that small subsystems generically evolve to an approximately static equilibrium state. Finally, we consider subspaces in which all initial states effectively equilibrate to the same state.

  5. Equilibration Influence on Jet Energy Loss

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Luan; Wang Enke

    2010-05-12

    With the initial conditions in the chemical non-equilibrated medium and Bjorken expanding medium at RHIC, we investigate the consequence for parton evolution. With considering the parton equilibration, we obtain the time dependence of the opacity when the jet propagates through the QGP medium. The parton equilibration affect the jet energy loss with detailed balance evidently. Both parton energy loss from stimulated emission in the chemical non-equilibrated expanding medium and in Bjorken expanding medium are linear dependent on the propagating distance rather than square dependent in the static medium. This will increase the energy and propagating distance dependence of the parton energy loss.

  6. Equilibrator: Modeling Chemical Equilibria with Excel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Griend, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    Equilibrator is a Microsoft Excel program for learning about chemical equilibria through modeling, similar in function to EQS4WIN, which is no longer supported and does not work well with newer Windows operating systems. Similar to EQS4WIN, Equilibrator allows the user to define a system with temperature, initial moles, and then either total…

  7. Incompletely compacted equilibrated ordinary chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Sasso, M.R.; Macke, R.J.; Boesenberg, J.S.; Britt, D.T.; Rovers, M.L.; Ebel, D.S.; Friedrich, J.M.

    2010-01-22

    We document the size distributions and locations of voids present within five highly porous equilibrated ordinary chondrites using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray microtomography ({mu}CT) and helium pycnometry. We found total porosities ranging from {approx}10 to 20% within these chondrites, and with {mu}CT we show that up to 64% of the void space is located within intergranular voids within the rock. Given the low (S1-S2) shock stages of the samples and the large voids between mineral grains, we conclude that these samples experienced unusually low amounts of compaction and shock loading throughout their entire post accretionary history. With Fe metal and FeS metal abundances and grain size distributions, we show that these chondrites formed naturally with greater than average porosities prior to parent body metamorphism. These materials were not 'fluffed' on their parent body by impact-related regolith gardening or events caused by seismic vibrations. Samples of all three chemical types of ordinary chondrites (LL, L, H) are represented in this study and we conclude that incomplete compaction is common within the asteroid belt.

  8. Temperature equilibration in strongly coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L. E.; Chang, C. H.; Snell, C. M.; Daughton, W. S.; Csanak, G. Y.

    2002-01-01

    A laser-driven experiment investigating electron-ion equilibration in strongly coupled plasma was performed in 1995. At that time, standard estimates for the electron-ion equilibration time were two-to-three orders of magnitude faster than observed experimentally. As a result, the electron-ion equilibration time was taken as a fitting parameter to understand the experimental results. Based upon guidance from nonequilibrium molecular dynamics mixture calculations 121 and comparison with strongly coupled resistivity experiments, we have developed a consistent binary collision model to understand the electron-ion equilibration experiment. The model has been implemented in a newly developed multi-species, multi-temperature physics code, which was used for simulation of the experiment. The resulting electron-ion exchange rate is close to the experiment, which is about three orders-of-magnitude slower than given by standard estimates, most of which is the result of a modified coulomb logarithm.

  9. Transport in partially equilibrated inhomogeneous quantum wires.

    SciTech Connect

    Levchenko, A.; Micklitz, T.; Rech, J.; Matveev, K. A.; Materials Science Division; Freie Univ. Berlin; Centre de Physique Theorique

    2010-01-01

    We study transport properties of weakly interacting one-dimensional electron systems including on an equal footing thermal equilibration due to three-particle collisions and the effects of large-scale inhomogeneities. We show that equilibration in an inhomogeneous quantum wire is characterized by the competition of interaction processes which reduce the electrons total momentum and such which change the number of right- and left-moving electrons. We find that the combined effect of interactions and inhomogeneities can dramatically increase the resistance of the wire. In addition, we find that the interactions strongly affect the thermoelectric properties of inhomogeneous wires and calculate their thermal conductance, thermopower, and Peltier coefficient.

  10. Multisystem Temperature Equilibration and the Second Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leff, Harvey S.

    1977-01-01

    Shows that the entropy change during the temperature equilibration of an isolated collection of systems which may exchange heat (but not work) energy is positive when the constant-volume heat capacity of each system is a non-negative function of the temperature. (MLH)

  11. Theorie de la Levitation Radiative a L'equilibre dans les Etoiles Naines Blanches Chaudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chayer, Pierre

    1995-01-01

    Les resultats de nouveaux calculs detailles de levitation radiative dans des naines blanches chaudes utilisant la base de donnees atomiques TOPBASE sont presentes. Des accelerations radiatives et des abondances d'equilibre ont ete calculees pour C, N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ar, Ca, et Fe, sur des grilles de modeles d'enveloppes stellaires riches en hydrogene et riches en helium. La grille des modeles de DA a des gravites telles que log g = 7.0, 7.5, 8.0, et 8.5, et couvre les temperatures effectives pour lesquelles 100,000K >= T_ {rm eff} >= 20,000K par sauts de 2,500K. La grille des modeles de DO/DB est similaire mais se prolonge a T_{rm eff } = 130,000K. Les resultats d'abondances d'equilibre de Ni dans des DA utilisant la base de donnees de Kurucz sont aussi presentes. Nous discutons dans les moindres details de la physique incluse dans les calculs afin de fournir une bonne comprehension physique de la levitation radiative sous les conditions rencontrees dans les naines blanches. Nous discutons aussi de la forme et de la dependance en fonction de la profondeur des reservoirs des elements, crees par un equilibre entre l'acceleration radiative et la gravite locale effective dans differentes enveloppes stellaires. Nous soulignons le role important joue dans la morphologie de ces reserviors par les etats d'ionisation dominants se trouvant dans la configuration gaz noble. Nos resultats centraux sont presentes sous forme de figures montrant le comportement de l'abondance photospherique estimee pour chaque element en fonction de la temperature effective et de la gravite de surface. Nous apportons egalement des ameliorations aux calculs de levitation radiative en utilisant une approche de modeles d'atmospheres pour les etoiles riches en hydrogene. Nous mettons l'emphase, en particulier, sur le role des traces d'elements lourds qui peuvent etre presents dans le plasma. Nous utilisons une table d'opacite monochromatique detaillee calculee pour un plasma compose de H

  12. Electric field quench, equilibration, and universal behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri-Sharifi, S.; Ali-Akbari, M.; Sepangi, H. R.

    2015-06-01

    We study electric field quench in N =2 strongly coupled gauge theory, using the AdS/CFT correspondence. To do so, we consider the aforementioned system which is subjected to a time-dependent electric field indicating an out of equilibrium system. Defining the equilibration time teq , at which the system relaxes to its final equilibrium state after injecting the energy, we find that the rescaled equilibration time k-1teq decreases as the transition time k increases. Therefore, we expect that for sufficiently large transition time, k →∞, the relaxation of the system to its final equilibrium can be an adiabatic process. On the other hand, we observe a universal behavior for the fast quenches, k ≪1 , meaning that the rescaled equilibration time does not depend on the final value of the time-dependent electric field. Our calculations generalized to systems in various dimensions also confirm the universalization process which seems to be a typical feature of all strongly coupled gauge theories that admit a gravitational dual.

  13. Equilibration of an Atmosphere by Geostrophic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Malte F.

    A major question for climate studies is to quantify the role of turbulent eddy fluxes in maintaining the observed atmospheric mean state. It has been argued that eddy fluxes keep the mid-latitude atmosphere in a state that is marginally critical to the deepest mode of baroclinic instability, which provide's a powerful constraint on the response of the atmosphere to changes in external forcing. A similar criterion does, however not hold in the Southern Ocean, a region whose dynamics are otherwise very similar to the mid-latitude atmosphere. This thesis resolves this apparent contradiction, using a combination of theoretical considerations and eddy-resolving numerical simulations. It is shown that the adjustment of the extra-tropical troposphere to states of marginal criticality does not follow from a fundamental constraint, but is rather the result of the particular parameters characterizing Earth's troposphere. Both marginally critical and strongly supercritical zonal mean flows can be obtained in planetary atmospheres if external parameters are varied. We argue that changes in the equilibrated mean state over a wide range of simulations can better be understood in terms of a balance between the diabatic forcing and the eddy driven overturning circulation. Using a diffusive closure for the eddy flux of potential vorticity, we can relate the eddy-driven overturning transport to properties of the mean flow, and derive scaling relations for both the baroclinicity and vertical stratification of the equilibrated state. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs mit.edu)

  14. Abrupt percolation in small equilibrated networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsoukas, Themis

    2015-05-01

    Networks can exhibit an abrupt transition in the form of a spontaneous self-organization of a sizable fraction of the population into a giant component of connected members. This behavior has been demonstrated in random graphs under suppressive rules that passively or actively attempt to delay the formation of the giant cluster. We show that suppressive rules are not a necessary condition for a sharp transition at the percolation threshold. Rather, a finite system with aggressive tendency to form a giant cluster may exhibit an instability at the percolation threshold that is relieved through an abrupt and discontinuous transition to the stable branch. We develop the theory for a class of equilibrated networks that produce this behavior and find that the discontinuous jump is especially pronounced in small networks but disappears when the size of the system is infinite.

  15. Equilibration: Developing the Hard Core of the Piagetian Research Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowell, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Argues that the status of the concept of equilibration is classified by considering Piagetian theory as a research program in the sense elaborated in 1974 by Lakatos. A pilot study was made to examine the precision and testability of equilibration in Piaget's 1977 model.(Author/RH)

  16. Weak and strong coupling equilibration in nonabelian gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keegan, Liam; Kurkela, Aleksi; Romatschke, Paul; van der Schee, Wilke; Zhu, Yan

    2016-04-01

    We present a direct comparison studying equilibration through kinetic theory at weak coupling and through holography at strong coupling in the same set-up. The set-up starts with a homogeneous thermal state, which then smoothly transitions through an out-of-equilibrium phase to an expanding system undergoing boost-invariant flow. This first apples-to-apples comparison of equilibration provides a benchmark for similar equilibration processes in heavy-ion collisions, where the equilibration mechanism is still under debate. We find that results at weak and strong coupling can be smoothly connected by simple, empirical power-laws for the viscosity, equilibration time and entropy production of the system.

  17. Weak and strong coupling equilibration in nonabelian gauge theories

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Keegan, Liam; Kurkela, Aleksi; Romatschke, Paul; van der Schee, Wilke; Zhu, Yan

    2016-04-06

    In this study, we present a direct comparison studying equilibration through kinetic theory at weak coupling and through holography at strong coupling in the same set-up. The set-up starts with a homogeneous thermal state, which then smoothly transitions through an out-of-equilibrium phase to an expanding system undergoing boost-invariant flow. This first apples-to-apples comparison of equilibration provides a benchmark for similar equilibration processes in heavy-ion collisions, where the equilibration mechanism is still under debate. We find that results at weak and strong coupling can be smoothly connected by simple, empirical power-laws for the viscosity, equilibration time and entropy production of themore » system.« less

  18. Shock Re-equilibration of Fluid Inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, M. E. Elwood; Horz, F.; Bodnar, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    Fluid inclusions (microscopic volumes of fluid trapped within minerals as they precipitate) are extremely common in terrestrial minerals formed under a wide range of geological conditions from surface evaporite deposits to kimberlite pipes. While fluid inclusions in terrestrial rocks are nearly ubiquitous, only a few fluid inclusion-bearing meteorites have been documented. The scarcity of fluid inclusions in meteoritic materials may be a result of (a) the absence of fluids when the mineral was formed on the meteorite parent body or (b) the destruction of fluid inclusions originally contained in meteoritic materials by subsequent shock metamorphism. However, the effects of impact events on pre-existing fluid inclusions trapped in target and projectile rocks has received little study. Fluid inclusions trapped prior to the shock event may be altered (re-equilibrated) or destroyed due to the high pressures, temperatures, and strain rates associated with impact events. By examining the effects of shock deformation on fluid inclusion properties and textures we may be able to better constrain the pressure-temperature path experienced by terrestrial and meteoritic shocked materials and also gain a clearer understanding of why fluid inclusions are rarely found in meteorite samples.

  19. Equilibrating temperaturelike variables in jammed granular subsystems.

    PubMed

    Puckett, James G; Daniels, Karen E

    2013-02-01

    Although jammed granular systems are athermal, several thermodynamiclike descriptions have been proposed which make quantitative predictions about the distribution of volume and stress within a system and provide a corresponding temperaturelike variable. We perform experiments with an apparatus designed to generate a large number of independent, jammed, two-dimensional configurations. Each configuration consists of a single layer of photoelastic disks supported by a gentle layer of air. New configurations are generated by cyclically dilating, mixing, and then recompacting the system through a series of boundary displacements. Within each configuration, a bath of particles surrounds a smaller subsystem of particles with a different interparticle friction coefficient than the bath. The use of photoelastic particles permits us to find all particle positions as well as the vector forces at each interparticle contact. By comparing the temperaturelike quantities in both systems, we find compactivity (conjugate to the volume) does not equilibrate between the systems, while the angoricity (conjugate to the stress) does. Both independent components of the angoricity are linearly dependent on the hydrostatic pressure, in agreement with predictions of the stress ensemble. PMID:23414047

  20. Thermal, chemical and spectral equilibration in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almási, Gábor András; Wolf, György

    2015-11-01

    We have considered the equilibration in relativistic heavy ion collisions at energies 1-7 A GeV using our transport model. We applied periodic boundary conditions to close the system in a box. We found that the thermal equilibration takes place in the first 20-40 fm/c whose time is comparable to the duration of a heavy ion collision. The chemical equilibration is a much slower process and the system does not equilibrate in a heavy ion collision. We have shown that in the testparticle simulation of the Boltzmann equation the mass spectra of broad resonances follow instantaneously their in-medium spectral functions as expected from the Markovian approximation to the Kadanoff-Baym equations employed via the (local) gradient expansion.

  1. Vibrational pooling and constrained equilibration on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boney, E. T. D.

    In this thesis, we provide a statistical theory for the vibrational pooling and fluorescence time dependence observed in infrared laser excitation of CO on an NaCl surface. The pooling is seen in experiment and in computer simulations. In the theory, we assume a rapid equilibration of the quanta in the substrate and minimize the free energy subject to the constraint at any time t of a fixed number of vibrational quanta N(t). At low incident intensity, the distribution is limited to one-quantum exchanges with the solid and so the Debye frequency of the solid plays a key role in limiting the range of this one-quantum domain. The resulting inverted vibrational equilibrium population depends only on fundamental parameters of the oscillator (oe and oeχe) and the surface (oD and T). Possible applications and relation to the Treanor gas phase treatment are discussed. Unlike the solid phase system, the gas phase system has no Debye-constraining maximum. We discuss the possible distributions for arbitrary N-conserving diatom-surface pairs, and include application to H:Si(111) as an example. Computations are presented to describe and analyze the high levels of infrared laser induced vibrational excitation of a monolayer of absorbed 13CO on a NaCl(100) surface. The calculations confirm that, for situations where the Debye frequency limited n domain restriction approximately holds, the vibrational state population deviates from a Boltzmann population linearly in n, a result that we have derived earlier theoretically for a domain of n restricted to one-phonon transfers. This theoretically understood term, linear in n, dominates the Boltzmann term and is responsible for the inversion of the population of vibrational states, Pn We discuss the one-to-one relationship between N and gamma and the examine the state space of the new distribution function for varied gamma. We derive the Free Energy and effective chemical potential for the vibrational pool. We also find the anti

  2. Electron-ion temperature equilibration in warm dense tantalum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Doppner, T; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Hartley, N. J.; Peters, L.; Gregori, G.; Belancourt, P.; Drake, R. P.; Chapman, D. A.; et al

    2014-11-05

    We present measurements of electron-ion temperature equilibration in proton-heated tantalum, under warm dense matter conditions. Our results agree with theoretical predictions for metals calculated using input data from ab initio simulations. Furthermore, the fast relaxation observed in the experiment contrasts with much longer equilibration times found in proton heated carbon, indicating that the energy flow pathways in warm dense matter are far from being fully understood.

  3. Electron-ion temperature equilibration in warm dense tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Doppner, T; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Hartley, N. J.; Peters, L.; Gregori, G.; Belancourt, P.; Drake, R. P.; Chapman, D. A.; Richardson, S.; Gericke, D. O.; Glenzer, S. H.; Khaghani, D.; Neumayer, P.; Vorberger, J.; White, T. G.

    2014-11-05

    We present measurements of electron-ion temperature equilibration in proton-heated tantalum, under warm dense matter conditions. Our results agree with theoretical predictions for metals calculated using input data from ab initio simulations. Furthermore, the fast relaxation observed in the experiment contrasts with much longer equilibration times found in proton heated carbon, indicating that the energy flow pathways in warm dense matter are far from being fully understood.

  4. Canonical versus noncanonical equilibration dynamics of open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-Jie; An, Jun-Hong; Luo, Hong-Gang; Li, Yading; Oh, C H

    2014-08-01

    In statistical mechanics, any quantum system in equilibrium with its weakly coupled reservoir is described by a canonical state at the same temperature as the reservoir. Here, by studying the equilibration dynamics of a harmonic oscillator interacting with a reservoir, we evaluate microscopically the condition under which the equilibration to a canonical state is valid. It is revealed that the non-Markovian effect and the availability of a stationary state of the total system play a profound role in the equilibration. In the Markovian limit, the conventional canonical state can be recovered. In the non-Markovian regime, when the stationary state is absent, the system equilibrates to a generalized canonical state at an effective temperature; whenever the stationary state is present, the equilibrium state of the system cannot be described by any canonical state anymore. Our finding of the physical condition on such noncanonical equilibration might have significant impact on statistical physics. A physical scheme based on circuit QED is proposed to test our results. PMID:25215704

  5. Equilibrating dynamics in quenched Bose gases: Characterizing multiple time regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rançon, A.; Levin, K.

    2014-08-01

    We address the physics of equilibration in ultracold atomic gases following a quench of the interaction parameter. Our work is based on a bath model which generates damping of the bosonic excitations. We illustrate this dissipative behavior through the momentum distribution of the excitations nk, observing that larger k modes have shorter relaxation times τ (k); they will equilibrate faster, as has been claimed in recent experimental work. We identify three time regimes. At short times nk exhibits oscillations; these are damped out at intermediate times where the system appears to be in a false or slowly converging equilibrium. Finally, at longer times, full equilibration occurs. This false equilibrium is, importantly, associated with the k dependence in τ (k) and has implications for experiment.

  6. A constraint solving approach to model reduction by tropical equilibration.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Sylvain; Fages, François; Radulescu, Ovidiu

    2014-01-01

    Model reduction is a central topic in systems biology and dynamical systems theory, for reducing the complexity of detailed models, finding important parameters, and developing multi-scale models for instance. While singular perturbation theory is a standard mathematical tool to analyze the different time scales of a dynamical system and decompose the system accordingly, tropical methods provide a simple algebraic framework to perform these analyses systematically in polynomial systems. The crux of these methods is in the computation of tropical equilibrations. In this paper we show that constraint-based methods, using reified constraints for expressing the equilibration conditions, make it possible to numerically solve non-linear tropical equilibration problems, out of reach of standard computation methods. We illustrate this approach first with the detailed reduction of a simple biochemical mechanism, the Michaelis-Menten enzymatic reaction model, and second, with large-scale performance figures obtained on the http://biomodels.net repository. PMID:25493095

  7. The rate of equilibration of viscous aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Meara, Simon; Topping, David O.; McFiggans, Gordon

    2016-04-01

    The proximity of atmospheric aerosol particles to equilibrium with their surrounding condensable vapours can substantially impact their transformations, fate and impacts and is the subject of vibrant research activity. In this study we first compare equilibration timescales estimated by three different models for diffusion through aerosol particles to assess any sensitivity to choice of model framework. Equilibration times for diffusion coefficients with varying dependencies on composition are compared for the first time. We show that even under large changes in the saturation ratio of a semi-volatile component (es) of 1-90 % predicted equilibration timescales are in agreement, including when diffusion coefficients vary with composition. For condensing water and a diffusion coefficient dependent on composition, a plasticising effect is observed, leading to a decreased estimated equilibration time with increasing final es. Above 60 % final es maximum equilibration times of around 1 s are estimated for comparatively large particles (10 µm) containing a relatively low diffusivity component (1 × 10-25 m2 s-1 in pure form). This, as well as other results here, questions whether particle-phase diffusion through water-soluble particles can limit hygroscopic growth in the ambient atmosphere. In the second part of this study, we explore sensitivities associated with the use of particle radius measurements to infer diffusion coefficient dependencies on composition using a diffusion model. Given quantified similarities between models used in this study, our results confirm considerations that must be taken into account when designing such experiments. Although quantitative agreement of equilibration timescales between models is found, further work is necessary to determine their suitability for assessing atmospheric impacts, such as their inclusion in polydisperse aerosol simulations.

  8. Des ballons pour demain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Régipa, R.

    A partir d'une théorie sur la détermination des formes et des contraintes globales d'un ballon de révolution, ou s'en rapprochant, une nouvelle famille de ballons a été définie. Les ballons actuels, dits de ``forme naturelle'', sont calculés en général pour une tension circonférencielle nulle. Ainsi, pour une mission donnée, la tension longitudinale et la forme de l'enveloppe sont strictement imposées. Les ballons de la nouvelle génération sont globalement cylindriques et leurs pôles sont réunis par un câble axial, chargé de transmettre une partie des efforts depuis le crochet (pôle inférieur), directement au pôle supérieur. De plus, la zone latérale cylindrique est soumise à un faible champ de tensions circonférencielles. Ainsi, deux paramètres permettent de faire évoluer la distribution des tensions et la forme de l'enveloppe: - la tension du câble de liaison entre pôles (ou la longueur de ce câble) - la tension circonférencielle moyenne désirée (ou le rayon du ballon). On peut donc calculer et réaliser: - soit des ballons de forme adaptée, comme les ballons à fond plat pour le bon fonctionnement des montgolfières infrarouge (projet MIR); - soit des ballons optimisés pour une bonne répartition des contraintes et une meilleure utilisation des matériaux d'enveloppe, pour l'ensemble des programmes stratosphériques. Il s'ensuit une économie sensible des coûts de fabrication, une fiabilité accrue du fonctionnement de ces ballons et une rendement opérationnel bien supérieur, permettant entre autres, d'envisager des vols à très haute altitude en matériaux très légers.

  9. Petrology of Two Itokawa Particles: Comparison with Equilibrated LL Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komatsu, M.; Mikouchi, T.; Arai, T.; Fagan, T. J.; Zolensky, M.; Hagiya, K.; Ohsumi, K.; Karouji, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A strong link between Itokawa particles and LL chondrites was confirmed by preliminary examinations of Hayabusa particles [e.g., 1, 2]. Both poorly equilibrated and highly equilibrated particles have been found among the grains returned from Itokawa [1], and it is suggested that they correspond to LL4 and LL5-6, respectively. Here we report the petrography of two Itokawa particles and TEM study of one, and compare them to Antarctic LL chondrites with variable petrologic types (LL4-LL7) in order to understand the metamorphic history of asteroid Itokawa.

  10. Mineral inclusions in diamond: temperature and pressure of equilibration.

    PubMed

    Meyer, H O; Tsai, H M

    1976-02-27

    Two distinct suites of minerals included in natural diamond occur and probably represent different physical and chemical conditions during diamond growth. Minerals of the ultramafic suite appear to have equilibrated in the range 1000 degrees to 1300 degrees C between 45 and 65 kilobars, whereas the temperature range for minerals of the eclogitic suite is 850 degrees to 1250 degrees C. At present, models relating the partitioning of magnesium and iron between coexisting phases are not sufficiently rigorous to determine a value for the pressure of equilibration of these eclogitic suite inclusions. PMID:17730997

  11. Equilibration in φ4 theory in 3+1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrizabalaga, Alejandro; Smit, Jan; Tranberg, Anders

    2005-07-01

    The process of equilibration in φ4 theory is investigated for a homogeneous system in 3+1 dimensions and a variety of out-of-equilibrium initial conditions, both in the symmetric and broken phase, by means of the 2PI effective action. Two Φ-derivable approximations including scattering effects are used: the two-loop and the basketball, the latter corresponding to the truncation of the 2PI effective action at O(λ2). The approach to equilibrium, as well as the kinetic and chemical equilibration is investigated.

  12. Picosecond conformational transition and equilibration of a cyclic peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredenbeck, Jens; Helbing, Jan; Sieg, Arne; Schrader, Tobias; Zinth, Wolfgang; Renner, Christian; Behrendt, Raymond; Moroder, Luis; Wachtveitl, Josef; Hamm, Peter

    2003-05-01

    Ultrafast IR spectroscopy is used to monitor the nonequilibrium backbone dynamics of a cyclic peptide in the amide I vibrational range with picosecond time resolution. A conformational change is induced by means of a photoswitch integrated into the peptide backbone. Although the main conformational change of the backbone is completed after only 20 ps, the subsequent equilibration in the new region of conformational space continues for times >16 ns. Relaxation and equilibration processes of the peptide backbone occur on a discrete hierarchy of time scales. Albeit possessing only a few conformational degrees of freedom compared with a protein, the peptide behaves highly nontrivially and provides insights into the complexity of fast protein folding.

  13. VIEW POURING PLATFORM SHOWING MOLD POURING JACKETS AND WEIGHTS AND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW POURING PLATFORM SHOWING MOLD POURING JACKETS AND WEIGHTS AND, IN THE FOREGROUND, SAND RETURN FROM THE SHAKEOUT ACTUATING A SIMPLE LEVER SYSTEM THAT ADDED FRESH WATER TO THE SAND IN PREPARATION FOR ITS REUSE. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Centerville Foundry, 101 Airport Road, Centreville, Bibb County, AL

  14. PARTON SATURATION, PRODUCTION, AND EQUILIBRATION IN HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS

    SciTech Connect

    VENUGOPALAN,R.

    1999-03-20

    Deeply inelastic scattering of electrons off nuclei can determine whether parton distributions saturate at HERA energies. If so, this phenomenon will also tell us a great deal about how particles are produced, and whether they equilibrate, in high energy nuclear collisions.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Ion Equilibration in Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimovic, Nikola; Langin, Thomas; Strickler, Trevor; Killian, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Understanding transport and equilibration in strongly coupled plasmas is important for modeling plasmas found in extreme environments like inertial confinement fusion plasmas and interiors of gas-giant planets. We use molecular dynamics simulations of Yukawa one component plasmas under periodic boundary conditions to study the evolution of strongly coupled ultracold neutral plasmas (UNPs) at early times. Simulations provide access to observable quantities in strongly coupled plasmas, namely correlation functions. Experimentally, the average velocity of an ion subset with a skewed velocity profile has been used to measure velocity autocorrelation functions and provide access to diffusion coefficients and other transport processes in UNPs. Using the simulation, we verify the experimental measurements of average velocities of ion subsets in UNPs and confirm their agreement with the velocity autocorrelation function. Finally, we examine the collective mode behavior of the ions during their equilibration phase by calculating the longitudinal current correlation function at various times during equilibration. This allows us to study the collective mode coupling behavior of the equilibration of ions in UNPs and its dependence on screening parameter.

  16. A New Method of Estimating Atomic Charges by Electronegativity Equilibration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Derek W.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a modification of Bratsch's prescription so that difficult problems are obviated while simple, familiar Pauling electronegativities are retained. Discussed are the equilibration of electronegativity in molecules, group electronegativities, coordination compounds and molecules with dative bonds, ions, and correlation with core…

  17. Kinetics of amino acids equilibration in the dialysate during CAPD.

    PubMed

    De Santo, N G; Capodicasa, G; Di Leo, V A; Di Serafino, A; Cirillo, D; Esposito, R; Fiore, R; Cucciniello, E; Damiano, M; Buonadonna, L; Di Iorio, R; Capasso, G; Giordano, C

    1981-01-01

    The equilibrium between plasma and peritoneal dialysis fluid has been studies for 23 amino acids during peritoneal exchanges at dwell times up to 8 hours in patients on CAPD. It is demonstrated that equilibration is a particular process typical for each amino acid which after 8 hour is nearly complete only for Glycine, Alanine and Asparagine. PMID:7216530

  18. Leaf water oxygen isotope measurement by direct equilibration.

    PubMed

    Song, Xin; Barbour, Margaret M

    2016-08-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of leaf water imparts a signal to a range of molecules in the atmosphere and biosphere, but has been notoriously difficult to measure in studies requiring a large number of samples as a consequence of the labour-intensive extraction step. We tested a method of direct equilibration of water in fresh leaf samples with CO2 , and subsequent oxygen isotope analysis on an optical spectrometer. The oxygen isotope composition of leaf water measured by the direct equilibration technique was strongly linearly related to that of cryogenically extracted leaf water in paired samples for a wide range of species with differing anatomy, with an R(2) of 0.95. The somewhat more enriched values produced by the direct equilibration method may reflect lack of full equilibration with unenriched water in the vascular bundles, but the strong relationship across a wide range of species suggests that this difference can be adequately corrected for using a simple linear relationship. PMID:27147584

  19. On equilibration of pore water in column leaching tests.

    PubMed

    Grathwohl, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Column leaching tests are closer to natural conditions than batch shaking tests and in the last years have become more popular for assessing the release potential of pollutants from a variety of solids such as contaminated soils, waste, recycling and construction materials. Uncertainties still exist regarding equilibration of the percolating water with the solids, that might potentially lead to underestimation of contaminant concentrations in the effluent. The intention of this paper is to show that equilibration of pore water in a finite bath is fundamentally different from release of a certain fraction of the pollutant from a sample and that equilibrium is reached much faster at low liquid-to-solid ratios typical for column experiments (<0.25) than in batch tests with much higher liquid-to-solid ratios (e.g., 2-10). Two mass transfer mechanisms are elucidated: First-order type release (film diffusion) and intraparticle diffusion. For the latter, mass transfer slows down with time and sooner or later non-equilibrium conditions are observed at the column outlet after percolation has been started. Time scales of equilibrium leaching can be estimated based on a comparison of column length with the length of the mass transfer zone, which is equivalent to a Damköhler number approach. Mass transfer and diffusion coefficients used in this study apply to mass transfer mechanisms limited by diffusion in water, which is typical for release of organic compounds but also for dissolution of soluble minerals such as calcite, gypsum or similar. As a conclusion based on these theoretical considerations column tests (a) equilibrate much faster than batch leaching tests and (b) the equilibrium concentrations are maintained in the column effluent even for slow intraparticle diffusion limited desorption for extended periods of time (>days). Since for equilibration the specific surface area is crucial, the harmonic mean of the grain size is relevant (small grain sizes result in high

  20. A Simple Method for Automated Equilibration Detection in Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Chodera, John D

    2016-04-12

    Molecular simulations intended to compute equilibrium properties are often initiated from configurations that are highly atypical of equilibrium samples, a practice which can generate a distinct initial transient in mechanical observables computed from the simulation trajectory. Traditional practice in simulation data analysis recommends this initial portion be discarded to equilibration, but no simple, general, and automated procedure for this process exists. Here, we suggest a conceptually simple automated procedure that does not make strict assumptions about the distribution of the observable of interest in which the equilibration time is chosen to maximize the number of effectively uncorrelated samples in the production timespan used to compute equilibrium averages. We present a simple Python reference implementation of this procedure and demonstrate its utility on typical molecular simulation data. PMID:26771390

  1. Novel procedure for thermal equilibration in molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Marco T; Grant, Barry J; Teodoro, Miguel L; Melton, Julia; Cieplak, Piotr; Phillips, George N; Stec, Boguslaw

    2009-04-01

    We describe a simple novel procedure for achieving thermal equilibration between a protein and a surrounding solvent during molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The method uniquely defines the length of simulation time required to achieve thermal equilibrium over a broad range of parameters, thus removing ambiguities associated with the traditional heuristic approaches. The proposed protocol saves simulation time and avoids bias introduced by the inclusion of non-equilibrium events. The key element of the procedure involves coupling only the solvent atoms to a standard heat bath. Measuring progress towards thermal equilibration involves simply monitoring the difference in temperature between the solvent and the protein. Here, we report that the results of MD simulations using the above procedure are measurably improved relative to the traditional approaches in terms of root-mean-square deviations and principal components analysis both indicating significantly less undesirable divergence. PMID:25125797

  2. Novel procedure for thermal equilibration in molecular dynamics simulation

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Marco T.; Grant, Barry J.; Teodoro, Miguel L.; Melton, Julia; Cieplak, Piotr; Phillips, George N.; Stec, Boguslaw

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simple novel procedure for achieving thermal equilibration between a protein and a surrounding solvent during molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The method uniquely defines the length of simulation time required to achieve thermal equilibrium over a broad range of parameters, thus removing ambiguities associated with the traditional heuristic approaches. The proposed protocol saves simulation time and avoids bias introduced by the inclusion of non-equilibrium events. The key element of the procedure involves coupling only the solvent atoms to a standard heat bath. Measuring progress towards thermal equilibration involves simply monitoring the difference in temperature between the solvent and the protein. Here, we report that the results of MD simulations using the above procedure are measurably improved relative to the traditional approaches in terms of root-mean-square deviations and principal components analysis both indicating significantly less undesirable divergence. PMID:25125797

  3. Time scale for point-defect equilibration in nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, Paul C.; Wolf, Dieter; Desai, Tapan; Yamakov, Vesselin

    2008-10-20

    Molecular dynamics simulations of high-temperature annealing are performed on nanostructured materials enabling direct observation of vacancy emission from planar defects (i.e., grain boundaries and free surfaces) to populate the initially vacancy-free grain interiors on a subnanosecond time scale. We demonstrate a universal time-length scale correlation that governs these re-equilibration processes, suggesting that nanostructures are particularly stable against perturbations in their point-defect concentrations, caused for example by particle irradiation or temperature fluctuations.

  4. Self-similar equilibration of strongly interacting systems from holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakas, Ioannis; Skenderis, Kostas; Withers, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    We study the equilibration of a class of far-from-equilibrium strongly interacting systems using gauge-gravity duality. The systems we analyze are 2 +1 dimensional and have a four-dimensional gravitational dual. A prototype example of a system we analyze is the equilibration of a two-dimensional fluid which is translational invariant in one direction and is attached to two different heat baths with different temperatures at infinity in the other direction. We realize such setup in gauge-gravity duality by joining two semi-infinite asymptotically anti-de Sitter (AdS) black branes of different temperatures, which subsequently evolve towards equilibrium by emitting gravitational radiation towards the boundary of AdS. At sufficiently late times the solution converges to a similarity solution, which is only sensitive to the left and right equilibrium states and not to the details of the initial conditions. This attractor solution not only incorporates the growing region of equilibrated plasma but also the outwardly propagating transition regions, and can be constructed by solving a single ordinary differential equation.

  5. Voltage equilibration for reactive atomistic simulations of electrochemical processes

    SciTech Connect

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-08-07

    We introduce electrochemical dynamics with implicit degrees of freedom (EChemDID), a model to describe electrochemical driving force in reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The method describes the equilibration of external electrochemical potentials (voltage) within metallic structures and their effect on the self-consistent partial atomic charges used in reactive molecular dynamics. An additional variable assigned to each atom denotes the local potential in its vicinity and we use fictitious, but computationally convenient, dynamics to describe its equilibration within connected metallic structures on-the-fly during the molecular dynamics simulation. This local electrostatic potential is used to dynamically modify the atomic electronegativities used to compute partial atomic changes via charge equilibration. Validation tests show that the method provides an accurate description of the electric fields generated by the applied voltage and the driving force for electrochemical reactions. We demonstrate EChemDID via simulations of the operation of electrochemical metallization cells. The simulations predict the switching of the device between a high-resistance to a low-resistance state as a conductive metallic bridge is formed and resistive currents that can be compared with experimental measurements. In addition to applications in nanoelectronics, EChemDID could be useful to model electrochemical energy conversion devices.

  6. Bounds on metal-silicate equilibration conditions during core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguen, Renaud

    2016-04-01

    Much of the Earth was built by high-energy impacts of planetesimals and embryos, many of these impactors already differentiated, with metallic cores of their own. Geochemical data provide critical information on the timing of accretion and the prevailing physical conditions. The comparison between the inferred core/mantle partitioning with the experimentally determined partitioning behavior of a number of siderophile elements can be used to place constraints on the conditions (pressure, temperature, oxygen fugacity) under which the metal and silicates equilibrated before separating to form the core and mantle. The main limitation of this approach is that the interpretation of the geochemical data in terms of equilibration conditions is non-unique. This is an ill-posed inverse problem, and the inversion is usually carried out by making a number of assumptions to close the problem and make it (artificially) well-posed. Here, we take another approach and derive exact bounds on the distribution of conditions of equilibration during Earth's formation and core mantle differentiation.

  7. Effect of equilibration time on Pu desorption from goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jennifer C.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Begg, James D.; Kersting, Annie B.; Powell, Brian A.

    2015-01-28

    Strongly sorbing ions such as plutonium may become irreversibly bound to mineral surfaces over time implicates near- and far-field transport of Pu. Batch adsorption–desorption data were collected as a function of time and pH to study the surface stability of Pu on goethite. Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite over the pH range 4.2 to 6.6 for different periods of time (1, 6, 15, 34 and 116 d). Moreover, following adsorption, Pu was leached from the mineral surface with desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a complexant capable of effectively competing with the goethite surface for Pu. The amount of Pu desorbed from the goethite was found to vary as a function of the adsorption equilibration time, with less Pu removed from the goethite following longer adsorption periods. This effect was most pronounced at low pH. Logarithmic desorption distribution ratios for each adsorption equilibration time were fit to a pH-dependent model. Model slopes decreased between 1 and 116 d adsorption time, indicating that overall Pu(IV) surface stability on goethite surfaces becomes less dependent on pH with greater adsorption equilibration time. The combination of adsorption and desorption kinetic data suggest that non-redox aging processes affect Pu sorption behavior on goethite.

  8. Effect of equilibration time on Pu desorption from goethite

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wong, Jennifer C.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Begg, James D.; Kersting, Annie B.; Powell, Brian A.

    2015-01-28

    Strongly sorbing ions such as plutonium may become irreversibly bound to mineral surfaces over time implicates near- and far-field transport of Pu. Batch adsorption–desorption data were collected as a function of time and pH to study the surface stability of Pu on goethite. Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite over the pH range 4.2 to 6.6 for different periods of time (1, 6, 15, 34 and 116 d). Moreover, following adsorption, Pu was leached from the mineral surface with desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a complexant capable of effectively competing with the goethite surface for Pu. The amount of Pu desorbed from the goethitemore » was found to vary as a function of the adsorption equilibration time, with less Pu removed from the goethite following longer adsorption periods. This effect was most pronounced at low pH. Logarithmic desorption distribution ratios for each adsorption equilibration time were fit to a pH-dependent model. Model slopes decreased between 1 and 116 d adsorption time, indicating that overall Pu(IV) surface stability on goethite surfaces becomes less dependent on pH with greater adsorption equilibration time. The combination of adsorption and desorption kinetic data suggest that non-redox aging processes affect Pu sorption behavior on goethite.« less

  9. Mathematically optimized cryoprotectant equilibration procedures for cryopreservation of human oocytes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Simple and effective cryopreservation of human oocytes would have an enormous impact on the financial and ethical constraints of human assisted reproduction. Recently, studies have demonstrated the potential for cryopreservation in an ice-free glassy state by equilibrating oocytes with high concentrations of cryoprotectants (CPAs) and rapidly cooling to liquid nitrogen temperatures. A major difficulty with this approach is that the high concentrations required for the avoidance of crystal formation (vitrification) also increase the risk of osmotic and toxic damage. We recently described a mathematical optimization approach for designing CPA equilibration procedures that avoid osmotic damage and minimize toxicity, and we presented optimized procedures for human oocytes involving continuous changes in solution composition. Methods Here we adapt and refine our previous algorithm to predict piecewise-constant changes in extracellular solution concentrations in order to make the predicted procedures easier to implement. Importantly, we investigate the effects of using alternate equilibration endpoints on predicted protocol toxicity. Finally, we compare the resulting procedures to previously described experimental methods, as well as mathematically optimized procedures involving continuous changes in solution composition. Results For equilibration with CPA, our algorithm predicts an optimal first step consisting of exposure to a solution containing only water and CPA. This is predicted to cause the cells to initially shrink and then swell to the maximum cell volume limit. To reach the target intracellular CPA concentration, the cells are then induced to shrink to the minimum cell volume limit by exposure to a high CPA concentration. For post-thaw equilibration to remove CPA, the optimal procedures involve exposure to CPA-free solutions that are predicted to cause swelling to the maximum volume limit. The toxicity associated with these procedures is predicted

  10. Compositional re-equilibration of fluid inclusions in quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael Sterner, S.; Hall, Donald L.; Keppler, Hans

    1995-02-01

    Compositional modifications to salt-water fluid inclusions in quartz were observed following exposure to disequilibrium conditions in a series of laboratory experiments in which samples containing inclusions of known composition were annealed at 3 kbar and 600≤ T≤825°C in the presence of fluids having different compositions for time intervals ranging from a few days to one month. Changes in inclusion compositions following re-equilibration were monitored using salt crystal dissolution temperatures and/or IR (infra red) spectroscopy. The behaviors of both synthetic and natural fluid inclusions were studied. The synthetic samples were re-equilibrated under P int= P conf conditions to minimize stress in the crystal surrounding the inclusions, and were subjected to both f {H2O/int} f {H2O/conf} and f {H2O/int} f {H2O/conf}. After re-equilibration for four days at T≥600°C, most inclusions displayed significant compositional changes Without decrepitation. Salinity variations as large as ≈ 25 wt% were inferred for brine inclusions exposed to f {H2O/int}≠ f {H2O/conf} for 16 days at 825°C. The majority of our observations are consistent with the net diffusion of water toward the reservior having the lowest μH2O; i.e., synthetic NaCl-H2O fluid inclusions exhibited increased Tm(NaCl)s (implying lower relative H2O contents) when re-equilibrated in the presence of fluids having lower μH2O, whereas, similar (and, in some cases, the same) inclusions exhibited decreased Tm(NaCl)s (implying higher H2O contents) after exposure to fluids having higher μH2O. The behavior of natural salt-water fluid inclusions during re-equilibration was generally consistent with corresponding observations on synthetic samples verifying that compositional changes are not restricted to synthetic inclusions. Our results clearly show that there was chemical communication between fluids trapped as inclusions in quartz and the external fluid reservoir. Additionally, it is evident that

  11. U-Pb systematics of phosphates from equilibrated ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopel, C.; Manhes, G.; Allegre, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    U-Pb systematics were determined from fifteen phosphate separates from equilibrated ordinary chondrites and from small bulk fragments of the same meteorites. The high U-238/Pb-204 ratios of thirteen of these phosphate separates lead to extremely radiogenic Pb whose Pb-206/Pb-204 ratios range from 250 up to 3500. The Pb/Pb model ages for these phosphates range from 4.563 to 4.502 Ga, with an analytical precision of 106y and the U-Pb system is apparently concordant. The time interval observed 60 x 106y, reflects the thermal processing of the equilibrated chondrites and is consistent with that previously derived from the Rb/Sr, K/Ar and Pu chronologies. The Pb/Pb ages of the phosphates from the seven H chondrites show a negative correlation versus their metamorphic grade. This is the first clear relationship ever observed between a long-lived chronometer and the intensity of metamorphism as reflected by metamorphic grade. Assuming that the Pb/Pb age indicates the accurate U-Pb closure time in phosphates, the Pb/Pb chronology is compatible with the model of a layered H chondrite parent body. However, this interpretation of the U/Pb systematics is not unique; it postulates a slow cooling of the equilibrated materials at high temperature, in apparent conflict with petrological observations. Except for the H chondrites, which agree rather well with Pu systematics, comparison of the Pb/Pb chronology with published radiochronometric data does not reveal simple correlations. In the present debate concerning the thermal history of chondrites, the chronometric information derived from each isotope system is interpreted as the time of its thermal closure. However, this basic assumption may not be correct for all the radio-chronologies and must be evaluated before the radiochronometric data can be applied as compelling time constraints for the period of 4.56 - 4.4 Ga of proto-planetary history.

  12. Vacancy chains and equilibration in senior-level labor markets

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, Y.; Roth, A.E.; Rothblum, U.

    1994-12-31

    In senior-level labor markets unfilled positions (caused by retirement of worker or by creation of new jobs) are often filled with candidates who are themselves incumbents in other similar position; thus creating a chain of vacancies that propagates from firm to firm. In this paper we apply the stable marriage model of Gale and Shapley (in which the two sided are {open_quotes}firms{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}workers{close_quotes}) to study this re-equilibration process. We show that a simple {open_quotes}deferred acceptance{close_quotes} algorithm in which firms with vacant position propose to workers who could hold at most one position at a time, would always produce a stable matching (assuming that the market was initially stable). This algorithm generates a matching that is independent of the order of proposals and optimal for the firms in a well defined subset of the stable matchings. We also show that this re-equilibration process is monotone and preserves individual firm-optimality. Once we assume that the {open_quotes}deferred acceptance{close_quotes} algorithm is the equilibration process, the workers and firms have to decide how to act when the algorithm works (an agent must not act truly according to its/her true preferences). This decision problem define a game where the strategy space is any profile of preferences. We show that in this game it is optimal for each firm to act truly and to reveal its true preferences, independently of how the other agents play. This result is shown to be untrue for the workers. In particular, workers have often incentives to deviate from their true preferences. We also show that an equilibrium always exist in this game and we characterize some matchings that can result from strategies that form an equilibrium. Finally, we show that each matching that results from equilibrium is stable for the true preferences.

  13. Equilibration and nonclassicality of a double-well potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Steve; de Chiara, Gabriele; Paternostro, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    A double well loaded with bosonic atoms represents an ideal candidate to simulate some of the most interesting aspects in the phenomenology of thermalisation and equilibration. Here we report an exhaustive analysis of the dynamics and steady state properties of such a system locally in contact with different temperature reservoirs. We show that thermalisation only occurs ‘accidentally’. We further examine the nonclassical features and energy fluxes implied by the dynamics of the double-well system, thus exploring its finite-time thermodynamics in relation to the settlement of nonclassical correlations between the wells.

  14. Equilibration and nonclassicality of a double-well potential.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Steve; De Chiara, Gabriele; Paternostro, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    A double well loaded with bosonic atoms represents an ideal candidate to simulate some of the most interesting aspects in the phenomenology of thermalisation and equilibration. Here we report an exhaustive analysis of the dynamics and steady state properties of such a system locally in contact with different temperature reservoirs. We show that thermalisation only occurs 'accidentally'. We further examine the nonclassical features and energy fluxes implied by the dynamics of the double-well system, thus exploring its finite-time thermodynamics in relation to the settlement of nonclassical correlations between the wells. PMID:26823097

  15. Equilibration and nonclassicality of a double-well potential

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Steve; De Chiara, Gabriele; Paternostro, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    A double well loaded with bosonic atoms represents an ideal candidate to simulate some of the most interesting aspects in the phenomenology of thermalisation and equilibration. Here we report an exhaustive analysis of the dynamics and steady state properties of such a system locally in contact with different temperature reservoirs. We show that thermalisation only occurs ‘accidentally’. We further examine the nonclassical features and energy fluxes implied by the dynamics of the double-well system, thus exploring its finite-time thermodynamics in relation to the settlement of nonclassical correlations between the wells. PMID:26823097

  16. Equilibration Temperature of LEW 88774 and Other Ureilites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikami, J.; Mikouchi, T.; Miyamoto, M.; Takeda, H.

    1995-09-01

    LEW88774 is a Cr and Ca-rich ureilite that includes pyroxene with coarse exsolution lamellae, and minor Cr-rich spinel, and Fe-Cr carbide, which have not been found in other ureilites. [1] indicated that it requires slow cooling to form such coarse exsolution lamellae. [2] suggested that the equilibration temperature is near-solidus (~1300 degrees C), as usual for ureilites. They preferred a model of original crystallization deep in the mantle of the ureilite parent body, because of the presence of graphite. Since equilibration at high temperature and the subsequent rapid cooling by a possible breaking-up of the parent body are important aspects of the thermal history of ureilites, we reinvestigated the equilibration temperatures of the coexsisting pyroxene polymorphs. We reanalyzed the coarse exsolution lamellae of LEW88774. The composition of the exsolved augite and the host low-Ca pyroxene are Ca33.7Mg52.8Fe13.5 and Ca4.4Mg75Fe20.6, respectively. These imply an equilibration temperature of about 1170 degrees C by the two pyroxene geothemometer [5]. Chikami et al. [4] estimated that exsolution lamellae of LEW88774 were produced at 1280 degrees C and cooled at 0.01 degrees C/year until 1170 degrees C, based on a method developed by Miyamoto and Takeda [3]. Y74130 is also a Ca-rich ureilite, and consists of olivine, augite, enclosed pigeonite in augite, and low-Ca pyroxene [6]. From these assemblages, equilibration temperatures of 1200 to 1300 degrees C were deduced [5]. Pyroxenes of MET78008 are also augite, pigeonite, and orthopyroxene [7], and they yielded the temperature of 1250 degrees C. On the other hand, ALH82106 and ALH82130 are paired meteorites and include coexisting pigeonite-augite. This assemblage gave equilibration temperature of 1250 degrees C. LEW85440 consists of olivine, orthopyroxene, and minor augite [9]. The temperature from the orthopyroxene-augite pair is about 1220 degrees C. In Y791538 coexisting pigeonite-orthopyroxene pair is found [9

  17. Universality in the Equilibration of Quenched Yukawa One Component Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langin, Thomas; McQuillen, Patrick; Strickler, Trevor; Maksimovic, Nikola; Pohl, Thomas; Killian, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    We study the equilibration of a Yukawa One Component Plasma (OCP) after a rapid change in the screening parameter from κ0 = ∞ to κf (n ,Te) , which is realized by photoionizing a laser cooled (T ~ 10 mK), uncorrelated gas of 88Sr atoms with density n between 1014 m-3 and 3 ×1016 m-3 using a two photon process in which the energy of one of the photons is adjustable. The excess photon energy above the ionization threshold sets the electron temperature, Te, and thus gives us control of κf. The resultant plasma is a classical plasma with strongly coupled ions, and is therefore described by the Yukawa OCP model with the electrons treated as a screening background. After photoionization, the ions develop spatial correlations to minimize their interaction energy, thus heating the ions. Since the dynamics of a Yukawa OCP depend solely on κ, we expect the heating process to be uniquely determined by κf. We verify this behavior by measuring the ion heating curve and comparing it to molecular dynamics simulations. We also report on how this behavior can be used to accurately measure n given a measured equilibration curve at a known Te. This work was supported by the United States National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy (PHY-0714603), the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550- 12-1-0267), and the Department of Defense (DoD) through the NDSEG Program.

  18. A simple headspace equilibration method for measuring dissolved methane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magen, C; Lapham, L.L.; Pohlman, John W.; Marshall, Kristin N.; Bosman, S.; Casso, Michael; Chanton, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved methane concentrations in the ocean are close to equilibrium with the atmosphere. Because methane is only sparingly soluble in seawater, measuring it without contamination is challenging for samples collected and processed in the presence of air. Several methods for analyzing dissolved methane are described in the literature, yet none has conducted a thorough assessment of the method yield, contamination issues during collection, transport and storage, and the effect of temperature changes and preservative. Previous extraction methods transfer methane from water to gas by either a "sparge and trap" or a "headspace equilibration" technique. The gas is then analyzed for methane by gas chromatography. Here, we revisit the headspace equilibration technique and describe a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method to measure methane in fresh and seawater, regardless of concentration. Within the range of concentrations typically found in surface seawaters (2-1000 nmol L-1), the yield of the method nears 100% of what is expected from solubility calculation following the addition of known amount of methane. In addition to being sensitive (detection limit of 0.1 ppmv, or 0.74 nmol L-1), this method requires less than 10 min per sample, and does not use highly toxic chemicals. It can be conducted with minimum materials and does not require the use of a gas chromatograph at the collection site. It can therefore be used in various remote working environments and conditions.

  19. Non-equilibration of hydrostatic pressure in blebbing cells.

    PubMed

    Charras, Guillaume T; Yarrow, Justin C; Horton, Mike A; Mahadevan, L; Mitchison, T J

    2005-05-19

    Current models for protrusive motility in animal cells focus on cytoskeleton-based mechanisms, where localized protrusion is driven by local regulation of actin biochemistry. In plants and fungi, protrusion is driven primarily by hydrostatic pressure. For hydrostatic pressure to drive localized protrusion in animal cells, it would have to be locally regulated, but current models treating cytoplasm as an incompressible viscoelastic continuum or viscous liquid require that hydrostatic pressure equilibrates essentially instantaneously over the whole cell. Here, we use cell blebs as reporters of local pressure in the cytoplasm. When we locally perfuse blebbing cells with cortex-relaxing drugs to dissipate pressure on one side, blebbing continues on the untreated side, implying non-equilibration of pressure on scales of approximately 10 microm and 10 s. We can account for localization of pressure by considering the cytoplasm as a contractile, elastic network infiltrated by cytosol. Motion of the fluid relative to the network generates spatially heterogeneous transients in the pressure field, and can be described in the framework of poroelasticity. PMID:15902261

  20. Igneous fractionation and subsolidus equilibration of diogenite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Diogenites are coarse-grained orthopyroxenite breccias of remarkably uniform major element composition. Most diogenites contain homogeneous pyroxene fragments up to 5 cm across of Wo2En74Fs24 composition. Common minor constituents are chromite, olivine, trolite and metal, while silica, plagioclase, merrillite and diopside are trace phases. Diogenites are generally believed to be cumulates from the eucrite parent body, although their relationship with eucrites remains obscure. It has been suggested that some diogenites are residues after partial melting. I have performed EMPA and INAA for major, minor and trace elements on most diogenites, concentrating on coarse-grained mineral and lithic clasts in order to elucidate their igneous formation and subsequent metamorphic history. Major element compositions of diogenites are decoupled from minor and trace element compositions; the latter record an igneous fractionation sequence that is not preserved in the former. Low equilibration temperatures indicate that major element diffusion continued long after crystallization. Diffusion coefficients for trivalent and tetravalent elements in pyroxene are lower than those of divalent elements. Therefore, major element compositions of diogenites may represent means of unknown portions of a cumulate homogenized by diffusion, while minor and trace elements still yield information on their igneous history. The scale of major element equilibration is unknown, but is likely to be on the order of a few cm. Therefore, the diogenite precursors may have consisted largely of cm-sized, igneously zoned orthopyroxene grains, which were subsequently annealed during slow cooling, obliterating major element zoning but preserving minor and trace incompatible element zoning.

  1. Approaching the thermodynamic limit in equilibrated scale-free networks.

    PubMed

    Waclaw, B; Bogacz, L; Janke, W

    2008-12-01

    We discuss how various models of scale-free complex networks approach their limiting properties when the size N of the network grows. We focus mainly on equilibrated networks and their finite-size degree distributions. Our results show that the position of the cutoff in the degree distribution, k_{cutoff} , scales with N in a different way than predicted for N-->infinity ; that is, subleading corrections to the scaling k_{cutoff} approximately N;{alpha} are strong even for networks of order N approximately 10;{9} nodes. We observe also a logarithmic correction to the scaling for degenerated graphs with the degree distribution pi(k) approximately k;{-3} . On the other hand, the distribution of the maximal degree k_{max} may have a different scaling than the cutoff and, moreover, it approaches the thermodynamic limit much faster. We argue that k_{max} approximately N;{alpha;{'}} with an exponent alpha;{'}=min[alpha,1(gamma-1)] , where gamma is the exponent in the power law pi(k) approximately k;{-gamma} . We also present some results on the cutoff function and the distribution of the maximal degree in equilibrated networks. PMID:19256820

  2. Contact Potentials, Fermi Level Equilibration, and Surface Charging.

    PubMed

    Peljo, Pekka; Manzanares, José A; Girault, Hubert H

    2016-06-14

    This article focuses on contact electrification from thermodynamic equilibration of the electrochemical potential of the electrons of two conductors upon contact. The contact potential difference generated in bimetallic macro- and nanosystems, the Fermi level after the contact, and the amount and location of the charge transferred from one metal to the other are discussed. The three geometries considered are spheres in contact, Janus particles, and core-shell particles. In addition, the force between the two spheres in contact with each other is calculated and is found to be attractive. A simple electrostatic model for calculating charge distribution and potential profiles in both vacuum and an aqueous electrolyte solution is described. Immersion of these bimetallic systems into an electrolyte solution leads to the formation of an electric double layer at the metal-electrolyte interface. This Fermi level equilibration and the associated charge transfer can at least partly explain experimentally observed different electrocatalytic, catalytic, and optical properties of multimetallic nanosystems in comparison to systems composed of pure metals. For example, the shifts in the surface plasmon resonance peaks in bimetallic core-shell particles seem to result at least partly from contact charging. PMID:27176729

  3. Compartmentation and equilibration of abscisic acid in isolated Xanthium cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, E.A.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The compartmentation of endogenous abscisic acid (ABA), applied (+/-)-(/sup 3/H)ABA, and (+/-)-trans-ABA was measured in isolated mesophyll cells of the Chicago strain of Xanthium strumarium L. The release of ABA to the medium in the presence or absence of DMSO was used to determine the equilibration of ABA in the cells. It was found that a greater percentage of the (+/-)-(/sup 3/H)ABA and the (+/-)-trans-ABA was released into the medium than of the endogenous ABA, indicating that applied ABA did not equilibrate with the endogenous material. Therefore, in further investigations only the compartmentation of endogenous ABA was studied. Endogenous ABA was released from Xanthium cells according to the pH gradients among the various cellular compartments. Thus, darkness, high external pH, KNO/sub 2/, and drought-stress all increased the efflux of ABA from the cells. Efflux of ABA from the cells in the presence of 0.6 M mannitol occurred within 30 seconds, but only 8% of the endogenous material was released during the 20 minute treatment.

  4. Equilibration timescale of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Seinfeld, John H.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from partitioning of oxidation products of anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) accounts for a substantial portion of atmospheric particulate matter. In describing SOA formation, it is generally assumed that VOC oxidation products rapidly adopt gas-aerosol equilibrium. Here we estimate the equilibration timescale, τeq, of SOA gas-particle partitioning using a state-of-the-art kinetic flux model. τeq is found to be of order seconds to minutes for partitioning of relatively high volatility organic compounds into liquid particles, thereby adhering to equilibrium gas-particle partitioning. However, τeq increases to hours or days for organic aerosol associated with semi-solid particles, low volatility, large particle size, and low mass loadings. Instantaneous equilibrium partitioning may lead to substantial overestimation of particle mass concentration and underestimation of gas-phase concentration.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Temperature Equilibration in Dense Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Glosli, J; Graziani, F; More, R; Murillo, M; Streitz, F; Surh, M; Benedict, L; Hau-Riege, S; Langdon, A; London, R

    2008-02-14

    The temperature equilibration rate in dense hydrogen (for both T{sub i} > T{sub e} and T{sub i} < T{sub e}) has been calculated with large-scale molecular dynamics simulations for temperatures between 10 and 300 eV and densities between 10{sup 20}/cc to 10{sup 24}/cc. Careful attention has been devoted to convergence of the simulations, including the role of semiclassical potentials. We find that for Coulomb logarithms L {approx}> 1, Brown-Preston-Singleton [Brown et al., Phys. Rep. 410, 237 (2005)] with the sub-leading corrections and the fit of Gericke-Murillo-Schlanges [Gericke et al., PRE 65, 036418 (2003)] to the T-matrix evaluation of the collision operator, agrees with the MD data to within the error bars of the simulation. For more strongly-coupled plasmas where L {approx}< 1, our numerical results are consistent with the fit of Gericke-Murillo-Schlanges.

  6. Information propagation and equilibration in long-range Kitaev chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Regemortel, Mathias; Sels, Dries; Wouters, Michiel

    2016-03-01

    We study the propagation of information through a Kitaev chain with long-range pairing interactions. Although the Lieb-Robinson bound is violated in the strict sense for long-range interacting systems, we illustrate that a major amount of information in this model still propagates ballistically on a light cone. We find a pronounced effect of the interaction range on the decay of the mutual information between spatially disconnected subsystems. A significant amount of information is shared at timelike separations. This regime is accompanied by very slow equilibration of local observables. As the Kitaev model is quasifree, we illustrate how the distribution of quasiparticle group velocities explains the physics of this system qualitatively.

  7. The complex isostatic equilibration of Australia's deep crust.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, Alan; Gross, Lutz; Altinay, Cihan

    2016-04-01

    A recent study, using a new finite-element based gravity inversion method has modelled in high-resolution the density and pressure fields for the Australian continent. Here we analyse the pressure results to consider how Australia's lower-crust and Moho contribute to the isostatic equilibration of topography and crustal masses. We find that the situation is more complex than the commonly applied model of isostatic compensation through crustal thickness variations. Key differences include low pressure-variability at ca. 30-35 km, suggesting that the thickness of the felsic-intermediate crust equilibrates most of the upper-crustal loads; increasing pressure-variability between 30-50 km, suggesting that positively buoyant deep-crustal roots generate disequilibrium. These large roots have previously been inferred to represent mafic underplates. Pressure-variability in the uppermost lithospheric mantle reduces to a minimum at ~125 km depth, suggesting that these loads are compensated by dense mantle at ~100 km depth, rather than by crustal loads or topography. This raises the notion that Australia's lithosphere is isostatically compensated at two levels: Crustal compensation involving topography and the felsic to intermediate crust; and deep-lithosphere compensation involving the mafic lower crust and lithospheric mantle. Rather than its traditional role of compensating for crustal masses, the Moho in this case appears to be a source of isostatic disequilibrium, acting in a separate cell with lithospheric mantle density sources. These results imply that, for cratonised continents like Australia, the notion of crustal isostasy is a poor descriptor of the system.

  8. When It Rains, It Pours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Linda

    2012-01-01

    "It's raining, it's pouring, the old man is snoring!" "The itsy, bitsy spider crawled up the waterspout, down came the rain and washed the spider out. Out came the sun and dried up all the rain, and the itsy, bitsy spider went up the spout again." What do children's nursery rhymes have to do with the school library? The author begins by telling a…

  9. Oxygen isotopes in nitrite: Analysis, calibration, and equilibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casciotti, K.L.; Böhlke, J.K.; McIlvin, M.R.; Mroczkowski, S.J.; Hannon, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrite is a central intermediate in the nitrogen cycle and can persist in significant concentrations in ocean waters, sediment pore waters, and terrestrial groundwaters. To fully interpret the effect of microbial processes on nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), and nitrous oxide (N2O) cycling in these systems, the nitrite pool must be accessible to isotopic analysis. Furthermore, because nitrite interferes with most methods of nitrate isotopic analysis, accurate isotopic analysis of nitrite is essential for correct measurement of nitrate isotopes in a sample that contains nitrite. In this study, nitrite salts with varying oxygen isotopic compositions were prepared and calibrated and then used to test the denitrifier method for nitrite oxygen isotopic analysis. The oxygen isotopic fractionation during nitrite reduction to N2O by Pseudomonas aureofaciens was lower than for nitrate conversion to N2O, while oxygen isotopic exchange between nitrite and water during the reaction was similar. These results enable the extension of the denitrifier method to oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite (in the absence of nitrate) and correction of nitrate isotopes for the presence of nitrite in "mixed" samples. We tested storage conditions for seawater and freshwater samples that contain nitrite and provide recommendations for accurate oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite by any method. Finally, we report preliminary results on the equilibrium isotope effect between nitrite and water, which can play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic value of nitrite where equilibration with water is significant. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  10. Para hydrogen equilibration in the atmospheres of the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrath, Barney J.

    1986-01-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets is strongly dependent on the extent to which local thermal equilibration of the ortho and para states of molecular hydrogen is achieved. Voyager IRIS data from Jupiter imply substantial departures of the para hydrogen fraction from equilibrium in the upper troposphere at low latitudes, but with values approaching equilibrium at higher latitudes. Data from Saturn are less sensitive to the orth-para ratio, but suggest para hydrogen fractions near the equilibrium value. Above approximately the 200 K temperature level, para hydrogen conversion can enhance the efficiency of convection, resulting in a substantial increase in overturning times on all of the outer planets. Currently available data cannot definitively establish the ortho-para ratios in the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune, but suggest values closer to local equilibrium than to the 3.1 normal ratio. Modeling of sub-millimeter wavelength measurements of these planets suggest thermal structures with frozen equilibrium lapse rates in their convective regions.

  11. Equilibration of hadrons in HICs via Hagedorn States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beitel, M.; Gallmeister, K.; Greiner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Hagedorn states (HS) are a tool to model the hadronization process which occurs in the phase transition region between the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and the hadron resonance gas (HRG). These states are believed to appear near the Hagedorn temperature TH which in our understanding equals the critical temperature Tc. A covariantly formulated bootstrap equation is solved to generate the zoo of these particles characterized baryon number B, strangeness S and electric charge Q. These hadron-like resonances are characterized by being very massive and by not being limited to quantum numbers of known hadrons. All hadronic properties like masses, spectral functions etc. are taken from the hadronic transport model Ultra Relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD). Decay chains of single Hagedorn states provide a well description of experimentally observed multiplicity ratios of strange and multi-strange particles. In addition, the final energy spectra of resulting hadrons show a thermal-like distribution with the characteristic Hagedorn temperature TH. Box calculations including these Hagedorn states are performed. Indeed, the time scales leading to equilibration of the system are drastically reduced down to 2…5fm/c.

  12. Zoning and recrystallization of phengitic micas: implications for metamorphic equilibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempster, T. J.

    1992-02-01

    White micas (phengites) in the metasediments of the Scottish Dalradian display a large range of compositions within single samples. The variations in the composition of these phengites are strongly controlled by their structural age, with early fabrics containing a paragonite-poor, celadonite-rich phengite whereas in later fabrics the micas are generally paragonite-rich and celadonite-poor. Retrograde phengite growth, identified using back scattered electron imaging, occurs as celadonite-rich rims on micas within all existing fabrics and appears to be preferentially developed along existing white mica-plagioclase grain boundaries. The presence of these chemically distinct phengite populations within single samples implies that chemical exchange between the individual micas was inefficient. It is proposed that diffusion-controlled exchange reactions in phengites have relatively high closure temperatures below which major element exchange is effectively impossible. This closed system behaviour of micas questions the ease with which phengites may equilibrate with other phases during prograde greenschist and lower amphibolite facies metamorphism. Many of the chemical variations preserved in phengites from such metamorphic rocks may reflect deformation/recrystallization controlled equilibria.

  13. First assembly times and equilibration in stochastic coagulation-fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    D’Orsogna, Maria R.; Lei, Qi; Chou, Tom

    2015-07-07

    We develop a fully stochastic theory for coagulation and fragmentation (CF) in a finite system with a maximum cluster size constraint. The process is modeled using a high-dimensional master equation for the probabilities of cluster configurations. For certain realizations of total mass and maximum cluster sizes, we find exact analytical results for the expected equilibrium cluster distributions. If coagulation is fast relative to fragmentation and if the total system mass is indivisible by the mass of the largest allowed cluster, we find a mean cluster-size distribution that is strikingly broader than that predicted by the corresponding mass-action equations. Combinations of total mass and maximum cluster size under which equilibration is accelerated, eluding late-stage coarsening, are also delineated. Finally, we compute the mean time it takes particles to first assemble into a maximum-sized cluster. Through careful state-space enumeration, the scaling of mean assembly times is derived for all combinations of total mass and maximum cluster size. We find that CF accelerates assembly relative to monomer kinetic only in special cases. All of our results hold in the infinite system limit and can be only derived from a high-dimensional discrete stochastic model, highlighting how classical mass-action models of self-assembly can fail.

  14. Rapid photochemical equilibration of isotope bond ordering in O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Laurence Y.; Ash, Jeanine L.; Young, Edward D.

    2014-09-01

    The abundances of 18O18O and 17O18O in the atmosphere were recently found to be enriched relative to the stochastic distribution of isotopes in O2. The enrichment is believed to arise from O(3P) + O2 isotope exchange reactions, which reorder the isotopes in O2 to a distribution that favors bonds between heavy isotopes. Theoretical predictions and laboratory experiments suggest that the reordered distribution of isotopes should reflect internal isotopic equilibrium, but a laboratory test of this hypothesis for the complete O2 isotopologue system has not yet been realized. Here we use a simple photochemical experiment that reorders the isotopes in O2 at temperatures between 200 K and 350 K. Using simultaneous measurements of five O2 isotopologues, we show that O(3P) + O2 reorders the isotopes in O2 to isotopic equilibrium. Furthermore, we use this scheme to calibrate measurements of isotopic ordering in samples of O2, obtaining Δ36 and Δ35 values within ±0.1‰. Measurements of atmospheric O2 sampled at the University of California, Los Angeles, from 2012 to 2014 have mean values of Δ36 = 1.97 ± 0.07‰ and Δ35 = 1.0 ± 0.1‰ (2 SE; n = 23), with no detectable long-term trend. These measurements are consistent with values for air reported earlier, but with a threefold to fourfold improvement in precision. Together, the experiments and observations support the case that isotopic ordering in tropospheric O2 is altered by O(3P) + O2; however, they also suggest that tropospheric Δ36 and Δ35 values do not reflect complete isotopic equilibration in the troposphere. Isotopic ordering in atmospheric O2 likely reflects the decadal-scale balance of stratospheric and tropospheric air masses modulated by variations in tropospheric photochemistry and convection.

  15. Selective equilibration among the current-carrying states in the quantum Hall regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alphenaar, B. W.; Mceuen, P. L.; Wheeler, R. G.; Sacks, R. N.

    1990-01-01

    The Hall resistance of a two-dimensional electron gas is measured with gated probes to determine the extent of equilibration among the N current-carrying states in the quantum Hall regime. After traveling macroscopic distances, current injected into the first state is equilibrated among the N - 1 lowest states but equilibration into the highest state varies strongly across the Hall plateau. This is attributed to a change in the Nth state from being localized within a magnetic length of the edge to substantially extending into the sample.

  16. Low pour crude oil compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Motz, K.L.; Latham, R.A.; Statz, R.J.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes and improvement in the process of transporting waxy crude oils through a pipeline. It comprises: incorporating into the crude oil an effective pour point depressant amount of an additive comprising a polymer selected from the group consisting of copolymers of ethylene and acrylonitrile, and terpolymers of ethylene, acrylonitrile and a third monomer selected from the group consisting of vinyl acetate, carbon monoxide, alkyl acrylates, alkyl methacrylates, alkyl vinyl ethers, vinyl chloride, vinyl fluoride, acrylic acid, and methacrylic acid, wherein the amount of third monomer in the terpolymer ranges from about 0.1 to about 10.0 percent by weight.

  17. Anomalous Orthopyroxene Cell Volumes from Unshocked Equilibrated H Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folco, L.; Mellini, M.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1995-09-01

    Thirteen orthopyroxenes were extracted from eight unshocked equilibrated H-chondrites representatives of the petrographic types 4 to 6 [1] for crystal-chemical analyses. Chemical compositions were determined through a WDS JEOL JX 8600 electron microprobe. Three to six spot analyses were run on each crystal and no significant chemical variation was detected. High quality single crystal X-ray diffraction data were obtained by a SIEMENS P4 diffractometer using MoK alpha radiation, and site occupancies by least squares structure refinements. Figure 1a shows a significant cell volume (Vc) increase with petrographic type, and a _1.5 Angstrom^3 spread within each petrographic type. In solid solutions, Vc is expected to mainly vary with the chemical composition: the higher the proportion of the large ions present, the larger the Vc. In particular, as shown by [2], Vc variations in orthopyroxenes are essentially linear with Fe/(Fe+Mg), and our data fall within this general trend. However, no such a correlation exists at the scale of our values (Fig.1b), rather, each petrographic type plots along a different roughly negative trend. Furthermore, as experimentally obtained by [3], the decrease of the Fe-Mg ordering between the M1 and M2 sites in orthopyroxenes (a temperature-time-dependent process), causes significant Vc increase due to the displacement of the large Fe2+ ions from the larger M2 to the smaller M1 sites. Again, in the Vc versus kD (i.e., the intracrystalline Fe-Mg distribution coefficient) diagram (Fig.1c), we observe no such a correlation. Contrary to the most immediate expectations, our data suggest that the net increase in Vc from H4 to H6 does not significantly depend upon chemical composition and degree of ordering, and demands that another as yet unidentified parameter accounts for the observed trends. Acknowledgments: We thank EUROMET for the Frontier Mt. samples, and PNRA for supporting this study. References: [1] Folco L. et al., this volume. [2] Sykes

  18. Investigating the Nuclear Equation of State through N/Z Equilibration

    SciTech Connect

    Yennello, S.; Keksis, A.; Bell, E.

    2007-10-26

    The equilibration of the N/Z degree of freedom during heavy-ion collisions can be a discriminating observables for helping to understand the nuclear equation of state. Equilibration can be investigated by examining the ratios of isotopes produced in these reactions. The isotope ratio method and the tracer method yield consistent results. The quasiprojectiles produced in deep inelastic collisions are predicted to be sensitive to the density dependence of the equation of state.

  19. Equilibrated moisture content of several carbon phenolics and their relationship to resin, fiber, and interface properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, E. H.

    1991-01-01

    This study focuses on the relationship between relative humidity and the equilibrated moisture content of several variants of two distinctly different carbon phenolic composites. One of the materials gives a typical exponential relationship between RH and equilibrated moisture content while the second gives an inverse sigmoidal relationship with the largest increase in moisture between 45-60 percent relative humidity. The possible relationship between the shape of the curves and the nature of the material constituents is discussed.

  20. Effect of equilibration period on the viability of frozen-thawed mouse morulae after rapid freezing.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Kanagawa, H

    1990-06-01

    Mouse morulae were frozen with 1.5-4.0 M glycerol + 0.25 M lactose solution by direct plunging into liquid nitrogen vapor 0.5-30 min after equilibration at room temperature. After thawing, embryos were cultured in vitro, and the highest survival rates were obtained after exposure for 3 min at 3.0 and 4.0 M and for 5 min at 1.5 and 2.0 M glycerol levels. Significant reductions in the survival rates (P less than 0.05) were observed when equilibration periods were extended for 3-5 min at 3.0 and 4.0 M and for 5-10 min at 1.5 and 2.0 M glycerol levels. These results clearly demonstrate that the equilibration time of embryos in glycerol-lactose mixture is one of the most important factors in the present rapid freezing conditions. To clarify the factors that lower embryo viability after prolonged equilibration, we performed further experiments on the effects of exposure to glycerol-lactose mixture on the developmental potential of embryos without freezing and on the volume changes of embryos during the exposure to glycerol solution with or without lactose. It was suggested that the detrimental effects of prolonged equilibration are due not only to the toxicity and osmotic injury of higher concentrations of cryoprotectant solution but also to the influx of water into embryonic cells caused by the hypotonic salt concentration of the extracellular (freezing) solution. PMID:2372393

  1. Diagenetic palaeotemperatures from aqueous fluid inclusions: re- equilibration of inclusions in carbonate cements by burial heating.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burruss, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    Calculations based on the observed behaviour of inclusions in fluorite under external confining P allows prediction of the T and depths of burial necessary to initiate re-equilibration of aqueous inclusions in the common size range 40-4 mu m. Heating of 20-60oC over the initial trapping T may cause errors of 10-20oC in the homogenization T. This suggests that re-equilibration may cause aqueous inclusions in carbonates to yield a poor record of their low-T history, but a useful record of the maximum T experienced by the host rock. Previous work suggests that inclusions containing petroleum fluids will be less susceptible to re-equilibration.This and the following six abstracts represent papers presented at a joint meeting of the Applied Mineralogy Group of the Mineralogical Society and the Petroleum Group of the Geological Society held in Newcastle upon Tyne in April 1986.-R.A.H.

  2. Matrix equilibration in method of moment solutions of surface integral equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolundzija, Branko M.; Kostic, Milan M.

    2014-12-01

    Basic theory of matrix equilibration is presented, relating it to other techniques for decreasing the condition number of matrix equations obtained by the method of moments (MOM) applied to surface integral equations (SIEs). It is shown that matrix equilibration is a general technique that can be used for both (1) balancing field and source quantities in SIEs, which is used to decrease the condition number in the case of SIEs of mixed type and high contrast in material properties, and (2) scaling basis and test functions in MOM, which is used to decrease the condition number in the case of higher-order bases and patches of different sizes. In particular, it is demonstrated that a combination of such balancing and scaling can be performed using simple matrix equilibration based on magnitudes of diagonal elements and 2-norms of rows/columns of the MOM matrix.

  3. Fast equilibration protocol for million atom systems of highly entangled linear polyethylene chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliozberg, Yelena R.; Kröger, Martin; Chantawansri, Tanya L.

    2016-04-01

    Equilibrated systems of entangled polymer melts cannot be produced using direct brute force equilibration due to the slow reptation dynamics exhibited by high molecular weight chains. Instead, these dense systems are produced using computational techniques such as Monte Carlo-Molecular Dynamics hybrid algorithms, though the use of soft potentials has also shown promise mainly for coarse-grained polymeric systems. Through the use of soft-potentials, the melt can be equilibrated via molecular dynamics at intermediate and long length scales prior to switching to a Lennard-Jones potential. We will outline two different equilibration protocols, which use various degrees of information to produce the starting configurations. In one protocol, we use only the equilibrium bond angle, bond length, and target density during the construction of the simulation cell, where the information is obtained from available experimental data and extracted from the force field without performing any prior simulation. In the second protocol, we moreover utilize the equilibrium radial distribution function and dihedral angle distribution. This information can be obtained from experimental data or from a simulation of short unentangled chains. Both methods can be used to prepare equilibrated and highly entangled systems, but the second protocol is much more computationally efficient. These systems can be strictly monodisperse or optionally polydisperse depending on the starting chain distribution. Our protocols, which utilize a soft-core harmonic potential, will be applied for the first time to equilibrate a million particle system of polyethylene chains consisting of 1000 united atoms at various temperatures. Calculations of structural and entanglement properties demonstrate that this method can be used as an alternative towards the generation of entangled equilibrium structures.

  4. Tuning equilibration of quantum Hall edge states in graphene - Role of crossed electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Sudipta; Deshmukh, Mandar M.

    2016-07-01

    We probe quantum Hall effect in a tunable 1-D lateral superlattice (SL) in graphene created using electrostatic gates. Lack of equilibration is observed along edge states formed by electrostatic gates inside the superlattice. We create strong local electric field at the interface of regions of different charge densities. Crossed electric and magnetic fields modify the wavefunction of the Landau Levels (LLs) - a phenomenon unique to graphene. In the region of copropagating electrons and holes at the interface, the electric field is high enough to modify the Landau levels resulting in increased scattering that tunes equilibration of edge states and this results in large longitudinal resistance.

  5. Radon as a tracer of biogenic gas equilibration and transport from methane-saturated sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, Christopher S.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.

    1989-01-01

    Data on Rn-222 activity in methane-rich gas bubbles from anoxic coastal sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina, were used to determine gas equilibration with pore waters and the rates of ebullitive stripping and transport of gases to overlying waters and the atmosphere. Results showed that, during summer months, the bubble ebullition process strips and transports 1.9-4.8 percent/day of the standing crop of radon (and, by inference, other gases equilibrated with gas bubbles) in surface sediments of Cape Lookout Bight to the troposphere. Thus, the ebullitive mode of gas transport represents an effective mechanism for delivering reduced biogenic gases directly to the atmosphere.

  6. Equilibration in {phi}{sup 4} theory in 3+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Arrizabalaga, Alejandro; Smit, Jan; Tranberg, Anders

    2005-07-15

    The process of equilibration in {phi}{sup 4} theory is investigated for a homogeneous system in 3+1 dimensions and a variety of out-of-equilibrium initial conditions, both in the symmetric and broken phase, by means of the 2PI effective action. Two {phi}-derivable approximations including scattering effects are used: the two-loop and the basketball, the latter corresponding to the truncation of the 2PI effective action at O({lambda}{sup 2}). The approach to equilibrium, as well as the kinetic and chemical equilibration is investigated.

  7. The Perils of Partition: Difficulties in Retrieving Magma Compositions from Chemically Equilibrated Basaltic Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1996-01-01

    The chemical compositions of magmas can be derived from the compositions of their equilibrium minerals through mineral/magma partition coefficients. This method cannot be applied safely to basaltic rocks, either solidified lavas or cumulates, which have chemically equilibrated or partially equilibrated at subsolidus temperatures, i.e., in the absence of magma. Applying mineral/ melt partition coefficients to mineral compositions from such rocks will typically yield 'magma compositions' that are strongly fractionated and unreasonably enriched in incompatible elements (e.g., REE's). In the absence of magma, incompatible elements must go somewhere; they are forced into minerals (e.g., pyroxenes, plagioclase) at abundance levels far beyond those established during normal mineral/magma equilibria. Further, using mineral/magma partition coefficients with such rocks may suggest that different minerals equilibrated with different magmas, and the fractionation sequence of those melts (i.e., enrichment in incompatible elements) may not be consistent with independent constraints on the order of crystallization. Subsolidus equilibration is a reasonable cause for incompatible- element-enriched minerals in some eucrites, diogenites, and martian meteorites and offers a simple alternative to petrogenetic schemes involving highly fractionated magmas or magma infiltration metasomatism.

  8. Equilibration of the jet forming instability in barotropic beta-plane turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, Navid; Bakas, Nikolaos; Ioannou, Petros

    2016-04-01

    Planetary turbulent flows are observed to self-organize into large scale structures such as zonal jets and coherent vortices. Recently, it was shown that a comprehensive understanding of the properties of these large scale structures and of the dynamics underlying their emergence and maintenance is gained through the study of the dynamics of the statistical state of the flow. Previous studies ad-dressed the emergence of the coherent structures in barotropic turbulence and showed the zonal jets emerge as an instability of the Statistical State Dynamics (SSD). In this work, the equilibration of the incipient instabilities and the stability of the equilibrated jets near onset is investigated. It is shown through a weakly nonlinear analysis of the SSD that the amplitude of the jet evolves according to a Ginzburg-Landau equation. The equilibrated jets were found to have a harmonic structure and an amplitude that is an increasing function of the planetary vorticity gradient. It is also shown that most of the equilibrated jets are secondarily unstable and will evolve through jet merging and branching to the stable jets that have a scale close to the most unstable (refering to the jet forming primary instability) emerging jet.

  9. The equilibrated state of freezing as a basis for distinguishing lethal stresses of freezing in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A model for coordination of stresses that limit winterhardiness in plants based on the thermodynamic equilibrated state of freezing and melting provides a rational basis for distinction of freeze-induced energies which can stress and injure living organisms in various ways. The departure from equili...

  10. EVALUATION OF VAPOR EQUILIBRATION AND IMPACT OF PURGE VOLUME ON SOIL-GAS SAMPLING RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequential sampling was utilized at the Raymark Superfund site to evaluate attainment of vapor equilibration and the impact of purge volume on soil-gas sample results. A simple mass-balance equation indicates that removal of three to five internal volumes of a sample system shou...

  11. In vivo and in vitro bromide equilibration time course in adults and sample handling effect

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extracellular water is a major component of body weight and an indicator of nutritional status. Bromide dilution has been used to estimate this compartment. Recent evidence, however, indicates that the bromide equilibration time is longer than the 4 hr assumed in many studies. The aim of this stud...

  12. Calibration of Dissolved Noble Gas Mass Spectrometric Measurements by an Air-Water Equilibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegonds, Darren; Matsumoto, Takuya; Jaklitsch, Manfred; Han, Liang-Feng; Klaus, Philipp; Wassenaar, Leonard; Aggarwal, Pradeep

    2013-04-01

    Precise measurements by mass spectrometry of dissolved noble gases (He, Ar, Ne, Kr, Xe) in water samples require careful calibration against laboratory standards with known concentrations. Currently, air pipettes are used for day-to-day calibrations, making estimation of overall analytical uncertainties for dissolved noble gas measurements in water difficult. Air equilibrated water (AEW) is often used as a matrix-equivalent laboratory standard for dissolved gases in groundwater, because of the well-known and constant fractions of noble gases in the atmosphere. AEW standards, however, are only useful if the temperature and pressure of the gas-water equilibrium can be controlled and measured precisely (i.e., to better than 0.5%); contamination and partial sample degassing must also be prevented during sampling. Here we present the details of a new custom air-water equilibration system which consists of an insulated 600 liter tank filled with deionized water, held isothermally at a precise target temperature (<0.05 °C) through the use of a heat exchanger. The temperature and total dissolved gas of the water in the tank are monitored continually, as are atmospheric pressure and air temperature in the laboratory. Different noble gas concentration standards can be reliably produced by accurately controlling the water temperature of the equilibration system. Equilibration characteristics and reproducibility of this system for production of copper tubes containing known amounts of noble gases will be presented.

  13. Equilibration of Melt at the Base of the Lithosphere in the Basin and Range Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsyth, D. W.; Plank, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    New measurements of the water concentration and new constraints on oxygen fugacity of Basin and Range basalts enable more accurate pressure (P) and temperature (T) estimates of the depth of equilibration of the mantle melts. We developed a revised thermobarometer that more precisely predicts the results of laboratory experiments on melts equilibrated with olivine and orthopyroxene. Applying these methods to basalts from recently active volcanic settings in the Basin and Range province, we find that most equilibrated near the dry solidus in P-T space and that the depths are in the vicinity of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) inferred from receiver function analysis and surface wave tomography. The basalts have enough water that they should have begun melting well below the dry solidus, so the depths of equilibration probably reflect pooling and stalling of upward migrated melts beneath a dry lithosphere rather than a mean depth of formation. The equilibration conditions then reflect the pre-existing thickness of the lithosphere, which may be eroded in spots by the thermal and chemical corrosion of melts infiltrating into the depleted layer. Assuming that there is a ~5% drop in shear velocity at the LAB associated with pooled melt, a two-parameter thermal model is sufficient to simultaneously satisfy both the seismological and petrological constraints in each of the study areas. In the model, depth to the dry solidus defines the bottom boundary of the conductive lid, while the potential temperature (Tp) controls the asthenosphere and LAB thermal structure. Combining the petrological and seismological constraints, the optimum estimates of Tp range from < 1300 to > 1500 °C, and depths to the LAB range from ~ 45 to 70 km. The highest Tp (> 1400°C) occurs just west of the Colorado Plateau. Upwelling of regionally hot and wet mantle creates widespread melting beneath the Basin and Range, which maintains the base of the lithosphere at its solidus.

  14. Analytical expression for gas-particle equilibration time scale and its numerical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anttila, Tatu; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.; Dal Maso, Miikka

    2016-05-01

    We have derived a time scale τeq that describes the characteristic time for a single compound i with a saturation vapour concentration Ceff,i to reach thermodynamic equilibrium between the gas and particle phases. The equilibration process was assumed to take place via gas-phase diffusion and absorption into a liquid-like phase present in the particles. It was further shown that τeq combines two previously derived and often applied time scales τa and τs that account for the changes in the gas and particle phase concentrations of i resulting from the equilibration, respectively. The validity of τeq was tested by comparing its predictions against results from a numerical model that explicitly simulates the transfer of i between the gas and particle phases. By conducting a large number of simulations where the values of the key input parameters were varied randomly, it was found out that τeq yields highly accurate results when i is a semi-volatile compound in the sense that the ratio of total (gas and particle phases) concentration of i to the saturation vapour concentration of i, μ, is below unity. On the other hand, the comparison of analytical and numerical time scales revealed that using τa or τs alone to calculate the equilibration time scale may lead to considerable errors. It was further shown that τeq tends to overpredict the equilibration time when i behaves as a non-volatile compound in a sense that μ > 1. Despite its simplicity, the time scale derived here has useful applications. First, it can be used to assess if semi-volatile compounds reach thermodynamic equilibrium during dynamic experiments that involve changes in the compound volatility. Second, the time scale can be used in modeling of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to check whether SOA forming compounds equilibrate over a certain time interval.

  15. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH CRANE OPERATOR, TED SEALS, POURING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH CRANE OPERATOR, TED SEALS, POURING MOLTEN METAL INTO A 1,300 TON ELECTRIC HOLDING FURNACE OR MIXER. AN ELECTRONIC SCALE RECORDED THAT 50.5 TONS OF METAL WERE POURED INTO THE FURNACE DURING THIS POUR. - American Cast Iron Pipe Company, Mixer Building, 1501 Thirty-first Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. A Statistical Treatment of Bioassay Pour Fractions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barengoltz, Jack; Hughes, David W.

    2014-01-01

    The binomial probability distribution is used to treat the statistics of a microbiological sample that is split into two parts, with only one part evaluated for spore count. One wishes to estimate the total number of spores in the sample based on the counts obtained from the part that is evaluated (pour fraction). Formally, the binomial distribution is recharacterized as a function of the observed counts (successes), with the total number (trials) an unknown. The pour fraction is the probability of success per spore (trial). This distribution must be renormalized in terms of the total number. Finally, the new renormalized distribution is integrated and mathematically inverted to yield the maximum estimate of the total number as a function of a desired level of confidence ( P(pour fraction. The extension to recovery efficiency corrections is also presented. Now the product of recovery efficiency and pour fraction may be small enough that the likely value may be much larger than the usual calculation: the number of spores divided by that product. The use of this analysis would not be limited to microbiological data.

  17. The ilmenite/titano-magnetite assemblage - Kinetics of re-equilibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, P. A.; Taylor, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    The petrogenesis of igneous and metamorphic rocks is a function of several parameters. Of these, temperature and pressure are of particular importance. Information concerning these two parameters is obtained through the use of mineral indicators. One such commonly used geothermometer/oxybarometer is that involving ilmenite/titano-magnetite. Anomalously low temperatures have been reported in cases in which the geothermometer/oxybarometer was employed. The studies suggest that low temperatures result from slow cooling rates which allows the Fe-Ti oxides to re-equilibrate. The current investigation is mainly concerned with the kinetics of the reduction of ilmenite-hematite solid solution, since this is the slower and, consequently, rate-controlling step in the re-equilibration process. The reaction rates determined for the reduction of ilmenites in the investigation are geologically rapid and must be considered when applying the considered geothermometer/oxybarometer.

  18. Dipolar degrees of freedom and isospin equilibration processes in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papa, M.; Berceanu, I.; Acosta, L.; Amorini, F.; Agodi, C.; Anzalone, A.; Auditore, L.; Cardella, G.; Cavallaro, S.; Chatterjee, M. B.; De Filippo, E.; Francalanza, L.; Geraci, E.; Grassi, L.; Gnoffo, B.; Han, J.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Maiolino, C.; Minniti, T.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2015-04-01

    The dipolar degrees of freedom on the 48Ca+27Al system at 40 MeV/nucleon have been investigated for the first time with the 4 π multidetector CHIMERA. The global variable was measured for well-reconstructed events in binary dissipative processes. Both the close link with isospin equilibration processes and its insensitivity to later statistical hot source decays have been discussed. This latter feature provides the opportunity to investigate globally and exclusively the dynamics of the equilibration processes. At this first level of investigation the experimental evidence, supported by the study of the reference system 27Al+40Ca and the auxiliary one 27Ca+48Ca , substantially agree with the CoMD-III calculations by describing the isovectorial forces through stiffness parameter values γ ≈0.8 -1.2 .

  19. Improvements in the gaseous hydrogen-water equilibration technique for hydrogen isotope ratio analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Wildman, J.D.; Chen, J.

    1991-01-01

    Improved precision in the H2-H2O equilibration method for ??D analysis has been achieved in an automated system. Reduction in 1-?? standard deviation of a single mass-spectrometer analysis to 1.3??? is achieved by (1) bonding catalyst to glass rods and assigning use to specific equilibration chambers to monitor performance of catalyst, (2) improving the apparatus design, and (3) reducing the H3+ contribution of the mass-spectrometer ion source. For replicate analysis of a water sample, the standard deviation improved to 0.8???. H2S-bearing samples and samples as small as 0.1 mL can be analyzed routinely with this method.

  20. Charge Equilibration Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Lipids, Bilayers, and Integral Membrane Protein Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Timothy R.; Bauer, Brad A.; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    With the continuing advances in computational hardware and novel force fields constructed using quantum mechanics, the outlook for non-additive force fields is promising. Our work in the past several years has demonstrated the utility of polarizable force fields, those based on the charge equilibration formalism, for a broad range of physical and biophysical systems. We have constructed and applied polarizable force fields for lipids and lipid bilayers. In this review of our recent work, we discuss the formalism we have adopted for implementing the charge equilibration (CHEQ) method for lipid molecules. We discuss the methodology, related issues, and briefly discuss results from recent applications of such force fields. Application areas include DPPC-water monolayers, potassium ion permeation free energetics in the gramicidin A bacterial channel, and free energetics of permeation of charged amino acid analogues across the water-bilayer interface. PMID:21967961

  1. Equilibration, thermalisation, and the emergence of statistical mechanics in closed quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Gogolin, Christian; Eisert, Jens

    2016-05-01

    We review selected advances in the theoretical understanding of complex quantum many-body systems with regard to emergent notions of quantum statistical mechanics. We cover topics such as equilibration and thermalisation in pure state statistical mechanics, the eigenstate thermalisation hypothesis, the equivalence of ensembles, non-equilibration dynamics following global and local quenches as well as ramps. We also address initial state independence, absence of thermalisation, and many-body localisation. We elucidate the role played by key concepts for these phenomena, such as Lieb-Robinson bounds, entanglement growth, typicality arguments, quantum maximum entropy principles and the generalised Gibbs ensembles, and quantum (non-)integrability. We put emphasis on rigorous approaches and present the most important results in a unified language. PMID:27088565

  2. Equilibration, thermalisation, and the emergence of statistical mechanics in closed quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogolin, Christian; Eisert, Jens

    2016-05-01

    We review selected advances in the theoretical understanding of complex quantum many-body systems with regard to emergent notions of quantum statistical mechanics. We cover topics such as equilibration and thermalisation in pure state statistical mechanics, the eigenstate thermalisation hypothesis, the equivalence of ensembles, non-equilibration dynamics following global and local quenches as well as ramps. We also address initial state independence, absence of thermalisation, and many-body localisation. We elucidate the role played by key concepts for these phenomena, such as Lieb-Robinson bounds, entanglement growth, typicality arguments, quantum maximum entropy principles and the generalised Gibbs ensembles, and quantum (non-)integrability. We put emphasis on rigorous approaches and present the most important results in a unified language.

  3. Learning to perceive in the sensorimotor approach: Piaget’s theory of equilibration interpreted dynamically

    PubMed Central

    Di Paolo, Ezequiel Alejandro; Barandiaran, Xabier E.; Beaton, Michael; Buhrmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Learning to perceive is faced with a classical paradox: if understanding is required for perception, how can we learn to perceive something new, something we do not yet understand? According to the sensorimotor approach, perception involves mastery of regular sensorimotor co-variations that depend on the agent and the environment, also known as the “laws” of sensorimotor contingencies (SMCs). In this sense, perception involves enacting relevant sensorimotor skills in each situation. It is important for this proposal that such skills can be learned and refined with experience and yet up to this date, the sensorimotor approach has had no explicit theory of perceptual learning. The situation is made more complex if we acknowledge the open-ended nature of human learning. In this paper we propose Piaget’s theory of equilibration as a potential candidate to fulfill this role. This theory highlights the importance of intrinsic sensorimotor norms, in terms of the closure of sensorimotor schemes. It also explains how the equilibration of a sensorimotor organization faced with novelty or breakdowns proceeds by re-shaping pre-existing structures in coupling with dynamical regularities of the world. This way learning to perceive is guided by the equilibration of emerging forms of skillful coping with the world. We demonstrate the compatibility between Piaget’s theory and the sensorimotor approach by providing a dynamical formalization of equilibration to give an explicit micro-genetic account of sensorimotor learning and, by extension, of how we learn to perceive. This allows us to draw important lessons in the form of general principles for open-ended sensorimotor learning, including the need for an intrinsic normative evaluation by the agent itself. We also explore implications of our micro-genetic account at the personal level. PMID:25126065

  4. Stochastic method for accommodation of equilibrating basins in kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Van Siclen, Clinton D

    2007-02-01

    A computationally simple way to accommodate "basins" of trapping states in standard kinetic Monte Carlo simulations is presented. By assuming the system is effectively equilibrated in the basin, the residence time (time spent in the basin before escape) and the probabilities for transition to states outside the basin may be calculated. This is demonstrated for point defect diffusion over a periodic grid of sites containing a complex basin.

  5. Sevoflurane in low-flow anesthesia using “equilibration point”

    PubMed Central

    Chatrath, Veena; Khetarpal, Ranjana; Bansal, Divya; Kaur, Harjinder

    2016-01-01

    Context: While giving low-flow anesthesia, it is a routine practice to give fixed duration of initial high-flow. This study was conducted to show the use of equilibration point as changeover point from initial high-flow to low-flow. Aims: It was to compare the use of equilibration point, hemodynamics, end-tidal agent concentration, recovery time, and recovery score between isoflurane and sevoflurane. Settings and Design: It was a prospective randomized study conducted on 100 patients who were admitted for elective surgery expected to be < 2 h duration. Materials and Methods: Patients were randomly assigned to one of the two groups of 50 each. Group I received isoflurane and Group S sevoflurane as an inhalational agent. Statistical Analysis: The observations obtained in both the groups were recorded and compared. Analysis was done using unpaired t-test and Chi-square test. Results: Hemodynamic parameters were comparable in both the groups. The mean equilibration times obtained for sevoflurane and isoflurane were 8.22 ± 1.060 min and 17.24 ± 10.2 min, respectively. The drift in end-tidal agent concentration over time was less in sevoflurane group. Mean recovery time was 7.92 ± 1.56 min in the sevoflurane group and 12.89 ± 3.45 min in the isoflurane group (P = 0.001). There was no significant difference between intraoperative and postoperative complications. Conclusion: Use of equilibration time of the volatile anesthetic agent as a changeover point, from high-flow to low-flow, can help us to use circle system with low-flow anesthesia in a more efficient way, especially with newer anesthetics such as sevoflurane. PMID:27212762

  6. Technical note: Assessing gas equilibration systems for continuous pCO2 measurements in inland waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Tae Kyung; Jin, Hyojin; Oh, Neung-Hwan; Park, Ji-Hyung

    2016-07-01

    High-frequency continuous measurements of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) are crucial for constraining the spatiotemporal dynamics of CO2 emissions from inland water systems. However, direct measurements of pCO2 are scarce, and no systematic comparisons have been conducted on the suitability of the widely used measurement systems for continuous underway or long-term deployment in various field conditions. We compared spray- and marble-type equilibrators and a membrane-enclosed CO2 sensor to assess their suitability for continuous long-term or underway pCO2 measurements in an urbanized river system in Korea. Both equilibrators had a shorter response time compared with the membrane-enclosed sensor, and could capture large spatial variations of pCO2 during a transect study along a highly urbanized river reach. The membrane-enclosed sensor based on passive equilibration provided comparable underway measurements along the river sections where pCO2 varied within the sensor detection range. When deployed in a eutrophic river site, the membrane-enclosed sensor was able to detect large diel variations in pCO2. However, biofouling on the membrane could reduce the accuracy of the measurement during long deployments exceeding several days. The overall results suggest that the fast response of the equilibrator systems facilitates capturing large spatial variations in pCO2 during short underway measurements. However, the attendant technical challenges of these systems, such as clogging and desiccant maintenance, have to be addressed carefully to enable their long-term deployment. The membrane-enclosed sensor would be suitable as an alternative tool for long-term continuous measurements if membrane biofouling could be overcome by appropriate antifouling measures such as copper mesh coverings.

  7. Cyclic kinetics during thermal equilibration of an axially chiral bis-spiropyran.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Pintu K; Lerner, Avishai; Kučanda, Kristina; Leitus, Gregory; Klajn, Rafal

    2014-08-13

    A compound combining the features of a molecular rotor and a photoswitch was synthesized and was shown to exist as three diastereomers, which interconvert via a reversible cyclic reaction scheme. Each of the three diastereomers was isolated, and by following the equilibration kinetics, activation barriers for all reactions were calculated. The results indicate that the properties of molecular switches depend heavily on their immediate chemical environment. The conclusions are important in the context of designing new switchable molecules and materials. PMID:25072292

  8. Adaptive network based on fuzzy inference system for equilibrated urea concentration prediction.

    PubMed

    Azar, Ahmad Taher

    2013-09-01

    Post-dialysis urea rebound (PDUR) has been attributed mostly to redistribution of urea from different compartments, which is determined by variations in regional blood flows and transcellular urea mass transfer coefficients. PDUR occurs after 30-90min of short or standard hemodialysis (HD) sessions and after 60min in long 8-h HD sessions, which is inconvenient. This paper presents adaptive network based on fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) for predicting intradialytic (Cint) and post-dialysis urea concentrations (Cpost) in order to predict the equilibrated (Ceq) urea concentrations without any blood sampling from dialysis patients. The accuracy of the developed system was prospectively compared with other traditional methods for predicting equilibrated urea (Ceq), post dialysis urea rebound (PDUR) and equilibrated dialysis dose (eKt/V). This comparison is done based on root mean squares error (RMSE), normalized mean square error (NRMSE), and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). The ANFIS predictor for Ceq achieved mean RMSE values of 0.3654 and 0.4920 for training and testing, respectively. The statistical analysis demonstrated that there is no statistically significant difference found between the predicted and the measured values. The percentage of MAE and RMSE for testing phase is 0.63% and 0.96%, respectively. PMID:23806679

  9. Effect of cryoprotectant and equilibration temperature on cryopreservation of Lama glama spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Carretero, M I; Neild, D M; Ferrante, A; Caldevilla, M; Arraztoa, C C; Fumuso, F G; Giuliano, S M

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of two equilibration temperatures (5 °C and room temperature) and two cryoprotectants (glycerol and dimethylformamide, both at 7%) on llama sperm cryopreservation. Llama ejaculates were divided into four aliquots. A lactose-EDTA-egg yolk (LEEY) extender with either 7% glycerol (LEEY-G) or 7% dimethylformamide (LEEY-DMF) was added to two of the aliquots, which were equilibrated for 20 min at room temperature and subsequently frozen. The other two aliquots were extended in LEEY, cooled to 5 °C, then LEEY-G or LEEY-DMF was added, equilibrated for 20 min at 5 °C and frozen. No significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed in membrane function and chromatin condensation between any of the freeze-thawing protocols. Post-thaw motility was greater (P < 0.05) in LEEY-DMF than LEEY-G. DNA fragmentation was not different between raw and frozen semen with LEEY-DMF but was high in all samples with glycerol. Our results indicate that 7% glycerol would be detrimental for llama spermatozoa, but further studies are needed to evaluate effectiveness if used at lower concentrations. Dimethylformamide preserved motility and DNA integrity of frozen-thawed llama spermatozoa and could be used to replace glycerol at the concentrations used in this study. PMID:25059904

  10. Isotope studies of hydrogen and oxygen in ground ice-experiences with the equilibration technique.

    PubMed

    Meyer, H; Schönicke, L; Wand, U; Hubberten, H W; Friedrichsen, H

    2000-01-01

    Equilibration technique suitable for a large amount of samples is described for hydrogen and oxygen isotope analyses of ground ice, especially ice wedges, including the sampling strategy and the analytical procedure as well as the calibration of the Finnigan MAT Delta-S mass spectrometer in June, 1999. Since for future analyses of ice wedges, a higher sampling resolution with limited sample volume is required, the limit of the equilibration technique for small water sample sizes of between 0.05 and 5 ml was checked. For water samples smaller than 1 ml, corresponding to a molar ratio [H2O]/[H2] of smaller than 0.994, a balance correction has to be applied. The experimental errors due to partial evaporation during evacuation, the balance calculation of the isotope equilibration process, the linearity as well as memory effects of the mass spectrometer for samples with large differences in delta18O and deltaD are tackled in this paper. In the polar regions of Northern Siberia without Late Pleistocene and Holocene glaciation, ground ice is used as an archive for paleoclimate studies. First results of stable isotope measurements on ice wedges clearly show a shift towards heavier isotopes and thus warmer winter temperatures as well as a change in the source of the precipitation between Late Pleistocene and Holocene. These results indicate the high potential of ground ice for paleoclimate studies. PMID:11077928

  11. Fermi level equilibration between colloidal lead and silver particles in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Henglein, A.; Holzwarth, A.; Mulvaney, P.

    1992-10-29

    Colloidal solutions of lead and silver were mixed under the exclusion of air. The equilibration of the Fermi levels in the two different types of metal particles took place over a few days at room temperature. The equilibration took place by the transfer of lead atoms from lead to silver particles until the latter carried a lead mantle of one to two monolayers. This could be concluded from the observed changes in the optical spectrum of the silver particles. The results are discussed in terms of two mechanisms: (1) Pb atom transfer following heterocoagulation of the lead and silver particles and (2) electron transfer during Brownian encounters, followed by Pb{sup 2+} desorption from the lead particles and subsequent Pb{sup 2+} reductor on the silver particles carrying the transferred electrons. Traces of methylviologen, MV{sup 2+}, in the solution drastically increase the rate of equilibration; this is explained by a relay mechanism in which electrons in the lead particles are first picked up by MV{sup 2+} and are then transferred from MV{sup +} to the silver particles. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Mechanism of Isospin Equilibration in Semi-Peripheral Heavy Ion Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinska-Pfabe, Malgorzata

    2006-04-01

    The BUU formalism with the inclusion of fluctuations was used to study a mechanism of isospin equilibration in semi-peripheral collisions of heavy ions close to the Fermi energy. In order to investigate the density dependence of the asymmetry term in the nuclear equation of state (i.e. the asy-stiffness of the equation of state) the calculations with different parametrization of this term were performed. It has been found that the low density interface between the interacting nuclei which develops in semi-peripheral collisions plays an important role in controlling the currents of neutrons and protons. The isospin transport is affected by an interplay between drift and diffusion being driven by differences in N/Z ratio and by density gradients. Both, the drift and the diffusion are sensitive to the asy-stiffness of the nuclear equation of state. A study of the isospin transport ratio shows that the experiment seems to favor a more asy-stiff equation of state and that a more asy-soft equation leads to a larger isospin equilibration. We may conclude that the charge equilibration measurements for semi-peripheral collisions provide an effective tool to investigate the properties of asymmetric nuclear matter. In collaboration with Massimo Di Toro, Maria Colonna, and Virgil Baran, LNS, Catania, Italy; and Hermann Wolter, University of Munich, Munich, Germany.

  13. Selective Equilibration of Spin-Polarized Quantum Hall Edge States in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amet, F.; Williams, J. R.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2014-05-01

    We report on transport measurements of dual-gated, single-layer graphene devices in the quantum Hall regime, allowing for independent control of the filling factors in adjoining regions. Progress in device quality allows us to study scattering between edge states when the fourfold degeneracy of the Landau level is lifted by electron correlations, causing edge states to be spin and/or valley polarized. In this new regime, we observe a dramatic departure from the equilibration seen in more disordered devices: edge states with opposite spins propagate without mixing. As a result, the degree of equilibration inferred from transport can reveal the spin polarization of the ground state at each filling factor. In particular, the first Landau level is shown to be spin polarized at half filling, providing an independent confirmation of a conclusion of Young et al. [Nat. Phys. 8, 550 (2012)]. The conductance in the bipolar regime is strongly suppressed, indicating that copropagating edge states, even with the same spin, do not equilibrate along PN interfaces. We attribute this behavior to the formation of an insulating ν =0 stripe at the PN interface.

  14. Relative rates of albumin equilibration in the skin interstitium and lymph during vasodilation

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, M.R.; Wallace, J.R.; Bell, D.R.

    1986-03-01

    The initial equilibration of /sup 125/I-labeled albumin between the vascular and extravascular compartments was studied in hindpaw skin of 6 anesthetized rabbits. Papavarine (200 ug/min) was infused into a small branch of the femoral artery of one limb with the contralateral limb as a control. There was a 1.2-fold increase in lymph flow (p < 0.01) with no significant change in the lymph-to-plasma total protein concentration ratio from prepopliteal lymphatics following papavarine. After reaching a constant, elevated lymph flow, tracer labeled albumin was infused to maintain the plasma activity constant for 3 hrs. The plasma volume in tissue samples was measured using /sup 131/I-labeled albumin injected 10 min before ending the experiment. Endogenous albumin was measured in plasma, lymph, and tissue samples using rocket electroimmunoassay. After 3 hrs of tracer infusion, lymph specific activity relative to plasma was significantly greater in the vasodilated hindlimb (0.30 +/- 0.07 vs 0.13 +/- 0.05; mean +/- SE; p < 0.01). Extravascular specific activity relative to plasma was greater in the vasodilated limb (0.13 +/- 0.02 vs 0.09 +/- 0.02; p < 0.05). Thus, vasodilation increased the rates at which lymph and tissue equilibrate with plasma. Also, the difference between lymph and tissue equilibration was greater in the vasodilated hindlimb.

  15. Posttransfusion Haematocrit Equilibration: Timing Posttransfusion Haematocrit Check in Neonates at the National Hospital, Abuja, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Audu, L. I.; Otuneye, A. T.; Mairami, A. B.; Mshelia, L. J.; Nwatah, V. E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaemia is a common morbidity in the NICU and often requires transfusion of packed red blood cells. Haematocrit equilibration following red cell transfusion occurs over time ultimately resulting in a stable packed cell volume (PCV). Knowledge of this equilibration process is pertinent in the accurate timing of posttransfusion (PT) PCV. We conducted a prospective study to determine an appropriate timing for PT PCV estimation on 47 stable anaemic babies at the Neonatal Unit of National Hospital, Abuja. Values of PCV were determined before transfusion and at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours posttransfusion. Forty of the recruited neonates and young infants were analyzed. Their gestational age range was 26 to 40 weeks. 1-hour PT PCV (48.5% ± 5.5%) was similar to the 6-hour PT PCV (47.8% ± 5.6%) P = 0.516, but both were significantly different from the 12-hour (46.8% ± 5.9%), 24-hour (45.9 ± 5.8%), and 48-hour (45.4% ± 6.2%) PT PCVs. The 12-hour PT PCV was similar to the 24-hour and 48-hour PT PCVs (P = 0.237 and 0.063, resp.). We concluded that, in stable nonhaemorrhaging and nonhaemolysing young infants, the estimated timing of haematocrit equilibration and, consequently, posttransfusion PCV is 12 hours after red blood cell transfusion. PMID:25861284

  16. Estimation of membrane diffusion coefficients and equilibration times for low-density polyethylene passive diffusion samplers.

    PubMed

    Divine, Craig E; McCray, John E

    2004-03-15

    Passive diffusion (PD) samplers offer several potential technical and cost-related advantages, particularly for measuring dissolved gases and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in groundwater at contaminated sites. Sampler equilibration is a diffusion-type process; therefore, equilibration time is dependent on sampler dimensions, membrane thickness, and the temperature-dependent membrane diffusion coefficient (Dm) for the analyte of interest. Diffusion coefficients for low-density polyethylene membranes were measured for He, Ne, H2, O2, and N2 in laboratory experiments and ranged from 1.1 to 1.9 x 10(-7) cm2 sec(-1) (21 degrees C). Additionally, Dm values for several commonly occurring VOCs were estimated from empirical experimental data previously presented by others (Vroblesky, D. A.; Campbell, T. R. Adv. Environ. Res. 2001, 5(1), 1.), and estimated values ranged from 1.7 to 4.4 x 10(-7) cm2 sec(-1) (21 degrees C). On the basis of these Dm ranges, PD sampler equilibration time is predicted for various sampler dimensions, including dimensions consistent with simple constructed samplers used in this study and commercially available samplers. Additionally, a numerical model is presented that can be used to evaluate PD sampler concentration "lag time" for conditions in which in situ concentrations are temporally variable. The model adequately predicted lag time for laboratory experiments and is used to show that data obtained from appropriately designed PD samplers represent near-instantaneous measurement of in situ concentrations for most field conditions. PMID:15074699

  17. First come, first served. Does pouring sequence matter for consumption?

    PubMed

    Stroebele-Benschop, Nanette; Dieze, Anastasia; Hilzendegen, Carolin

    2016-10-01

    Various environmental factors associated with eating and drinking affect people's food choice and food intake. Lately, the role of tableware has been studied in more detail. The aim of this study was to determine whether pouring sequence of food components affects portion size. Study 1 invited participants to pour a beverage containing both apple juice and sparkling water. Pouring apple juice first increased juice by almost 25% compared to pouring water first. Pouring water first increased water by almost 19% compared to pouring juice first confirming our hypothesis that pouring sequence affects the ratio poured. Study 2 asked participants to prepare themselves a snack containing cereals with milk. Within-subject comparisons revealed that pouring milk before cereals significantly increased both milk and cereal amounts resulting in larger overall portion size compared to pouring cereals before adding milk. Habitual tendencies for preparing foods causing a perception bias or a perception bias itself could be possible explanations for the divergent study findings. These findings show for the first time the influence of pouring and preparation sequence on portion size. PMID:27417334

  18. Metal-Silicate Equilibration at Super-Liquidus Temperatures During Core Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernlund, J. W.; Ichikawa, H.; Labrosse, S.; Kameyama, M.

    2014-12-01

    Experimental constraints on the partitioning of moderately siderophile elements between metal and silicates during core formation suggest equilibration temperatures significantly greater than the liquidus of the silicate Earth (e.g., Wade and Wood, 2005). However, because equilibration was considered to occur in a ponded metal at the silicate solidus, such high temperature equilibration was rejected as implausible. Instead, lower temperature equilibration with variable oxygen fugacity was proposed as an alternative, although the plausibility of the physical mechanisms invoked in this scenario is also questionable. We have re-visited the model of metal-silicate separation in large molten pockets following energetic accretion events, and find that silicate-metal equlibration is most rapid when the iron rains out of the magma, and the release of gravitational potential energy by this rain heats the mixture by as much as 1000 K above the liquidus. However, the first drops of iron rain to pond at the base of the molten pocket will equilibrate at lower temperatures, and only the final drops will be subject to the highest temperatures. We model rain fall and heating of the magma by viscous dissipation to calculate the effective pressure-temperature conditions for partitioning in this scenario, and find that effective pressure conditions are smaller than the pressure at the base of the molten pocket. The ponded metal itself is gravitationally stratified (both in composition and temperature), and is not expected to convect or mix until it undergoes subsequent downward transport into the Earth's core. We also suggest that such a process operating during the very largest giant impact events (extending into the deep mantle) may have given rise to a buoyant oxygen-enriched metal layer atop the outer core, as suggested by some seismological models of the present-day Earth (e.g., Helffrich and Kaneshima, 2010). References: Helffrich, G. and S. Kaneshima (2010), Outer

  19. A new equilibrator: A device for the determination of the distribution ratio of a volatile solute between two miscible solvents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, G.

    1928-01-01

    A description is given of a new device, called an equilibrator, which by mere rotation acts as an automatic circulating pump, forcing a gas or vapor to bubble continuously and in turn through two separated liquids.

  20. Effect of Extender and Equilibration Time on Post Thaw Motility and Chromatin Structure of Buffalo Bull (Bubalus Bubalis) Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Shahverdi, Abdolhossain; Rastegarnia, Abdolreza; Rezaei Topraggaleh, Tohid

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of four equilibration times (2, 4, 8 and 16 hours) and two extenders (tris or Bioxcell®) on cryopreservation of buffalo semen. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, split pooled ejaculates (n=4), possessing more than 70% visual sperm motility were divided in two aliquots and diluted in Bioxcell® and tris-citric egg yolk (TCE) extenders. Semen was cooled to 4°C within 2 hours, equilibrated at 4°C for 2, 4, 8 and 16 hours, then transferred into 0.5 ml French straws, and frozen in a programmable cell freezer before being plunged into liquid nitrogen. Postthaw motility characteristics, plasma membrane integrity, acrosome morphology and DNA integrity of the buffalo sperm were studied after thawing. Results There were significant interactions between equilibration times and extenders for sperm motility and membrane integrity. Post thaw sperm motility (PMOT), progressive motile spermatozoa (PROG), plasma membrane integrity (PMI) and normal apical ridge (NAR) measures were lower for sperm equilibrated for 2 hours in both TCE and Bioxcell® extender compared to others equilibration times. PMOT, PMI and NAR for sperm equilibrated for 4, 8 and 16 hours showed no significant differences in either extender, although PROG measures were superior in Bioxcell®compared to TCE at all equilibration times (p<0.05). Kinematic parameters such as average path velocity, curvilinear velocity and linearity in the Bioxcell®extender were superior to those in the TCE extender studied. In contrast to motility and viability, the DNA integrity of post thaw spermatozoa remained unaffected by different equilibration times. Conclusion Equilibration time is necessary for preservation of the motility and integrity of buffalo sperm membranes. Equilibration times of over than 2 hours resulted in the greatest preservation of total semen parameters during cryopreservation. There were no significant interactions between

  1. Plutonium Immobilization Program cold pour tests

    SciTech Connect

    Hovis, G.L.; Stokes, M.W.; Smith, M.E.; Wong, J.W.

    1999-07-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) is a joint venture between the Savannah River Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to carry out the disposition of excess weapons-grade plutonium. This program uses the can-in-canister (CIC) approach. CIC involves encapsulating plutonium in ceramic forms (or pucks), placing the pucks in sealed stainless steel cans, placing the cans in long cylindrical magazines, latching the magazines to racks inside Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters, and filling the DWPF canisters with high-level waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it attractive for reuse. At present, the DWPF pours glass into empty canisters. In the CIC approach, the addition of a stainless steel rack, magazines, cans, and ceramic pucks to the canisters introduces a new set of design and operational challenges: All of the hardware installed in the canisters must maintain structural integrity at elevated (molten-glass) temperatures. This suggests that a robust design is needed. However, the amount of material added to the DWPF canister must be minimized to prevent premature glass cooling and excessive voiding caused by a large internal thermal mass. High metal temperatures, minimizing thermal mass, and glass flow paths are examples of the types of technical considerations of the equipment design process. To determine the effectiveness of the design in terms of structural integrity and glass-flow characteristics, full-scale testing will be conducted. A cold (nonradioactive) pour test program is planned to assist in the development and verification of a baseline design for the immobilization canister to be used in the PIP process. The baseline design resulting from the cold pour test program and CIC equipment development program will provide input to Title 1 design for second-stage immobilization. The cold pour tests will be conducted in two

  2. Development of a silicone membrane tube equilibrator for measuring partial pressures of volatile organic compounds in natural water.

    PubMed

    Ooki, Atsushi; Yokouchi, Yoko

    2008-08-01

    Methods for determining volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water and air are required so that the VOCs' fluxes in water environments can be estimated. We developed a silicone membrane tube equilibrator for collecting gas-phase samples containing VOCs at equilibrium with natural water. The equilibrator consists of six silicone tubes housed in a polyvinyl chloride pipe. Equilibrated air samples collected from the equilibrator were analyzed with an automated preconcentration gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system for hourly measurements of VOC partial pressures. The partial pressures of all the target VOCs reached equilibrium within 1 h in the equilibrator. The system was used to determine VOC partial pressures in Lake Kasumigaura, a shallow eutrophic lake with a high concentration of suspended particulate matter (SPM). Compressed air was used daily to remove SPM deposited on the inner wall of the equilibrator and to maintain the equilibrium conditions for more than a week without the need to shut the system down. CH2Br2, CHCl3, CHBrCl2, CH2BrCl, C2H5I, C2Cl4, CH3I, and CH3Br in the lake were supersaturated with respect to the air, whereas CH3CI was undersaturated. CHCl3 had the highest flux (6.2 nmol m(-2) hr(-1)) during the observation period. PMID:18754497

  3. Kinetics of bacterial potentiometric titrations: the effect of equilibration time on buffering capacity of Pantoea agglomerans suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kapetas, Leon; Ngwenya, Bryne T; Macdonald, Alan M; Elphick, Stephen C

    2011-07-15

    Several recent studies have made use of continuous acid-base titration data to describe the surface chemistry of bacterial cells as a basis for accurately modelling metal adsorption to bacteria and other biomaterials of potential industrial importance. These studies do not share a common protocol; rather they titrate in different pH ranges and they use different stability criteria to define equilibration time during titration. In the present study we investigate the kinetics of bacterial titrations and test the effect they have on the derivation of functional group concentrations and acidity constants. We titrated suspensions of Pantoea agglomerans by varying the equilibration time between successive titrant additions until stability of 0.1 or 0.001 mV s(-1) was attained. We show that under longer equilibration times, titration results are less reproducible and suspensions exhibit marginally higher buffering. Fluorescence images suggest that cell lysis is not responsible for these effects. Rather, high DOC values and titration reversibility hysterisis after long equilibration times suggest that variability in buffering is due to the presence of bacterial exudates, as demonstrated by titrating supernatants separated from suspensions of different equilibration times. It is recommended that an optimal equilibration time is always determined with variable stability control and preliminary reversibility titration experiments. PMID:21543082

  4. Developpement d'une plateforme de calcul d'equilibres chimiques complexes et adaptation aux problemes electrochimiques et d'equilibres contraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neron, Alex

    Avec l'arrivée de l'environnement comme enjeu mondial, le secteur de l'efficacité énergétique prend une place de plus en plus importante pour les entreprises autant au niveau économique que pour l'image de la compagnie. Par le fait même, le domaine des technologies de l'énergie est un créneau de recherche dont les projets en cours se multiplient. D'ailleurs, un des problèmes qui peut survenir fréquemment dans certaines entreprises est d'aller mesurer la composition des matériaux dans des conditions difficiles d'accès. C'est le cas par exemple de l'électrolyse de l'aluminium qui se réalise à des températures très élevées. Pour pallier à ce problème, il faut créer et valider des modèles mathématiques qui vont calculer la composition et les propriétés à l'équilibre du système chimique. Ainsi, l'objectif global du projet de recherche est de développer un outil de calcul d'équilibres chimiques complexes (plusieurs réactions et plusieurs phases) et l'adapter aux problèmes électrochimiques et d'équilibres contraints. Plus spécifiquement, la plateforme de calcul doit tenir compte de la variation de température due à un gain ou une perte en énergie du système. Elle doit aussi considérer la limitation de l'équilibre due à un taux de réaction et enfin, résoudre les problèmes d'équilibres électrochimiques. Pour y parvenir, les propriétés thermodynamiques telles que l'énergie libre de Gibbs, la fugacité et l'activité sont tout d'abord étudiées pour mieux comprendre les interactions moléculaires qui régissent les équilibres chimiques. Ensuite, un bilan énergétique est inséré à la plateforme de calcul, ce qui permet de calculer la température à laquelle le système est le plus stable en fonction d'une température initiale et d'une quantité d'énergie échangée. Puis, une contrainte cinétique est ajoutée au système afin de calculer les équilibres pseudo-stationnaires en évolution dans le temps. De plus, la

  5. Non equilibrium dynamics of mixing, oscillations, and equilibration: A model study

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Chiu Man; Boyanovsky, D.; Ho, C. M.

    2006-12-22

    The non-equilibrium dynamics of mixing, oscillations and equilibration is studied in a field theory of flavored neutral mesons that effectively models two flavors of mixed neutrinos, in interaction with other mesons that represent a thermal bath of hadrons or quarks and charged leptons. This model describes the general features of neutrino mixing and relaxation via charged currents in a medium. The reduced density matrix and the non-equilibrium effective action that describes the propagation of neutrinos is obtained by integrating out the bath degrees of freedom. We obtain the dispersion relations, mixing angles and relaxation rates of ``neutrino'' quasiparticles. The dispersion relations and mixing angles are of the same form as those of neutrinos in the medium, and the relaxation rates are given by $\\Gamma_1(k) = \\Gamma_{ee}(k) \\cos^2\\theta_m(k)+\\Gamma_{\\mu\\mu}(k)\\sin^2\\theta_m(k); \\Gamma_2(k)= \\Gamma_{\\mu\\mu}(k) \\cos^2\\theta_m(k)+\\Gamma_{ee}(k)\\sin^2\\theta_m(k) $ where $\\Gamma_{\\alpha\\alpha}(k)$ are the relaxation rates of the flavor fields in \\emph{absence} of mixing, and $\\theta_m(k)$ is the mixing angle in the medium. A Weisskopf-Wigner approximation that describes the asymptotic time evolution in terms of a non-hermitian Hamiltonian is derived. At long time $>>\\Gamma^{-1}_{1,2}$ ``neutrinos'' equilibrate with the bath. The equilibrium density matrix is nearly diagonal in the basis of eigenstates of an \\emph{effective Hamiltonian that includes self-energy corrections in the medium}. The equilibration of ``sterile neutrinos'' via active-sterile mixing is discussed.

  6. Immunocytochemical demonstration of the equilibrative nucleoside transporter rENT1 in rat sinoatrial node.

    PubMed

    Musa, H; Dobrzynski, H; Berry, Z; Abidi, F; Cass, C E; Young, J D; Baldwin, S A; Boyett, M R

    2002-03-01

    Adenosine exerts multiple receptor-mediated effects in the heart, including a negative chronotropic effect on the sinoatrial node. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of the equilibrative nucleoside transporter rENT1 in rat sinoatrial node and atrial muscle. Immunocytochemistry and/or immunoblotting revealed abundant expression of this protein in plasma membranes of sinoatrial node and in atrial and ventricular cells. Because rENT1-mediated transport is likely to regulate the local concentrations of adenosine in the sinoatrial node and other parts of the heart, it represents a potential pharmacological target that might be exploited to ameliorate ischemic damage during heart surgery. PMID:11850433

  7. FRONT VIEW OF POURING FROM #61 HOLDING FURNACE AT #02 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FRONT VIEW OF POURING FROM #61 HOLDING FURNACE AT #02 STATION INTO THREE VERTICAL MOLDS SUBMERGED IN A WATER-FILLED TANK BELOW THE CASTING FLOOR. THE CASTING CREW'S JOBS DURING THIS PHASE OF THE OPERATION INCLUDE REGULATING THE POURING RATE AND MONITORING THE VALVE RODS THAT CONTROL THE WATER SPRAYS ON THE MOLDS. DIFFERENT ALLOYS REQUIRE SPECIFIC POURING SPEEDS AND WATER PRESSURES. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  8. Stability of β-equilibrated dense matter and core-crust transition in neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atta, Debasis; Basu, D. N.

    2014-09-01

    The stability of the β-equilibrated dense nuclear matter is analyzed with respect to the thermodynamic stability conditions. Based on the density dependent M3Y effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, the effects of the nuclear incompressibility on the proton fraction in neutron stars and the location of the inner edge of their crusts and core-crust transition density and pressure are investigated. The high-density behavior of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter satisfies the constraints from the observed flow data of heavy-ion collisions. The neutron star properties studied using β-equilibrated neutron star matter obtained from this effective interaction for a pure hadronic model agree with the recent observations of the massive compact stars. The density, pressure, and proton fraction at the inner edge separating the liquid core from the solid crust of neutron stars are determined to be ρt=0.0938 fm-3, Pt=0.5006 MeV fm-3, and xp (t)=0.0308, respectively.

  9. Comparison of two methods to assess blood CO2 equilibration curve in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Cavaliere, Franco; Giovannini, Ivo; Chiarla, Carlo; Conti, Giorgio; Pennisi, Mariano A; Montini, Luca; Gaspari, Rita; Proietti, Rodolfo

    2005-03-01

    In order to compare two mathematical methods to assess the blood CO2 equilibration curve from a single blood gas analysis [Loeppky, J.A., Luft, U.C., Fletcher, E.R., 1983. Quantitative description of whole blood CO2 dissociation curve and Haldane effect. Resp. Physiol. 51, 167-181; Giovannini, I., Chiarla, C., Boldrini, G., Castagneto, M., 1993. Calculation of venoarterial CO2 concentration difference. J. Appl. Physiol. 74, 959-964], arterial and central venous blood gas analyses and oximetry were performed before and after ventilatory resetting, at constant arterial O2 saturation, in 12 mechanically ventilated patients. CO2 equilibration curves obtained from basal arterial blood gas analyses were used to predict arterial CO2 content after ventilatory resetting and vice versa. Internal consistency was very good for both methods and comparable. Method 2 also yielded excellent predictions of changes of arterial pH associated with ventilatory resetting. In determining Haldane effect, method 2 yielded very stable results within the expected range of values, while method 1 yielded a wider spread of results. Method 2 appeared more suitable to determine the Haldane effect in the conditions of the study, probably due to an approach minimizing the effect of potential sources of inaccuracy. PMID:15733781

  10. A simple automated continuous-flow-equilibration method for measuring carbon monoxide in seawater.

    PubMed

    Xie, H; Zafiriou, O C; Wang, W; Taylor, C D

    2001-04-01

    A simple, robust, low-maintenance method using air-segmented continuous-flow equilibration was developed and automated to measure carbon monoxide (CO) in natural waters precisely and accurately. Finely regulated flows of CO-free air and of seawater or standard water were pumped into a glass coil, forming discrete gas/liquid segments. The partially CO-equilibrated gas effluent was injected into a Trace Analytical reduction analyzer for CO detection. A semiempirical mass-balance model was established for predicting and optimizing the performance of the CO extractor. The optimized gas and water flow rates were approximately 1.2 and approximately 14 mL min(-1), respectively, giving a response time of less than 15 min and a CO-extraction yield of approximately 80%. The analytical blank, precision, and accuracy were, respectively, 0.02 nM, +/-2.5% (at the approximately 1 nM level), and better than 5%. Two extractors can be interfaced to one detector at 4-6 samples per hour for each extractor. Coupled with a continuous surface-water sampler, the system was successfully applied to monitoring the diurnal variation of CO concentration in Sargasso Sea surface waters. PMID:11348089

  11. Heavy baryonic resonances, multistrange hadrons, and equilibration at energies available at the GSI Schwerionensynchrotron, SIS18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinheimer, J.; Lorenz, M.; Becattini, F.; Stock, R.; Bleicher, M.

    2016-06-01

    We study the details and time dependence of particle production in nuclear collisions at a fixed target beam energy of Elab=1.76 A GeV with the UrQMD transport model. We find that the previously proposed production mechanisms for multistrange hadrons ϕ and Ξ are possible due to secondary interactions of incoming nuclei of the projectile and target with already created nuclear resonances, while the Fermi momenta of the nuclei play only a minor role. We also show how the centrality dependence of these particle multiplicities can be used to confirm the proposed mechanism, as it strongly depends on the number of participants in the reaction. Furthermore we investigate the time dependence of particle production in collisions of Ca + Ca at this beam energy, in order to understand the origins of the apparent chemical equilibration of the measured particle yields. We find that indeed the light hadron yields appear to be in equilibrium already from the very early stage of the collision, while in fact no local equilibration, through multicollision processes, takes place. The apparent equilibrium is reached only through the decay of the resonances according to available phase space.

  12. Equilibration and GGE in interacting-to-free quantum quenches in dimensions d\\gt 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriadis, Spyros; Martelloni, Gabriele

    2016-03-01

    Ground states ofinteracting QFTs are non-Gaussian states, i.e. their connected n-point correlation functions do not vanish for n\\gt 2, in contrast to the free QFT case. We show that, when the ground state of an interacting QFT evolves under a free massive QFT for a long time (a scenario that can be realised by a quantum quench), the connected correlation functions decay and all local physical observables equilibrate to values that are given by a Gaussian density matrix that retains memory only of the two-point initial correlation function. The argument hinges upon the fundamental physical principle of cluster decomposition, which is valid for the ground state of a general QFT. An analogous result was already known to be valid in the case of d = 1 spatial dimensions, where it is a special case of the so-called generalised Gibbs ensemble (GGE) hypothesis, and we now generalise it to higher dimensions. Moreover, in the case of massless free evolution, despite the fact that the evolution may lead not to equilibration but instead to unbounded increase of correlations with time, the GGE gives correctly the leading-order asymptotic behaviour of correlation functions in the thermodynamic and large time limit. The demonstration is performed in the context of a bosonic relativistic QFT, but the arguments apply more generally.

  13. Revisiting methods to predict the rate of equilibration of viscous aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Meara, Simon; Topping, David; McFiggans, Gordon

    2016-04-01

    Recent attention on aerosol particle phase state has motivated questions about methods to model diffusion through them. At the single particle level, some methods have already been used to: prescribe general equilibration timescales; infer relative importance of processes in SOA formation; derive diffusion coefficients in mixtures and even assess effects on cloud dynamics. Modelling diffusion is a well-established discipline. It is important to assess models that attempt to predict or infer the effects of diffusion limitations in order to report findings with confidence. In this study, we compare equilibration timescales estimated by three different models. Particles were subject to varying saturation ratio changes of a semi-volatile component in the gas phase, with the diffusion coefficient both dependent and independent of composition. We show that introducing a composition dependant diffusion coefficient significantly alters the perceived importance of kinetic mass transfer limitations in viscous aerosol, relative to a constant diffusion coefficient. In a fickian framework, simplified approximations to the partial differential form of Ficks second law can be used for all studied scenarios, although computational expense of previously available models may be an important factor to consider. We demonstrate the ability to capture the behaviour of simulations with compositional dependant diffusion coefficients in a box model framework, enabling potential effects on the microphysics of aerosol populations to be assessed.

  14. Multiscale approach for the construction of equilibrated all-atom models of a poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianfeng; Murthy, N Sanjeeva; Becker, Matthew L; Latour, Robert A

    2016-06-01

    A multiscale modeling approach is presented for the efficient construction of an equilibrated all-atom model of a cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel using the all-atom polymer consistent force field (PCFF). The final equilibrated all-atom model was built with a systematic simulation toolset consisting of three consecutive parts: (1) building a global cross-linked PEG-chain network at experimentally determined cross-link density using an on-lattice Monte Carlo method based on the bond fluctuation model, (2) recovering the local molecular structure of the network by transitioning from the lattice model to an off-lattice coarse-grained (CG) model parameterized from PCFF, followed by equilibration using high performance molecular dynamics methods, and (3) recovering the atomistic structure of the network by reverse mapping from the equilibrated CG structure, hydrating the structure with explicitly represented water, followed by final equilibration using PCFF parameterization. The developed three-stage modeling approach has application to a wide range of other complex macromolecular hydrogel systems, including the integration of peptide, protein, and/or drug molecules as side-chains within the hydrogel network for the incorporation of bioactivity for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery applications. PMID:27013229

  15. A statistical treatment of bioassay pour fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barengoltz, Jack; Hughes, David

    A bioassay is a method for estimating the number of bacterial spores on a spacecraft surface for the purpose of demonstrating compliance with planetary protection (PP) requirements (Ref. 1). The details of the process may be seen in the appropriate PP document (e.g., for NASA, Ref. 2). In general, the surface is mechanically sampled with a damp sterile swab or wipe. The completion of the process is colony formation in a growth medium in a plate (Petri dish); the colonies are counted. Consider a set of samples from randomly selected, known areas of one spacecraft surface, for simplicity. One may calculate the mean and standard deviation of the bioburden density, which is the ratio of counts to area sampled. The standard deviation represents an estimate of the variation from place to place of the true bioburden density commingled with the precision of the individual sample counts. The accuracy of individual sample results depends on the equipment used, the collection method, and the culturing method. One aspect that greatly influences the result is the pour fraction, which is the quantity of fluid added to the plates divided by the total fluid used in extracting spores from the sampling equipment. In an analysis of a single sample’s counts due to the pour fraction, one seeks to answer the question: What is the probability that if a certain number of spores are counted with a known pour fraction, that there are an additional number of spores in the part of the rinse not poured. This is given for specific values by the binomial distribution density, where detection (of culturable spores) is success and the probability of success is the pour fraction. A special summation over the binomial distribution, equivalent to adding for all possible values of the true total number of spores, is performed. This distribution when normalized will almost yield the desired quantity. It is the probability that the additional number of spores does not exceed a certain value. Of course

  16. A statistical treatment of bioassay pour fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barengoltz, Jack; Hughes, David

    A bioassay is a method for estimating the number of bacterial spores on a spacecraft surface for the purpose of demonstrating compliance with planetary protection (PP) requirements (Ref. 1). The details of the process may be seen in the appropriate PP document (e.g., for NASA, Ref. 2). In general, the surface is mechanically sampled with a damp sterile swab or wipe. The completion of the process is colony formation in a growth medium in a plate (Petri dish); the colonies are counted. Consider a set of samples from randomly selected, known areas of one spacecraft surface, for simplicity. One may calculate the mean and standard deviation of the bioburden density, which is the ratio of counts to area sampled. The standard deviation represents an estimate of the variation from place to place of the true bioburden density commingled with the precision of the individual sample counts. The accuracy of individual sample results depends on the equipment used, the collection method, and the culturing method. One aspect that greatly influences the result is the pour fraction, which is the quantity of fluid added to the plates divided by the total fluid used in extracting spores from the sampling equipment. In an analysis of a single sample’s counts due to the pour fraction, one seeks to answer the question: What is the probability that if a certain number of spores are counted with a known pour fraction, that there are an additional number of spores in the part of the rinse not poured. This is given for specific values by the binomial distribution density, where detection (of culturable spores) is success and the probability of success is the pour fraction. A special summation over the binomial distribution, equivalent to adding for all possible values of the true total number of spores, is performed. This distribution when normalized will almost yield the desired quantity. It is the probability that the additional number of spores does not exceed a certain value. Of course

  17. Sulfide mineralization in magmas: Investigating the effect of re-equilibrating olivine xenocrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currier, R. M.; Marsh, B. D.

    2011-12-01

    Large amounts of entrained olivine xenocrysts are common features of many mafic magmas. It is only natural that mantle derived melts mechanically destabilize and incorporate disaggregated wall rock material during ascension and transport. Bowen noticed this in 1928 and many subsequent studies at, for example, Kilauea have noted an abundance of these 'Tramp Crystals' in proportion to the eruptive flux. These olivines are distinguished by their high, nonequilibrium magnesium contents (Fo:88-92), and, due to the very fast interdiffusion rates of iron and magnesium in olivine (~10-7-10-9 mm2/s), these crystals are often rimmed in iron-rich olivine, or, if given enough time, become completely re-equilibrated with the surrounding melt. Because this exchange occurs in a finite volume of liquid, the composition of the liquid during xenocryst re-equilibration may be strongly affected and driven from its normal course of evolution. The magnitude of this change is clearly a function of the relative amount of xenocrysts and the compositional difference between liquid and crystals. Because mantle olivine is always more forsteritic than the equilibrium olivine composition of the liquid, re-equilibration of olivine increases the magnesium content and decreases the iron content of the liquid. A possible outcome is a decrease in the saturation point of sulfide. The saturation point of sulfide in magmas is sensitive to the concentration of iron. This is a fundamentally important consideration, given the fact that the PGE content of sulfides reflects the cumulative amount of magma the sulfide "sees," and higher temperature saturation greatly increases the odds of sulfide existence and longevity. Presented is a model predicting sulfide saturation with varying loads of xenocrystic olivine within a solidifying body. Even at high temperatures, reasonable fractions of xenocrysts can lower the sulfide saturation concentration over 200 ppm. The model is then compared to a world

  18. The Role of Flexible Loops in Folding, Trafficking and Activity of Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporters.

    PubMed

    Aseervatham, Jaya; Tran, Lucky; Machaca, Khaled; Boudker, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) are integral membrane proteins, which reside in plasma membranes of all eukaryotic cells and mediate thermodynamically downhill transport of nucleosides. This process is essential for nucleoside recycling, and also plays a key role in terminating adenosine-mediated cellular signaling. Furthermore, ENTs mediate the uptake of many drugs, including anticancer and antiviral nucleoside analogues. The structure and mechanism, by which ENTs catalyze trans-membrane transport of their substrates, remain unknown. To identify the core of the transporter needed for stability, activity, and for its correct trafficking to the plasma membrane, we have expressed human ENT deletion mutants in Xenopus laevis oocytes and determined their localization, transport properties and susceptibility to inhibition. We found that the carboxyl terminal trans-membrane segments are essential for correct protein folding and trafficking. In contrast, the soluble extracellular and intracellular loops appear to be dispensable, and must be involved in the fine-tuning of transport regulation. PMID:26406980

  19. The ichneumon fly and the equilibration of British natural economies in the eighteenth century.

    PubMed

    Wille, Sheila

    2015-12-01

    The parasitic ichneumon fly, discovered by European natural philosophers in the seventeenth century, remained largely unstudied until it captured the attention of Enlightenment-era natural historians. Although this sudden surge of interest has been explained as an effort to understand the natural 'evil' of parasitism, the heyday of ichneumon studies was actually inspired by the political and agricultural context of late eighteenth-century Britain. British naturalists were captivated by this insect for reasons both philosophical and practical. In the providentially self-equilibrating qualities of 'natural' ichneumon economies, they saw solutions to political problems of famine, dearth, national wealth, governance and excess population, in addition to finding reassurance that Enlightened confidence in nature's inherent stability and fruitfulness was not unfounded. PMID:26502951

  20. Effect of Dihedral Angle and Porosity on Percolating-Sealing Capacity of Texturally Equilibrated Rock Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarzadeh, S.; Hesse, M. A.; Prodanovic, M.; Gardner, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Salt deposits in sedimentary basins have long been considered to be a seal against fluid penetration. However, experimental, theoretical and field evidence suggests brine (and oil) can wet salt crystal surfaces at higher pressures and temperatures, which can form a percolating network. This network may act as flow conduits even at low porosities. The aim of this work is to investigate the effects of dihedral angle and porosity on the formation of percolating paths in different salt network lattices. However, previous studies considered only simple homogeneous and isotropic geometries. This work extends the analysis to realistic salt textures by presenting a novel numerical method to describe the texturally equilibrated pore shapes in polycrystalline rock salt and brine systems. First, a theoretical interfacial topology was formulated to minimize the interfacial surface between brine and salt. Then, the resulting nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations was solved using the Newton-Raphson method. Results show that the formation of connected fluid channels is more probable in lower dihedral angles and at higher porosities. The connectivity of the pore network is hysteretic, because the connection and disconnection at the pore throats for processes with increasing or decreasing porosities occur at different porosities. In porous media with anisotropic solids, pores initially connect in the direction of the shorter crystal axis and only at much higher porosities in the other directions. Consequently, even an infinitesimal elongation of the crystal shape can give rise to very strong anisotropy in permeability of the pore network. Also, fluid flow was simulated in the resulting pore network to calculate permeability, capillary entry pressure and velocity field. This work enabled us to investigate the opening of pore space and sealing capacity of rock salts. The obtained pore geometries determine a wide range of petrophysical properties such as permeability and

  1. Two temperature gas equilibration model with a Fokker-Planck type collision operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, A. R.; Chacón-Acosta, G.; García-Perciante, A. L.

    2014-01-01

    The equilibration process of a binary mixture of gases with two different temperatures is revisited using a Fokker-Planck type equation. The collision integral term of the Boltzmann equation is approximated by a Fokker-Planck differential collision operator by assuming that one of the constituents can be considered as a background gas in equilibrium while the other species diffuses through it. As a main result the coefficients of the linear term and of the first derivative are modified by the temperature and kinetic energy difference of the two species. These modifications are expected to influence the form of the solution for the distribution function and the corresponding transport equations. When temperatures are equal, the usual result of a Rayleigh gas is recovered.

  2. The Role of Flexible Loops in Folding, Trafficking and Activity of Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Aseervatham, Jaya; Tran, Lucky; Machaca, Khaled; Boudker, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) are integral membrane proteins, which reside in plasma membranes of all eukaryotic cells and mediate thermodynamically downhill transport of nucleosides. This process is essential for nucleoside recycling, and also plays a key role in terminating adenosine-mediated cellular signaling. Furthermore, ENTs mediate the uptake of many drugs, including anticancer and antiviral nucleoside analogues. The structure and mechanism, by which ENTs catalyze trans-membrane transport of their substrates, remain unknown. To identify the core of the transporter needed for stability, activity, and for its correct trafficking to the plasma membrane, we have expressed human ENT deletion mutants in Xenopus laevis oocytes and determined their localization, transport properties and susceptibility to inhibition. We found that the carboxyl terminal trans-membrane segments are essential for correct protein folding and trafficking. In contrast, the soluble extracellular and intracellular loops appear to be dispensable, and must be involved in the fine-tuning of transport regulation. PMID:26406980

  3. From a colored glass condensate to the gluon plasma: Equilibration in high energy heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoraker, Jefferson; Venugopalan, Raju

    2001-02-01

    The initial distribution of gluons at the very early times after a high-energy heavy ion collision is described by the bulk scale Q{sub s} of gluon saturation in the nuclear wave function. The subsequent evolution of the system towards kinetic equilibrium is described by a nonlinear Landau equation for the single particle distributions [A. H. Mueller, Nucl. Phys. B572, 227 (2000); Phys. Lett. B 475, 220 (2000)]. In this paper, we solve this equation numerically for the idealized initial conditions proposed by Mueller, and study the evolution of the system to equilibrium. We discuss the sensitivity of our results on the dynamical screening of collinear divergences. In a particular model of dynamical screening, the convergence to the hydrodynamic limit is seen to be rapid relative to hydrodynamic time scales. The equilibration time, the initial temperature, and the chemical potential are shown to have a strong functional dependence on the initial gluon saturation scale Q{sub s}.

  4. Amplification of Pressure Waves during Vibrational Equilibration of Excited Chemical Reaction Products

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2004-05-11

    The Non-Equilibrium Zeldovich - von Neumann - Doring (NEZND) theory of self-sustaining detonation identified amplification of pressure wavelets during equilibration of vibrationally excited reaction products in the reaction zone as the physical mechanism by which exothermic chemical energy release sustains detonation waves. This mechanism leads to the formation of the well-known, complex three-dimensional structure of a self-sustaining detonation wave. This amplification mechanism is postulated to be a general property of subsonic and supersonic reactive flows occurring during: shock to detonation transition (SDT); hot spot ignition and growth; deflagration to detonation transition (DDT); flame acceleration by shock or compression waves; and acoustic (sound) wave amplification. The existing experimental and theoretical evidence for pressure wave amplification by chemical energy release into highly vibrationally excited product molecules under these reactive flow conditions is reviewed in this paper.

  5. Communication: One size fits all: Equilibrating chemically different polymer liquids through universal long-wavelength description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guojie; Stuehn, Torsten; Daoulas, Kostas Ch.; Kremer, Kurt

    2015-06-01

    Mesoscale behavior of polymers is frequently described by universal laws. This physical property motivates us to propose a new modeling concept, grouping polymers into classes with a common long-wavelength representation. In the same class, samples of different materials can be generated from this representation, encoded in a single library system. We focus on homopolymer melts, grouped according to the invariant degree of polymerization. They are described with a bead-spring model, varying chain stiffness and density to mimic chemical diversity. In a renormalization group-like fashion, library samples provide a universal blob-based description, hierarchically backmapped to create configurations of other class-members. Thus, large systems with experimentally relevant invariant degree of polymerizations (so far accessible only on very coarse-grained level) can be microscopically described. Equilibration is verified comparing conformations and melt structure with smaller scale conventional simulations.

  6. Initial-state-independent equilibration at the breakdown of the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodja, Abdellah; Schmidtke, Daniel; Gemmer, Jochen

    2016-04-01

    This work aims at understanding the interplay between the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH), initial state independent equilibration, and quantum chaos in systems that do not have a direct classical counterpart. It is based on numerical investigations of asymmetric Heisenberg spin ladders with varied interaction strengths between the legs, i.e., along the rungs. The relaxation of the energy difference between the legs is investigated. Two different parameters, both intended to quantify the degree of accordance with the ETH, are computed. Both indicate violation of the ETH at large interaction strengths but at different thresholds. Indeed, the energy difference is found not to relax independently of its initial value above some critical interaction strength, which coincides with one of the thresholds. At the same point the level statistics shift from Poisson-type to Wigner-type. Hence, the system may be considered to become integrable again in the strong interaction limit.

  7. An extended-Lagrangian scheme for charge equilibration in reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Ken-ichi; Small, Patrick E.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2015-07-01

    Reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) simulations describe chemical reactions at orders-of-magnitude faster computing speed compared with quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations. A major computational bottleneck of RMD is charge-equilibration (QEq) calculation to describe charge transfer between atoms. Here, we eliminate the speed-limiting iterative minimization of the Coulombic energy in QEq calculation by adapting an extended-Lagrangian scheme that was recently proposed in the context of QMD simulations, Souvatzis and Niklasson (2014). The resulting XRMD simulation code drastically improves energy conservation compared with our previous RMD code, Nomura et al. (2008), while substantially reducing the time-to-solution. The XRMD code has been implemented on parallel computers based on spatial decomposition, achieving a weak-scaling parallel efficiency of 0.977 on 786,432 IBM Blue Gene/Q cores for a 67.6 billion-atom system.

  8. Universality in the equilibration of quantum systems after a small quench

    SciTech Connect

    Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2010-03-15

    A sudden change in the Hamiltonian parameter drives a quantum system out of equilibrium. For a finite-size system, expectations of observables start fluctuating in time without converging to a precise limit. A new equilibrium state emerges only in the probabilistic sense, when the probability distribution for the observable expectations over long times concentrates around their mean value. In this paper we study the full statistic of generic observables after a small quench. When the quench is performed around a regular (i.e., noncritical) point of the phase diagram, generic observables are expected to be characterized by Gaussian distribution functions ('good equilibration'). Instead, when quenching around a critical point a new, universal, double-peaked distribution function emerges for relevant perturbations. Our analytic predictions are numerically checked for a nonintegrable extension of the quantum Ising model.

  9. Coda wave interferometry and the equilibration of energy in elastic media.

    PubMed

    Snieder, Roel

    2002-10-01

    Multiple-scattered waves usually are not useful for creating deterministic images of the interior of elastic media. However, in many applications, one is not so much interested in making a deterministic image as in detecting changes in the medium. Cases in point are volcano monitoring and measuring the change in hydrocarbon reservoirs during enhanced recovery operations. Coda wave interferometry is a technique wherein changes in multiple-scattered waves are used as a diagnostic for minute changes in the medium. This technique was developed previously for scalar waves; however, the application of this technique in geophysics, nondestructive testing, and other applications where elastic waves are used, requires the extension of the existing formulation of coda wave interferometry to include conversions between P and S waves. Here, a simple model for the equilibration between P and S waves incorporates into the theory of coda wave interferometry the mode conversions that are inherent to multiply scattered elastic waves. PMID:12443357

  10. Twin defects in thick stoichiometric lithium tantalate crystals prepared by a vapor transport equilibration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinfeng; Sun, Jun; Xu, Jingjun; Li, Qinglian; Shang, Jifang; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Shiguo; Huang, Cunxin

    2016-01-01

    The twins were observed and investigated in vapor transport equilibration (VTE) treated lithium tantalate crystals by burying congruent lithium tantalate crystals (CLT) in a Li-rich polycrystalline powder. Twins and their etched patterns were observed under an optical polarizing microscope, and the geometry of the twins was discussed. Twin composition planes were the { 01 1 bar 2 } planes. The cause of twinning was analyzed and verified by experiment. The results indicate that the emergence of twins is due to sintering stress, which arises from sintered Li-rich polycrystalline powders at high temperature. 3.2 mm thick stoichiometric lithium tantalate (SLT) crystals without twins were obtained by setting corundum crucibles over the top of the crystals to make crystals free from the sintering stress. In addition, cracks were observed at the intersection of twin bands, and the stress caused by the dislocation pile-up was considered to be the reason for the formation of cracks.

  11. Equilibration of isolated many-body quantum systems with respect to general distinguishability measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balz, Ben N.; Reimann, Peter

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate equilibration of isolated many-body systems in the sense that, after initial transients have died out, the system behaves practically indistinguishable from a time-independent steady state, i.e., non-negligible deviations are unimaginably rare in time. Measuring the distinguishability in terms of quantum mechanical expectation values, results of this type have been previously established under increasingly weak assumptions about the initial disequilibrium, the many-body Hamiltonian, and the considered observables. Here, we further extend these results with respect to generalized distinguishability measures which fully take into account the fact that the actually observed, primary data are not expectation values but rather the probabilistic occurrence of different possible measurement outcomes.

  12. Mechanisms of submicron inclusion re-equilibration during host mineral deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Thomas; Habler, Gerlinde; Abart, Rainer; Rhede, Dieter; Wirth, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Both brittle and ductile deformation can facilitate re-equilibration of mineral inclusions. The presence of inclusions also influences stress and strain distribution in the host. The processes governing feedbacks between brittle deformation, ductile deformation, and inclusion re-equilibration have been studied using unique microstructures in Permian meta-pegmatite garnets from the Koralpe, Eastern Alps, Austria. Sampled almandine-spessartine garnets contain highly abundant submicron-sized inclusions, which originated during or subsequent to magmatic garnet growth. The Permian magmatic assemblages were affected by eclogite facies metamorphism during the Cretaceous tectono-metamorphic event. The meta-pegmatite garnet deformed crystal-plastically at this metamorphic stage (Bestmann et al. 2008) and the host-inclusion system was affected by partial recrystallization. Trails of coarser inclusions (1-10µm diameter) crosscut the magmatic submicron inclusion density zoning in the garnet, defining curviplanar geometrical surfaces in 3D. In 10-40µm broad 'bleaching zones' flanking inclusion trails, the original ≤1µm sized inclusions are not seen in the optical microscope or SEM, however inclusions <100nm are still abundant in TEM foils from these areas. From their microstructural characteristics it is inferred that the trails formed at sites of healed brittle cracks. FEG-microprobe data showed that inclusion-trails and associated bleaching zones can be formed isochemically, although some trails showed non-isochemical coarsening. In both cases no change in garnet major element composition was observed. EBSD mapping revealed two phenomena that were investigated by cutting targeted TEM foils. Firstly, bleaching zones are associated with systematic very low angle (ca. 0.5°) garnet lattice orientation changes along discrete boundaries. TEM foils transecting such a boundary show a lower concentration of dislocations than expected for the lattice rotation inferred from EBSD

  13. Assessment of split-charge equilibration model for development of polarizable force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Konstantin S.

    2015-10-01

    Performance of split-charge equilibration model (SQE) for force field development was tested by computing static and response characteristics of water clusters. Results of the study show that SQE yields reliable results for the molecular electrostatic potential, dipole, and polarizability of clusters of increasing size. Intermolecular charge transfer needs to be considered for hydrogen bonded systems in order to accurately reproduce the dipole versus system size behavior. It was found that the model quantitatively mimics the IR intensities of intermolecular vibrational modes, but fails in the computation of the IR and Raman intensities of intramolecular vibrations. The response of charge distribution to perturbation by point charge is confidently modeled by SQE in the conditions corresponding to the linear-response regime.

  14. Theory of ion transport with fast acid-base equilibrations in bioelectrochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykstra, J. E.; Biesheuvel, P. M.; Bruning, H.; Ter Heijne, A.

    2014-07-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems recover valuable components and energy in the form of hydrogen or electricity from aqueous organic streams. We derive a one-dimensional steady-state model for ion transport in a bioelectrochemical system, with the ions subject to diffusional and electrical forces. Since most of the ionic species can undergo acid-base reactions, ion transport is combined in our model with infinitely fast ion acid-base equilibrations. The model describes the current-induced ammonia evaporation and recovery at the cathode side of a bioelectrochemical system that runs on an organic stream containing ammonium ions. We identify that the rate of ammonia evaporation depends not only on the current but also on the flow rate of gas in the cathode chamber, the diffusion of ammonia from the cathode back into the anode chamber, through the ion exchange membrane placed in between, and the membrane charge density.

  15. Mass Dependence of Iron Isotope Fractionation in Fe(II)-Fe(III) Electron Exchange Equilibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasuhiko; Kim, Sang-Ho; Nomura, Masao; Kawakami, Fumiaki

    2013-02-01

    A one hundred meter long ion-exchange chromatograph was used to establish rigorously the mass effects in the iron isotope fractionation in the Fe(II)-Fe(III) electron exchange equilibration.We used a highly porous, strongly basic anion exchange resin packed in glass columns. The abundance ratios of all natural iron isotopes, 54Fe, 56Fe, 57Fe, and 58Fe, in the effluent at the iron adsorption band boundary were measured with a mass spectrometer. The enrichment correlations among these isotopes were analyzed by three-isotope plots. The results clearly showed that the isotope fractionation of Fe(II)-Fe(III) is governed by the normal mass effect; the iron isotope fractionation is not proportional to the nuclear size, but proportional to the reduced mass difference of the pair of iron isotopes.

  16. Equilibration of a quantum field in de Sitter space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Andreas; Holman, R.; Richard, Benoit J.

    2015-02-01

    We address the following question: To what extent can a quantum field tell if it has been placed in de Sitter space? Our approach is to use the techniques of nonequilibrium quantum field theory to compute the time evolution of a state which starts off in flat space for (conformal) times η <η0 and then evolves in a de Sitter background turned on instantaneously at η =η0. We find that the answer depends on what quantities one examines. We study a range of them, all based on two-point correlation functions, and analyze which ones approach the standard Bunch-Davies values over time. The outcome of this analysis suggests that the nature of the equilibration process in this system is similar to that in more familiar systems.

  17. Theory of ion transport with fast acid-base equilibrations in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, J E; Biesheuvel, P M; Bruning, H; Ter Heijne, A

    2014-07-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems recover valuable components and energy in the form of hydrogen or electricity from aqueous organic streams. We derive a one-dimensional steady-state model for ion transport in a bioelectrochemical system, with the ions subject to diffusional and electrical forces. Since most of the ionic species can undergo acid-base reactions, ion transport is combined in our model with infinitely fast ion acid-base equilibrations. The model describes the current-induced ammonia evaporation and recovery at the cathode side of a bioelectrochemical system that runs on an organic stream containing ammonium ions. We identify that the rate of ammonia evaporation depends not only on the current but also on the flow rate of gas in the cathode chamber, the diffusion of ammonia from the cathode back into the anode chamber, through the ion exchange membrane placed in between, and the membrane charge density. PMID:25122405

  18. Equilibration Rates in a Strongly Coupled Nonconformal Quark-Gluon Plasma.

    PubMed

    Buchel, Alex; Heller, Michal P; Myers, Robert C

    2015-06-26

    We initiate the study of equilibration rates of strongly coupled quark-gluon plasmas in the absence of conformal symmetry. We primarily consider a supersymmetric mass deformation within N=2^{*} gauge theory and use holography to compute quasinormal modes of a variety of scalar operators, as well as the energy-momentum tensor. In each case, the lowest quasinormal frequency, which provides an approximate upper bound on the thermalization time, is proportional to temperature, up to a prefactor with only a mild temperature dependence. We find similar behavior in other holographic plasmas, where the model contains an additional scale beyond the temperature. Hence, our study suggests that the thermalization time is generically set by the temperature, irrespective of any other scales, in strongly coupled gauge theories. PMID:26197117

  19. Experimental studies of N/Z equilibration in peripheral collisions using fragment yield ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Keksis, A. L.; May, L. W.; Kohley, Z.; Soisson, S. N.; Stein, B. C.; Wuenschel, S.; Yennello, S. J.; Souliotis, G. A.; Veselsky, M.; Galanopoulos, S.; Shetty, D. V.; Tripathi, R.; Li, B. A.

    2010-05-15

    Peripheral collisions of {sup 40}Ca and {sup 48}Ca projectiles at 32 MeV/nucleon on {sup 112}Sn and {sup 124}Sn targets were studied in this work. The fragments of the projectile-like source (quasiprojectile) were collected with a charged-particle multidetector array. The average value of the neutron-to-proton ratio N/Z of the quasiprojectiles formed in the reactions was determined with two approaches. The first is a direct reconstruction approach using isotopically resolved fragments and is hindered by undetected neutrons leading to lower N/Z values. The second approach, based on the assumption of early fragment formation, employs yield ratios of fragment isobars and is not hindered by undetected neutrons. Using this approach, the amount of N/Z mixing that occurred in the quasiprojectiles (compared to a fully N/Z equilibrated system) was found to be approximately 53%. The experimental results were compared with model calculations. First, the phenomenological DIT (deep inelastic transfer) model was used, followed by the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM). The results of these calculations are in close agreement with the data and indicate that the mean number of undetected neutrons increases with the N/Z of the composite system, accounting for the difference observed between the two approaches of quasiprojectile N/Z determination. Second, the microscopic transport model IBUU (isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck) was employed, providing preliminary results in reasonable agreement with the data. The determination of the degree of N/Z equilibration employing the present fragment yield ratio approach may provide a valuable probe to study the isospin part of the nuclear equation of state in conjunction with detailed microscopic models of the collisions in the Fermi energy regime.

  20. Electrical Conductivity, Thermoelectric Power, and Equilibration Kinetics of Nb-Doped TiO2.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, Janusz; Bak, Tadeusz; Dickey, Elisabeth C; Sigmund, Wolfgang; Alim, Mohammad A

    2016-09-01

    This work considers the equilibration kinetics of Nb-doped TiO2 single crystal (0.066 atom % Nb) during oxidation and reduction within a wide range of temperature (1073-1298 K) and oxygen activity (10(-14)-10(5) Pa). The associated semiconducting properties were determined using simultaneous measurements of both electrical conductivity and thermoelectric power. It is shown that the chemical diffusion coefficient in the strongly reducing regime, p(O2) < 10(-5) Pa, is 4 orders of magnitude larger than that in the reducing and oxidizing regimes, 10 Pa < p(O2) < 22 kPa. The derived theoretical model considers the gas/solid kinetics for the TiO2/O2 system in terms of two diffusion regimes: the fast regime related to fast defects (oxygen vacancies and titanium interstitials) and leading to quasi-equilibrium, and the slow regime associated with slow defects (titanium vacancies) resulting in the gas/solid equilibrium. It has been shown that incorporation of donor-type elements, such as niobium, and imposition of oxygen activity above a certain critical value, results in a substantial reduction in the concentration of high mobility defects and leads to slowing down the equilibration kinetics. In consequence, the fast kinetic regime is not observed. Comparison of the kinetic data for Nb-doped TiO2 single crystal (this work) and polycrystalline Nb-doped TiO2 (reported before) indicates that the gas/solid kinetics for the polycrystalline specimen at higher oxygen activities is rate controlled by the transport of oxygen within individual grains. PMID:27490974

  1. Isotopic equilibration during partial melting: an experimental test of the behaviour of Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammouda, T.; Pichavant, M.; Chaussidon, M.

    1996-10-01

    Experiments using isotopically enriched, Sr doped minerals designed to test for isotopic equilibrium between source and melt during partial melting reveal that 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios of the liquids are primarily determined by the proportions of minerals consumed and vary with the advancement of the melting reaction. The experiments were performed at 1 atm on model crustal assemblages composed of pairs of natural plagioclase (An 68; 87Sr/ 86Sr= 0.701 ) and synthetic fluorphlogopite doped with 90 ppm Sr having 87Sr/ 86Sr= 4.2 . SIMS traverses showed that during the initial stages of the reaction, liquids are isotopically zoned. All the analyzed melts have 87Sr/ 86Sr markedly higher than that of the bulk starting assemblage (i.e. the source), because of the faster melting rate of fluorphlogopite. At 1200°C and 1250°C melting occurs above a critical temperature, wherein the dissolution rates of the crystals are controlled by diffusion of species in the melt, and reactants and reaction products are out of isotopic equilibrium. This is due to faster melt-crystal boundary migration when compared to Sr diffusion in the crystals. Equilibration is possible only if melting stops. Calculations show that total equilibration between melt and residue by Sr tracer diffusion in the crystals takes 10 4-10 6 yr (for temperature and grain size ranging, respectively, from 800°C to 1000°C, and 0.1 to 1 cm). When compared to the proposed residence time of crustal magmas at their sources, this result strongly suggests that magmas that do not reflect the bulk isotopic characteristics of their source regions can be produced.

  2. Localization of submicron inclusion re-equilibration at healed fractures in host garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, T. A.; Habler, G.; Rhede, D.; Wirth, R.; Ram, F.; Abart, R.

    2014-12-01

    Microstructures in Permian inclusion-bearing metapegmatite garnets from the Koralpe (Eastern Alps, Austria) reveal re-equilibration by coarsening of abundant submicron-sized inclusions (1 μm-2 nm diameter) at the site of healed brittle cracks. The microstructures developed during Cretaceous eclogite-facies deformation and the related overprinting of the host-inclusion system. Trails of coarsened inclusions (1-10 μm diameter) crosscut the garnet, defining traces of former fractures with occasional en-echelon overlaps. Trails are flanked by 10- to 100-μm-wide `bleaching zones' characterized by the absence of ≤1-μm-sized inclusions in optical and SE images. FEG-microprobe data show that trails and bleaching zones can form isochemically, although some trails exhibit non-isochemical coarsening. Cross-correlation-based EBSD analysis reveals garnet lattice rotation of up to 0.45°, spatially correlated with bleaching zones. The garnet lattice in the center of trails is misoriented around different axes with respect to the lattice either side of the trail. Elevated dislocation density within bleaching zones is confirmed by TEM observations. Dislocations represent a plastic wake formed by crystal plastic deformation at the crack tip. Fracture enhanced diffusion rates in the lattice adjacent to crack planes by introducing dislocations, priming these areas to behave differently to the bulk of the garnet during Cretaceous metamorphism and facilitating localized coarsening of inclusions. Diffusion within the bleaching zone was enhanced by a minimum factor of 102. The partially closed host-inclusion system records the influence of deformation mechanisms on re-equilibration and contributes to understanding of the interaction between deformation and chemical reaction during metamorphism.

  3. APPARATUS FOR MELTING AND POURING METAL

    DOEpatents

    Harris, F.A.

    1958-02-25

    This patent relates to a crucible for melting and pouring a metal under controlled atmospheric conditions. The crucible has a frangible plug in the bottom and a retaining device to prevent the entrance of the broken portions of the plug into the mold without interfering with the flow of the melt. After the charge has been melted, a knockout rod is lowered through the charge and forced against the frangible plug sufficiently to break off the closure disk along a previously scored line. The disk drops onto a retaining grid large enough to permit the flow of metal around the disk and into the mold below. Thts arrangement elimnates the entry of broken portions of the plug into the mold, thereby elimnating a common cause of imperfect castings.

  4. An investigation of equilibration in small quantum systems: the example of a particle in a 1D random potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luck, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the equilibration of a small isolated quantum system by means of its matrix of asymptotic transition probabilities in a preferential basis. The trace of this matrix is shown to measure the degree of equilibration of the system launched from a typical state, from the standpoint of the chosen basis. This approach is substantiated by an in-depth study of the example of a tight-binding particle in one dimension. In the regime of free ballistic propagation, the above trace saturates to a finite limit, testifying good equilibration. In the presence of a random potential, the trace grows linearly with the system size, testifying poor equilibration in the insulating regime induced by Anderson localization. In the weak-disorder situation of most interest, a universal finite-size scaling law describes the crossover between the ballistic and localized regimes. The associated crossover exponent 2/3 is dictated by the anomalous band-edge scaling characterizing the most localized energy eigenstates.

  5. Isospin diffusion and equilibration for Sn+Sn collisions at E/A=35 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Z. Y.; Tsang, M. B.; Lynch, W. G.; Danielewicz, P.; Verde, G.; Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Amorini, F.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Andronenko, L.; Andronenko, M.; Chatterje, M.; Galichet, E.; Maiolino, C.; Santonocito, D.

    2010-11-15

    Equilibration and equilibration rates have been measured by colliding Sn nuclei with different isospin asymmetries at beam energies of E/A=35 MeV. Using the yields of mirror nuclei of {sup 7}Li and {sup 7}Be, we have studied the diffusion of isospin asymmetry by combining data from asymmetric {sup 112}Sn+{sup 124}Sn and {sup 124}Sn+{sup 112}Sn collisions with those from symmetric {sup 112}Sn+{sup 112}Sn and {sup 124}Sn+{sup 124}Sn collisions. We use these measurements to probe isospin equilibration in central collisions where nucleon-nucleon collisions are strongly blocked by the Pauli exclusion principle. The results are consistent with transport theoretical calculations that predict a degree of transparency in these collisions, but inconsistent with the emission of intermediate mass fragments by a single chemically equilibrated source. Comparisons with quantum molecular dynamics calculations are consistent with results obtained at higher incident energies that provide constraints on the density dependence of the symmetry energy.

  6. Equilibration times, compound selectivity, and stability of diffusion samplers for collection of ground-water VOC concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Campbell, T.R.

    2001-01-01

    Vapor-filled polyethylene diffusion samplers (typically used to locate discharge zones of volatile organic compound contaminated ground water beneath streams and lakes) and water-filled polyethylene diffusion bag samplers (typically used to obtain volatile organic compound concentrations in ground-water at wells) were tested to determine compound selectivity, equilibration times, and sample stability. The aqueous concentrations of several volatile organic compounds obtained from within water-filled diffusion samplers closely matched concentrations in ambient water outside the samplers. An exception was methyl-tert-butyl ether, which was detectable, but not reliably quantifiable using the diffusion samplers. The samplers equilibrated to a variety of volatile organic compounds within 24 h for vapor-filled passive diffusion vial samplers and within 48 h for water-filled passive diffusion bag samplers. Under field conditions, however, a longer equilibration time may be required to account for environmental disturbances caused by sampler deployment. An equilibrium period for both vapor- and water-filled diffusion samplers of approximately 2 weeks probably is adequate for most investigations in sandy formations. Longer times may be required for diffusion-sampler equilibration in poorly permeable sediment. The vapor-filled samplers should be capped and water from the diffusion bag samplers should be transferred to sampling vials immediately upon recovery to avoid volatilization losses of the gasses. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  7. CT dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene cylinders with diameters from 6 to 55 cm

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: ICRU Report No. 87 Committee and AAPM Task Group 200 designed a three-sectional polyethylene phantom of 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in length for evaluating the midpoint dose D{sub L}(0) and its rise-to-the-equilibrium curve H(L) = D{sub L}(0)/D{sub eq} from computed tomography (CT) scanning, where D{sub eq} is the equilibrium dose. To aid the use of the phantom in radiation dose assessment and to gain an understanding of dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene, the authors evaluated the short (20 cm) to long (60 cm) phantom dose ratio with a polyethylene diameter of 30 cm, assessed H(L) in polyethylene cylinders of 6–55 cm in diameters, and examined energy absorption in these cylinders. Methods: A GEANT4-based Monte Carlo program was used to simulate the single axial scans of polyethylene cylinders (diameters 6–55 cm and length 90 cm, as well as diameter 30 cm and lengths 20 and 60 cm) on a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare). Axial dose distributions were computed on the phantom central and peripheral axes. An average dose over the central 23 or 100 mm region was evaluated for modeling dose measurement using a 0.6 cm{sup 3} thimble chamber or a 10 cm long pencil ion chamber, respectively. The short (20 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were calculated for the 30 cm diameter polyethylene phantoms scanned at four tube voltages (80–140 kV) and a range of beam apertures (1–25 cm). H(L) was evaluated using the dose integrals computed with the 90 cm long phantoms. The resultant H(L) data were subsequently used to compute the fraction of the total energy absorbed inside or outside the scan range (E{sub in}/E or E{sub out}/E) on the phantom central and peripheral axes, where E = LD{sub eq} was the total energy absorbed along the z axis. Results: The midpoint dose in the 60 cm long polyethylene phantom was equal to that in the 90 cm long polyethylene phantom. The short-to-long phantom dose

  8. Targeting the Plasmodium vivax equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (PvENT1) for antimalarial drug development

    PubMed Central

    Deniskin, Roman; Frame, I.J.; Sosa, Yvett; Akabas, Myles H.

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Plasmodium falciparum and vivax cause most cases of malaria. Emerging resistance to current antimalarial medications makes new drug development imperative. Ideally a new antimalarial drug should treat both falciparum and vivax malaria. Because malaria parasites are purine auxotrophic, they rely on purines imported from the host erythrocyte via Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporters (ENTs). Thus, the purine import transporters represent a potential target for antimalarial drug development. For falciparum parasites the primary purine transporter is the P. falciparum Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter Type 1 (PfENT1). Recently we identified potent PfENT1 inhibitors with nanomolar IC50 values using a robust, yeast-based high throughput screening assay. In the current work we characterized the Plasmodium vivax ENT1 (PvENT1) homologue and its sensitivity to the PfENT1 inhibitors. We expressed a yeast codon-optimized PvENT1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PvENT1-expressing yeast imported both purines ([3H]adenosine) and pyrimidines ([3H]uridine), whereas wild type (fui1Δ) yeast did not. Based on radiolabel substrate uptake inhibition experiments, inosine had the lowest IC50 (3.8 μM), compared to guanosine (14.9 μM) and adenosine (142 μM). For pyrimidines, thymidine had an IC50 of 183 μM (vs. cytidine and uridine; mM range). IC50 values were higher for nucleobases compared to the corresponding nucleosides; hypoxanthine had a 25-fold higher IC50 than inosine. The archetypal human ENT1 inhibitor 4-nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR) had no effect on PvENT1, whereas dipyridamole inhibited PvENT1, albeit with a 40 μM IC50, a 1000-fold less sensitive than human ENT1 (hENT1). The PfENT1 inhibitors blocked transport activity of PvENT1 and the five known naturally occurring non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with similar IC50 values. Thus, the PfENT1 inhibitors also target PvENT1. This implies that development of novel antimalarial drugs

  9. Targeting the Plasmodium vivax equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (PvENT1) for antimalarial drug development.

    PubMed

    Deniskin, Roman; Frame, I J; Sosa, Yvett; Akabas, Myles H

    2016-04-01

    Infection with Plasmodium falciparum and vivax cause most cases of malaria. Emerging resistance to current antimalarial medications makes new drug development imperative. Ideally a new antimalarial drug should treat both falciparum and vivax malaria. Because malaria parasites are purine auxotrophic, they rely on purines imported from the host erythrocyte via Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporters (ENTs). Thus, the purine import transporters represent a potential target for antimalarial drug development. For falciparum parasites the primary purine transporter is the P. falciparum Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter Type 1 (PfENT1). Recently we identified potent PfENT1 inhibitors with nanomolar IC50 values using a robust, yeast-based high throughput screening assay. In the current work we characterized the Plasmodium vivax ENT1 (PvENT1) homologue and its sensitivity to the PfENT1 inhibitors. We expressed a yeast codon-optimized PvENT1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PvENT1-expressing yeast imported both purines ([(3)H]adenosine) and pyrimidines ([(3)H]uridine), whereas wild type (fui1Δ) yeast did not. Based on radiolabel substrate uptake inhibition experiments, inosine had the lowest IC50 (3.8 μM), compared to guanosine (14.9 μM) and adenosine (142 μM). For pyrimidines, thymidine had an IC50 of 183 μM (vs. cytidine and uridine; mM range). IC50 values were higher for nucleobases compared to the corresponding nucleosides; hypoxanthine had a 25-fold higher IC50 than inosine. The archetypal human ENT1 inhibitor 4-nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR) had no effect on PvENT1, whereas dipyridamole inhibited PvENT1, albeit with a 40 μM IC50, a 1000-fold less sensitive than human ENT1 (hENT1). The PfENT1 inhibitors blocked transport activity of PvENT1 and the five known naturally occurring non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with similar IC50 values. Thus, the PfENT1 inhibitors also target PvENT1. This implies that development of novel antimalarial

  10. Dependence of the pour point of diesel fuels on the properties of the initial components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostashov, V. M.; Bobrovskiy, S. A.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical expression is obtained for the dependence of the pour point of diesel fuels on the pour point and weight relationship of the initial components. For determining the pour point of a multicomponent fuel mixture, it is assumed that the mixture of two components has the pour point of a separate equivalent component, then calculating the pour point of this equivalent component mixed with a third component, etc.

  11. POURING IRON FROM ELECTRIC FURNACE INTO BULL LADLE AFTER MAGNESIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    POURING IRON FROM ELECTRIC FURNACE INTO BULL LADLE AFTER MAGNESIUM HAD BEEN ADDED TO GENERATE DUCTILE IRON WHEN IT COOLS IN THE MOLD. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  12. 45. EXPOSEDAGGREGATE CONCRETE AT NICHE, NORTH BOUNDARY, SEVERAL TEXTURES POURED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. EXPOSED-AGGREGATE CONCRETE AT NICHE, NORTH BOUNDARY, SEVERAL TEXTURES POURED AT ONE TIME, October 1987 - Meridian Hill Park, Bounded by Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Euclid & W Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. 42. Casting floor, "B" furnace, pour in progress; mudgun is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Casting floor, "B" furnace, pour in progress; mudgun is to right of furnace; operator takes temperature of iron in trough during pout. Looking south - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  14. 100. photographer unknown 29 March 1940 PREPARATIONS FOR POURING CONCRETE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    100. photographer unknown 29 March 1940 PREPARATIONS FOR POURING CONCRETE AROUND PIT LINER OF UNIT NO 3. - Bonneville Project, Powerhouse No.1, Spanning Bradford Slough, from Bradford Island, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  15. POURING IRON FROM BULL LADLE INTO MOBILE LADLES USED TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    POURING IRON FROM BULL LADLE INTO MOBILE LADLES USED TO FILL MOLDS ON CONVEYOR LINES AFTER FERRO-SILICON IS ADDED TO ENHANCE DUCTILITY AND FLUIDITY. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  16. 6. VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM THE POURING AISLE OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM THE POURING AISLE OF THE ELECTRIC FURNACE BUILDING AT ELECTRIC FURNACE X-3. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Electric Furnace Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  17. 41. Casting floor, "B" furnace, pour in progress; mudgun is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Casting floor, "B" furnace, pour in progress; mudgun is to right of furnace; photo taken from furnace operator's booth. Looking south/southwest - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  18. 51. VIEW SHOWING THE POURING OF CAP ON PIER 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. VIEW SHOWING THE POURING OF CAP ON PIER 7, LOOKING WEST FROM BARGE, December 22, 1934 - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  19. 13. MASS OF POURED CONCRETE IN IRREGULAR STEPPED LAYERS AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. MASS OF POURED CONCRETE IN IRREGULAR STEPPED LAYERS AT THE BASE OF THE LEFT (EAST) BUTTRESS. CAMERA FACING SOUTHWEST. - Salinas Dam, Salinas River near Pozo Road, Santa Margarita, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  20. 47. Pouring deck columns, steampowered concrete mixer at center; direction ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. Pouring deck columns, steam-powered concrete mixer at center; direction of view not clear, but probably to north. - Parks Bar Bridge, Spanning Yuba River at State Highway 20, Smartville, Yuba County, CA

  1. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE REX T. BARBER BRIDGE DECK POUR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE REX T. BARBER BRIDGE DECK POUR, VIEW TO NORTHWEST SHOWING HIGH LINE SYSTEM. - Rex T. Barber Veterans Memorial Bridge, Spanning Crooked River Gorge, Dalles-California Highway (US 97), Terrebonne, Deschutes County, OR

  2. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE REX T. BARBER BRIDGE DECK POUR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE REX T. BARBER BRIDGE DECK POUR, VIEW TO NORTH. - Rex T. Barber Veterans Memorial Bridge, Spanning Crooked River Gorge, Dalles-California Highway (US 97), Terrebonne, Deschutes County, OR

  3. Decodeurs rapides pour codes topologiques quantiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclos-Cianci, Guillaume

    L'encodage topologique de l'information quantique a attire beaucoup d'attention, car c'est un modele qui semble propice a resister aux erreurs locales. Tout d'abord, le modele du calcul topologique est base sur la statistique anyonique non-Abelienne universelle et sur son controle. Des anyons indesirables peuvent apparaitre soudainement, en raison de fluctuations thermiques ou de processus virtuels. La presence de ces anyons peut corrompre l'information encodee, il est necessaire de les eliminer: la correction consiste a fusionner les defauts tout en preservant la topologie du systeme. Ensuite, dans le cas des codes topologiques, on doit aussi proteger l'information encodee dans la topologie. En effet, dans ces systemes, on n'a acces qu'a une fraction de l'information decrivant l'erreur. Elle est recueillie par des mesures et peut etre interpretee en termes de particules. Ces defauts peuplent le code et doivent etre annihiles adequatement dans le but de preserver l'information encodee. Dans ce memoire, nous proposons un algorithme efficace, appele decodeur, pouvant etre utilise dans les deux contextes decrits ci-haut. Pour y parvenir, cet algorithme s'inspire de methodes de renormalisation et de propagation de croyance. Il est exponentiellement plus rapide que les methodes deja existantes, etant de complexite O (ℓ2 log ℓ) en serie et, si on parallelise, O (log ℓ) en temps, contre O (ℓ6) pour les autres decodeurs. Le temps etant le facteur limitant dans le probleme du decodage, cette caracteristique est primordiale. De plus, il tolere une plus grande amplitude de bruit que les methodes existantes; il possede un seuil de ˜ 16.5% sur le canal depolarisant surpassant le seuil deja etabli de ˜ 15.5%. Finalement, il est plus versatile. En effet, en etant limite au code de Kitaev, on ne savait pas decoder les codes topologiques de maniere generale (e.g. codes de couleur). Or, le decodeur propose dans ce memoire peut traiter la grande classe des codes

  4. Unshocked Equilibrated H Chondrites: A Common Low-Temperature Record from Fe-Mg Ordering in Orthopyroxene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folco, L.; Mellini, M.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1995-09-01

    The study of the thermal metamorphism of ordinary chondrites through geothermometers can provide significant constraints on the parent body thermal models which remain controversial. We report here results from Fe-Mg ordering closure temperatures (Tc) of orthopyroxenes from eight unshocked equilibrated H-chondrites obtained by means of single crystal X-ray diffraction. The method is based on the fact that cation partitioning in orthopyroxene is sensitive to temperature [1], and makes use of the experimental calibration by Molin et al. [2]. The goal of the investigation is to check how petrographic types relate to cation ordering thermal records. Results: The orthopyroxenes show a very similar degree of Fe-Mg ordering (see Table 1.). The Tc's cluster within the 384+/-48 to 480+/-28 degrees C interval, and show no correlation with petrographic type. The lack of a correlation does not mean that the distribution is random, rather, it appears to be controlled in individual samples by the degree of equilibration. In fact, the higher the petrographic type, the more coherent the results of the grains from individual chondrites. The spread of Tc's in the least equilibrated chondrites could be either a memory of heterogeneous pre-metamorphic records related to individual chondrule histories, or an artefact due to crystal defects. Therefore (1) the thermal records, inferred from the Fe-Mg ordering, are nearly the same for all the equilibrated H-chondrites; (2) the most equilibrated chondrites record distinct Tc values within the larger common Tc range; (3) the spread of Tc in H4's maybe indicative of disequilibrium and merits further study. The closure temperature conveys information on the cooling rate close to its value, regardless of the temperature regimes when the ordering process started. Extrapolation to high temperatures can be made only if the cooling path is constrained. Since we have no data to establish the temperature when ordering began and to decide whether the

  5. The type 1 equilibrative nucleoside transporter regulates anxiety-like behavior in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J.; Rinaldo, L.; Lim, S.-J.; Young, H.; Messing, R. O.; Choi, D.-S.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of adenosine receptors in the brain reduces anxiety-like behavior in animals and humans. Because nucleoside transporters regulate adenosine levels, we used mice lacking the type 1 equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT1) to investigate whether ENT1 contributes to anxiety-like behavior. The ENT1 null mice spent more time in the center of an open field compared with wild-type littermates. In the elevated plus maze, ENT1 null mice entered more frequently into and spent more time exploring the open arms. The ENT1 null mice also spent more time exploring the light side of a light–dark box compared with wild-type mice. Microinjection of an ENT1-specific antagonist, nitrobenzylthioinosine (nitrobenzylmercaptopurine riboside), into the amygdala of C57BL/6J mice reduced anxiety-like behavior in the open field and elevated plus maze. These findings show that amygdala ENT1 modulates anxiety-like behavior. The ENT1 may be a drug target for the treatment of anxiety disorders. PMID:17376149

  6. Balance Assessment in Sports-Related Concussion: Evaluating Test-Retest Reliability of the Equilibrate System.

    PubMed

    Odom, Mitchell J; Lee, Young M; Zuckerman, Scott L; Apple, Rachel P; Germanos, Theodore; Solomon, Gary S; Sills, Allen K

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the test-retest reliability of a novel computer-based, portable balance assessment tool, the Equilibrate System (ES), used to diagnose sports-related concussion. Twenty-seven students participated in ES testing consisting of three sessions over 4 weeks. The modified Balance Error Scoring System was performed. For each participant, test-retest reliability was established using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The ES test-retest reliability from baseline to week 2 produced an ICC value of 0.495 (95% CI, 0.123-0.745). Week 2 testing produced ICC values of 0.602 (95% CI, 0.279-0.803) and 0.610 (95% CI, 0.299-0.804), respectively. All other single measures test-retest reliability values produced poor ICC values. Same-day ES testing showed fair to good test-retest reliability while interweek measures displayed poor to fair test-retest reliability. Testing conditions should be controlled when using computerized balance assessment methods. ES testing should only be used as a part of a comprehensive assessment. PMID:27518293

  7. Corrosion of heat exchanger alloys exposed to a non-equilibrated Co-based sulfidizing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, J.F.; Maier, M.; Bakker, W.T.

    1999-11-01

    This paper presents results from a series of experiments involving the intermittent exposure of several steels to a CO-based gas mixture containing 0.1 % H{sub 2}S for periods of up to 1000 hours. The flow of the gas was maintained at a rate sufficiently high to prevent equilibration of the mixture occurring at the reaction temperature of 550 C, thereby simulating conditions found in commercial coal gasification plants. Five materials were selected for this study, i.e. three commercial alloys containing 9, 12 and 20% Cr and two specially cast 12%Cr model alloys with additions of 1% and 2% Si. Several specimens of each alloy were exposed at the same time; some samples were also coated with a Cl-containing ash mixture prior to exposure in order to study the influence of fly-ash deposits upon degradation. In addition, after intermittently cooling the samples to room temperature, half were desiccated dry whilst the remainder were placed in moisture-saturated air at 30 C in order to simulate conditions arising during periods of plant down-time, i. e. down-time corrosion (DTC). Corrosion kinetics are presented in terms of weight change and metal loss measurements indicating the significant improvement accompanying the addition of 1--2% Si to the basic 12% Cr composition. The contributions of ash deposits and periods of moist down-time are also discussed.

  8. Thermally stimulated luminescence from vapor-transport-equilibrated LiTaO3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirila, M. M.; Garces, N. Y.; Halliburton, L. E.; Evans, D. R.; Route, R. K.; Fejer, M. M.

    2003-07-01

    Thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL), optical absorption, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) have been used to characterize the emission of ultraviolet light from undoped LiTaO3. The crystals in this study were grown from a congruent melt and then subjected to a vapor-transport-equilibration (VTE) treatment. Two overlapping TSL peaks occur at 94 and 98 K, with each showing a 350 nm maximum in its spectral emission. These peaks are observed after a 77 K exposure of the crystals to x rays or lasers (266, 325, or 355 nm). Congruent crystals from the same boule (but not VTE treated) produced no measurable emission in similar experiments. During excitation of the VTE-treated crystals at 77 K, holes are localized on oxygen ions, either self-trapped or with a nearby stabilizer, and electrons are trapped at regular Ta5+ ions and at Fe3+ impurities (present at trace levels), where they form Ta4+ and Fe2+ ions. The hole centers and the Fe3+ ions have characteristic EPR spectra, and a broad optical absorption band peaking near 1600 nm is attributed to the Ta4+ electron center. Upon warming, the trapped hole centers formed during the initial excitation become unstable below 100 K and move to Ta4+ ions, thus causing radiative recombination in the TaO6 units.

  9. A level set method for solid-liquid interface tracking in texturally equilibrated pore networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarzadeh, Soheil; Hesse, Marc; Prodanovic, Masa

    2015-04-01

    The properties of some porous media are determined by their evolution towards textural equilibrium. Melt drainage from temperate glacier ice and the accumulation of hydrocarbons beneath rock salt are two examples in natural systems. In these materials, pore geometry evolves to minimize the solid-liquid interfacial energy while maintaining dihedral angle, θ, at solid-liquid contact lines. In this work we present the first computations of 3-D texturally equilibrated pore networks using a novel level set method. Interfacial energy minimization is achieved by evolving interface under surface diffusion to constant mean curvature surface. The porosity and dihedral angle constraints are added to the formulation using virtual velocity terms. A domain decomposition scheme is devised to restrict the computational domain and the coupling between the interfaces is achieved on the original computational domain. For the last 30 years, explicit representation of the interfaces limited the computations to highly idealized geometries. The presented model overcomes these limitations and opens the door to the exploration of the physics of these materials in realistic systems. For example, our results show that the fully wetted grain boundaries exist even for θ>0 which reconciles the theory with experimental observations. This work is sponsored by the Statoil Fellows Program at The University of Texas.

  10. Facet-controlled phase separation in supersaturated Au-Ni nanoparticles upon shape equilibration

    SciTech Connect

    Herz, A. E-mail: dong.wang@tu-ilmenau.de; Rossberg, D.; Hentschel, M.; Theska, F.; Wang, D. E-mail: dong.wang@tu-ilmenau.de; Schaaf, P.; Friák, M.; Holec, D.; Šob, M.; Schneeweiss, O.

    2015-08-17

    Solid-state dewetting is used to fabricate supersaturated, submicron-sized Au-Ni solid solution particles out of thin Au/Ni bilayers by means of a rapid thermal annealing technique. Phase separation in such particles is studied with respect to their equilibrium crystal (or Wulff) shape by subsequent annealing at elevated temperature. It is found that (100) faceting planes of the equilibrated particles are enriched with Ni and (111) faces with Au. Both phases are considered by quantum-mechanical calculations in combination with an error-reduction scheme that was developed to compensate for a missing exchange-correlation potential that would reliably describe both Au and Ni. The observed phase configuration is then related to the minimization of strongly anisotropic elastic energies of Au- and Ni-rich phases and results in a rather unique nanoparticle composite state that is characterized by nearly uniform value of elastic response to epitaxial strains all over the faceted surface. The same conclusion is yielded also by evaluating bi-axial elastic moduli when employing interpolated experimental elastic constants. This work demonstrates a useful route for studying features of physical metallurgy at the mesoscale.

  11. Facet-controlled phase separation in supersaturated Au-Ni nanoparticles upon shape equilibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herz, A.; Friák, M.; Rossberg, D.; Hentschel, M.; Theska, F.; Wang, D.; Holec, D.; Šob, M.; Schneeweiss, O.; Schaaf, P.

    2015-08-01

    Solid-state dewetting is used to fabricate supersaturated, submicron-sized Au-Ni solid solution particles out of thin Au/Ni bilayers by means of a rapid thermal annealing technique. Phase separation in such particles is studied with respect to their equilibrium crystal (or Wulff) shape by subsequent annealing at elevated temperature. It is found that {100} faceting planes of the equilibrated particles are enriched with Ni and {111} faces with Au. Both phases are considered by quantum-mechanical calculations in combination with an error-reduction scheme that was developed to compensate for a missing exchange-correlation potential that would reliably describe both Au and Ni. The observed phase configuration is then related to the minimization of strongly anisotropic elastic energies of Au- and Ni-rich phases and results in a rather unique nanoparticle composite state that is characterized by nearly uniform value of elastic response to epitaxial strains all over the faceted surface. The same conclusion is yielded also by evaluating bi-axial elastic moduli when employing interpolated experimental elastic constants. This work demonstrates a useful route for studying features of physical metallurgy at the mesoscale.

  12. Determination of silver speciation in wastewater and receiving waters by competitive ligand equilibration/solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, N.W.H.; Kramer, J.R.

    1999-12-01

    A competitive ligand equilibration/solvent extraction (CLE/SE) technique was used to examine silver complexation in the particulate, colloidal, and dissolved states of wastewater effluent and receiving waters. Additions of silver at near ambient levels, followed by CLE/SE, allowed the determination of complexation sites with large stability constants responsible for silver binding. Good agreement between these constants and formation constants of well-characterized silver sulfide complexes suggests that silver in wastewater effluents and receiving waters is likely to be complexed to sulfur(-II). This is supported by previously collected data on silver and sulfide concentrations in these waters, which showed that inorganic sulfide concentrations are 200 to 300 times in excess of silver concentrations. Organic ligands appear to be insignificant in comparison to the contribution of inorganic ligands to silver binding. These inorganic ligands probably consist of metal sulfides, which are stable for hours and days in oxic waters. When complexed to these strong-affinity ligands, silver(I) is protected from photoreduction to zero-valent silver.

  13. Effects of electron-ion temperature equilibration on inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Barry; Hu, S X

    2011-07-01

    The electron-ion temperature relaxation essentially affects both the laser absorption in coronal plasmas and the hot-spot formation in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It has recently been reexamined for plasma conditions closely relevant to ICF implosions using either classical molecular-dynamics simulations or analytical methods. To explore the electron-ion temperature equilibration effects on ICF implosion performance, we have examined two Coulomb logarithm models by implementing them into our hydrocodes, and we have carried out hydrosimulations for ICF implosions. Compared to the Lee-More model that is currently used in our standard hydrocodes, the two models predict substantial differences in laser absorption, coronal temperatures, and neutron yields for ICF implosions at the OMEGA Laser Facility [Boehly et al. Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Such effects on the triple-picket direct-drive design at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have also been explored. Based on the validity of the two models, we have proposed a combined model of the electron-ion temperature-relaxation rate for the overall ICF plasma conditions. The hydrosimulations using the combined model for OMEGA implosions have shown ∼6% more laser absorption, ∼6%-15% higher coronal temperatures, and ∼10% more neutron yield, when compared to the Lee-More model prediction. It is also noticed that the gain for the NIF direct-drive design can be varied by ∼10% among the different electron-ion temperature-relaxation models. PMID:21867323

  14. Equilibration and Aging of Liquids of Non-Spherically Interacting Particles.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Morales, Ernesto C; Elizondo-Aguilera, L F; Medina-Noyola, M

    2016-08-18

    The nonequilibrium self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of irreversible processes in liquids is extended to describe the positional and orientational thermal fluctuations of the instantaneous local concentration profile n(r,Ω,t) of a suddenly quenched colloidal liquid of particles interacting through nonspherically symmetric pairwise interactions, whose mean value n(r,Ω,t) is constrained to remain uniform and isotropic, n (r,Ω, t) = n (t). Such self-consistent theory is cast in terms of the time-evolution equation of the covariance [Formula: see text] of the fluctuations [Formula: see text] of the spherical harmonics projections nlm(k;t) of the Fourier transform of n(r,Ω,t). The resulting theory describes the nonequilibrium evolution after a sudden temperature quench of both, the static structure factor projections Slm(k,t) and the two-time correlation function [Formula: see text], where τ is the correlation delay time and t is the evolution or waiting time after the quench. As a concrete and illustrative application we use the resulting self-consistent equations to describe the irreversible processes of equilibration or aging of the orientational degrees of freedom of a system of strongly interacting classical dipoles with quenched positional disorder. PMID:27461585

  15. Continuous Equilibration of Phosphatidylcholine and Its Precursors between Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondria in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    de Kroon, Anton I.P.M.; Koorengevel, Martijn C.; Vromans, Tom A.M; de Kruijff, Ben

    2003-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphatidylcholine (PC) is synthesized in the ER and transported to mitochondria via an unknown mechanism. The transport of PC synthesized by the triple methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine was investigated by pulsing yeast spheroplasts with l-[methyl-3H]methionine, followed by a chase with unlabeled methionine and subcellular fractionation. During the pulse, increasing amounts of PC and its mono- and dimethylated precursors (PMME and PDME, respectively) appear in similar proportions in both microsomes and mitochondria, with the extent of incorporation in microsomes being twice that in mitochondria. During the chase, the [3H]-methyl label from the precursors accumulates into PC with similar kinetics in both organelles. The results demonstrate that transport of methylated phospholipids from ER to mitochondria is 1) coupled to synthesis, 2) not selective for PC, 3) at least as fast as the fastest step in the methylation of PE, and 4) bidirectional for PMME and PDME. The interorganellar equilibration of methylated phospholipids was reconstituted in vitro and did not depend on ongoing methylation, cytosolic factors, ATP, and energization of the mitochondria, although energization could accelerate the reaction. The exchange of methylated phospholipids was reduced after pretreating both microsomes and mitochondria with trypsin, indicating the involvement of membrane proteins from both organelles. PMID:12802081

  16. Physical propoerties of incompletely compacted equilibrated ordinary chondrites: Implications for asteroidal structure and impact processing

    SciTech Connect

    Sasso, M.R.; Macke, R.J.; Britt, D.T.; Rivers, M.L.; Ebel, D.S.; Friedrich, J.M.

    2009-03-19

    Aside from robotic exploration, meteorites are our primary source of information about the asteroids that they sample. Although there are some discrepancies, there are dynamical, spectral, and compositional evidence for an S-type asteroid connection to the ordinary chondrite meteorites. Reconciling the measured bulk density of chondrites with that of asteroids can yield important inferences about the internal structure of asteroids. For example, the bulk density of S-type asteroids is typically much less than the bulk density of chondrites, leading to the inference that asteroids contain a significant quantity of macroporosity. We have identified several unusual ordinary chondrites that have been incompletely compacted relative to petrologically similar but much less porous chondrites. Although these are equilibrated chondrites, they have extreme amounts of pore spaces between mineral grains. Here, we detail our efforts quantifying the nature of the pore spaces in these chondrites and we examine the implications for the structure and mechanical processing of the asteroids from which these chondrites originate. Our pore size distribution data may also provide constraints for the modeling of heat flow and shock waves within primordial chondritic parent bodies.

  17. Properties of gravitationally equilibrated Yukawa systems—A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Charan, Harish; Ganesh, Rajaraman Joy, Ashwin

    2014-04-15

    Using 2D Molecular Dynamics simulation, the equilibrium and dynamical properties of a gravitationally equilibrated Yukawa liquid are investigated. We observe that due to asymmetry introduced in one direction by gravity, several interesting features arise. For example, for a given value of coupling parameter Γ, screening parameter κ, and according to a chosen value of gravitational force g (say in y-direction), the system is seen to exhibit super-, sub- or normal diffusion. Interestingly, x-averaged density profiles, unlike a barotropic fluid, acquires sharp, free surface with scale free linear y-dependence. As can be expected for a system with macroscopic gradients, self-diffusion calculated from Green-Kubo’s formalism does not agree with that obtained from Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion. A 2D angular-radial pair correlation function g(r, θ) clearly indicates asymmetric features induced by gravity. We observe that due to compression in y-direction, though in liquid state for all values of gravity considered, the transverse mode is found to predominant as compared to the longitudinal mode, leading to a novel Anisotropic Solid-like Yukawa liquid.

  18. Conformational equilibration time of unfolded protein chains and the folding speed limit†

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Christina J.; Goldbeck, Robert A.; Latypov, Ramil F.; Roder, Heinrich; Kliger, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The speed with which the conformers of unfolded protein chains interconvert is a fundamental question in the study of protein folding. Kinetic evidence is presented here for the time constant for interconversion of disparate unfolded chain conformations of a small globular protein, cytochrome c, in the presence of guanidine HCl denaturant. The axial binding reactions of histidine and methionine residues with the Fe(II) heme cofactor were monitored with time-resolved magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy after photodissociation of the CO complexes of unfolded protein obtained from horse and tuna, and from several histidine mutants of the horse protein. A kinetic model fitting both the reaction rate constants and spectra of the intermediates was used to obtain a quantitative estimate of the conformational diffusion time. The latter parameter was approximated as a first-order time constant for exchange between conformational subensembles presenting either a methionine or a histidine residue to the heme iron for facile binding. The mean diffusional time constant of the wild type and variants was 3 ± 2 μs, close to the folding "speed limit". The implications of the relatively rapid conformational equilibration time observed are discussed in terms of the energy landscape and classical pathway time regimes of folding, for which the conformational diffusion time can be considered a pivot point. PMID:17352458

  19. Effect of equilibration time on the motility and functional integrity of canine spermatozoa frozen in three different extenders.

    PubMed

    Belala, R; Briand-Amirat, L; Vinciguerra, L; Tainturier, D; Kaidi, R; Thorin, C; Michaud, S; Anton, M; Bencharif, D

    2016-06-01

    The present work aimed to assess the effect of equilibration time on post-thaw motility parameters of canine sperm frozen in three extenders: 6% low-density lipoproteins (LDL), 6% liposomes (LIPO), and 40% egg yolk plasma (EYP). A second experiment is aimed at evaluating the functional integrity of canine spermatozoa frozen in the three extenders at the best equilibration time found in the experiment one. In the first experiment, 20 ejaculates harvested from 7 dogs, were frozen in three extenders (LDL, LIPO, and EYP) after four equilibration times (30min, 1h, 3h, and 6h). The semen was evaluated after thawing using an image analyser (HT-IVOS 14.0). The 6h equilibration time gave better results of motility and progressive motility in the three studied extenders. (LDL: 58.9% vs. 42.7%; LIPO: 54.4% vs. 31.9%; EYP: 55.4% vs 40.5% for motility 6 vs. 1h). In the second experiment, 10 ejaculates taken from 6 dogs were frozen under the same conditions as the previous experiment, after 6h equilibration time. The integrity parameters of the spermatozoal membrane (hypo-osmotic swelling test, and SYBR14/propidium Iodide staining), acrosome (FITC-Pisium sativum Aglutinin staining), and DNA (acridine orange staining) were evaluated at three different stages: post-dilution (T0), post-equilibration, and post-thawing. Post-thaw results were as follows: membrane integrity (HOSt: 62;6% vs 58% vs 64.4%; SYBR14/IP: 63.6% vs 57.9% vs 64.8%); acrosome integrity (FITC-PSA: 79.4% vs 74% vs 76.2%) and DNA integrity (Acridine-orange: 98.9% vs 98.5% vs 98.7%) respectively for LDL vs. LIPO vs. EYP. No significant difference existed between the extenders tested; thus 6%LIPO and 40%EYP could be good candidates for replacement of 6%LDL in the protection of canine sperm during the freeze-thaw process without altering motility and integrity parameters. PMID:27234538

  20. Algorithmes et architectures pour ordinateurs quantiques supraconducteurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blais, Alexandre

    Depuis sa formulation, la theorie de l'information a ete basee, implicitement, sur les lois de la physique classique. Une telle formulation est toutefois incomplete puisqu'elle ne tient pas compte de la realite quantique. Au cours des vingt dernieres annees, l'expansion de la theorie de l'information englobant les effets purement quantiques a connu un interet grandissant. La realisation d'un systeme de traitement de l'information quantique, un ordinateur quantique, presente toutefois de nombreux defis. Dans ce document, on s'interesse a differents aspects concernant ces defis. On commence par presenter des concepts algorithmiques comme l'optimisation de calculs quantiques et le calcul quantique geometrique. Par la suite, on s'interesse au design et a differents aspects de l'utilisation de qubits bases sur les jonctions Josephson. En particulier, un nouveau design de qubit supraconducteur est suggere. On presente aussi une approche originale pour l'interaction entre qubits. Cette approche est tres generale puisqu'elle peut etre appliquee a differents designs de qubits. Finalement, on s'interesse a la lecture des qubits supraconducteurs de flux. Le detecteur suggere ici a l'avantage de pouvoir etre decouple du qubit lorsqu'il n'y a pas de mesure en cours.

  1. Effects of extender and equilibration time on post-thaw motility and membrane integrity of cryopreserved Gyr bull semen evaluated by CASA and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Leite, Ticiano Guimarães; do Vale Filho, Vicente Ribeiro; de Arruda, Rubens Paes; de Andrade, André Furugen Cesar; Emerick, Lucas Luz; Zaffalon, Fabiane Gilli; Martins, Jorge André Matias; de Andrade, Venício José

    2010-07-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate the effects of three equilibration times (0, 2, and 4h) and two extenders (TRIS or Bioxcell) for cryopreservation of bull semen. Semen from 12 Gyr bulls was cryopreserved using an automated freezing machine. There were significant interactions between equilibration times and extenders for sperm motility and membrane integrity. The control treatment (0h equilibration) had the lowest values (P<0.05) for total (MOT) and progressive motilities (PROG), and percentage of sperm with intact plasma and acrosomal membranes (IPIA), with no significant differences between extenders. Extender TRIS had greater cryoprotective action than Bioxcell, with greater MOT, PROG, IPIA at 2 and 4h, as well as the lowest proportion of damaged plasma membrane (DPM, 72.2% vs. 85.8%) for all times. Equilibration for 4h yielded the most desirable (P<0.05) for MOT, PROG, and IPIA, and the least DPM percentage (86.5, 78.0, and 72.6% for 0, 2, and 4h, respectively). Overall, the combination of TRIS and 4h of equilibration was the most desirable semen cryopreservation method, with greatest MOT, PROG, and IPIA (TRIS-T4=26.8%; BIO-T4=18.3%) and the least DPM. In conclusion, based on objective analyses, equilibration during cryopreservation was essential for maintaining motility and integrity of sperm membranes; equilibration for 4h yielded the greatest sperm survival, independent of the extender used. PMID:20434857

  2. Fluorescence excitation spectra of all-trans-1,6-diphenylhexatriene conformers: Adiabatic conformer equilibration in the 21Ag state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turek, Andrzej M.; Krishna, Tallapragada S. R.; Brela, Mateusz; Saltiel, Jack

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence spectra of all-trans-1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene were measured in n-hexadecane at 99 °C by varying λexc in the 294-404 nm range. Resolution of this spectral matrix into s-trans,s-trans and s-cis,s-trans conformer fluorescence spectra yields the λexc dependence of fractional contributions which are converted to conformer specific fluorescence excitation spectra. Conformer absorption spectra obtained from the fluorescence excitation spectra are remarkably similar, but differ significantly from absorption spectra derived from a spectrothermal absorption spectral matrix measured in n-alkanes under isopolarizability conditions. The results reveal substantial conformer equilibration in the excited state. Theory is consistent with adiabatic conformer equilibration in the 21Ag state.

  3. The impact of equilibrating hemispheric albedos on tropical performance in the HadGEM2-ES coupled climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, Jim M.; Jones, Andy; Dunstone, Nick; Milton, Sean; Vellinga, Michael; Bodas-Salcedo, Alejandro; Hawcroft, Matt; Kravitz, Ben; Cole, Jason; Watanabe, Shingo; Stephens, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    The Earth's hemispheric reflectances are equivalent to within ± 0.2 Wm-2, even though the Northern Hemisphere contains a greater proportion of higher reflectance land areas, because of greater cloud cover in the Southern Hemisphere. This equivalence is unlikely to be by chance, but the reasons are open to debate. Here we show that equilibrating hemispheric albedos in the Hadley Centre Global Environment Model version 2-Earth System coupled climate model significantly improves what have been considered longstanding and apparently intractable model biases. Monsoon precipitation biases over all continental land areas, the penetration of monsoon rainfall across the Sahel, the West African monsoon "jump", and indicators of hurricane frequency are all significantly improved. Mechanistically, equilibrating hemispheric albedos improves the atmospheric cross-equatorial energy transport and increases the supply of tropical atmospheric moisture to the Hadley cell. We conclude that an accurate representation of the cross-equatorial energy transport appears to be critical if tropical performance is to be improved.

  4. Re-equilibration after quenches in athermal martensites: Conversion delays for vapor-to-liquid domain-wall phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankaraiah, N.; Murthy, K. P. N.; Lookman, T.; Shenoy, S. R.

    2015-06-01

    Entropy barriers and aging states appear in martensitic structural-transition models, slowly re-equilibrating after temperature quenches, under Monte Carlo dynamics. Concepts from protein folding and aging harmonic oscillators turn out to be useful in understanding these nonequilibrium evolutions. We show how the athermal, nonactivated delay time for seeded parent-phase austenite to convert to product-phase martensite arises from an identified entropy barrier in Fourier space. In an aging state of low Monte Carlo acceptances, the strain structure factor makes constant-energy searches for rare pathways to enter a Brillouin zone "golf hole" enclosing negative-energy states, and to suddenly release entropically trapped stresses. In this context, a stress-dependent effective temperature can be defined, that re-equilibrates to the quenched bath temperature.

  5. Pouring 'Cold Water' on Hot Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, A. E.

    1995-09-01

    was concluded that the textures must have formed during cooling after hot accretion. However, because spinodal decomposition textures develop over the temperature range 1400-1100 K [14,15] and type-4 and -5 OC were probably not heated above 1000 K and 1050 K, respectively [16], these textures are probably relicts of chondrule formation. It was also suggested [14] that compositional zoning in pyroxenes indicates that type-3 OC cooled more rapidly than type-4 to -5 OC. However, OC metallographic cooling rates are not correlated with petrologic type [17]. Furthermore, experimental data [13] show that rare thick opx lamellae in H4 Conquista could not have formed during single stage cooling as expected in autometamorphism; a two-stage cooling history involving rapid cooling during chondrule formation followed by parent-body annealing is more plausible. Polycrystalline taenite. Polycrystalline taenite in H/L3 Tieschitz was interpreted as a relict solidification structure that failed to anneal into monocrystalline taenite because of rapid cooling (1700 to 1000 K within days to weeks) [18]; by analogy, it was proposed that all H3-6 chondrites containing polycrystalline taenite cooled rapidly from 1700 K [4], an idea inconsistent with prograde metamorphism. However, cooling rates in equilibrated chondrites that were slow enough to permit significant growth of kamacite would erase prior solidification zoning in taenite by solid-state diffusion [19,20]. This hypothesis, confirmed by computer modeling [21], invalidates the assumption that equilibrated OC containing polycrystalline taenite cooled rapidly. Polycrystalline taenite is most likely a pre-metamorphic relict. Heterogeneous metal grains. Compositionally and texturally heterogeneous metal grains in L6 Bruderheim are unlikely to have survived solid-state diffusion during prograde metamorphism [22]; these authors favored hot accretion followed by low-temperature annealing. However, Bruderheim is a fragmental breccia of shock

  6. Hyperquenching and cold equilibration strategies for the study of liquid--liquid and protein folding transitions.

    PubMed

    Angell, C Austen; Wang, Li Min

    2003-09-01

    In this paper we consider the extension of the recent quantitative studies of hyperquenched glassformers to include (1). systems that exhibit first order liquid-liquid phase transitions, and (2). systems that contain molecules, which, during normal cooling, undergo internal structural changes above the glass temperature. The general aim of these studies is to trap-in a high enthalpy, high entropy, state of the system and then observe it evolving in time at low temperatures during a controlled annealing procedure. In this manner events that normally occur during change of temperature may be observed occurring during passage of time, at much lower temperatures. At such low temperatures the smearing effects of vibrations are greatly reduced. While the case of most interest in the second class is the refolding of thermally denatured protein molecules, any reconstructive molecular or chemical exchange process is a potential subject for investigation. Processes that occur in stages can be studied in greater detail, and any stage of interest can be frozen when desired, by drop of temperature, for more detailed spectroscopic examination. We review an electrospray method for hyperquenching liquids at approximately 10(5) K/s, and discuss some results of such experiments in order to illustrate a calorimetric approach to exploiting the hyperquenching-and- cold-equilibration strategy. To apply the idea to the study of proteins, the following protein solvent requirements must be met: (1). the solvents must not crystallize ice on cooling or heating, yet must not denature the proteins; (2). the solvents must support thermally denatured molecules without permitting aggregation. We describe two solvent systems, the first of which meets the first requirement, but the second only partially. The second solvent system apparently meets both. Preliminary results, only at the proof of concept stage, are reported for cold refolding of lysozyme, which, it seems, can be trapped in our solvent

  7. Cellular Uptake of Decitabine by Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporters in HCT116 Cells.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Kumiko; Hosokawa, Mika; Iwakawa, Seigo

    2015-01-01

    DNA hypermethylation, an epigenetic change that silences gene expression without altering nucleotide sequences, plays a critical role in the formation and progression of colorectal cancers as well as in the acquisition of drug resistance. Decitabine (DAC), a DNA methyltransferase 1 inhibitor of nucleoside analogues, has been shown to restore gene expression silenced by hypermethylation. In the present study, the mechanisms underlying both uridine and DAC uptake were examined in the human colon cancer cell line HCT116. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that ENT1 mRNA was the most abundant among the nucleoside transporters examined in HCT116 cells. The ENT1 protein was detected in the membrane fraction, as determined by Western blotting. The uptake of uridine or DAC was time- and concentration-dependent, but also Na(+)-independent. The uptake of these agents was inhibited by S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBMPR), an inhibitor of equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs), and was also decreased in cells treated with ENT1 small interfering RNA. The uptake of both uridine and DAC was inhibited by uridine, cytidine, adenosine, or inosine, while that of DAC was also inhibited by thymidine. The expression of MAGEA1 mRNA, the DNA of which was methylated in HCT116 cells, was increased by DAC treatment, and this increment was attenuated by concomitant treatment with NBMPR. The IC50 value of DAC was also increased in the presence of NBMPR. These results suggest that DAC is mainly taken up by ENT1 and that this uptake is one of the key determinants of the activity of DAC in HCT116 cells. PMID:26235575

  8. Ingested water equilibrates isotopically with the body water pool of a shorebird with unrivaled water fluxes.

    PubMed

    Visser, G H; Dekinga, A; Achterkamp, B; Piersma, T

    2000-11-01

    We investigated the applicability of (2)H to measure the amount of body water (TBW) and water fluxes in relation to diet type and level of food intake in a mollusk-eating shorebird, the Red Knot (Calidris canutus). Six birds were exposed to eight experimental indoor conditions. Average fractional (2)H turnover rates ranged between 0. 182 day(-1) (SD = 0.0219) for fasting birds and 7.759 day(-1) (SD = 0.4535) for birds feeding on cockles (Cerastoderma edule). Average TBW estimates obtained with the plateau method were within the narrow range of 75.9-85.4 g (or between 64.6 and 70.1% of the body mass). Those obtained with the extrapolation method showed strong day-to-day variations (range 55.7-83.7 g, or between 49.7 and 65.5%). Average difference between the two calculation methods ranged between 0.6% and 36.3%, and this difference was strongly negatively correlated with water flux rate. Average water influx rates ranged between 15.5 g/day (fasting) and 624.5 g/day (feeding on cockles). The latter value is at 26.6 times the allometrically predicted value and is the highest reported to date. Differences in (2)H concentrations between the blood and feces (i.e., biological fractionation) were small but significant (-3.4% when fed a pellet diet, and -1.1% for all the other diets), and did not relate to the rate of water flux (chi(2)(1) = 0.058, P < 0.81). We conclude that the ingested water equilibrated rapidly with the body water pool even in an avian species that shows record water flux rates when living on ingested marine bivalves. PMID:11049863

  9. Control of Rubisco function via homeostatic equilibration of CO2 supply

    PubMed Central

    Igamberdiev, Abir U.

    2015-01-01

    Rubisco is the most abundant protein on Earth that serves as the primary engine of carbon assimilation. It is characterized by a slow rate and low specificity for CO2 leading to photorespiration. We analyze here the challenges of operation of this enzyme as the main carbon fixation engine. The high concentration of Rubisco exceeds that of its substrate CO2 by 2–3 orders of magnitude; however, the total pool of available carbon in chloroplast, i.e., mainly bicarbonate, is comparable to the concentration of Rubisco active sites. This makes the reactant stationary assumption (RSA), which is essential as a condition of satisfying the Michaelis–Menten (MM) kinetics, valid if we assume that the delivery of CO2 from this pool is not limiting. The RSA is supported by active carbonic anhydrases (CA) that quickly equilibrate bicarbonate and CO2 pools and supply CO2 to Rubisco. While the operation of stromal CA is independent of light reactions, the thylakoidal CA associated with PSII and pumping CO2 from the thylakoid lumen is coordinated with the rate of electron transport, water splitting and proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane. At high CO2 concentrations, CA becomes less efficient (the equilibrium becomes unfavorable), so a deviation from the MM kinetics is observed, consistent with Rubisco reaching its Vmax at approximately 50% lower level than expected from the classical MM curve. Previously, this deviation was controversially explained by the limitation of RuBP regeneration. At low ambient CO2 and correspondingly limited capacity of the bicarbonate pool, its depletion at Rubisco sites is relieved in that the enzyme utilizes O2 instead of CO2, i.e., by photorespiration. In this process, CO2 is supplied back to Rubisco, and the chloroplastic redox state and energy level are maintained. It is concluded that the optimal performance of photosynthesis is achieved via the provision of continuous CO2 supply to Rubisco by carbonic anhydrases and photorespiration

  10. Acceleration of Lateral Equilibration in Mixed Lipid Bilayers Using Replica Exchange with Solute Tempering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The lateral heterogeneity of cellular membranes plays an important role in many biological functions such as signaling and regulating membrane proteins. This heterogeneity can result from preferential interactions between membrane components or interactions with membrane proteins. One major difficulty in molecular dynamics simulations aimed at studying the membrane heterogeneity is that lipids diffuse slowly and collectively in bilayers, and therefore, it is difficult to reach equilibrium in lateral organization in bilayer mixtures. Here, we propose the use of the replica exchange with solute tempering (REST) approach to accelerate lateral relaxation in heterogeneous bilayers. REST is based on the replica exchange method but tempers only the solute, leaving the temperature of the solvent fixed. Since the number of replicas in REST scales approximately only with the degrees of freedom in the solute, REST enables us to enhance the configuration sampling of lipid bilayers with fewer replicas, in comparison with the temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation (T-REMD) where the number of replicas scales with the degrees of freedom of the entire system. We apply the REST method to a cholesterol and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer mixture and find that the lateral distribution functions of all molecular pair types converge much faster than in the standard MD simulation. The relative diffusion rate between molecules in REST is, on average, an order of magnitude faster than in the standard MD simulation. Although REST was initially proposed to study protein folding and its efficiency in protein folding is still under debate, we find a unique application of REST to accelerate lateral equilibration in mixed lipid membranes and suggest a promising way to probe membrane lateral heterogeneity through molecular dynamics simulation. PMID:25328493

  11. Oxygen Isotope Systematics of Chondrules from the Least Equilibrated H Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kita, N. T.; Kimura, M.; Ushikubo, T.; Valley, J. W.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen isotope compositions of bulk chondrules and their mineral separates in type 3 ordinary chondrites (UOC) show several % variability in the oxygen three isotope diagram with slope of approx.0.7 [1]. In contrast, ion microprobe analyses of olivine and pyroxene phenocrysts in ferromagnesian chondrules from LL 3.0-3.1 chondrites show mass dependent isotopic fractionation as large as 5% among type I (FeO-poor) chondrules, while type II (FeO-rich) chondrules show a narrow range (less than or equal to 1%) of compositions [2]. The .Delta(exp 17)O (=delta(exp 17)O-0.52xdelta(exp 18)O) values of olivine and pyroxene in these chondrules show a peak at approx.0.7% that are systematically lower than those of bulk chondrule analyses as well as the bulk LL chondrites [2]. Further analyses of glass in Semarkona chondrules show .17O values as high as +5% with highly fractionated d18O (max +18%), implying O-16-poor glass in chondrules were altered as a result of hydration in the parent body at low temperature [3]. Thus, chondrules in LL3.0-3.1 chondrites do not provide any direct evidence of oxygen isotope exchange between solid precursor and O-16-depleted gas during chondrule melting events. To compare the difference and/or similarity between chondrules from LL and H chondrites, we initiated systematic investigations of oxygen isotopes in chondrules from Yamato 793408 (H3.2), one of the least equilibrated H chondrite [4]. In our preliminary study of 4 chondrules, we reported distinct oxygen isotope ratios from dusty olivine and refractory forsterite (RF) grains compared to their host chondrules and confirmed their relict origins [5].

  12. Disrupted sleep-wake regulation in type 1 equilibrative nucleoside transporter knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, T; Ramesh, V; Dworak, M; Choi, D-S; McCarley, R W; Kalinchuk, A V; Basheer, R

    2015-09-10

    The type 1 equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT1) is implicated in regulating levels of extracellular adenosine ([AD]ex). In the basal forebrain (BF) levels of [AD]ex increase during wakefulness and closely correspond to the increases in the electroencephalogram (EEG) delta (0.75-4.5Hz) activity (NRδ) during subsequent non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS). Thus in the BF, [AD]ex serves as a biochemical marker of sleep homeostasis. Waking EEG activity in theta range (5-9Hz, Wθ) is also described as a marker of sleep homeostasis. An hour-by-hour temporal relationship between the Wθ and NRδ is unclear. In this study we examined the relationship between these EEG markers of sleep homeostasis during spontaneous sleep-wakefulness and during sleep deprivation (SD) and recovery sleep in the ENT1 gene knockout (ENT1KO) mouse. We observed that baseline NREMS amount was decreased during the light period in ENT1KO mice, accompanied by a weak correlation between Wθ of each hour and NRδ of its subsequent hour when compared to their wild-type (WT) littermates. Perfusion of low dose of adenosine into BF not only strengthened the Wθ-NRδ relationship, but also increased NREMS to match with the WT littermates suggesting decreased [AD]ex in ENT1KO mice. However, the SD-induced [AD]ex increase in the BF and the linear correlation between the EEG markers of sleep homeostasis were unaffected in ENT1KO mice suggesting that during SD, sources other than ENT1 contribute to increase in [AD]ex. Our data provide evidence for a differential regulation of wakefulness-associated [AD]ex during spontaneous vs prolonged waking. PMID:26143012

  13. Modulation of the equilibrative nucleoside transporter by inhibitors of DNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Pressacco, J.; Wiley, J. S.; Jamieson, G. P.; Erlichman, C.; Hedley, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    Expression of the equilibrative, S-(p-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBMPR)-sensitive nucleoside transporter (es), a component of the nucleoside salvage pathway, was measured during unperturbed growth and following exposure to various antimetabolites at growth-inhibitory concentrations. The probe 5-(SAENTA-x8)-fluorescein is a highly modified form of adenosine incorporating a fluorescein molecule. It binds. with high affinity and specificity to the (es) nucleoside transporter at a 1:1 stoichiometry, allowing reliable estimates of es expression by flow cytometry. Using a dual labelling technique which combined the vital DNA dye Hoechst-33342 and 5-(SAENTA-x8)-fluorescein, we found that surface expression of es approximately doubled between G1 and G2 + M phases of the cell cycle. To address the question of whether es expression could be modulated in cells exposed to drugs which inhibit de novo synthesis of nucleotides, cells were exposed to antimetabolite drugs having different modes of action. Hydroxyurea and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which inhibit the de novo synthesis of DNA precursors, produced increases in the expression of es. In contrast, cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) and aphidicolin, which directly inhibit DNA synthesis, produced no significant increase in es expression. Thymidine (TdR), which is an allosteric inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase that depletes dATP, dCTP and dGTP pools while repleting the dTTP pool, had no significant effect on es expression. These data suggest that surface expression of the es nucleoside transporter is regulated by a mechanism which is sensitive to the supply of deoxynucleotides. Because 5-FU (which specifically depletes dTTP pools) causes a large increase in expression whereas TdR (which depletes all precursors except dTTP) does not, this mechanism might be particularly sensitive to dTTP pools. PMID:7547244

  14. Isotopic Equilibration Between Sulfide and Organic Matter: Implications for Records of Sedimentary δ34S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raven, M. R.; Sessions, A. L.; Adkins, J. F.; Fischer, W. W.

    2015-12-01

    Records of the sulfur-isotopic composition of sedimentary pyrite have been used to constrain the evolutionary timing of major metabolic pathways, the size of the marine sulfate reservoir, and the redox balance of the planet. It remains a major challenge, however, to explain the enormous range of pyrite δ34S values in the literature and their typical ~10‰ offset relative to sedimentary organic S. We investigate the development of pyrite and organic S records in Santa Barbara Basin, which has suboxic bottom water and high (≥4 wt%) organic matter burial. Concentration and δ34S profiles of major sulfur species (sulfate, sulfide, elemental S, proto-kerogen, pyrite, and extractable organic matter) suggest the occurrence of S-isotope exchange between porewater sulfide and organic S, so we conducted laboratory experiments to test organic S exchangeability with 34S-labelled sulfide-polysulfide solutions. We found that both extractable and proto-kerogen organic matter incorporated significant amounts of label within days, supporting the feasibility of equilibration between sulfide and organic matter in the environment. Unlike organic S, pyrite δ34S values in Santa Barbara Basin sediments are up to 30‰ lower than those for porewater sulfide. We hypothesize that this strongly 34S-depleted pyrite reflects the immediate products of bacterial sulfate reduction at organic-rich structures like microbial biofilms or aggregates and suggest that this δ34S difference between porewater sulfide and pyrite may be a more common than previously recognized. Pyrite δ34S values are not necessarily reflective of porewater sulfide δ34S, suggesting that this common assumption should be revisited. Sedimentary pyrite and organic S are potentially powerful and complementary archives of environmental information. To meaningfully interpret these records, it is essential that we take into account the complex processes affecting sedimentary pyrite and organic sulfur δ34S in modern sediments.

  15. Basolateral Uptake of Nucleosides by Sertoli Cells Is Mediated Primarily by Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1

    PubMed Central

    Klein, David M.; Evans, Kristen K.; Hardwick, Rhiannon N.; Dantzler, William H.; Wright, Stephen H.

    2013-01-01

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB) prevents the entry of many xenobiotic compounds into seminiferous tubules thereby protecting developing germ cells. Understanding drug transport across the BTB may improve drug delivery into the testis. Members of one class of drug, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), do penetrate the BTB, presumably through interaction with physiologic nucleoside transporters. By investigating the mechanism of nucleoside transport, it may be possible to design other drugs to bypass the BTB in a similar manner. We present a novel ex vivo technique to study transport at the BTB that employs isolated, intact seminiferous tubules. Using this system, we found that over 80% of total uptake by seminiferous tubules of the model nucleoside uridine could be inhibited by 100 nM nitrobenzylmercaptopurine riboside (NBMPR, 6-S-[(4-nitrophenyl)methyl]-6-thioinosine), a concentration that selectively inhibits equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) activity. In primary cultured rat Sertoli cells, 100 nM NBMPR inhibited all transepithelial transport and basolateral uptake of uridine. Immunohistochemical staining showed ENT1 to be located on the basolateral membrane of human and rat Sertoli cells, whereas ENT2 was located on the apical membrane of Sertoli cells. Transepithelial transport of uridine by rat Sertoli cells was partially inhibited by the NRTIs zidovudine, didanosine, and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, consistent with an interaction between these drugs and ENT transporters. These data indicate that ENT1 is the primary route for basolateral nucleoside uptake into Sertoli cells and a possible mechanism for nucleosides and nucleoside-based drugs to undergo transepithelial transport. PMID:23639800

  16. Tissue distribution of concentrative and equilibrative nucleoside transporters in male and female rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Chen, Chuan; Klaassen, Curtis

    2004-12-01

    Concentrative nucleoside transporters (Cnts) and equilibrative nucleoside transporters (Ents) have essential physiological functions and are important in disposition of anticancer and antiviral nucleoside analogs. Information on tissue distribution of Cnts and Ents in rodents is sparse. Thus, the present study aimed to determine the distribution of Cnt1-3 and Ent1-3 transcripts in 19 tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL/6 mice of both genders. These six transcripts were quantified using the branched DNA signal amplification assay. Cnt1 transcripts were highest in small intestine, followed by kidney and testes, with similar expression in both species. Cnt2 mRNA was expressed highest in the small intestine of both rats and mice, intermediate in liver of rats but not in mice, and lower in thymus and spleen of both species. Cnt3 mRNA has marked species differences, with the highest expression in lung of rats but uterus of mice. Ent1 mRNA was most highly expressed in testes and lung of both species. Ent1 mRNA was highly expressed in liver and pituitary of mice, but not in rats. Ent2 mRNA was highly expressed in testes and brain of both species. Ent3 mRNA was highest in kidney, followed by testes, in both species. Significant gender differences were observed in kidney (mouse) and heart (rat). These studies demonstrate that in general, tissue distribution of Cnt and Ent is similar in rats and mice. However, a few important species and gender differences do exist, which could be responsible for related differences in efficacy and toxicity of substrates for these transporters. PMID:15371301

  17. Thermodynamics and kinetics of inhibitor binding to human equilibrative nucleoside transporter subtype-1.

    PubMed

    Rehan, Shahid; Ashok, Yashwanth; Nanekar, Rahul; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2015-12-15

    Many nucleoside transport inhibitors are in clinical use as anti-cancer, vasodilator and cardioprotective drugs. However, little is known about the binding energetics of these inhibitors to nucleoside transporters (NTs) due to their low endogenous expression levels and difficulties in the biophysical characterization of purified protein with ligands. Here, we present kinetics and thermodynamic analyses of inhibitor binding to the human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hENT1), also known as SLC29A1. Using a radioligand binding assay, we obtained equilibrium binding and kinetic rate constants of well-known NT inhibitors--[(3)H]nitrobenzylmercaptopurine ribonucleoside ([(3)H]NBMPR), dilazep, and dipyridamole--and the native permeant, adenosine, to hENT1. We observed that the equilibrium binding affinities for all inhibitors decreased whereas, the kinetic rate constants increased with increasing temperature. Furthermore, we found that binding is enthalpy driven and thus, an exothermic reaction, implying that the transporter does not discriminate between its inhibitors and substrates thermodynamically. This predominantly enthalpy-driven binding by four chemically distinct ligands suggests that the transporter may not tolerate diversity in the type of interactions that lead to high affinity binding. Consistent with this, the measured activation energy of [(3)H]NBMPR association was relatively large (20 kcal mol(-1)) suggesting a conformational change upon inhibitor binding. For all three inhibitors the enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) contributions to the reaction energetics were determined by van't Hoff analysis to be roughly similar (25-75% ΔG°). Gains in enthalpy with increasing polar surface area of inhibitors suggest that the binding is favored by electrostatic or polar interactions between the ligands and the transporter. PMID:26428002

  18. The Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System: A 12 months Test of an Artificial Aquatic Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blüm, V.; Andriske, M.; Ludwig, Ch.; Paaßen, U.; Voeste, D.

    1999-01-01

    The ``Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System'' (C.E.B.A.S.) is finally disposed for long-term multi-generation experiments with aquatic organisms in a space station. Therefore a minimum operation time of three month is required. It is verified in three versions of laboratory prototypes. The third one passed successfully a 12 months mid-term test in 1995/96 thus demonstrating its high biological stability. The third version of the C.E.B.A.S. consists of a 100 l animal tank, two plant cultivators with a volume of 15 l each with independent illuminations, a 3.0 l semibiological ``mechanical'' filter, a 3.0 l bacteria filter, a heating/cooling device and a dummy filter unit. The live-bearing teleost Xiphophorus helleri is the vertebrate and the pulmonate water snail Biomphalaria glabrata the invertebrate experimental animal in the system. The rootless higher water plant Ceratophyllum demersum is the producer organism. Ammonia oxidizing bacteria and other microorganisms settle in the filters. A simple data acquisition is combined with temperature and plant illumination control. Besides of the space aspects the C.E.B.A.S. proved to be an extremely suitable tool to investigate the organism and subcomponent interactions in a well defined terrestrial aquatic closed ecosystem by providing physical, chemical and biological data which allow an approach to a comprehensive system analysis. Moreover the C.E.B.A.S. is the base for the development of innovative combined animal-plant aquaculture systems for human nutrition on earth which could be implemented into bioregenerative life support systems with a higher degree of complexity suitable for lunar or planetary bases.

  19. Regulation by equilibrative nucleoside transporter of adenosine outward currents in adult rat spinal dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Fujita, Tsugumi; Kawasaki, Yasuhiko; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2004-07-30

    A current response induced by superfusing adenosine was examined in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons of adult rat spinal cord slices by using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. In 78% of the neurons examined, adenosine induced an outward current at -70 mV [18.8 +/- 1.1 pA (n = 98) at 1mM] in a dose-dependent manner (EC(50) = 177 microM). A similar current was induced by A(1) agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (1 microM), whereas A(1) antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (1 microM) reversed the adenosine action. The adenosine current reversed its polarity at a potential being close to the equilibrium potential for K(+), and was attenuated by Ba(2+) (100 microM) and 4-aminopyridine (5mM) but not tetraethylammonium (5mM). The adenosine current was enhanced in duration by equilibrative nucleoside-transport (rENT1) inhibitor S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (1 microM) and adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (1 microM), and slowed in falling phase by adenosine kinase (AK) inhibitor iodotubercidine (1 microM). We conclude that a Ba(2+)- and 4-aminopyridine-sensitive K(+) channel in SG neurons is opened via the activation of A(1) receptors by adenosine whose level is possibly regulated by rENT1, adenosine deaminase and adenosine kinase. Considering that intrathecally-administered adenosine analogues produce antinociception, the regulatory systems of adenosine may serve as targets for antinociceptive drugs. PMID:15275960

  20. Energy loss, equilibration, and thermodynamics of a baryon rich strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougemont, Romulo; Ficnar, Andrej; Finazzo, Stefano I.; Noronha, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    Lattice data for the QCD equation of state and the baryon susceptibility near the crossover phase transition (at zero baryon density) are used to determine the input parameters of a 5-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton holographic model that provides a consistent holographic framework to study both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium properties of a hot and baryon rich strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma (QGP). We compare our holographic equation of state computed at nonzero baryon chemical potential, μ B , with recent lattice calculations and find quantitative agreement for the pressure and the speed of sound for μ B ≤ 400 MeV. This holographic model is used to obtain holographic predictions for the temperature and μ B dependence of the drag force and the Langevin diffusion coefficients associated with heavy quark jet propagation as well as the jet quenching parameter q and the shooting string energy loss of light quarks in the baryon dense plasma. We find that the energy loss of heavy and light quarks generally displays a nontrivial, fast-varying behavior as a function of the temperature near the crossover. Moreover, energy loss is also found to generally increase due to nonzero baryon density effects even though this strongly coupled liquid cannot be described in terms of well defined quasiparticle excitations. Furthermore, to get a glimpse of how thermalization occurs in a hot and baryon dense QGP, we study how the lowest quasinormal mode of an external massless scalar disturbance in the bulk is affected by a nonzero baryon charge. We find that the equilibration time associated with the lowest quasinormal mode decreases in a dense medium.

  1. Substrate and Inhibitor Specificity of the Plasmodium berghei Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter Type 1.

    PubMed

    Arora, Avish; Deniskin, Roman; Sosa, Yvett; Nishtala, Sita Nirupama; Henrich, Philipp P; Kumar, T R Santha; Fidock, David A; Akabas, Myles H

    2016-06-01

    Malaria is a critical public health issue in the tropical world, causing extensive morbidity and mortality. Infection by unicellular, obligate intracellular Plasmodium parasites causes malaria. The emergence of resistance to current antimalarial drugs necessitates the development of novel therapeutics. A potential novel drug target is the purine import transporter. Because Plasmodium parasites are purine auxotrophic, they must import purines from their host to fulfill metabolic requirements. They import purines via equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) homologs. Recently, we used a yeast-based high-throughput screen to identify inhibitors of the P. falciparum ENT1 (PfENT1) that kill P. falciparum parasites in culture. P. berghei infection of mice is an animal model for human malaria. Because P. berghei ENT1 (PbENT1) shares only 60% amino acid sequence identity with PfENT1, we sought to characterize PbENT1 and its sensitivity to our PfENT1 inhibitors. We expressed PbENT1 in purine auxotrophic yeast and used radiolabeled substrate uptake to characterize its function. We showed that PbENT1 transports both purines and pyrimidines. It preferred nucleosides compared with nucleobases. Inosine (IC50 = 3.7 µM) and guanosine (IC50 = 21.3 µM) had the highest affinities. Our recently discovered PfENT1 inhibitors were equally effective against both PbENT1- and PfENT1-mediated purine uptake. The PfENT1 inhibitors are at least 10-fold more potent against PfENT1 than human hENT1. They kill P. berghei parasites in 24-hour ex vivo culture. Thus, the P. berghei murine malaria model may be useful to evaluate the efficacy of PfENT1 inhibitors in vivo and their therapeutic potential for treatment of malaria. PMID:27048953

  2. Extrinsic Labeling of Staple Food Crops with Isotopic Iron Does Not Consistently Result in Full Equilibration: Revisiting the Methodology.

    PubMed

    Glahn, Raymond P; Cheng, Zhiqiang; Giri, Shree

    2015-11-01

    Extrinsic isotopic labeling of food Fe has been used for over 50 years to measure Fe absorption. This method assumes that complete equilibration occurs between the extrinsic and the intrinsic Fe prior to intestinal absorption. The present study tested this assumption via in vitro digestion of varieties of maize, white beans, black beans, red beans, and lentils. Prior to digestion, foods were extrinsically labeled with (58)Fe at concentrations of 1, 10, 50, and 100% of the intrinsic (56)Fe. Following an established in vitro digestion protocol, the digest was centrifuged and the Fe solubilities of the extrinsic (58)Fe and the intrinsic (56)Fe were compared as a measure of extrinsic/intrinsic equilibration. In the beans, significantly more of the extrinsic Fe (up to 2-3 times, p < 0.001) partitioned into the supernatant. The effect varied depending upon the seed coat color, the harvest, and the concentration of the extrinsic Fe. For lentils and maize the extrinsic Fe tended to partition into the insoluble fraction and also varied depending on variety and harvest. There was no crop that consistently demonstrated full equilibration of the extrinsic Fe with the intrinsic Fe. These observations challenge the accuracy of Fe absorption studies in which isotopic extrinsic Fe was used to evaluate Fe absorption and bioavailability. PMID:26456842

  3. The interpretation of CO2 equilibration data to obtain plaque fluid buffer capacities, and comparison with results obtained by titration.

    PubMed

    Dibdin, G H; Shellis, R P

    1989-09-01

    Titration measurements of pooled plaque fluid buffering capacity (Shellis and Dibdin, 1988), which showed a broadly defined minimum at pH 7, were compared with recent curves published by Carey et al. (1988a), which they obtained by an ultra-micro CO2-equilibration technique and which suggested a quite different profile, peaking sharply at pH 7.1. When analyzed in a different, more conventional way, the raw measurements in the latter study become more consistent with our own results and with earlier findings of Tatevossian (1977). In particular, we conclude that the peak at pH 7.1 is an artifact, and that Carey et al. underestimated buffer capacities below pH 6.4 and above pH 7.4. Rationales for the two modes of analysis are compared, and possible reasons for the remaining differences between the re-analyzed CO2-equilibration results and the titration results are discussed. Suggestions for the improvement of the accuracy of the CO2-equilibration technique are put forward. PMID:2506258

  4. Quark matter in a parallel electric and magnetic field background: Chiral phase transition and equilibration of chiral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggieri, M.; Peng, G. X.

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we study spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking for quark matter in the background of static and homogeneous parallel electric field E and magnetic field B . We use a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with a local kernel interaction to compute the relevant quantities to describe chiral symmetry breaking at a finite temperature for a wide range of E and B . We study the effect of this background on the inverse catalysis of chiral symmetry breaking for E and B of the same order of magnitude. We then focus on the effect of the equilibration of chiral density n5 , produced dynamically by an axial anomaly on the critical temperature. The equilibration of n5 , a consequence of chirality-flipping processes in the thermal bath, allows for the introduction of the chiral chemical potential μ5, which is computed self-consistently as a function of the temperature and field strength by coupling the number equation to the gap equation and solving the two within an expansion in E /T2 , B /T2 , and μ52/T2 . We find that even if chirality is produced and equilibrates within a relaxation time τM , it does not change drastically the thermodynamics, with particular reference to the inverse catalysis induced by the external fields, as long as the average μ5 at equilibrium is not too large.

  5. INVESTIGATION OF WASTE GLASS POURING PROCESS OVER A KNIFE EDGE

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    Vitrification is the process of capturing radioactive waste in glass. The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is one of the facilities using the vitrification technology to treat and immobilize radioactive waste. The objective of the project is to investigate the pouring behavior of molten glass over a pour spout knife edge. Experiments are run using simulant glass containing the same chemical formulation as the radioactive sludge glass, but without radioactive contaminants. The purpose of these tests is to obtain actual glass data that, when combined with previous cold data from other fluids, will provide an overall understanding of the physics of liquids flowing over a pour spout and knife edge, A specific objective is to verify computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models with a range of liquid data with particular emphasis on glass so as to provide confidence in use of these CFD models for designing a new improved pour spout for the DWPF melter. The work to be performed at FIU-HCET includes assembling the melting and pouring system that mimics the DWPF melter and determining the key parameters that may influence wicking. Information from the FIU-HCET melter tests will lead to better operating guidelines for the DWPF melter so as to avoid wicking. During FY98, a bench-scale melter complete with pour spout and a knife edge was designed and assembled at FIU-HCET. Initially, the system was tested with glycerine. Subsequently, glass provided by SRS was used for experimentation. Flow visualization tests were performed with the melter in FY98 to investigate the pouring behavior of molten glass over a pour spout model simulating a DWPF pour spout of the original design. Simulant glass containing the same chemical formulation as sludge glass but without radioactive contaminants was used in the tests. All the tasks and milestones mentioned in the PTP for the project were accomplished. The project completed its second year, and this document

  6. Reducing exposures during the pouring operations of a brass foundry.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, M A; Gressel, M G; O'Brien, D M; Clark, N J

    1993-05-01

    The focus of this exposure assessment and control technology study was a brass foundry and the lead exposures of workers involved in the transportation and pouring of metal. Controls in place at the foundry included ventilation systems at the furnace and along the continuous and stationary pouring lines. Real-time measurements were made to determine which tasks were the primary exposure sources, and a hand-held aerosol monitor was used to measure real-time aerosol exposures (as a surrogate for lead) in the workers' breathing zones. Data were collected over two 30-min sampling periods while worker activities were monitored using a video camera. Analysis of the data showed that the greatest aerosol exposures occurred during the transportation of an unventilated, full ladle, resulting in an average concentration of at least twice that of the other tasks. The study concluded that the addition of exhaust ventilation such as a moveable hood and duct system during the ladle transport and pouring tasks, and the implementation of a side draft hood at the pigging area, could result in a reduction of worker exposure to aerosols during the continuous pouring operation by up to 40%. The controls and techniques suggested in this study could be applied to pouring operations throughout the industry to reduce worker exposure to metal fumes. PMID:8498361

  7. Investigation of waste glass pouring behavior over a knife edge

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The development of vitrification technology for converting radioactive waste into a glass solid began in the early 1960s. Some problems encountered in the vitrification process are still waiting for a solution. One of them is wicking. During pouring, the glass stream flows down the wall of the pour spout until it reaches an angled cut in the wall. At this point, the stream is supposed to break cleanly away from the wall of the pour spout and fall freely into the canister. However, the glass stream is often pulled toward the wall and does not always fall into the canister, a phenomenon known as wicking. Phase 1 involves the assembly, construction, and testing of a melter capable of supplying molten glass at operational flow rates over a break-off point knife edge. Phase 2 will evaluate the effects of glass and pour spout temperatures as well as glass flow rates on the glass flow behavior over the knife edge. Phase 3 will identify the effects on wicking resulting from varying the knife edge diameter and height as well as changing the back-cut angle of the knife edge. The following tasks were completed in FY97: Design the experimental system for glass melting and pouring; Acquire and assemble the melter system; and Perform initial research work.

  8. Effects of recrystallization and strain on Ti re-equilibration in quartz in a cooling pluton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestmann, Michel; Pennacchioni, Giorgio

    2014-05-01

    Since a couple of years the trace amount of Ti in quartz (Ti-in-quartz or TitaniQ) has been used to constrain the deformation temperature in quartzitic rocks. Independently of how precise the estimate of deformation temperature could be, a basic question still remains controversial of how effective is dynamic recrystallization to reset the Ti in quartz in mylonites. The study of a heterogeneous ductile shear zone developed during post-magmatic cooling of a titanite-bearing granodiorite allows the effect of strain and recrystallization on Ti re-equilibration in quartz to be assessed. The different strain facies show a heterogeneous distribution of Ti content (measured by SIMS) which correlates well with cathodoluminescence (CL) intensity. In the granodiorite protolith CL-bright Ti-rich (20-38 ppm) quartz shows CL-dark Ti-poor haloes (Ti as low as 6-8 ppm) surrounding euhedral titanite. Grain-scale heterogeneities include Ti depleted (CL-darker) grain boundaries (Ti 4-6 ppm). In the protomylonite quartz shows a variable degree of recrystallization associated with strain gradients along S-C foliations anastomosing around feldspar porphyroclasts. Original CL-dark haloes surrounding titanite were passively stretched into the foliation; away from these haloes recrystallized quartz appears mainly bright in CL and retained high Ti contents as in the protolith. Quartz-filled pressure shadows, appended to disrupted feldspar porphyroclasts, show dark CL indicative of very low Ti content (1-3 ppm). In the mylonites and ultramylonites quartz forms totally recrystallized layers that are dominantly dark in CL but show internally a "subtle" CL layering subparallel to foliation reflecting variations of Ti in the range of 3 to 12 ppm. EBSD analysis of quartz indicates that prism was the dominant crystallographic slip system, associated with subgrain formation and subgrain rotation recrystallization, at all stages of deformation. This indicates together with dynamic

  9. Re-equilibration of primary fluid inclusions in peritectic garnet from metapelitic enclaves, El Hoyazo, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, Silvio; Bodnar, Robert J.; Cesare, Bernardo; Viti, Cecilia

    2011-05-01

    Primary-appearing fluid (FI) and melt (FI) inclusions occur in peritectic garnet from restitic enclaves from El Hoyazo (Spain). The inclusions were trapped under conditions of immiscibility during partial melting of the enclaves. Trapped fluids in Bt-Grt-Sil and Spl-Crd enclaves have been characterized by microthermometric, Raman spectroscopic, electron microprobe (EMP) and transmission electron microprobe (TEM) analyses to better constrain melt and fluid products and pressure conditions of the partial melting event. In Bt-Grt-Sil enclaves, FI are one phase and contain a CO2-N2 mixture, sometimes with graphite as trapped phase. In Spl-Crd enclaves, FI are two phase and contain an H2O-rich (≤ 90 mol%), with minor amounts of CO2, N2, and traces of H2S and CH4. Graphite often occurs as a trapped phase in the H2O-rich FI, and rare carbonates and other accessory minerals are also observed. Although decrepitation features are not recognized during examination with a petrographic microscope, FI densities based on mass balance constraints are always lower than expected at the inferred PT conditions of entrapment, 5-7 kbar and 800-900 °C. Extremely low densities (≈ 0.1 g cm- 1) of FI in Bt-Grt-Sil enclaves suggest a pressure ≤ 500 bar at 800-900 °C, while densities up to 0.53 g cm- 1 in Spl-Crd enclaves indicate P ≤ 3 kbar at 800-900 °C. Re-equilibration is likely to have occurred via partial decrepitation, as suggested by TEM studies that show rare partially annealed sub-μm cracks, containing small cavities, which may have been the pathways for fluid movement out of the inclusions. MI coexisting with FI have a rhyolitic, peraluminous composition, with higher H2O contents of MI in Spl-Crd enclaves (≈ 9 wt.%) compared to MI in Bt-Grt-Sil enclaves (≈ 3 wt.%). Based on published data, peritectic garnet in Spl-Crd enclaves grew in the presence of a leucogranitic melt saturated in an H2O-rich fluid, in good agreement with the inferred garnet PT growth conditions

  10. Effect of shortening the prefreezing equilibration time with glycerol on the quality of chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica), ibex (Capra pyrenaica), mouflon (Ovis musimon) and aoudad (Ammotragus lervia) ejaculates.

    PubMed

    Pradiee, J; O'Brien, E; Esteso, M C; Castaño, C; Toledano-Díaz, A; Lopez-Sebastián, A; Marcos-Beltrán, J L; Vega, R S; Guillamón, F G; Martínez-Nevado, E; Guerra, R; Santiago-Moreno, J

    2016-08-01

    The present study reports the effect of shortening the prefreezing equilibration time with glycerol on the quality of frozen-thawed ejaculated sperm from four Mediterranean mountain ungulates: Cantabrian chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica), Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica), mouflon (Ovis musimon) and aoudad (Ammotragus lervia). Ejaculated sperm from these species were divided into two aliquots. One was diluted with either a Tris-citric acid-glucose based medium (TCG-glycerol; for chamois and ibex sperm) or a Tris-TES-glucose-based medium (TTG-glycerol; for mouflon and aoudad sperm), and maintained at 5°C for 3h prior to freezing. The other aliquot was diluted with either TCG (chamois and ibex sperm) or TTG (mouflon and aoudad sperm) and maintained at 5°C for 1h before adding glycerol (final concentration 5%). After a 15min equilibration period in the presence of glycerol, the samples were frozen. For the ibex, there was enhanced (P<0.05) sperm viability and acrosome integrity after the 3h as compared with the 15min equilibration time. For the chamois, subjective sperm motility and cell membrane functional integrity were less (P<0.05) following 15min of equilibration. In the mouflon, progressive sperm motility and acrosome integrity was less (P<0.05) when the equilibration time was reduced to 15min. For the aoudad, the majority of sperm variables measured were more desirable after the 3h equilibration time. The freezing-thawing processes reduced the sperm head size in all the species studied; however, the equilibration time further affected the frozen-thawed sperm head variables in a species-dependent fashion. While the equilibration time for chamois sperm might be shortened, this appears not to be the case for all ungulates. PMID:27346588

  11. Yeast-based high-throughput screen identifies Plasmodium falciparum equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 inhibitors that kill malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Frame, I J; Deniskin, Roman; Rinderspacher, Alison; Katz, Francine; Deng, Shi-Xian; Moir, Robyn D; Adjalley, Sophie H; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Fidock, David A; Willis, Ian M; Landry, Donald W; Akabas, Myles H

    2015-03-20

    Equilibrative transporters are potential drug targets; however, most functional assays involve radioactive substrate uptake that is unsuitable for high-throughput screens (HTS). We developed a robust yeast-based growth assay that is potentially applicable to many equilibrative transporters. As proof of principle, we applied our approach to Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 of the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfENT1). PfENT1 inhibitors might serve as novel antimalarial drugs since PfENT1-mediated purine import is essential for parasite proliferation. To identify PfENT1 inhibitors, we screened 64 560 compounds and identified 171 by their ability to rescue the growth of PfENT1-expressing fui1Δ yeast in the presence of a cytotoxic PfENT1 substrate, 5-fluorouridine (5-FUrd). In secondary assays, nine of the highest activity compounds inhibited PfENT1-dependent growth of a purine auxotrophic yeast strain with adenosine as the sole purine source (IC50 0.2-2 μM). These nine compounds completely blocked [(3)H]adenosine uptake into PfENT1-expressing yeast and erythrocyte-free trophozoite-stage parasites (IC50 5-50 nM), and inhibited chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant parasite proliferation (IC50 5-50 μM). Wild-type (WT) parasite IC50 values were up to 4-fold lower compared to PfENT1-knockout (pfent1Δ) parasites. pfent1Δ parasite killing showed a delayed-death phenotype not observed with WT. We infer that, in parasites, the compounds inhibit both PfENT1 and a secondary target with similar efficacy. The secondary target identity is unknown, but its existence may reduce the likelihood of parasites developing resistance to PfENT1 inhibitors. Our data support the hypothesis that blocking purine transport through PfENT1 may be a novel and compelling approach for antimalarial drug development. PMID:25602169

  12. Postshock Annealing and Postannealing Shock in Equilibrated Ordinary Chondrites: Implications for the Thermal and Shock Histories of Chondritic Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    In addition to shock effects in olivine, plagioclase, orthopyroxene and Ca-pyroxene, petrographic shock indicators in equilibrated ordinary chondrites (OC) include chromite veinlets, chromite-plagioclase assemblages, polycrystalline troilite, metallic Cu, irregularly shaped troilite grains within metallic Fe-Ni, rapidly solidified metal-sulfide intergrowths, martensite and various types of plessite, metal-sulfide veins, large metal and/or sulfide nodules, silicate melt veins, silicate darkening, low-Ca clinopyroxene, silicate melt pockets, and large regions of silicate melt. The presence of some of these indicators in every petrologic type-4 to -6 ordinary chondrite (OC) demonstrates that collisional events caused all equilibrated OC to reach shock stages S3-S6. Those type-4 to -6 OC that are classified as shock-stage S1 (on the basis of sharp optical extinction in olivine) underwent postshock annealing due to burial beneath materials heated by the impact event. Those type-4 to -6 OC that are classified S2 (on the basis of undulose extinction and lack of planar fractures in olivine) were shocked to stage S3-S6, annealed to stage S1 and then shocked again to stage S2. Some OC were probably shocked to stage 253 after annealing. It seems likely that many OC experienced multiple episodes of shock and annealing. Because 40Ar-39Ar chronological data indicate that MIL 99301 (LL6, Sl) was annealed approximately 4.26 Ga ago, presumably as a consequence of a major impact, it seems reasonable to suggest that other equilibrated S1 and S2 OC (which contain relict shock features) were also annealed by impacts. Because some type-6 S1 OC (e.g., Guarena, Kernouve, Portales Valley, all of which contain relict shock features) were annealed 4.44-4.45 Ga ago (during a period when impacts were prevalent and most OC were thermally metamorphosed), it follows that impact-induced annealing could have contributed significantly to OC thermal metamorphism.

  13. Hidden Flows: Advection Between Topographic Highs and Lows in a Patterned Wetland Driven By Instantaneous Water Level Equilibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, D.; Cohen, M. J.; Kaplan, D. A.; Mclaughlin, D. L.; Osborne, T.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater movement within wetlands can have substantial implications for solute transport even where surface water is the dominant flowpath. For example, water table head gradients driven by evapotranspiration have been used to explain elevated nutrient levels in higher-elevation patches. However, where lateral transport occurs via nearly instantaneous water table equilibration of the water table between adjacent patches, no sustained hydraulic gradient will be observed even though water and solute movement is occurring. Here we present evidence for this effect in the ridge-slough patterned landscape of the Everglades (Florida, USA). Ridges and sloughs occupy different elevation modes, with ridges between 5 and 30 cm higher than sloughs in the present-day system. In the absence of water level equilibration between ridges and sloughs, we would expect distinct divergence in water levels when the water table drops below the ridge soil surface but sloughs remain inundated due to differences in specific yield (Sy) between ridges (Sy~0.2) and sloughs (Sy~1.0). On the contrary, we observed a 'lock-step' response in the diurnal signature of the water table, suggesting a mixing of open-water and ground-water signatures due to equilibration (i.e., advection) of water from sloughs to ridges. This mechanism may help explain the observation of higher soil phosphorus with higher soil elevation, a relationship that breaks down as ridge-slough elevation differences degrade. We place this mechanism in the context of vertical and horizontal conductivites of the Everglades peats and discuss the implications for solute transport.

  14. Algorithmes et architectures pour ordinateurs quantiques supraconducteurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blais, A.

    2003-09-01

    'utilisation de qubits basés sur les jonctions Josephson. On présente entre autres une approche originale pour l'interaction entre qubits. Cette approche est très générale puisqu'elle peut être appliquée à différents designs de qubits. Finalement, on s'intéresse à la lecture des qubits supraconducteurs de flux. Le détecteur suggéré ici a l'avantage de pouvoir être découplé du qubit lorsqu'il n'y a pas de mesure en cours.

  15. Equilibrator-based measurements of dissolved nitrous oxide in the surface ocean using an integrated cavity output laser absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grefe, I.; Kaiser, J.

    2014-06-01

    Dissolved nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations are usually determined by gas chromatography (GC). Here we present laboratory tests and initial field measurements using a novel setup comprising a commercially available laser-based analyser for N2O, carbon monoxide and water vapour coupled to a glass-bed equilibrator. This approach is less labour-intensive and provides higher temporal and spatial resolution than the conventional GC technique. The standard deviation of continuous equilibrator or atmospheric air measurements was 0.2 nmol mol-1 (averaged over 5 min). The short-term repeatability for reference gas measurements within 1 h of each other was 0.2 nmol mol-1 or better. Another indicator of the long-term stability of the analyser is the standard deviation of the calibrated N2O mole fraction in marine air, which was between 0.5 and 0.7 nmol mol-1. The equilibrator measurements were compared with purge-and-trap gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses of N2O concentrations in discrete samples from the Southern Ocean and showed agreement to within the 2% measurement uncertainty of the GC-MS method. The equilibrator response time to concentration changes in water was from 142 to 203 s, depending on the headspace flow rate. The system was tested at sea during a north-to-south transect of the Atlantic Ocean. While the subtropical gyres were slightly undersaturated, the equatorial region was a source of nitrous oxide to the atmosphere, confirming previous findings (Forster et al., 2009). The ability to measure at high temporal and spatial resolution revealed submesoscale variability in dissolved N2O concentrations. Mean sea-to-air fluxes in the tropical and subtropical Atlantic ranged between -1.6 and 0.11 μmol m-2 d-1 and confirm that the subtropical Atlantic is not an important source region for N2O to the atmosphere, compared to global average fluxes of 0.6-2.4 μmol m-2 d-1. The system can be easily modified for autonomous operation on voluntary

  16. Tungsten isotope evidence for post-giant impact equilibration of the Earth and Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruijer, T.; Kleine, T.; Fischer-Gödde, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Moon is thought to have formed by re-accretion of material ejected by a giant impact on Earth [e.g., 1]. This model, at least in its classical form, predicts an isotopic difference between the Earth and Moon, because the Moon would largely consist of impactor material. Yet Earth and Moon show an unexpected isotopic similarity for many elements [e.g., 2]. Here we use variations in 182W—the decay-product of short-lived 182Hf (t1/2~9 Myr)—between the Moon and the bulk silicate Earth (BSE) to shed new light on this issue. We precisely determined the lunar 182W value by analysing KREEP-rich samples with MC-ICPMS and a new approach for quantifying cosmogenic 182W variations using Hf isotopes [6]. We find that the Moon shows a 27±4 ppm 182W excess over the modern BSE, in excellent agreement with [7]. This excess agrees with the predicted 182W change resulting from disproportional late accretion to the Earth and Moon after Earth's core had fully formed [6,7]. Thus, the pre-late-veneer BSE and the Moon were indistinguishable in 182W. However, the giant impact itself should have caused a notable Earth-Moon 182W difference by (1) changing the ɛ182W of the proto-Earth mantle by adding impactor mantle and core material, both carrying distinct 182W anomalies, and (2) by supplying W-rich but 182W-depleted impactor core material into the lunar accretion disk [6]. Thus, the Earth-Moon 182W homogeneity is an unexpected outcome of the giant impact. Unlike for Ti and O isotopes, the 182W homogeneity cannot be explained by accretion of impactor and proto-Earth from a homogeneous inner disk reservoir [3] or by making the Moon fully from proto-Earth mantle [4,5]. Thus, the 182W results require an efficient post-impact isotopic equilibration of the BSE and the Moon, but the mechanism for this has yet to be explored. One option is that Earth's mantle and its vapour atmosphere remained connected with the lunar accretion disk just after the giant impact [8]. [1] Canup R

  17. Workmen and Crawler Crane pouring roof slab and parapet wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Workmen and Crawler Crane pouring roof slab and parapet wall of building - looking northwest. Taken Nov. 15, 1929. 14th Naval District Photo Collection Item No. 7165 - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Exterior Cranes, Waterfront Crane Track System, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. First Concrete Poured for NSLS-II Ring Building

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-07-20

    The first bits of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) ring building are now taking shape after the concrete-pouring process for the new, world-class facility began on Monday, July 20. Once complete, the 400,000 square-foot building will hou

  19. Le sumatriptan intranasal pour la migraine chez les enfants

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Ran D.; Meckler, Garth D.

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Question Je vois de plus en plus d’enfants et d’adolescents qui souffrent de céphalées pouvant se classer dans la catégorie des migraines. J’ai fait des lectures sur le sumatriptan par voie intranasale comme thérapie abortive. Est-ce un traitement efficace? Réponse La migraine aiguë chez les enfants et les adolescents est fréquente et difficile à traiter. Le sumatriptan intranasal est une option sûre et généralement efficace pour les enfants et les adolescents. La dose actuellement recommandée est de 20 mg pour les enfants qui pèsent plus de 40 kg et de 10 mg pour ceux dont le poids se situe entre 20 et 39 kg. Il faudrait faire des études de plus grande envergure pour contrecarrer les limitations des échantillons de petite taille et mieux comprendre la faible concentration plasmique et les effets placebo observés dans les études jusqu’à présent.

  20. Pouring and running a protein gel by reusing commercial cassettes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Alexander C; Grey, Paris H; Cuddy, Katrina; Oppenheimer, David G

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of proteins using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis is a common technique used by biochemistry and molecular biology researchers. For laboratories that perform daily analyses of proteins, the cost of commercially available polyacrylamide gels (~$10/gel) can be considerable over time. To mitigate this cost, some researchers prepare their own polyacrylamide gels. Traditional methods of pouring these gels typically utilize specialized equipment and glass gel plates that can be expensive and preclude pouring many gels and storing them for future use. Furthermore, handling of glass plates during cleaning or gel pouring can result in accidental breakage creating a safety hazard, which may preclude their use in undergraduate laboratory classes. Our protocol demonstrates how to pour multiple protein gels simultaneously by recycling Invitrogen Nupage Novex minigel cassettes, and inexpensive materials purchased at a home improvement store. This economical and streamlined method includes a way to store the gels at 4°C for a few weeks. By re-using the plastic gel cassettes from commercially available gels, labs that run frequent protein gels can save significant costs and help the environment. In addition, plastic gel cassettes are extremely resistant to breakage, which makes them ideal for undergraduate laboratory classrooms. PMID:22349047

  1. STEEL BEAMS FOR FIRST FLOOR BEING READIED FOR CONCRETE POUR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STEEL BEAMS FOR FIRST FLOOR BEING READIED FOR CONCRETE POUR UNDER WEATHER SHELTER DURING COLD WINTER. NOTE ABUNDANCE OF BEAMS; THE FLOOR WILL SUPPORT HEAVY LOADS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 1175. Unknown Photographer, 12/20/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. Analysis of the DWPF glass pouring system using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Calloway, T.B. Jr.; Jantzen, C.M.; Medich, L.; Spennato, N.

    1997-08-05

    Neural networks were used to determine the sensitivity of 39 selected Melter/Melter Off Gas and Melter Feed System process parameters as related to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Melter Pour Spout Pressure during the overall analysis and resolution of the DWPF glass production and pouring issues. Two different commercial neural network software packages were used for this analysis. Models were developed and used to determine the critical parameters which accurately describe the DWPF Pour Spout Pressure. The model created using a low-end software package has a root mean square error of {+-} 0.35 inwc (< 2% of the instrument`s measured range, R{sup 2} = 0.77) with respect to the plant data used to validate and test the model. The model created using a high-end software package has a R{sub 2} = 0.97 with respect to the plant data used to validate and test the model. The models developed for this application identified the key process parameters which contribute to the control of the DWPF Melter Pour Spout pressure during glass pouring operations. The relative contribution and ranking of the selected parameters was determined using the modeling software. Neural network computing software was determined to be a cost-effective software tool for process engineers performing troubleshooting and system performance monitoring activities. In remote high-level waste processing environments, neural network software is especially useful as a replacement for sensors which have failed and are costly to replace. The software can be used to accurately model critical remotely installed plant instrumentation. When the instrumentation fails, the software can be used to provide a soft sensor to replace the actual sensor, thereby decreasing the overall operating cost. Additionally, neural network software tools require very little training and are especially useful in mining or selecting critical variables from the vast amounts of data collected from process computers.

  3. The impact of equilibrating hemispheric albedos on tropical performance in the HadGEM2-ES coupled climate model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Haywood, Jim M.; Jones, Andy; Dunstone, Nick; Milton, Sean; Vellinga, Michael; Bodas-Salcedo, Alejandro; Hawcroft, Matt; Kravitz, Ben; Cole, Jason; Watanabe, Shingo; et al

    2016-01-14

    The Earth's hemispheric reflectances are equivalent to within ± 0.2 Wm–2, even though the Northern Hemisphere contains a greater proportion of higher reflectance land areas, because of greater cloud cover in the Southern Hemisphere. This equivalence is unlikely to be by chance, but the reasons are open to debate. Here we show that equilibrating hemispheric albedos in the Hadley Centre Global Environment Model version 2-Earth System coupled climate model significantly improves what have been considered longstanding and apparently intractable model biases. Monsoon precipitation biases over all continental land areas, the penetration of monsoon rainfall across the Sahel, the West Africanmore » monsoon “jump”, and indicators of hurricane frequency are all significantly improved. Mechanistically, equilibrating hemispheric albedos improves the atmospheric cross-equatorial energy transport and increases the supply of tropical atmospheric moisture to the Hadley cell. Furthermore, we conclude that an accurate representation of the cross-equatorial energy transport appears to be critical if tropical performance is to be improved.« less

  4. Surface roughness statistics and temperature step stress effects for D-T solid layers equilibrated inside a 2 mm beryllium torus

    SciTech Connect

    Sheliak, J.D.; Hoffer, J.K.

    1998-12-31

    Solid D-T layers are equilibrated inside a 2 mm diameter beryllium toroidal cell at temperatures ranging from 19.0 K to 19.6 K, using the beta-layering process. The experimental runs consists of multiple cycles of rapid- or slow-freezing of the initially liquid D-T charge, followed by a lengthy period of beta-layering equilibration, terminated by melting the layer. The temperature was changed in discrete steps at the end of some equilibration cycles in an attempt to simulate actual ICF target conditions. High-precision images of the D-T solid-vapor interface were analyzed to yield the surface roughness {sigma}{sub mns} as a sum of modal contributions. Results show an overage {sigma}{sub mns} of 1.3 {+-} 0.3 {micro}m for layers equilibrated at 19.0 K and show an inverse dependence of {sigma}{sub mns} on equilibration temperature up to 19.525 K. Inducing sudden temperature perturbations lowered {sigma}{sub mns} to 1.0 {+-} 0.05 {micro}m.

  5. Effect of glutamine supplementation and replacement of tris-egg yolk based extender with defatted cow milk on spermatozoa quality after equilibration and thawing

    PubMed Central

    Dawra, Vasundhara; Yadav, Brijesh; Yadav, Sarvajeet

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of supplementation of glutamine and replacement of Tris-egg yolk (TE) based buffer with defatted cow milk on the spermatozoa quality after equilibration and thawing. Materials and Methods: Semen was collected from five Bhadawari bulls biweekly, and a total of 30 ejaculates were taken. The semen ejaculates were pooled and divided into three equal parts. The pooled semen was diluted by TE based extender (control), TE + glutamine (8 mM) (T1) and 50% TE + 50% deffated cow milk + glutamine (8 mM) (T2). At two stages viz. after equilibration and after 12 h of cryopreservation (thawed samples), progressive motility, percent live, and percent acrosomal damage of the spermatozoa was assessed. Results: Supplementation of glutamine improved (p<0.05) the spermatozoa quality with respect to the progressive motility, percent live and acrosomal damage both post-equilibration and post-thaw. T2 improved (p<0.05) the spermatozoa quality as compared to control, however; it was less (p<0.05) effective as compared T1 both post-equilibration and post-thaw. Conclusion: From the results of present study it can be concluded that glutamine supplementation was effective in maintaining post-equilibration and post-thaw spermatozoa quality whereas defatted cow milk was not as effective as TE based buffer in the extender in improving the spermatozoa quality. PMID:27047193

  6. Using double-poured alginate impressions to fabricate bleaching trays.

    PubMed

    Haywood, V B; Powe, A

    1998-01-01

    Esthetic and diagnostic treatment often requires two casts of one arch, one for baseline and one for alterations (diagnostic wax-up, bleaching tray, occlusal analysis). The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of stone casts generated from a second pour of a properly handled alginate impression with first-poured casts. A maxillary dentoform was indexed with six reference spaces (#8-15, 9-2, 2-15, and incisal-to-gingival of #3, 9, 14). Irreversible hydrocolloid (Jeltrate) impressions were made in perforated steel trays by a single investigator. Impression material was spatulated for 1 minute. The seated impression and dentoform were wrapped in a damp paper towel to simulate intraoral conditions, and allowed to set for 2 minutes. Upon separation, the impression was stored in a damp towel for 5 minutes. The impression was poured in cast stone (Microstone) according to the manufacturer's instructions. The stone-filled impression was immediately rewrapped in a damp paper towel and allowed to set for 45 minutes at room temperature. Upon removal of the stone, the impression was rinsed with cold water, shaken dry, and repoured in the same manner. Ten impressions were made: the first five impressions were poured to make casts for Group A, then repoured as described above for casts for Group B. The remaining five impressions were poured once to make casts for Group C. The six spaces of each cast were measured three times in random order using a dial caliper and the space average calculated for the cast. At each space, analysis of variance showed no significant difference among Groups A, B, or C (P < 0.05). When alginate impressions that have been poured with cast stone are kept moist during stone setting and repoured within 45 minutes, two casts can be generated from one impression with the same degree of accuracy as two casts made from taking two separate impressions, providing the alginate does not tear during first cast removal. PMID:9656923

  7. Isoscaling of heavy projectile residues and N /Z equilibration in peripheral heavy-ion collisions below the Fermi energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souliotis, G. A.; Fountas, P. N.; Veselsky, M.; Galanopoulos, S.; Kohley, Z.; McIntosh, A.; Yennello, S. J.; Bonasera, A.

    2014-12-01

    The isoscaling of heavy projectile residues from peripheral heavy-ion reactions at 15-25 MeV/nucleon is employed to obtain information on the process of N /Z equilibration. Recent mass spectrometric data of projectile residues from the reactions of 86Kr (15 MeV/nucleon) with Ni,5864 and Sn,112124 were first analyzed. The isotopically resolved yield distributions of the fragments in the range Z =26 -39 were employed for the isoscaling analysis. The yield ratios R21(N ,Z ) of the fragments from each pair of systems exhibit isoscaling (i.e., an exponential dependence on the fragment neutron number N for each atomic number Z ) with the isoscaling parameter α increasing with decreasing (or increasing) Z away from the projectile. This variation is related to the evolution toward N /Z equilibration with increasing energy dissipation estimated from the residue velocities. In parallel to the new heavy-residue isoscaling data of 86Kr at 15 MeV/nucleon, our previous data at 25 MeV/nucleon for the reactions 86Kr+Sn,112124 and 64Ni+Ni,5864, 64Ni+Sn,112124, as well as our data at 15 MeV/nucleon of the lighter system 40Ar+Ni,5864, were analyzed in a similar way. Calculations with the stochastic nucleon-exchange model DIT (deep inelastic transfer) and the microscopic many-body model CoMD (constrained molecular dynamics) provided an overall fair description of data and valuable guidance for their interpretation. Interestingly, the data of the 86Kr+Ni ,Sn reactions at 15 MeV/nucleon show a retardation of the process of N /Z equilibration which, as suggested by the CoMD calculations, is indicative of the collective character of the process. This retardation is not present in the investigated systems at 25 MeV/nucleon (and the light 40Ar+Ni systems at 15 MeV/nucleon), whose behavior is found to be consistent with stochastic nucleon exchange.

  8. Influence of isotopic re-equilibration on speleothem and fluid inclusion isotope ratios after primary calcite precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, Tobias; Haderlein, Astrid; Weißbach, Therese

    2016-04-01

    Oxygen isotope ratios in speleothems (notably stalagmites) have been used since decades to successfully infer paleotemperatures and deduce paleo-environmental information. In addition, recent technical developments allow to increasingly use fluid inclusions as an archive for drip-water and together with the surrounding calcite as paleothermometer. A basic requirement for isotope data interpretation is the complete knowledge of the fractionation between calcite and fluid. Most laboratory and in-situ cave experiments focus on calcite growth and the isotope fractionation between calcite and feed solution. Potential isotope exchange and re-equilibration processes after the initial deposition have mostly been neglected. However, experiments of Oelkers et al. (2015) showed that the isotope exchange between minerals and fluid can proceed rapidly (within days), even at chemical equilibrium. In hydrous Mg carbonates a similar process of continuous isotope exchange between carbonate and fluid was observed after the carbonate precipitation was completed (Mavromatis et al., 2015). These observations suggest that the isotope ratios of speleothem calcite may be affected by this continuous exchange, likely driving the isotope composition continuously towards equilibrium at the respective cave conditions. In addition, fluid inclusions are suspected to be sensitive to an isotope exchange with the surrounding carbonate highlighting the need to precisely understand and quantify this effect. We assessed the oxygen isotope exchange between calcite and solution at chemical equilibrium conditions with theoretical estimates and laboratory experiments over an intermediate time scale (hours-weeks). A large isotope gradient (~20 ‰)) between solution and calcite was prepared in the experiment to investigate the dynamics of this re-equilibration process. We used a theoretical model based on a Rayleigh fractionation approach and the direct comparison with the experiment to determine

  9. Yeast-based High-Throughput Screen Identifies Plasmodium falciparum Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 Inhibitors That Kill Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Frame, I. J.; Deniskin, Roman; Rinderspacher, Alison; Katz, Francine; Deng, Shi-Xian; Moir, Robyn D.; Adjalley, Sophie H.; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Fidock, David A.; Willis, Ian M.; Landry, Donald W.; Akabas, Myles H.

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrative transporters are potential drug targets, however most functional assays involve radioactive substrate uptake that is unsuitable for high-throughput screens (HTS). We developed a robust yeast-based growth assay that is potentially applicable to many equilibrative transporters. As proof of principle, we applied our approach to Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 of the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfENT1). PfENT1 inhibitors might serve as novel antimalarial drugs since PfENT1-mediated purine import is essential for parasite proliferation. To identify PfENT1 inhibitors, we screened 64,560 compounds and identified 171 by their ability to rescue the growth of PfENT1-expressing fui1Δ yeast in the presence of a cytotoxic PfENT1 substrate, 5-fluorouridine (5-FUrd). In secondary assays, nine of the highest activity compounds inhibited PfENT1-dependent growth of a purine auxotrophic yeast strain with adenosine as the sole purine source (IC50 0.2–2 µM). These nine compounds completely blocked [3H]adenosine uptake into PfENT1-expressing yeast and erythrocyte-free trophozoite-stage parasites (IC50 5–50 nM), and inhibited chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant parasite proliferation (IC50 5–50 µM). Wild-type (WT) parasite IC50 values were up to four-fold lower compared to PfENT1-knockout (pfent1Δ) parasites. pfent1Δ parasite killing showed a delayed-death phenotype not observed with WT. We infer that in parasites, the compounds inhibit both PfENT1 and a secondary target with similar efficacy. The secondary target identity is unknown, but its existence may reduce the likelihood of parasites developing resistance to PfENT1 inhibitors. Our data support the hypothesis that blocking purine transport through PfENT1 may be a novel and compelling approach for antimalarial drug development. PMID:25602169

  10. Viscous pour point of microquantities of fluid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardos, M. N.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described involving the measurement of the viscous desolidification (pour) point of wax-free lubricant fluids. This method is especially useful for pour point testing of experimental quantities, since only six to sixteen drops of the oil are required for a single determination (automatically performed in duplicate) with nearly full recovery of the sample. The technique consists of: (1) rapidly freezing a small, predetermined amount of the oil on the side of a small test tube to form a frozen drop of given dimensions; (2) immersing duplicates of the charged and stoppered tubes into a cold bath; and (3) measuring the temperature when the drop front has moved a predetermined distance as the bath warms up.