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Sample records for absolute neutron spectrum

  1. First measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J.; Casey, D.; Li, C.; Seguin, F.; Petrasso, R.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C.; Eckart, M.; Haan, S.; Hatchett, S.; Khater, H.; Landen, O.; MacKinnon, A.; Moran, M.; Rygg, J.; Kilkenny, J.; Glebov, V.; Sangster, T.; Meyerhofer, D.; Magoon, J.; Fletcher, K.; Leeper, R.

    2010-11-01

    Proper assembly of capsule mass, as manifested through evolution of fuel areal density (ρR), is fundamentally important for achieving hot-spot ignition planned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Experimental information about ρR and ρR asymmetries, Ti and yield is therefore essential for understanding how this assembly occurs. To obtain this information, a neutron spectrometer, called the Magnetic-Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been implemented on the NIF. Its primary objective is to measure the absolute neutron spectrum in the range 5 to 30 MeV, from which ρR, Ti and yield can be directly inferred for both low-yield tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) and high-yield DT implosions. In this talk, the results from the first measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum produced in exploding pusher and THD implosions will be presented. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, LLNL and LLE.

  2. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J.; Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A.; McKernan, M. A.; Moran, M.; Rygg, J. R.; Yeoman, M. F.; Zacharias, R.; Leeper, R. J.; Fletcher, K.; Farrell, M.; Jasion, D.; Kilkenny, J.; Paguio, R.

    2013-04-01

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  3. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M Gatu; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Magoon, J; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M; Ulreich, J; Ashabranner, R C; Bionta, R M; Carpenter, A C; Felker, B; Khater, H Y; LePape, S; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Rygg, J R; Yeoman, M F; Zacharias, R; Leeper, R J; Fletcher, K; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Kilkenny, J; Paguio, R

    2013-04-01

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF. PMID:23635195

  4. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J.; Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A.; McKernan, M. A.; Moran, M.; Rygg, J. R.; Yeoman, M. F.; Zacharias, R.; Leeper, R. J.; Fletcher, K.; Farrell, M.; Jasion, D.; Kilkenny, J.; Paguio, R.

    2013-04-18

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, iontemperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  5. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; et al

    2013-04-18

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, iontemperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describesmore » ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.« less

  6. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J.; Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A.; and others

    2013-04-15

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  7. First measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Li, C. K.; Rygg, J. R.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Yu Glebov, V.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Hatchett, S.; Haan, S.; Cerjan, C.; Landen, O.; Moran, M.; Song, P.; Wilson, D. C.; Leeper, R. J.

    2008-10-15

    A neutron spectrometer, called a magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS), has been built and implemented at the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] for absolute measurements of the neutron spectrum in the range of 6-30 MeV, from which fuel areal density ({rho}R), ion temperature (T{sub i}), and yield (Y{sub n}) can be determined. The results from the first MRS measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum are presented. In addition, measuring {rho}R at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)] will be essential for assessing implosion performance during all stages of development from surrogate implosions to cryogenic fizzles to ignited implosions. To accomplish this, we are also developing an MRS for the NIF. As much of the research and development and instrument optimization of the MRS at OMEGA are directly applicable to the MRS at the NIF, a description of the design and characterization of the MRS on the NIF is discussed as well.

  8. First measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA (invited).

    PubMed

    Frenje, J A; Casey, D T; Li, C K; Rygg, J R; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Hatchett, S; Haan, S; Cerjan, C; Landen, O; Moran, M; Song, P; Wilson, D C; Leeper, R J

    2008-10-01

    A neutron spectrometer, called a magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS), has been built and implemented at the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] for absolute measurements of the neutron spectrum in the range of 6-30 MeV, from which fuel areal density (rhoR), ion temperature (T(i)), and yield (Y(n)) can be determined. The results from the first MRS measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum are presented. In addition, measuring rhoR at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)] will be essential for assessing implosion performance during all stages of development from surrogate implosions to cryogenic fizzles to ignited implosions. To accomplish this, we are also developing an MRS for the NIF. As much of the research and development and instrument optimization of the MRS at OMEGA are directly applicable to the MRS at the NIF, a description of the design and characterization of the MRS on the NIF is discussed as well. PMID:19044488

  9. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  10. Measurements of the absolute neutron fluence spectrum emitted at 0/sup 0/ and 90/sup 0/ from the Little-Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.H.; Gold, R.; Preston, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear research emulsions (NRE) have been used to characterize the neutron spectrum emitted by the Little-Boy replica. NRE were irradiated at the Little-Boy surface as well as approximately 2m from the center of the Little-Boy replica using polar angles of 0/sup 0/, 30/sup 0/, 60/sup 0/ and 90/sup 0/. For the NRE exposed at 2m, neutron background was determined using shadow shields of borated polyethylene. Emulsion scanning to date has concentrated exclusively on the 2m, 0/sup 0/ and 2m, 90/sup 0/ locations. Approximately 5000 proton-recoil tracks have been measured in NRE irradiated at each of these locations. At the 2m, 90/sup 0/ location the NRE neutron spectrum extends from 0.37 up to 8.2 MeV, whereas the NRE neutron spectrum at the 2m, 0/sup 0/ location is much softer and extends only up to 2.7 MeV. NRE neutron spectrometry results at these two locations are compared with both liquid scintillator neutron spectrometry and Monte Carlo calculations. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

    2012-05-03

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  12. An Alpha-Gamma Counter for Absolute Neutron Flux Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, A.; Greene, G.; Dewey, M.; Gilliam, D.; Nico, J.; Laptev, A.

    2012-03-01

    An alpha-gamma counter was used to measure the absolute neutron flux of a monochromatic cold neutron beam to sub-0.1,% precision. Simultaneously, the counter was used to calibrate a thin neutron flux monitor based on neutron absorption on ^6Li to the same precision. This monitor was used in the most precise beam-based measurement of the neutron lifetime, where the limiting systematic effect was the uncertainty in the neutron counting efficiency (0.3,%). The counter uses a thick target of ^10B-enriched boron carbide to completely absorb the beam. The rate of absorbed neutrons is determined by counting 478 keV gamma rays from neutron capture on ^10B with calibrated high-purity germanium detectors. The calibration results and the implications for the neutron lifetime will be discussed.

  13. On the Absolutely Continuous Spectrum of Stark Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelman, Galina

    The stability of the absolutely continuous spectrum of the one-dimensional Stark operator under perturbations of the potential is discussed. The focus is on proving this stability under minimal assumptions on smoothness of the perturbation. A general criterion is presented together with some applications. These include the case of periodic perturbations where we show that any perturbation vL1()∩H-1/2() preserves the a.c. spectrum.

  14. Absence of absolutely continuous spectrum for random scattering zippers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumaza, Hakim; Marin, Laurent

    2015-02-01

    A scattering zipper is a system obtained by concatenation of scattering events with equal even number of incoming and outgoing channels. The associated scattering zipper operator is the unitary analog of Jacobi matrices with matrix entries. For infinite identical events and independent and identically distributed random phases, Lyapunov exponents positivity is proved and yields absence of absolutely continuous spectrum by Kotani's theory.

  15. Strategy for the absolute neutron emission measurement on ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, M.; Bertalot, L.; Ishikawa, M.; Popovichev, S.

    2010-10-15

    Accuracy of 10% is demanded to the absolute fusion measurement on ITER. To achieve this accuracy, a functional combination of several types of neutron measurement subsystem, cross calibration among them, and in situ calibration are needed. Neutron transport calculation shows the suitable calibration source is a DT/DD neutron generator of source strength higher than 10{sup 10} n/s (neutron/second) for DT and 10{sup 8} n/s for DD. It will take eight weeks at the minimum with this source to calibrate flux monitors, profile monitors, and the activation system.

  16. Measurements of the reactor neutron power in absolute units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, G. V.

    2015-12-01

    The neutron power of the reactor of the Yenisei space nuclear power plant is measured in absolute units using the modernized method of correlation analysis during the ground-based tests of the Yenisei prototypes. Results of the experiments are given. The desired result is obtained in a series of experiments carried out at the stage of the plant preparation for tests. The acceptability of experimental data is confirmed by the results of measuring the reactor neutron power in absolute units at the nominal level by the thermal balance during the life cycle tests of the ground prototypes.

  17. Measurements of the reactor neutron power in absolute units

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, G. V.

    2015-12-15

    The neutron power of the reactor of the Yenisei space nuclear power plant is measured in absolute units using the modernized method of correlation analysis during the ground-based tests of the Yenisei prototypes. Results of the experiments are given. The desired result is obtained in a series of experiments carried out at the stage of the plant preparation for tests. The acceptability of experimental data is confirmed by the results of measuring the reactor neutron power in absolute units at the nominal level by the thermal balance during the life cycle tests of the ground prototypes.

  18. Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Bionta, R M; Bleuel, D L; Döppner, T; Glenzer, S; Hartouni, E; Hatchett, S P; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Moses, E; Park, H-S; Ralph, J; Remington, B A; Smalyuk, V; Yeamans, C B; Kline, J; Kyrala, G; Chandler, G A; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C L; Cooper, G W; Nelson, A J; Fletcher, K; Kilkenny, J; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Paguio, R

    2012-10-01

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF. PMID:23126915

  19. Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Doeppner, T.; Glenzer, S.; Hartouni, E.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; MacKinnon, A.; and others

    2012-10-15

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  20. Absolute Neutron Fluence Measurements at the NIST Center for Neutron Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, A.; Dewey, M.; Gilliam, D.; Nico, J.; Anderson, E.; Snow, M.; Greene, G.; Laptev, A.

    2015-10-01

    Precise, absolute fluence measurements of cold and thermal neutron beams are of primary importance to beam-type determinations of the neutron lifetime, measurements of standard neutron cross sections, and the development of standards for neutron dosimetry. At the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), a totally absorbing neutron detector based on absolute counting of the 10B(n,α1)7Li reaction 478 keV gamma ray has been used to perform fluence measurements with a precision of 0.06%. This detector has been used to improve the neutron fluence determination in the 2000 NIST beam neutron lifetime by a factor of five, significantly reducing the uncertainty in the lifetime result. Ongoing and possible future uses of the Alpha-Gamma device include 1) Calibration of the neutron fluence monitors that will be used in the upcoming NIST beam neutron lifetime measurement BL2; 2) The first direct, absolute measurement of the 6Li(n,t)4He neutron cross section at sub-thermal neutron energy; 3) Measurements of the 10B(n, γ)11B and 235U(n,f) neutron cross sections; 4) A re-calibration of the national neutron standard NBS-1. The apparatus, measurement technique, and applications will be discussed.

  1. Absolute determination of the neutron source yield using melamine as a neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciechanowski, M.; Bolewski, A., Jr.; Kreft, A.

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to absolute determination of the neutron source yield is presented. It bases on the application of melamine (C3H6N6) to neutron detection combined with Monte Carlo simulations of neutron transport. Melamine has the ability to detect neutrons via 14N(n, p)14C reaction and subsequent determination of 14C content. A cross section for this reaction is relatively high for thermal neutrons (1.827 b) and much lower for fast neutrons. A concentration of 14C nuclei created in the irradiated sample of melamine can be reliably measured with the aid of the accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The mass of melamine sufficient for this analysis is only 10 mg. Neutron detection is supported by Monte Carlo simulations of neutron transport carried out with the use of MCNP-4C code. These simulations are aimed at computing the probability of 14C creation in the melamine sample per the source neutron. The result of AMS measurements together with results of MCNP calculations enable us to determine the number of neutrons emitted from the source during the irradiation of melamine. The proposed method was applied for determining the neutron emission from a commercial 252Cf neutron source which was independently calibrated. The measured neutron emission agreed with the certified one within uncertainty limits. The relative expanded uncertainty (k=2) of the absolute neutron source yield determination was estimated at 2.6%. Apart from calibration of radionuclide neutron sources the proposed procedure could facilitate absolute yield measurements for more complex sources. Potential applications of this methodology as it is further developed include diagnostics of inertial confinement fusion and plasma-focus experiments, calibration of neutron measurement systems at tokamaks and accelerator-based neutron sources as well as characterization of neutron fields generated in large particle detectors during collisions of hadron beams.

  2. Diagnostic Application of Absolute Neutron Activation Analysis in Hematology

    SciTech Connect

    Zamboni, C.B.; Oliveira, L.C.; Dalaqua, L. Jr.

    2004-10-03

    The Absolute Neutron Activation Analysis (ANAA) technique was used to determine element concentrations of Cl and Na in blood of healthy group (male and female blood donators), select from Blood Banks at Sao Paulo city, to provide information which can help in diagnosis of patients. This study permitted to perform a discussion about the advantages and limitations of using this nuclear methodology in hematological examinations.

  3. Conductance and Absolutely Continuous Spectrum of 1D Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruneau, L.; Jakšić, V.; Last, Y.; Pillet, C.-A.

    2016-06-01

    We characterize the absolutely continuous spectrum of the one-dimensional Schrödinger operators {h = -Δ + v} acting on {ℓ^2(mathbb{Z}_+)} in terms of the limiting behaviour of the Landauer-Büttiker and Thouless conductances of the associated finite samples. The finite sample is defined by restricting h to a finite interval {[1, L] \\cap mathbb{Z}_+} and the conductance refers to the charge current across the sample in the open quantum system obtained by attaching independent electronic reservoirs to the sample ends. Our main result is that the conductances associated to an energy interval {I} are non-vanishing in the limit {L to infty} iff {sp_ac(h) \\cap I neq emptyset}. We also discuss the relationship between this result and the Schrödinger Conjecture (Avila, J Am Math Soc 28:579-616, 2015; Bruneau et al., Commun Math Phys 319:501-513, 2013).

  4. Neutron activation analysis of certified samples by the absolute method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadem, F.; Belouadah, N.; Idiri, Z.

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear reactions analysis technique is mainly based on the relative method or the use of activation cross sections. In order to validate nuclear data for the calculated cross section evaluated from systematic studies, we used the neutron activation analysis technique (NAA) to determine the various constituent concentrations of certified samples for animal blood, milk and hay. In this analysis, the absolute method is used. The neutron activation technique involves irradiating the sample and subsequently performing a measurement of the activity of the sample. The fundamental equation of the activation connects several physical parameters including the cross section that is essential for the quantitative determination of the different elements composing the sample without resorting to the use of standard sample. Called the absolute method, it allows a measurement as accurate as the relative method. The results obtained by the absolute method showed that the values are as precise as the relative method requiring the use of standard sample for each element to be quantified.

  5. Spectrum tailoring of the neutron energy spectrum in the context of delayed neutron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, William E; Tobin, Steve J; Sandoval, Nathan P; Fensin, Mike L

    2010-01-01

    For the purpose of measuring plutonium mass in spent fuel, a delayed neutron instrument is of particular interest since, if properly designed, the delayed neutron signal from {sup 235}U is significantly stronger than the signature from {sup 239}Pu or {sup 241}Pu. A key factor in properly designing a delayed neutron instrument is to minimize the fission of {sup 238}U. This minimization is achieved by keeping the interrogating neutron spectrum below {approx} 1 MeV. In the context of spent fuel measurements it is desirable to use a 14 MeV (deuterium and tritium) neutron generator for economic reasons. Spectrum tailoring is the term used to describe the inclusion of material between the 14 MeV neutrons and the interrogated object that lower the neutron energy through nuclear reactions and moderation. This report quantifies the utility of different material combination for spectrum tailoring.

  6. Training Reactor VR-1 Neutron Spectrum Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vins, M.; Kolros, A.; Katovsky, K.

    2009-08-01

    The main objective of the investigations presented in the paper is to determine the neutron energy spectrum at the specified position in the reactor core used for neutron activation analysis. The methodology is based on irradiation of certified activation foils, measurements of their reaction rates, and consecutive deconvolution of the spectrum using various adjustments/unfolding computer codes. The activation detectors consist of foils of high purity elements (i.e. gold, nickel, indium, tungsten, scandium, manganese, vanadium, and copper were used). Some foils were irradiated also in cadmium cover for suppressing of thermal neutrons. All gamma measurements were performed on a HPGe detector. The measured reaction rates served as an input for computer deconvolution codes as SAND-II, STAY-SL, MAXED (from the UMG package) and GRAVEL (from the UMG package). Libraries of response functions (cross sections of observed reactions) for the all used codes were adopted from the IRDF-2002 library or generated from the ENDF/B-VII.0 using NJOY99. Monte Carlo calculation code MCNP5 was used for calculation of the first approximation of the neutron spectrum. The used codes solve the adjustment issue with a different mathematical approach and a comparison of different neutron adjustment/unfolding methods is a part of the result. Neutron capture and (n,p) reactions were produced during irradiation. The high ratio of thermal and epithermal neutrons in the spectra and low contribution of fast neutrons was expected and was also observed. The results will be used for evaluation of neutron activation analysis exercises on reactor VR-1 and for further innovation of experimental methods. The neutron fluence rates in thermal, epithermal and fast energy regions were also obtained and represent the important part of results.

  7. Determination of TFTR far-field neutron detector efficiencies by local neutron flux spectrum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassby, D. L.; Ascione, G.; Kugel, H. W.; Roquemore, A. L.; Barcelo, T. W.; Kumar, A.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron detectors have often been located on the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) test cell floor 3 m or more from the vacuum vessel for ease of detector access, to reduce radiation damage, minimize count saturation problems, and to avoid high magnetic fields. These detectors include Si surface-barrier diodes, fission chambers, natural diamond detectors, and T2 production in a moderated 3He cell. To evaluate the performance of these detectors during deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation, we determined the neutron flux spectrum incident on the principal detector enclosure using nuclide sample sets containing Al, Ti, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni, Zr, Nb, In, and Au activation foils. Foils were installed and then removed after ample exposure to TFTR D-T neutrons. High efficiency, high purity Ge detectors were used for gamma spectroscopy of the irradiated foils. The incident neutron fluence and spectral distribution were unfolded from the measured results, and used to derive absolute detector efficiencies.

  8. Predicted ICF Neutron Spectrum Corrections from Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, John; Munro, Dave; Spears, Brian; Peterson, Luc; Brandon, Scott; Gaffney, Jim; Hammer, Jim; Kritcher, Andrea; Nora, Ryan; Springer, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Produced neutron spectra have long been used as a diagnostic of ICF implosions. The neutron spectrum width is characteristic of the burn temperature as well as the variance of the burning region's fluid motion. Corrections to higher moments of the spectrum are thought to be diagnostic as well. Because of the large neutron fluxes at the NIF, we expect to have the opportunity to measure these corrections and compare with simulation. We will discuss a post-process platform that we have built for extracting these moment corrections as well as many other extensive quantities from the hydrodynamic simulations, and report on the predicted neutron spectrum corrections recently calculated for a large suite of implosion simulations in one, two, and three dimensions with varying drive symmetry and overall convergence ratio. We are particularly interested in the observable effects on the neutron spectrum along different lines of sight from the dimensional symmetry constraint in the simulated hydrodynamics. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Absolute determination of inelastic mean-free paths and surface excitation parameters by absolute reflection electron energy loss spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomi, T.; Goto, K.

    2005-11-01

    An analytical approach was proposed for simultaneously determining an inelastic mean-free path (IMFP) and a surface excitation parameter (SEP) with absolute units by the analysis of an absolute experimental reflection electron energy loss spectrum. The IMFPs and SEPs in Ni were deduced for electrons of 300 to 3000 eV. The obtained IMFPs were in good agreement with those calculated using the TPP-2M equation. The Chen-type empirical formula was proposed for determining the SEP. The results confirmed the applicability of the present approach for determining the IMFP and SEP for medium-energy electrons.

  10. DIRECTIONAL DETECTION OF FISSION-SPECTRUM NEUTRONS.

    SciTech Connect

    VANIER,P.E.

    2007-05-04

    Conventional neutron detectors consisting of {sup 3}He tubes surrounded by a plastic moderator can be quite efficient in detecting fission spectrum neutrons, but do not indicate the direction of the incident radiation. We have developed a new directional detector based on double proton recoil in two separated planes of plastic scintillators. This method allows the spectrum of the neutrons to be measured by a combination of peak amplitude in the first plane and time of flight to the second plane. It also allows the determination of the angle of scattering in the first plane. If the planes are position-sensitive detectors, then the direction of the scattered neutron is known, and the direction of the incident neutron can be determined to lie on a cone of s fixed angle. The superposition of many such cones generates an image that indicates the presence of a localized source. Typical background neutron fluences from the interaction of cosmic rays with the atmosphere are low and fairly uniformly distributed in angle. Directional detection helps to locate a manmade source in the presence of natural background. Monte Carlo simulations are compared with experimental results.

  11. Neutron spectrum from the little boy mock-up

    SciTech Connect

    Robba, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Most of the human exposure data used for setting radiation protection guidelines have been obtained by following the survivors of the nuclear explosions at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Proper evaluation of these data requires estimates of the radiation exposure received by those survivors. Until now neutron dose estimates have relied primarily on calculations as no measurements of the leakage neutron flux or neutron spectrum were available. We have measured the high-energy leakage neutron spectrum from a mock-up of the Little Boy device operating at delayed critical. The measurements are compared with Monte Carlo calculations of the leakage neutron spectrum.

  12. Absolutely continuous spectrum implies ballistic transport for quantum particles in a random potential on tree graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizenman, Michael; Warzel, Simone

    2012-09-01

    We discuss the dynamical implications of the recent proof that for a quantum particle in a random potential on a regular tree graph absolutely continuous (ac) spectrum occurs non-perturbatively through rare fluctuation-enabled resonances. The main result is spelled in the title.

  13. Absolutely continuous spectrum implies ballistic transport for quantum particles in a random potential on tree graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Aizenman, Michael; Warzel, Simone

    2012-09-15

    We discuss the dynamical implications of the recent proof that for a quantum particle in a random potential on a regular tree graph absolutely continuous (ac) spectrum occurs non-perturbatively through rare fluctuation-enabled resonances. The main result is spelled in the title.

  14. The 235U Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum in the BR1 Reactor at SCK•CEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemans, Jan; Malambu, Edouard; Borms, Luc; Fiorito, Luca

    2016-02-01

    The BR1 research reactor at SCK•CEN has a spherical cavity in the graphite above the reactor core. In this cavity an accurately characterised Maxwellian thermal neutron field is present. Different converters can be loaded in the cavity in order to obtain other types of neutron (and gamma) irradiation fields. Inside the so-called MARK III converter a fast 235U(n,f) prompt fission neutron field can be obtained. With the support of MCNP calculations, irradiations in MARK III can be directly related to the pure 235U(n,f) prompt fission neutron spectrum. For this purpose MARK III spectrum averaged cross sections for the most relevant fluence dosimetry reactions have been determined. A calibration factor for absolute measurements has been determined applying activation dosimetry following ISO/IEC 17025 standards.

  15. Background neutron spectrum at 2420 m above sea level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene; Manzanares-Acuña, Eduardo

    2004-05-01

    The ambient neutron spectrum was measured in-doors at ground level in Zacatecas Mexico at 2420 m above sea level. A Bonner sphere spectrometer with a 6LiI(Eu) scintillator was used to obtain the neutron spectrum. With the spectrum the ambient dose equivalent was calculated using the ICRP 74 neutron fluence-to-dose conversion factors. The neutron fluence rate was 65±3 cm -2 h -1, producing 13.7±0.6 nSv h -1 due to ambient dose equivalent.

  16. Effects of silicon cross section and neutron spectrum on the radial uniformity in neutron transmutation doping.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haksung; Ho Pyeon, Cheol; Lim, Jae-Yong; Misawa, Tsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    The effects of silicon cross section and neutron spectrum on the radial uniformity of a Si-ingot are examined experimentally with various neutron spectrum conditions. For the cross section effect, the numerical results using silicon single crystal cross section reveal good agreements with experiments within relative difference of 6%, whereas the discrepancy is approximately 20% in free-gas cross section. For the neutron spectrum effect, the radial uniformity in hard neutron spectrum is found to be more flattening than that in soft spectrum. PMID:21917470

  17. Absolute configuration of a chiral CHD group via neutron diffraction: confirmation of the absolute stereochemistry of the enzymatic formation of malic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Bau, R.; Brewer, I.; Chiang, M.Y.; Fujita, S.; Hoffman, J.; Watkins, M.I.; Koetzle, T.F.

    1983-09-30

    Neutron diffraction has been used to monitor the absolute stereochemistry of an enzymatic reaction. (-)(2S)malic-3-d acid was prepared by the action of fumarase on fumaric acid in D/sub 2/O. After a large number of cations were screened, it was found that (+)(R)..cap alpha..-phenylethylamine forms the large crystals necessary for a neutron diffraction analysis. The subsequent structure determination showed that (+)(R)..cap alpha..-phenylethylammonium (-)(2S)malate-3-d has an absolute configuration of R at the CHD site. This result confirms the absolute stereochemistry of fumarate-to-malate transformation as catalyzed by the enzyme fumarase.

  18. Neutron energy spectrum adjustment using deposited metal films on Teflon in the miniature neutron source reactor.

    PubMed

    Nassan, L; Abdallah, B; Omar, H; Sarheel, A; Alsomel, N; Ghazi, N

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this article was on the experimental estimation of the neutron energy spectrum in the inner irradiation site of the miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR), using, for the first time, a selected set of deposited metal films on Teflon (DMFTs) neutron detectors. Gold, copper, zinc, titanium, aluminum, nickel, silver, and chromium were selected because of the dependence of their neutron cross-sections on neutron energy. Emphasis was placed on the usability of this new type of neutron detectors in the total neutron energy spectrum adjustment. The measured saturation activities per target nucleus values of the DMFTs, and the calculated neutron spectrum in the inner irradiation site using the MCNP-4C code were used as an input for the STAY'SL computer code during the adjustment procedure. The agreement between the numerically calculated and experimentally adjusted spectra results was discussed. PMID:26562448

  19. Study of absolute fast neutron dosimetry using CR-39 track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sersy, A. R.

    2010-06-01

    In this work, CR-39 track detectors have extensively been used in the determination of fast neutron fluence-to-dose factor. The registration efficiency, ɛ, of CR-39 detectors for fast neutrons was calculated using different theoretical approaches according to each mode of neutron interaction with the constituent atoms (H, C and O) of the detector material. The induced proton-recoiled showed the most common interaction among the others. The dependence of ɛ on both neutron energy and etching time was also studied. In addition, the neutron dose was calculated as a function of neutron energy in the range from 0.5 to 14 MeV using the values of (d E/d X) for each recoil particle in CR-39 detector. Results showed that the values of ɛ were obviously affected by both neutron energy and etching time where the contribution in ɛ from proton recoil was the most. The contribution from carbon and oxygen recoils in dose calculation was pronounced due to their higher corresponding values of d E/d X in comparison to those from proton recoils. The present calculated fluence-to-dose factor was in agreement with that either from ICRP no. 74 or from TRS no. 285 of IAEA, which reflected the importance of using CR-39 in absolute fast neutron dosimetry.

  20. Determination of neutron energy spectrum at KAMINI shielding experiment location.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sujoy; Bagchi, Subhrojit; Prasad, R R; Venkatasubramanian, D; Mohanakrishnan, P; Keshavamurty, R S; Haridas, Adish; Arul, A John; Puthiyavinayagam, P

    2016-09-01

    The neutron spectrum at KAMINI reactor south beam tube end has been determined using multifoil activation method. This beam tube is being used for characterizing neutron attenuation of novel shield materials. Starting from a computed guess spectrum, the spectrum adjustment/unfolding procedure makes use of minimization of a modified constraint function representing (a) least squared deviations between the measured and calculated reaction rates, (b) a measure of sharp fluctuations in the adjusted spectrum and (c) the square of the deviation of adjusted spectrum from the guess spectrum. The adjusted/unfolded spectrum predicts the reaction rates accurately. The results of this new procedure are compared with those of widely used SAND-II code. PMID:27389881

  1. Absolute measurement of the 242Pu neutron-capture cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Chyzh, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Dance Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The absolute neutron-capture cross section of 242Pu was measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. The first direct measurement of the 242Pu(n ,γ ) cross section was made over the incident neutron energy range from thermal to ≈6 keV, and the absolute scale of the (n ,γ ) cross section was set according to the known 239Pu(n ,f ) resonance at En ,R=7.83 eV. This was accomplished by adding a small quantity of 239Pu to the 242Pu sample. The relative scale of the cross section, with a range of four orders of magnitude, was determined for incident neutron energies from thermal to ≈40 keV. Our data, in general, are in agreement with previous measurements and those reported in ENDF/B-VII.1; the 242Pu(n ,γ ) cross section at the En ,R=2.68 eV resonance is within 2.4 % of the evaluated value. However, discrepancies exist at higher energies; our data are ≈30 % lower than the evaluated data at En≈1 keV and are approximately 2 σ away from the previous measurement at En≈20 keV.

  2. Absolute measurement of the 242Pu neutron-capture cross section

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Chyzh, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; et al

    2016-04-21

    Here, the absolute neutron-capture cross section of 242Pu was measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. The first direct measurement of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section was made over the incident neutron energy range from thermal to ≈ 6 keV, and the absolute scale of the (n,γ) cross section was set according to the known 239Pu(n,f) resonance at En,R = 7.83 eV. This was accomplished by adding a small quantity of 239Pu to the 242Pu sample. The relative scale of the crossmore » section, with a range of four orders of magnitude, was determined for incident neutron energies from thermal to ≈ 40 keV. Our data, in general, are in agreement with previous measurements and those reported in ENDF/B-VII.1; the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section at the En,R = 2.68 eV resonance is within 2.4% of the evaluated value. However, discrepancies exist at higher energies; our data are ≈30% lower than the evaluated data at En ≈ 1 keV and are approximately 2σ away from the previous measurement at En ≈ 20 keV.« less

  3. Absolutely continuous spectrum and ballistic transport in a one-dimensional quasiperiodic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Biplab; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2013-02-01

    We analyse a quasiperiodic arrangement of four atomic sites sitting at the vertices of a diamond shaped plaquette and single isolated sites, occupying a one dimensional backbone following a Fibonacci quasicrystal pattern. We work within a tight binding formalism. It is shown that, even with this simple deviation from pure one dimension, a definite relation between the numerical values of the system parameters will render all the single particle states completely extended. The spectrum will be absolutely continuous with the transmission completely ballistic throughout the band, completely violating the Cantor set character of the usual Fibonacci quasiperiodic chains.

  4. Tailoring the Neutron Spectrum from a 14-MeV Neutron Generator to Approximate a Spontaneous-Fission Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    James Simpson; David Chichester

    2011-06-01

    Many applications of neutrons for non-invasive measurements began with isotopic sources such as AmBe or Cf-252. Political factors have rendered AmBe undesirable in the United States and other countries, and the supply of Cf-252 is limited and significantly increasing in price every few years. Compact and low-power deuterium-tritium (DT) electronic neutron generators can often provide sufficient flux, but the 14-MeV neutron spectrum is much more energetic (harder) than an isotopic neutron source. A series of MCNP simulations were run to examine the extent to which the 14-MeV DT neutron spectrum could be softened through the use of high-Z and low-Z materials. Some potential concepts of operation require a portable neutron generator system, so the additional weight of extra materials is also a trade-off parameter. Using a reference distance of 30 cm from the source, the average neutron energy can be lowered to be less than that of either AmBe or Cf-252, while obtaining an increase in flux at the reference distance compared to a bare neutron generator. This paper discusses the types and amounts of materials used, the resulting neutron spectra, neutron flux levels, and associated photon production.

  5. Tailoring the Neutron Spectrum from a 14-MeV Neutron Generator to Approximate a Spontaneous-Fission Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J. D.; Chichester, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    Many applications of neutrons for non-invasive measurements began with isotopic sources such as AmBe or Cf-252. Political factors have rendered AmBe undesirable in the United States and other countries, and the supply of Cf-252 is limited and significantly increasing in price every few years. Compact and low-power deuterium-tritium (DT) electronic neutron generators can often provide sufficient flux, but the 14-MeV neutron spectrum is much more energetic (harder) than an isotopic neutron source. A series of MCNP simulations was run to examine the extent to which the 14-MeV DT neutron spectrum could be softened through the use of high-Z and low-Z materials. Some potential concepts of operation require a portable neutron generator system, so the additional weight of extra materials is also a trade-off parameter. Using a reference distance of 30 cm from the source, the average neutron energy can be lowered to be less than that of either AmBe or Cf-252, while obtaining an increase in flux at the reference distance compared to a bare neutron generator. This paper discusses the types and amounts of materials used, the resulting neutron spectra, neutron flux levels, and associated photon production.

  6. Tailoring the Neutron Spectrum from a 14-MeV Neutron Generator to Approximate a Spontaneous-Fission Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J. D.; Chichester, D. L.

    2011-12-13

    Many applications of neutrons for non-invasive measurements began with isotopic sources such as AmBe or Cf-252. Political factors have rendered AmBe undesirable in the United States and other countries, and the supply of Cf-252 is limited and significantly increasing in price every few years. Compact and low-power deuterium-tritium (DT) electronic neutron generators can often provide sufficient flux, but the 14-MeV neutron spectrum is much more energetic (harder) than an isotopic neutron source. A series of MCNP simulations was run to examine the extent to which the 14-MeV DT neutron spectrum could be softened through the use of high-Z and low-Z materials. Some potential concepts of operation require a portable neutron generator system, so the additional weight of extra materials is also a trade-off parameter. Using a reference distance of 30 cm from the source, the average neutron energy can be lowered to be less than that of either AmBe or Cf-252, while obtaining an increase in flux at the reference distance compared to a bare neutron generator. This paper discusses the types and amounts of materials used, the resulting neutron spectra, neutron flux levels, and associated photon production.

  7. Absolute calibration of TFTR neutron detectors for D-T plasma operation

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, L.C.; Roquemore, A.L.; Strachan, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.; Medley, S.S.; Young, K.M.; Barnes, C.W.

    1995-03-01

    The two most sensitive TFTR fission-chamber detectors were absolutely calibrated in situ by a D-T neutron generator ({approximately}5 {times} 10{sup 7} n/s) rotated once around the torus in each direction, with data taken at about 45 positions. The combined uncertainty for determining fusion neutron rates, including the uncertainty in the total neutron generator output ({plus_minus}9%), counting statistics, the effect of coil coolant, detector stability, cross-calibration to the current mode or log Campbell mode and to other fission chambers, and plasma position variation, is about {plus_minus}13%. The NE-451 (ZnS) scintillators and {sup 4}He proportional counters that view the plasma in up to 10 collimated sightlines were calibrated by scanning. the neutron generator radially and toroidally in the horizontal midplane across the flight tubes of 7 cm diameter. Spatial integration of the detector responses using the calibrated signal per unit chord-integrated neutron emission gives the global neutron source strength with an overall uncertainty of {plus_minus}14% for the scintillators and {plus_minus}15% for the {sup 4}He counters.

  8. Absolute calibration method for laser megajoule neutron yield measurement by activation diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Landoas, Olivier; Glebov, Vladimir Yu; Rossé, Bertrand; Briat, Michelle; Disdier, Laurent; Sangster, Thomas C; Duffy, Tim; Marmouget, Jean Gabriel; Varignon, Cyril; Ledoux, Xavier; Caillaud, Tony; Thfoin, Isabelle; Bourgade, Jean-Luc

    2011-07-01

    The laser megajoule (LMJ) and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) plan to demonstrate thermonuclear ignition using inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The neutron yield is one of the most important parameters to characterize ICF experiment performance. For decades, the activation diagnostic was chosen as a reference at ICF facilities and is now planned to be the first nuclear diagnostic on LMJ, measuring both 2.45 MeV and 14.1 MeV neutron yields. Challenges for the activation diagnostic development are absolute calibration, accuracy, range requirement, and harsh environment. At this time, copper and zirconium material are identified for 14.1 MeV neutron yield measurement and indium material for 2.45 MeV neutrons. A series of calibrations were performed at Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) on a Van de Graff facility to determine activation diagnostics efficiencies and to compare them with results from calculations. The CEA copper activation diagnostic was tested on the OMEGA facility during DT implosion. Experiments showed that CEA and Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) diagnostics agree to better than 1% on the neutron yield measurement, with an independent calibration for each system. Also, experimental sensitivities are in good agreement with simulations and allow us to scale activation diagnostics for the LMJ measurement range. PMID:21806179

  9. Neutron Spectrum Measurements from Irradiations at NCERC

    SciTech Connect

    Jackman, Kevin Richard; Mosby, Michelle A.; Bredeweg, Todd Allen; Hutchens, Gregory Joe; White, Morgan Curtis

    2015-04-15

    Several irradiations have been conducted on assemblies (COMET/ZEUS and Flattop) at the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Configurations of the assemblies and irradiated materials changed between experiments. Different metallic foils were analyzed using the radioactivation method by gamma-ray spectrometry to understand/characterize the neutron spectra. Results of MCNP calculations are shown. It was concluded that MCNP simulated spectra agree with experimental measurements, with the caveats that some data are limited by statistics at low-energies and some activation foils have low activities.

  10. Neutron energy spectrum characterization on TMR-1 at the Indiana University neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halstead, Matthew R.; Lee, Sangjin; Petrosky, James; Bickley, Abigail; Sokol, Paul

    The energy spectrum of the Neutron Radiation Effects Program (NREP) beam line, Target-Moderator-Reflector-1 (TMR-1), at Indiana University has not been previously characterized. The facility has a unique proton source with variable pulse length (15-600 ms) and energy (13 MeV). Thus, it can produce a unique and tailored neutron beam when incident on a beryllium target. Through a combination of MCNP-X particle simulations, neutron activation experiments, and application of a spectrum unfolding code (SAND-II), the neutron source is characterized. Eight activation foils and wires were irradiated in the target area and the gamma activity measured. This information was used in an unfolding code, SAND-II, to deconvolve the spectrum, using the MCNP simulations as a basis for the spectral fitting.

  11. Bayesian Statistical Analysis Applied to NAA Data for Neutron Flux Spectrum Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiesa, D.; Previtali, E.; Sisti, M.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we present a statistical method, based on Bayesian statistics, to evaluate the neutron flux spectrum from the activation data of different isotopes. The experimental data were acquired during a neutron activation analysis (NAA) experiment [A. Borio di Tigliole et al., Absolute flux measurement by NAA at the Pavia University TRIGA Mark II reactor facilities, ENC 2012 - Transactions Research Reactors, ISBN 978-92-95064-14-0, 22 (2012)] performed at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of Pavia University (Italy). In order to evaluate the neutron flux spectrum, subdivided in energy groups, we must solve a system of linear equations containing the grouped cross sections and the activation rate data. We solve this problem with Bayesian statistical analysis, including the uncertainties of the coefficients and the a priori information about the neutron flux. A program for the analysis of Bayesian hierarchical models, based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations, is used to define the problem statistical model and solve it. The energy group fluxes and their uncertainties are then determined with great accuracy and the correlations between the groups are analyzed. Finally, the dependence of the results on the prior distribution choice and on the group cross section data is investigated to confirm the reliability of the analysis.

  12. DIFFERENTIAL SPECTRUM OF NEUTRONS AT CHACALTAYA-BOLIVIA

    SciTech Connect

    Mayta, R.; Zanini, A.; Ticona, R.; Velarde, A.

    2009-04-30

    We describe the Neutron Spectrometer Experiment installed at Chacaltaya Cosmic Rays Observatory (68 deg. O, 16.2 deg. S), located in Bolivia, at 5230 m.a.s.l. This experimental system is constituted by passive detectors which register the flux of neutrons, in an energy range of 10 KeV-20 MeV. Using the unfolding code BUNTO a peak around 1 MeV of the characteristic spectrum of neutrons was obtained. Experimental values, observed during April of 2008, are compared with similar ones carried out in 1997 at the same place, in order to look for eventual changes due to local atmosphere. A similar experiment was also carried up at the Laboratory of Testa Grigia-Italy (45.56 deg. N, 7.42 deg. E,. 3480 m.a.l.s). Data of both stations allow us to compare the spectra in order to explain the difference of neutron flux of these two stations.

  13. Neutron spectrum studies in the ATR (Advanced Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.; Putnam, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been and currently is used to provide irradiation fields to study the effects of intense radiation on samples of reactor materials. These samples include fuel, cladding, control and structural materials. The ATR is also used to irradiate target materials for the production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications as well as for scientific research. Routine monitoring of the thermal'' and fast'' neutron levels have been conducted during every operational cycle since its startup in 1970. The routine neutron dosimetry has been primarily accomplished using the {sup 59}Co(n,{gamma}){sup 60}Co reaction for thermal'' neutrons and the {sup 58}Ni(n,p) {sup 58}Co reaction for fast'' neutrons as described in ASTM standard methods E261, E262, and E264. Neutron spectrum studies have now been conducted in the epithermal and fast neutron energy ranges for the various capsule irradiation test facilities and the routine neutron monitoring locations. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Little Boy neutron spectrum below 3 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.E.; Bennett, E.F.; Yule, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    The leakage neutron spectrum from the Little Boy replica has been measured from 12 keV to 3 MeV using a high-resolution /sup 3/He ionization chamber, and from 1 keV to 3 MeV using proton-recoil proportional counters. The /sup 3/He-spectrometer measurements were made at distances of 0.75 and 2.0 m from the active center and at angles of 0/sup 0/, 45/sup 0/, and 90/sup 0/ with respect to the axis of the assembly. Proton-recoil measurments were made at 90/sup 0/ to the assembly axis at distances of 0.75 and 2.0 m, with a shielded measurement made at 2.0 m to estimate background due to scattering. The /sup 3/He spectrometer was calibrated at Los Alamos using monoenergetic /sup 7/Li(p,n)/sup 7/Be neutrons to generate a family of response functions. The proton-recoil counters were calibrated at Argonne by studying the capture of thermal neutrons by nitrogen in the counters, by observation of the 24-keV neutron resonance in iron, and by relating to the known hydrogen content of the counters. The neutron spectrum from Little Boy was found to be highly structured, with peaks corresponding to minima in the iron total neutron cross section. In particular, influence of the 24-keV iron window was evident in both sets of spectra. The measurements provide information for dosimetry calculations and also a valuable intercomparison of neutron spectrometry using the two different detector types. Spectra measured with both detectors are in essential agreement. 8 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Calibration and absolute normalization procedure of a new Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Palomino, L. A.; Blostein, J. J.; Dawidowski, J.

    2011-08-01

    We describe the calibration process of a new Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) spectrometer, recently implemented at the Bariloche Electron LINAC (Argentina), consisting in the determination of the incident neutron spectrum, dead-time and electronic delay of the data acquisition line, and detector bank efficiency. For this purpose, samples of lead, polyethylene and graphite of different sizes were employed. Their measured spectra were corrected by multiple scattering, attenuation and detector efficiency effects, by means of an ad hoc Monte Carlo code. We show that the corrected spectra are correctly scaled with respect to the scattering power of the tested materials within a 2% of experimental error, thus allowing us to define an experimental constant that links the arbitrary experimental scale (number of recorded counts per monitor counts) with the involved cross-sections. The present work also serves to analyze the existence of possible sources of systematic errors.

  16. Modeling the Complete Gravitational Wave Spectrum of Neutron Star Mergers.

    PubMed

    Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Dietrich, Tim; Nagar, Alessandro

    2015-08-28

    In the context of neutron star mergers, we study the gravitational wave spectrum of the merger remnant using numerical relativity simulations. Postmerger spectra are characterized by a main peak frequency f2 related to the particular structure and dynamics of the remnant hot hypermassive neutron star. We show that f(2) is correlated with the tidal coupling constant κ(2)^T that characterizes the binary tidal interactions during the late-inspiral merger. The relation f(2)(κ(2)^T) depends very weakly on the binary total mass, mass ratio, equation of state, and thermal effects. This observation opens up the possibility of developing a model of the gravitational spectrum of every merger unifying the late-inspiral and postmerger descriptions. PMID:26371635

  17. Little Boy neutron spectrum below 1 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    A high-resolution /sup 3/He ionization chamber of the type development by Cuttler and Shalev was used to study the neutron spectrum from the Little Boy mockup. Measurements were made at distances of 0.75 and 2.0 m and at angles of 0/sup 0/, 45/sup 0/, and 90/sup 0/ with respect to the axis of the assembly, which was operated at power levels from 8.6 to 450 mW. Detector efficiency as a function of energy as well as parameters for correction of pulse-height distributions for proton-recoil and wall effects were determined from a set of response functions for monoenergetic neutrons measured at the Los Alamos 3.75-MeV Van de Graaff Accelerator Facility. Pulse-shape discrimination was used to separate /sup 3/He-recoil pulses from the pulse-height distribution. The spectrum was found to be highly structured, with peaks corresponding to minima in the total neutron cross section of iron. In particular, 15% of the neutrons above the epithermal peak in energy were found to be in the 24-keV iron window. Lesser peaks out to 700 keV are also attributable to filtering action of the weapon's heavy iron casing. Data taken using experimental proton-recoil proportional counters are compared with the high-resolution spectra.

  18. Neutron spectrum measurements in DT discharges using activation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, B.; Bertalot, L.; Loughlin, M.; Roquemore, A. L.

    1999-01-01

    The JET activation system has eight irradiation ends where samples may be irradiated in the neutron flux from the plasma. There is one end, re-entrant into the top of the vessel, for which there is little intervening material between it and the plasma; the other ends, including two beneath the divertor coils, have increasingly larger amounts of intervening structure. The local neutron spectrum at each irradiation end was measured by simultaneously activating several elemental foils (Al, Au, Co, Fe, In, Mg, Nb, Ni, Ti, Zr). There were 15 activation reactions in the energy range of 0.5-16 MeV which were used as input to the SNL-SAND-II code to determine the neutron energy spectrum. The results are compared with neutron transport calculations both from the MCNP and FURNACE codes: the average standard deviation between measured to SNL-SAND-II calculated activity ratios was as low as 5%. The results demonstrate the reliability of the neutronics calculations and have implications for the design of diagnostics and blankets for the next generation of large tokamaks such as ITER. The 377.9 keV line of the 54Fe(n,2n)53Fe reaction (threshold ˜13.9 MeV, not a dosimetric standard) has also been measured in different plasma conditions. The ratio of the saturated activity from this reaction to that from the 56Fe(n,p)56Mn reaction (threshold ˜4.5 MeV) provides information on the broadening of the 14 MeV fusion peak.

  19. Modification of the neutron beam spectrum for neutron radiography at Tehran Research Reactor (TRR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, K. Kamali; Ziaie, F.

    1996-02-01

    Recently due to the replacement of the High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel with the Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel and the changes in the reactor core configuration at TRR, the existing Neutron Radiography (NR) system was no longer efficient. Thus, it was decided to modify the system in order to increase the neutron flux and to improve the characteristics of the system. The neutron energy spectrum was measured by foil activation method using SAND-II code and calculated by ANISN/PC code. The general trend of the calculated and measured spectra show good similarity. By introducing different sizes of moderator and gamma absorber behind the collimator, the optimum thermal neutron flux impinge the collimator was calculated using ANISN/PC code. The inlet diameter of the collimator was changed from 1.8 to 5 cm in order to increase the neutron flux at the sample position, which should result in an increase of 8 fold in spite of a small increase in the geometrical unsharpness. The new beam characteristics at the sample position are predicted as an average thermal neutron flux of about 10 6 n cm 2 s 1 and a neutron to gamma ratio of about 10 6 n cm 2 mR -1.

  20. Incident spectrum determination for time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, J. P.

    1998-08-27

    Accurate characterization of the incident neutron spectrum is an important requirement for precise Rietveld analysis of time-of-flight powder neutron diffraction data. Without an accurate incident spectrum the calculated model for the measured relative intensities of individual Bragg reflections will possess systematic errors. We describe a method for obtaining an accurate numerical incident spectrum using data from a transmitted beam monitor.

  1. Neutron Measurements Using the Universal Radiation Spectrum Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Cummings; Byron Christiansen; Laird Bean

    2005-02-01

    The Universal Radiation Spectrum Analyzer (URSA-II), developed by Radiation Safety Associates, and manufactured by SE International (Figure 1) is an interface between a radiation detector and a personal computer. Originally, the URSA-II was developed for use with detectors that measure the energy of gamma rays. At the Idaho National Laboratory, the URSA-II is an integral part of standard measurement techniques to measure characteristics of neutron radiation fields. Those techniques are discussed briefly and spectra using the URSA-II are presented.

  2. Flat-spectrum radio sources - Cosmic conspiracy or relativistic neutrons?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovanoni, Peter M.; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    1990-01-01

    The intensity spectrum of the core of radio-loud AGN varies smoothly from 10 exp 8.5 to 10 to the 16th Hz, and is flat between 10 to the 9th and 10 to the 10th Hz, implying that a single emission mechanism is responsible. It is proposed here that energy is transported from the central source by relativistic neutrons which travel freely over a large volume and decay into relativistic protons. The protons produce secondary electrons which generate the observed radiation. The photon spectra thus produced are largely model-independent and flat.

  3. Gamma spectrum following neutron capture in {sup 167}Er

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, D.; Khoo, T.L.; Lister, C.J.

    1995-08-01

    Statistical decay from a highly excited state samples all the lower-lying states and, hence, provides a sensitive measure of the level density. Pairing has a major impact on the level density, e.g. creating a pair gap between the 0- and 2-quasiparticle configurations. Hence the shape of the statistical spectrum contains information on pairing, and can be used to provide information on the reduction of pairing with thermal excitation energy. For this reason, we measured the complete spectrum of {gamma}rays following thermal neutron capture in {sup 167}Er. The experiment was performed at the Brookhaven reactor using Compton-suppressed Ge detectors from TESSA. The spectrum, which was corrected for detector response and efficiency, reveals primary (first-step, high-energy) transitions up to nearly 8 MeV, secondary (last-step, lower-energy) transitions, as we as a continuous statistical component. Effort was expanded to identify all lines from contaminant sources and an upper limit of 5% was tentatively set for their contributions. The spectral shape of the statistical spectrum will be compared with theoretical spectra obtained from a calculation of pairing which accounts for a stepwise reduction of the pair correlations as the number of quasiparticles increases. The primary lines which decay directly to the near-yrast states will also be used to deduce the level densities.

  4. Measurement Of The Neutron Spectrum Of A DD Electronic Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Chichester, David L.; Johnson, James T.; Seabury, Edward H.

    2011-06-01

    A Cuttler-Shalev (C-S){sup 3}He proportional counter has been used to measure the energy spectrum of neutrons from a portable deuterium-deuterium electronic neutron generator. To improve the analysis of results from the C-S detector digital pulse shape analysis techniques have been used to eliminate neutron recoil artifacts in the recorded data. Data was collected using a 8-GHz, 10-bit waveform digitizer with its full scale corresponding to approximately 6-MeV neutrons. The measurements were made with the detector axis perpendicular to the direction of ions in the ENG in a plane 0.5-m to the side of the ENG, measuring neutrons emitted at an angle from 87.3 deg. to 92.7 deg. with respect to the path of ions in the ENG. The system demonstrated an energy resolution of approximately 0.040 MeV for the thermal peak and approximately 0.13 MeV at the DD neutron energy. In order to achieve the ultimate resolution capable with this type of detector it is clear that a higher-precision digitizer will be needed.

  5. Measurement Of The Neutron Spectrum Of A DD Electronic Neutron Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichester, David L.; Johnson, James T.; Seabury, Edward H.

    2011-06-01

    A Cuttler-Shalev (C-S) 3He proportional counter has been used to measure the energy spectrum of neutrons from a portable deuterium-deuterium electronic neutron generator. To improve the analysis of results from the C-S detector digital pulse shape analysis techniques have been used to eliminate neutron recoil artifacts in the recorded data. Data was collected using a 8-GHz, 10-bit waveform digitizer with its full scale corresponding to approximately 6-MeV neutrons. The measurements were made with the detector axis perpendicular to the direction of ions in the ENG in a plane 0.5-m to the side of the ENG, measuring neutrons emitted at an angle from 87.3° to 92.7° with respect to the path of ions in the ENG. The system demonstrated an energy resolution of approximately 0.040 MeV for the thermal peak and approximately 0.13 MeV at the DD neutron energy. In order to achieve the ultimate resolution capable with this type of detector it is clear that a higher-precision digitizer will be needed.

  6. Measurement of the Neutron Spectrum of a DD Electronic Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; J. T. Johnson; E. H. Seabury

    2010-08-01

    A Cuttler-Shalev (C-S) 3He proportional counter has been used to measure the energy spectrum of neutrons from a portable deuterium-deuterium electronic neutron generator. To improve the analysis of results from the C-S detector digital pulse shape analysis techniques have been used to eliminate neutron recoil artifacts in the recorded data. Data was collected using a 8-GHz, 10-bit waveform digitizer with its full scale corresponding to approximately 6-MeV neutrons. The measurements were made with the detector axis perpendicular to the direction of ions in the ENG in a plane 0.5-m to the side of the ENG, measuring neutrons emitted at an angle from 87.3? to 92.7? with respect to the path of ions in the ENG. The system demonstrated an energy resolution of approximately 0.040 MeV for the thermal peak and approximately 0.13 MeV at the DD neutron energy. In order to achieve the ultimate resolution capable with this type of detector it is clear that a higher-precision digitizer will be needed.

  7. T-T Neutron Spectrum from Inertial Confinement Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caggiano, Joseph; Sayre, Daniel; Brune, Carl; Gatu Johnson, Maria; McNabb, Dennis; Bacher, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of the T(t , 2 n) α fusion reaction (TT) have been conducted using high-purity (~99 percent) tritium, gas-filled glass capsules in inertial confinement fusion implosions. In these experiments, which were conducted at both the NIF and the OMEGA laser facilities, spectral measurements of the TT neutrons were carried out using two well-established instruments: the neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) and the magnet-based Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS). The resolutions of these systems were improved significantly for the nTOF facility by using a crystal with much faster decay time and for the MRS by using a thinner, more uniform CD2 recoil foil. At OMEGA, charged particle energy spectra were also measured using a magnetic charged particle spectrometer and the Thompson Parabola Ion Energy spectrometer. These measurements at reactant central-mass energies in the range of 10-30 keV can be used to study the TT reaction mechanism near astrophysical energies. This work was reported at the 2013 APS April meeting, where we used basic R-matrix line shapes. Since then we have updated and improved the fitting method by including the proper quantum interferences from fermion symmetry and decay channels. The implications of these effects on our understanding of the spectrum also will be discussed.

  8. Measurement of prompt fission neutron spectrum using a gamma tag double time-of-flight setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Ezekiel

    Current uncertainties in the prompt fission neutron spectrum have a significant effect of up to 4% on keff for reactor criticality and safety calculations. Therefore, a method was developed at RPI to improve the accuracy of the measurement of the prompt fission neutron spectrum. This method involves using an array of BaF2 gamma detectors to tag that a fission event has occurred, and a double time-of-flight setup to obtain the prompt fission neutron spectrum as a function of incident neutron energy. The gamma tagging method improves upon conventional fission chambers by allowing for much larger sample sizes to be utilized while not suffering from effects of discriminator level on the shape of the prompt fission neutron spectrum. A coincidence requirement on an array of 4 BaF2 gamma detectors is used to determine the timing of the fission event. Furthermore, a method is under development for the use of thin plastic scintillators for measurement of the prompt fission neutron spectrum with low energies. Measurements with spontaneous fission of . {252} Cf show good agreement with previous datasets and current evaluations as well as providing accurate data down to 50 keV with the plastic scintillator detector. Preliminary incident neutron beam analysis was performed with 238U and shows good agreement with the current evaluations demonstrating the feasibility of the gamma tagging method for in beam prompt fission neutron spectrum measurements of various isotopes.

  9. Investigation of the prompt-neutron spectrum for spontaneously-fissioning /sup 252/Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Poenitz, W.P.; Tamura, T.

    1982-01-01

    The prompt-fission-neutron spectrum of /sup 252/Cf was investigated. The spectrum was measured with Black Neutron Detectors which have a well known efficiency. Considerations of various issues in such measurements lead to an experiment in which a time-calibration pulser, a random pulser, the neutron detector time-of-flight spectrum, the pulse-shape-discriminator gamma time-of-flight spectrum, and the detector-response spectra were simultaneously recorded for the prompt-fission neutrons, transmission through carbon, and shadowbars in a total-cross-section-type measurement. Corrections and associated uncertainties were applied for a large variety of effects which may have been overlooked in many of the previously reported measurements. Preliminary results indicate deviations from a Maxwellian shape toward a Watt-spectrum shape. Agreement is good with the shape differences relative to a Maxwellian from the recent theoretical calculation by Madland and Nix, however, a lower average energy was found.

  10. Measurement of the Absolute Elastic and Inelastic Differential Neutron Cross Sections for 23Na Between 2 and 4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Chakraborty, A.; Crider, B. P.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Yates, S. W.; Hicks, S. F.; Kersting, L. J.; Luke, C. J.; McDonough, P. J.; Sigillito, A. J.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2013-03-01

    Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering angular distributions have been measured from 23Na for incident neutron energies between 2 and 4 MeV at the University of Kentucky using neutron time-of-flight techniques. The cross sections obtained are important for applications in nuclear reactor development and other areas, and they are an energy region in which existing data are very sparse. Absolute cross sections were obtained by normalizing Na angular distributions to the well-known np cross sections.

  11. Calculation of the absolute detection efficiency of a moderated /sup 235/U neutron detector on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, L.P.; Hendel, H.W.; Liew, S.L.

    1989-02-01

    Neutron transport simulations have been carried out to calculate the absolute detection efficiency of a moderated /sup 235/U neutron detector which is used on the TFTR as a part of the primary fission detector diagnostic system for measuring fusion power yields. Transport simulations provide a means by which the effects of variations in various shielding and geometrical parameters can be explored. These effects are difficult to study in calibration experiments. The calculational model, benchmarked against measurements, can be used to complement future detector calibrations, when the high level of radioactivity resulting from machine operation may severely restrict access to the tokamak. We present a coupled forward-adjoint algorithm, employing both the deterministic and Monte Carlo sampling methods, to model the neutron transport in the complex tokamak and detector geometries. Sensitivities of the detector response to the major and minor radii, and angular anisotropy of the neutron emission are discussed. A semi-empirical model based on matching the calculational results with a small set of experiments produces good agreement (+-15%) for a wide range of source energies and geometries. 20 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. How to Produce a Reactor Neutron Spectrum Using a Proton Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, K.; Wootan, D.; Gates, R.; Schmitt, B.; Asner, D. M.

    A method for reproducing the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor using an engineered target in an accelerator proton beam is proposed. The protons interact with a target to create neutrons through various (p,n) type reactions. Spectral tailoring of the emitted neutrons can be used to modify the energy of the generated neutron spectrum to represent various reactor spectra. Through the use of moderators and reflectors, the neutron spectrum can be modified to reproduce many different spectra of interest including spectra in small thermal test reactors, large pressurized water reactors, and fast reactors. The particular application of this methodology is the design of an experimental approach for using an accelerator to measure the betas produced during fission to be used to reduce uncertainties in the interpretation of reactor antineutrino measurements. This approach involves using a proton accelerator to produce a neutron field representative of a power reactor, and using this neutron field to irradiate fission foils of the primary isotopes contributing to fission in the reactor, creating unstable, neutron rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. A major advantage of an accelerator neutron source over a neutron beam from a thermal reactor is that the fast neutrons can be slowed down or tailored to approximate various power reactor spectra. An accelerator based neutron source that can be tailored to match various reactor neutron spectra provides an advantage for control in studying how changes in the neutron spectra affect parameters such as the resulting fission product beta spectrum.

  13. How to produce a reactor neutron spectrum using a proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Kimberly A.; Wootan, David W.; Gates, Robert O.; Schmitt, Bruce E.; Asner, David M.

    2015-01-01

    A method for reproducing the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor using an engineered target in an accelerator proton beam is proposed. The protons interact with a target to create neutrons through various (p,n) type reactions. Spectral tailoring of the emitted neutrons can be used to modify the energy of the generated neutron spectrum to represent various reactor spectra. Through the use of moderators and reflectors, the neutron spectrum can be modified to reproduce many different spectra of interest including spectra in small thermal test reactors, large pressurized water reactors, and fast reactors. The particular application of this methodology is the design of an experimental approach for using an accelerator to measure the betas produced during fission to be used to reduce uncertainties in the interpretation of reactor antineutrino measurements. This approach involves using a proton accelerator to produce a neutron field representative of a power reactor, and using this neutron field to irradiate fission foils of the primary isotopes contributing to fission in the reactor, creating unstable, neutron rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. A major advantage of an accelerator neutron source over a neutron beam from a thermal reactor is that the fast neutrons can be slowed down or tailored to approximate various power reactor spectra. An accelerator based neutron source that can be tailored to match various reactor neutron spectra provides an advantage for control in studying how changes in the neutron spectra affect parameters such as the resulting fission product beta spectrum.

  14. Absolute neutron fluence measurements between 0.5 and 3MeV and their intercomparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M. W.; Guung, T. C.; Pei, C. C.; Yang, T. N.; Hwang, W. S.; Thomas, D. J.

    1999-02-01

    Primary standards of monoenergetic neutron fluences for 0.565, 1.5 and 2.5MeV neutrons produced by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction have been developed for the calibration of neutron dosimeters and spectrometers. The fluences for 0.565MeV neutrons were measured using both H2 and CH4 proton recoil proportional counters with the measured spectra fitted to the modified SPEC-4 Monte Carlo simulations for the subtraction of gamma and recoil carbons. The fluences for 1.5 and 2.5MeV neutrons were determined with vacuum-type proton recoil telescopes. Various uncertainties for each detector are analyzed and its overall uncertainty is 3.1% for gas counter and less than 3% for the telescope. These neutron fluence standards have been intercompared with those of the National Physical Laboratory of the United Kingdom by the use of two transfer instruments: a long counter and a 3He detector. The comparison results will be presented and discussed.

  15. Broad energy range neutron spectroscopy using a liquid scintillator and a proportional counter: Application to a neutron spectrum similar to that from an improvised nuclear device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A.; Garty, Guy; Harken, Andrew; Brenner, David J.

    2015-09-01

    A novel neutron irradiation facility at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been developed to mimic the neutron radiation from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) at relevant distances (e.g. 1.5 km) from the epicenter. The neutron spectrum of this IND-like neutron irradiator was designed according to estimations of the Hiroshima neutron spectrum at 1.5 km. It is significantly different from a standard reactor fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and it is dominated by neutron energies from 100 keV up to 9 MeV. To verify such wide energy range neutron spectrum, detailed here is the development of a combined spectroscopy system. Both a liquid scintillator detector and a gas proportional counter were used for the recoil spectra measurements, with the individual response functions estimated from a series of Monte Carlo simulations. These normalized individual response functions were formed into a single response matrix for the unfolding process. Several accelerator-based quasi-monoenergetic neutron source spectra were measured and unfolded to test this spectroscopy system. These reference neutrons were produced from two reactions: T(p,n)3He and D(d,n)3He, generating neutron energies in the range between 0.2 and 8 MeV. The unfolded quasi-monoenergetic neutron spectra indicated that the detection system can provide good neutron spectroscopy results in this energy range. A broad-energy neutron spectrum from the 9Be(d,n) reaction using a 5 MeV deuteron beam, measured at 60 degrees to the incident beam was measured and unfolded with the evaluated response matrix. The unfolded broad neutron spectrum is comparable with published time-of-flight results. Finally, the pair of detectors were used to measure the neutron spectrum generated at the RARAF IND-like neutron facility and a comparison is made to the neutron spectrum of Hiroshima.

  16. Determination of the gamma-ray spectrum in a strong neutron/gamma-ray mixed field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan-Hao; Lin, Yi-Chun; Nievaart, Sander; Chou, Wen-Tsae; Liu, Hong-Ming; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2011-10-01

    The knowledge of gamma-ray spectrum highly affects the accuracy of the correspondingly derived gamma-ray dose and the correctness of calculated neutron dose in the neutron/gamma-ray mixed field dosimetry when using the paired ionization chambers technique. It is of our interest to develop a method to determine the gamma-ray spectrum in a strong neutron/gamma-ray mixed field. The current type detector, Mg(Ar) ionization chamber with 6 different thick caps incorporated with the unfolding technique, was used to determine the gamma-ray spectrum in the THOR epithermal neutron beam, which contains intense neutrons and gamma rays. The applied caps had nominal thicknesses from 1 to 6 mm. Detector response functions of the applied Mg(Ar) chamber with different caps were calculated using MCNP5 with a validated chamber model. The spectrum unfolding process was performed using the well-known SAND-II algorithm. The unfolded result was found much softer than the originally calculated spectrum at the design stage. A large portion of low energy continuum was shown in the adjusted spectrum. This work gave us a much deeper insight into the THOR epithermal neutron beam and also showed a way to determine the gamma-ray spectrum.

  17. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and ρR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Waugh, C. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hohenberger, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Yeamans, C. B.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Talison, B.; Casey, D. T.; Landen, O. L.; Moran, M. J.; Zacharias, R. A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-10-01

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (ρR) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ˜1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF.

  18. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and ρR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, M J; Zylstra, A B; Frenje, J A; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M Gatu; Waugh, C J; Séguin, F H; Sio, H; Sinenian, N; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Hohenberger, M; Stoeckl, C; Sangster, T C; Yeamans, C B; LePape, S; Mackinnon, A J; Bionta, R M; Talison, B; Casey, D T; Landen, O L; Moran, M J; Zacharias, R A; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A

    2014-10-01

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (ρR) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ∼1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF. PMID:25362390

  19. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and ρR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J. Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Waugh, C. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hohenberger, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Yeamans, C. B.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Talison, B.; and others

    2014-10-01

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (ρR) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ~1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF.

  20. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and pR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Waugh, C. J.; Seguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hohenberger, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Yeamans, C. B.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Talison, B.; Casey, D. T.; Landen, O. L.; Moran, M. J.; Zacharias, R. A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-10-10

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (ρR) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ~1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF

  1. Where Tori Fear to Tread: Hypermassive Neutron Star Remnants and Absolute Event Horizons or Topics in Computational General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Jeffrey Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Computational general relativity is a field of study which has reached maturity only within the last decade. This thesis details several studies that elucidate phenomena related to the coalescence of compact object binaries. Chapters 2 and 3 recounts work towards developing new analytical tools for visualizing and reasoning about dynamics in strongly curved spacetimes. In both studies, the results employ analogies with the classical theory of electricity and magnetism, first (Ch. 2) in the post-Newtonian approximation to general relativity and then (Ch. 3) in full general relativity though in the absence of matter sources. In Chapter 4, we examine the topological structure of absolute event horizons during binary black hole merger simulations conducted with the SpEC code. Chapter 6 reports on the progress of the SpEC code in simulating the coalescence of neutron star-neutron star binaries, while Chapter 7 tests the effects of various numerical gauge conditions on the robustness of black hole formation from stellar collapse in SpEC. In Chapter 5, we examine the nature of pseudospectral expansions of non-smooth functions motivated by the need to simulate the stellar surface in Chapters 6 and 7. In Chapter 8, we study how thermal effects in the nuclear equation of state effect the equilibria and stability of hypermassive neutron stars. Chapter 9 presents supplements to the work in Chapter 8, including an examination of the stability question raised in Chapter 8 in greater mathematical detail.

  2. The spectrum of neutrons at 60 hg m(-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The rate of neutron interactions was measured for the energy range 7.5 to 60 MeV, using a 3.85 kg cell of liquid scintillator. The neutrons are selected by pulse shape discrimination, with anticoincidence counters used to reduce interference from muons transversing the scintillator. The observed flux is interpreted in terms of neutrons produced from environmental uranium and thorium, those resulting from the capture of negative muons in nuclei and those from fast muon interactions.

  3. Neutron spectrum unfolding using artificial neural network and modified least square method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Abolfazl

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, neutron spectrum is reconstructed using the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Modified Least Square (MLSQR) methods. The detector's response (pulse height distribution) as a required data for unfolding of energy spectrum is calculated using the developed MCNPX-ESUT computational code (MCNPX-Energy engineering of Sharif University of Technology). Unlike the usual methods that apply inversion procedures to unfold the energy spectrum from the Fredholm integral equation, the MLSQR method uses the direct procedure. Since liquid organic scintillators like NE-213 are well suited and routinely used for spectrometry of neutron sources, the neutron pulse height distribution is simulated/measured in the NE-213 detector. The response matrix is calculated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational code through the simulation of NE-213 detector's response to monoenergetic neutron sources. For known neutron pulse height distribution, the energy spectrum of the neutron source is unfolded using the MLSQR method. In the developed multilayer perception neural network for reconstruction of the energy spectrum of the neutron source, there is no need for formation of the response matrix. The multilayer perception neural network is developed based on logsig, tansig and purelin transfer functions. The developed artificial neural network consists of two hidden layers of type hyperbolic tangent sigmoid transfer function and a linear transfer function in the output layer. The motivation of applying the ANN method may be explained by the fact that no matrix inversion is needed for energy spectrum unfolding. The simulated neutron pulse height distributions in each light bin due to randomly generated neutron spectrum are considered as the input data of ANN. Also, the randomly generated energy spectra are considered as the output data of the ANN. Energy spectrum of the neutron source is identified with high accuracy using both MLSQR and ANN methods. The results obtained from

  4. A note on the revised galactic neutron spectrum of the Ames collaborative study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    Energy distributions of the neutron dose equivalents in the 0.1 to 300 Mev interval for the Ames and Hess spectra are compared. The Ames spectrum shows no evaporation peak, moves the bulk of the flux away from the region of elastic collision and spreads it more evenly over higher energies. The neutron spectrum in space does not seem to hear out the Ames model. Emulsion findings on all manned missions of the past consistently indicate that evaporation events are a prolific source of neutrons in space.

  5. Use of Apollo 17 Epoch Neutron Spectrum as a Benchmark in Testing LEND Collimated Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Gordon; Sagdeev, R.; Milikh, G.

    2011-01-01

    The Apollo 17 neutron experiment LPNE provided a unique set of data on production of neutrons in the Lunar soil bombarded by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). It serves as valuable "ground-truth" in the age of orbital remote sensing. We used the neutron data attributed to Apollo 17 epoch as a benchmark for testing the LEND's collimated sensor, as introduced by the geometry of collimator and efficiency of He3 counters. The latter is defined by the size of gas counter and pressure inside it. The intensity and energy spectrum of neutrons escaping the lunar surface are dependent on incident flux of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) whose variability is associated with Solar Cycle and its peculiarities. We obtain first the share of neutrons entering through the field of view of collimator as a fraction of the total neutron flux by using the angular distribution of neutron exiting the Moon described by our Monte Carlo code. We computed next the count rate of the 3He sensor by using the neutron energy spectrum from McKinney et al. [JGR, 2006] and by consider geometry and gas pressure of the LEND sensor. Finally the neutron count rate obtained for the Apollo 17 epoch characterized by intermediate solar activity was adjusted to the LRO epoch characterized by low solar activity. It has been done by taking into account solar modulation potential, which affects the GCR flux, and in turn changes the neutron albedo flux.

  6. Solid-state track recorder dosimetry device to measure absolute reaction rates and neutron fluence as a function of time

    DOEpatents

    Gold, Raymond; Roberts, James H.

    1989-01-01

    A solid state track recording type dosimeter is disclosed to measure the time dependence of the absolute fission rates of nuclides or neutron fluence over a period of time. In a primary species an inner recording drum is rotatably contained within an exterior housing drum that defines a series of collimating slit apertures overlying windows defined in the stationary drum through which radiation can enter. Film type solid state track recorders are positioned circumferentially about the surface of the internal recording drum to record such radiation or its secondary products during relative rotation of the two elements. In another species both the recording element and the aperture element assume the configuration of adjacent disks. Based on slit size of apertures and relative rotational velocity of the inner drum, radiation parameters within a test area may be measured as a function of time and spectra deduced therefrom.

  7. Reference data file for neutron spectrum adjustment and related radiation damage calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zsolnay, E.M. ); Nolthenius, H.J.; Greenwood, L.R.; Szondi, E.J. )

    1990-08-01

    The REAL-88 interlaboratory exercise organized by IAEA resulted in a neutron metrology file. (NMF-90) comprising problem dependent data for benchmark neutron fields, furthermore, nuclear data and computer programs for neutron spectrum adjustment and radiation damage parameter calculations for the service life assessment of nuclear facilities. Calculation results of some experienced laboratories are also present. This paper describes and analyses the content of the neutron metrology file and outlines the most important problems and tasks to be solved in the field of radiation damage parameter calculations. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Cadmium Depletion Impacts on Hardening Neutron6 Spectrum for Advanced Fuel Testing in ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Gray S. Chang

    2011-05-01

    For transmuting long-lived isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products effectively is in a fast neutron spectrum reactor. In the absence of a fast spectrum test reactor in the United States of America (USA), initial irradiation testing of candidate fuels can be performed in a thermal test reactor that has been modified to produce a test region with a hardened neutron spectrum. A test region is achieved with a Cadmium (Cd) filter which can harden the neutron spectrum to a spectrum similar (although still somewhat softer) to that of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). A fuel test loop with a Cd-filter has been installed within the East Flux Trap (EFT) of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A detailed comparison analyses between the cadmium (Cd) filter hardened neutron spectrum in the ATR and the LMFBR fast neutron spectrum have been performed using MCWO. MCWO is a set of scripting tools that are used to couple the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the isotope depletion and buildup code ORIGEN-2.2. The MCWO-calculated results indicate that the Cd-filter can effectively flatten the Rim-Effect and reduce the linear heat rate (LHGR) to meet the advanced fuel testing project requirements at the beginning of irradiation (BOI). However, the filtering characteristics of Cd as a strong absorber quickly depletes over time, and the Cd-filter must be replaced for every two typical operating cycles within the EFT of the ATR. The designed Cd-filter can effectively depress the LHGR in experimental fuels and harden the neutron spectrum enough to adequately flatten the Rim Effect in the test region.

  9. A New Method of Prompt Fission Neutron Energy Spectrum Unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalova, O. V.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2010-11-01

    The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of 252Cf has been investigated applying digital signal electronics along with associated digital signal processing algorithms. The goal was to find out the reasons of a long time existing discrepancy between theoretical calculations and the measurements of prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission dependence on the total kinetic energy (TKE) of fission fragments (FF). On the one hand the 252Cf (sf) reaction is one of the main references for nuclear data, on the other hand the understanding of PFN emission mechanism is very important for nuclear fission theory. Using a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber for fission fragment (FF) detection and a NE213-equivalent neutron detector in total about 107 fission fragment-neutron coincidences have been registered. Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution, neutron time-of-flight and pulse shape have been investigated using a 12 bit waveform digitizer. The signal waveforms have been analyzed using digital signal processing algorithms. For the first time the dependence of the number of emitted neutrons as a function of total kinetic energy (TKE) of the fragments is in very good agreement with theoretical calculations in the range of TKE from 140-220 MeV.

  10. A New Method of Prompt Fission Neutron Energy Spectrum Unfolding

    SciTech Connect

    Zeynalova, O. V.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2010-11-25

    The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf has been investigated applying digital signal electronics along with associated digital signal processing algorithms. The goal was to find out the reasons of a long time existing discrepancy between theoretical calculations and the measurements of prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission dependence on the total kinetic energy (TKE) of fission fragments (FF). On the one hand the {sup 252}Cf(sf) reaction is one of the main references for nuclear data, on the other hand the understanding of PFN emission mechanism is very important for nuclear fission theory. Using a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber for fission fragment (FF) detection and a NE213-equivalent neutron detector in total about 10{sup 7} fission fragment-neutron coincidences have been registered. Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution, neutron time-of-flight and pulse shape have been investigated using a 12 bit waveform digitizer. The signal waveforms have been analyzed using digital signal processing algorithms. For the first time the dependence of the number of emitted neutrons as a function of total kinetic energy (TKE) of the fragments is in very good agreement with theoretical calculations in the range of TKE from 140-220 MeV.

  11. Neutron energy spectrum influence on irradiation hardening and microstructural development of tungsten

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fukuda, Makoto; Kiran Kumar, N. A. P.; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Garrison, Lauren M.; Snead, Lance L.; Katoh, Yutai; Hasegawa, Akira

    2016-07-02

    We performed a neutron irradiation to single crystal pure tungsten in the mixed spectrum High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). In order to investigate the influences of neutron energy spectrum, the microstructure and irradiation hardening were compared with previous data obtained from the irradiation campaigns in the mixed spectrum Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR) and the sodium-cooled fast reactor Joyo. The irradiation temperatures were in the range of ~90–~800 °C and fast neutron fluences were 0.02–9.00 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Post irradiation evaluation included Vickers hardness measurements and transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, the hardness and microstructure changes exhibitedmore » a clear dependence on the neutron energy spectrum. The hardness appeared to increase with increasing thermal neutron flux when fast fluence exceeds 1 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Finally, irradiation induced precipitates considered to be χ- and σ-phases were observed in samples irradiated to >1 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), which were pronounced at high dose and due to the very high thermal neutron flux of HFIR. Although the irradiation hardening mainly caused by defects clusters in a low dose regime, the transmutation-induced precipitation appeared to impose additional significant hardening of the tungsten.« less

  12. Evaluating the 239Pu Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum Induced by Thermal to 30 MeV Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neudecker, D.; Talou, P.; Kawano, T.; Kahler, A. C.; Rising, M. E.; White, M. C.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new evaluation of the 239Pu prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) induced by thermal to 30 MeV neutrons. Compared to the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation, this one includes recently published experimental data as well as an improved and extended model description to predict PFNS. For instance, the pre-equilibrium neutron emission component to the PFNS is considered and the incident energy dependence of model parameters is parametrized more realistically. Experimental and model parameter uncertainties and covariances are estimated in detail. Also, evaluated covariances are provided between all PFNS at different incident neutron energies. Selected evaluation results and first benchmark calculations using this evaluation are briefly discussed.

  13. INITIAL EVALUATION OF A PULSED WHITE SPECTRUM NEUTRON GENERATOR FOR EXPLOSIVE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    King, Michael J.; Miller, Gill T.; Reijonen, Jani; Ji, Qing; Andresen, Nord; Gicquel,, Frederic; Kavlas, Taneli; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Kwan, Joe

    2008-06-02

    Successful explosive material detection in luggage and similar sized containers is acritical issue in securing the safety of all airline passengers. Tensor Technology Inc. has recently developed a methodology that will detect explosive compounds with pulsed fast neutron transmission spectroscopy. In this scheme, tritium beams will be used to generate neutrons with a broad energy spectrum as governed by the T(t,2n)4He fission reaction that produces 0-9 MeV neutrons. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with Tensor Technology Inc., has designedand fabricated a pulsed white-spectrum neutron source for this application. The specifications of the neutron source are demanding and stringent due to the requirements of high yield and fast pulsing neutron emission, and sealed tube, tritium operation. In a unique co-axial geometry, the ion source uses ten parallel rf induction antennas to externally couple power into a toroidal discharge chamber. There are 20 ion beam extraction slits and 3 concentric electrode rings to shape and accelerate the ion beam into a titanium cone target. Fast neutron pulses are created by using a set ofparallel-plate deflectors switching between +-1500 volts and deflecting the ion beams across a narrow slit. The generator is expected to achieve 5 ns neutron pulses at tritium ion beam energies between 80 - 120 kV. First experiments demonstrated ion source operation and successful beam pulsing.

  14. A new neutron energy spectrum unfolding code using a two steps genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabinejad, H.; Hosseini, S. A.; Sohrabpour, M.

    2016-03-01

    A new neutron spectrum unfolding code TGASU (Two-steps Genetic Algorithm Spectrum Unfolding) has been developed to unfold the neutron spectrum from a pulse height distribution which was calculated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational Monte Carlo code. To perform the unfolding process, the response matrices were generated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational code. Both one step (common GA) and two steps GAs have been implemented to unfold the neutron spectra. According to the obtained results, the new two steps GA code results has shown closer match in all energy regions and particularly in the high energy regions. The results of the TGASU code have been compared with those of the standard spectra, LSQR method and GAMCD code. The results of the TGASU code have been demonstrated to be more accurate than that of the existing computational codes for both under-determined and over-determined problems.

  15. Investigation of the neutron spectrum of americium-beryllium sources by Bonner sphere spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, R.; Domingo, C.; Roberts, N.; Thomas, D. J.; Chiti, M.; Esposito, A.; Garcia, M. J.; Gentile, A.; Liu, Z. Z.; de-San-Pedro, M.

    2014-11-01

    Americium-beryllium neutron sources are certainly the most widely used in neutron dosimetry laboratories, basically due to their long half-life and their energy distribution, which covers the energy domain of interest for many applications in ambient and personal dosimetry. Nevertheless, the spectrum of this source depends on the materials and dimension of the capsule and on the amount and physical-chemical properties of the active material, thus affecting relevant quantities such as the spectrum-averaged fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficient. A EURAMET (European Association of National Metrology Institutes) project (n. 1104) was initiated to experimentally investigate how the neutron spectrum changes for different source sizes and encapsulations with a view to providing improved data for a planned revision of the ISO 8529 Standard Series. The experimental campaign was carried out in the low scatter facility at NPL. Here three different Bonner sphere spectrometers, BSSs, were exposed to the neutron fields produced by three different neutron sources formats: one X3 capsule (1 Ci) and two X14 capsules (10 Ci and 15 Ci). The specific advantage of the BSS is the large sensitivity to low-energy neutrons (E<0.1 MeV) which is the component expected to be most affected by the capsule-to-capsule variations and the component which is least well known. This paper summarises the results of the campaign with emphasis on (1) estimating the low-energy component of the Am-Be neutron spectrum, according to the encapsulation type; (2) evaluating the coherence between the Bonner spheres data and the previous studies performed with high-resolution spectrometers but limited in energy to E>0.1 MeV; (3) understanding whether the ISO-recommended Am-Be spectrum needs to be amended, and for which source formats.

  16. Bayesian calibration of reactor neutron flux spectrum using activation detectors measurements: Application to CALIBAN reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cartier, J.; Casoli, P.; Chappert, F.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present calibration methods in order to estimate reactor neutron flux spectrum and its uncertainties by using integral activation measurements. These techniques are performed using Bayesian and MCMC framework. These methods are applied to integral activation experiments in the cavity of the CALIBAN reactor. We estimate the neutron flux and its related uncertainties. The originality of this work is that these uncertainties take into account measurements uncertainties, cross-sections uncertainties and model error. In particular, our results give a very good approximation of the total flux and indicate that neutron flux from MCNP simulation for energies above about 5 MeV seems to overestimate the 'real flux'. (authors)

  17. T-T Neutron Spectrum from Inertial Confinement Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caggiano, Joseph; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Bacher, Andrew; McNabb, Denns

    2013-04-01

    Measurements of the T(2n,)^4He reaction (TT) have been conducted using high-purity tritium, gas-filled capsules in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. At the OMEGA laser facility, TT neutron spectra were measured using two instruments: the neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) facility and the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) facility. The resolutions of these systems were improved for nTOF by using a crystal with much faster decay time and for MRS by using a thinner, more uniform CD2 recoil foil. Measurements at c.m. energies of 10-30 keV can be used to study the TT three-body reaction mechanism near astrophysical energies. With both nTOF and MRS, we observe a small, narrow peak starting at the 9.44 MeV endpoint, corresponding to the n + ^5He (g.s.) reaction channel. Most of the TT reaction proceeds through other reaction channels which produce broad, continuous neutron spectra in the range 0 - 9.5 MeV. Implications for ICF experiments at the National Ignition Facility will be discussed. Work in collaboration with J. A. Frenje, D. T. Casey, M. J.-E. Manuel, N. Sinenian, A. B. Zylstra, F. H. Seguin, C. K. Li, R. D. Petrasso, V. Yu Glebov, P. B. Radha, D. D. Meyerhofer, T. C. Sangster, P. A. Amendt, R. Hatarik, D. B. Sayre, J. R. Rygg, H. W. Herrmann and Y. H. Kim.

  18. Sustainable Thorium Nuclear Fuel Cycles: A Comparison of Intermediate and Fast Neutron Spectrum Systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Feng, B.; Heidet, F.; Stauff, N.; Zhang, G.; Todosow, Michael; Worrall, Andrew; Gehin, Jess C.; Kim, T. K.; et al

    2015-05-21

    This paper presents analyses of possible reactor representations of a nuclear fuel cycle with continuous recycling of thorium and produced uranium (mostly U-233) with thorium-only feed. The analysis was performed in the context of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to develop a compendium of informative nuclear fuel cycle performance data. The objective of this paper is to determine whether intermediate spectrum systems, having a majority of fission events occurring with incident neutron energies between 1 eV and 105 eV, perform as well as fast spectrum systems in this fuel cycle. The intermediate spectrum options analyzed include tight lattice heavymore » or light water-cooled reactors, continuously refueled molten salt reactors, and a sodium-cooled reactor with hydride fuel. All options were modeled in reactor physics codes to calculate their lattice physics, spectrum characteristics, and fuel compositions over time. Based on these results, detailed metrics were calculated to compare the fuel cycle performance. These metrics include waste management and resource utilization, and are binned to accommodate uncertainties. The performance of the intermediate systems for this selfsustaining thorium fuel cycle was similar to a representative fast spectrum system. However, the number of fission neutrons emitted per neutron absorbed limits performance in intermediate spectrum systems.« less

  19. Sustainable Thorium Nuclear Fuel Cycles: A Comparison of Intermediate and Fast Neutron Spectrum Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Feng, B.; Heidet, F.; Stauff, N.; Zhang, G.; Todosow, Michael; Worrall, Andrew; Gehin, Jess C.; Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.

    2015-05-21

    This paper presents analyses of possible reactor representations of a nuclear fuel cycle with continuous recycling of thorium and produced uranium (mostly U-233) with thorium-only feed. The analysis was performed in the context of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to develop a compendium of informative nuclear fuel cycle performance data. The objective of this paper is to determine whether intermediate spectrum systems, having a majority of fission events occurring with incident neutron energies between 1 eV and 105 eV, perform as well as fast spectrum systems in this fuel cycle. The intermediate spectrum options analyzed include tight lattice heavy or light water-cooled reactors, continuously refueled molten salt reactors, and a sodium-cooled reactor with hydride fuel. All options were modeled in reactor physics codes to calculate their lattice physics, spectrum characteristics, and fuel compositions over time. Based on these results, detailed metrics were calculated to compare the fuel cycle performance. These metrics include waste management and resource utilization, and are binned to accommodate uncertainties. The performance of the intermediate systems for this selfsustaining thorium fuel cycle was similar to a representative fast spectrum system. However, the number of fission neutrons emitted per neutron absorbed limits performance in intermediate spectrum systems.

  20. Measurement of the neutron spectrum and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent from the small 252Cf source at 1 meter

    SciTech Connect

    Radev, R.

    2015-07-07

    NASA Langley Research Center requested a measurement of the neutron spectral distribution and fluence from the 252Cf source (model NS-120, LLNL serial # 7001677, referred as the SMALL Cf source) and determination of the ambient neutron dose rate equivalent and kerma at 100 cm for the Radiation Budget Instrument Experiment (Rad-X). The dosimetric quantities should be based on the neutron spectrum and the current neutron-to-dose conversion coefficients.

  1. PIN diode and neutron spectrum measurements at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, M.A.

    1994-12-01

    The Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) is a multi-faceted facility operating a Godiva type pulse reactor, housed in a low scatter aluminum silo 30m in diameter and 20m high. The reactor is movable to several locations and heights. Several well characterized exposure environments are available for experiments. When testing silicon devices against a nuclear threat, it is essential to consider the difference between the neutron energy spectrum of the threat environment and that of the test environment. In this paper, neutron spectrum measurements using the foil activation technique have been made in two widely varying environments. One is an extremely high neutron-to-gamma field and the other extremely low. These measurements were used to characterize the fields and to evaluate the use of the DN-156 PIN diode for measuring 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence in silicon ([Phi]1MeV(Si)). The agreement between the [Phi]1MeV(Si) as measured with diodes and as determined by the spectral measurements was within [+-] 5%. A proton recoil neutron spectrum measurement was also made in the low gamma environment.

  2. Determination of Neutron Spectrum by the Dosimetry Foil Method up to 37 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, S. P.; Bém, P.; Burjan, V.; Fischer, U.; Forrest, R. A.; Götz, M.; Honusek, M.; Kroha, V.; Novàk, J.; Šimečková, E.

    2009-08-01

    The dosimetry activation foil technique was used for the determination of a white neutron spectrum at the U120M cyclotron facility of NPI/Řež. The neutrons were produced by 37 MeV protons slowing down in the thick heavy water target and have an energy distribution extending up to 37 MeV. To cover the whole energy range a set of 10 foils Al, Ti, Fe, Co, Ni, Y, Nb, In, Lu, and Au was used. The γ-rays from the decaying nuclei produced in 26 activation reactions were detected. The cross sections for these reaction were chosen from European Activation File EAF-2007 (up to 55 MeV) after intercomparison with the dosimetry cross section library IRDF-2002 which represents the cross section only up to 20 MeV and other high energy libraries. For the spectrum determination the SAND-II code was used after it had been modified to input dosimetry cross sections above 20 MeV in an arbitrary group structure. The guessed neutron spectrum which is needed to start an adjustment procedure was combined from those measured and calculated by the MCNPX code. The uncertainty of the adjusted neutron spectrum was estimated using the uncertainties of measured specific γ-activities induced in nuclides and dosimetry cross sections. It is less than 10% in the energy range below 25 MeV, the sensitivity domain of the most dosimetry reactions, but increases above this energy.

  3. The neutron spectrum of the Hiroshima A-bomb and the Dosimetry System 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühm, W.; Kato, K.; Korschinek, G.; Morinaga, H.; Urban, A.; Zerle, L.; Nolte, E.

    1990-12-01

    The radioisotope 41Ca produced by the Hiroshima A-bomb in a gravestone 107 m from the hypocenter was measured with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at the Munich accelerator laboratory. The resonance integral for the reaction 40Ca(n,γ) 41Ca was determined to be Iγ = (0.22 ± 0.02) b. This, together with γ spectrometric data on 60Co, 152Eu and 154Eu and AMS data on 36Cl from the same gravestone permitted deduction of the neutron energy spectrum and fluence at this distance in Hiroshima. The derived spectrum is much harder than the spectrum used in the Dosimetry System 1986, DS86.

  4. Spectrum-luminosity dependence of radiation from the polar emitting regions in accreting magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkov, Dmitry

    2016-04-01

    The recent progress in observational techniques allowed one to probe the evolution of the X-ray spectrum in accreting pulsars (especially, of the cyclotron absorption line - the key spectral feature of accreting magnetized neutron stars) in great detail on various timescales, from pulse-to-pulse variability to secular trends. Particularly interesting are the discovered spectrum-luminosity correlations which are being used to infer the structure and physical characteristics of the pulsar's polar emitting region. I will present the latest developments in the modeling of the emitting structure (accretion column/mound/spot) aimed at explaining the observed spectrum-luminosity dependences.

  5. Dual Spectrum Neutron Radiography: Identification of Phase Transitions between Frozen and Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biesdorf, J.; Oberholzer, P.; Bernauer, F.; Kaestner, A.; Vontobel, P.; Lehmann, E. H.; Schmidt, T. J.; Boillat, P.

    2014-06-01

    In this Letter, a new approach to distinguish liquid water and ice based on dual spectrum neutron radiography is presented. The distinction is based on arising differences between the cross section of water and ice in the cold energy range. As a significant portion of the energy spectrum of the ICON beam line at Paul Scherrer Institut is in the thermal energy range, no differences can be observed with the entire beam. Introducing a polycrystalline neutron filter (beryllium) inside the beam, neutrons above its cutoff energy are filtered out and the cold energy region is emphasized. Finally, a contrast of about 1.6% is obtained with our imaging setup between liquid water and ice. Based on this measurement concept, the temporal evolution of the aggregate state of water can be investigated without any prior knowledge of its thickness. Using this technique, we could unambiguously prove the production of supercooled water inside fuel cells with a direct measurement method.

  6. Dual spectrum neutron radiography: identification of phase transitions between frozen and liquid water.

    PubMed

    Biesdorf, J; Oberholzer, P; Bernauer, F; Kaestner, A; Vontobel, P; Lehmann, E H; Schmidt, T J; Boillat, P

    2014-06-20

    In this Letter, a new approach to distinguish liquid water and ice based on dual spectrum neutron radiography is presented. The distinction is based on arising differences between the cross section of water and ice in the cold energy range. As a significant portion of the energy spectrum of the ICON beam line at Paul Scherrer Institut is in the thermal energy range, no differences can be observed with the entire beam. Introducing a polycrystalline neutron filter (beryllium) inside the beam, neutrons above its cutoff energy are filtered out and the cold energy region is emphasized. Finally, a contrast of about 1.6% is obtained with our imaging setup between liquid water and ice. Based on this measurement concept, the temporal evolution of the aggregate state of water can be investigated without any prior knowledge of its thickness. Using this technique, we could unambiguously prove the production of supercooled water inside fuel cells with a direct measurement method. PMID:24996112

  7. Low-mass fission detector for the fission neutron spectrum measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C Y; Henderson, R; Gostic, J; Haight, R C; Lee, H Y

    2010-10-20

    For the fission neutron spectrum measurement, the neutron energy is determined in a time-of-flight experiment by the time difference between the fission event and detection of the neutron. Therefore, the neutron energy resolution is directly determined by the time resolution of both neutron and fission detectors. For the fission detection, the detector needs not only a good timing response but also the tolerance of radiation damage and high {alpha}-decay rate. A parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) has many advantages for the detection of heavy charged particles such as fission fragments. These include fast timing, resistance to radiation damage, and tolerance of high counting rate. A PPAC also can be tuned to be insensitive to particles, which is important for experiments with - emitting actinides. Therefore, a PPAC is an ideal detector for experiments requiring a fast and clean trigger for fission. In the following sections, the description will be given for the design and performance of a new low-mass PPAC for the fission-neutron spectrum measurements at LANL.

  8. A neutron spectrum unfolding computer code based on artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Rodríguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.

    2014-02-01

    The Bonner Spheres Spectrometer consists of a thermal neutron sensor placed at the center of a number of moderating polyethylene spheres of different diameters. From the measured readings, information can be derived about the spectrum of the neutron field where measurements were made. Disadvantages of the Bonner system are the weight associated with each sphere and the need to sequentially irradiate the spheres, requiring long exposure periods. Provided a well-established response matrix and adequate irradiation conditions, the most delicate part of neutron spectrometry, is the unfolding process. The derivation of the spectral information is not simple because the unknown is not given directly as a result of the measurements. The drawbacks associated with traditional unfolding procedures have motivated the need of complementary approaches. Novel methods based on Artificial Intelligence, mainly Artificial Neural Networks, have been widely investigated. In this work, a neutron spectrum unfolding code based on neural nets technology is presented. This code is called Neutron Spectrometry and Dosimetry with Artificial Neural networks unfolding code that was designed in a graphical interface. The core of the code is an embedded neural network architecture previously optimized using the robust design of artificial neural networks methodology. The main features of the code are: easy to use, friendly and intuitive to the user. This code was designed for a Bonner Sphere System based on a 6LiI(Eu) neutron detector and a response matrix expressed in 60 energy bins taken from an International Atomic Energy Agency compilation. The main feature of the code is that as entrance data, for unfolding the neutron spectrum, only seven rate counts measured with seven Bonner spheres are required; simultaneously the code calculates 15 dosimetric quantities as well as the total flux for radiation protection purposes. This code generates a full report with all information of the unfolding in

  9. Calibration of the reactor neutron spectrum for the ko-NAA standardization using several approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučera, J.; Frána, J.; Horák, Z.; Marek, M.; Tomášek, F.; Viereibl, L.

    1999-01-01

    The parameters f and α ( f-thermal/epithermal neutron fluence rate, α—a parameter accounting for the non-ideality of the 1/E epithermal neutron fluence rate distribution) were determined using the following approaches: “Cd-covered multi-monitor” and “Cd-ratio for multimonitor” methods, two versions of the “bare multi-monitor” method, and two neutron dosimetry approaches, namely two-group formalism and reactor spectrum unfolding using the SAND II computer code. It has been found that the determination of α values close to zero is associated with a relatively high uncertainty. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that under these circumstances the uncertainty of α has only a little effect on the accuracy of results obtained by k0-NAA, especially for elements whose nuclides have a low resonance integral to thermal neutron cross section ratio.

  10. Neutron energy spectrum from 120 GeV protons on a thick copper target

    SciTech Connect

    Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Sanami, Toshiya; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Saito, Kiwamu; Ishibashi, Kenji; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Yukio; Lee, Hee-Seock; Ramberg, Erik; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    Neutron energy spectrum from 120 GeV protons on a thick copper target was measured at the Meson Test Beam Facility (MTBF) at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The data allows for evaluation of neutron production process implemented in theoretical simulation codes. It also helps exploring the reasons for some disagreement between calculation results and shielding benchmark data taken at high energy accelerator facilities, since it is evaluated separately from neutron transport. The experiment was carried out using a 120 GeV proton beam of 3E5 protons/spill. Since the spill duration was 4 seconds, protoninduced events were counted pulse by pulse. The intensity was maintained using diffusers and collimators installed in the beam line to MTBF. The protons hit a copper block target the size of which is 5cm x 5cm x 60 cm long. The neutrons produced in the target were measured using NE213 liquid scintillator detectors, placed about 5.5 m away from the target at 30{sup o} and 5 m 90{sup o} with respect to the proton beam axis. The neutron energy was determined by time-of-flight technique using timing difference between the NE213 and a plastic scintillator located just before the target. Neutron detection efficiency of NE213 was determined on basis of experimental data from the high energy neutron beam line at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron spectrum was compared with the results of multiparticle transport codes to validate the implemented theoretical models. The apparatus would be applied to future measurements to obtain a systematic data set for secondary particle production on various target materials.

  11. Measuring the neutron energy spectrum of laser-fusion targets with CR-39

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, S.M.

    1983-09-01

    We are developing a detector capable of measuring the neutron energy spectrum from a laser fusion target containing DT fuel. From such a spectrum the compressed areal density of the DT can be inferred by observing the fraction of 14.1 MeV neutrons down-shifted in energy by elastic scattering. The detector consists of a 0.1 cm thick Ta x-ray and debris shield backed by a 50 to 200 ..mu..m polyethylene radiator followed by layers of CR-39. The energy of each neutron producing a knock-on proton in the radiatior, that in turn creates a damage track in the CR-39, can be derived from the resultant track diameter, location, and orientation. We have analyzed the proton sensitivity and sample readability of 5 types of CR-39 in the energy range 3 to 11 MeV and have found a type fabricated by American Acrylics from a monomer made by a French company, Allymer, to be the most acceptable. Calibration curves were obtained for this plastic at energies of 3 to 15 MeV and dip angles ranging from 75 to 90/sup 0/. These curves were subsequently used to unfold a 14.7 MeV spectrum generated at the Livermore Rotating Target Neutron Source.

  12. Measurement of neutron dose with an organic liquid scintillator coupled with a spectrum weight function.

    PubMed

    Kim, E; Endo, A; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoshizawa, M; Nakamura, T

    2002-01-01

    A dose evaluation method for neutrons in the energy range of a few MeV to 100 MeV has been developed using a spectrum weight function (G-function), which is applied to an organic liquid scintillator of 12.7 cm in diameter and 12.7 cm in length. The G-function that converts the pulse height spectrum of the scintillator into the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), was calculated by an unfolding method using successive approximation of the response function of the scintillator and the ambient dose equivalent per unit neutron fluence (H*(10) conversion coefficients) of ICRP 74. To verify the response function of the scintillator and the value of H*(10) evaluated by the G-function. pulse height spectra of the scintillator were measured in some different neutron fields, which have continuous energy, monoenergetic and quasi-monoenergetic spectra. Values of H*(10) estimated using the G-function and pulse height spectra of the scintillator were compared with those calculated using neutron energy spectra. These doses agreed with each other. From the results, it was concluded that H*(10) can be evaluated directly from the pulse height spectrum of the scintillator by applying the G-function proposed in this study. PMID:12212900

  13. Temporal Changes in the Rigidity Spectrum of Forbush Decreases Based on Neutron Monitor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alania, M. V.; Wawrzynczak, A.; Sdobnov, V. E.; Kravtsova, M. V.

    2013-09-01

    The Forbush decrease (Fd) of the Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity and disturbances in the Earth's magnetic field generally take place simultaneously and are caused by the same phenomenon, namely a coronal mass ejection (CME) or a shock wave created after violent processes in the solar atmosphere. The magnetic cut-off rigidity of the Earth's magnetic field changes because of the disturbances, leading to additional changes in the GCR intensity observed by neutron monitors and muon telescopes. Therefore, one may expect distortion in the temporal changes in the power-law exponent of the rigidity spectrum calculated from neutron monitor data without correcting for the changes in the cut-off rigidity of the Earth's magnetic field. We compare temporal changes in the rigidity spectrum of Fds calculated from neutron monitor data corrected and uncorrected for the geomagnetic disturbances. We show some differences in the power-law exponent of the rigidity spectrum of Fds, particularly during large disturbances of the cut-off rigidity of the Earth's magnetic field. However, the general features of the temporal changes in the rigidity spectrum of Fds remain valid as they were found in our previous study. Namely, at the initial phase of the Fd, the rigidity spectrum is relatively soft and it gradually becomes hard up to the time of the minimum level of the GCR intensity. Then during the recovery phase of the Fd, the rigidity spectrum gradually becomes soft. This confirms that the structural changes of the interplanetary magnetic field turbulence in the range of frequencies of 10-6 - 10-5 Hz are generally responsible for the time variations in the rigidity spectrum we found during the Fds.

  14. Toward a fractal spectrum approach for neutron and gamma pulse shape discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming-Zhe; Liu, Bing-Qi; Zuo, Zhuo; Wang, Lei; Zan, Gui-Bin; Tuo, Xian-Guo

    2016-06-01

    Accurately selecting neutron signals and discriminating γ signals from a mixed radiation field is a key research issue in neutron detection. This paper proposes a fractal spectrum discrimination approach by means of different spectral characteristics of neutrons and γ rays. Figure of merit and average discriminant error ratio are used together to evaluate the discrimination effects. Different neutron and γ signals with various noise and pulse pile-up are simulated according to real data in the literature. The proposed approach is compared with the digital charge integration and pulse gradient methods. It is found that the fractal approach exhibits the best discrimination performance, followed by the digital charge integration method and the pulse gradient method, respectively. The fractal spectrum approach is not sensitive to high frequency noise and pulse pile-up. This means that the proposed approach has superior performance for effective and efficient anti-noise and high discrimination in neutron detection. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41274109), Sichuan Youth Science and Technology Innovation Research Team (2015TD0020), Scientific and Technological Support Program of Sichuan Province (2013FZ0022), and the Creative Team Program of Chengdu University of Technology.

  15. Measurements of the neutron spectrum in transit to Mars on the Mars Science Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Köhler, J; Ehresmann, B; Zeitlin, C; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R F; Hassler, D M; Reitz, G; Brinza, D E; Appel, J; Böttcher, S; Böhm, E; Burmeister, S; Guo, J; Lohf, H; Martin, C; Posner, A; Rafkin, S

    2015-04-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, containing the Curiosity rover, was launched to Mars on 26 November 2011. Although designed for measuring the radiation on the surface of Mars, the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) measured the radiation environment inside the spacecraft during most of the 253-day, 560-million-kilometer cruise to Mars. An important factor for determining the biological impact of the radiation environment inside the spacecraft is the specific contribution of neutrons with their high biological effectiveness. We apply an inversion method (based on a maximum-likelihood estimation) to calculate the neutron and gamma spectra from the RAD neutral particle measurements. The measured neutron spectrum (12-436 MeV) translates into a radiation dose rate of 3.8±1.2 μGy/day and a dose equivalent of 19±5 μSv/day. Extrapolating the measured spectrum (0.1-1000 MeV), we find that the total neutron-induced dose rate is 6±2 μGy/day and the dose equivalent rate is 30±10 μSv/day. For a 360 day round-trip from Earth to Mars with comparable shielding, this translates into a neutron induced dose equivalent of about 11±4 mSv. PMID:26177845

  16. Measurements of the neutron spectrum in transit to Mars on the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J.; Ehresmann, B.; Zeitlin, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Hassler, D. M.; Reitz, G.; Brinza, D. E.; Appel, J.; Böttcher, S.; Böhm, E.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Lohf, H.; Martin, C.; Posner, A.; Rafkin, S.

    2015-04-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, containing the Curiosity rover, was launched to Mars on 26 November 2011. Although designed for measuring the radiation on the surface of Mars, the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) measured the radiation environment inside the spacecraft during most of the 253-day, 560-million-kilometer cruise to Mars. An important factor for determining the biological impact of the radiation environment inside the spacecraft is the specific contribution of neutrons with their high biological effectiveness. We apply an inversion method (based on a maximum-likelihood estimation) to calculate the neutron and gamma spectra from the RAD neutral particle measurements. The measured neutron spectrum (12-436 MeV) translates into a radiation dose rate of 3.8 ± 1.2 μGy /day and a dose equivalent of 19 ± 5 μSv /day. Extrapolating the measured spectrum (0.1-1000 MeV), we find that the total neutron-induced dose rate is 6 ± 2 μGy /day and the dose equivalent rate is 30 ± 10 μSv /day. For a 360 day round-trip from Earth to Mars with comparable shielding, this translates into a neutron induced dose equivalent of about 11 ± 4 mSv.

  17. Updated neutron spectrum characterization of SNL baseline reactor environments. Volume 2, Analysis computer listings

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P.J.; Kelly, J.G.; Vehar, D.W.

    1994-04-01

    This document provides SAND-II and MANIPULATE output listings from calculations used to derive the new spectrum-averaged integral parameters that were reported in volume 1. When used in conjunction with volume 1, this document provides an audit trail for the neutron radiation field characterization and supports current quality assurance initiatives. This document provides detailed information on the neutron spectrum characteristics of the primary Sandia National Laboratories` (SNL) reactor environments. The information in this volume is not intended for the casual user of the SNL reactor facilities. This detailed characterization of the neutron and gamma environments at the Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR) and the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) is provided to aid the users who wish to convert the information given in the Radiation Metrology Laboratory (RML) dosimetry reports into other (non-silicon) measures of neutron damage. The spectra provided in these appendices can be used as a source term for Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations to study the impact of experimenter`s test package on the neutron environment.

  18. The determination of neutron energy spectrum in reactor core C1 of reactor VR-1 Sparrow

    SciTech Connect

    Vins, M.

    2008-07-15

    This contribution overviews neutron spectrum measurement, which was done on training reactor VR-1 Sparrow with a new nuclear fuel. Former nuclear fuel IRT-3M was changed for current nuclear fuel IRT-4M with lower enrichment of 235U (enrichment was reduced from former 36% to 20%) in terms of Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program. Neutron spectrum measurement was obtained by irradiation of activation foils at the end of pipe of rabit system and consecutive deconvolution of obtained saturated activities. Deconvolution was performed by computer iterative code SAND-II with 620 groups' structure. All gamma measurements were performed on Canberra HPGe. Activation foils were chosen according physical and nuclear parameters from the set of certificated foils. The Resulting differential flux at the end of pipe of rabit system agreed well with typical spectrum of light water reactor. Measurement of neutron spectrum has brought better knowledge about new reactor core C1 and improved methodology of activation measurement. (author)

  19. Updated neutron spectrum characterization of SNL baseline reactor environments. Volume 1, Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P.J.; Kelly, J.G.; Vehar, D.W.

    1994-04-01

    The neutron spectrum characteristics of the primary reactor environments are defined for use by facility customers and to provide an audit trail in support of current quality assurance initiatives. The neutron and gamma environments in the four primary customer environments at SPR-III and ACRR facilities are characterized in detail. Enough detail is provided on other frequently-used environments to support the definition of the 3-MeV and 1-MeV(Si) fluence provided on the Radiation Metrology Laboratory dosimetry reports.

  20. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  1. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  2. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and pR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Waugh, C. J.; Seguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; et al

    2014-10-10

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (ρR) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ~1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in themore » filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF« less

  3. A method to measure prompt fission neutron spectrum using gamma multiplicity tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, E.; Daskalakis, A.; Block, R. C.; Barry, D.; Danon, Y.

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve on current prompt fission neutron spectrum measurements, a gamma multiplicity tagging method was developed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Gearttner Linear Accelerator Center. This method involves using a coincidence requirement on an array of BaF2 gamma detectors to determine the timing of a fission event. This allows for much larger fission samples to be used due to the higher penetrability of gammas compared to fission fragments. Additionally, since the method relies on gammas as opposed to fission fragments, the effects of the low level discriminator, used in fission chambers to eliminate alpha events, are not seen. A 252Cf fission chamber was constructed in order to determine the viability of this method as well as the efficiency when compared to a fission chamber. The implemented multiple gamma tagging method was found to accurately reproduce the prompt fission neutron spectrum for the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and to detect 30% of fission events.

  4. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  5. Observation of variations in the T +T neutron spectrum with varying center-of-mass energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Zylstra, A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Forrest, C.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, T.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Sayre, D.; Caggiano, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Hatarik, R.; McNabb, D. P.; Pino, J. E.; Bacher, A.; Herrmann, H.; Kim, Y.; Bourgade, J.-. L.; Landoas, O.; Rosse, B.

    2014-10-01

    C. BRUNE, Ohio University - The T +T fusion reaction, which produces two neutrons and an alpha particle in a 3-body final state, has been studied in a series of direct-drive, T2-gas-filled thin (~3 μm) glass-capsule implosions at OMEGA. The shapes of the reaction product spectra are dictated by the final-state interactions between n- α (5He in the ground- and excited states) and n-n (di-neutron interaction). The theory behind final-state interactions is not well understood and detailed study of the reaction product spectra can teach us about the intricacies of the nuclear theory involved. In this presentation, measured neutron spectra are interpreted in terms of the sequential decay through 5He in the ground- and excited states. A clear energy dependence in relative reaction-channel strength at low center-of-mass energy (18-55 keV) is observed in the data. The role of the di-neutron interaction could be more clearly deduced through study of the alpha particle spectrum. In the presentation, we also identify steps required to successfully measure the T +T alpha spectrum in future experiments. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, NLUF, LLNL and LLE.

  6. Absolute integrated intensity and individual line parameters for the 6.2-micron band of NO2. [in solar spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Bonomo, F. S.; Williams, W. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Snider, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    The absolute integrated intensity of the 6.2-micron band of NO2 at 40 C was determined from quantitative spectra at about 10 per cm resolution by the spectral band model technique. A value of 1430 plus or minus 300 per sq cm per atm was obtained. Individual line parameters, positions, intensities, and ground-state energies were derived, and line-by-line calculations were compared with the band model results and with the quantitative spectra obtained at about 0.5 per cm resolution.

  7. Statistical and evaporation models for the neutron emission energy spectrum in the center-of-mass system from fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, T.; Talou, P.; Stetcu, I.; Chadwick, M. B.

    2013-09-01

    The neutron emission energy spectra in the CMS (center-of-mass) frame from two compound nuclei produced by fission are studied. The neutron spectra calculated with the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model are compared with the evaporation theory, and the definition of the temperature is revisited. Using the Monte Carlo technique we average the CMS neutron spectra from many fission fragments to construct the representative CMS spectrum from both the light and heavy fragments. The CMS spectra for each fission fragment pair are also converted into the laboratory frame to calculate the total prompt fission neutron spectrum that can be observed experimentally. This is compared to measured laboratory data for thermal neutron induced fission on 235U. We show that the Hauser-Feshbach calculation gives a different spectrum shape than the Madland-Nix model calculation.

  8. Measurement of low energy neutron spectrum below 10 keV with the slowing down time method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, F.; Oyama, Y.

    1996-02-01

    No general-purpose method of neutron spectrum measurement in the energy region around eV has been established so far. Neutron spectrum measurement in this energy region was attempted by applying the slowing down time (SDT) method, for the first time, inside two types of shield for fusion reactors, type 316 stainless steel (SS316) and SS316/water layered assemblies, incorporating with pulsed neutrons. In the SS316 assembly, neutron spectra below 1 keV were measured with an accuracy less than 10%. Although application of the SDT method was expected very difficult for SS316/water assembly since it contained lightest atoms of hydrogen, the measurement demonstrated that the SDT method was still effective for such shield assembly. The SDT method was also extended to thermal flux measurement in the SS316/water assembly. The present study demonstrated that the SDT method was effective for neutron spectrum measurement in the energy region around eV.

  9. The sup 252 Cf(sf) neutron spectrum in the 5- to 20-MeV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, H.; Richter, D.; Seeliger, D. ); Fromm, W.D. ); Bottger, R.; Klein, H. )

    1990-11-01

    This paper reports on the {sup 252}Cf neutron spectrum measured at high energies with a miniature ionization chamber and two different NE-213 neutron detectors. The gamma-ray background and the main cosmic background caused by muons were suppressed by applying efficient pulse-shape discrimination. On the basis of two-dimensional spectroscopy of the neutron time-of-flight and scintillation pulse height, the sliding bias method is used to minimize experimental uncertainties. The experimental data, corrected for several systematic influences, confirm earlier results that show negative deviations from a reference Maxwellian distribution with a 1.42-MeV spectrum temperature for neutron energies above 6 MeV. Experimental results of this work are compared with various statistical model approaches to the {sup 252}Cf(sf) neutron spectrum.

  10. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, C. J.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-05-27

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  11. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Waugh, C. J.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-05-27

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition,more » comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.« less

  12. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, C. J. Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-05-15

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  13. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors.

    PubMed

    Waugh, C J; Rosenberg, M J; Zylstra, A B; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Sangster, T C; Stoeckl, C

    2015-05-01

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule. PMID:26026524

  14. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waugh, C. J.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-05-01

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  15. Measurements of the neutron spectrum on the Martian surface with MSL/RAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Ehresmann, B.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Hassler, D. M.; Reitz, G.; Brinza, D. E.; Weigle, G.; Appel, J.; Böttcher, S.; Böhm, E.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Martin, C.; Posner, A.; Rafkin, S.; Kortmann, O.

    2014-03-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity, measures the energetic charged and neutral particles and the radiation dose rate on the surface of Mars. An important factor for determining the biological impact of the Martian surface radiation is the specific contribution of neutrons, with their deeper penetration depth and ensuing high biological effectiveness. This is very difficult to measure quantitatively, resulting in considerable uncertainties in the total radiation dose. In contrast to charged particles, neutral particles (neutrons and gamma rays) are generally only measured indirectly. Measured spectra are a complex convolution of the incident particle spectrum with the detector response function and must be unfolded. We apply an inversion method (based on a maximum likelihood estimation) to calculate the neutron and gamma spectra from the RAD neutral particle measurements. Here we show the first spectra on the surface of Mars and compare them to theoretical predictions. The measured neutron spectrum (ranging from 8 to 740 MeV) translates into a radiation dose rate of 14±4μGy/d and a dose equivalent rate of 61±15μSv/d. This corresponds to 7% of the measured total surface dose rate and 10% of the biologically relevant surface dose equivalent rate on Mars. Measuring the Martian neutron and gamma spectra is an essential step for determining the mutagenic influences to past or present life at or beneath the Martian surface as well as the radiation hazard for future human exploration, including the shielding design of a potential habitat.

  16. Measurement of the Absolute Elastic and Inelastic Differential Neutron Cross Sections for 23Na between 2 and 4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay; McEllistrem, M. T.; Crider, B. P.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estevez, F. M.; Chakraborty, A.; Yates, S. W.; Sigillito, A.; McDonough, P. J.; Kersting, L. J.; Luke, C. J.; Hicks, S. F.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2011-10-01

    Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering angular distributions for 23Na sample were measured at the University of Kentucky using the time-of-flight (ToF) technique, between 2 and 4 MeV incident neutron energies.Normalization of yields into scattering cross sections was accomplished by comparison of Na yields to the yields obtained from hydrogen in polyethylene samples via the well-known n-p scattering cross sections.The 3H(p,n) differential cross sections are used to determine the energy-dependent efficiency of the main detector. Because the efficiency of this detector appears as a ratio in the comparison of scattered yields from different samples, the absolute values of the 3H(p,n) cross sections are not critical, but their energy dependence is. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE contract no. DE-AC07-051D14517.

  17. Measuring Neutron Spectrum at MIT Research Reactor Utilizing He-3 Bonner Cylinder Approach with an Unfolding Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leder, Alexander; Ricochet Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Ricochet experiment seeks to measure Coherent (neutral-current) Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering (CENNS) using dark matter style detectors placed near a neutrino source, possibly the MIT research reactor (MITR), which offers a high continuous neutrino flux at high energies. Currently, Ricochet is characterizing the backgrounds at MITR. The main background is the neutrons emitted simultaneously from the core. To characterize this background, we wrapped a Bonner cylinder around a 3He thermal neutron detector, whose data was then unfolded to produce a neutron energy spectrum across several orders of magnitude. We discuss the resulting spectrum as well its implications for deploying Ricochet in the future.

  18. The lunar neutron energy spectrum inferred from the isotope compositions of rare-earth elements and hafnium in Apollo samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albalat, Emmanuelle; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Telouk, Philippe; Albarède, Francis

    2015-11-01

    The isotopic abundances of Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Yb, and Hf have been measured in nine lunar samples by MC-ICP-MS. The data were corrected for both instrumental mass bias and natural isotope fractionation. We used the data to calculate the total flux and energy spectrum of the neutrons absorbed by the rocks. We write the constitutive equations of the isotopic changes for these elements induced by neutrons and solve the inverse problem by computing local energy averages. Resonant absorption peaks can be used as convenient kernels to define the spectrum of epithermal neutrons. We find that 149Sm and 157Gd anomalies correlate with neutron flux density for E < 0.015 eV (r2 > 0.98) and E ≈ 0.13 eV (r2 > 0.85), while no significant correlation exists between the ratio of these anomalies and the epithermal/thermal flux ratio at any value of energy. Neutron flux density variations can be used to trace the proportions of neutrons scattered out of the samples. The spectrum in the thermal region follows the expected E - 1 / 2 dependence but with 'notches' corresponding to neutron absorption. A major notch at the lowest end of the epithermal neutron spectrum (0.2-0.8 eV) is possibly due to absorption of neutrons by 151Eu, 167Er, and 149Sm. In general, we find a rather good correlation between the neutron flux density at specific energies and the exposure age, which suggests a mean residence time of the samples at the surface of the regolith of 2-300 Ma. Another correlation of epithermal neutrons with sample wt% FeO + TiO2 is consistent with orbital reflectance observations.

  19. Time dependent Monte Carlo calculations of the ORELA (Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator) target neutron spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, S.N.; Perey, F.G.

    1990-01-01

    The time dependent spectrum of neutrons in the water-moderated Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) target has been calculated using a modified version of the MORSE multi-group Monte Carlo code with an analytic hydrogen scattering model. Distributions of effective neutron distance traversed in the target are estimated with a time and energy dependent algorithm from the leakage normal to the target face. These data are used in the resonance shaped analyses of time-of-flight cross section measurements to account for the experimental resolution function. The 20 MeV--10 eV energy range is adequately represented in the MORSE code by the 174 group VITAMIN-E cross section library with a P{sub 5} expansion. An approximate representation of the ORELA positron source facility, recently installed near the target, has been included in the calculations to determine any perturbations the positron source might create in the computed neutron distributions from the target. A series of coupled Monte Carlo calculations was performed from the target to the positron source and back to the target using a next-event estimation surface source for each step. The principal effect of the positron source was found to be an increase in the distance for the lower energy neutron spectra, producing no real change in the distributions where the ORELA source is utilized for experiments. Different configurations for the target were investigated in order to simulate the placement of a shadow bar in the neutron beam. These beam configurations included neutrons escaping from : (1) the central tantalum plates only, (2) the entire target with the tantalum plates blocked out, and (3) only a small area from the water. Comparisons of the current data with previous calculations having a less detailed model of the tantalum plates have been satisfactory. 10 refs.

  20. Multi-purpose fast neutron spectrum analyzer with real-time signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulyaev, Yu. S.; Puryga, E. A.; Khilchenko, A. D.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Burdakov, A. V.; Grishnyaev, E. V.

    2013-08-01

    Diagnostics of hot ion component of plasma on the products of fusion reactions is widely used on thermonuclear facilities. In case of employment of neutron spectrometers, based on organics scintillators, there is advanced technique developed to eliminate neutron pulses from gamma background—digital pulse shape discrimination. For every DPSD application it is necessary to use the fast (2-5 ns) and precise (12 bit) transient ADC unit with large amount of onboard memory for storing every digitized scintillation pulses during shot time. At present time the duration of hot thermonuclear plasma burning in large tokamaks approximate to 1 min, and this requires very high onboard memory capacity (˜100 GB). This paper describes a neutron spectrum analyzer with real-time DPSD algorithm, implemented to ADC unit. This approach saves about two orders of onboard memory capacity, gives the possibility of instant use of outcome to feedback systems. This analyzer was tested and calibrated with help of 60Co and 252Cf radiation sources, and deuterium neutron generator.

  1. Unfolding the neutron spectrum of a NE213 scintillator using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Sharghi Ido, A; Bonyadi, M R; Etaati, G R; Shahriari, M

    2009-10-01

    Artificial neural networks technology has been applied to unfold the neutron spectra from the pulse height distribution measured with NE213 liquid scintillator. Here, both the single and multi-layer perceptron neural network models have been implemented to unfold the neutron spectrum from an Am-Be neutron source. The activation function and the connectivity of the neurons have been investigated and the results have been analyzed in terms of the network's performance. The simulation results show that the neural network that utilizes the Satlins transfer function has the best performance. In addition, omitting the bias connection of the neurons improve the performance of the network. Also, the SCINFUL code is used for generating the response functions in the training phase of the process. Finally, the results of the neural network simulation have been compared with those of the FORIST unfolding code for both (241)Am-Be and (252)Cf neutron sources. The results of neural network are in good agreement with FORIST code. PMID:19586776

  2. Reaction Rate Measurement at the Californium User Facility (CUF) for unfolding the neutron spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannan, Mohammad; Ortega, Ruben

    2011-03-01

    Neutron Activation Analysis was used to determine Reaction Rate measurement of several activation detectors at the ORNL Californium User Facility (CUF). The irradiations were performed with 34 mg Cf 252 neutron source strength.. Ten source capsules > 34 mgwerepositionedconcentricallyaroundasamplecavity . Wehavedeterminedabsoluteactivityperatomof 9 detectors : Au 197 (n , γ) Au 198 , Al 27 (n , α) Na 24 , Al 27 (n , p) Mg 27 , Fe 56 (n , p) Mn 5 , Fe 54 (n , p) Mn 54 , In 115 (n , γ) In 116 , Ti 46 (n , p) Sc 46 , Ni 60 (n , p) Co 60 , Fe 58 (n , γ) Fe 59 . Theerrorsarewithin 1.5 - 8 60 and Fe 58 have errors of 46% and 32 %. These high errors may be attributed to the counting statistics. These reaction rate values will be used to unfold the neutron spectrum of the CUF using the MAXED 2000, a computer code for the de convolution of multi sphere neutron spectrometer data and the results are discussed. The authors acknowledge help, advise, and using facility at ORNL-CUF to Dr. Rodger martin and Mr. David C. Galsgow.

  3. The MRSt for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C.; Seguin, F.; Petrasso, R.; Hilsabeck, T.; Kilkenny, J.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C.

    2015-11-01

    Information about the time evolution of inertial-confinement-fusion fuel assembly and hot-spot formation can be obtained with the next-generation Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometers for ICF applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and ρR -Ti trajectory during burn. As the peak burn generally occurs before and after peak compression in failed and ignited implosions, respectively, an MRSt measurement of the relative timing of these events will be critical for assessing implosion dynamics. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, LLNL and LLE.

  4. Measurement of the T + T neutron spectrum using the national ignition facility.

    PubMed

    Sayre, D B; Brune, C R; Caggiano, J A; Glebov, V Y; Hatarik, R; Bacher, A D; Bleuel, D L; Casey, D T; Cerjan, C J; Eckart, M J; Fortner, R J; Frenje, J A; Friedrich, S; Gatu-Johnson, M; Grim, G P; Hagmann, C; Knauer, J P; Kline, J L; McNabb, D P; McNaney, J M; Mintz, J M; Moran, M J; Nikroo, A; Phillips, T; Pino, J E; Remington, B A; Rowley, D P; Schneider, D H; Smalyuk, V A; Stoeffl, W; Tipton, R E; Weber, S V; Yeamans, C B

    2013-08-01

    Neutron time-of-flight spectra from inertial confinement fusion experiments with tritium-filled targets have been measured at the National Ignition Facility. These spectra represent a significant improvement in energy resolution and statistics over previous measurements, and afford the first definitive observation of a peak resulting from sequential decay through the ground state of (5)He at low reaction energies E(c.m.) 100 spectrum, we have developed an R-matrix model that accounts for interferences from fermion symmetry and intermediate states, and show these effects to be non-negligible. We also find the spectrum can be described by sequential decay through ℓ=1 states in (5)He, which differs from previous interpretations. PMID:23952390

  5. Evaluated Mean Values and Covariances for the Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum of 239Pu induced by neutrons of 500 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Neudecker, Denise

    2014-07-10

    This document provides the numerical values of the evaluated prompt fission neutron spectrum for 239Pu induced by neutrons of 500 keV as well as relative uncertainties and correlations. This document also contains a short description how these data were obtained and shows plots comparing the evaluated results to experimental information as well as the corresponding ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation.

  6. Evaluating the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz-Rodriguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Solis Sanches, L. O.; Miranda, R. Castaneda; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.

    2013-07-03

    In this work the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks is evaluated. The first one code based on traditional iterative procedures and called Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry from the Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas (NSDUAZ) use the SPUNIT iterative algorithm and was designed to unfold neutron spectrum and calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and 7 IAEA survey meters. The main feature of this code is the automated selection of the initial guess spectrum trough a compendium of neutron spectrum compiled by the IAEA. The second one code known as Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry with artificial neural networks (NDSann) is a code designed using neural nets technology. The artificial intelligence approach of neural net does not solve mathematical equations. By using the knowledge stored at synaptic weights on a neural net properly trained, the code is capable to unfold neutron spectrum and to simultaneously calculate 15 dosimetric quantities, needing as entrance data, only the rate counts measured with a Bonner spheres system. Similarities of both NSDUAZ and NSDann codes are: they follow the same easy and intuitive user's philosophy and were designed in a graphical interface under the LabVIEW programming environment. Both codes unfold the neutron spectrum expressed in 60 energy bins, calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and generate a full report in HTML format. Differences of these codes are: NSDUAZ code was designed using classical iterative approaches and needs an initial guess spectrum in order to initiate the iterative procedure. In NSDUAZ, a programming routine was designed to calculate 7 IAEA instrument survey meters using the fluence-dose conversion coefficients. NSDann code use artificial neural networks for solving the ill-conditioned equation system of neutron spectrometry problem through synaptic weights of a properly trained neural network. Contrary to iterative procedures, in neural

  7. Evaluating the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Rodríguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Solís Sánches, L. O.; Miranda, R. Castañeda; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.

    2013-07-01

    In this work the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks is evaluated. The first one code based on traditional iterative procedures and called Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry from the Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas (NSDUAZ) use the SPUNIT iterative algorithm and was designed to unfold neutron spectrum and calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and 7 IAEA survey meters. The main feature of this code is the automated selection of the initial guess spectrum trough a compendium of neutron spectrum compiled by the IAEA. The second one code known as Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry with artificial neural networks (NDSann) is a code designed using neural nets technology. The artificial intelligence approach of neural net does not solve mathematical equations. By using the knowledge stored at synaptic weights on a neural net properly trained, the code is capable to unfold neutron spectrum and to simultaneously calculate 15 dosimetric quantities, needing as entrance data, only the rate counts measured with a Bonner spheres system. Similarities of both NSDUAZ and NSDann codes are: they follow the same easy and intuitive user's philosophy and were designed in a graphical interface under the LabVIEW programming environment. Both codes unfold the neutron spectrum expressed in 60 energy bins, calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and generate a full report in HTML format. Differences of these codes are: NSDUAZ code was designed using classical iterative approaches and needs an initial guess spectrum in order to initiate the iterative procedure. In NSDUAZ, a programming routine was designed to calculate 7 IAEA instrument survey meters using the fluence-dose conversion coefficients. NSDann code use artificial neural networks for solving the ill-conditioned equation system of neutron spectrometry problem through synaptic weights of a properly trained neural network. Contrary to iterative procedures, in neural

  8. Characteristics and application of spherical-type activation detectors in neutron spectrum measurements at a boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Heng-Xiao; Chen, Wei-Lin; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2016-03-01

    A set of spherical-type activation detectors was developed aiming to provide better determination of the neutron spectrum at the Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR) BNCT facility. An activation foil embedded in a specially designed spherical holder exhibits three advantages: (1) minimizing the effect of neutron angular dependence, (2) creating response functions with broadened coverage of neutron energies by introducing additional moderators or absorbers to the central activation foil, and (3) reducing irradiation time because of improved detection efficiencies to epithermal neutron beam. This paper presents the design concept and the calculated response functions of new detectors. Theoretical and experimental demonstrations of the performance of the detectors are provided through comparisons of the unfolded neutron spectra determined using this method and conventional multiple-foil activation techniques.

  9. Use of new threshold detectors 93Nb(n, n') 93mNb and 199Hg(n, n') 199mHg for neutron spectrum unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Kiyoshi

    1982-10-01

    The feasibility of using new threshold detectors 39Nb(n, n') 93mNb and 199Hg(n, n') 199mHg was examined. The neutron spectrum YAYOI glory-hole was unfolded with 13 reaction rates including the 93Nb(n, n') 93mNb or the 199Hg(n, n') 199mHg reaction rate characteristic neutron flux density values (total, above 1 and 0.1 MeV) were calculated from the best estimate for the input spectrum and from the unfolded neutron spectrum. The characteristic neutron flux density values calculated from the input spectrum were about 20% smaller than those calculated from the output neutron spectrum. The neutron flux density values calculated from the neutron spectrum unfolded with 13 reaction rates including the 93Nb(n, n') 93mNb reaction rate were about 5 to 10% higher than those rate, the characteristic neutron flux density values were about 1 to 3% smaller than those calculated from the neutron spectrum unfolded without the 199Hg(n, n') 199mHg reaction rate. These new threshold detectors were successfully used for neutron spectrum unfolding with the SAND II code.

  10. Energy spectrum and flux of 3- to 20-Mev neutrons and 1- to 10-Mev gamma rays in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpar, D. M.; Lockwood, J. A.; Saint Onge, R. N.; Friling, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    An experiment is described which was designed to measure the neutron and gamma ray energy spectrums and fluxes in the energy intervals 3 to 20 MeV and 1 to 10 MeV, respectively. In addition, from the 3 to 20-MeV proton recoil spectrums it is possible to infer the shape of the neutron energy spectrum from 20 to 50 MeV. The detecting system utilized a separate charged particle rejection scheme and a two-parameter display system for the output from the pulse shape discrimination which separated gamma rays from neutrons (n). Two long-duration flights were made with this detector in 1970 at Palestine, Tex. (P sub c = 4.6 Gv) and at Ft. Churchill, Canada (P sub c = 0.3 Gv).

  11. Application of the BINS superheated drop detector spectrometer to the {sup 9}Be(p,xn) neutron energy spectrum determination

    SciTech Connect

    Di Fulvio, A.; Ciolini, R.; Mirzajani, N.; Romei, C.; D'Errico, F.; Bedogni, R.; Esposito, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Colautti, P.

    2013-07-18

    In the framework of TRASCO-BNCT project, a Bubble Interactive Neutron Spectrometer (BINS) device was applied to the characterization of the angle-and energy-differential neutron spectra generated by the {sup 9}Be(p,xn)reaction. The BINS spectrometer uses two superheated emulsion detectors, sequentially operated at different temperatures and thus provides a series of six sharp threshold responses, covering the 0.1-10 MeV neutron energy range. Spectrum unfolding of the data was performed by means of MAXED code. The obtained angle, energy-differential spectra were compared with those measured with a Bonner sphere spectrometer, a silicon telescope spectrometer and literature data.

  12. Event-by-event evaluation of the prompt fission neutron spectrum from 239Pu(n,f)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, R.; Randrup, J.; Brown, D. A.; Descalle, M. A.; Ormand, W. E.

    2012-02-01

    Earlier studies of 239Pu(n,f) have been extended to incident neutron energies up to 20 MeV within the framework of the event-by-event fission model FREYA, into which we have incorporated multichance fission and pre-equilibrium neutron emission. The main parameters controlling prompt fission neutron evaporation have been identified and the prompt fission neutron spectrum has been analyzed by fitting those parameters to the average neutron multiplicity ν¯ from ENDF-B/VII.0, including the energy-energy correlations in the covariance of ν¯(E) obtained by fitting to the experimental ν¯ data used in the ENDF-B/VII.0 evaluation. We present our results, discuss relevant tests of this new evaluation, and describe possible further improvements.

  13. Comparison of HEU and LEU Fuel Neutron Spectrum for ATR Fuel Element and ATR Flux-Trap Positions

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang

    2008-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power and high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the high total core power and high neutron flux, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. An optimized low-enriched uranium (LEU) (U-10Mo) core conversion case, which can meet the project requirements, has been selected. However, LEU contains a significant quantity of high density U-238 (80.3 wt.%), which will harden the neutron spectrum in the core region. Based on the reference ATR HEU and the optimized LEU full core plate-by-plate (PBP) models, the present work investigates and compares the neutron spectra differences in the fuel element (FE), Northeast flux trap (NEFT), Southeast flux trap (SEFT), and East flux trap (EFT) positions. A detailed PBP MCNP ATR core model was developed and validated for fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. The current ATR core with HEU U 235 enrichment of 93.0wt.% was used as the reference model. Each HEU fuel element contains 19 fuel plates with a fuel meat thickness of 0.508 mm (20 mil). In this work, an optimized LEU (U-10Mo) core conversion case with a nominal fuel meat thickness of 0.330 mm (13 mil) and the U-235 enrichment of 19.7 wt.% was used to calculate the impact of the neutron spectrum in FE and FT positions. MCNP-calculated results show that the neutron spectrum in the LEU FE is slightly harder than in the HEU FE, as expected. However, when neutrons transport through water coolant and beryllium (Be), the neutrons are thermalized to an equilibrium neutron spectrum as a function of water volume fraction in the investigated FT positions. As a result, the neutron spectrum differences of the HEU and LEU in the NEFT, SEFT, and EFT are negligible. To demonstrate that the LEU core fuel cycle performance can meet the

  14. Genetic algorithms - A new technique for solving the neutron spectrum unfolding problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, David W.; Ray Edwards, D.; Bolon, Albert E.

    1999-04-01

    A new technique utilizing genetic algorithms has been applied to the Bonner sphere neutron spectrum unfolding problem. Genetic algorithms are part of a relatively new field of "evolutionary" solution techniques that mimic living systems with computer-simulated "chromosome" solutions. Solutions mate and mutate to create better solutions. Several benchmark problems, considered representative of radiation protection environments, have been evaluated using the newly developed UMRGA code which implements the genetic algorithm unfolding technique. The results are compared with results from other well-established unfolding codes. The genetic algorithm technique works remarkably well and produces solutions with relatively high spectral qualities. UMRGA appears to be a superior technique in the absence of a priori data - it does not rely on "lucky" guesses of input spectra. Calculated personnel doses associated with the unfolded spectra match benchmark values within a few percent.

  15. Measurements of the Neutron Spectrum n the Tevatron Tunnel with Application to the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    McCaslin, Joseph B.; Swanson, William P.; Groon, Donald E.; Elias, John; Freeman, William S.; Elwyn, Alexander; Yurista, Peder; /Fermilab

    1985-01-01

    This is an agreement between Fermilab and the experimenters to carry out an experiment to determine the radiation background in the Tevatron tunnel. The goal will be to determine the spectrum of neutrons in the tunnel while the Tevatron is operating (while gating all effects of the Main Ring ltout U) and for the Main Ring plus Tevatron (no gating). The detectors will also give information on the flux of charged particles near the Tevatron. The purpose is to obtain information on radiation fields in the tunnel in order to estimate possible radiation effects on equipment in such an environment. These data will be useful in desiqning the SSC tunnel and in assessing detector backgrounds. A preliminary description of the experiment is given in a memorandum from J.B. McCaslin to M. Tiqner, dated July 11, 1985, which is attached as Appendix I.

  16. Cumulative fission yields of short-lived isotopes under natural-abundance-boron-carbide-moderated neutron spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, Erin C.; Metz, Lori A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Pierson, Bruce; Wittman, Richard S.; Friese, Judah I.; Kephart, Rosara F.

    2015-04-09

    The availability of gamma spectroscopy data on samples containing mixed fission products at short times after irradiation is limited. Due to this limitation, data interpretation methods for gamma spectra of mixed fission product samples, where the individual fission products have not been chemically isolated from interferences, are not well-developed. The limitation is particularly pronounced for fast pooled neutron spectra because of the lack of available fast reactors in the United States. Samples containing the actinide isotopes 233, 235, 238U, 237Np, and 239Pu individually were subjected to a 2$ pulse in the Washington State University 1 MW TRIGA reactor. To achieve a fission-energy neutron spectrum, the spectrum was tailored using a natural abundance boron carbide capsule to absorb neutrons in the thermal and epithermal region of the spectrum. Our tailored neutron spectrum is unique to the WSU reactor facility, consisting of a soft fission spectrum that contains some measurable flux in the resonance region. This results in a neutron spectrum at greater than 0.1 keV with an average energy of 70 keV, similar to fast reactor spectra and approaching that of 235U fission. Unique fission product gamma spectra were collected from 4 minutes to 1 week after fission using single-crystal high purity germanium detectors. Cumulative fission product yields measured in the current work generally agree with published fast pooled fission product yield values from ENDF/B-VII, though a bias was noted for 239Pu. The present work contributes to the compilation of energy-resolved fission product yield nuclear data for nuclear forensic purposes.

  17. Preliminary On-Orbit Neutron Dose Equivalent and Energy Spectrum Results from the ISS-RAD Fast Neutron Detector (FND)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semones, Edward; Leitgab, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The ISS-RAD instrument was activated on ISS on February 1st, 2016. Integrated in ISS-RAD, the Fast Neutron Detector (FND) performs, for the first time on ISS, routine and precise direct neutron measurements between 0.5 and 8 MeV. Preliminary results for neutron dose equivalent and neutron flux energy distributions from online/on-board algorithms and offline ground analyses will be shown, along with comparisons to simulated data and previously measured neutron spectral data. On-orbit data quality and pre-launch analysis validation results will be discussed as well.

  18. Small angle neutron scattering on an absolute intensity scale and the internal surface of diatom frustules from three species of differing morphologies.

    PubMed

    Garvey, C J; Strobl, M; Percot, A; Saroun, J; Haug, J; Vyverman, W; Chepurnov, V A; Ferris, J M

    2013-05-01

    The internal nanostructure of the diatoms Cyclotella meneghiniana, Seminavis robusta and Achnanthes subsessilis was investigated using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to examine thin biosilica samples, consisting of isotropic (powder) from their isolated cell walls. The interpretation of SANS data was assisted by several other measurements. The N2 adsorption, interpreted within the Branuer-Emmet-Teller isotherm, yielded the specific surface area of the material. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy indicates that the isolated material is amorphous silica with small amounts of organic cell wall materials acting as a filling material between the silica particles. A two-phase (air and amorphous silica) model was used to interpret small angle neutron scattering data. After correction for instrumental resolution, the measurements on two SANS instruments covered an extended range of scattering vectors 0.0011 nm(-1) < q < 5.6 nm(-1), giving an almost continuous SANS curve over a range of scattering vectors, q, on an absolute scale of intensity for each sample. Each of the samples gave a characteristic scattering curve where log (intensity) versus log (q) has a -4 dependence, with other features superimposed. In the high-q regime, departure from this behaviour was observed at a length-scales equivalent to the proposed unitary silica particle. The limiting Porod scattering law was used to determine the specific area per unit of volume of each sample illuminated by the neutron beam. The Porod behaviour, and divergence from this behaviour, is discussed in terms of various structural features and the proposed mechanisms for the bio-assembly of unitary silica particles in frustules. PMID:23377745

  19. Study of the fission spectrum of less than 1 MeV neutrons using a Lithium-glass detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastola, Suraj; Rees, Lawrence; Bart, Czirr

    2011-10-01

    The fission spectrum of neutrons with kinetic energies less than 1 MeV is of considerable practical importance for the design of nuclear reactors. However, it is not as precisely known as that for higher energy neutrons. One of the major problems scientists have previously encountered is room return neutrons. These are neutrons that reflect from the walls, ceiling or floor of the lab. Another problem is finding a way to measure accurately the neutron time of flight. This is the time neutrons take to travel from a fission event to the detector. Time of flight is used to measure the neutron energy. To avoid the room return, I am going to perform an experiment about 45 feet above the ground in the BYU Indoor Practice Facility, so that neutrons from the source will not scatter from nearby surfaces and return to the detector. To find the time of flight to a greater accuracy, I have been using a Time to Amplitude Converter (TAC). A TAC has a capacitor that charges linearly as the voltage builds up. With a 12-bit digitizer system, we can measure the time to 0.1 nanoseconds, whereas the same digitizer can only measure time in steps of 4 nanoseconds. So, we will get a more accurate measurement of time of flight with the TAC.

  20. Neutron spectrum measurements at a radial beam port of the NUR research reactor using a Bonner spheres spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Mazrou, H; Nedjar, A; Seguini, T

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes the measurement campaign held around the neutron radiography (NR) facility of the Algerian 1MW NUR research reactor. The main objective of this work is to characterize accurately the neutron beam provided at one of the radial channels of the NUR research reactor taking benefit of the acquired CRNA Bonner spheres spectrometer (BSS). The specific objective was to improve the image quality of the NR facility. The spectrometric system in use is based on a central spherical (3)He thermal neutron proportional counter combined with high density polyethylene spheres of different diameters ranging from 3 to 12in. This counting system has good gamma ray discrimination and is able to cover an energy range from thermal to 20MeV. The measurements were performed at the sample distance of 0.6m from the beam port and at a height of 1.2m from the facility floor. During the BSS measurements, the reactor was operating at low power (100W) to avoid large dead times, pulse pileup and high level radiation exposures, in particular, during spheres handling. Thereafter, the neutron spectrum at the sample position was unfolded by means of GRAVEL and MAXED computer codes. The thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluxes, the total neutron flux, the mean energy and the Cadmium ratio (RCd) were provided. A sensitivity analysis was performed taking into account various defaults spectra and ultimately a different response functions in the unfolding procedure. Overall, from the obtained results it reveals, unexpectedly, that the measured neutron spectrum at the sample position of the neutron radiography of the NUR reactor is being harder with a predominance of fast neutrons (>100keV) by about 60%. Finally, those results were compared to previous and more recent measurements obtained by activation foils detectors. The agreement was fairly good highlighting thereby the consistency of our findings. PMID:27203706

  1. Experimental inelastic neutron scattering spectrum of hydrogen hexagonal clathrate-hydrate compared with rigorous quantum simulations.

    PubMed

    Celli, Milva; Powers, Anna; Colognesi, Daniele; Xu, Minzhong; Bačić, Zlatko; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2013-10-28

    We have performed high-resolution inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements on binary hydrogen clathrate hydrates exhibiting the hexagonal structure (sH). Two samples, differing only in the ortho/para fraction of hydrogen, were prepared using heavy water and methyl tert-butyl ether as the promoter in its perdeuterated form. The INS spectrum of the translation-rotation (TR) excitations of the guest H2 molecule was obtained by subtracting the very weak signal due to the D2O lattice modes. By means of a subtraction procedure, it has been possible to obtain separately the spectra of caged p-H2 and o-H2. sH clathrates are comprised of three distinct types of cages, two of which, differing in shape and size, are each occupied by one H2 molecule only. Both contribute to the measured INS spectrum which is, therefore, rather complex and challenging to assign unambiguously. To assist with the interpretation, the INS spectra are calculated accurately utilizing the quantum methodology which incorporates the coupled five-dimensional TR energy levels and wave functions of the H2 molecule confined in each type of nanocage. The computed INS spectra are highly realistic and reflect the complexity of the coupled TR dynamics of the guest H2 in the anisotropic confining environment. The simulated INS spectra of p-H2 and o-H2 in the small and medium cages are compared with the experimental data, and are indispensable for their interpretation. PMID:24182049

  2. Experimental inelastic neutron scattering spectrum of hydrogen hexagonal clathrate-hydrate compared with rigorous quantum simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Milva; Powers, Anna; Colognesi, Daniele; Xu, Minzhong; Bačić, Zlatko; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2013-10-01

    We have performed high-resolution inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements on binary hydrogen clathrate hydrates exhibiting the hexagonal structure (sH). Two samples, differing only in the ortho/para fraction of hydrogen, were prepared using heavy water and methyl tert-butyl ether as the promoter in its perdeuterated form. The INS spectrum of the translation-rotation (TR) excitations of the guest H2 molecule was obtained by subtracting the very weak signal due to the D2O lattice modes. By means of a subtraction procedure, it has been possible to obtain separately the spectra of caged p-H2 and o-H2. sH clathrates are comprised of three distinct types of cages, two of which, differing in shape and size, are each occupied by one H2 molecule only. Both contribute to the measured INS spectrum which is, therefore, rather complex and challenging to assign unambiguously. To assist with the interpretation, the INS spectra are calculated accurately utilizing the quantum methodology which incorporates the coupled five-dimensional TR energy levels and wave functions of the H2 molecule confined in each type of nanocage. The computed INS spectra are highly realistic and reflect the complexity of the coupled TR dynamics of the guest H2 in the anisotropic confining environment. The simulated INS spectra of p-H2 and o-H2 in the small and medium cages are compared with the experimental data, and are indispensable for their interpretation.

  3. High-resolution measurements of the DT neutron spectrum using new CD foils in the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Eckart, M. J.; Farrell, M. P.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoppe, M.; et al

    2016-08-09

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility measures the DT neutron spectrum from cryogenically layered inertial confinement fusion implosions. Yield, areal density, apparent ion temperature, and directional fluid flow are inferred from the MRS data. Here, this paper describes recent advances in MRS measurements of the primary peak using new, thinner, reduced-area deuterated plastic (CD) conversion foils. The new foils allow operation of MRS at yields 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously possible, at a resolution down to ~200 keV FWHM.

  4. Experimental characterization of the Advanced Liquid Hydrogen Cold Neutron Source spectrum of the NBSR reactor at the NIST Center for Neutron Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J. C.; Barker, J. G.; Rowe, J. M.; Williams, R. E.; Gagnon, C.; Lindstrom, R. M.; Ibberson, R. M.; Neumann, D. A.

    2015-08-01

    The recent expansion of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research facility has offered a rare opportunity to perform an accurate measurement of the cold neutron spectrum at the exit of a newly-installed neutron guide. Using a combination of a neutron time-of-flight measurement, a gold foil activation measurement, and Monte Carlo simulation of the neutron guide transmission, we obtain the most reliable experimental characterization of the Advanced Liquid Hydrogen Cold Neutron Source brightness to date. Time-of-flight measurements were performed at three distinct fuel burnup intervals, including one immediately following reactor startup. Prior to the latter measurement, the hydrogen was maintained in a liquefied state for an extended period in an attempt to observe an initial radiation-induced increase of the ortho (o)-hydrogen fraction. Since para (p)-hydrogen has a small scattering cross-section for neutron energies below 15 meV (neutron wavelengths greater than about 2.3 Å), changes in the o- p hydrogen ratio and in the void distribution in the boiling hydrogen influence the spectral distribution. The nature of such changes is simulated with a continuous-energy, Monte Carlo radiation-transport code using 20 K o and p hydrogen scattering kernels and an estimated hydrogen density distribution derived from an analysis of localized heat loads. A comparison of the transport calculations with the mean brightness function resulting from the three measurements suggests an overall o- p ratio of about 17.5(±1) % o- 82.5% p for neutron energies<15 meV, a significantly lower ortho concentration than previously assumed.

  5. Event-by-event evaluation of the prompt fission neutron spectrum from 239Pu(n,f)

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R; Randrup, J; Brown, D A; Descalle, M A; Ormand, W E

    2011-11-28

    We have developed an improved evaluation method for the spectrum of neutrons emitted in fission of {sup 239}Pu induced by incident neutrons with energies up to 20 MeV. The covariance data, including incident energy correlations introduced by the evaluation method, were used to fix the input parameters in our event-by-event model of fission, FREYA, by applying formal statistical methods. Formal estimates of uncertainties in the evaluation were developed by randomly sampling model inputs and calculating likelihood functions based on agreement with the evaluated . Our approach is able to employ a greater variety of fission measurements than the relatively coarse spectral data alone. It also allows the study of numerous fission observables for more accurate model validation. The combination of an event-by-event Monte Carlo fission model with a statistical-likelihood analysis is thus a powerful tool for evaluation of fission-neutron data. Our empirical model FREYA follows the complete fission event from birth of the excited fragments through their decay via neutron emission until the fragment excitation energy is below the neutron separation energy when neutron emission can no longer occur. The most recent version of FREYA incorporates pre-equilibrium neutron emission, the emission of the first neutron before equilibrium is reached in the compound nucleus, and multi-chance fission, neutron evaporation prior to fission when the incident neutron energy is above the neutron separation energy. Energy, momentum, charge and mass number are conserved throughout the fission process. The best available values of fragment masses and total kinetic energies are used as inputs to FREYA. We fit three parameters that are not well under control from previous measurements: the shift in the total fragment kinetic energy; the energy scale of the asymptotic level density parameter, controlling the fragment 'temperature' for neutron evaporation; and the relative excitation of the

  6. Secondary neutron spectrum from 250-MeV passively scattered proton therapy: Measurement with an extended-range Bonner sphere system

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Rebecca M.; Burgett, E. A.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Secondary neutrons are an unavoidable consequence of proton therapy. While the neutron dose is low compared to the primary proton dose, its presence and contribution to the patient dose is nonetheless important. The most detailed information on neutrons includes an evaluation of the neutron spectrum. However, the vast majority of the literature that has reported secondary neutron spectra in proton therapy is based on computational methods rather than measurements. This is largely due to the inherent limitations in the majority of neutron detectors, which are either not suitable for spectral measurements or have limited response at energies greater than 20 MeV. Therefore, the primary objective of the present study was to measure a secondary neutron spectrum from a proton therapy beam using a spectrometer that is sensitive to neutron energies over the entire neutron energy spectrum. Methods: The authors measured the secondary neutron spectrum from a 250-MeV passively scattered proton beam in air at a distance of 100 cm laterally from isocenter using an extended-range Bonner sphere (ERBS) measurement system. Ambient dose equivalent H*(10) was calculated using measured fluence and fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients. Results: The neutron fluence spectrum had a high-energy direct neutron peak, an evaporation peak, a thermal peak, and an intermediate energy continuum between the thermal and evaporation peaks. The H*(10) was dominated by the neutrons in the evaporation peak because of both their high abundance and the large quality conversion coefficients in that energy interval. The H*(10) 100 cm laterally from isocenter was 1.6 mSv per proton Gy (to isocenter). Approximately 35% of the dose equivalent was from neutrons with energies ≥20 MeV. Conclusions: The authors measured a neutron spectrum for external neutrons generated by a 250-MeV proton beam using an ERBS measurement system that was sensitive to neutrons over the entire

  7. THE COMPLETE SPECTRUM OF THE NEUTRON STAR X-RAY BINARY 4U 0614+091

    SciTech Connect

    Migliari, S.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Heinz, S.; Hynes, R. I.; Fender, R. P.; Maccarone, T. J.; Gallo, E.; Jonker, P. G.

    2010-02-10

    We observed the neutron star (NS) ultra-compact X-ray binary 4U 0614+091 quasi-simultaneously in the radio band (Very Large Array), mid-infrared (IR)/IR (Spitzer/Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer and Infrared Array Camera), near-IR/optical (Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System), optical-UV (Swift/UV-Optical Telescope), soft and hard X-rays (Swift/X-ray Telescope and Rossi-X-ray Timing Explorer). The source was steadily in its 'hard state'. We detected the source in the whole range, for the first time in the radio band at 4.86 and 8.46 GHz and in the mid-IR at 24 {mu}m, up to 100 keV. The optically thick synchrotron spectrum of the jet is consistent with being flat from the radio to the mid-IR band. The flat jet spectrum breaks in the range {approx}(1-4) x 10{sup 13} Hz to an optically thin power-law synchrotron spectrum with spectral index {approx}-0.5. These observations allow us to estimate a lower limit on the jet radiative power of {approx}3 x 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1} and a total jet power L{sub J} {approx} 10{sup 34}mu{sup -1}{sub 0.05} E {sup 0.53}{sub c} erg s{sup -1} (where E{sub c} is the high-energy cutoff of the synchrotron spectrum in eV and mu{sub 0.05} is the radiative efficiency in units of 0.05). The contemporaneous detection of the optically thin part of the compact jet and the X-ray tail above 30 keV allows us to assess the contribution of the jet to the hard X-ray tail by synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) processes. We conclude that, for realistic jet size, boosting, viewing angle, and energy partition, the SSC emission alone, from the post-shock, accelerated, non-thermal population in the jet, is not a viable mechanism to explain the observed hard X-ray tail of the NS 4U 0614+091.

  8. Procedure developed for reporting fast-neutron exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossin, A. D.

    1968-01-01

    Procedure for reporting fast-neutron exposure involves determination of the spectrum shape and absolute magnitude, selection of an energy weighting for the neutrons, and definition of a unit for reporting exposure. Using this method, comparisons of irradiation data from different reactors will be free from errors resulting from differences between the spectra.

  9. [BIOLOGICAL EFFECTIVENESS OF FISSION SPECTRUM NEUTRONS AND PROTONS WITH ENERGIES OF 60-126 MEV DURING ACUTE AND PROLONGED IRRADIATION].

    PubMed

    Shafirkin, A V

    2015-01-01

    Neutrons of the fission spectrum are characterized by relatively high values of linear energy transfer (LET). Data about their effects on biological objects are used to evaluate the risk of delayed effects of accelerated ions within the same LET range that serve as an experimental model of the nuclei component of galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Additionally, risks of delayed consequences to cosmonaut's health and average lifetime from certain GCR fluxes and secondary neutrons can be also prognosticated. The article deals with comparative analysis of the literature on reduction of average lifespan (ALS) of animals exposed to neutron reactor spectrum, 60-126 MeV protons, and X- and γ-rays in a broad range of radiation intensity and duration. It was shown that a minimal lifespan reduction by 5% occurs due to a brief exposure to neutrons with the absorbed dose of 5 cGy, whereas same lifespan reduction due to hard X- and γ-radiation occurs after absorption of a minimal dose of 100 cGy. Therefore, according to the estimated minimal ALS reduction in mice, neutron effectiveness is 20-fold higher. Biological effectiveness of protons as regards ALS reduction is virtually equal to that of standard types of radiation. Exposure to X- and γ-radiation with decreasing daily doses, and increasing number of fractions and duration gives rise to an apparent trend toward a less dramatic ALS reduction in mice; on the contrary, exposure to neutrons of varying duration had no effect on threshold doses for the specified ALS reductions. Factors of relative biological effectiveness of neutrons reached 40. PMID:26934784

  10. MSL/RAD Measurements of the Neutron Spectrum in Transit to Mars and on the Martian Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) onboard Mars Science Laboratory's rover Curiosity has measured the energetic charged- and neutral-particle spectra and the radiation dose rate during most of the 253-day 560-million-kilometer cruise to Mars and is now measuring on the Martian surface. An important factor for determining the biological impact of the Martian surface radiation is the specific contribution of neutrons, which possess a high biological effectiveness. In contrast to charged particles, neutrons and gamma rays are generally only measured indirectly, requiring the transfer of kinetic energy from neutral to one or more charged particles. Therefore, the measurement is the result of a complex convolution of the incident particle spectrum with the measurement process. We apply an inversion method to calculate the gamma/neutron spectra from RAD neutral particle measurements. Here we show first measurements of the gamma/neutron spectra during transit and on Mars and compare them to theoretical predictions. Measuring the neutron spectra in transit to Mars and on the Martian surface is an essential step for determining radiation hazard for future human exploration, including shielding designs of potential spacecraft and habitats. The relative contribution of neutrons to the dose equivalent increases considerably with shielding thickness, so our quantitative measurements provide an important baseline to strategies that would mitigate cancer risk.

  11. MSL/RAD Measurements of the Neutron Spectrum in Transit to Mars and on the Martian Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, J.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Ehresmann, B.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Hassler, D.; Reitz, G.; Brinza, D. E.; Böttcher, S. I.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Boehm, E.; Posner, A.; Rafkin, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) onboard Mars Science Laboratory's rover Curiosity has measured the energetic charged- and neutral-particle spectra and the radiation dose rate during most of the 253-day 560-million-kilometer cruise to Mars and is now measuring on the Martian surface. An important factor for determining the biological impact of the Martian surface radiation is the specific contribution of neutrons, which possess a high biological effectiveness. In contrast to charged particles, neutrons and gamma rays are generally only measured indirectly, requiring the transfer of kinetic energy from neutral to one or more charged particles. Therefore, the measurement is the result of a complex convolution of the incident particle spectrum with the measurement process. We apply an inversion method to calculate the gamma/neutron spectra from RAD neutral particle measurements. Here we show first measurements of the gamma/neutron spectra during transit and on Mars and compare them to theoretical predictions. Measuring the neutron spectra in transit to Mars and on the Martian surface is an essential step for determining radiation hazard for future human exploration, including shielding designs of potential spacecraft and habitats. The relative contribution of neutrons to the dose equivalent increases considerably with shielding thickness, so our quantitative measurements provide an important baseline to strategies that would mitigate cancer risk.

  12. Secondary Neutron Doses to Pediatric Patients During Intracranial Proton Therapy: Monte Carlo Simulation of the Neutron Energy Spectrum and its Organ Doses.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shinnosuke; Koba, Yusuke; Kohno, Ryosuke; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E; Kai, Michiaki

    2016-04-01

    Proton therapy has the physical advantage of a Bragg peak that can provide a better dose distribution than conventional x-ray therapy. However, radiation exposure of normal tissues cannot be ignored because it is likely to increase the risk of secondary cancer. Evaluating secondary neutrons generated by the interaction of the proton beam with the treatment beam-line structure is necessary; thus, performing the optimization of radiation protection in proton therapy is required. In this research, the organ dose and energy spectrum were calculated from secondary neutrons using Monte Carlo simulations. The Monte Carlo code known as the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS) was used to simulate the transport proton and its interaction with the treatment beam-line structure that modeled the double scattering body of the treatment nozzle at the National Cancer Center Hospital East. The doses of the organs in a hybrid computational phantom simulating a 5-y-old boy were calculated. In general, secondary neutron doses were found to decrease with increasing distance to the treatment field. Secondary neutron energy spectra were characterized by incident neutrons with three energy peaks: 1×10, 1, and 100 MeV. A block collimator and a patient collimator contributed significantly to organ doses. In particular, the secondary neutrons from the patient collimator were 30 times higher than those from the first scatter. These results suggested that proactive protection will be required in the design of the treatment beam-line structures and that organ doses from secondary neutrons may be able to be reduced. PMID:26910030

  13. Gamma-rays and neutrons as a probe of the proton spectrum during the solar flare of 1988 December 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunphy, P. P.; Chupp, E. L.

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported on high-energy gamma-rays and neutrons from the flare of 1988 December 16 detected by the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer on the SMM satellite. In this paper, we present results on gamma-ray lines seen by the same detector during this flare. Together, these measurements constitute a powerful probe of the proton spectrum that produces the flare neutrals. Analysis of the data suggests a Bessel-function proton spectrum with a shape parameter (alpha T) of 0.054 +/- 0.004 and the number of protons above 30 MeV equal to (9.0 +/- 0.9) x 10 exp 32. The number of neutrons detected from this flare is much smaller than what is predicted from an isotropic distribution of the protons, indicating that the distribution may be nonisotropic.

  14. Measurement of the D-D fusion neutron energy spectrum and variation of the peak width with plasma ion temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, W. A.; Chen, S. H.; Gwinn, D.; Parker, R. R.

    1983-11-01

    We report a set of neutron spectrum measurements made at the Alcator-C tokamak under Ohmic-heating conditions. It has been found that the width of the D-D fusion neutron peak increases with the plasma ion temperature consistent with the theoretical prediction. In particular, the neutron spectra resulting from the sum of many plasma discharges with ion temperatures of 780 and 1050 eV have been obtained. The width for the 780-eV case is 64+ 9-11 keV and that of the 1050-eV case, 81+10-14 keV (full width at half maximum), corresponding to ion temperatures of 740 and 1190 eV, respectively.

  15. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Frenje, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Wink, C. W.; Bell, P.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; et al

    2016-08-02

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (Ti), yield (Yn), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with amore » time resolution of ~20 ps and energy resolution of ~100 keV for total neutron yields above ~1016. Lastly, at lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ~20 ps.« less

  16. The Her X-1 spectrum: A measure of the field near the magnetic poles of a neutron star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Rothschild, R. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    The steep high energy cutoff observed in the spectrum for Her X-1 was analyzed in terms of the severely modified Thomson scattering that dominates the radiative transfer in a highly magnetized plasma near the surface of a neutron star. The data indicate a field of about 1013 G near the magnetic poles and the stopping of accreting matter by nuclear collisions in the neighboring plasma.

  17. The Her X-1 spectrum - A measure of the field near the magnetic poles of a neutron star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Rothschild, R. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    The steep high energy cutoff observed in the spectrum for Her X-1 is analyzed in terms of the severely modified Thomson scattering that dominates the radiative transfer in a highly magnetized plasma near the surface of a neutron star. The data are shown to indicate a field of about 10 to the 13th G near the magnetic poles and the stopping of accreting matter by nuclear collisions in the neighboring plasma

  18. Inferring Low-Mode Asymmetries from the Elastically Scattered Neutron Spectrum in Layered Cryogenic DT Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution neutron spectroscopy is used to probe the areal density of layered cryogenic DT direct-drive implosions in inertial confinement fusion experiments on OMEGA. Advanced scintillation detectors record the neutron spectrum using time-of-flight techniques. The shape of the energy spectrum is fully determined by the neutron elastic scattering cross-section for spherically symmetric target configurations. Significant differences from the expected shape have been measured for some recent implosions, which indicate a deviation from a spherically symmetric fuel assembly. Neutron scattering with low-mode perturbations in the DT fuel assembly have been simulated in the Monte Carlo n-particle transport code. The experimental data shows good agreement with the model when the mass distribution of the compressed DT shell is highly asymmetric with one side having a factor-of-2 higher areal density. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  19. Measurement of Fission Neutron Spectrum and Multiplicity using a Gamma Tag Double Time-of-flight Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, E.; Daskalakis, A.; Danon, Y.

    2014-05-01

    Recent efforts have been made to improve the prompt fission neutron spectrum and nu-bar measurements for Uranium and Plutonium isotopes particularly in the keV region. A system has been designed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) utilizing an array of EJ-301 liquid scintillators as well as lithium glass and plastic scintillators to experimentally determine these values. An array of BaF2 detectors was recently obtained from Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be used in conjunction with the neutron detectors. The system uses a novel gamma tagging method for fission which can offer an improvement over conventional fission chambers due to increased sample mass. A coincidence requirement on the gamma detectors from prompt fission gammas is used as the fission tag for the system as opposed to fission fragments in a conventional fission chamber. The system utilizes pulse digitization using Acqiris 8 bit digitizer boards which allow for gamma/neutron pulse height discrimination on the liquid scintillators during post processing. Additionally, a 252Cf fission chamber was designed and constructed at RPI which allowed for optimization and testing of the system without the need for an external neutron source. The characteristics of the gamma tagging method such as false detection rate and detection efficiency were determined using this fission chamber and verified using MCNP Polimi modeling. Prompt fission neutron spectrum data has been taken using the fission chamber focusing on the minimum detectable neutron energy for each of the various detectors. Plastic scintillators were found to offer a significant improvement over traditional liquid scintillators allowing energy measurements down to 50 keV. Background was also characterized for all detectors and will be discussed.

  20. Solar neutrons and the energy spectrum of flare-accelerated particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocharov, G. E.; Mandzhavidze, N. Z.

    1987-10-01

    The Monte Carlo method is used to calculate the generation and escape of neutrons in the framework of the magnetic-arc model. It is shown that the generation of neutrons lasts for 20-30 minutes; the characteristic time of the intensity decline increases with magnetic field gradient and the radius of the coronal part of the arc. The angular distribution of escaping neutrons is anisotropic, with the maximum flux occurring at the limb. The neutron energy spectra are different in different directions. Particular attention is given to the solar-longitude dependence of neutron fluxes in a flare with gamma-ray emission.

  1. Fission Product Data Measured at Los Alamos for Fission Spectrum and Thermal Neutrons on 239Pu, 235U, 238U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selby, H. D.; Mac Innes, M. R.; Barr, D. W.; Keksis, A. L.; Meade, R. A.; Burns, C. J.; Chadwick, M. B.; Wallstrom, T. C.

    2010-12-01

    We describe measurements of fission product data at Los Alamos that are important for determining the number of fissions that have occurred when neutrons are incident on plutonium and uranium isotopes. The fission-spectrum measurements were made using a fission chamber designed by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in the BIG TEN critical assembly, as part of the Inter-laboratory Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration. The thermal measurements were made at Los Alamos' Omega West Reactor. A related set of measurements were made of fission-product ratios (so-called R-values) in neutron environments provided by a number of Los Alamos critical assemblies that range from having average energies causing fission of 400-600 keV (BIG TEN and the outer regions of the Flattop-25 assembly) to higher energies (1.4-1.9 MeV) in the Jezebel, and in the central regions of the Flattop-25 and Flattop-Pu, critical assemblies. From these data we determine ratios of fission product yields in different fuel and neutron environments (Q-values) and fission product yields in fission spectrum neutron environments for 99Mo, 95Zr, 137Cs, 140Ba, 141,143Ce, and 147Nd. Modest incident-energy dependence exists for the 147Nd fission product yield; this is discussed in the context of models for fission that include thermal and dynamical effects. The fission product data agree with measurements by Maeck and other authors using mass-spectrometry methods, and with the ILRR collaboration results that used gamma spectroscopy for quantifying fission products. We note that the measurements also contradict earlier 1950s historical Los Alamos estimates by ˜5-7%, most likely owing to self-shielding corrections not made in the early thermal measurements. Our experimental results provide a confirmation of the England-Rider ENDF/B-VI evaluated fission-spectrum fission product yields that were carried over to the ENDF/B-VII.0 library, except for 99Mo

  2. "Measurements of the neutron spectrum in transit to Mars on the Mars Science Laboratory", Köhler et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jack

    2015-04-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft carried the Curiosity rover to Mars. While the dramatic, successful landing of Curiosity and its subsequent exploration of the Martian surface have justifiably generated great excitement, from the standpoint of the health of crewmembers on missions to Mars, knowledge of the environment between Earth and Mars is critical. This paper reports data taken during the cruise phase of the MSL by the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD). The results are of great interest for several reasons. They are a direct measurement of the radiation environment during what will be a significant fraction of the duration of a proposed human mission to Mars; they were made behind the de facto shielding provided by various spacecraft components; and, in particular, they are a measurement of the contribution to radiation dose by neutrons. The neutron environment inside spacecraft is produced primarily by galactic cosmic ray ions interacting in shielding materials, and given the high biological effectiveness of neutrons and the increased contribution of neutrons to dose with increased depth in shielding, accurate knowledge of the neutron energy spectrum behind shielding is vital. The results show a relatively modest contribution from neutrons and gammas compared to that from charged particles, but also a discrepancy in both dose and dose rate between the data and simulations. The failure of the calculations to accurately reproduce the data is significant, given that future manned spacecraft will be more heavily shielded (and thus produce more secondary neutrons) and that spacecraft design will rely on simulations and model calculations of radiation transport. The methodology of risk estimation continues to evolve, and incorporates our knowledge of both the physical and biological effects of radiation. The relatively large uncertainties in the biological data, and the difficulties in reducing those uncertainties, makes it all the more important to

  3. Validation of absolute axial neutron flux distribution calculations with MCNP with 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction rate distribution measurements at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor.

    PubMed

    Radulović, Vladimir; Štancar, Žiga; Snoj, Luka; Trkov, Andrej

    2014-02-01

    The calculation of axial neutron flux distributions with the MCNP code at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor has been validated with experimental measurements of the (197)Au(n,γ)(198)Au reaction rate. The calculated absolute reaction rate values, scaled according to the reactor power and corrected for the flux redistribution effect, are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effect of different cross-section libraries on the calculations has been investigated and shown to be minor. PMID:24316530

  4. Absolute spectrum and charge ratio of cosmic ray muons in the energy region from 0.2 GeV to 100 GeV at 600 m above sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Pascale, M. P.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Golden, R. L.; Grimani, C.; Kimbell, B. L.; Stephens, S. A.; Stochaj, S. J.; Webber, W. R.; Basini, G.

    1993-01-01

    We have determined the momentum spectrum and charge ratio of muons in the region from 250 MeV/c to 100 GeV/c using a superconducting magnetic spectrometer. The absolute differential spectrum of muons obtained in this experiment at 600 m above sea level is in good agreement with the previous measurements at sea level. The differential spectrum can be represented by a power law with a varying index, which is consistent with zero below 450 MeV/c and steepens to a value of -2.7 +/- 0.1 between 20 and 100 GeV/c. The integral f1ux of muons measured in this experiment span a very large range of momentum and is in excellent agreement with the earlier results. The positive to negative muon ratio appears to be constant in the entire momentum range covered in this experiment within the errors and the mean value is 1.220 +/- 0.044. The absolute momentum spectrum and the charge ratio measured in this experiment are also consistent with the theoretical expectations. This is the only experiment which covers a wide range of nearly three decades in momentum from a very low momentum.

  5. Evaluation of the neutron spectrum and dose assessment around the venus reactor.

    PubMed

    Coeck, Michèle; Vermeersch, Fernand; Vanhavere, Filip

    2005-01-01

    An assessment of the neutron field near the VENUS reactor is made in order to evaluate the neutron dose to the operators, particularly in an area near the reactor shielding and in the control room. Therefore, a full MCNPX model of the shielding geometry was developed. The source term used in the simulation is derived from a criticality calculation done beforehand. Calculations are compared to routine neutron dose rate measurements and show good agreement. The MCNPX model developed easily allows core adaptations in order to evaluate the effect of future core configuration on the neutron dose to the operators. PMID:16381686

  6. Benchmarking the Sandia Pulsed Reactor III cavity neutron spectrum for electronic parts calibration and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.G.; Griffin, P.J.; Fan, W.C.

    1993-08-01

    The SPR III bare cavity spectrum and integral parameters have been determined with 24 measured spectrum sensor responses and an independent, detailed, MCNP transport calculation. This environment qualifies as a benchmark field for electronic parts testing.

  7. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  8. The LANL/LLNL Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum Program at LANSCE and Approach to Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.; Wu, C.Y.; Lee, H.Y.; Taddeucci, T.N.; Perdue, B.A.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Ullmann, J.L.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Jandel, M.; Nelson, R.O.; Wender, S.A.; Neudecker, D.; Rising, M.E.; Mosby, S.; Sjue, S.; White, M.C.; Bucher, B.; Henderson, R.

    2015-01-15

    New data on the prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) from neutron-induced fission with higher accuracies are needed to resolve discrepancies in the literature and to address gaps in the experimental data. The Chi-Nu project, conducted jointly by LANL and LLNL, aims to measure the shape of the PFNS for fission of {sup 239}Pu induced by neutrons from 0.5 to 20 MeV with accuracies of 3–5% in the outgoing energy from 0.1 to 9 MeV and 15% from 9 to 12 MeV and to provide detailed experimental uncertainties. Neutrons from the WNR/LANSCE neutron source are being used to induce fission in a Parallel-Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC). Two arrays of neutron detectors are used to cover the energy range of neutrons emitted promptly in the fission process. Challenges for the present experiment include background reduction, use of {sup 239}Pu in a PPAC, and understanding neutron detector response. Achieving the target accuracies requires the understanding of many systematic uncertainties. The status and plans for the future will be presented.

  9. Ion temperature and plasma rotation profile effects in the neutron emission spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.; Henriksson, H.; Källne, J.

    2004-03-01

    The instrumental factors and measuring conditions affecting neutron emission spectrometry measurements of tokamak plasmas are described and analyzed. The measured energy broadening and shift of the neutron emission is used to deduce ion temperature (Ti) and toroidal plasma rotation velocity (Vt) representing average (effective) values for the nonuniform plasma volume viewed. Analytical expressions are derived for the relationship between the line-volume integrated effective temperature (Teff) and the radial profile Ti(r) for the case of thermal plasmas with isotropic neutron emission; effects on Teff due to spectral broadening from the radial dependence Vt(r) were also considered. The analysis method presented here is applied to high quality data obtained with the magnetic proton recoil neutron spectrometer installed at Joint European Torus for measurements of deuterium-tritium plasmas. Similarly, cases of anisotropic neutron emission were quantitatively assessed.

  10. Description of the /sup 252/Cf(sf) neutron spectrum in the framework of a generalized Madland-Nix model

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, H.; Seeliger, D.

    1986-08-01

    The Madland-Nix model (MNM) for the calculation of fission neutron spectra is modified considering the dependence on fragment mass number A. Further, an approximation of this generalized Madland-Nix model (GMNM) that takes into account the different center-of-mass system spectra for the light and heavy fragment groups is discussed. These new calculations are compared with two versions of the original MNM. In particular, the level density parameter, which was adjusted by fitting the calculated spectra to a Maxwellian distribution deduced from experimental data, becomes more reasonable in the framework of the GMNM. The results of the different model calculations are compared with experimental data on the /sup 252/Cf(sf) neutron spectrum in the 0.1- to 20-MeV energy range.

  11. Measurements of the T(t,2n)4He neutron spectrum at low reactant energies from inertial confinement implosions.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Manuel, M J-E; Sinenian, N; Zylstra, A B; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Radha, P B; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; McNabb, D P; Amendt, P A; Boyd, R N; Hatchett, S P; Quaglioni, S; Rygg, J R; Thompson, I J; Bacher, A D; Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H

    2012-07-13

    Measurements of the neutron spectrum from the T(t,2n)4He (tt) reaction have been conducted using inertial confinement fusion implosions at the OMEGA laser facility. In these experiments, deuterium-tritium (DT) gas-filled capsules were imploded to study the tt reaction in thermonuclear plasmas at low reactant center-of-mass (c.m.) energies. In contrast to accelerator experiments at higher c.m. energies (above 100 keV), these results indicate a negligible n + 5He reaction channel at a c.m. energy of 23 keV. PMID:23030170

  12. The Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum: From Experiment to the Evaluated Data and its Impact on Critical Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Rising, Michael Evan

    2015-06-10

    After a brief introduction concerning nuclear data, prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) evaluations and the limited PFNS covariance data in the ENDF/B-VII library, and the important fact that cross section uncertainties ~ PFNS uncertainties, the author presents background information on the PFNS (experimental data, theoretical models, data evaluation, uncertainty quantification) and discusses the impact on certain well-known critical assemblies with regard to integral quantities, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty propagation. He sketches recent and ongoing research and concludes with some final thoughts.

  13. Neutron spectrum effect on pressure vessel embrittlement: Dosimetry and qualification of irradiation locations in OSIRIS and SILOE reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Alberman, A.; Bourdet, L.; Carcreff, H.; Beretz, D.

    1994-12-31

    Two irradiation experiments have been undertaken in OSIRIS (Saclay) and SILOE (Grenoble) reactors, in order to establish the correlation between the embrittlement of pressure vessel steels and neutron spectrum. Target fluence is 0.1 dpa for both experiments. This damage fluence corresponds to a fluence of 7.5 10{sup 19} n.cm{sup {minus}2} E > 1 MeV (7.5 10{sup 15} n.m{sup {minus}2}) in the case of a well moderated light water spectrum, but only 45 10{sup 19} n.cm{sup {minus}2} in the case of the specially designed SILOE irradiation location. One irradiation run is now completed, the second one is underway. This paper presents the experimental dosimetry data and irradiation parameters obtained in the preliminary qualification program, needed to assess this damage correlation.

  14. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  15. Warhead verification as inverse problem: Applications of neutron spectrum unfolding from organic-scintillator measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Chris C.; Febbraro, Michael; Flaska, Marek; Pozzi, Sara A.; Becchetti, F. D.

    2016-08-01

    Verification of future warhead-dismantlement treaties will require detection of certain warhead attributes without the disclosure of sensitive design information, and this presents an unusual measurement challenge. Neutron spectroscopy—commonly eschewed as an ill-posed inverse problem—may hold special advantages for warhead verification by virtue of its insensitivity to certain neutron-source parameters like plutonium isotopics. In this article, we investigate the usefulness of unfolded neutron spectra obtained from organic-scintillator data for verifying a particular treaty-relevant warhead attribute: the presence of high-explosive and neutron-reflecting materials. Toward this end, several improvements on current unfolding capabilities are demonstrated: deuterated detectors are shown to have superior response-matrix condition to that of standard hydrogen-base scintintillators; a novel data-discretization scheme is proposed which removes important detector nonlinearities; and a technique is described for re-parameterizing the unfolding problem in order to constrain the parameter space of solutions sought, sidestepping the inverse problem altogether. These improvements are demonstrated with trial measurements and verified using accelerator-based time-of-flight calculation of reference spectra. Then, a demonstration is presented in which the elemental compositions of low-Z neutron-attenuating materials are estimated to within 10%. These techniques could have direct application in verifying the presence of high-explosive materials in a neutron-emitting test item, as well as other for treaty verification challenges.

  16. COMBINE7.0 - A Portable ENDF/B-VII.0 Based Neutron Spectrum and Cross-Section Generation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Woo Y. Yoon; David W. Nigg

    2008-09-01

    COMBINE7.0 is a FORTRAN 90 computer code that generates multigroup neutron constants for use in the deterministic diffusion and transport theory neutronics analysis. The cross-section database used by COMBINE7.0 is derived from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF/B-VII.0). The neutron energy range covered is from 20 MeV to 1.0E-5 eV. The Los Alamos National Laboratory NJOY code is used as the processing code to generate a 167 finegroup cross-section library in MATXS format for Bondarenko self-shielding treatment. Resolved resonance parameters are extracted from ENDF/B-VII.0 File 2 for a separate library to be used in an alternate Nordheim self-shielding treatment in the resolved resonance energy range. The equations solved for energy dependent neutron spectrum in the 167 fine-group structure are the B-3 or B-1 approximations to the transport equation. The fine group cross sections needed for the spectrum calculation are first prepared by Bondarenko selfshielding interpolation in terms of background cross section and temperature. The geometric lump effect, when present, is accounted for by augmenting the background cross section. Nordheim self-shielded fine group cross sections for a material having resolved resonance parameters overwrite correspondingly the existing self-shielded fine group cross sections when this option is used. The fine group cross sections in the thermal energy range are replaced by those selfshielded with the Amouyal/Benoist/Horowitz method in the three region geometry when this option is requested. COMBINE7.0 coalesces fine group cross sections into broad group macroscopic and microscopic constants. The coalescing is performed by utilizing fine-group fluxes and/or currents obtained by spectrum calculation as the weighting functions. The multigroup constant may be output in any of several standard formats including ANISN 14** free format, CCCC ISOTXS format, and AMPX working library format. ANISN-PC, a onedimensional, discrete

  17. COMBINE7.1 - A Portable ENDF/B-VII.0 Based Neutron Spectrum and Cross-Section Generation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Woo Y. Yoon; David W. Nigg

    2009-08-01

    COMBINE7.1 is a FORTRAN 90 computer code that generates multigroup neutron constants for use in the deterministic diffusion and transport theory neutronics analysis. The cross-section database used by COMBINE7.1 is derived from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF/B-VII.0). The neutron energy range covered is from 20 MeV to 1.0E-5 eV. The Los Alamos National Laboratory NJOY code is used as the processing code to generate a 167 fine-group cross-section library in MATXS format for Bondarenko self-shielding treatment. Resolved resonance parameters are extracted from ENDF/B-VII.0 File 2 for a separate library to be used in an alternate Nordheim self-shielding treatment in the resolved resonance energy range. The equations solved for energy dependent neutron spectrum in the 167 fine-group structure are the B-3 or B-1 approximations to the transport equation. The fine group cross sections needed for the spectrum calculation are first prepared by Bondarenko self-shielding interpolation in terms of background cross section and temperature. The geometric lump effect, when present, is accounted for by augmenting the background cross section. Nordheim self-shielded fine group cross sections for a material having resolved resonance parameters overwrite correspondingly the existing self-shielded fine group cross sections when this option is used. The fine group cross sections in the thermal energy range are replaced by those self-shielded with the Amouyal/Benoist/Horowitz method in the three region geometry when this option is requested. COMBINE7.1 coalesces fine group cross sections into broad group macroscopic and microscopic constants. The coalescing is performed by utilizing fine-group fluxes and/or currents obtained by spectrum calculation as the weighting functions. The multigroup constant may be output in any of several standard formats including ANISN 14** free format, CCCC ISOTXS format, and AMPX working library format. ANISN-PC, a one-dimensional, discrete

  18. NSDann2BS, a neutron spectrum unfolding code based on neural networks technology and two bonner spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Rodríguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Solís Sánches, L. O.; Miranda, R. Castañeda; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.

    2013-07-01

    In this work a neutron spectrum unfolding code, based on artificial intelligence technology is presented. The code called "Neutron Spectrometry and Dosimetry with Artificial Neural Networks and two Bonner spheres", (NSDann2BS), was designed in a graphical user interface under the LabVIEW programming environment. The main features of this code are to use an embedded artificial neural network architecture optimized with the "Robust design of artificial neural networks methodology" and to use two Bonner spheres as the only piece of information. In order to build the code here presented, once the net topology was optimized and properly trained, knowledge stored at synaptic weights was extracted and using a graphical framework build on the LabVIEW programming environment, the NSDann2BS code was designed. This code is friendly, intuitive and easy to use for the end user. The code is freely available upon request to authors. To demonstrate the use of the neural net embedded in the NSDann2BS code, the rate counts of 252Cf, 241AmBe and 239PuBe neutron sources measured with a Bonner spheres system.

  19. NSDann2BS, a neutron spectrum unfolding code based on neural networks technology and two bonner spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz-Rodriguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Solis Sanches, L. O.; Miranda, R. Castaneda; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.

    2013-07-03

    In this work a neutron spectrum unfolding code, based on artificial intelligence technology is presented. The code called ''Neutron Spectrometry and Dosimetry with Artificial Neural Networks and two Bonner spheres'', (NSDann2BS), was designed in a graphical user interface under the LabVIEW programming environment. The main features of this code are to use an embedded artificial neural network architecture optimized with the ''Robust design of artificial neural networks methodology'' and to use two Bonner spheres as the only piece of information. In order to build the code here presented, once the net topology was optimized and properly trained, knowledge stored at synaptic weights was extracted and using a graphical framework build on the LabVIEW programming environment, the NSDann2BS code was designed. This code is friendly, intuitive and easy to use for the end user. The code is freely available upon request to authors. To demonstrate the use of the neural net embedded in the NSDann2BS code, the rate counts of {sup 252}Cf, {sup 241}AmBe and {sup 239}PuBe neutron sources measured with a Bonner spheres system.

  20. COMBINE7.1 - A Portable ENDF/B-VII.0 Based Neutron Spectrum and Cross-Section Generation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Woo Y. Yoon; David W. Nigg

    2011-09-01

    COMBINE7.1 is a FORTRAN 90 computer code that generates multigroup neutron constants for use in the deterministic diffusion and transport theory neutronics analysis. The cross-section database used by COMBINE7.1 is derived from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF/B-VII.0). The neutron energy range covered is from 20 MeV to 1.0E-5 eV. The Los Alamos National Laboratory NJOY code is used as the processing code to generate a 167 fine-group cross-section library in MATXS format for Bondarenko self-shielding treatment. Resolved resonance parameters are extracted from ENDF/B-VII.0 File 2 for a separate library to be used in an alternate Nordheim self-shielding treatment in the resolved resonance energy range. The equations solved for energy dependent neutron spectrum in the 167 fine-group structure are the B3 or B1 zero-dimensional approximations to the transport equation. The fine group cross sections needed for the spectrum calculation are first prepared by Bondarenko self-shielding interpolation in terms of background cross section and temperature. The geometric lump effect, when present, is accounted for by augmenting the background cross section. Nordheim self-shielded fine group cross sections for a material having resolved resonance parameters overwrite correspondingly the existing self-shielded fine group cross sections when this option is used. COMBINE7.1 coalesces fine group cross sections into broad group macroscopic and microscopic constants. The coalescing is performed by utilizing fine-group fluxes and/or currents obtained by spectrum calculation as the weighting functions. The multigroup constants may be output in any of several standard formats including INL format, ANISN 14** free format, CCCC ISOTXS format, and AMPX working library format. ANISN-PC, a one-dimensional (1-D) discrete-ordinate transport code, is incorporated into COMBINE7.1. As an option, the 167 fine-group constants generated by zero-dimensional COMBINE portion in the program can be

  1. Measurement of the Neutron Spectrum of the HB-4 Cold Source at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J. L.; Iverson, E. B.

    2009-08-01

    Measurements of the cold neutron spectrum from the super critical hydrogen cold source at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were made using time-of-flight spectroscopy. Data were collected at reactor power levels of 8.5MW, 42.5MW and 85MW. The moderator temperature was also varied. Data were collected at 17K and 25K while the reactor power was at 8.5MW, 17K and 25K while at 42.5MW and 18K and 22K while at 85MW. The purpose of these measurements was to characterize the brightness of the cold source and to better understand the relationship between reactor power, moderator temperature, and cold neutron production. The authors will discuss the details of the measurement, the changes observed in the neutron spectrum, and the process for determining the source brightness from the measured neutron intensity.

  2. The perturbation of backscattered fast neutrons spectrum caused by the resonances of C, N and O for possible use in pyromaterial detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedin, Ahmad Firdaus Zainal; Ibrahim, Noorddin; Zabidi, Noriza Ahmad; Abdullah, Abqari Luthfi Albert

    2015-04-01

    Neutron radiation is able to determine the signature of land mine detection based on backscattering energy spectrum of landmine. In this study, the Monte Carlo simulation of backscattered fast neutrons was performed on four basic elements of land mine; hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and carbon. The moderation of fast neutrons to thermal neutrons and their resonances cross-section between 0.01 eV until 14 MeV were analysed. The neutrons energies were divided into 29 groups and ten million neutrons particles histories were used. The geometries consist of four main components: neutrons source, detectors, landmine and soil. The neutrons source was placed at the origin coordinate and shielded with carbon and polyethylene. Americium/Beryllium neutron source was placed inside lead casing of 1 cm thick and 2.5 cm height. Polyethylene was used to absorb and disperse radiation and was placed outside the lead shield of width 10 cm and height 7 cm. Two detectors were placed between source with distance of 8 cm and radius of 1.9 cm. Detectors of Helium-3 was used for neutron detection as it has high absorption cross section for thermal neutrons. For the anomaly, the physical is in cylinder form with radius of 10 cm and 8.9 cm height. The anomaly is buried 5 cm deep in the bed soil measured 80 cm radius and 53.5 cm height. The results show that the energy spectrum for the four basic elements of landmine with specific pattern which can be used as indication for the presence of landmines.

  3. The perturbation of backscattered fast neutrons spectrum caused by the resonances of C, N and O for possible use in pyromaterial detection

    SciTech Connect

    Abedin, Ahmad Firdaus Zainal Ibrahim, Noorddin; Zabidi, Noriza Ahmad; Abdullah, Abqari Luthfi Albert

    2015-04-29

    Neutron radiation is able to determine the signature of land mine detection based on backscattering energy spectrum of landmine. In this study, the Monte Carlo simulation of backscattered fast neutrons was performed on four basic elements of land mine; hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and carbon. The moderation of fast neutrons to thermal neutrons and their resonances cross-section between 0.01 eV until 14 MeV were analysed. The neutrons energies were divided into 29 groups and ten million neutrons particles histories were used. The geometries consist of four main components: neutrons source, detectors, landmine and soil. The neutrons source was placed at the origin coordinate and shielded with carbon and polyethylene. Americium/Beryllium neutron source was placed inside lead casing of 1 cm thick and 2.5 cm height. Polyethylene was used to absorb and disperse radiation and was placed outside the lead shield of width 10 cm and height 7 cm. Two detectors were placed between source with distance of 8 cm and radius of 1.9 cm. Detectors of Helium-3 was used for neutron detection as it has high absorption cross section for thermal neutrons. For the anomaly, the physical is in cylinder form with radius of 10 cm and 8.9 cm height. The anomaly is buried 5 cm deep in the bed soil measured 80 cm radius and 53.5 cm height. The results show that the energy spectrum for the four basic elements of landmine with specific pattern which can be used as indication for the presence of landmines.

  4. Energy spectra of single neutrons and charged particles emitted following the absorption of stopped negative pions in 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernigoi, C.; Gabrielli, I.; Grion, N.; Pauli, G.; Saitta, B.; Ricci, R. A.; Boccaccio, P.; Viesti, G.

    1981-02-01

    Energy spectra have been measured of single neutrons, protons and deuterons emitted following the capture at rest of negative pions in 4He. The neutron energy spectrum has been measured with an energy resolution of 4% at 90 MeV. The absolute number of stopped pions has been measured.

  5. Neutron capture cross section and capture gamma-ray spectra of 89Y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katabuchi, Tatsuya; Okamiya, Tohomohiro; Yanagida, Shotaro; Mizumoto, Motoharu; Terada, Kazushi; Kimura, Atsushi; Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Igashira, Masayuki

    2016-06-01

    The neutron capture cross section of 89Y was measured by the time-of-flight method in an energy range from 15 to 100 keV. A pulse-height weighting technique was applied to derive the capture yield. The absolute cross section was determined based on the standard reaciotn 197 Au(n, γ)198 Au reaction. The neutron capture γ-ray spectrum was derived by unfolding the pulse-height spectrum with detector response functions.

  6. Thoughts on Sensitivity Analysis and Uncertainty Propagation Methods with Respect to the Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum Impact on Critical Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Rising, M.E.

    2015-01-15

    The prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) uncertainties in the n+{sup 239}Pu fission reaction are used to study the impact on several fast critical assemblies modeled in the MCNP6.1 code. The newly developed sensitivity capability in MCNP6.1 is used to compute the k{sub eff} sensitivity coefficients with respect to the PFNS. In comparison, the covariance matrix given in the ENDF/B-VII.1 library is decomposed and randomly sampled realizations of the PFNS are propagated through the criticality calculation, preserving the PFNS covariance matrix. The information gathered from both approaches, including the overall k{sub eff} uncertainty, is statistically analyzed. Overall, the forward and backward approaches agree as expected. The results from a new method appear to be limited by the process used to evaluate the PFNS and is not necessarily a flaw of the method itself. Final thoughts and directions for future work are suggested.

  7. Evaluation of the ²³⁹Pu prompt fission neutron spectrum induced by neutrons of 500 keV and associated covariances

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Neudecker, D.; Talou, P.; Kawano, T.; Smith, D. L.; Capote, R.; Rising, M. E.; Kahler, A. C.

    2015-08-01

    We present evaluations of the prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) of ²³⁹Pu induced by 500 keV neutrons, and associated covariances. In a previous evaluation by Talou et al. 2010, surprisingly low evaluated uncertainties were obtained, partly due to simplifying assumptions in the quantification of uncertainties from experiment and model. Therefore, special emphasis is placed here on a thorough uncertainty quantification of experimental data and of the Los Alamos model predicted values entering the evaluation. In addition, the Los Alamos model was extended and an evaluation technique was employed that takes into account the qualitative differences between normalized model predicted valuesmore » and experimental shape data. These improvements lead to changes in the evaluated PFNS and overall larger evaluated uncertainties than in the previous work. However, these evaluated uncertainties are still smaller than those obtained in a statistical analysis using experimental information only, due to strong model correlations. Hence, suggestions to estimate model defect uncertainties are presented, which lead to more reasonable evaluated uncertainties. The calculated keff of selected criticality benchmarks obtained with these new evaluations agree with each other within their uncertainties despite the different approaches to estimate model defect uncertainties. The keff one standard deviations overlap with some of those obtained using ENDF/B-VII.1, albeit their mean values are further away from unity. Spectral indexes for the Jezebel critical assembly calculated with the newly evaluated PFNS agree with the experimental data for selected (n,γ) and (n,f) reactions, and show improvements for high-energy threshold (n,2n) reactions compared to ENDF/B-VII.1.« less

  8. Evaluation of the ²³⁹Pu prompt fission neutron spectrum induced by neutrons of 500 keV and associated covariances

    SciTech Connect

    Neudecker, D.; Talou, P.; Kawano, T.; Smith, D. L.; Capote, R.; Rising, M. E.; Kahler, A. C.

    2015-08-01

    We present evaluations of the prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) of ²³⁹Pu induced by 500 keV neutrons, and associated covariances. In a previous evaluation by Talou et al. 2010, surprisingly low evaluated uncertainties were obtained, partly due to simplifying assumptions in the quantification of uncertainties from experiment and model. Therefore, special emphasis is placed here on a thorough uncertainty quantification of experimental data and of the Los Alamos model predicted values entering the evaluation. In addition, the Los Alamos model was extended and an evaluation technique was employed that takes into account the qualitative differences between normalized model predicted values and experimental shape data. These improvements lead to changes in the evaluated PFNS and overall larger evaluated uncertainties than in the previous work. However, these evaluated uncertainties are still smaller than those obtained in a statistical analysis using experimental information only, due to strong model correlations. Hence, suggestions to estimate model defect uncertainties are presented, which lead to more reasonable evaluated uncertainties. The calculated keff of selected criticality benchmarks obtained with these new evaluations agree with each other within their uncertainties despite the different approaches to estimate model defect uncertainties. The keff one standard deviations overlap with some of those obtained using ENDF/B-VII.1, albeit their mean values are further away from unity. Spectral indexes for the Jezebel critical assembly calculated with the newly evaluated PFNS agree with the experimental data for selected (n,γ) and (n,f) reactions, and show improvements for high-energy threshold (n,2n) reactions compared to ENDF/B-VII.1.

  9. Measurement/Evaluation Techniques and Nuclear Data Associated with Fission of 239Pu by Fission Spectrum Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Baisden, P; Bauge, E; Ferguson, J; Gilliam, D; Granier, T; Jeanloz, R; McMillan, C; Robertson, D; Thompson, P; Verdon, C; Wilkerson, C; Young, P

    2010-03-16

    This Panel was chartered to review and assess new evaluations of work on fission product data, as well as the evaluation process used by the two U.S. nuclear weapons physics laboratories. The work focuses on fission product yields resulting from fission spectrum neutrons incident on plutonium, and includes data from measurements that had not been previously published as well as new or revised fission product cumulative yield data, and related quantities such as Q values and R values. This report documents the Panel's assessment of the work presented by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Based on the work presented we have seven key observations: (1) Experiments conducted in the 1970s at LANL, some of which were performed in association with a larger, NIST-led, program, have recently been documented. A preliminary assessment of this work, which will be referred to in this document as ILRR-LANL, shows it to be technically sound. (2) LLNL has done a thorough, unbiased review and evaluation of the available literature and is in the process of incorporating the previously unavailable LANL data into its evaluation of key fission product yields. The results of the LLNL effort, which includes a preliminary evaluation of the ILRR-LANL data, have been documented. (3) LANL has also conducted an evaluation of fission product yields for fission spectrum neutrons on plutonium including a meta-analysis of benchmark data as part of a planned upgrade to the ENDF/B compilation. We found that the approach of using meta-analysis provides valuable additional insight for evaluating the sparse data sets involved in this assessment. (4) Both laboratories have provided convincing evidence for energy dependence in the fission product yield of {sup 147}Nd produced from the bombardment of {sup 239}Pu with fission spectrum neutrons over an incident neutron energy range of 0.2 to 1.9 MeV. (5) Consistent, complete, and explicit treatment of

  10. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Manglos, S.H.

    1988-03-10

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

  11. Fast Neutron Spectrum Potassium Worth for Space Power Reactor Design Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, John D.; Marshall, Margaret A.; Briggs, J. Blair; Tsiboulia, Anatoli; Rozhikhin, Yevgeniy; Mihalczo, John T.

    2015-03-01

    A variety of critical experiments were constructed of enriched uranium metal (oralloy ) during the 1960s and 1970s at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. The purposes of these experiments included the evaluation of storage, casting, and handling limits for the Y-12 Plant and providing data for verification of calculation methods and cross-sections for nuclear criticality safety applications. These included solid cylinders of various diameters, annuli of various inner and outer diameters, two and three interacting cylinders of various diameters, and graphite and polyethylene reflected cylinders and annuli. Of the hundreds of delayed critical experiments, one was performed that consisted of uranium metal annuli surrounding a potassium-filled, stainless steel can. The outer diameter of the annuli was approximately 13 inches (33.02 cm) with an inner diameter of 7 inches (17.78 cm). The diameter of the stainless steel can was 7 inches (17.78 cm). The critical height of the configurations was approximately 5.6 inches (14.224 cm). The uranium annulus consisted of multiple stacked rings, each with radial thicknesses of 1 inch (2.54 cm) and varying heights. A companion measurement was performed using empty stainless steel cans; the primary purpose of these experiments was to test the fast neutron cross sections of potassium as it was a candidate for coolant in some early space power reactor designs.The experimental measurements were performed on July 11, 1963, by J. T. Mihalczo and M. S. Wyatt (Ref. 1) with additional information in its corresponding logbook. Unreflected and unmoderated experiments with the same set of highly enriched uranium metal parts were performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility in the 1960s and are evaluated in the International Handbook for Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook) with the identifier HEU MET FAST 051. Thin

  12. Validating the ENDF-B/VII{sup 235}U(n{sub th},f) prompt fission neutron spectrum using updated dosimetry cross sections (IRDFF)

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, R.; Zolotarev, K. I.; Pronyaev, V. G.; Trkov, A.

    2012-07-01

    The International Reactor Dosimetry File IRDF-2002 released in 2004 by the IAEA contains cross-section data and corresponding uncertainties for 66 dosimetry reactions. New cross-section evaluations have become available recently that re-define some of these dosimetry reactions for reactor applications including: 1) high fidelity evaluation work undertaken by one of the authors (KIZ); 2) evaluations from the ENDF/B-VII libraries that cover reactions within the International Evaluation of Neutron Cross-Section Standards; and 3) evaluations from JENDL-3.1 and JENDL-4 libraries. Overall, 37 new evaluations of dosimetry reactions have been assessed to determine whether they should be adopted to update and improve IRDF-2002. A new dosimetry library (International Reactor Dosimetry File for Fission and Fusion - IRDFF) was assembled based on new evaluations combined with selected IRDF-2002 evaluations. A grand-total of 74 dosimetry reactions are included into the IRDFF dosimetry library available at www-nds.iaea.org/IRDFFI. The assembled library was used to validate the {sup 235}U(n{sub th},f) ENDF-B/VII.0 prompt fission neutron spectrum. An excellent average C/E value of 1.002 +/- 0.02 is achieved for reactions with mean neutron energy of the integrated response (E50%) lower than 11 MeV. C/E data for reactions with E50%-response higher than 11 MeV decreases up to 0.8. We conclude that the ENDF-B/VII.0 {sup 235}U(n{sub th},f) prompt fission neutron spectrum from 1-11 MeV is validated within quoted uncertainties by available integral measurements in {sup 235}U(n{sub th},f) neutron field. Further investigations for high-threshold reactions are needed and new measurements of spectrum average cross sections for those reactions in the {sup 235}U(n{sub th},f) neutron field are recommended. (authors)

  13. Fission Spectrum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bloch, F.; Staub, H.

    1943-08-18

    Measurements of the spectrum of the fission neutrons of 25 are described, in which the energy of the neutrons is determined from the ionization produced by individual hydrogen recoils. The slow neutrons producing fission are obtained by slowing down the fast neutrons from the Be-D reaction of the Stanford cyclotron. In order to distinguish between fission neutrons and the remaining fast cyclotron neutrons both the cyclotron current and the pusle amplifier are modulated. A hollow neutron container, in which slow neutrons have a lifetime of about 2 milliseconds, avoids the use of large distances. This method results in much higher intensities than the usual modulation arrangement. The results show a continuous distribution of neutrons with a rather wide maximum at about 0.8 MV falling off to half of its maximum value at 2.0 MV. The total number of netrons is determined by comparison with the number of fission fragments. The result seems to indicate that only about 30% of the neutrons have energies below .8 MV. Various tests are described which were performed in order to rule out modification of the spectrum by inelastic scattering. Decl. May 4, 1951

  14. Absolute calibration of TFTR helium proportional counters

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Diesso, M.; Jassby, D.; Johnson, L.; McCauley, S.; Munsat, T.; Roquemore, A.L.; Barnes, C.W. |; Loughlin, M. |

    1995-06-01

    The TFTR helium proportional counters are located in the central five (5) channels of the TFTR multichannel neutron collimator. These detectors were absolutely calibrated using a 14 MeV neutron generator positioned at the horizontal midplane of the TFTR vacuum vessel. The neutron generator position was scanned in centimeter steps to determine the collimator aperture width to 14 MeV neutrons and the absolute sensitivity of each channel. Neutron profiles were measured for TFTR plasmas with time resolution between 5 msec and 50 msec depending upon count rates. The He detectors were used to measure the burnup of 1 MeV tritons in deuterium plasmas, the transport of tritium in trace tritium experiments, and the residual tritium levels in plasmas following 50:50 DT experiments.

  15. Cosmogenic neutron-capture-produced nuclides in stony meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spergel, M. S.; Reedy, R. C.; Lazareth, O. W.; Levy, P. W.; Slatest, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    The complete neutron-flux results and production rates for Cl-36, Ni-59, and Co-60 in stony meteorites of various radii and composition are presented. The relative neutron source strengths and neutron production-versus-depth profiles were determined by using calculated H-3 production rates. The absolute source strengths were normalized to that determined for the moon by Woolum et al. (1975). The energy spectrum of the source neutrons and the neutron transport calculations, which employed the ANISN computer code, were similar to those used for the moon by Lingenfelter et al. (1972). The production rates of the three radionuclides were determined as a function of depth in various spherical meteoroids from the calculated equilibrium neutron-flux distributions and from energy-dependent neutron-capture cross sections. Rates for producing these radionuclides by spallation reactions were also calculated.

  16. Irradiation creep in austenitic and ferritic steels irradiated in a tailored neutron spectrum to induce fusion reactor levels of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Gibson, L.T.; Jitsukawa, S.

    1996-04-01

    Six austenitic stainless steels and two ferritic alloys were irradiated sequentially in two research reactors where the neutron spectrum was tailored to produce a He production rate typical of a fusion device. Irradiation began in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor where an atomic displacement level of 7.4 dpa was achieved and was then transferred to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for the remainder of the irradiation to a total displacement level of 19 dpa. Temperatures of 60 and 330{degree}C are reported on. At 330{degree}C irradiation creep was found to be linear in stress and fluence with rates in the range of 1.7 - 5.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. Annealed and cold-worked materials exhibited similar creep rates. There is some indication that austenitic alloys with TiC or TiO precipitates had a slightly higher irradiation creep rate than those without. The ferritic alloys HT-9 and Fe-16Cr had irradiatoin creep rates about 0.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. No meaningful data could be obtained from the tubes irradiated at 60{degree}C because of damage to the tubes.

  17. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  18. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-01

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2β) searches, single β-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy. Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium β-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope (137Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R&D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2β decay and single β-decay.

  19. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  20. Effective dose of A-bomb radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki as assessed by chromosomal effectiveness of spectrum energy photons and neutrons.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, M S; Endo, S; Ejima, Y; Saito, I; Okamura, K; Oka, Y; Hoshi, M

    2006-07-01

    The effective dose of combined spectrum energy neutrons and high energy spectrum gamma-rays in A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has long been a matter of discussion. The reason is largely due to the paucity of biological data for high energy photons, particularly for those with an energy of tens of MeV. To circumvent this problem, a mathematical formalism was developed for the photon energy dependency of chromosomal effectiveness by reviewing a large number of data sets published in the literature on dicentric chromosome formation in human lymphocytes. The chromosomal effectiveness was expressed by a simple multiparametric function of photon energy, which made it possible to estimate the effective dose of spectrum energy photons and differential evaluation in the field of mixed neutron and gamma-ray exposure with an internal reference radiation. The effective dose of reactor-produced spectrum energy neutrons was insensitive to the fine structure of the energy distribution and was accessible by a generalized formula applicable to the A-bomb neutrons. Energy spectra of all sources of A-bomb gamma-rays at different tissue depths were simulated by a Monte Carlo calculation applied on an ICRU sphere. Using kerma-weighted chromosomal effectiveness of A-bomb spectrum energy photons, the effective dose of A-bomb neutrons was determined, where the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons was expressed by a dose-dependent variable RBE, RBE(gamma, D (n)), against A-bomb gamma-rays as an internal reference radiation. When the newly estimated variable RBE(gamma, D (n)) was applied to the chromosome data of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the city difference was completely eliminated. The revised effective dose was about 35% larger in Hiroshima, 19% larger in Nagasaki and 26% larger for the combined cohort compared with that based on a constant RBE of 10. Since the differences are significantly large, the proposed effective dose might have an

  1. Neutron radiation can activate K-ras via a point mutation in codon 146 and induces a different spectrum of ras mutations than does gamma radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, S R; Newcomb, E W; Pellicer, A

    1990-01-01

    Neutron radiation is known to produce tumors in animals and cause cell transformation. We have developed a protocol to efficiently induce thymic lymphomas in RF/J mice by a single acute dose of neutron irradiation. Activated ras genes were detected in 17% (4 of 24) of the tumors analyzed. One of the tumors contained a K-ras gene activated by a point mutation in codon 146. Activating ras mutations at position 146 have not been previously detected in any known human or animal tumors. The spectrum of ras mutations detected in neutron radiation-induced thymic lymphomas was different from that seen in thymic lymphomas induced by gamma radiation in the same strain of mice. These results may have important implications for the mechanisms by which different types of radiation damage DNA. Images PMID:2403644

  2. Fission Product Data Measured at Los Alamos for Fission Spectrum and Thermal Neutrons on {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, H.D.; Mac Innes, M.R.; Barr, D.W.; Keksis, A.L.; Meade, R.A.; Burns, C.J.; Chadwick, M.B.; Wallstrom, T.C.

    2010-12-15

    We describe measurements of fission product data at Los Alamos that are important for determining the number of fissions that have occurred when neutrons are incident on plutonium and uranium isotopes. The fission-spectrum measurements were made using a fission chamber designed by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in the BIG TEN critical assembly, as part of the Inter-laboratory Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration. The thermal measurements were made at Los Alamos' Omega West Reactor. A related set of measurements were made of fission-product ratios (so-called R-values) in neutron environments provided by a number of Los Alamos critical assemblies that range from having average energies causing fission of 400-600 keV (BIG TEN and the outer regions of the Flattop-25 assembly) to higher energies (1.4-1.9 MeV) in the Jezebel, and in the central regions of the Flattop-25 and Flattop-Pu, critical assemblies. From these data we determine ratios of fission product yields in different fuel and neutron environments (Q-values) and fission product yields in fission spectrum neutron environments for {sup 99}Mo, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 140}Ba, {sup 141,143}Ce, and {sup 147}Nd. Modest incident-energy dependence exists for the {sup 147}Nd fission product yield; this is discussed in the context of models for fission that include thermal and dynamical effects. The fission product data agree with measurements by Maeck and other authors using mass-spectrometry methods, and with the ILRR collaboration results that used gamma spectroscopy for quantifying fission products. We note that the measurements also contradict earlier 1950s historical Los Alamos estimates by {approx}5-7%, most likely owing to self-shielding corrections not made in the early thermal measurements. Our experimental results provide a confirmation of the England-Rider ENDF/B-VI evaluated fission-spectrum fission product yields that were carried

  3. On formation of the asymptotic spectrum of delayed neutron emitters in measuring the VVER-1000 scram system effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Shishkov, L. K. Zizin, M. N.

    2014-12-15

    The process of formation of an asymptotic distribution of the neutron flux density in the reactor systems after introducing different negative reactivities is considered. The impact of two factors after the reactivity introduction is evaluated: (1) nonuniformity of perturbation of core properties, on one hand, and (2) a sharp reduction in the density of prompt neutrons, which prevents the appearance of new delayed neutron emitters distributed in accordance with the “new” prompt neutron distribution, on the other hand. The results of calculations show that the errors of measuring the scram system effectiveness using the method of inverse solution of the kinetics equation are caused by the fact that, after the negative reactivity insertion, the sources of prompt and delayed neutrons have different spatial distributions. In the case of high negative reactivities, this difference remains while the system still has neutrons, which can be measured.

  4. On formation of the asymptotic spectrum of delayed neutron emitters in measuring the VVER-1000 scram system effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkov, L. K.; Zizin, M. N.

    2014-12-01

    The process of formation of an asymptotic distribution of the neutron flux density in the reactor systems after introducing different negative reactivities is considered. The impact of two factors after the reactivity introduction is evaluated: (1) nonuniformity of perturbation of core properties, on one hand, and (2) a sharp reduction in the density of prompt neutrons, which prevents the appearance of new delayed neutron emitters distributed in accordance with the "new" prompt neutron distribution, on the other hand. The results of calculations show that the errors of measuring the scram system effectiveness using the method of inverse solution of the kinetics equation are caused by the fact that, after the negative reactivity insertion, the sources of prompt and delayed neutrons have different spatial distributions. In the case of high negative reactivities, this difference remains while the system still has neutrons, which can be measured.

  5. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  6. Neutron spectrum measurements using proton recoil proportional counters: results of measurements of leakage spectra for the Little Boy assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, E.F.; Yule, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of degraded fission-neutron spectra using recoil proportional counters are done routinely for studies involving fast reactor mockups. The same techniques are applicable to measurements of neutron spectra required for personnel dosimetry in fast neutron environments. A brief discussion of current applications of these methods together with the results of a measurement made on the LITTLE BOY assembly at Los Alamos are here described.

  7. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korff, S. A.; Mendell, R. B.; Merker, M.; Light, E. S.; Verschell, H. J.; Sandie, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Contributions to fast neutron measurements in the atmosphere are outlined. The results of a calculation to determine the production, distribution and final disappearance of atmospheric neutrons over the entire spectrum are presented. An attempt is made to answer questions that relate to processes such as neutron escape from the atmosphere and C-14 production. In addition, since variations of secondary neutrons can be related to variations in the primary radiation, comment on the modulation of both radiation components is made.

  8. The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith C.

    2008-01-01

    The Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICE) will be a Mission of Opportunity dedicated to the study of neutron stars, the only places in the universe where all four fundamental forces of nature are simultaneously in play. NICE will explore the exotic states of matter within neutron stars, revealing their interior and surface compositions through rotation resolved X-ray spectroscopy. Absolute time-referenced data will allow NICE to probe the extreme physical environments associated with neutron stars, leveraging observations across the electromagnetic spectrum to answer decades-old questions about one of the most powerful cosmic accelerators known. Finally, NICE will definitively measure stabilities of pulsars as clocks, with implications for navigation, a pulsar-based timescale, and gravitational-wave detection. NICE will fly on the International Space Station, while GLAST is on orbit and post-RXTE, and will allow for the discovery of new high-energy pulsars and provide continuity in X-ray timing astrophysics.

  9. Measurements of the T(t,2n)He4 Neutron Spectrum at Low Reactant Energies from Inertial Confinement Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Sinenian, N.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu; Radha, P. B.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; McNabb, D. P.; Amendt, P. A.; Boyd, R. N.; Hatchett, S. P.; Quaglioni, S.; Rygg, J. R.; Thompson, I. J.; Bacher, A. D.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.

    2012-07-01

    Measurements of the neutron spectrum from the T(t,2n)He4 (tt) reaction have been conducted using inertial confinement fusion implosions at the OMEGA laser facility. In these experiments, deuterium-tritium (DT) gas-filled capsules were imploded to study the tt reaction in thermonuclear plasmas at low reactant center-of-mass (c.m.) energies. In contrast to accelerator experiments at higher c.m. energies (above 100 keV), these results indicate a negligible n+He5 reaction channel at a c.m. energy of 23 keV.

  10. Measuring neutron spectra in radiotherapy using the nested neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Maglieri, Robert Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Kildea, John; Licea, Angel

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Out-of-field neutron doses resulting from photonuclear interactions in the head of a linear accelerator pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel during radiotherapy. To quantify neutron production, in-room measurements have traditionally been carried out using Bonner sphere systems (BSS) with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a recently developed active detector, the nested neutron spectrometer (NNS), was tested in radiotherapy bunkers. Methods: The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional BSS. Operated in current-mode, the problem of pulse pileup due to high dose-rates is overcome by measuring current, similar to an ionization chamber. In a bunker housing a Varian Clinac 21EX, the performance of the NNS was evaluated in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and dose-rate effects. Using a custom maximum-likelihood expectation–maximization algorithm, measured neutron spectra at various locations inside the bunker were then compared to Monte Carlo simulations of an identical setup. In terms of dose, neutron ambient dose equivalents were calculated from the measured spectra and compared to bubble detector neutron dose equivalent measurements. Results: The NNS-measured spectra for neutrons at various locations in a treatment room were found to be consistent with expectations for both relative shape and absolute magnitude. Neutron fluence-rate decreased with distance from the source and the shape of the spectrum changed from a dominant fast neutron peak near the Linac head to a dominant thermal neutron peak in the moderating conditions of the maze. Monte Carlo data and NNS-measured spectra agreed within 30% at all locations except in the maze where the deviation was a maximum of 40%. Neutron ambient dose equivalents calculated from the authors’ measured spectra were consistent (one standard deviation) with bubble detector measurements in the treatment room. Conclusions: The NNS may

  11. Spectrum and density of neutron flux in the irradiation beam line no. 3 of the IBR-2 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabalin, E. P.; Verkhoglyadov, A. E.; Bulavin, M. V.; Rogov, A. D.; Kulagin, E. N.; Kulikov, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    Methodology and results of measuring the differential density of the neutron flux in irradiation beam line no. 3 of the IBR-2 reactor using neutron activation analysis (NAA) are presented in the paper. The results are compared to the calculation performed on the basis of the 3D MCNP model. The data that are obtained are required to determine the integrated radiation dose of the studied samples at various distances from the reactor.

  12. A CHANGE IN THE QUIESCENT X-RAY SPECTRUM OF THE NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY MXB 1659-29

    SciTech Connect

    Cackett, E. M.; Brown, E. F.; Cumming, A.; Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M.; Fridriksson, J. K.; Wijnands, R.; Homan, J.

    2013-09-10

    The quasi-persistent neutron star low-mass X-ray binary MXB 1659-29 went into quiescence in 2001, and we have followed its quiescent X-ray evolution since. Observations over the first 4 yr showed a rapid drop in flux and temperature of the neutron star atmosphere, interpreted as cooling of the neutron star crust which had been heated during the 2.5 yr outburst. However, observations taken approximately 1400 and 2400 days into quiescence were consistent with each other, suggesting the crust had reached thermal equilibrium with the core. Here we present a new Chandra observation of MXB 1659-29 taken 11 yr into quiescence and 4 yr since the last Chandra observation. This new observation shows an unexpected factor of {approx}3 drop in count rate and change in spectral shape since the last observation, which cannot be explained simply by continued cooling. Two possible scenarios are that either the neutron star temperature has remained unchanged and there has been an increase in the column density, or, alternatively the neutron star temperature has dropped precipitously and the spectrum is now dominated by a power-law component. The first scenario may be possible given that MXB 1659-29 is a near edge-on system, and an increase in column density could be due to build-up of material in, and a thickening of, a truncated accretion disk during quiescence. But, a large change in disk height may not be plausible if standard accretion disk theory holds during quiescence. Alternatively, the disk may be precessing, leading to a higher column density during this latest observation.

  13. Measurement of Absolute Fission Yields in the Fast Neutron-Induced Fission of Actinides: {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 243}Am, and {sup 244}Cm by Track-Etch-cum-Gamma Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, R.H.; Naik, H.; Pandey, A.K.; Kalsi, P.C.; Singh, R.J.; Ramaswami, A.; Nair, A.G.C.

    2000-07-15

    The absolute fission yields of 46 fission products in {sup 238}U (99.9997 at.%), 46 fission products in {sup 237}Np, 27 fission products in {sup 238}Pu (99.21 at.%), 30 fission products in {sup 240}Pu (99.48 at.%), 30 fission products in {sup 243}Am (99.998 at.%), and 32 fission products in {sup 244}Cm (99.43 at.%) induced by fast neutrons were determined using a fission track-etch-cum-gamma spectrometric technique. In the case of highly alpha-active and sparingly available actinides - e.g., {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 243}Am, and {sup 244}Cm - a novel recoil catcher technique to collect the fission products on a Lexan polycarbonate foil followed by gamma-ray spectrometry was developed during the course of this work. This completely removed interferences from (a) gamma rays of daughter products in secular equilibrium with the target nuclide (e.g., {sup 243}Am-{sup 239}Np), (b) activation products of the catcher foil [e.g., {sup 24}Na from Al(n,{alpha})], and (c) activation products of the target [e.g., {sup 238}Np from {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}) and {sup 239}Np from {sup 238}U(n,{gamma})] reactions, making the gamma spectrometric analysis very simple and accurate. The high-yield asymmetric fission products were analyzed by direct gamma spectrometry, whereas the low-yield symmetric products (e.g., Ag, Cd, and Sb) as well as some of the asymmetric fission products (e.g., Br) and rare earths (in the case of {sup 238}U and {sup 237}Np) were radiochemically separated and then analyzed by gamma-ray spectrometry. The neutron spectra in the irradiation positions of the reactors were measured and delineated in the thermal to 10-MeV region using threshold activation detectors. The present data were compared with the ENDF/VI and UKFY2 evaluated data files. From the measured cumulative yields, the mass-chain yields have been deduced using charge distribution systematics. The mass yields, along with similar data for other fast neutron-induced fissioning systems, show several

  14. An experimental setup for measurement of neutron energy spectra in lithium with collimated 14.7 MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofek, R.; Tsechanski, A.; Profio, A. E.; Shani, G.

    1989-06-01

    Neutron energy spectra in an 88 cm diameter, 88 cm long lithium tank were measured with the Ben Gurion University experimental setup. In this setup, the lithium tank is separated from the DT neutron generator by a 120 cm thick paraffin wall with a 6 cm diameter collimator through it, along the axis of the neutron generator and the lithium tank. This enables unidirectionality and monoenergeticity of the neutrons penetrating the lithium tank. A neutron energy spectrum is obtained by unfolding with the code FORIST of proton-recoil spectra measured by an NE213 liquid scintillator. The important features of the spectrometry system, comprised of the NE213 scintillator and the attached electronic system, are the high pulse shape discrimination capability of the NE213 scintillator, which enables the separation of neutron and gamma events, relatively high energy resolution, and the system linearity. Also the simultaneous measurement of the low gain and high gain proton-recoil spectra prevents a distortion of the unfolded neutron spectrum. The neutron energy spectra are absolutely normalized and internormalized to each other by an absolutely calibrated, second NE213 scintillator, placed close to the neutron generator. The measured neutron energy spectra inside the lithium tank were compared to some preliminary calculations of the spectra, carried out with the discrete-ordinates transport code DOT4.2. Both spectra are in poor agreement. These discrepancies are assigned mainly to the inadequancy of the transport calculations. Finally, the distribution of the tritium production in the lithium tank, with the same experimental configurations, was calculated with the code DOT4.2 as well. The results indicate that the collimated neutron beam configuration is inappropriate for the purpose of tritium breeding ratio measurements.

  15. 252Cf fission-neutron spectrum using a simplified time-of-flight setup: An advanced teaching laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becchetti, F. D.; Febbraro, M.; Torres-Isea, R.; Ojaruega, M.; Baum, L.

    2013-02-01

    The removal of PuBe and AmBe neutron sources from many university teaching laboratories (due to heightened security issues) has often left a void in teaching various aspects of neutron physics. We have recently replaced such sources with sealed 252Cf oil-well logging sources (nominal 10-100 μCi), and developed several experiments using them as neutron sources. This includes a fission-neutron time-of-flight experiment using plastic scintillators, which utilizes the prompt γ rays emitted in 252Cf spontaneous fission as a fast timing start signal. The experiment can be performed with conventional nuclear instrumentation and a 1-D multi-channel pulse-height analyzer, available in most advanced teaching laboratories. Alternatively, a more sophisticated experiment using liquid scintillators and n/γ pulse-shape discrimination can be performed. Several other experiments using these neutron sources are also feasible. The experiments can introduce students to the problem of detecting the dark matter thought to dominate the universe and to the techniques used to detect contraband fissionable nuclear materials.

  16. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Mano K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2015-12-01

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  17. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-06-05

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  18. Measurement of DT and DD components in neutron spectrum with a double-crystal time-of-flight spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, K.; Kondo, K.; Ochiai, K.; Sato, S.; Nishitani, T.; Konno, C.; Okamoto, A.; Kitajima, S.; Sasao, M.

    2008-03-01

    To investigate the deuteron and triton density ratio in core plasmas, a new methodology with measurement of tritium (DT) and deuterium (DD) neutron count rate ratio using a double-crystal time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer is proposed. Multi-discriminator electronic circuits for the first and second detectors are used in addition to the TOF technique. The optimum arrangement of the detectors and discrimination window were examined considering the relations between the geometrical arrangement and deposited energy using a Monte Carlo Code, PHITS (Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System). An experiment to verify the calculations was performed using DD neutrons from an accelerator.

  19. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses. PMID:23586876

  20. On the solar cycle variation in the barometer coefficients of high latitude neutron monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusunose, M.; Ogita, N.

    1985-01-01

    Evaluation of barometer coefficients of neutron monitors located at high latitudes has been performed by using the results of the spherical harmonic analysis based on the records from around twenty stations for twelve years from January 1966 to December 1977. The average of data at eight stations, where continuous records are available for twelve years, show that the absolute value of barometer coefficient is in positive correlation with the cosmic ray neutron intensity. The variation rate of the barometer coefficient to the cosmic ray neutron intensity is influenced by the changes in the cutoff rigidity and in the primary spectrum.

  1. ^238U Fission Ion Chamber for Neutron Dosimetry at the 88-Inch Cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Brent; McMahan, Peggy; Barquest, Brad; Johnson, Mike

    2007-10-01

    Efficiency measurements have been conducted for a commercial ^238U fission ion chamber, to be used for neutron dosimetry at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL. Fast, quasi-monoenergetic neutrons in the energy range of 5 to 30 MeV are under development at the facility through deuteron break-up, for radiation effects testing and cross-section measurements for a variety of applications. Through comparisons with absolute fluxes obtained using activation foils, and energy spectra obtained using the time-of-flight method, efficiency for both monoenergetic and white spectrum neutrons can be calculated.

  2. Calibration of time of flight detectors using laser-driven neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Mirfayzi, S. R.; Kar, S. Ahmed, H.; Green, A.; Alejo, A.; Jung, D.; Krygier, A. G.; Freeman, R. R.; Clarke, R.; Fuchs, J.; Vassura, L.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Roth, M.; Morrison, J. T.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P.; Oliver, M.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-07-15

    Calibration of three scintillators (EJ232Q, BC422Q, and EJ410) in a time-of-flight arrangement using a laser drive-neutron source is presented. The three plastic scintillator detectors were calibrated with gamma insensitive bubble detector spectrometers, which were absolutely calibrated over a wide range of neutron energies ranging from sub-MeV to 20 MeV. A typical set of data obtained simultaneously by the detectors is shown, measuring the neutron spectrum emitted from a petawatt laser irradiated thin foil.

  3. Calibration of time of flight detectors using laser-driven neutron source.

    PubMed

    Mirfayzi, S R; Kar, S; Ahmed, H; Krygier, A G; Green, A; Alejo, A; Clarke, R; Freeman, R R; Fuchs, J; Jung, D; Kleinschmidt, A; Morrison, J T; Najmudin, Z; Nakamura, H; Norreys, P; Oliver, M; Roth, M; Vassura, L; Zepf, M; Borghesi, M

    2015-07-01

    Calibration of three scintillators (EJ232Q, BC422Q, and EJ410) in a time-of-flight arrangement using a laser drive-neutron source is presented. The three plastic scintillator detectors were calibrated with gamma insensitive bubble detector spectrometers, which were absolutely calibrated over a wide range of neutron energies ranging from sub-MeV to 20 MeV. A typical set of data obtained simultaneously by the detectors is shown, measuring the neutron spectrum emitted from a petawatt laser irradiated thin foil. PMID:26233373

  4. Neutron standard data

    SciTech Connect

    Peelle, R.; Conde, H.

    1988-01-01

    The neutron standards are reviewed with emphasis on the evaluation for ENDFB-VI. Also discussed are the neutron spectrum of /sup 252/Cf spontaneous fission, activation cross sections for neutron flux measurement, and standards for neutron energies greater than 20 MeV. Recommendations are made for future work. 21 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Search for the deeply bound K-pp state from the semi-inclusive forward-neutron spectrum in the in-flight K- reaction on helium-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, T.; Ajimura, S.; Beer, G.; Bhang, H.; Bragadireanu, M.; Busso, L.; Cargnelli, M.; Choi, S.; Curceanu, C.; Enomoto, S.; Faso, D.; Fujioka, H.; Fujiwara, Y.; Fukuda, T.; Guaraldo, C.; Hayano, R. S.; Hiraiwa, T.; Iio, M.; Iliescu, M.; Inoue, K.; Ishiguro, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Ishimoto, S.; Itahashi, K.; Iwai, M.; Iwasaki, M.; Kato, Y.; Kawasaki, S.; Kienle, P.; Kou, H.; Ma, Y.; Marton, J.; Matsuda, Y.; Mizoi, Y.; Morra, O.; Nagae, T.; Noumi, H.; Ohnishi, H.; Okada, S.; Outa, H.; Piscicchia, K.; Poli Lener, M.; Romero Vidal, A.; Sada, Y.; Sakaguchi, A.; Sakuma, F.; Sato, M.; Scordo, A.; Sekimoto, M.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D.; Sirghi, F.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, T.; Tanida, K.; Tatsuno, H.; Tokuda, M.; Tomono, D.; Toyoda, A.; Tsukada, K.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Yamaga, T.; Yamazaki, T.; Yim, H.; Zhang, Q.; Zmeskal, J.

    2015-06-01

    An experiment to search for the K-pp bound state was performed via the in-flight {}^3He(K-,n) reaction using 5.3 × 10^9 kaons at 1 GeV/c at the J-PARC hadron experimental facility. In the semi-inclusive neutron missing-mass spectrum at θ n^{lab}=0°, no significant peak was observed in the region corresponding to K-pp binding energy larger than 80 MeV, where a bump structure has been reported in the Λ p final state in different reactions. Assuming the state to be isotropically decaying into Λ p, mass-dependent upper limits on the production cross section were determined to be 30-180, 70-250, and 100-270μb/sr, for the natural widths of 20, 60, and 100 MeV, respectively, at 95% confidence level.

  6. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < ‑1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  7. The absolute path command

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it canmore » provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.« less

  8. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  9. Calculations of neutron spectra after neutron neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, B. E.; Stephenson, S. L.; Howell, C. R.; Mitchell, G. E.; Tornow, W.; Furman, W. I.; Lychagin, E. V.; Muzichka, A. Yu; Nekhaev, G. V.; Strelkov, A. V.; Sharapov, E. I.; Shvetsov, V. N.

    2004-09-01

    A direct neutron-neutron scattering length, ann, measurement with the goal of 3% accuracy (0.5 fm) is under preparation at the aperiodic pulsed reactor YAGUAR. A direct measurement of ann will not only help resolve conflicting results of ann by indirect means, but also in comparison to the proton-proton scattering length, app, shed light on the charge-symmetry of the nuclear force. We discuss in detail the analysis of the nn-scattering data in terms of a simple analytical expression. We also discuss calibration measurements using the time-of-flight spectra of neutrons scattered on He and Ar gases and the neutron activation technique. In particular, we calculate the neutron velocity and time-of-flight spectra after scattering neutrons on neutrons and after scattering neutrons on He and Ar atoms for the proposed experimental geometry, using a realistic neutron flux spectrum—Maxwellian plus epithermal tail. The shape of the neutron spectrum after scattering is appreciably different from the initial spectrum, due to collisions between thermal-thermal and thermal-epithermal neutrons. At the same time, the integral over the Maxwellian part of the realistic scattering spectrum differs by only about 6 per cent from that of a pure Maxwellian nn-scattering spectrum.

  10. Molecular iodine absolute frequencies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, C.J.

    1990-06-25

    Fifty specified lines of {sup 127}I{sub 2} were studied by Doppler-free frequency modulation spectroscopy. For each line the classification of the molecular transition was determined, hyperfine components were identified, and one well-resolved component was selected for precise determination of its absolute frequency. In 3 cases, a nearby alternate line was selected for measurement because no well-resolved component was found for the specified line. Absolute frequency determinations were made with an estimated uncertainty of 1.1 MHz by locking a dye laser to the selected hyperfine component and measuring its wave number with a high-precision Fabry-Perot wavemeter. For each line results of the absolute measurement, the line classification, and a Doppler-free spectrum are given.

  11. Absolute calibration in vivo measurement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kruchten, D.A.; Hickman, D.P.

    1991-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating a new method for obtaining absolute calibration factors for radiation measurement systems used to measure internally deposited radionuclides in vivo. Absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems will eliminate the need to generate a series of human surrogate structures (i.e., phantoms) for calibrating in vivo measurement systems. The absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems utilizes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to define physiological structure, size, and composition. The MRI image provides a digitized representation of the physiological structure, which allows for any mathematical distribution of radionuclides within the body. Using Monte Carlo transport codes, the emission spectrum from the body is predicted. The in vivo measurement equipment is calibrated using the Monte Carlo code and adjusting for the intrinsic properties of the detection system. The calibration factors are verified using measurements of existing phantoms and previously obtained measurements of human volunteers. 8 refs.

  12. Study of the reflection spectrum of the accreting neutron star GX 3+1 using XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintore, F.; Di Salvo, T.; Bozzo, E.; Sanna, A.; Burderi, L.; D'Aì, A.; Riggio, A.; Scarano, F.; Iaria, R.

    2015-06-01

    Broad emission features of abundant chemical elements, such as iron, are commonly seen in the X-ray spectra of accreting compact objects and their studies can provide useful information about the geometry of the accretion processes. In this work, we focus our attention on GX 3+1, a bright, persistent accreting low-mass X-ray binary, classified as an atoll source. Its spectrum is well described by an accretion disc plus a stable Comptonizing, optically thick corona which dominates the X-ray emission in the 0.3-20 keV energy band. In addition, four broad emission lines are found and we associate them with reflection of hard photons from the inner regions of the accretion disc, where Doppler and relativistic effects are important. We used self-consistent reflection models to fit the spectra of the 2010 XMM-Newton observation and the stacking of the whole data sets of 2010 INTEGRAL observations. We conclude that the spectra are consistent with reflection produced at ˜10 gravitational radii by an accretion disc with an ionization parameter of ξ ˜ 600 erg cm s-1 and viewed under an inclination angle of the system of ˜35°. Furthermore, we detected for the first time for GX 3+1, the presence of a power-law component dominant at energies higher than 20 keV, possibly associated with an optically thin component of non-thermal electrons.

  13. Study of muon-induced neutron production using accelerator muon beam at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Y.; Lin, C. J.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Draeger, E.; White, C. G.; Luk, K. B.; Steiner, H.

    2015-08-17

    Cosmogenic muon-induced neutrons are one of the most problematic backgrounds for various underground experiments for rare event searches. In order to accurately understand such backgrounds, experimental data with high-statistics and well-controlled systematics is essential. We performed a test experiment to measure muon-induced neutron production yield and energy spectrum using a high-energy accelerator muon beam at CERN. We successfully observed neutrons from 160 GeV/c muon interaction on lead, and measured kinetic energy distributions for various production angles. Works towards evaluation of absolute neutron production yield is underway. This work also demonstrates that the setup is feasible for a future large-scale experiment for more comprehensive study of muon-induced neutron production.

  14. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  15. PERSONNEL NEUTRON DOSIMETER

    DOEpatents

    Fitzgerald, J.J.; Detwiler, C.G. Jr.

    1960-05-24

    A description is given of a personnel neutron dosimeter capable of indicating the complete spectrum of the neutron dose received as well as the dose for each neutron energy range therein. The device consists of three sets of indium foils supported in an aluminum case. The first set consists of three foils of indium, the second set consists of a similar set of indium foils sandwiched between layers of cadmium, whereas the third set is similar to the second set but is sandwiched between layers of polyethylene. By analysis of all the foils the neutron spectrum and the total dose from neutrons of all energy levels can be ascertained.

  16. ABSOLUTE POLARIMETRY AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    OKADA; BRAVAR, A.; BUNCE, G.; GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; MAKDISI, Y.; NASS, A.; WOOD, J.; ZELENSKI, Z.; ET AL.

    2007-09-10

    Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy Of {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} < 5%. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power A{sub N} of this process has allowed us to achieve {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} = 4.2% in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of AN in the CNI region (four-momentum transfer squared 0.001 < -t < 0.032 (GeV/c){sup 2}) are also discussed. We point out the current issues and expected optimum accuracy in 2006 and the future.

  17. Implants as absolute anchorage.

    PubMed

    Rungcharassaeng, Kitichai; Kan, Joseph Y K; Caruso, Joseph M

    2005-11-01

    Anchorage control is essential for successful orthodontic treatment. Each tooth has its own anchorage potential as well as propensity to move when force is applied. When teeth are used as anchorage, the untoward movements of the anchoring units may result in the prolonged treatment time, and unpredictable or less-than-ideal outcome. To maximize tooth-related anchorage, techniques such as differential torque, placing roots into the cortex of the bone, the use of various intraoral devices and/or extraoral appliances have been implemented. Implants, as they are in direct contact with bone, do not possess a periodontal ligament. As a result, they do not move when orthodontic/orthopedic force is applied, and therefore can be used as "absolute anchorage." This article describes different types of implants that have been used as orthodontic anchorage. Their clinical applications and limitations are also discussed. PMID:16463910

  18. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  19. Measurement of the secondary neutron dose distribution from the LET spectrum of recoils using the CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector in 10 MV X-ray medical radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Kodaira, Satoshi; Sawaguchi, Fumiya; Abe, Yasuyuki; Obara, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Masae; Kawashima, Hajime; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kurano, Mieko; Uchihori, Yukio; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Koguchi, Yasuhiro; Nakajima, Masaru; Kitamura, Nozomi; Sato, Tomoharu

    2015-04-01

    We measured the recoil charged particles from secondary neutrons produced by the photonuclear reaction in a water phantom from a 10-MV photon beam from medical linacs. The absorbed dose and the dose equivalent were evaluated from the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum of recoils using the CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) based on well-established methods in the field of space radiation dosimetry. The contributions and spatial distributions of these in the phantom on nominal photon exposures were verified as the secondary neutron dose and neutron dose equivalent. The neutron dose equivalent normalized to the photon-absorbed dose was 0.261 mSv/100 MU at source to chamber distance 90 cm. The dose equivalent at the surface gave the highest value, and was attenuated to less than 10% at 5 cm from the surface. The dose contribution of the high LET component of ⩾100 keV/μm increased with the depth in water, resulting in an increase of the quality factor. The CR-39 PNTD is a powerful tool that can be used to systematically measure secondary neutron dose distributions in a water phantom from an in-field to out-of-field high-intensity photon beam.

  20. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  1. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Manglos, Stephen H.

    1989-06-06

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

  2. Effect of the energy spectrum and angular momentum of pre-scission neutrons on the prediction of fission fragment angular anisotropy by the models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soheyli, Saeed; Khanlari, Marzieh Varasteh

    2016-04-01

    Effects of the various neutron emission energy spectra, as well as the influence of the angular momentum of pre-scission neutrons on theoretical predictions of fission fragment angular anisotropies for several heavy-ion induced fission systems are considered. Although theoretical calculations of angular anisotropy are very sensitive to neutron emission correction, the effects of the different values of kinetic energy of emitted neutrons derived from the various neutron emission energy spectra before reaching to the saddle point on the prediction of fission fragment angular distribution by the model are not significant and can be neglected, since these effects on angular anisotropies of fission fragments for a wide range of fissility parameters and excitation energies of compound nuclei are not more than 10%. Furthermore, the theoretical prediction of fission fragment angular anisotropy is not sensitive to the angular momentum of emitted neutrons.

  3. Absolute limit on rotation of gravitationally bound stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1994-03-01

    The authors seek an absolute limit on the rotational period for a neutron star as a function of its mass, based on the minimal constraints imposed by Einstein`s theory of relativity, Le Chatelier`s principle, causality and a low-density equation of state, uncertainties which can be evaluated as to their effect on the result. This establishes a limiting curve in the mass-period plane below which no pulsar that is a neutron star can lie. For example, the minimum possible Kepler period, which is an absolute limit on rotation below which mass-shedding would occur, is 0.33 ms for a M = 1.442 M{circle_dot} neutron star (the mass of PSR1913+16). If the limit were found to be broken by any pulsar, it would signal that the confined hadronic phase of ordinary nucleons and nuclei is only metastable, an extraordinary conclusion.

  4. "Influence Method" applied to measure a moderated neutron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, I. J.; Mayer, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    The "Influence Method" is conceived for the absolute determination of a nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency. This method exploits the influence of the presence of one detector, in the count rate of another detector when they are placed one behind the other and define statistical estimators for the absolute number of incident particles and for the efficiency. The method and its detailed mathematical description were recently published (Rios and Mayer, 2015 [1]). In this article we apply it to the measurement of the moderated neutron flux produced by an 241AmBe neutron source surrounded by a light water sphere, employing a pair of 3He detectors. For this purpose, the method is extended for its application where particles arriving at the detector obey a Poisson distribution and also, for the case when efficiency is not constant over the energy spectrum of interest. Experimental distributions and derived parameters are compared with theoretical predictions of the method and implications concerning the potential application to the absolute calibration of neutron sources are considered.

  5. Characterizing ICF Neutron Diagnostics on the nTOF line at SUNY Geneseo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simone, Angela; Padalino, Stephen; Turner, Ethan; Ginnane, Mary Kate; Dubois, Natalie; Fletcher, Kurtis; Giordano, Michael; Lawson-Keister, Patrick; Harrison, Hannah; Visca, Hannah; Sangster, Craig; Regan, Sean

    2014-10-01

    Charged particle beams from the Geneseo 1.7 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator produce nuclear reactions that emit neutrons in the range of 0.5 to 17.9 MeV via the d(d,n)3He and 11B(d,n)12C reactions. The neutron energy and flux can be adjusted by controlling the accelerator beam current and potential. This adjustable neutron source makes it possible to calibrate ICF and HEDP neutron scintillator diagnostics. However, gamma rays which are often present during an accelerator-based calibration are difficult to differentiate from neutron signals in scintillators. To identify neutrons from gamma rays and to determine their energy, a permanent neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) line is being constructed. By detecting the scintillator signal in coincidence with an associated charged particle (ACP) produced in the reaction, the identity of the neutron can be known and its energy determined by time of flight. Using a 100% efficient surface barrier detector to count the ACPs, the absolute efficiency of the scintillator as a function of neutron energy can be determined. This is done by determining the ratio of the ACP counts in the singles spectrum to coincidence counts for matched solid angles of the SBD and scintillator. Funded in part by a LLE contract through the DOE.

  6. Neutron radiography with sub-15 μm resolution through event centroiding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, Anton S.; McPhate, Jason B.; Vallerga, John V.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Bruce Feller, W.; Lehmann, Eberhard; Kaestner, Anders; Boillat, Pierre; Panzner, Tobias; Filges, Uwe

    2012-10-01

    Conversion of thermal and cold neutrons into a strong ˜1 ns electron pulse with an absolute neutron detection efficiency as high as 50-70% makes detectors with 10B-doped Microchannel Plates (MCPs) very attractive for neutron radiography and microtomography applications. The subsequent signal amplification preserves the location of the event within the MCP pore (typically 6-10 μm in diameter), providing the possibility to perform neutron counting with high spatial resolution. Different event centroiding techniques of the charge landing on a patterned anode enable accurate reconstruction of the neutron position, provided the charge footprints do not overlap within the time required for event processing. The new fast 2×2 Timepix readout with >1.2 kHz frame rates provides the unique possibility to detect neutrons with sub-15 μm resolution at several MHz/cm2 counting rates. The results of high resolution neutron radiography experiments presented in this paper, demonstrate the sub-15 μm resolution capability of our detection system. The high degree of collimation and cold spectrum of ICON and BOA beamlines combined with the high spatial resolution and detection efficiency of MCP-Timepix detectors are crucial for high contrast neutron radiography and microtomography with high spatial resolution. The next generation of Timepix electronics with sparsified readout should enable counting rates in excess of 107 n/cm2/s taking full advantage of high beam intensity of present brightest neutron imaging facilities.

  7. Neutron Activation Analysis: Techniques and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, Ryan

    2011-04-27

    The role of neutron activation analysis in low-energy low-background experimentsis discussed in terms of comparible methods. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis is introduce. The procedure of instrumental neutron activation analysis is detailed especially with respect to the measurement of trace amounts of natural radioactivity. The determination of reactor neutron spectrum parameters required for neutron activation analysis is also presented.

  8. Absolute Identification by Relative Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Neil; Brown, Gordon D. A.; Chater, Nick

    2005-01-01

    In unidimensional absolute identification tasks, participants identify stimuli that vary along a single dimension. Performance is surprisingly poor compared with discrimination of the same stimuli. Existing models assume that identification is achieved using long-term representations of absolute magnitudes. The authors propose an alternative…

  9. Be Resolute about Absolute Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret L.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how conceptualization of absolute value can start long before it is introduced. The manner in which absolute value is introduced to students in middle school has far-reaching consequences for their future mathematical understanding. It begins to lay the foundation for students' understanding of algebra, which can change…

  10. Measurement of the keV-neutron capture cross section and capture gamma-ray spectrum of isotopes around N=82 region

    SciTech Connect

    Katabuchi, Tatsuya; Igashira, Masayuki

    2012-11-12

    The keV-neutron capture cross section and capture {gamma}-ray spectra of nuclides with a neutron magic number N= 82, {sup 139}La and {sup 142}Nd, were newly measured by the time-of-flight method. Capture {gamma}-rays were detected with an anti-Compton NaI(T1) spectrometer, and the pulse-height weighting technique was applied to derive the neutron capture cross section. The results were provided with our previous measurements of other nuclides around N= 82, {sup 140}Ce, {sup 141}Pr, {sup 143}Nd and {sup 145}Nd.

  11. α and 2 p 2 n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions on 60Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Haight, R. C.; Nelson, R. O.; Kunieda, S.; Kawano, T.

    2015-06-01

    Background: The cross sections for populating the residual nucleus in the reaction ZAX(n,x) Z -2 A -4Y exhibit peaks as a function of incident neutron energy corresponding to the (n ,n'α ) reaction and, at higher energy, to the (n ,2 p 3 n ) reaction. The relative magnitudes of these peaks vary with the Z of the target nucleus. Purpose: Study fast neutron-induced reactions on 60Ni. Locate experimentally the nuclear charge region along the line of stability where the cross sections for α emission and for 2 p 2 n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions are comparable as a further test of reaction models. Methods: Data were taken by using the Germanium Array for Neutron-Induced Excitations. The broad-spectrum pulsed neutron beam of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's Weapons Neutron Research facility provided neutrons in the energy range from 1 to 250 MeV. The time-of-flight technique was used to determine the incident-neutron energies. Results: Absolute partial cross sections for production of seven discrete Fe γ rays populated in 60Ni (n ,α /2 p x n γ ) reactions with 2 ≤x ≤5 were measured for neutron energies 1 MeVneutron energies while discrepancies appear at higher neutron energies. The cross section for producing an isotope in fast neutron-induced reactions on stable targets via α emission at the peak of the (n ,α ) and (n ,n'α ) reactions is comparable to that for 2 p 2 n and 2 p 3 n emission at higher incident energies in the nuclear charge region around Fe.

  12. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  13. Ion chambers simplify absolute intensity measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, J. A. R.

    1966-01-01

    Single or double ion chamber technique measures absolute radiation intensities in the extreme vacuum ultraviolet region of the spectrum. The ion chambers use rare gases as the ion carrier. Photon absorbed by the gas creates one ion pair so a measure of these is a measure of the number of incident photons.

  14. Simulation of the neutron spectrum from the 7Li(p,n) reaction with a liquid-lithium target at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, M.; Cohen, D.; Paul, M.; Berkovits, D.; Eisen, Y.; Feinberg, G.; Giorginis, G.; Halfon, S.; Krása, A.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Shor, A.

    2013-01-01

    The 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction has been used for the last 25 years to produce quasi-Maxwellian neutrons in order to measure Maxwellian-Averaged Cross-Sections in the relevant temperatures for stellar nucleosynthesis. A liquid-lithium target at the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility is expected to allow us to perform such measurements at higher neutron intensities. Here we describe a Monte Carlo tool, SimLiT, developed to evaluate neutron spectra, intensities and angular distributions resulting from this reaction. We also demonstrate the feasibility to couple SimLiT with an advanced transport code, resulting in a powerful tool for planning and analysis of experiments using the 7Li(p,n) reaction as a neutron source.

  15. Characterization and MCNP simulation of neutron energy spectrum shift after transmission through strong absorbing materials and its impact on tomography reconstructed image.

    PubMed

    Hachouf, N; Kharfi, F; Boucenna, A

    2012-10-01

    An ideal neutron radiograph, for quantification and 3D tomographic image reconstruction, should be a transmission image which exactly obeys to the exponential attenuation law of a monochromatic neutron beam. There are many reasons for which this assumption does not hold for high neutron absorbing materials. The main deviations from the ideal are due essentially to neutron beam hardening effect. The main challenges of this work are the characterization of neutron transmission through boron enriched steel materials and the observation of beam hardening. Then, in our work, the influence of beam hardening effect on neutron tomographic image, for samples based on these materials, is studied. MCNP and FBP simulation are performed to adjust linear attenuation coefficients data and to perform 2D tomographic image reconstruction with and without beam hardening corrections. A beam hardening correction procedure is developed and applied based on qualitative and quantitative analyses of the projections data. Results from original and corrected 2D reconstructed images obtained shows the efficiency of the proposed correction procedure. PMID:22871438

  16. Experimental Determination of the Antineutrino Spectrum of the Fission Products of U238

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, N.; Gütlein, A.; Hofmann, M.; Oberauer, L.; Potzel, W.; Schreckenbach, K.; Wagner, F. M.

    2014-03-01

    An experiment was performed at the scientific neutron source FRM II in Garching to determine the cumulative antineutrino spectrum of the fission products of U238. Target foils of natural uranium were irradiated with a thermal and a fast neutron beam and the emitted β spectra were recorded with a γ-suppressing electron telescope. The obtained β spectrum of the fission products of U235 was normalized to the data of the magnetic spectrometer BILL. This method strongly reduces systematic errors in the U238 measurement. The β spectrum of U238 was converted into the corresponding ν¯e spectrum. The final ν¯e spectrum is given in 250 keV bins in the range from 2.875 to 7.625 MeV with an energy-dependent error of 3.5% at 3 MeV, 7.6% at 6 MeV, and ≳14% at energies ≳7 MeV (68% confidence level). Furthermore, an energy-independent uncertainty of ˜3.3% due to the absolute normalization is added. Compared to the generally used summation calculations, the obtained spectrum reveals a spectral distortion of ˜10% but returns the same value for the mean cross section per fission for the inverse beta decay.

  17. Neutron field characteristics of Ciemat's Neutron Standards Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Garcia, Karen A; Mendez-Villafañe, Roberto; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo calculations were carried out to characterize the neutron field produced by the calibration neutron sources of the Neutron Standards Laboratory at the Research Center for Energy, Environment, and Technology (CIEMAT) in Spain. For (241)AmBe and (252)Cf neutron sources, the neutron spectra, the ambient dose equivalent rates and the total neutron fluence rates were estimated. In the calibration hall, there are several items that modify the neutron field. To evaluate their effects different cases were used, from point-like source in vacuum up to the full model. Additionally, using the full model, the neutron spectra were estimated to different distances along the bench; with these spectra, the total neutron fluence and the ambient dose equivalent rates were calculated. The hall walls induce the largest changes in the neutron spectra and the respective integral quantities. The free-field neutron spectrum is modified due the room return effect. PMID:25468287

  18. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    industry, from the initial fuel enrichment and fabrication processes right through to storage or reprocessing, and neutron metrology is clearly important in this area. Neutron fields do, however, occur in other areas, for example where neutron sources are used in oil well logging and moisture measurements. They also occur around high energy accelerators, including photon linear accelerators used for cancer therapy, and are expected to be a more serious problem around the new hadron radiation therapy facilities. Roughly 50% of the cosmic ray doses experienced by fliers at the flight altitudes of commercial aircraft are due to neutrons. Current research on fusion presents neutron metrology with a whole new range of challenges because of the very high fluences expected. One of the most significant features of neutron fields is the very wide range of possible neutron energies. In the nuclear industry, for example, neutrons occur with energies from those of thermal neutrons at a few meV to the upper end of the fission spectrum at perhaps 10 MeV. For cosmic ray dosimetry the energy range extends into the GeV region. This enormous range sets a challenge for designing measuring devices and a parallel challenge of developing measurement standards for characterizing these devices. One of the major considerations when deciding on topics for this special issue was agreeing on what not to include. Modelling, i.e. the use of radiation transport codes, is now a very important aspect of neutron measurements. These calculations are vital for shielding and for instrument design; nevertheless, the topic has only been included here where it has a direct bearing on metrology and the development of standards. Neutron spectrometry is an increasingly important technique for unravelling some of the problems of dose equivalent measurements and for plasma diagnostics in fusion research. However, this topic is at least one step removed from primary metrology and so it was felt that it should not be

  19. Interpreting inertial fusion neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, David H.

    2016-03-01

    A burning laser fusion plasma produces a neutron spectrum first described by Brysk (1973 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 15 611). This and more recent work deals with the spectrum produced by a single fluid element. The distribution of temperatures and velocities in multiple fluid elements combine in any real spectrum; we derive formulas for how the neutron spectrum averages these contributions. The single element momentum spectrum is accurately Gaussian, but the multi-element spectrum exhibits higher moments. In particular, the skew and kurtosis are likely to be large enough to measure. Even the single fluid element spectrum may exhibit measurable directional anisotropy, so that instruments with different lines of sight should see different yields, mean velocities, mean temperatures, and higher moments. Finally, we briefly discuss how scattering in the imploded core modifies the neutron spectrum by changing the relative weighting of fuel regions with different temperatures and velocities.

  20. Neutron beam characterization measurements at the Manuel Lujan Jr. neutron scattering center

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal; Muhrer, Guenter; Daemen, Luke L; Kelsey, Charles T; Duran, Michael A; Tovesson, Fredrik K

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the neutron beam characteristics of neutron moderators at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at LANSCE. The absolute thermal neutron flux, energy spectra and time emission spectra were measured for the high resolution and high intensity decoupled water, partially coupled liquid hydrogen and partially coupled water moderators. The results of our experimental study will provide an insight into aging of different target-moderator-reflector-shield components as well as new experimental data for benchmarking of neutron transport codes.

  1. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. )

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

  2. Prototype Neutron Energy Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Mitchell, Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Richard Maurer, Ronald Wolff

    2010-06-16

    The project goals are: (1) Use three to five pressurized helium tubes with varying polyethylene moderators to build a neutron energy spectrometer that is most sensitive to the incident neutron energy of interest. Neutron energies that are of particular interest are those from the fission neutrons (typically around 1-2 MeV); (2) Neutron Source Identification - Use the neutron energy 'selectivity' property as a tool to discriminate against other competing processes by which neutrons are generated (viz. Cosmic ray induced neutron production [ship effect], [a, n] reactions); (3) Determine the efficiency as a function of neutron energy (response function) of each of the detectors, and thereby obtain the composite neutron energy spectrum from the detector count rates; and (4) Far-field data characterization and effectively discerning shielded fission source. Summary of the presentation is: (1) A light weight simple form factor compact neutron energy spectrometer ready to be used in maritime missions has been built; (2) Under laboratory conditions, individual Single Neutron Source Identification is possible within 30 minutes. (3) Sources belonging to the same type of origin viz., (a, n), fission, cosmic cluster in the same place in the 2-D plot shown; and (4) Isotopes belonging to the same source origin like Cm-Be, Am-Be (a, n) or Pu-239, U-235 (fission) do have some overlap in the 2-D plot.

  3. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    industry, from the initial fuel enrichment and fabrication processes right through to storage or reprocessing, and neutron metrology is clearly important in this area. Neutron fields do, however, occur in other areas, for example where neutron sources are used in oil well logging and moisture measurements. They also occur around high energy accelerators, including photon linear accelerators used for cancer therapy, and are expected to be a more serious problem around the new hadron radiation therapy facilities. Roughly 50% of the cosmic ray doses experienced by fliers at the flight altitudes of commercial aircraft are due to neutrons. Current research on fusion presents neutron metrology with a whole new range of challenges because of the very high fluences expected. One of the most significant features of neutron fields is the very wide range of possible neutron energies. In the nuclear industry, for example, neutrons occur with energies from those of thermal neutrons at a few meV to the upper end of the fission spectrum at perhaps 10 MeV. For cosmic ray dosimetry the energy range extends into the GeV region. This enormous range sets a challenge for designing measuring devices and a parallel challenge of developing measurement standards for characterizing these devices. One of the major considerations when deciding on topics for this special issue was agreeing on what not to include. Modelling, i.e. the use of radiation transport codes, is now a very important aspect of neutron measurements. These calculations are vital for shielding and for instrument design; nevertheless, the topic has only been included here where it has a direct bearing on metrology and the development of standards. Neutron spectrometry is an increasingly important technique for unravelling some of the problems of dose equivalent measurements and for plasma diagnostics in fusion research. However, this topic is at least one step removed from primary metrology and so it was felt that it should not be

  4. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  5. Precision Neutron Polarimetry for Neutron Beta Decay

    PubMed Central

    Penttila, S. I.; Bowman, J. D.

    2005-01-01

    The abBA collaboration is developing a new type of field-expansion spectrometer for a measurement of the three correlation coefficients a, A, and B and the shape parameter b. The measurement of A and B requires precision neutron polarimetry. We will polarize a pulsed cold neutron beam from the SNS using a 3He neutron spin filter. The well-known polarizing cross section for n-3He has a 1/v dependence, where v is the neutron velocity, which is used to determine the absolute beam polarization through a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. We show that by measuring the TOF dependence of A and B, the coefficients and the neutron polarization can be determined with a small loss of the statistical precision and with negligible systematic error. We conclude that it is possible to determine the neutron polarization averaged over a long run in the neutron beta decay experiment with a statistical error less than 10−4. We discuss various sources of systematic uncertainty in the measurement of A and B and conclude that the fractional systematic errors are less than 2 × 10−4. PMID:27308142

  6. Capture cross section measurement analysis in the Californium-252 spectrum with the Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Manojlovič, Stanko; Trkov, Andrej; Žerovnik, Gašper; Snoj, Luka

    2015-07-01

    Absolute average capture cross sections of gold, thorium, tantalum, molybdenum, copper and strontium in (252)Cf spontaneous fission neutron spectrum were simulated for two types of experiment setups preformed by Z. Dezso and J. Csikai and by L. Green. The experiments were simulated with MCNP5 using cross section data from the ENDF/B-VII.0 library. The determination of neutron backscattering was calculated with the use of neutron flagging. Correction factors to experimentally measured values were determined to obtain average cross sections in a pure (252)Cf spontaneous fission spectrum. Influence of concrete wall thickness, air moisture and room size on the average cross section was analyzed. Correction factors amounted to about 30%. Corrected values corresponding to average cross sections in a pure (252)Cf spectrum were calculated for (197)Au, (232)Th, (181)Ta, (98)Mo, (65)Cu and (84)Sr. Average cross sections were also calculated with the RR_UNC software using IRDFF-v.1.05 and ENDF/B-VII.0 libraries. The revised average radiative capture cross sections are 75.5±0.1 mb for (197)Au, 87.0±1.6 mb for (232)Th , 98.0±4.5 mb for (181)Ta, 21.2±0.5 mb for (98)Mo, 10.3±0.3 mb for (63)Cu, and 34.9±6.5 mb for (84)Sr. PMID:25880611

  7. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  8. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  9. ATR neutron spectral characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INEL provides intense neutron fields for irradiation-effects testing of reactor material samples, for production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications, and for scientific research. Characterization of the neutron environments in the irradiation locations of the ATR has been done by means of neutronics calculations and by means of neutron dosimetry based on the use of neutron activation monitors that are placed in the various irradiation locations. The primary purpose of this report is to present the results of an extensive characterization of several ATR irradiation locations based on neutron dosimetry measurements and on least-squares-adjustment analyses that utilize both neutron dosimetry measurements and neutronics calculations. This report builds upon the previous publications, especially the reference 4 paper. Section 2 provides a brief description of the ATR and it tabulates neutron spectral information for typical irradiation locations, as derived from the more historical neutron dosimetry measurements. Relevant details that pertain to the multigroup neutron spectral characterization are covered in section 3. This discussion includes a presentation on the dosimeter irradiation and analyses and a development of the least-squares adjustment methodology, along with a summary of the results of these analyses. Spectrum-averaged cross sections for neutron monitoring and for displacement-damage prediction in Fe, Cr, and Ni are given in section 4. In addition, section4 includes estimates of damage generation rates for these materials in selected ATR irradiation locations. In section 5, the authors present a brief discussion of the most significant conclusions of this work and comment on its relevance to the present ATR core configuration. Finally, detailed numerical and graphical results for the spectrum-characterization analyses in each irradiation location are provided in the Appendix.

  10. Expanding Lorentz and spectrum corrections to large volumes of reciprocal space for single-crystal time-of-flight neutron diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Michels-Clark, Tara M.; Savici, Andrei T.; Lynch, Vickie E.; Wang, Xiaoping; Hoffmann, Christina M.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is mounting that potentially exploitable properties of technologically and chemically interesting crystalline materials are often attributable to local structure effects, which can be observed as modulated diffuse scattering (mDS) next to Bragg diffraction (BD). BD forms a regular sparse grid of intense discrete points in reciprocal space. Traditionally, the intensity of each Bragg peak is extracted by integration of each individual reflection first, followed by application of the required corrections. In contrast, mDS is weak and covers expansive volumes of reciprocal space close to, or between, Bragg reflections. For a representative measurement of the diffuse scattering, multiple sample orientations are generally required, where many points in reciprocal space are measured multiple times and the resulting data are combined. The common post-integration data reduction method is not optimal with regard to counting statistics. A general and inclusive data processing method is needed. In this contribution, a comprehensive data analysis approach is introduced to correct and merge the full volume of scattering data in a single step, while correctly accounting for the statistical weight of the individual measurements. Development of this new approach required the exploration of a data treatment and correction protocol that includes the entire collected reciprocal space volume, using neutron time-of-flight or wavelength-resolved data collected at TOPAZ at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. PMID:27047306

  11. Expanding Lorentz and spectrum corrections to large volumes of reciprocal space for single-crystal time-of-flight neutron diffraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Michels-Clark, Tara M.; Savici, Andrei T.; Lynch, Vickie E.; Wang, Xiaoping; Hoffmann, Christina M.

    2016-03-01

    Evidence is mounting that potentially exploitable properties of technologically and chemically interesting crystalline materials are often attributable to local structure effects, which can be observed as modulated diffuse scattering (mDS) next to Bragg diffraction (BD). BD forms a regular sparse grid of intense discrete points in reciprocal space. Traditionally, the intensity of each Bragg peak is extracted by integration of each individual reflection first, followed by application of the required corrections. In contrast, mDS is weak and covers expansive volumes of reciprocal space close to, or between, Bragg reflections. For a representative measurement of the diffuse scattering, multiple sample orientationsmore » are generally required, where many points in reciprocal space are measured multiple times and the resulting data are combined. The common post-integration data reduction method is not optimal with regard to counting statistics. A general and inclusive data processing method is needed. In this contribution, a comprehensive data analysis approach is introduced to correct and merge the full volume of scattering data in a single step, while correctly accounting for the statistical weight of the individual measurements. Lastly, development of this new approach required the exploration of a data treatment and correction protocol that includes the entire collected reciprocal space volume, using neutron time-of-flight or wavelength-resolved data collected at TOPAZ at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.« less

  12. Precision neutron polarimetry for neutron beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Penttila, S. I.; Bowman, J. D.

    2004-01-01

    The abBA collaboration is developing a new type of field-expansion spectrometer for measurement of the three correlation coefficients a, A, and B and shape parameter b. The measurement of A and B requires precision neutron polarimetry. We will polarize a pulsed cold neutron beam from SNS using a {sup 3}He neutron spin filter. The well-known polarizing cross section for n-{sup 3}He has 1/v dependence, which is used to determine the absolute beam polarization through a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. We show that measuring the TOF dependence of A and B, the coefficients and the neutron polarization can be determined with small loss of statistical precision and negligible systematic error. We conclude that it is possible to determine the neutron polarization averaged over a run in the neutron beta decay experiment to better than 10{sup -3}. We discuss various sources of systematic uncertainties in the measurement of A and B and conclude that they are less than 10{sup -4}.

  13. The AFGL absolute gravity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, J. A.; Iliff, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A brief discussion of the AFGL's (Air Force Geophysics Laboratory) program in absolute gravity is presented. Support of outside work and in-house studies relating to gravity instrumentation are discussed. A description of the current transportable system is included and the latest results are presented. These results show good agreement with measurements at the AFGL site by an Italian system. The accuracy obtained by the transportable apparatus is better than 0.1 microns sq sec 10 microgal and agreement with previous measurements is within the combined uncertainties of the measurements.

  14. Zellweger Spectrum

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Zellweger spectrum result from defects in the assembly of a cellular structure called the peroxisome, and ... Zellweger spectrum are caused by defects in the assembly of the peroxisome. There are at least 12 ...

  15. Personnel neutron monitoring in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    A brief review is presented of available information on the galactic neutron spectrum. An examination is made of the difficulties encountered in the determination of the dose equivalent of neutron recoil protons in the presence of a substantially larger background of trapped and star-produced protons as well as other ionizing particles in space.

  16. Assessing Neutron Generator Output Using Delayed Activation of Silicon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron generators are used for elemental composition analysis and medical applications. Often composition is determined by examining elemental ratios in which the knowledge of the neutron flux is unnecessary. However, the absolute value of the neutron flux is required when t...

  17. Collective excitations in neutron-star crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamel, N.; Page, D.; Reddy, S.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the spectrum of low-energy collective excitations in the crust of a neutron star, especially in the inner region where neutron-proton clusters are immersed in a sea of superfluid neutrons. The speeds of the different modes are calculated systematically from the nuclear energy density functional theory using a Skyrme functional fitted to essentially all experimental atomic mass data.

  18. Multiple-integrating sphere spectrophotometer for measuring absolute spectral reflectance and transmittance.

    PubMed

    Zerlaut, G A; Anderson, T E

    1981-11-01

    A spectroreflectometer/transmissometer is described that permits determination of absolute optical characteristics in the 300-2600-nm wavelength region (which is essentially the complete solar spectrum). The uniqueness of the instrument derives from use of three rapidly interchangeable 20-cm (8-in.) integrating spheres to measure (1) absolute hemispherical spectral reflectance as a function of angles of incidence from -40 to +40 degrees employing an Edwards-type integrating sphere with a center-mounted sample [using small 2.5-cm (1-in.) diam specimens], (2) absolute hemispherical and absolute diffuse spectral reflectance at an angle of incidence of 20 degrees employing a sphere with a wall-mounted sample (for large specimens) and a screened detector, and (3) absolute hemispherical and absolute directional (near-normal exitance) transmittance employing a complete integrating sphere with the only ports being for the sample and reference beams. Data are presented that demonstrate the ability to measure the spectral reflectance of nonmirror surfaces to an absolute accuracy of 0.995 (an uncertainty of +/-0.005 reflectance units) in both reflectance spheres and of highly specular mirrors to an absolute accuracy of 0.993 (an uncertainty of +/-0.007 reflectance units). Spectral transmittance can be measured to an absolute accuracy of better than 0.995 (an uncertainty of +/-0.005 transmittance units). PMID:20372262

  19. 1987 calibration of the TFTR neutron spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Strachan, J.D.; Princeton Univ., NJ . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1989-12-01

    The {sup 3}He neutron spectrometer used for measuring ion temperatures and the NE213 proton recoil spectrometer used for triton burnup measurements were absolutely calibrated with DT and DD neutron generators placed inside the TFTR vacuum vessel. The details of the detector response and calibration are presented. Comparisons are made to the neutron source strengths measured from other calibrated systems. 23 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. From Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, S. R.; Lindler, D.

    2016-05-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R˜1000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18–1.03 μ. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsl/. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We have therefore developed an observing procedure, data-reduction procedure, and correction algorithms that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1%.

  1. A relativistically smeared spectrum in the neutron star X-ray binary 4U 1705-44: looking at the inner accretion disc with X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Salvo, T.; D'Aí, A.; Iaria, R.; Burderi, L.; Dovčiak, M.; Karas, V.; Matt, G.; Papitto, A.; Piraino, S.; Riggio, A.; Robba, N. R.; Santangelo, A.

    2009-10-01

    Iron emission lines at 6.4-6.97 keV, identified with fluorescent Kα transitions, are among the strongest discrete features in the X-ray band. These are therefore one of the most powerful probes to infer the properties of the plasma in the innermost part of the accretion disc around a compact object. In this paper, we present a recent XMM-Newton observation of the X-ray burster 4U 1705-44, where we clearly detect a relativistically smeared iron line at about 6.7 keV, testifying with high statistical significance that the line profile is distorted by high-velocity motion in the accretion disc. As expected from disc reflection models, we also find a significant absorption edge at about 8.3 keV; this feature appears to be smeared, and is compatible with being produced in the same region where the iron line is produced. From the line profile, we derive the physical parameters of the inner accretion disc with large precision. The line is identified with the Kα transition of highly ionized iron, FeXXV, the inner disc radius is Rin = 14 +/- 2 Rg (where Rg is the Gravitational radius, GM/c2), the emissivity dependence from the disc radius is r-2.27+/-0.08, the inclination angle with respect to the line of sight is i = 39° +/- 1°. Finally, the XMM-Newton spectrum shows evidences of other low-energy emission lines, which again appear broad and their profiles are compatible with being produced in the same region where the iron line is produced.

  2. Relativistically correct DD and DT neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, B.; Chittenden, J.

    2014-06-01

    We use relativistic kinematics to derive an expression for the energy spectrum of neutrons produced by fusion reactions in deuterium and deuterium-tritium thermal plasmas. The derivation does not require approximations and the obtained expression gives the exact shape of the spectrum. It is shown that the high-energy tail of the neutron spectrum is highly sensitive to the plasma temperature. Simple expressions for the plasma temperature as a function of the neutron spectrum full width at half maximum (FWHM) are given.

  3. Determination of energy distribution for photon and neutron microdosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todo, A. S.

    This work was undertaken to provide basic physical data for use in both microdosimetry and dosimetry of high energy photons and also in the neutron radiation field. Described is the formalism to determine the initial electron energy spectra in water irradiated by photons with energies up to 1 GeV. Calculations were performed with a Monte Carlo computer code, PHOEL-3, which is also described. The code treats explicitly the production of electron-positron pairs, Compton scattering, photoelectric absorption, and the emission of Auger electrons following the occurrence of K-shell vacancies in oxygen. The tables give directly the information needed to specify the absolute single-collision kerma in water, which approximates tissue, at each photon energy. Results for continuous photon energy spectra can be obtained by using linear interpolation with the tables. The conditions under which first-collision kerma approximate absorbed dose are discussed. A formula is given for estimating bremsstrahlung energy loss, one of the principal differences between kerma and absorbed dose in practical cases. A study has been carried out, on the use of cylindrical, energy-proportional pulse-height detector for determining microdosimetric quantities, as neutron fractional dose spectra, D (L), in the function of linear energy transfer (LET). In the present study the Hurst detector was used; this device satisfies the requirement of the Bragg-Gray principle. A Monte Carlo Method was developed to obtain the D(L) spectrum from a measured pulse-height spectrum H(h), and the knowledge of the distribution of recoil-particle track lenght, P(T) in the sensitive volume of the detector. These developed programs to find P(T) and D(L) are presented. The distribution of D(L) in LET were obtained using a known distribution of P(T) and the measured H(h) spectrum fromthe Cf-2 52 neutron source. All the results are discussed and the conclusions are presented.

  4. Improving HST Pointing & Absolute Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallo, Matthew; Nelan, E.; Kimmer, E.; Cox, C.; Casertano, S.

    2007-05-01

    Accurate absolute astrometry is becoming increasingly important in an era of multi-mission archives and virtual observatories. Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) Guidestar Catalog II (GSC2) has reduced coordinate error to around 0.25 arcsecond, a factor 2 or more compared with GSC1. With this reduced catalog error, special attention must be given to calibrate and maintain the Fine Guidance Sensors (FGSs) and Science Instruments (SIs) alignments in HST to a level well below this in order to ensure that the accuracy of science product's astrometry keywords and target positioning are limited only by the catalog errors. After HST Servicing Mission 4, such calibrations' improvement in "blind" pointing accuracy will allow for more efficient COS acquisitions. Multiple SIs and FGSs each have their own footprints in the spatially shared HST focal plane. It is the small changes over time in primarily the whole-body positions & orientations of these instruments & guiders relative to one another that is addressed by this work. We describe the HST Cycle 15 program CAL/OTA 11021 which, along with future variants of it, determines and maintains positions and orientations of the SIs and FGSs to better than 50 milli- arcseconds and 0.04 to 0.004 degrees of roll, putting errors associated with the alignment sufficiently below GSC2 errors. We present recent alignment results and assess their errors, illustrate trends, and describe where and how the observer sees benefit from these calibrations when using HST.

  5. Absolute oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Drusano, G L; Standiford, H C; Plaisance, K; Forrest, A; Leslie, J; Caldwell, J

    1986-09-01

    We evaluated the absolute bioavailability of ciprofloxacin, a new quinoline carboxylic acid, in 12 healthy male volunteers. Doses of 200 mg were given to each of the volunteers in a randomized, crossover manner 1 week apart orally and as a 10-min intravenous infusion. Half-lives (mean +/- standard deviation) for the intravenous and oral administration arms were 4.2 +/- 0.77 and 4.11 +/- 0.74 h, respectively. The serum clearance rate averaged 28.5 +/- 4.7 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the intravenous administration arm. The renal clearance rate accounted for approximately 60% of the corresponding serum clearance rate and was 16.9 +/- 3.0 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the intravenous arm and 17.0 +/- 2.86 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the oral administration arm. Absorption was rapid, with peak concentrations in serum occurring at 0.71 +/- 0.15 h. Bioavailability, defined as the ratio of the area under the curve from 0 h to infinity for the oral to the intravenous dose, was 69 +/- 7%. We conclude that ciprofloxacin is rapidly absorbed and reliably bioavailable in these healthy volunteers. Further studies with ciprofloxacin should be undertaken in target patient populations under actual clinical circumstances. PMID:3777908

  6. Absolute Instability in Coupled-Cavity TWTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, D. M. H.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Simon, D. H.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Chernin, D.; Antonsen, T. M., Jr.

    2014-10-01

    This paper will present results of our analysis of absolute instability in a coupled-cavity traveling wave tube (TWT). The structure mode at the lower and upper band edges are respectively approximated by a hyperbola in the (omega, k) plane. When the Briggs-Bers criterion is applied, a threshold current for onset of absolute instability is observed at the upper band edge, but not the lower band edge. The nonexistence of absolute instability at the lower band edge is mathematically similar to the nonexistence of absolute instability that we recently demonstrated for a dielectric TWT. The existence of absolute instability at the upper band edge is mathematically similar to the existence of absolute instability in a gyroton traveling wave amplifier. These interesting observations will be discussed, and the practical implications will be explored. This work was supported by AFOSR, ONR, and L-3 Communications Electron Devices.

  7. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.; Babcock, Dale F.; Menegus, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  8. Absolute negative mobility of interacting Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Ya-li; Hu, Cai-tian; Wu, Jian-chun; Ai, Bao-quan

    2015-12-01

    Transport of interacting Brownian particles in a periodic potential is investigated in the presence of an ac force and a dc force. From Brownian dynamic simulations, we find that both the interaction between particles and the thermal fluctuations play key roles in the absolute negative mobility (the particle noisily moves backwards against a small constant bias). When no the interaction acts, there is only one region where the absolute negative mobility occurs. In the presence of the interaction, the absolute negative mobility may appear in multiple regions. The weak interaction can be helpful for the absolute negative mobility, while the strong interaction has a destructive impact on it.

  9. Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, D.A.; Erkkila, B.H.; Vasilik, D.G.

    The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

  10. Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, David A.; Erkkila, Bruce H.; Vasilik, Dennis G.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

  11. Prompt Fission Neutron Energy Spectra Induced by Fast Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staples, Parrish Alan

    Prompt fission neutron energy spectra for ^{235}U and ^{239 }Pu have been measured for fission neutron energies greater than the energy of the incident neutrons inducing fission. The measurements were undertaken to investigate the shape dependence of the fission neutron spectra upon both the incident neutron energy and the mass of the nucleus undergoing fission. Measurements were made for both nuclides at the following incident neutron energies; 0.50 MeV, 1.50 MeV, 2.50 MeV and 3.50 MeV. The data are presented either as relative yields or as ratios of a measured spectrum to the ^{235}U spectrum at 0.50 MeV. Incident neutrons were produced by the ^7Li(p,n)^7Be reaction using a pulsed, bunched proton beam from the 5.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Pinanski Energy Center. The neutrons were detected by a thin liquid scintillator with good time resolution capabilities; time-of-flight techniques were used for neutron energy determination; in addition pulse-shape-discrimination was used to reduce gamma-ray background levels. The measurements are compared to calculations based on the Los Alamos Model of Madland and Nix to test its predictive capabilities. The data are fit by the Watt equation to determine the mean energy of the spectra, and to facilitate comparison of the results to previous measurements. The data are also compared directly to previous measurements.

  12. Spectrum Recombination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  13. Facility for fast neutron irradiation tests of electronics at the ISIS spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Salsano, A.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Gerardin, S.; Frost, C. D.; Ansell, S.; Platt, S. P.

    2008-03-17

    The VESUVIO beam line at the ISIS spallation neutron source was set up for neutron irradiation tests in the neutron energy range above 10 MeV. The neutron flux and energy spectrum were shown, in benchmark activation measurements, to provide a neutron spectrum similar to the ambient one at sea level, but with an enhancement in intensity of a factor of 10{sup 7}. Such conditions are suitable for accelerated testing of electronic components, as was demonstrated here by measurements of soft error rates in recent technology field programable gate arrays.

  14. Solar neutron decay proton observations in cycle 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, Paul; Kroeger, Richard; Meyer, Peter; Reames, Donald

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of the flux and energy spectrum of the protons resulting from the decay of solar flare neutrons gives unique information on the spectrum of neutrons from 5 to 200 MeV. Neutrons from three flares have been observed in this manner during solar cycle 21. The use of the decay protons to determine neutron energy spectra is reviewed, and new and definitive energy spectra are presented for the two large flares on June 3, 1982 and April 25, 1984.

  15. Distinguishing Pu Metal From Pu Oxide Using Fast Neutron Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J M; Chapline, G F; Nakae, L; Wurtz, R; Sheets, S

    2012-05-29

    We describe a method for simultaneously determining the {alpha}-ratio and k{sub eff} for fissile materials using fast neutrons. Our method is a generalization of the Hage-Cifarrelli method for determining k{sub eff} for fissile assemblies which utilizes the shape of the fast neutron spectrum. In this talk we illustrate the method using Monte Carlo simulations of the fast neutrons generated in PuO{sub 2} to calculate the fast neutron spectrum and Feynman correlations.

  16. Inequalities, Absolute Value, and Logical Connectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parish, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an approach to the concept of absolute value that alleviates students' problems with the traditional definition and the use of logical connectives in solving related problems. Uses a model that maps numbers from a horizontal number line to a vertical ray originating from the origin. Provides examples solving absolute value equations and…

  17. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  18. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    DOEpatents

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  19. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  20. Investigating Absolute Value: A Real World Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret; Pagni, David

    2009-01-01

    Making connections between various representations is important in mathematics. In this article, the authors discuss the numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of sums of absolute values of linear functions. The initial explanations are accessible to all students who have experience graphing and who understand that absolute value simply…

  1. Absolute Income, Relative Income, and Happiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Richard; Chernova, Kateryna

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses data from the World Values Survey to investigate how an individual's self-reported happiness is related to (i) the level of her income in absolute terms, and (ii) the level of her income relative to other people in her country. The main findings are that (i) both absolute and relative income are positively and significantly…

  2. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  3. Absolute photoionization cross-section of the propargyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Savee, John D.; Welz, Oliver; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Soorkia, Satchin; Selby, Talitha M.

    2012-04-07

    Using synchrotron-generated vacuum-ultraviolet radiation and multiplexed time-resolved photoionization mass spectrometry we have measured the absolute photoionization cross-section for the propargyl (C{sub 3}H{sub 3}) radical, {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(E), relative to the known absolute cross-section of the methyl (CH{sub 3}) radical. We generated a stoichiometric 1:1 ratio of C{sub 3}H{sub 3} : CH{sub 3} from 193 nm photolysis of two different C{sub 4}H{sub 6} isomers (1-butyne and 1,3-butadiene). Photolysis of 1-butyne yielded values of {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(10.213 eV)=(26.1{+-}4.2) Mb and {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(10.413 eV)=(23.4{+-}3.2) Mb, whereas photolysis of 1,3-butadiene yielded values of {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(10.213 eV)=(23.6{+-}3.6) Mb and {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(10.413 eV)=(25.1{+-}3.5) Mb. These measurements place our relative photoionization cross-section spectrum for propargyl on an absolute scale between 8.6 and 10.5 eV. The cross-section derived from our results is approximately a factor of three larger than previous determinations.

  4. DS86 neutron dose: Monte Carlo analysis for depth profile of 152Eu activity in a large stone sample.

    PubMed

    Endo, S; Iwatani, K; Oka, T; Hoshi, M; Shizuma, K; Imanaka, T; Takada, J; Fujita, S; Hasai, H

    1999-06-01

    The depth profile of 152Eu activity induced in a large granite stone pillar by Hiroshima atomic bomb neutrons was calculated by a Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP). The pillar was on the Motoyasu Bridge, located at a distance of 132 m (WSW) from the hypocenter. It was a square column with a horizontal sectional size of 82.5 cm x 82.5 cm and height of 179 cm. Twenty-one cells from the north to south surface at the central height of the column were specified for the calculation and 152Eu activities for each cell were calculated. The incident neutron spectrum was assumed to be the angular fluence data of the Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86). The angular dependence of the spectrum was taken into account by dividing the whole solid angle into twenty-six directions. The calculated depth profile of specific activity did not agree with the measured profile. A discrepancy was found in the absolute values at each depth with a mean multiplication factor of 0.58 and also in the shape of the relative profile. The results indicated that a reassessment of the neutron energy spectrum in DS86 is required for correct dose estimation. PMID:10494148

  5. Neutron spectrometer for improved SNM search.

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Andrew L.; Aigeldinger, Georg

    2007-03-01

    With the exception of large laboratory devices with very low sensitivities, a neutron spectrometer have not been built for fission neutrons such as those emitted by special nuclear materials (SNM). The goal of this work was to use a technique known as Capture Gated Neutron Spectrometry to develop a solid-state device with this functionality. This required modifications to trans-stilbene, a known solid-state scintillator. To provide a neutron capture signal we added lithium to this material. This unique triggering signal allowed identification of neutrons that lose all of their energy in the detector, eliminating uncertainties that arise due to partial energy depositions. We successfully implemented a capture gated neutron spectrometer and were able to distinguish an SNM like fission spectrum from a spectrum stemming from a benign neutron source.

  6. Experimental investigation of new neutron moderator materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal; Daemen, Luke L; Hartl, Monika; Huegle, Thomas; Muhrer, Guenter

    2010-01-01

    In this study we present experimental investigation of thermal neutron energy spectra produced by lead and bismuth hydroxides (Pb(OH){sub 2}, and Bi(OH){sub 3}). The experimental energy spectra are compared with a thermal neutron energy spectrum of water measured in the same geometry. We present an MCNPX geometry model used to help with the experimental data interpretation. We demonstrate a very good reproduction of the experimental thermal neutron energy spectrum produced by the water moderator. We show a sensitivity study with the Pb(OH){sub 2}, and Bi(OH){sub 3} materials on different combinations of thermal neutron scattering kernels.

  7. Fast-neutron-spectrum measurements for the thick-target /sup 9/Be(d,n)/sup 10/B reaction at E/sub d/ = 7 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Meadows, J.W.; Guenther, P.T.

    1985-04-01

    Spectra of neutrons with energies greater than or equal to 800 keV which are emitted from a metallic beryllium target that is thick enough to completely stop 7-MeV incident deuterons are measured using organic scintillators and the pulse-beam time-of-flight method. Data are acquired for twenty different emission angles in the laboratory over the range 0 to 155 degrees. The resulting information on the energy-angle detail of neutron emission is then employed in calculations which are performed in order to examine certain effects of the anisotropic neutron production on typical measurements of integral fast-neutron reaction cross sections. 28 refs.

  8. Fast neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report concentrates on two major areas of dosimetry research: measurement of fast neutron kerma factors for several elements for monochromatic and white spectrum neutron fields and determination of the response of thermoluminescent phosphors to various ultra-soft X-ray energies and beta-rays. Dr. Zhixin Zhou from the Shanghai Institute of Radiation Medicine, People's Republic of China brought with him special expertise in the fabrication and use of ultra-thin TLD materials. Such materials are not available in the USA. The rather unique properties of these materials were investigated during this grant period.

  9. Absolute optical instruments without spherical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyc, Tomáš; Dao, H. L.; Danner, Aaron J.

    2015-11-01

    Until now, the known set of absolute optical instruments has been limited to those containing high levels of symmetry. Here, we demonstrate a method of mathematically constructing refractive index profiles that result in asymmetric absolute optical instruments. The method is based on the analogy between geometrical optics and classical mechanics and employs Lagrangians that separate in Cartesian coordinates. In addition, our method can be used to construct the index profiles of most previously known absolute optical instruments, as well as infinitely many different ones.

  10. Precision neutron flux measurements and applications using the Alpha Gamma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Eamon

    2016-03-01

    The Alpha Gamma device is a totally-absorbing 10 B neutron detector designed to measure the absolute detection efficiency of a thin-film lithium neutron monitor on a monoenergetic neutron beam. The detector has been shown to measure neutron fluence with an absolute accuracy of 0.06%. This capability has been used to perform the first direct, absolute measurement of the 6Li(n,t) 4He cross section at sub-thermal energy, improve the neutron fluence determination in a past beam neutron lifetime measurement by a factor of five, and is being used to calibrate the neutron monitors for use in the upcoming beam neutron lifetime measurement BL2 (NIST Beam Lifetime 2). The principle of the measurement method will presented and the applications will be discussed. We would like to acknowledge support of this research through the NSF-PHY-1068712 Grant as well as the NIST Precision Measurement Grant program.

  11. Intense steady state neutron source. The CNR reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Difilippo, F.C.; Moon, R.M.; Gambill, W.R.; Moon, R.M.; Primm, R.T. III; West, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Center for Neutron Research (CNR) has been proposed in response to the needs - neutron flux, spectrum, and experimental facilities - that have been identified through workshops, studies, and discussions by the neutron-scattering, isotope, and materials irradiation research communities. The CNR is a major new experimental facility consisting of a reactor-based steady state neutron source of unprecedented flux, together with extensive facilities and instruments for neutron scattering, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other areas of research.

  12. A Technique for Determining Neutron Beam Fluence to 0.01% Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, A. T.; Dewey, M. S.; Gilliam, D. M.; Nico, J. S.; Fomin, N.; Greene, G. L.; Snow, W. M.; Wietfeldt, F. E.

    2014-01-01

    The achievable uncertainty in neutron lifetime measurements using the beam technique has been limited by the uncertainty in the determination of the neutron density in the decay volume. In the Sussex-ILL-NIST series of beam lifetime experiments, the density was determined with a neutron fluence mon itor that detected the charged particle products from neutron absorption in a thin layer of 6Li or lOB. In each of the experiments, the absolute detection efficiency of the neutron monitor was determined from the measured density of the neutron absorber, the thermal neutron cross section for the absorbing ma terial, and the solid angle of the charged particle detectors. The efficiency of the neutron monitor used in the most recent beam lifetime experiment has since been measured directly by operating it on a monochromatic neutron beam in which the total neutron rate is determined with a totally absorbing neutron detector. The absolute nature of this technique does not rely on any knowl edge of neutron absorption cross sections or a measurement of the density of the neutron absorbing deposit. This technique has been used to measure the neutron monitor efficiency to 0.06% uncertainty. VVe show that a new monitor and absolute neutron detector employing the same technique would be capable of achieving determining neutron fluence to an uncertainty of 0.01%.

  13. Absolute magnitudes of trans-neptunian objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffard, R.; Alvarez-candal, A.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Ortiz, J. L.; Morales, N.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Thirouin, A.

    2015-10-01

    Accurate measurements of diameters of trans- Neptunian objects are extremely complicated to obtain. Radiomatric techniques applied to thermal measurements can provide good results, but precise absolute magnitudes are needed to constrain diameters and albedos. Our objective is to measure accurate absolute magnitudes for a sample of trans- Neptunian objects, many of which have been observed, and modelled, by the "TNOs are cool" team, one of Herschel Space Observatory key projects grantes with ~ 400 hours of observing time. We observed 56 objects in filters V and R, if possible. These data, along with data available in the literature, was used to obtain phase curves and to measure absolute magnitudes by assuming a linear trend of the phase curves and considering magnitude variability due to rotational light-curve. In total we obtained 234 new magnitudes for the 56 objects, 6 of them with no reported previous measurements. Including the data from the literature we report a total of 109 absolute magnitudes.

  14. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  15. Neutronic moderator design for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, L.A.; Barnes, J.M.; Johnson, J.O.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1998-11-01

    Neutronics analyses are now in progress to support the initial selection of moderator design parameters for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The results of the initial optimization studies involving moderator poison plate location, moderator position, and premoderator performance for the target system are presented in this paper. Also presented is an initial study of the use of a composite moderator to produce a liquid methane like spectrum.

  16. The neutron detector array DESCANT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bildstein, Vinzenz; Garrett, P. E.; Bandyopadhay, D.; Bangay, J.; Bianco, L.; Demand, G.; Hadinia, B.; Leach, K. G.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Wong, J.; Ashley, S. F.; Crider, B. P.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Yates, S. W.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Pearson, C. J.

    2013-10-01

    The DESCANT array at TRIUMF is designed to track neutrons from RIB experiments. DESCANT is comprised of 70 close-packed deuterated liquid organic scintillators coupled to digital fast read-out ADC modules. This configuration will permit online pulse-shape discrimination between neutron and γ-ray events. The anisotropy of the n-d scattering will allow to distinguish higher neutron multiplicities from scattering within the array and to determine the neutron energy spectrum directly from the pulse-height spectrum without using TOF. Comparative type-testing of candidate small deuterated scintillators to non-deuterated scintillators have been performed at the University of Kentucky. Results of these type-testing measurements will be presented together with first designs of the firmware written for the fast sampling ADC modules.

  17. Feasibility of sealed D-T neutron generator as neutron source for liver BNCT and its beam shaping assembly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Li, Gang; Liu, Linmao

    2014-04-01

    This paper involves the feasibility of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for liver tumor with four sealed neutron generators as neutron source. Two generators are placed on each side of the liver. The high energy of these emitted neutrons should be reduced by designing a beam shaping assembly (BSA) to make them useable for BNCT. However, the neutron flux decreases as neutrons pass through different materials of BSA. Therefore, it is essential to find ways to increase the neutron flux. In this paper, the feasibility of using low enrichment uranium as a neutron multiplier is investigated to increase the number of neutrons emitted from D-T neutron generators. The neutron spectrum related to our system has a proper epithermal flux, and the fast and thermal neutron fluxes comply with the IAEA recommended values. PMID:24448270

  18. Closed-loop step motor control using absolute encoders

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, J.S.; Wright, M.C.

    1997-08-01

    A multi-axis, step motor control system was developed to accurately position and control the operation of a triple axis spectrometer at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Triple axis spectrometers are used in neutron scattering and diffraction experiments and require highly accurate positioning. This motion control system can handle up to 16 axes of motion. Four of these axes are outfitted with 17-bit absolute encoders. These four axes are controlled with a software feedback loop that terminates the move based on real-time position information from the absolute encoders. Because the final position of the actuator is used to stop the motion of the step motors, the moves can be made accurately in spite of the large amount of mechanical backlash from a chain drive between the motors and the spectrometer arms. A modified trapezoidal profile, custom C software, and an industrial PC, were used to achieve a positioning accuracy of 0.00275 degrees of rotation. A form of active position maintenance ensures that the angles are maintained with zero error or drift.

  19. Superresolution of a compact neutron spectrometer at energies relevant for fusion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Reginatto, M.; Zimbal, A.

    2011-03-14

    The ability to achieve resolution that is better than the instrument resolution (i.e., superresolution) is well known in optics, where it has been extensively studied. Unfortunately, there are only a handful of theoretical studies concerning superresolution of particle spectrometers, even though experimentalists are familiar with the enhancement of resolution that is achievable when appropriate methods of data analysis are used, such as maximum entropy and Bayesian methods. Knowledge of the superresolution factor is in many cases important. For example, in applications of neutron spectrometry to fusion diagnostics, the temperature of a burning plasma is an important physical parameter which may be inferred from the width of the peak of the neutron energy spectrum, and the ability to determine this width depends on the superresolution factor. Kosarev has derived an absolute limit for resolution enhancement using arguments based on a well known theorem of Shannon. Most calculations of superresolution factors in the literature, however, are based on the assumption of Gaussian, translationally invariant response functions and therefore not directly applicable to neutron spectrometers which typically have response functions not satisfying these requirements. In this work, we develop a procedure that allows us to overcome these difficulties and we derive estimates of superresolution for liquid scintillator spectrometers of a type commonly used for neutron measurements. Theoretical superresolution factors are compared to experimental results.

  20. International Evaluation of Neutron Cross Section Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, A. D.; Pronyaev, V. G.; Smith, D. L.; Larson, N. M.; Chen, Zhenpeng; Hale, G. M.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Gai, E. V.; Oh, Soo-Youl; Badikov, S. A.; Kawano, T.; Hofmann, H. M.; Vonach, H.; Tagesen, S.

    2009-12-01

    Neutron cross section standards are the basis for the determination of most neutron cross sections. They are used for both measurements and evaluations of neutron cross sections. Not many cross sections can be obtained absolutely - most cross sections are measured relative to the cross section standards and converted using evaluations of the standards. The previous complete evaluation of the neutron cross section standards was finished in 1987 and disseminated as the NEANDC/INDC and ENDF/B-VI standards. R-matrix model fits for the light elements and non-model least-squares fits for all the cross sections in the evaluation were the basis of the combined fits for all of the data. Some important reactions and constants are not standards, but they assist greatly in the determination of the standard cross sections and reduce their uncertainties - these data were also included in the combined fits. The largest experimental database used in the evaluation was prepared by Poenitz and included about 400 sets of experimental data with covariance matrices of uncertainties that account for all cross-energy, cross-reaction and cross-material correlations. For the evaluation GMA, a least-squares code developed by Poenitz, was used to fit all types of cross sections (absolute and shape), their ratios, spectrum-averaged cross sections and thermal constants in one full analysis. But, the uncertainties derived in this manner, and especially those obtained in the R-matrix model fits, have been judged to be too low and unrealistic. These uncertainties were substantially increased prior to their release in the recommended data files of 1987. Modified percentage uncertainties were reassigned by the United States Cross Section Evaluation Working Group's Standards Subcommittee for a wide range of energies, and no covariance (or correlation) matrices were supplied at that time. The need to re-evaluate the cross section standards is based on the appearance of a significant amount of precise

  1. Neutron multiplicity recordings during GLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eduard, Vashenyuk; Leonid, Schur; Balabin, Yuri; Gvozdevsky, Boris

    A neutron multiplicity can give the information on a spectrum of primary solar protons and its variations during ground level enhancements (GLE). Such rare events are detected by ground based neutron monitors. With the help of the multiplicity recorder designed in PGI the variations of multiplicities during the GLE of December 13, 2006 on the neutron monitor in Barentsburg (Spitsbergen) have been studied. The neutron monitor in Barentsburg (18-NM-64) was put into operation on April, 2003. The recently developed data acquisition system is based on a PC equipped with two extension cards. One of them is ADLINK PCI-7233H, which is a high-speed 32-channel digital input card. The other is ADLINK PCI-8554, 12-channel counter/timer card. The specially written collecting program runs continuously. It captures the data registered by the two cards and stores the data to the hard disk. The PCI-7233H card registers pulses from all 18 channels of the neutron monitor and intervals between them. PCI-8554 card counts pulses from atmospheric pressure and temperature sensors. On the basis of this device the multiplicity recorder is realized to register the count rates on multiplicities (2-10). During the GLE on 13 December, 2006 significant increase of the count rates of multiplicities from 2 up to 5 was detected. The multiplicity spectrum changes are compared with the solar proton spectrum dynamics during event. The spectra of relativistic solar protons were derived by modeling technique from the worldwide neutron monitor network.

  2. Acceleration and deceleration of neutrons: From the phase modulation of a neutron wave to a neutron turbine with refracting prisms

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A. I.

    2013-05-15

    The possibility of the acceleration and deceleration of neutrons undergoing diffraction at a moving grating is discussed. It is shown that, in contrast to phase {pi} gratings used at the present time, which form a discrete spectrum featuring a large number of lines, a grating that has a special profile may shift, under certain conditions, the entire spectrum of diffracted neutrons. A blazing grating of this type may be used in efficiently accelerating and decelerating neutrons. As the scale of the structure becomes larger, a description based on the idea of neutron-wave refraction at its elements becomes valid, a system of moving prims forming a 'neutron turbine,' which is also able to accelerate or decelerate neutrons, being a classical limit of this enlargement.

  3. Scintillating-glass-fiber neutron sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, K. H.; Arthur, R. J.; Bliss, M.; Brite, D. W.; Brodzinski, R. L.; Craig, R. A.; Geelhood, B. D.; Goldman, D. S.; Griffin, J. W.; Perkins, R. W.; Reeder, P. L.; Richey, W. R.; Stahl, K. A.; Sunberg, D. S.; Warner, R. A.; Wogman, N. A.; Weber, M. J.

    1994-12-01

    Cerium-doped lithium-silicate glass fibers have been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for use as thermal neutron detectors. By using highly-enriched 6Li, these fibers efficiently capture thermal neutrons and produce scintillation light that can be detected at the ends of the fibers. Advantages of scintillating fibers over 3He or BF 3 proportional tubes include flexibility in geometric configuration, ruggedness in high-vibration environments, and less detector weight for the same neutron sensitivity. This paper describes the performance of these scintillating fibers with regard to count rates, pulse height spectra, absolute efficiencies, and neutron/gamma discrimination. Fibers with light transmission lengths ( {1}/{e}) of greater than 2 m have been produced at PNL. Neutron sensors in fiber form allow development of a variety of neutron detectors packaged in previously unavailable configurations. Brief descriptions of some of the devices already produced are included to illustrate these possibilities.

  4. The decompression of cold neutron star matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattimer, J. M.; Mackie, F.; Ravenhall, D. G.; Schramm, D. N.

    1977-01-01

    The ejection of cold neutron-star matter is examined, and an attempt is made to determine whether the final composition of this matter may be similar to that normally associated with the hot high-neutron-flux r-process. A semiempirical liquid-drop model is used for the nucleus, and the equilibrium composition of the matter is determined by assuming it to be in its absolute ground state at a given density. Physical mechanisms operating during the expansion are analyzed, and the composition of the ejected matter is found as a function of its density during expansion. The results indicate that it is virtually impossible for deuterium to form, that neutrons can be captured only after beta decay increases the atomic numbers of nuclei, and that no free neutrons can escape. It is concluded that neutron-star ejecta can produce heavy neutron-rich nuclei and may produce somewhat heavier nuclei than a standard r-process.

  5. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed. PMID:19831037

  6. Neutron emission prior to fission

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Gayer, A.; Boissevain, J.; Britt, H.C.; Nix, J.R.; Sierk, A.J.; Grange, P.; Hassani, S.; Weidenmueller, H.A.; Beene, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron emission in the /sup 158/Er composite system is studied in order to investigate particle emission with energy spectrum and angular distribution in excess of statistical model predictions. Data are analyzed using a modified statistical model which incorporates effects due to nuclear dissipation, and also calculates neutron emission during the descent from the saddle to the scission point. Calculations consider the Kramers effect and the Transient effect. It is concluded that a detailed interpretation of enhanced neutron emission preceding fission in compound nucleus reactions is possible, and that an upper limit may be set on the reduced nuclear dissipation coefficient. 5 refs., 2 figs. (LEW)

  7. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  8. Dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurements with high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Jidong; Liu, Shenggang; Ma, Heli; Tao, Tianjiong; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Hua

    2014-11-15

    A unique dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurement has been developed recently. This paper presents the working principle of the new interferometric system, which uses a photonic crystal fiber to transmit the wide-spectrum light beams and a high-speed streak camera or frame camera to record the interference stripes. Preliminary measurements of harmonic vibrations of a speaker, driven by a radio, and the changes in the tip clearance of a rotating gear wheel show that this new type of interferometer has the ability to perform absolute distance measurements both with high time- and distance-resolution.

  9. Neutron guide

    DOEpatents

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  10. Neutron dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1976-07-27

    A method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor is provided. A sintered oxide wire is disposed within the reactor and exposed to neutron radiation. The induced radioactivity is measured to provide an indication of the neutron energy and flux within the reactor.

  11. Prompt fission neutron spectra of actinides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Capote, R.; Chen, Y. -J.; Hambsch, F. -J.; Kornilov, N. V.; Lestone, J. P.; Litaize, O.; Morillon, B.; Neudecker, D.; Oberstedt, S.; Ohsawa, T.; et al

    2016-01-06

    Here, the energy spectrum of prompt neutrons emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) "Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides" was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei.

  12. Neutron dosimetry in solid water phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Benites-Rengifo, Jorge Luis; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2014-11-07

    The neutron spectra, the Kerma and the absorbed dose due to neutrons were estimated along the incoming beam in a solid water phantom. Calculations were carried out with the MCNP5 code, where the bunker, the phantom and the model of the15 MV LINAC head were modeled. As the incoming beam goes into the phantom the neutron spectrum is modified and the dosimetric values are reduced.

  13. Absolute stellar photometry on moderate-resolution FPA images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    An extensive database of star (and Moon) images has been collected by the ground-based RObotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) as part of the US Geological Survey program for lunar calibration. The stellar data are used to derive nightly atmospheric corrections for the observations from extinction measurements, and absolute calibration of the ROLO sensors is based on observations of Vega and published reference flux and spectrum data. The ROLO telescopes were designed for imaging the Moon at moderate resolution, thus imposing some limitations for the stellar photometry. Attaining accurate stellar photometry with the ROLO image data has required development of specialized processing techniques. A key consideration is consistency in discriminating the star core signal from the off-axis point spread function. The analysis and processing methods applied to the ROLO stellar image database are described. ?? 2009 BIPM and IOP Publishing Ltd.

  14. Full field imaging based instantaneous hyperspectral absolute refractive index measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Boudreaux, Philip R

    2012-01-01

    Multispectral refractometers typically measure refractive index (RI) at discrete monochromatic wavelengths via a serial process. We report on the demonstration of a white light full field imaging based refractometer capable of instantaneous multispectral measurement of absolute RI of clear liquid/gel samples across the entire visible light spectrum. The broad optical bandwidth refractometer is capable of hyperspectral measurement of RI in the range 1.30 1.70 between 400nm 700nm with a maximum error of 0.0036 units (0.24% of actual) at 414nm for a = 1.50 sample. We present system design and calibration method details as well as results from a system validation sample.

  15. Absolute isotopic abundances of TI in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederer, F. R.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1985-03-01

    The absolute isotope abundance of Ti has been determined in Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende and Leoville meteorites and in samples of whole meteorites. The absolute Ti isotope abundances differ by a significant mass dependent isotope fractionation transformation from the previously reported abundances, which were normalized for fractionation using 46Ti/48Ti. Therefore, the absolute compositions define distinct nucleosynthetic components from those previously identified or reflect the existence of significant mass dependent isotope fractionation in nature. The authors provide a general formalism for determining the possible isotope compositions of the exotic Ti from the measured composition, for different values of isotope fractionation in nature and for different mixing ratios of the exotic and normal components.

  16. Stimulus probability effects in absolute identification.

    PubMed

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of presentation probability on both proportion correct and response times. The effects were moderated by the ubiquitous stimulus position effect. The accuracy and response time data were predicted by an exemplar-based model of perceptual cognition (Kent & Lamberts, 2005). The bow in discriminability was also attenuated when presentation probability for middle items was relatively high, an effect that will constrain future model development. The study provides evidence for item-specific learning in absolute identification. Implications for other theories of absolute identification are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26478959

  17. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P.

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, ``A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,`` was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

  18. Measurement of the Neutron Lifetime by Counting Trapped Protons

    PubMed Central

    Wietfeldt, F. E.; Dewey, M. S.; Gilliam, D. M.; Nico, J. S.; Fei, X.; Snow, W. M.; Greene, G. L.; Pauwels, J.; Eykens, R.; Lamberty, A.; Van Gestel, J.

    2005-01-01

    We measured the neutron decay lifetime by counting in-beam neutron decay recoil protons trapped in a quasi-Penning trap. The absolute neutron beam fluence was measured by capture in a thin 6LiF foil detector with known efficiency. The combination of these measurements gives the neutron lifetime: τn = (886.8 ± 1.2 ± 3.2) s, where the first (second) uncertainty is statistical (systematic) in nature. This is the most precise neutron lifetime determination to date using an in-beam method. PMID:27308145

  19. Precise Measurement of the Absolute Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ave, M.; Bohacova, M.; Daumiller, K.; Di Carlo, P.; di Giulio, C.; San Luis, P. Facal; Gonzales, D.; Hojvat, C.; Hörandel, J. R.; Hrabovsky, M.; Iarlori, M.; Keilhauer, B.; Klages, H.; Kleifges, M.; Kuehn, F.; Monasor, M.; Nozka, L.; Palatka, M.; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Ridky, J.; Rizi, V.; D'Orfeuil, B. Rouille; Salamida, F.; Schovanek, P.; Smida, R.; Spinka, H.; Ulrich, A.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    2011-09-01

    We present preliminary results of the absolute yield of fluorescence emission in atmospheric gases. Measurements were performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility with a variety of beam particles and gases. Absolute calibration of the fluorescence yield to 5% level was achieved by comparison with two known light sources--the Cherenkov light emitted by the beam particles, and a calibrated nitrogen laser. The uncertainty of the energy scale of current Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays experiments will be significantly improved by the AIRFLY measurement.

  20. Apollo 16 neutron stratigraphy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russ, G. P., III

    1973-01-01

    The Apollo 16 soils have the largest low-energy neutron fluences yet observed in lunar samples. Variations in the isotopic ratios Gd-158/Gd-157 and Sm-150/Sm-149 (up to 1.9 and 2.0%, respectively) indicate that the low-energy neutron fluence in the Apollo 16 drill stem increases with depth throughout the section sampled. Such a variation implies that accretion has been the dominant regolith 'gardening' process at this location. The data may be fit by a model of continuous accretion of pre-irradiated material or by models involving as few as two slabs of material in which the first slab could have been deposited as long as 1 b.y. ago. The ratio of the number of neutrons captured per atom by Sm to the number captured per atom by Gd is lower than in previously measured lunar samples, which implies a lower energy neutron spectrum at this site. The variation of this ratio with chemical composition is qualitatively similar to that predicted by Lingenfelter et al. (1972). Variations are observed in the ratio Gd-152/Gd-160 which are fluence-correlated and probably result from neutron capture by Eu-151.

  1. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed. PMID:26022836

  2. COMPTEL neutron response at 17 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, Terrence J.; Ait-Ouamer, Farid; Morris, Joann; Tumer, O. Tumay; White, R. Stephen; Zych, Allen D.

    1992-01-01

    The Compton imaging telescope (COMPTEL) instrument of the Gamma Ray Observatory was exposed to 17 MeV d,t neutrons prior to launch. These data were analyzed and compared with Monte Carlo calculations using the MCNP(LANL) code. Energy and angular resolutions are compared and absolute efficiencies are calculated at 0 and 30 degrees incident angle. The COMPTEL neutron responses at 17 MeV and higher energies are needed to understand solar flare neutron data.

  3. PINS Spectrum Identification Guide

    SciTech Connect

    A.J. Caffrey

    2012-03-01

    The Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy—PINS, for short—system identifies the chemicals inside munitions and containers without opening them, a decided safety advantage if the fill chemical is a hazardous substance like a chemical warfare agent or an explosive. The PINS Spectrum Identification Guide is intended as a reference for technical professionals responsible for the interpretation of PINS gamma-ray spectra. The guide is divided into two parts. The three chapters that constitute Part I cover the science and technology of PINS. Neutron activation analysis is the focus of Chapter 1. Chapter 2 explores PINS hardware, software, and related operational issues. Gamma-ray spectral analysis basics are introduced in Chapter 3. The six chapters of Part II cover the identification of PINS spectra in detail. Like the PINS decision tree logic, these chapters are organized by chemical element: phosphorus-based chemicals, chlorine-based chemicals, etc. These descriptions of hazardous, toxic, and/or explosive chemicals conclude with a chapter on the identification of the inert chemicals, e.g. sand, used to fill practice munitions.

  4. Absolute partial photoionization cross sections of ozone.

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, J.; Chemistry

    2008-04-01

    Despite the current concerns about ozone, absolute partial photoionization cross sections for this molecule in the vacuum ultraviolet (valence) region have been unavailable. By eclectic re-evaluation of old/new data and plausible assumptions, such cross sections have been assembled to fill this void.

  5. Solving Absolute Value Equations Algebraically and Geometrically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiyuan, Wei

    2005-01-01

    The way in which students can improve their comprehension by understanding the geometrical meaning of algebraic equations or solving algebraic equation geometrically is described. Students can experiment with the conditions of the absolute value equation presented, for an interesting way to form an overall understanding of the concept.

  6. Teaching Absolute Value Inequalities to Mature Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierpinska, Anna; Bobos, Georgeana; Pruncut, Andreea

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives an account of a teaching experiment on absolute value inequalities, whose aim was to identify characteristics of an approach that would realize the potential of the topic to develop theoretical thinking in students enrolled in prerequisite mathematics courses at a large, urban North American university. The potential is…

  7. Increasing Capacity: Practice Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Pennie; Donkin, Christopher; Brown, Scott D.; Heathcote, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In most of the long history of the study of absolute identification--since Miller's (1956) seminal article--a severe limit on performance has been observed, and this limit has resisted improvement even by extensive practice. In a startling result, Rouder, Morey, Cowan, and Pfaltz (2004) found substantially improved performance with practice in the…

  8. On Relative and Absolute Conviction in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Keith; Mejia-Ramos, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Conviction is a central construct in mathematics education research on justification and proof. In this paper, we claim that it is important to distinguish between absolute conviction and relative conviction. We argue that researchers in mathematics education frequently have not done so and this has lead to researchers making unwarranted claims…

  9. Absolute Points for Multiple Assignment Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adlakha, V.; Kowalski, K.

    2006-01-01

    An algorithm is presented to solve multiple assignment problems in which a cost is incurred only when an assignment is made at a given cell. The proposed method recursively searches for single/group absolute points to identify cells that must be loaded in any optimal solution. Unlike other methods, the first solution is the optimal solution. The…

  10. Nonequilibrium equalities in absolutely irreversible processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashita, Yuto; Funo, Ken; Ueda, Masahito

    2015-03-01

    Nonequilibrium equalities have attracted considerable attention in the context of statistical mechanics and information thermodynamics. Integral nonequilibrium equalities reveal an ensemble property of the entropy production σ as = 1 . Although nonequilibrium equalities apply to rather general nonequilibrium situations, they break down in absolutely irreversible processes, where the forward-path probability vanishes and the entropy production diverges. We identify the mathematical origins of this inapplicability as the singularity of probability measure. As a result, we generalize conventional integral nonequilibrium equalities to absolutely irreversible processes as = 1 -λS , where λS is the probability of the singular part defined based on Lebesgue's decomposition theorem. The acquired equality contains two physical quantities related to irreversibility: σ characterizing ordinary irreversibility and λS describing absolute irreversibility. An inequality derived from the obtained equality demonstrates the absolute irreversibility leads to the fundamental lower bound on the entropy production. We demonstrate the validity of the obtained equality for a simple model.

  11. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  12. Precision absolute positional measurement of laser beams.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimons, Ewan D; Bogenstahl, Johanna; Hough, James; Killow, Christian J; Perreur-Lloyd, Michael; Robertson, David I; Ward, Henry

    2013-04-20

    We describe an instrument which, coupled with a suitable coordinate measuring machine, facilitates the absolute measurement within the machine frame of the propagation direction of a millimeter-scale laser beam to an accuracy of around ±4 μm in position and ±20 μrad in angle. PMID:23669658

  13. Measurement of the Surface and Underground Neutron Spectra with the UMD/NIST Fast Neutron Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, Thomas J.

    The typical fast neutron detector falls into one of two categories, Bonner sphere spectrometers and liquid scintillator proton recoil detectors. These two detector types have traditionally been used to measure fast neutrons at the surface and in low background environments. The cosmogenic neutron spectrum and flux is an important parameter for a number of experimental efforts, including procurement of low background materials and the prediction of electronic device faults. Fast neutrons can also cause problems for underground low-background experiments, through material activation or signals that mimic rare events. Current detector technology is not sufficient to properly characterize these backgrounds. To this end, the University of Maryland and the National Institute of Standards and Technology designed, developed, and deployed two Fast Neutron Spectrometers (FaNS) comprised of plastic scintillator and 3He proportional counters. The detectors are based upon capture-gated spectroscopy, a technique that demands a delayed coincidence between a neutron scatter and the resulting neutron capture after thermalization. This technique provides both particle identification and knowledge that the detected neutron fully thermalized. This improves background rejection capabilities and energy resolution. Presented are the design, development, and deployment of FaNS-1 and FaNS-2. Both detectors were characterized using standard fields at NIST, including calibrated 252Cf neutron sources and two monoenergetic neutron generators. Measurements of the surface fast neutron spectrum and flux have been made with both detectors, which are compared with previous measurements by traditional detectors. Additionally, FaNS-1 was deployed at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) in Ripplemead, VA. A measurement of the fast neutron spectrum and flux at KURF is presented as well. FaNS-2 is currently installed in a shallow underground laboratory where it is measuring the muon

  14. Monitoring Neutron Generator Output in a Mixed Neutron-Gamma Field Using a Plastic Scintillator.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra,S.; Wielopolski, L.

    2007-10-28

    Quantitative neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy employing neutron generators (NGs) entails monitoring them for possible fluctuations in their neutron output. We accomplished this using a plastic scintillator and recording a spectrum from which we selected a neutron region-of-interest (nROI) to discriminate between neutrons and the accompanying high-energy gamma-rays. We show that the selected nROI is insensitive to changes in the gamma-ray background, thus allowing satisfactory normalization of the gamma-ray spectra of an in-situ system for analyzing soil carbon.

  15. The correction of vibration in frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system for dynamic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cheng; Liu, Guodong; Liu, Bingguo; Chen, Fengdong; Zhuang, Zhitao; Xu, Xinke; Gan, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Absolute distance measurement systems are of significant interest in the field of metrology, which could improve the manufacturing efficiency and accuracy of large assemblies in fields such as aircraft construction, automotive engineering, and the production of modern windmill blades. Frequency scanning interferometry demonstrates noticeable advantages as an absolute distance measurement system which has a high precision and doesn't depend on a cooperative target. In this paper , the influence of inevitable vibration in the frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system is analyzed. The distance spectrum is broadened as the existence of Doppler effect caused by vibration, which will bring in a measurement error more than 103 times bigger than the changes of optical path difference. In order to decrease the influence of vibration, the changes of the optical path difference are monitored by a frequency stabilized laser, which runs parallel to the frequency scanning interferometry. The experiment has verified the effectiveness of this method.

  16. Fast Neutron Sensitivity with HPGe

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Allen; Hensley, Walter K.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Pitts, W. K.

    2008-01-22

    In addition to being excellent gamma-ray detectors, germanium detectors are also sensitive to fast neutrons. Incident neutrons undergo inelastic scattering {Ge(n,n')Ge*} off germanium nuclei and the resulting excited states emit gamma rays or conversion electrons. The response of a standard 140% high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with a bismuth germanate (BGO) anti-coincidence shield was measured for several neutron sources to characterize the ability of the HPGe detector to detect fast neutrons. For a sensitivity calculation performed using the characteristic fast neutron response peak that occurs at 692 keV, the 140% germanium detector system exhibited a sensitivity of ~175 counts / kg of WGPumetal in 1000 seconds at a source-detector distance of 1 meter with 4 in. of lead shielding between source and detector. Theoretical work also indicates that it might be possible to use the shape of the fast-neutron inelastic scattering signatures (specifically, the end-point energy of the long high energy tail of the resulting asymmetric peak) to gain additional information about the energy distribution of the incident neutron spectrum. However, the experimentally observed end-point energies appear to be almost identical for each of the fast neutron sources counted. Detailed MCNP calculations show that the neutron energy distributions impingent on the detector for these sources are very similar in this experimental configuration, due to neutron scattering in a lead shield (placed between the neutron source and HPGe detector to reduce the gamma ray flux), the BGO anti-coincidence detector, and the concrete floor.

  17. Combined Use of Absolute and Differential Seismic Arrival Time Data to Improve Absolute Event Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, S.; Johannesson, G.

    2012-12-01

    Arrival time measurements based on waveform cross correlation are becoming more common as advanced signal processing methods are applied to seismic data archives and real-time data streams. Waveform correlation can precisely measure the time difference between the arrival of two phases, and differential time data can be used to constrain relative location of events. Absolute locations are needed for many applications, which generally requires the use of absolute time data. Current methods for measuring absolute time data are approximately two orders of magnitude less precise than differential time measurements. To exploit the strengths of both absolute and differential time data, we extend our multiple-event location method Bayesloc, which previously used absolute time data only, to include the use of differential time measurements that are based on waveform cross correlation. Fundamentally, Bayesloc is a formulation of the joint probability over all parameters comprising the multiple event location system. The Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method is used to sample from the joint probability distribution given arrival data sets. The differential time component of Bayesloc includes scaling a stochastic estimate of differential time measurement precision based the waveform correlation coefficient for each datum. For a regional-distance synthetic data set with absolute and differential time measurement error of 0.25 seconds and 0.01 second, respectively, epicenter location accuracy is improved from and average of 1.05 km when solely absolute time data are used to 0.28 km when absolute and differential time data are used jointly (73% improvement). The improvement in absolute location accuracy is the result of conditionally limiting absolute location probability regions based on the precise relative position with respect to neighboring events. Bayesloc estimates of data precision are found to be accurate for the synthetic test, with absolute and differential time measurement

  18. Beam characterization at the Neutron Radiography Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah W. Morgan; Jeffrey C. King; Chad L. Pope

    2013-12-01

    The quality of a neutron-imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, potential image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This paper provides a characterization of the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio and potential image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. The NRAD has an effective collimation ratio greater than 125, a beam divergence of 0.3 +_ 0.1 degrees, and a gold foil cadmium ratio of 2.7. The flux profile has been quantified and the facility is an ASTM Category 1 radiographic facility. Based on bare and cadmium covered foil activation results, the neutron energy spectrum used in the current MCNP model of the radiography beamline over-samples the thermal region of the neutron energy spectrum.

  19. A capture-gated neutron spectrometer for characterization of neutron sources and their shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Philip; Peräjärvi, Kari; Ristkari, Samu; Siiskonen, Teemu; Toivonen, Harri

    2014-07-01

    A portable capture-gated neutron spectrometer was designed and built. The spectrometer consists of a boron-loaded scintillator. Data acquisition is performed in list-mode. 252Cf and AmBe sources and various neutron and gamma shields were used to characterize the response of the device. It is shown that both the unfolded capture-gated neutron spectrum and the singles spectrum up to 5 MeV should be utilized. Source identification is then possible and important information is revealed regarding the surroundings of the source. The detector's discrimination of neutrons from photons is relatively good; specifically, one out of 105 photons is misclassified as a neutron and, more importantly, this misclassification rate can be calculated precisely for different measurement environments and can be taken into account in setting alarm limits for neutron detection. The source and source shield identification capabilities of the detector make it an interesting asset for security applications.

  20. Neutron Spectra in a 15 MV LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Chu, Wei-Han; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Lan, Jen-Hong

    2010-12-07

    Neutron spectra were calculated inside the treatment hall of a 15 MV LINAC, calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. With a Bonner sphere spectrometer with pairs of thermoluminiscent dosimeters the neutron spectrum at 100 cm from the isocenter was measured and compared with the calculated spectrum. All the spectra in the treatment hall show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons; also the room-return due to the hall features is shown. In the maze the large contribution are due to epithermal and thermal neutrons. A good agreement between the calculated and measured spectrum at 100 cm was noticed, from this comparison the differences are attributed to the water content in the concrete of the hall.

  1. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  2. Absolute photoneutron cross sections of Sm isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gheorghe, I.; Glodariu, T.; Utsunomiya, H.; Filipescu, D.; Nyhus, H.-T.; Renstrom, T.; Tesileanu, O.; Shima, T.; Takahisa, K.; Miyamoto, S.

    2015-02-24

    Photoneutron cross sections for seven samarium isotopes, {sup 144}Sm, {sup 147}Sm, {sup 148}Sm, {sup 149}Sm, {sup 150}Sm, {sup 152}Sm and {sup 154}Sm, have been investigated near neutron emission threshold using quasimonochromatic laser-Compton scattering γ-rays produced at the synchrotron radiation facility NewSUBARU. The results are important for nuclear astrophysics calculations and also for probing γ-ray strength functions in the vicinity of neutron threshold. Here we describe the neutron detection system and we discuss the related data analysis and the necessary method improvements for adapting the current experimental method to the working parameters of the future Gamma Beam System of Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics facility.

  3. Future of Semiconductor Based Thermal Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R J; Cheung, C L; Reinhardt, C E; Wang, T F

    2006-02-22

    Thermal neutron detectors have seen only incremental improvements over the last decades. In this paper we overview the current technology of choice for thermal neutron detection--{sup 3}He tubes, which suffer from, moderate to poor fieldability, and low absolute efficiency. The need for improved neutron detection is evident due to this technology gap and the fact that neutrons are a highly specific indicator of fissile material. Recognizing this need, we propose to exploit recent advances in microfabrication technology for building the next generation of semiconductor thermal neutron detectors for national security requirements, for applications requiring excellent fieldability of small devices. We have developed an innovative pathway taking advantage of advanced processing and fabrication technology to produce the proposed device. The crucial advantage of our Pillar Detector is that it can simultaneously meet the requirements of high efficiency and fieldability in the optimized configuration, the detector efficiency could be higher than 70%.

  4. Absolute standardization of the impurity (121)Te associated to the production of the radiopharmaceutical (123)I.

    PubMed

    Araújo, M T F; Poledna, R; Delgado, J U; Silva, R L; Iwahara, A; da Silva, C J; Tauhata, L; Oliveira, A E; de Almeida, M C M; Lopes, R T

    2016-03-01

    (123)I is widely used for radiodiagnostic procedures. It is produced by reaction of (124)Xe (p,2n) (123)Cs →(123)Xe →(123)I in cyclotrons. (121)Te and (125)I appear in a photon energy spectrum as impurities. An activity of (121)Te was calibrated absolutely by sum-peak method and its photon emitting probability was estimated, whose results were consistent with published results. PMID:26805708

  5. Absolute Bunch Length Measurements at the ALS by Incoherent Synchrotron Radiation Fluctuation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Filippetto, D.; Sannibale, F.; Zolotorev, Max Samuil; Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC

    2008-01-24

    By analyzing the pulse to pulse intensity fluctuations of the radiation emitted by a charge particle in the incoherent part of the spectrum, it is possible to extract information about the spatial distribution of the beam. At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and tested a simple scheme based on this principle that allows for the absolute measurement of the bunch length. A description of the method and the experimental results are presented.

  6. Spectral correction factors for conventional neutron dosemeters used in high-energy neutron environments.

    PubMed

    Lee, K W; Sheu, R J

    2015-04-01

    High-energy neutrons (>10 MeV) contribute substantially to the dose fraction but result in only a small or negligible response in most conventional moderated-type neutron detectors. Neutron dosemeters used for radiation protection purpose are commonly calibrated with (252)Cf neutron sources and are used in various workplace. A workplace-specific correction factor is suggested. In this study, the effect of the neutron spectrum on the accuracy of dose measurements was investigated. A set of neutron spectra representing various neutron environments was selected to study the dose responses of a series of Bonner spheres, including standard and extended-range spheres. By comparing (252)Cf-calibrated dose responses with reference values based on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients, this paper presents recommendations for neutron field characterisation and appropriate correction factors for responses of conventional neutron dosemeters used in environments with high-energy neutrons. The correction depends on the estimated percentage of high-energy neutrons in the spectrum or the ratio between the measured responses of two Bonner spheres (the 4P6_8 extended-range sphere versus the 6″ standard sphere). PMID:25280480

  7. POLARIZED NEUTRONS IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    COURANT,E.D.

    1998-04-27

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. To accelerate polarized particles in a ring, one must make provisions for overcoming the depolarizing resonances that occur at certain energies. These resonances arise when the spin tune (ratio of spin precession frequency to orbit frequency) resonates with a component present in the horizontal field. The horizontal field oscillates with the vertical motion of the particles (due to vertical focusing); its frequency spectrum is dominated by the vertical oscillation frequency and its modulation by the periodic structure of the accelerator ring. In addition, the magnet imperfections that distort the closed orbit vertically contain all integral Fourier harmonics of the orbit frequency.

  8. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    SciTech Connect

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Romano, F.; Carpinelli, M.; Presti, D. Lo; Raffaele, L.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Sacchi, R.; Monaco, V.; Marchetto, F.; Giordanengo, S.

    2013-07-26

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  9. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum. PMID:25423049

  10. Absolute-magnitude distributions of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Dean; Wright, John; Jenkins III, Robert L.; Maddox, Larry

    2014-05-01

    The absolute-magnitude distributions of seven supernova (SN) types are presented. The data used here were primarily taken from the Asiago Supernova Catalogue, but were supplemented with additional data. We accounted for both foreground and host-galaxy extinction. A bootstrap method is used to correct the samples for Malmquist bias. Separately, we generate volume-limited samples, restricted to events within 100 Mpc. We find that the superluminous events (M{sub B} < –21) make up only about 0.1% of all SNe in the bias-corrected sample. The subluminous events (M{sub B} > –15) make up about 3%. The normal Ia distribution was the brightest with a mean absolute blue magnitude of –19.25. The IIP distribution was the dimmest at –16.75.

  11. Absolute radiometry and the solar constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A series of active cavity radiometers (ACRs) are described which have been developed as standard detectors for the accurate measurement of irradiance in absolute units. It is noted that the ACR is an electrical substitution calorimeter, is designed for automatic remote operation in any environment, and can make irradiance measurements in the range from low-level IR fluxes up to 30 solar constants with small absolute uncertainty. The instrument operates in a differential mode by chopping the radiant flux to be measured at a slow rate, and irradiance is determined from two electrical power measurements together with the instrumental constant. Results are reported for measurements of the solar constant with two types of ACRs. The more accurate measurement yielded a value of 136.6 plus or minus 0.7 mW/sq cm (1.958 plus or minus 0.010 cal/sq cm per min).

  12. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  13. Absolute enantioselective separation: optical activity ex machina.

    PubMed

    Bielski, Roman; Tencer, Michal

    2005-11-01

    The paper describes methodology of using three independent macroscopic factors affecting molecular orientation to accomplish separation of a racemic mixture without the presence of any other chiral compounds, i. e., absolute enantioselective separation (AES) which is an extension of a concept of applying these factors to absolute asymmetric synthesis. The three factors may be applied simultaneously or, if their effects can be retained, consecutively. The resulting three mutually orthogonal or near orthogonal directors constitute a true chiral influence and their scalar triple product is the measure of the chirality of the system. AES can be executed in a chromatography-like microfluidic process in the presence of an electric field. It may be carried out on a chemically modified flat surface, a monolithic polymer column made of a mesoporous material, each having imparted directional properties. Separation parameters were estimated for these media and possible implications for the natural homochirality are discussed. PMID:16342798

  14. An absolute measure for a key currency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  15. Neutron Soft Errors in Xilinx FPGAs at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    George, Jeffrey S.; Koga, Rocky; McMahan, Margaret A.

    2008-07-25

    The LBNL 88-Inch Cyclotron offers broad-spectrum neutrons for single event effects testing. We discuss results from this beamline for neutron soft upsets in Xilinx Virtex-4 and -5 field-programmable-gate-array (FPGA) devices.

  16. Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Absolute Activity Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loidl, M.; Leblanc, E.; Rodrigues, M.; Bouchard, J.; Censier, B.; Branger, T.; Lacour, D.

    2008-05-01

    We present a prototype of metallic magnetic calorimeters that we are developing for absolute activity measurements of low energy emitting radionuclides. We give a detailed description of the realization of the prototype, containing an 55Fe source inside the detector absorber. We present the analysis of first data taken with this detector and compare the result of activity measurement with liquid scintillation counting. We also propose some ways for reducing the uncertainty on the activity determination with this new technique.

  17. Absolute photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.

    1985-01-01

    The absolute values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.

  18. Absolute photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The absolute values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.

  19. Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob; Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie

    2010-06-23

    The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

  20. Blood pressure targets and absolute cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Odutayo, Ayodele; Rahimi, Kazem; Hsiao, Allan J; Emdin, Connor A

    2015-08-01

    In the Eighth Joint National Committee guideline on hypertension, the threshold for the initiation of blood pressure-lowering treatment for elderly adults (≥60 years) without chronic kidney disease or diabetes mellitus was raised from 140/90 mm Hg to 150/90 mm Hg. However, the committee was not unanimous in this decision, particularly because a large proportion of adults ≥60 years may be at high cardiovascular risk. On the basis of Eighth Joint National Committee guideline, we sought to determine the absolute 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease among these adults through analyzing the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2005-2012). The primary outcome measure was the proportion of adults who were at ≥20% predicted absolute cardiovascular risk and above goals for the Seventh Joint National Committee guideline but reclassified as at target under the Eighth Joint National Committee guideline (reclassified). The Framingham General Cardiovascular Disease Risk Score was used. From 2005 to 2012, the surveys included 12 963 adults aged 30 to 74 years with blood pressure measurements, of which 914 were reclassified based on the guideline. Among individuals reclassified as not in need of additional treatment, the proportion of adults 60 to 74 years without chronic kidney disease or diabetes mellitus at ≥20% absolute risk was 44.8%. This corresponds to 0.8 million adults. The proportion at high cardiovascular risk remained sizable among adults who were not receiving blood pressure-lowering treatment. Taken together, a sizable proportion of reclassified adults 60 to 74 years without chronic kidney disease or diabetes mellitus was at ≥20% absolute cardiovascular risk. PMID:26056340

  1. Relative errors can cue absolute visuomotor mappings.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Loes C J; Ernst, Marc O

    2015-12-01

    When repeatedly switching between two visuomotor mappings, e.g. in a reaching or pointing task, adaptation tends to speed up over time. That is, when the error in the feedback corresponds to a mapping switch, fast adaptation occurs. Yet, what is learned, the relative error or the absolute mappings? When switching between mappings, errors with a size corresponding to the relative difference between the mappings will occur more often than other large errors. Thus, we could learn to correct more for errors with this familiar size (Error Learning). On the other hand, it has been shown that the human visuomotor system can store several absolute visuomotor mappings (Mapping Learning) and can use associated contextual cues to retrieve them. Thus, when contextual information is present, no error feedback is needed to switch between mappings. Using a rapid pointing task, we investigated how these two types of learning may each contribute when repeatedly switching between mappings in the absence of task-irrelevant contextual cues. After training, we examined how participants changed their behaviour when a single error probe indicated either the often-experienced error (Error Learning) or one of the previously experienced absolute mappings (Mapping Learning). Results were consistent with Mapping Learning despite the relative nature of the error information in the feedback. This shows that errors in the feedback can have a double role in visuomotor behaviour: they drive the general adaptation process by making corrections possible on subsequent movements, as well as serve as contextual cues that can signal a learned absolute mapping. PMID:26280315

  2. Absolute distance measurements by variable wavelength interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bien, F.; Camac, M.; Caulfield, H. J.; Ezekiel, S.

    1981-02-01

    This paper describes a laser interferometer which provides absolute distance measurements using tunable lasers. An active feedback loop system, in which the laser frequency is locked to the optical path length difference of the interferometer, is used to tune the laser wavelengths. If the two wavelengths are very close, electronic frequency counters can be used to measure the beat frequency between the two laser frequencies and thus to determine the optical path difference between the two legs of the interferometer.

  3. Neutron tube design study for boron neutron capture therapy application

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1999-05-06

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  4. Absolute dosimetry for extreme-ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Kurt W.; Campiotti, Richard H.

    2000-06-01

    The accurate measurement of an exposure dose reaching the wafer on an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithographic system has been a technical challenge directly applicable to the evaluation of candidate EUV resist materials and calculating lithography system throughputs. We have developed a dose monitoring sensor system that can directly measure EUV intensities at the wafer plane of a prototype EUV lithographic system. This sensor system, located on the wafer stage adjacent to the electrostatic chuck used to grip wafers, operates by translating the sensor into the aerial image, typically illuminating an 'open' (unpatterned) area on the reticle. The absolute signal strength can be related to energy density at the wafer, and thus used to determine resist sensitivity, and the signal as a function of position can be used to determine illumination uniformity at the wafer plane. Spectral filtering to enhance the detection of 13.4 nm radiation was incorporated into the sensor. Other critical design parameters include the packaging and amplification technologies required to place this device into the space and vacuum constraints of a EUV lithography environment. We describe two approaches used to determine the absolute calibration of this sensor. The first conventional approach requires separate characterization of each element of the sensor. A second novel approach uses x-ray emission from a mildly radioactive iron source to calibrate the absolute response of the entire sensor system (detector and electronics) in a single measurement.

  5. A NEW SINGLE-CRYSTAL FILTERED THERMAL NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Brockman; David W. Nigg; M. Frederick Hawthorne

    2008-09-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and initial neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline to be used for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The calculated and measured thermal neutron flux produced at the irradiation location is on the order of 9.5x108 neutrons/cm2-s, with a measured cadmium ratio (Au foils) of 105, indicating a well-thermalized spectrum.

  6. Neutron dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Miola, U.J.; Ettinger, K.V.

    1981-01-01

    The recent development of various borated compounds and the utilization of one of these (Na/sub 2/B/sub 12/H/sub 11/SH) to treat brain tumors in clinical studies in Japan has renewed interest in neutron capture therapy. In these procedures thermal neutrons interact with /sup 10/B in boron containing cells through the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction producing charged particles with a maximum range of approx. 10..mu..m in tissue. Borated analogs of chlorpromazine, porphyrin, thiouracil and deoxyuridine promise improved tumor uptake and blood clearance. The therapy beam from the Medical Research Reactor in Brookhaven contains neutrons from a modified and filtered fission spectrum and dosimetric consequences of the use of the above mentioned compounds in conjunction with thermal and epithermal fluxes are discussed in the paper. One of the important problems of radiation dosimetry in capture therapy is determination of the flux profile and, hence, the dose profile in the brain. This has been achieved by constructing a brain phantom made of TE plastic. The lyoluminescence technique provides a convenient way of monitoring the neutron flux distributions; the detectors for this purpose utilize /sup 6/Li and /sup 10/B compounds. Such compounds have been synthesized specially for the purpose of dosimetry of thermal and epithermal beams. In addition, standard lyoluminescent phosphors, like glutamine, could be used to determine the collisional component of the dose as well as the contribution of the /sup 14/N(n,p)/sup 14/C reaction. Measurements of thermal flux were compared with calculations and with measurements done with activation foils.

  7. Micromegas neutron beam monitor neutronics.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Andrew C; Miller, Laurence F

    2005-01-01

    The Micromegas is a type of ionising radiation detector that consists of a gas chamber sandwiched between two parallel plate electrodes, with the gas chamber divided by a Frisch grid into drift and amplification gaps. Investigators have applied it to a number of different applications, such as charged particle, X-ray and neutron detection. A Micromegas device has been tested as a neutron beam monitor at CERN and is expected to be used for that purpose at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) under construction in Oak Ridge, TN. For the Micromegas to function effectively as neutron beam monitor, it should cause minimal disruption to the neutron beam in question. Specifically, it should scatter as few neutrons as possible and avoid neutron absorption when it does not contribute to generating useful information concerning the neutron beam. Here, we present the results of Monte Carlo calculations of the effect of different types of wall materials and detector gases on neutron beams and suggest methods for minimising disruption to the beam. PMID:16381746

  8. FAST NEUTRON SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Davis, F.J.; Hurst, G.S.; Reinhardt, P.W.

    1959-08-18

    An improved proton recoil spectrometer for determining the energy spectrum of a fast neutron beam is described. Instead of discriminating against and thereby"throwing away" the many recoil protons other than those traveling parallel to the neutron beam axis as do conventional spectrometers, this device utilizes protons scattered over a very wide solid angle. An ovoidal gas-filled recoil chamber is coated on the inside with a scintillator. The ovoidal shape of the sensitive portion of the wall defining the chamber conforms to the envelope of the range of the proton recoils from the radiator disposed within the chamber. A photomultiplier monitors the output of the scintillator, and a counter counts the pulses caused by protons of energy just sufficient to reach the scintillator.

  9. The possible use of a spallation neutron source for neutron capture therapy with epithermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Grusell, E.; Conde, H.; Larsson, B.; Roennqvist, T.; Sornsuntisook, O.; Crawford, J.; Reist, H.; Dahl, B.; Sjoestrand, N.G.; Russel, G. . Dept. of Radiation Sciences; Paul Scherrer Inst. , Villigen; Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Goeteborg . Dept. of Reactor Physics; Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1989-01-01

    Spallation is induced in a heavy material by 72 MeV protons. The hereby produced neutrons with essentially an evaporation spectrum with a peak energy of less than 2 MeV are moderated in two steps, first in iron, and then in carbon. Results from neutron fluence measurements in a perspex phantom placed close to the moderator are presented. Monte Carlo calculations of neutron fluence in a water phantom are also presented under some chosen configurations of spallation source and moderator. The calculations and measurements show a good agreement and also show that useful thermal neutron fluences are attainable in the depth of the brain, at proton currents of less than 0.5 mA. 3 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Neutron and gamma-ray spectra of 239PuBe and 241AmBe.

    PubMed

    Vega-Carrillo, Héctor René; Manzanares-Acuña, Eduardo; Becerra-Ferreiro, Ana María; Carrillo-Nuñez, Aureliano

    2002-08-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray spectra of 239PuBe and 241AmBe were measured and their dosimetric features were calculated. Neutron spectra were measured using a multisphere neutron spectrometer with a 6LiI(Eu) scintillator. The 239PuBe neutron spectrum was measured in an open environment, while the 241AmBe neutron spectrum was measured in a closed environment. Gamma-ray spectra were measured using a NaI(Tl) scintillator using the same experimental conditions for both sources. The effect of measuring conditions for the 241AmBe neutron spectrum indicates the presence of epithermal and thermal neutrons. The low-resolution neutron spectra obtained with the multisphere spectrometer allows one to calculate the dosimetric features of neutron sources. At 100 cm both sources produce approximately the same count rate as that of the 4.4 MeV gamma-ray per unit of alpha emitter activity. PMID:12150274

  11. Lunar neutron capture as a tracer for regolith dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    The Apollo 17 Lunar Neutron Probe Experiment measured both the boron-10 neutron capture rate and the uranium-235 neutron-induced fission rate as a function of depth. Cd absorption gave a measure of the neutron energy spectrum. Comparisons of the results are made with theory, and good agreement is obtained for the magnitudes and depth dependences of the capture rates. While the low-energy neutron spectrum at depth agrees with theory, the spectrum near the peak of the flux profile is harder than predicted. In light of these results, several alternatives for interpreting the magnitude and uniformity of the neutron capture data from lunar surface soil samples are outlined. While none of the alternatives can be unquestionably defended or discarded, a surface layer mixing model is discussed in detail.

  12. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-08-17

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.; Anderson, H.L.

    1958-09-16

    Means are presenied for increasing the reproduction ratio of a gaphite- moderated neutronic reactor by diminishing the neutron loss due to absorption or capture by gaseous impurities within the reactor. This means comprised of a fluid-tight casing or envelope completely enclosing the reactor and provided with a valve through which the casing, and thereby the reactor, may be evacuated of atmospheric air.

  14. Preliminary Analysis of the Multisphere Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhagen, P.; Kniss, T.; Wilson, J. W.; Singleterry, R. C.; Jones, I. W.; VanSteveninck, W.

    2003-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial aircraft flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) Project, an international collaboration of 15 laboratories, made simultaneous radiation measurements with 14 instruments on five flights of a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The primary AIR instrument was a highly sensitive extended-energy multisphere neutron spectrometer with lead and steel shells placed within the moderators of two of its 14 detectors to enhance response at high energies. Detector responses were calculated for neutrons and charged hadrons at energies up to 100 GeV using MCNPX. Neutron spectra were unfolded from the measured count rates using the new MAXED code. We have measured the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum (thermal to greater than 10 GeV), total neutron fluence rate, and neutron effective dose and dose equivalent rates and their dependence on altitude and geomagnetic cutoff. The measured cosmic-ray neutron spectra have almost no thermal neutrons, a large "evaporation" peak near 1 MeV and a second broad peak near 100 MeV which contributes about 69% of the neutron effective dose. At high altitude, geomagnetic latitude has very little effect on the shape of the spectrum, but it is the dominant variable affecting neutron fluence rate, which was 8 times higher at the northernmost measurement location than it was at the southernmost. The shape of the spectrum varied only slightly with altitude from 21 km down to 12 km (56 - 201 grams per square centimeter atmospheric depth), but was significantly different on the ground. In all cases, ambient dose equivalent was greater than effective dose for cosmic-ray neutrons.

  15. Neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-10-21

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

  16. Neutron tubes

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  17. Characterization of emergent leakage neutrons from multiple layers of hydrogen/water in the lunar regolith by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SU, J.; Sagdeev, R.; Usikov, D.; Chin, G.; Boyer, L.; Livengood, T. A.; McClanahan, T. P.; Murray, J.; Starr, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction: The leakage flux of lunar neutrons produced by precipitation of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles in the upper layer of the lunar regolith and measured by orbital instruments such as the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) is investigated by Monte Carlo simulation. Previous Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have been used to investigate neutron production and leakage from the lunar surface to assess the elemental composition of lunar soil [1-6] and its effect on the leakage neutron flux. We investigate effects on the emergent flux that depend on the physical distribution of hydrogen within the regolith. We use the software package GEANT4 [7] to calculate neutron production from spallation by GCR particles [8,9] in the lunar soil. Multiple layers of differing hydrogen/water at different depths in the lunar regolith model are introduced to examine enhancement or suppression of leakage neutron flux. We find that the majority of leakage thermal and epithermal neutrons are produced in 25 cm to 75 cm deep from the lunar surface. Neutrons produced in the shallow top layer retain more of their original energy due to fewer scattering interactions and escape from the lunar surface mostly as fast neutrons. This provides a diagnostic tool in interpreting leakage neutron flux enhancement or suppression due to hydrogen concentration distribution in lunar regolith. We also find that the emitting angular distribution of thermal and epithermal leakage neutrons can be described by cos3/2(theta) where the fast neutrons emitting angular distribution is cos(theta). The energy sensitivity and angular response of the LEND detectors SETN and CSETN are investigated using the leakage neutron spectrum from GEANT4 simulations. A simplified LRO model is used to benchmark MCNPX[10] and GEANT4 on CSETN absolute count rate corresponding to neutron flux from bombardment of 120MV solar potential GCR particles on FAN lunar soil. We are able to interpret the count rates of SETN and

  18. Determination of the neutron and photon spectra of a clinical fast neutron beam.

    PubMed

    Moyers, M F; Horton, J L

    1990-01-01

    A simple technique to determine the neutron and photon spectra of a clinical fast neutron beam is described. This technique involves making narrow beam attenuation measurements with a pair of ionization chambers and an iterative fitting program to analyze the data. A method is also described for determining the first-guess neutron spectrum for input into the iterative program. The results of the analysis yield spectra suitable for use in dose calculation algorithms and dosimetry protocols. Presented here is the first-known published photon spectrum from a clinical machine. PMID:2120558

  19. Neutron activation system for spectral measurements of pulsed ion diode neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.L.; Kruse, L.W.

    1980-02-01

    A neutron energy spectrometer has been developed to study intense ion beam-target interactions in the harsh radiation environment of a relativistic electron beam source. The main component is a neutron threshold activation system employing two multiplexed high efficiency Ge(Li) detectors, an annihilation gamma coincidence system, and a pneumatic sample transport. Additional constraints on the neutron spectrum are provided by total neutron yield and time-of-flight measurements. A practical lower limit on the total neutron yield into 4..pi.. required for a spectral measurement with this system is approx. 10/sup 10/ n where the neutron yield is predominantly below 4 MeV and approx. 10/sup 8/ n when a significant fraction of the yield is above 4 MeV. Applications of this system to pulsed ion diode neutron production experiments on Hermes II are described.

  20. The JET Neutron Activation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roquemore, A. L.; Bertalot, L.; Esposito, B.; Jarvis, O. N.; Loughlin, M. J.; Sadler, G.; van Belle, P.

    1997-11-01

    The JET activation system provides the absolute value of the neutron yields as well as a check on the linearity of other neutron detector systems. The total neutron yield is standardized to one irradiation end reentrant in the top of the vessel, while the results from the other seven irradiation ends are normalized to this standard end and provide redundancy as well as information on the plasma position. A pneumatic transfer system is used to transfer up to five capsules containing elemental foils for a single discharge on JET. Eleven different elemental foils have been utilized to determine the yields from both DD and DT plasmas. By placing several different foils with different activation energy thresholds in a single capsule for one DT discharge, neutron spectral information has been obtained by use of the SAND-II unfolding code. A description of the activation system hardware and calibration of the activation detector system will be presented along with the results from the DT neutron calibration campaign.

  1. Proton recoil spectroscopy 400 meters from a fission neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Stanka, M.B.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron kerma and spectrum measurements have been made at the US Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) to 400m in an air-over-ground geometry from a fission neutron source and have been compared to Monte Carlo transport calculations. The neutron spectra measurements were made using a rotating neutron spectrometer. This spectrometer consists of four spherical proton-recoil detectors mounted on a common rotating base. Detector radius, gas composition, and pressure have been varied to allow sensitivity over a neutron range of 50 keV to 4.5 MeV. Neutron kerma was determined by using the Kerr soft-tissue kerma factors. Measured neutron kerma agreed with the calculated neutron kerma to within 5%. Comparisons with other neutron spectrometers such as NE213 and Bonner Spheres are presented and agreement between the different spectrometers is better than 20%.

  2. Monoenergetic fast neutron reference fields: II. Field characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, Ralf; Thomas, David J.

    2011-12-01

    Monoenergetic neutron reference fields are required for the calibration of neutron detectors and dosemeters for various applications ranging from nuclear physics and nuclear data measurements to radiation protection. In a series of two separate publications the metrological aspects of the production and measurement of fast neutrons are reviewed. In the first part, requirements for the nuclear reactions used to produce neutron fields as well as methods for target characterization and the general layout of reference facilities were discussed. This second part focuses on the most important techniques for field characterization and includes the determination of the neutron fluence as well as the spectral neutron distribution and the determination of the fluence of contaminating photons. The measurements are usually carried out relative to reference cross sections which are reviewed in a separate contribution, but for certain conditions 'absolute' methods for neutron measurements can be used which are directly traceable to the international system of units (SI).

  3. Neutron Sources for Standard-Based Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Radev, Radoslav; McLean, Thomas

    2014-11-10

    The DHS TC Standards and the consensus ANSI Standards use 252Cf as the neutron source for performance testing because its energy spectrum is similar to the 235U and 239Pu fission sources used in nuclear weapons. An emission rate of 20,000 ± 20% neutrons per second is used for testing of the radiological requirements both in the ANSI standards and the TCS. Determination of the accurate neutron emission rate of the test source is important for maintaining consistency and agreement between testing results obtained at different testing facilities. Several characteristics in the manufacture and the decay of the source need to be understood and accounted for in order to make an accurate measurement of the performance of the neutron detection instrument. Additionally, neutron response characteristics of the particular instrument need to be known and taken into account as well as neutron scattering in the testing environment.

  4. DIRECTIONAL DETECTION OF A NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    VANIER, P.E.; FORMAN, L.

    2006-10-23

    Advantages afforded by the development of new directional neutron detectors and imagers are discussed. Thermal neutrons have mean free paths in air of about 20 meters, and can be effectively imaged using coded apertures. Fission spectrum neutrons have ranges greater than 100 meters, and carry enough energy to scatter at least twice in multilayer detectors which can yield both directional and spectral information. Such strategies allow better discrimination between a localized spontaneous fission source and the low, but fluctuating, level of background neutrons generated by cosmic rays. A coded aperture thermal neutron imager will be discussed as well as a proton-recoil double-scatter fast-neutron directional detector with time-of-flight energy discrimination.

  5. Low energy neutron background in deep underground laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Andreas; Görres, Joachim; Junker, Matthias; Kratz, Karl-Ludwig; Laubenstein, Matthias; Long, Alexander; Nisi, Stefano; Smith, Karl; Wiescher, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The natural neutron background influences the maximum achievable sensitivity in most deep underground nuclear, astroparticle and double-beta decay physics experiments. Reliable neutron flux numbers are an important ingredient in the design of the shielding of new large-scale experiments as well as in the analysis of experimental data. Using a portable setup of 3He counters we measured the thermal neutron flux at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility, the Soudan Underground Laboratory, on the 4100 ft and the 4850 ft levels of the Sanford Underground Research Facility, at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory. Absolute neutron fluxes at these laboratories are presented.

  6. Earth albedo neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preszler, A. M.; Simnett, G. M.; White, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    We report the measurement of the energy and angular distributions of earth albedo neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV at 40 deg N geomagnetic latitude from a balloon at 120,000 ft, below 4.65 g/sq cm. The albedo-neutron omnidirectional energy distribution is flat to 50 MeV, then decreases with energy. The absolute neutron energy distribution is of the correct strength and shape for the albedo neutrons to be the source of the protons trapped in earth's inner radiation belt.

  7. Measurement of the lunar neutron density profile. [Apollo 17 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolum, D. S.; Burnett, D. S.; Furst, M.; Weiss, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    An in situ measurement of the lunar neutron density from 20 to 400 g/sq cm depth between the lunar surface was made by the Apollo 17 Lunar Neutron Probe Experiment using particle tracks produced by the B10(n, alpha)Li7 reaction. Both the absolute magnitude and depth profile of the neutron density are in good agreement with past theoretical calculations. The effect of cadmium absorption on the neutron density and in the relative Sm149 to Gd157 capture rates obtained experimentally implies that the true lunar Gd157 capture rate is about one half of that calculated theoretically.

  8. Application of Wavelet Unfolding Technique in Neutron Spectroscopic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Jessica; Barzilov, Alexander

    Nonproliferation of nuclear materials is important in nuclear power industry and fuel cycle facilities. It requires technologies capable of measuring and assessing the radiation signatures of fission events. Neutrons produced in spontaneous or induced fission reactions are mainly fast. The neutron energy information allows characterization of nuclear materials and neutron sources. It can also be applied in remote sensing and source search tasks. The plastic scintillator EJ-299-33A was studied as a fast neutron detector. The detector response to a polyenergetic flux was unfolded usingthe multiple linear regression method. It yields the intensities of neutron flux of particular energy, hence, enabling the spectroscopic analysis. The wavelet technique was evaluated for the unfolding of neutron spectrum using the scintillator's response functions between 1 MeV and 14 MeV computed with the MCNPX code. This paperpresents the computational results of the wavelet-based spectrum unfolding applied to a scintillator detector with neutron / photon pulse shape discrimination properties.

  9. β-delayed neutron spectroscopy using trapped radioactive ions.

    PubMed

    Yee, R M; Scielzo, N D; Bertone, P F; Buchinger, F; Caldwell, S; Clark, J A; Deibel, C M; Fallis, J; Greene, J P; Gulick, S; Lascar, D; Levand, A F; Li, G; Norman, E B; Pedretti, M; Savard, G; Segel, R E; Sharma, K S; Sternberg, M G; Van Schelt, J; Zabransky, B J

    2013-03-01

    A novel technique for β-delayed neutron spectroscopy has been demonstrated using trapped ions. The neutron-energy spectrum is reconstructed by measuring the time of flight of the nuclear recoil following neutron emission, thereby avoiding all the challenges associated with neutron detection, such as backgrounds from scattered neutrons and γ rays and complicated detector-response functions. (137)I(+) ions delivered from a (252)Cf source were confined in a linear Paul trap surrounded by radiation detectors, and the β-delayed neutron-energy spectrum and branching ratio were determined by detecting the β(-) and recoil ions in coincidence. Systematic effects were explored by determining the branching ratio three ways. Improvements to achieve higher detection efficiency, better energy resolution, and a lower neutron-energy threshold are proposed. PMID:23496704

  10. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  11. The National Geodetic Survey absolute gravity program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, George; Moose, Robert E.; Wessells, Claude W.

    1989-03-01

    The National Geodetic Survey absolute gravity program will utilize the high precision afforded by the JILAG-4 instrument to support geodetic and geophysical research, which involves studies of vertical motions, identification and modeling of other temporal variations, and establishment of reference values. The scientific rationale of these objectives is given, the procedures used to collect gravity and environmental data in the field are defined, and the steps necessary to correct and remove unwanted environmental effects are stated. In addition, site selection criteria, methods of concomitant environmental data collection and relative gravity observations, and schedule and logistics are discussed.

  12. An absolute radius scale for Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; Cooke, Maren L.; Pelton, Emily

    1990-01-01

    Radio and stellar occultation observations of Saturn's rings made by the Voyager spacecraft are discussed. The data reveal systematic discrepancies of almost 10 km in some parts of the rings, limiting some of the investigations. A revised solution for Saturn's rotation pole has been proposed which removes the discrepancies between the stellar and radio occultation profiles. Corrections to previously published radii vary from -2 to -10 km for the radio occultation, and +5 to -6 km for the stellar occultation. An examination of spiral density waves in the outer A Ring supports that the revised absolute radii are in error by no more than 2 km.

  13. Characterization of the DARA solar absolute radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finsterle, W.; Suter, M.; Fehlmann, A.; Kopp, G.

    2011-12-01

    The Davos Absolute Radiometer (DARA) prototype is an Electrical Substitution Radiometer (ESR) which has been developed as a successor of the PMO6 type on future space missions and ground based TSI measurements. The DARA implements an improved thermal design of the cavity detector and heat sink assembly to minimize air-vacuum differences and to maximize thermal symmetry of measuring and compensating cavity. The DARA also employs an inverted viewing geometry to reduce internal stray light. We will report on the characterization and calibration experiments which were carried out at PMOD/WRC and LASP (TRF).

  14. Absolute calibration of the Auger fluorescence detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauleo, P.; Brack, J.; Garrard, L.; Harton, J.; Knapik, R.; Meyhandan, R.; Rovero, A.C.; Tamashiro, A.; Warner, D.

    2005-07-01

    Absolute calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors uses a light source at the telescope aperture. The technique accounts for the combined effects of all detector components in a single measurement. The calibrated 2.5 m diameter light source fills the aperture, providing uniform illumination to each pixel. The known flux from the light source and the response of the acquisition system give the required calibration for each pixel. In the lab, light source uniformity is studied using CCD images and the intensity is measured relative to NIST-calibrated photodiodes. Overall uncertainties are presently 12%, and are dominated by systematics.

  15. Absolute angular positioning in ultrahigh vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Schief, H.; Marsico, V.; Kern, K.

    1996-05-01

    Commercially available angular resolvers, which are routinely used in machine tools and robotics, are modified and adapted to be used under ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) conditions. They provide straightforward and reliable measurements of angular positions for any kind of UHV sample manipulators. The corresponding absolute reproducibility is on the order of 0.005{degree}, whereas the relative resolution is better than 0.001{degree}, as demonstrated by high-resolution helium-reflectivity measurements. The mechanical setup and possible applications are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  17. Absolute Priority for a Vehicle in VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad

    In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide absolute priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.

  18. Interpretation of the COBE FIRAS CMBR spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, E. L.; Mather, J. C.; Fixsen, D. J.; Kogut, A.; Shafer, R. A.; Bennett, C. L.; Boggess, N. W.; Cheng, E. S.; Silverberg, R. F.; Smoot, G. F.

    1994-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) spectrum measured by the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instrument on NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) is indistinguishable from a blackbody, implying stringent limits on energy release in the early universe later than the time t = 1 yr after the big bang. We compare the FIRAS data to previous precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background spectrum and find a reasonable agreement. We discuss the implications of the absolute value of y is less than 2.5 x 10(exp -5) and the absolute value of mu is less than 3.3 x 10(exp -4) 95% confidence limits found by Mather et al. (1994) on many processes occurring after t = 1 yr, such as explosive structure formation, reionization, and dissipation of small-scale density perturbations. We place limits on models with dust plus Population III stars, or evolving populations of IR galaxies, by directly comparing the Mather et al. spectrum to the model predictions.

  19. A neutron spectrometer for neutron energies between 1 eV and 10 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.K.; Blue, T.E.

    1988-01-01

    In boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), it is the consensus that epithermal neutron beams have advantages over thermal beams in treating deep-seated brain tumors, and large neutron fields have advantages over narrow beams, since whole-brain irradiations are thought to be necessary in many cases. Epithermal neutron sources for BNCT, which include filtered reactor neutron beams and moderated reactor neutron fields, are currently being developed at many institutions around the world. Neutrons with energies between 1 eV and 10 keV are most suitable for treating brain tumors. However, techniques for measuring neutron spectra in a vacuum in this energy range are not well developed. This paper describes a new type of neutron spectrometer that has a set of response functions that peak at equally spaced intervals on a logarithmic energy scale ranging from 1 eV to 10 keV; therefore, neutron spectra (or histograms) in this energy range can be obtained by properly applying spectrum unfolding techniques to the measured data. The spectrometer is applicable for measurements in a vacuum for both narrow neutron beams and wide neutron fields.

  20. Determination of the absolute contours of optical flats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primak, W.

    1969-01-01

    Emersons procedure is used to determine true absolute contours of optical flats. Absolute contours of standard flats are determined and a comparison is then made between standard and unknown flats. Contour differences are determined by deviation of Fizeau fringe.

  1. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bernander, N.K. et al.

    1960-10-18

    An apparatus is described for producing neutrons through target bombardment with deuterons. Deuterium gas is ionized by electron bombardment and the deuteron ions are accelerated through a magnetic field to collimate them into a continuous high intensity beam. The ion beam is directed against a deuteron pervious metal target of substantially the same nnaterial throughout to embed the deuterous therein and react them to produce neutrons. A large quantity of neutrons is produced in this manner due to the increased energy and quantity of ions bombarding the target.

  2. The new cold neutron chopper spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source: design and performance.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, G; Podlesnyak, A A; Niedziela, J L; Iverson, E B; Sokol, P E

    2011-08-01

    The design and performance of the new cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct-geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed essentially to cover the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM-II, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE, and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments. PMID:21895276

  3. The new cold neutron chopper spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source: Design and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlers, G.; Podlesnyak, A. A.; Niedziela, J. L.; Iverson, E. B.; Sokol, P. E.

    2011-08-15

    The design and performance of the new cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct-geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed essentially to cover the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM-II, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE, and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments.

  4. The new Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source -- Design and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlers, Georg; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Iverson, Erik B.; Sokol, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    The design and performance of the new cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct-geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed essentially to cover the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM-II, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE, and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments.

  5. A neutron detector to monitor the intensity of transmitted neutrons for small-angle neutron scattering instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lurgio, Patrick M.; Klann, Raymond T.; Fink, Charles L.; McGregor, Douglas S.; Thiyagarajan, Pappannan; Naday, Istvan

    2003-06-01

    A semiconductor-based neutron detector was developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for use as a neutron beam monitor for small-angle neutron scattering instruments. The detector is constructed using a coating of 10B on a gallium-arsenide semiconductor detector and is mounted directly within a cylindrical (2.2 cm dia. and 4.4 cm long) enriched 10B 4C beam stop in the time-of-flight Small Angle Neutron Diffractometer (SAND) instrument at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) facility at ANL. The neutron beam viewed by the SAND is from a pulsed spallation source moderated by a solid methane moderator that produces useful neutrons in the wavelength range of 0.5-14 Å. The SAND instrument uses all detected neutrons in the above wavelength range sorted by time-of-flight into 68 constant Δ T/ T=0.05 channels. This new detector continuously monitors the transmitted neutron beam through the sample during scattering measurements and takes data concurrently with the other detectors in the instrument. The 10B coating on the GaAs detector allows the detection of the cold neutron spectrum with reasonable efficiency. This paper describes the details of the detector fabrication, the beam stop monitor design, and includes a discussion of results from preliminary tests using the detector during several run cycles at the IPNS.

  6. Absolute absorption spectra of batho- and photorhodopsins at room temperature. Picosecond laser photolysis of rhodopsin in polyacrylamide.

    PubMed Central

    Kandori, H; Shichida, Y; Yoshizawa, T

    1989-01-01

    Picosecond laser photolysis of rhodopsin in 15% polyacrylamide gel was performed for estimating absolute absorption spectra of the primary intermediates of cattle rhodopsin (bathorhodopsin and photorhodopsin). Using a rhodopsin digitonin extract embedded in 15% polyacrylamide gel, a precise percentage of bleaching of rhodopsin after excitation of a picosecond laser pulse was measured. Using this value, the absolute absorption spectrum of bathorhodopsin was calculated from the spectral change before and 1 ns after the picosecond laser excitation (corresponding to the difference spectrum between rhodopsin and bathorhodopsin). The absorption spectrum of bathorhodopsin thus obtained displayed a lambda max at 535 nm, which was shorter than that at low temperature (543 nm) and a half band-width broader than that measured at low temperature. The oscillator strength of bathorhodopsin at room temperature was smaller than that at low temperature. The absolute absorption spectrum of photorhodopsin was also estimated from the difference spectrum measured at 15 ps after the excitation of rhodopsin (Shichida, Y., S. Matuoka, and T. Yoshizawa. 1984. Photobiochem. Photobiophys. 7:221-228), assuming a sequential conversion of photorhodopsin to bathorhodopsin. Its lambda max was located at approximately 570 nm, and the oscillator strength was smaller than those of rhodopsin and bathorhodopsin. PMID:2790133

  7. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, Anthony J.; Stromswold, David C.

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  8. Absolute rates of hole transfer in DNA.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, Kittusamy; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Lewis, Frederick D; Berlin, Yuri A; Ratner, Mark A; Siebbeles, Laurens D A

    2005-10-26

    Absolute rates of hole transfer between guanine nucleobases separated by one or two A:T base pairs in stilbenedicarboxamide-linked DNA hairpins were obtained by improved kinetic analysis of experimental data. The charge-transfer rates in four different DNA sequences were calculated using a density-functional-based tight-binding model and a semiclassical superexchange model. Site energies and charge-transfer integrals were calculated directly as the diagonal and off-diagonal matrix elements of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian, respectively, for all possible combinations of nucleobases. Taking into account the Coulomb interaction between the negative charge on the stilbenedicarboxamide linker and the hole on the DNA strand as well as effects of base pair twisting, the relative order of the experimental rates for hole transfer in different hairpins could be reproduced by tight-binding calculations. To reproduce quantitatively the absolute values of the measured rate constants, the effect of the reorganization energy was taken into account within the semiclassical superexchange model for charge transfer. The experimental rates could be reproduced with reorganization energies near 1 eV. The quantum chemical data obtained were used to discuss charge carrier mobility and hole-transport equilibria in DNA. PMID:16231945

  9. Transient absolute robustness in stochastic biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Enciso, German A

    2016-08-01

    Absolute robustness allows biochemical networks to sustain a consistent steady-state output in the face of protein concentration variability from cell to cell. This property is structural and can be determined from the topology of the network alone regardless of rate parameters. An important question regarding these systems is the effect of discrete biochemical noise in the dynamical behaviour. In this paper, a variable freezing technique is developed to show that under mild hypotheses the corresponding stochastic system has a transiently robust behaviour. Specifically, after finite time the distribution of the output approximates a Poisson distribution, centred around the deterministic mean. The approximation becomes increasingly accurate, and it holds for increasingly long finite times, as the total protein concentrations grow to infinity. In particular, the stochastic system retains a transient, absolutely robust behaviour corresponding to the deterministic case. This result contrasts with the long-term dynamics of the stochastic system, which eventually must undergo an extinction event that eliminates robustness and is completely different from the deterministic dynamics. The transiently robust behaviour may be sufficient to carry out many forms of robust signal transduction and cellular decision-making in cellular organisms. PMID:27581485

  10. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  11. Sentinel-2/MSI absolute calibration: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonjou, V.; Lachérade, S.; Fougnie, B.; Gamet, P.; Marcq, S.; Raynaud, J.-L.; Tremas, T.

    2015-10-01

    Sentinel-2 is an optical imaging mission devoted to the operational monitoring of land and coastal areas. It is developed in partnership between the European Commission and the European Space Agency. The Sentinel-2 mission is based on a satellites constellation deployed in polar sun-synchronous orbit. It will offer a unique combination of global coverage with a wide field of view (290km), a high revisit (5 days with two satellites), a high resolution (10m, 20m and 60m) and multi-spectral imagery (13 spectral bands in visible and shortwave infra-red domains). CNES is involved in the instrument commissioning in collaboration with ESA. This paper reviews all the techniques that will be used to insure an absolute calibration of the 13 spectral bands better than 5% (target 3%), and will present the first results if available. First, the nominal calibration technique, based on an on-board sun diffuser, is detailed. Then, we show how vicarious calibration methods based on acquisitions over natural targets (oceans, deserts, and Antarctica during winter) will be used to check and improve the accuracy of the absolute calibration coefficients. Finally, the verification scheme, exploiting photometer in-situ measurements over Lacrau plain, is described. A synthesis, including spectral coherence, inter-methods agreement and temporal evolution, will conclude the paper.

  12. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  13. Validation of neutron emission profiles in MAST with a collimated neutron monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Sangaroon, S.; Cecconello, M.; Conroy, S.; Weiszflog, M.; Wodniak, I.; Ericsson, G.; Turnyanskiy, M.

    2012-10-15

    A neutron camera with liquid scintillator detectors is used in MAST to measure the neutron emissivity from D(d,n){sup 3}He reactions along collimated lines of sight. In this work, the measured recoil proton pulse height spectra generated in the detectors by the incident neutrons is modelled taking into account the energy spectrum of the generated neutrons, their spatial distribution and transport to the detectors as well as the detector's response function. The contribution of scattered neutrons to the pulse height spectrum is also modelled. Good agreement is found between the experimental data and the simulations. Examples are given showing the sensitivity of the recoil proton pulse height spectra to different observation angles with respect the neutral beam injection and the plasma rotation direction.

  14. Development of Measurement Methods for Detection of Special Nuclear Materials using D-D Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Yagi, Takahiro; Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Kimura, Masaharu; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2015-10-01

    For detection of hidden special nuclear materials (SNMs), we have developed an active neutron-based interrogation system combined with a D-D fusion pulsed neutron source and a neutron detection system. In the detection scheme, we have adopted new measurement techniques simultaneously; neutron noise analysis and neutron energy spectrum analysis. The validity of neutron noise analysis method has been experimentally studied in the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA), and was applied to a cargo container inspection system by simulation.

  15. A Conceptual Approach to Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark W.; Bryson, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The absolute value learning objective in high school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex absolute value equations and inequalities. When absolute value problems become more complex, students often do not have sufficient conceptual understanding to make any sense of what is happening mathematically. The authors suggest that the…

  16. Using, Seeing, Feeling, and Doing Absolute Value for Deeper Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponce, Gregorio A.

    2008-01-01

    Using sticky notes and number lines, a hands-on activity is shared that anchors initial student thinking about absolute value. The initial point of reference should help students successfully evaluate numeric problems involving absolute value. They should also be able to solve absolute value equations and inequalities that are typically found in…

  17. 20 CFR 404.1205 - Absolute coverage groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Absolute coverage groups. 404.1205 Section... INSURANCE (1950- ) Coverage of Employees of State and Local Governments What Groups of Employees May Be Covered § 404.1205 Absolute coverage groups. (a) General. An absolute coverage group is a...

  18. Irradiation tests of ITER candidate Hall sensors using two types of neutron spectra.

    PubMed

    Ďuran, I; Bolshakova, I; Viererbl, L; Sentkerestiová, J; Holyaka, R; Lahodová, Z; Bém, P

    2010-10-01

    We report on irradiation tests of InSb based Hall sensors at two irradiation facilities with two distinct types of neutron spectra. One was a fission reactor neutron spectrum with a significant presence of thermal neutrons, while another one was purely fast neutron field. Total neutron fluence of the order of 10(16) cm(-2) was accumulated in both cases, leading to significant drop of Hall sensor sensitivity in case of fission reactor spectrum, while stable performance was observed at purely fast neutron spectrum. This finding suggests that performance of this particular type of Hall sensors is governed dominantly by transmutation. Additionally, it further stresses the need to test ITER candidate Hall sensors under neutron flux with ITER relevant spectrum. PMID:21033987

  19. Irradiation tests of ITER candidate Hall sensors using two types of neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, I.; Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Sentkerestiova, J.; Bem, P.

    2010-10-15

    We report on irradiation tests of InSb based Hall sensors at two irradiation facilities with two distinct types of neutron spectra. One was a fission reactor neutron spectrum with a significant presence of thermal neutrons, while another one was purely fast neutron field. Total neutron fluence of the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} was accumulated in both cases, leading to significant drop of Hall sensor sensitivity in case of fission reactor spectrum, while stable performance was observed at purely fast neutron spectrum. This finding suggests that performance of this particular type of Hall sensors is governed dominantly by transmutation. Additionally, it further stresses the need to test ITER candidate Hall sensors under neutron flux with ITER relevant spectrum.

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to a reflector means for a neutronic reactor. A reflector comprised of a plurality of vertically movable beryllium control members is provided surrounding the sides of the reactor core. An absorber of fast neutrons comprised of natural uramum surrounds the reflector. An absorber of slow neutrons surrounds the absorber of fast neutrons and is formed of a plurality of beryllium blocks having natural uranium members distributcd therethrough. in addition, a movable body is positioned directly below the core and is comprised of a beryllium reflector and an absorbing member attached to the botiom thereof, the absorbing member containing a substance selected from the goup consisting of natural urantum and Th/sup 232/.

  1. System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Nigg, D.W.; Wemple, C.A.

    1999-07-06

    A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy is disclosed. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention. 5 figs.

  2. System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Nigg, David W.; Wemple, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention.

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

    1961-11-21

    A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

  4. NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Richmond, J.L.; Wells, C.E.

    1963-01-15

    A neutron source is obtained without employing any separate beryllia receptacle, as was formerly required. The new method is safer and faster, and affords a source with both improved yield and symmetry of neutron emission. A Be container is used to hold and react with Pu. This container has a thin isolating layer that does not obstruct the desired Pu--Be reaction and obviates procedures previously employed to disassemble and remove a beryllia receptacle. (AEC)

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1958-04-22

    A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

  6. INTERPRETATION OF THE ARCADE 2 ABSOLUTE SKY BRIGHTNESS MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Seiffert, M.; Levin, S. M.; Fixsen, D. J.; Kogut, A.; Wollack, E.; Limon, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Mirel, P.; Singal, J.; Villela, T.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2011-06-10

    We use absolutely calibrated data between 3 and 90 GHz from the 2006 balloon flight of the ARCADE 2 instrument, along with previous measurements at other frequencies, to constrain models of extragalactic emission. Such emission is a combination of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) monopole, Galactic foreground emission, the integrated contribution of radio emission from external galaxies, any spectral distortions present in the CMB, and any other extragalactic source. After removal of estimates of foreground emission from our own Galaxy, and an estimated contribution of external galaxies, we present fits to a combination of the flat-spectrum CMB and potential spectral distortions in the CMB. We find 2{sigma} upper limits to CMB spectral distortions of {mu} < 6 x 10{sup -4} and |Y{sub ff}| < 1 x 10{sup -4}. We also find a significant detection of a residual signal beyond that, which can be explained by the CMB plus the integrated radio emission from galaxies estimated from existing surveys. This residual signal may be due to an underestimated galactic foreground contribution, an unaccounted for contribution of a background of radio sources, or some combination of both. The residual signal is consistent with emission in the form of a power law with amplitude 18.4 {+-} 2.1 K at 0.31 GHz and a spectral index of -2.57 {+-} 0.05.

  7. Cosmic backgrounds of relic gravitons and their absolute normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    Provided the consistency relations are not violated, the recent BICEP2 observations pin down the absolute normalization, the spectral slope and the maximal frequency of the cosmic graviton background produced during inflation. The properly normalized spectra are hereby computed from the lowest frequencies (of the order of the present Hubble rate) up to the highest frequency range in the GHz region. Deviations from the conventional paradigm cannot be excluded and are examined by allowing for different physical possibilities including, in particular, a running of the tensor spectral index, an explicit breaking of the consistency relations and a spike in the high-frequency tail of the spectrum coming either from a post-inflationary phase dominated by a stiff fluid or from the contribution of waterfall fields in a hybrid inflationary context. The direct determinations of the tensor to scalar ratio at low frequencies, if confirmed by the forthcoming observations, will also affect and constrain the high-frequency uncertainties. The limits on the cosmic graviton backgrounds coming from wide-band interferometers (such as LIGO/Virgo, LISA and BBO/DECIGO) together with a more accurate scrutiny of the tensor B-mode polarization at low frequencies will set direct bounds on the post-inflationary evolution and on other unconventional completions of the standard lore.

  8. Measurement of the total spectrum of electrons and positrons in the energy range of 300–1500 GeV in the PAMELA experiment with the aid of a sampling calorimeter and a neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Karelin, A. V. Voronov, S. A.; Galper, A. M.; Koldobskiy, S. A.; Collaboration: on behalf of the PAMELA Collaboration

    2015-03-15

    A method based on the use of a sampling calorimeter was developed for measuring the total energy spectrum of electrons and positrons from high-energy cosmic rays in the PAMELA satellite-borne experiment. This made it possible to extend the range of energies accessible to measurements by the magnetic system of the PAMELA spectrometer. Themethod involves a procedure for selecting electrons on the basis of features of a secondary-particle shower in the calorimeter. The results obtained by measuring the total spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range of 300–1500 GeV by the method in question are presented on the basis of data accumulated over a period spanning 2006 and 2013.

  9. Neutron activation for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Loughlin, M.J.; Nishitani, Takeo

    1996-04-29

    There are three primary goals for the Neutron Activation system for ITER: maintain a robust relative measure of fusion power with stability and high dynamic range (7 orders of magnitude); allow an absolute calibration of fusion power (energy); and provide a flexible and reliable system for materials testing. The nature of the activation technique is such that stability and high dynamic range can be intrinsic properties of the system. It has also been the technique that demonstrated (on JET and TFTR) the highest accuracy neutron measurements in DT operation. Since the gamma-ray detectors are not located on the tokamak and are therefore amenable to accurate characterization, and if material foils are placed very close to the ITER plasma with minimum scattering or attenuation, high overall accuracy in the fusion energy production (7--10%) should be achievable on ITER. In the paper, a conceptual design is presented. A system is shown to be capable of meeting these three goals, also detailed design issues remain to be solved.

  10. Electron cyclotron emission measurements on JET: Michelson interferometer, new absolute calibration, and determination of electron temperature.

    PubMed

    Schmuck, S; Fessey, J; Gerbaud, T; Alper, B; Beurskens, M N A; de la Luna, E; Sirinelli, A; Zerbini, M

    2012-12-01

    At the fusion experiment JET, a Michelson interferometer is used to measure the spectrum of the electron cyclotron emission in the spectral range 70-500 GHz. The interferometer is absolutely calibrated using the hot/cold technique and, in consequence, the spatial profile of the plasma electron temperature is determined from the measurements. The current state of the interferometer hardware, the calibration setup, and the analysis technique for calibration and plasma operation are described. A new, full-system, absolute calibration employing continuous data acquisition has been performed recently and the calibration method and results are presented. The noise level in the measurement is very low and as a result the electron cyclotron emission spectrum and thus the spatial profile of the electron temperature are determined to within ±5% and in the most relevant region to within ±2%. The new calibration shows that the absolute response of the system has decreased by about 15% compared to that measured previously and possible reasons for this change are presented. Temperature profiles measured with the Michelson interferometer are compared with profiles measured independently using Thomson scattering diagnostics, which have also been recently refurbished and recalibrated, and agreement within experimental uncertainties is obtained. PMID:23282107

  11. Autism Spectrum Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Autism Spectrum Disorder Information Page Condensed from Autism Spectrum ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Autism Spectrum Disorder? Autistic disorder (sometimes called autism or ...

  12. Use of Absolute and Comparative Performance Feedback in Absolute and Comparative Judgments and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Don A.; Klein, William M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Which matters more--beliefs about absolute ability or ability relative to others? This study set out to compare the effects of such beliefs on satisfaction with performance, self-evaluations, and bets on future performance. In Experiment 1, undergraduate participants were told they had answered 20% correct, 80% correct, or were not given their…

  13. Recent Progress Towards a Measurement of the Neutron Lifetime Using Magnetically Trapped Ultracold Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelhammer, K. W.; Huffer, C. R.; Huffman, P. R.; Marley, D. E.; Coakley, K. J.; Huber, Michael; Hughes, P. P.; Mumm, H. P.; Thompson, A. K.; Yue, A. T.; Abrams, N. C.

    2012-03-01

    Free neutron beta decay is a fundamental process in the Standard Model that can be used to test the weak interaction as well as provide information about primordial ^4He abundance. Recent precision measurements of the neutron lifetime have led to reduced confidence in the absolute value of this parameter; due presumably to unknown systematic effects. This work seeks to measure the neutron lifetime using a different technique that employs a superconducting magnetic trap to confine ultracold neutrons. Neutrons are loaded into the trap through the superthermal technique where 1 mEv neutrons down scatter from phonons in liquid helium losing the majority of their energy. Neutrons in the appropriate spin state are then confined by the static magnetic field. During the past year, over 400 run cycles of data were collected using the upgraded apparatus. Analysis of previous data sets was limited due to large numbers of background events relative to the neutron decay signal. An increased number of trapped neutrons as well as a analysis using pulse shape discrimination allows one to significantly increase the overall precision of the measurement. Details of this ongoing analysis will be presented with preliminary results.

  14. Neutron and Gamma-ray Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilnikov, Anatoly V.; Sasao, Mamiko; Kaschuck, Yuri A.; Kiptily, Vasily G.; Nishitani, Takeo; Popovichev, Sergey V.; Bertalot, Luciano

    2008-03-01

    Due to high neutron and gamma-ray yields and large size plasmas many future fusion reactor plasma parameters such as fusion power, fusion power density, ion temperature, fuel mixture, fast ion energy and spatial distributions can be well measured by various fusion product diagnostics. Neutron diagnostics provide information on fusion reaction rate, which indicates how close is the plasma to the ultimate goal of nuclear fusion and fusion power distribution in the plasma core, which is crucial for optimization of plasma breakeven and burn. Depending on the plasma conditions neutron and gamma-ray diagnostics can provide important information, namely about dynamics of fast ion energy and spatial distributions during neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron heating and generated by fast ions MHD instabilities. The influence of the fast particle population on the 2-D neutron source profile was clearly demonstrated in JET experiments. 2-D neutron and gamma-ray source measurements could be important for driven plasma heating profile optimization in fusion reactors. To meat the measurement requirements in ITER the planned set of neutron and gamma ray diagnostics includes radial and vertical neutron and gamma cameras, neutron flux monitors, neutron activation systems and neutron spectrometers. The necessity of using massive radiation shielding strongly influences the diagnostic designs in fusion reactor, determines angular fields of view of neutron and gamma-ray cameras and spectrometers and gives rise to unavoidable difficulties in the absolute calibration. The development, testing in existing tokomaks and a possible engineering integration of neuron and gamma-ray diagnostic systems into ITER are presented.

  15. Absolute calibration of ultraviolet filter photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, R. C.; Fairchild, T.; Code, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The essential features of the calibration procedure can be divided into three parts. First, the shape of the bandpass of each photometer was determined by measuring the transmissions of the individual optical components and also by measuring the response of the photometer as a whole. Secondly, each photometer was placed in the essentially-collimated synchrotron radiation bundle maintained at a constant intensity level, and the output signal was determined from about 100 points on the objective. Finally, two or three points on the objective were illuminated by synchrotron radiation at several different intensity levels covering the dynamic range of the photometers. The output signals were placed on an absolute basis by the electron counting technique described earlier.

  16. MAGSAT: Vector magnetometer absolute sensor alignment determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for accurately determining the absolute alignment of the magnetic axes of a triaxial magnetometer sensor with respect to an external, fixed, reference coordinate system. The method does not require that the magnetic field vector orientation, as generated by a triaxial calibration coil system, be known to better than a few degrees from its true position, and minimizes the number of positions through which a sensor assembly must be rotated to obtain a solution. Computer simulations show that accuracies of better than 0.4 seconds of arc can be achieved under typical test conditions associated with existing magnetic test facilities. The basic approach is similar in nature to that presented by McPherron and Snare (1978) except that only three sensor positions are required and the system of equations to be solved is considerably simplified. Applications of the method to the case of the MAGSAT Vector Magnetometer are presented and the problems encountered discussed.

  17. Absolute geostrophic currents in global tropical oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lina; Yuan, Dongliang

    2016-03-01

    A set of absolute geostrophic current (AGC) data for the period January 2004 to December 2012 are calculated using the P-vector method based on monthly gridded Argo profiles in the world tropical oceans. The AGCs agree well with altimeter geostrophic currents, Ocean Surface Current Analysis-Real time currents, and moored current-meter measurements at 10-m depth, based on which the classical Sverdrup circulation theory is evaluated. Calculations have shown that errors of wind stress calculation, AGC transport, and depth ranges of vertical integration cannot explain non-Sverdrup transport, which is mainly in the subtropical western ocean basins and equatorial currents near the Equator in each ocean basin (except the North Indian Ocean, where the circulation is dominated by monsoons). The identified non-Sverdrup transport is thereby robust and attributed to the joint effect of baroclinicity and relief of the bottom (JEBAR) and mesoscale eddy nonlinearity.

  18. Absolute Measurement of Electron Cloud Density

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Seidl, P A; Logan, G; Bieniosek, F; Baca, D; Vay, J; Orlando, E; Vujic, J L

    2007-06-21

    Beam interaction with background gas and walls produces ubiquitous clouds of stray electrons that frequently limit the performance of particle accelerator and storage rings. Counterintuitively we obtained the electron cloud accumulation by measuring the expelled ions that are originated from the beam-background gas interaction, rather than by measuring electrons that reach the walls. The kinetic ion energy measured with a retarding field analyzer (RFA) maps the depressed beam space-charge potential and provides the dynamic electron cloud density. Clearing electrode current measurements give the static electron cloud background that complements and corroborates with the RFA measurements, providing an absolute measurement of electron cloud density during a 5 {micro}s duration beam pulse in a drift region of the magnetic transport section of the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL.

  19. Absolute instability of a viscous hollow jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M.

    2007-02-01

    An investigation of the spatiotemporal stability of hollow jets in unbounded coflowing liquids, using a general dispersion relation previously derived, shows them to be absolutely unstable for all physical values of the Reynolds and Weber numbers. The roots of the symmetry breakdown with respect to the liquid jet case, and the validity of asymptotic models are here studied in detail. Asymptotic analyses for low and high Reynolds numbers are provided, showing that old and well-established limiting dispersion relations [J. W. S. Rayleigh, The Theory of Sound (Dover, New York, 1945); S. Chandrasekhar, Hydrodynamic and Hydromagnetic Stability (Dover, New York, 1961)] should be used with caution. In the creeping flow limit, the analysis shows that, if the hollow jet is filled with any finite density and viscosity fluid, a steady jet could be made arbitrarily small (compatible with the continuum hypothesis) if the coflowing liquid moves faster than a critical velocity.

  20. Stitching interferometry: recent results and absolute calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Stitching Interferometry is a method of analysing large optical components using a standard "small" interferometer. This result is obtained by taking multiple overlapping images of the large component, and numerically "stitching" these sub-apertures together. We have already reported the industrial use our Stitching Interferometry systems (Previous SPIE symposia), but experimental results had been lacking because this technique is still new, and users needed to get accustomed to it before producing reliable measurements. We now have more results. We will report user comments and show new, unpublished results. We will discuss sources of error, and show how some of these can be reduced to arbitrarily small values. These will be discussed in some detail. We conclude with a few graphical examples of absolute measurements performed by us.

  1. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometer metrological performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, J.; Fratter, I.; Bertrand, F.; Jager, T.; Morales, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) has been developed for the ESA Earth Observation Swarm mission, planned for launch in November 2012. As its Overhauser magnetometers forerunners flown on Oersted and Champ satellites, it will deliver high resolution scalar measurements for the in-flight calibration of the Vector Field Magnetometer manufactured by the Danish Technical University. Latest results of the ground tests carried out to fully characterize all parameters that may affect its accuracy, both at instrument and satellite level, will be presented. In addition to its baseline function, the ASM can be operated either at a much higher sampling rate (burst mode at 250 Hz) or in a dual mode where it also delivers vector field measurements as a by-product. The calibration procedure and the relevant vector performances will be discussed.

  2. Absolute nonlocality via distributed computing without communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekaj, Ł.; Pawłowski, M.; Vértesi, T.; Grudka, A.; Horodecki, M.; Horodecki, R.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the role that quantum entanglement plays as a resource in various information processing tasks is one of the crucial goals of quantum information theory. Here we propose an alternative perspective for studying quantum entanglement: distributed computation of functions without communication between nodes. To formalize this approach, we propose identity games. Surprisingly, despite no signaling, we obtain that nonlocal quantum strategies beat classical ones in terms of winning probability for identity games originating from certain bipartite and multipartite functions. Moreover we show that, for a majority of functions, access to general nonsignaling resources boosts success probability two times in comparison to classical ones for a number of large enough outputs. Because there are no constraints on the inputs and no processing of the outputs in the identity games, they detect very strong types of correlations: absolute nonlocality.

  3. Dependence of Delayed-Neutron Energy Spectra on the Energy of Neutrons which Induce Fission of Uranium -235

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharfuddin, Quazi

    Delayed neutron energy spectra following both fast and thermal neutron induced fission of U-235 are measured by the time-of-flight technique using beta-neutron correlations. Fast neutrons are produced via the (p,n) reaction in Li-7 using the University of Lowell 5.5 MV Van de Graaff Accelerator, whereas thermal neutrons are produced by surrounding the fission chamber and target assembly with paraffin. Fission fragments stopped in the helium atmosphere of the fission chamber are transferred by a helium jet system to a low background counting room where the composite delayed neutron energy spectra are measured as a function of time after fission. The delayed neutron energy spectra following fast fission of U-235 are compared to those resulting from thermal fission of U-235. Two mathematical methods are developed to deduce the equilibrium delayed neutron spectrum from the composite delayed neutron spectra measured as a function of delay time after fission. These methods are then applied to obtain the equilibrium delayed neutron spectrum from thermal fission of U-235. Finally, the six-group delayed neutron spectra resulting from thermal fission of U-235 are deduced from the measured composite delayed neutron spectra as a function of delay time after fission using a matrix inversion method.

  4. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping; Garty, Guy; Marino, Stephen A; Massey, Thomas N; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Johnson, Gary W; Brenner, David J

    2012-03-16

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons.We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target.A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a Proton Microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction. This novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components. PMID:22545061

  5. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Yanping; Garty, G.; Marino, S. A.; Massey, Thomas Neal; Johnson, G. W.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Brenner, D. J.

    2012-03-16

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will bemore » based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a proton microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction. Lastly, this novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.« less

  6. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanping; Garty, Guy; Marino, Stephen A.; Massey, Thomas N.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Johnson, Gary W.; Brenner, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10–20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a Proton Microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. This novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components. PMID:22545061

  7. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yanping; Garty, G.; Marino, S. A.; Massey, Thomas Neal; Johnson, G. W.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Brenner, D. J.

    2012-03-16

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a proton microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction. Lastly, this novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.

  8. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Garty, G.; Marino, S. A.; Massey, T. N.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Johnson, G. W.; Brenner, D. J.

    2012-03-01

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a proton microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. This novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.

  9. Nonperturbative results for the spectrum of surface-disordered waveguides.

    PubMed

    Makarov, N M; Moroz, A V

    1998-11-15

    We calculated the spectrum of normal scalar waves in a planar waveguide with absolutely soft randomly rough boundaries. Our approach is beyond perturbation theories in the roughness heights and slopes and is based instead on the exact boundary scattering potential. The spectrum is proved to be a nearly real nonanalytic function of the dispersion zeta(2) of the roughness heights (with square-root singularity) as zeta(2)?0 . The opposite case of large boundary defects is summarized. PMID:18091895

  10. Absolute rigidity spectrum of protons and helium nuclei above 10 GV/c

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, R. L.; Lacy, J. L.; Daniel, R. R.; Horan, S.; Kimbell, B.; Badhwar, G. D.; Zipse, J. E.; Stephens, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    Proton and helium nuclei differential spectra were gathered with a balloon borne magnet spectrometer. The data were fitted to the assumption that the differential flux can be represented by a power law in rigidity. In the rigidity range 10 to 25 GV/c the spectral indices were found to be -(2.74 plus or minus 0.04) for protons and -(2.71 plus or minus 0.05) for helium nuclei. A brief discussion is given by systematic errors.

  11. Active Neutron Shielding R&D for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Shawn; Monroe, Jocelyn; Fisher, Peter; Dmtpc Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    Neutrons are a dangerous background to direct dark matter detection searches because they can mimic exactly the signal signature. For this reason, it is desirable to measure the neutron flux directly at underground sites where dark matter experiments are active. We have developed a liquid scintillator-based neutron detector for this purpose, which is currently underground and taking data at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in NM. Before being commissioned underground, the response of this detector to neutrons with kinetic energies from 50 MeV to 800 MeV was determined in a beam test at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in NM. The goal of this R&D is to (i) demonstrate the feasibility of a large scale active and passive neutron shield for dark matter searches and (ii) to measure the neutron energy spectrum underground at WIPP above 50 MeV neutron kinetic energies.

  12. Neutron Capture Reactions on lu Isotopes at Dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, O.; Meot, V.; Daugas, J.-M.; Morel, P.; Jandel, M.; Vieira, D. J.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Wouters, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    The DANCE1 (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) array at LANSCE spallation neutron source in Los Alamos has been used to obtain the neutron radiative capture cross sections for 175Lu and 176Lu with neutron energies from thermal up to 100 keV. Both isotopes are of current interest for the nucleosynthesis s-process.2,3 Three targets were used to perform these measurements. One was natural Lu foil of 31 mg/cm2 and the other two were isotope-enriched targets of 175Lu and 176Lu. Firstly, the cross sections were obtained by normalizing yield to a well-known cross section at the thermal neutron energy. Now, we want to obtain absolute cross sections of radiative capture through a precise neutron flux determination, an accurate target mass measurement and an efficiency determination of the DANCE array.

  13. Design considerations for neutron activation and neutron source strength monitors for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Jassby, D.L.; LeMunyan, G.; Roquemore, A.L.; Walker, C.

    1997-12-31

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will require highly accurate measurements of fusion power production in time, space, and energy. Spectrometers in the neutron camera could do it all, but experience has taught us that multiple methods with redundancy and complementary uncertainties are needed. Previously, conceptual designs have been presented for time-integrated neutron activation and time-dependent neutron source strength monitors, both of which will be important parts of the integrated suite of neutron diagnostics for this purpose. The primary goals of the neutron activation system are: to maintain a robust relative measure of fusion energy production with stability and wide dynamic range; to enable an accurate absolute calibration of fusion power using neutronic techniques as successfully demonstrated on JET and TFTR; and to provide a flexible system for materials testing. The greatest difficulty is that the irradiation locations need to be close to plasma with a wide field of view. The routing of the pneumatic system is difficult because of minimum radius of curvature requirements and because of the careful need for containment of the tritium and activated air. The neutron source strength system needs to provide real-time source strength vs. time with {approximately}1 ms resolution and wide dynamic range in a robust and reliable manner with the capability to be absolutely calibrated by in-situ neutron sources as done on TFTR, JT-60U, and JET. In this paper a more detailed look at the expected neutron flux field around ITER is folded into a more complete design of the fission chamber system.

  14. Measurements of delayed neutron parameters for U-235 and Np-237

    SciTech Connect

    Loaiza, D.

    1997-07-01

    Delayed neutrons are emitted by excited nuclei formed in beta decay of fission products called delayed neutron precursors. About 1% of the total neutrons released in fission are delayed neutrons; however, this small fraction plays an important role in nuclear reactor control. The delayed neutrons determine the time-dependent behavior of reactors, and knowledge of parameters used to predict neutron emission rate is essential for establishing reactivity worths. The delayed neutron yields, decay constants, and the absolute yield for the six-group delayed neutrons have been measured for U-235 and Np-237. This experiment has been called for in the forecast of experiments needed to support operations in the US. The bare U-235 metal assembly Godiva IV at the Los Alamos Critical Experiment Facility (LACEF) provided the source of neutrons. Godiva IV generated about 10{sup 7} total fissions in the samples for the infinite and instantaneous irradiation needed to accentuate the shorter and longer-lived groups of delayed neutrons. The detection system used in the experiment consisted of 20 He-3 tubes embedded in a polyethylene cylinder. The delayed neutron activity resulting from the fast neutron-induced fission has been measured. The measured absolute yield for U-235 was determined to be 0.0163 {+-} 0.009 neutrons/fission. This value compares very well with the well-established Keepin absolute yield of 0.0165 {+-} 0.0005. The newly measured absolute yield value for Np-237 was 0.0126 {+-} 0.0007, which compares well to the recently reported value of 0.0129 {+-} 0.0004 by Saleh and Parish. The measured values for U-235 are corroborated with period (e-folding time) versus reactivity calculations.

  15. Assay of the Martian Regolith with Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Darrell M.; Reedy, R.; Jakowsky, B.; Clark, B.; Squyres, S.

    1998-01-01

    Different aspects of assaying Martian regolith using neutrons have been investigated. The epithermal portion of moderated neutrons spectra is dramatically effected by the presence of hydrogen (usually in the form of water). A simple analytic formula has been derived to describe the amplitude of this portion of the neutron spectrum as a function of water concentration. Several demonstration experiments have been performed and modeled with a Monte Carlo code. Results of these experiments generally agreed with the calculations to within 20%. In addition to He-3 detectors, lithium-glass scintillators and U-238 fission ion chambers were investigated to determine their applicability to space experiments.

  16. The Absolute Calibration of the HiRes Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, J. N.; Thomas, S. B.; HiRes Collaboration

    2003-07-01

    The HiRes experiment studies ultra high energy cosmic rays using the air fluorescence technique. The experiment uses large mirrors that collect the fluorescence light and fo cus it onto arrays of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The PMTs measure the intensity and time of arrival of the collected light. Our primary system for in situ calibration of the PMTs uses a high stability (<1%) portable light source. This source is transferred from the lab to the field where it is employed as a standard candle to calibrate the 64 detectors (>16,000 PMTs). To determine the absolute response it is necessary to understand the absolute light output of this source. We have measured the source irradiance using a hybrid photo dio de system, two NIST calibrated photo-dio des, and by observing the photo electron statistics of the PMTs. 2. Introduction The goal of the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) project is to study cosmic rays at the highest energies. An ultra high energy cosmic ray entering the earth's atmosphere collides with atmospheric nuclei triggering the development of an Extensive Air Shower (EAS). The EAS emits fluorescence light as it develops. HiRes uses the air fluorescence signal to measure properties of the primary cosmic ray particle. The fundamental detector elements in HiRes are photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The light from an EAS is collected by large mirrors and fo cused into cameras each consisting of 256 PMTs [1]. Routine monitoring and calibration of the PMTs and associated electronics are crucial to the proper interpretation of the data. The primary system for in situ calibration of the PMTs involves the use of a high stability portable xenon flash lamp. The Roving Xenon Flasher (RXF) offers several advantages. The pulse-to-pulse variation in intensity is very small ˜0.3% and the stability over a night is better than 2%. The emission spectrum of the RXF is sufficiently broad to allow calibration over a wide range of wavelengths. It is also readily transported

  17. HST Stellar Standards with 1% Accuracy in Absolute Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlin, R. C.

    2007-04-01

    Free of any atmospheric contamination, the {Hubble Space Telescope} provides the best available spectrophotometry from the far-UV to the near-IR for stars as faint as V˜16. The HST CALSPEC standard star network is based on three standard candles: the hot, pure hydrogen white dwarf (WD) stars G 191B2B, GD 153, and GD 71, which have Hubeny NLTE flux calculations that require the atomic physics for only one atom. These model flux distributions are normalized to the absolute flux for Vega of 3.46×10-9 erg cm-2 s-1 Å-1 at 5556 Å using precise Landolt V band photometry and the V bandpass function corrected for atmospheric transmission by M. Cohen. The three primary WD standards provide absolute flux calibrations for FOS, STIS and NICMOS spectrophotometry from these instruments on the HST. About 32 stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) have been constructed with a primary pedigree from the STIS data, which extends from 1150 Å for the hot stars to a long wavelength limit of 1 μm. NICMOS grism spectrophotometry provides an extension to 1.9 μm in the IR for 17 of the HST standards and longward to 2.5 μm for a few of the brighter stars. Included among these HST standards are Vega, the Sloan standard BD+17 4708, three bright solar analog candidates, three cool stars of type M or later, and five hot WDs. In addition, four K giants and four main sequence A-stars have NICMOS spectrophotometry from 0.8-2.5 μm. The WD fluxes are compared to their modeled SEDs and demonstrate an internal precision of 1-2%, while the A-stars agree with the Cohen IR fluxes to ˜2%. Three solar analog candidate stars differ from the solar spectrum by up to 10% in the region of heavy line blanketing from 3000-4000 Å and show differences in shape of ˜5% in the IR around 1.8 μm.

  18. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hurwitz, H. Jr.; Brooks, H.; Mannal, C.; Payne, J.H.; Luebke, E.A.

    1959-03-24

    A reactor of the heterogeneous, liquid cooled type is described. This reactor is comprised of a central region of a plurality of vertically disposed elongated tubes surrounded by a region of moderator material. The central region is comprised of a central core surrounded by a reflector region which is surrounded by a fast neutron absorber region, which in turn is surrounded by a slow neutron absorber region. Liquid sodium is used as the primary coolant and circulates through the core which contains the fuel elements. Control of the reactor is accomplished by varying the ability of the reflector region to reflect neutrons back into the core of the reactor. For this purpose the reflector is comprised of moderator and control elements having varying effects on reactivity, the control elements being arranged and actuated by groups to give regulation, shim, and safety control.

  19. Cryogenic Neutron Spectrometer Development

    SciTech Connect

    Niedermayr, T; Hau, I D; Friedrich, S; Burger, A; Roy, U N; Bell, Z W

    2006-03-08

    and the instrument is transportable. We are currently developing a fast neutron spectrometer with 0.1% energy resolution at 1 MeV neutron energy with an efficiency of > 1%. Our fast-neutron spectrometers use boron-based and {sup 6}LiF absorber crystals with Mo/Cu thermistors readout. They have achieved an energy resolution of 5.5 keV FWHM for 2.79 MeV deposited in {sup 10}B by thermal neutron capture (fig. 1), and 46 keV FWHM for fast (MeV) neutrons absorbed in {sup 6}LiF (fig. 2). Since the energy resolution does not depend on the neutron energy, we expect a similar energy resolution for MeV neutron energies. The response function is given simply by the cross section of the capture reaction, offset from zero by the Q-value of the capture reaction. This allows straightforward discrimination against gamma-events, most of which deposit less that Q{sub 6Li} = 4.79 MeV in the {sup 6}LiF absorber, and easy deconvolution of the neutron spectrum, since there is only a single capture reaction in {sup 6}Li and the spectrum is not affected by edge effects or geometric broadening. The current challenge for microcalorimeters is their necessarily small effective pixel area, {approx}1cm{sup 3} for neutron spectrometer pixels, and their slow decay time, {approx}10ms for neutron spectrometers. The pixel size is limited by the requirement for low Cabs for high energy resolution; the decay time is set by the intrinsically weak thermal coupling between materials at low temperatures. Both issues can be addressed by fabricating large detector arrays. This will enable high-precision neutron spectrometry with high statistics, such as simulated for Pu analysis in fig 3.

  20. Neutron Detection via the Cherenkov Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Zane W; Boatner, Lynn A

    2010-01-01

    We have incorporated neutron-absorbing elements in transparent, nonscintillating glasses and used the Cherenkov effect to convert neutron-induced beta-gamma radiation directly into light. Use of the Cherenkov effect requires glasses with a high index of refraction (to lower the threshold and increase the number of Cherenkov photons) and neutron absorbers resulting in radioactive products emitting high-energy beta or gamma radiation. In this paper, we present a brief description of the requirements for developing efficient Cherenkov-based neutron detectors, show the results of measurements of the response of representative samples to thermal and fast neutron fluxes, and give the results of a calculation of the expected response of a detector to a moderated fission spectrum.