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Sample records for absorber element lifetime

  1. Magic wavelengths, matrix elements, polarizabilities, and lifetimes of Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, M. S.; Safronova, U. I.; Clark, Charles W.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by recent interest in their applications, we report a systematic study of Cs atomic properties calculated by a high-precision relativistic all-order method. Excitation energies, reduced matrix elements, transition rates, and lifetimes are determined for levels with principal quantum numbers n ≤12 and orbital angular momentum quantum numbers l ≤3 . Recommended values and estimates of uncertainties are provided for a number of electric-dipole transitions and the electric dipole polarizabilities of the n s , n p , and n d states. We also report a calculation of the electric quadrupole polarizability of the ground state. We display the dynamic polarizabilities of the 6 s and 7 p states for optical wavelengths between 1160 and 1800 nm and identify corresponding magic wavelengths for the 6 s -7 p1 /2 and 6 s -7 p3 /2 transitions. The values of relevant matrix elements needed for polarizability calculations at other wavelengths are provided.

  2. Modal element method for scattering of sound by absorbing bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.; Kreider, Kevin L.

    1992-01-01

    The modal element method for acoustic scattering from 2-D body is presented. The body may be acoustically soft (absorbing) or hard (reflecting). The infinite computational region is divided into two subdomains - the bounded finite element domain, which is characterized by complicated geometry and/or variable material properties, and the surrounding unbounded homogeneous domain. The acoustic pressure field is represented approximately in the finite element domain by a finite element solution, and is represented analytically by an eigenfunction expansion in the homogeneous domain. The two solutions are coupled by the continuity of pressure and velocity across the interface between the two subdomains. Also, for hard bodies, a compact modal ring grid system is introduced for which computing requirements are drastically reduced. Analysis for 2-D scattering from solid and coated (acoustically treated) bodies is presented, and several simple numerical examples are discussed. In addition, criteria are presented for determining the number of modes to accurately resolve the scattered pressure field from a solid cylinder as a function of the frequency of the incoming wave and the radius of the cylinder.

  3. Mode superposition transient dynamic analysis for dental implants with stress-absorbing elements: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Yasuhiro; Hayakawa, Tohru; Nemoto, Kimiya

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the dynamic behavior of a dental implant with a stress-absorbing element, using dynamic analysis. Two model types, stress-absorbing model with a resilient stress absorber made of polyoxymethylene and non-stress-absorbing model with rigid titanium, were employed. In both model types, the implant was 4.0 mm in diameter and 13.0 mm in length and placed in the mandibular first molar region. Shapes of the finite element implant and implant-bone were modeled using computer-aided design. All calculations for the dynamic analysis were performed using the finite element method. It was found that the stress-absorbing model had a lower natural frequency than the non-stress-absorbing model. In addition, the stress-absorbing model had a higher damping effect than the non-stress-absorbing model. It was concluded that mode superposition transient dynamic analysis is a useful technique for determining dynamic behavior around dental implants. PMID:17076317

  4. Fluorescent lifetime measurements of rare-earth elements in gallium arsenide. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Topp, D.J.

    1990-12-01

    Lifetime measurements of the excited states of three GaAs semiconductors doped with the rare earth elements Erbium (Er), Praseodymium (Pr), and Thulium (Tm) has been studied using a pulsed nitrogen laser and germanium detector. The measurements were made with an experimental set up with a system response time of 0.34 microseconds. A 330 milliwatt nitrogen laser with a wavelength of 3370 angstroms was used to excite transitions of the rare earth elements.

  5. Automated Hybridization of X-ray Absorber Elements-A Path to Large Format Microcalorimeter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S.; Kelley, R.; Allen, C.; Kilbourne, C.; Costen, N.; Miller, T.

    2007-01-01

    In the design of microcalorimeters, it is often desirable to produce the X-ray absorber separately from the detector element. In this case, the attachment of the absorber to the detector element with the required thermal and mechanical characteristics is a major challenge. In such arrays, the attachment has been done by hand. This process is not easily extended to the large format arrays required for future X- ray astronomy missions such as the New x-ray Telescope or NeXT. In this paper we present an automated process for attaching absorber tiles to the surface of a large-scale X-ray detector array. The absorbers are attached with stycast epoxy to a thermally isolating polymer structure made of SU-8. SU-8 is a negative epoxy based photo resist produced by Microchem. We describe the fabrication of the X-ray absorbers and their suspension on a handle die in an adhesive matrix. We describe the production process for the polymer isolators on the detector elements. We have developed a new process for the alignment, and simultaneous bonding of the absorber tiles to an entire detector array. This process uses equipment and techniques used in the flip-chip bonding industry and approaches developed in the fabrication of the XRS-2 instrument. XRS-2 was an X-ray spectrometer that was launched on the Suzaku telescope in July 10, 2005. We describe the process and show examples of sample arrays produced by this process. Arrays with up to 300 elements have been bonded. The present tests have used dummy absorbers made of Si. In future work, we will demonstrate bonding of HgTe absorbers.

  6. Distributions of 12 elements on 64 absorbers from simulated Hanford Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW)

    SciTech Connect

    Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.; Marsh, S.F.

    1994-12-01

    As part of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System program at Los Alamos, we evaluated 64 commercially available or experimental absorber materials for their ability to remove hazardous components from high-level waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. We tested these absorbers with a solution that simulates Hanford neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) (pH 14.2). To this simulant solution we added the appropriate radionuclides and used gamma spectrometry to measure fission products (Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y) and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Ni, V, Zn, and Zr). For each of 768 element/absorber combinations, we measured distribution coefficients for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. On the basis of these 2304 measured distribution coefficients, we determined that many of the tested absorbers may be suitable for processing NCAW solutions.

  7. Distributions of 15 elements on 58 absorbers from simulated Hanford Double-Shell Slurry Feed (DSSF)

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1994-11-01

    As part of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System program at Los Alamos, we evaluated 58 commercially available or experimental absorber materials for their ability to remove hazardous components from high-level waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, pillared layered materials, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. We tested these absorbers with a solution that simulates Hanford double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) (pH 14.0). To this simulant solution we added the appropriate radionuclides and used gamma spectrometry to measure fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y), actinides (U and Am), and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Ni, V, Zn, and Zr). For each of 870 element/absorber combinations, we measured distribution coefficients for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. On the basis of these 2610 measured distribution coefficients, we determined that many of the tested absorbers may be suitable for processing DSSF solutions.

  8. A new conformal absorbing boundary condition for finite element meshes and parallelization of FEMATS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Volakis, J. L.; Nguyen, J.; Nurnberger, M.; Ross, D.

    1993-01-01

    Some of the progress toward the development and parallelization of an improved version of the finite element code FEMATS is described. This is a finite element code for computing the scattering by arbitrarily shaped three dimensional surfaces composite scatterers. The following tasks were worked on during the report period: (1) new absorbing boundary conditions (ABC's) for truncating the finite element mesh; (2) mixed mesh termination schemes; (3) hierarchical elements and multigridding; (4) parallelization; and (5) various modeling enhancements (antenna feeds, anisotropy, and higher order GIBC).

  9. A comparative study of an ABC and an artificial absorber for truncating finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oezdemir, T.; Volakis, John L.

    1993-01-01

    The type of mesh termination used in the context of finite element formulations plays a major role on the efficiency and accuracy of the field solution. The performance of an absorbing boundary condition (ABC) and an artificial absorber (a new concept) for terminating the finite element mesh was evaluated. This analysis is done in connection with the problem of scattering by a finite slot array in a thick ground plane. The two approximate mesh truncation schemes are compared with the exact finite element-boundary integral (FEM-BI) method in terms of accuracy and efficiency. It is demonstrated that both approximate truncation schemes yield reasonably accurate results even when the mesh is extended only 0.3 wavelengths away from the array aperture. However, the artificial absorber termination method leads to a substantially more efficient solution. Moreover, it is shown that the FEM-BI method remains quite competitive with the FEM-artificial absorber method when the FFT is used for computing the matrix-vector products in the iterative solution algorithm. These conclusions are indeed surprising and of major importance in electromagnetic simulations based on the finite element method.

  10. THERMAL FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS X9 AND X29 X-RAY RING CROTCH RADIATION ABSORBERS.

    SciTech Connect

    MERCADO-CORUJO,H.

    1999-08-11

    This report details the efforts by engineers at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to evaluate the reliability of water-cooled radiation absorbers used in the NSLS X-ray ring. The absorbers on this report are part of the X-9 and X-29 dipole vacuum chambers. The absorbers are located at the intersection (crotch) of the beamline exit ports with the electron beam chamber, and are generally referred to as ''crotches''. The purpose of this analysis was to demonstrate the thermal reliability of the crotches under operating conditions that will be present over the expected life of the ring. The efforts described include general engineering layouts, engineering calculations, finite element analysis (FEA), results and conclusions of the analysis, and future design recommendations.

  11. A mixed-grid finite element method with PML absorbing boundary conditions for seismic wave modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaolin; Li, Xiaofan; Wang, Wenshuai; Liu, Youshan

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a mixed-grid finite element method (MGFEM) to simulate seismic wave propagation in 2D structurally complex media. This method divides the physical domain into two subdomains. One subdomain covering the major part of the physical domain is divided by regular quadrilateral elements, while the other subdomain uses triangular elements to correctly fit a rugged free surface topography. The local stiffness matrix of any quadrilateral element is identical and matrix-vector production is calculated using an element-by-element technique, which avoids assembling a huge global stiffness matrix. As only a few triangular elements exist in the subdomain containing the rugged free surface topography, the memory requirements for storing the assembled subdomain global stiffness matrix are significantly reduced. To eliminate artificial boundary reflections, the MGFEM is also implemented to solve the system equations of PML absorbing boundary conditions (PML ABC). The accuracy and efficiency of the MGFEM is tested in numerical experiments by comparing it with conventional methods, and numerical comparisons also indicate its tremendous ability to describe rugged surfaces.

  12. Finite Element Analysis of an Energy Absorbing Sub-floor Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Scott C.

    1995-01-01

    As part of the Advanced General Aviation Transportation Experiments program, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center is conducting tests to design energy absorbing structures to improve occupant survivability in aircraft crashes. An effort is currently underway to design an Energy Absorbing (EA) sub-floor structure which will reduce occupant loads in an aircraft crash. However, a recent drop test of a fuselage specimen with a proposed EA sub-floor structure demonstrated that the effects of sectioning the fuselage on both the fuselage section's stiffness and the performance of the EA structure were not fully understood. Therefore, attempts are underway to model the proposed sub-floor structure on computers using the DYCAST finite element code to provide a better understanding of the structure's behavior in testing, and in an actual crash.

  13. Finite element analysis of electromagnetic propagation in an absorbing wave guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.

    1986-01-01

    Wave guides play a significant role in microwave space communication systems. The attenuation per unit length of the guide depends on its construction and design frequency range. A finite element Galerkin formulation has been developed to study TM electromagnetic propagation in complex two-dimensional absorbing wave guides. The analysis models the electromagnetic absorptive characteristics of a general wave guide which could be used to determine wall losses or simulate resistive terminations fitted into the ends of a guide. It is believed that the general conclusions drawn by using this simpler two-dimensional geometry will be fundamentally the same for other geometries.

  14. Retention of elements absorbed by juvenile fish (Menidia menidia, Menidia Beryllina) from zooplankton prey

    SciTech Connect

    Reinfelder, J.R.; Fisher, N.S.

    1994-12-01

    Radiolabeled copepods (Acartia spp.) were fed to juvenile silversides (Menidia menidia and Menidia beryllina) to study element absorption in the fish. Copepods were reared from nauplii in the presence of different radiotracers ({sup 14}C,{sup 109}Cd,{sup 57}Co,{sup 32}P,{sup 35}S,{sup 75}Se, o;r {sup 65}Zn) and were analyzed for relative concentrations of these elements in their tissue fractions. Copepod exoskeletons contained nearly all of the trace metals (>97%), 60% of the Se, and less than half of the C,P, and S accumulated by the copepods. Within the nonexoskeleton tissues of the copepods, nonpolar (CHCl{sub 3} extractable) material contained 34 and 24% of the total C and P, but only 8 and 2% of the total S and Se. Absorption efficiencies of trace metals in juvenile silversides (2.7% for Cd, 2.1% for Co, 6.2% for Zn) were an order of magnitude lower than those for nonmetals (29% for Se, 50% for S and C, 60% for P). The absorption efficiencies in the juvenile silversides of all seven elements studied were directly related to the percent of each element in the nonexoskeleton fractions of the copepod prey, indicating that the fish absorbed the soft tissues of the copepods and egested the chitinous exoskeleton and its associated elements. 32 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Modal element method for scattering and absorbing of sound by two-dimensional bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Kreider, K. L.

    1993-01-01

    The modal element method for acoustic scattering from a 2-D body is presented. The body may be acoustically soft (absorbing) or hard (reflecting). The infinite computational region is divided into two subdomains - the bounded finite element domain, which is characterized by complicated geometry and/or variable material properties, and the surrounding unbounded homogeneous domain. The acoustic pressure field is represented approximately in the finite element domain by a finite element solution, and is represented analytically by an eigenfunction expansion in the homogeneous domain. The two solutions are coupled by the continuity of pressure and velocity across the interface between the two subdomains. Also, for hard bodies, a compact modal ring grid system is introduced for which computing requirements are drastically reduced. Analysis for 2-D scattering from solid and coated (acoustically treated) bodies is presented, and several simple numerical examples are discussed. In addition, criteria are presented for determining the number of modes to accurately resolve the scattered pressure field from a solid cylinder as a function of the frequency of the incoming wave and the radius of the cylinder.

  16. A novel pre-oxidation method for elemental mercury removal utilizing a complex vaporized absorbent.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Hao, Runlong; Guo, Qing

    2014-09-15

    A novel semi-dry integrative method for elemental mercury (Hg(0)) removal has been proposed in this paper, in which Hg(0) was initially pre-oxidized by a vaporized liquid-phase complex absorbent (LCA) composed of a Fenton reagent, peracetic acid (CH3COOOH) and sodium chloride (NaCl), after which Hg(2+) was absorbed by the resultant Ca(OH)2. The experimental results indicated that CH3COOOH and NaCl were the best additives for Hg(0) oxidation. Among the influencing factors, the pH of the LCA and the adding rate of the LCA significantly affected the Hg(0) removal. The coexisting gases, SO2 and NO, were characterized as either increasing or inhibiting in the removal process, depending on their concentrations. Under optimal reaction conditions, the efficiency for the single removal of Hg(0) was 91%. Under identical conditions, the efficiencies of the simultaneous removal of SO2, NO and Hg(0) were 100%, 79.5% and 80.4%, respectively. Finally, the reaction mechanism for the simultaneous removal of SO2, NO and Hg(0) was proposed based on the characteristics of the removal products as determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), the analysis of the electrode potentials, and through data from related research references. PMID:25146096

  17. Tricholoma matsutake can absorb and accumulate trace elements directly from rock fragments in the shiro.

    PubMed

    Vaario, Lu-Min; Pennanen, Taina; Lu, Jinrong; Palmén, Jorma; Stenman, Jarkko; Leveinen, Jussi; Kilpeläinen, Petri; Kitunen, Veikko

    2015-07-01

    Tricholoma matsutake, a highly valued delicacy in Japan and East Asia, is an ectomycorrhizal fungus typically found in a complex soil community of mycorrhizae, soil microbes, and host-tree roots referred to as the shiro in Japan. A curious characteristic of the shiro is an assortment of small rock fragments that have been implicated as a direct source of minerals and trace elements for the fungus. In this study, we measured the mineral content of 14 samples of shiro soil containing live matsutake mycelium and the extent to which the fungus can absorb minerals directly from the rock fragments. X-ray powder diffraction identified major phases of quartz, microcline, orthoclase, and albite in all shiro samples. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting and direct sequencing confirmed the presence of T. matsutake on 32 of 33 rock fragments. Piloderma sp. co-occurred on 40% of fragments and was positively correlated with locations known to produce good mushroom crops. The ability of T. matsutake to absorb trace elements directly from rock fragments was examined in vitro on nutrient-agar plates supplemented with rock fragments from the shiro. In comparison to the mineral content of tissues grown on control media, the concentration of Al, Cu, Fe, Mn, P, and Zn increased from 1.1 to 106.4 times for both T. matsutake and Piloderma sp. Mineral content of dried sporocarps sampled from the study site partially reflected the results of the in vitro study. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to the natural development and artificial culture of this important fungus. PMID:25355073

  18. Microwave absorbing properties of rare-earth elements substituted W-type barium ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Wang; Hong, Zhang; Shuxin, Bai; Ke, Chen; Changrui, Zhang

    2007-05-01

    W-type barium ferrites Ba(MnZn) 0.3Co 1.4R 0.01Fe 15.99O 27 with R=Dy, Nd and Pr were prepared by chemical coprecipitation method. Effects of rare-earth elements (RE) substitution on microstructural and electromagnetic properties were analyzed. The results show that a small amount of RE 3+ ions can replace Fe 3+ ions and adjust hyperfine parameters. An obvious increase in natural resonance frequency and high frequency relaxation, and a sharp decrease for complex permittivity have been observed. Furthermore, the matching thickness and the reflection loss (RL) of one-layer ferrite absorber were calculated. It reveals that thin and broad-band can be obtained by RE-substitution. But only when the magnetic moment of RE 3+ is higher than that of Fe 3+, can substitution be effective for higher RL. Dy-substituted ferrite composite has excellent microwave absorption properties. The frequency (with respect to -10 dB RL) begins from 9.9 GHz, and the bandwidth reaches far more than 8.16 GHz. The peak value is -51.92 dB at a matching thickness of 2.1 mm.

  19. Computation of scattering matrix elements of large and complex shaped absorbing particles with multilevel fast multipole algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yueqian; Yang, Minglin; Sheng, Xinqing; Ren, Kuan Fang

    2015-05-01

    Light scattering properties of absorbing particles, such as the mineral dusts, attract a wide attention due to its importance in geophysical and environment researches. Due to the absorbing effect, light scattering properties of particles with absorption differ from those without absorption. Simple shaped absorbing particles such as spheres and spheroids have been well studied with different methods but little work on large complex shaped particles has been reported. In this paper, the surface Integral Equation (SIE) with Multilevel Fast Multipole Algorithm (MLFMA) is applied to study scattering properties of large non-spherical absorbing particles. SIEs are carefully discretized with piecewise linear basis functions on triangle patches to model whole surface of the particle, hence computation resource needs increase much more slowly with the particle size parameter than the volume discretized methods. To improve further its capability, MLFMA is well parallelized with Message Passing Interface (MPI) on distributed memory computer platform. Without loss of generality, we choose the computation of scattering matrix elements of absorbing dust particles as an example. The comparison of the scattering matrix elements computed by our method and the discrete dipole approximation method (DDA) for an ellipsoid dust particle shows that the precision of our method is very good. The scattering matrix elements of large ellipsoid dusts with different aspect ratios and size parameters are computed. To show the capability of the presented algorithm for complex shaped particles, scattering by asymmetry Chebyshev particle with size parameter larger than 600 of complex refractive index m = 1.555 + 0.004 i and different orientations are studied.

  20. Distributions of 14 elements on 60 selected absorbers from two simulant solutions (acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate) for Hanford HLW Tank 102-SY

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1993-10-01

    Sixty commercially available or experimental absorber materials were evaluated for partitioning high-level radioactive waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. The distributions of 14 elements onto each absorber were measured from simulated solutions that represent acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate solutions from Hanford high-level waste (HLW) Tank 102-SY. The selected elements, which represent fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y); actinides (U, Pu, and Am); and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Zr), were traced by radionuclides and assayed by gamma spectrometry. Distribution coefficients for each of the 1680 element/absorber/solution combinations were measured for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to provide sorption kinetics information for the specified elements from these complex media. More than 5000 measured distribution coefficients are tabulated.

  1. Spontaneous Fission Modes and Lifetimes of Superheavy Elements in the Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Staszczak, A,

    2013-01-01

    Background: The reactions with the neutron-rich 48Ca beam and actinide targets resulted in the detection of new superheavy (SH) nuclides with Z=104 118. The unambiguous identification of the new isotopes, however, still poses a problem because their -decay chains terminate by spontaneous fission (SF) before reaching the known region of the nuclear chart. The understanding of the competition between -decay and SF channels in SH nuclei is, therefore, of crucial importance for our ability to map the SH region and to assess its extent.

    Purpose: We perform self-consistent calculations of the competing decay modes of even-even SH isotopes with 108 Z 126 and 148 N 188.

    Methods: We use the state-of-the-art computational framework based on self-consistent symmetry-unrestricted nuclear density functional theory capable of describing the competition between nuclear attraction and electrostatic repulsion. We apply the SkM* Skyrme energy density functional. The collective mass tensor of the fissioning superfluid nucleus is computed by means of the cranking approximation to the adiabatic time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) approach. This paper constitutes a systematic self-consistent study of spontaneous fission in the SH region, carried out at a full HFB level, that simultaneously takes into account both triaxiality and reflection asymmetry.

    Results: Breaking axial symmetry and parity turns out to be crucial for a realistic estimate of collective action; it results in lowering SF lifetimes by more than 7 orders of magnitude in some cases. We predict two competing SF modes: reflection symmetric modes and reflection asymmetric modes.

    Conclusions: The shortest-lived SH isotopes decay by SF; they are expected to lie in a narrow corridor formed by 280Hs, 284Fl, and 118284Uuo that separates the regions of SH nuclei synthesized in cold-fusion and hot-fusion reactions. The region of long-lived SH nuclei is expected to be centered on 294Ds with a total half-life of

  2. System-Integrated Finite Element Analysis of a Full-Scale Helicopter Crash Test with Deployable Energy Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annett, Martin S.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    A full-scale crash test of an MD-500 helicopter was conducted in December 2009 at NASA Langley's Landing and Impact Research facility (LandIR). The MD-500 helicopter was fitted with a composite honeycomb Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA) and tested under vertical and horizontal impact velocities of 26-ft/sec and 40-ft/sec, respectively. The objectives of the test were to evaluate the performance of the DEA concept under realistic crash conditions and to generate test data for validation of a system integrated finite element model. In preparation for the full-scale crash test, a series of sub-scale and MD-500 mass simulator tests was conducted to evaluate the impact performances of various components, including a new crush tube and the DEA blocks. Parameters defined within the system integrated finite element model were determined from these tests. The objective of this paper is to summarize the finite element models developed and analyses performed, beginning with pre-test predictions and continuing through post-test validation.

  3. The influence of external dynamic loads on the lifetime of rolling element bearings: Experimental analysis of the lubricant film and surface wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, William; Van Hooreweder, Brecht; Boonen, Rene; Sas, Paul; Moens, David

    2016-06-01

    Precise prediction of the lifetime of rolling element bearings is a crucial step towards a reliable design of many rotating machines. For bearings subjected to highly varying loads, recent research emphasises a strong reduction of the actual bearing lifetime w.r.t. the classically calculated bearing lifetime. This paper experimentally analyses the influence of external dynamic loads on the lifetime of rolling element bearings. A novel bearing test rig is introduced. The test rig is able to apply a fully controlled multi-axial static and dynamic load on a single test bearing. Also, different types and sizes of bearings can be tested. Two separate investigations are conducted. First, the behaviour of the lubricant film between the rolling elements and raceways is analysed. Increased metallic contact or breakdown of the film during dynamic excitation is investigated based on the measured electrical resistance through the bearing. The study shows that the lubricant film thickness follows the imposed variations of the load. Variations of the lubricant film thickness are similar to the variations when the magnitude of the static bearing load is changed. Second, wear of the raceway surfaces is analysed. Surface wear is investigated after a series of accelerated lifetime tests under high dynamic load. Due to sliding motion between asperities of the contacting surfaces in the bearing, polishing of the raceway honing structure occurs. This polishing is clearly observed on SEM images of the inner raceway after a test duration of only 0.5% of the calculated L10 life. Polishing wear of the surfaces, such as surface induced cracks and material delamination, is expected when the bearing is further exposed to the high dynamic load.

  4. 3D finite element analysis of a metallic sphere scatterer comparison of first and second order vector absorbing boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanellopoulos, V. N.; Webb, J. P.

    1993-03-01

    A 3D vector analysis of plane wave scattering by a metallic sphere using finite elements and Absorbing Boundary Conditions (ABCs) is presented. The ABCs are applied on the outer surface that truncates the infinitely extending domain. Mixed order curvilinear covariantprojection elements are used to avoid spurious corruptions. The second order ABC is superior to the first at no extra computational cost. The errors due to incomplete absorption decrease as the outer surface is moved further away from the scatterer. An error of about 1% in near-field values was obtained with the second order ABC, when the outer surface was less than half a wavelength from the scatterer. Une analyse tridimensionnelle vectorielle de la diffusion d'onde plane sur une sphère métallique utilisant des éléments finis et des Conditions aux Limites Absorbantes (CLA) est présentée. Les CLA sont appliquées sur la surface exteme tronquant le domaine s'étendant à l'infini. Des éléments curvilignes mixtes utilisant des projections covariantes sont utilisés pour éviter des solutions parasites. La CLA de second ordre est supérieure à celle de premier ordre sans effort de calcul additionnel. Les erreurs dues à l'absorption incomplète décroissent à mesure que l'on déplace la surface externe à une distance croissante du diffuseur. Un taux d'erreur d'environ 1 % dans les valeurs du champ proche a été obtenu avec les CLA de second ordre lorsque la surface externe était placée à une distance inférieure à une demi-longueur de la source de diffusion.

  5. Simulation of patch and slot antennas using FEM with prismatic elements and investigations of artificial absorber mesh termination schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, J.; Ozdemir, T.; Volakis, J; Nurnberger, M.

    1995-01-01

    Year 1 progress can be characterized with four major achievements which are crucial toward the development of robust, easy to use antenna analysis code on doubly conformal platforms. (1) A new FEM code was developed using prismatic meshes. This code is based on a new edge based distorted prism and is particularly attractive for growing meshes associated with printed slot and patch antennas on doubly conformal platforms. It is anticipated that this technology will lead to interactive, simple to use codes for a large class of antenna geometries. Moreover, the codes can be expanded to include modeling of the circuit characteristics. An attached report describes the theory and validation of the new prismatic code using reference calculations and measured data collected at the NASA Langley facilities. The agreement between the measured and calculated data is impressive even for the coated patch configuration. (2) A scheme was developed for improved feed modeling in the context of FEM. A new approach based on the voltage continuity condition was devised and successfully tested in modeling coax cables and aperture fed antennas. An important aspect of this new feed modeling approach is the ability to completely separate the feed and antenna mesh regions. In this manner, different elements can be used in each of the regions leading to substantially improved accuracy and meshing simplicity. (3) A most important development this year has been the introduction of the perfectly matched interface (PMI) layer for truncating finite element meshes. So far the robust boundary integral method has been used for truncating the finite element meshes. However, this approach is not suitable for antennas on nonplanar platforms. The PMI layer is a lossy anisotropic absorber with zero reflection at its interface. (4) We were able to interface our antenna code FEMA_CYL (for antennas on cylindrical platforms) with a standard high frequency code. This interface was achieved by first generating

  6. Advanced Reflector and Absorber Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of advanced reflector and absorber materials: evaluating performance, determining degradation rates and lifetime, and developing new coatings.

  7. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  8. Fast and high resolution thermal detector based on an aluminum nitride piezoelectric microelectromechanical resonator with an integrated suspended heat absorbing element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Yu; Rinaldi, Matteo

    2013-03-01

    This letter presents a miniaturized, fast, and high resolution thermal detector, in which a heat absorbing element and a temperature sensitive microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator are perfectly overlapped but separated by a microscale air gap. This unique design guarantees efficient and fast (˜10s μs) heat transfer from the absorbing element to the temperature sensitive device and enables high resolution thermal power detection (˜nW), thanks to the low noise performance of the high quality factor (Q = 2305) MEMS resonant thermal detector. A device prototype was fabricated, and its detection capabilities were experimentally characterized. A thermal power as low as 150 nW was experimentally measured, and a noise equivalent power of 6.5 nW/Hz1/2 was extracted. A device thermal time constant of only 350 μs was measured (smallest ever reported for MEMS resonant thermal detectors), indicating the great potential of the proposed technology for the implementation of ultra-fast and high resolution un-cooled resonant thermal detectors.

  9. Characterization of compliant thermal conductive tungsten material for thermionic element application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, V.; Merrigan, M.; Ranken, W.

    The two compliant, thermally conductive, tungsten-based materials that have been developed for use by the Thermionic Fuel Element Verification program are to be inserted between UO2 fuel cylinders and the copper cladding thst surrounds them in order to absorb swelling and reduce tungsten emitter element stress. Test procedures and test results are presented, with attention to the anticipated effects on thermionic element lifetime; lifetimes of the order of 7 years appear to be achievable by means of the buffer materials.

  10. Controlled trial comparing prednisolone with an elemental diet plus non-absorbable antibiotics in active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Saverymuttu, S; Hodgson, H J; Chadwick, V S

    1985-10-01

    In a randomised clinical trial, patients with moderately active Crohn's disease received either prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg/day plus a normal diet, or an elemental diet plus oral framycetin, colistin and nystatin. Patients were assessed using the Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI), ESR, and faecal granulocyte excretion quantified by 111In-autologous leucocytes. Five patients were intolerant of the elemental diet plus antibiotics and were withdrawn from the trial within 72 hours. Sixteen patients completed 10 days treatment on each regime. Fifteen of 16 patients on elemental diet plus antibiotics and all 16 patients on prednisolone improved with marked, but statistically indistinguishable falls in CDAI, ESR, and faecal granulocyte excretion between the two groups. Thus a regime decreasing the intraluminal concentration of bacteria and complex food molecules, was associated with rapid improvement in activity of Crohn's disease. This suggests that these intraluminal factors play a role in maintaining inflammation and that their removal or alteration offers an approach to management. PMID:3902590

  11. Variational (time-independent) calculations of reactive S matrix elements: application of negative imaginary absorbing potentials and contracted L 2 basis sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Last, Isidore; Baer, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Recently we introduced a time-independent approach to treat reactive collisions employing the negative imaginary absorbing potentials and L 2 basis sets. The application of these potentials led to the formulation of a method whereby only one arrangement channel has to be considered in a given calculation. In the present work we further extend this approach. (a) We show how this method is capable of yielding reactive state-to-state S-matrix elements. (In the previous versions of this method, these could not be obtained.) (b) We show that by employing contracted vibrational adiabatic and translational Gaussian functions the number of algebraic equations to be solved within this approach is significantly reduced (by a factor of four).

  12. A modal-based reduction method for sound absorbing porous materials in poro-acoustic finite element models.

    PubMed

    Rumpler, Romain; Deü, Jean-François; Göransson, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Structural-acoustic finite element models including three-dimensional (3D) modeling of porous media are generally computationally costly. While being the most commonly used predictive tool in the context of noise reduction applications, efficient solution strategies are required. In this work, an original modal reduction technique, involving real-valued modes computed from a classical eigenvalue solver is proposed to reduce the size of the problem associated with the porous media. In the form presented in this contribution, the method is suited for homogeneous porous layers. It is validated on a 1D poro-acoustic academic problem and tested for its performance on a 3D application, using a subdomain decomposition strategy. The performance of the proposed method is estimated in terms of degrees of freedom downsizing, computational time enhancement, as well as matrix sparsity of the reduced system. PMID:23145601

  13. Transient fluid-structure interaction of elongated bodies by finite-element method using elliptical and spheroidal absorbing boundaries.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, S K; Premkumar, R

    2003-12-01

    In a domain method of solution of exterior scalar wave equation, the radiation condition needs to be imposed on a truncation boundary of the modeling domain. The Bayliss, Gunzberger, and Turkel (BGT) boundary dampers, which require a circular cylindrical and spherical truncation boundaries in two-(2D) and three-(3D)-dimensional problems, respectively, have been particularly successful in the analysis of scattering and radiation problems. However, for an elongated body, elliptical (2D) or spheroidal (3D) truncation boundaries have potential to reduce the size of modeling domain and hence computational effort. For harmonic problems, such extensions of the first- and second-order BGT dampers are available in the literature. In this paper, BGT dampers in both elliptical and spheroidal coordinate systems have been developed for transient problems involving acoustic radiation as well as fluid-structure interaction and implemented in the context of finite-element method based upon unsymmetric pressure-displacement formulation. Applications to elongated radiators and shells are reported using several numerical examples with excellent comparisons. It is demonstrated that significant computational economy can be achieved for elongated bodies with the use of these dampers. PMID:14714787

  14. Transient fluid-structure interaction of elongated bodies by finite-element method using elliptical and spheroidal absorbing boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S. K.; Premkumar, R.

    2003-12-01

    In a domain method of solution of exterior scalar wave equation, the radiation condition needs to be imposed on a truncation boundary of the modeling domain. The Bayliss, Gunzberger, and Turkel (BGT) boundary dampers, which require a circular cylindrical and spherical truncation boundaries in two-(2D) and three-(3D)-dimensional problems, respectively, have been particularly successful in the analysis of scattering and radiation problems. However, for an elongated body, elliptical (2D) or spheroidal (3D) truncation boundaries have potential to reduce the size of modeling domain and hence computational effort. For harmonic problems, such extensions of the first- and second-order BGT dampers are available in the literature. In this paper, BGT dampers in both elliptical and spheroidal coordinate systems have been developed for transient problems involving acoustic radiation as well as fluid-structure interaction and implemented in the context of finite-element method based upon unsymmetric pressure-displacement formulation. Applications to elongated radiators and shells are reported using several numerical examples with excellent comparisons. It is demonstrated that significant computational economy can be achieved for elongated bodies with the use of these dampers.

  15. Analysis of cylindrical wrap-around and doubly conformal patch antennas by way of the finite element-artificial absorber method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volakis, J. L.; Kempel, L. C.; Sliva, R.; Wang, H. T. G.; Woo, A. G.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop analysis codes for computing the scattering and radiation of antennas on cylindrically and doubly conformal platforms. The finite element-boundary integral (FE-BI) method has been shown to accurately model the scattering and radiation of cavity-backed patch antennas. Unfortunately extension of this rigorous technique to coated or doubly curved platforms is cumbersome and inefficient. An alternative approximate approach is to employ an absorbing boundary condition (ABC) for terminating the finite element mesh thus avoiding use of a Green's function. A FE-ABC method is used to calculate the radar cross section (RCS) and radiation pattern of a cavity-backed patch antenna which is recessed within a metallic surface. It is shown that this approach is accurate for RCS and antenna pattern calculations with an ABC surface displaced as little as 0.3 lambda from the cavity aperture. These patch antennas may have a dielectric overlay which may also be modeled with this technique.

  16. Predicting the Dynamic Crushing Response of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber Using Solid-Element-Based Models in LS-DYNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an analytical study that was performed as part of the development of an externally deployable energy absorber (DEA) concept. The concept consists of a composite honeycomb structure that can be stowed until needed to provide energy attenuation during a crash event, much like an external airbag system. One goal of the DEA development project was to generate a robust and reliable Finite Element Model (FEM) of the DEA that could be used to accurately predict its crush response under dynamic loading. The results of dynamic crush tests of 50-, 104-, and 68-cell DEA components are presented, and compared with simulation results from a solid-element FEM. Simulations of the FEM were performed in LS-DYNA(Registered TradeMark) to compare the capabilities of three different material models: MAT 63 (crushable foam), MAT 26 (honeycomb), and MAT 126 (modified honeycomb). These material models are evaluated to determine if they can be used to accurately predict both the uniform crushing and final compaction phases of the DEA for normal and off-axis loading conditions

  17. Heat Transfer Enhancement in a Solar Air Heater with Roughened Duct Having Arc-Shaped Elements as Roughness Element on the Absorber Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anil Prakash; Goel, Varun; Vashishtha, Siddhartha; Kumar, Amit

    2016-05-01

    An experimental study has been carried out for the heat transfer and friction characteristics for arc shaped roughness element used in solar air heaters. Duct has an aspect ratio (W/H) of 11, relative roughness pitch (p/e) range of 4-16, relative roughness height (e/D) range of 0.027-0.045, Reynolds number (Re) range of 2200-22,000 and arc angle (α) was kept constant at 60°. The effects of Re, relative roughness pitch (p/e) and relative roughness height (e/D) on heat transfer and friction factor have been discussed. The results obtained for Nusselt number and friction factor has been compared with smooth solar air heater to see the enhancement in heat transfer and friction factor and it is found out that considerable enhancement takes place in case of heat transfer as well as in friction factor. Correlations were also developed for Nusselt number and friction factor. Thermo-hydraulic performance parameter is also calculated for the same.

  18. Heat Transfer Enhancement in a Solar Air Heater with Roughened Duct Having Arc-Shaped Elements as Roughness Element on the Absorber Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anil Prakash; Goel, Varun; Vashishtha, Siddhartha; Kumar, Amit

    2016-07-01

    An experimental study has been carried out for the heat transfer and friction characteristics for arc shaped roughness element used in solar air heaters. Duct has an aspect ratio (W/H) of 11, relative roughness pitch (p/e) range of 4-16, relative roughness height (e/D) range of 0.027-0.045, Reynolds number ( Re) range of 2200-22,000 and arc angle (α) was kept constant at 60°. The effects of Re, relative roughness pitch (p/e) and relative roughness height (e/D) on heat transfer and friction factor have been discussed. The results obtained for Nusselt number and friction factor has been compared with smooth solar air heater to see the enhancement in heat transfer and friction factor and it is found out that considerable enhancement takes place in case of heat transfer as well as in friction factor. Correlations were also developed for Nusselt number and friction factor. Thermo-hydraulic performance parameter is also calculated for the same.

  19. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. The objective of this task is to quantify lifetimes through measurement of the optical and mechanical stability of candidate polymeric glazing and absorber materials. Polycarbonate sheet glazings, as proposed by two industry partners, have been tested for resistance to UV radiation with three complementary methods. Incorporation of a specific 2-mil thick UV-absorbing screening layer results in glazing lifetimes of at least 15 years; improved screens promise even longer lifetimes. Proposed absorber materials were tested for creep and embrittlement under high temperature, and appear adequate for planned ICS absorbers.

  20. Absorber coatings' degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    This report is intended to document some of the Los Alamos efforts that have been carried out under the Department of Energy (DOE) Active Heating and Cooling Materials Reliability, Maintainability, and Exposure Testing program. Funding for these activities is obtained directly from DOE although they represent a variety of projects and coordination with other agencies. Major limitations to the use of solar energy are the uncertain reliability and lifetimes of solar systems. This program is aimed at determining material operating limitations, durabilities, and failure modes such that materials improvements can be made and lifetimes can be extended. Although many active and passive materials and systems are being studied at Los Alamos, this paper will concentrate on absorber coatings and degradation of these coatings.

  1. Colloquium: The neutron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Geoffrey L; Wietfeldt, F

    2011-01-01

    The decay of the free neutron into a proton, electron, and antineutrino is the prototype semileptonic weak decay and is the simplest example of nuclear beta decay. It played a key role in the early Universe as it determined the ratio of neutrons to protons during the era of primordial light element nucleosynthesis. Neutron decay is physically related to important processes in solar physics and neutrino detection. The mean neutron lifetime has been the subject of more than 20 major experiments done, using a variety of methods, between 1950 and the present. The most precise recent measurements have stated accuracies approaching 0.1%, but are not in good agreement as they differ by as much as 5 sigma using quoted uncertainties. The history of neutron lifetime measurements is reviewed and the different methods used are described, giving important examples of each. The discrepancies and some systematic issues in the experiments that may be responsible are discussed, and it is shown by means of global averages that the neutron lifetime is likely to lie in the range of 880 884 s. Plans and prospects for future experiments are considered that will address these systematic issues and improve our knowledge of the neutron lifetime.

  2. Fluorescence lifetime distributions in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Alcala, J. R.; Gratton, E.; Prendergast, F. G.

    1987-01-01

    The fluorescence lifetime value of tryptophan residues varies by more than a factor of 100 in different proteins and is determined by several factors, which include solvent exposure and interactions with other elements of the protein matrix. Because of the variety of different elements that can alter the lifetime value and the sensitivity to the particular environment of the tryptophan residue, it is likely that non-unique lifetime values result in protein systems. The emission decay of most proteins can be satisfactorily described only using several exponential components. Here it is proposed that continuous lifetime distributions can better represent the observed decay. An approach based on protein dynamics is presented, which provides fluorescence lifetime distribution functions for single tryptophan residue proteins. First, lifetime distributions for proteins interconverting between two conformations, each characterized by a different lifetime value, are derived. The evolution of the lifetime values as a function of the interconversion rate is studied. In this case lifetime distributions can be obtained from a distribution of rates of interconversion between the two conformations. Second, the existence of a continuum of energy substates within a given conformation was considered. The occupation of a particular energy substate at a given temperature is proportional to the Boltzmann factor. The density of energy states of the potential well depends upon the width of the well, which determines the degree of freedom the residue can move in the conformational space. Lifetime distributions can be obtained by association of each energy substate with a different lifetime value and assuming that the average conformation can change as the energy of the substate is increased. Finally, lifetime distributions for proteins interconverting between two conformations, each characterized by a quasi-continuum of energy substates, are presented. The origin of negative components

  3. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  4. Advanced absorber assembly design for breeder reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Pitner, A.L.; Birney, K.R.

    1980-01-01

    An advanced absorber assembly design has been developed for breeder reactor control rod applications that provides for improved in-reactor performance, longer lifetimes, and reduced fabrication costs. The design comprises 19 vented pins arranged in a circular array inside of round duct tubes. The absorber material is boron carbide; cladding and duct components are constructed from the modified Type 316 stainless steel alloy. Analyses indicate that this design will scram 30 to 40% faster than the reference FFTF absorber assembly. The basic design characteristics of this advanced FFTF absorber assembly are applicable to large core breeder reactor design concepts.

  5. Passively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber lasers using multiple quantum well saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayduk, Michael Joseph

    1997-09-01

    An experimental study of the mode-locking process in erbium-doped fiber lasers (EDFL's) operating at 1.55 μm using multiple quantum well saturable absorbers is presented. The self-starting passively mode-locked laser was constructed in a Fabry-Perot configuration using the saturable absorber as the back reflector of the cavity. Picosecond pulses that ranged from 14.2 to 38.8 ps were generated using a series of saturable absorbers. The pulse widths were dependent upon the optical properties of the saturable absorber used as the mode-locking element. The output power of the EDFL varied from 0.2 to 6.7 mW and was also dependent upon the saturable absorber used in the cavity. Soliton mode-locking using saturable absorbers was the mechanism responsible for the generation of the picosecond pulses by the EDFL. The long-lived carrier lifetime in the quantum wells was the primary optical property of the saturable absorber that determined the final pulse width. The carrier lifetimes of the eight individual saturable absorbers were investigated using time-resolved pump/probe experimental techniques. The lifetimes ranged from 40 to 1757 ps. The soliton mode- locking process allowed pulse widths of up to 45 times shorter than these carrier lifetimes to be produced. A self-starting passively mode-locked solid-state Cr4+:YAG laser was also developed using a novel saturable absorber mirror structure. The laser produced femtosecond pulses that were tunable from 1.488 to 1.535 μm. The average output power of the laser ranged from 40 to 80 mW at a repetition rate of 95 MHz. A minimum pulse width of 120 fs was generated at 1.488 μm. The high peak power of these pulses combined with its tunability in the 1.5 μm region made this laser an ideal spectroscopic source for use in the time-resolved pump/probe experiments.

  6. Measurements of defect structures by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy of the tellurite glass TeO2-P2O5-ZnO-LiNbO3 doped with ions of rare earth elements: Er3+, Nd3+ and Gd3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golis, E.; Yousef, El. S.; Reben, M.; Kotynia, K.; Filipecki, J.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study was the structural analysis of the TeO2-P2O5-ZnO-LiNbO3 tellurite glasses doped with ions of the rare-earth elements: Er3+, Nd3+ and Gd3+ based on the PALS (Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy) method of measuring positron lifetimes. Values of positron lifetimes and the corresponding intensities may be connected with the sizes and number of structural defects, such as vacancies, mono-vacancies, dislocations or pores, the sizes of which range from a few angstroms to a few dozen nanometres. Experimental positron lifetime spectrum revealed existence of two positron lifetime components τ1 and τ2. Their interpretation was based on two-state positron trapping model where the physical parameters are the annihilation velocity and positron trapping rate.

  7. Spatially resolved measurements of charge carrier lifetimes in CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, C.; Hempel, H.; Buschmann, V.; Siebert, T.; Heisler, C.; Wesch, W.; Ronning, C.

    2013-03-01

    The lifetime of the minority charge carriers in polycrystalline Cadmium Telluride (pc-CdTe) for solar cell applications is a crucial material parameter and has been determined by analysis of the decay curves of the luminescence signal. Both the lateral and the transversal distributions of the carrier lifetime on the surface and in the bulk of pc-CdTe material as well as the respective solar cell characteristics were measured as a function of the deposition technique, the activation treatment, and the incorporation of additional group-V elements. The results are compared to prior studies. It was found that an activation process passivates grain boundaries and increases the carrier lifetime, which is then higher at the pn-junction than at the surface. Furthermore, nitrogen and phosphorus doping of the CdTe absorber material influences the charge carrier lifetime. The results show that the spatial resolved measurement of the carrier lifetime in pc-CdTe gives an important insight to the charge carrier dynamics of the material.

  8. Detection of Matrix Elements and Trace Impurities in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 Photovoltaic Absorbers Using Surface Analytical Techniques.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Jihye; Kim, Seon Hee; Kim, Haidong; Lee, Kang-Bong; Lee, Yeonhee

    2015-10-01

    Chalcopyrite Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films are well known as the next-generation solar cell materials notable for their high absorption coefficient for solar radiation, suitable band gap, and ability for deposition on flexible substrate materials, allowing the production of highly flexible and lightweight solar panels. To improve solar cell performances, a quantitative and depth-resolved elemental analysis of photovoltaic thin films is much needed. In this study, Cu(In, Ga)Se2 thin films were prepared on molybdenum back contacts deposited on soda-lime glass substrates via three-stage evaporation. Surface analyses via AES and SIMS were used to characterize the CIGS thin films and compare their depth profiles. We determined the average concentration of the matrix elements, Cu, In, Ga, and Se, using ICP-AES, XRF, and EPMA. We also obtained depth profiling results using TOF-SIMS, magnetic sector SIMS and AES, and APT, a sub-nanometer resolution characterization technique that enables three-dimensional elemental mapping. The SIMS technique, with its high detection limit and ability to obtain the profiles of elements in parallel, is a powerful tool for monitoring trace elements in CIGS thin films. To identify impurities in a CIGS layer, the distribution of trace elements was also observed according to depth by SIMS and APT. PMID:26726401

  9. Satellite lifetime routine user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, H. U.; Myler, T. R.

    1975-01-01

    A FORTRAN coded computer program which determines secular variations in mean orbital elements of earth satellites and the lifetime of the orbit is described. The dynamical model treats a point mass satellite subject to solar and lunar disturbing gravitational fields, second, third and fourth harmonics of the earth's oblate potential, earth's atmospheric drag, and solar radiation pressure. Each of these disturbing functions may be selectively simulated. Data preparation instructions, a sample problem, and definitions of output quantities are included.

  10. Analysis of burnable poison in Ford Nuclear Reactor fuel to extend fuel lifetime. Final report, August 1, 1994--September 29, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, R.R.; Lee, J.C.

    1996-12-01

    The objective of the project was to establish the feasibility of extending the lifetime of fuel elements for the Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR) by replacing current aluminide fuel with silicide fuel comprising a heavier uranium loading but with the same fissile enrichment of 19.5 wt% {sup 235}U. The project has focused on fuel designs where burnable absorbers, in the form of B{sub 4}C, are admixed with uranium silicide in fuel plates so that increases in the control reactivity requirements and peak power density, due to the heavier fuel loading, may be minimized. The authors have developed equilibrium cycle models simulating current full-size aluminide core configurations with 43 {approximately} 45 fuel elements. Adequacy of the overall equilibrium cycle approach has been verified through comparison with recent FNR experience in spent fuel discharge rates and simulation of reactor physics characteristics for two representative cycles. Fuel cycle studies have been performed to compare equilibrium cycle characteristics of silicide fuel designs, including burnable absorbers, with current aluminide fuel. These equilibrium cycle studies have established the feasibility of doubling the fuel element lifetime, with minimal perturbations to the control reactivity requirements and peak power density, by judicious additions of burnable absorbers to silicide fuel. Further study will be required to investigate a more practical silicide fuel design, which incorporates burnable absorbers in side plates of each fuel element rather than uniformly mixes them in fuel plates.

  11. Laser-assisted manufacturing of micro-optical volume elements for enhancing the amount of light absorbed by solar cells in photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peharz, Gerhard; Kuna, Ladislav; Leiner, Claude

    2015-03-01

    The laser-generation of micro-optical volume elements is a promising approach to decrease the optical shadowing of front side metal contacts of solar cells. Focusing a femtosecond laser beam into the volume of the encapsulation material causes a local modification its optical constants. Suchlike fabricated micro-optical elements can be used to decrease the optical shadowing of the front side metallization of c-Si solar cells. Test samples comprising of a sandwich structure of a glass sheet with metallic grid-lines, an Ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulant and another glass sheet were manufactured in order to investigate the optical performance of the volume optics. Transmission measurements show that the shadowing of the metalling grid-lines is substantially decreased by the micro-optical volume elements created in the EVA bulk right above the grid-fingers. A detailed investigation of the optical properties of these volume elements was performed: (i) experimentally on the basis of goniometric measurements, as well as (ii) theoretically by applying optical modelling and optimization procedures. This resulted in a better understanding of the effectiveness of the optical volume elements in decreasing the optical shadowing of metal grid lines on the active cell surfaces. Moreover, results of photovoltaic mini-modules with incorporated micro-optical volume elements are presented. Results of optical simulation and Laser Beam Induced Current (LBIC) experiments show that the losses due to the grid fingers can be reduced by about 50%, when using this fs-laser structuring approach for the fabrication of micro-optical volume elements in the EVA material.

  12. Lifetime measurements in neutral alkalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diberardino, Diana

    1998-12-01

    Precision measurements of transition probabilities and energies provide a means for testing atomic structure calculations. The most accurate atomic structure calculations employ many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) and are used for the interpretation of atomic parity nonconservation (PNC) measurements and for testing of quantum electrodynamics (QED). Our group's measurement of the 6p/ 2P3/2,1/2 state lifetimes in atomic cesium provides constraints for recent MBPT calculations in cesium and electric dipole (E1) matrix elements. These E1 matrix elements contribute a large fraction to the weak-interaction-induced 6S[-]7S transition amplitude in cesium. Part of this thesis has been motivated by our desire to reduce the uncertainties in the measured 6p/ 2P3/2,1/2 state lifetimes in atomic cesium using improvements in our fast-beam apparatus. Thus, a new fiber optic detector system is designed to provide better collection efficiency and reduce beam tracking errors. Also, a new method of measuring the atomic beam velocity using a solid etalon is demonstrated to improve the velocity precision by a factor of seven. Additionally, this thesis describes measurements of the cesium 5d/ 2D5/2,/ 5d/ 2D3/2, and 11s/ 2S1/2 state lifetimes using pulsed-dye laser excitation of cesium vapor. The 5d/ 2D3/2 lifetime measurement, along with its branching ratio, provides the electric dipole reduced matrix element between the 5d/ 2D3/2 state and the 6p/ 2P1/2 state. Furthermore, a previous 5d/ 2D5/2 experimental value is compared with our new value and recent theoretical calculations.

  13. The Lifetimes of Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    2015-08-01

    For members of the American Astronomical Society, I collected data on their lifetimes from (1) 489 obituaries published in 1991-2015, (2) about 127 members listed as deceased but without published obituaries, and (3) a sample of AAS members without obituaries or not known to the AAS as being deceased. These show that the most frequent lifetimes is 85 years. Of 674 deceased members with known lifetimes, 11.0 ± 1.3% lived to be 90 or more years. In comparison to the astronomers, the most frequent lifetime for the general population is 77 years, showing that astronomers live an average of 8 years longer than the general population.

  14. Differences in Growth Characteristics and Dynamics of Elements Absorbed in Seedlings of Three Spruce Species Raised on Serpentine Soil in Northern Japan

    PubMed Central

    KAYAMA, MASAZUMI; QUORESHI, ALI M.; UEMURA, SHIGERU; KOIKE, TAKAYOSHI

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims Serpentine soils are characterized by the presence of heavy metals (Ni and Cr) and excess Mg; these elements often suppress plant growth. Picea glehnii is nevertheless distributed widely on serpentine soils in northern Japan. Growth characteristics were compared among P. glehnii, Picea jezoensis (distributed in the same region) and Picea abies (planted for timber production), and concentrations of elements in various tissues over time and the amount of ectomycorrhizal infection in short roots were evaluated. • Methods Seedlings of three spruce species were planted in two types of experimental plots, comprising serpentine soil and brown forest (non-serpentine) soil, and these seedlings were grown for 3 years. Growth, ectomycorrhizal infection of short roots, and elemental composition of tissues were examined. • Key Results The total dry mass of P. glehnii planted on serpentine soil was almost the same as on brown forest soil, and a large number of needles survived to reach later age classes. By contrast, growth of P. jezoensis and P. abies in serpentine soil was significantly less than in brown forest soil, and needle shedding was accelerated. Moreover, roots of seedlings of P. glehnii on serpentine soil were highly infected with ectomycorrhiza, and the concentration of Ni in needles and roots of P. glehnii was the lowest of the three species. • Conclusions Picea glehnii has a high ability to maintain a low concentration of Ni, and the ectomycorrhizal infection may have the positive effect of excluding Ni. As a result, P. glehnii is more tolerant than the other spruce species to serpentine soil conditions. PMID:15650010

  15. The extended Touschek lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Bizek, H.M.

    1997-06-01

    Scattering of particles within the bunch is called Touschek scattering. If large enough, such an energy transfer may eject the particle out of the bunch. If a particle is scattered in the dispersive region, it will induce a horizontal betatron oscillation which will be coupled into vertical motion when it passes through skew components. The amount of coupling is expressed in terms of the coupling coefficient, {chi}. If the coupling coefficient is large enough, the resulting vertical oscillations may exceed the normally small vertical admittance of the ring. Thus the particles may be lost even though the energy loss is within the momentum acceptance. The lifetime associated with this loss mechanism is called the extended Touschek lifetime. In the usual touschek lifetime calculation, the lifetime increases as the coupling increases. Including the effect of the vertical oscillation results in a decrease of Touschek lifetime beyond some coupling value.

  16. Passive Earth Entry Vehicle Energy Absorbing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellas, S.; Maddock, R. W.

    2014-06-01

    A critical element of a passive EEV performance is the energy absorbing system required to attenuate the dynamic landing loads. Two design approaches are described and the pros and cons based on particular mission requirements are discussed.

  17. TPX/TFTR Neutral Beam energy absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlgren, F.; Wright, K.; Kamperschroer, J.; Grisham, L.; Lontai, L.; Peters, C.; VonHalle, A.

    1993-11-01

    The present beam energy absorbing surfaces on the TFTR Neutral Beams such as Ion Dumps, Calorimeters, beam defining apertures, and scrapers, are simple water cooled copper plates which wee designed to absorb (via their thermal inertia) the incident beam power for two seconds with a five minute coal down interval between pulses. These components are not capable of absorbing the anticipated beam power loading for 1000 second TPX pulses and will have to be replaced with an actively cooled design. While several actively cooled energy absorbing designs were considered,, the hypervapotron elements currently being used on the JET beamlines were chosen due to their lower cooling water demands and reliable performance on JET.

  18. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Lindquist, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-11-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. We have begun evaluation of several new UV-screened polycarbonate sheet glazing constructions. This has involved interactions with several major polymer industry companies to obtain improved candidate samples. Proposed absorber materials were tested for UV resistance, and appear adequate for unglazed ICS absorbers.

  19. Maximizing TDRS Command Load Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Aaron J.

    2002-01-01

    The GNC software onboard ISS utilizes TORS command loads, and a simplistic model of TORS orbital motion to generate onboard TORS state vectors. Each TORS command load contains five "invariant" orbital elements which serve as inputs to the onboard propagation algorithm. These elements include semi-major axis, inclination, time of last ascending node crossing, right ascension of ascending node, and mean motion. Running parallel to the onboard software is the TORS Command Builder Tool application, located in the JSC Mission Control Center. The TORS Command Builder Tool is responsible for building the TORS command loads using a ground TORS state vector, mirroring the onboard propagation algorithm, and assessing the fidelity of current TORS command loads onboard ISS. The tool works by extracting a ground state vector at a given time from a current TORS ephemeris, and then calculating the corresponding "onboard" TORS state vector at the same time using the current onboard TORS command load. The tool then performs a comparison between these two vectors and displays the relative differences in the command builder tool GUI. If the RSS position difference between these two vectors exceeds the tolerable lim its, a new command load is built using the ground state vector and uplinked to ISS. A command load's lifetime is therefore defined as the time from when a command load is built to the time the RSS position difference exceeds the tolerable limit. From the outset of TORS command load operations (STS-98), command load lifetime was limited to approximately one week due to the simplicity of both the onboard propagation algorithm, and the algorithm used by the command builder tool to generate the invariant orbital elements. It was soon desired to extend command load lifetime in order to minimize potential risk due to frequent ISS commanding. Initial studies indicated that command load lifetime was most sensitive to changes in mean motion. Finding a suitable value for mean motion

  20. The extended Touschek lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Bizek, H.M.

    1996-02-01

    With the advent of synchrotron radiation sources, the issue of beam lifetime becomes increasingly important. Users of these machines need to perform experiments which seldom last 15 minutes, but require hours for their completion. Therefore, the beam should circulate stably for hours. The beam of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring at Argonne National Laboratory is assumed to circulate stably for a minimum of 10 hours. The main contributions to the total beam lifetime (which is the inverse of the loss rate) come from residual gas scattering and Touschek scattering. The residual gas scattering is comprised of single Coulomb scattering and bremsstrahlung. The single-Coulomb scattering involves elastic collisions, while bremsstrahlung involves inelastic collisions, between the bunch and the surrounding residual gas. In the calculation the authors take the gas to be nitrogen at a pressure of 1 nTorr. Touschek scattering involves scattering of particles within the bunch, transferring energy among themselves. Such an energy transfer, if large enough, may eject the particle out of the bunch, thus causing it to be lost. Let us not forget the residual-gas lifetime. As pointed out, the calculation of this lifetime is done for the very low pressure of 1 nTorr. If the pressure is higher, the residual-gas lifetime will be smaller. This will further reduce the total beam lifetime, causing it to slip deeper below the minimum lifetime for stable storage ring operation. They begin this article by reviewing the Touschek integral and the associated limits of integration. The program ZAP has been altered to take into account the possible loss due to induced betatron oscillations. At each lattice position the energy loss required to produce, by coupling, a vertical oscillation that exceeds the vertical aperture is calculated. When this energy loss is less than the rf bucket half-height, it replaces the rf bucket half-height in the Touschek integral.

  1. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

    1995-05-02

    A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  2. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Enz, Glenn L.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  3. Lifetime tests for MAC vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.N.

    1986-07-01

    A vertex chamber for MAC was proposed to increase precision in the measurement of the B hadron and tau lepton lifetimes. Thin-walled aluminized mylar drift tubes were used for detector elements. A study of radiation hardness was conducted under the conditions of the proposed design using different gases and different operating conditions. (LEW)

  4. Vibrational lifetimes of protein amide modes

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.A.; Rella, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Measurement of the lifetimes of vibrational modes in proteins has been achieved with a single frequency infrared pump-probe technique using the Stanford Picosecond Free-electron Laser, These are the first direct measurements of vibrational dynamics in the polyamide structure of proteins. In this study, modes associated with the protein backbone are investigated. Results for the amide I band, which consists mainly of the stretching motion of the carbonyl unit of the amide linkage, show that relaxation from the first vibrational excited level (v=1) to the vibrational ground state (v=0) occurs within 1.5 picoseconds with apparent first order kinetics. Comparison of lifetimes for myoglobin and azurin, which have differing secondary structures, show a small but significant difference. The lifetime for the amide I band of myoglobin is 300 femtoseconds shorter than for azurin. Further measurements are in progress on other backbone vibrational modes and on the temperature dependence of the lifetimes. Comparison of vibrational dynamics for proteins with differing secondary structure and for different vibrational modes within a protein will lead to a greater understanding of energy transfer and dissipation in biological systems. In addition, these results have relevance to tissue ablation studies which have been conducted with pulsed infrared lasers. Vibrational lifetimes are necessary for calculating the rate at which the energy from absorbed infrared photons is converted to equilibrium thermal energy within the irradiated volume. The very fast vibrational lifetimes measured here indicate that mechanisms which involve direct vibrational up-pumping of the amide modes with consecutive laser pulses, leading to bond breakage or weakening, are not valid.

  5. Collisional lifetimes of meteoroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, R. H.; Schwarzkopf, G. J.; Sommer, M.; Vaubaillon, J.; Albin, T.; Rodmann, J.; Grün, E.; Srama, R.

    2016-01-01

    Collisions of meteoroids with interplanetary dust grain fragments particles, dispersing larger particles amongst lower mass intervals. Here we use the method of Grün et al. (1985) and the IMEM interplanetary dust model to calculate the collisional lifetimes for different orbits, and for particles in different meteor showers. The timescales are usually long - of order 10^4 years for 1mm grains on Jupiter-family and Hally-type comet orbits. However, near-sun orbits particles suffer more frequent collisions and therefore have much shorter lifetimes. We discuss factors that affect the accuracy of these calculations.

  6. Aging behavior and lifetime modeling for polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlen, S.; Wallner, G.M.; Lang, R.W.

    2010-05-15

    In this paper, polycarbonate (PC) as a material candidate for solar absorber applications is investigated as to the aging behavior at different temperatures in air and water. The aging conditioning was performed in air in the temperature range from 120 to 140 C and in water between 70 and 95 C. Tensile tests were performed on unaged and aged PC film specimens at ambient temperature using strain-to-break values as a performance indicator for the degree of aging. For PC the effect of aging was found to strongly depend on the aging conditions. Activation energy based lifetime prediction models according to various methods described in the literature were applied. The activation energies and corresponding lifetime predictions for the temperature range from 40 to 60 C in water and from 90 to 110 C in air derived from these models are compared and interpreted as to their practical relevance. (author)

  7. Modelling Absorbent Phenomena of Absorbent Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayeb, S.; Ladhari, N.; Ben Hassen, M.; Sakli, F.

    Absorption, retention and strike through time, as evaluating criteria of absorbent structures quality were studied. Determination of influent parameters on these criteria were realized by using the design method of experimental sets. In this study, the studied parameters are: Super absorbent polymer (SAP)/fluff ratio, compression and the porosity of the non woven used as a cover stock. Absorption capacity and retention are mostly influenced by SAP/fluff ratio. However, strike through time is affected by compression. Thus, a modelling of these characteristics in function of the important parameter was established.

  8. Our Allotted Lifetimes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Stephen Jay

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested that measured by the internal clock of heartbeats or breathing, all mammals live a similar lifespan. This is based on the fact that mammals, regardless of size, breathe about 200 million times in their lifetime at a rate of 1 breath for every 4 heartbeats. (AJ)

  9. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Guillen, Donna P.; Longhurst, Glen R.; Porter, Douglas L.; Parry, James R.

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  10. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Ronald J.

    1987-09-22

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  11. Rubber shock absorber for deep-well rod operated pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Bagirov, M.M.

    1984-05-01

    Tests of hydropneumatic shock absorbers of deep-well pumps in oil fields showed that they improve the efficiency of the installations by their design is very complicated. Mechanically acting absorbers of dynamic forces are simpler in design. Rubber shock absorbers differ advantageously from spring absorbers in that considerable oscillation-damping forces of any amplitude act in them. The design of a shock absorber is described which is situated under the balance arm of a pumping jack. A prototype of the shock absorber, in which the elastic elements were cylinders made of rubber was tested in a test borehole. Dynamographic recordings made in this borehole in operation with and without shock absorber show that the shock absorber reduces the maximum load on the rods and the double amplitude of load change. Calculations show that when the described shock absorber is used the reduced load is 11-18% smaller. This may considerably reduce the number of breakages of deepwell pump rods.

  12. Lifetimes and heavy quark expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Kolya Uraltsev was one of the inventors of the Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE), that describes inclusive weak decays of hadrons containing heavy quarks and in particular lifetimes. Besides giving a pedagogic introduction to the subject, we review the development and the current status of the HQE, which just recently passed several non-trivial experimental tests with an unprecedented precision. In view of many new experimental results for lifetimes of heavy hadrons, we also update several theory predictions: τ (B+)/τ (Bd) = 1.04+0.05-0.01 ± 0.02 ± 0.01, τ(Bs)/τ(Bd) = 1.001 ±0.002, τ(Λb)/τ(Bd) = 0.935 ±0.054 and \\bar {τ } (Ξ b0)/\\bar {τ } (Ξ b+) = 0.95 ± 0.06. The theoretical precision is currently strongly limited by the unknown size of the non-perturbative matrix elements of four-quark operators, which could be determined with lattice simulations.

  13. Multispectral metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Grant, J; McCrindle, I J H; Li, C; Cumming, D R S

    2014-03-01

    We present the simulation, implementation, and measurement of a multispectral metamaterial absorber (MSMMA) and show that we can realize a simple absorber structure that operates in the mid-IR and terahertz (THz) bands. By embedding an IR metamaterial absorber layer into a standard THz metamaterial absorber stack, a narrowband resonance is induced at a wavelength of 4.3 μm. This resonance is in addition to the THz metamaterial absorption resonance at 109 μm (2.75 THz). We demonstrate the inherent scalability and versatility of our MSMMA by describing a second device whereby the MM-induced IR absorption peak frequency is tuned by varying the IR absorber geometry. Such a MSMMA could be coupled with a suitable sensor and formed into a focal plane array, enabling multispectral imaging. PMID:24690713

  14. Lifetime of a Chemically Bound Helium Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Lundell, Jan; Gerber, R. Benny; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The rare-gas atoms are chemically inert, to an extent unique among all elements. This is due to the stable electronic structure of the atoms. Stable molecules with chemically bound rare-gas atoms are, however, known. A first such compound, XePtF6, W2S prepared in 1962 and since then a range of molecules containing radon, xenon and krypton have been obtained. Most recently, a first stable chemically bound compound of argon was prepared, leaving neon and helium as the only elements for which stable chemically bound molecules are not yet known. Electronic structure calculations predict that a metastable species HHeF exists, but significance of the result depends on the unknown lifetime. Here we report quantum dynamics calculations of the lifetime of HHeF, using accurate interactions computed from electronic structure theory. HHeF is shown to disintegrate by tunneling through energy barriers into He + HF and H + He + F the first channel greatly dominating. The lifetime of HHeF is more than 120 picoseconds, that of DHeF is 14 nanoseconds. The relatively long lifetimes are encouraging for the preparation prospects of this first chemically bound helium compound.

  15. Wavelength-tunable microbolometers with metamaterial absorbers.

    PubMed

    Maier, Thomas; Brückl, Hubert

    2009-10-01

    Microbolometers are modified by metallic resonant absorber elements, leading to an enhanced responsivity at selectable wavelengths. The dissipative energy absorption of tailored metamaterials allows for engineering the response of conventional bolometer microbridges. The absorption peak position and height are determined by the geometry of the metamaterial. Square-shaped metal/dielectric/metal stacks as absorber elements show spectral resonances at wavelengths between 4.8 and 7.0 microm in accordance with numerical simulations. Total peak absorptions of 0.8 are obtained. The metamaterial modified bolometers are suitable for multispectral thermal imaging systems in the mid-IR and terahertz regime. PMID:19794799

  16. Internal absorber solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Sletten, Carlyle J.; Herskovitz, Sheldon B.; Holt, F. S.; Sletten, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Thin solar collecting panels are described made from arrays of small rod collectors consisting of a refracting dielectric rod lens with an absorber imbedded within it and a reflecting mirror coated on the back side of the dielectric rod. Non-tracking collector panels on vertical walls or roof tops receive approximately 90% of solar radiation within an acceptance zone 60.degree. in elevation angle by 120.degree. or more in the azimuth sectors with a collector concentration ratio of approximately 3.0. Miniaturized construction of the circular dielectric rods with internal absorbers reduces the weight per area of glass, plastic and metal used in the collector panels. No external parts or insulation are needed as heat losses are low due to partial vacuum or low conductivity gas surrounding heated portions of the collector. The miniature internal absorbers are generally made of solid copper with black selective surface and the collected solar heat is extracted at the collector ends by thermal conductivity along the absorber rods. Heat is removed from end fittings by use of liquid circulants. Several alternate constructions are provided for simplifying collector panel fabrication and for preventing the thermal expansion and contraction of the heated absorber or circulant tubes from damaging vacuum seals. In a modified version of the internal absorber collector, oil with temperature dependent viscosity is pumped through a segmented absorber which is now composed of closely spaced insulated metal tubes. In this way the circulant is automatically diverted through heated portions of the absorber giving higher collector concentration ratios than theoretically possible for an unsegmented absorber.

  17. Metal shearing energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, R. J.; Wittrock, E. P. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A metal shearing energy absorber is described. The absorber is composed of a flat thin strip of metal which is pulled through a slot in a cutter member of a metal, harder than the metal of the strip. The slot's length, in the direction perpendicular to the pull direction, is less than the strip's width so that as the strip is pulled through the slot, its edges are sheared off, thereby absorbing some of the pulling energy. In one embodiment the cutter member is a flat plate of steel, while in another embodiment the cutter member is U-shaped with the slot at its base.

  18. Lipid-absorbing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Wallace, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The removal of bile acids and cholesterol by polymeric absorption is discussed in terms of micelle-polymer interaction. The results obtained with a polymer composed of 75 parts PEO and 25 parts PB plus curing ingredients show an absorption of 305 to 309%, based on original polymer weight. Particle size effects on absorption rate are analyzed. It is concluded that crosslinked polyethylene oxide polymers will absorb water, crosslinked polybutadiene polymers will absorb lipids; neither polymer will absorb appreciable amounts of lipids from micellar solutions of lipids in water.

  19. ANALYSIS OF NSLS-II TOUSCHEK LIFETIME

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.; Kramer, S.L.

    2011-03-28

    As scrapers are adopted for the loss control of NSLS-II storage ring, Touschek lifetime estimations for various cases are required to assure the stable operation. However, to estimate the Touschek lifetime, momentum apertures should be measured all along the ring and, if we want to estimate the lifetime in various situations, it can take extremely long time. Thus, rather than simulating for each case, a semi-analytic methods with the interpolations are used for the measurements of the momentum apertures. In this paper, we described the methods and showed the results. Having enough Touschek lifetime is important for synchrotron light source for the users to perform experiments with stable beams. In NSLS-II, the scrapers will be installed for the loss control. Especially, the horizontal scrapers will be installed where the dispersions are maximum. Therefore, we need to find the proper scraper gap values which do not reduce the lifetime too much for the stable beam operation. To estimate reliable Touschek lifetime, we should measure the momentum apertures at many positions along the ring. For the rough estimation of the Touschek lifetime, the RF momentum acceptance can be used and for a more detailed estimation, the linear approximation of synchrotron oscillation can be used. However, for the strong focussing synchrotrons, like NSLS-II, the linear approximation is not enough to obtain the reliable momentum apertures, and, in general, particle tracking simulations are used. However, for NSLS-II case, we need to track the particle about 400 turns at each point to make it a full synchrotron oscillation period and to obtain the reliable Touschek lifetime we need measure the momentum apertures at several hundred positions at least. Therefore, it can take quite a long time if we want to have the reasonable resolution for the measurements. Furthermore, at the simulation, if we want to measure the aperture inside a element, we should divide the element and this will make the

  20. Measurement of the Ds lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermilab E791 Collaboration; Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Fernandez, A.; Fox, G. F.; Gagnon, P.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lundberg, B.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Mihalcea, D.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; D'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanders, D. A.; Santha, A. K. S.; Santoro, A. F. S.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Solano, J.; Stanton, N. R.; Stefanski, R. J.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yang, S. M.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    1999-01-01

    We report the results of a precise measurement of the Ds meson lifetime based on 1662+/-56 fully reconstructed Ds-->φπ decays, from the charm hadroproduction experiment E791 at Fermilab. Using an unbinned maximum likelihood fit, we measure the Ds lifetime to be 0.518+/-0.014+/-0.007 ps. The ratio of the measured Ds lifetime to the world average D0 lifetime [1] is 1.25+/-0.04. This result differs from unity by six standard deviations, indicating significantly different lifetimes for the Ds and the D0.

  1. Iron Chalcogenide Photovoltaic Absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Liping; Lany, Stephan; Kykyneshi, Robert; Jieratum, Vorranutch; Ravichandran, Ram; Pelatt, Brian; Altschul, Emmeline; Platt, Heather A. S.; Wager, John F.; Keszler, Douglas A.; Zunger, Alex

    2011-08-10

    An integrated computational and experimental study of FeS₂ pyrite reveals that phase coexistence is an important factor limiting performance as a thin-film solar absorber. This phase coexistence is suppressed with the ternary materials Fe₂SiS₄ and Fe₂GeS₄, which also exhibit higher band gaps than FeS₂. Thus, the ternaries provide a new entry point for development of thin-film absorbers and high-efficiency photovoltaics.

  2. "Smart" Electromechanical Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, Lebarian; Glenn, Dean C.; Carroll, Monty B.

    1989-01-01

    Shock-absorbing apparatus includes electromechanical actuator and digital feedback control circuitry rather than springs and hydraulic damping as in conventional shock absorbers. Device not subject to leakage and requires little or no maintenance. Attenuator parameters adjusted in response to sensory feedback and predictive algorithms to obtain desired damping characteristic. Device programmed to decelerate slowly approaching vehicle or other large object according to prescribed damping characteristic.

  3. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-06-01

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to the emitter/absorber interface, especially for high-efficiency cells with high bulk lifetime. Performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant when interface defect states are located near mid-gap energies. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e., defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV ≤ ΔEC ≤ 0.3 eV) can help maintain good cell efficiency in spite of high interface defect density, much like with Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) cells. The basic principle is that positive ΔEC, often referred to as a "spike," creates an absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (ΔEC ≥ 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a "cliff" (ΔEC < 0 eV) allows high hole concentration in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. Another way to mitigate performance losses due to interface defects is to use a thin and highly doped emitter, which can invert the absorber and form a large hole barrier at the interface. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. The ΔEC of other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ΔEC. These materials are predicted to yield higher voltages and would therefore be

  4. thin films as absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J. O.; Shaji, S.; Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G. A.; Das Roy, T. K.; Krishnan, B.

    2014-09-01

    Photovoltaic structures were prepared using AgSb(S x Se1- x )2 as absorber and CdS as window layer at various conditions via a hybrid technique of chemical bath deposition and thermal evaporation followed by heat treatments. Silver antimony sulfo selenide thin films [AgSb(S x Se1- x )2] were prepared by heating multilayers of sequentially deposited Sb2S3/Ag dipped in Na2SeSO3 solution, glass/Sb2S3/Ag/Se. For this, Sb2S3 thin films were deposited from a chemical bath containing SbCl3 and Na2S2O3. Then, Ag thin films were thermally evaporated on glass/Sb2S3, followed by selenization by dipping in an acidic solution of Na2SeSO3. The duration of dipping was varied as 3, 4 and 5 h. Two different heat treatments, one at 350 °C for 20 min in vacuum followed by a post-heat treatment at 325 °C for 2 h in Ar, and the other at 350 °C for 1 h in Ar, were applied to the multilayers of different configurations. X-ray diffraction results showed the formation of AgSb(S x Se1- x )2 thin films as the primary phase and AgSb(S,Se)2 and Sb2S3 as secondary phases. Morphology and elemental detection were done by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies showed the depthwise composition of the films. Optical properties were determined by UV-vis-IR transmittance and reflection spectral analysis. AgSb(S x Se1- x )2 formed at different conditions was incorporated in PV structures glass/FTO/CdS/AgSb(S x Se1- x )2/C/Ag. Chemically deposited post-annealed CdS thin films of various thicknesses were used as window layer. J- V characteristics of the cells were measured under dark and AM1.5 illumination. Analysis of the J- V characteristics resulted in the best solar cell parameters of V oc = 520 mV, J sc = 9.70 mA cm-2, FF = 0.50 and η = 2.7 %.

  5. Radiative Lifetimes of V I and V II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den Hartog, E. A.; Lawler, J. E.; Wood, M. P.

    2014-11-01

    New radiative lifetimes are reported for 168 levels of V I ranging in energy from 18086 cm-1 to 47702 cm-1, and for 31 levels of V II ranging in energy from 34593 cm-1 to 47420 cm-1. These lifetimes are measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on a slow atomic/ionic beam as part of an ongoing study of the radiative properties of the iron group elements. All but two of the V II lifetimes have been measured before using modern laser-based methods, but a large fraction of the V I lifetimes are reported here for the first time. Comparison to earlier measurements is discussed. These new lifetimes are, for the most part, accurate to ±5%. They will be combined with branching fraction measurements to produce a large set of transition probabilities for V I and V II which are needed by the astrophysics community for stellar abundance determinations.

  6. Unidirectional perfect absorber.

    PubMed

    Jin, L; Wang, P; Song, Z

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices. PMID:27615125

  7. Neutron-absorbing amorphous alloys for cladding coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevryukov, O. N.; Fedotov, V. T.; Polyansky, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    This paper shows developed compositions of neutron-absorbing cladding alloys based on nickel and containing such elements as B, Gd, Hf, and Mn. The techniques for application of coatings from these alloys on the surface of structural steels have been improved. It has been shown that the amorphous neutron-absorbing coating is more uniform than the crystalline one. The experimental data on the adhesion of cladding coatings with a steel substrate and their neutron-absorbing capacity have been obtained.

  8. Radar Absorbing Materials for Cube Stealth Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, D.; Pastore, R.; Vricella, A.; Marchetti, M.

    A Cube Stealth Satellite is proposed for potential applications in defense system. Particularly, the faces of the satellite exposed to the Earth are made of nanostructured materials able to absorb radar surveillance electromagnetic waves, conferring stealth capability to the cube satellite. Microwave absorbing and shielding material tiles are proposed using composite materials consisting in epoxy-resin and carbon nanotubes filler. The electric permittivity of the composite nanostructured materials is measured and discussed. Such data are used by the modeling algorithm to design the microwave absorbing and the shielding faces of the cube satellite. The electromagnetic modeling takes into account for several incidence angles (0-80°), extended frequency band (2-18 GHz), and for the minimization of the electromagnetic reflection coefficient. The evolutionary algorithm used for microwave layered microwave absorber modeling is the recently developed Winning Particle Optimization. The mathematical model of the absorbing structure is finally experimentally validated by comparing the electromagnetic simulation to the measurement of the manufactured radar absorber tile. Nanostructured composite materials manufacturing process and electromagnetic reflection measurements methods are described. Finally, a finite element method analysis of the electromagnetic scattering by cube stealth satellite is performed.

  9. Dysprosium titanate as an absorber material for control rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risovany, V. D.; Varlashova, E. E.; Suslov, D. N.

    2000-09-01

    Disprosium titanate is an attractive control rod material for the thermal neutron reactors. Its main advantages are: insignificant swelling, no out-gassing under neutron irradiation, rather high neutron efficiency, a high melting point (˜1870°C), non-interaction with the cladding at temperatures above 1000°C, simple fabrication and easily reprocessed non-radioactive waste. It can be used in control rods as pellets and powder. The disprosium titanate control rods have worked off in the MIR reactor for 17 years, in VVER-1000 - for 4 years without any operating problems. After post-irradiation examinations this type of control rod having high lifetime was recommended for the VVER and RBMK. The paper presents the examination results of absorber element dummies containing dysprosium titanate, irradiated in the SM reactor to the neutron fluence of 3.4×10 22 cm -2 ( E>0.1 MeV) and, also, the data on structure, thermal-physical properties of dysprosium titanate, efficiency of dysprosium titanate control rods.

  10. Exits in order: How crowding affects particle lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penington, Catherine J.; Baker, Ruth E.; Simpson, Matthew J.

    2016-06-01

    Diffusive processes are often represented using stochastic random walk frameworks. The amount of time taken for an individual in a random walk to intersect with an absorbing boundary is a fundamental property that is often referred to as the particle lifetime, or the first passage time. The mean lifetime of particles in a random walk model of diffusion is related to the amount of time required for the diffusive process to reach a steady state. Mathematical analysis describing the mean lifetime of particles in a standard model of diffusion without crowding is well known. However, the lifetime of agents in a random walk with crowding has received much less attention. Since many applications of diffusion in biology and biophysics include crowding effects, here we study a discrete model of diffusion that incorporates crowding. Using simulations, we show that crowding has a dramatic effect on agent lifetimes, and we derive an approximate expression for the mean agent lifetime that includes crowding effects. Our expression matches simulation results very well, and highlights the importance of crowding effects that are sometimes overlooked.

  11. Multiple-layer Radiation Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert M. L.; Baker, Bonnie Sue

    A structure is discussed for absorbing incident radiation, either electromagnetic (EM) or sound. Such a surface structure is needed, for example, in a highly sensitive high-frequency gravitational wave or HFGW detector such as the Li-Baker. The multi-layer absorber, which is discussed, is constructed with metamaterial [MM] layer or layers on top. This MM is configured for a specific EM or sound radiation frequency band, which absorbs incident EM or sound radiation without reflection. Below these top MM layers is a substrate of conventional EM-radiation absorbing or acoustical absorbing reflective material, such as an array of pyramidal foam absorbers. Incident radiation is partially absorbed by the MM layer or layers, and then it is more absorbed by the lower absorbing and reflecting substrate. The remaining reflected radiation is even further absorbed by the MM layers on its "way out_ so that essentially all of the incident radiation is absorbed _ a nearly perfect black-body absorber. In a HFGW detector a substrate, such as foam absorbers, may outgas into a high vacuum and reduce the capability of the vacuum-producing equipment, however, the layers above this lowest substrate will seal the absorbing and reflecting substrate from any external vacuum. The layers also serve to seal the absorbing material against air or water flow past the surfaces of aircraft, watercraft or submarines. Other applications for such a multiple-level radiation absorber include stealth aircraft, missiles and submarines.

  12. Plutonium: Aging mechanisms and weapon pit lifetime assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martz, Joseph C.; Schwartz, Adam J.

    2003-09-01

    Planning for future refurbishment and manufacturing needs of the U.S. nuclear weapons complex critically depends on credible estimates for component lifetimes. One of the most important of these components is the pit, that portion of the weapon that contains the fissile element plutonium. The U.S. government has proposed construction of a new Modern Pit Facility, and a key variable in planning both the size and schedule for this facility is the minimum estimated lifetime for stockpile pits. This article describes the current understanding of aging effects in plutonium, provides a lifetime estimate range, and outlines in some detail methodology that will improve this estimate over the next few years.

  13. Performance of an artificial absorber for truncating FEM meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jian; Volakis, John L.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the effectiveness of an artificial absorber for truncating finite element (FE) meshes. Specifically, we present the implementation of a novel mesh truncation approach using a perfectly matched anisotropic absorber for waveguides and stripline circuits. This truncation scheme is useful in many applications, including antennas, scattering, and microwave circuits.

  14. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  15. Shock-Absorbent Ball-Screw Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirr, Otto A., Jr.; Meneely, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Actuator containing two ball screws in series employs Belleville springs to reduce impact loads, thereby increasing life expectancy. New application of springs increases reliability of equipment in which ball screws commonly used. Set of three springs within lower screw of ball-screw mechanism absorbs impacts that result when parts reach their upper and lower limits of movement. Mechanism designed with Belleville springs as shock-absorbing elements because springs have good energy-to-volume ratio and easily stacked to attain any stiffness and travel.

  16. The Double Absorbing Boundary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagstrom, Thomas; Givoli, Dan; Rabinovich, Daniel; Bielak, Jacobo

    2014-02-01

    A new approach is devised for solving wave problems in unbounded domains. It has common features to each of two types of existing techniques: local high-order Absorbing Boundary Conditions (ABC) and Perfectly Matched Layers (PML). However, it is different from both and enjoys relative advantages with respect to both. The new method, called the Double Absorbing Boundary (DAB) method, is based on truncating the unbounded domain to produce a finite computational domain Ω, and on applying a local high-order ABC on two parallel artificial boundaries, which are a small distance apart, and thus form a thin non-reflecting layer. Auxiliary variables are defined on the two boundaries and inside the layer bounded by them, and participate in the numerical scheme. The DAB method is first introduced in general terms, using the 2D scalar time-dependent wave equation as a model. Then it is applied to the 1D Klein-Gordon equation, using finite difference discretization in space and time, and to the 2D wave equation in a wave guide, using finite element discretization in space and dissipative time stepping. The computational aspects of the method are discussed, and numerical experiments demonstrate its performance.

  17. Extended lifetime railgap switch

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, D.B.; Mendoza, P.J.

    1988-02-02

    In a railgap switch of the type having an elongate blade electrode made of conductive material, an elongate housing made of insulating material for supporting the blade electrode and plate electrode in opposed relation extending in the same direction with the blade centered over the plate and separated therefrom by a gap, and a gas filling the housing and the gap, the gas being selected to breakdown and switch from a highly insulative state to a highly conductive state upon application of a high voltage across the blade and plate electrodes, the improvement is described comprising: forming the blade with laterally extending transverse wing portions at the edge of the blade and adjacent the gap so as to extend in spaced parallel relation to the surface of the plate, the blade generally following the contour thereof to form an inverted T-shape structure with the wing portions extending transversely of the elongate dimension of the blade. The wing portions terminating in a pair of spaced parallel edges extending along the elongate direction of the blade to thereby create two spaced elongate edges along which arcs form serving to divide the erosion effects of discharge between them, the current through each edge being one-half of that in single-edge devices with ablation wear reduced accordingly to give significantly larger switch lifetime. The blade and wing portions limiting ablation erosion of the edges in a direction generally align with the plate contour so that the edge-to-plate separation remains substantially constant.

  18. Pinhole shifting lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ramshesh, Venkat K; Lemasters, John J

    2008-01-01

    Lifetime imaging microscopy is a powerful tool to probe biological phenomena independent of luminescence intensity and fluorophore concentration. We describe time-resolved imaging of long-lifetime luminescence with an unmodified commercial laser scanning confocal/multiphoton microscope. The principle of the measurement is displacement of the detection pinhole to collect delayed luminescence from a position lagging the rasting laser beam. As proof of principle, luminescence from microspheres containing europium (Eu(3+)), a red emitting probe, was compared to that of short-lifetime green-fluorescing microspheres and/or fluorescein and rhodamine in solution. Using 720-nm two-photon excitation and a pinhole diameter of 1 Airy unit, the short-lifetime fluorescence of fluorescein, rhodamine and green microspheres disappeared much more rapidly than the long-lifetime phosphorescence of Eu(3+) microspheres as the pinhole was repositioned in the lagging direction. In contrast, repositioning of the pinhole in the leading and orthogonal directions caused equal loss of short- and long-lifetime luminescence. From measurements at different lag pinhole positions, a lifetime of 270 micros was estimated for the Eu(3+) microspheres, consistent with independent measurements. This simple adaptation is the basis for quantitative 3-D lifetime imaging microscopy. PMID:19123648

  19. Lifetime-based tomographic multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Scott B.; Boas, David A.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Kumar, Anand T. N.

    2010-07-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence tomography of multiple fluorophores has previously been limited by the bandwidth of the NIR spectral regime and the broad emission spectra of most NIR fluorophores. We describe in vivo tomography of three spectrally overlapping fluorophores using fluorescence lifetime-based separation. Time-domain images are acquired using a voltage-gated, intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) in free-space transmission geometry with 750 nm Ti:sapphire laser excitation. Lifetime components are fit from the asymptotic portion of fluorescence decay curve and reconstructed separately with a lifetime-adjusted forward model. We use this system to test the in vivo lifetime multiplexing suitability of commercially available fluorophores, and demonstrate lifetime multiplexing in solution mixtures and in nude mice. All of the fluorophores tested exhibit nearly monoexponential decays, with narrow in vivo lifetime distributions suitable for lifetime multiplexing. Quantitative separation of two fluorophores with lifetimes of 1.1 and 1.37 ns is demonstrated for relative concentrations of 1:5. Finally, we demonstrate tomographic imaging of two and three fluorophores in nude mice with fluorophores that localize to distinct organ systems. This technique should be widely applicable to imaging multiple NIR fluorophores in 3-D.

  20. Improved Determination of the Neutron Lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, A.

    2013-10-01

    The most precise determination of the neutron lifetime using the beam method reported a result of τn = (886 . 3 +/- 3 . 4) s. The dominant uncertainties were attributed to the absolute determination of the fluence of the neutron beam (2.7 s). The fluence was determined with a monitor that counted the neutron-induced charged particles from absorption in a thin, well-characterized 6Li deposit. The detection efficiency of the monitor was calculated from the areal density of the deposit, the detector solid angle, and the ENDF/B-VI 6Li(n,t)4He thermal neutron cross section. We have used a second, totally-absorbing neutron detector to directly measure the detection efficiency of the monitor on a monochromatic neutron beam of precisely known wavelength. This method does not rely on the 6Li(n,t)4He cross section or any other nuclear data. The monitor detection efficiency was measured to an uncertainty of 0.06%, which represents a five-fold improvement in uncertainty. We have verified the temporal stability of the monitor with ancillary measurements, and the measured neutron monitor efficiency has been used to improve the fluence determination in the past lifetime experiment. An updated neutron lifetime based on the improved fluence determination will be presented. Work done in collaboration with M. Dewey, D. Gilliam, J. Nico, National Institute of Standards and Technology; G. Greene, University of Tennessee / Oak Ridge National Laboratory; A. Laptev, Los Alamos National Laboratory; W. Snow, Indiana University; and F. Wietfeldt, Tulane University.

  1. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-02-01

    Here, we demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Moreover, our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributionsmore » to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.« less

  2. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure. PMID:26828999

  3. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.

  4. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul K; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J M; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R; Luk, Ting S; Taylor, Antoinette J; Dalvit, Diego A R; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure. PMID:26828999

  5. Ionized Absorbers in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-08-01

    As a part of this program, we observed three AGN:PKS2251 + 113, PG0043 = 039 and PLH909. Two objects show signatures of absorbtion in their UV spectra. Based on our earlier modeling of X-ray warm absorbents, we expected to observe X-ray observation in these objects. The third, PLH909, is known to have soft excess in EINSTEIN data. Attachment: "Exploratory ASCA observation of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects".

  6. Ionized Absorbers in AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-01-01

    As a part of this program, we observed three AGN:PKS2251 + 113, PG0043 = 039 and PLH909. Two objects show signatures of absorbtion in their UV spectra. Based on our earlier modeling of X-ray warm absorbents, we expected to observe X-ray observation in these objects. The third, PLH909, is known to have soft excess in EINSTEIN data. Attachment: "Exploratory ASCA observation of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects".

  7. Radiative lifetimes in Co I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitz, D. E.; Bergeson, S. D.; Lawler, J. E.

    1995-03-01

    New radiative-lifetime measurements based on time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence are reported for 133 odd-parity and 2 even-parity levels of Co I, ranging in energy from 28300 to 59400 cm-1. Our lifetimes agree with earlier, but much less extensive, lifetime measurements based on laser-induced fluorescence. Satisfactory agreement is also found with the critical compilation of atomic transition probabilities from the U.S. National Bureau of Standards [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 17, Suppl 4 (1988)]. Our measurements provide a reliable absolute normalization for a much more comprehensive determination of Co I atomic transition probabilities.

  8. Absorber for terahertz radiation management

    DOEpatents

    Biallas, George Herman; Apeldoorn, Cornelis; Williams, Gwyn P.; Benson, Stephen V.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Heckman, John D.

    2015-12-08

    A method and apparatus for minimizing the degradation of power in a free electron laser (FEL) generating terahertz (THz) radiation. The method includes inserting an absorber ring in the FEL beam path for absorbing any irregular THz radiation and thus minimizes the degradation of downstream optics and the resulting degradation of the FEL output power. The absorber ring includes an upstream side, a downstream side, and a plurality of wedges spaced radially around the absorber ring. The wedges form a scallop-like feature on the innermost edges of the absorber ring that acts as an apodizer, stopping diffractive focusing of the THz radiation that is not intercepted by the absorber. Spacing between the scallop-like features and the shape of the features approximates the Bartlett apodization function. The absorber ring provides a smooth intensity distribution, rather than one that is peaked on-center, thereby eliminating minor distortion downstream of the absorber.

  9. Lifetime Measurements in 162Dy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casarella, Clark; Aprahamian, A.; Lesher, S.; Crider, B.; Lowe, M.; Peters, E.; Prados-Estevez, F.; Ross, T.; Tully, Z.; Yates, S.

    2015-10-01

    Historically, the rare-earth region of nuclei has been a fountainhead for nuclear structure phenomena. One of the more debated structure effects is the nature of excited 0+ bands in nuclei, and continues to be an outstanding challenge in nuclear structure physics; several interpretations exist, and we hope that lifetime measurements can help distinguish between them. 162Dy has an abundance of 0+ states with limited lifetime data; we have measured excitation functions, mean lifetimes, and angular distributions of gamma rays for excited states in 162Dy at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory. Low lying excited states were populated up to an excitation energy of E < 3.2 MeV, where we will discuss the implications of the lifetimes under this energy threshold. This work was supported by the NSF under contract numbers PHY-1068192, PHY-1205412, and PHY-0956310.

  10. Measurement of the tau lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1982-10-01

    If the tau lepton couples to the charged weak current with universal strength, its lifetime can be expressed in terms of the muon's lifetime, the ratio of the masses of the muon and the tau, and the tau's branching ratio into e anti nu/sub e/ nu/sub tau/ as tau/sub tau/ = tau/sub ..mu../ (m/sub ..mu..//m/sub tau/)/sup 5/ B(tau ..-->.. e anti nu/sub e/nu/sub tau/) = 2.8 +- 0.2 x 10/sup -13/ s. This paper describes the measurement of the tau lifetime made by the Mark II collaboration, using a new high precision drift chamber in contunction with the Mark II detector at PEP. The results of other tau lifetime measurements are summarized.

  11. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C.; Lee, Chuck K.; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  12. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  13. Solar radiation absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Schreyer, James M.; Whitehead, Harlan D.

    1977-01-01

    Solar energy absorbing means in solar collectors are provided by a solar selective carbon surface. A solar selective carbon surface is a microporous carbon surface having pores within the range of 0.2 to 2 micrometers. Such a surface is provided in a microporous carbon article by controlling the pore size. A thermally conductive substrate is provided with a solar selective surface by adhering an array of carbon particles in a suitable binder to the substrate, a majority of said particles having diameters within the range of about 0.2-10 microns.

  14. Absorber for solar power.

    PubMed

    Powell, W R

    1974-10-01

    A simple, economical absorber utilizing a new principle of operation to achieve very low reradiation losses while generating temperatures limited by material properties of quartz is described. Its performance is analyzed and indicates approximately 90% thermal efficiency and 73% conversion efficiency for an earth based unit with moderately concentrated (~tenfold) sunlight incident. It is consequently compatible with the most economic of concentrator mirrors (stamped) or mirrors deployable in space. Space applications are particularly attractive, as temperatures significantly below 300 K are possible and permit even higher conversion efficiency. PMID:20134700

  15. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Newson, H.W.

    1960-09-13

    A novel composite neutronic reactor control element is offered. The element comprises a multiplicity of sections arranged in end-to-end relationship, each of the sections having a markedly different neutron-reactive characteristic. For example, a three-section control element could contain absorber, moderator, and fuel sections. By moving such an element longitudinally through a reactor core, reactivity is decreased by the absorber, increased slightly by the moderator, or increased substantially by the fuel. Thus, control over a wide reactivity range is provided.

  16. Liquid Cryogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Baynham, D.E.; Bish, P.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Cummings, M.A.; Green,M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivaniouchenkov, I.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.Q.; Zisman, M.S.

    2005-08-20

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will test ionization cooling of muons. In order to have effective ionization cooling, one must use an absorber that is made from a low-z material. The most effective low z materials for ionization cooling are hydrogen, helium, lithium hydride, lithium and beryllium, in that order. In order to measure the effect of material on cooling, several absorber materials must be used. This report describes a liquid-hydrogen absorber that is within a pair of superconducting focusing solenoids. The absorber must also be suitable for use with liquid helium. The following absorber components are discussed in this report; the absorber body, its heat exchanger, the hydrogen system, and the hydrogen safety. Absorber cooling and the thin windows are not discussed here.

  17. Advanced Models and Controls for Prediction and Extension of Battery Lifetime (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-02-01

    Predictive models of capacity and power fade must consider a multiplicity of degradation modes experienced by Li-ion batteries in the automotive environment. Lacking accurate models and tests, lifetime uncertainty must presently be absorbed by overdesign and excess warranty costs. To reduce these costs and extend life, degradation models are under development that predict lifetime more accurately and with less test data. The lifetime models provide engineering feedback for cell, pack and system designs and are being incorporated into real-time control strategies.

  18. Lifetimes of lunar satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Kurt W.; Buglia, James J.; Desai, Prasun N.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Exploration Initiative has generated a renewed interest in lunar mission planning. The lunar missions currently under study, unlike the Apollo missions, involve long stay times. Several lunar gravity models have been formulated, but mission planners do not have enough confidence in the proposed models to conduct detailed studies of missions with long stay times. In this report, a particular lunar gravitational model, the Ferrari 5 x 5 model, was chosen to determine the lifetimes for 100-km and 300-km perilune altitude, near-circular parking orbits. The need to analyze orbital lifetimes for a large number of initial orbital parameters was the motivation for the formulation of a simplified gravitational model from the original model. Using this model, orbital lifetimes were found to be heavily dependent on the initial conditions of the nearly circular orbits, particularly the initial inclination and argument of perilune. This selected model yielded lifetime predictions of less than 40 days for some orbits, and other orbits had lifetimes exceeding a year. Although inconsistencies and limitations are inherent in all existing lunar gravity models, primarily because of a lack of information about the far side of the moon, the methods presented in this analysis are suitable for incorporating the moon's nonspherical gravitational effects on the preliminary design level for future lunar mission planning.

  19. Vibrational lifetimes of hydrated phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadidi, Tayebeh; Anvari, Mehrnaz; Mashaghi, Alireza; Sahimi, Muhammad; Rahimi Tabar, M. Reza

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations have been carried out to compute, at human-body temperature, the vibrational modes and lifetimes of pure and hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipids. The projected atomic vibrations calculated from the spectral energy density are used to compute the vibrational modes and the lifetimes. All the normal modes of the pure and hydrated DPPC and their frequencies are identified. The computed lifetimes incorporate the full anharmonicity of the atomic interactions. The vibrational modes of the water molecules close to the head group of DPPC are active (possess large projected spectrum amplitudes) in the frequency range 0.5-55 THz, with a peak at 2.80 THz in the energy spectrum. The computed lifetimes for the high-frequency modes agree well with the recent data measured at room temperature where high-order phonon scattering is not negligible. The computed lifetimes of the low-frequency modes can be tested using the current experimental capabilities. Moreover, the approach may be applied to other lipids and biomolecules, in order to predict their vibrational dispersion relations, and to study the dynamics of vibrational energy transfer.

  20. Lifetime costs of cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Marie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Madsen, Mette; Uldall, Peter

    2009-08-01

    This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs. The population analysed was retrieved from the Danish Cerebral Palsy Register, which covers the eastern part of the country and has registered about half of the Danish population of individuals with CP since 1950. For this study we analysed 2367 individuals with CP, who were born in 1930 to 2000 and were alive in 2000. The prevalence of CP in eastern Denmark was approximately 1.7 per 1000. Information on productivity and the use of health care was retrieved from registers. The lifetime cost of CP was about 860,000 euro for men and about 800,000 euro for women. The largest component was social care costs, particularly during childhood. A sensitivity analysis found that alterations in social care costs had a small effect, whereas lowering the discount rate from 5 to 3 per cent markedly increased total lifetime costs. Discounting decreases the value of costs in the future compared with the present. The high social care costs and productivity costs associated with CP point to a potential gain from labour market interventions that benefit individuals with CP. PMID:19416329

  1. Phytoplankton-Fluorescence-Lifetime Vertical Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Salvador M.; Guignon, Ernest F.; St. Louis, Ernest

    2004-01-01

    A battery-operated optoelectronic instrument is designed to be lowered into the ocean to measure the intensity and lifetime of fluorescence of chlorophyll A in marine phytoplankton as a function of depth from 0 to 300 m. Fluorescence lifetimes are especially useful as robust measures of photosynthetic productivity of phytoplankton and of physical and chemical mechanisms that affect photosynthesis. The knowledge of photosynthesis in phytoplankton gained by use of this and related instruments is expected to contribute to understanding of global processes that control the time-varying fluxes of carbon and associated biogenic elements in the ocean. The concentration of chlorophyll in the ocean presents a major detection challenge because in order to obtain accurate values of photosynthetic parameters, the intensity of light used to excite fluorescence must be kept very low so as not to disturb the photosynthetic system. Several innovations in fluorometric instrumentation were made in order to make it possible to reach the required low detection limit. These innovations include a highly efficient optical assembly with an integrated flow-through sample interface, and a high-gain, low-noise electronic detection subsystem. The instrument also incorporates means for self-calibration during operation, and electronic hardware and software for control, acquisition and analysis of data, and communications. The electronic circuitry is highly miniaturized and designed to minimize power demand. The instrument is housed in a package that can withstand the water pressure at the maximum depth of 300 m. A light-emitting diode excites fluorescence in the sample flow cell, which is placed at one focal point of an ellipsoidal reflector. A photomultiplier tube is placed at the other focal point. This optical arrangement enables highly efficient collection of fluorescence emitted over all polar directions. Fluorescence lifetime is measured indirectly, by use of a technique based on the

  2. Metamaterial electromagnetic wave absorbers.

    PubMed

    Watts, Claire M; Liu, Xianliang; Padilla, Willie J

    2012-06-19

    The advent of negative index materials has spawned extensive research into metamaterials over the past decade. Metamaterials are attractive not only for their exotic electromagnetic properties, but also their promise for applications. A particular branch-the metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA)-has garnered interest due to the fact that it can achieve unity absorptivity of electromagnetic waves. Since its first experimental demonstration in 2008, the MPA has progressed significantly with designs shown across the electromagnetic spectrum, from microwave to optical. In this Progress Report we give an overview of the field and discuss a selection of examples and related applications. The ability of the MPA to exhibit extreme performance flexibility will be discussed and the theory underlying their operation and limitations will be established. Insight is given into what we can expect from this rapidly expanding field and future challenges will be addressed. PMID:22627995

  3. System size expansion for systems with an absorbing state.

    PubMed

    Di Patti, Francesca; Azaele, Sandro; Banavar, Jayanth R; Maritan, Amos

    2011-01-01

    The well-known van Kampen system size expansion, while of rather general applicability, is shown to fail to reproduce some qualitative features of the time evolution for systems with an absorbing state, apart from a transient initial time interval. We generalize the van Kampen ansatz by introducing a new prescription leading to non-Gaussian fluctuations around the absorbing state. The two expansion predictions are explicitly compared for the infinite range voter model with speciation as a paradigmatic model with an absorbing state. The new expansion, both for a finite size system in the large time limit and at finite time in the large size limit, converges to the exact solution as obtained in a numerical implementation using the Gillespie algorithm. Furthermore, the predicted lifetime distribution is shown to have the correct asymptotic behavior. PMID:21405654

  4. Radiative lifetimes in B I using ultraviolet and vacuum-ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brian, T. R.; Lawler, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes of the eight lowest even parity levels in the doublet system of B I are measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence in the UV and VUV on an atomic beam of boron. The accurate lifetimes provide a base for improved determination of absolute transition probabilities in B I. The techniques described are broadly applicable to measurement of lifetimes of levels with transitions in the visible, UV, and VUV in almost any element.

  5. Lifetime measurements in 180Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. M.; Wu, X. G.; Chen, Y. S.; Li, C. B.; Gao, Z. C.; Li, G. S.; Chen, F. Q.; He, C. Y.; Zheng, Y.; Hu, S. P.; Zhong, J.; Wu, Y. H.; Li, H. W.; Luo, P. W.

    2016-04-01

    Lifetimes of the yrast states in 180Pt have been measured from 4+ to 8+ using the recoil distance Doppler-shift technique in the coincidence mode. These states were populated by the reaction 156Gd(28Si,4 n )180Pt at a beam energy of 144 MeV. The differential decay curve method was applied to determine the lifetimes from experimental coincidence data. The B (E 2 ) values extracted from lifetimes increase with increasing spin, implying rotor behavior, but do not show the typical shape coexistence where the B (E 2 ) values present a rapid increase at very low spins. Calculations based on the triaxial projected shell model were performed for the yrast states in 180Pt and the results of both energies and E 2 transition probabilities reproduce the experimental data very well. The result also shows that a better description of the yrast band in 180Pt requires consideration of the γ degree of freedom.

  6. On the method of positron lifetime measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiyama, F.; Shizuma, K.; Nasai, H.; Nishi, M.

    1983-01-01

    A fast-slow coincidence system was constructed for the measurement of positron lifetimes in material. The time resolution of this system was 270 ps for the (60)Co gamma rays. Positron lifetime spectra for 14 kinds of alkali halides were measured with this system. Two lifetime components and their intensities were derived from analyses of the lifetime spectra.

  7. Electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Heppner, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary designs were generated for two electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber concepts. Initially, an electrochemically regenerable absorption bed concept was designed. This concept incorporated the required electrochemical regeneration components in the absorber design, permitting the absorbent to be regenerated within the absorption bed. This hardware was identified as the electrochemical absorber hardware. The second hardware concept separated the functional components of the regeneration and absorption process. This design approach minimized the extravehicular activity component volume by eliminating regeneration hardware components within the absorber. The electrochemical absorber hardware was extensively characterized for major operating parameters such as inlet carbon dioxide partial pressure, process air flow rate, operational pressure, inlet relative humidity, regeneration current density and absorption/regeneration cycle endurance testing.

  8. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimoto, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshida, M.; Green, Michael A.; Kuno, Y.; Lau, Wing

    2010-05-30

    Liquid hydrogen absorbers for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) have been developed, and the first absorber has been tested at KEK. In the preliminary test at KEK we have successfully filled the absorber with {approx}2 liters of liquid hydrogen. The measured hydrogen condensation speed was 2.5 liters/day at 1.0 bar. No hydrogen leakage to vacuum was found between 300 K and 20 K. The MICE experiment includes three AFC (absorber focusing coil) modules, each containing a 21 liter liquid hydrogen absorber made of aluminum. The AFC module has safety windows to separate its vacuum from that of neighboring modules. Liquid hydrogen is supplied from a cryocooler with cooling power 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The first absorber will be assembled in the AFC module and installed in MICE at RAL.

  9. Broadband patterned magnetic microwave absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Wu, Tianlong; Wang, Wei; Guan, Jianguo; Zhai, Pengcheng

    2014-07-28

    It is a tough task to greatly improve the working bandwidth for the traditional flat microwave absorbers because of the restriction of available material parameters. In this work, a simple patterning method is proposed to drastically broaden the absorption bandwidth of a conventional magnetic absorber. As a demonstration, an ultra-broadband microwave absorber with more than 90% absorption in the frequency range of 4–40 GHz is designed and experimentally realized, which has a thin thickness of 3.7 mm and a light weight equivalent to a 2-mm-thick flat absorber. In such a patterned absorber, the broadband strong absorption is mainly originated from the simultaneous incorporation of multiple λ/4 resonances and edge diffraction effects. This work provides a facile route to greatly extend the microwave absorption bandwidth for the currently available absorbing materials.

  10. Lifetime of double occupancies in the Fermi-Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Sensarma, Rajdeep; Pekker, David; Demler, Eugene; Altman, Ehud; Strohmaier, Niels; Moritz, Henning; Greif, Daniel; Joerdens, Robert; Tarruell, Leticia; Esslinger, Tilman

    2010-12-01

    We investigate the decay of artificially created double occupancies in a repulsive Fermi-Hubbard system in the strongly interacting limit using diagrammatic many-body theory and experiments with ultracold fermions in optical lattices. The lifetime of the doublons is found to scale exponentially with the ratio of the on-site repulsion to the bandwidth. We show that the dominant decay process in presence of background holes is the excitation of a large number of particle-hole pairs to absorb the energy of the doublon. We also show that the strongly interacting nature of the background state is crucial in obtaining the correct estimate of the doublon lifetime in these systems. The theoretical estimates and the experimental data are in agreement.

  11. The Work of a Lifetime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2012-01-01

    If there's one message that Joan Hillsman wants to get across to music directors, it's this: Teaching is a lifetime commitment. Hillsman is a longtime music educator, African-American music historian, author, consultant, music producer, clinician, radio show host, and current member of the Academic Board of the James Cleveland Gospel Music…

  12. Lifetime of heavy flavour particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1985-10-01

    Recent measurements of the lifetime of the tau leptons and charm and beauty hadrons are reviewed and their significance for the couplings of the charged weak current, flavour mixing, and models relating quarks to hadron decay are discussed. 70 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Encouraging the Lifetime Reading Habit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanacore, Joseph

    Educators must accept the challenge of encouraging the lifetime reading habit in school. Students who are surrounded with books, newspapers, magazines, and other materials will be tempted to browse and to read from these sources. When selecting materials for the classroom, educators should work closely with the library media specialist who is…

  14. Plants absorb heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, J.

    1995-02-01

    Decontamination of heavy metals-polluted soils remains one of the most intractable problems of cleanup technology. Currently available techniques include extraction of the metals by physical and chemical means, such as acid leaching and electroosmosis, or immobilization by vitrification. There are presently no techniques for cleanup which are low cost and retain soil fertility after metals removal. But a solution to the problem could be on the horizon. A small but growing number of plants native to metalliferous soils are known to be capable of accumulating extremely high concentrations of metals in their aboveground portions. These hyperaccumulators, as they are called, contain up to 1,000 times larger metal concentrations in their aboveground parts than normal species. Their distribution is global, including many different families of flowering plants of varying growth forms, from herbaceous plants to trees. Hyperaccumulators absorb metals they do not need for their own nutrition. The metals are accumulated in the leaf and stem vacuoles, and to a lesser extent in the roots.

  15. Laboratory study of the cosmic-ray muon lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, T.; Barker, M.; Breeden, J.; Komisarcik, K.; Pickar, M.; Wark, D.; Wiggins, J.

    1985-06-01

    The cosmic-ray muon lifetime was measured with a variety of counters designed to study both the free and μ- capture lifetimes. The data were obtained using scintillation detectors and a lead glass detector. These data show the dependence of μ- capture on the atomic number of the chemical element in the detector. The Z dependence of the weak interaction capture process is discussed in terms of the familiar Fermi (ΔJ=0) and Gamow-Teller (ΔJ=1) decays. This experiment was designed for use in advanced undergraduate physics laboratories.

  16. Cosmological constraints on the lifetime of massive particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindley, D.

    1985-01-01

    Particles with masses more than a few MeV, decaying into photons or electrons, can cause destruction by photofission of cosmologically produced light elements. A previous calculation of this effect is corrected and extended, and used to derive maximum lifetimes for massive neutrinos; these range from a few thousand seconds upward, depending on the particle mass. Some approximate expressions are given that enable lifetime limits to be obtained for other particles, with different masses and abundances, such as gravitinos. These limits are generally stronger than previously determined constraints, such as distortion of the microwave background by energetic photons.

  17. Flexible subterahertz metamaterial absorber fabrication using inkjet printing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongju; Sung, Hyuk-Kee; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a flexible metamaterial (MM) absorber was designed at 0.1 THz and fabricated using inkjet printing technology. The unit cell of the MM absorber was designed using a finite element method-based full-wave simulation. The unit cell comprised square rings, and it was printed with silver nanoparticle ink on flexible Kapton polyimide film. The fabrication processes were performed using a material printer. The absorber's reflection coefficient was measured using a vector network analyzer and a WR-10 waveguide. The absorption ratio was 93.5 % at 0.102 THz. Therefore, we demonstrated the possibility of inkjet printing at a subterahertz band.

  18. Probabilistic Prediction of Lifetimes of Ceramic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Jadaan, Osama M.; Palfi, Tamas; Powers, Lynn; Reh, Stefan; Baker, Eric H.

    2006-01-01

    ANSYS/CARES/PDS is a software system that combines the ANSYS Probabilistic Design System (PDS) software with a modified version of the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life (CARES/Life) Version 6.0 software. [A prior version of CARES/Life was reported in Program for Evaluation of Reliability of Ceramic Parts (LEW-16018), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 20, No. 3 (March 1996), page 28.] CARES/Life models effects of stochastic strength, slow crack growth, and stress distribution on the overall reliability of a ceramic component. The essence of the enhancement in CARES/Life 6.0 is the capability to predict the probability of failure using results from transient finite-element analysis. ANSYS PDS models the effects of uncertainty in material properties, dimensions, and loading on the stress distribution and deformation. ANSYS/CARES/PDS accounts for the effects of probabilistic strength, probabilistic loads, probabilistic material properties, and probabilistic tolerances on the lifetime and reliability of the component. Even failure probability becomes a stochastic quantity that can be tracked as a response variable. ANSYS/CARES/PDS enables tracking of all stochastic quantities in the design space, thereby enabling more precise probabilistic prediction of lifetimes of ceramic components.

  19. Energy absorber for the CETA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J.

    1994-01-01

    The energy absorber that was developed for the CETA (Crew Equipment and Translation Aid) on Space Station Freedom is a metal on metal frictional type and has a load regulating feature that prevents excessive stroking loads from occurring while in operation. This paper highlights some of the design and operating aspects and the testing of this energy absorber.

  20. Metal-shearing energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, R. J.; Wittrock, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    Device, consisting of tongue of thin aluminum alloy strip, pull tab, slotted steel plate which serves as cutter, and steel buckle, absorbs mechanical energy when its ends are subjected to tensile loading. Device is applicable as auxiliary shock absorbing anchor for automobile and airplane safety belts.

  1. Energy absorber for the CETA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J.

    1994-05-01

    The energy absorber that was developed for the CETA (Crew Equipment and Translation Aid) on Space Station Freedom is a metal on metal frictional type and has a load regulating feature that prevents excessive stroking loads from occurring while in operation. This paper highlights some of the design and operating aspects and the testing of this energy absorber.

  2. Leaf absorbance and photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a leaf is often thought to contain some clues to the photosynthetic action spectrum of chlorophyll. Of course, absorption of photons is needed for photosynthesis, but the reverse, photosynthesis when there is absorption, is not necessarily true. As a check on the existence of absorption limits we measured spectra for a few different leaves. Two techniques for measuring absorption have been used, viz. the separate determination of the diffuse reflectance and the diffuse transmittance with the leaf at a port of an integrating sphere and the direct determination of the non-absorbed fraction with the leaf in the sphere. In a cross-check both methods yielded the same results for the absorption spectrum. The spectrum of a Fuchsia leaf, covering the short-wave region from 350 to 2500 nm, shows a high absorption in UV, blue and red, the well known dip in the green and a steep fall-off at 700 nm. Absorption drops to virtually zero in the near infrared, with subsequent absorptions, corresponding to the water absorption bands. In more detailed spectra, taken at 5 nm intervals with a 5 nm bandwidth, differences in chlorophyll content show in the different depths of the dip around 550 nm and in a small shift of the absorption edge at 700 nm. Spectra for Geranium (Pelargonium zonale) and Hibiscus (with a higher chlorophyll content) show that the upper limit for photosynthesis can not be much above 700 nm. No evidence, however, is to be seen of a lower limit for photosynthesis and, in fact, some experiments down to 300 nm still did not show a decrease of the absorption although it is well recognized that no photosynthesis results with 300 nm wavelengths.

  3. Visible light broadband perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, X. L.; Meng, Q. X.; Yuan, C. X.; Zhou, Z. X.; Wang, X. O.

    2016-03-01

    The visible light broadband perfect absorbers based on the silver (Ag) nano elliptical disks and holes array are studied using finite difference time domain simulations. The semiconducting indium silicon dioxide thin film is introduced as the space layer in this sandwiched structure. Utilizing the asymmetrical geometry of the structures, polarization sensitivity for transverse electric wave (TE)/transverse magnetic wave (TM) and left circular polarization wave (LCP)/right circular polarization wave (RCP) of the broadband absorption are gained. The absorbers with Ag nano disks and holes array show several peaks absorbance of 100% by numerical simulation. These simple and flexible perfect absorbers are particularly desirable for various potential applications including the solar energy absorber.

  4. A novel broadband waterborne acoustic absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changxian; Wen, Weibin; Huang, Yixing; Chen, Mingji; Lei, Hongshuai; Fang, Daining

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we extended the ray tracing theory in polar coordinate system, and originally proposed the Snell-Descartes law in polar coordinates. Based on these theories, a novel broadband waterborne acoustic absorber device was proposed. This device is designed with gradient-distributing materials along radius, which makes the incidence acoustic wave ray warps. The echo reduction effects of this device were investigated by finite element analysis, and the numerical results show that the reflectivity of acoustic wave for the new device is lower than that of homogenous and Alberich layers in almost all frequency 0-30 kHz at the same loss factor.

  5. DHCAL with minimal absorber: measurements with positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, B.; Neubüser, C.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Dotti, A.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H. L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schroeder, S.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kovalcuk, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Besson, D.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Corriveau, F.; Blazey, G. C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Zutshi, V.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-05-01

    In special tests, the active layers of the CALICE Digital Hadron Calorimeter prototype, the DHCAL, were exposed to low energy particle beams, without being interleaved by absorber plates. The thickness of each layer corresponded approximately to 0.29 radiation lengths or 0.034 nuclear interaction lengths, defined mostly by the copper and steel skins of the detector cassettes. This paper reports on measurements performed with this device in the Fermilab test beam with positrons in the energy range of 1 to 10 GeV. The measurements are compared to simulations based on GEANT4 and a standalone program to emulate the detailed response of the active elements.

  6. Influences on lifetime of wire ropes in traction lifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, W.

    2016-05-01

    Traction lifts are complex systems with rotating and translating moving masses, springs and dampers and several system inputs from the lifts and the users. The wire ropes are essential mechanical elements. The mechanical properties of the ropes in use depend on the rope construction, the load situation, nonlinearities and the lift dimensions. The mechanical properties are important for the proper use in lifts and the ride quality. But first of all the wire ropes (for all other suspension means as well) have to satisfy the safety relevant requirements sufficient lifetime, reliable determination of discard and sufficient and limited traction capacity. The lifetime of the wire ropes better the number of trips until rope discard depends on a lot of parameters of the rope and the rope application eg use of plastic deflection sheaves and reverse bending layouts. New challenges for rope lifetime are resulting from the more or less open D/d-ratio limits possible by certificates concerning the examination of conformity by notified bodies. This paper will highlight the basics of wire rope technology, the endurance and lifetime of wire ropes running over sheaves, and the different influences from the ropes and more and more important from the lift application parameters. Very often underestimated are the influences of transport, storage, installation and maintenance. With this background we will lead over to the calculation methods of wire rope lifetime considering the actual findings of wire rope endurance research. We'll show in this paper new and innovative facts as the influence of rope length and size factor in the lifetime formular, the reduction of lifetime caused by traction grooves, the new model for the calculation in reverse bending operations and the statistically firmed possibilities for machine roomless lifts (MRL) under very small bending conditions.

  7. Exploring Lifetime Effects in Femtoscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D; Soltz, R; Newby, J; Kisiel, A

    2005-09-06

    We investigate the role of lifetime effects from resonances and emission duration tails in femtoscopy at RHIC in two Blast-Wave models. We find the non-Gaussian components compare well with published source imaged data, but the value of R{sub out} obtained from Gaussian fits is not insensitive to the non-Gaussian contributions when realistic acceptance cuts are applied to models.

  8. Lifetime of MCP-PMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, A.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Belias, A.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Kalicy, G.; Krebs, M.; Lehmann, D.; Nerling, F.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Schmidt, M.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.

    2016-05-01

    The hadron identification in the PANDA experiment at FAIR will be done with DIRC detectors. Because of design and space reasons the sensors of the DIRCs have to be placed inside the strong magnetic field of the solenoid. As the favored photon sensors microchannel-plate photomultipliers (MCP-PMTs) were identified. However, these devices showed serious aging problems until very recently, which manifest themselves by a fast degrading quantum efficiency (QE) of the photo cathode (PC). This is mainly due to feedback ions from the residual gas. In this paper we discuss the recently accomplished huge improvements in the lifetime of MCP-PMTs. With innovative countermeasures applied to the MCP-PMTs in the attempt to reduce the aging effects the manufacturers were able to increase the lifetime of MCP-PMT prototypes by almost two orders of magnitude compared to the former commercially available devices. Our group has studied the aging of MCP-PMTs for more than four years by simultaneously illuminating different types of lifetime-enhanced MCP-PMTs at the same photon rate. Gain, dark count rate, and QE as a function of the wavelength and the PC surface were measured in regular time intervals and studied in dependence of the integrated anode charge. We observe that MCP-PMTs treated with an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique are by far the best devices available now. A lifetime of up to 10 C/cm2 integrated anode charge was reached with these sensors. This is sufficient for both PANDA DIRCs.

  9. Failure mechanisms in energy-absorbing composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Alastair F.; David, Matthew

    2010-11-01

    Quasi-static tests are described for determination of the energy-absorption properties of composite crash energy-absorbing segment elements under axial loads. Detailed computer tomography scans of failed specimens were used to identify local compression crush failure mechanisms at the crush front. These mechanisms are important for selecting composite materials for energy-absorbing structures, such as helicopter and aircraft sub-floors. Finite element models of the failure processes are described that could be the basis for materials selection and future design procedures for crashworthy structures.

  10. Electromagnetic propagation in PEC and absorbing curved S-ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    A finite-element Galerkin formulation has been developed to study transverse magnetic (TM) wave propagation in 2-D S-curved ducts with both perfectly conducting and absorbing walls. The reflection and transmission at the entrances and the exits of the curved ducts are determined by coupling the finite-element solutions in the curved ducts to the eigenfunctions of an infinite, uniform, perfectly conducting duct. Example solutions are presented for a double mitred and S-ducts of various lengths. The length of the S-duct is found to significantly effect the reflective characteristics of the duct. Also, the effect of curvature on an absorbing duct is illustrated.

  11. High-Efficiency Absorber for Damping the Transverse Wake Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Weathersby, S.; /SLAC

    2007-02-28

    Transverse wake fields generated by intense beams may propagate long distances in the vacuum chamber and dissipate power in different shielded elements such as bellows, vacuum valves or vacuum pumps. Induced heating in these elements may be high enough to deteriorate vacuum conditions. We have developed a broadband water-cooled bellows-absorber to capture and damp these harmful transverse fields without impacting the longitudinal beam impedance. Experimental results at the PEP-II SLAC B-factory demonstrate high efficiency of this device. This absorber may be useful in other machines like synchrotron light sources or International Linear Collider.

  12. High-efficiency absorber for damping transverse wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Weathersby, S.

    2007-04-01

    Transverse wakefields generated by intense beams may propagate long distances in a vacuum chamber and dissipate power in different shielded elements such as bellows, vacuum valves, or vacuum pumps. Induced heating in these elements may be high enough to deteriorate vacuum conditions. We have developed a broadband water-cooled bellows absorber to capture and damp these harmful transverse fields without impacting the longitudinal beam impedance. Experimental results at the PEP-II SLAC B-factory demonstrate a high efficiency for this device. This absorber may be useful in super B-factories, the International Linear Collider, the Large Hadron Collider, or synchrotron light sources.

  13. Stratospheric lifetime ratio of CFC-11 and CFC-12 from satellite and model climatologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, L.; Hoppe, C. M.; Müller, R.; Dutton, G. S.; Gille, J. C.; Griessbach, S.; Jones, A.; Meyer, C. I.; Spang, R.; Volk, C. M.; Walker, K. A.

    2014-11-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) play a key role in stratospheric ozone loss and are strong infrared absorbers that contribute to global warming. The stratospheric lifetimes of CFCs are a measure of their stratospheric loss rates that are needed to determine global warming and ozone depletion potentials. We applied the tracer-tracer correlation approach to zonal mean climatologies from satellite measurements and model data to assess the lifetimes of CFCl3 (CFC-11) and CF2Cl2 (CFC-12). We present estimates of the CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio and the absolute lifetime of CFC-12, based on a reference lifetime of 52 years for CFC-11. We analyzed climatologies from three satellite missions, the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), the HIgh Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS). We found a CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio of 0.47±0.08 and a CFC-12 lifetime of 112(96-133) years for ACE-FTS, a ratio of 0.46±0.07 and a lifetime of 113(97-134) years for HIRDLS, and a ratio of 0.46±0.08 and a lifetime of 114(98-136) years for MIPAS. The error-weighted, combined CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio is 0.46±0.04 and the CFC-12 lifetime estimate is 113(103-124) years. These results agree with the recent Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate (SPARC) reassessment, which recommends lifetimes of 52(43-67) years and 102(88-122) years, respectively. Having smaller uncertainties than the results from other recent studies, our estimates can help to better constrain CFC-11 and CFC-12 lifetime recommendations in future scientific studies and assessments. Furthermore, the satellite observations were used to validate first simulation results from a new coupled model system, which integrates a Lagrangian chemistry transport model into a climate model. For the coupled model we found a CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio of 0.48±0.07 and a CFC-12 lifetime of 110(95-129) years

  14. Stratospheric lifetime ratio of CFC-11 and CFC-12 from satellite and model climatologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, L.; Hoppe, C. M.; Müller, R.; Dutton, G. S.; Gille, J. C.; Griessbach, S.; Jones, A.; Meyer, C. I.; Spang, R.; Volk, C. M.; Walker, K. A.

    2014-06-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) play a key role in stratospheric ozone loss and are strong infrared absorbers that contribute to global warming. The stratospheric lifetimes of CFCs are a measure of their global loss rates that are needed to determine global warming and ozone depletion potentials. We applied the tracer-tracer correlation approach to zonal mean climatologies from satellite measurements and model data to assess the lifetimes of CFCl3 (CFC-11) and CF2Cl2 (CFC-12). We present estimates of the CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio and the absolute lifetime of CFC-12, based on a reference lifetime of 52 yr for CFC-11. We analyzed climatologies from three satellite missions, the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), the HIgh Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS). We found a CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio of 0.47±0.08 and a CFC-12 lifetime of 111(96-132) yr for ACE-FTS, a ratio of 0.46±0.07 and a lifetime of 112(97-133) yr for HIRDLS, and a ratio of 0.46±0.08 and a lifetime of 112(96-135) yr for MIPAS. The error-weighted, combined CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio is 0.47±0.04 and the CFC-12 lifetime estimate is 112(102-123) yr. These results agree with the recent Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate (SPARC) reassessment, which recommends lifetimes of 52(43-67) yr and 102(88-122) yr, respectively. Having smaller uncertainties than the results from other recent studies, our estimates can help to better constrain CFC-11 and CFC-12 lifetime recommendations in future scientific studies and assessments. Furthermore, the satellite observations were used to validate first simulation results from a new coupled model system, which integrates a Lagrangian chemistry transport model into a climate model. For the coupled model we found a CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio of 0.48±0.07 and a CFC-12 lifetime of 110(95-129) yr, based on a ten-year perpetual

  15. RADIATIVE LIFETIMES OF V I AND V II

    SciTech Connect

    Den Hartog, E. A.; Lawler, J. E.; Wood, M. P. E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu

    2014-11-01

    New radiative lifetimes are reported for 168 levels of V I ranging in energy from 18086 cm{sup –1} to 47702 cm{sup –1}, and for 31 levels of V II ranging in energy from 34593 cm{sup –1} to 47420 cm{sup –1}. These lifetimes are measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on a slow atomic/ionic beam as part of an ongoing study of the radiative properties of the iron group elements. All but two of the V II lifetimes have been measured before using modern laser-based methods, but a large fraction of the V I lifetimes are reported here for the first time. Comparison to earlier measurements is discussed. These new lifetimes are, for the most part, accurate to ±5%. They will be combined with branching fraction measurements to produce a large set of transition probabilities for V I and V II which are needed by the astrophysics community for stellar abundance determinations.

  16. Absorbent product to absorb fluids. [for collection of human wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, F. S.; Correale, J. V. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A multi-layer absorbent product for use in contact with the skin to absorb fluids is discussed. The product utilizes a water pervious facing layer for contacting the skin, overlayed by a first fibrous wicking layer, the wicking layer preferably being of the one-way variety in which fluid or liquid is moved away from the facing layer. The product further includes a first container section defined by inner and outer layer of a water pervious wicking material between which is disposed a first absorbent mass. A second container section defined by inner and outer layers between which is disposed a second absorbent mass and a liquid impermeable/gas permeable layer. Spacesuit applications are discussed.

  17. Rolling Element Bearing Diagnostics in Run-To Lifetime Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T.; Ribadeneira, X.; Billington, S.; Kurfess, T.

    2001-09-01

    Bearing failure is one of the foremost causes of breakdown in rotating machinery. Such failures can be catastrophic and can result in costly downtime. To date, most research has studied crack propagation resulting from artificial or 'seeded' damage. This damage has been induced in bearings by: scratching the surface, introducing debris into the lubricant or machined with an electrical discharge. The work presented here involves running new undamaged ball and roller bearings through to failure. Traditional vibration metrics such as: root mean square, peak value, kurtosis and crest factor are recorded through the test duration from accelerometers and acoustic emission sensors.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime imaging in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Leary, M. A.; Boas, D. A.; Li, X. D.; Chance, B.; Yodh, A. G.

    1996-01-01

    The lifetime of a fluorophore generally varies in different environments, making the molecule a sensitive indicator of tissue oxygenation, pH, and glucose. However, lifetime measurements are complicated when the fluorophore is embedded in an optically thick, highly scattering medium such as human tissue. We formulate the inverse problem for fluorescence lifetime tomography using diffuse photon density waves, and we demonstrate the technique by deriving spatial images of heterogeneous fluorophore distribution and lifetime, using simulated measurements in heterogeneous turbid media.

  19. Minority carrier lifetime in indium phosphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Weinberg, Irving; Kneisel, Keith

    1991-01-01

    Transient photoluminescence is used to measure the minority carrier lifetime on n-type and p-type InP wafers. The measurements show that unprocessed InP wafers have very high minority carrier lifetimes. Lifetimes of 200 ns and 700 ns were observed for lightly-doped p- and n-type material respectively. Lifetimes over 5 ns were found in heavily doped n-type material.

  20. A circuit method to integrate metamaterial and graphene in absorber design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zuojia; Zhou, Min; Lin, Xiao; Liu, Huixia; Wang, Huaping; Yu, Faxin; Lin, Shisheng; Li, Erping; Chen, Hongsheng

    2014-10-01

    We theoretically investigate a circuit analog approach to integrate graphene and metamaterial in electromagnetic wave absorber design. In multilayer graphene-metamaterial (GM) absorbers, ultrathin metamaterial elements are theoretically modeled as equivalent loads which attached to the junctions between two transmission lines. Combining with the benefits of tunable chemical potential in graphene, an optimized GM absorber is proposed as a proof of the circuit method. Numerical simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the circuit analytical model. The operating frequency of the GM absorber can be varied in terahertz frequency, indicating the potential applications of the GM absorber in sensors, modulators, and filters.

  1. Fluorescence lifetimes of some Rauwolfia alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, J.; Arjona, D. Gonzalez; Roldan, E.; Sanchez, M.

    1986-03-01

    The natural fluorescence lifetimes of the following Rauwolfia alkaloids, Reserpine, Rescinnamine, Corynanthine, Yohimbine, --- Ajmalicine, Serpentine and Ajmaline, have been calculated from a modified form of the Strickler-Berg equation. The actual lifetimes were derived from the quantum yields and the calculated natural lifetimes.

  2. Students absorb it better.

    PubMed

    Poppe, P; Aller Atucha, L M

    1992-12-01

    Despite 15 years of public sector efforts to provide sex education and information to Mexico's youths, information is virtually nonexistent. This fact is most alarming when one considers that those aged 15-19 years comprise almost 1/3 of the population of Mexico. 16.5 years is the average age of 1st sexual intercourse, 1/3 of the youths use contraception during 1st sexual encounter, and 1/6 of sexually active youths use contraceptives. 24% of births in 1989 were to women under age 20. There is great demand among youths and teachers for sex education. 22 animated sex education films which address this demand are described. "The Blue Pigeon" is generally targeted to those aged 11-16. It helps teachers describe the key elements of human sexuality and the physiological changes of puberty and adolescence. Though criticized by parents, health authorities, and a group of teachers and professors, The Blue Pigeon is well-received by students and teachers and educators who use it. The film serves as a useful, easily understood educational support tool. "Music for Two" is targeted to youths over age 15 in urban and suburban areas and may be suitable for young adults and couples. This film discusses factors involved in choosing a mate. It informs while promoting attitudinal change about sexuality and communication within couples. Field experiences with the 2 films are briefly presented. PMID:12317832

  3. Photoluminescence-based quality control for thin film absorber layers of photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Repins, Ingrid L.; Kuciauskas, Darius

    2015-07-07

    A time-resolved photoluminescence-based system providing quality control during manufacture of thin film absorber layers for photovoltaic devices. The system includes a laser generating excitation beams and an optical fiber with an end used both for directing each excitation beam onto a thin film absorber layer and for collecting photoluminescence from the absorber layer. The system includes a processor determining a quality control parameter such as minority carrier lifetime of the thin film absorber layer based on the collected photoluminescence. In some implementations, the laser is a low power, pulsed diode laser having photon energy at least great enough to excite electron hole pairs in the thin film absorber layer. The scattered light may be filterable from the collected photoluminescence, and the system may include a dichroic beam splitter and a filter that transmit the photoluminescence and remove scattered laser light prior to delivery to a photodetector and a digital oscilloscope.

  4. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, William H.

    1984-01-01

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system.

  5. Hyperuniformity of critical absorbing states.

    PubMed

    Hexner, Daniel; Levine, Dov

    2015-03-20

    The properties of the absorbing states of nonequilibrium models belonging to the conserved directed percolation universality class are studied. We find that, at the critical point, the absorbing states are hyperuniform, exhibiting anomalously small density fluctuations. The exponent characterizing the fluctuations is measured numerically, a scaling relation to other known exponents is suggested, and a new correlation length relating to this ordering is proposed. These results may have relevance to photonic band-gap materials. PMID:25839254

  6. Hyperuniformity of Critical Absorbing States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexner, Daniel; Levine, Dov

    2015-03-01

    The properties of the absorbing states of nonequilibrium models belonging to the conserved directed percolation universality class are studied. We find that, at the critical point, the absorbing states are hyperuniform, exhibiting anomalously small density fluctuations. The exponent characterizing the fluctuations is measured numerically, a scaling relation to other known exponents is suggested, and a new correlation length relating to this ordering is proposed. These results may have relevance to photonic band-gap materials.

  7. Packed Alumina Absorbs Hypergolic Vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. J.; Mauro, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    Beds of activated alumina effective as filters to remove hypergolic vapors from gas streams. Beds absorb such substances as nitrogen oxides and hydrazines and may also absorb acetylene, ethylene, hydrogen sulfide, benzene, butadiene, butene, styrene, toluene, and xoylene. Bed has no moving parts such as pumps, blowers and mixers. Reliable and energy-conservative. Bed readily adapted to any size from small portable units for use where little vapor release is expected to large stationary units for extensive transfer operations.

  8. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, W.H.

    1984-10-16

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system. 9 figs.

  9. Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Shi, Y.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-09-01

    Predictive models of Li-ion battery reliability must consider a multiplicity of electrochemical, thermal and mechanical degradation modes experienced by batteries in application environments. Complicating matters, Li-ion batteries can experience several path dependent degradation trajectories dependent on storage and cycling history of the application environment. Rates of degradation are controlled by factors such as temperature history, electrochemical operating window, and charge/discharge rate. Lacking accurate models and tests, lifetime uncertainty must be absorbed by overdesign and warranty costs. Degradation models are needed that predict lifetime more accurately and with less test data. Models should also provide engineering feedback for next generation battery designs. This presentation reviews both multi-dimensional physical models and simpler, lumped surrogate models of battery electrochemical and mechanical degradation. Models are compared with cell- and pack-level aging data from commercial Li-ion chemistries. The analysis elucidates the relative importance of electrochemical and mechanical stress-induced degradation mechanisms in real-world operating environments. Opportunities for extending the lifetime of commercial battery systems are explored.

  10. Principles and applications of fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beranová, Lenka; Humpolícková, Jana; Hof, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Two fluorescence spectroscopy concepts, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) are employed in fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (FLCS) - a relatively new technique with several experimental benefits. In FLCS experiments, pulsed excitation is used and data are stored in a special time-tagged time-resolved mode. Mathematical treatment of TCSPC decay patterns of distinct fluorophores and their mixture enables to calculate autocorrelation functions of each of the fluorophores and thus their diffusion properties and concentrations can be determined separately. Moreover, crosscorrelation of the two signals can be performed and information on interaction of the species can be obtained. This technique is particularly helpful for distinguishing different states of the same fluorophore in different microenvironments. The first application of that concept represents the simultaneous determination of two-dimensional diffusion in planar lipid layers and three-dimensional vesicle diffusion in bulk above the lipid layers. The lifetime in both investigated systems differed because the lifetime of the dye is considerably quenched in the layer near the light-absorbing surface. This concept was also used in other applications: a) investigation of a conformational change of a labeled protein, b) detection of small amounts of labeled oligonucleotides bound to metal particles or c) elucidation of the compaction mechanism of different sized labeled DNA molecules. Moreover, it was demonstrated that FLCS can help to overcome some FCS experimental drawbacks.

  11. Minority carrier lifetimes in very long-wave infrared InAs/GaInSb superlattices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Olson, Benjamin Varberg; Haugan, Heather J.; Brown, Gail J.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Kim, Jin K.; Shaner, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, significantly improved carrier lifetimes in very-long wave infrared InAs/GaInSb superlattice(SL) absorbers are demonstrated by using time-resolved microwave reflectance (TMR) measurements. A nominal 47.0 Å InAs/21.5 Å Ga0.75In0.25Sb SLstructure that produces an approximately 25 μm response at 10 K has a minority carrier lifetime of 140 ± 20 ns at 18 K, which is markedly long for SL absorber with such a narrow bandgap. This improvement is attributed to the strain-engineered ternary design. Such SL employs a shorter period with reduced gallium in order to achieve good optical absorption and epitaxial advantages, which ultimately leads to the improvements in themore » minority carrier lifetime by reducing Shockley–Read–Hall (SRH) defects. By analyzing the temperature-dependence of TMR decay data, the recombination mechanisms and trap states that currently limit the performance of this SL absorber have been identified. The results show a general decrease in the long-decay lifetime component, which is dominated by the SRH recombination at temperature below ~30 K, and by Auger recombination at temperatures above ~45 K.« less

  12. Minority carrier lifetimes in very long-wave infrared InAs/GaInSb superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Benjamin Varberg; Haugan, Heather J.; Brown, Gail J.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Kim, Jin K.; Shaner, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, significantly improved carrier lifetimes in very-long wave infrared InAs/GaInSb superlattice(SL) absorbers are demonstrated by using time-resolved microwave reflectance (TMR) measurements. A nominal 47.0 Å InAs/21.5 Å Ga0.75In0.25Sb SLstructure that produces an approximately 25 μm response at 10 K has a minority carrier lifetime of 140 ± 20 ns at 18 K, which is markedly long for SL absorber with such a narrow bandgap. This improvement is attributed to the strain-engineered ternary design. Such SL employs a shorter period with reduced gallium in order to achieve good optical absorption and epitaxial advantages, which ultimately leads to the improvements in the minority carrier lifetime by reducing Shockley–Read–Hall (SRH) defects. By analyzing the temperature-dependence of TMR decay data, the recombination mechanisms and trap states that currently limit the performance of this SL absorber have been identified. The results show a general decrease in the long-decay lifetime component, which is dominated by the SRH recombination at temperature below ~30 K, and by Auger recombination at temperatures above ~45 K.

  13. Optical element for photographic radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, M.J.

    1984-02-21

    An optical element for filtering infrared light for use in a radiometer is disclosed wherein at least one metalorganic infrared absorbing dye is at least partially dissolved homogeniously throughout a molded optical plastic.

  14. Twin laser cavity solitons in a VCSEL with saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Mansour; Kheradmand, Reza; Bahari, Parvin; Tajalli, Habib

    2015-09-01

    We show numerically the existence and stability of double-peak (twin) laser cavity solitons in a model of a semiconductor laser containing a saturable absorber. The onset of twin laser cavity solitons is observed in a narrow range of switching pulse energies above the maximum energy required to switch a normal single laser cavity soliton. Also, the FWHM value of the population dip at the end of injection is found to be wider which later breaks into two closely spaced dips. Three regimes of oscillating, oscillating-rotating and oscillating-rotating-travelling twin laser cavity solitons are reported depending on the value of a bifurcation parameter given by the ratio of the lifetimes of carriers in amplifier and absorber materials. The associated dynamical behaviors in these three regimes are also discussed.

  15. Carrier lifetimes in thin-film photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Dohyun

    2015-09-01

    The carrier lifetimes in thin-film solar cells are reviewed and discussed. Shockley-Read-Hall recombination is dominant at low carrier density, Auger recombination is dominant under a high injection condition and high carrier density, and surface recombination is dominant under any conditions. Because the surface photovoltage technique is insensitive to the surface condition, it is useful for bulk lifetime measurements. The photoconductance decay technique measures the effective recombination lifetime. The time-resolved photoluminescence technique is very useful for measuring thin-film semiconductor or solar-cell materials lifetime, because the sample is thin, other techniques are not suitable for measuring the lifetime. Many papers have provided time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) lifetimes for copper-indium-gallium-selenide (CIGS) and CdTe thin-film solar cell. The TRPL lifetime strongly depends on open-circuit voltage and conversion efficiency; however, the TRPL life time is insensitive to the short-circuit current.

  16. Corrosion Preventive Compounds Lifetime Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Stephanie M.; Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2007-01-01

    Lifetime Testing of Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) was performed to quantify performance in the various environments to which the Space Shuttle Orbiter is exposed during a flight cycle. Three CPCs are approved for use on the Orbiter: HD Calcium Grease, Dinitrol AV-30, and Braycote 601 EF. These CPCs have been rigorously tested to prove that they mitigate corrosion in typical environments, but little information is available on how they perform in the unique combination of the coastal environment at the launch pad, the vacuum of low-earth orbit, and the extreme heat of reentry. Currently, there is no lifetime or reapplication schedule established for these compounds that is based on this combination of environmental conditions. Aluminum 2024 coupons were coated with the three CPCs and exposed to conditions that simulate the environments to which the Orbiter is exposed. Uncoated Aluminum 2024 coupons were exposed to the environmental conditions as a control. Visual inspection and Electro- Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were performed on the samples in order to determine the effectiveness of the CPCs. The samples were processed through five mission life cycles or until the visual inspection revealed the initiation of corrosion and EIS indicated severe degradation of the coating.

  17. Corrosion Preventive Compounds Lifetime Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Stephanie M.; Kammerer, Catherine C.; Copp, Tracy L.

    2007-01-01

    Lifetime Testing of Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) was performed to quantify performance in the various environments to which the Space Shuttle Orbiter is exposed during a flight cycle. Three CPCs are approved for use on the Orbiter: RD Calcium Grease, Dinitrol AV-30, and Braycote 601 EF. These CPCs have been rigorously tested to prove that they mitigate corrosion in typical environments, but little information is available on how they perform in the unique combination of the coastal environment at the launch pad, the vacuum of low-earth orbit, and the extreme heat of reentry. Currently, there is no lifetime or reapplication schedule established for these compounds that is based on this combination of environmental conditions. Aluminum 2024 coupons were coated with the three CPCs and exposed to conditions that simulate the environments to which the Orbiter is exposed. Uncoated Aluminum 2024 coupons were exposed to the environmental conditions as a control. Visual inspection and Electro- Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were performed on the samples in order to determine the effectiveness of the CPCs. The samples were processed through five mission life cycles or until the visual inspection revealed the initiation of corrosion and EIS indicated severe degradation of the coating.

  18. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Annie; Gibbons, Anne E.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically-encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporters are powerful tools to analyze cell signaling and function at single cell resolution in standard two-dimensional cell cultures, but these reporters rarely have been applied to three-dimensional environments. FRET interactions between donor and acceptor molecules typically are determined by changes in relative fluorescence intensities, but wavelength-dependent differences in absorption of light complicate this analysis method in three-dimensional settings. Here we report fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with phasor analysis, a method that displays fluorescence lifetimes on a pixel-wise basis in real time, to quantify apoptosis in breast cancer cells stably expressing a genetically encoded FRET reporter. This microscopic imaging technology allowed us to identify treatment-induced apoptosis in single breast cancer cells in environments ranging from two-dimensional cell culture, spheroids with cancer and bone marrow stromal cells, and living mice with orthotopic human breast cancer xenografts. Using this imaging strategy, we showed that combined metabolic therapy targeting glycolysis and glutamine pathways significantly reduced overall breast cancer metabolism and induced apoptosis. We also determined that distinct subpopulations of bone marrow stromal cells control resistance of breast cancer cells to chemotherapy, suggesting heterogeneity of treatment responses of malignant cells in different bone marrow niches. Overall, this study establishes FLIM with phasor analysis as an imaging tool for apoptosis in cell-based assays and living mice, enabling real-time, cellular-level assessment of treatment efficacy and heterogeneity. PMID:26771007

  19. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shinpei Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-26

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF{sub 2} etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  20. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  1. Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment (CARE)

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric

    2015-12-23

    During Project DE-FE0007528, CARE (Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment), Neumann Systems Group (NSG) designed, installed and tested a 0.5MW NeuStream® carbon dioxide (CO2) capture system using the patented NeuStream® absorber equipment and concentrated (6 molal) piperazine (PZ) as the solvent at Colorado Springs Utilities’ (CSU’s) Martin Drake pulverized coal (PC) power plant. The 36 month project included design, build and test phases. The 0.5MW NeuStream® CO2 capture system was successfully tested on flue gas from both coal and natural gas combustion sources and was shown to meet project objectives. Ninety percent CO2 removal was achieved with greater than 95% CO2product purity. The absorbers tested support a 90% reduction in absorber volume compared to packed towers and with an absorber parasitic power of less than 1% when configured for operation with a 550MW coal plant. The preliminary techno-economic analysis (TEA) performed by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) predicted an over-the-fence cost of $25.73/tonne of CO2 captured from a sub-critical PC plant.

  2. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF2 etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  3. Nonventing, Regenerable, Lightweight Heat Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    A lightweight, regenerable heat absorber (RHA), developed for rejecting metabolic heat from a space suit, may also be useful on Earth for short-term cooling of heavy protective garments. Unlike prior space-suit-cooling systems, a system that includes this RHA does not vent water. The closed system contains water reservoirs, tubes through which water is circulated to absorb heat, an evaporator, and an absorber/radiator. The radiator includes a solution of LiCl contained in a porous material in titanium tubes. The evaporator cools water that circulates through a liquid-cooled garment. Water vapor produced in the evaporator enters the radiator tubes where it is absorbed into the LiCl solution, releasing heat. Much of the heat of absorption is rejected to the environment via the radiator. After use, the RHA is regenerated by heating it to a temperature of 100 C for about 2 hours to drive the absorbed water back to the evaporator. A system including a prototype of the RHA was found to be capable of maintaining a temperature of 20 C while removing heat at a rate of 200 W for 6 hours.

  4. Lifetime measurements for bottom hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, G.

    1984-09-01

    The review of lifetime measurements of bottom hadrons begins with a first measurement by JADE, followed by similar measurements by MAC and MKII groups. New MAC data are reviewed based on a total of 75,000 multihadron events taken at a c.m. energy of 29 GeV. According to Monte Carlo calculations, 18% of the lepton candidates stem from charm decay and roughly 30% were misidentified hadrons. DELCO studied electrons obtained from 42,000 multihadron events at 29 GeV. The electrons were identified by means of Cerenkov counters. JADE analayzed 22,000 multihadron events at 35 GeV. Data were analyzed using two methods - one using a sample of b-enriched events, and the other using weighted distributions. The TASSO results were obtained with two different configurations of the detector - one of which used a drift chamber and the other a vertex detector. (LEW)

  5. Wideband polarization-insensitive metamaterial absorber with perfect dual resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayop, Osman; Rahim, Mohamad Kamal A.; Murad, Noor Asniza; Samsuri, Noor Asmawati

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the analysis of wideband polarization-insensitive metamaterial absorber with perfect dual resonances. The structure is designed using lossy FR4 substrate with copper layers. The resonating elements are designed using the combination of circular ring with modified circle-shaped structure. The resonating elements are printed on the top surface of FR4 substrate, while the bottom surface is printed with full copper ground plane. From the simulation, the proposed design achieves nearly perfect absorbance at dual resonant frequency with improved bandwidth compared to the general circular ring design. Two peaks absorbance of 98.66 and 99.84 % are observed at 9.81 and 10.41 GHz respectively with full width half maximum (FWHM) bandwidth of 1050 MHz or 10.38 % at normal incident EM wave. The structure is also simulated for different polarization angles and it is observed that the structure can maintain the absorbance characteristic for all polarization angles. The experimental work is done to validate the simulated result. It is confirmed that two peaks absorbance are achieved with magnitudes of 99.88 and 99.67 % at 10.14 and 10.79 GHz, respectively. The measured FWHM is 1160 MHz.

  6. Adaptive inertial shock-absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraj, Rami; Holnicki-Szulc, Jan; Knap, Lech; Seńko, Jarosław

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces and discusses a new concept of impact absorption by means of impact energy management and storage in dedicated rotating inertial discs. The effectiveness of the concept is demonstrated in a selected case-study involving spinning management, a recently developed novel impact-absorber. A specific control technique performed on this device is demonstrated to be the main source of significant improvement in the overall efficiency of impact damping process. The influence of various parameters on the performance of the shock-absorber is investigated. Design and manufacturing challenges and directions of further research are formulated.

  7. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; Hamby, C. Jr.; Akerman, M.A.; Seals, R.D.

    1993-09-07

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, is prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000 C to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm[sup 3]. 9 figures.

  8. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Hamby, Jr., Clyde; Akerman, M. Alfred; Seals, Roland D.

    1993-01-01

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000.degree. C. to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm.sup.3.

  9. Effect of the neutron lifetime on processes in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechkin, A. V.; Ivanchik, A. V.; Serebrov, A. P.; Bobashev, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of the neutron lifetime on the abundance of light elements produced during the primordial nucleosynthesis early in the birth of the Universe is considered. Among light elements, namely, D, 3He, 4He, and 7Li, 4He proves to be most sensitive to neutron lifetime τ n . Astronomic data on the light element abundance also provide the best accuracy for 4He. The solution of a number of problems discussed in this paper requires improving the accuracy of observations for the 4He abundance and refining the value of τ n .

  10. Lifetime-based photoacoustic probe activation modeled by a dual methylene blue-lysine conjugate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgounova, Ekaterina; Johnson, Sadie M.; Shao, Qi; Hackel, Benjamin; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2014-03-01

    Activatable photoacoustic probes have a promising future due to their ability to provide high-resolution, high-penetration depth information on enzyme activity in vivo. Spectral identification methods, however, suffer from heterogeneous optical properties and wavelength-dependent light attenuation in tissue, thereby limiting the effective suppression of background noise signal. Our approach is predicated on probing the excited-state lifetime of a dual-labeled methylene blue (MB) probe that changes its lifetime from short to long upon cleavage. Recently, we have reported on the ability of our system to probe the long triplet lifetime of free MB monomers in solution and to differentiate between monomers and dimers based on their lifetime contrast. Here we introduce an improvement to our system that significantly increases the system sensitivity to fast changes, and reduces the minimum resolvable lifetime down to a few nanoseconds. We applied this method to probe the excited-state lifetime of a covalently coupled dual methylene blue-lysine conjugate (MB2K) in a mixed MB/MB2K solution. Preliminary results show that a stable dimeric bond is formed between the chromophores within the conjugate, and that this conjugate is statically quenched. Examination of the transient absorption of MB2K reveals it does not exhibit a triplet excited-state lifetime, suggesting that it undergoes a fast deexcitation process directly from the singlet state. Finally, we demonstrate how the transient photoacoustic lifetime signal can be used to selectively detect the presence of MB monomers while improving background noise suppression by differentiating the lifetime of free MB dye with other absorbing structures.

  11. Acoustic metamaterial structures based on multi-frequency vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, P. Frank; Peng, Hao

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a new metamaterial beam based on multi-frequency vibration absorbers for broadband vibration absorption. The proposed metamaterial beam consists of a uniform isotropic beam and small two-mass spring-mass- damper subsystems at many locations along the beam to act as multi-frequency vibration absorbers. For an infinite metamaterial beam, governing equations of a unit cell are derived using the extended Hamilton principle. The existence of two stopbands is demonstrated using a model based on averaging material properties over a cell length and a model based on finite element modeling and the Bloch-Floquet theory for periodic structures. For a finite metamaterial beam, because these two idealized models cannot be used for finite beams and/or elastic waves having short wavelengths, a finite-element method is used for detailed modeling and analysis. The concepts of negative effective mass and effective stiffness and how the spring-mass-damper subsystem creates two stopbands are explained in detail. Numerical simulations reveal that the actual working mechanism of the proposed metamaterial beam is based on the concept of conventional mechanical vibration absorbers. For an incoming wave with a frequency in one of the two stopbands, the absorbers are excited to vibrate in their optical modes to create shear forces to straighten the beam and stop the wave propagation. For an incoming wave with a frequency outside of but between the two stopbands, it can be efficiently damped out by the damper with the second mass of each absorber. Hence, the two stopbands are connected into a wide stopband. Numerical examples validate the concept and show that the structure's boundary conditions do not have significant influence on the absorption of high-frequency waves. However, for absorption of low-frequency waves, the structure's boundary conditions and resonance frequencies and the location and spatial distribution of absorbers need to be considered in design, and it

  12. Experimental insight into b-hadron lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, J. P.; Flores-Castillo, L. R.

    2016-01-01

    A review on the experimental status of the measurement of b-hadron lifetimes is presented. After a brief introduction to the Standard Model, the work done by theorists about b-hadron lifetimes is put in context. The core of the review is devoted to explain the ingredients that are necessary to make a lifetime measurement, from the detector infrastructure and requirements to the statistical treatment of the data. Finally, an overview of current experimental results and future prospects is presented.

  13. Combined fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheslavskiy, V. I.; Neubauer, A.; Bukowiecki, R.; Dinter, F.; Becker, W.

    2016-02-01

    We present a lifetime imaging technique that simultaneously records the fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime images in confocal laser scanning systems. It is based on modulating a high-frequency pulsed laser synchronously with the pixel clock of the scanner, and recording the fluorescence and phosphorescence signals by multidimensional time-correlated single photon counting board. We demonstrate our technique on the recording of the fluorescence/phosphorescence lifetime images of human embryonic kidney cells at different environmental conditions.

  14. Counterflow absorber for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    An air-cooled, vertical tube absorber for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. Strong absorbent solution is supplied to the top of the absorber and refrigerant vapor is supplied to the bottom of the absorber to create a direct counterflow of refrigerant vapor and absorbent solution in the absorber. The refrigeration system is designed so that the volume flow rate of refrigerant vapor in the tubes of the absorber is sufficient to create a substantially direct counterflow along the entire length of each tube in the absorber. This provides several advantages for the absorber such as higher efficiency and improved heat transfer characteristics, and allows improved purging of non-condensibles from the absorber.

  15. Oil and fat absorbing polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for forming a solid network polymer having a minimal amount of crosslinking for use in absorbing fats and oils. The polymer remains solid at a swelling ratio in oil or fat of at least ten and provides an oil absorption greater than 900 weight percent.

  16. Effects of Low Activity Solar Cycle on Orbital Debris Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, Samual B.; Sutton, Eric K.; Lin, chin S.; Liou, J.-C.

    2011-01-01

    Long duration of low solar activity in the last solar minimum has an undesirable consequence of extending the lifetime of orbital debris. The AFRL TacSat-2 satellite decommissioned in 2008 has finally re-entered into the atmosphere on February 5th after more than one year overdue. Concerning its demise we have monitored its orbital decay and monthly forecasted Tacsat-2 re-entry since September 2010 by using the Orbital Element Prediction (OEP) model developed by the AFRL Orbital Drag Environment program. The model combines estimates of future solar activity with neutral density models, drag coefficient models, and an orbit propagator to predict satellite lifetime. We run the OEP model with solar indices forecast by the NASA Marshall Solar Activity Future Estimation model, and neutral density forecast by the MSIS-00 neutral density model. Based on the two line elements in 2010 up to mid September, we estimated at a 50% confidence level TacSat-2's re-entry time to be in early February 2011, which turned out to be in good agreement with Tacsat-2's actual re-entry date. The potential space weather effects of the coming low activity solar cycle on satellite lifetime and orbital debris population are examined. The NASA long-term orbital debris evolutionary model, LEGEND, is used to quantify the effects of solar flux on the orbital debris population in the 200-600 km altitude environment. The results are discussed for developing satellite orbital drag application product.

  17. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Alexandrov, Yuri; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using two photon microscopy (TPM) have been used to study tissue autofluorescence in ex vivo skin cancer samples. A commercially available system (DermaInspect®) was modified to collect fluorescence intensity and lifetimes in two spectral channels using time correlated single photon counting and depth-resolved steady state measurements of the fluorescence emission spectrum. Uniquely, image segmentation has been used to allow fluorescence lifetimes to be calculated for each cell. An analysis of lifetime values obtained from a range of pigmented and non-pigmented lesions will be presented.

  18. Systems and methods for circuit lifetime evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, Timothy L. (Inventor); Sheldon, Douglas J. (Inventor); Bowerman, Paul N. (Inventor); Everline, Chester J. (Inventor); Shalom, Eddy (Inventor); Rasmussen, Robert D. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Systems and methods for estimating the lifetime of an electrical system in accordance with embodiments of the invention are disclosed. One embodiment of the invention includes iteratively performing Worst Case Analysis (WCA) on a system design with respect to different system lifetimes using a computer to determine the lifetime at which the worst case performance of the system indicates the system will pass with zero margin or fail within a predetermined margin for error given the environment experienced by the system during its lifetime. In addition, performing WCA on a system with respect to a specific system lifetime includes identifying subcircuits within the system, performing Extreme Value Analysis (EVA) with respect to each subcircuit to determine whether the subcircuit fails EVA for the specific system lifetime, when the subcircuit passes EVA, determining that the subcircuit does not fail WCA for the specified system lifetime, when a subcircuit fails EVA performing at least one additional WCA process that provides a tighter bound on the WCA than EVA to determine whether the subcircuit fails WCA for the specified system lifetime, determining that the system passes WCA with respect to the specific system lifetime when all subcircuits pass WCA, and determining that the system fails WCA when at least one subcircuit fails WCA.

  19. Parallel-Plate Acoustic Absorbers For Hot Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doychak, Joseph; Parrot, Tony L.

    1995-01-01

    Stacking patterns and materials chosen to suppress noise. Acoustic liners incorporating parallel-plate absorbing elements proposed for use in suppressing broadband aerodynamic noise originating in flows of hot gases in ducts. One potential application lies in suppressing noise generated in exhaust-jet mixer/ejectors in propulsion system of proposed High-Speed Civil Transport. In addition, such absorbers useful in any situation in which high temperature limits use of such conventional resonant acoustic-liner materials as perforated face sheets bonded to honey-comb-core panels.

  20. [Study of new blended chemical absorbents to absorb CO2].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Lian; Fang, Meng-Xiang; Yan, Shui-Ping; Luo, Zhong-Yang; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2007-11-01

    Three kinds of blended absorbents were investigated on bench-scale experimental bench according to absorption rate and regeneration grade to select a reasonable additive concentration. The results show that, among methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and piperazine (PZ) mixtures, comparing MDEA : PZ = 1 : 0.4 (m : m) with MDEA : PZ = 1 : 0.2 (m : m), the absorption rate is increased by about 70% at 0.2 mol x mol(-1). When regeneration lasting for 40 min, regeneration grade of blended absorbents with PZ concentration of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 is decreased to 83.06%, 77.77% and 76.67% respectively while 91.04% for PZ concentration of 0. MDEA : PZ = 1 : 0.4(m : m) is a suitable ratio for MDEA/PZ mixtures as absorption and regeneration properties of the blended absorbents are all improved. The aqueous blends with 10% primary amines and 2% tertiary amines could keep high CO2 absorption rate, and lower regeneration energy consumption. Adding 2% 2-Amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) to 10% diethanolamine (DEA), the blended amine solvents have an advantage in absorption and regeneration properties over other DEA/AMP mixtures. Blended solvents, which consist of a mixture of primary amines with a small amount of tertiary amines, have the highest absorption rate among the three. And mixed absorbents of secondary amines and a small amount of sterically hindered amines have the best regeneration property. To combine absorption and regeneration properties, blends with medium activator addition to tertiary amines are competitive. PMID:18290495

  1. Cosmology in Mr. Tompkins' Lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Rudi Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mr. Tompkins, the hero of George Gamow's most famous book, was born in the first decade of the twentieth century and lived until its end. A bank clerk by day, Mr. Tompkins had wide-ranging interests, and his curiosity led him to popular scientific presentations, and these in turn brought him a long and happy marriage to Maud, the daughter of a professor of physics. His lifetime offers an appropriate framework for a meditation on the history of cosmology during the century in which cosmology became a scientific enterprise. As it happens, Mr. Tompkins' first exposure to cosmology, in which he observed both the expansion and contraction of an oscillating universe in 1939, happened during the long night of relativity, the generation in which relativity specialists became few and, like the galaxies, far between. This talk will consider the heyday of early relativistic cosmology from 1917 to 1935, the causes and consequences of the "long night" from 1935 until 1963, and the renaissance of cosmology, which, occurring as it did upon the retirement of Mr. Tompkins, afforded him great pleasure in his later years.

  2. Lifetime Evolution of UV Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corti, G.; Poletto, G.; Suess, S. T.; Moore, R.; Sterling, A.

    2006-01-01

    We report on observations acquired in May 2003 during a SOHO-Ulysses quadrature campaign. From May 25 to May 28, the SoHO LASCO Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) catalog lists a number of events which might have been observed by SOHO/UVCS, whose slit was centered along the Ulysses direction. However, because of time gaps in the observing schedule, or because of the unfavorable position of some CMEs, the most interesting events recorded by UVCS were a few short-lived ejections that represent the extension at higher altitudes of recursive EIT jets. We focus on jets occurring on May 26/27, visible also in EIT and LASCO images, which seem to propagate along the radial to Ulysses. UVCS spectra at 1.7 Rsun showed an unusually high emission in cool lines, lasting for about 10 to 25 minutes, with no evidence of hot plasma. Analysis of the cool line emission allowed us to infer the evolution of physical parameters during the jets lifetime and derive a crude estimate of the energy needed to account for their properties. We also looked for any evidence of the event in in situ data. Whether UVCS is observing jets or narrow CMEs is discussed in the contest of previous works on these classes of events and, in the last Section, we propose a scenario that accounts for our observations.

  3. Aspects of silicon bulk lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsberg, P. T.

    1985-01-01

    The best lifetimes attained for bulk crytalline silicon as a function of doping concentrations are analyzed. It is assumed that the dopants which set the Fermi level do not contribute to the recombination traffic which is due to the unknown defect. This defect is assumed to have two charge states: neutral and negative, the neutral defect concentration is frozen-in at some temperature T sub f. The higher doping concentrations should include the band-band Auger effect by using a generalization of the Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) mechanism. The generalization of the SRH mechanism is discussed. This formulation gives a straightforward procedure for incorporating both band-band and band-trap Auger effects in the SRH procedure. Two related questions arise in this context: (1) it may sometimes be useful to write the steady-state occupation probability of the traps implied by SRH procedure in a form which approximates to the Fermi-Dirac distribution; and (2) the effect on the SRH mechanism of spreading N sub t levels at one energy uniformly over a range of energies is discussed.

  4. Lifetime measurement in ^170Yb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Krücken, R.; Beausang, C. W.; Casten, R. F.; Cooper, J. R.; Cederkäll, J.; Caprio, M.; Novak, J. R.; Zamfir, N. V.; Barton, C.

    1999-10-01

    The nature of the low lying K^π=0^+ excitations in deformed nuclei have recently been subject of intense discussion. In this context we present results from a Coulomb excitation experiment on ^170Yb using a 70MeV ^16O beam on a gold backed, 1.5 mg/cm^2 thick ^170Yb target. The beam was delivered by the ESTU tandem accelerator of WNSL at Yale University. Gamma rays were detected by the YRAST Ball array in coincidence with back-scattered ^16O particles, which were detected in an array of 8 solar cells. Lineshapes were observed for several transitions from collective states in ^170Yb and the lifetimes for those states were extracted using a standard DSAM analysis. The results will be presented together with a short introduction to the solar cell array at Yale (SCARY) that was used to make angular selection of the excited ^170Yb nuclei. This work is supported by the US-DOE under grant numbers DE-FG02-91ER-40609 and DE-FG02-88ER-40417.

  5. Predicting the lifetime of superlubricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Anle; He, Qichang; Xu, Zhiping

    2015-12-01

    The concept of superlubricity has recently called upon notable interest after the demonstration of ultralow friction between atomistically smooth surfaces in layered materials. However, the energy dissipation process conditioning the sustainability of a superlubric state has not yet been well understood. In this work, we address this issue by performing dynamic simulations based on both full-atom and reduced Frenkel-Kontorova models. We find that the center-of-mass momentum autocorrelation of a sliding object can be used as a statistical indicator of the state of superlubricity. Beyond a critical value of it, the sliding motion experiences a catastrophic breakdown with a dramatically high rate of energy dissipation, caused by the inter-vibrational-mode coupling. By tracking this warning signal, one can extract heat from modes other than the translation to avoid the catastrophe and extend the lifetime of superlubricity. This concept is demonstrated in double-walled carbon-nanotubes-based nanomechanical devices with the indicator-based feedback design implemented.

  6. On estimating mean lifetimes by a weighted sum of lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosper, Harrison Bertrand

    1987-10-01

    Given N lifetime measurements an estimate of the mean lifetime can be obtained from a weighted sum of these measurements. We derive exact expressions for the probability density function, the moment-generating function, and the cumulative distribution function for the weighted sum. We indicate how these results might be used in the estimation of particle lifetimes. The probability distribution function of Yost for the distribution of lifetime measurements with finite measurement error is our starting point.

  7. Thermal analysis of the crotch absorber in APS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, I.C.; Howell, J.

    1992-10-01

    A crotch absorber design for use in the Advanced Photon source (APS) has been proposed and analyzed. the absorber is placed downstream of sectors S2 and S4 in the curved storage ring chamber and will be subjected to a peak power of 120 W/mm{sup 2} per 100mA synchrotron radiation. A beryllium ring is brazed on the GlidCop cooling cylinder in order to diffuse the concentrated bending magnet heating. One concentric water channel and two annular return water channels are arranged in the GlidCop cylinder to enhance the cooling. A Bodner-Partom thermoviscoplastic constitutive equation and a modified Manson-Coffin fatigue relation are proposed to simulate the cyclic thermal loading, as well as to predict the thermal fatigue life of the crotch absorber. Results of temperature and stress using finite element computations are displayed and series of e-beam welder tests and microstructure measurements are reported.

  8. Thermal analysis of the crotch absorber in APS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, I.C.; Howell, J.

    1992-01-01

    A crotch absorber design for use in the Advanced Photon source (APS) has been proposed and analyzed. the absorber is placed downstream of sectors S2 and S4 in the curved storage ring chamber and will be subjected to a peak power of 120 W/mm{sup 2} per 100mA synchrotron radiation. A beryllium ring is brazed on the GlidCop cooling cylinder in order to diffuse the concentrated bending magnet heating. One concentric water channel and two annular return water channels are arranged in the GlidCop cylinder to enhance the cooling. A Bodner-Partom thermoviscoplastic constitutive equation and a modified Manson-Coffin fatigue relation are proposed to simulate the cyclic thermal loading, as well as to predict the thermal fatigue life of the crotch absorber. Results of temperature and stress using finite element computations are displayed and series of e-beam welder tests and microstructure measurements are reported.

  9. Terahertz metamaterials perfect absorbers for sensing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilbert, David S.; Hokmabadi, Mohammad P.; Martinez, Joshua; Kung, Patrick; Kim, Seongsin M.

    2013-02-01

    Devices operating at THz frequencies have been continuously expanded in many areas of application and major research field, which requires materials with suitable electromagnetic responses at THz frequency ranges. Unlike most naturally occurring materials, novel THz metamaterials have proven to be well suited for use in various devices due to narrow and tunable operating ranges. In this work, we present the results of two THz metamaterial absorber structures aiming two important device aspects; polarization sensitivity and broad band absorption. The absorbers were simulated by finite element method and fabricated through the combination of standard lift-off photolithography and electron beam metal deposition. The fabricated devices were characterized by reflection mode THz time domain spectroscopy. The narrow band absorber structures exhibit up to 95% absorption with a bandwidth of 0.1 THz to 0.15 THz.

  10. Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, R.A.

    1987-12-01

    Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime from PEP and PETRA experiments are presented. These measurements firmly establish that the B lifetime is long (approx.1 psec), implying that the mixing between the third generation of quarks and the lighter quarks is much weaker that the mixing between the first two generations.

  11. Indices of Lifetime Polydrug Use among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sneed, Carl D.; Morisky, Donald E.; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Lee, Sung-Jae; Ebin, V. J. Vicki J.

    2004-01-01

    The functional equivalency for three indices of lifetime polydrug use was examined in a sample of adolescents (N=794). The following indices were included in analyses: (a) a count of lifetime self-report of substances used; (b) an index weighted by the severity of the substances used; and (c) a hierarchical index of substance use. Analyses for…

  12. Stochastic Analysis of Orbital Lifetimes of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasamoto, Washito; Goodliff, Kandyce; Cornelius, David

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses (1) a Monte-Carlo-based methodology for probabilistic prediction and analysis of orbital lifetimes of spacecraft and (2) Orbital Lifetime Monte Carlo (OLMC)--a Fortran computer program, consisting of a previously developed long-term orbit-propagator integrated with a Monte Carlo engine. OLMC enables modeling of variances of key physical parameters that affect orbital lifetimes through the use of probability distributions. These parameters include altitude, speed, and flight-path angle at insertion into orbit; solar flux; and launch delays. The products of OLMC are predicted lifetimes (durations above specified minimum altitudes) for the number of user-specified cases. Histograms generated from such predictions can be used to determine the probabilities that spacecraft will satisfy lifetime requirements. The document discusses uncertainties that affect modeling of orbital lifetimes. Issues of repeatability, smoothness of distributions, and code run time are considered for the purpose of establishing values of code-specific parameters and number of Monte Carlo runs. Results from test cases are interpreted as demonstrating that solar-flux predictions are primary sources of variations in predicted lifetimes. Therefore, it is concluded, multiple sets of predictions should be utilized to fully characterize the lifetime range of a spacecraft.

  13. Tropospheric OH and the lifetimes of hydrochlorofluorocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael; Spivakovsky, Clarisa M.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) may be used as alternatives for the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Lifetimes for the HCFCs are predicted here in two ways: integrating their loss with a global model and scaling to another compound with a better known lifetime. Both approaches are shown to yield similar results. Three-dimensional fields of modeled tropospheric OH concentrations are used to calculate lifetimes against destruction by OH for the HCFCs and other hydrogenated halocarbons. The lifetimes of various hydro-halocarbons are shown to be insensitive to possible spatial variations and seasonal cycles. It is possible to scale the HCFC lifetimes to that of methyl chloroform or methane by using a ratio of the rate coefficients for reaction with OH at an appropriate temperature, about 277 K.

  14. Beam lifetime and beam brightness in ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.; Jackson, A.; Warwick, A.

    1995-04-01

    Beam lifetime in ALS is dominated by the Touschek scattering. Measurements of lifetime in single-bunch mode with estimates of bunch dimensions obtained from undulator radiation data are consistent with expectations (t=1.8 hours at 1.25 mA per bunch). However, the lifetime is significantly longer in multi-bunch mode (t=ll hours at 400 mA per 320 bunches). This discrepancy has been traced to an increase in the momentum spread and bunch length in the beam caused by longitudinal coupled-bunch motions driven by higher-order modes in the rf cavities. The increased momentum spread leads to a significant degradation in the undulator spectral performance. Feedback stabilization of the coupled-bunch motion improves the spectral characteristics of the undulator beam at the expense of beam lifetime. We observe an increase of {approximately}200% in beam lifetime by operating at the betatron coupling resonance.

  15. Energy-Absorbing, Lightweight Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waydo, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Improved energy-absorbing wheels are under development for use on special-purpose vehicles that must traverse rough terrain under conditions (e.g., extreme cold) in which rubber pneumatic tires would fail. The designs of these wheels differ from those of prior non-pneumatic energy-absorbing wheels in ways that result in lighter weights and more effective reduction of stresses generated by ground/wheel contact forces. These wheels could be made of metals and/or composite materials to withstand the expected extreme operating conditions. As shown in the figure, a wheel according to this concept would include an isogrid tire connected to a hub via spring rods. The isogrid tire would be a stiff, lightweight structure typically made of aluminum. The isogrid aspect of the structure would both impart stiffness and act as a traction surface. The hub would be a thin-walled body of revolution having a simple or compound conical or other shape chosen for structural efficiency. The spring rods would absorb energy and partially isolate the hub and the supported vehicle from impact loads. The general spring-rod configuration shown in the figure was chosen because it would distribute contact and impact loads nearly evenly around the periphery of the hub, thereby helping to protect the hub against damage that would otherwise be caused by large loads concentrated onto small portions of the hub.

  16. Relationship Between Absorber Layer Properties and Device Operation Modes For High Efficiency Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, Ram; Kokenyesi, Robert; Wager, John; Keszler, Douglas; CenterInverse Design Team

    2014-03-01

    A thin film solar cell (TFSC) can be differentiated into two distinct operation modes based on the transport mechanism. Current TFSCs predominantly exploit diffusion to extract photogenerated minority carriers. For efficient extraction, the absorber layer requires high carrier mobilities and long minority carrier lifetimes. Materials exhibiting a strong optical absorption onset near the fundamental band gap allows reduction of the absorber layer thickness to significantly less than 1 μm. In such a TFSC, a strong intrinsic electric field drives minority carrier extraction, resulting in drift-based transport. The basic device configuration utilized in this simulation study is a heterojunction TFSC with a p-type absorber layer. The diffusion/drift device operation modes are simulated by varying the thickness and carrier concentration of the absorber layer, and device performance between the two modes is compared. In addition, the relationship between device operation mode and transport properties, including carrier mobility and minority carrier lifetime are explored. Finally, candidate absorber materials that enable the advantages of a drift-based TFSC developed within the Center for Inverse Design are presented. School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

  17. The lifetime of axion stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eby, Joshua; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the decay of condensates of scalars in a field theory defined by V (𝒜) = m2f2[1 ‑cos(𝒜/f)], where m and f are the mass and decay constant of the scalar field. An example of such a theory is that of the axion, in which case the condensates are called axion stars. The axion field, 𝒜, is self-adjoint. As a result, the axion number is not an absolutely conserved quantity. Therefore, axion stars are not stable and have finite lifetimes. Bound axions, localized on the volume of the star, have a coordinate uncertainty δx ˜ R ˜ 1/(maΔ), where R is the radius of the star and Δ = 1 ‑ E0 2/ma 2. Here ma and E0 are the mass, and the ground state energy of the bound axion. Then the momentum distribution of axions has a width of δp ˜ maΔ. At strong binding, Δ = 𝒪(1), bound axions can easily transfer a sufficient amount of momentum to create and emit a free axion, leading to fast decay of the star with a transition rate Γ ˜ ma. However, when Δ ≪ 1, the momentum distribution is more restricted, and as shown in this paper, the transition rate for creating a free axion decreases as exp(‑pδx) ˜exp(‑Δ‑1). Then sufficiently large, weakly bound axion stars, produced after the Big Bang, survive until the present time. We plot the region of their stability, limited by decay through axion loss and by gravitational instability, as a function of the mass of the axion and the mass of the star.

  18. Effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime of Tehran research reactor mixed-core.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, A; Khalafi, H; Kazeminejad, H

    2013-05-01

    In this work, kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor (TRR) mixed cores have been calculated. The mixed core configurations are made by replacement of the low enriched uranium control fuel elements with highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core. The MTR_PC package, a nuclear reactor analysis tool, is used to perform the analysis. Simulations were carried out to compute effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime. Calculation of kinetic parameters is necessary for reactivity and power excursion transient analysis. The results of this research show that effective delayed neutron fraction decreases and prompt neutron lifetime increases with the fuels burn-up. Also, by increasing the number of highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core, the prompt neutron lifetime increases, but effective delayed neutron fraction does not show any considerable change. PMID:24976672

  19. The evolution of magnetic network elements in the quiet Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Y.; Zhang, H.; Ai, G.; Wang, H.; Zirin, H.

    1994-01-01

    Using the 155-h coordinated magnetograph data of Huairou and Big Bear Solar Observatories, we have studied the evolution and lifetime of magnetic network elements in an enhanced network region. Both statistical and counting methods give a mean lifetime of network elements of 50h. The network elements are divided into two categories according to their evolution: 'breakup' and 'merging'. They have similar average lifetimes. We also find that the number of the elements that disappear by merging is about twice that by breakup. This may indicate that the creation and disappearance of magnetic network elements are balanced.

  20. Passively mode-locked picosecond erbium-doped fiber lasers using multiple quantum well saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayduk, Michael J.; Krol, Mark F.; Pollock, Clifford R.; Teegarden, Kenneth J.; Wicks, Gary W.; Kaechele, Walter

    1998-07-01

    An experimental study of the mode-locking process in erbium- doped fiber lasers (EDFLs) operating at 1.55 micrometer using multiple quantum well saturable absorbers is described. The self-starting passively mode-locked laser was constructed in a Fabry-Perot configuration using the saturable absorber as the back reflector of the cavity. Picosecond pulses that ranged from 3.1 to 38.8 ps were generated using a series of saturable absorbers. The pulse widths were dependent upon the optical properties of the saturable absorber used as the mode- locking element as well as the dispersive elements contained within the cavity. The output power of the EDFL varied from 0.2 to 6.7 mW and was also dependent upon the saturable absorber used in the cavity.

  1. Triplet-triplet energy transfer from a UV-A absorber butylmethoxydibenzoylmethane to UV-B absorbers.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Azusa; Oguchi-Fujiyama, Nozomi; Miyazawa, Kazuyuki; Yagi, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    The phosphorescence decay of a UV-A absorber, 4-tert-butyl-4'-methoxydibenzolymethane (BMDBM) has been observed following a 355 nm laser excitation in the absence and presence of UV-B absorbers, 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate (octyl methoxycinnamate, OMC) and octocrylene (OCR) in ethanol at 77 K. The lifetime of the lowest excited triplet (T1) state of BMDBM is significantly reduced in the presence of OMC and OCR. The observed quenching of BMDBM triplet by OMC and OCR suggests that the intermolecular triplet-triplet energy transfer occurs from BMDBM to OMC and OCR. The T1 state of OCR is nonphosphorescent or very weakly phosphorescent. However, we have shown that the energy level of the T1 state of OCR is lower than that of the enol form of BMDBM. Our methodology of energy-donor phosphorescence decay measurements can be applied to the study of the triplet-triplet energy transfer between UV absorbers even if the energy acceptor is nonphosphorescent. In addition, the delayed fluorescence of BMDBM due to triplet-triplet annihilation was observed in the BMDBM-OMC and BMDBM-OCR mixtures in ethanol at 77 K. Delayed fluorescence is one of the deactivation processes of the excited states of BMDBM under our experimental conditions. PMID:24329403

  2. Three-dimensional fluorescence lifetime tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Eppstein, Margaret J.

    2005-04-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence tomography using molecularly targeted lifetime-sensitive, fluorescent contrast agents have applications for early-stage cancer diagnostics. Yet, although the measurement of fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is extensively used in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, demonstration of fluorescence lifetime tomography for medical imaging is limited to two-dimensional studies. Herein, the feasibility of three-dimensional fluorescence-lifetime tomography on clinically relevant phantom volumes is established, using (i) a gain-modulated intensified charge coupled device (CCD) and modulated laser diode imaging system, (ii) two fluorescent contrast agents, e.g., Indocyanine green and 3-3'-Diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide differing in their fluorescence lifetime by 0.62 ns, and (iii) a two stage approximate extended Kalman filter reconstruction algorithm. Fluorescence measurements of phase and amplitude were acquired on the phantom surface under different target to background fluorescence absorption (70:1, 100:1) and fluorescence lifetime (1:1, 2.1:1) contrasts at target depths of 1.4-2 cm. The Bayesian tomography algorithm was employed to obtain three-dimensional images of lifetime and absorption owing to the fluorophores.

  3. Shock absorber operates over wide range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creasy, W. K.; Jones, J. C.

    1965-01-01

    Piston-type hydraulic shock absorber, with a metered damping system, operates over a wide range of kinetic energy loading rates. It is used for absorbing shock and vibration on mounted machinery and heavy earth-moving equipment.

  4. A Superconducting Magnet UCN Trap for Precise Neutron Lifetime Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Picker, R.; Altarev, I.; Bröcker, J.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Hartmann, J.; Müller, A.; Paul, S.; Schott, W.; Trinks, U.; Zimmer, O.

    2005-01-01

    Finite-element methods along with Monte Carlo simulations were used to design a magnetic storage device for ultracold neutrons (UCN) to measure their lifetime. A setup was determined which should make it possible to confine UCN with negligible losses and detect the protons emerging from β-decay with high efficiency: stacked superconducting solenoids create the magnetic storage field, an electrostatic extraction field inside the storage volume assures high proton collection efficiency. Alongside with the optimization of the magnetic and electrostatic design, the properties of the trap were investigated through extensive Monte Carlo simulation. PMID:27308150

  5. The atmospheric lifetime of black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cape, J. N.; Coyle, M.; Dumitrean, P.

    2012-11-01

    Black carbon (BC) in the atmosphere contributes to the human health effects of particulate matter and contributes to radiative forcing of climate. The lifetime of BC, particularly the smaller particle sizes (PM2.5) which can be transported over long distances, is therefore an important factor in determining the range of such effects, and the spatial footprint of emission controls. Theory and models suggest that the typical lifetime of BC is around one week. The frequency distributions of measurements of a range of hydrocarbons at a remote rural site in southern Scotland (Auchencorth Moss) between 2007 and 2010 have been used to quantify the relationship between atmospheric lifetime and the geometric standard deviation of observed concentration. The analysis relies on an assumed common major emission source for hydrocarbons and BC, namely diesel-engined vehicles. The logarithm of the standard deviation of the log-transformed concentration data is linearly related to hydrocarbon lifetime, and the same statistic for BC can be used to assess the lifetime of BC relative to the hydrocarbons. Annual average data show BC lifetimes in the range 4-12 days, for an assumed OH concentration of 7 × 105 cm-3. At this site there is little difference in BC lifetime between winter and summer, despite a 3-fold difference in relative hydrocarbon lifetimes. This observation confirms the role of wet deposition as an important removal process for BC, as there is no difference in precipitation between winter and summer at this site. BC lifetime was significantly greater in 2010, which had 23% less rainfall than the preceding 3 years.

  6. Lifetimes and Accretion Rates of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Xiao, Lin

    2016-03-01

    Protoplanetary disks originate in the collapse of molecular cloud cores. The formation and evolution of disks are influenced by the properties of molecular cloud cores. In this paper we investigate the dependence of disk lifetimes and accretion rates on cloud core properties. We find that the lifetime increases as the angular velocities and the mass of cloud cores increase and that the lifetime decreases as the core temperature increases. We have calculated the distribution of disk lifetimes and disk fractions with stellar age. Our calculations show that the lifetime is in the range of 1-15 Myr and that the typical lifetime is 1-3 Myr. There are a few disks with lifetimes greater than 10 Myr and ˜ 30% of the disks have lifetimes less than 1 Myr. We also fit the disk fraction by an exponential decay curve with characteristic time ˜3.7 Myr. Our results explain the observations of disk lifetimes. We also find that the accretion rate does not change significantly with ω and generally decreases with {T}{{cd}}. At the early evolution of the disks, the \\dot{M}{--}{M}* relation is about \\dot{M}\\propto {M}*1.2-2. Since the effects of the photoevaporation are weak at this stage, this relation is the consequence of the cloud core properties. At the late evolution of the disks, the \\dot{M}{--}{M}* relation is about \\dot{M}\\propto {M}*1.2-1.7. For low accretion rates at this stage, the \\dot{M}{--}{M}* relation results from the effects of X-ray photoevaporation. The calculated \\dot{M}{--}{M}* relations are consistent with the observations.

  7. The fate of photons absorbed by phytoplankton in the global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hanzhi; Kuzminov, Fedor I.; Park, Jisoo; Lee, SangHoon; Falkowski, Paul G.; Gorbunov, Maxim Y.

    2016-01-01

    Solar radiation absorbed by marine phytoplankton can follow three possible paths. By simultaneously measuring the quantum yields of photochemistry and chlorophyll fluorescence in situ, we calculate that, on average, ~60% of absorbed photons are converted to heat, only 35% are directed toward photochemical water splitting, and the rest are reemitted as fluorescence. The spatial pattern of fluorescence yields and lifetimes strongly suggests that photochemical energy conversion is physiologically limited by nutrients. Comparison of in situ fluorescence lifetimes with satellite retrievals of solar-induced fluorescence yields suggests that the mean values of the latter are generally representative of the photophysiological state of phytoplankton; however, the signal-to-noise ratio is unacceptably low in extremely oligotrophic regions, which constitute 30% of the open ocean.

  8. Phytoplankton. The fate of photons absorbed by phytoplankton in the global ocean.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hanzhi; Kuzminov, Fedor I; Park, Jisoo; Lee, SangHoon; Falkowski, Paul G; Gorbunov, Maxim Y

    2016-01-15

    Solar radiation absorbed by marine phytoplankton can follow three possible paths. By simultaneously measuring the quantum yields of photochemistry and chlorophyll fluorescence in situ, we calculate that, on average, ~60% of absorbed photons are converted to heat, only 35% are directed toward photochemical water splitting, and the rest are reemitted as fluorescence. The spatial pattern of fluorescence yields and lifetimes strongly suggests that photochemical energy conversion is physiologically limited by nutrients. Comparison of in situ fluorescence lifetimes with satellite retrievals of solar-induced fluorescence yields suggests that the mean values of the latter are generally representative of the photophysiological state of phytoplankton; however, the signal-to-noise ratio is unacceptably low in extremely oligotrophic regions, which constitute 30% of the open ocean. PMID:26743625

  9. Measurement of Rydberg positronium fluorescence lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, A.; Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Hogan, S. D.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-06-01

    We report measurements of the fluorescence lifetimes of positronium (Ps) atoms with principal quantum numbers n =10 -19 . Ps atoms in Rydberg-Stark states were produced via a two-color two-step 1 3S→2 3P→n 3S/n lifetimes of the Rydberg levels, yielding values ranging from 3 μ s to 26 μ s . Our data are in accord with the expected radiative lifetimes of Rydberg-Stark states of Ps.

  10. Fluorescence lifetime resolution with phase fluorometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, Geert; Engelborghs, Yves; Persoons, Andre

    1983-07-01

    A phase fluorometer for the measurement of fluorescence lifetimes was constructed from commercially available components. The instrument was tested by using optical delays of 4 and 2 cm, showing an accuracy of 10 ps. Lifetimes, as short as 0.3 ns, obtained by the quenching of fluorescein by KI, were analyzed with a standard deviation of 3 ps. The lifetime resolving power was checked using mixtures of acridine and quinine-sulphate and least-squares fitting procedures. Accurate amplitude ratios were obtained with the technique of phase-sensitive detection [J. R. Lakowicz and H. Cherek, J. Biochem. Biophys. Methods 5, 19 (1981)].

  11. Lifetimes of Electrodes for AMTEC Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, M. A.; Kisor, A.; Williams, R F.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; O'Connor, D.

    1994-01-01

    The lifetime of an AMTEC electrode depends on the rate of grain growth, which in turn depends on the surface self-diffusion coefficient of the electrode material under AMTEC operating conditions. Grain growth rates for molybdenum and platinum-tungsten alloy electrodes have been determined, and have been used to predict operating lifetimes of AMTEC electrodes. For lifetimes of 10 years of more, Mo may be used in AMTEC cells only at operating temperatures under 1100 K. Pt(sub 2.5)W electrodes may be used at much higher temperatures, up to 1300 K.

  12. Models for Battery Reliability and Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G. H.; Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-03-01

    Models describing battery degradation physics are needed to more accurately understand how battery usage and next-generation battery designs can be optimized for performance and lifetime. Such lifetime models may also reduce the cost of battery aging experiments and shorten the time required to validate battery lifetime. Models for chemical degradation and mechanical stress are reviewed. Experimental analysis of aging data from a commercial iron-phosphate lithium-ion (Li-ion) cell elucidates the relative importance of several mechanical stress-induced degradation mechanisms.

  13. Reliability and lifetime issues for new photovoltaic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czanderna, A. W.

    1997-04-01

    The purposes of this paper are to elucidate the crucial importance of predicting the service lifetime (SLP) for new photovoltaic technologies (PV) modules and to present an outline for developing a SLP methodology for encapsulated PV cells and minimodules. Specific objectives are (a) to illustrate the essential need and generic nature of SLP for several types of existing solar energy conversion or conservation devices, (b) to elucidate the complexity associated with quantifying the durability of these devices, (c) to define and explain the seven major elements that constitute a generic SLP methodology, (d) to show that implementing the SLP methodology for developing laboratory-scale PV cells and minimodules can reduce the cost of technology development, and (e) to outline an acceptable methodology for relating accelerated life testing to real time testing, using sufficient sample numbers, and applying the methodology in (c) for predicting a service lifetime. The major conclusions are that predicting the service lifetime of PV cells and minimodules should be an essential part of the research and development for developing any future generation PV technology and that using the SLP methodology can be most cost-effectively applied to laboratory scale PV cells and minidevices.

  14. Demonstration of long minority carrier lifetimes in very narrow bandgap ternary InAs/GaInSb superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Benjamin Varberg; Kim, Jin K.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Shaner, Eric A.; Haugan, Heather J.; Brown, Gail J.

    2015-09-28

    Minority carrier lifetimes in very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) InAs/GaInSb superlattices (SLs) are reported using time-resolved microwave reflectance measurements. A strain-balanced ternary SL absorber layer of 47.0 Å InAs/21.5 Å Ga0.75In0.25Sb, corresponding to a bandgap of ~50 meV, is found to have a minority carrier lifetime of 140 ± 20 ns at ~18 K. This lifetime is extraordinarily long, when compared to lifetime values previously reported for other VLWIR SL detector materials. As a result, this enhancement is attributed to the strain-engineered ternary design, which offers a variety of epitaxial advantages and ultimately leads to a reduction of defect-mediated recombination centers.

  15. Demonstration of long minority carrier lifetimes in very narrow bandgap ternary InAs/GaInSb superlattices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Olson, Benjamin Varberg; Kim, Jin K.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Shaner, Eric A.; Haugan, Heather J.; Brown, Gail J.

    2015-09-28

    Minority carrier lifetimes in very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) InAs/GaInSb superlattices (SLs) are reported using time-resolved microwave reflectance measurements. A strain-balanced ternary SL absorber layer of 47.0 Å InAs/21.5 Å Ga0.75In0.25Sb, corresponding to a bandgap of ~50 meV, is found to have a minority carrier lifetime of 140 ± 20 ns at ~18 K. This lifetime is extraordinarily long, when compared to lifetime values previously reported for other VLWIR SL detector materials. As a result, this enhancement is attributed to the strain-engineered ternary design, which offers a variety of epitaxial advantages and ultimately leads to a reduction of defect-mediated recombinationmore » centers.« less

  16. Demonstration of long minority carrier lifetimes in very narrow bandgap ternary InAs/GaInSb superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugan, H. J.; Brown, G. J.; Olson, B. V.; Kadlec, E. A.; Kim, J. K.; Shaner, E. A.

    2015-09-01

    Minority carrier lifetimes in very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) InAs/GaInSb superlattices (SLs) are reported using time-resolved microwave reflectance measurements. A strain-balanced ternary SL absorber layer of 47.0 Å InAs/21.5 Å Ga0.75In0.25Sb, corresponding to a bandgap of ˜50 meV, is found to have a minority carrier lifetime of 140 ± 20 ns at ˜18 K. This lifetime is extraordinarily long, when compared to lifetime values previously reported for other VLWIR SL detector materials. This enhancement is attributed to the strain-engineered ternary design, which offers a variety of epitaxial advantages and ultimately leads to a reduction of defect-mediated recombination centers.

  17. Improved Single-Source Precursors for Solar-Cell Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder K.; Harris, Jerry; Hepp, Aloysius

    2007-01-01

    Improved single-source precursor compounds have been invented for use in spray chemical vapor deposition (spray CVD) of chalcopyrite semiconductor absorber layers of thin-film cells. A "single-source precursor compound" is a single molecular compound that contains all the required elements, which when used under the spray CVD conditions, thermally decomposes to form CuIn(x)Ga(1-x)S(y)Se(2-y).

  18. Embedded absorbers for helicopter rotor lag damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, Lynn; Gandhi, Farhan

    2009-09-01

    Radial and chordwise damped vibration absorbers embedded in the rotor blade are compared for rotor lag damping augmentation. Results show that the radial absorber is more effective in transferring damping to the rotor blade lag mode. The chordwise absorber needs to be at a more outboard location and have a larger mass to introduce levels of lag damping comparable to that introduced by the radial absorber. The 1/rev amplitude of a chordwise absorber at the blade tip, per degree of blade lead-lag motion in forward flight, is of the order of 35% of the blade chord, and such a stroke might be difficult to accommodate. The 1/rev amplitude of a radial absorber at 70% span (having significantly lower mass than the chordwise absorber and producing comparable lag damping) is of the order of 4% of the rotor blade span. The static displacement of the radial absorber under centrifugal load needs to be limited using a frequency-dependent (high static stiffness, low dynamic stiffness) or nonlinear spring. The chordwise absorber can also undergo a large static displacement under the chordwise component of the centrifugal load if there is an offset from the feather axis, and this would again have to be limited using a strategy such as a frequency-dependent spring. Significant advantages of the radial absorber are—higher lag damping, lower absorber mass, space for absorber mass travel, and no chordwise travel of blade center of gravity reducing susceptibility to aeroelastic instability and dynamic pitch-link loads.

  19. 21 CFR 872.6050 - Saliva absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Saliva absorber. 872.6050 Section 872.6050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... absorber is a device made of paper or cotton intended to absorb moisture from the oral cavity during...

  20. 21 CFR 872.6050 - Saliva absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Saliva absorber. 872.6050 Section 872.6050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... absorber is a device made of paper or cotton intended to absorb moisture from the oral cavity during...

  1. Improving the laboratory monitoring of absorbent oil

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Shved; S.S. Sychev; I.V. Safina; S.A. Klykov

    2009-05-15

    The performance of absorbent coal tar oil is analyzed as a function of the constituent and group composition. The qualitative and quantitative composition of the oil that ensures the required absorbent properties is determined. Operative monitoring may be based on absorbent characteristics that permit regulation of the beginning and end of regeneration.

  2. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, D.C.

    1987-11-20

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compound of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved. 2 figs.

  3. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-01-01

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  4. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-02-06

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  5. Stratospheric lifetime ratio of CFC-11 and CFC-12 from satellite and model climatologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Lars; Hoppe, Charlotte; Müller, Rolf; Dutton, Geoffrey S.; Gille, John C.; Griessbach, Sabine; Jones, Ashley; Meyer, Catrin I.; Spang, Reinhold; Volk, C. Michael; Walker, Kaley A.

    2015-04-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) play a key role in stratospheric ozone loss and are strong infrared absorbers that contribute to global warming. The stratospheric lifetimes of CFCs are a measure of their stratospheric loss rates that are needed to determine global warming and ozone depletion potentials. We applied the tracer-tracer correlation approach to zonal mean climatologies from satellite measurements and model data to assess the lifetimes of CFCl3 (CFC-11) and CF2Cl2 (CFC-12). We present new estimates of the CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio and the absolute lifetime of CFC-12, based on a reference lifetime of 52 yr for CFC-11. We analyzed climatologies from three satellite missions, the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), the HIgh Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS). We found a CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio of 0.47 ± 0.08 and a CFC-12 lifetime of 112(96 - 133) yr for ACE-FTS, a ratio of 0.46 ± 0.07 and a lifetime of 113(97 - 134) yr for HIRDLS, and a ratio of 0.46 ± 0.08 and a lifetime of 114(98 - 136) yr for MIPAS. The error-weighted, combined CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio is 0.46 ± 0.04 and the CFC-12 lifetime estimate is 113(103 - 124) yr. These results are in excellent agreement with the recent Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate (SPARC) reassessment, which recommends lifetimes of 52(43 - 67) yr for CFC-11 and 102(88 - 122) yr for CFC-12, respectively. Having smaller uncertainties than the results from other recent studies, our estimates can help to better constrain CFC-11 and CFC-12 lifetime recommendations in future scientific studies and assessments. Furthermore, the satellite observations were used to validate first simulation results from a new coupled model system, which integrates a Lagrangian chemistry transport model into a climate model. For the coupled EMAC/CLaMS model we found a CFC-11/CFC-12 lifetime ratio

  6. Precision Excited State Lifetime Measurements for Atomic Parity Violation and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Jerry; Patterson, Brian; Gearba, Alina; Snell, Jeremy; Knize, Randy

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes provide a valuable test of atomic theory, allowing comparisons between experimental and theoretical transition dipole matrix elements. Such tests are important in Rb and Cs, where atomic parity violating experiments have been performed or proposed, and where atomic structure calculations are required to properly interpret the parity violating effect. In optical lattice clocks, precision lifetime measurements can aid in reducing the uncertainty of frequency shifts due to the surrounding blackbody radiation field. We will present our technique for precisely measuring excited state lifetimes which employs mode-locked ultrafast lasers interacting with two counter-propagating atomic beams. This method allows the timing in the experiment to be based on the inherent timing stability of mode-locked lasers, while counter-propagating atomic beams provides cancellation of systematic errors due to atomic motion to first order. Our current progress measuring Rb excited state lifetimes will be presented along with future planned measurements in Yb.

  7. Cosmological constraints on the neutron lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvati, L.; Pagano, L.; Consiglio, R.; Melchiorri, A.

    2016-03-01

    We derive new constraints on the neutron lifetime based on the recent Planck 2015 observations of temperature and polarization anisotropies of the CMB. Under the assumption of standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, we show that Planck data constrains the neutron lifetime to τn = (907±69) [s] at 68% c.l.. Moreover, by including the direct measurements of primordial Helium abundance of Aver et al. (2015) and Izotov et al. (2014), we show that cosmological data provide the stringent constraints τn = (875±19) [s] and τn = (921±11) [s] respectively. The latter appears to be in tension with neutron lifetime value quoted by the Particle Data Group (τn = (880.3±1.1) [s]). Future CMB surveys as COrE+, in combination with a weak lensing survey as EUCLID, could constrain the neutron lifetime up to a ~ 6 [s] precision.

  8. Hadamard-transform fluorescence-lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Takahiko; Iwata, Tetsuo

    2016-04-18

    We discuss a Hadamard-transform-based fluorescence-lifetime-imaging (HT-FLI) technique for fluorescence-lifetime-imaging microscopy (FLIM). The HT-FLI uses a Fourier-transform phase-modulation fluorometer (FT-PMF) for fluorescence-lifetime measurements, where the modulation frequency of the excitation light is swept linearly in frequency from zero to a specific maximum during a fixed duration of time. Thereafter, fluorescence lifetimes are derived through Fourier transforms for the fluorescence and reference waveforms. The FT-PMF enables the analysis of multi-component samples simultaneously. HT imaging uses electronic exchange of HT illumination mask patterns, and a high-speed, high-sensitivity photomultiplier, to eliminate frame-rate issues that accompany two-dimensional image detectors. PMID:27137259

  9. Lifetime and Temperature of Incandescent Lamps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, Dulli C.; Menon, V. Jayaram

    1998-01-01

    Describes a procedure based on the assumption that during the rated lifetime of a light bulb roughly half of the radius of the filament evaporates. Explains how the filament's operating temperature can be deduced. (DDR)

  10. Sound-absorbing slabs and structures based on granular materials (bound and unbound). [energy absorbing efficiency of porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre-Lazar, S.; Popeea, G.

    1974-01-01

    Sound absorbing slabs and structures made up of bound or unbound granular materials are considered and how to manufacture these elements at the building site. The raw material is a single grain powder (sand, expanded blast furnace slag, etc.) that imparts to the end products an apparent porosity of 25-45% and an energy dissipation within the structure leading to absorption coefficients that can be compared with those of mineral wool and urethane.