Science.gov

Sample records for absorption path length

  1. Light absorption cell combining variable path and length pump

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.

    1993-01-01

    A device for use in making spectrophotometric measurements of fluid samples. In particular, the device is a measurement cell containing a movable and a fixed lens with a sample of the fluid therebetween and through which light shines. The cell is connected to a source of light and a spectrophotometer via optic fibers. Movement of the lens varies the path length and also pumps the fluid into and out of the cell. Unidirectional inlet and exit valves cooperate with the movable lens to assure a one-way flow of fluid through the cell. A linear stepper motor controls the movement of the lens and cycles it from a first position closer to the fixed lens and a second position farther from the fixed lens, preferably at least 10 times per minute for a nearly continuous stream of absorption spectrum data.

  2. Light absorption cell combining variable path and length pump

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.

    1993-12-07

    A device is described for use in making spectrophotometric measurements of fluid samples. In particular, the device is a measurement cell containing a movable and a fixed lens with a sample of the fluid there between and through which light shines. The cell is connected to a source of light and a spectrophotometer via optic fibers. Movement of the lens varies the path length and also pumps the fluid into and out of the cell. Unidirectional inlet and exit valves cooperate with the movable lens to assure a one-way flow of fluid through the cell. A linear stepper motor controls the movement of the lens and cycles it from a first position closer to the fixed lens and a second position farther from the fixed lens, preferably at least 10 times per minute for a nearly continuous stream of absorption spectrum data. 2 figures.

  3. Cesium oscillator strengths measured with a multiple-path-length absorption cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Absorption-oscillator-strength measurements for the principal series in cesium were measured using a multiple-path-length cell. The optical arrangement included a movable transverse path for checking the uniformity of the alkali density along the length of the cell and which also allowed strength measurements to be made simultaneously on both strong and weak lines. The strengths measured on the first 10 doublets indicate an increasing trend in the doublet ratio. The individual line strengths are in close agreement with the high resolution measurements of Pichler (1974) and with the calculations of Norcross (1973).

  4. Suppression of infrared absorption in nanostructured metals by controlling Faraday inductance and electron path length.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Eon

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured metals have been intensively studied for optical applications over the past few decades. However, the intrinsic loss of metals has limited the optical performance of the metal nanostructures in diverse applications. In particular, light concentration in metals by surface plasmons or other resonances causes substantial absorption in metals. Here, we avoid plasmonic excitations for low loss and investigate methods to further suppress loss in nanostructured metals. We demonstrate that parasitic absorption in metal nanostructures can be significantly reduced over a broad band by increasing the Faraday inductance and the electron path length. For an example structure, the loss is reduced in comparison to flat films by more than an order of magnitude over most of the very broad spectrum between short and long wavelength infrared. For a photodetector structure, the fraction of absorption in the photoactive material increases by two orders of magnitude and the photoresponsivity increases by 15 times because of the selective suppression of metal absorption. These findings could benefit many metal-based applications that require low loss such as photovoltaics, photoconductive detectors, solar selective surfaces, infrared-transparent defrosting windows, and other metamaterials. PMID:26906830

  5. Column Path Length Measurements Using a Multi-Frequency, Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) Laser Absorption Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, F. W.; Lin, B.; Browell, E. V.; Dobler, J.; McGregor, D.; Kooi, S. A.; Collins, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate understanding of carbon balance in the environment is critical to projections of the future evolution of the Earth's climate. As a result, the NRC Decadal Survey (DS) of Earth Science and Applications from Space identified Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) as a mid-term (Tier II) mission. The active space remote measurement of the column CO2 mixing ratio (XCO2) for the ASCENDS mission requires the simultaneous measurement of the CO2 and O2 number density and the column path length over which they are measured in order to derive the average XCO2 column. This paper presents methods for measuring the path lengths of the CO2 and O2 measurements that are inherent to the Multi-Functional Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL), a laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) system under development for the ASCENDS mission. The MFLL is a multi-frequency intensity-modulated continuous-wave (IM-CW) LAS operating near 1.57 and 1.26 μm that uses a range-encoded modulation technique to minimize bias from thin clouds in the CO2 and O2 column measurements while simultaneously measuring the path length to the surface and to intervening cloud layers. This paper discusses the latest MFLL ground and flight test results. During these tests, range-encoded modulation techniques were demonstrated for path length measurements and the MFLL remote CO2 column measurements were evaluated against in situ CO2 measurements. This paper describes the encoding techniques employed, presents an approach for obtaining column path length measurements during CO2 retrievals, and presents the accuracy and precision of the technique. Measurement of path length meeting ASCENDS requirements of approximately 2-m precision were obtained in ground testing and demonstrated during flights over Railroad Valley, NV.

  6. Monitoring of Atmospheric Hydrogen Peroxide in Houston Using Long Path-Length Laser-Based Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, N. P.; Cao, Y.; Jiang, W.; Tittel, F. K.; Griffin, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a relevant atmospheric species mainly formed by recombination of hydroperoxyl radicals. H2O2 participates in the formation of sulfate aerosol by in-cloud oxidation of S(IV) to S(VI) and has been associated with the generation of multi-functional water soluble organic compounds in atmospheric particulate matter. Furthermore, H2O2 plays an important role in the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere as it acts as a reservoir for HOx radicals (OH and HO2). Particular conditions in the Houston area (e.g. extensive presence of petrochemical industry and high ozone and humidity levels) indicate the potential relevance of this species at this location. Despite its atmospheric relevance, no reports on the levels of H2O2 in Houston have been presented previously in the scientific literature. Determination of atmospheric H2O2 usually has been conducted based on transfer of the gas-phase H2O2 to the liquid phase prior to quantification by techniques such as fluorescence spectroscopy. Although these methods allow detection of H2O2 at the sub-ppb level, they present some limitations including the interference from other atmospheric constituents and potential sampling artifacts. In this study, a high sensitivity sensor based on long-path absorption spectroscopy using a distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser was developed and used to conduct direct gas-phase H2O2 monitoring in Houston. The sensor, which targets a strong H2O2 absorption line (~7.73 μm) with no interference from other atmospheric species, was deployed at a ground level monitoring station near the University of Houston main campus during summer 2014. The performance of this novel sensor was evaluated by side-by-side comparison with a fluorescence-based instrument typically used for atmospheric monitoring of H2O2. H2O2 levels were determined, and time series of H2O2 mixing ratios were generated allowing insight into the dynamics, trends, and atmospheric inter-relations of H2O2 in the

  7. Variable path length spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    O'Rourke, Patrick E.; McCarty, Jerry E.; Haggard, Ricky A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact, variable pathlength, fiber optic probe for spectrophotometric measurements of fluids in situ. The probe comprises a probe body with a shaft having a polished end penetrating one side of the probe, a pair of optic fibers, parallel and coterminous, entering the probe opposite the reflecting shaft, and a collimating lens to direct light from one of the fibers to the reflecting surface of the shaft and to direct the reflected light to the second optic fiber. The probe body has an inlet and an outlet port to allow the liquid to enter the probe body and pass between the lens and the reflecting surface of the shaft. A linear stepper motor is connected to the shaft to cause the shaft to advance toward or away from the lens in increments so that absorption measurements can be made at each of the incremental steps. The shaft is sealed to the probe body by a bellows seal to allow freedom of movement of the shaft and yet avoid leakage from the interior of the probe.

  8. Dependence of the absorption of pulsed CO{sub 2}-laser radiation by silane on wavenumber, fluence, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of absorbing and nonabsorbing gases

    SciTech Connect

    Blazejowski, J.; Gruzdiewa, L.; Rulewski, J.; Lampe, F.W.

    1995-05-15

    The absorption of three lines [{ital P}(20), 944.2 cm{sup {minus}1}; {ital P}(14), 949.2 cm{sup {minus}1}; and {ital R}(24), 978.5 cm{sup {minus}1}] of the pulsed CO{sub 2} laser (00{sup 0}1--10{sup 0}0 transition) by SiH{sub 4} was measured at various pulse energy, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of the compound and nonabsorbing foreign gases. In addition, low intensity infrared absorption spectrum of silane was compared with high intensity absorption characteristics for all lines of the pulsed CO{sub 2} laser. The experimental dependencies show deviations from the phenomenological Beer--Lambert law which can be considered as arising from the high intensity of an incident radiation and collisions of absorbing molecules with surroundings. These effects were included into the expression, being an extended form of the Beer--Lambert law, which reasonably approximates all experimental data. The results, except for extending knowledge on the interaction of a high power laser radiation with matter, can help understanding and planning processes leading to preparation of silicon-containing technologically important materials.

  9. Gap Filling as Exact Path Length Problem.

    PubMed

    Salmela, Leena; Sahlin, Kristoffer; Mäkinen, Veli; Tomescu, Alexandru I

    2016-05-01

    One of the last steps in a genome assembly project is filling the gaps between consecutive contigs in the scaffolds. This problem can be naturally stated as finding an s-t path in a directed graph whose sum of arc costs belongs to a given range (the estimate on the gap length). Here s and t are any two contigs flanking a gap. This problem is known to be NP-hard in general. Here we derive a simpler dynamic programming solution than already known, pseudo-polynomial in the maximum value of the input range. We implemented various practical optimizations to it, and compared our exact gap-filling solution experimentally to popular gap-filling tools. Summing over all the bacterial assemblies considered in our experiments, we can in total fill 76% more gaps than the best previous tool, and the gaps filled by our method span 136% more sequence. Furthermore, the error level of the newly introduced sequence is comparable to that of the previous tools. The experiments also show that our exact approach does not easily scale to larger genomes, where the problem is in general difficult for all tools. PMID:26959081

  10. UV laser long-path absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, Hans-Peter; Brauers, Theo; Neuroth, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    Long path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using a picosecond UV laser as a light source was developed in our institute. Tropospheric OH radicals are measured by their rotational absorption lines around 308 nm. The spectra are obtained using a high resolution spectrograph. The detection system has been improved over the formerly used optomechanical scanning device by application of a photodiode array which increased the observed spectral range by a factor of 6 and which utilizes the light much more effectively leading to a considerable reduction of the measurement time. This technique provides direct measurements of OH because the signal is given by the product of the absorption coefficient and the OH concentration along the light path according to Lambert-Beers law. No calibration is needed. Since the integrated absorption coefficient is well known the accuracy of the measurement essentially depends on the extent to which the OH absorption pattern can be detected in the spectra. No interference by self generated OH radicals in the detection lightpath has been observed. The large bandwidth (greater than 0.15 nm) and the high spectral resolution (1.5 pm) allows absolute determination of interferences by other trace gas absorptions. The measurement error is directly accessible from the absorption-signal to baseline-noise ratio in the spectra. The applicability of the method strongly depends on visibility. Elevated concentrations of aerosols lead to considerable attenuation of the laser light which reduces the S/N-ratio. In the moderately polluted air of Julich, where we performed a number of OH measurement spectra. In addition absorption features of unidentified species were frequently detected. A quantitative deconvolution even of the known species is not easy to achieve and can leave residual structures in the spectra. Thus interferences usually increase the noise and deteriorate the OH detection sensitivity. Using diode arrays for sensitive

  11. 47 CFR 101.143 - Minimum path length requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minimum path length requirements. 101.143... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.143 Minimum path length requirements. (a) The...) Minimum path length (km) Below 1,850 N/A 1,850 to 7,125 17 10,550 to 13,250 5 Above 17,700 N/A (b)...

  12. 47 CFR 101.143 - Minimum path length requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minimum path length requirements. 101.143... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.143 Minimum path length requirements. (a) The...) Minimum path length (km) Below 1,850 N/A 1,850 to 7,125 17 10,550 to 13,250 5 Above 17,700 N/A (b)...

  13. 47 CFR 101.143 - Minimum path length requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minimum path length requirements. 101.143... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.143 Minimum path length requirements. (a) The...) Minimum path length (km) Below 1,850 N/A 1,850 to 7,125 17 10,550 to 13,250 5 Above 17,700 N/A (b)...

  14. Diagnosis of multilayer clouds using photon path length distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siwei; Min, Qilong

    2010-10-01

    Photon path length distribution is sensitive to 3-D cloud structures. A detection method for multilayer clouds has been developed, by utilizing the information of photon path length distribution. The photon path length method estimates photon path length information from the low level, single-layer cloud structure that can be accurately observed by a millimeter-wave cloud radar (MMCR) combined with a micropulse lidar (MPL). As multiple scattering within the cloud layers and between layers would substantially enhance the photon path length, the multilayer clouds can be diagnosed by evaluating the estimated photon path information against observed photon path length information from a co-located rotating shadowband spectrometer (RSS). The measurements of MMCR-MPL and RSS at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site have been processed for the year 2000. Cases studies illustrate the consistency between MMCR-MPL detection and the photon path length method under most conditions. However, the photon path length method detected some multilayer clouds that were classified by the MMCR-MPL as single-layer clouds. From 1 year statistics at the ARM SGP site, about 27.7% of single-layer clouds detected by the MMCR-MPL with solar zenith angle less than 70° and optical depth greater than 10 could be multilayer clouds. It suggests that a substantial portion of single-layer clouds detected by the MMCR-MPL could also be influenced by some "missed" clouds or by the 3-D effects of clouds.

  15. Modified Sagnac interferometer for contact-free length measurement of a direct absorption cell.

    PubMed

    Elandaloussi, Hadj; Rouillé, Christian; Marie-Jeanne, Patrick; Janssen, Christof

    2016-03-10

    Accurate path length measurements in absorption cells are recurrent requirements in quantitative molecular absorption spectroscopy. A new twin path laser interferometer for length measurements in a simple direct path absorption geometry is presented, along with a full uncertainty budget. The path in an absorption cell is determined by measuring the optical path length change due to the diminution of the refractive index when the cell originally filled with nitrogen gas is evacuated. The performance of the instrument based on a stabilized HeNe laser is verified by comparison with the results of direct mechanical length measurements of a roughly 45 mm long, specially designed absorption cell. Due to a resolution of about 1/300 of a HeNe fringe, an expanded (coverage factor k=2) uncertainty of 16 μm in the length measurement is achieved, providing an expanded relative uncertainty of 3.6·10⁻⁴ for the length of our test absorption cell. This value is about 8 times lower than what has been reported previously. The instrument will be useful for precision measurements of absorption cross sections of strong absorbers which require short light paths, such as ozone, halogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds in the UV. PMID:26974791

  16. 47 CFR 101.143 - Minimum path length requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.143 Minimum path length requirements. (a) The... carrier fixed point-to-point microwave services must equal or exceed the value set forth in the...

  17. 47 CFR 101.143 - Minimum path length requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.143 Minimum path length requirements. (a) The... carrier fixed point-to-point microwave services must equal or exceed the value set forth in the...

  18. Foraging Path-length Protocol for Drosophila melanogaster Larvae.

    PubMed

    Anreiter, Ina; Vasquez, Oscar E; Allen, Aaron M; Sokolowski, Marla B

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster larval path-length phenotype is an established measure used to study the genetic and environmental contributions to behavioral variation. The larval path-length assay was developed to measure individual differences in foraging behavior that were later linked to the foraging gene. Larval path-length is an easily scored trait that facilitates the collection of large sample sizes, at minimal cost, for genetic screens. Here we provide a detailed description of the current protocol for the larval path-length assay first used by Sokolowski. The protocol details how to reproducibly handle test animals, perform the behavioral assay and analyze the data. An example of how the assay can be used to measure behavioral plasticity in response to environmental change, by manipulating feeding environment prior to performing the assay, is also provided. Finally, appropriate test design as well as environmental factors that can modify larval path-length such as food quality, developmental age and day effects are discussed. PMID:27167330

  19. Extinction measurement with open-path cavity ring-down technique of variable cavity length.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hao; Li, Bincheng; Han, Yanling; Wang, Jing; Gao, Chunming; Wang, Yafei

    2016-06-13

    Open-path cavity ring down (OPCRD) technique with variable cavity length was developed to measure optical extinction including scattering and absorption of air in laboratory environment at 635 nm wavelength. By moving the rear cavity mirror of the ring-down cavity to change cavity length, ring-down time with different cavity lengths was experimentally obtained and the dependence of total cavity loss on cavity length was determined. The extinction coefficient of air was determined by the slope of linear dependence of total cavity loss on cavity length. The extinction coefficients of air with different particle concentrations at 635 nm wavelength were measured to be from 10.46 to 84.19 Mm-1 (ppm/m) in a normal laboratory environment. This variable-cavity-length OPCRD technique can be used for absolute extinction measurement and real-time environmental monitoring without closed-path sample cells and background measurements. PMID:27410351

  20. All-optical, thermo-optical path length modulation based on the vanadium-doped fibers.

    PubMed

    Matjasec, Ziga; Campelj, Stanislav; Donlagic, Denis

    2013-05-20

    This paper presents an all-fiber, fully-optically controlled, optical-path length modulator based on highly absorbing optical fiber. The modulator utilizes a high-power 980 nm pump diode and a short section of vanadium-co-doped single mode fiber that is heated through absorption and a non-radiative relaxation process. The achievable path length modulation range primarily depends on the pump's power and the convective heat-transfer coefficient of the surrounding gas, while the time response primarily depends on the heated fiber's diameter. An absolute optical length change in excess of 500 µm and a time-constant as short as 11 ms, were demonstrated experimentally. The all-fiber design allows for an electrically-passive and remote operation of the modulator. The presented modulator could find use within various fiber-optics systems that require optical (remote) path length control or modulation. PMID:23736401

  1. Analytical solution of average path length for Apollonian networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongzhi; Chen, Lichao; Zhou, Shuigeng; Fang, Lujun; Guan, Jihong; Zou, Tao

    2008-01-01

    With the help of recursion relations derived from the self-similar structure, we obtain the solution of average path length, dmacr t , for Apollonian networks. In contrast to the well-known numerical result dmacr t∝(lnNt)3/4 [J. S. Andrade, Jr. , Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 018702 (2005)], our rigorous solution shows that the average path length grows logarithmically as dmacr t∝lnNt in the infinite limit of network size Nt . The extensive numerical calculations completely agree with our closed-form solution.

  2. Limited-path-length entanglement percolation in quantum complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuquet, Martí; Calsamiglia, John

    2011-03-01

    We study entanglement distribution in quantum complex networks where nodes are connected by bipartite entangled states. These networks are characterized by a complex structure, which dramatically affects how information is transmitted through them. For pure quantum state links, quantum networks exhibit a remarkable feature absent in classical networks: it is possible to effectively rewire the network by performing local operations on the nodes. We propose a family of such quantum operations that decrease the entanglement percolation threshold of the network and increase the size of the giant connected component. We provide analytic results for complex networks with an arbitrary (uncorrelated) degree distribution. These results are in good agreement with numerical simulations, which also show enhancement in correlated and real-world networks. The proposed quantum preprocessing strategies are not robust in the presence of noise. However, even when the links consist of (noisy) mixed-state links, one can send quantum information through a connecting path with a fidelity that decreases with the path length. In this noisy scenario, complex networks offer a clear advantage over regular lattices, namely, the fact that two arbitrary nodes can be connected through a relatively small number of steps, known as the small-world effect. We calculate the probability that two arbitrary nodes in the network can successfully communicate with a fidelity above a given threshold. This amounts to working out the classical problem of percolation with a limited path length. We find that this probability can be significant even for paths limited to few connections and that the results for standard (unlimited) percolation are soon recovered if the path length exceeds by a finite amount the average path length, which in complex networks generally scales logarithmically with the size of the network.

  3. Test Bed For Control Of Optical-Path Lengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neal, Michael C.; Eldred, Daniel D.; Liu, Dankai; Redding, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Truss structure and ancillary equipment constitute test bed for experiments in methods of controlling lengths of optical paths under conditions of structural vibration and deformation. Accommodates both passive and active methods of control. Experimental control system reduces millimeter-level disturbances in optical path length to nanometers. Developed for control, alignment, and aiming of distributed optical systems on large flexible structures. Test bed includes tower 2.5 meters high with two horizontal arms extending at right angles from its top. Rigidly mounted on massive steel block providing measure of isolation from ground vibrations. Optical motion-compensation system similar to one described previously in NASA Tech Briefs enclosed in flexure-mounted frame, called "trolley," at end of longer horizontal arm.

  4. 47 CFR 78.108 - Minimum path lengths for fixed links.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minimum path lengths for fixed links. 78.108... CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.108 Minimum path lengths for fixed links. (a...) Minimum path length (km) 12,200 to 13,250 5 Above 17,700 N/A (b) For paths shorter than those specified...

  5. 47 CFR 78.108 - Minimum path lengths for fixed links.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minimum path lengths for fixed links. 78.108... CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.108 Minimum path lengths for fixed links. (a...) Minimum path length (km) 12,200 to 13,250 5 Above 17,700 N/A (b) For paths shorter than those specified...

  6. 47 CFR 78.108 - Minimum path lengths for fixed links.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum path lengths for fixed links. 78.108... CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.108 Minimum path lengths for fixed links. (a...) Minimum path length (km) 12,200 to 13,250 5 Above 17,700 N/A (b) For paths shorter than those specified...

  7. 47 CFR 78.108 - Minimum path lengths for fixed links.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum path lengths for fixed links. 78.108... CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.108 Minimum path lengths for fixed links. (a...) Minimum path length (km) 12,200 to 13,250 5 Above 17,700 N/A (b) For paths shorter than those specified...

  8. 47 CFR 78.108 - Minimum path lengths for fixed links.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minimum path lengths for fixed links. 78.108... CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.108 Minimum path lengths for fixed links. (a...) Minimum path length (km) 12,200 to 13,250 5 Above 17,700 N/A (b) For paths shorter than those specified...

  9. Depth-resolved photothermal optical coherence tomography by local optical path length change measurement (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, Shuichi; Hong, Young-Joo; Li, En; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2016-03-01

    Photothermal OCT has been emerged to contrast absorbers in biological tissues. The tissues response to photothermal excitation as change of thermal strain and refractive index. To resolve the depth of absorption agents, the measurements of the local thermal strain change and local refractive index change due to photothermal effect is required. In this study, we developed photothermal OCT for depth-resolved absorption contrast imaging. The phase-resolved OCT can measure the axial strain change and local refractive index change as local optical path length change. A swept-source OCT system is used with a wavelength swept laser at 1310 nm with a scanning rate of 50 kHz. The sensitivity of 110 dB is achieved. At the sample arm, the excitation beam from a fiber-coupled laser diode of 406 nm wavelength is combined with the OCT probe beam co-linearly. The slowly modulated excitation beam around 300 Hz illuminate biological tissues. M-mode scan is applied during one-period modulation duration. The local optical path length change is measured by temporal and axial phase difference. The theoretical prediction of the photothermal response is derived and in good agreement with experimental results. In the case of slow modulation, the delay of photothermal response can be neglected. The local path length changes are averaged over the half period of the excitation modulation, and then demodulated. This method exhibits 3-dB gain in the sensitivity of the local optical path length change measurement over the direct Fourier transform method. In vivo human skin imaging of endogenous absorption agent will be demonstrated.

  10. Path Length Fluctuations Derived from Site Testing Interferometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Nessel, James A.; Morse, Jacquelynne R.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate possible sites for NASA's proposed Ka-band antenna array, the NASA Glenn Research Center has constructed atmospheric phase monitors (APM) which directly measure the tropospheric phase stability. These instruments observe an unmodulated 20.2 GHz beacon signal broadcast from a geostationary satellite (Anik F2) and measure the phase difference between the signals received by the two antennas. Two APM's have been deployed, one at the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) Tracking Complex in Goldstone, California, and the other at the NASA White Sands Complex, in Las Cruces, New Mexico. Two station-years of atmospheric phase fluctuation data have been collected at Goldstone since operations commenced in May 2007 and 0.5 station-years of data have been collected at White Sands since operations began February 2009. With identical instruments operating simultaneously, we can directly compare the phase stability at the two sites. Phase stability is analyzed statistically in terms of the root-mean-square (rms) of the tropospheric path length fluctuations over 10 min blocks. Correlation between surface wind speed and relative humidity with interferometer phase are discussed. For 2 years, the path length fluctuations at the DSN site in Goldstone, California, have been better than 757 micrometer (with reference to a 300 m baseline and to Zenith) for 90 percent of the time. For the 6 months of data collected at White Sands, New Mexico, the path length fluctuations have been better than 830 micrometers (with reference to a 300 m baseline and to Zenith) for 90 percent of the time. This type of data analysis, as well as many other site quality characteristics (e.g., rain attenuation, infrastructure, etc.), will be used to determine the suitability of both sites for NASA s future communication services at Ka-band using an array of antennas.

  11. Photon path length distributions for cloudy skies  oxygen A-Band measurements and model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, O.; Pfeilsticker, K.

    2003-03-01

    This paper addresses the statistics underlying cloudy sky radiative transfer (RT) by inspection of the distribution of the path lengths of solar photons. Recent studies indicate that this approach is promising, since it might reveal characteristics about the diffusion process underlying atmospheric radiative transfer (Pfeilsticker, 1999). Moreover, it uses an observable that is directly related to the atmospheric absorption and, therefore, of climatic relevance. However, these studies are based largely on the accuracy of the measurement of the photon path length distribution (PPD). This paper presents a refined analysis method based on high resolution spectroscopy of the oxygen A-band. The method is validated by Monte Carlo simulation atmospheric spectra. Additionally, a new method to measure the effective optical thickness of cloud layers, based on fitting the measured differential transmissions with a 1-dimensional (discrete ordinate) RT model, is presented. These methods are applied to measurements conducted during the cloud radar inter-comparison campaign CLARE’98, which supplied detailed cloud structure information, required for the further analysis. For some exemplary cases, measured path length distributions and optical thicknesses are presented and backed by detailed RT model calculations. For all cases, reasonable PPDs can be retrieved and the effects of the vertical cloud structure are found. The inferred cloud optical thicknesses are in agreement with liquid water path measurements.

  12. 47 CFR 74.644 - Minimum path lengths for fixed links.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minimum path lengths for fixed links. 74.644... Auxiliary Stations § 74.644 Minimum path lengths for fixed links. (a) The distance between end points of a... accordance with the equation set forth below. Frequency band(MHz) Minimum path length(km) Below 1,990 n/a...

  13. 47 CFR 74.644 - Minimum path lengths for fixed links.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum path lengths for fixed links. 74.644... Auxiliary Stations § 74.644 Minimum path lengths for fixed links. (a) The distance between end points of a... accordance with the equation set forth below. Frequency band(MHz) Minimum path length(km) Below 1,990 n/a...

  14. 47 CFR 74.644 - Minimum path lengths for fixed links.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minimum path lengths for fixed links. 74.644... Auxiliary Stations § 74.644 Minimum path lengths for fixed links. (a) The distance between end points of a... accordance with the equation set forth below. Frequency band(MHz) Minimum path length(km) Below 1,990 n/a...

  15. Path Length Entropy Analysis of Diastolic Heart Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Griffel, B.; Zia, M. K.; Fridman, V.; Saponieri, C.; Semmlow, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Early detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) using the acoustic approach, a noninvasive and cost-effective method, would greatly improve the outcome of CAD patients. To detect CAD, we analyze diastolic sounds for possible CAD murmurs. We observed diastolic sounds to exhibit 1/f structure and developed a new method, path length entropy (PLE) and a scaled version (SPLE), to characterize this structure to improve CAD detection. We compare SPLE results to Hurst exponent, Sample entropy and Multi-scale entropy for distinguishing between normal and CAD patients. SPLE achieved a sensitivity-specificity of 80%–81%, the best of the tested methods. However, PLE and SPLE are not sufficient to prove nonlinearity, and evaluation using surrogate data suggests that our cardiovascular sound recordings do not contain significant nonlinear properties. PMID:23930808

  16. Long-length contaminated equipment disposal process path document

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, W.A.

    1998-09-30

    The first objective of the LLCE Process Path Document is to guide future users of this system on how to accomplish the cradle-to-grave process for the disposal of long-length equipment. Information will be provided describing the function and approach to each step in the process. Pertinent documentation, prerequisites, drawings, procedures, hardware, software, and key interfacing organizations will be identified. The second objective is related to the decision to lay up the program until funding is made available to complete it or until a need arises due to failure of an important component in a waste tank. To this end, the document will identify work remaining to be completed for each step of the process and open items or issues that remain to be resolved.

  17. Automated path length and M{sub 56} measurements at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, D.; Tang, J.; Legg, R.

    1997-08-01

    Accurate measurement of path length and path length changes versus momentum (M{sub 56}) are critical for maintaining minimum beam energy spread in the CEBAF (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility) accelerator at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). The relative path length for each circuit of the beam (1256m) must be equal within 1.5 degrees of 1497 MHz RF phase. A relative path length measurement is made by measuring the relative phases of RF signals from a cavity that is separately excited for each pass of a 4.2 {mu}s pulsed beam. This method distinguishes the path length to less than 0.5 path length error. The development of a VME based automated measurement system for path length and M{sub 56} has contributed to faster machine setup time and has the potential for use as a feedback parameter for automated control.

  18. An Exact Algebraic Evaluation of Path-Length Difference for Two-Source Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Seth; Howell, John

    2006-01-01

    When studying wave interference, one often wants to know the difference in path length for two waves arriving at a common point P but coming from adjacent sources. For example, in many contexts interference maxima occur where this path-length difference is an integer multiple of the wavelength. The standard approximation for the path-length…

  19. Simulation of experimental investigations of X-ray spectral path lengths on Iskra-5 laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel'kov, S. A.; Sharov, O. O.

    2011-10-01

    We describe an improved Slater average-ion model employed in the numerical-theoretical analysis of experimental data, which were obtained in the investigation of X-ray spectral path lengths performed on the Iskra-5 laser facility at the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF). The proposed model permits determining the spectral characteristics of the X-ray radiation with an accuracy of a few electronvolts. We outline the results of simulations of experiments with X-ray radiation-heated aluminium and germanium specimens of initial thickness of ~0.1 mm, in which absorption lines arising from 1s—2p transitions in Al and the absorption band arising from 2p—3d transitions in Ge were recorded.

  20. Simulation of experimental investigations of X-ray spectral path lengths on Iskra-5 laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bel'kov, S A; Sharov, O O

    2011-10-31

    We describe an improved Slater average-ion model employed in the numerical-theoretical analysis of experimental data, which were obtained in the investigation of X-ray spectral path lengths performed on the Iskra-5 laser facility at the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF). The proposed model permits determining the spectral characteristics of the X-ray radiation with an accuracy of a few electronvolts. We outline the results of simulations of experiments with X-ray radiation-heated aluminium and germanium specimens of initial thickness of {approx}0.1 mm, in which absorption lines arising from 1s-2p transitions in Al and the absorption band arising from 2p-3d transitions in Ge were recorded.

  1. Temperature variable long path cell for absorption measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shetter, R. E.; Davidson, J. A.; Cantrell, C. A.; Calvert, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    The design and construction of a long path cell for absorption measurements at temperatures ranging from 215-470 K and at pressures from vacuum to 10 atm are described. The cell consists of three concentric stainless-steel tubes; the innermost tube is 6.5-in. in internal diameter, has a volume of about 47 l, and contains White-type optics, six thermocouples, and a gas input tube; and the outermost tube provides a vacuum Dewar around the inner assembly. The optical design and temperature control system for the long path temperature variable cell are examined. The long path cell is applicable for analyzing temperature and pressure dependence of spectra and reaction rates of gases, and the cell has flow and photolysis capabilities for studying transient species and photochemically initiated reactions. A diagram of the cell is provided.

  2. Ray tracing based path-length calculations for polarized light tomographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2015-09-01

    A ray tracing based path length calculation is investigated for polarized light transport in a pixel space. Tomographic imaging using polarized light transport is promising for applications in optical projection tomography of small animal imaging and turbid media with low scattering. Polarized light transport through a medium can have complex effects due to interactions such as optical rotation of linearly polarized light, birefringence, di-attenuation and interior refraction. Here we investigate the effects of refraction of polarized light in a non-scattering medium. This step is used to obtain the initial absorption estimate. This estimate can be used as prior in Monte Carlo (MC) program that simulates the transport of polarized light through a scattering medium to assist in faster convergence of the final estimate. The reflectance for p-polarized (parallel) and s-polarized (perpendicular) are different and hence there is a difference in the intensities that reach the detector end. The algorithm computes the length of the ray in each pixel along the refracted path and this is used to build the weight matrix. This weight matrix with corrected ray path length and the resultant intensity reaching the detector for each ray is used in the algebraic reconstruction (ART) method. The proposed method is tested with numerical phantoms for various noise levels. The refraction errors due to regions of different refractive index are discussed, the difference in intensities with polarization is considered. The improvements in reconstruction using the correction so applied is presented. This is achieved by tracking the path of the ray as well as the intensity of the ray as it traverses through the medium.

  3. Signal absorption effects on HF radio paths near Sodankyla observatory (Finland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskii, D. V.

    2015-05-01

    Studies were performed on three oblique ionospheric sounding (OIS) paths: Gor'kovskaya-Lovozero (St. Petersburg) with a length of 890 km, Sodankyla-Gor'kovskaya (800 km), and Sodankyla-Lovozero (360 km). The data for March 17 and April 14, 2012, the days during the recovery phase of the corresponding magnetic storms, have been analyzed. According to the observations performed at Sodankyla, riometer absorption in the morning-daytime hours was high against a background of very weak magnetic disturbances registered with a magnetometer; a high absorption level was also typical of the second day but during a substantial magnetic disturbance. The signal propagation mode structure and intensity on different paths were compared for the indicated days. The main results achieved are as follows. The OIS signal mode structure at weak (for April 14, 2012) and strong (for March 17, 2012) absorption substantially differed when magnetic disturbances were weak at the same instant. Diffuse reflections from the F2 layer were observed on the first two paths during a magnetic disturbance at night of April 14, 2012. At the same time, diffusivity was absent on the same paths under quiet magnetic conditions in the morning and daytime hours on March 17, 2012. A short-term abrupt increase in the maximum observed frequency of the Es layer (MOF Es) by 30-80% was registered half an hour before a substantial absorption burst on the first path. Signal reflections from the sporadic Es layer were observed only on the first path on March 17, 2012, and April 14, 2012, during the absorption maximum ( A = 6 dB) according to the Sodankyla data, and the signal characteristics differed on those days.

  4. Laser Metrology for an Optical-Path-Length Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gursel, Yekta

    2005-01-01

    Laser gauges have been developed to satisfy requirements specific to monitoring the amplitude of the motion of an optical-path-length modulator that is part of an astronomical interferometer. The modulator includes a corner-cube retroreflector driven by an electromagnetic actuator. During operation of the astronomical interferometer, the electromagnet is excited to produce linear reciprocating motion of the corner-cube retroreflector at an amplitude of 2 to 4 mm at a frequency of 250, 750, or 1,250 Hz. Attached to the corner-cube retroreflector is a small pick-off mirror. To suppress vibrations, a counterweight having a mass equal to that of the corner-cube retroreflector and pick-off mirror is mounted on another electromagnetic actuator that is excited in opposite phase. Each gauge is required to measure the amplitude of the motion of the pick-off mirror, assuming that the motions of the pick-off mirror and the corner-cube retroreflector are identical, so as to measure the amplitude of motion of the corner- cube retroreflector to within an error of the order of picometers at each excitation frequency. Each gauge is a polarization-insensitive heterodyne interferometer that includes matched collimators, beam separators, and photodiodes (see figure). The light needed for operation of the gauge comprises two pairs of laser beams, the beams in each pair being separated by a beat frequency of 80 kHz. The laser beams are generated by an apparatus, denoted the heterodyne plate, that includes stabilized helium-neon lasers, acousto-optical modulators, and associated optical and electronic subsystems. The laser beams are coupled from the heterodyne plate to the collimators via optical fibers.

  5. Optical Path Switching Based Differential Absorption Radiometry for Substance Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system and method are provided for detecting one or more substances. An optical path switch divides sample path radiation into a time series of alternating first polarized components and second polarized components. The first polarized components are transmitted along a first optical path and the second polarized components along a second optical path. A first gasless optical filter train filters the first polarized components to isolate at least a first wavelength band thereby generating first filtered radiation. A second gasless optical filter train filters the second polarized components to isolate at least a second wavelength band thereby generating second filtered radiation. The first wavelength band and second wavelength band are unique. Further, spectral absorption of a substance of interest is different at the first wavelength band as compared to the second wavelength band. A beam combiner combines the first and second filtered radiation to form a combined beam of radiation. A detector is disposed to monitor magnitude of at least a portion of the combined beam alternately at the first wavelength band and the second wavelength band as an indication of the concentration of the substance in the sample path.

  6. Infrared Pulse-laser Long-path Absorption Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Using a Raman-shifted Dye Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minato, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Sasano, Yasuhiro

    1992-01-01

    A pulsed laser source is effective in infrared laser long-path absorption measurements when the optical path length is very long or the reflection from a hard target is utilized, because higher signal-to-noise ratio is obtained in the detection of weak return signals. We have investigated the performance of a pulse-laser long-path absorption system using a hydrogen Raman shifter and a tunable dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG laser, which generates second Stokes radiation in the 2-micron region.

  7. High reflected cubic cavity as long path absorption cell for infrared gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jia; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2014-10-01

    One direct and efficient method to improve the sensitivity of infrared gas sensors is to increase the optical path length of gas cells according to Beer-Lambert Law. In this paper, cubic shaped cavities with high reflected inner coating as novel long path absorption cells for infrared gas sensing were developed. The effective optical path length (EOPL) for a single cubic cavity and tandem cubic cavities were investigated based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) measuring oxygen P11 line at 763 nm. The law of EOPL of a diffuse cubic cavity in relation with the reflectivity of the coating, the port fraction and side length of the cavity was obtained. Experimental results manifested an increase of EOPL for tandem diffuse cubic cavities as the decrease of port fraction of the connecting aperture f', and the EOPL equaled to the sum of that of two single cubic cavities at f'<0.01. The EOPL spectra at infrared wavelength range for different inner coatings including high diffuse coatings and high reflected metallic thin film coatings were deduced.

  8. Estimation of partial optical path length in the brain in subject-specific head models for near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kotaro; Kurihara, Kazuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Obata, Takayuki; Ito, Hiroshi; Okada, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional head models with the structures constructed from the MR head images of 40 volunteers were constructed to analyze light propagation in the subject-specific head models. The mean optical path length in the head and the partial optical path length in the brain at 13 fiducial points for each volunteer were estimated to evaluate the intersubject and spatial variability in the optical path lengths. Although the intersubject variability in the optical path lengths is very high, the spatial variability in the average of the mean optical path length and partial optical path length is similar to the previously reported data. The mean optical path length in the head increases, whereas the partial optical path length in the brain decreases with an increase in the depth of the brain surface. The partial optical path length is highly correlated with the depth of the brain surface in comparison to the mean optical path length in the head.

  9. COMPARISON BETWEEN PATH LENGTHS TRAVELED BY SOLAR ELECTRONS AND IONS IN GROUND-LEVEL ENHANCEMENT EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lun C.; Malandraki, Olga E.; Patsou, Ioanna; Papaioannou, Athanasios; Reames, Donald V.; Ng, Chee K.; Wang, Linghua

    2013-05-01

    We have examined the Wind/3DP/SST electron and Wind/EPACT/LEMT ion data to investigate the path length difference between solar electrons and ions in the ground-level enhancement (GLE) events in solar cycle 23. Assuming that the onset time of metric type II or decameter-hectometric (DH) type III radio bursts is the solar release time of non-relativistic electrons, we have found that within an error range of {+-}10% the deduced path length of low-energy ({approx}27 keV) electrons from their release site near the Sun to the 1 AU observer is consistent with the ion path length deduced by Reames from the onset time analysis. In addition, the solar longitude distribution and IMF topology of the GLE events examined are in favor of the coronal mass ejection-driven shock acceleration origin of observed non-relativistic electrons. We have also found an increase of electron path lengths with increasing electron energies. The increasing rate of path lengths is correlated with the pitch angle distribution (PAD) of peak electron intensities locally measured, with a higher rate corresponding to a broader PAD. The correlation indicates that the path length enhancement is due to the interplanetary scattering experienced by first arriving electrons. The observed path length consistency implies that the maximum stable time of magnetic flux tubes, along which particles transport, could reach 4.8 hr.

  10. Comparison Between Path Lengths Traveled by Solar Electrons and Ions in Ground-Level Enhancement Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Lun C.; Malandraki, Olga E.; Reames, Donald; NG, Chee K.; Wang, Linghua; Patsou, Ioanna; Papaioannou, Athanasios

    2013-01-01

    We have examined the Wind/3DP/SST electron and Wind/EPACT/LEMT ion data to investigate the path length difference between solar electrons and ions in the ground-level enhancement (GLE) events in solar cycle 23. Assuming that the onset time of metric type II or decameter-hectometric (DH) type III radio bursts is the solar release time of non-relativistic electrons, we have found that within an error range of plus or minus 10% the deduced path length of low-energy (approximately 27 keV) electrons from their release site near the Sun to the 1 AU observer is consistent with the ion path length deduced by Reames from the onset time analysis. In addition, the solar longitude distribution and IMF topology of the GLE events examined are in favor of the coronal mass ejection-driven shock acceleration origin of observed non-relativistic electrons.We have also found an increase of electron path lengths with increasing electron energies. The increasing rate of path lengths is correlated with the pitch angle distribution (PAD) of peak electron intensities locally measured, with a higher rate corresponding to a broader PAD. The correlation indicates that the path length enhancement is due to the interplanetary scattering experienced by first arriving electrons. The observed path length consistency implies that the maximum stable time of magnetic flux tubes, along which particles transport, could reach 4.8 hr.

  11. Comparison between Path Lengths Traveled by Solar Electrons and Ions in Ground-Level Enhancement Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lun C.; Malandraki, Olga E.; Reames, Donald V.; Ng, Chee K.; Wang, Linghua; Patsou, Ioanna; Papaioannou, Athanasios

    2013-05-01

    We have examined the Wind/3DP/SST electron and Wind/EPACT/LEMT ion data to investigate the path length difference between solar electrons and ions in the ground-level enhancement (GLE) events in solar cycle 23. Assuming that the onset time of metric type II or decameter-hectometric (DH) type III radio bursts is the solar release time of non-relativistic electrons, we have found that within an error range of ±10% the deduced path length of low-energy (~27 keV) electrons from their release site near the Sun to the 1 AU observer is consistent with the ion path length deduced by Reames from the onset time analysis. In addition, the solar longitude distribution and IMF topology of the GLE events examined are in favor of the coronal mass ejection-driven shock acceleration origin of observed non-relativistic electrons. We have also found an increase of electron path lengths with increasing electron energies. The increasing rate of path lengths is correlated with the pitch angle distribution (PAD) of peak electron intensities locally measured, with a higher rate corresponding to a broader PAD. The correlation indicates that the path length enhancement is due to the interplanetary scattering experienced by first arriving electrons. The observed path length consistency implies that the maximum stable time of magnetic flux tubes, along which particles transport, could reach 4.8 hr.

  12. Optical study of thin-film photovoltaic cells with apparent optical path length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Changsoon; Jeong, Seonju; Lee, Jung-Yong

    2016-09-01

    Extending the insufficient optical path length (OPL) in thin-film photovoltaic cells (PVs) is the key to achieving a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) in devices. Here, we introduce the apparent OPL (AOPL) as a figure of merit for light absorbing capability in thin-film PVs. The optical characteristics such as the structural effects and angular responses in thin-film PVs were analyzed in terms of the AOPL. Although the Lambertian scattering surface yields a broadband absorption enhancement in thin-film PVs, the enhancement is not as effective as in thick-film PVs. On the other hand, nanophotonic schemes are introduced as an approach to increasing the single-pass AOPL by inducing surface plasmon resonance. The scheme using periodic metal gratings is proved to increase the AOPL in a narrow wavelength range and specific polarization, overcoming the Yablonovitch limit. The AOPL calculation can be also adopted in the experimental analysis and a maximum AOPL of 4.15d (where d is the active layer thickness) is exhibited in the absorption band edge region of PTB7:PC70BM-based polymer PVs.

  13. Elastic transducers incorporating finite-length optical paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Kara J.; Washabaugh, Peter D.

    1995-08-01

    Frequently, when designing a structure to incorporate integrated sensors, one sacrifices the stiffness of the system to improve sensitivity. However, the use of interferometric displacement sensors that tessellate throughout the volume of a structure has the potential to allow the precision and range of the component measurement to scale with the geometry of the device rather than the maximum strain in the structure. The design of stiff structures that measure all six resultant-load components is described. In addition, an advanced torsion sensor and a linear acceleration transducer are also discussed. Finally, invariant paths are presented that allow the in situ integrity of a structural volume to be monitored with a single pair of displacement sensors.

  14. A microfabricated fixed path length silicon sample holder improves background subtraction for cryoSAXS

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Jesse B.; Katz, Andrea M.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Warkentin, Matthew A.; Thorne, Robert E.; Pollack, Lois

    2015-01-01

    The application of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) for high-throughput characterization of biological macromolecules in solution is limited by radiation damage. By cryocooling samples, radiation damage and required sample volumes can be reduced by orders of magnitude. However, the challenges of reproducibly creating the identically sized vitrified samples necessary for conventional background subtraction limit the widespread adoption of this method. Fixed path length silicon sample holders for cryoSAXS have been microfabricated to address these challenges. They have low background scattering and X-ray absorption, require only 640 nl of sample, and allow reproducible sample cooling. Data collected in the sample holders from a nominal illuminated sample volume of 2.5 nl are reproducible down to q ≃ 0.02 Å−1, agree with previous cryoSAXS work and are of sufficient quality for reconstructions that match measured crystal structures. These sample holders thus allow faster, more routine cryoSAXS data collection. Additional development is required to reduce sample fracturing and improve data quality at low q. PMID:26089749

  15. Pillar cuvettes: capillary-filled, microliter quartz cuvettes with microscale path lengths for optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Holzner, Gregor; Kriel, Frederik Hermanus; Priest, Craig

    2015-05-01

    The goal of most analytical techniques is to reduce the lower limit of detection; however, it is sometimes necessary to do the opposite. High sample concentrations or samples with high molar absorptivity (e.g., dyes and metal complexes) often require multiple dilution steps or laborious sample preparation prior to spectroscopic analysis. Here, we demonstrate dilution-free, one-step UV-vis spectroscopic analysis of high concentrations of platinum(IV) hexachloride in a micropillar array, that is, "pillar cuvette". The cuvette is spontaneously filled by wicking of the liquid sample into the micropillar array. The pillar height (thus, the film thickness) defines the optical path length, which was reduced to between 10 and 20 μm in this study (3 orders of magnitude smaller than in a typical cuvette). Only one small droplet (∼2 μL) of sample is required, and the dispensed volume need not be precise or even known to the analyst for accurate spectroscopy measurements. For opaque pillars, we show that absorbance is linearly related to platinum concentration (the Beer-Lambert Law). For fully transparent or semitransparent pillars, the measured absorbance was successfully corrected for the fractional surface coverage of the pillars and the transmittance of the pillars and reference. Thus, both opaque and transparent pillars can be applied to absorbance spectroscopy of high absorptivity, microliter samples. It is also shown here that the pillar array has a useful secondary function as an integrated (in-cuvette) filter for particulates. For pillar cuvette measurements of platinum solutions spiked with 6 μm diameter polystyrene spheres, filtered and unfiltered samples gave identical spectra. PMID:25844800

  16. Chord-length and free-path distribution functions for many-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, B. ); Torquato, S. )

    1993-04-15

    We study fundamental morphological descriptors of disordered media (e.g., heterogeneous materials, liquids, and amorphous solids): [ital the] [ital chord]-[ital length] [ital distribution] [ital function] [ital p]([ital z]) and the [ital free]-[ital path] [ital distribution] [ital function] [ital p]([ital z],[ital a]). For concreteness, we will speak in the language of heterogeneous materials composed of two different materials or phases.'' The probability density function [ital p]([ital z]) describes the distribution of chord lengths in the sample and is of great interest in stereology. For example, the first moment of [ital p]([ital z]) is the mean intercept length'' or mean chord length.'' The chord-length distribution function is of importance in transport phenomena and problems involving discrete free paths'' of point particles (e.g., Knudsen diffusion and radiative transport). The free-path distribution function [ital p]([ital z],[ital a]) takes into account the finite size of a simple particle of radius [ital a] undergoing discrete free-path motion in the heterogeneous material and we show that it is actually the chord-length distribution function for the system in which the pore space'' is the space available to a finite-sized particle of radius [ital a]. Thus it is shown that [ital p]([ital z])=[ital p]([ital z],0). We demonstrate that the functions [ital p]([ital z]) and [ital p]([ital z],[ital a]) are related to another fundamentally important morphological descriptor of disordered media, namely, the so-called lineal-path function [ital L]([ital z]) studied by us in previous work [Phys. Rev. A [bold 45], 922 (1992)]. The lineal path function gives the probability of finding a line segment of length [ital z] wholly in one of the phases'' when randomly thrown into the sample.

  17. Relations between ac-dc components and optical path length in photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chungkeun; Sik Shin, Hang; Lee, Myoungho

    2011-07-01

    Photoplethysmography is used in various areas such as vital sign measurement, vascular characteristics analysis, and autonomic nervous system assessment. Photoplethysmographic signals are composed of ac and dc, but it is difficult to find research about the interaction of photoplethysmographic components. This study suggested a model equation combining two Lambert-Beer equations at the onset and peak points of photoplethysmography to evaluate ac characteristics, and verified the model equation through simulation and experiment. In the suggested equation, ac was dependent on dc and optical path length. In the simulation, dc was inversely proportionate to ac sensitivity (slope), and ac and optical path length were proportionate. When dc increased from 10% to 90%, stabilized ac decreased from 1 to 0.89 +/- 0.21, and when optical path length increased from 10% to 90%, stabilized ac increased from 1 to 1.53 +/- 0.40.

  18. Speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography by "path length encoded" angular compounding.

    PubMed

    Iftimia, N; Bouma, B E; Tearney, G J

    2003-04-01

    Speckle, the dominant factor reducing image quality in optical coherence tomography (OCT), limits the ability to identify cellular structures that are essential for diagnosis of a variety of diseases. We describe a new high-speed method for implementing angular compounding by path length encoding (ACPE) for reducing speckle in OCT images. By averaging images obtained at different incident angles, with each image encoded by path length, ACPE maintains high-speed image acquisition and requires minimal modifications to OCT probe optics. ACPE images obtained from tissue phantoms and human skin in vivo demonstrate a qualitative improvement over traditional OCT and an increased SNR that correlates well with theory. PMID:12683852

  19. Optical path switching based differential absorption radiometry for substance detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An optical path switch divides sample path radiation into a time series of alternating first polarized components and second polarized components. The first polarized components are transmitted along a first optical path and the second polarized components along a second optical path. A first gasless optical filter train filters the first polarized components to isolate at least a first wavelength band thereby generating first filtered radiation. A second gasless optical filter train filters the second polarized components to isolate at least a second wavelength band thereby generating second filtered radiation. A beam combiner combines the first and second filtered radiation to form a combined beam of radiation. A detector is disposed to monitor magnitude of at least a portion of the combined beam alternately at the first wavelength band and the second wavelength band as an indication of the concentration of the substance in the sample path.

  20. Optical path switching based differential absorption radiometry for substance detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An optical path switch divides sample path radiation into a time series of alternating first polarized components and second polarized components. The first polarized components are transmitted along a first optical path and the second polarized components along a second optical path. A first gasless optical filter train filters the first polarized components to isolate at least a first wavelength band thereby generating first filtered radiation. A second gasless optical filter train filters the second polarized components to isolate at least a second wavelength band thereby generating second filtered radiation. A beam combiner combines the first and second filtered radiation to form a combined beam of radiation. A detector is disposed to monitor magnitude of at least a portion of the combined beam alternately at the first wavelength band and the second wavelength band as an indication of the concentration of the substance in the sample path.

  1. Path Length Control in a Nulling Coronagraph with a MEMS Deformable Mirror and a Calibration Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Shanti R.; Wallacea, J. Kent; Samuele, Rocco; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy; Hicks, Brian; Jung, Paul; Lane, Benjamin; Levine, B. Martin; Mendillo, Chris; Schmidtlin, Edouard; Shao, Mike; Stewart, Jason B.

    2008-01-01

    We report progress on a nulling coronagraph intended for direct imaging of extrasolar planets. White light is suppressed in an interferometer, and phase errors are measured by a second interferometer. A 1020-pixel MEMS deformable mirror in the first interferometer adjusts the path length across the pupil. A feedback control system reduces deflections of the deformable mirror to order of 1 nm rms.

  2. Achromatic recirculated chicane with fixed geometry and independently variable path length and momentum compaction

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David R.; Neil, George R.

    2005-04-26

    A particle beam recirculated chicane geometry that, through the inducement of a pair of 180 degree bends directed by the poles of a pair of controllable magnetic fields allows for variation of dipole position, return loop radii and steering/focussing, thereby allowing the implementation of independent variation of path length and momentum compaction.

  3. 47 CFR 74.644 - Minimum path lengths for fixed links.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum path lengths for fixed links. 74.644 Section 74.644 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Television Broadcast Auxiliary Stations § 74.644...

  4. 47 CFR 74.644 - Minimum path lengths for fixed links.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minimum path lengths for fixed links. 74.644 Section 74.644 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Television Broadcast Auxiliary Stations § 74.644...

  5. [A path-length correction method on biochemical parameter nondestructive measuring of folium].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Xuan; Zhang, Guang-Jun; Li, Qing-Bo

    2010-05-01

    Vis/NIR spectroscopy technology is capable of analyzing the content of biochemical parameter in folium rapidly and nondestructively. In the process of spectrum analysis, the variations in path-length between different samples exist, with the random light scattering and leaf thickness perturbations, which influence the precision of quantitative analysis model. In order to resolve this problem, an improved path-length correction method based on Extended Multiplicative Scattering Correction is presented. In this paper, firstly the theory of EMSC algorithm is deduced. EMSC method incorporates both chemical terms and wavelength functions to help realize the efficient separation of path-length and interest concentration. Secondly two experiments were implemented to demonstrate the validity of the method. In Experiment 1, sixteen samples of different thickness but almost the same chlorophyll content were selected, and how the path-length affects the spectrum was compared, after EMSC preprocessing, the variable coefficient of spectrum could approach the repeatability error of spectrometer. In Experiment 2, thirty-two samples of different thickness and chlorophyll content were selected. PLS model established using cross validation was employed to evaluate the efficiency of the presented algorithm. Before the preprocessing, the root mean squared error of prediction is 3.9 SPAD with 5 principal components. After preprocessing, the predicted root mean squared error is 2.2 SPAD with 12 principal components. The results indicate that the improved EMSC preprocessing method could exactly eliminate the spectrum difference caused by the path-length variations between different foliums, enhance the sensitivity of concentration and spectral data, and increase the precision of calibrated model. PMID:20672624

  6. Path-length measurement performance evaluation of polarizing laser interferometer prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-qiong; Luo, Zi-ren; Liu, He-shan; Dong, Yu-hui; Jin, Gang

    2015-02-01

    The space laser interferometer has been considered the most promising means for detecting gravitational waves and improving the accuracy and spatial resolution of the Earth's gravity model. An on-ground polarizing laser interferometer prototype equipped with one reference interferometer and two measurement interferometers having equal-length arms is presented in the paper. The laser interferometer prototype is designed as the demonstration of a Chinese space laser interferometer antenna in the future, of which the path-length measurement performance evaluation and preliminary noise analysis are investigated here. The results show that the path-length measurement sensitivity is better than 200 pm/Hz½ in the frequency band of 10 mHz-1 Hz, and the sensitivity of measuring the motion of a sinusoidally driven testmass is better than 100 pm within the frequency regime of 1 mHz-1 Hz. In this way, laboratory activities have demonstrated the feasibility of this prototype to measure tiny path-length fluctuations of the simulated testmass. As a next step, adopting an integrated design of optics and optical substrate to enhance the stability of the laser interferometer is being planned, and other key techniques included in the space laser interferometer such as laser pointing modulation and laser phase-locking control are to be implanted into this prototype are under consideration.

  7. Tapered laser rods as a means of minimizing the path length of trapped barrel mode rays

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J.; Honea, Eric C.; Payne, Stephen A.; Mercer, Ian; Perry, Michael D.

    2005-08-30

    By tapering the diameter of a flanged barrel laser rod over its length, the maximum trapped path length of a barrel mode can be dramatically reduced, thereby reducing the ability of the trapped spontaneous emission to negatively impact laser performance through amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). Laser rods with polished barrels and flanged end caps have found increasing application in diode array end-pumped laser systems. The polished barrel of the rod serves to confine diode array pump light within the rod. In systems utilizing an end-pumping geometry and such polished barrel laser rods, the pump light that is introduced into one or both ends of the laser rod, is ducted down the length of the rod via the total internal reflections (TIRs) that occur when the light strikes the rod's barrel. A disadvantage of using polished barrel laser rods is that such rods are very susceptible to barrel mode paths that can trap spontaneous emission over long path lengths. This trapped spontaneous emission can then be amplified through stimulated emission resulting in a situation where the stored energy available to the desired lasing mode is effectively depleted, which then negatively impacts the laser's performance, a result that is effectively reduced by introducing a taper onto the laser rod.

  8. Modeling the average shortest-path length in growth of word-adjacency networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulig, Andrzej; DroŻdŻ, Stanisław; Kwapień, Jarosław; OświÈ©cimka, Paweł

    2015-03-01

    We investigate properties of evolving linguistic networks defined by the word-adjacency relation. Such networks belong to the category of networks with accelerated growth but their shortest-path length appears to reveal the network size dependence of different functional form than the ones known so far. We thus compare the networks created from literary texts with their artificial substitutes based on different variants of the Dorogovtsev-Mendes model and observe that none of them is able to properly simulate the novel asymptotics of the shortest-path length. Then, we identify the local chainlike linear growth induced by grammar and style as a missing element in this model and extend it by incorporating such effects. It is in this way that a satisfactory agreement with the empirical result is obtained.

  9. Correlation between weighted spectral distribution and average path length in evolving networks.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Bo; Shi, Jianmai; Wu, Xiaoqun; Nie, Yuanping; Huang, Chengdong; Du, Jing; Zhou, Ying; Guo, Ronghua; Tao, Yerong

    2016-02-01

    The weighted spectral distribution (WSD) is a metric defined on the normalized Laplacian spectrum. In this study, synchronic random graphs are first used to rigorously analyze the metric's scaling feature, which indicates that the metric grows sublinearly as the network size increases, and the metric's scaling feature is demonstrated to be common in networks with Gaussian, exponential, and power-law degree distributions. Furthermore, a deterministic model of diachronic graphs is developed to illustrate the correlation between the slope coefficient of the metric's asymptotic line and the average path length, and the similarities and differences between synchronic and diachronic random graphs are investigated to better understand the correlation. Finally, numerical analysis is presented based on simulated and real-world data of evolving networks, which shows that the ratio of the WSD to the network size is a good indicator of the average path length. PMID:26931591

  10. Round-Trip System Available to Measure Path Length Variation in Korea VLBI System for Geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, Hongjong; Kondo, Tetsuro; Lee, Jinoo; Kim, Tuhwan; Kim, Myungho; Kim, Suchul; Park, Jinsik; Ju, Hyunhee

    2010-01-01

    The construction project of Korea Geodetic VLBI officially started in October 2008. The construction of all systems will be completed by the end of 2011. The project was named Korea VLBI system for Geodesy (KVG), and its main purpose is to maintain the Korea Geodetic Datum. In case of the KVG system, an observation room with an H-maser frequency standard is located in a building separated from the antenna by several tens of meters. Therefore KVG system will adopt a so-called round-trip system to transmit reference signals to the antenna with reduction of the effect of path length variations. KVG s round-trip system is designed not only to use either metal or optical fiber cables, but also to measure path length variations directly. We present this unique round trip system for KVG.

  11. Correlation between weighted spectral distribution and average path length in evolving networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Bo; Shi, Jianmai; Wu, Xiaoqun; Nie, Yuanping; Huang, Chengdong; Du, Jing; Zhou, Ying; Guo, Ronghua; Tao, Yerong

    2016-02-01

    The weighted spectral distribution (WSD) is a metric defined on the normalized Laplacian spectrum. In this study, synchronic random graphs are first used to rigorously analyze the metric's scaling feature, which indicates that the metric grows sublinearly as the network size increases, and the metric's scaling feature is demonstrated to be common in networks with Gaussian, exponential, and power-law degree distributions. Furthermore, a deterministic model of diachronic graphs is developed to illustrate the correlation between the slope coefficient of the metric's asymptotic line and the average path length, and the similarities and differences between synchronic and diachronic random graphs are investigated to better understand the correlation. Finally, numerical analysis is presented based on simulated and real-world data of evolving networks, which shows that the ratio of the WSD to the network size is a good indicator of the average path length.

  12. Modeling the average shortest-path length in growth of word-adjacency networks.

    PubMed

    Kulig, Andrzej; Drożdż, Stanisław; Kwapień, Jarosław; Oświȩcimka, Paweł

    2015-03-01

    We investigate properties of evolving linguistic networks defined by the word-adjacency relation. Such networks belong to the category of networks with accelerated growth but their shortest-path length appears to reveal the network size dependence of different functional form than the ones known so far. We thus compare the networks created from literary texts with their artificial substitutes based on different variants of the Dorogovtsev-Mendes model and observe that none of them is able to properly simulate the novel asymptotics of the shortest-path length. Then, we identify the local chainlike linear growth induced by grammar and style as a missing element in this model and extend it by incorporating such effects. It is in this way that a satisfactory agreement with the empirical result is obtained. PMID:25871160

  13. Short path length pQCD corrections to energy loss in the quark gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbe, Isobel; Horowitz, W. A.

    2016-01-01

    The twin identifications of high-pT enhancement and low-pT collective behaviour in the shockingly small systems of interacting particles created in pA collisions calls for a detailed theoretical energy loss analysis. We study the way in which energy is dissipated in the QGP created in pA collisions by calculating the short path length corrections to the DGLV energy loss formulae that have produced excellent predictions for AA collisions. We find that, shockingly, because of the large formation time assumption (used in the DGLV calculation), a highly non-trivial cancellation of correction terms results in a null short path length correction to the DGLV energy loss formula. We investigate the effect of relaxing the large formation time assumption in the final stages of the calculation and find, because of the separation distance between production and scattering centre is integrated over from 0 to ∞, ≳ 100% corrections, even in the large path length approximation employed by DGLV.

  14. A Run-Length Encoding Approach for Path Analysis of C. elegans Search Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hongkyun; Furst, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans explores the environment using a combination of different movement patterns, which include straight movement, reversal, and turns. We propose to quantify C. elegans movement behavior using a computer vision approach based on run-length encoding of step-length data. In this approach, the path of C. elegans is encoded as a string of characters, where each character represents a path segment of a specific type of movement. With these encoded string data, we perform k-means cluster analysis to distinguish movement behaviors resulting from different genotypes and food availability. We found that shallow and sharp turns are the most critical factors in distinguishing the differences among the movement behaviors. To validate our approach, we examined the movement behavior of tph-1 mutants that lack an enzyme responsible for serotonin biosynthesis. A k-means cluster analysis with the path string-encoded data showed that tph-1 movement behavior on food is similar to that of wild-type animals off food. We suggest that this run-length encoding approach is applicable to trajectory data in animal or human mobility data. PMID:27462364

  15. Multibeam long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy instrument: a device for simultaneous measurements along multiple light paths.

    PubMed

    Pundt, Irene; Mettendorf, Kai Uwe

    2005-08-10

    A novel long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) apparatus for measuring tropospheric trace gases and the first results from its use are presented: We call it the multibeam instrument. It is the first active DOAS device that emits several light beams simultaneously through only one telescope and with only one lamp as a light source, allowing simultaneous measurement along multiple light paths. In contrast to conventional DOAS instruments, several small mirrors are positioned near the lamp, creating multiple virtual light sources that emit one light beam each in one specific direction. The possibility of error due to scattering between the light beams is negligible. The trace-gas detection limits of NO2, SO2, O3, and H2CO are similar to those of the traditional long-path DOAS instrument. PMID:16114540

  16. Visibility oscillation in a multimode laser interferometer signal and its use in optimizing path lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruden, E. L.; Camacho, J. F.; Lynn, A. G.

    2013-10-01

    The interference signal visibility V (difference to sum ratio of intensities at maximum and minimum interference) of an interferometer that uses a multimode laser is here derived for a given laser gain profile and spectral mode separation as a function of the difference ZS between the probe and reference beam optical path lengths and the spectral separation kS between the center of the laser gain profile and the nearest laser mode of higher frequency. kS has a significant effect on V for a given ZS. This parameter, in lasers where it sweeps freely across the gain profile, and other effects, such as various misalignments and optical coupling inefficiencies, render V alone an unreliable parameter for quantifying ZS (for the purpose of reducing it, say). However, the difference to sum ratio of the maximum and minimum V due to variations in kS for a given ZS is an intrinsic property of the laser insensitive to configurational details. Parameter W so defined, therefore, proves very useful for balancing path lengths. This is of particular importance for systems where probe and/or reference beams are transmitted via long single mode optical fibers, so this application is detailed. Optical path lengths within such fibers often cannot be measured to sufficient accuracy by spatial path length measurements due to fiber nonuniformity resulting in variations in the mode's group velocity (needed to convert to optical path length). Two examples are provided using different makes and models of 0.633 μm HeNe lasers with similar specifications. In the first case, the function W(ZS) is calculated directly from the laser's published gain profile and mode separation. In the second case, W is determined empirically for a range of ZS values for a laser with an unknown gain profile in a (heterodyned) interferometer whose interference signal oscillates between maximum and minimum intensity at 80 MHz due to the reference beam's optical frequency being acousto-optically upshifted by that

  17. Length Dependent Thermal Conductivity Measurements Yield Phonon Mean Free Path Spectra in Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hang; Hua, Chengyun; Ding, Ding; Minnich, Austin J.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal conductivity measurements over variable lengths on nanostructures such as nanowires provide important information about the mean free paths (MFPs) of the phonons responsible for heat conduction. However, nearly all of these measurements have been interpreted using an average MFP even though phonons in many crystals possess a broad MFP spectrum. Here, we present a reconstruction method to obtain MFP spectra of nanostructures from variable-length thermal conductivity measurements. Using this method, we investigate recently reported length-dependent thermal conductivity measurements on SiGe alloy nanowires and suspended graphene ribbons. We find that the recent measurements on graphene imply that 70% of the heat in graphene is carried by phonons with MFPs longer than 1 micron. PMID:25764977

  18. Length dependent thermal conductivity measurements yield phonon mean free path spectra in nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hang; Hua, Chengyun; Ding, Ding; Minnich, Austin J

    2015-01-01

    Thermal conductivity measurements over variable lengths on nanostructures such as nanowires provide important information about the mean free paths (MFPs) of the phonons responsible for heat conduction. However, nearly all of these measurements have been interpreted using an average MFP even though phonons in many crystals possess a broad MFP spectrum. Here, we present a reconstruction method to obtain MFP spectra of nanostructures from variable-length thermal conductivity measurements. Using this method, we investigate recently reported length-dependent thermal conductivity measurements on SiGe alloy nanowires and suspended graphene ribbons. We find that the recent measurements on graphene imply that 70% of the heat in graphene is carried by phonons with MFPs longer than 1 micron. PMID:25764977

  19. Cosmic-ray propagation in the Galaxy and in the heliosphere - The path-length distribution at low energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Simpson, J. A.; Guzik, T. G.; Wefel, J. P.; Margolis, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    The energy dependence of the path-length distribution of cosmic rays at low energies, below relativistic velocities, is studied, and its implications for models of cosmic-ray confinement and propagation in the Galaxy and Galactic halo, including the effects of a possible Galactic wind, are studied. It is found that the mean free path in Galactic propagation must be fully energy-dependent, with the mean of an exponential path-length distribution increasing with increasing energy below 1 GeV per nucleon and decreasing with increasing energy above 1 GeV per nucleon. This indicates that, at low energies, diffusion is not the controlling process. The path-length distribution is not purely exponential but is depleted in short path lengths at low energies. This depletion is energy-dependent, being largest at low energies and decreasing with increasing energy.

  20. Determinants of daily path length in black and gold howler monkeys (Alouatta caraya) in northeastern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Raño, Mariana; Kowalewski, Martin M; Cerezo, Alexis M; Garber, Paul A

    2016-08-01

    Models used to explain the social organization of primates suggest that variation in daily path length (DPL) is a response to variation in resource distribution and the intensity of intragroup feeding competition. However, daily path length may be affected by a number of other factors including the availability and distribution of nutritionally complementary food items, temperature which can influence activity budget, patterns of subgrouping, and the frequency and function of intergroup encounters. In this 6-month study (total 495 hr of quantitative data), we examined daily path lengths in two neighboring groups of black and gold howler monkeys (Alouatta caraya) inhabiting a semi-deciduous gallery forest in San Cayetano (27° 30'S, 58° 41'W), in the northwest province of Corrientes, Argentina. Both study groups were of similar size and composition. We identified relationships across groups between time spent feeding on fruits, leaves, and flowers, the number of trees visited, group spread, frequency of intergroup encounters, mean daily temperature, and DPL. Our results suggest that variation in food availability had a significant impact on howler ranging behavior by increasing DPL under conditions of high immature and mature fruit availability, and by decreasing DPL with increased availability and increased time invested in feeding on mature leaves. These results do not support the contention that a reduction in food availability or an increase in within-group feeding competition increased DPL in black and gold howler monkeys. DPL in black and gold howlers is influenced by several interrelated factors. In this regard we suggest that models of socio-ecology and ecological constraints need to reconsider how factors such as individual nutritional requirements, social tolerance and group cohesion, and the spatial and temporal availability of preferred and nearby food resources influence primate ranging behavior. Am. J. Primatol. 78:825-837, 2016. © 2016 Wiley

  1. On the path length of an excess electron interacted with optical phonons in a molecular chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhno, V. D.

    2008-08-01

    We show that in a molecular chain with dispersionless phonons at zero temperature, a “quasistationary” moving soliton state of an excess electron is possible. As the soliton velocity vanishes, the path length of the excess electron exponentially tends to infinity. It is demonstrated that in the presence of dispersion, when the soliton initial velocity exceeds the maximum group velocity of the chain, the soliton slows down until it reaches the maximum group velocity and then moves stationarily at this maximum group velocity. A conclusion is made of the fallacy of some works were the existence of moving polarons in a dispersionless medium is considered infeasible.

  2. Contact surface motion paths associated with leg length inequality following unilateral total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Budenberg, Sarah; Redmond, Anthony; White, Derek; Grainger, Andrew; O'Connor, Philip; Stone, Martin H; Stewart, Todd D

    2012-12-01

    In the past, there has been little research into leg length inequality (LLI) and its effect on hip arthroplasty bearing longevity. This investigation aimed to determine the effects of post-operative LLI on hip motions during gait and to postulate the subsequent influence on the wear of the artificial hip joint replacement. Motion data from a clinical gait analysis were processed with an in-house computational model to plot graphs showing the movement of loci of 20 points on the femoral head during one gait cycle for two cohorts: 19 LLI patients and 38 normal healthy patients. Loci paths were quantified by calculating the aspect ratio (AR) of the path shape. It was found that on average, LLI patients had a reduction in flexion/extension and abduction/adduction. Furthermore, the AR of LLI patients was found to be 8% smaller than the normal group. The shorter, more multidirectional, motion paths in LLI patients would suggest the potential for greater wear in a polyethylene bearing compared to an asymptomatic, non-LLI patient. The results have potential implications towards preclinical wear testing of joint replacements. PMID:23636960

  3. The effect of path length and display size on memory for spatial information.

    PubMed

    Guérard, Katherine; Tremblay, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    In serial memory for spatial information, some studies showed that recall performance suffers when the distance between successive locations increases relatively to the size of the display in which they are presented (the path length effect; e.g., Parmentier et al., 2005) but not when distance is increased by enlarging the size of the display (e.g., Smyth & Scholey, 1994). In the present study, we examined the effect of varying the absolute and relative distance between to-be-remembered items on memory for spatial information. We manipulated path length using small (15″) and large (64″) screens within the same design. In two experiments, we showed that distance was disruptive mainly when it is varied relatively to a fixed reference frame, though increasing the size of the display also had a small deleterious effect on recall. The insertion of a retention interval did not influence these effects, suggesting that rehearsal plays a minor role in mediating the effects of distance on serial spatial memory. We discuss the potential role of perceptual organization in light of the pattern of results. PMID:22246063

  4. New method for path-length equalization of long single-mode fibers for interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M.; Monnier, J. D.; Ozdowy, K.; Woillez, J.; Perrin, G.

    2014-07-01

    The ability to use single mode (SM) fibers for beam transport in optical interferometry offers practical advantages over conventional long vacuum pipes. One challenge facing fiber transport is maintaining constant differential path length in an environment where environmental thermal variations can lead to cm-level variations from day to night. We have fabricated three composite cables of length 470 m, each containing 4 copper wires and 3 SM fibers that operate at the astronomical H band (1500-1800 nm). Multiple fibers allow us to test performance of a circular core fiber (SMF28), a panda-style polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber, and a lastly a specialty dispersion-compensated PM fiber. We will present experimental results using precision electrical resistance measurements of the of a composite cable beam transport system. We find that the application of 1200 W over a 470 m cable causes the optical path difference in air to change by 75 mm (+/- 2 mm) and the resistance to change from 5.36 to 5.50Ω. Additionally, we show control of the dispersion of 470 m of fiber in a single polarization using white light interference fringes (λc=1575 nm, Δλ=75 nm) using our method.

  5. A volumetric approach to path-length measurements is essential when treating radiotherapy with modulated beams

    SciTech Connect

    Forde, Elizabeth; Booth, Jeremy; Leech, Michelle

    2014-07-01

    The established dosimetric benefits of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy have lead to their increased use in prostate radiotherapy. Complimenting these techniques, volumetric image guidance has supported increased positional accuracy. In addition, 3-dimensional image guidance has also allowed for assessment of potential dosimetric variation that can be attributed to a deformation of either internal or external structures, such as rectal distension or body contour. Compounding these issues is the variation of tissue density through which the new field position passes and also the variation of dose across a modulated beam. Despite the growing level of interest in this area, there are only a limited number of articles that examine the effect of a variation in beam path length, particularly across a modulated field. IMRT and volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT) fields are dynamic in nature, and the dose gradient within these fields is variable. Assessment of variation of path length away from the beam's central axis and across the entire field is vital where there is considerable variation of dose within the field, such as IMRT and VMAT. In these cases, reliance on the traditional central axis to focus skin distances is no longer appropriate. This article discusses these more subtle challenges that may have a significant clinical effect if left unrecognized and undervalued.

  6. The Sensitivity of Sediment Path-Lengths to Channel Morphology: Results from Physical Models of Braided Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprak, A.; Ashmore, P.; Peirce, S.; Wheaton, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The travel distances of coarse sediment in gravel-bed rivers during floods, or their path-lengths, exhibit strong dependencies on the arrangement of geomorphic units they are sourced from, routed through or around, and finally deposited on. Despite previous research on both braiding and single-thread meandering streams, a coherent rule set which relates particle path lengths to morphology remains elusive; such a rule set has the potential to vastly simplify models which seek to predict sediment transport or morphodynamics in these channels. Here we seek to understand the sensitivity of particle path-length distributions to morphology via a physical model of a braided stream, by using fluorescent tracer particles to track sediment path-lengths. These flume experiments provide a rich dataset composed of before-and-after bed photogrammetry, along with high-resolution photography and high-speed video documentation of particle deposition and mobility. Initial analyses indicate a strong coupling between particle path-length and the spatial arrangement of in-channel geomorphic units, with bar heads and point bars frequently acting as sink locations for tracer particles. This is interesting as it suggests that morphodynamics are in part contingent on morphology with strong positive feedbacks on hydraulics, deposition and negative feedbacks on path-length. Several mechanisms of braiding were captured in the simulations as erosional source processes for the tracers, including chute cutoff of point bars, bank erosion, channel incision, and bar edge trimming. These results may help inform the development of morphodynamic models for braided rivers which rely on particle path-lengths to simplify sediment transport algorithms, and such relations between channel morphology and path-length hold the potential to benefit numerous other modeling efforts, as well as provide a heuristic framework with which to understand fluvial morphodynamics.

  7. Comparison between solar electron and ion path lengths traveled during the Ground-Level Enhancement events in solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malandraki, Olga; Tan, Lun; Reames, Donald; Ng, Chee; Wang, Linghua; Patsou, Ioanna; Papaioannou, Athanasios

    2014-05-01

    The inconsistency of electron and ion path lengths during Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events remains an open issue. In order to investigate the difference between the electron and ion path lengths during the Ground-Level Enhancement (GLE) events in solar cycle 23, electron and ion data from the WIND/3DP/SST and WIND/EPACT/LEMT instruments respectively have been used. The electron path lengths were determined for the GLEs in solar cycle 23 assuming that the solar release time of non-relativistic electrons is well represented by the onset time of metric type II or decametre-hectometric (DH) type III radio bursts. The values estimated for low-energy electrons (~ 27 keV) were compared to the ion path lengths deduced by Reames for the GLEs in solar cycle 23 based on the onset-time analysis and consistency within an error range of 10% was found. In addition, the electron path lengths were found to increase with increasing electron energies, with the increasing rate of path lengths corresponding to broader position angle distribution (PAD) of electrons, which suggests that electron path length enhancement is due to interplanetary scattering experienced by first-arriving electrons. Furthermore, the solar longitude distribution and IMF topology of the GLE events examined support that the non-relativistic electrons observed have been accelerated in shocks driven by CMEs. Finally, it should be stressed that the observed path length consistency leads to stability of magnetic flux tubes along which particles travel, with a maximum stability time of ~ 4.8 hours, which could be very important for forecasting since, based on the observed onset time of the electron event, it is possible to observe the arrival and duration of the proton event.

  8. Long-path supercontinuum absorption spectroscopy for measurement of atmospheric constituents.

    PubMed

    Brown, David M; Shi, Kebin; Liu, Zhiwen; Philbrick, C R

    2008-06-01

    A supercontinuum source has been proposed as a new tool for measurement of minor species concentrations on long paths through the atmosphere. The present work describes results from recent experiments that demonstrate the potential for Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (DAS) and Spectral Pattern Recognition Differential Absorption Lidar (SPR-DIAL) measurements utilizing a supercontinuum source. As an initial example of this measurement approach, the results include the quantification of water vapor concentration through indoor and outdoor path absorption measurements using a collimated supercontinuum source. Experimental spectra are compared with equivalent simulations from MODTRAN??? versions 4 and 5 to examine the water vapor band between 1300 and 1500 nm to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach. PMID:18545560

  9. In-situ detection of tropospheric OH radicals by folded long-path laser absorption. Results from the POPCORN Field Campaign in August 1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, H.-P.; Brandenburger, U.; Brauers, T.; Hausmann, M.; Ehhalt, D. H.

    Ground based in-situ measurements of tropospheric hydroxyl radicals were conducted by folded long-path laser absorption as part of the field campaign POPCORN in August 1994. The OH instrument used an open optical multiple-reflection cell of 38.5 m base length through which the laser beam was passed up to 80 times. The broadband emission of a short-pulse UV laser together with a multichannel detection system allowed the simultaneous observation of six OH absorption lines in a spectral interval of Δλ≃0.24 nm at 308.1nm (A²Σ+,υ‧ = 0← X²Π,υ″ = 0 transition). Along with the OH radicals, the trace gases SO2, HCHO, and naphthalene were measured by this technique. The large spectral detection range covered a multitude of rotational absorption lines of these trace gases which were all used for multicomponent analysis, thus allowing a specific and sensitive detection of tropospheric OH radicals. An average 2σ detection limit of 1.5 × 106 OH/cm³ for an integration time of 200 seconds and an absorption light path length of 1848 m was determined from the field measurements. In total, 392 OH data were obtained by long-path absorption during 16 days of field measurements. The observed OH concentrations reached peak values of 13 × 106 cm-3 at noon.

  10. Two Upper Bounds for the Weighted Path Length of Binary Trees. Report No. UIUCDCS-R-73-565.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pradels, Jean Louis

    Rooted binary trees with weighted nodes are structures encountered in many areas, such as coding theory, searching and sorting, information storage and retrieval. The path length is a meaningful quantity which gives indications about the expected time of a search or the length of a code, for example. In this paper, two sharp bounds for the total…

  11. DIC image reconstruction using an energy minimization framework to visualize optical path length distribution

    PubMed Central

    Koos, Krisztian; Molnár, József; Kelemen, Lóránd; Tamás, Gábor; Horvath, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Label-free microscopy techniques have numerous advantages such as low phototoxicity, simple setup and no need for fluorophores or other contrast materials. Despite their advantages, most label-free techniques cannot visualize specific cellular compartments or the location of proteins and the image formation limits quantitative evaluation. Differential interference contrast (DIC) is a qualitative microscopy technique that shows the optical path length differences within a specimen. We propose a variational framework for DIC image reconstruction. The proposed method largely outperforms state-of-the-art methods on synthetic, artificial and real tests and turns DIC microscopy into an automated high-content imaging tool. Image sets and the source code of the examined algorithms are made publicly available. PMID:27453091

  12. Beam splitter and method for generating equal optical path length beams

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Shinan; Takacs, Peter

    2003-08-26

    The present invention is a beam splitter for splitting an incident beam into first and second beams so that the first and second beams have a fixed separation and are parallel upon exiting. The beam splitter includes a first prism, a second prism, and a film located between the prisms. The first prism is defined by a first thickness and a first perimeter which has a first major base. The second prism is defined by a second thickness and a second perimeter which has a second major base. The film is located between the first major base and the second major base for splitting the incident beam into the first and second beams. The first and second perimeters are right angle trapezoidal shaped. The beam splitter is configured for generating equal optical path length beams.

  13. Determining average path length and average trapping time on generalized dual dendrimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Guan, Jihong

    2015-03-01

    Dendrimer has wide number of important applications in various fields. In some cases during transport or diffusion process, it transforms into its dual structure named Husimi cactus. In this paper, we study the structure properties and trapping problem on a family of generalized dual dendrimer with arbitrary coordination numbers. We first calculate exactly the average path length (APL) of the networks. The APL increases logarithmically with the network size, indicating that the networks exhibit a small-world effect. Then we determine the average trapping time (ATT) of the trapping process in two cases, i.e., the trap placed on a central node and the trap is uniformly distributed in all the nodes of the network. In both case, we obtain explicit solutions of ATT and show how they vary with the networks size. Besides, we also discuss the influence of the coordination number on trapping efficiency.

  14. Acoustic method for measuring the sound speed of gases over small path lengths.

    PubMed

    Olfert, J S; Checkel, M D; Koch, C R

    2007-05-01

    Acoustic "phase shift" methods have been used in the past to accurately measure the sound speed of gases. In this work, a phase shift method for measuring the sound speed of gases over small path lengths is presented. We have called this method the discrete acoustic wave and phase detection (DAWPD) method. Experimental results show that the DAWPD method gives accurate (+/-3.2 ms) and predictable measurements that closely match theory. The sources of uncertainty in the DAWPD method are examined and it is found that ultrasonic reflections and changes in the frequency ratio of the transducers (the ratio of driving frequency to resonant frequency) can be major sources of error. Experimentally, it is shown how these sources of uncertainty can be minimized. PMID:17552851

  15. DIC image reconstruction using an energy minimization framework to visualize optical path length distribution.

    PubMed

    Koos, Krisztian; Molnár, József; Kelemen, Lóránd; Tamás, Gábor; Horvath, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Label-free microscopy techniques have numerous advantages such as low phototoxicity, simple setup and no need for fluorophores or other contrast materials. Despite their advantages, most label-free techniques cannot visualize specific cellular compartments or the location of proteins and the image formation limits quantitative evaluation. Differential interference contrast (DIC) is a qualitative microscopy technique that shows the optical path length differences within a specimen. We propose a variational framework for DIC image reconstruction. The proposed method largely outperforms state-of-the-art methods on synthetic, artificial and real tests and turns DIC microscopy into an automated high-content imaging tool. Image sets and the source code of the examined algorithms are made publicly available. PMID:27453091

  16. Correlations between psychometric schizotypy, scan path length, fixations on the eyes and face recognition.

    PubMed

    Hills, Peter J; Eaton, Elizabeth; Pake, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    Psychometric schizotypy in the general population correlates negatively with face recognition accuracy, potentially due to deficits in inhibition, social withdrawal, or eye-movement abnormalities. We report an eye-tracking face recognition study in which participants were required to match one of two faces (target and distractor) to a cue face presented immediately before. All faces could be presented with or without paraphernalia (e.g., hats, glasses, facial hair). Results showed that paraphernalia distracted participants, and that the most distracting condition was when the cue and the distractor face had paraphernalia but the target face did not, while there was no correlation between distractibility and participants' scores on the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ). Schizotypy was negatively correlated with proportion of time fixating on the eyes and positively correlated with not fixating on a feature. It was negatively correlated with scan path length and this variable correlated with face recognition accuracy. These results are interpreted as schizotypal traits being associated with a restricted scan path leading to face recognition deficits. PMID:25835241

  17. The distribution of path lengths of self avoiding walks on Erdős–Rényi networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishby, Ido; Biham, Ofer; Katzav, Eytan

    2016-07-01

    We present an analytical and numerical study of the paths of self avoiding walks (SAWs) on random networks. Since these walks do not retrace their paths, they effectively delete the nodes they visit, together with their links, thus pruning the network. The walkers hop between neighboring nodes, until they reach a dead-end node from which they cannot proceed. Focusing on Erdős–Rényi networks we show that the pruned networks maintain a Poisson degree distribution, {p}t(k), with an average degree, < k{> }t, that decreases linearly in time. We enumerate the SAW paths of any given length and find that the number of paths, {n}T({\\ell }), increases dramatically as a function of {\\ell }. We also obtain analytical results for the path-length distribution, P({\\ell }), of the SAW paths which are actually pursued, starting from a random initial node. It turns out that P({\\ell }) follows the Gompertz distribution, which means that the termination probability of an SAW path increases with its length.

  18. Error Reduction Methods for Integrated-path Differential-absorption Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jeffrey R.; Numata, Kenji; Wu, Stewart T.

    2012-01-01

    We report new modeling and error reduction methods for differential-absorption optical-depth (DAOD) measurements of atmospheric constituents using direct-detection integrated-path differential-absorption lidars. Errors from laser frequency noise are quantified in terms of the line center fluctuation and spectral line shape of the laser pulses, revealing relationships verified experimentally. A significant DAOD bias is removed by introducing a correction factor. Errors from surface height and reflectance variations can be reduced to tolerable levels by incorporating altimetry knowledge and "log after averaging", or by pointing the laser and receiver to a fixed surface spot during each wavelength cycle to shorten the time of "averaging before log".

  19. Multispectral reflectance imaging of brain activation in rodents: methodological study of the differential path length estimations and first in vivo recordings in the rat olfactory bulb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, Rémi; Martin, Claire; Gurden, Hirac; Pain, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic maps of relative changes in blood volume and oxygenation following brain activation are obtained using multispectral reflectance imaging. The technique relies on optical absorption modifications linked to hemodynamic changes. The relative variation of hemodynamic parameters can be quantified using the modified Beer-Lambert Law if changes in reflected light intensities are recorded at two wavelengths or more and the differential path length (DP) is known. The DP is the mean path length in tissues of backscattered photons and varies with wavelength. It is usually estimated using Monte Carlo simulations in simplified semi-infinite homogeneous geometries. Here we consider the use of multilayered models of the somatosensory cortex (SsC) and olfactory bulb (OB), which are common physiological models of brain activation. Simulations demonstrate that specific DP estimation is required for SsC and OB, specifically for wavelengths above 600 nm. They validate the hypothesis of a constant path length during activation and show the need for specific DP if imaging is performed in a thinned-skull preparation. The first multispectral reflectance imaging data recorded in vivo during OB activation are presented, and the influence of DP on the hemodynamic parameters and the pattern of oxymetric changes in the activated OB are discussed.

  20. Multispectral reflectance imaging of brain activation in rodents: methodological study of the differential path length estimations and first in vivo recordings in the rat olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Rémi; Martin, Claire; Gurden, Hirac; Pain, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic maps of relative changes in blood volume and oxygenation following brain activation are obtained using multispectral reflectance imaging. The technique relies on optical absorption modifications linked to hemodynamic changes. The relative variation of hemodynamic parameters can be quantified using the modified Beer-Lambert Law if changes in reflected light intensities are recorded at two wavelengths or more and the differential path length (DP) is known. The DP is the mean path length in tissues of backscattered photons and varies with wavelength. It is usually estimated using Monte Carlo simulations in simplified semi-infinite homogeneous geometries. Here we consider the use of multilayered models of the somatosensory cortex (SsC) and olfactory bulb (OB), which are common physiological models of brain activation. Simulations demonstrate that specific DP estimation is required for SsC and OB, specifically for wavelengths above 600 nm. They validate the hypothesis of a constant path length during activation and show the need for specific DP if imaging is performed in a thinned-skull preparation. The first multispectral reflectance imaging data recorded in vivo during OB activation are presented, and the influence of DP on the hemodynamic parameters and the pattern of oxymetric changes in the activated OB are discussed. PMID:22352662

  1. Nearly arc-length tool path generation and tool radius compensation algorithm research in FTS turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Minghui; Zhao, Xuesen; Li, Zengqiang; Sun, Tao

    2014-08-01

    In the non-rotational symmetrical microstrcture surfaces generation using turning method with Fast Tool Servo(FTS), non-uniform distribution of the interpolation data points will lead to long processing cycle and poor surface quality. To improve this situation, nearly arc-length tool path generation algorithm is proposed, which generates tool tip trajectory points in nearly arc-length instead of the traditional interpolation rule of equal angle and adds tool radius compensation. All the interpolation points are equidistant in radial distribution because of the constant feeding speed in X slider, the high frequency tool radius compensation components are in both X direction and Z direction, which makes X slider difficult to follow the input orders due to its large mass. Newton iterative method is used to calculate the neighboring contour tangent point coordinate value with the interpolation point X position as initial value, in this way, the new Z coordinate value is gotten, and the high frequency motion components in X direction is decomposed into Z direction. Taking a typical microstructure with 4μm PV value for test, which is mixed with two 70μm wave length sine-waves, the max profile error at the angle of fifteen is less than 0.01μm turning by a diamond tool with big radius of 80μm. The sinusoidal grid is machined on a ultra-precision lathe succesfully, the wavelength is 70.2278μm the Ra value is 22.81nm evaluated by data points generated by filtering out the first five harmonics.

  2. A 2-Micron Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development For Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Reithmaier, Karl; Bai, Yingxin; Trieu, Bo C.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2012-01-01

    A 2-micron pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  3. Finding the biased-shortest path with minimal congestion in networks via linear-prediction of queue length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yi; Ren, Gang; Liu, Yang

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a biased-shortest path method with minimal congestion. In the method, we use linear-prediction to estimate the queue length of nodes, and propose a dynamic accepting probability function for nodes to decide whether accept or reject the incoming packets. The dynamic accepting probability function is based on the idea of homogeneous network flow and is developed to enable nodes to coordinate their queue length to avoid congestion. A path strategy incorporated with the linear-prediction of the queue length and the dynamic accepting probability function of nodes is designed to allow packets to be automatically delivered on un-congested paths with short traveling time. Our method has the advantage of low computation cost because the optimal paths are dynamically self-organized by nodes in the delivering process of packets with local traffic information. We compare our method with the existing methods such as the efficient path method (EPS) and the optimal path method (OPS) on the BA scale-free networks and a real example. The numerical computations show that our method performs best for low network load and has minimum run time due to its low computational cost and local routing scheme.

  4. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Absorption and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on airborne CO2 column absorption measurements made in 2009 with a pulsed direct-detection lidar operating at 1572.33 nm and utilizing the integrated path differential absorption technique. We demonstrated these at different altitudes from an aircraft in July and August in flights over four locations in the central and eastern United States. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The lidar measurement statistics were also calculated for each flight as a function of altitude. The optical depth varied nearly linearly with altitude, consistent with calculations based on atmospheric models. The scatter in the optical depth measurements varied with aircraft altitude as expected, and the median measurement precisions for the column varied from 0.9 to 1.2 ppm. The altitude range with the lowest scatter was 810 km, and the majority of measurements for the column within it had precisions between 0.2 and 0.9 ppm.

  5. Continuous correction of differential path length factor in near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Tanveer; Moore, Jason H; Diamond, Solomon G

    2013-05-01

    In continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CW-NIRS), changes in the concentration of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin can be calculated by solving a set of linear equations from the modified Beer-Lambert Law. Cross-talk error in the calculated hemodynamics can arise from inaccurate knowledge of the wavelength-dependent differential path length factor (DPF). We apply the extended Kalman filter (EKF) with a dynamical systems model to calculate relative concentration changes in oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin while simultaneously estimating relative changes in DPF. Results from simulated and experimental CW-NIRS data are compared with results from a weighted least squares (WLSQ) method. The EKF method was found to effectively correct for artificially introduced errors in DPF and to reduce the cross-talk error in simulation. With experimental CW-NIRS data, the hemodynamic estimates from EKF differ significantly from the WLSQ (p < 0.001). The cross-correlations among residuals at different wavelengths were found to be significantly reduced by the EKF method compared to WLSQ in three physiologically relevant spectral bands 0.04 to 0.15 Hz, 0.15 to 0.4 Hz and 0.4 to 2.0 Hz (p < 0.001). This observed reduction in residual cross-correlation is consistent with reduced cross-talk error in the hemodynamic estimates from the proposed EKF method. PMID:23640027

  6. Continuous correction of differential path length factor in near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukdar, Tanveer; Moore, Jason H.; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2013-05-01

    In continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CW-NIRS), changes in the concentration of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin can be calculated by solving a set of linear equations from the modified Beer-Lambert Law. Cross-talk error in the calculated hemodynamics can arise from inaccurate knowledge of the wavelength-dependent differential path length factor (DPF). We apply the extended Kalman filter (EKF) with a dynamical systems model to calculate relative concentration changes in oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin while simultaneously estimating relative changes in DPF. Results from simulated and experimental CW-NIRS data are compared with results from a weighted least squares (WLSQ) method. The EKF method was found to effectively correct for artificially introduced errors in DPF and to reduce the cross-talk error in simulation. With experimental CW-NIRS data, the hemodynamic estimates from EKF differ significantly from the WLSQ (p<0.001). The cross-correlations among residuals at different wavelengths were found to be significantly reduced by the EKF method compared to WLSQ in three physiologically relevant spectral bands 0.04 to 0.15 Hz, 0.15 to 0.4 Hz and 0.4 to 2.0 Hz (p<0.001). This observed reduction in residual cross-correlation is consistent with reduced cross-talk error in the hemodynamic estimates from the proposed EKF method.

  7. Continuous correction of differential path length factor in near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jason H.; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. In continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CW-NIRS), changes in the concentration of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin can be calculated by solving a set of linear equations from the modified Beer-Lambert Law. Cross-talk error in the calculated hemodynamics can arise from inaccurate knowledge of the wavelength-dependent differential path length factor (DPF). We apply the extended Kalman filter (EKF) with a dynamical systems model to calculate relative concentration changes in oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin while simultaneously estimating relative changes in DPF. Results from simulated and experimental CW-NIRS data are compared with results from a weighted least squares (WLSQ) method. The EKF method was found to effectively correct for artificially introduced errors in DPF and to reduce the cross-talk error in simulation. With experimental CW-NIRS data, the hemodynamic estimates from EKF differ significantly from the WLSQ (p<0.001). The cross-correlations among residuals at different wavelengths were found to be significantly reduced by the EKF method compared to WLSQ in three physiologically relevant spectral bands 0.04 to 0.15 Hz, 0.15 to 0.4 Hz and 0.4 to 2.0 Hz (p<0.001). This observed reduction in residual cross-correlation is consistent with reduced cross-talk error in the hemodynamic estimates from the proposed EKF method. PMID:23640027

  8. Changes in diffusion path length with old age in diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnéry, Clément; Leclerc, Paul-Olivier; Desjardins, Michèle; Hoge, Rick; Bherer, Louis; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric

    2012-05-01

    Diffuse, optical near infrared imaging is increasingly being used in various neurocognitive contexts where changes in optical signals are interpreted through activation maps. Statistical population comparison of different age or clinical groups rely on the relative homogeneous distribution of measurements across subjects in order to infer changes in brain function. In the context of an increasing use of diffuse optical imaging with older adult populations, changes in tissue properties and anatomy with age adds additional confounds. Few studies investigated these changes with age. Duncan et al. measured the so-called diffusion path length factor (DPF) in a large population but did not explore beyond the age of 51 after which physiological and anatomical changes are expected to occur [Pediatr. Res. 39(5), 889-894 (1996)]. With increasing interest in studying the geriatric population with optical imaging, we studied changes in tissue properties in young and old subjects using both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided Monte-Carlo simulations and time-domain diffuse optical imaging. Our results, measured in the frontal cortex, show changes in DPF that are smaller than previously measured by Duncan et al. in a younger population. The origin of these changes are studied using simulations and experimental measures.

  9. Minority carrier diffusion lengths and absorption coefficients in silicon sheet material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, K. A.; Swimm, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Most of the methods which have been developed for the measurement of the minority carrier diffusion length of silicon wafers require that the material have either a Schottky or an ohmic contact. The surface photovoltage (SPV) technique is an exception. The SPV technique could, therefore, become a valuable diagnostic tool in connection with current efforts to develop low-cost processes for the production of solar cells. The technique depends on a knowledge of the optical absorption coefficient. The considered investigation is concerned with a reevaluation of the absorption coefficient as a function of silicon processing. A comparison of absorption coefficient values showed these values to be relatively consistent from sample to sample, and independent of the sample growth method.

  10. NO2 measurements in Hong Kong using LED based long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. L.; Pöhler, D.; Kuhlmann, G.; Hartl, A.; Platt, U.; Wenig, M. O.

    2012-05-01

    In this study we present the first long term measurements of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using a LED based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) instrument. This instrument is measuring continuously in Hong Kong since December 2009, first in a setup with a 550 m absorption path and then with a 3820 m path at about 30 m to 50 m above street level. The instrument is using a high power blue light LED with peak intensity at 450 nm coupled into the telescope using a Y-fibre bundle. The LP-DOAS instrument measures NO2 levels in the Kowloon Tong and Mongkok district of Hong Kong and we compare the measurement results to mixing ratios reported by monitoring stations operated by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in that area. Hourly averages of coinciding measurements are in reasonable agreement (R = 0.74). Furthermore, we used the long-term data set to validate the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 data product. Monthly averaged LP-DOAS and OMI measurements correlate well (R = 0.84) when comparing the data for the OMI overpass time. We analyzed weekly patterns in both data sets and found that the LP-DOAS detects a clear weekly cycle with a reduction on weekends during rush hour peaks, whereas OMI is not able to observe this weekly cycle due to its fix overpass time (13:30-14:30 LT - local time).

  11. Parallel estimation of path-integrated concentration and vapor absorptivity using topographic backscatter lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, R. E.; Vanderbeek, R. G.

    2005-08-01

    Topographic backscatter lidar that uses solid surfaces to provide the return signals is a well known vapor estimation technique either though the two-wavelength DIAL (differential absorption lidar) paradigm or a multiple wavelength generalization. All algorithms known to the authors for estimating the path-integrated concentration, or CL, require prior knowledge of the wavelength dependence of the absorptivity of the vapor materials of interest for generating the CL estimates. However, for many applications it is not feasible to process the data in the traditional way. In addition, for some materials the absorptivity may be only approximately known. For these reasons it is often desirable to estimate the spectral structure of the absorptivity using the same data set used to estimate the vapor CL. This paper describes a method for simultaneously estimating the spectral dependence of the absorptivity of a set of Q materials in parallel with the timedependence of the corresponding CLs using a time series of topographic backscatter lidar data collected at M wavelengths. For processing efficiency we provide dynamic estimates of the CLs through a Kalman filter. The fluctuating transmitted energy is also included in the state vector. This inclusion automatically accomplishes transmitter energy normalization optimally. Absorptivity is estimated through a sequential least-squares method. The basic idea is to run two estimators in parallel: a Kalman filter for CL and transmitter energy, and a sequential least-squares estimator for absorptivity. These algorithms exchange information continuously over the data processing stream. The approach is illustrated on simulated and real topographic backscatter lidar data collected by ECBC.

  12. Water-equivalent path length calibration of a prototype proton CT scanner

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, R. F.; Schulte, R. W.; Bashkirov, V. A.; Wroe, A. J.; Ghebremedhin, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Rykalin, V.; Coutrakon, G.; Koss, P.; Patyal, B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present a calibration method for a prototype proton computed tomography (pCT) scanner. The accuracy of these measurements depends upon careful calibration of the energy detector used to measure the residual energy of the protons that passed through the object. Methods: A prototype pCT scanner with a cesium iodide (CsI(Tl)) crystal calorimeter was calibrated by measuring the calorimeter response for protons of 200 and 100 MeV initial energies undergoing degradation in polystyrene plates of known thickness and relative stopping power (RSP) with respect to water. Calibration curves for the two proton energies were obtained by fitting a second-degree polynomial to the water-equivalent path length versus calorimeter response data. Using the 100 MeV calibration curve, the RSP values for a variety of tissue-equivalent materials were measured and compared to values obtained from a standard depth-dose range shift measurement using a water-tank. A cylindrical water phantom was scanned with 200 MeV protons and its RSP distribution was reconstructed using the 200 MeV calibration. Results: It is shown that this calibration method produces measured RSP values of various tissue-equivalent materials that agree to within 0.5% of values obtained using an established water-tank method. The mean RSP value of the water phantom reconstruction was found to be 0.995 ± 0.006. Conclusions: The method presented provides a simple and reliable procedure for calibration of a pCT scanner. PMID:22559614

  13. A Multi-Baseline 12 GHz Atmospheric Phase Interferometer with One Micron Path Length Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimberk, Robert S.; Hunter, Todd R.; Leiker, Patrick S.; Blundell, Raymond; Nystrom, George U.; Petitpas, Glen R.; Test, John; Wilson, Robert W.; Yamaguchi, Paul; Young, Kenneth H.

    2012-12-01

    We have constructed a five station 12 GHz atmospheric phase interferometer (API) for the Submillimeter Array (SMA) located near the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Operating at the base of unoccupied SMA antenna pads, each station employs a commercial low noise mixing block coupled to a 0.7 m off-axis satellite dish which receives a broadband, white noise-like signal from a geostationary satellite. The signals are processed by an analog correlator to produce the phase delays between all pairs of stations with projected baselines ranging from 33-261 m. Each baseline's amplitude and phase is measured continuously at a rate of 8 kHz, processed, averaged and output at 10 Hz. Further signal processing and data reduction is accomplished with a Linux computer, including the removal of the diurnal motion of the target satellite. The placement of the stations below ground level with an environmental shield combined with the use of low temperature coefficient, buried fiber optic cables provides excellent system stability. The sensitivity in terms of rms path length is 1.3 microns which corresponds to phase deviations of about 1° of phase at the highest operating frequency of the SMA. The two primary data products are: (1) standard deviations of observed phase over various time scales, and (2) phase structure functions. These real-time statistical data measured by the API in the direction of the satellite provide an estimate of the phase front distortion experienced by the concurrent SMA astronomical observations. The API data also play an important role, along with the local opacity measurements and weather predictions, in helping to plan the scheduling of science observations on the telescope.

  14. Water-equivalent path length calibration of a prototype proton CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, R. F.; Schulte, R. W.; Bashkirov, V. A.; Wroe, A. J.; Ghebremedhin, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Rykalin, V.; Coutrakon, G.; Koss, P.; Patyal, B.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: The authors present a calibration method for a prototype proton computed tomography (pCT) scanner. The accuracy of these measurements depends upon careful calibration of the energy detector used to measure the residual energy of the protons that passed through the object. Methods: A prototype pCT scanner with a cesium iodide (CsI(Tl)) crystal calorimeter was calibrated by measuring the calorimeter response for protons of 200 and 100 MeV initial energies undergoing degradation in polystyrene plates of known thickness and relative stopping power (RSP) with respect to water. Calibration curves for the two proton energies were obtained by fitting a second-degree polynomial to the water-equivalent path length versus calorimeter response data. Using the 100 MeV calibration curve, the RSP values for a variety of tissue-equivalent materials were measured and compared to values obtained from a standard depth-dose range shift measurement using a water-tank. A cylindrical water phantom was scanned with 200 MeV protons and its RSP distribution was reconstructed using the 200 MeV calibration. Results: It is shown that this calibration method produces measured RSP values of various tissue-equivalent materials that agree to within 0.5% of values obtained using an established water-tank method. The mean RSP value of the water phantom reconstruction was found to be 0.995 {+-} 0.006. Conclusions: The method presented provides a simple and reliable procedure for calibration of a pCT scanner.

  15. Airborne measurements of atmospheric methane column abundance using a pulsed integrated-path differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Riris, Haris; Numata, Kenji; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Ramanathan, Anand; Dawsey, Martha; Mao, Jianping; Kawa, Randolph; Abshire, James B

    2012-12-01

    We report airborne measurements of the column abundance of atmospheric methane made over an altitude range of 3-11 km using a direct detection integrated-path differential-absorption lidar with a pulsed laser emitting at 1651 nm. The laser transmitter was a tunable, seeded optical parametric amplifier pumped by a Nd:YAG laser, and the receiver used a photomultiplier detector and photon-counting electronics. The results follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude, and the measured line shapes and optical depths show good agreement with theoretical calculations. PMID:23207402

  16. Error reduction methods for integrated-path differential-absorption lidar measurements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeffrey R; Numata, Kenji; Wu, Stewart T

    2012-07-01

    We report new modeling and error reduction methods for differential-absorption optical-depth (DAOD) measurements of atmospheric constituents using direct-detection integrated-path differential-absorption lidars. Errors from laser frequency noise are quantified in terms of the line center fluctuation and spectral line shape of the laser pulses, revealing relationships verified experimentally. A significant DAOD bias is removed by introducing a correction factor. Errors from surface height and reflectance variations can be reduced to tolerable levels by incorporating altimetry knowledge and "log after averaging", or by pointing the laser and receiver to a fixed surface spot during each wavelength cycle to shorten the time of "averaging before log". PMID:22772254

  17. Estimation of Path Length Reduction Factor by Using One Year Rain Attenuation Statistics over a Line of Sight Link Operating at 28.75 GHz in Amritsar (INDIA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Parshotam; Hudiara, Inderjit Singh; Singh, Maninder Lal

    2011-02-01

    The effect of environmental factors in general and rain droplets in particular, on microwave propagation is a very well known fact now. If the rain droplets are present in an inhomogeneous way across the path length of the microwave communication system then, a new concept of path length reduction factor is introduced which accounts for the inhomogeneous nature of the rain droplets along the path length of the microwave signal. The present paper presents results of path length reduction factor using data on attenuation levels obtained on a LOS link operating at 28.75 GHz in Amritsar region and its comparison with Crane's and ITU-R's model.

  18. Measurement of tropospheric OH by laser long-path absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Michael; Perner, D.

    1994-01-01

    OH-radicals are measured by laser long-path absorption spectroscopy. A tunable Nd:YAG/dye laser system provides broadbanded light at 308 nm. The beam is expanded to 0.3 m and pointed to an array of retroreflectors placed at a distance of 2800 m. The returning beam is separated from the outgoing beam and focused into a spectrometer of 0.3 pm resolution. A 1024 element diode array is used as a detector. The signal is digitized by a 14 bit analog to digital converter. The ultimate aim is a detection limit of 10(exp 5) molecules cm(exp -3) of OH. However the measurements in 1991 allowed only the recognition of OH absorptions corresponding to 3 x 10(exp 6) OH cm(exp -3) with a signal to noise ratio of two. Improvements of the instrument are under way. The advantages of the DOAS method are: the accuracy of detection is guaranteed because loss of OH radicals within the device is avoided, the rate of OH production by the device is negligible, and absorptions of other trace gases could be corrected for; and the calibration procedure for the device is fast and easy. The disadvantages of the system are: time resolution is about minutes because about ten spectra had to be added to keep the noise level down, the OH concentration is averaged along the whole light path, weight (500 kg) and size (4x4 m) of the device; and approximately 10 l/min of coolant and supply of 8 kW electrical power are necessary.

  19. Correlation between seismic events and anomalous `VLF day-length' for west-east and east-west propagation paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sasmal, Sudipta

    We present results of year-long analysis of VLF signals, both for VTX-Malda (`west-east' propagation path) and VTX-Pune (`east-west' propagation path). We analyzed whole year data of 2008 and 2009 for VTX-Malda and VTX-Pune propagation path, respectively. In both the cases we found that `VLF day-length' (defined as time difference between sunset terminator time and sunrise terminator time) became anomalously high 1-2 days before an earthquake. Besides this year-long study we have also done some case by case analysis. On 9th January, 2009 an earthquake of magnitude 5.5 occurred at Carlsberg Ridge (latitude 10.3(°) N, longitude 57.1(°) E). In a separate incident, on 3rd November, 2009, another earthquake of magnitude 5.4 occurred at Andaman Islands (latitude 14.1(°) N, longitude 93.1(°) E). We analyze VLF signals for VTX-Pune (`east-west’ propagation path) propagation path around these two earthquake days and found that for both of these cases, the `VLF-day-length' became anomalously high two days before the event. This agrees well with statistical analysis based on year-long data for VTX-Pune path. Furthermore, during time period of June, 2010, two major earthquakes of low-depth ( 10Km) and high magnitude (M>5) occurred near NWC-Salt Lake (east-west propagation path) propagation paths. First one occurred on 13th June, 2010 at Nicobar Islands, India (latitude 7.8(°) N, longitude 92.0(°) E). Its magnitude was 5.1 (in Richter scale). The second one of magnitude 6.0 (in Richter Scale) occurred on 19th June, 2010 at Andaman Islands, India (latitude 13.4(°) N, longitude 93.0(°) E). For both of these two earthquakes, we found that VLF-day-length, became anomalously high one day before earthquakes. We claim that these were pre-cursors of the earthquakes which occurred in Andaman and Nicober Islands.

  20. Geographical effects on the path length and the robustness in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yukio; Matsukubo, Jun

    2006-06-01

    The short paths between any two nodes and the robustness of connectivity are advanced properties of scale-free (SF) networks; however, they may be affected by geographical constraints in realistic situations. We consider geographical networks with the SF structure based on planar triangulation for online routings, and suggest scaling relations between the average distance or number of hops on the optimal paths and the network size. We also show that the tolerance to random failures and attacks on hubs is weakened in geographical networks, and that even then it is possible for the extremely vulnerable ones to be improved by adding with the local exchange of links.

  1. Open-path tunable diode laser absorption for eddy correlation flux measurements of atmospheric trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Stuart M.; Zahniser, Mark S.

    1991-01-01

    Biogenic emissions from and dry deposition to terrestrial surfaces are important processes determining the trace gas composition of the atmosphere. An instrument has been developed for flux measurements of gases such as CH4, N2O, and O3 based on the eddy correlation technique which combines trace gas fluctuation measurements with simultaneous windfield measurements. The instrument combines a tunable diode laser infrared light source with an open-path multipass absorption cell in order to provide the fast time response and short base pathlength required for the eddy correlation method. Initial field tests using the instrument to measure methane emissions from a local wetland demonstrate the capability for high precision eddy correlation flux measurements.

  2. Development of a Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Refaat, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important greenhouse gas that significantly contributes to the carbon cycle and global radiation budget on Earth. Active remote sensing of CO2 is important to address several limitations that contend with passive sensors. A 2-micron double-pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This active remote sensing instrument will provide an alternate approach of measuring atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise ratio level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. Commercial, on the shelf, components are implemented for the detection system. Instrument integration will be presented in this paper as well as a background for CO2 measurement at NASA Langley research Center

  3. Quantifying Path Length: Fourth-Grade Children's Developing Abstractions for Linear Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Jeffrey E.; Clements, Douglas H.

    2003-01-01

    This article describes how children build increasingly abstract knowledge of linear measurement, emphasizing ways they relate space and number. Assessments indicate children struggle to understand measurement, especially concepts related to complex paths as in perimeter tasks. This article draws on developmental accounts of children's knowledge of…

  4. Open-path tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy for acquisition of fugitive emission flux data.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Eben D; Shores, Richard C; Thompson, Edgar L; Harris, D Bruce; Thorneloe, Susan A; Varma, Ravi M; Hashmonay, Ram A; Modrak, Mark T; Natschke, David F; Gamble, Heather A

    2005-05-01

    Air pollutant emission from unconfined sources is an increasingly important environmental issue. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed a ground-based optical remote-sensing method that enables direct measurement of fugitive emission flux from large area sources. Open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) has been the primary technique for acquisition of pollutant concentration data used in this emission measurement method. For a number of environmentally important compounds, such as ammonia and methane, open-path tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (OP-TDLAS) is shown to be a viable alternative to Fourier transform spectroscopy for pollutant concentration measurements. Near-IR diode laser spectroscopy systems offer significant operational and cost advantages over Fourier transform instruments enabling more efficient implementation of the measurement strategy. This article reviews the EPA's fugitive emission measurement method and describes its multipath tunable diode laser instrument. Validation testing of the system is discussed. OP-TDLAS versus OP-FTIR correlation testing results for ammonia (R2 = 0.980) and methane (R2 = 0.991) are reported. Two example applications of tunable diode laser-based fugitive emission measurements are presented. PMID:15991674

  5. Development of a portable active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy system for volcanic gas measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vita, Fabio; Kern, Christoph; Inguaggiato, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) has been an effective tool for measuring atmospheric trace gases for several decades. However, instruments were large, heavy and power-inefficient, making their application to remote environments extremely challenging. Recent developments in fibre-coupling telescope technology and the availability of ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDS) have now allowed us to design and construct a lightweight, portable, low-power LP-DOAS instrument for use at remote locations and specifically for measuring degassing from active volcanic systems. The LP-DOAS was used to measure sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from La Fossa crater, Vulcano, Italy, where column densities of up to 1.2 × 1018 molec cm−2 (~ 500 ppmm) were detected along open paths of up to 400 m in total length. The instrument's SO2 detection limit was determined to be 2 × 1016 molec cm−2 (~ 8 ppmm), thereby making quantitative detection of even trace amounts of SO2 possible. The instrument is capable of measuring other volcanic volatile species as well. Though the spectral evaluation of the recorded data showed that chlorine monoxide (ClO) and carbon disulfide (CS2) were both below the instrument's detection limits during the experiment, the upper limits for the X / SO2 ratio (X = ClO, CS2) could be derived, and yielded 2 × 10−3 and 0.1, respectively. The robust design and versatility of the instrument make it a promising tool for monitoring of volcanic degassing and understanding processes in a range of volcanic systems.

  6. Oblique chirp sounding and modeling of ionospheric HF channel at paths of different length and orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertogradov, G. G.; Vertogradov, V. G.; Uryadov, V. P.

    2007-05-01

    [1] The results of systematic observations during 2005 of the main characteristics of HF propagation at a network of paths of oblique linear frequency modulation (LFM) sounding of the ionosphere are presented. The values of the maximum observed frequency (MOF) are calculated using the IRI 2001 model and the effective sunspot number W eff. It is shown that the difference between the predicted and measured monthly mean values does not exceed 12%. It is found that at all propagation paths, quasiperiodic variations of MOF are almost always observed. The amplitude of the MOF variations in the daytime can reach 2 MHz. A spectral analysis of the MOF variations at the midlatitude paths Cyprus-Rostov-on-Don and Inskip-Rostov-on-Don is performed. It is shown that the spectra of the MOF fluctuations have a well-pronounced linear structure. The power of spectral components of MOF fluctuations is concentrated in the 20-90 min range. Analyzing the dynamics of motion of z-type features on a trace of the high-angle ray, the periods of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID) are determined and found to be 15-30 min. It is found that the TID with such periods correlate well with the sunset and sunrise for the middle point of the path. Modeling of oblique sounding (OS) ionograms at the presence of TID is performed taking into account the procedure of LFM signal processing. On the basis of the comparison of the experimental and calculated data, parameters of middle-scale wave disturbances responsible for the formation of z-type features in OS ionograms are determined.

  7. Enhancing light absorption within the carrier transport length in quantum junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yulan; Hara, Yukihiro; Miller, Christopher W; Lopez, Rene

    2015-09-10

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells have attracted tremendous attention because of their tunable absorption spectrum window and potentially low processing cost. Recently reported quantum junction solar cells represent a promising approach to building a rectifying photovoltaic device that employs CQD layers on each side of the p-n junction. However, the ultimate efficiency of CQD solar cells is still highly limited by their high trap state density in both p- and n-type CQDs. By modeling photonic structures to enhance the light absorption within the carrier transport length and by ensuring that the carrier generation and collection efficiencies were both augmented, our work shows that overall device current density could be improved. We utilized a two-dimensional numerical model to calculate the characteristics of patterned CQD solar cells based on a simple grating structure. Our calculation predicts a short circuit current density as high as 31  mA/cm2, a value nearly 1.5 times larger than that of the conventional flat design, showing the great potential value of patterned quantum junction solar cells. PMID:26368966

  8. Phrase Length Matters: The Interplay between Implicit Prosody and Syntax in Korean "Garden Path" Sentences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Hyekyung; Steinhauer, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    In spoken language comprehension, syntactic parsing decisions interact with prosodic phrasing, which is directly affected by phrase length. Here we used ERPs to examine whether a similar effect holds for the on-line processing of written sentences during silent reading, as suggested by theories of "implicit prosody." Ambiguous Korean sentence…

  9. Linear and quadratic dispersion characterization of millimeter-length fibers and waveguides using common-path interferometry.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, W; Meier, J; Galle, M; Qian, L; Aitchison, J S; Smith, P W E

    2007-11-15

    We measured linear and quadratic dispersion on millimeter-length fibers, waveguides, and nanowires based on common-path spectral interferometry. We obtained the linear dispersion parameter, beta', with a relative precision of 1.45 x 10(-4), and extracted the quadratic dispersion parameter, beta'', from the Taylor expansion of beta' x beta'' values show a discrepancy of < 1% when compared with simulation as well as with measurement results obtained by a conventional Michelson interferometer. Using this method, we experimentally confirmed the sign inversion of the group velocity dispersion of AlGaAs nanowires for what is believed to be the first time. PMID:18026291

  10. Radiometric correction of atmospheric path length fluctuations in interferometric experiments. [in radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, G. M.; Hogg, D. E.; Napier, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    To support very long baseline interferometric experiments, a system has been developed for estimating atmospheric water vapor path delay. The system consists of dual microwave radiometers, one operating at 20.7 GHz and the other at 31.4 GHz. The measured atmospheric brightness temperatures at these two frequencies yield the estimate of the precipitable water present in both vapor and droplets. To determine the accuracy of the system, a series of observations were undertaken, comparing the outputs of two water vapor radiometers with the phase variation observed with two connected elements of the very large array (VLA). The results show that: (1) water vapor fluctuations dominate the residual VLA phase and (2) the microwave radiometers can measure and correct these effects. The rms phase error after correction is typically 15 deg at a wavelength of 6 cm, corresponding to an uncertainty in the path delay of 0.25 cm. The residual uncertainty is consistent with the stability of the microwave radiometer but is still considerably larger than the stability of the VLA. The technique is less successful under conditions of heavy cloud.

  11. Measurement of Urban Air Quality by an Open-Path Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer in Beijing During Summer 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, A. P.; Liu, P. Q.; Yeung, J. K.; Zhang, Y.; Baeck, M. L.; Pan, X.; Dong, H.; Wang, Z.; Smith, J. A.; Gmachl, C. F.

    2009-05-01

    The 2008 Olympic Games focused attention on the air quality of Beijing, China and served as an important test-bed for developing, deploying, and testing new technologies for analysis of air quality and regional climate in urban environments. Poor air quality in urban locations has a significant detrimental effect on the health of residents while also impacting both regional and global climate change. As a result, there exists a great need for highly sensitive trace gas sensors for studying the atmosphere of the urban environment. Open-path remote sensors are of particular interest as they can obtain data on spatial scales similar to those used in regional climate models. Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) can be designed for operation in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) with a central wavelength anywhere between 3 to 24 μm and made tunable over a wavelength interval of over 0.1 μm. The Quantum Cascade Laser Open-Path System (QCLOPS) is a mid-infrared laser absorption spectrometer that uses a tunable, thermoelectrically cooled, pulsed Daylight Solutions Inc. QCL for measurement of trace gases. The system is aimed at applications with path lengths ranging from approximately 0.1 to 1.0 km. The system is designed to continuously monitor multiple trace gases [water vapor (H2O), ozone (O3), ammonia (NH3), and carbon dioxide (CO2)] in the lower atmosphere. A field campaign from July to September 2008 in Beijing used QCLOPS to study trace gas concentrations before, during, and after the Olympic Games in an effort to capture changes induced by emissions reduction methods. QCLOPS was deployed at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics - Chinese Academy of Sciences on the roof of a two-story building, at an approximate distance of 2 miles from the Olympic National Stadium ("The Bird's Nest.") QCLOPS operated with an open-path round trip distance of approximately 75 m. The system ran with minimal human interference, twenty-four hours per day for the full campaign period. In order to

  12. RF Path and Absorption Loss Estimation for Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks in Different Water Environments.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Umair Mujtaba; Shaikh, Faisal Karim; Aziz, Zuneera; Shah, Syed M Zafi S; Sheikh, Adil A; Felemban, Emad; Qaisar, Saad Bin

    2016-01-01

    Underwater Wireless Sensor Network (UWSN) communication at high frequencies is extremely challenging. The intricacies presented by the underwater environment are far more compared to the terrestrial environment. The prime reason for such intricacies are the physical characteristics of the underwater environment that have a big impact on electromagnetic (EM) signals. Acoustics signals are by far the most preferred choice for underwater wireless communication. Because high frequency signals have the luxury of large bandwidth (BW) at shorter distances, high frequency EM signals cannot penetrate and propagate deep in underwater environments. The EM properties of water tend to resist their propagation and cause severe attenuation. Accordingly, there are two questions that need to be addressed for underwater environment, first what happens when high frequency EM signals operating at 2.4 GHz are used for communication, and second which factors affect the most to high frequency EM signals. To answer these questions, we present real-time experiments conducted at 2.4 GHz in terrestrial and underwater (fresh water) environments. The obtained results helped in studying the physical characteristics (i.e., EM properties, propagation and absorption loss) of underwater environments. It is observed that high frequency EM signals can propagate in fresh water at a shallow depth only and can be considered for a specific class of applications such as water sports. Furthermore, path loss, velocity of propagation, absorption loss and the rate of signal loss in different underwater environments are also calculated and presented in order to understand why EM signals cannot propagate in sea water and oceanic water environments. An optimal solk6ution for underwater communication in terms of coverage distance, bandwidth and nature of communication is presented, along with possible underwater applications of UWSNs at 2.4 GHz. PMID:27322263

  13. RF Path and Absorption Loss Estimation for Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks in Different Water Environments

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Umair Mujtaba; Shaikh, Faisal Karim; Aziz, Zuneera; Shah, Syed M. Zafi S.; Sheikh, Adil A.; Felemban, Emad; Qaisar, Saad Bin

    2016-01-01

    Underwater Wireless Sensor Network (UWSN) communication at high frequencies is extremely challenging. The intricacies presented by the underwater environment are far more compared to the terrestrial environment. The prime reason for such intricacies are the physical characteristics of the underwater environment that have a big impact on electromagnetic (EM) signals. Acoustics signals are by far the most preferred choice for underwater wireless communication. Because high frequency signals have the luxury of large bandwidth (BW) at shorter distances, high frequency EM signals cannot penetrate and propagate deep in underwater environments. The EM properties of water tend to resist their propagation and cause severe attenuation. Accordingly, there are two questions that need to be addressed for underwater environment, first what happens when high frequency EM signals operating at 2.4 GHz are used for communication, and second which factors affect the most to high frequency EM signals. To answer these questions, we present real-time experiments conducted at 2.4 GHz in terrestrial and underwater (fresh water) environments. The obtained results helped in studying the physical characteristics (i.e., EM properties, propagation and absorption loss) of underwater environments. It is observed that high frequency EM signals can propagate in fresh water at a shallow depth only and can be considered for a specific class of applications such as water sports. Furthermore, path loss, velocity of propagation, absorption loss and the rate of signal loss in different underwater environments are also calculated and presented in order to understand why EM signals cannot propagate in sea water and oceanic water environments. An optimal solk6ution for underwater communication in terms of coverage distance, bandwidth and nature of communication is presented, along with possible underwater applications of UWSNs at 2.4 GHz. PMID:27322263

  14. Simulating the Effect of Modulated Tool-Path Chip Breaking On Surface Texture and Chip Length

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.S.; McFarland, J.T.; Tursky, D. A.; Assaid, T. S.; Barkman, W. E.; Babelay, Jr., E. F.

    2010-04-30

    One method for creating broken chips in turning processes involves oscillating the cutting tool in the feed direction utilizing the CNC machine axes. The University of North Carolina at Charlotte and the Y-12 National Security Complex have developed and are refining a method to reliably control surface finish and chip length based on a particular machine's dynamic performance. Using computer simulations it is possible to combine the motion of the machine axes with the geometry of the cutting tool to predict the surface characteristics and map the surface texture for a wide range of oscillation parameters. These data allow the selection of oscillation parameters to simultaneously ensure broken chips and acceptable surface characteristics. This paper describes the machine dynamic testing and characterization activities as well as the computational method used for evaluating and predicting chip length and surface texture.

  15. Design of differential optical absorption spectroscopy long-path telescopes based on fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Merten, André; Tschritter, Jens; Platt, Ulrich

    2011-02-10

    We present a new design principle of telescopes for use in the spectral investigation of the atmosphere and the detection of atmospheric trace gases with the long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. A combination of emitting and receiving fibers in a single bundle replaces the commonly used coaxial-Newton-type combination of receiving and transmitting telescope. This very simplified setup offers a higher light throughput and simpler adjustment and allows smaller instruments, which are easier to handle and more portable. The higher transmittance was verified by ray-tracing calculations, which result in a theoretical factor threefold improvement in signal intensity compared with the old setup. In practice, due to the easier alignment and higher stability, up to factor of 10 higher signal intensities were found. In addition, the use of a fiber optic light source provides a better spectral characterization of the light source, which results in a lower detection limit for trace gases studied with this instrument. This new design will greatly enhance the usability and the range of applications of active DOAS instruments. PMID:21343997

  16. Airborne 2-Micron Double-Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Column CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 millijouls and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 microseconds and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micron IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  17. Determination of the diffusion length and the optical self absorption coefficient using EBIC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guermazi, S.; Guermazi, H.; Mlik, Y.; El Jani, B.; Grill, C.; Toureille, A.

    2001-10-01

    We have developed a model of calculation of the induced current due to an electron beam. The expression for the electron beam induced current (EBIC) with an extended generation profile is obtained via the resolution of a steady state continuity equation by the Green function method, satisfying appropriated boundary conditions to the physical model. The generation profile takes into account the lateral diffusion, the effect of defects, dislocations and recombination surfaces besides the number of absorbed electrons and that of diffuse electrons as a function of the depth. In the case of a Schottky diode Au/GaAs obtained by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) method, the theoretical induced current profile is compared to the experimental one and to theoretical profiles whose analytical expressions are given by van Roosbroeck and Bresse. The minority carriers diffusion length L_n = 2 μm and the optical self-absorption coefficient a=0.034 μm^{-1} can be deduced from the experimental current profile, measured by scanning electron microscopy. The theoretical curve, obtained from the proposed model is in a good agreement with the experimental one for surface recombination velocity 10^6 cm s^{-1} except for distances far from the depletion layer (x_0 > 2.3 μm) where the photocurrent produced by the multiple process of the reabsorbed recombination radiation is preponderant. Our results are in agreement with those obtained by other experimental techniques on the same samples.

  18. Thermodynamic length, time, speed, and optimum path to minimize entropy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diósi, L.; Kulacsy, K.; Lukács, B.; Rácz, A.

    1996-12-01

    In addition to the Riemannian metricization of the thermodynamic state space, local relaxation times offer a natural time scale, too. Generalizing existing proposals, we relate a thermodynamic time scale to the standard kinetic coefficients of irreversible thermodynamics. The notion of thermodynamic speed is generalized to higher dimensions. Criteria for minimum entropy production in slow, slightly irreversible processes are discussed. Euler-Lagrange equations are derived for optimum thermodynamic control for fixed clock time period as well as for fixed thermodynamic time period. It is emphasized that the correct derivation of the principle of constant thermodynamic speed, proposed earlier by others, requires the entropy minimization at fixed thermodynamic time instead of clock-time. Most remarkably, optimum paths are Riemannian geodesics which would not be the case had we used ordinary time. To interpret thermodynamic time, an easy-to-implement stepwise algorithm is constructed to realize control at constant thermodynamic speed. Thermodynamic time is shown to correspond to the number of steps, and the sophisticated task of determining thermodynamic time in real control problems is achieved by measuring ordinary intensive variables.

  19. Chiral-index resolved length mapping of carbon nanotubes in solution using electric-field induced differential absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenshan; Hennrich, Frank; Flavel, Benjamin S.; Kappes, Manfred M.; Krupke, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    The length of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is an important metric for the integration of SWCNTs into devices and for the performance of SWCNT-based electronic or optoelectronic applications. In this work we propose a rather simple method based on electric-field induced differential absorption spectroscopy to measure the chiral-index-resolved average length of SWCNTs in dispersions. The method takes advantage of the electric-field induced length-dependent dipole moment of nanotubes and has been verified and calibrated by atomic force microscopy. This method not only provides a low cost, in situ approach for length measurements of SWCNTs in dispersion, but due to the sensitivity of the method to the SWCNT chiral index, the chiral index dependent average length of fractions obtained by chromatographic sorting can also be derived. Also, the determination of the chiral-index resolved length distribution seems to be possible using this method.

  20. Computer code long path method for long path differential-absorption predictions using CO{sub 2} laser lines

    SciTech Connect

    Zuev, V.V.; Mitsel`, A.A.; Kataev, M.Y.; Ptashnik, I.V.; Firsov, K.M.

    1995-11-01

    A computer program LPM (Long Path Method) has been developed for imitative modeling of the concentration at gases (H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, NH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) in the atmosphere using a long-path double-wavelength laser system equipped with two tunable CO{sub 2} lasers. The model is designed for four different lasing isotopes of CO{sub 2} ({sup 12}C{sup 16}O{sub 2}, {sup 13}C{sup 16}O{sub 2}, {sup 12}C{sup 18}O{sub 2}, {sup 13}C{sup 18}O{sub 2}). The program determines optimal pairs of CO{sub 2} laser wavelengths, and the gas concentration retrieval errors from sounding data caused both by detector noise and systematic inaccuracy. The program was written in MS FORTRAN and Visual Basic languages for Windows 3.1 and an IBM-compatible PC. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  1. Triple-Pulsed Two-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar: A New Active Remote Sensing Capability with Path to Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong

    2016-06-01

    The two-micron wavelength is suitable for monitoring atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide, the two most dominant greenhouse gases. Recent advances in 2-μm laser technology paved the way for constructing state-of-the-art lidar transmitters for active remote sensing applications. In this paper, a new triple-pulsed 2-μm integrated path differential absorption lidar is presented. This lidar is capable of measuring either two species or single specie with two different weighting functions, simultaneously and independently. Development of this instrument is conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. Instrument scaling for projected future space missions will be discussed.

  2. Triple-Pulsed Two-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar: A New Active Remote Sensing Capability with Path to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    The two-micron wavelength is suitable for monitoring atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide, the two most dominant greenhouse gases. Recent advances in 2-micron laser technology paved the way for constructing state-of-the-art lidar transmitters for active remote sensing applications. In this paper, a new triple-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption lidar is presented. This lidar is capable of measuring either two species or single specie with two different weighting functions, simultaneously and independently. Development of this instrument is conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. Instrument scaling for projected future space missions will be discussed.

  3. Temperature-dependent ballistic transport in a channel with length below the scattering-limited mean free path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Vijay K.; Zainal Abidin, Mastura Shafinaz; Tan, Michael L. P.; Riyadi, Munawar A.

    2012-03-01

    The temperature-dependent ballistic transport, using nonequilibrium Arora distribution function (NEADF), is shown to result in mobility degradation with reduction in channel length, in direct contrast to expectation of a collision-free transport. The ballistic mean free path (mfp) is much higher than the scattering-limited long-channel mfp, yet the mobility is amazingly lower. High-field effects, converting stochastic velocity vectors to streamlined ones, are found to be negligible when the applied voltage is less than the critical voltage appropriate for a ballistic mfp, especially at cryogenic temperatures. Excellent agreement with the experimental data on a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor is obtained. The applications of NEADF are shown to cover a wide spectrum, covering regimes from the scattering-limited to ballistic, from nondegenerate to degenerate, from nanowire to bulk, from low- to high-temperature, and from a low electric field to an extremely high electric field.

  4. Investigation of an implantable dosimeter for single-point water equivalent path length verification in proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Mann, Greg; Cascio, Ethan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose:In vivo range verification in proton therapy is highly desirable. A recent study suggested that it was feasible to use point dose measurement for in vivo beam range verification in proton therapy, provided that the spread-out Bragg peak dose distribution is delivered in a different and rather unconventional manner. In this work, the authors investigate the possibility of using a commercial implantable dosimeter with wireless reading for this particular application. Methods: The traditional proton treatment technique delivers all the Bragg peaks required for a SOBP field in a single sequence, producing a constant dose plateau across the target volume. As a result, a point dose measurement anywhere in the target volume will produce the same value, thus providing no information regarding the water equivalent path length to the point of measurement. However, the same constant dose distribution can be achieved by splitting the field into a complementary pair of subfields, producing two oppositely “sloped” depth-dose distributions, respectively. The ratio between the two distributions can be a sensitive function of depth and measuring this ratio at a point inside the target volume can provide the water equivalent path length to the dosimeter location. Two types of field splits were used in the experiment, one achieved by the technique of beam current modulation and the other by manipulating the location and width of the beam pulse relative to the range modulator track. Eight MOSFET-based implantable dosimeters at four different depths in a water tank were used to measure the dose ratios for these field pairs. A method was developed to correct the effect of the well-known LET dependence of the MOSFET detectors on the depth-dose distributions using the columnar recombination model. The LET-corrected dose ratios were used to derive the water equivalent path lengths to the dosimeter locations to be compared to physical measurements. Results: The implantable

  5. Challenges and Solutions for Frequency and Energy References for Spaceborne and Airborne Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, Andreas; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Witschas, Benjamin; Wirth, Martin; Büdenbender, Christian; Amediek, Axel; Ehret, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    The stringent requirements for both the frequency stability and power reference represent a challenging task for Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidars (IPDA) to measure greenhouse gas columns from satellite or aircraft. Currently, the German-French methane mission MERLIN (Methan Remote Lidar Mission) is prepared. At the same time CHARM-F, an aircraft installed system has been developed at DLR as an airborne demonstrator for a spaceborne greenhouse gas mission. The concepts and realization of these important sub-systems are discussed.

  6. Ground-based Photon Path Measurements from Solar Absorption Spectra of the O2 A-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Z.; Wennberg, P. O.; Cageao, R. P.; Pongetti, T. J.; Toon, G. C.; Sander, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution solar absorption spectra obtained from Table Mountain Facility (TMF, 34.38degN, 117.68degW, 2286 m elevation) have been analyzed in the region of the O2 A-band. The photon paths of direct sunlight in clear sky cases are retrieved from the O2 absorption lines and compared with ray-tracing calculations based on the solar zenith angle and surface pressure. At a given zenith angle, the ratios of retrieved to geometrically derived photon paths are highly precise (approx.0.2%), but they vary as the zenith angle changes. This is because current models of the spectral lineshape in this band do not properly account for the significant absorption that exists far from the centers of saturated lines. For example, use of a Voigt function with Lorentzian far wings results in an error in the retrieved photon path of as much as 5%, highly correlated with solar zenith angle. Adopting a super-Lorentz function reduces, but does not completely eliminate this problem. New lab measurements of the lineshape are required to make further progress.

  7. Long term NO2 measurements in Hong Kong using LED based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. L.; Pöhler, D.; Kuhlmann, G.; Hartl, A.; Platt, U.; Wenig, M. O.

    2011-11-01

    In this study we present the first long term measurements of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using a LED based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) instrument. This instrument is measuring continuously in Hong Kong since December 2009, first in a setup with a 550 m absorption path and then with a 3820 m path at about 30 m to 50 m above street level. The instrument is using a high power blue light LED with peak intensity at 450 nm coupled into the telescope using a Y-fibre bundle. The LP-DOAS instrument measures NO2 concentrations in the Kowloon Tong and Mong Kok district of Hong Kong and we compare the measurement results to concentrations reported by monitoring stations operated by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in that area. Hourly averages of coinciding measurements are in reasonable agreement (R = 0.74). Furthermore, we used the long-term data set to validate the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 data product. Monthly averaged LP-DOAS and OMI measurements correlate well (R = 0.84) when comparing the data for the OMI overpass time. We analyzed weekly patterns in both data sets and found that the LP-DOAS detects a clear weekly cycle with a reduction on weekends during rush hour peaks, whereas OMI is not able to observe this weekly cycle due to its fix overpass time.

  8. Measurement of tropospheric trace gases by long-path differential absorption spectroscopy during the 1993 OH Photochemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, J. W.; Jakoubek, R. O.; Mount, G. H.

    1997-03-01

    In August and September 1993 a comparative study of tropospheric long-path absorption techniques with in situ methods was performed for both the hydroxyl radical and the other important trace species. Long-path measurements were made over the 10.3 km path between Fritz Peak Observatory and Caribou Mine in the mountains 17 km west of Boulder, Colorado. At Caribou Mine, a 121 element, 1 m2 retroreflector array folds the optical path to give a total path of 20.6 km. The in situ instruments were located at Idaho Hill 0.5 km northwest of Caribou Mine. The optical design and analysis techniques used to obtain the path-integrated concentrations of O3, CH2O, SO2, and NO2 will be presented. The spectrograph used in this study is a 1/4 m double, crossed Czerny-Turner that employs a diode array detector allowing the acquisition of 40 nm spectral bands in the near UV and visible spectral regions. This system also utilizes automatic alignment and self-adjusting time integration so the system will acquire data in an unattended mode. The spectral bands selected for this study permit the simultaneous measurement of O3, NO2, CH2O, and SO2; NO2 and H2O; and NO3 and H2O. The data analysis uses a nonlinear least squares regression procedure to deduce the concentration of each of the species present in the atmosphere and also provides an effective method for removing the influence of scattered solar light for daytime measurements. An estimate of the measurement precision can be found by comparing atmospheric spectra analyzed with two different IO spectra; one measured through the atmosphere and the other a direct arc lamp spectrum.

  9. [Measurement of atmospheric NO3 radical with long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy based on red light emitting diodes].

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Wen; Liu, Wen-Qing; Wang, Jiang-Tao; Xie, Pin-Hua; Wang, Xu-De

    2013-02-01

    Nitrate radical (NO3) is the most important oxidant in the tropospheric nighttime chemistry. Due to its high reactivity and low atmospheric concentrations, modern red light emitting diodes (LEDs) was proposed as light source in long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) to measure NO3 radical in the atmosphere. The spectral properties of Luxeon LXHL-MD1D LEDs were analyzed in the present paper. The principle of LEDs-DOAS system to measure nitrate radical was studied in this paper. The experimental setup and retrieval method of NO3 radical were discussed in this paper. The retrieved example of NO3 was given and the time series of NO3 concentrations was performed for a week. The results showed that the detection limits of LEDs-DOAS system were 12 ppt for atmospheric NO3 radical when the optical path of LEDs-DOAS system was 2.8 km. PMID:23697129

  10. OPEN PATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY FOR ACQUISITION OF FUGITIVE EMISSION FLUX DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollutant emission from unconfined sources is an increasingly important environmental issue. The U.S. EPA has developed a gorund-based optical remote sensing method that enables direct measurement of fugitive emission flux from large area sources. Open-path Fourier transfor...

  11. Tomographic multiaxis-differential optical absorption spectroscopy observations of Sun-illuminated targets: a technique providing well-defined absorption paths in the boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Frins, Erna; Bobrowski, Nicole; Platt, Ulrich; Wagner, Thomas

    2006-08-20

    A novel experimental procedure to measure the near-surface distribution of atmospheric trace gases by using passive multiaxis differential absorption optical spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) is proposed. The procedure consists of pointing the receiving telescope of the spectrometer to nonreflecting surfaces or to bright targets placed at known distances from the measuring device, which are illuminated by sunlight. We show that the partial trace gas absorptions between the top of the atmosphere and the target can be easily removed from the measured total absorption. Thus it is possible to derive the average concentration of trace gases such as NO(2), HCHO, SO(2), H(2)O, Glyoxal, BrO, and others along the line of sight between the instrument and the target similar to the well-known long-path DOAS observations (but with much less expense). If tomographic arrangements are used, even two- or three-dimensional trace gas distributions can be retrieved. The basic assumptions of the proposed method are confirmed by test measurements taken across the city of Heidelberg. PMID:16892129

  12. Preliminary simulation of hyporheic hydrology suggests systematic changes in hyporheic flow path length and residence time in response to reach-scale channel restoration in Meacham Creek, OR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amerson, B. E.; Poole, G.

    2011-12-01

    Hyporheic hydrologic response to stream restoration has typically focused on hydrodynamics associated with individual features or habitat units rather than whole reaches. Here we present preliminary results from MODFLOW simulations that compare modeled hyporheic hydrology prior to and after major channel reconfiguration associated with a recently completed reach-scale channel restoration on Meacham Creek in northeastern Oregon. Our model was parameterized using LiDAR floodplain surface elevation data and empirically-derived estimates of aquifer properties. Results show that groundwater flow path length and cumulative residence time distributions are apt to be altered by channel reconfiguration. For example, our model shows that the relatively high-gradient and straight baseline channel is dominated by either short or long flow path lengths, with relatively few medium length flow paths. In contrast, the proposed restoration channel is more sinuous and has a lower gradient. Our modeling suggests that the restoration channel will have a broader distribution of flow path lengths and residence times. We used model results to select well locations for intensive monitoring of groundwater surface elevation and temperature. Monitoring will continue through 2012 and is designed to evaluate model predictions as well as to document the effects of the channel restoration on surface water-groundwater interactions and concomitant effects on water temperature.

  13. Measurements of atmospheric NO3 radicals in Hefei using LED-based long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Lu; Min, Qin; Pin-Hua, Xie; Jun, Duan; Wu, Fang; Liu-Yi, Ling; Lan-Lan, Shen; Jian-Guo, Liu; Wen-Qing, Liu

    2016-02-01

    NO3 radicals accumulate during the night, thereby being the most critical night oxidant. Owing to the low concentration and dramatic variation, the detection of atmospheric NO3 radicals is still challenging. In this paper, an LED-based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LPDOAS) instrument is developed for measuring the atmospheric NO3 radicals. This instrument is composed of a Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, a combined emitting and receiving fiber, and a red LED equipped with a thermostat, and has a center wavelength of 660 nm, covering the NO3 strongest absorption peak (662 nm). The influence of LED temperature fluctuations is discussed. The temperature of the LED lamp with a home-made thermostat is tested, showing a stability of ±0.1 °C. The principle and fitting analyses of LED-LPDOAS are presented. A retrieval example and a time series of NO3 radical concentrations with good continuity for one night are shown. The detection limit of NO3 for 2.6-km optical path is about 10 ppt. Project supported by the “Strategic Priority Research Program” of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. XDB05040200 and XDB05010500).

  14. An indoor test campaign of the tomography long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Mettendorf, K U; Hartl, A; Pundt, I

    2006-02-01

    In this study we validate the two-dimensional long path DOAS tomography measurement technique by means of an indoor experiment with well-known concentration distributions. The experiment was conducted over an area of 10 m x 15 m using one and two cylindrical polycarbonate containers of diameter 2 m, respectively, filled with NO2. The setup was realized with three of the multibeam instruments recently developed by Pundt and Mettendorf (Appl. Opt., 2005, in press), which allow the simultaneous measurement along at least four light paths each. The configuration consisted of twelve simultaneous light beams, 39 horizontal light paths in total, and 18 different cylinder positions inside the field. It was found that for the discretization and inversion technique shown here reconstructions of the concentration distributions from experimental data agree well with simulated reconstructions. In order to draw conclusions for atmospheric applications, numerical studies including instrumental errors were carried out. It was found that with the presented measurement setup it is possible to measure and reconstruct one or two NO2 plumes of 600 m diameter and average concentrations above 4.2 ppbv each, on a scale of 13.5 km2. Theoretical investigations show that it should be possible to localize and quantify 600 m diameter plumes of SO2 > 1.5 ppbv, H2CO > 6.3 ppbv, HONO > 3.2 ppbv, and ozone > 46.2 ppbv. Larger plumes can be measured with higher precision. PMID:16470260

  15. LONG PATH DIFFERENTIAL OPTICAL ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER AND EPA-APPROVED FIXED POINT METHODS INTERCOMPARISON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differential optical absorption spectrometry (DOAS) has been used by a number of investigators over the past 10 years to measure a wide range of gaseous air pollutants. ecently OPSIS AB, Lund, Sweden, has developed and made commercially available DOAS instrument that has a number...

  16. In situ stratospheric ozone measurements by long path UV absorption - Developments and interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstock, E. M.; Schiller, C. M.; Anderson, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    A high-sensitivity, in situ UV absorption ozone sensor has been developed for use in the stratosphere. The instrument couples 254-nm radiation from a low-pressure mercury discharge lamp into a 40-pass White cell to attain a high-sensitivity ozone absorption measurement. Preflight/postflight laboratory tests utilizing an ozone source coupled to a laboratory UV ozone photometer in a fast-flow system as well as in-flight diagnostics verify the successful operation of the instrument. Evidence is presented to verify that in situ UV absorption ozone photometers can measure stratospheric ozone with better than 3 percent precision and 5 percent accuracy, provided proper attention is given to both the thermal field surrounding the gondola and the ambient pressure measurements. Ozone data are compared with modeled profiles in the 28- to 40-km region. An assessment of the disagreement between observations and modeled profiles is given along with suggestions for future experiments designed to constrain photochemical models.

  17. High-efficiency high-power diode laser beam shaping and focusing with constant optical-path length equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, Stefano; Villoresi, Paolo

    2006-04-01

    ) the maximum optical efficiency in the beam shaping process, 2) the optimal equalization of the beam parameter product for the two axes, 3) the use of few optical elements and 4) a very compact size. These goals are addressed by a scheme that splits the collimated beam from the laser diode into different portions while the length of the optical paths of each sub element is kept constant, and by the subsequent use of short focal length aspheric lenses for the focalization of the transformed beam. Each sub-beam is deflected by a couple of plane parallel mirrors, whose normal is directed to equalize the BPP without any mutual shadowing. An optimal solution can be easily envisaged for a laser source of common size of 0.7 x 10 mm. The condition on equal optical path length has the noticeable property of placing the virtual position of the individual portions into which the original beam is split at the same distance with respect to target. Thanks to this, their subsequent focusing is unaffected by the axial displacement of the common solution by the stepped mirrors. In fact, to correct this effect, this latter technique requires the use of a prism pair, involving complexity, size enlargement and higher costs. In this work both an extensive ray tracing and optical analysis is presented as well as the experimental characterization of an experimental model. Moreover, we also report on the technique for the realization of th tilted-face plane mirrors of which is composed our beam shaping device. The scheme of beam shaping here reported can be extended to higher power beam by means of the technique of the beam combination by polarization coupling or that of the optical beam compression. Examples of theses developments are discussed in the paper, and experimental results presented. The most direct applications of the class of optical devices here reported are the high power diode laser direct application in material processing or manufacturing, the coupling into multimode optical

  18. NitroMAC: An instrument for the measurement of HONO and intercomparison with a long-path absorption photometer.

    PubMed

    Afif, Charbel; Jambert, Corinne; Michoud, Vincent; Colomb, Aurélie; Eyglunent, Gregory; Borbon, Agnès; Daële, Véronique; Doussin, Jean-François; Perros, Pascal

    2016-02-01

    NitroMAC (French acronym for continuous atmospheric measurements of nitrogenous compounds) is an instrument which has been developed for the semi-continuous measurement of atmospheric nitrous acid (HONO). This instrument relies on wet chemical sampling and detection using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-visible absorption at 540 nm. Sampling proceeds by dissolution of gaseous HONO in a phosphate buffer solution followed by derivatization with sulfanilamide/N-(1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine. The performance of this instrument was found to be as follows: a detection limit of around 3 ppt with measurement uncertainty of 10% over an analysis time of 10 min. Intercomparison was made between the instrument and a long-path absorption photometer (LOPAP) during two experiments in different environments. First, air was sampled in a smog chamber with concentrations up to 18 ppb of nitrous acid. NitroMAC and LOPAP measurements showed very good agreement. Then, in a second experiment, ambient air with HONO concentrations below 250 ppt was sampled. While NitroMAC showed its capability of measuring HONO in moderate and highly polluted environments, the intercomparison results in ambient air highlighted that corrections must be made for minor interferences when low concentrations are measured. PMID:26969550

  19. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. III. Exact stochastic path integral evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Moix, Jeremy M.; Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-07

    A numerically exact path integral treatment of the absorption and emission spectra of open quantum systems is presented that requires only the straightforward solution of a stochastic differential equation. The approach converges rapidly enabling the calculation of spectra of large excitonic systems across the complete range of system parameters and for arbitrary bath spectral densities. With the numerically exact absorption and emission operators, one can also immediately compute energy transfer rates using the multi-chromophoric Förster resonant energy transfer formalism. Benchmark calculations on the emission spectra of two level systems are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the stochastic approach. This is followed by calculations of the energy transfer rates between two weakly coupled dimer systems as a function of temperature and system-bath coupling strength. It is shown that the recently developed hybrid cumulant expansion (see Paper II) is the only perturbative method capable of generating uniformly reliable energy transfer rates and emission spectra across a broad range of system parameters.

  20. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. III. Exact stochastic path integral evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moix, Jeremy M; Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-01

    A numerically exact path integral treatment of the absorption and emission spectra of open quantum systems is presented that requires only the straightforward solution of a stochastic differential equation. The approach converges rapidly enabling the calculation of spectra of large excitonic systems across the complete range of system parameters and for arbitrary bath spectral densities. With the numerically exact absorption and emission operators, one can also immediately compute energy transfer rates using the multi-chromophoric Förster resonant energy transfer formalism. Benchmark calculations on the emission spectra of two level systems are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the stochastic approach. This is followed by calculations of the energy transfer rates between two weakly coupled dimer systems as a function of temperature and system-bath coupling strength. It is shown that the recently developed hybrid cumulant expansion (see Paper II) is the only perturbative method capable of generating uniformly reliable energy transfer rates and emission spectra across a broad range of system parameters. PMID:25747062

  1. Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Optimizations Based on Pre-Analyzed Atmospheric Data for ASCENDS Mission Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pliutau, Denis; Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a modeling method based on data reductions is investigated which includes pre analyzed MERRA atmospheric fields for quantitative estimates of uncertainties introduced in the integrated path differential absorption methods for the sensing of various molecules including CO2. This approach represents the extension of our existing lidar modeling framework previously developed and allows effective on- and offline wavelength optimizations and weighting function analysis to minimize the interference effects such as those due to temperature sensitivity and water vapor absorption. The new simulation methodology is different from the previous implementation in that it allows analysis of atmospheric effects over annual spans and the entire Earth coverage which was achieved due to the data reduction methods employed. The effectiveness of the proposed simulation approach is demonstrated with application to the mixing ratio retrievals for the future ASCENDS mission. Independent analysis of multiple accuracy limiting factors including the temperature, water vapor interferences, and selected system parameters is further used to identify favorable spectral regions as well as wavelength combinations facilitating the reduction in total errors in the retrieved XCO2 values.

  2. Performance Simulations of Spaceborne Methane Observations by Integrated-Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiemle, Christoph; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Ehret, Gerhard; Amediek, Axel

    A lidar-based satellite instrument for global observations of atmospheric methane is foreseen whose expected performance and technical feasibility are currently investigated in planning phase 0/A. Methane is, after carbon dioxide, the second most important greenhouse gas, whereby its anthropogenic emissions are much more uncertain. In addition, climate change may cause an important positive feedback of yet unknown intensity by release of methane from melting permafrost soils and ocean sediments. The current observational network is not able to monitor these sources with sufficient density and accuracy: While the ground-based in-situ network is too sparse, existing passive remote sensors on spacecraft are not accurate enough. Preliminary studies show that lidar with a realistic instrument design on a LEO platform has the potential to overcome these shortcomings and to measure methane with an accuracy and spatial resolution that satisfies the requirements of the user community. The presentation will include basic issues such as the selection of suitable methane absorption wavelengths, key per-formance parameters of instrument and spacecraft, and an assessment of the residual bias. It will highlight critical performance parameters such as instrument noise and surface reflectivity, and list the instrument and platform characteristics needed to fulfil the user requirements.

  3. Mapping of methane spatial distribution around biogas plant with an open-path tunable diode absorption spectroscopy scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shirui; Wang, Jihua; Dong, Daming; Zheng, Wengang; Zhao, Xiande

    2013-02-01

    An open-path tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (OP-TDLAS) detector was applied to detect the methane emission from a biogas plant in a dairy farm. Two OP-TDLAS scanning systems were built according to maximum likelihood with expectation minimization (MLEM) and smooth basis function minimization (SBFM) algorithms to reconstruct the two-dimensional (2-D) distribution maps. Six reconstruction maps with the resolution of 30×80 were obtained by the MLEM algorithm with "grid translation method" and three reconstruction maps were obtained by the SBFM algorithm with 2-D Gaussian model. The maximum mixing ratio in the first result was between 0.85 and 1.30 ppm, while it was between 1.14 and 1.30 ppm in the second result. The average mixing ratio in the first result was between 0.54 and 0.49 ppm, and between 0.56 and 0.65 ppm in the second result. The reconstruction results validated that the two algorithms could effectively reflect the methane mixing ratio distribution within the target area. However, with the more simple optical rays and less equipment requirements, the OP-TDLAS scanning system based on SBFM algorithm provides a useful monitoring tool of methane emissions in agricultural production.

  4. Observation of halogen species in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, by active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pöhler, Denis; Vogel, Leif; Friess, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-04-13

    In the polar tropospheric boundary layer, reactive halogen species (RHS) are responsible for ozone depletion as well as the oxidation of elemental mercury and dimethyl sulphide. After polar sunrise, air masses enriched in reactive bromine cover areas of several million square kilometers. Still, the source and release mechanisms of halogens are not completely understood. We report measurements of halogen oxides performed in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, during spring 2008. Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements were set up offshore, several kilometers from the coast, directly on the sea ice, which was never done before. High bromine oxide concentrations were detected frequently during sunlight hours with a characteristic daily cycle showing morning and evening maxima and a minimum at noon. The, so far, highest observed average mixing ratio in the polar boundary layer of 41 pmol/mol (equal to pptv) was detected. Only short sea ice contact is required to release high amounts of bromine. An observed linear decrease of maximum bromine oxide levels with ambient temperature during sunlight, between -24 degrees C and -15 degrees C, provides indications on the conditions required for the emission of RHS. In addition, the data indicate the presence of reactive chlorine in the Arctic boundary layer. In contrast to Antarctica, iodine oxide was not detected above a detection limit of 0.3 pmol/mol. PMID:20160121

  5. Observation of halogen species in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, by active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pöhler, Denis; Vogel, Leif; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    In the polar tropospheric boundary layer, reactive halogen species (RHS) are responsible for ozone depletion as well as the oxidation of elemental mercury and dimethyl sulphide. After polar sunrise, air masses enriched in reactive bromine cover areas of several million square kilometers. Still, the source and release mechanisms of halogens are not completely understood. We report measurements of halogen oxides performed in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, during spring 2008. Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements were set up offshore, several kilometers from the coast, directly on the sea ice, which was never done before. High bromine oxide concentrations were detected frequently during sunlight hours with a characteristic daily cycle showing morning and evening maxima and a minimum at noon. The, so far, highest observed average mixing ratio in the polar boundary layer of 41 pmol/mol (equal to pptv) was detected. Only short sea ice contact is required to release high amounts of bromine. An observed linear decrease of maximum bromine oxide levels with ambient temperature during sunlight, between -24 °C and -15 °C, provides indications on the conditions required for the emission of RHS. In addition, the data indicate the presence of reactive chlorine in the Arctic boundary layer. In contrast to Antarctica, iodine oxide was not detected above a detection limit of 0.3 pmol/mol. PMID:20160121

  6. Double-pulse 2-μm integrated path differential absorption lidar airborne validation for atmospheric carbon dioxide measurement.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer F; Singh, Upendra N; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Ismail, Syed

    2016-05-20

    Field experiments were conducted to test and evaluate the initial atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement capability of airborne, high-energy, double-pulsed, 2-μm integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. This IPDA was designed, integrated, and operated at the NASA Langley Research Center on-board the NASA B-200 aircraft. The IPDA was tuned to the CO2 strong absorption line at 2050.9670 nm, which is the optimum for lower tropospheric weighted column measurements. Flights were conducted over land and ocean under different conditions. The first validation experiments of the IPDA for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing, focusing on low surface reflectivity oceanic surface returns during full day background conditions, are presented. In these experiments, the IPDA measurements were validated by comparison to airborne flask air-sampling measurements conducted by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. IPDA performance modeling was conducted to evaluate measurement sensitivity and bias errors. The IPDA signals and their variation with altitude compare well with predicted model results. In addition, off-off-line testing was conducted, with fixed instrument settings, to evaluate the IPDA systematic and random errors. Analysis shows an altitude-independent differential optical depth offset of 0.0769. Optical depth measurement uncertainty of 0.0918 compares well with the predicted value of 0.0761. IPDA CO2 column measurement compares well with model-driven, near-simultaneous air-sampling measurements from the NOAA aircraft at different altitudes. With a 10-s shot average, CO2 differential optical depth measurement of 1.0054±0.0103 was retrieved from a 6-km altitude and a 4-GHz on-line operation. As compared to CO2 weighted-average column dry-air volume mixing ratio of 404.08 ppm, derived from air sampling, IPDA measurement resulted in a value of 405.22±4.15  ppm with 1.02% uncertainty and

  7. Intercomparison of OH Radical Measurements by Long-Path Absorption and Laser Induced Fluorescence in the Atmosphere Simulation Chamber SAPHIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, H.-P.; Brauers, T.; Greif, J.; Häseler, R.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Rupp, L.

    2003-04-01

    A striking advantage of the SAPHIR chamber is the availability of two spectroscopic detection instruments for OH radicals: Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIF) and Long-Path Differential Optical Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Both instruments have already been compared in 1994 during the field measurement campaign POPCORN. They agreed well with a correlation coefficient of r=0.90 and a weighted linear fit with a slope of 1.09 +- 0.12. However, OH measurements in the simulation chamber differ significantly from measurements in ambient air. While DOAS measures OH as an integral value along the central longitudinal axis of SAPHIR, LIF samples the air locally and close (2 cm) to the floor of the chamber. Thus, the LIF measurements might be possibly affected by local concentration gradients caused by insufficient mixing of the chamber air or by deposition to the wall. On the other hand, if turbulent mixing of the chamber air is weak and high concentrations of ozone are used in experiments, the DOAS instrument might be subject to artificial formation of OH radicals in the air volume which is illuminated by the detection laser. This interference results from laser induced photolysis of ozone and the subsequent reaction of water vapor with the excited oxygen atoms formed. Thus it is of decisive importance to compare OH measurements from both instruments in order to investigate potential disturbing effects due to the specific sampling properties of both instruments within SAPHIR. We report on OH measurements accomplished simultaneously with both instruments using different trace gas compositions and experimental conditions.

  8. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  9. Application of maximum likelihood estimator in nano-scale optical path length measurement using spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Motaghian Nezam, S. M. R.; Joo, C; Tearney, G. J.; de Boer, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy (SD-OCPM) measures minute phase changes in transparent biological specimens using a common path interferometer and a spectrometer based optical coherence tomography system. The Fourier transform of the acquired interference spectrum in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is complex and the phase is affected by contributions from inherent random noise. To reduce this phase noise, knowledge of the probability density function (PDF) of data becomes essential. In the present work, the intensity and phase PDFs of the complex interference signal are theoretically derived and the optical path length (OPL) PDF is experimentally validated. The full knowledge of the PDFs is exploited for optimal estimation (Maximum Likelihood estimation) of the intensity, phase, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in SD-OCPM. Maximum likelihood (ML) estimates of the intensity, SNR, and OPL images are presented for two different scan modes using Bovine Pulmonary Artery Endothelial (BPAE) cells. To investigate the phase accuracy of SD-OCPM, we experimentally calculate and compare the cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of the OPL standard deviation and the square root of the Cramér-Rao lower bound (1/2SNR) over 100 BPAE images for two different scan modes. The correction to the OPL measurement by applying ML estimation to SD-OCPM for BPAE cells is demonstrated. PMID:18957999

  10. Imaging (NIRI) and quantitation (NIRS) in tissue using time-resolved spectrophotometry: the impact of statistically and dynamically variable optical path lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaron, David A.; Ho, David C.; Rubinsky, Boris; Shannon, Mark

    1993-09-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and near-infrared optical imaging (NIRI) are two medical techniques under development, respectively offering the ability to use light to noninvasively quantitate metabolite concentration and to image structure within the human body. Due to the dual effects of scattering and absorbance, quantitative measurement using NIRS and reconstruction of deep-tissue structure using NIRI have been problematic. Significant advances have occurred, however, over the past few years that have brought these measurements closer to reality. In this paper, we present several of the areas in which our laboratory has made progress, and discuss the relevance of these contributions in the light of work by other laboratories. With regard to NIR spectroscopy, it now appears both practical and necessary to take into account the length of the paths taken by light in order to derive deep-tissue estimates of pigment concentrations such as hemoglobin. With regard to NIR imaging, path corrected approaches offer improved resolution, and have been used successfully by our group and others to image phantoms, animals, and now humans. Different simplifications have been used in order to accomplish separately spectroscopy and imaging, but it is hoped that a common method will allow combination of the two techniques in order to achieve spatially resolved quantitative optical measurements.

  11. Advancements in Algorithms for the Retrieval of CO2 Column Amount and Path Length Using an Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, F. W.; Lin, B.; Ismail, S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Dobler, J. T.; Browell, E. V.; Kooi, S. A.; Campbell, J. F.; Obland, M. D.; Yang, M. M.; Meadows, B.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an overview of the methods for the retrieval of carbon dioxide (CO2) and oxygen (O2) column amounts and their associated path lengths measured by the Multi-Functional Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL) and the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES). MFLL and ACES are multi-frequency, Intensity-Modulated, Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) Lidar systems developed as proof-of-concept demonstrators for NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The National Research Council identified ASCENDS in 2007 as an important mid-term decadal survey mission to provide measurements critical to improved projections of the Earth's future climate. The ASCENDS measurement requirements have evolved significantly since first proposed by the NRC as has our understanding of the IM-CW measurement technique we propose for use by ASCENDS. To meet these requirements, both MFLL and ACES transmit wavelengths near 1.57 and 1.26 μm modulated with range-encoded signals to minimize bias from thin clouds in the CO2 and O2 column measurements while simultaneously measuring the path length to the surface and to intervening cloud layers. In preparation for the ASCENDS mission, the MFLL has been deployed on 13 airborne field campaigns since 2005, including the latest series of flights in August 2014. NASA also flew the ACES instrument as a technology demonstrator in 2014. In this paper we describe the current ASCENDS retrieval technique and present the accuracy and precision of the measurements obtained using this technique. We also present a reanalysis of the 2011 MFLL measurements and compare the results previously reported to the reanalysis. Reanalysis yields range precisions of less that one meter from an altitude of 12 kilometers from the CO2 offline channel with 1.6 watts of transmitted power.

  12. Adjusting the tasseled cap brightness and greenness factors for atmospheric path radiance and absorption on a pixel by pixel basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D.; Slater, P. N.; Pinter, P. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    A radiative transfer model was used to convert ground measured reflectances into the radiance at the top of the atmosphere, for several levels of atmospheric path radiance. The radiance in MSS7 (0.8 to 1.1 m) was multiplied by the transmission fraction for atmospheres having different levels of precipitable water. The radiance values were converted to simulated LANDSAT digital counts for four path radiance levels and four levels of precipitable water. These values were used to calculate the Kauth-Thomas brightness, greenness, yellowness, and nonsuch factors. Brightness was affected by surface conditions and path radiance. Greenness was affected by surface conditions, path radiance, and precipitable water. Yellowness was affected by path radiance and nonsuch by precipitable water, and both factors changed only slightly with surface conditions. Yellowness and nonsuch were used to adjust brightness and greenness to produce factors that were affected only by surface conditions such as soils and vegetation, and not by path radiance and precipitable water.

  13. Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of CO(2), CH(4), H(2)O, and Isotopes Over a 2 km Outdoor Path: Concentration Retrievals Using Different Absorption Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieker, G. B.; Giorgetta, F. R.; Coddington, I.; Swann, W. C.; Zolot, A. M.; Sinclair, L. C.; Baumann, E.; Cromer, C.; Newbury, N.

    2014-06-01

    A dual frequency comb spectrometer is used to make high signal-to-noise measurements of atmospheric absorption from 5990 to 6260 cm-1 with 0.0033 cm-1 point spacing and ˜4·10-8 cm-1 resolution over a 2 km outdoor air path. The spectra, which encompass over 700 absorption features of CO2, CH4, and H2O, are fit with several absorption models to assess the quality of the models and to retrieve the various species concentrations and air temperature. The models tested include the HITRAN 2008 and 2012 spectral databases with Voigt line-shape profiles as well as a recent model for CO2 that includes the effects of line mixing and speed dependence. Residuals are typically less than 2% of the peak absorbance, except for the HITRAN 2012 CH4 model, which exhibits larger residuals. Species concentration retrievals using the models are compared with a calibrated point sensor mounted on a tower near the open air path.

  14. Full-potential theoretical investigations of electron inelastic mean free paths and extended x-ray absorption fine structure in molybdenum.

    PubMed

    Chantler, C T; Bourke, J D

    2014-04-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy is one of the most robust, adaptable, and widely used structural analysis tools available for a range of material classes from bulk solids to aqueous solutions and active catalytic structures. Recent developments in XAFS theory have enabled high-accuracy calculations of spectra over an extended energy range using full-potential cluster modelling, and have demonstrated particular sensitivity in XAFS to a fundamental electron transport property-the electron inelastic mean free path (IMFP). We develop electron IMFP theory using a unique hybrid model that simultaneously incorporates second-order excitation losses, while precisely accounting for optical transitions dictated by the complex band structure of the solid. These advances are coupled with improved XAFS modelling to determine wide energy-range absorption spectra for molybdenum. This represents a critical test case of the theory, as measurements of molybdenum K-edge XAFS represent the most accurate determinations of XAFS spectra for any material. We find that we are able to reproduce an extended range of oscillatory structure in the absorption spectrum, and demonstrate a first-time theoretical determination of the absorption coefficient of molybdenum over the entire extended XAFS range utilizing a full-potential cluster model. PMID:24651638

  15. Seismic scattering and absorption mapping of debris flows, feeding paths, and tectonic units at Mount St. Helens volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Siena, Luca; Calvet, Marie; Watson, Keira J.; Jonkers, Art R. D.; Thomas, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Frequency-dependent peak-delay times and coda quality factors have been used jointly to separate seismic absorption from scattering quantitatively in Earth media at regional and lithospheric scale; to this end, we measure and map these two quantities at Mount St. Helens volcano. The results show that we can locate and characterise volcanic and geological structures using their unique contribution to seismic attenuation. At 3 Hz a single high-scattering and high-absorption anomaly outlines the debris flows that followed the 1980 explosive eruption, as deduced by comparison with remote sensing imagery. The flows overlay a NNW-SSE interface, separating rocks of significant varying properties down to 2-4 km, and coinciding with the Saint Helens Seismic Zone. High-scattering and high-absorption anomalies corresponding to known locations of magma emplacement follow this signature under the volcano, showing the important interconnections between its feeding systems and the regional tectonic boundaries. With frequency increasing from 6 to 18 Hz the NNW-SSE tectonic/feeding trends rotate around an axis centered on the volcano in the direction of the regional-scale magmatic arc (SW-NE). While the aseismic high-scattering region WSW of the volcano shows no evidence of high absorption, the regions of highest-scattering and absorption are consistently located at all frequencies under either the eastern or the south-eastern flank of the volcanic edifice. From the comparison with the available geological and geophysical information we infer that these anomalies mark both the location and the trend of the main feeding systems at depths greater than 4 km.

  16. Seismic scattering and absorption mapping of debris flows, feeding paths, and tectonic units at Mount St. Helens volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Siena, L.; Calvet, M.; Watson, K. J.; Jonkers, A. R. T.; Thomas, C.

    2016-05-01

    Frequency-dependent peak-delay times and coda quality factors have been used jointly to separate seismic absorption from scattering quantitatively in Earth media at regional and continental scale; to this end, we measure and map these two quantities at Mount St. Helens volcano. The results show that we can locate and characterize volcanic and geological structures using their unique contribution to seismic attenuation. At 3 Hz a single high-scattering and high-absorption anomaly outlines the debris flows that followed the 1980 explosive eruption, as deduced by comparison with remote sensing imagery. The flows overlay a NNW-SSE interface, separating rocks of significant varying properties down to 2-4 km, and coinciding with the St. Helens Seismic Zone. High-scattering and high-absorption anomalies corresponding to known locations of magma emplacement follow this signature under the volcano, showing the important interconnections between its feeding systems and the regional tectonic boundaries. With frequency increasing from 6 to 18 Hz the NNW-SSE tectonic/feeding trends rotate around an axis centered on the volcano in the direction of the regional-scale magmatic arc (SW-NE). While the aseismic high-scattering region WSW of the volcano shows no evidence of high absorption, the regions of highest-scattering and absorption are consistently located at all frequencies under either the eastern or the south-eastern flank of the volcanic edifice. From the comparison with the available geological and geophysical information we infer that these anomalies mark both the location and the trend of the main feeding systems at depths greater than 4 km.

  17. SU-E-J-141: Activity-Equivalent Path Length Approach for the 3D PET-Based Dose Reconstruction in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Attili, A; Vignati, A; Giordanengo, S; Kraan, A; Dalmasso, F; Battistoni, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Ion beam therapy is sensitive to uncertainties from treatment planning and dose delivery. PET imaging of induced positron emitter distributions is a practical approach for in vivo, in situ verification of ion beam treatments. Treatment verification is usually done by comparing measured activity distributions with reference distributions, evaluated in nominal conditions. Although such comparisons give valuable information on treatment quality, a proper clinical evaluation of the treatment ultimately relies on the knowledge of the actual delivered dose. Analytical deconvolution methods relating activity and dose have been studied in this context, but were not clinically applied. In this work we present a feasibility study of an alternative approach for dose reconstruction from activity data, which is based on relating variations in accumulated activity to tissue density variations. Methods: First, reference distributions of dose and activity were calculated from the treatment plan and CT data. Then, the actual measured activity data were cumulatively matched with the reference activity distributions to obtain a set of activity-equivalent path lengths (AEPLs) along the rays of the pencil beams. Finally, these AEPLs were used to deform the original dose distribution, yielding the actual delivered dose. The method was tested by simulating a proton therapy treatment plan delivering 2 Gy on a homogeneous water phantom (the reference), which was compared with the same plan delivered on a phantom containing inhomogeneities. Activity and dose distributions were were calculated by means of the FLUKA Monte Carlo toolkit. Results: The main features of the observed dose distribution in the inhomogeneous situation were reproduced using the AEPL approach. Variations in particle range were reproduced and the positions, where these deviations originated, were properly identified. Conclusions: For a simple inhomogeneous phantom the 3D dose reconstruction from PET

  18. A novel method for patient exit and entrance dose prediction based on water equivalent path length measured with an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Kavuma, Awusi; Glegg, Martin; Metwaly, Mohamed; Currie, Garry; Elliott, Alex

    2010-01-21

    In vivo dosimetry is one of the quality assurance tools used in radiotherapy to monitor the dose delivered to the patient. Electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images for a set of solid water phantoms of varying thicknesses were acquired and the data fitted onto a quadratic equation, which relates the reduction in photon beam intensity to the attenuation coefficient and material thickness at a reference condition. The quadratic model is used to convert the measured grey scale value into water equivalent path length (EPL) at each pixel for any material imaged by the detector. For any other non-reference conditions, scatter, field size and MU variation effects on the image were corrected by relative measurements using an ionization chamber and an EPID. The 2D EPL is linked to the percentage exit dose table, for different thicknesses and field sizes, thereby converting the plane pixel values at each point into a 2D dose map. The off-axis ratio is corrected using envelope and boundary profiles generated from the treatment planning system (TPS). The method requires field size, monitor unit and source-to-surface distance (SSD) as clinical input parameters to predict the exit dose, which is then used to determine the entrance dose. The measured pixel dose maps were compared with calculated doses from TPS for both entrance and exit depth of phantom. The gamma index at 3% dose difference (DD) and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA) resulted in an average of 97% passing for the square fields of 5, 10, 15 and 20 cm. The exit dose EPID dose distributions predicted by the algorithm were in better agreement with TPS-calculated doses than phantom entrance dose distributions. PMID:20019398

  19. Correlation of electron path lengths observed in the highly wound outer region of magnetic clouds with the slab fraction of magnetic turbulence in the dissipation range

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lun C.; Shao, Xi; Reames, Donald V.; Ng, Chee K.; Wang, Linghua

    2014-05-10

    Three magnetic cloud events, in which solar impulsive electron events occurred in their outer region, are employed to investigate the difference of path lengths L {sub 0eIII} traveled by non-relativistic electrons from their release site near the Sun to the observer at 1 AU, where L {sub 0eIII} = v {sub l} × (t {sub l} – t {sub III}), v {sub l} and t {sub l} being the velocity and arrival time of electrons in the lowest energy channel (∼27 keV) of the Wind/3DP/SST sensor, respectively, and t {sub III} being the onset time of type III radio bursts. The deduced L {sub 0eIII} value ranges from 1.3 to 3.3 AU. Since a negligible interplanetary scattering level can be seen in both L {sub 0eIII} > 3 AU and ∼1.2 AU events, the difference in L {sub 0eIII} could be linked to the turbulence geometry (slab or two-dimensional) in the solar wind. By using the Wind/MFI magnetic field data with a time resolution of 92 ms, we examine the turbulence geometry in the dissipation range. In our examination, ∼6 minutes of sampled subintervals are used in order to improve time resolution. We have found that, in the transverse turbulence, the observed slab fraction is increased with an increasing L {sub 0eIII} value, reaching ∼100% in the L {sub 0eIII} > 3 AU event. Our observation implies that when only the slab spectral component exists, magnetic flux tubes (magnetic surfaces) are closed and regular for a very long distance along the transport route of particles.

  20. A novel method for patient exit and entrance dose prediction based on water equivalent path length measured with an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavuma, Awusi; Glegg, Martin; Metwaly, Mohamed; Currie, Garry; Elliott, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry is one of the quality assurance tools used in radiotherapy to monitor the dose delivered to the patient. Electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images for a set of solid water phantoms of varying thicknesses were acquired and the data fitted onto a quadratic equation, which relates the reduction in photon beam intensity to the attenuation coefficient and material thickness at a reference condition. The quadratic model is used to convert the measured grey scale value into water equivalent path length (EPL) at each pixel for any material imaged by the detector. For any other non-reference conditions, scatter, field size and MU variation effects on the image were corrected by relative measurements using an ionization chamber and an EPID. The 2D EPL is linked to the percentage exit dose table, for different thicknesses and field sizes, thereby converting the plane pixel values at each point into a 2D dose map. The off-axis ratio is corrected using envelope and boundary profiles generated from the treatment planning system (TPS). The method requires field size, monitor unit and source-to-surface distance (SSD) as clinical input parameters to predict the exit dose, which is then used to determine the entrance dose. The measured pixel dose maps were compared with calculated doses from TPS for both entrance and exit depth of phantom. The gamma index at 3% dose difference (DD) and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA) resulted in an average of 97% passing for the square fields of 5, 10, 15 and 20 cm. The exit dose EPID dose distributions predicted by the algorithm were in better agreement with TPS-calculated doses than phantom entrance dose distributions.

  1. Spectroscopy in an extremely thin vapor cell: Comparing the cell-length dependence in fluorescence and in absorption techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisyan, D.; Varzhapetyan, T.; Sarkisyan, A.; Malakyan, Yu.; Papoyan, A.; Lezama, A.; Bloch, D.; Ducloy, M.

    2004-06-01

    We compare the behavior of absorption and of resonance fluorescence spectra in an extremely thin Rb vapor cell as a function of the ratio of L/λ , with L the cell thickness (L˜150 1800 nm) and λ the wavelength of the Rb D2 line (λ=780 mn) . The Dicke-type coherent narrowing [

    G. Dutier et al., Europhys. Lett. 63, 35 (2003)
    ] is observed only in transmission measurements, in the linear regime, with its typical collapse and revival, which reaches a maximum for L= (2n+1) λ/2 ( n integer). It is shown not to appear in fluorescence, whose behavior-amplitude, and spectral width, is more monotonic with L . Conversely, at high-intensity, the sub-Doppler saturation effects are shown to be the most visible in transmission around L=nλ .

  2. 2-Micron Triple-Pulse Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has contributed in developing several 2-micron carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the DIAL technique. Currently, an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development at NASA LaRC. This paper focuses on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of wavelength control, packaging and lidar integration. In addition, receiver development updates will also be presented, including telescope integration, detection systems and data acquisition electronics. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will be presented.

  3. Open-path quantum cascade laser-based system for simultaneous remote sensing of methane, nitrous oxide, and water vapor using chirped-pulse differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Paulo; Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2015-10-01

    Methane and Nitrous Oxide are long-lived greenhouse gases in the atmosphere with significant global warming effects. We report on application of chirped-pulsed quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) to simultaneous measurements of these trace gases in both open-path fence-line and backscatter systems. The intra-pulse thermal frequency chip in a QCL can be time resolved and calibrated to allow for high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy over the spectral window of the chip, which for a DFB-QCL can be reach ~2cm-1 for a 500 nsec pulse. The spectral line-shape of the output from these lasers are highly stable from pulse to pulse over long period of time (> 1 day), and the system does not require frequent calibrations.

  4. Probing grain boundary sink strength at the nanoscale: Energetics and length scales of vacancy and interstitial absorption by grain boundaries in α-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschopp, M. A.; Solanki, K. N.; Gao, F.; Sun, X.; Khaleel, M. A.; Horstemeyer, M. F.

    2012-02-01

    The energetics and length scales associated with the interaction between point defects (vacancies and self-interstitial atoms) and grain boundaries in bcc Fe was explored. Molecular statics simulations were used to generate a grain boundary structure database that contained ≈170 grain boundaries with varying tilt and twist character. Then, vacancy and self-interstitial atom formation energies were calculated at all potential grain boundary sites within 15 Å of the boundary. The present results provide detailed information about the interaction energies of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms with symmetric tilt grain boundaries in iron and the length scales involved with absorption of these point defects by grain boundaries. Both low- and high-angle grain boundaries were effective sinks for point defects, with a few low-Σ grain boundaries (e.g., the Σ3{112} twin boundary) that have properties different from the rest. The formation energies depend on both the local atomic structure and the distance from the boundary center. Additionally, the effect of grain boundary energy, disorientation angle, and Σ designation on the boundary sink strength was explored; the strongest correlation occurred between the grain boundary energy and the mean point defect formation energies. Based on point defect binding energies, interstitials have ≈80% more grain boundary sites per area and ≈300% greater site strength than vacancies. Last, the absorption length scale of point defects by grain boundaries is over a full lattice unit larger for interstitials than for vacancies (mean of 6-7 Å versus 10-11 Å for vacancies and interstitials, respectively).

  5. Probing grain boundary sink strength at the nanoscale: Energetics and length scales of vacancy and interstitial absorption by grain boundaries in α-Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Tschopp, Mark A.; Solanki, K. N.; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Horstemeyer, Mark

    2012-02-10

    The energetics and length scales associated with the interaction between point defects (vacancies and self-interstitial atoms) and grain boundaries in bcc Fe was explored. Molecular statics simulations were used to generate a grain boundary structure database that contained {approx}170 grain boundaries with varying tilt and twist character. Then, vacancy and self-interstitial atom formation energies were calculated at all potential grain boundary sites within 15 {angstrom} of the boundary. The present results provide detailed information about the interaction energies of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms with symmetric tilt grain boundaries in iron and the length scales involved with absorption of these point defects by grain boundaries. Both low- and high-angle grain boundaries were effective sinks for point defects, with a few low-{Sigma} grain boundaries (e.g., the {Sigma}3{l_brace}112{r_brace} twin boundary) that have properties different from the rest. The formation energies depend on both the local atomic structure and the distance from the boundary center. Additionally, the effect of grain boundary energy, disorientation angle, and {Sigma} designation on the boundary sink strength was explored; the strongest correlation occurred between the grain boundary energy and the mean point defect formation energies. Based on point defect binding energies, interstitials have {approx}80% more grain boundary sites per area and {approx}300% greater site strength than vacancies. Last, the absorption length scale of point defects by grain boundaries is over a full lattice unit larger for interstitials than for vacancies (mean of 6-7 {angstrom} versus 10-11 {angstrom} for vacancies and interstitials, respectively).

  6. Utilization of medium-chain triglycerides by neonatal piglets: chain length of even- and odd-carbon fatty acids and apparent digestion/absorption and hepatic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Odle, J; Benevenga, N J; Crenshaw, T D

    1991-05-01

    Jugular plasma concentrations of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA) and whole blood concentrations of D-beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) were measured in 1-d-old pigs at 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8 h after forcefeeding 12 mL of one of four triglycerides: tri-7:0, 8:0, 9:0 or 10:0. Both BHBA and MCFA were highest at 1 h. The MCFA measured at 1 h decreased (P less than 0.01) with increasing chain length. The BHBA was not different in pigs given tri-7:0, 8:0 or 9:0 but was lower (P less than 0.05) for pigs given tri-10:0. Isolated hepatocytes converted [1-14C] C7 or C9 to CO2 and acid soluble products more than 40% faster than cells given 8:0 or 10:0 and consumed 7% more O2. Even- and odd-MCFA were oxidized faster (P less than 0.01) than 18:1 (n-9). Theoretical calculations from fatty acid oxidation accounted for 96 to 142% of measured O2 consumption for the various fatty acids. In all instances, L-carnitine had no effect. Appearance of 14C in lipid products increased progressively with chain length from 7:0 to 18:1 (n-9). Collectively, these data suggest that changes in chain length within the medium-chain family may dramatically influence the rate and extent of digestion and/or absorption and metabolism of medium-chain triglycerides by neonates. This may be a consequence of increased hydrophobicity with increasing chain length or, for odd-chain fatty acids, a reflection of anaplerotic carbon effects from propionyl-CoA metabolism. PMID:2019870

  7. Changes in Search Path Complexity and Length During Learning of a Virtual Water Maze: Age Differences and Differential Associations with Hippocampal Subfield Volumes.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, Ana M; Bender, Andrew R; Yuan, Peng; Raz, Naftali

    2016-06-01

    Impairment of hippocampus-dependent cognitive processes has been proposed to underlie age-related deficits in navigation. Animal studies suggest a differential role of hippocampal subfields in various aspects of navigation, but that hypothesis has not been tested in humans. In this study, we examined the association between volume of hippocampal subfields and age differences in virtual spatial navigation. In a sample of 65 healthy adults (age 19-75 years), advanced age was associated with a slower rate of improvement operationalized as shortening of the search path over 25 learning trials on a virtual Morris water maze task. The deficits were partially explained by greater complexity of older adults' search paths. Larger subiculum and entorhinal cortex volumes were associated with a faster decrease in search path complexity, which in turn explained faster shortening of search distance. Larger Cornu Ammonis (CA)1-2 volume was associated with faster distance shortening, but not in path complexity reduction. Age differences in regional volumes collectively accounted for 23% of the age-related variance in navigation learning. Independent of subfield volumes, advanced age was associated with poorer performance across all trials, even after reaching the asymptote. Thus, subiculum and CA1-2 volumes were associated with speed of acquisition, but not magnitude of gains in virtual maze navigation. PMID:25838036

  8. Space-borne remote sensing of CO2, CH4, and N2O by integrated path differential absorption lidar: a sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, G.; Kiemle, C.; Wirth, M.; Amediek, A.; Fix, A.; Houweling, S.

    2008-03-01

    CO2, CH4, and N2O are recognised as the most important greenhouse gases, the concentrations of which increase rapidly through human activities. Space-borne integrated path differential absorption lidar allows global observations at day and night over land and water surfaces in all climates. In this study we investigate potential sources of measurement errors and compare them with the scientific requirements. Our simulations reveal that moderate-size instruments in terms of telescope aperture (0.5 1.5 m) and laser average power (0.4 4 W) potentially have a low random error of the greenhouse gas column which is 0.2% for CO2 and 0.4% for CH4 for soundings at 1.6 μm, 0.4% for CO2 at 2.1 μm, 0.6% for CH4 at 2.3 μm, and 0.3% for N2O at 3.9 μm. Coherent detection instruments are generally limited by speckle noise, while direct detection instruments suffer from high detector noise using current technology. The wavelength selection in the vicinity of the absorption line is critical as it controls the height region of highest sensitivity, the temperature cross-sensitivity, and the demands on frequency stability. For CO2, an error budget of 0.08% is derived from our analysis of the sources of systematic errors. Among them, the frequency stability of ± 0.3 MHz for the laser transmitter and spectral purity of 99.9% in conjunction with a narrow-band spectral filter of 1 GHz (FWHM) are identified to be challenging instrument requirements for a direct detection CO2 system operating at 1.6 μm.

  9. CHARM-F: An airborne Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) LIDAR for the simultaneous measurement of CO2 and CH4 Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, M.; Amediek, A.; Büdenbender, C.; Ehret, G.; Fix, A.; Kiemle, C.; Quatrevalet, M.; Hoffmann, D.; Löhring, J.; Klein, V.; Schöggl, R.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) - in collaboration with Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik (ILT) and Kayser-Threde GmbH (KT) - is developing CHARM-F, an Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) LIDAR for simultaneous measurement of CO2 and CH4 columns. Design goal is a compact and rugged instrument optimized for airborne use on board of DLR's long range research aircraft HALO. The main scientific goal of the instrument is to provide precise column measurements of CO2 and CH4 to infer fluxes of these important greenhouse gases by means of inverse modeling. For this purpose, very stringent requirements concerning accuracy and precision have to be met since typical surface sources and sinks alter the total column only by a few percent. To achieve this, CHARM-F uses laser sources emitting pulse-pairs with nanosecond duration which allows for a precise ranging and a proper separation of atmospheric influences (i.e. aerosol and clouds) from the ground return leading to an unambiguously defined column (no airmass factors involved). Two laser systems - one for each trace gas - are employed using highly efficient and robust Nd:YAG lasers to pump optical parametric oscillators (OPO) which convert the pump radiation to the desired measurement wavelengths in the near infrared. Each laser system emits a pulse pair having different wavelengths. One is tuned to an absorption line of the trace gas under consideration and the other one to a nearby wavelength with much less absorption. The close temporal pulse separation of 250 μs together with a relatively large spot size of 30 m on ground ensures that nearly the same area is illuminated by both pulses. To achieve single-mode operation, both the pump and the OPO are injection seeded. The seed lasers are locked to a gas cell filled with a mixture of CO2 and CH4 to ensure an absolute wavelength calibration. Furthermore, deviations of the wavelength between outgoing laser pulse and the seed lasers

  10. Self-Calibration and Laser Energy Monitor Validations for a Double-Pulsed 2-Micron CO2 Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    Double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photo-electromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-micron IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  11. New Results from Frequency and Energy Reference Measurements during the first Test Flight with the Airborne Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar System CHARM-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, G.; Fix, A.; Amediek, A.; Quatrevalet, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) technique is regarded as a suitable means for the measurement of methane and carbon dioxide columns from satellite or aircraft platforms with unprecedented accuracy. Currently, the German-French methane mission MERLIN (Methan Remote Lidar Mission) is prepared. At the same time CHARM-F, an aircraft installed system has been developed at DLR as an airborne demonstrator for a spaceborne greenhouse gas mission. Both use e.g. optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) in a double-pulse mode as the transmitter. Of particular importance for both instruments are the sub-modules required for the frequency stabilization of the transmitter wavelength and, since the IPDA technique, in contrast to DIAL, requires the exact knowledge of the energy ratio of outgoing on-line. The coherence of the lidar transmitter gives rise to speckle effects which have to be considered for the monitoring of the energy ratio of outgoing on- and off-line pulses. For the frequency reference of CHARM-F, a very successful stabilization scheme has been developed which will also serve as the reference for MERLIN. In Spring 2015, CHARM-F was flown aboard the German HALO aircraft for the first time which enables a detailed view on the performance of both the energy calibration and frequency reference subsystems under real flight conditions. As an initial quality check we will compared the airborne results to previous lab measurements which have been performed under stable environmental conditions.

  12. Absorption technique for OH measurements and calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Bakalyar, D.M.; James, J.V.; Wang, C.C.

    1982-08-15

    An absorption technique is described which utilizes a stabilized frequency-doubled tunable dye laser and a long-path White cell with high mirror reflectivities both in the red and UV. In laboratory conditions we have been able to obtain routinely a detection sensitivity of 3 parts in 10/sup 6/ over absorption paths <1 m in length and a detection sensitivity of approx.6 parts in 10/sup 5/ over an absorption path of the order of 1 km. The latter number corresponds to 3 x 10/sup 6/ OH molecules/cm/sup 3/, and therefore the technique should be particularly useful for calibration of our fluorescence instrument for OH measurements. However, the presence of atmospheric fluctuations coupled with intensity variation accompanying frequency scanning appears to degrade the detection sensitivity in outdoor ambient conditions, thus making it unlikely that this technique can be employed for direct OH monitoring.

  13. Absorption technique for OH measurements and calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakalyar, D. M.; James, J. V.; Wang, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    An absorption technique is described which utilizes a stabilized frequency-doubled tunable dye laser and a long-path White cell with high mirror reflectivities both in the red and UV. In laboratory conditions it has been possible to routinely obtain a detection sensitivity of 3 parts in 1,000,000 over absorption paths less than 1 m in length and a detection sensitivity of approximately 6 parts in 100,000 over an absorption path of the order of 1 km. The latter number corresponds to 3,000,000 OH molecules/cu cm, and therefore the technique should be particularly useful for calibration the fluorescence instrument for OH measurements. However, the presence of atmospheric fluctuations coupled with intensity variation accompanying frequency scanning appears to degrade the detection sensitivity in outdoor ambient conditions, thus making it unlikely that this technique can be employed for direct OH monitoring.

  14. A two-laser beam technique for improving the sensitivity of low frequency open path tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (OP-TDLAS) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Israa L.; Anderson, Gary T.; Chen, Youhua

    2013-09-01

    Open path tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy (OP-TDLAS) is a promising technique to detect low concentrations of possible biogenic gases on Mars. This technique finds the concentration of a gas by measuring the amount of laser light absorbed by gaseous molecules at a specific wavelength. One of the major factors limiting sensitivity in the TDLAS systems operating at low modulation frequencies is 1/f noise. 1/f noise is minimized in many spectroscopy systems by the use of high frequency modulation techniques. However, these techniques require complex instruments that include reference cells and other devices for calibration, making them relatively large and bulky. We are developing a spectroscopy system for space applications that requires small, low mass and low power instrumentation, making the high frequency techniques unsuitable. This paper explores a new technique using two-laser beam to reduce the affect of 1/f noise and increase the signal strength for measurements made at lower frequencies. The two lasers are excited at slightly different frequencies. An algorithm is used to estimate the noise in the second harmonic from the combined spectra of both lasers. This noise is subtracted from the signal to give a more accurate measurement of gas concentration. The error in estimation of 1/f noise is negligible as it corresponds to noise level made at much higher frequencies. Simulation results using ammonia gas and two lasers operating at 500 and 510 Hz respectively shows that this technique is able to decrease the error in estimation of gas concentration to 1/6 its normal value.

  15. A two-laser beam technique for improving the sensitivity of low frequency open path tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (OP-TDLAS) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Isra'a. Lateef

    Open path tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy (OP-TDLAS) is a promising technique that is proposed for detecting low concentrations of possible biogenic gases on Mars. This technique determines the concentration of a gas by measuring the amount of laser light absorbed by molecules at a specific wavelength that is characteristic of those molecules. One of the major factors limiting sensitivity in the OP-TDLAS systems is noise. At low modulation frequencies, 1/f noise usually dominates. This 1/f noise is minimized in many spectroscopy systems by use of high frequency techniques. However, these methods use complex instruments that include reference cells and other devices for calibration, making them relatively large and bulky. We have built a spectroscopy system for space applications that requires small, low mass and low power instrumentation, making the high frequency techniques unsuitable. This work explores a new technique that uses a two-laser beam to reduce the affect of 1/f noise and increase the signal strength for measurements made at lower frequencies. The two lasers are excited at slightly different frequencies. An algorithm is used to estimate the total noise in the second harmonic from the combined spectra of both lasers. This noise is subtracted from the signal to give a more accurate measurement of gas concentration. The error in estimation of 1/f noise is negligible as it corresponds to noise level made at much higher frequencies. Experimental results using ammonia gas and two lasers operating at 500 and 510 Hz respectively shows that this technique reduces the effect of 1/f noise by 1/3 its normal value. Furthermore, the error in estimation of gas concentration is also reduced.

  16. Integration of Fluorescence Differential Path-Length Spectroscopy to Photodynamic Therapy of the Head and Neck Tumors is Useful in Monitoring Clinical Outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakullukcu, Baris; Kanick, Stephen; Aans, Jan Bonne; Sterenborg, Henricus; Tan, Bing; Amelink, Arjen; Robinson, Dominic

    2015-04-01

    The use of fluorescence differential pathlength spectroscopy (FDPS) has the potential to provide real-time information on photosensitiser pharmacokinetics, vascular physiology and photosensitizer photobleaching based dosimetry of tumors in the oral cavity receiving m-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (mTHPC) photodynamic therapy (PDT). Reflectance spectra can be used provide quantitative values of oxygen saturation, blood volume fraction, blood vessel diameter, and to determine the local optical properties that can be used to correct raw fluorescence for tissue absorption. Patients and methods: Twenty-seven lesions in the oral cavity, either dysplasias or cancer were interrogated using FDPS, before and immediately after the therapeutic illumination. The average tumor center to normal mucosa ratio of fluorescence was 1.50 ± 0.66. mTHPC photobleaching was observed in 24 of the lesions treated. The average extent of photobleaching was 81% ± 17%. Information from FDPS spectroscopy coupled with the clinical results of the treatment identified 3 types of correctable errors in the application of mTHPC-PDT: Two patients exhibited very low concentrations of photosensitizer in tumour center, indicating an ineffective i.v. injection of photosensitiser or an erroneous systemic distribution of mTHPC. In one in tumor we observed no photobleaching accompanied by a high blood volume fraction in the illuminated tissue, suggesting that the presence of blood prevented therapeutic light reaching the target tissue. All 3 of the these lesions had no clinical response to PDT. In four patients we observed less than 50% photobleaching at the tumor margins , suggesting a possible geographic miss. One patient in this group had a recurrence within 2 months after PDT even though the initial response was good. The integration of FDPS to clinical PDT yields data on tissue physiology, photosensitiser content and photobleaching that can help identify treatment errors that can potentially be corrected.

  17. Azimuthal anisotropy of π⁰ production in Au+Au collisions at sqrt((s)NN)=200  GeV: path-length dependence of jet quenching and the role of initial geometry.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hanks, J; Han, R; Hartouni, E P; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hegyi, S; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; He, X; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E J; Kim, E; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Liebing, P; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Li, X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Okada, K; Oka, M; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Sparks, N A; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Wood, J P; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; You, Z; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2010-10-01

    We have measured the azimuthal anisotropy of π⁰ production for 1path-length dependence steeper than what is implied by current PQCD energy-loss models show reasonable agreement with the data. PMID:21230825

  18. Azimuthal Anisotropy of pi Production in Au+Au Collisions at s_NN = 200 GeV: Path-length Dependence of Jet-Quenching and the Role of Initial Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Awes, Terry C; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Enokizono, Akitomo; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the azimuthal anisotropy of {pi}{sup 0} production for 1 < p{sub T} < 18 GeV/c for Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The observed anisotropy shows a gradual decrease for 3 {approx}< p {approx}< 7-10 GeV/c, but remains positive beyond 10 GeV/c. The magnitude of this anisotropy is underpredicted, up to at least {approx}10 GeV/c, by current perturbative QCD (PQCD) energy-loss model calculations. An estimate of the increase in anisotropy expected from initial-geometry modification due to gluon saturation effects and fluctuations is insufficient to account for this discrepancy. Calculations that implement a path-length dependence steeper than what is implied by current PQCD energy-loss models show reasonable agreement with the data.

  19. Azimuthal Anisotropy of {pi}{sup 0} Production in Au+Au Collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV: Path-Length Dependence of Jet Quenching and the Role of Initial Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Bickley, A. A.; Ellinghaus, F.; Glenn, A.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Nagle, J. L.; Rosen, C. A.; Seele, J.; Wysocki, M.; Afanasiev, S.; Isupov, A.; Litvinenko, A.; Malakhov, A.; Peresedov, V.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Zolin, L.; Aidala, C.; Datta, A.

    2010-10-01

    We have measured the azimuthal anisotropy of {pi}{sup 0} production for 1path-length dependence steeper than what is implied by current PQCD energy-loss models show reasonable agreement with the data.

  20. Method and apparatus for background signal reduction in opto-acoustic absorption measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosengren, L. G. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The sensitivity of an opto-acoustic absorption detector is increased to make it possible to measure trace amounts of constituent gases. A second beam radiation path is created through the sample cell identical to a first path except as to length, alternating the beam through the two paths and minimizing the detected pressure difference for the two paths while the beam wavelength is tuned away from the absorption lines of the sample. Then with the beam wavelength tuned to the absorption line of any constituent of interest, the pressure difference is a measure of trace amounts of the constituent. The same improved detector may also be used for measuring the absorption coefficient of known concentrations of absorbing gases.

  1. [Influencing factors in measuring absorption coefficient of suspended particulate matters].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-long; Shen, Fang; Zhang, Jin-fang

    2013-05-01

    Absorption coefficient of suspended particulate matters in natural water is one of the key parameters in ocean color remote sensing. In order to study the influencing factors that affect the measurement, a series of experiments were designed to measure samples using transmittance method (T method), transmittance-reflectance method (T-R method) and absorptance method (A method). The results shows that absorption coefficient measured by the A method has a much lower error compared to the T method and T-R method due to influencing factors,such as filter-to-filter variations, water content of the filter, and homogeneity of filter load and so on. Another factor influence absorption coefficient is path-length amplification induced by multiple scattering inside the filter. To determine the path-length amplification, the true absorption was measured by AC-s (WetLabs). The linear fitting result shows that the mean path-length amplification is much higher for the A method than that of the T-R method and the T method (4.01 versus 2.20 and 2.32), and the corresponding correlation coefficient are 0.90, 0.87 and 0.80. For the A method and the T-R method, higher correlation coefficients are calculated when using polynomial fitting, and the value are 0.95 and 0.94. Analysis of the mean relative error caused by different influencing factors indicates that path-length amplification is the largest error source in measuring the absorption coefficient. PMID:23914523

  2. Path Finder

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-01-07

    PathFinder is a graph search program, traversing a directed cyclic graph to find pathways between labeled nodes. Searches for paths through ordered sequences of labels are termed signatures. Determining the presence of signatures within one or more graphs is the primary function of Path Finder. Path Finder can work in either batch mode or interactively with an analyst. Results are limited to Path Finder whether or not a given signature is present in the graph(s).

  3. Broadband transient absorption spectroscopy with 1- and 2-photon excitations: Relaxation paths and cross sections of a triphenylamine dye in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.; Dobryakov, A. L.; Hecht, S. E-mail: skovale@chemie.hu-berlin.de; Kovalenko, S. A. E-mail: skovale@chemie.hu-berlin.de; Ioffe, I. N.; Granovsky, A. A.

    2015-07-14

    1-photon (382 nm) and 2-photon (752 nm) excitations to the S{sub 1} state are applied to record and compare transient absorption spectra of a push-pull triphenylamine (TrP) dye in solution. After 1-photon excitation, ultrafast vibrational and structural molecular relaxations are detected on a 0.1 ps time scale in nonpolar hexane, while in polar acetonitrile, the spectral evolution is dominated by dipolar solvation. Upon 2-photon excitation, transient spectra in hexane reveal an unexpected growth of stimulated emission (SE) and excited-state absorption (ESA) bands. The behavior is explained by strong population transfer S{sub 1} → S{sub n} due to resonant absorption of a third pump photon. Subsequent S{sub n} → S{sub 1} internal conversion (with τ{sub 1} = 1 ps) prepares a very hot S{sub 1} state which cools down with τ{sub 2} = 13 ps. The pump pulse energy dependence proves the 2-photon origin of the bleach signal. At the same time, SE and ESA are strongly affected by higher-order pump absorptions that should be taken into account in nonlinear fluorescence applications. The 2-photon excitation cross sections σ{sup (2)} = 32 ⋅ 10{sup −50} cm{sup 4} s at 752 nm are evaluated from the bleach signal.

  4. Broadband transient absorption spectroscopy with 1- and 2-photon excitations: Relaxation paths and cross sections of a triphenylamine dye in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, J.; Dobryakov, A. L.; Ioffe, I. N.; Granovsky, A. A.; Hecht, S.; Kovalenko, S. A.

    2015-07-01

    1-photon (382 nm) and 2-photon (752 nm) excitations to the S1 state are applied to record and compare transient absorption spectra of a push-pull triphenylamine (TrP) dye in solution. After 1-photon excitation, ultrafast vibrational and structural molecular relaxations are detected on a 0.1 ps time scale in nonpolar hexane, while in polar acetonitrile, the spectral evolution is dominated by dipolar solvation. Upon 2-photon excitation, transient spectra in hexane reveal an unexpected growth of stimulated emission (SE) and excited-state absorption (ESA) bands. The behavior is explained by strong population transfer S1 → Sn due to resonant absorption of a third pump photon. Subsequent Sn → S1 internal conversion (with τ1 = 1 ps) prepares a very hot S1 state which cools down with τ2 = 13 ps. The pump pulse energy dependence proves the 2-photon origin of the bleach signal. At the same time, SE and ESA are strongly affected by higher-order pump absorptions that should be taken into account in nonlinear fluorescence applications. The 2-photon excitation cross sections σ(2) = 32 ṡ 10-50 cm4 s at 752 nm are evaluated from the bleach signal.

  5. Imaging of highly turbid media by the absorption method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, Daniele; Liszka, Heather; Sassaroli, Angelo; Zaccanti, Giovanni

    1996-05-01

    The results of a study on imaging that is based on the absorption method are presented. This method is based on attenuation measurements carried out in the presence of a sufficiently high absorption coefficient by the use of a continuous-wave source. The benefit of absorption on image quality comes from the strong attenuation of photons traveling along long trajectories. When the absorption coefficient is increased, the received energy decreases, but the mean path length of received photons decreases. The effect of increasing the absorption coefficient is similar to that of decreasing the gating time when the time-gating technique is used. Experimental results showed that the spatial resolution obtained with the absorption technique is similar to that obtained with the time-gating technique. method, spatial resolution, turbid media.

  6. Diode laser-based sensor system for long-path absorption measurements of atmospheric concentration and near-IR molecular spectral parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N.; Lee, J.; Adler-Golden, S.M.; Bien, F.

    1993-12-31

    Line-locked near-IR diode lasers and a simple retroreflector/telescope system were used for remote sensing of atmospheric constituents over long atmospheric paths. The experimental configuration used in preliminary measurements of atmospheric water vapor and oxygen with AlGaAs diode lasers is presented. A prototype field sensor system currently under development shares the same basic configuration but incorporates interchangeable AlGaAs and InGaAsP diode-laser modules for monitoring a variety of atmospheric gases.

  7. Shortest Paths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    There are many uses for the shortest path algorithm presented which are limited only by our ability to recognize when a problem may be converted into the shortest path in a graph representation. (Author/TG)

  8. Significances of the variability of airway paths and their air-flow rates to dosimetry model predictions of the absorption of gases

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, J.H.; Barnett, A.E.; Graham, R.C.

    1987-12-01

    The ozone-dosimetry model developed at EPA was developed to be used in conjunction with species lung models that summarize the structure of a lung as a lung of many equivalent paths. The paper reports the results of a preliminary study into the question of whether or not more realistic lung structures and airflow rates in individual airways need to be taken into account in order to make more-accurate predictions of ozone uptake. The results indicate that in order to obtain a better understanding of the distribution of absorbed ozone in the lower respiratory tract (LRT), realistic lung structures need to be taken into account. Whereas, estimating LRT dose using a lung model composed of equivalent paths was found to give the same results obtained as when the complex lung structure was taken into account. The information will allow for a better use of experimental uptake data for the evaluation of dosimetry model predictions as well as for improved interpreting of toxicological data.

  9. Global sampling of the photochemical reaction paths of bromoform by ultrafast deep-UV through near-IR transient absorption and ab initio multiconfigurational calculations.

    PubMed

    Pal, S K; Mereshchenko, A S; Butaeva, E V; El-Khoury, P Z; Tarnovsky, A N

    2013-03-28

    Ultrafast deep-ultraviolet through near infrared (210-950 nm) transient absorption spectroscopy complemented by ab initio multiconfigurational calculations offers a global description of the photochemical reaction pathways of bromoform following 255-nm excitation in methylcyclohexane and acetonitrile solutions. Photoexcitation of CHBr3 leads to the ground-state iso-CHBr3 product in a large quantum yield (∼35%), formed through two different mechanisms: concerted excited-state isomerization and cage-induced isomerization through the recombination of the nascent radical pair. These two processes take place on different time scales of tens of femtoseconds and several picoseconds, respectively. The novel ultrafast direct isomerization pathway proposed herein is consistent with the occurrence of a conical intersection between the first excited singlet state of CHBr3 and the ground electronic state of iso-CHBr3. Complete active space self-consistent field calculations characterize this singularity in the vicinity of a second order saddle point on the ground state which connects the two isomer forms. For cage-induced isomerization, both the formation of the nascent radical pair and its subsequent collapse into ground-state iso-CHBr3 are directly monitored through the deep-ultraviolet absorption signatures of the radical species. In both mechanisms, the optically active (i.e., those with largest Franck-Condon factors) C-Br-Br bending and Br-Br stretching modes of ground-state iso-CHBr3 have the largest projection on the reaction coordinate, enabling us to trace the structural changes accompanying vibrational relaxation of the non-equilibrated isomers through transient absorption dynamics. The iso-CHBr3 photoproduct is stable in methylcyclohexane, but undergoes either facile thermal isomerization to the parent CHBr3 structure through a cyclic transition state stabilized by the polar acetonitrile medium (∼300-ps lifetime), and hydrolysis in the presence of water. PMID

  10. Development of an Airborne Triple-Pulse 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong; Antill, Charles W.; Remus, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will provide status and details of an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar being developed at NASA Langley Research Center with support from NASA ESTO Instrument Incubator Program. The development of this active optical remote sensing IPDA instrument is targeted for measuring both atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapor in the atmosphere from an airborne platform. This presentation will focus on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of seed laser locking, wavelength control, receiver and detector upgrades, laser packaging and lidar integration. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will also be presented.

  11. Absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and visible spectral range of hexavalent chromium aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, Anna G.; Spadoni, Lorenzo

    1999-09-01

    In order to demonstrate the possibility of performing direct absorption spectroscopy of Hexavalent Chromium aqueous solutions, absorption measurements were performed at the dual- beam spectrophotometer in the 250 - 850 nm spectral range, with 10 mm and 100 mm path lengths. Low concentration (26 - 520 (mu) g/l) (and high concentration (2.6 - 52 mg/l) solutions were analyzed, showing that it is possible to implement a basic instrumentation for risk condition monitoring and a more advanced instrumentation for quantitative measurements.

  12. Application of a long-path differential optical absorption spectrometer (LP-DOAS) on the measurements of NO(2), SO(2), O(3), and HNO(2) in Gwangju, Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeongsoon; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Young J; Lee, Jaihoon

    2008-03-01

    A differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) technique has been applied to monitor airborne trace pollutants including NO(2), SO(2), O(3), and HNO(2) in the ultraviolet (UV) region (290-350 nm) over a 1.5 km beam path (two ways) during an intensive measurement campaign held at Gwangju, Korea (March 2002). Their mean mixing ratios (and standard deviations) were computed as 11.3 (8.8), 1.9 (1.7), 17.1 (19.3), and 0.5 (0.4)ppbv, respectively. As a means to evaluate the performance of the long-path DOAS (LP-DOAS) system with conventional point monitoring systems (PMS), correlation analysis was conducted between the two data sets. These data sets were then inspected to account for the influence of the environmental conditions on the correlation strength between the two systems, especially with respect to light level and wind speed. To facilitate the comparison, correlation analyses were conducted after dividing the data sets for those parameters into several classes. The strength of the correlations between DOAS and meteorological parameters was also examined to evaluate their effects on the DOAS performance. It was found that, among the four pollutant species, O(3) is the most sensitive to changes in meteorological conditions in relation with atmospheric mixing conditions. The overall results of our study indicate that open-path monitoring techniques can be used to effectively diagnose air quality and be substituted for the conventional point monitoring methods with the proper consideration of those parameters affecting the DOAS sensitivity (e.g., light level and wind speed). PMID:17335958

  13. Optical path control in the MAM testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regehr, M. W.; Hines, B.; Holmes, B.

    2003-01-01

    Future space-based optical interferometers will require control of the optical path delay to accomplish some or all of the three objectives: balancing the optical path in the two arms to within a tolerance corresponding to the coherence length of the star light being observed, modulating the optical path in order to observe the phase of the star light interference fringe, and modulating the path length in order to reduce the effect of cyclic errors in the laser metrology system used to measure the optical path length in the two arms of the interferometer.

  14. Noise estimation technique to reduce the effects of 1/f noise in Open Path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometry (OP-TDLAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Israa L.; Anderson, Gary T.; Chen, Youhua

    2014-06-01

    Many techniques using high frequency modulation have been proposed to reduce the effects of 1/f noise in tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). The instruments and devices used by these techniques are not suitable for space applications that require small, low mass and low power instrumentation. A new noise estimation technique has already been proposed and validated for two lasers to reduce the effect of 1/f noise at lower frequencies. This paper extends the noise estimation technique and applies it using one distribution feedback (DFB) laser diode. In this method a DFB laser diode is excited at two slightly different frequencies, giving two different harmonics that can be used to estimate the total noise in the measurement. Simulations and experimental results on ammonia gas validate that the 1/f noise is effectively reduced by the noise estimation technique using one laser. Outdoor experimental results indicate that the effect of 1/f noise is reduced to more than 1/4 its normal value.

  15. Near-infrared optical-absorption behavior in high-beta nonlinear optical chromophore-polymer guest-host materials. II. Dye spacer length effects in an amorphous polycarbonate copolymer host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barto, Richard R.; Frank, Curtis W.; Bedworth, Peter V.; Ermer, Susan; Taylor, Rebecca E.

    2005-06-01

    In the second of a three-part series, spectral absorption behavior of nonlinear optical (NLO) dyes incorporated into amorphous polycarbonate, comprised of a homologous series of dialkyl spacer groups extending from the midsection of the dye molecule, is characterized by UV-Vis and photothermal deflection spectroscopy. The dyes are structural analogs of the NLO dye FTC [2-(3-cyano-4-{2-[5-(2-{4-[ethyl-(2-methoxyethyl)amino]phenyl}vinyl)-3,4-diethylthiophen-2-yl]vinyl}-5,5-dimethyl-5H-furan-2-ylidene)malononitrile]. Previous Monte Carlo calculations [B. H. Robinson and L. R. Dalton, J. Phys. Chem. A 104, 4785 (2000)] predict a strong dependence of the macroscopic nonlinear optical susceptibility on the chromophore waist: length aspect ratio in electric-field-poled films arising from interactions between chromophores. It is expected that these interactions will play a role in the absorption characteristics of unpoled films, as well. The spacer groups range in length from diethyl to dihexyl, and each dye is studied over a wide range of concentrations. Among the four dyes studied, a universal dependence of near-IR loss on inhomogeneous broadening of the dye main absorption peak is found. The inhomogeneous width and its concentration dependence are seen to vary with spacer length in a manner characteristic of the near-IR loss-concentration slope at transmission wavelengths of 1.06 and 1.3μm, but not at 1.55μm. The lower wavelength loss behavior is assigned to purely Gaussian broadening, and is described by classical mixing thermodynamic quantities based on the Marcus theory of inhomogeneous broadening [R. A. Marcus, J. Chem. Phys. 43, 1261 (1965)], modeled as a convolution of dye-dye dipole broadening and dye-polymer van der Waals broadening. The Gaussian dipole interactions follow a Loring dipole-broadening description [R. F. Loring, J. Phys. Chem. 94, 513 (1990)] dominated by the excited-state dipole moment, and have a correlated homogeneous broadening contribution

  16. Path ANalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, Mark K.

    2007-07-14

    The PANL software determines path through an Adversary Sequence Diagram (ASD) with minimum Probability of Interruption, P(I), given the ASD information and data about site detection, delay, and response force times. To accomplish this, the software generates each path through the ASD, then applies the Estimate of Adversary Sequence Interruption (EASI) methodology for calculating P(I) to each path, and keeps track of the path with the lowest P(I). Primary use is for training purposes during courses on physical security design. During such courses PANL will be used to demonstrate to students how more complex software codes are used by the US Department of Energy to determine the most-vulnerable paths and, where security needs improvement, how such codes can help determine physical security upgrades.

  17. Path ANalysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-07-14

    The PANL software determines path through an Adversary Sequence Diagram (ASD) with minimum Probability of Interruption, P(I), given the ASD information and data about site detection, delay, and response force times. To accomplish this, the software generates each path through the ASD, then applies the Estimate of Adversary Sequence Interruption (EASI) methodology for calculating P(I) to each path, and keeps track of the path with the lowest P(I). Primary use is for training purposes duringmore » courses on physical security design. During such courses PANL will be used to demonstrate to students how more complex software codes are used by the US Department of Energy to determine the most-vulnerable paths and, where security needs improvement, how such codes can help determine physical security upgrades.« less

  18. The dependence of the ultrafast relaxation kinetics of the S2 and S1 states in β-carotene homologs and lycopene on conjugation length studied by femtosecond time-resolved absorption and Kerr-gate fluorescence spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosumi, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Masazumi; Fujii, Ritsuko; Cogdell, Richard J.; Hashimoto, Hideki; Yoshizawa, Masayuki

    2009-06-01

    The ultrafast relaxation kinetics of all-trans-β-carotene homologs with varying numbers of conjugated double bonds n(n =7-15) and lycopene (n =11) has been investigated using femtosecond time-resolved absorption and Kerr-gate fluorescence spectroscopies, both carried out under identical excitation conditions. The nonradiative relaxation rates of the optically allowed S2(1Bu+1) state were precisely determined by the time-resolved fluorescence. The kinetics of the optically forbidden S1(2Ag-1) state were observed by the time-resolved absorption measurements. The dependence of the S1 relaxation rates upon the conjugation length is adequately described by application of the energy gap law. In contrast to this, the nonradiative relaxation rates of S2 have a minimum at n =9 and show a reverse energy gap law dependence for values of n above 11. This anomalous behavior of the S2 relaxation rates can be explained by the presence of an intermediate state (here called the Sx state) located between the S2 and S1 states at large values of n (such as n =11). The presence of such an intermediate state would then result in the following sequential relaxation pathway S2→Sx→S1→S0. A model based on conical intersections between the potential energy curves of these excited singlet states can readily explain the measured relationships between the decay rates and the energy gaps.

  19. Path Pascal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. H.; Kolstad, R. B.; Holle, D. F.; Miller, T. J.; Krause, P.; Horton, K.; Macke, T.

    1983-01-01

    Path Pascal is high-level experimental programming language based on PASCAL, which incorporates extensions for systems and real-time programming. Pascal is extended to treat real-time concurrent systems.

  20. Graphene intracavity spaser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovik, Yu. E.; Nechepurenko, I. A.; Dorofeenko, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    We propose an intracavity plasmon absorption spectroscopy method based on graphene active plasmonics. It is shown that the plasmonic cavity contribution to the sensitivity is proportional to the quality factor Q of the graphene plasmonic cavity and reaches two orders of magnitude. The addition of gain medium into the cavity increases the sensitivity of method. Maximum sensitivity is reached in the vicinity of the plasmon generation threshold. The gain contribution to the sensitivity is proportional to Q1/2. The giant amplification of sensitivity in the graphene plasmon generator is associated with a huge path length, limited only by the decoherence processes. An analytical estimation of the sensitivity to loss caused by analyzed particles (molecules, nanoparticles, etc.) normalized by the single pass plasmon scheme is derived. Usage of graphene nanoflakes as plasmonic cavity allows a high spatial resolution to be reached, in addition to high sensitivity.

  1. Computer programs for absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Jones, R N

    1969-03-01

    Brief descriptions are given of twenty-two modular computer programs for performing the basic numerical computations of absorption spectrophotometry. The programs, written in Fortran IV for card input and output, are available from the National Research Council of Canada. The input and output formats are standardized to permit easy interfacing to yield more complex data processing systems. Though these programs were developed for ir spectrophotometry, they are readily modified for use with digitized visual and uv spectrophotometers. The operations covered include ordinate and abscissal unit and scale interconversions, ordinate addition and subtraction, location of band maxima and minima, smoothing and differentiation, slit function convolution and deconvolution, band profile analysis and asymmetry quantification, Fourier transformation to time correlation curves, multiple overlapping band separation in terms of Cauchy (Lorentz), Gauss, Cauchy-Gauss product, and Cauchy-Gauss sum functions and cell path length determination from fringe spacing analysis. PMID:20072266

  2. Time optimal paths for high speed maneuvering

    SciTech Connect

    Reister, D.B.; Lenhart, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Recent theoretical results have completely solved the problem of determining the minimum length path for a vehicle with a minimum turning radius moving from an initial configuration to a final configuration. Time optimal paths for a constant speed vehicle are a subset of the minimum length paths. This paper uses the Pontryagin maximum principle to find time optimal paths for a constant speed vehicle. The time optimal paths consist of sequences of axes of circles and straight lines. The maximum principle introduces concepts (dual variables, bang-bang solutions, singular solutions, and transversality conditions) that provide important insight into the nature of the time optimal paths. We explore the properties of the optimal paths and present some experimental results for a mobile robot following an optimal path.

  3. Intracavity absorption with a continuous wave dye laser - Quantification for a narrowband absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brobst, William D.; Allen, John E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the dependence of intracavity absorption on factors including transition strength, concentration, absorber path length, and pump power is presented for a CW dye laser with a narrow-band absorber (NO2). A Beer-Lambert type relationship is found over a small but useful range of these parameters. Quantitative measurement of intracavity absorption from the dye laser spectral profiles showed enhancements up to 12,000 (for pump powers near lasing threshold) when compared to extracavity measurements. The definition of an intracavity absorption coefficient allowed the determination of accurate transition strength ratios, demonstrating the reliability of the method.

  4. A conformation and orientation model of the carboxylic group of fatty acids dependent on chain length in a Langmuir monolayer film studied by polarization-modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Muro, Maiko; Itoh, Yuki; Hasegawa, Takeshi

    2010-09-01

    The conformation of the carboxylic group of fatty acids in a Langmuir (L) monolayer film on water is described in relation to the aggregation property of the hydrocarbon chain. Polarization-modulation infrared reflection absorption spectra (PM-IRRAS) of L films of heptadecanoic acid (C(17)), octadecanoic acid (C(18)), and nonadecanoic acid (C(19)) exhibit systematic spectral changes in both the C-H and C=O stretching vibration regions. Through a stabilization analysis of the L films at a high surface pressure, the C(19) L film has been found outstandingly stable exhibiting no film shrink, while the other two compounds exhibit a large shrink at high surface pressure. By taking into account the uniquely high aggregation property of the hydrocarbon chains of C(19), the three major bands arising from the C=O stretching vibration mode propose three types of molecular conformations about the carboxylic group, which are elucidated by a balance of the hydration of the carboxylic group, the chain length of the hydrocarbon chain, and the surface pressure. PMID:20718412

  5. The aerospace long-path multiple reflection cell facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, K. C.; Ortega, L. J.; Robbins, R. G.; Durso, S. S.; Young, R. M.; Urevig, D. S.; Rice, C. J.

    1982-08-01

    Aerospace long-path infrared absorption cell is described. This facility is a multiple-pass modified White cell which can be operated at any temperature between 170 K and room temperature with path lengths from 60 m up to 4 km. The cell itself is an 11-m long double-walled aluminum dewar. The spectral coverage extends from visible to 50 microns using as a source either a high temperature black body or a tunable diode laser. An internal 20 kV flash photolysis system permits detection and kinetic studies of transient species. This combination of characteristics makes the system ideally suited to study a wide variety of upper and lower atmospheric phenomena under realistic conditions as well as other phenomena requiring low concentrations or high sensitivity.

  6. Multi-Criteria Path Finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, E.; Hunter, A.

    2012-07-01

    Path finding solutions are becoming a major part of many GIS applications including location based services and web-based GIS services. Most traditional path finding solutions are based on shortest path algorithms that tend to minimize the cost of travel from one point to another. These algorithms make use of some cost criteria that is usually an attribute of the edges in the graph network. Providing one shortest path limits user's flexibility when choosing a possible route, especially when more than one parameter is utilized to calculate cost (e.g., when length, number of traffic lights, and number of turns are used to calculate network cost.) K shortest path solutions tend to overcome this problem by providing second, third, and Kth shortest paths. These algorithms are efficient as long as the graphs edge weight does not change dynamically and no other parameters affect edge weights. In this paper we try to go beyond finding shortest paths based on some cost value, and provide all possible paths disregarding any parameter that may affect total cost. After finding all possible paths, we can rank the results by any parameter or combination of parameters, without a substantial increase in time complexity.

  7. Tapped-Hole Vent Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Long helical vent path cools and releases hot pyrotechnical gas that exits along its spiraling threads. Current design uses 1/4-28 threads with outer diameter of stud reduced by 0.025 in. (0.62 mm). To open or close gassampler bottle, pyrotechnic charges on either one side or other of valve cylinder are actuated. Gases vented slowly over long path are cool enough to present no ignition hazard. Vent used to meter flow in refrigeration, pneumaticcontrol, and fluid-control systems by appropriately adjusting size and length of vent path.

  8. Optical Path, Phase, and Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newburgh, Ronald

    2005-11-01

    A powerful tool in wave optics is the concept of optical path length, a notion usually introduced with Fermat's principle.1-3 The analysis of Fermat's principle requires the application of the calculus of variations and the concept of an extremum, ideas too advanced for beginning students. However, the concept has proven its usefulness in the analysis4 of interference experiments such as those of Michelson and Fabry-Perot. In this paper we shall show how optical path length can aid in the analysis of a modified two-slit Young experiment.

  9. TDLAS-based open-path laser hygrometer using simple reflective foils as scattering targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, A.; Wagner, S.; Ebert, V.

    2012-11-01

    We present a new, very simple to use and very easy to align, inexpensive, robust, mono-static optical hygrometer based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) that makes use of very inexpensive reflective foils as scattering targets at the distant side of the absorption path. Various alternative foils as scattering targets were examined concerning their reflective behaviour and their suitability for TDLAS applications. Using a micro prismatic reflection tape as the optimum scattering target we determined absolute water vapour concentrations employing open path TDLAS. With the reflection tape being in a distance of 75 cm to 1 m (i.e., absorption path lengths between 1.5 and 2 m) we detected ambient H2O concentrations of up to 12,300 ppmv with detectivities of 1 ppm which corresponds to length and bandwidth normalized H2O detection limits of up to 0.9 ppmv m/ sqrt {{Hz}} , which is only a factor of 2 worse than our previous bi-static TDLAS setups (Hunsmann, Appl. Phys. B 92:393-401, 1). This small sensitivity disadvantage is well compensated for by the simplicity of the spectrometer setup and particularly by its extreme tolerance towards misalignment of the scattering target.

  10. Ground-based, integrated path differential absorption LIDAR measurement of CO2, CH4, and H2O near 1.6  μm.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gerd A; Plusquellic, David F

    2016-08-10

    A ground-based, integrated path, differential absorption light detection and ranging (IPDA LIDAR) system is described and characterized for a series of nighttime studies of CO2, CH4, and H2O. The transmitter is based on an actively stabilized, continuous-wave, single-frequency external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) operating from 1.60 to 1.65 μm. The fixed frequency output of the ECDL is microwave sideband tuned using an electro-optical phase modulator driven by an arbitrary waveform generator and filtered using a confocal cavity to generate a sequence of 123 frequencies separated by 300 MHz. The scan sequence of single sideband frequencies of 600 ns duration covers a 37 GHz region at a spectral scan rate of 10 kHz (100 μs per scan). Simultaneously, an eye-safe backscatter LIDAR system at 1.064 μm is used to monitor the atmospheric boundary layer. IPDA LIDAR measurements of the CO2 and CH4 dry air mixing ratios are presented in comparison with those from a commercial cavity ring-down (CRD) instrument. Differences between the IPDA LIDAR and CRD concentrations in several cases appear to be well correlated with the atmospheric aerosol structure from the backscatter LIDAR measurements. IPDA LIDAR dry air mixing ratios of CO2 and CH4 are determined with fit uncertainties of 2.8 μmol/mol (ppm) for CO2 and 22 nmol/mol (ppb) for CH4 over 30 s measurement periods. For longer averaging times (up to 1200 s), improvements in these detection limits by up to 3-fold are estimated from Allan variance analyses. Two sources of systematic error are identified and methods to remove them are discussed, including speckle interference from wavelength decorrelation and the seed power dependence of amplified spontaneous emission. Accuracies in the dry air retrievals of CO2 and CH4 in a 30 s measurement period are estimated at 4 μmol/mol (1% of ambient levels) and 50

  11. Near-infrared open-path measurement of CO₂ concentration in the urban atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hayato; Manago, Naohiro; Kuriyama, Kenji; Kuze, Hiroaki

    2015-06-01

    Average concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) has been measured over a path length of 5.1 km in the lower troposphere by the method of differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) using a near-infrared light source based on amplified spontaneous emission. The analysis of CO2 absorption intensity around 1575 nm observed during 10 days over the Chiba city area has revealed that the CO2 concentration varied in the range of around 360-450 ppmv, with presumable influence of air mass advection from nearby industrial facilities. In addition, a good correlation has been found in relative humidity values between the DOAS and meteorological station data. As a whole, the present result indicates the usefulness of such a DOAS approach for measuring the concentration of CO2 averaged over an optical path of a few kilometers in the lower troposphere. PMID:26030559

  12. A Random Walk on a Circular Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, W.-K.; Lee, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    This short note introduces an interesting random walk on a circular path with cards of numbers. By using high school probability theory, it is proved that under some assumptions on the number of cards, the probability that a walker will return to a fixed position will tend to one as the length of the circular path tends to infinity.

  13. Shortest Paths between Shortest Paths and Independent Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, Marcin; Medvedev, Paul; Milanič, Martin

    We study problems of reconfiguration of shortest paths in graphs. We prove that the shortest reconfiguration sequence can be exponential in the size of the graph and that it is NP-hard to compute the shortest reconfiguration sequence even when we know that the sequence has polynomial length. Moreover, we also study reconfiguration of independent sets in three different models and analyze relationships between these models, observing that shortest path reconfiguration is a special case of independent set reconfiguration in perfect graphs, under any of the three models. Finally, we give polynomial results for restricted classes of graphs (even-hole-free and P 4-free graphs).

  14. Temperature dependence of HNO3 absorption in the 11.3-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Bonomo, F. S.; Valero, F. P. J.; Goorvitch, D.; Boese, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory spectra have been obtained for HNO3 with a Michelson-type Fourier transform interferometer using absorption cells with path lengths of 10.3, 25.5, and 49.8 cm at temperatures of 240, 248, 283, and 294 K. The measurements lead to a total band intensity value of 642 plus or minus 5% per sq cm amagat, which is a temperature independent value after the gas density correction has been made. However, the temperature dependence of the spectral absorption coefficients is apparent in the 885 kayser region.

  15. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, M.E.; Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.

    1986-12-09

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined. 5 figs.

  16. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, Michael E.; Bien, Fritz; Bernstein, Lawrence S.

    1986-01-01

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined.

  17. Automatic Control Of Length Of Welding Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F.

    1991-01-01

    Nonlinear relationships among current, voltage, and length stored in electronic memory. Conceptual microprocessor-based control subsystem maintains constant length of welding arc in gas/tungsten arc-welding system, even when welding current varied. Uses feedback of current and voltage from welding arc. Directs motor to set position of torch according to previously measured relationships among current, voltage, and length of arc. Signal paths marked "calibration" or "welding" used during those processes only. Other signal paths used during both processes. Control subsystem added to existing manual or automatic welding system equipped with automatic voltage control.

  18. Towards quantitative atmospheric water vapor profiling with differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Dinovitser, Alex; Gunn, Lachlan J; Abbott, Derek

    2015-08-24

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is a powerful laser-based technique for trace gas profiling of the atmosphere. However, this technique is still under active development requiring precise and accurate wavelength stabilization, as well as accurate spectroscopic parameters of the specific resonance line and the effective absorption cross-section of the system. In this paper we describe a novel master laser system that extends our previous work for robust stabilization to virtually any number of multiple side-line laser wavelengths for the future probing to greater altitudes. In this paper, we also highlight the significance of laser spectral purity on DIAL accuracy, and illustrate a simple re-arrangement of a system for measuring effective absorption cross-section. We present a calibration technique where the laser light is guided to an absorption cell with 33 m path length, and a quantitative number density measurement is then used to obtain the effective absorption cross-section. The same absorption cell is then used for on-line laser stabilization, while microwave beat-frequencies are used to stabilize any number of off-line lasers. We present preliminary results using ∼300 nJ, 1 μs pulses at 3 kHz, with the seed laser operating as a nanojoule transmitter at 822.922 nm, and a receiver consisting of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to a 356 mm mirror. PMID:26368258

  19. Thermooptic-based differential measurements of weak solute absorptions with an interferometer.

    PubMed

    Cremers, D A; Keller, R A

    1982-05-01

    An interferometric method of measuring small differences between weak optical absorptions of solutions has been developed using the thermooptic effect. To record the small changes in optical path length ~lambda/200 due to heating, it was necessary to stabilize the fringe pattern with respect to slow thermal drift using a galvanometer-driven compensator plate controlled by a closed feedback loop. Fringe shifts from background absorptions were nulled out to better than 1 part in 400, permitting the measurement of differences in absorptions between two solutions that were l/100th of background. Using laser powers of 100 mW, absorptions approximately 5 x 10(-6) cm(-1) (base e) could be measured with CC1(4) solutions. PMID:20389912

  20. Temperature- and pressure-dependent absorption coefficients for CO2 and O2 at 193 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartinger, K. T.; Nord, S.; Monkhouse, P. B.

    Absorption of laser radiation at 193 nm by CO2 and O2 was studied at a series of different temperatures up to 1273 K and pressures up to 1 bar. The spectrum for CO2 was found to be broadband, so that absorption could be fitted to a Beer-Lambert law. On the other hand, the corresponding O2 spectrum is strongly structured and parameterisation requires a more complex relation, depending on both temperature and the product (pressure × absorption path length). In this context, the influence of spectral structure on the resulting spectrally integrated absorption coefficients is discussed. Using the fitting parameters obtained, effective transmissions at 193 nm can be calculated for a wide range of experimental conditions. As an illustration of the practical application of these data, the calculation of effective transmission for a typical industrial flue gas is described.

  1. Intracavity absorption with a continuous wave dye laser: quantification for a narowband absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Brobst, W.D.; Allen J.E. Jr.

    1987-09-01

    Although it is recognized as a very sensitive detection technique, the general application of intracavity absorption to areas such as chemical kinetics and photochemistry has been somewhat limited. Concerns are frequently expressed about the nonlinear nature, experimental difficulty, and reliability of the technique. To allay some of these objections, the dependence of intracavity absorption on factors such as transition strength, concentration, absorber path length, and pump power has been investigated experimentally for a cw dye laser with a narrowband absorber (NO/sub 2/). For this case a Beer-Lambert type relationship has been confirmed over a useful range of these parameters. The extent of intracavity absorption was quantitatively measured directly from the dye laser spectral profiles and, when compared to extracavity measurements, indicated enhancements as high as 12,000 for pump powers near lasing threshold. By defining an intracavity absorption coefficient, it was possible to demonstrate the reliability of the method by obtaining accurate transition strength ratios.

  2. Spectral Fingerprinting of Individual Cells Visualized by Cavity-Reflection-Enhanced Light-Absorption Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Minamikawa, Takeo; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Nagai, Takeharu

    2015-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of light is known to be a “molecular fingerprint” that enables analysis of the molecular type and its amount. It would be useful to measure the absorption spectrum in single cell in order to investigate the cellular status. However, cells are too thin for their absorption spectrum to be measured. In this study, we developed an optical-cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopic microscopy method for two-dimensional absorption imaging. The light absorption is enhanced by an optical cavity system, which allows the detection of the absorption spectrum with samples having an optical path length as small as 10 μm, at a subcellular spatial resolution. Principal component analysis of various types of cultured mammalian cells indicates absorption-based cellular diversity. Interestingly, this diversity is observed among not only different species but also identical cell types. Furthermore, this microscopy technique allows us to observe frozen sections of tissue samples without any staining and is capable of label-free biopsy. Thus, our microscopy method opens the door for imaging the absorption spectra of biological samples and thereby detecting the individuality of cells. PMID:25950513

  3. Time-resolved detection of temperature, concentration, and pressure in a shock tube by intracavity absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjodorow, Peter; Fikri, Mustapha; Schulz, Christof; Hellmig, Ortwin; Baev, Valery M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the first application of intracavity absorption spectroscopy (ICAS) for monitoring species concentration, total pressure, and temperature in shock-tube experiments. ICAS with a broadband Er3+-doped fiber laser is applied to time-resolved measurements of absorption spectra of shock-heated C2H2. The measurements are performed in a spectral range between 6512 and 6542 cm-1, including many absorption lines of C2H2, with a time resolution of 100 µs and an effective absorption path length of 15 m. Up to 18-times increase of the total pressure and a temperature rise of up to 1200 K have been monitored. Due to the ability of simultaneously recording many absorption lines in a broad spectral range, the presented technique can also be applied to multi-component analysis of transient single-shot processes in reactive gas mixtures in shock tubes, pulse detonation engines, or explosions.

  4. Opportunity's Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This Long Term Planning graphic was created from a mosaic of navigation camera images overlain by a polar coordinate grid with the center point as Opportunity's original landing site. The blue dots represent the rover position at various locations.

    The red dots represent the center points of the target areas for the instruments on the rover mast (the panoramic camera and miniature thermal emission spectrometer). Opportunity visited Stone Mountain on Feb. 5. Stone Mountain was named after the southernmost point of the Appalachian Mountains outside of Atlanta, Ga. On Earth, Stone Mountain is the last big mountain before the Piedmont flatlands, and on Mars, Stone Mountain is at one end of Opportunity Ledge. El Capitan is a target of interest on Mars named after the second highest peak in Texas in Guadaloupe National Park, which is one of the most visited outcrops in the United States by geologists. It has been a training ground for students and professional geologists to understand what the layering means in relation to the formation of Earth, and scientists will study this prominent point of Opportunity Ledge to understand what the layering means on Mars.

    The yellow lines show the midpoint where the panoramic camera has swept and will sweep a 120-degree area from the three waypoints on the tour of the outcrop. Imagine a fan-shaped wedge from left to right of the yellow line.

    The white contour lines are one meter apart, and each drive has been roughly about 2-3 meters in length over the last few sols. The large white blocks are dropouts in the navigation camera data.

    Opportunity is driving along and taking a photographic panorama of the entire outcrop. Scientists will stitch together these images and use the new mosaic as a 'base map' to decide on geology targets of interest for a more detailed study of the outcrop using the instruments on the robotic arm. Once scientists choose their targets of interest, they plan to study the outcrop for roughly five to

  5. Signal optimization, noise reduction, and systematic error compensation methods in long-path DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeone, Emilio; Donati, Alessandro

    1998-12-01

    The increment of the exploitable optical path represents one of the most important efforts in the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments improvement. The methods that allow long path measurements in the UV region are presented and discussed in this paper. These methods have been experimented in the new Italian DOAS instrument - SPOT - developed and manufactured by Kayser Italia. The system was equipped with a tele-controlled optical shuttle on the light source unit, allowing background radiation measurement. Wavelength absolute calibration of spectra by means of a collimated UV beam from a mercury lamp integrated in the telescope has been exploited. Besides, possible thermal effects on the dispersion coefficients of the holographic grating have been automatically compensated by means of a general non-linear fit during the spectral analysis session. Measurements in bistatic configuration have been performed in urban areas at 1300 m and 2200 m in three spectral windows from 245 to 380 nm. Measurements with these features are expected in the other spectral windows on path lengths ranging from about 5 to 10 km in urban areas. The DOAS technique can be used in field for very fast measurements in the 245-275 nm spectral range, on path lengths up to about 2500 m.

  6. Continuously variable focal length lens

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  7. Path Separability of Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diot, Emilie; Gavoille, Cyril

    In this paper we investigate the structural properties of k-path separable graphs, that are the graphs that can be separated by a set of k shortest paths. We identify several graph families having such path separability, and we show that this property is closed under minor taking. In particular we establish a list of forbidden minors for 1-path separable graphs.

  8. Dither Cavity Length Controller with Iodine Locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Marty; Eloranta, Ed

    2016-06-01

    A cavity length controller for a seeded Q-switched frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser is constructed. The cavity length controller uses a piezo-mirror dither voltage to find the optimum length for the seeded cavity. The piezo-mirror dither also dithers the optical frequency of the output pulse. [1]. This dither in optical frequency is then used to lock to an Iodine absorption line.

  9. Method of spectral subtraction of gas-phase Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra by minimizing the spectrum length.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Denis; Besov, Alexey

    2011-08-01

    A new method of spectral subtraction for gas-phase Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra was developed for long-path gas measurements. The method is based on minimization of the length of the spectrum that results from subtracting the spectrum of an individual component of a gas mixture (water, CO(2), etc.) from the experimental spectrum of the mixture. For this purpose a subtraction coefficient (k(min)) is found for which the length of the resulting spectrum is minimized. A mathematical simulation with two Lorentzian absorption bands was conducted and the limits of application for the proposed method were determined. Two experimental examples demonstrate that a successful result could be achieved in the case when the subtrahend spectrum contains a number of narrow absorption bands (such as the spectrum of water vapor). PMID:21819781

  10. A cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockett, M. H.; Lawler, J. E.

    2012-03-01

    A novel absorption cell has been developed to enable a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under astrophysically relevant conditions and utilizing a synchrotron radiation continuum to test the still controversial hypothesis that these molecules or their ions could be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell resembles a wind tunnel; molecules evaporated from a crucible or injected using a custom gas feedthrough are entrained in a laminar flow of cryogenically cooled buffer gas and advected into the path of the synchrotron beam. This system includes a multi-pass optical White cell enabling absorption path lengths of hundreds of meters and a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 107 cm-3. A capacitively coupled radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge provides ionized and metastable buffer gas atoms for ionizing the candidate molecules via charge exchange and the Penning effect. Stronger than expected clustering of PAH molecules has slowed efforts to record gas phase PAH spectra at cryogenic temperatures, though such clusters may play a role in other interstellar phenomena.

  11. A cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell

    SciTech Connect

    Stockett, M. H.; Lawler, J. E.

    2012-03-15

    A novel absorption cell has been developed to enable a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under astrophysically relevant conditions and utilizing a synchrotron radiation continuum to test the still controversial hypothesis that these molecules or their ions could be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell resembles a wind tunnel; molecules evaporated from a crucible or injected using a custom gas feedthrough are entrained in a laminar flow of cryogenically cooled buffer gas and advected into the path of the synchrotron beam. This system includes a multi-pass optical White cell enabling absorption path lengths of hundreds of meters and a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3}. A capacitively coupled radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge provides ionized and metastable buffer gas atoms for ionizing the candidate molecules via charge exchange and the Penning effect. Stronger than expected clustering of PAH molecules has slowed efforts to record gas phase PAH spectra at cryogenic temperatures, though such clusters may play a role in other interstellar phenomena.

  12. A cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell.

    PubMed

    Stockett, M H; Lawler, J E

    2012-03-01

    A novel absorption cell has been developed to enable a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under astrophysically relevant conditions and utilizing a synchrotron radiation continuum to test the still controversial hypothesis that these molecules or their ions could be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell resembles a wind tunnel; molecules evaporated from a crucible or injected using a custom gas feedthrough are entrained in a laminar flow of cryogenically cooled buffer gas and advected into the path of the synchrotron beam. This system includes a multi-pass optical White cell enabling absorption path lengths of hundreds of meters and a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 10(7) cm(-3). A capacitively coupled radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge provides ionized and metastable buffer gas atoms for ionizing the candidate molecules via charge exchange and the Penning effect. Stronger than expected clustering of PAH molecules has slowed efforts to record gas phase PAH spectra at cryogenic temperatures, though such clusters may play a role in other interstellar phenomena. PMID:22462957

  13. Optimization of A 2-Micron Laser Frequency Stabilization System for a Double-Pulse CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingsin; Koch, Grady; Petros, Mulugeta; Trieu, Bo; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    A carbon dioxide (CO2) Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for accurate CO2 concentration measurement requires a frequency locking system to achieve high frequency locking precision and stability. We describe the frequency locking system utilizing Frequency Modulation (FM), Phase Sensitive Detection (PSD), and Proportional Integration Derivative (PID) feedback servo loop, and report the optimization of the sensitivity of the system for the feed back loop based on the characteristics of a variable path-length CO2 gas cell. The CO2 gas cell is characterized with HITRAN database (2004). The method can be applied for any other frequency locking systems referring to gas absorption line.

  14. Atmospheric absorption of high frequency noise and application to fractional-octave bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, F. D.; Bass, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    Pure tone sound absorption coefficients were measured at 1/12 octave intervals from 4 to 100 KHz at 5.5K temperature intervals between 255.4 and 310.9 K and at 10 percent relative humidity increments between 0 percent and saturation in a large cylindrical tube (i.d., 25.4 cm; length, 4.8 m). Special solid-dielectric capacitance transducers, one to generate bursts of sound waves and one to terminate the sound path and detect the tone bursts, were constructed to fit inside the tube. The absorption was measured by varying the transmitter receiver separation from 1 to 4 m and observing the decay of multiple reflections or change in amplitude of the first received burst. The resulting absorption was compared with that from a proposed procedure for computing sound absorption in still air. Absorption of bands of noise was numerically computed by using the pure tone results. The results depended on spectrum shape, on filter type, and nonlinearly on propagation distance. For some of the cases considered, comparison with the extrapolation of ARP-866A showed a difference as large as a factor of 2. However, for many cases, the absorption for a finite band was nearly equal to the pure tone absorption at the center frequency of the band. A recommended prediction procedure is described for 1/3 octave band absorption coefficients.

  15. Global path planning of mobile robots using a memetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zexuan; Wang, Fangxiao; He, Shan; Sun, Yiwen

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a memetic algorithm for global path planning (MAGPP) of mobile robots is proposed. MAGPP is a synergy of genetic algorithm (GA) based global path planning and a local path refinement. Particularly, candidate path solutions are represented as GA individuals and evolved with evolutionary operators. In each GA generation, the local path refinement is applied to the GA individuals to rectify and improve the paths encoded. MAGPP is characterised by a flexible path encoding scheme, which is introduced to encode the obstacles bypassed by a path. Both path length and smoothness are considered as fitness evaluation criteria. MAGPP is tested on simulated maps and compared with other counterpart algorithms. The experimental results demonstrate the efficiency of MAGPP and it is shown to obtain better solutions than the other compared algorithms.

  16. Crack-path effect on material toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Asher A.

    1990-01-01

    The main features of a toughening mechanism associated with a curvilinear crack path are examined using a model consisting of a macrocrack in a brittle solid with a curvilinear segment at the crack tip. A numerical procedure for finite and semiinfinite cracks is formulated and evaluated using an example which has an exact solution (a finite crack in the form of a circular arc in a uniform stress field). It is shown that, for a relatively small amplitude of crack path oscillations, the toughening ratio can be taken equal to the ratio of the corresponding crack path lengths.

  17. The absolute path command

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it canmore » provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.« less

  18. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  19. Quantitative filter technique measurements of spectral light absorption by aquatic particles using a portable integrating cavity absorption meter (QFT-ICAM).

    PubMed

    Röttgers, Rüdiger; Doxaran, David; Dupouy, Cecile

    2016-01-25

    The accurate determination of light absorption coefficients of particles in water, especially in very oligotrophic oceanic areas, is still a challenging task. Concentrating aquatic particles on a glass fiber filter and using the Quantitative Filter Technique (QFT) is a common practice. Its routine application is limited by the necessary use of high performance spectrophotometers, distinct problems induced by the strong scattering of the filters and artifacts induced by freezing and storing samples. Measurements of the sample inside a large integrating sphere reduce scattering effects and direct field measurements avoid artifacts due to sample preservation. A small, portable, Integrating Cavity Absorption Meter setup (QFT-ICAM) is presented, that allows rapid measurements of a sample filter. The measurement technique takes into account artifacts due to chlorophyll-a fluorescence. The QFT-ICAM is shown to be highly comparable to similar measurements in laboratory spectrophotometers, in terms of accuracy, precision, and path length amplification effects. No spectral artifacts were observed when compared to measurement of samples in suspension, whereas freezing and storing of sample filters induced small losses of water-soluble pigments (probably phycoerythrins). Remaining problems in determining the particulate absorption coefficient with the QFT-ICAM are strong sample-to-sample variations of the path length amplification, as well as fluorescence by pigments that is emitted in a different spectral region than that of chlorophyll-a. PMID:26832563

  20. [Measurement of OH radicals in flame with high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Liu, Wen-Qing; Kan, Rui-Feng; Si, Fu-Qi; Xu, Zhen-Yu; Hu, Ren-Zhi; Xie, Pin-Hua

    2011-10-01

    The present paper describes a new developed high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy instrument used for the measurement of OH radicals in flame. The instrument consists of a Xenon lamp for light source; a double pass high resolution echelle spectrometer with a resolution of 3.3 pm; a multiple-reflection cell of 20 meter base length, in which the light reflects in the cell for 176 times, so the whole path length of light can achieve 3 520 meters. The OH radicals'6 absorption lines around 308 nm were simultaneously observed in the experiment. By using high resolution DOAS technology, the OH radicals in candles, kerosene lamp, and alcohol burner flames were monitored, and their concentrations were also inverted. PMID:22250529

  1. Extremal paths on a random Cayley tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Satya N.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2000-12-01

    We investigate the statistics of extremal path(s) (both the shortest and the longest) from the root to the bottom of a Cayley tree. The lengths of the edges are assumed to be independent identically distributed random variables drawn from a distribution ρ(l). Besides, the number of branches from any node is also random. Exact results are derived for arbitrary distribution ρ(l). In particular, for the binary \\{0,1\\} distribution ρ(l)=pδl,1+(1-p)δl,0, we show that as p increases, the minimal length undergoes an unbinding transition from a ``localized'' phase to a ``moving'' phase at the critical value, p=pc=1-b-1, where b is the average branch number of the tree. As the height n of the tree increases, the minimal length saturates to a finite constant in the localized phase (ppc) where the velocity vmin(p) is determined via a front selection mechanism. At p=pc, the minimal length grows with n in an extremely slow double-logarithmic fashion. The length of the maximal path, on the other hand, increases linearly as vmax(p)n for all p. The maximal and minimal velocities satisfy a general duality relation, vmin(p)+vmax(1-p)=1, which is also valid for directed paths on finite-dimensional lattices.

  2. Two-path plasmonic interferometer with integrated detector

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Shaner, Eric A.; Aizin, Gregory

    2016-03-29

    An electrically tunable terahertz two-path plasmonic interferometer with an integrated detection element can down convert a terahertz field to a rectified DC signal. The integrated detector utilizes a resonant plasmonic homodyne mixing mechanism that measures the component of the plasma waves in-phase with an excitation field that functions as the local oscillator in the mixer. The plasmonic interferometer comprises two independently tuned electrical paths. The plasmonic interferometer enables a spectrometer-on-a-chip where the tuning of electrical path length plays an analogous role to that of physical path length in macroscopic Fourier transform interferometers.

  3. Scramjet Performance Assessment Using Water Absorption Diagnostics (U)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavolowsky, John A.; Loomis, Mark P.; Deiwert, George

    1995-01-01

    Simultaneous multiple path measurements of temperature and H2O concentration will be presented for the AIMHYE test entries in the NASA Ames 16-Inch Shock Tunnel. Monitoring the progress of high temperature chemical reactions that define scramjet combustor efficiencies is a task uniquely suited to nonintrusive optical diagnostics. One application strategy to overcome the many challenges and limitations of nonintrusive measurements is to use laser absorption spectroscopy coupled with optical fibers. Absorption spectroscopic techniques with rapidly tunable lasers are capable of making simultaneous measurements of mole fraction, temperature, pressure, and velocity. The scramjet water absorption diagnostic was used to measure combustor efficiency and was compared to thrust measurements using a nozzle force balance and integrated nozzle pressures to develop a direct technique for evaluating integrated scramjet performance. Tests were initially performed with a diode laser tuning over a water absorption feature at 1391.7 nm. A second diode laser later became available at a wavelength near 1343.3 nm covering an additional water absorption feature and was incorporated in the system for a two-wavelength technique. Both temperature and mole fraction can be inferred from the lineshape analysis using this approach. Additional high temperature spectroscopy research was conducted to reduce uncertainties in the scramjet application. The lasers are optical fiber coupled to ports at the combustor exit and in the nozzle region. The output from the two diode lasers were combined in a single fiber, and the resultant two-wavelength beam was subsequently split into four legs. Each leg was directed through 60 meters of optical fiber to four combustor exit locations for measurement of beam intensity after absorption by the water within the flow. Absorption results will be compared to 1D combustor analysis using RJPA and nozzle CFD computations as well as to data from a nozzle metric

  4. Predicting Moisture Absorption in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transport programs adaptable for absorption analysis. Lightweight sandwich panel specimen used for comparison of water absorption measurements with program predictions. In program model, moisture -- like heat in heat-transport problem moves through variety of materials and structures along complex paths.

  5. Intensities and N2 collision-broadening coefficients measured for selected H2O absorption lines between 715 and 732 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, T. D.; Schwemmer, G.; Gentry, B.; Giver, L. P.

    1979-01-01

    Intensities and N2 collision-broadening coefficients are measured for 62 water vapor absorption lines between 715 and 732 nm potentially applicable to laser remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor. Absolute line strengths and widths were determined from spectra corrected for instrument resolution, air-path absorption and Lorentz and Doppler broadening for pure water vapor and water vapor-nitrogen mixtures in a multipass absorption cell with a base path length of 25 m (White cell). Line strengths are observed to range from 4 x 10 to the -25th to 4 x 10 to the -23rd kayser/molecule per sq cm, and collision broadening coefficients are found to be approximately equal to 0.1 kayser/atm.

  6. Substrate and chain length dependencies of the thermal behavior of [CF3(CF2)m(CH2)nCOO]2Cd single monolayers investigated by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yanzhi; Asanuma, Morito; Iimura, Ken-ichi; Kato, Teiji

    2001-01-01

    Temperature-variable grazing incidence reflection absorption (GIR) spectra were recorded for the single monolayer of [CF3(CF2)m(CH2)nCOO)]2Cd [(m,n)=(7,10), (7,16), (7,22), (5,22), and (3,22)], transferred from aqueous Cd2+ subphase to gold- and aluminum-evaporated glass substrates. The spectra reveal that these monolayers have better thermal stability on Al substrates than on Au. An "interaction band" is identified at 1484˜1480 cm-1, due to the νs(COO-) mode of carboxylate headgroups in ionic bonding with the Al surface. It is found that both the van der Waals interaction between the trans zig-zag hydrocarbon chains and the overlapping interaction between the fluorocarbon helixes are responsible for the systematic variation of the monolayer thermal behavior with (m,n). The thermal behavior of a single monolayer of cadmium stearate, serving as a model system, has been investigated to further confirm the spectral interpretation about the partially fluorinated monolayer. In addition, temperature-dependent friction measurements show that the single monolayers of (m,n)=(7,16), (7,22), (5,22), and (3,22) are potential molecular lubricants that can be used in the range of 25˜140 °C.

  7. A multiple path photonic lab on a chip for parallel protein concentration measurements.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, Isaac; Conejero-Muriel, Mayte; Ackermann, Tobias N; Gavira, José A; Llobera, Andreu

    2015-02-21

    We propose a PDMS-based photonic system for the accurate measurement of protein concentration with minute amounts of the sample. As opposed to the state of the art approach, in the multiple path photonic lab on a chip (MPHIL), analyte concentration or molar absorptivity is obtained with a single injection step, by performing simultaneous parallel optical measurements varying the optical path length. Also, as opposed to the standard calibration protocol, the MPHIL approach does not require a series of measurements at different concentrations. MPHIL has three main advantages: firstly the possibility of dynamically selecting the path length, always working in the absorbance vs. concentration linear range for each target analyte. Secondly, a dramatic reduction of the total volume of the sample required to obtain statistically reliable results. Thirdly, since only one injection is required, the measurement time is minimized, reducing both contamination and signal drifts. These characteristics are clearly advantageous when compared to commercial micro-spectrophotometers. The MPHIL concept was validated by testing three commercial proteins, lysozyme (HEWL), glucose isomerase (d-xylose-ketol-isomerase, GI) and Aspergillus sp. lipase L (BLL), as well as two proteins expressed and purified for this study, B. cereus formamidase (FASE) and dihydropyrimidinase from S. meliloti CECT41 (DHP). The use of MPHIL is also proposed for any spectrophotometric measurement in the UV-VIS range, as well as for its integration as a concentration measurement platform in more advanced photonic lab on a chip systems. PMID:25537135

  8. Cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Ostlund, Richard E

    2002-03-01

    Cholesterol absorption is a key regulatory point in human lipid metabolism because it determines the amount of endogenous biliary as well as dietary cholesterol that is retained, thereby influencing whole body cholesterol balance. Plant sterols (phytosterols) and the drug ezetimibe reduce cholesterol absorption and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in clinical trials, complementing the statin drugs, which inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. The mechanism of cholesterol absorption is not completely known but involves the genes ABC1, ABCG5, and ABCG8, which are members of the ATP-binding cassette protein family and appear to remove unwanted cholesterol and phytosterols from the enterocyte. ABC1 is upregulated by the liver X (LXR) and retinoid X (RXR) nuclear receptors. Acylcholesterol acytransferase-2 is an intestinal enzyme that esterifies absorbed cholesterol and increases cholesterol absorption when dietary intake is high. New clinical treatments based on better understanding of absorption physiology are likely to substantially improve clinical cholesterol management in the future. PMID:17033296

  9. Cooperative organic mine avoidance path planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCubbin, Christopher B.; Piatko, Christine D.; Peterson, Adam V.; Donnald, Creighton R.; Cohen, David

    2005-06-01

    The JHU/APL Path Planning team has developed path planning techniques to look for paths that balance the utility and risk associated with different routes through a minefield. Extending on previous years' efforts, we investigated real-world Naval mine avoidance requirements and developed a tactical decision aid (TDA) that satisfies those requirements. APL has developed new mine path planning techniques using graph based and genetic algorithms which quickly produce near-minimum risk paths for complicated fitness functions incorporating risk, path length, ship kinematics, and naval doctrine. The TDA user interface, a Java Swing application that obtains data via Corba interfaces to path planning databases, allows the operator to explore a fusion of historic and in situ mine field data, control the path planner, and display the planning results. To provide a context for the minefield data, the user interface also renders data from the Digital Nautical Chart database, a database created by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency containing charts of the world's ports and coastal regions. This TDA has been developed in conjunction with the COMID (Cooperative Organic Mine Defense) system. This paper presents a description of the algorithms, architecture, and application produced.

  10. Diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption sensor for nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, S. F.; Barron-Jimenez, R.; Anderson, T. N.; Lucht, R. P.; Caton, J. A.; Walther, T.

    2002-07-01

    An all-solid-state continuous-wave laser system for ultraviolet absorption measurements of the nitric oxide (NO) molecule has been developed and demonstrated. The single-mode, tunable output of a 10-mW, 395-nm external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) is sum-frequency-mixed with the output of a 115-mW, frequency-doubled, diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser in a beta-barium-borate crystal to produce 40 nW of tunable radiation at 226.8 nm. The wavelength of the 395-nm ECDL is then scanned over NO absorption lines to produce fully resolved absorption spectra. Initial results from mixtures of NO in nitrogen in a room-temperature gas cell are discussed. The estimated NO detection limit of the system for a demonstrated absorption sensitivity of 2×10-3 is 0.2 ppm per meter of path length for 300 K gas. The estimated accuracy of the measurements is ±10%.

  11. Spectroscopic method for determination of the absorption coefficient in brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Johannes D.

    2010-09-01

    I use Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements to characterize a probe with adjacent optical fibres for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy during stereotactic surgery in the brain. Simulations and measurements have been fitted to a modified Beer-Lambert model for light transport in order to be able to quantify chromophore content based on clinically measured spectra in brain tissue. It was found that it is important to take the impact of the light absorption into account when calculating the apparent optical path length, lp, for the photons in order to get good estimates of the absorption coefficient, μa. The optical path length was found to be well fitted to the equation lp=a+b ln(Is)+c ln(μa)+d ln(Is)ln(μa), where Is is the reflected light intensity for scattering alone (i.e., zero absorption). Although coefficients a-d calculated in this study are specific to the probe used here, the general form of the equation should be applicable to similar probes.

  12. Path optimization with limited sensing ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sung Ha; Kim, Seong Jun; Zhou, Haomin

    2015-10-01

    We propose a computational strategy to find the optimal path for a mobile sensor with limited coverage to traverse a cluttered region. The goal is to find one of the shortest feasible paths to achieve the complete scan of the environment. We pose the problem in the level set framework, and first consider a related question of placing multiple stationary sensors to obtain the full surveillance of the environment. By connecting the stationary locations using the nearest neighbor strategy, we form the initial guess for the path planning problem of the mobile sensor. Then the path is optimized by reducing its length, via solving a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs), while maintaining the complete scan of the environment. Furthermore, we use intermittent diffusion, which converts the ODEs into stochastic differential equations (SDEs), to find an optimal path whose length is globally minimal. To improve the computation efficiency, we introduce two techniques, one to remove redundant connecting points to reduce the dimension of the system, and the other to deal with the entangled path so the solution can escape the local traps. Numerical examples are shown to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Path optimization with limited sensing ability

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sung Ha Kim, Seong Jun Zhou, Haomin

    2015-10-15

    We propose a computational strategy to find the optimal path for a mobile sensor with limited coverage to traverse a cluttered region. The goal is to find one of the shortest feasible paths to achieve the complete scan of the environment. We pose the problem in the level set framework, and first consider a related question of placing multiple stationary sensors to obtain the full surveillance of the environment. By connecting the stationary locations using the nearest neighbor strategy, we form the initial guess for the path planning problem of the mobile sensor. Then the path is optimized by reducing its length, via solving a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs), while maintaining the complete scan of the environment. Furthermore, we use intermittent diffusion, which converts the ODEs into stochastic differential equations (SDEs), to find an optimal path whose length is globally minimal. To improve the computation efficiency, we introduce two techniques, one to remove redundant connecting points to reduce the dimension of the system, and the other to deal with the entangled path so the solution can escape the local traps. Numerical examples are shown to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Localization in a disordered multi-mode waveguide with absorption or amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misirpashaev, T. Sh.; Paasschens, J. C. J.; Beenakker, C. W. J.

    1997-02-01

    An analytical and numerical study of transmission of radiation through a multi-mode waveguide containing a random medium with a complex dielectric constant ε = ε‧ + iε″ is presented. Depending on the sign of ε″, the medium is absorbing or amplifying. The transmitted intensity decays exponentially ∝ exp(- L/ ξ) as the waveguide length L → ∞, regardless of the sign of ε″. The localization length ξ is computed as a function of the mean free path l, the absorption or amplification length | σ| -1, and the number of modes in the waveguide N. The method used is an extension of the Fokker-Planck approach of Dorokhov, Mello, Pereyra and Kumar to non-unitary scattering matrices. Asymptotically exact results are obtained for N≫1 and | σ|≫1/ N2l. An approximate interpolation formula for all σ agrees reasonably well either numerical simulations.

  15. Absorption of planar waves in a draining bathtub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Ednilton S.; Dolan, Sam R.; Crispino, Luís C. B.

    2010-06-01

    We present an analysis of the absorption of acoustic waves by a black hole analogue in (2+1) dimensions generated by a fluid flow in a draining bathtub. We show that the low-frequency absorption length is equal to the acoustic hole circumference and that the high-frequency absorption length is 4 times the ergoregion radius. For intermediate values of the wave frequency, we compute the absorption length numerically and show that our results are in excellent agreement with the low- and high-frequency limits. We analyze the occurrence of superradiance, manifested as negative partial absorption lengths for corotating modes at low frequencies.

  16. Absorption of planar waves in a draining bathtub

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Ednilton S.; Dolan, Sam R.; Crispino, Luis C. B.

    2010-06-15

    We present an analysis of the absorption of acoustic waves by a black hole analogue in (2+1) dimensions generated by a fluid flow in a draining bathtub. We show that the low-frequency absorption length is equal to the acoustic hole circumference and that the high-frequency absorption length is 4 times the ergoregion radius. For intermediate values of the wave frequency, we compute the absorption length numerically and show that our results are in excellent agreement with the low- and high-frequency limits. We analyze the occurrence of superradiance, manifested as negative partial absorption lengths for corotating modes at low frequencies.

  17. TATP stand-off detection with open path: FTIR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, C.; Pohl, T.; Weber, K.; Vogel, A.; van Haren, G.; Schweikert, W.

    2012-10-01

    TATP is a very easy to synthesize [9], sensitive, high explosive [10] and high volatile explosive [1, 3, 7] with great absorption in the IR Spectra [4, 5, 6]. In this project we detect TATP gas traces with open path FTIR - techniques. The first project phase was to construct and build a heatable multi-reflection cell with adjustable optical path length and a heatable intake to evaporate solid TATP samples. In this cell reference TATP - spectra were collected under controlled conditions with a Bruker FTIR system (Typ OPAG 33). The next step was to find out how the TATP gas will be diluted in the ambient air and validate some physical properties which are described inconsistently in literature e.g. evaporation rates. We constructed a special double - T shaped chamber with stabile air conditions. In this chamber the dispersion kinetics of the TATP vapour could be tested. It turned out that the TATP vapours has the tendency to drop down. Therefore the highest TATP - concentrations were measured below the TATP sample. During the investigation for this study it turned out, that some materials scrub the TATP- vapour out of the air, e.g. Metals, fabric, leather. In the second phase of the project successful open path FTIR- measurements were taken in ambient air and will be continued with different system configurations of the OPAG 33 to lower the detection limits. Also successful measurements were taken in indoor ambient air with a Hyper spectral camera (passive FTIR with array sensor) to detect TATP in solid and gaseous phase. This technique allows detecting TATP and identifying the TATP source. The poster shows some selected results of the continued research.

  18. Nonlinear optical propagation in a tandem structure comprising nonlinear absorption and scattering materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kangpeng; Ju, Yongfeng; He, Jin; Zhang, Long E-mail: lzhang@siom.ac.cn; Wang, Jun E-mail: lzhang@siom.ac.cn; Chen, Yu; Blau, Werner J.

    2014-01-13

    Laser propagation in a tandem structure comprising carbon nanotubes and phthalocyanines is studied by Z-scan method. Due to the different mechanisms of the two materials, the laser beam can be attenuated with different absorptivities, by changing the sequence of light passing through each material. Numerical simulations considering the effect of path length and the change of nonlinear coefficient within each material are conducted for understanding the distribution of laser intensity in the tandem system and hence, fitting of the asymmetric Z-scan curves. The results are helpful for the design of nonlinear optical devices comprising multiple nonlinear materials and mechanisms.

  19. Quantification and parametrization of non-linearity effects by higher-order sensitivity terms in scattered light differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puķīte, Jānis; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We address the application of differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) of scattered light observations in the presence of strong absorbers (in particular ozone), for which the absorption optical depth is a non-linear function of the trace gas concentration. This is the case because Beer-Lambert law generally does not hold for scattered light measurements due to many light paths contributing to the measurement. While in many cases linear approximation can be made, for scenarios with strong absorptions non-linear effects cannot always be neglected. This is especially the case for observation geometries, for which the light contributing to the measurement is crossing the atmosphere under spatially well-separated paths differing strongly in length and location, like in limb geometry. In these cases, often full retrieval algorithms are applied to address the non-linearities, requiring iterative forward modelling of absorption spectra involving time-consuming wavelength-by-wavelength radiative transfer modelling. In this study, we propose to describe the non-linear effects by additional sensitivity parameters that can be used e.g. to build up a lookup table. Together with widely used box air mass factors (effective light paths) describing the linear response to the increase in the trace gas amount, the higher-order sensitivity parameters eliminate the need for repeating the radiative transfer modelling when modifying the absorption scenario even in the presence of a strong absorption background. While the higher-order absorption structures can be described as separate fit parameters in the spectral analysis (so-called DOAS fit), in practice their quantitative evaluation requires good measurement quality (typically better than that available from current measurements). Therefore, we introduce an iterative retrieval algorithm correcting for the higher-order absorption structures not yet considered in the DOAS fit as well as the absorption dependence on

  20. Path optimization for oil probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, O'Neil; Rahmes, Mark; Blue, Mark; Peter, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    We discuss a robust method for optimal oil probe path planning inspired by medical imaging. Horizontal wells require three-dimensional steering made possible by the rotary steerable capabilities of the system, which allows the hole to intersect multiple target shale gas zones. Horizontal "legs" can be over a mile long; the longer the exposure length, the more oil and natural gas is drained and the faster it can flow. More oil and natural gas can be produced with fewer wells and less surface disturbance. Horizontal drilling can help producers tap oil and natural gas deposits under surface areas where a vertical well cannot be drilled, such as under developed or environmentally sensitive areas. Drilling creates well paths which have multiple twists and turns to try to hit multiple accumulations from a single well location. Our algorithm can be used to augment current state of the art methods. Our goal is to obtain a 3D path with nodes describing the optimal route to the destination. This algorithm works with BIG data and saves cost in planning for probe insertion. Our solution may be able to help increase the energy extracted vs. input energy.

  1. The universal path integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Seth; Dreyer, Olaf

    2016-02-01

    Path integrals calculate probabilities by summing over classical configurations of variables such as fields, assigning each configuration a phase equal to the action of that configuration. This paper defines a universal path integral, which sums over all computable structures. This path integral contains as sub-integrals all possible computable path integrals, including those of field theory, the standard model of elementary particles, discrete models of quantum gravity, string theory, etc. The universal path integral possesses a well-defined measure that guarantees its finiteness. The probabilities for events corresponding to sub-integrals can be calculated using the method of decoherent histories. The universal path integral supports a quantum theory of the universe in which the world that we see around us arises out of the interference between all computable structures.

  2. Absorption Optics of Aqueous Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini; Gittings, Alex; Durian, D. J.

    2002-11-01

    Aqueous foams are composed of gas bubbles packed together in a small volume of soapy water. The large number of gas-liquid interfaces in foams results in very strong scattering of light, which explains the opaque nature of conventional aqueous foams such as shaving foams and mousse. For dry foams, the interfaces can take the following three forms: the soap films where two bubbles meet, the triangular plateau borders where three soap films meet and the vertices where four plateau borders meet. Previous experiments have shown that most of the scattering occurs from the plateau borders 2,3 and the transport mean free path of light (l*), the bubble radius (R) and the liquid fraction of foam (epsilon) is related through the relation l*=R/(epsilon0.5). To understand the reflection and scattering of light at the gas-bubble interfaces, we study the absorption of photons in the liquid network as a function of the foam absorptivity. We do this to confirm if the time spent by the photons in the liquid phase is proportional to the liquid fraction of the foam. Our results indicate that for a specific range of liquid fractions (0.05 is less than e is less than 0.1), the photons seem to get trapped in the liquid network. This result is independent of the absorptivity of the foam and leads us to conclude that under appropriate conditions, an aqueous foam behaves very much like an optical fiber network. Aqueous foam is generated in the lab by the method of turbulent mixing of N2 gas with a jet of alpha-olefin-sulfonate (AOS) solution. The foam has been made absorbing by dissolving small quantities of rhodamine dye (R = 0.005 g/l, R = 0.01 g/l and R = 0.0124 g/l) in the AOS solution. The transmission of photons through the foams of liquid fractions 0.0297 is less than e is less than 0.35 has been studied using Diffuse Transmission Spectroscopy (DTS). For each liquid fraction, the transport mean free path l* (the length over which the photon travels before it gets completely

  3. Robot path planning using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleghorn, Timothy F.; Baffes, Paul T.; Wang, Liu

    1988-01-01

    Robot path planning can refer either to a mobile vehicle such as a Mars Rover, or to an end effector on an arm moving through a cluttered workspace. In both instances there may exist many solutions, some of which are better than others, either in terms of distance traversed, energy expended, or joint angle or reach capabilities. A path planning program has been developed based upon a genetic algorithm. This program assumes global knowledge of the terrain or workspace, and provides a family of good paths between the initial and final points. Initially, a set of valid random paths are constructed. Successive generations of valid paths are obtained using one of several possible reproduction strategies similar to those found in biological communities. A fitness function is defined to describe the goodness of the path, in this case including length, slope, and obstacle avoidance considerations. It was found that with some reproduction strategies, the average value of the fitness function improved for successive generations, and that by saving the best paths of each generation, one could quite rapidly obtain a collection of good candidate solutions.

  4. Multilayer Active Control For Structural Damping And Optical-Path Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Zahidul H.; Spanos, John T.; Fanson, James L.

    1995-01-01

    Two active-control concepts incorporated into system for suppression of vibrations in truss structure and regulation of length of optical path on structure to nanometer level. Optical-path-length-control subsystem contains two feedback control loops to obtain active damping in wide amplitude-and-frequency range. Concept described in more detail in number of previous articles, including "Stabilizing Optical-Path Length on a Vibrating Structure" (NPO-19040), "Controllable Optical Delay Line for Stellar Interferometry" (NPO-18686), "Test Bed for Control of Optical-Path Lengths" (NPO-18487).

  5. Arc Length Gone Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreaux, Gregory M.; Wells, M. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Everyone with a thorough knowledge of single variable calculus knows that integration can be used to find the length of a curve on a given interval, called its arc length. Fortunately, if one endeavors to pose and solve more interesting problems than simply computing lengths of various curves, there are techniques available that do not require an…

  6. Measuring Thermodynamic Length

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E

    2007-09-07

    Thermodynamic length is a metric distance between equilibrium thermodynamic states. Among other interesting properties, this metric asymptotically bounds the dissipation induced by a finite time transformation of a thermodynamic system. It is also connected to the Jensen-Shannon divergence, Fisher information, and Rao's entropy differential metric. Therefore, thermodynamic length is of central interestin understanding matter out of equilibrium. In this Letter, we will consider how to denethermodynamic length for a small system described by equilibrium statistical mechanics and how to measure thermodynamic length within a computer simulation. Surprisingly, Bennett's classic acceptance ratio method for measuring free energy differences also measures thermodynamic length.

  7. Tornado intensity estimated from damage path dimensions.

    PubMed

    Elsner, James B; Jagger, Thomas H; Elsner, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    The Newcastle/Moore and El Reno tornadoes of May 2013 are recent reminders of the destructive power of tornadoes. A direct estimate of a tornado's power is difficult and dangerous to get. An indirect estimate on a categorical scale is available from a post-storm survery of the damage. Wind speed bounds are attached to the scale, but the scale is not adequate for analyzing trends in tornado intensity separate from trends in tornado frequency. Here tornado intensity on a continuum is estimated from damage path length and width, which are measured on continuous scales and correlated to the EF rating. The wind speeds on the EF scale are treated as interval censored data and regressed onto the path dimensions and fatalities. The regression model indicates a 25% increase in expected intensity over a threshold intensity of 29 m s(-1) for a 100 km increase in path length and a 17% increase in expected intensity for a one km increase in path width. The model shows a 43% increase in the expected intensity when fatalities are observed controlling for path dimensions. The estimated wind speeds correlate at a level of .77 (.34, .93) [95% confidence interval] with a small sample of wind speeds estimated independently from a doppler radar calibration. The estimated wind speeds allow analyses to be done on the tornado database that are not possible with the categorical scale. The modeled intensities can be used in climatology and in environmental and engineering applications. Research is needed to understand the upward trends in path length and width. PMID:25229242

  8. Tornado Intensity Estimated from Damage Path Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, James B.; Jagger, Thomas H.; Elsner, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    The Newcastle/Moore and El Reno tornadoes of May 2013 are recent reminders of the destructive power of tornadoes. A direct estimate of a tornado's power is difficult and dangerous to get. An indirect estimate on a categorical scale is available from a post-storm survery of the damage. Wind speed bounds are attached to the scale, but the scale is not adequate for analyzing trends in tornado intensity separate from trends in tornado frequency. Here tornado intensity on a continuum is estimated from damage path length and width, which are measured on continuous scales and correlated to the EF rating. The wind speeds on the EF scale are treated as interval censored data and regressed onto the path dimensions and fatalities. The regression model indicates a 25% increase in expected intensity over a threshold intensity of 29 m s−1 for a 100 km increase in path length and a 17% increase in expected intensity for a one km increase in path width. The model shows a 43% increase in the expected intensity when fatalities are observed controlling for path dimensions. The estimated wind speeds correlate at a level of .77 (.34, .93) [95% confidence interval] with a small sample of wind speeds estimated independently from a doppler radar calibration. The estimated wind speeds allow analyses to be done on the tornado database that are not possible with the categorical scale. The modeled intensities can be used in climatology and in environmental and engineering applications. Research is needed to understand the upward trends in path length and width. PMID:25229242

  9. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Guenther, Alex B.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-11-19

    The OH- and O3- initiated oxidations of isoprene, which is one of the primary volatile organic compounds produced by vegetation, are a major source of atmospheric formaldehyde and other oxygenated organics, yet little quantitative IR data exists for isoprene. We thus report absorption coefficients and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600 - 6500 cm-1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298 and 323 K in a 19.96 cm path length cell at 0.112 cm-1 resolution, using a Bruker 66V FTIR. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven pressures at each temperature.

  10. Impact of the magnetic superstorm on March 17-19, 2015 on subpolar HF radio paths: Experiment and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchensky, D. V.; Maltseva, O. A.; Anishin, M. M.; Sergeeva, M. A.; Rogov, D. D.

    2016-09-01

    The ionospheric phenomena which significantly influenced radio propagation during March 17-19, 2015 are considered in the study. The data of oblique ionospheric sounding (OIS) were analyzed at six radio paths. These paths are located in the zone of North Siberia in Russia and have different lengths: from 1000 to 5000 km. The results are the following. The magnetic storm drastically changed the character of radio propagation at all the considered paths: in most cases the reflections from the ionospheric F2-layer were changed by the reflections only from the sporadic Es-layer. The parameters of movement of the disturbance front were estimated on the basis of OIS data of the paths. The average velocity of the front movements from east to west was about V = 440 m/s. Even the moderate growth of riometer absorption within the region of radio paths' locations, resulted in loss of multihop modes in the signal reflections from sporadic layers. It also resulted in a sharp decrease of signal strength at the paths. Real distance-frequency characteristics (DFC) of the paths were compared to DFC calculated on the basis of International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model. It was revealed that on a quiet day of March, 15th, the real and the calculated DFC are similar or coincide in the majority of cases. During the disturbed days of March, 17-19, most commonly observed are the significant differences between the calculated and the experimental data. The most pronounced difference is revealed while estimating the character of OIS signals' reflections from Es-layers.

  11. Self Absorption Effects on the Detection of Hg and Cd in an Atmospheric Microwave Sustained Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadidi, Kamal; Woskov, Paul; Flores, Guadalupe; Green, Karen; Thomas, Paul

    1999-10-01

    The detection limits for cadmium and mercury at the 228.8 nm and 253.65 nm transitions, respectively, in an atmospheric 1.5 kW, 2.45 GHz microwave sustained plasma has been found to depend on the path length between the plasma and the detection system. Atomic emission spectroscopy of such microwave plasma is under development as a real-time monitor of EPA regulated hazardous metals in smokestacks. Measurements of the detection limits for axial and radial side views of the discharge show a clear increase of the axial detection limit. Self absorption by unexcited cadmium and mercury along the longer turbulent axial propagation path is shown to be responsible for the increase of the detection limits.

  12. [Retrieval of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Xie, Pin-Hua; Fu, Qiang; Liu, Jian-Guo; Liu, Wen-Qing; Qin, Min; Li, Ang; Liu, Shi-Sheng; Wei, Qing-Nong

    2006-09-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique has been used to measure trace gases in the atmosphere by their strongly structured absorption of radiation in the UV and visible spectral range, e. g. SO2, NO2, O3 etc. However, unlike the absorption spectra of SO2 and NO2, the analysis of aromatic compounds is difficult and strongly suffers from the cross interference of other absorbers (Herzberg bands of oxygen, ozone and sulfur dioxide), especially with relatively low concentrations of aromatic compounds in the atmosphere. In the present paper, the DOAS evaluation of aromatic compounds was performed by nonlinear least square fit with two interpolated oxygen optical density spectra at different path lengths and reference spectra of ozone at different temperature and SO2 cross section to correct the interference from absorbers of O2, O3 and SO2. The measurement of toluene, benzene, (m, p, o) xylene and phenol with a DOAS system showed that DOAS method is suitable for monocyclic aromatic compounds monitoring in the atmosphere. PMID:17112022

  13. Regional respiratory tract absorption of inhaled reactive gases

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, F.J.; Overton, J.H.; Kimbell, J.S.; Russell, M.L.

    1992-06-29

    Highly reactive gases present unique problems due to the number of factors which must be taken into account to determine regional respiratory tract uptake. The authors reviewed some of the physical, chemical, and biological factors that affect dose and that must be understood to interpret toxicological data, to evaluate experimental dosimetry studies, and to develop dosimetry models. Selected dosimetry experiments involving laboratory animals and humans were discussed, showing the variability and uptake according to animal species and respiratory tract region for various reactive gases. New experimental dosimetry approaches, such as those involving isotope ratio mass spectroscopy and cyclotron generation reactive gases, were discussed that offer great promise for improving the ability to study regional respiratory tract absorption of reactive gases. Various dosimetry modeling applications were discussed which demonstrate: the importance of airflow patterns for site-specific dosimetry in the upper respiratory tract, the influence of the anatomical model used to make inter- and intraspecies dosimetric comparisons, the influence of tracheobronchial path length on predicted dose curves, and the implications of ventilatory unit structure and volume on dosimetry and response. Collectively, these examples illustrate important aspects of regional respiratory tract absorption of inhaled reactive gases. Given the complex nature of extent and pattern of injury in the respiratory tract from exposure to reactive gases, understanding interspecies differences in the absorption of reactive gases will continue to be an important area for study.

  14. Minimal entropy probability paths between genome families.

    PubMed

    Ahlbrandt, Calvin; Benson, Gary; Casey, William

    2004-05-01

    We develop a metric for probability distributions with applications to biological sequence analysis. Our distance metric is obtained by minimizing a functional defined on the class of paths over probability measures on N categories. The underlying mathematical theory is connected to a constrained problem in the calculus of variations. The solution presented is a numerical solution, which approximates the true solution in a set of cases called rich paths where none of the components of the path is zero. The functional to be minimized is motivated by entropy considerations, reflecting the idea that nature might efficiently carry out mutations of genome sequences in such a way that the increase in entropy involved in transformation is as small as possible. We characterize sequences by frequency profiles or probability vectors, in the case of DNA where N is 4 and the components of the probability vector are the frequency of occurrence of each of the bases A, C, G and T. Given two probability vectors a and b, we define a distance function based as the infimum of path integrals of the entropy function H( p) over all admissible paths p(t), 0 < or = t< or =1, with p(t) a probability vector such that p(0)=a and p(1)=b. If the probability paths p(t) are parameterized as y(s) in terms of arc length s and the optimal path is smooth with arc length L, then smooth and "rich" optimal probability paths may be numerically estimated by a hybrid method of iterating Newton's method on solutions of a two point boundary value problem, with unknown distance L between the abscissas, for the Euler-Lagrange equations resulting from a multiplier rule for the constrained optimization problem together with linear regression to improve the arc length estimate L. Matlab code for these numerical methods is provided which works only for "rich" optimal probability vectors. These methods motivate a definition of an elementary distance function which is easier and faster to calculate, works on non

  15. Detection of optical path in spectroscopic space-based observations of greenhouse gases: Application to GOSAT data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshchepkov, Sergey; Bril, Andrey; Maksyutov, Shamil; Yokota, Tatsuya

    2011-07-01

    We present a method to detect optical path modification due to atmospheric light scattering in space-based greenhouse gas spectroscopic sounding. This method, which was applied to the analysis of radiance spectra measured by the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT), is based on the path length probability density function (PPDF) and on retrieval of PPDF parameters from radiance spectra in the oxygen A-band of absorption at 0.76 μm. We show that these parameters can be effectively used to characterize the impact of atmospheric light scattering on carbon dioxide retrieval in the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption bands at 1.6 μm and 2.0 μm. The threshold for PPDF parameters is set so that the optical-path modification is negligible, and these settings are recommended as a basic guideline for selecting the clearest atmospheric scenarios. An example of data processing for six global GOSAT repeat cycles in April and July 2009 shows that PPDF-based selection efficiently removes CO2 retrieval biases associated with subvisible cirrus and sandstorm activities.

  16. Multi optical path generator for fiber optic strain sensors multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hao; Yuan, Yonggui; Yuan, Libo

    2015-07-01

    A multi optical path generator based on a tunable long Fabry-Perot optical fiber cavity is proposed and demonstrated. It would be used in an optical fiber sensing system which could multiplex a number of fiber sensors with different gauge lengths. Using this optical path generator, we can get a sequence of light beams with different optical paths, which will be coupled to the fiber sensor array in the sensing system. The multi optical path lengths generated by the device are analyzed and discussed. And the relative intensity of the corresponding light beam is calculated. The multiplexing capability caused by the optical path generator is discussed and the experimental results are confirmed this. The system can be used in strain or deformation sensing for smart structure health monitoring.

  17. Characterization of soil organic matter composition at intact preferential flow path surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leue, M.; Gerke, H. H.; Ellerbrock, R. H.

    2012-04-01

    In structured soils, the interaction of percolating water and reactive solutes with the soil matrix is mostly restricted to surfaces of preferential flow paths. Surfaces of flow paths that are formed by cracks, decayed root channels or worm burrows are often covered by clay-organic coatings (i.e., cutanes), in which the outermost layer is mainly organic matter (OM). The composition of OM finally controls wettability, sorption, and transfer properties. However, the in-situ local distribution of OM properties along such surfaces is largely unknown to date because experimental techniques to study the relatively thin and vulnerable coatings at intact structure surfaces were not available. The objective of this study was to analyze the local mm-scale distribution and composition of SOM at preferential flow paths. The Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy in diffuse reflectance mode (DRIFT) was used to determine spectral information of the intact structural surfaces (cracks and biopores). With the DRIFT-mapping technique, potential flow path types, such as earthworm burrows, root channels, and cracks of structured subsoil horizons were analyzed in 1 mm steps along transects of 15 up to 65 mm length. The distribution of OM composition was characterized by evaluating the ratios of the absorption band intensities of the alkyl- (C-H-) and carbonyl (C=O-) functional groups (CH/CO), which represent a measure of the potential wettability of the OM of the surface. Samples of different soil types (Luvisol, Regosol, Stagnosol, Cambisol), of different geological provenance (till, loess, mudstone, limestone), and of different land use (arable, forest) were analyzed. The CH/CO-ratio was generally higher for earthworm burrows and root channels as compared to crack surfaces and the soil matrix. Differences between flow path types could be observed with respect to soil type, parent material, and land use. The local distribution of the OM properties may affect sorption and mass

  18. Apparatus and method for quantitative measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity between two samples using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect

    DOEpatents

    Cremers, D.A.; Keller, R.A.

    1984-05-08

    An apparatus and method for the measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity of weakly absorbing solutions using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect have been developed. Two sample cells are placed in each arm of an interferometer and are traversed by colinear probe and heating laser beams. The interrogation probe beams are recombined forming a fringe pattern, the intensity of which can be related to changes in optical path length of these laser beams through the cells. This in turn can be related to small differences in optical absorptivity which results in different amounts of sample heating when the heating laser beams are turned on, by the fact that the index of refraction of a liquid is temperature dependent. A critical feature of this invention is the stabilization of the optical path of the probe beams against drift. Background (solvent) absorption can then be suppressed by a factor of approximately 400. Solute absorptivities of about 10[sup [minus]5] cm[sup [minus]1] can then be determined in the presence of background absorptions in excess of 10[sup [minus]3] cm[sup [minus]1]. In addition, the smallest absorption measured with the instant apparatus and method is about 5 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] cm[sup [minus]1]. 6 figs.

  19. Topological analysis of polymeric melts: Chain-length effects and fast-converging estimators for entanglement length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoy, Robert S.; Foteinopoulou, Katerina; Kröger, Martin

    2009-09-01

    Primitive path analyses of entanglements are performed over a wide range of chain lengths for both bead spring and atomistic polyethylene polymer melts. Estimators for the entanglement length Ne which operate on results for a single chain length N are shown to produce systematic O(1/N) errors. The mathematical roots of these errors are identified as (a) treating chain ends as entanglements and (b) neglecting non-Gaussian corrections to chain and primitive path dimensions. The prefactors for the O(1/N) errors may be large; in general their magnitude depends both on the polymer model and the method used to obtain primitive paths. We propose, derive, and test new estimators which eliminate these systematic errors using information obtainable from the variation in entanglement characteristics with chain length. The new estimators produce accurate results for Ne from marginally entangled systems. Formulas based on direct enumeration of entanglements appear to converge faster and are simpler to apply.

  20. Cane Technique: Modifying the Touch Technique for Full Path Coverage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uslan, Mark M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of height of cane hand, cane length, step size, and forearm length of 17 cane using blind (14-21 years old) Ss were taken for the purpose of testing the hypothesis that the touch technique does not provide 100 percent path coverage. (Author)

  1. Combined Monte Carlo and path-integral method for simulated library of time-resolved reflectance curves from layered tissue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert H.; Vishwanath, Karthik; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2009-02-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are considered the "gold standard" for mathematical description of photon transport in tissue, but they can require large computation times. Therefore, it is important to develop simple and efficient methods for accelerating MC simulations, especially when a large "library" of related simulations is needed. A semi-analytical method involving MC simulations and a path-integral (PI) based scaling technique generated time-resolved reflectance curves from layered tissue models. First, a zero-absorption MC simulation was run for a tissue model with fixed scattering properties in each layer. Then, a closed-form expression for the average classical path of a photon in tissue was used to determine the percentage of time that the photon spent in each layer, to create a weighted Beer-Lambert factor to scale the time-resolved reflectance of the simulated zero-absorption tissue model. This method is a unique alternative to other scaling techniques in that it does not require the path length or number of collisions of each photon to be stored during the initial simulation. Effects of various layer thicknesses and absorption and scattering coefficients on the accuracy of the method will be discussed.

  2. Effect of radiometric errors on accuracy of temperature-profile measurement by spectral scanning using absorption-emission pyrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    The spectral-scanning method may be used to determine the temperature profile of a jet- or rocket-engine exhaust stream by measurements of gas radiation and transmittance, at two or more wavelengths. A single, fixed line of sight is used, using immobile radiators outside of the gas stream, and there is no interference with the flow. At least two sets of measurements are made, each set consisting of the conventional three radiometric measurements of absorption-emission pyrometry, but each set is taken over a different spectral interval that gives different weight to the radiation from a different portion of the optical path. Thereby, discrimination is obtained with respect to location along the path. A given radiometric error causes an error in computed temperatures. The ratio between temperature error and radiometric error depends on profile shape, path length, temperature level, and strength of line absorption, and the absorption coefficient and its temperature dependency. These influence the choice of wavelengths, for any given gas. Conditions for minimum temperature error are derived. Numerical results are presented for a two-wavelength measurement on a family of profiles that may be expected in a practical case of hydrogen-oxygen combustion. Under favorable conditions, the fractional error in temperature approximates the fractional error in radiant-flux measurement.

  3. On-column double-beam laser absorption detection for capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Y.; Yeung, E.S. )

    1993-08-01

    Double-beam laser absorption detection in capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been developed. This is based on the direct subtraction of reference and signal photocurrents by an electronic circuit, under feedback control, to reduce background noise. A simple equation for calculating concentrations has been proposed and was confirmed by experimental results. A practical noise-to-signal ratio of 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]5] in intensity is achieved. This is 5 times lower than that of commercial CE systems. For absorbance detection, as low as 2 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] M malachite green can be detected. This corresponds to a 25-fold improvement of detection limit over commercial systems. This gain in detectability results from both a reduction in intensity fluctuations (noise) and an increase in the effective absorption path length (signal). 22 refs., 6 figs.

  4. A Path to Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stegemoller, William; Stegemoller, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    The path taken and the turns made as a turtle traces a polygon are examined to discover an important theorem in geometry. A unique tool, the Angle Adder, is implemented in the investigation. (Contains 9 figures.)

  5. Tortuous path chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Wheeler, David R.; Simonson, Robert J.

    2010-09-21

    A non-planar, tortuous path chemical preconcentrator has a high internal surface area having a heatable sorptive coating that can be used to selectively collect and concentrate one or more chemical species of interest from a fluid stream that can be rapidly released as a concentrated plug into an analytical or microanalytical chain for separation and detection. The non-planar chemical preconcentrator comprises a sorptive support structure having a tortuous flow path. The tortuosity provides repeated twists, turns, and bends to the flow, thereby increasing the interfacial contact between sample fluid stream and the sorptive material. The tortuous path also provides more opportunities for desorption and readsorption of volatile species. Further, the thermal efficiency of the tortuous path chemical preconcentrator is comparable or superior to the prior non-planar chemical preconcentrator. Finally, the tortuosity can be varied in different directions to optimize flow rates during the adsorption and desorption phases of operation of the preconcentrator.

  6. Neandertal clavicle length

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik; Holliday, Trenton W.; Auerbach, Benjamin M.

    2014-01-01

    The Late Pleistocene archaic humans from western Eurasia (the Neandertals) have been described for a century as exhibiting absolutely and relatively long clavicles. This aspect of their body proportions has been used to distinguish them from modern humans, invoked to account for other aspects of their anatomy and genetics, used in assessments of their phylogenetic polarities, and used as evidence for Late Pleistocene population relationships. However, it has been unclear whether the usual scaling of Neandertal clavicular lengths to their associated humeral lengths reflects long clavicles, short humeri, or both. Neandertal clavicle lengths, along with those of early modern humans and latitudinally diverse recent humans, were compared with both humeral lengths and estimated body masses (based on femoral head diameters). The Neandertal do have long clavicles relative their humeri, even though they fall within the ranges of variation of early and recent humans. However, when scaled to body masses, their humeral lengths are relatively short, and their clavicular lengths are indistinguishable from those of Late Pleistocene and recent modern humans. The few sufficiently complete Early Pleistocene Homo clavicles seem to have relative lengths also well within recent human variation. Therefore, appropriately scaled clavicular length seems to have varied little through the genus Homo, and it should not be used to account for other aspects of Neandertal biology or their phylogenetic status. PMID:24616525

  7. Seismic scattering and absorption parameters in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region from elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Peter J.; Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    In this study, frequency-dependent seismic scattering and intrinsic attenuation parameters for the crustal structure beneath the W-Bohemia/Vogtland swarm earthquake region close to the border of Czech Republic and Germany are estimated. Synthetic seismogram envelopes are modelled using elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory. Scattering and absorption parameters are determined by fitting these synthetic envelopes to observed seismogram envelopes from 14 shallow local events from the October 2008 W-Bohemia/Vogtland earthquake swarm. The two different simulation approaches yield similar results for the estimated crustal parameters and show a comparable frequency dependence of both transport mean free path and intrinsic absorption path length. Both methods suggest that intrinsic attenuation is dominant over scattering attenuation in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region for the investigated epicentral distance range and frequency bands from 3 to 24 Hz. Elastic simulations of seismogram envelopes suggest that forward scattering is required to explain the data, however, the degree of forward scattering is not resolvable. Errors in the parameter estimation are smaller in the elastic case compared to results from the acoustic simulations. The frequency decay of the transport mean free path suggests a random medium described by a nearly exponential autocorrelation function. The fluctuation strength and correlation length of the random medium cannot be estimated independently, but only a combination of the parameters related to the transport mean free path of the medium can be computed. Furthermore, our elastic simulations show, that using our numerical method, it is not possible to resolve the value of the mean free path of the random medium.

  8. Portable 4.6 Micrometers Laser Absorption Spectrometer for Carbon Monoxide Monitoring and Fire Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Ryan M.; Frez, Clifford; Forouhar, Siamak; May, Randy D.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    The air quality aboard manned spacecraft must be continuously monitored to ensure crew safety and identify equipment malfunctions. In particular, accurate real-time monitoring of carbon monoxide (CO) levels helps to prevent chronic exposure and can also provide early detection of combustion-related hazards. For long-duration missions, environmental monitoring grows in importance, but the mass and volume of monitoring instruments must be minimized. Furthermore, environmental analysis beyond low-Earth orbit must be performed in-situ, as sample return becomes impractical. Due to their small size, low power draw, and performance reliability, semiconductor-laser-based absorption spectrometers are viable candidates for this purpose. To reduce instrument form factor and complexity, the emission wavelength of the laser source should coincide with strong fundamental absorption lines of the target gases, which occur in the 3 to 5 micrometers wavelength range for most combustion products of interest, thereby reducing the absorption path length required for low-level concentration measurements. To address the needs of current and future NASA missions, we have developed a prototype absorption spectrometer using a semiconductor quantum cascade laser source operating near 4.6 micrometers that can be used to detect low concentrations of CO with a compact single-pass absorption cell. In this study, we present the design of the prototype instrument and report on measurements of CO emissions from the combustion of a variety of aerospace plastics.

  9. H216O absorption spectrum between 22250 and 22800 cm-1: Fourier transform spectroscopy with bright light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serduykov, V. I.; Sinitsa, L. N.; Vasil'chenko, S. S.; Bykov, A. D.; Kruglova, T. V.; Polovtseva, E. R.; Scherbakov, A. P.

    2014-11-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption spectra in the visible spectral region near 0.44 mkm are performed using FTspectrometer IFS-125M and Light-emitting diode (LED) as source of radiation. Water vapor spectrum has been obtained by averaging over 17136 scans recorded at 34,8 m optical path length, temperature 24 ± 1 C and pressure of sample 24,8 mBar. Due to strong emission of LED source it was possible to achieve signal-to-noise ratio about 104 and to record weak lines with intensities of 6 10-27 cm/molecule. Comparisons with results of early works are made.

  10. Sampling diffusive transition paths

    SciTech Connect

    F. Miller III, Thomas; Predescu, Cristian

    2006-10-12

    We address the problem of sampling double-ended diffusive paths. The ensemble of paths is expressed using a symmetric version of the Onsager-Machlup formula, which only requires evaluation of the force field and which, upon direct time discretization, gives rise to a symmetric integrator that is accurate to second order. Efficiently sampling this ensemble requires avoiding the well-known stiffness problem associated with sampling infinitesimal Brownian increments of the path, as well as a different type of stiffness associated with sampling the coarse features of long paths. The fine-features sampling stiffness is eliminated with the use of the fast sampling algorithm (FSA), and the coarse-feature sampling stiffness is avoided by introducing the sliding and sampling (S&S) algorithm. A key feature of the S&S algorithm is that it enables massively parallel computers to sample diffusive trajectories that are long in time. We use the algorithm to sample the transition path ensemble for the structural interconversion of the 38-atom Lennard-Jones cluster at low temperature.

  11. Sampling diffusive transition paths.

    PubMed

    Miller, Thomas F; Predescu, Cristian

    2007-04-14

    The authors address the problem of sampling double-ended diffusive paths. The ensemble of paths is expressed using a symmetric version of the Onsager-Machlup formula, which only requires evaluation of the force field and which, upon direct time discretization, gives rise to a symmetric integrator that is accurate to second order. Efficiently sampling this ensemble requires avoiding the well-known stiffness problem associated with the sampling of infinitesimal Brownian increments of the path, as well as a different type of stiffness associated with the sampling of the coarse features of long paths. The fine-feature sampling stiffness is eliminated with the use of the fast sampling algorithm, and the coarse-feature sampling stiffness is avoided by introducing the sliding and sampling (S&S) algorithm. A key feature of the S&S algorithm is that it enables massively parallel computers to sample diffusive trajectories that are long in time. The authors use the algorithm to sample the transition path ensemble for the structural interconversion of the 38-atom Lennard-Jones cluster at low temperature. PMID:17444696

  12. Coefficients of Effective Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Roger H.

    1981-01-01

    Under certain conditions, a validity Coefficient of Effective Length (CEL) can produce highly misleading results. A modified coefficent is suggested for use when empirical studies indicate that underlying assumptions have been violated. (Author/BW)

  13. Length Paradox in Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Roberto de A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a thought experiment using a general analysis approach with Lorentz transformations to show that the apparent self-contradictions of special relativity concerning the length-paradox are really non-existant. (GA)

  14. [Sonographic leg length measurement].

    PubMed

    Holst, A; Thomas, W

    1989-03-01

    After brief presentation of the clinical and radiological methods to measure the leg length and the leg length difference the authors outline the new diagnostic method for measuring the leg length and the leg length difference by means of real time sonography. Postmortem tests and clinical examples show that ultrasound is ideal to determine exactly the length of femur and tibia. The joint gaps on the hip, knee and upper ankle joint can be demonstrated by means of a 5 MHz linear scanner. A 1 mm strong metal bar on the skin and under the scanner is placed at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the body so that the bar can be seen in the centre. A measuring device gives the distances of the joint gaps in cm so that the difference correspond to the real length of femur and tibia. This standardised measuring is done by a particularly developed bearing and measuring device. The results of the sonographical measurements on 20 corpses and checking after consecutive dissections showed in 75% of cases a 100% sonographic measuring accuracy of the total leg length. The separately considered results for femur (85%) and tibia (90) were even better. The maximum sonographic measuring fault was 1.0 cm for the femur (in one case) and 0.5 cm for the tibia, respectively. All sonographic measurements were performed with the Sonoline SL-1 of the Siemens Company (Erlangen, W-Germany). Thus, sonographical measuring of the leg length offers a reliable, non-invasive method that can be repeated as often as necessary and is simply executed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2652268

  15. Editorial: Redefining Length

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, Gene D.

    2011-07-15

    Technological changes have moved publishing to electronic-first publication where the print version has been relegated to simply another display mode. Distribution in HTML and EPUB formats, for example, changes the reading environment and reduces the need for strict pagination. Therefore, in an effort to streamline the calculation of length, the APS journals will no longer use the printed page as the determining factor for length. Instead the journals will now use word counts (or word equivalents for tables, figures, and equations) to establish length; for details please see http://publish.aps.org/authors/length-guide. The title, byline, abstract, acknowledgment, and references will not be included in these counts allowing authors the freedom to appropriately credit coworkers, funding sources, and the previous literature, bringing all relevant references to the attention of readers. This new method for determining length will be easier for authors to calculate in advance, and lead to fewer length-associated revisions in proof, yet still retain the quality of concise communication that is a virtue of short papers.

  16. Paths correlation matrix.

    PubMed

    Qian, Weixian; Zhou, Xiaojun; Lu, Yingcheng; Xu, Jiang

    2015-09-15

    Both the Jones and Mueller matrices encounter difficulties when physically modeling mixed materials or rough surfaces due to the complexity of light-matter interactions. To address these issues, we derived a matrix called the paths correlation matrix (PCM), which is a probabilistic mixture of Jones matrices of every light propagation path. Because PCM is related to actual light propagation paths, it is well suited for physical modeling. Experiments were performed, and the reflection PCM of a mixture of polypropylene and graphite was measured. The PCM of the mixed sample was accurately decomposed into pure polypropylene's single reflection, pure graphite's single reflection, and depolarization caused by multiple reflections, which is consistent with the theoretical derivation. Reflection parameters of rough surface can be calculated from PCM decomposition, and the results fit well with the theoretical calculations provided by the Fresnel equations. These theoretical and experimental analyses verify that PCM is an efficient way to physically model light-matter interactions. PMID:26371930

  17. Mobile transporter path planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baffes, Paul; Wang, Lui

    1990-01-01

    The use of a genetic algorithm (GA) for solving the mobile transporter path planning problem is investigated. The mobile transporter is a traveling robotic vehicle proposed for the space station which must be able to reach any point of the structure autonomously. Elements of the genetic algorithm are explored in both a theoretical and experimental sense. Specifically, double crossover, greedy crossover, and tournament selection techniques are examined. Additionally, the use of local optimization techniques working in concert with the GA are also explored. Recent developments in genetic algorithm theory are shown to be particularly effective in a path planning problem domain, though problem areas can be cited which require more research.

  18. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  19. Coherence-path duality relations for N paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillery, Mark; Bagan, Emilio; Bergou, Janos; Cottrell, Seth

    2016-05-01

    For an interferometer with two paths, there is a relation between the information about which path the particle took and the visibility of the interference pattern at the output. The more path information we have, the smaller the visibility, and vice versa. We generalize this relation to a multi-path interferometer, and we substitute two recently defined measures of quantum coherence for the visibility, which results in two duality relations. The path information is provided by attaching a detector to each path. In the first relation, which uses an l1 measure of coherence, the path information is obtained by applying the minimum-error state discrimination procedure to the detector states. In the second, which employs an entropic measure of coherence, the path information is the mutual information between the detector states and the result of measuring them. Both approaches are quantitative versions of complementarity for N-path interferometers. Support provided by the John Templeton Foundation.

  20. Following the Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodia, Becky

    2004-01-01

    This article profiles Diane Stanley, an author and illustrator of children's books. Although she was studying to be a medical illustrator in graduate school, Stanley's path changed when she got married and had children. As she was raising her children, she became increasingly enamored of the colorful children's books she would check out of the…

  1. An Unplanned Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarvey, Lynn M.; Sterenberg, Gladys Y.; Long, Julie S.

    2013-01-01

    The authors elucidate what they saw as three important challenges to overcome along the path to becoming elementary school mathematics teacher leaders: marginal interest in math, low self-confidence, and teaching in isolation. To illustrate how these challenges were mitigated, they focus on the stories of two elementary school teachers--Laura and…

  2. Fast orthogonal transforms and generation of Brownian paths

    PubMed Central

    Leobacher, Gunther

    2012-01-01

    We present a number of fast constructions of discrete Brownian paths that can be used as alternatives to principal component analysis and Brownian bridge for stratified Monte Carlo and quasi-Monte Carlo. By fast we mean that a path of length n can be generated in O(nlog(n)) floating point operations. We highlight some of the connections between the different constructions and we provide some numerical examples. PMID:23471545

  3. Broadband Phase Spectroscopy over Turbulent Air Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgetta, Fabrizio R.; Rieker, Gregory B.; Baumann, Esther; Swann, William C.; Sinclair, Laura C.; Kofler, Jon; Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan R.

    2015-09-01

    Broadband atmospheric phase spectra are acquired with a phase-sensitive dual-frequency-comb spectrometer by implementing adaptive compensation for the strong decoherence from atmospheric turbulence. The compensation is possible due to the pistonlike behavior of turbulence across a single spatial-mode path combined with the intrinsic frequency stability and high sampling speed associated with dual-comb spectroscopy. The atmospheric phase spectrum is measured across 2 km of air at each of the 70 000 comb teeth spanning 233 cm-1 across hundreds of near-infrared rovibrational resonances of CO2 , CH4 , and H2O with submilliradian uncertainty, corresponding to a 10-13 refractive index sensitivity. Trace gas concentrations extracted directly from the phase spectrum reach 0.7 ppm uncertainty, demonstrated here for CO2 . While conventional broadband spectroscopy only measures intensity absorption, this approach enables measurement of the full complex susceptibility even in practical open path sensing.

  4. Resonant absorption and not-so-resonant absorption in short, intense laser irradiated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Z. Y.; Zhuo, H. B.; Ma, Y. Y.; Yang, X. H.; Yu, T. P.; Zou, D. B.; Yin, Y.; Shao, F. Q.; Yu, W.; Luan, S. X.; Zhou, C. T.; Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 ; Peng, X. J.

    2013-07-15

    An analytical model for laser-plasma interaction during the oblique incidence by an ultrashort ultraintense p-polarized laser on a solid-density plasma is proposed. Both the resonant absorption and not-so-resonant absorption are self-consistently included. Different from the previous theoretical works, the physics of resonant absorption is found to be valid in more general conditions as the steepening of the electron density profile is considered. Even for a relativistic intensity laser, resonant absorption can still exist under certain plasma scale length. For shorter plasma scale length or higher laser intensity, the not-so-resonant absorption tends to be dominant, since the electron density is steepened to a critical level by the ponderomotive force. The laser energy absorption rates for both mechanisms are discussed in detail, and the difference and transition between these two mechanisms are presented.

  5. Absorption-line measurements of AGN outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Dale L.

    Investigations into the elemental abundances in two nearby active galaxies, the narrow-line Seyfert 1 Markarian 1044 and the Seyfert 1 Markarian 279, are reported. Spectra from three space-based observatories HST, FUSE, and CHANDRA, are used to measure absorption lines in material outflowing from the nucleus. I make multi-wavelength comparisons to better convert the ionic column densities into elemental column densities which can then be used to determine abundances (metallicities). Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies are known to have extreme values of a number of properties compared to active galactic nuclei (AGNs) as a class. In particular, emission-line studies have suggested that NLS1s are unusually metal-rich compared to broad-line AGNs of comparable luminosity. To test these suggestions I perform absorption-line studies on the NLS1 Markarian 1044, a nearby and bright AGN. I use lines of H I, C IV, N V, and O VI to properly make the photoionization correction through the software Cloudy and determine abundances of Carbon, Nitrogen and Oxygen. I find two results. The first is that Markarian 1044 has a bulk metallicity greater than five times solar. The second is that the N/C ratio in Markarian 1044 is consistent with a solar mixture. This is in direct contradiction of extrapolations from local H II regions which state N/ C should scale with bulk metallicity. This implies a different enrichment history in Markarian 1044 than in the Galactic disk. I also report discovery of three new low-redshift Lya forest lines with log N HI >= 12:77 in the spectrum of Markarian 1044. This number is consistent with the 2.6 expected Lya forest lines in the path length to Markarian 1044. I also investigate the CHANDRA X-ray spectrum of Markarian 279, a broad-line Seyfert 1. I use a new code, PHASE, to self-consistently model the entire absorption spectrum simultaneously. Using solely the X-ray spectrum I am able to determine the physical parameters of this absorber to a degree only

  6. Document Length Normalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singhal, Amit; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated document retrieval relevance based on document length in an experimental text collection. Topics include term weighting and document ranking, retrieval strategies such as the vector-space cosine match, and a modified technique called the pivoted cosine normalization. (LRW)

  7. AIR QUALITY MONITORING IN ATLANTA WITH THE DIFFERENTIAL OPTICAL ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    During July and August of 1990, a differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) made by OPSIS Inc. was used to measure gaseous air pollutants over three separate open paths in Atlanta, GA. ver path 1 (1099 m) and path 2 (1824 m), ozone (O3), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen d...

  8. Nonaffine chain and primitive path deformation in crosslinked polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, J. D.; Goulbourne, N. C.

    2016-08-01

    Chains in a polymer network deform nonaffinely at small length scales due to the ability for extensive microscopic rearrangement. Classically, the conformations of an individual chain can be described solely by an end-to-end length. This picture neglects interchain interactions and therefore does not represent the behavior of a real polymer network. The primitive path concept provides the additional detail to represent interchain entanglements, and techniques have recently been developed to identify the network of primitive paths in a polymer simulation. We use coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) to track both chain end-to-end and primitive path deformation in crosslinked polymer networks. The range of simulated materials includes short chain unentangled networks to long, entangled chain networks. Both chain end-to-end and primitive path length are found to be linear functions of the applied deformation, and a simple relationship describes the behavior of a network in response to large stretch uniaxial, pure shear, and equi-biaxial deformations. As expected, end-to-end chain length deformation is nonaffine for short chain networks, and becomes closer to affine for networks of long, entangled chains. However, primitive path deformation is found to always be nonaffine, even for long, entangled chains. We demonstrate how the microscopic constraints of crosslinks and entanglements affect nonaffine chain deformation as well as the simulated elastic behavior of the different networks.

  9. OPEN PATH AMBIENT MEASUREMENTS OF POLLUTANTS WITH A DOAS SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) has been in operation since August 1991 at the U.S. EPA in RTP, NC. he analyzer unit is located in an environmentally-controlled shelter in the EPA parking lot. our separate open optical paths have been established, ranging fr...

  10. Rapid Swept-Wavelength External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser for Open Path Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Brumfield, Brian E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-07-01

    A rapidly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser system is used for open path sensing. The system permits acquisition of transient absorption spectra over a 125 cm-1 tuning range in less than 0.01 s.

  11. Differential optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A differential optoacoustic absorption detector employed two tapered cells in tandem or in parallel. When operated in tandem, two mirrors were used at one end remote from the source of the beam of light directed into one cell back through the other, and a lens to focus the light beam into the one cell at a principal focus half way between the reflecting mirror. Each cell was tapered to conform to the shape of the beam so that the volume of one was the same as for the other, and the volume of each received maximum illumination. The axes of the cells were placed as close to each other as possible in order to connect a differential pressure detector to the cells with connecting passages of minimum length. An alternative arrangement employed a beam splitter and two lenses to operate the cells in parallel.

  12. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-01

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor. PMID:26938713

  13. [Concentration retrieving method of SO2 using differential optical absorption spectroscopy based on statistics].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Sun, Chang-Ku; Zhang, Chi; Zhao, Yu-Mei; Liu, Jun-Ping

    2011-01-01

    A concentration retrieving method using statistics is presented, which is applied in differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) for measuring the concentration of SO2. The method uses the standard deviation of the differential absorption to represents the gas concentration. Principle component analysis (PCA) method is used to process the differential absorption spectrum. In the method, the basis data for the concentration retrieval of SO2 is the combination of the PCA processing result, the correlation coefficient, and the standard deviation of the differential absorption. The method is applied to a continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) with optical path length of 0.3 m. Its measuring range for SO2 concentration is 0-5 800 mg x m(-3). The nonlinear calibration and the temperature compensation for the system were executed. The full scale error of the retrieving concentration is less than 0.7% FS. And the measuring result is -4.54 mg x m(-3) when the concentration of SO2 is zero. PMID:21428087

  14. Use of radial symmetry for the calculation of cylindrical absorption coefficients and optimal capillary loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Khalifah, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The problem of numerically evaluating absorption correction factors for cylindrical samples has been revisited using a treatment that fully takes advantage of the sample symmetry. It is shown that the path lengths for all points within the sample at all possible diffraction angles can be trivially determined once the angle-dependent distance distribution for a single line of points is calculated. This provides advantages in both computational efficiency and in gaining an intuitive understanding of the effects of absorption on diffraction data. A matrix of absorption coefficients calculated for µR products between 0 and 20 for diffraction angles θD of 0° to 90° were used to examine the influence of (1) capillary diameter and of (2) sample density on the overall scattered intensity as a function of diffraction angle, where µ is the linear absorption coefficient for the sample and R is the capillary radius. Based on this analysis, the optimal sample loading for a capillary experiment to maximize diffraction at angles of 0 – 50° is in general expected to be achieved when the maximum radius capillary compatible with the beam is used, and when the sample density is adjusted to be 3/(4µR) of its original density.

  15. Use of radial symmetry for the calculation of cylindrical absorption coefficients and optimal capillary loadings

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khalifah, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The problem of numerically evaluating absorption correction factors for cylindrical samples has been revisited using a treatment that fully takes advantage of the sample symmetry. It is shown that the path lengths for all points within the sample at all possible diffraction angles can be trivially determined once the angle-dependent distance distribution for a single line of points is calculated. This provides advantages in both computational efficiency and in gaining an intuitive understanding of the effects of absorption on diffraction data. A matrix of absorption coefficients calculated for µR products between 0 and 20 for diffraction angles θD of 0°more » to 90° were used to examine the influence of (1) capillary diameter and of (2) sample density on the overall scattered intensity as a function of diffraction angle, where µ is the linear absorption coefficient for the sample and R is the capillary radius. Based on this analysis, the optimal sample loading for a capillary experiment to maximize diffraction at angles of 0 – 50° is in general expected to be achieved when the maximum radius capillary compatible with the beam is used, and when the sample density is adjusted to be 3/(4µR) of its original density.« less

  16. Nonadiabatic transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, M. C.; Corcelli, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Fewest-switches surface hopping (FSSH) is combined with transition path sampling (TPS) to produce a new method called nonadiabatic path sampling (NAPS). The NAPS method is validated on a model electron transfer system coupled to a Langevin bath. Numerically exact rate constants are computed using the reactive flux (RF) method over a broad range of solvent frictions that span from the energy diffusion (low friction) regime to the spatial diffusion (high friction) regime. The NAPS method is shown to quantitatively reproduce the RF benchmark rate constants over the full range of solvent friction. Integrating FSSH within the TPS framework expands the applicability of both approaches and creates a new method that will be helpful in determining detailed mechanisms for nonadiabatic reactions in the condensed-phase.

  17. Nonadiabatic transition path sampling.

    PubMed

    Sherman, M C; Corcelli, S A

    2016-07-21

    Fewest-switches surface hopping (FSSH) is combined with transition path sampling (TPS) to produce a new method called nonadiabatic path sampling (NAPS). The NAPS method is validated on a model electron transfer system coupled to a Langevin bath. Numerically exact rate constants are computed using the reactive flux (RF) method over a broad range of solvent frictions that span from the energy diffusion (low friction) regime to the spatial diffusion (high friction) regime. The NAPS method is shown to quantitatively reproduce the RF benchmark rate constants over the full range of solvent friction. Integrating FSSH within the TPS framework expands the applicability of both approaches and creates a new method that will be helpful in determining detailed mechanisms for nonadiabatic reactions in the condensed-phase. PMID:27448877

  18. Four paths of competition

    SciTech Connect

    Studness, C.M.

    1995-05-01

    The financial community`s focus on utility competition has been riveted on the proceedings now in progress at state regulatory commissions. The fear that something immediately damaging will come out of these proceedings seems to have diminished in recent months, and the stock market has reacted favorably. However, regulatory developments are only one of four paths leading to competition; the others are the marketplace, the legislatures, and the courts. Each could play a critical role in the emergence of competition.

  19. Analysis for nonlinear inversion technique developed to estimate depth-distribution of absorption by spatially resolved backscattering measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Kazuhiro; Namita, Takeshi; Kato, Yuji; Shimizu, Koichi

    2015-03-01

    We have proposed a new nonlinear inversion technique to estimate the spatial distribution of the absorption coefficient (μa) in the depth direction of a turbid medium by spatially resolved backscattering measurement. With this technique, we can obtain cross-sectional image of μa as deep as the backscattered light traveled even when the transmitted light through the medium cannot be detected. In this technique, the depth distribution of absorption coefficient is determined by iterative calculation using the spatial path-length distribution (SPD) of traveled photons as a function of source-detector distance. In this calculation, the variance of path-length of many photons in each layer is also required. The SPD and the variance of path-length are obtained by Monte Carlo simulation using a known reduced scattering coefficient (μs'). Therefore, we need to know the μs' of the turbid medium beforehand. We have shown in computer simulation that this technique works well when the μs' is the typical values of mammalian body tissue, or 1.0 /mm. In this study, the accuracy of the μa estimation was analyzed and its dependence on the μs' was clarified quantitatively in various situations expected in practice. 10% deviations in μs' resulted in about 30% error in μa estimation, in average. This suggested that the measurement or the appropriate estimation of μs' is required to utilize the proposed technique effectively. Through this analysis, the effectiveness and the limitation of the newly proposed technique were clarified, and the problems to be solved were identified.

  20. PATHS groundwater hydrologic model

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.W.; Schur, J.A.

    1980-04-01

    A preliminary evaluation capability for two-dimensional groundwater pollution problems was developed as part of the Transport Modeling Task for the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP). Our approach was to use the data limitations as a guide in setting the level of modeling detail. PATHS Groundwater Hydrologic Model is the first level (simplest) idealized hybrid analytical/numerical model for two-dimensional, saturated groundwater flow and single component transport; homogeneous geology. This document consists of the description of the PATHS groundwater hydrologic model. The preliminary evaluation capability prepared for WISAP, including the enhancements that were made because of the authors' experience using the earlier capability is described. Appendixes A through D supplement the report as follows: complete derivations of the background equations are provided in Appendix A. Appendix B is a comprehensive set of instructions for users of PATHS. It is written for users who have little or no experience with computers. Appendix C is for the programmer. It contains information on how input parameters are passed between programs in the system. It also contains program listings and test case listing. Appendix D is a definition of terms.

  1. Spirit's Path to Bonneville

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Scientists created this overlay map by laying navigation and panoramic camera images taken from the surface of Mars on top of one of Spirit's descent images taken as the spacecraft descended to the martian surface. The map was created to help track the path that Spirit has traveled through sol 44 and to put into perspective the distance left to travel before reaching the edge of the large crater nicknamed 'Bonneville.'

    The area boxed in yellow contains the ground images that have been matched to and layered on top of the descent image. The yellow line shows the path that Spirit has traveled and the red dashed line shows the intended path for future sols. The blue circles highlight hollowed areas on the surface, such as Sleepy Hollow, near the lander, and Laguna Hollow, the sol 45 drive destination. Scientists use these hollowed areas - which can be seen in both the ground images and the descent image - to correctly match up the overlay.

    Field geologists on Earth create maps like this to assist them in tracking their observations.

  2. Very high finesse optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer for low concentration water vapor isotope analyses.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, J; Romanini, D; Kerstel, E

    2014-04-01

    So far, cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) has been based on optical cavities with a high finesse F that, however, has been limited by mirror reflectivity and by cavity transmission considerations to a few times 10,000. Here, we demonstrate a compact near-infrared optical-feedback CEAS instrument for water vapor isotope ratio measurements, with F>140,000. We show that this very high finesse can be effectively exploited to improve the detection sensitivity to the full extent predicted by the increased effective path length to reach a noise equivalent absorption sensitivity of 5.7×10(-11)  cm(-1) Hz(-1/2) for a full spectrum registration (including possible effects of interference fringes and fit model inadequacies). PMID:24686607

  3. Optimizing light absorption in a thin-film p-i-n solar cell using a quasi-periodic grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atalla, Mahmoud R. M.

    2014-03-01

    A p-i-n solar cell is best suited for strong absorbers with poor collection capabilities. However, the absorption naturally decreases at photon energies close to the electronic bandgap of the semiconductor. We hypothesized that a quasi-periodic surface textures in the role of diffraction gratings at the back contact can efficiently scatter light increasing the optical path length inside the absorber layer. The effect of quasi-periodic corrugated backing metallic contact of various types was studied theoretically. To help optimizing the design of the quasi periodic grating the corresponding canonical problem was considered. The absorption of light was calculated using the rigorous coupled-wave approach. The n- and i-layers consist of isotropic nonhomogeneous multilayered semiconductor.

  4. Far-from-equilibrium measurements of thermodynamic length

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Edward H.; Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-11-05

    Thermodynamic length is a path function that generalizes the notion of length to the surface of thermodynamic states. Here, we show how to measure thermodynamic length in far-from-equilibrium experiments using the work fluctuation relations. For these microscopic systems, it proves necessary to define the thermodynamic length in terms of the Fisher information. Consequently, the thermodynamic length can be directly related to the magnitude of fluctuations about equilibrium. The work fluctuation relations link the work and the free energy change during an external perturbation on a system. We use this result to determine equilibrium averages at intermediate points of the protocol in which the system is out-of-equilibrium. This allows us to extend Bennett's method to determine the potential of mean force, as well as the thermodynamic length, in single molecule experiments.

  5. Method for Veterbi decoding of large constraint length convolutional codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, In-Shek (Inventor); Truong, Trieu-Kie (Inventor); Reed, Irving S. (Inventor); Jing, Sun (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A new method of Viterbi decoding of convolutional codes lends itself to a pipline VLSI architecture using a single sequential processor to compute the path metrics in the Viterbi trellis. An array method is used to store the path information for NK intervals where N is a number, and K is constraint length. The selected path at the end of each NK interval is then selected from the last entry in the array. A trace-back method is used for returning to the beginning of the selected path back, i.e., to the first time unit of the interval NK to read out the stored branch metrics of the selected path which correspond to the message bits. The decoding decision made in this way is no longer maximum likelihood, but can be almost as good, provided that constraint length K in not too small. The advantage is that for a long message, it is not necessary to provide a large memory to store the trellis derived information until the end of the message to select the path that is to be decoded; the selection is made at the end of every NK time unit, thus decoding a long message in successive blocks.

  6. APPLYING OPEN-PATH OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY TO HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Non-dispersive infrared absorption has been used to measure gaseous emissions for both stationary and mobile sources. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy has been used for stationary sources as both extractive and open-path methods. We have applied the open-path method for bo...

  7. On the significant enhancement of the continuum-collision induced absorption in H2O+CO2 mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Yu. I.

    2016-05-01

    The IR spectra of water vapor-carbon dioxide mixtures as well as the spectra of pure gas samples have been recorded using a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer at a resolution of 0.1 cm-1 in order to explore the effect of colliding CO2 and H2O molecules on their continuum absorptions. The sample temperatures were 294, 311, 325 and 339 K. Measurements have been conducted at several different water vapor partial pressures depending on the cell temperature. Carbon dioxide pressures were kept close to the three values of 103, 207 and 311 kPa (1.02, 2.04 and 3.07 atm). The path length used in the study was 100 m. It was established that, in the region around 1100 cm-1, the continuum absorption coefficient C H2 O + CO2 is about 20 times stronger than the water-nitrogen continuum absorption coefficient CH2O+N2. On the other hand, in the far wing region (2500 cm-1) of the ν3 CO2 fundamental band, the binary absorption coefficient CCO2+H2O appears to be about one order of magnitude stronger than the absorption coefficient CCO2+CO2 in pure carbon dioxide. The continuum interpretation and the main problem of molecular band shape formation are discussed in light of these experimental facts.

  8. Research on absorption test methods of Yb-doped double cladding fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pupu; Li, Rundong; Rong, Liang; Ji, Wei; Gao, Yankun; Jiang, Cong; Gu, Shaoyi

    2016-01-01

    Absorption coefficient is a very useful feature for active fiber. In fiber laser system, the length of active fiber is chosen according to absorption coefficient. And the length of fiber can directly influence the feature of fiber laser. Therefore, how to obtain an accurate absorption coefficient is very important. Because fiber exists re-emission in typical absorption band pumped by power. It is difficult to accurately measure absorption coefficient. The absorption coefficients of Yb-doped double cladding fiber at 975 nm measured by several methods were compared. In conclusion, for the fibers with same length pumped by white light, the absorption coefficient is the highest when cutback only once. Meanwhile, when fibers with different length were measured by the same method, the absorption coefficient is inversely proportional to optical fiber length.

  9. "Albedo dome": a method for measuring spectral flux-reflectance in a laboratory for media with long optical paths.

    PubMed

    Light, Bonnie; Carns, Regina C; Warren, Stephen G

    2015-06-10

    A method is presented for accurate measurement of spectral flux-reflectance (albedo) in a laboratory, for media with long optical path lengths, such as snow and ice. The approach uses an acrylic hemispheric dome, which, when placed over the surface being studied, serves two functions: (i) it creates an overcast "sky" to illuminate the target surface from all directions within a hemisphere, and (ii) serves as a platform for measuring incident and backscattered spectral radiances, which can be integrated to obtain fluxes. The fluxes are relative measurements and because their ratio is used to determine flux-reflectance, no absolute radiometric calibrations are required. The dome and surface must meet minimum size requirements based on the scattering properties of the surface. This technique is suited for media with long photon path lengths since the backscattered illumination is collected over a large enough area to include photons that reemerge from the domain far from their point of entry because of multiple scattering and small absorption. Comparison between field and laboratory albedo of a portable test surface demonstrates the viability of this method. PMID:26192823

  10. Critical Path Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Judith L.; Charles, John B.; Rummel, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Approximately three years ago, the Agency's lead center for the human elements of spaceflight (the Johnson Space Center), along with the National Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) (which has the lead role in developing countermeasures) initiated an activity to identify the most critical risks confronting extended human spaceflight. Two salient factors influenced this activity: first, what information is needed to enable a "go/no go" decision to embark on extended human spaceflight missions; and second, what knowledge and capabilities are needed to address known and potential health, safety and performance risks associated with such missions. A unique approach was used to first define and assess those risks, and then to prioritize them. This activity was called the Critical Path Roadmap (CPR) and it represents an opportunity to develop and implement a focused and evolving program of research and technology designed from a "risk reduction" perspective to prevent or minimize the risks to humans exposed to the space environment. The Critical Path Roadmap provides the foundation needed to ensure that human spaceflight, now and in the future, is as safe, productive and healthy as possible (within the constraints imposed on any particular mission) regardless of mission duration or destination. As a tool, the Critical Path Roadmap enables the decisionmaker to select from among the demonstrated or potential risks those that are to be mitigated, and the completeness of that mitigation. The primary audience for the CPR Web Site is the members of the scientific community who are interested in the research and technology efforts required for ensuring safe and productive human spaceflight. They may already be informed about the various space life sciences research programs or they may be newcomers. Providing the CPR content to potential investigators increases the probability of their delivering effective risk mitigations. Others who will use the CPR Web Site and its content

  11. Critical Path Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Judith L.; Charles, John B.; Rummel, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Approximately three years ago, the Agency's lead center for the human elements of spaceflight (the Johnson Space Center), along with the National Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) (which has the lead role in developing countermeasures) initiated an activity to identify the most critical risks confronting extended human spaceflight. Two salient factors influenced this activity: first, what information is needed to enable a "go/no go" decision to embark on extended human spaceflight missions; and second, what knowledge and capabilities are needed to address known and potential health, safety and performance risks associated with such missions. A unique approach was used to first define and assess those risks, and then to prioritize them. This activity was called the Critical Path Roadmap (CPR) and it represents an opportunity to develop and implement a focused and evolving program of research and technology designed from a "risk reduction" perspective to prevent or minimize the risks to humans exposed to the space environment. The Critical Path Roadmap provides the foundation needed to ensure that human spaceflight, now and in the future, is as safe, productive and healthy as possible (within the constraints imposed on any particular mission) regardless of mission duration or destination. As a tool, the Critical Path Roadmap enables the decision maker to select from among the demonstrated or potential risks those that are to be mitigated, and the completeness of that mitigation. The primary audience for the CPR Web Site is the members of the scientific community who are interested in the research and technology efforts required for ensuring safe and productive human spaceflight. They may already be informed about the various space life sciences research programs or they may be newcomers. Providing the CPR content to potential investigators increases the probability of their delivering effective risk mitigations. Others who will use the CPR Web Site and its

  12. Thermoalgebras and path integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, F. C.; Malbouisson, A. P. C.; Malbouisson, J. M. C.; Santana, A. E.

    2009-09-01

    Using a representation for Lie groups closely associated with thermal problems, we derive the algebraic rules of the real-time formalism for thermal quantum field theories, the so-called thermo-field dynamics (TFD), including the tilde conjugation rules for interacting fields. These thermo-group representations provide a unified view of different approaches for finite-temperature quantum fields in terms of a symmetry group. On these grounds, a path integral formalism is constructed, using Bogoliubov transformations, for bosons, fermions and non-abelian gauge fields. The generalization of the results for quantum fields in (S1)d×R topology is addressed.

  13. Path Integrals and Supersolids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceperley, D. M.

    2008-11-01

    Recent experiments by Kim and Chan on solid 4He have been interpreted as discovery of a supersolid phase of matter. Arguments based on wavefunctions have shown that such a phase exists, but do not necessarily apply to solid 4He. Imaginary time path integrals, implemented using Monte Carlo methods, provide a definitive answer; a clean system of solid 4He should be a normal quantum solid, not one with superfluid properties. The Kim-Chan phenomena must be due to defects introduced when the solid is formed.

  14. JAVA PathFinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehhtz, Peter

    2005-01-01

    JPF is an explicit state software model checker for Java bytecode. Today, JPF is a swiss army knife for all sort of runtime based verification purposes. This basically means JPF is a Java virtual machine that executes your program not just once (like a normal VM), but theoretically in all possible ways, checking for property violations like deadlocks or unhandled exceptions along all potential execution paths. If it finds an error, JPF reports the whole execution that leads to it. Unlike a normal debugger, JPF keeps track of every step how it got to the defect.

  15. Portage and Path Dependence*

    PubMed Central

    Bleakley, Hoyt; Lin, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    We examine portage sites in the U.S. South, Mid-Atlantic, and Midwest, including those on the fall line, a geomorphological feature in the southeastern U.S. marking the final rapids on rivers before the ocean. Historically, waterborne transport of goods required portage around the falls at these points, while some falls provided water power during early industrialization. These factors attracted commerce and manufacturing. Although these original advantages have long since been made obsolete, we document the continuing importance of these portage sites over time. We interpret these results as path dependence and contrast explanations based on sunk costs interacting with decreasing versus increasing returns to scale. PMID:23935217

  16. Portage and Path Dependence.

    PubMed

    Bleakley, Hoyt; Lin, Jeffrey

    2012-05-01

    We examine portage sites in the U.S. South, Mid-Atlantic, and Midwest, including those on the fall line, a geomorphological feature in the southeastern U.S. marking the final rapids on rivers before the ocean. Historically, waterborne transport of goods required portage around the falls at these points, while some falls provided water power during early industrialization. These factors attracted commerce and manufacturing. Although these original advantages have long since been made obsolete, we document the continuing importance of these portage sites over time. We interpret these results as path dependence and contrast explanations based on sunk costs interacting with decreasing versus increasing returns to scale. PMID:23935217

  17. Length of stain dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Payload customers for the Space Shuttle have recently expressed concerns about the possibility of their payloads at an adjacent pad being contaminated by plume effluents from a shuttle at an active pad as they await launch on an inactive pad. As part of a study to satisfy such concerns a ring of inexpensive dosimeters was deployed around the active pad at the inter-pad distance. However, following a launch, dosimeters cannot be read for several hours after the exposure. As a consequence factors such as different substrates, solvent systems, and possible volatilization of HCl from the badges were studied. This observation led to the length of stain (LOS) dosimeters of this invention. Commercial passive LOS dosimeters are sensitive only to the extent of being capable of sensing 2 ppm to 20 ppm if the exposure is 8 hours. To map and quantitate the HCl generated by Shuttle launches, and in the atmosphere within a radius of 1.5 miles from the active pad, a sensitivity of 2 ppm HCl in the atmospheric gases on an exposure of 5 minutes is required. A passive length of stain dosimeter has been developed having a sensitivity rendering it capable of detecting a gas in a concentration as low as 2 ppm on an exposure of five minutes.

  18. Open-Path High Sensitivity Atmospheric Ammonia Sensing with a Quantum Cascade Laser Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D. J.; Dirisu, A.; Rafferty, K.; Parkes, B.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric trace-gas sensing with quantum cascade laser (QCL) spectroscopy offers the potential for high sensitivity, fast, selective mid-infrared absorption measurements of atmospheric species such as ammonia (NH3). As the third most abundant nitrogen species and most gaseous base in the atmosphere, ammonia plays important roles in neutralizing acidic species and as a gas-phase precursor to ammoniated fine particulate matter. High precision gas phase measurements are necessary to constrain highly uncertain emission sources and sinks with implications for understanding how chemical components of fine particulate matter affect air quality and climate as well as nitrogen deposition to ecosystems. Conventional ammonia sensors employing chemical ionization, denuder or filter techniques are labor-intensive, not gas-selective and exhibit low time resolution. As an advantageous alternative to conventional measurement techniques, we develop an open-path quantum cascade laser-based ammonia sensor operating at 9.06 μm for ground-based measurements. A continuous wave, thermoelectrically cooled quantum cascade laser is used to perform wavelength modulation absorption spectroscopy (WMS). Room-temperature, unattended operation with minimal surface adsorption effects due to the open-path configuration represent significant improvements over cryogenically cooled, closed path systems. The feasibility of a cylindrical mirror multi-pass optical cell for achieving long path lengths near 50 m in a compact design is also assessed. Meaningful ammonia measurements require fast sub-ppbv detection limits due to ammonia’s large dynamic range and temporal and spatial atmospheric variability. When fully developed, our instrument will achieve high time resolution (up to 10 Hz) measurements with ammonia detection limits in the 100 pptv range. Initial results include ambient laboratory ammonia detection at 58 ppbv relative to a 0.4% ammonia reference cell based on the WMS signal integrated

  19. Internet's critical path horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, S.; Solé, R. V.

    2004-03-01

    Internet is known to display a highly heterogeneous structure and complex fluctuations in its traffic dynamics. Congestion seems to be an inevitable result of user's behavior coupled to the network dynamics and it effects should be minimized by choosing appropriate routing strategies. But what are the requirements of routing depth in order to optimize the traffic flow? In this paper we analyse the behavior of Internet traffic with a topologically realistic spatial structure as described in a previous study [S.-H. Yook et al., Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 99, 13382 (2002)]. The model involves self-regulation of packet generation and different levels of routing depth. It is shown that it reproduces the relevant key, statistical features of Internet's traffic. Moreover, we also report the existence of a critical path horizon defining a transition from low-efficient traffic to highly efficient flow. This transition is actually a direct consequence of the web's small world architecture exploited by the routing algorithm. Once routing tables reach the network diameter, the traffic experiences a sudden transition from a low-efficient to a highly-efficient behavior. It is conjectured that routing policies might have spontaneously reached such a compromise in a distributed manner. Internet would thus be operating close to such critical path horizon.

  20. Hausdorff dimension of a particle path in a quantum manifold

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolini, Piero; Niedner, Benjamin

    2011-01-15

    After recalling the concept of the Hausdorff dimension, we study the fractal properties of a quantum particle path. As a novelty we consider the possibility for the space where the particle propagates to be endowed with a quantum-gravity-induced minimal length. We show that the Hausdorff dimension accounts for both the quantum mechanics uncertainty and manifold fluctuations. In addition the presence of a minimal length breaks the self-similarity property of the erratic path of the quantum particle. Finally we establish a universal property of the Hausdorff dimension as well as the spectral dimension: They both depend on the amount of resolution loss which affects both the path and the manifold when quantum gravity fluctuations occur.

  1. An Optimal Level of Adding Edges for a Simple Path to a Complete K-ary Tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Kiyoshi

    2010-10-01

    This study proposes a model of adding edges of forming a simple path to a level of depth N in a complete K-ary (K≥3) tree of height H under giving priority to edges between two nodes of which the deepest common ancestor is deeper. An optimal depth N* is obtained by maximizing the total shortening path length which is the sum of shortening lengths of shortest paths between every pair of all nodes in the complete K-ary tree.

  2. Long-path measurement of atmospheric NO2 with an obstruction flashlight and a charge-coupled-device spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Yotsumi; Kuze, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Nobuo

    2003-07-20

    A novel method of differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) is proposed and demonstrated to monitor the concentration of atmospheric pollutant gas. In contrast to conventional DOAS measurements with continuous light sources, the present method relies on white flashlights such as aviation obstruction lights that are generally installed on tall constructions. A simple detection system is devised by means of a telescope and a compact CCD spectrometer. A path length of 5.5 km allows us to measure atmospheric NO2 concentration with a detection limit of approximately 1 part per billion. We also discuss the possibility of deriving the aerosol optical thickness through the horizontal atmosphere from this pulsed DOAS measurement. PMID:12921286

  3. 757 Path Loss Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, Kent; Huffman, Mitch; Eppic, Brian; White, Harrison

    2005-01-01

    Path Loss Measurements were obtained on three (3) GPS equipped 757 aircraft. Systems measured were Marker Beacon, LOC, VOR, VHF (3), Glide Slope, ATC (2), DME (2), TCAS, and GPS. This data will provide the basis for assessing the EMI (Electromagnetic Interference) safety margins of comm/nav (communication and navigation) systems to portable electronic device emissions. These Portable Electronic Devices (PEDs) include all devices operated in or around the aircraft by crews, passengers, servicing personnel, as well as the general public in the airport terminals. EMI assessment capability is an important step in determining if one system-wide PED EMI policy is appropriate. This data may also be used comparatively with theoretical analysis and computer modeling data sponsored by NASA Langley Research Center and others.

  4. Active differential optical absorption spectroscopy for NO2 gas pollution using blue light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljalal, Abdulaziz; Gasmi, Khaled; Al-Basheer, Watheq

    2015-05-01

    Availability of high intensity light emitting diodes in the blue region offer excellent opportunity for using them in active Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) to detect air pollution. Their smooth and relatively broad spectral emissions as well as their long life make them almost ideal light sources for active DOAS. In this study, we report the usage of a blue light emitting diode in an active DOAS setup to measure traces of NO2 gas and achieving few parts per billion detection limit for a path length of 300 m. Details of the setup will be presented along with the effects on measurement accuracy due to shifts in the measured spectra calibration and due to using theoretical instrument Gaussian function instead of the measured instrument function.

  5. Gas cell for in situ soft X-ray transmission-absorption spectroscopy of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drisdell, W. S.; Kortright, J. B.

    2014-07-15

    A simple gas cell design, constructed primarily from commercially available components, enables in situ soft X-ray transmission-absorption spectroscopy of materials in contact with gas at ambient temperature. The cell has a minimum X-ray path length of 1 mm and can hold gas pressures up to ∼300 Torr, and could support higher pressures with simple modifications. The design enables cycling between vacuum and gas environments without interrupting the X-ray beam, and can be fully sealed to allow for measurements of air-sensitive samples. The cell can attach to the downstream port of any appropriate synchrotron beamline, and offers a robust and versatile method for in situ measurements of certain materials. The construction and operation of the cell are discussed, as well as sample preparation and proper spectral analysis, illustrated by examples of spectral measurements. Potential areas for improvement and modification for specialized applications are also mentioned.

  6. Effective utilization of quantum-cascade distributed-feedback lasers in absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosterev, A. A.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Gmachl, C.; Capasso, F.; Sivco, D. L.; Baillargeon, J. N.; Hutchinson, A. L.; Cho, A. Y.

    2000-01-01

    A variable duty cycle quasi-cw frequency scanning technique was applied to reduce thermal effects resulting from the high heat dissipation of type I quantum-cascade lasers. This technique was combined with a 100-m path-length multipass cell and a zero-air background-subtraction technique to enhance detection sensitivity to a parts-in-10(9) (ppb) concentration level for spectroscopic trace-gas detection of CH4, N2O, H2O, and C2H5OH in ambient air at 7.9 micrometers. A new technique for analysis of dense high resolution absorption spectra was applied to detection of ethanol in ambient air, yielding a 125-ppb detection limit.

  7. Interactive cutting path analysis programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiner, J. M.; Williams, D. S.; Colley, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    The operation of numerically controlled machine tools is interactively simulated. Four programs were developed to graphically display the cutting paths for a Monarch lathe, Cintimatic mill, Strippit sheet metal punch, and the wiring path for a Standard wire wrap machine. These programs are run on a IMLAC PDS-ID graphic display system under the DOS-3 disk operating system. The cutting path analysis programs accept input via both paper tape and disk file.

  8. Long-range open-path greenhouse gas monitoring using mid-infrared laser dispersion spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daghestani, Nart; Brownsword, Richard; Weidmann, Damien

    2015-04-01

    Accurate and sensitive methods of monitoring greenhouse gas (GHG) emission over large areas has become a pressing need to deliver improved estimates of both human-made and natural GHG budgets. These needs relate to a variety of sectors including environmental monitoring, energy, oil and gas industry, waste management, biogenic emission characterization, and leak detection. To address the needs, long-distance open-path laser spectroscopy methods offer significant advantages in terms of temporal resolution, sensitivity, compactness and cost effectiveness. Path-integrated mixing ratio measurements stemming from long open-path laser spectrometers can provide emission mapping when combined with meteorological data and/or through tomographic approaches. Laser absorption spectroscopy is the predominant method of detecting gasses over long integrated path lengths. The development of dispersion spectrometers measuring tiny refractive index changes, rather than optical power transmission, may offer a set of specific advantages1. These include greater immunity to laser power fluctuations, greater dynamic range due to the linearity of dispersion, and ideally a zero baseline signal easing quantitative retrievals of path integrated mixing ratios. Chirped laser dispersion spectrometers (CLaDS) developed for the monitoring of atmospheric methane and carbon dioxide will be presented. Using quantum cascade laser as the source, a minimalistic and compact system operating at 7.8 μm has been developed and demonstrated for the monitoring of atmospheric methane over a 90 meter open path2. Through full instrument modelling and error propagation analysis, precision of 3 ppm.m.Hz-0.5 has been established (one sigma precision for atmospheric methane normalized over a 1 m path and 1 s measurement duration). The system was fully functional in the rain, sleet, and moderate fog. The physical model and system concept of CLaDS can be adapted to any greenhouse gas species. Currently we are

  9. Slip length crossover on a graphene surface

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel

    2015-04-07

    Using equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we study the flow of argon fluid above the critical temperature in a planar nanochannel delimited by graphene walls. We observe that, as a function of pressure, the slip length first decreases due to the decreasing mean free path of gas molecules, reaches the minimum value when the pressure is close to the critical pressure, and then increases with further increase in pressure. We demonstrate that the slip length increase at high pressures is due to the fact that the viscosity of fluid increases much faster with pressure than the friction coefficient between the fluid and the graphene. This behavior is clearly exhibited in the case of graphene due to a very smooth potential landscape originating from a very high atomic density of graphene planes. By contrast, on surfaces with lower atomic density, such as an (100) Au surface, the slip length for high fluid pressures is essentially zero, regardless of the nature of interaction between fluid and the solid wall.

  10. Near infrared cavity enhanced absorption spectra of atmospherically relevant ether-1, 4-Dioxane.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Satheesh; Varma, Ravi

    2016-01-15

    1, 4-Dioxane (DX) is a commonly found ether in industrially polluted atmosphere. The near infrared absorption spectra of this compound has been recorded in the region 5900-8230 cm(-1) with a resolution of 0.08 cm(-1) using a novel Fourier transform incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer (FT-IBBCEAS). All recorded spectra were found to contain regions that are only weakly perturbed. The possible combinations of fundamental modes and their overtone bands corresponding to selected regions in the measured spectra are tabulated. Two interesting spectral regions were identified as 5900-6400 cm(-1) and 8100-8230 cm(-1). No significant spectral interference due to presence of water vapor was observed suggesting the suitability of these spectral signatures for spectroscopic in situ detection of DX. The technique employed here is much more sensitive than standard Fourier transform spectrometer measurements on account of long effective path length achieved. Hence significant enhancement of weaker absorption lines above the noise level was observed as demonstrated by comparison with an available measurement from database. PMID:26474242

  11. Near infrared cavity enhanced absorption spectra of atmospherically relevant ether-1, 4-Dioxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Satheesh; Varma, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    1, 4-Dioxane (DX) is a commonly found ether in industrially polluted atmosphere. The near infrared absorption spectra of this compound has been recorded in the region 5900-8230 cm- 1 with a resolution of 0.08 cm- 1 using a novel Fourier transform incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer (FT-IBBCEAS). All recorded spectra were found to contain regions that are only weakly perturbed. The possible combinations of fundamental modes and their overtone bands corresponding to selected regions in the measured spectra are tabulated. Two interesting spectral regions were identified as 5900-6400 cm- 1 and 8100-8230 cm- 1. No significant spectral interference due to presence of water vapor was observed suggesting the suitability of these spectral signatures for spectroscopic in situ detection of DX. The technique employed here is much more sensitive than standard Fourier transform spectrometer measurements on account of long effective path length achieved. Hence significant enhancement of weaker absorption lines above the noise level was observed as demonstrated by comparison with an available measurement from database.

  12. Direct single-mode fibre-coupled miniature White cell for laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnreich, Benjamin; Höh, Matthias; Wagner, Steven; Ebert, Volker

    2016-02-01

    We present the design, setup, and characterization of a new lens-free fibre-coupled miniature White cell for extractive gas analysis using direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS). The construction of this cell is based on a modified White cell design and allows for an easy variation of the absorption length in the range from 29 cm to 146 cm. The design avoids parasitic absorption paths outside the cell by using direct, lensless fibre coupling and allows small physical cell dimensions and cell volumes. To characterize the cell performance, different H2O and CH4 concentration levels were measured using dTDLAS. Detection limits of 2.5 ppm ṡ m for CH4 (at 1.65 μm) and 1.3 ppm ṡ m for H2O (at 1.37 μm) were achieved. In addition, the gas exchange time and its flow-rate dependence were determined for both species and found to be less than 15 s for CH4 and up to a factor of thirteen longer for H2O.

  13. Kinetic paths, time scale, and underlying landscapes: A path integral framework to study global natures of nonequilibrium systems and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Erkwang

    2010-09-01

    We developed a general framework to quantify three key ingredients for dynamics of nonequilibrium systems through path integrals in length space. First, we identify dominant kinetic paths as the ones with optimal weights, leading to effective reduction of dimensionality or degrees of freedom from exponential to polynomial so large systems can be treated. Second, we uncover the underlying nonequilibrium potential landscapes from the explorations of the state space through kinetic paths. We apply our framework to a specific example of nonequilibrium network system: lambda phage genetic switch. Two distinct basins of attractions emerge. The dominant kinetic paths from one basin to another are irreversible and do not follow the usual steepest descent or gradient path along the landscape. It reflects the fact that the dynamics of nonequilibrium systems is not just determined by potential gradient but also the residual curl flux force, suggesting experiments to test theoretical predictions. Third, we have calculated dynamic transition time scales from one basin to another critical for stability of the system through instantons. Theoretical predictions are in good agreements with wild type and mutant experiments. We further uncover the correlations between the kinetic transition time scales and the underlying landscape topography: the barrier heights along the dominant paths. We found that both the dominant paths and the landscape are relatively robust against the influences of external environmental perturbations and the system tends to dissipate less with less fluctuations. Our general framework can be applied to other nonequilibrium systems.

  14. Quantum cascade laser-based multipass absorption system for hydrogen peroxide detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yingchun; Sanchez, Nancy P.; Jiang, Wenzhe; Ren, Wei; Lewicki, Rafal; Jiang, Dongfang; Griffin, Robert J.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a relevant molecular trace gas species, that is related to the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, the production of radical species such as OH, the generation of sulfate aerosol via oxidation of S(IV) to S(VI), and the formation of acid rain. The detection of atmospheric H2O2 involves specific challenges due to its high reactivity and low concentration (ppbv to sub-ppbv level). Traditional methods for measuring atmospheric H2O2 concentration are often based on wet-chemistry methods that require a transfer from the gas- to liquid-phase for a subsequent determination by techniques such as fluorescence spectroscopy, which can lead to problems such as sampling artifacts and interference by other atmospheric constituents. A quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy-based system for the measurement of atmospheric H2O2 with a detection limit of 75 ppb for 1-s integration time was previously reported. In this paper, an updated H2O2 detection system based on long-optical-path-length absorption spectroscopy by using a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB-QCL) will be described. A 7.73-μm CW-DFB-QCL and a thermoelectrically cooled infrared detector, optimized for a wavelength of 8 μm, are employed for theH2O2 sensor system. A commercial astigmatic Herriott multi-pass cell with an effective optical path-length of 76 m is utilized for the reported QCL multipass absorption system. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) with second harmonic detection is used for enhancing the signal-to-noise-ratio. A minimum detection limit of 13.4 ppb is achieved with a 2 s sampling time. Based on an Allan-Werle deviation analysis the minimum detection limit can be improved to 1.5 ppb when using an averaging time of 300 s.

  15. An advanced open-path atmospheric monitor design

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.; Suhre, D.; Mech, S.

    1996-05-01

    The conceptual design of an open-path atmospheric monitor combines an acousto-optic tunable filter for emission spectroscopy (3-14 {mu}m) with a mid-IR (4.6-5.4 {mu}m) for absorption spectroscopy. It utilizes mostly commercially available components, covers a large area ({approximately}4 km radius), measures the distance to any reflecting object, can take measurements along any line-of-sight, and is eye safe. Of twenty test pollutants it is to detect, the concentrations of all twenty will be measurable via emission spectroscopy and ten by the more sensitive absorption spectroscopy.

  16. Far infrared multiple-path cell without internal mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marteau, Ph.; Obriot, J.

    1990-11-01

    A mirrorless multiple path cell which can be efficiently used in the FIR is described. The device is based on the White cell and light pipe methods, and requires no setup even after cooling. It is shown how the system can be efficiently operated if certain geometrical conditions are maintained which ensure a uniform light energy distribution inside the cell. The optimization of some physical parameters is discussed, and it is shown that an effective absorption pathlength as long as 4 or 5 m can be obtained with a simple absorption cell which is 10 cm long. The FIR spectrum of CH4 obtained using the cell is presented.

  17. Design of a simple cryogenic system for ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy with a back-reflectance fiber optic probe.

    PubMed

    Vinyard, Andrew; Hansen, Kaj A; Byrd, Ross; Stuart, Douglas A; Hansen, John E

    2014-01-01

    We report a convenient and inexpensive technique for the rapid acquisition of absorption spectra from small samples at cryogenic temperatures using a home built cryostat with novel collection optics. A cylindrical copper block was constructed with a coaxial bore to hold a 4.00 mm diameter electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) tube and mounted on a copper feed in thermal contact with liquid nitrogen. A 6.35 mm diameter hole was bored into the side of the cylinder so a fiber optic cable bundle could be positioned orthogonally to the EPR tube. The light passing through the sample is reflected off of the opposing surfaces of the EPR tube and surrounding copper, back through the sample. The emergent light is then collected using the fiber optic bundle and analyzed using a dispersive spectrometer. Absorption spectra for KMnO4 were measured between 400 and 700 nm. Absorption intensity at 506, 525, 545, and 567 nm was found to be proportional to concentration, displaying Beer's law-like behavior. The EPR tube had an internal diameter of 3.2 mm; the double pass of the probe beam through the sample affords a central path length of about 6.4 mm. Comparing these measurements with those recorded on a conventional tabletop spectrometer using a cuvette with a 10.00 mm path length, we consistently found a ratio between intensities of 0.58 rather than the anticipated 0.64. These 6% smaller values we attribute to the curvature of the EPR tube and transmission/reflection losses. This system is particularly well-suited to studying the kinetics and dynamics of chemical reactions at cryogenic temperatures. The rapid response (100 ms) and multiplex advantage provided the opportunity of recording simultaneous time courses at several wavelengths following initiation of a chemical reaction with a pulsed laser source. PMID:24405962

  18. Development of a Near-Ir Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectrometer for the Detection of Atmospheric Oxidation Products and Organoamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddingsaas, Nathan C.; Jewell, Breanna; Thurnherr, Emily

    2014-06-01

    An estimated 10,000 to 100,000 different compounds have been measured in the atmosphere, each one undergoes many oxidation reactions that may or may not degrade air quality. To date, the fate of even some of the most abundant hydrocarbons in the atmosphere is poorly understood. One difficulty is the detection of atmospheric oxidation products that are very labile and decompose during analysis. To study labile species under atmospheric conditions, a highly sensitive, non-destructive technique is needed. Here we describe a near-IR incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) setup that we are developing to meet this end. We have chosen to utilize the near-IR, where vibrational overtone absorptions are observed, due to the clean spectral windows and better spectral separation of absorption features. In one spectral window we can simultaneously and continuously monitor the composition of alcohols, hydroperoxides, and carboxylic acids in an air mass. In addition, we have used our CEAS setup to detect organoamines. The long effective path length of CEAS allows for low detection limits, even of the overtone absorption features, at ppb and ppt levels.

  19. Sensor for headspace pressure and H2O concentration measurements in closed vials by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Tingdong; Wang, Guishi; Cao, Zhensong; Zhang, Weijun; Gao, Xiaoming

    2014-07-01

    The concentration of H2O and the pressure in the headspace of vials are simultaneously measured by a tunable diode laser sensor based on absorption spectroscopy techniques. The 7168.437 cm-1 spectral line of H2O is chosen as the sensing transition for its strong absorption strength and being reasonably far away from its neighboring molecular transitions. In order to prevent interference absorption by ambient water vapor in the room air, a difference between the measured signal and the referenced signal is used to calculate the pressure and H2O concentration in the headspace of vials, eliminating the need for inert gas purges and calibration with known gas. The validation of the sensor is conducted in a static vial, yielding an accuracy of 1.23% for pressure and 3.81% for H2O concentration. The sensitivity of the sensor is estimated to be about 2.5 Torr for pressure and 400 ppm for H2O concentration over a 3 cm absorption path length respectively. Accurate measurements for commercial freeze-dried products demonstrate the in-line applications of the sensor for the pharmaceutical industry.

  20. Reconfigurable data path processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohoe, Gregory (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A reconfigurable data path processor comprises a plurality of independent processing elements. Each of the processing elements advantageously comprising an identical architecture. Each processing element comprises a plurality of data processing means for generating a potential output. Each processor is also capable of through-putting an input as a potential output with little or no processing. Each processing element comprises a conditional multiplexer having a first conditional multiplexer input, a second conditional multiplexer input and a conditional multiplexer output. A first potential output value is transmitted to the first conditional multiplexer input, and a second potential output value is transmitted to the second conditional multiplexer output. The conditional multiplexer couples either the first conditional multiplexer input or the second conditional multiplexer input to the conditional multiplexer output, according to an output control command. The output control command is generated by processing a set of arithmetic status-bits through a logical mask. The conditional multiplexer output is coupled to a first processing element output. A first set of arithmetic bits are generated according to the processing of the first processable value. A second set of arithmetic bits may be generated from a second processing operation. The selection of the arithmetic status-bits is performed by an arithmetic-status bit multiplexer selects the desired set of arithmetic status bits from among the first and second set of arithmetic status bits. The conditional multiplexer evaluates the select arithmetic status bits according to logical mask defining an algorithm for evaluating the arithmetic status bits.

  1. Enhanced squeezing by absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünwald, P.; Vogel, W.

    2016-04-01

    Absorption is usually expected to be detrimental to quantum coherence effects. However, there have been few studies into the situation for complex absorption spectra. We consider the resonance fluorescence of excitons in a semiconductor quantum well. The creation of excitons requires absorption of the incoming pump-laser light. Thus, the absorption spectrum of the medium acts as a spectral filter for the emitted light. Surprisingly, absorption can even improve quantum effects, as is demonstrated for the squeezing of the resonance fluorescence of the quantum-well system. This effect can be explained by an improved phase matching due to absorption.

  2. Path Integral Simulations of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, Hosam

    2007-10-01

    Some properties of graphene are explored using a path integral approach. The path integral method allows us to simulate relatively large systems using monte carlo techniques and extract thermodynamic quantities. We simulate the effects of screening a large external charge potential, as well as conductivity and charge distributions in graphene sheets.

  3. Differential optical absorption spectrometer for measurement of tropospheric pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelisti, F.; Baroncelli, A.; Bonasoni, P.; Giovanelli, G.; Ravegnani, F.

    1995-05-01

    Our institute has recently developed a differential optical absorption spectrometry system called the gas analyzer spectrometer correlating optical absorption differences (GASCOAD), which features as a detector a linear image sensor that uses an artificial light source for long-path tropospheric-pollution monitoring. The GASCOAD, its method of eliminating interference from background sky light, and subsequent spectral analysis are reported and discussed. The spectrometer was used from 7 to 22 February 1993 in Milan, a heavily polluted metropolitan area, to measure the concentrations of SO2, NO2, O3, and HNO2 averaged over a 1.7-km horizontal light path. The findings are reported and briefly discussed.

  4. Collabortive Authoring of Walden's Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuanling; Bogen II, Paul Logasa; Pogue, Daniel; Furuta, Richard Keith; Shipman, Frank Major

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a prototype of an authoring tool to allow users to collaboratively build, annotate, manage, share and reuse collections of distributed resources from the World Wide Web. This extends on the Walden’s Path project’s work to help educators bring resources found on the World Wide Web into a linear contextualized structure. The introduction of collaborative authoring feature fosters collaborative learning activities through social interaction among participants, where participants can coauthor paths in groups. Besides, the prototype supports path sharing, branching and reusing; specifically, individual participant can contribute to the group with private collections of knowledge resources; paths completed by group can be shared among group members, such that participants can tailor, extend, reorder and/or replace nodes to have sub versions of shared paths for different information needs.

  5. CW DFB RT diode laser-based sensor for trace-gas detection of ethane using a novel compact multipass gas absorption cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzempek, Karol; Jahjah, Mohammad; Lewicki, Rafał; Stefański, Przemysław; So, Stephen; Thomazy, David; Tittel, Frank K.

    2013-09-01

    The development of a continuous wave, thermoelectrically cooled (TEC), distributed feedback diode laser-based spectroscopic trace-gas sensor for ultra-sensitive and selective ethane (C2H6) concentration measurements is reported. The sensor platform used tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and wavelength modulation spectroscopy as the detection technique. TDLAS was performed using an ultra-compact 57.6 m effective optical path length innovative spherical multipass cell capable of 459 passes between two mirrors separated by 12.5 cm and optimized for the 2.5-4 μm range TEC mercury-cadmium-telluride detector. For an interference-free C2H6 absorption line located at 2,976.8 cm-1, a 1 σ minimum detection limit of 740 pptv with a 1 s lock-in amplifier time constant was achieved.

  6. Automated continuous monitoring of inorganic and total mercury in wastewater and other waters by flow-injection analysis and cold-vapour atomic absorption spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Birnie, S. E.

    1988-01-01

    An automated continuous monitoring system for the determination of inorganic and total mercury by flow-injection analysis followed by cold-vapour atomic absorption spectrometry is described. The method uses a typical flow-injection manifold where digestion and reduction of the injected sample takes place. Mercury is removed by aeration from the flowing stream in a specially designed air-liquid separator and swept into a silica cell for absorption measurement at a wavelength of 253.7 nm. A calibration curve up to 10 μg Hg ml-1 using three different path length cells is obtained with a detection limit of 0.02 μg Hg ml-1. The sampling rate of an injection every 3 min produces 20 results per hour from a flowing stream. PMID:18925201

  7. Prediction of noise reduction through vehicle path rerouting.

    PubMed

    Makarewicz, Rufin

    2010-01-01

    Traffic noise, produced by moving vehicles, is described in terms of the day-night average sound level L(dn) and the day-evening-night level L(den). Both levels depend on the path of noise sources, such as road vehicles or aircraft. Usually, noise source path is rectilinear. Substituting a circle arc of radius R for the straight path segment yields noise reduction DeltaL=DeltaL(dn)=DeltaL(den). Assuming that noise propagation is governed by geometrical spreading, air absorption, and ground effect, relationship between DeltaL and R is derived. For example, replacement of a straight road at the distance of 100 m with the road of radius R=270 m and the angle Phi=68 degrees yields the noise reduction of 4 dB. In the case of road traffic noise, the presented results seem to be a viable alternative to barrier construction. PMID:20058966

  8. A flight investigation with a STOL airplane flying curved, descending instrument approach paths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, M. S.; Mclaughlin, M. D.; Sawyer, R. H.; Vangunst, R.; Ryan, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    A flight investigation using a De Havilland Twin Otter airplane was conducted to determine the configurations of curved, 6 deg descending approach paths which would provide minimum airspace usage within the requirements for acceptable commercial STOL airplane operations. Path configurations with turns of 90 deg, 135 deg, and 180 deg were studied; the approach airspeed was 75 knots. The length of the segment prior to turn, the turn radius, and the length of the final approach segment were varied. The relationship of the acceptable path configurations to the proposed microwave landing system azimuth coverage requirements was examined.

  9. Path planning and execution monitoring for a planetary rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, Erann; Slack, Marc G.; Miller, David P.; Firby, R. James

    1990-01-01

    A path planner and an execution monitoring planner that will enable the rover to navigate to its various destinations safely and correctly while detecting and avoiding hazards are described. An overview of the complete architecture is given. Implementation and testbeds are described. The robot can detect unforseen obstacles and take appropriate action. This includes having the rover back away from the hazard and mark the area as untraversable in the in the rover's internal map. The experiments have consisted of paths roughly 20 m in length. The architecture works with a large variety of rover configurations with different kinematic constraints.

  10. D-xylose absorption

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003606.htm D-xylose absorption To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. D-xylose absorption is a laboratory test to determine ...

  11. Improving Atmospheric Correction for Visible/Short Wave Infrared (VSWIR) Imaging Spectrometers with Iterative Fitting of Absorption By Three Phases of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, E. A.; Thompson, D. R.; Green, R. O.; Gao, B. C.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne imaging spectrometers like the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) offer valuable insight into the Earth's terrestrial and ocean ecosystems, mineralogy, and land use. Estimating surface reflectance requires accounting for atmospheric absorption, which is sensitive to the local abundance of water vapor. Analysts typically estimate water vapor concentrations using the depths of absorption features, which can be inaccurate by up to 50% over surface features containing liquid water or ice. This can bias the retrieved water vapor maps and create atmospheric artifacts in reflectance spectra. A new retrieval method offers significant accuracy improvements over plant canopies or ice by estimating the path lengths of all three phases of water simultaneously, adjusting absorptions to best fit the measurement over a broader spectral interval. This paper assesses the remaining sources of error for the three-phase retrieval technique. We analyze retrievals for synthetic data when the 940 and 1140 nm wavelength features are fitted, for initial vapor path estimates ranging from 0 to ±50% accuracy. These tests indicate that most error comes from inaccuracy in the initial path estimate used to obtain vapor absorption coefficients. We evaluate a modified algorithm that uses multiple iterations to refine this estimate. Error is found to approach a constant value, demonstrating improved robustness to initialization conditions. We also assess the new iterative method using corrected AVIRIS data over various environments. The iterative method yields significantly better water vapor maps, reducing spurious correlations between vegetation canopy water and vapor estimates. The new iterative method offers accuracy improvements over traditional Visible/Short Wave Infrared (VSWIR) atmospheric correction methods, at modest computational cost.

  12. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brauer, C. S.; Blake, T. A.; Guenther, A. B.; Sharpe, S. W.; Sams, R. L.; Johnson, T. J.

    2014-11-19

    Isoprene (C5H8, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) is a volatile organic compound (VOC) and is one of the primary contributors to annual global VOC emissions. Isoprene is produced primarily by vegetation as well as anthropogenic sources, and its OH- and O3-initiated oxidations are a major source of atmospheric oxygenated organics. Few quantitative infrared studies have been reported for isoprene, limiting the ability to quantify isoprene emissions via remote or in situ infrared detection. We thus report absorption cross sections and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600–6500 cm-1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298, and 323 Kmore » in a 19.94 cm path-length cell at 0.112 cm-1 resolution, using a Bruker IFS 66v/S Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven isoprene sample pressures, each at one of three temperatures, and the number densities are normalized to 296 K and 1 atm.« less

  13. Length-adaptive graph search for automatic segmentation of pathological features in optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brenton; Cunefare, David; Grewal, Dilraj S.; Mahmoud, Tamer H.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Farsiu, Sina

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a metric in graph search and demonstrate its application for segmenting retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of macular pathology. Our proposed "adjusted mean arc length" (AMAL) metric is an adaptation of the lowest mean arc length search technique for automated OCT segmentation. We compare this method to Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm, which we utilized previously in our popular graph theory and dynamic programming segmentation technique. As an illustrative example, we show that AMAL-based length-adaptive segmentation outperforms the shortest path in delineating the retina/vitreous boundary of patients with full-thickness macular holes when compared with expert manual grading.

  14. Infrared absorption of carbon dioxide at high densitites with application to the atmosphere of Venus. Ph.D. Thesis - Columbia Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    Several new infrared absorptions were found in carbon dioxide. All are normally forbidden, and were collision-induced in an absorbing cell whose combination of pressure and path length has a unique sensitivity for induced absorptions. The new absorptions in the 2.3 micron region are attributed to transitions from ground to the 3(1)1 Fermi pair at 4248 and 4391/cm. Other absorptions are attributed to simultaneous CO2-N2 transitions and to the 00(0)0-00(0)2 transition in CO2 polarizability derivatives and regular progressions in strength versus increasing quantum number. The spectra were used to predict the radiative transfer in a dry CO2 model of the lower Venus atmosphere. The results indicate that the radiation balance in the lower atmosphere is adequately explained by a dry massive atmosphere of CO2 with a layer of infrared-opaque clouds. The absorptions in the 2.3 micron region are significant in accounting for the opacity to sustain Venus' 768 K surface temperature.

  15. Ultrasensitive, real-time analysis of biomarkers in breath using tunable external cavity laser and off-axis cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakli, Ismail; Akman, Hatice

    2015-03-01

    A robust biomedical sensor for ultrasensitive detection of biomarkers in breath based on a tunable external cavity laser (ECL) and an off-axis cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OA-CEAS) using an amplitude stabilizer is developed. A single-mode, narrow-linewidth, tunable ECL is demonstrated. A broadly coarse wavelength tuning range of 720 cm-1 for the spectral range between 6890 and 6170 cm-1 is achieved by rotating the diffraction grating forming a Littrow-type external-cavity configuration. A mode-hop-free tuning range of 1.85 cm-1 is obtained. The linewidths below 140 kHz are recorded. The ECL is combined with an OA-CEAS to perform laser chemical sensing. Our system is able to detect any molecule in breath at concentrations to the ppbv range that have absorption lines in the spectral range between 1450 and 1620 nm. Ammonia is selected as target molecule to evaluate the performance of the sensor. Using the absorption line of ammonia at 6528.76 cm-1, a minimum detectable absorption coefficient of approximately 1×10-8 cm-1 is demonstrated for 256 averages. This is achieved for a 1.4-km absorption path length and a 2-s data-acquisition time. These results yield a detection sensitivity of approximately 8.6×10-10 cm-1 Hz-1/2. Ammonia in exhaled breath is analyzed and found in a concentration of 870 ppb for our example.

  16. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for measuring atmospheric mercury using differential absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, A.; Obrist, D.; Moosmuller, H.; Moore, C.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric elemental mercury (Hg0) is a globally pervasive element that can be transported and deposited to remote ecosystems where it poses — particularly in its methylated form — harm to many organisms including humans. Current techniques for measurement of atmospheric Hg0 require several liters of sample air and several minutes for each analysis. Fast-response (i.e., 1 second or faster) measurements would improve our ability to understand and track chemical cycling of mercury in the atmosphere, including high frequency Hg0 fluctuations, sources and sinks, and chemical transformation processes. We present theory, design, challenges, and current results of our new prototype sensor based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for fast-response measurement of Hg0 mass concentrations. CRDS is a direct absorption technique that implements path-lengths of multiple kilometers in a compact absorption cell using high-reflectivity mirrors, thereby improving sensitivity and reducing sample volume compared to conventional absorption spectroscopy. Our sensor includes a frequency-doubled, dye-laser emitting laser pulses tunable from 215 to 280 nm, pumped by a Q-switched, frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser with a pulse repetition rate of 50 Hz. We present how we successfully perform automated wavelength locking and stabilization of the laser to the peak Hg0 absorption line at 253.65 nm using an external isotopically-enriched mercury (202Hg0) cell. An emphasis of this presentation will be on the implementation of differential absorption measurement whereby measurements are alternated between the peak Hg0 absorption wavelength and a nearby wavelength "off" the absorption line. This can be achieved using a piezo electric tuning element that allows for pulse-by-pulse tuning and detuning of the laser "online" and "offline" of the Hg absorption line, and thereby allows for continuous correction of baseline extinction losses. Unexpected challenges with this approach included

  17. Estimation of microwave absorption in the Jupiter atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    A procedure for estimating the microwave absorption loss of the Jupiter atmosphere is presented. Estimation of microwave absorption by planetary atmospheres involves two different investigative disciplines (1) the determination of an acceptable model of the atmosphere itself and (2) the determination of the microwave attenuation rate applicable to each different volume sample of the atmosphere, and the integration of this loss over the varying radio propagation path for any given entry trajectory to obtain the total loss.

  18. Long-path atmospheric measurements using dual frequency comb measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxman, Eleanor; Cossel, Kevin; Truong, Gar-Wing; Giorgetta, Fabrizio; Swann, William; Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan

    2016-04-01

    The dual frequency comb spectrometer is a new tool for performing atmospheric trace gas measurements. This instrument is capable of measuring carbon dioxide, methane, and water with extremely high resolution in the region between 1.5 and 2.1 microns in the near-IR. It combines the high resolution of a laboratory-based FTIR instrument with the portability of a long-path DOAS system. We operate this instrument at path lengths of a few kilometers, thus bridging the spatial resolution of in-situ point sensors and the tens of square kilometer footprints of satellites. This spatial resolution is ideal for measuring greenhouse gas emissions from cities. Here we present initial long-path integrated column measurements of the greenhouse gases water, carbon dioxide, and methane in an urban environment. We present a time series with 5 minute time resolution over a 2 kilometer path in Boulder, Colorado at the urban-rural interface. We validate this data via a comparison with an in-situ greenhouse gas monitor co-located along the measurement path and show that we agree well on the baseline concentration but that we are significantly less sensitive to local point source emission that have high temporal variability, making this instrument ideal for measurements of average city-wide emissions. We additionally present progress towards measurements over an 11 kilometer path over downtown Boulder to measure the diurnal flux of greenhouse gases across the city.

  19. Finding reaction paths using the potential energy as reaction coordinate.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Mogas, Antoni; Giménez, Xavier; Bofill, Josep Maria

    2008-03-14

    The intrinsic reaction coordinate curve (IRC), normally proposed as a representation of a reaction path, is parametrized as a function of the potential energy rather than the arc-length. This change in the parametrization of the curve implies that the values of the energy of the potential energy surface points, where the IRC curve is located, play the role of reaction coordinate. We use Caratheodory's relation to derive in a rigorous manner the proposed parametrization of the IRC path. Since this Caratheodory's relation is the basis of the theory of calculus of variations, then this fact permits to reformulate the IRC model from this mathematical theory. In this mathematical theory, the character of the variational solution (either maximum or minimum) is given through the Weierstrass E-function. As proposed by Crehuet and Bofill [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 234105 (2005)], we use the minimization of the Weierstrass E-function, as a function of the potential energy, to locate an IRC path between two minima from an arbitrary curve on the potential energy surface, and then join these two minima. We also prove, from the analysis of the Weierstrass E-function, the mathematical bases for the algorithms proposed to locate the IRC path. The proposed algorithm is applied to a set of examples. Finally, the algorithm is used to locate a discontinuous, or broken, IRC path, namely, when the path connects two first order saddle points through a valley-ridged inflection point. PMID:18345872

  20. Finding reaction paths using the potential energy as reaction coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Mogas, Antoni; Giménez, Xavier; Bofill, Josep Maria

    2008-03-01

    The intrinsic reaction coordinate curve (IRC), normally proposed as a representation of a reaction path, is parametrized as a function of the potential energy rather than the arc-length. This change in the parametrization of the curve implies that the values of the energy of the potential energy surface points, where the IRC curve is located, play the role of reaction coordinate. We use Carathéodory's relation to derive in a rigorous manner the proposed parametrization of the IRC path. Since this Carathéodory's relation is the basis of the theory of calculus of variations, then this fact permits to reformulate the IRC model from this mathematical theory. In this mathematical theory, the character of the variational solution (either maximum or minimum) is given through the Weierstrass E-function. As proposed by Crehuet and Bofill [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 234105 (2005)], we use the minimization of the Weierstrass E-function, as a function of the potential energy, to locate an IRC path between two minima from an arbitrary curve on the potential energy surface, and then join these two minima. We also prove, from the analysis of the Weierstrass E-function, the mathematical bases for the algorithms proposed to locate the IRC path. The proposed algorithm is applied to a set of examples. Finally, the algorithm is used to locate a discontinuous, or broken, IRC path, namely, when the path connects two first order saddle points through a valley-ridged inflection point.

  1. Measurement of Debye length in laser-produced plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehler, W.

    1973-01-01

    The Debye length of an expanded plasma created by placing an evacuated chamber with an entrance slit in the path of a freely expanding laser produced plasma was measured, using the slab geometry. An independent measurement of electron density together with the observed value for the Debye length also provided a means for evaluating the plasma electron temperature. This temperature has applications in ascertaining plasma conductivity and magnetic field necessary for confinement of the laser produced plasma. Also, the temperature obtained would be useful in analyzing electron-ion recombination rates in the expanded plasma and the dynamics of the cooling process of the plasma expansion.

  2. Pathways with PathWhiz.

    PubMed

    Pon, Allison; Jewison, Timothy; Su, Yilu; Liang, Yongjie; Knox, Craig; Maciejewski, Adam; Wilson, Michael; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    PathWhiz (http://smpdb.ca/pathwhiz) is a web server designed to create colourful, visually pleasing and biologically accurate pathway diagrams that are both machine-readable and interactive. As a web server, PathWhiz is accessible from almost any place and compatible with essentially any operating system. It also houses a public library of pathways and pathway components that can be easily viewed and expanded upon by its users. PathWhiz allows users to readily generate biologically complex pathways by using a specially designed drawing palette to quickly render metabolites (including automated structure generation), proteins (including quaternary structures, covalent modifications and cofactors), nucleic acids, membranes, subcellular structures, cells, tissues and organs. Both small-molecule and protein/gene pathways can be constructed by combining multiple pathway processes such as reactions, interactions, binding events and transport activities. PathWhiz's pathway replication and propagation functions allow for existing pathways to be used to create new pathways or for existing pathways to be automatically propagated across species. PathWhiz pathways can be saved in BioPAX, SBGN-ML and SBML data exchange formats, as well as PNG, PWML, HTML image map or SVG images that can be viewed offline or explored using PathWhiz's interactive viewer. PathWhiz has been used to generate over 700 pathway diagrams for a number of popular databases including HMDB, DrugBank and SMPDB. PMID:25934797

  3. Pathways with PathWhiz

    PubMed Central

    Pon, Allison; Jewison, Timothy; Su, Yilu; Liang, Yongjie; Knox, Craig; Maciejewski, Adam; Wilson, Michael; Wishart, David S.

    2015-01-01

    PathWhiz (http://smpdb.ca/pathwhiz) is a web server designed to create colourful, visually pleasing and biologically accurate pathway diagrams that are both machine-readable and interactive. As a web server, PathWhiz is accessible from almost any place and compatible with essentially any operating system. It also houses a public library of pathways and pathway components that can be easily viewed and expanded upon by its users. PathWhiz allows users to readily generate biologically complex pathways by using a specially designed drawing palette to quickly render metabolites (including automated structure generation), proteins (including quaternary structures, covalent modifications and cofactors), nucleic acids, membranes, subcellular structures, cells, tissues and organs. Both small-molecule and protein/gene pathways can be constructed by combining multiple pathway processes such as reactions, interactions, binding events and transport activities. PathWhiz's pathway replication and propagation functions allow for existing pathways to be used to create new pathways or for existing pathways to be automatically propagated across species. PathWhiz pathways can be saved in BioPAX, SBGN-ML and SBML data exchange formats, as well as PNG, PWML, HTML image map or SVG images that can be viewed offline or explored using PathWhiz's interactive viewer. PathWhiz has been used to generate over 700 pathway diagrams for a number of popular databases including HMDB, DrugBank and SMPDB. PMID:25934797

  4. Paths with more turns are perceived as longer: misperceptions with map-based and abstracted path stimuli.

    PubMed

    Brunyé, Tad T; Mahoney, Caroline R; Taylor, Holly A

    2015-04-01

    When navigating, people tend to overestimate distances when routes contain more turns, termed the route-angularity effect. Three experiments examined the source and generality of this effect. The first two experiments examined whether route-angularity effects occur while viewing maps and might be related to sex differences or sense of direction. The third experiment tested whether the route-angularity effect would occur with stimuli devoid of spatial context, reducing influences of environmental experience and visual complexity. In the three experiments, participants (N=1,552; M=32.2 yr.; 992 men, 560 women) viewed paths plotted on maps (Exps. 1 and 2) or against a blank background (Exp. 3). The depicted paths were always the same overall length, but varied in the number of turns (from 1 to 7) connecting an origin and destination. Participants were asked to estimate the time to traverse each path (Exp. 1) or the length of each path (Exps. 2 and 3). The Santa Barbara Sense of Direction questionnaire was administered to assess whether overall spatial sense of direction would be negatively related to the magnitude of the route-angularity effect. Repeated-measures analyses of variance (ANOVAs) indicated that paths with more turns elicited estimates of greater distance and travel times, whether they were depicted on maps or blank backgrounds. Linear regressions also indicated that these effects were significantly larger in those with a relatively low sense of direction. The results support the route-angularity effect and extend it to paths plotted on map-based stimuli. Furthermore, because the route-angularity effect was shown with paths plotted against blank backgrounds, route-angularity effects are not specific to understanding environments and may arise at the level of visual perception. PMID:25799028

  5. Ultraviolet to near-infrared absorption spectrum of carbon dioxide ice from 0.174 to 1.8 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Gary B.

    2005-11-01

    A laboratory experiment was devised to measure transmission at fine spectral resolution through thick, high-quality samples of CO2 ice over an extended wavelength range. The absorption coefficient throughout the ultraviolet and near-infrared spectral ranges 0.174-1.8 μm (5555-57,470 cm-1 in wave number) is presented here. CO2 ice samples were grown at a temperature of 150 K, typical of the Martian polar caps. The path length of the samples varied from 1.6 to 107.5 mm, allowing the measurement of absorption from <0.1 to 4000 m-1. The experiment used both a grating monochromator (with spectral resolution 0.1-0.3 nm) and a Fourier transform spectrometer (with an effective resolution of <1.0 cm-1). The transmission data for five thicknesses are used to estimate both the scattering losses for each sample and the absorption coefficient at each wavelength. The uncertainty in the most transparent wavelength regions (<10 m-1) is due to scattering extinction. Measurement noise and data scatter produce significant uncertainty only where absorption coefficients exceed 1000 m-1. Between 1.0 and 1.8 μm there are several weak to moderate absorption lines. Only an upper limit to the absorption can be determined in many places; e.g., the absorption from ~0.25 to 1.0 μm is below the detection limit. The estimated visible absorption, ~10-2 m-1, is a factor of 1000 smaller than the values reported by Egan and Spagnolo, which have been used previously to compute albedos of CO2 snow. The new results should be useful for studies of the seasonal polar caps of Mars.

  6. 14 CFR 23.57 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff path. 23.57 Section 23.57... path. For each commuter category airplane, the takeoff path is as follows: (a) The takeoff path extends... completed; and (1) The takeoff path must be based on the procedures prescribed in § 23.45; (2) The...

  7. 14 CFR 23.57 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff path. 23.57 Section 23.57... path. For each commuter category airplane, the takeoff path is as follows: (a) The takeoff path extends... completed; and (1) The takeoff path must be based on the procedures prescribed in § 23.45; (2) The...

  8. Preliminary assignments of 2 ν 3 - ν 4 hot band of 12 CH 4 in the 2 μm transparency window from long-path FTS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, A. V.; Daumont, L.; Thomas, X.; Régalia, L.; Rey, M.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.; Brown, L. R.

    2011-07-01

    New measurements and assignments for the rovibrational transitions of the hot band 2 v3- v4 of 12CH 4 are reported from 4600 to 4880 cm -1 and refer to lower part of the 2 μm methane transparency window. Three long-path spectra were recorded with a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) in Reims using an L = 1603 m absorption path length at 1, 7, 34 h Pa for the natural samples of CH 4; a spectrum of enriched 13CH 4 was also used. Assignments were made for 196 lines of 2 v3(F 2,E)- v4. These transitions had an integrated intensity of 5 × 10 -24 cm/molecule at 296 K and improved the overall description of absorption in the 2.1 μm region. The empirical upper state levels of these assignments belong to Tetradecad (4800-6200 cm -1). The new analysis provided much better accuracies of badly blended positions of 2 v3(F 2)-ground state manifolds at 1.66 μm.

  9. Path Integrals on Ultrametric Spaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Alan

    A framework for the study of path integrals on adelic spaces is developed, and it is shown that a family of path space measures on the localizations of an algebraic number field may, under certain conditions, be combined to form a global path space measure on its adele ring. An operator on the field of p-adic numbers analogous to the harmonic oscillator operator is then analyzed, and used to construct an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type process on the adele ring of the rationals. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617 -253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.).

  10. IMPEDANCE OF FINITE LENGTH RESISTOR

    SciTech Connect

    KRINSKY, S.; PODOBEDOV, B.; GLUCKSTERN, R.L.

    2005-05-15

    We determine the impedance of a cylindrical metal tube (resistor) of radius a, length g, and conductivity {sigma}, attached at each end to perfect conductors of semi-infinite length. Our main interest is in the asymptotic behavior of the impedance at high frequency, k >> 1/a. In the equilibrium regime, , the impedance per unit length is accurately described by the well-known result for an infinite length tube with conductivity {sigma}. In the transient regime, ka{sup 2} >> g, we derive analytic expressions for the impedance and wakefield.

  11. An algorithm to find critical execution paths of software based on complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guoyan; Zhang, Bing; Ren, Rong; Ren, Jiadong

    2015-01-01

    The critical execution paths play an important role in software system in terms of reducing the numbers of test date, detecting the vulnerabilities of software structure and analyzing software reliability. However, there are no efficient methods to discover them so far. Thus in this paper, a complex network-based software algorithm is put forward to find critical execution paths (FCEP) in software execution network. First, by analyzing the number of sources and sinks in FCEP, software execution network is divided into AOE subgraphs, and meanwhile, a Software Execution Network Serialization (SENS) approach is designed to generate execution path set in each AOE subgraph, which not only reduces ring structure's influence on path generation, but also guarantees the nodes' integrity in network. Second, according to a novel path similarity metric, similarity matrix is created to calculate the similarity among sets of path sequences. Third, an efficient method is taken to cluster paths through similarity matrices, and the maximum-length path in each cluster is extracted as the critical execution path. At last, a set of critical execution paths is derived. The experimental results show that the FCEP algorithm is efficient in mining critical execution path under software complex network.

  12. Path Generation of Regular Polygon Using a Geared-Parallelogram Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, S.; Fan, Y.; Ren, Z.; Hanke, U.

    The paper proposes a geared-parallelogram mechanism (GPM) for path generation of regular polygon. The model presents the structural features of the mechanism as shown in Fig. 1 which forms the basis for the guiding features of its path and also for the guiding function in its kinematic parameters and dimensions. It is shown from the analysis results that length l2 has an effect on the size of the path, the initial phase θ on path direction and transmission ratio k on number of polygon sides. More important is that length ratio λ plays a crucial role in path curvature and defines indirectly the straightness for the regular polygon of path generation. In order to generate the path of regular polygon, some available value ranges of each parameter have been suggested. An example to solve path generation task with such mechanism using the method presented in this paper is given, through which a practical procedure to develop a synthesis tool for generating a regular polygon path will be provided. Fig. 1 Structural diagram of GPM

  13. Scattering theory with path integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfelder, R.

    2014-03-15

    Starting from well-known expressions for the T-matrix and its derivative in standard nonrelativistic potential scattering, I rederive recent path-integral formulations due to Efimov and Barbashov et al. Some new relations follow immediately.

  14. A Deterministic Approximation Algorithm for Maximum 2-Path Packing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanahashi, Ruka; Chen, Zhi-Zhong

    This paper deals with the maximum-weight 2-path packing problem (M2PP), which is the problem of computing a set of vertex-disjoint paths of length 2 in a given edge-weighted complete graph so that the total weight of edges in the paths is maximized. Previously, Hassin and Rubinstein gave a randomized cubic-time approximation algorithm for M2PP which achieves an expected ratio of 35/67 - ε ≈ 0.5223 - ε for any constant ε > 0. We refine their algorithm and derandomize it to obtain a deterministic cubic-time approximation algorithm for the problem which achieves a better ratio (namely, 0.5265 - ε for any constant ε > 0).

  15. Dynamical anisotropy of the optical propagation paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenyan, Tatiana I.; Pisklin, Maksim V.; Suhareva, Natalia A.; Zotov, Aleksey M.

    2015-11-01

    Dynamics of laser beam intensity profile spatial modulations over a model tropospheric path with the controlled meteorological parameters was studied. Influence of the underlying surface temperature as well as the side wind load were considered. The increase of dynamic anisotropic disturbances saturation with the path length was observed. Spatio-temporal correlation characteristics of the directivity pattern in the signal beam registration plane were obtained. Proposed method of the experimental samples analysis on the base of chronogram with the following definition of the dynamic structure tensors array allows to estimate local and averaged projections of the flow velocities over the chosen spatio-temporal region and to restore their geometry in the zone of intersection with the signal beam. Additional characteristics suggested for the diagonalized local structure tensors such as local energy capacity and local structuredness are informative for the estimation of the inhomogeneities spatial dimensions, time of access through the section considered, the dynamics of energetic jets. The concepts of rotational and translational dynamic anisotropy are introduced to discriminate the types of the changes of the local ellipsoids axes orientation as well as their values. Rotational anisotropy shows itself in the changes of the local ellipsoids orientation, thus characterizing the illumination variation over the beam cross-section. Translational anisotropy describes the difference between the axes values for local ellipsoids.

  16. Line Lengths and Starch Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Sandra E.

    1986-01-01

    Investigates readability of different line lengths in advertising body copy, hypothesizing a normal curve with lower scores for shorter and longer lines, and scores above the mean for lines in the middle of the distribution. Finds support for lower scores for short lines and some evidence of two optimum line lengths rather than one. (SKC)

  17. Constructing Overlay Networks with Short Paths and Low Communication Cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makikawa, Fuminori; Tsuchiya, Tatsuhiro; Kikuno, Tohru

    A Peer-To-Peer (P2P) application uses an overlay network which is a virtual network constructed over the physical network. Traditional overlay construction methods do not take physical location of nodes into consideration, resulting in a large amount of redundant traffic. Some proximity-aware construction methods have been proposed to address this problem. These methods typically connect nearby nodes in the physical network. However, as the number of nodes increases, the path length of a route between two distant nodes rapidly increases. To alleviate this problem, we propose a technique which can be incorporated in existing overlay construction methods. The idea behind this technique is to employ long links to directly connect distant nodes. Through simulation experiments, we show that using our proposed technique, networks can achieve small path length and low communication cost while maintaining high resiliency to failures.

  18. Path selection process utilizing rapid estimation scheme. [for Martian rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ring, H.; Shen, C. N.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the use of a rapid estimation scheme for path selection by a roving vehicle. Essentially, the evaluation procedure simulates movement of the rover over each of several corridors lying radially outward from the scanning position. Two levels of corridors are used, and the path selection scheme selects the optimal primary corridor according to a dynamic programming algorithm. In the present version, the length of the corridors is variable. The rapid estimation scheme provides information to define corridor dimensions. This corridor structure, which varies as a function of the terrain, eliminates the need for backtracking, except in certain extreme cases. Computer results are promising in that obstacles were avoided while corridor lengths were kept to a maximum where safety permitted.

  19. Modeling of gas absorption cross sections by use of principal-component-analysis model parameters.

    PubMed

    Bak, Jimmy

    2002-05-20

    Monitoring the amount of gaseous species in the atmosphere and exhaust gases by remote infrared spectroscopic methods calls for the use of a compilation of spectral data, which can be used to match spectra measured in a practical application. Model spectra are based on time-consuming line-by-line calculations of absorption cross sections in databases by use of temperature as input combined with path length and partial and total pressure. It is demonstrated that principal component analysis (PCA) can be used to compress the spectrum of absorption cross sections, which depend strongly on temperature, into a reduced representation of score values and loading vectors. The temperature range from 300 to 1000 K is studied. This range is divided into two subranges (300-650 K and 650-1000K), and separate PCA models are constructed for each. The relationship between the scores and the temperature values is highly nonlinear. It is shown, however, that because the score-temperature relationships are smooth and continuous, they can be modeled by polynomials of varying degrees. The accuracy of the data compression method is validated with line-by-line-calculated absorption data of carbon monoxide and water vapor. Relative deviations between the absorption cross sections reconstructed from the PCA model parameters and the line-by-line-calculated values are found to be smaller than 0.15% for cross sections exceeding 1.27 x 10(-21) cm(-1) atm(-1) (CO) and 0.20% for cross sections exceeding 4.03 x 10(-21) cm(-1) atm(-1) (H2O). The computing time is reduced by a factor of 10(4). PMID:12027171

  20. A Two Micron Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo C.; Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; VanValkenburg, Randal L.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    A pulsed, 2-micron coherent Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)/Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) transceiver, developed under the Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) at NASA, is integrated into a fully functional lidar instrument. This instrument measures atmospheric CO2 profiles (by DIAL) from a ground platform. It allows the investigators to pursue subsequent in science-driven deployments, and provides a unique tool for Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Night, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) validation that was strongly advocated in the recent ASCENDS Workshop. Keywords: Differential Absorption Lidar, Near Infrared Laser,

  1. Characterizing Reactive Flow Paths in Fractured Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenning, Q. C.; Huerta, N. J.; Hesse, M. A.; Bryant, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration can be a viable method for reducing anthropogenic CO2 flux into the atmosphere. However, the technology must be economically feasible and pose acceptable risk to stakeholders. One key risk is CO2 leakage out of the storage reservoir. Potential driving forces for leakage are the overpressure due to CO2 injection and the buoyancy of free phase CO2. Potential hazards of leakage are contamination of Underground Sources of Drinking Water or the atmosphere and would be deemed an unacceptable risk. Wells potentially provide a fast path for leakage from the reservoir. While the well's cement casing is reactive with CO2 and CO2-saturated brine, the low cement matrix permeability and slow diffusion rate make it unlikely that CO2 will escape through a properly constructed wellbore. However, highly permeable fractures with micrometer scale apertures can occur in cement casings. Reactions that occur in the flow in these fractures can either be self-limiting or self-enhancing. Therefore, understanding the reactive flow is critical to understanding of leakage evolution through these fractures. The goal of our work is to characterize the modification of the flow paths in the fracture due to reaction with acidic brine. With this aim we have characterized both the initial flow path of un-reactive flow and the final flow path after introduction of low-pH acid along the same fracture. Class H cement cores 3-6 cm in length and 2.5 cm diameter are created and a single natural and unique fracture is produced in each core using the Brazilian method. Our experimental fluid is injected at a constant rate into the cement core housed in a Hassler Cell under confining pressure. A solution of red dye and deionized water is pumped through the fracture to stain the un-reactive flow paths. Deionized water is then pumped through the core to limit diffusion of the dye into non-flowing portions of the fracture. After staining the initial flow path, low pH water due to

  2. Computing Path Tables for Quickest Multipaths In Computer Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Grimmell, W.C.

    2004-12-21

    We consider the transmission of a message from a source node to a terminal node in a network with n nodes and m links where the message is divided into parts and each part is transmitted over a different path in a set of paths from the source node to the terminal node. Here each link is characterized by a bandwidth and delay. The set of paths together with their transmission rates used for the message is referred to as a multipath. We present two algorithms that produce a minimum-end-to-end message delay multipath path table that, for every message length, specifies a multipath that will achieve the minimum end-to-end delay. The algorithms also generate a function that maps the minimum end-to-end message delay to the message length. The time complexities of the algorithms are O(n{sup 2}((n{sup 2}/logn) + m)min(D{sub max}, C{sub max})) and O(nm(C{sub max} + nmin(D{sub max}, C{sub max}))) when the link delays and bandwidths are non-negative integers. Here D{sub max} and C{sub max} are respectively the maximum link delay and maximum link bandwidth and C{sub max} and D{sub max} are greater than zero.

  3. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy characterization of gaseous atmospheric pressure plasmas with 2 mm spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Laroche, G.; Vallade, J.; Bazinette, R.; Hernandez, E.; Hernandez, G.; Massines, F.; Nijnatten, P. van

    2012-10-15

    This paper describes an optical setup built to record Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectra in an atmospheric pressure plasma with a spatial resolution of 2 mm. The overall system consisted of three basic parts: (1) optical components located within the FTIR sample compartment, making it possible to define the size of the infrared beam (2 mm Multiplication-Sign 2 mm over a path length of 50 mm) imaged at the site of the plasma by (2) an optical interface positioned between the spectrometer and the plasma reactor. Once through the plasma region, (3) a retro-reflector module, located behind the plasma reactor, redirected the infrared beam coincident to the incident path up to a 45 Degree-Sign beamsplitter to reflect the beam toward a narrow-band mercury-cadmium-telluride detector. The antireflective plasma-coating experiments performed with ammonia and silane demonstrated that it was possible to quantify 42 and 2 ppm of these species in argon, respectively. In the case of ammonia, this was approximately three times less than this gas concentration typically used in plasma coating experiments while the silane limit of quantification was 35 times lower. Moreover, 70% of the incoming infrared radiation was focused within a 2 mm width at the site of the plasma, in reasonable agreement with the expected spatial resolution. The possibility of reaching this spatial resolution thus enabled us to measure the gaseous precursor consumption as a function of their residence time in the plasma.

  4. An investigation of a mathematical model for atmospheric absorption spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niple, E. R.

    1979-01-01

    A computer program that calculates absorption spectra for slant paths through the atmosphere is described. The program uses an efficient convolution technique (Romberg integration) to simulate instrument resolution effects. A brief information analysis is performed on a set of calculated spectra to illustrate how such techniques may be used to explore the quality of the information in a spectrum.

  5. Logarithmic Sobolev Inequalities on Path Spaces Over Riemannian Manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Elton P.

    Let Wo(M) be the space of paths of unit time length on a connected, complete Riemannian manifold M such that γ(0) =o, a fixed point on M, and ν the Wiener measure on Wo(M) (the law of Brownian motion on M starting at o).If the Ricci curvature is bounded by c, then the following logarithmic Sobolev inequality holds:

  6. Dynamic behavior of shortest path routing algorithms for communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertsekas, D. P.

    1980-06-01

    Several proposed routing algorithms for store and forward communication networks, including one currently in operation in the ARPANET, route messages along shortest paths computed by using some set of link lengths. When these lengths depend on current traffic conditions as they must in an adaptive algorithm, dynamic behavior questions such as stability convergence, and speed of convergence are of interest. This paper is the first attempt to analyze systematically these issues. It is shown that minimum queuing delay path algorithms tend to exhibit violent oscillatory behavior in the absence of a damping mechanism. The oscillations can be damped by means of several types of schemes, two of which are analyzed in this paper. In the first scheme a constant bias is added to the queuing delay thereby providing a preference towards paths with a small number of links. In the second scheme the effects of several past routings are averaged as, for example, when the link lengths are computed and communicated asynchronously throughout the network.

  7. Spreading lengths of Hermite polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Moreno, P.; Dehesa, J. S.; Manzano, D.; Yáñez, R. J.

    2010-03-01

    The Renyi, Shannon and Fisher spreading lengths of the classical or hypergeometric orthogonal polynomials, which are quantifiers of their distribution all over the orthogonality interval, are defined and investigated. These information-theoretic measures of the associated Rakhmanov probability density, which are direct measures of the polynomial spreading in the sense of having the same units as the variable, share interesting properties: invariance under translations and reflections, linear scaling and vanishing in the limit that the variable tends towards a given definite value. The expressions of the Renyi and Fisher lengths for the Hermite polynomials are computed in terms of the polynomial degree. The combinatorial multivariable Bell polynomials, which are shown to characterize the finite power of an arbitrary polynomial, play a relevant role for the computation of these information-theoretic lengths. Indeed these polynomials allow us to design an error-free computing approach for the entropic moments (weighted Lq-norms) of Hermite polynomials and subsequently for the Renyi and Tsallis entropies, as well as for the Renyi spreading lengths. Sharp bounds for the Shannon length of these polynomials are also given by means of an information-theoretic-based optimization procedure. Moreover, the existence of a linear correlation between the Shannon length (as well as the second-order Renyi length) and the standard deviation is computationally proved. Finally, the application to the most popular quantum-mechanical prototype system, the harmonic oscillator, is discussed and some relevant asymptotical open issues related to the entropic moments, mentioned previously, are posed.

  8. When does length cause the word length effect?

    PubMed

    Jalbert, Annie; Neath, Ian; Bireta, Tamra J; Surprenant, Aimée M

    2011-03-01

    The word length effect, the finding that lists of short words are better recalled than lists of long words, has been termed one of the benchmark findings that any theory of immediate memory must account for. Indeed, the effect led directly to the development of working memory and the phonological loop, and it is viewed as the best remaining evidence for time-based decay. However, previous studies investigating this effect have confounded length with orthographic neighborhood size. In the present study, Experiments 1A and 1B revealed typical effects of length when short and long words were equated on all relevant dimensions previously identified in the literature except for neighborhood size. In Experiment 2, consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words with a large orthographic neighborhood were better recalled than were CVC words with a small orthographic neighborhood. In Experiments 3 and 4, using two different sets of stimuli, we showed that when short (1-syllable) and long (3-syllable) items were equated for neighborhood size, the word length effect disappeared. Experiment 5 replicated this with spoken recall. We suggest that the word length effect may be better explained by the differences in linguistic and lexical properties of short and long words rather than by length per se. These results add to the growing literature showing problems for theories of memory that include decay offset by rehearsal as a central feature. PMID:21171805

  9. Open-path atmospheric transmission for a diode-pumped cesium laser.

    PubMed

    Rice, Christopher A; Lott, Gordon E; Perram, Glen P

    2012-12-01

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy device was developed to study atmospheric propagation for emerging high-energy laser weapons. The cesium diode-pumped alkali laser operates near 895 nm in the vicinity of several water-vapor absorption lines. Temperature, pressure, and water vapor concentration were determined for 150 m and 1 km open paths with statistical errors of ∼0.2%. Comparison with meteorological instruments yields agreement for the 1 km path to within 0.6% for temperature, 3.7% for pressure, and 2.4% for concentration. PMID:23207380

  10. Application of a tunable-diode-laser absorption diagnostic for CO measurements in an automotive HCCI engine.

    SciTech Connect

    Steeper, Richard R.; Fitzgerald, Russell Paul

    2010-08-01

    An infrared laser absorption technique has been developed to measure in-cylinder concentrations of CO in an optical, automotive HCCI engine. The diagnostic employs a distributed-feedback, tunable diode laser selected to emit light at the R15 line of the first overtone of CO near 2.3 {micro}m. The collimated laser beam makes multiple passes through the cylinder to increase its path length and its sampling volume. High-frequency modulation of the laser output (wavelength modulation spectroscopy) further enhances the signal-to-noise ratio and detection limits of CO. The diagnostic has been tested in the motored and fired engine, exhibiting better than 200-ppm sensitivity for 50-cycle ensemble-average values of CO concentration with 1-ms time resolution. Fired results demonstrate the ability of the diagnostic to quantify CO production during negative valve overlap (NVO) for a range of fueling conditions.

  11. Depth and Shape of the 0.94-microm Water Vapor Absorption Band for Clear and Cloudy Skies.

    PubMed

    Volz, F E

    1969-11-01

    Sky radiation near zenith and solar radiation in the rhosigmatau band region were recorded by means of a rotating interference filter (lambda0.98-0.88 microm) and a silicon detector. Although the spectral resolution of the simple spectrometer was not high, the water vapor content of the cloud free atmosphere was obtained with reasonable accuracy. The band depth of the radiation from thin, bright clouds was only slightly greater than that of the cloud free atmosphere, but dense and dark clouds showed deep bands mainly caused by increased path length as a result of multiple scattering. Considerable distortion of the band due to absorption by liquid water is observed in the radiation from very dark and dense clouds, and sometimes during snowfall. Some laboratory measurements are also discussed. PMID:20076009

  12. Sensitive absorption measurements of hydrogen sulfide at 1.578 μm using wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hua; Dong, Feng-Zhong; Wu, Bian; Zhang, Zhi-Rong; Pang, Tao; Sun, Peng-Shuai; Cui, Xiao-Juan; Han, Luo; Wang, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Sensitive detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been performed by means of wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) near 1.578 μm. With the scan amplitude and the stability of the background baseline taken into account, the response time is 4 s for a 0.8 L multi-pass cell with a 56.7 m effective optical path length. Moreover, the linearity has been tested in the 0-50 ppmv range. The detection limit achievable by the Allan variance is 224 ppb within 24 s under room temperature and ambient pressure conditions. This tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) system for H2S detection has the feasibility of real-time online monitoring in many applications. Project supported by the Special Fund for Basic Research on Scientific Instruments of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. YZ201315) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204320, 41405034, and 11204319).

  13. Path coloring on the Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Rabani, Y.

    1996-12-31

    In the minimum path coloring problem, we are given a list of pairs of vertices of a graph. We are asked to connect each pair by a colored path. Paths of the same color must be edge disjoint. Our objective is to minimize the number of colors used. This problem was raised by Aggarwal et al and Raghavan and Upfal as a model for routing in all-optical networks. It is also related to questions in circuit routing. In this paper, we improve the O (ln N) approximation result of Kleinberg and Tardos for path coloring on the N x N mesh. We give an O(1) approximation algorithm to the number of colors needed, and a poly(ln ln N) approximation algorithm to the choice of paths and colors. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first sub-logarithmic bounds for any network other than trees, rings, or trees of rings. Our results are based on developing new techniques for randomized rounding. These techniques iteratively improve a fractional solution until it approaches integrality. They are motivated by the method used by Leighton, Maggs, and Rao for packet routing.

  14. Vehicle path-planning in three dimensions using optics analogs for optimizing visibility and energy cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, Neil C.; Lewis, David H.

    1989-01-01

    Path planning is an important issue for space robotics. Finding safe and energy-efficient paths in the presence of obstacles and other constraints can be complex although important. High-level (large-scale) path planning for robotic vehicles was investigated in three-dimensional space with obstacles, accounting for: (1) energy costs proportional to path length; (2) turn costs where paths change trajectory abruptly; and (3) safety costs for the danger associated with traversing a particular path due to visibility or invisibility from a fixed set of observers. Paths optimal with respect to these cost factors are found. Autonomous or semi-autonomous vehicles were considered operating either in a space environment around satellites and space platforms, or aircraft, spacecraft, or smart missiles operating just above lunar and planetary surfaces. One class of applications concerns minimizing detection, as for example determining the best way to make complex modifications to a satellite without being observed by hostile sensors; another example is verifying there are no paths (holes) through a space defense system. Another class of applications concerns maximizing detection, as finding a good trajectory between mountain ranges of a planet while staying reasonably close to the surface, or finding paths for a flight between two locations that maximize the average number of triangulation points available at any time along the path.

  15. Localization and phase coherence length in the Lloyd model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, D. E.; Pastawski, H. M.; Weisz, J. F.

    1986-12-01

    The coefficient for exponential attenuation of the averaged Green function [limδ-->0~av~e-κR] is calculated for several infinite lattices in one, two, and three dimensions with a diagonal Lorentzian disorder of site energies (Lloyd model). In the limit of extended states, l=κ-1 coincidences with the phase coherence length and with the mean free path associated with ||k> states. In the opposite limit, that of strongly localized states, the inequality κ>=γ is almost satisfied as an equality where γ is the inverse localization length. Our results for κ are the same as those calculated by Johnston and Kunz who associate their results with γ, that is, with the localization length. This leads us to reinterpret their results and to conclude that, when the dimensionality is higher than 2, there is still a strong possibility of a mobility edge in this model.

  16. Long Path Quantum Cascade Laser Based Sensor for Environment Sensing/Ambient Detection of CH4 and N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, P. C.; Sydoryk, I.; Gross, B.; Moshary, F.

    2013-12-01

    Methane (CH4) and Nitrous Oxide (N2O) are long-lived greenhouse gases in the atmosphere with significant global warming effects. These gases also are known to be produced in a number of anthropogenic settings such as manure management systems, which releases substantial GHGs and is mandated by the EPA to provide continuous monitoring. In addition, natural gas leaks in urban areas is another source of strong spatially inhomogeneous methane emissions Most open path methods for quantitative detection of trace gases utilize either Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTIR) or near-IR differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Although, FTIR is suitable for ambient air monitoring measurement of more abundant gases such as CO2 and H20 etc., the lack of spectral resolution makes the retrieval of weaker absorbing features such as N20 more difficult. On the other hand, conventional DOAS systems can be large and impractical. As an alternative, we illustrate a robust portable quantum cascade laser (QCL) approach for simultaneous detection of CH4 and N2O. In particular, gas spectra were recorded by ultrafast pulse intensity (thermal) chirp tuning over the 1299 - 1300cm-1 spectral window. Etalon measurements insure stable tuning was obtained. To deal with multiple species, a LSQ spectral fitting approach was used which accounted for both the overlapping trace gases , background water vapor as well as detector drift and calibration. In summary, ambient concentrations of CH4 with and N2O with accuracy < 1% was obtained on the order of 5ms using optical paths of 500 m path length. In addition, unattended long term operation was demonstrated and validations using other sensors when possible were shown to be consistent. The system accuracy is limited by systemic errors, which are still being explored.

  17. The Edge-Disjoint Path Problem on Random Graphs by Message-Passing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present a message-passing algorithm to solve a series of edge-disjoint path problems on graphs based on the zero-temperature cavity equations. Edge-disjoint paths problems are important in the general context of routing, that can be defined by incorporating under a unique framework both traffic optimization and total path length minimization. The computation of the cavity equations can be performed efficiently by exploiting a mapping of a generalized edge-disjoint path problem on a star graph onto a weighted maximum matching problem. We perform extensive numerical simulations on random graphs of various types to test the performance both in terms of path length minimization and maximization of the number of accommodated paths. In addition, we test the performance on benchmark instances on various graphs by comparison with state-of-the-art algorithms and results found in the literature. Our message-passing algorithm always outperforms the others in terms of the number of accommodated paths when considering non trivial instances (otherwise it gives the same trivial results). Remarkably, the largest improvement in performance with respect to the other methods employed is found in the case of benchmarks with meshes, where the validity hypothesis behind message-passing is expected to worsen. In these cases, even though the exact message-passing equations do not converge, by introducing a reinforcement parameter to force convergence towards a sub optimal solution, we were able to always outperform the other algorithms with a peak of 27% performance improvement in terms of accommodated paths. On random graphs, we numerically observe two separated regimes: one in which all paths can be accommodated and one in which this is not possible. We also investigate the behavior of both the number of paths to be accommodated and their minimum total length. PMID:26710102

  18. The Edge-Disjoint Path Problem on Random Graphs by Message-Passing.

    PubMed

    Altarelli, Fabrizio; Braunstein, Alfredo; Dall'Asta, Luca; De Bacco, Caterina; Franz, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    We present a message-passing algorithm to solve a series of edge-disjoint path problems on graphs based on the zero-temperature cavity equations. Edge-disjoint paths problems are important in the general context of routing, that can be defined by incorporating under a unique framework both traffic optimization and total path length minimization. The computation of the cavity equations can be performed efficiently by exploiting a mapping of a generalized edge-disjoint path problem on a star graph onto a weighted maximum matching problem. We perform extensive numerical simulations on random graphs of various types to test the performance both in terms of path length minimization and maximization of the number of accommodated paths. In addition, we test the performance on benchmark instances on various graphs by comparison with state-of-the-art algorithms and results found in the literature. Our message-passing algorithm always outperforms the others in terms of the number of accommodated paths when considering non trivial instances (otherwise it gives the same trivial results). Remarkably, the largest improvement in performance with respect to the other methods employed is found in the case of benchmarks with meshes, where the validity hypothesis behind message-passing is expected to worsen. In these cases, even though the exact message-passing equations do not converge, by introducing a reinforcement parameter to force convergence towards a sub optimal solution, we were able to always outperform the other algorithms with a peak of 27% performance improvement in terms of accommodated paths. On random graphs, we numerically observe two separated regimes: one in which all paths can be accommodated and one in which this is not possible. We also investigate the behavior of both the number of paths to be accommodated and their minimum total length. PMID:26710102

  19. Absorption cross section measurements of oxygen in the wavelength region 195-241 nm of the Herzberg continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, A. S.-C.; Yoshino, K.; Parkinson, W. H.; Freeman, D. E.; Guberman, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    The continuous absorption cross section of oxygen in the region 205-241 nm is studied as a function of path length and oxygen pressure. The technique used to study the continuous absorption cross section is described. Cross section measurements of oxygen in the wavelength region 193-205 nm obtained by Cheung et al. (1984) are applied in this experiment. The measured cross section is analyzed in terms of a Herzberg continuum and a pressure-dependent continuum. The total measured continuum cross section, the cross section involving two molecules of O2, and the Herzberg continuum absorption cross section values are calculated. It is observed that the Herzberg continuum cross section of oxygen values measured at 1 nm intervals in the region 195-241 nm, increase from 6.3 x 10 to the -24th sq cm at 195 nm to a maximum of 6.6 x 10 to the -24th sq cm at 201 nm and then decrease to 0.85 x 10 to the -24th sq cm at 241 nm. The Herzberg values are compared with data from previous investigations and the values correlate well.

  20. Fluorophore Absorption Size Exclusion Chromatography (FA-SEC): An Alternative Method for High-Throughput Detergent Screening of Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sung-Yao; Sun, Xing-Han; Hsiao, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Shao-En; Li, Guan-Syun; Hu, Nien-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins play key roles in many fundamental functions in cells including ATP synthesis, ion and molecule transporter, cell signalling and enzymatic reactions, accounting for ~30% genes of whole genomes. However, the hydrophobic nature of membrane proteins frequently hampers the progress of structure determination. Detergent screening is the critical step in obtaining stable detergent-solubilized membrane proteins and well-diffracting protein crystals. Fluorescence Detection Size Exclusion Chromatography (FSEC) has been developed to monitor the extraction efficiency and monodispersity of membrane proteins in detergent micelles. By tracing the FSEC profiles of GFP-fused membrane proteins, this method significantly enhances the throughput of detergent screening. However, current methods to acquire FSEC profiles require either an in-line fluorescence detector with the SEC equipment or an off-line spectrofluorometer microplate reader. Here, we introduce an alternative method detecting the absorption of GFP (FA-SEC) at 485 nm, thus making this methodology possible on conventional SEC equipment through the in-line absorbance spectrometer. The results demonstrate that absorption is in great correlation with fluorescence of GFP. The comparably weaker absorption signal can be improved by using a longer path-length flow cell. The FA-SEC profiles were congruent with the ones plotted by FSEC, suggesting FA-SEC could be a comparable and economical setup for detergent screening of membrane proteins. PMID:27332877

  1. Fluorophore Absorption Size Exclusion Chromatography (FA-SEC): An Alternative Method for High-Throughput Detergent Screening of Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Shao-En; Li, Guan-Syun; Hu, Nien-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins play key roles in many fundamental functions in cells including ATP synthesis, ion and molecule transporter, cell signalling and enzymatic reactions, accounting for ~30% genes of whole genomes. However, the hydrophobic nature of membrane proteins frequently hampers the progress of structure determination. Detergent screening is the critical step in obtaining stable detergent-solubilized membrane proteins and well-diffracting protein crystals. Fluorescence Detection Size Exclusion Chromatography (FSEC) has been developed to monitor the extraction efficiency and monodispersity of membrane proteins in detergent micelles. By tracing the FSEC profiles of GFP-fused membrane proteins, this method significantly enhances the throughput of detergent screening. However, current methods to acquire FSEC profiles require either an in-line fluorescence detector with the SEC equipment or an off-line spectrofluorometer microplate reader. Here, we introduce an alternative method detecting the absorption of GFP (FA-SEC) at 485 nm, thus making this methodology possible on conventional SEC equipment through the in-line absorbance spectrometer. The results demonstrate that absorption is in great correlation with fluorescence of GFP. The comparably weaker absorption signal can be improved by using a longer path-length flow cell. The FA-SEC profiles were congruent with the ones plotted by FSEC, suggesting FA-SEC could be a comparable and economical setup for detergent screening of membrane proteins. PMID:27332877

  2. Propagation and absorption of high-intensity femtosecond laser radiation in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Kononenko, V V; Konov, V I; Gololobov, V M; Zavedeev, E V

    2014-12-31

    Femtosecond interferometry has been used to experimentally study the photoexcitation of the electron subsystem of diamond exposed to femtosecond laser pulses of intensity 10{sup 11} to 10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2}. The carrier concentration has been determined as a function of incident intensity for three harmonics of a Ti : sapphire laser (800, 400 and 266 nm). The results demonstrate that, in a wide range of laser fluences (up to those resulting in surface and bulk graphitisation), a well-defined multiphoton absorption prevails. We have estimated nonlinear absorption coefficients for pulsed radiation at λ = 800 nm (four-photon transition) and at 400 and 266 nm (indirect and direct two-photon transitions, respectively). It has also been shown that, at any considerable path length of a femtosecond pulse in diamond (tens of microns or longer), the laser beam experiences a severe nonlinear transformation, determining the amount of energy absorbed by the lattice, which is important for the development of technology for diamond photostructuring by ultrashort pulses. The competition between wave packet self-focusing and the plasma defocusing effect is examined as a major mechanism governing the propagation of intense laser pulses in diamond. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  3. UV differential optical absorption method for measuring sulfur content in coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Feihu; Xu, Chuanlong; Wang, Shimin

    2012-02-01

    Determining the sulfur content in coal rapidly and accurately can provide a technical basis for the enterprises and the environmental administration departments. A novel method for measuring the sulfur content in coal based on UV differential optical absorption is presented in this paper. However, compared with the applications in atmosphere monitoring, the UV differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) for the sulfur content measurement in coal has the problems that the concentration range of SO2 in the flue gas is wider and the optical path-length of the gas cell is shorter. To solve these problems, an improved DOAS algorithm based on a finite impulse response (FIR) filter and a nonlinear compensation technique is proposed. An experimental measurement system based on the modified DOAS is designed and established. The standard SO2 gas and five kinds of standard coals are experimentally tested. Theoretical and experimental results show that the lower detection limit of the system is better than 0.014%, and the repeatability of the measurement system fairly meets the national standard of China. The system has advantages of low maintenance and shorter measurement duration (4 min).

  4. Gas-path seal technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1976-01-01

    Improved gas-path seals are needed for better fuel economy, longer performance retention, and lower maintenance, particularly in advanced, high-performance gas turbine engines. Problems encountered in gas-path sealing are described, as well as new blade-tip sealing approaches for high-pressure compressors and turbines. These include a lubricant coating for conventional, porous-metal, rub-strip materials used in compressors. An improved hot-press metal alloy shows promise to increase the operating surface temperatures of high-pressure-turbine, blade-tip seals to 1450 K (2150 F). Three ceramic seal materials are also described that have the potential to allow much higher gas-path surface operating temperatures than are possible with metal systems.

  5. Balanced Paths in Colored Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Alessandro; Faella, Marco; Mogavero, Fabio; Murano, Aniello

    We consider finite graphs whose edges are labeled with elements, called colors, taken from a fixed finite alphabet. We study the problem of determining whether there is an infinite path where either (i) all colors occur with the same asymptotic frequency, or (ii) there is a constant which bounds the difference between the occurrences of any two colors for all prefixes of the path. These two notions can be viewed as refinements of the classical notion of fair path, whose simplest form checks whether all colors occur infinitely often. Our notions provide stronger criteria, particularly suitable for scheduling applications based on a coarse-grained model of the jobs involved. We show that both problems are solvable in polynomial time, by reducing them to the feasibility of a linear program.

  6. 14 CFR 25.111 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Takeoff path. 25.111 Section 25.111... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.111 Takeoff path. (a) The takeoff path... and VFTO is reached, whichever point is higher. In addition— (1) The takeoff path must be based on...

  7. 14 CFR 25.111 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Takeoff path. 25.111 Section 25.111... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.111 Takeoff path. (a) The takeoff path... and VFTO is reached, whichever point is higher. In addition— (1) The takeoff path must be based on...

  8. 14 CFR 25.111 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff path. 25.111 Section 25.111... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.111 Takeoff path. (a) The takeoff path... and VFTO is reached, whichever point is higher. In addition— (1) The takeoff path must be based on...

  9. 14 CFR 25.111 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff path. 25.111 Section 25.111... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.111 Takeoff path. (a) The takeoff path... and VFTO is reached, whichever point is higher. In addition— (1) The takeoff path must be based on...

  10. 14 CFR 23.57 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Takeoff path. 23.57 Section 23.57... path. For normal, utility, and acrobatic category multiengine jets of more than 6,000 pounds maximum weight and commuter category airplanes, the takeoff path is as follows: (a) The takeoff path extends...

  11. 14 CFR 23.57 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Takeoff path. 23.57 Section 23.57... path. For normal, utility, and acrobatic category multiengine jets of more than 6,000 pounds maximum weight and commuter category airplanes, the takeoff path is as follows: (a) The takeoff path extends...

  12. 14 CFR 23.57 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Takeoff path. 23.57 Section 23.57... path. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 75753, December 2, 2011. For each commuter category airplane, the takeoff path is as follows: (a) The takeoff path extends from a standing start to a point...

  13. 14 CFR 25.111 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Takeoff path. 25.111 Section 25.111... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.111 Takeoff path. (a) The takeoff path... and VFTO is reached, whichever point is higher. In addition— (1) The takeoff path must be based on...

  14. Calculating Least Risk Paths in 3d Indoor Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanclooster, A.; De Maeyer, Ph.; Fack, V.; Van de Weghe, N.

    2013-08-01

    Over the last couple of years, research on indoor environments has gained a fresh impetus; more specifically applications that support navigation and wayfinding have become one of the booming industries. Indoor navigation research currently covers the technological aspect of indoor positioning and the modelling of indoor space. The algorithmic development to support navigation has so far been left mostly untouched, as most applications mainly rely on adapting Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm to an indoor network. However, alternative algorithms for outdoor navigation have been proposed adding a more cognitive notion to the calculated paths and as such adhering to the natural wayfinding behaviour (e.g. simplest paths, least risk paths). These algorithms are currently restricted to outdoor applications. The need for indoor cognitive algorithms is highlighted by a more challenged navigation and orientation due to the specific indoor structure (e.g. fragmentation, less visibility, confined areas…). As such, the clarity and easiness of route instructions is of paramount importance when distributing indoor routes. A shortest or fastest path indoors not necessarily aligns with the cognitive mapping of the building. Therefore, the aim of this research is to extend those richer cognitive algorithms to three-dimensional indoor environments. More specifically for this paper, we will focus on the application of the least risk path algorithm of Grum (2005) to an indoor space. The algorithm as proposed by Grum (2005) is duplicated and tested in a complex multi-storey building. The results of several least risk path calculations are compared to the shortest paths in indoor environments in terms of total length, improvement in route description complexity and number of turns. Several scenarios are tested in this comparison: paths covering a single floor, paths crossing several building wings and/or floors. Adjustments to the algorithm are proposed to be more aligned to the

  15. Collisionless absorption in sharp-edged plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, P. ); Bell, A.R. )

    1992-03-09

    The absorption of subpicosecond, obliquely incident laser light is studied using a 11/2D particle-in-cell code. Density scale lengths from {ital L}/{lambda}=0.01 to 2 and laser irradiances between {ital I}{lambda}{sup 2}=10{sup 14} and 10{sup 18} W cm{sup {minus}2} {mu}m{sup 2} are considered. Vacuum heating'' (F. Brunel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 52 (1987)) dominates over resonance absorption for scale lengths {ital L}/{lambda}{lt}0.1, and is most efficient when {ital v}{sub osc}/{ital c}{congruent}3.1({ital L}/{lambda}){sup 2}. Absorbed energy is carried mainly by a superhot'' electron population with {ital U}{sub hot}{similar to}({ital I}{lambda}{sup 2}){sup 1/3--1/2}.

  16. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  17. Speckle imaging over horizontal paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, Carmen J.

    2002-09-01

    Atmospheric aberrations reduce the resolution and contrast in surveillance images recorded over horizontal or slant paths. This paper describes our recent horizontal and slant-path imaging experiments of extended scenes as well as the results obtained using speckle imaging. The experiments were performed with an 8-inch diameter telescope placed on either a rooftop or hillside and cover ranges of interest from 0.5 km up to 10 km. The scenery includes resolution targets, people, vehicles, and other structures. The improvement in image quality using speckle imaging is dramatic in many cases, and depends significantly upon the atmospheric conditions. We quantify resolution improvement through modulation transfer function measurement comparisons.

  18. Speckle Imaging Over Horizontal Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, C J

    2002-05-21

    Atmospheric aberrations reduce the resolution and contrast in surveillance images recorded over horizontal or slant paths. This paper describes our recent horizontal and slant path imaging experiments of extended scenes as well as the results obtained using speckle imaging. The experiments were performed with an 8-inch diameter telescope placed on either a rooftop or hillside and cover ranges of interest from 0.5 km up to 10 km. The scenery includes resolution targets, people, vehicles, and other structures. The improvement in image quality using speckle imaging is dramatic in many cases, and depends significantly upon the atmospheric conditions. We quantify resolution improvement through modulation transfer function measurement comparisons.

  19. Multiple paths in complex tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galanter, Eugene; Wiegand, Thomas; Mark, Gloria

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between utility judgments of subtask paths and the utility of the task as a whole was examined. The convergent validation procedure is based on the assumption that measurements of the same quantity done with different methods should covary. The utility measures of the subtasks were obtained during the performance of an aircraft flight controller navigation task. Analyses helped decide among various models of subtask utility combination, whether the utility ratings of subtask paths predict the whole tasks utility rating, and indirectly, whether judgmental models need to include the equivalent of cognitive noise.

  20. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  1. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-06-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  2. Percutaneous absorption of drugs.

    PubMed

    Wester, R C; Maibach, H I

    1992-10-01

    The skin is an evolutionary masterpiece of living tissue which is the final control unit for determining the local and systemic availability of any drug which must pass into and through it. In vivo in humans, many factors will affect the absorption of drugs. These include individual biological variation and may be influenced by race. The skin site of the body will also influence percutaneous absorption. Generally, those body parts exposed to the open environment (and to cosmetics, drugs and hazardous toxic substances) are most affected. Treating patients may involve single daily drug treatment or multiple daily administration. Finally, the body will be washed (normal daily process or when there is concern about skin decontamination) and this will influence percutaneous absorption. The vehicle of a drug will affect release of drug to skin. On skin, the interrelationships of this form of administration involve drug concentration, surface area exposed, frequency and time of exposure. These interrelationships determine percutaneous absorption. Accounting for all the drug administered is desirable in controlled studies. The bioavailability of the drug then is assessed in relationship to its efficacy and toxicity in drug development. There are methods, both quantitative and qualitative, in vitro and in vivo, for studying percutaneous absorption of drugs. Animal models are substituted for humans to determine percutaneous absorption. Each of these methods thus becomes a factor in determining percutaneous absorption because they predict absorption in humans. The relevance of these predictions to humans in vivo is of intense research interest. The most relevant determination of percutaneous absorption of a drug in humans is when the drug in its approved formulation is applied in vivo to humans in the intended clinical situation. Deviation from this scenario involves the introduction of variables which may alter percutaneous absorption. PMID:1296607

  3. Long-path-length experimental studies of longitudinal phenomena in intense beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Intense charged particle beams are nonneutral plasmas and they can support a host of plasma waves and instabilities. For a long beam bunch, the longitudinal physics can often be reasonably described by a 1-D cold-fluid model, with a geometry factor to account for the transverse effects. The plasma physics of such beams has been extensively studied theoretically and computationally for decades, but until recently, the only experimental measurements were carried out on relatively short linacs. This work reviews experimental studies over the past 5 years on the U. Maryland Electron Ring, investigating longitudinal phenomena, for the first time, over time scales of hundreds and thousands of plasma periods. These results are in good agreement with theory and simulation. Topics that will be discussed are: Longitudinal confinement of a long bunch using barrier fields. The generation of space charge waves from barrier field mismatches, their propagation along the bunch and reflection at the beam ends, as well as their long-term dissipation. The characterization of solitary waves from density/velocity perturbations in the center of the bunch. Compression of solitary wave trains with velocity ``tilts'' (head-to-tail gradient). Observation of a multi-stream instability driven by the longitudinal merging of bunches and the characterization of the onset of the instability with a PIC code. The shock-wave compression of a bunch using rapidly-moving barrier fields.

  4. Dependence of length of free path of flare particles on energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daybog, Y. I.; Kurt, V. G.; Stolpovskiy, V. G.

    1985-09-01

    An analysis is made of the time profiles of fluxes of protons and alpha particles in the 0.1 to 100 MeV/nucleaon range, detected by Prognoz-6 in the solar-flare events of September 24, October 9 and 12, November 22, December 27, 1977. It is shown that a harmonic expansion of the measured field cannot be used to calculate the transport characteristics of solar cosmic rays (SCR). This is evidently due to the fact that the usual procedure for determining the power spectrum of IMF fluctuations does not make it possible to identify the type of inhomogeneity (wave, oscillation, or discontinuity) on which SCR-scattering occurs.

  5. Long path-length experimental studies of longitudinal phenomena in intense beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, B. L.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Bernal, S.; Koeth, T. W.

    2016-05-01

    Intense charged particle beams are nonneutral plasmas as they can support a host of plasma waves and instabilities. The longitudinal physics, for a long beam, can often be reasonably described by a 1-D cold-fluid model with a geometry factor to account for the transverse effects. The plasma physics of such beams has been extensively studied theoretically and computationally for decades, but until recently, the only experimental measurements were carried out on relatively short linacs. This work reviews experimental studies over the past five years on the University of Maryland Electron Ring, investigating longitudinal phenomena over time scales of thousands of plasma periods, illustrating good agreement with simulations.

  6. On the Distribution of Free Path Lengths for the Periodic Lorentz Gas III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caglioti, Emanuele; Golse, François

    For r(0,1), let Zr={xR2|dist(x,Z2)>r/2} and define τr(x,v)=inf{t>0|x+tv∂Zr}. Let Φr(t) be the probability that τr(x,v)>=t for x and v uniformly distributed in Zr and §1 respectively. We prove in this paper that as t-->+∞. This result improves upon the bounds on Φr in Bourgain-Golse-Wennberg [Commun. Math. Phys. 190, 491-508 (1998)]. We also discuss the applications of this result in the context of kinetic theory.

  7. Super-Resonant Intracavity Coherent Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malara, P.; Campanella, C. E.; Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; de Natale, P.; Gagliardi, G.

    2016-07-01

    The capability of optical resonators to extend the effective radiation-matter interaction length originates from a multipass effect, hence is intrinsically limited by the resonator’s quality factor. Here, we show that this constraint can be overcome by combining the concepts of resonant interaction and coherent perfect absorption (CPA). We demonstrate and investigate super-resonant coherent absorption in a coupled Fabry-Perot (FP)/ring cavity structure. At the FP resonant wavelengths, the described phenomenon gives rise to split modes with a nearly-transparent peak and a peak whose transmission is exceptionally sensitive to the intracavity loss. For small losses, the effective interaction pathlength of these modes is proportional respectively to the ratio and the product of the individual finesse coefficients of the two resonators. The results presented extend the conventional definition of resonant absorption and point to a way of circumventing the technological limitations of ultrahigh-quality resonators in spectroscopy and optical sensing schemes.

  8. Super-Resonant Intracavity Coherent Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Malara, P.; Campanella, C. E.; Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; De Natale, P.; Gagliardi, G.

    2016-01-01

    The capability of optical resonators to extend the effective radiation-matter interaction length originates from a multipass effect, hence is intrinsically limited by the resonator’s quality factor. Here, we show that this constraint can be overcome by combining the concepts of resonant interaction and coherent perfect absorption (CPA). We demonstrate and investigate super-resonant coherent absorption in a coupled Fabry-Perot (FP)/ring cavity structure. At the FP resonant wavelengths, the described phenomenon gives rise to split modes with a nearly-transparent peak and a peak whose transmission is exceptionally sensitive to the intracavity loss. For small losses, the effective interaction pathlength of these modes is proportional respectively to the ratio and the product of the individual finesse coefficients of the two resonators. The results presented extend the conventional definition of resonant absorption and point to a way of circumventing the technological limitations of ultrahigh-quality resonators in spectroscopy and optical sensing schemes. PMID:27364475

  9. Career Paths in Environmental Sciences

    EPA Science Inventory

    Career paths, current and future, in the environmental sciences will be discussed, based on experiences and observations during the author's 40 + years in the field. An emphasis will be placed on the need for integrated, transdisciplinary systems thinking approaches toward achie...

  10. Choosing the Path with Honor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arredondo, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The author describes the difficulties of achieving his life-long dream of going to an Ivy League college, and how his Shawnee grandfather advised him to acquire the white man's skills and bring them back to his people. He advises young Native Americans to choose the more difficult, yet honorable path of serving their own people. (TD)

  11. Perceived Shrinkage of Motion Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinico, Michele; Parovel, Giulia; Casco, Clara; Anstis, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    We show that human observers strongly underestimate a linear or circular trajectory that a luminous spot follows in the dark. At slow speeds, observers are relatively accurate, but, as the speed increases, the size of the path is progressively underestimated, by up to 35%. The underestimation imposes little memory load and does not require…

  12. Career Paths of Academic Deans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolverton, Mimi; Gonzales, Mary Jo

    This paper examines various career paths leading to deanship and considers the implications of the findings for women and minorities who aspire to this position. The paper is part of a larger study of academic deanship conducted by the Center for Academic Leadership at Washington State University between October 1996 and January 1997. Data for the…

  13. Employer Resource Manual. Project Path.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Karen R.; Del George, Eve

    Project Path at Illinois' College of DuPage was established to provide pre-employment training and career counseling for disabled students. To encourage the integration of qualified individuals with disabilities into the workplace, the project compiled this resource manual for area businesses, providing tips for interacting with disabled people…

  14. Persistence Length of Stable Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Taviare; Mirigian, Matthew; Yasar, M. Selcuk; Ross, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    Microtubules are a vital component of the cytoskeleton. As the most rigid of the cytoskeleton filaments, they give shape and support to the cell. They are also essential for intracellular traffic by providing the roadways onto which organelles are transported, and they are required to reorganize during cellular division. To perform its function in the cell, the microtubule must be rigid yet dynamic. We are interested in how the mechanical properties of stable microtubules change over time. Some ``stable'' microtubules of the cell are recycled after days, such as in the axons of neurons or the cilia and flagella. We measured the persistence length of freely fluctuating taxol-stabilized microtubules over the span of a week and analyzed them via Fourier decomposition. As measured on a daily basis, the persistence length is independent of the contour length. Although measured over the span of the week, the accuracy of the measurement and the persistence length varies. We also studied how fluorescently-labeling the microtubule affects the persistence length and observed that a higher labeling ratio corresponded to greater flexibility. National Science Foundation Grant No: 0928540 to JLR.

  15. Light-induced changes in subband absorption in a-Si:H using photoluminescence absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, S. Q.; Taylor, P. C.; Nitta, S.

    1991-08-01

    We have used the photoluminescence (PL) generated in a thin-film sample of a-Si:H to probe low absorption levels by measuring the absorption of the PL as it travels down the length of the film in a waveguide mode. This technique, which we have called PL absorption spectroscopy of PLAS, allows the measurement of values of the absorption coefficient α down to about 0.1 cm-1. Because this technique probes the top and bottom surfaces of the a-Si:H sample, it is important to separate surface from bulk absorption mechanisms. An improved sample geometry has been employed to facilitate this separation. One sample consisted of an a-Si1-xNix:H/a-Si:H/ a-Si1-xNx:H/NiCr layered structure where the silicon nitride layers served as the cladding layers for the waveguide. In a second sample the a-Si:H layer was interrupted near the middle for two separate, thin (100 Å) layers of a-Si1-xNx:H in order to check for the importance of the absorption at the silicon/silicon nitride interfaces in these PLAS measurements. Changes in the below-gap absorption on light soaking were examined using irradiation from an Ar+ laser (5145 Å, ˜200 mW/cm2 for 5.5 hours at 300 K). The silicon/silicon nitride interface is responsible for an absorption which has a shoulder near 1.2 eV while the bulk a-Si:H absorption exhibits no such shoulder. The metastable, optically-induced increase in the below gap absorption appears to come entirely from the bulk of the a-Si:H. These low temperature PLAS measurements are compared with those obtained at 300 K by photothermal deflection spectroscopy.

  16. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  17. Does length or neighborhood size cause the word length effect?

    PubMed

    Jalbert, Annie; Neath, Ian; Surprenant, Aimée M

    2011-10-01

    Jalbert, Neath, Bireta, and Surprenant (2011) suggested that past demonstrations of the word length effect, the finding that words with fewer syllables are recalled better than words with more syllables, included a confound: The short words had more orthographic neighbors than the long words. The experiments reported here test two predictions that would follow if neighborhood size is a more important factor than word length. In Experiment 1, we found that concurrent articulation removed the effect of neighborhood size, just as it removes the effect of word length. Experiment 2 demonstrated that this pattern is also found with nonwords. For Experiment 3, we factorially manipulated length and neighborhood size, and found only effects of the latter. These results are problematic for any theory of memory that includes decay offset by rehearsal, but they are consistent with accounts that include a redintegrative stage that is susceptible to disruption by noise. The results also confirm the importance of lexical and linguistic factors on memory tasks thought to tap short-term memory. PMID:21461875

  18. When Does Length Cause the Word Length Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jalbert, Annie; Neath, Ian; Bireta, Tamra J.; Surprenant, Aimee M.

    2011-01-01

    The word length effect, the finding that lists of short words are better recalled than lists of long words, has been termed one of the benchmark findings that any theory of immediate memory must account for. Indeed, the effect led directly to the development of working memory and the phonological loop, and it is viewed as the best remaining…

  19. Effective Cavity Length of Gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumm, Manfred

    2014-12-01

    Megawatt-class gyrotron oscillators for electron cyclotron heating and non-inductive current drive (ECH&CD) in magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas have relatively low cavity quality factors in the range of 1000 to 2000. The effective length of their cavities cannot be simply deduced from the cavity electric field profile, since this has by far not a Gaussian shape. The present paper presents a novel method to estimate the effective length of a gyrotron cavity just from the eigenvalue of the operating TEm,n mode, the cavity radius and the exact oscillation frequency which may be numerically computed or precisely measured. This effective cavity length then can be taken to calculate the Fresnel parameter in order to confirm that the cavity is not too short so that the transverse structure of any mode in the cavity is the same as that of the corresponding mode in a long circular waveguide with the same diameter.

  20. Graduated compression stockings: knee length or thigh length.

    PubMed

    Benkö, T; Cooke, E A; McNally, M A; Mollan, R A

    2001-02-01

    The mechanisms by which graduated compression stockings prevent deep venous thrombosis are not completely understood. In the current study the physiologic effect of low-pressure graduated compression stockings on the venous blood flow in the lower limb and the practical aspects of their use were assessed. Patients having elective orthopaedic surgery at a university orthopaedic department were randomized into five groups to wear two different types of graduated compression stockings in thigh and knee lengths. Patients in the fifth control group did not wear graduated compression stockings. Venous occlusion strain gauge plethysmography was used to measure venous flow. After 20-minutes bed rest there was a highly significant increase in venous capacitance and venous outflow in patients in all of the four groups wearing stockings. There was no difference in the mean of the percentage change of venous capacitance in patients in the four groups wearing stockings. The knee length Brevet stockings were less efficient in increasing the venous outflow. There was no significant change in the venous capacitance and venous outflow in patients in the control group. Visual assessment of the fit and use of stockings was done, and patients' subjective opinion of comfort was sought. The knee length graduated compression stockings wrinkled significantly less, and significantly fewer patients reported discomfort with them. All stockings were reported to be difficult to use. Thigh and knee length stockings have a significant effect on decreasing venous stasis of the lower limb. Knee length graduated compression stockings are similarly efficient in decreasing venous stasis, but they are more comfortable to wear, and they wrinkle less. PMID:11210954

  1. Walking on inclines: how do desert ants monitor slope and step length

    PubMed Central

    Seidl, Tobias; Wehner, Rüdiger

    2008-01-01

    Background During long-distance foraging in almost featureless habitats desert ants of the genus Cataglyphis employ path-integrating mechanisms (vector navigation). This navigational strategy requires an egocentric monitoring of the foraging path by incrementally integrating direction, distance, and inclination of the path. Monitoring the latter two parameters involves idiothetic cues and hence is tightly coupled to the ant's locomotor behavior. Results In a kinematic study of desert ant locomotion performed on differently inclined surfaces we aimed at pinpointing the relevant mechanisms of estimating step length and inclination. In a behavioral experiment with ants foraging on slippery surfaces we broke the otherwise tightly coupled relationship between stepping frequency and step length and examined the animals' ability to monitor distances covered even under those adverse conditions. We show that the ants' locomotor system is not influenced by inclined paths. After removing the effect of speed, slope had only marginal influence on kinematic parameters. Conclusion From the obtained data we infer that the previously proposed monitoring of angles of the thorax-coxa joint is not involved in inclinometry. Due to the tiny variations in cycle period, we also argue that an efference copy of the central pattern generator coding the step length in its output frequency will most likely not suffice for estimating step length and complementing the pedometer. Finally we propose that sensing forces acting on the ant's legs could provide the desired neuronal correlate employed in monitoring inclination and step length. PMID:18518946

  2. Coherence length of neutron superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    De Blasio, F.V.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Lazzari, G.; Baldo, M.; Schulze, H.

    1997-10-01

    The coherence length of superfluid neutron matter is calculated from the microscopic BCS wave function of a Cooper pair in momentum space making use of recent nucleon-nucleon potential models and including polarization (RPA) effects. We find as our main result that the coherence length is proportional to the Fermi momentum to pairing gap ratio, in good agreement with simple estimates used in the literature, with a nearly interaction independent constant of proportionality. Our calculations can be applied to the problem of inhomogeneous superfluidity of hadronic matter in the crust of a neutron star. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Overview of bunch length measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A. H.

    1999-02-19

    An overview of particle and photon beam bunch length measurements is presented in the context of free-electron laser (FEL) challenges. Particle-beam peak current is a critical factor in obtaining adequate FEL gain for both oscillators and self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) devices. Since measurement of charge is a standard measurement, the bunch length becomes the key issue for ultrashort bunches. Both time-domain and frequency-domain techniques are presented in the context of using electromagnetic radiation over eight orders of magnitude in wavelength. In addition, the measurement of microbunching in a micropulse is addressed.

  4. Enzymatic reaction paths as determined by transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterson, Jean Emily

    Enzymes are biological catalysts capable of enhancing the rates of chemical reactions by many orders of magnitude as compared to solution chemistry. Since the catalytic power of enzymes routinely exceeds that of the best artificial catalysts available, there is much interest in understanding the complete nature of chemical barrier crossing in enzymatic reactions. Two specific questions pertaining to the source of enzymatic rate enhancements are investigated in this work. The first is the issue of how fast protein motions of an enzyme contribute to chemical barrier crossing. Our group has previously identified sub-picosecond protein motions, termed promoting vibrations (PVs), that dynamically modulate chemical transformation in several enzymes. In the case of human heart lactate dehydrogenase (hhLDH), prior studies have shown that a specific axis of residues undergoes a compressional fluctuation towards the active site, decreasing a hydride and a proton donor--acceptor distance on a sub-picosecond timescale to promote particle transfer. To more thoroughly understand the contribution of this dynamic motion to the enzymatic reaction coordinate of hhLDH, we conducted transition path sampling (TPS) using four versions of the enzymatic system: a wild type enzyme with natural isotopic abundance; a heavy enzyme where all the carbons, nitrogens, and non-exchangeable hydrogens were replaced with heavy isotopes; and two versions of the enzyme with mutations in the axis of PV residues. We generated four separate ensembles of reaction paths and analyzed each in terms of the reaction mechanism, time of barrier crossing, dynamics of the PV, and residues involved in the enzymatic reaction coordinate. We found that heavy isotopic substitution of hhLDH altered the sub-picosecond dynamics of the PV, changed the favored reaction mechanism, dramatically increased the time of barrier crossing, but did not have an effect on the specific residues involved in the PV. In the mutant systems

  5. Advanced Sine Wave Modulation of Continuous Wave Laser System for Atmospheric CO2 Differential Absorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with ITT Exelis have been experimenting with Continuous Wave (CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) as a means of performing atmospheric CO2 column measurements from space to support the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission.Because range resolving Intensity Modulated (IM) CW lidar techniques presented here rely on matched filter correlations, autocorrelation properties without side lobes or other artifacts are highly desirable since the autocorrelation function is critical for the measurements of lidar return powers, laser path lengths, and CO2 column amounts. In this paper modulation techniques are investigated that improve autocorrelation properties. The modulation techniques investigated in this paper include sine waves modulated by maximum length (ML) sequences in various hardware configurations. A CW lidar system using sine waves modulated by ML pseudo random noise codes is described, which uses a time shifting approach to separate channels and make multiple, simultaneous online/offline differential absorption measurements. Unlike the pure ML sequence, this technique is useful in hardware that is band pass filtered as the IM sine wave carrier shifts the main power band. Both amplitude and Phase Shift Keying (PSK) modulated IM carriers are investigated that exibit perfect autocorrelation properties down to one cycle per code bit. In addition, a method is presented to bandwidth limit the ML sequence based on a Gaussian filter implemented in terms of Jacobi theta functions that does not seriously degrade the resolution or introduce side lobes as a means of reducing aliasing and IM carrier bandwidth.

  6. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  7. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  8. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  9. Dipeptide absorption in man

    PubMed Central

    Hellier, M. D.; Holdsworth, C. D.; McColl, I.; Perrett, D.

    1972-01-01

    A quantitative perfusion method has been used to study intestinal absorption of two dipeptides—glycyl-glycine and glycyl-l-alanine—in normal subjects. In each case, the constituent amino acids were absorbed faster when presented as dipeptides than as free amino acids, suggesting intact dipeptide transport. During absorption constituent amino acids were measured within the lumen and it is suggested that these represent amino acids which have diffused back to the lumen after absorption as dipeptide. Portal blood analyses during absorption of a third dipeptide, glycyl-l-lysine, have shown that this dipeptide, known to be transported intact from the intestinal lumen, is hydrolysed to its constitutent amino acids before it reaches portal venous blood. PMID:4652039

  10. Fluid absorption solar energy receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, Edward J.

    1993-01-01

    A conventional solar dynamic system transmits solar energy to the flowing fluid of a thermodynamic cycle through structures which contain the gas and thermal energy storage material. Such a heat transfer mechanism dictates that the structure operate at a higher temperature than the fluid. This investigation reports on a fluid absorption receiver where only a part of the solar energy is transmitted to the structure. The other part is absorbed directly by the fluid. By proportioning these two heat transfer paths the energy to the structure can preheat the fluid, while the energy absorbed directly by the fluid raises the fluid to its final working temperature. The surface temperatures need not exceed the output temperature of the fluid. This makes the output temperature of the gas the maximum temperature in the system. The gas can have local maximum temperatures higher than the output working temperature. However local high temperatures are quickly equilibrated, and since the gas does not emit radiation, local high temperatures do not result in a radiative heat loss. Thermal radiation, thermal conductivity, and heat exchange with the gas all help equilibrate the surface temperature.

  11. Active stabilization of a fiber-optic two-photon interferometer using continuous optical length control.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seok-Beom; Kim, Heonoh

    2016-05-16

    The practical realization of long-distance entanglement-based quantum communication systems strongly rely on the observation of highly stable quantum interference between correlated single photons. This task must accompany active stabilization of the optical path lengths within the single-photon coherence length. Here, we provide two-step interferometer stabilization methods employing continuous optical length control and experimentally demonstrate two-photon quantum interference using an actively stabilized 6-km-long fiber-optic Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer. The two-step active control techniques are applied for measuring highly stable two-photon interference fringes by scanning the optical path-length difference. The obtained two-photon interference visibilities with and without accidental subtraction are found to be approximately 90.7% and 65.4%, respectively. PMID:27409920

  12. LASER-BASED, LONG PATH MONITORING OF AMBIENT GASES, ANALYSIS OF TWO SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    New long path absorption techniques for measurement of ambient O3 and CO have recently been demonstrated using a CO2 laser and a semiconductor diode laser, respectively. For the CO2 laser system the use of closely spaced wavelengths minimizes system drift and simplifies the deter...

  13. Effect of deformation path sequence on the behavior of nanoscale copper bicrystal interfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Spearot, Douglas E.; Jacob, Karl I.; Plimpton, Steven James; McDowell, David Lynn

    2005-06-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations are performed to study the effect of deformation sequence and history on the inelastic behavior of copper interfaces on the nanoscale. An asymmetric 45 deg tilt bicrystal interface is examined, representing an idealized high-angle grain boundary interface. The interface model is subjected to three different deformation paths: tension then shear, shear then tension, and combined proportional tension and shear. Analysis shows that path-history dependent material behavior is confined within a finite layer of deformation around the bicrystal interface. The relationships between length scale and interface properties, such as the thickness of the path-history dependent layer and the interface strength, are discussed in detail.

  14. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  15. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  16. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  17. Path querying system on mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xing; Wang, Yifei; Tian, Yuan; Wu, Lun

    2006-01-01

    Traditional approaches to path querying problems are not efficient and convenient under most circumstances. A more convenient and reliable approach to this problem has to be found. This paper is devoted to a path querying solution on mobile devices. By using an improved Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm and a natural language translating module, this system can help people find the shortest path between two places through their cell phones or other mobile devices. The chosen path is prompted in text of natural language, as well as a map picture. This system would be useful in solving best path querying problems and have potential to be a profitable business system.

  18. Open-path cavity ring-down spectroscopy sensor for atmospheric ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadman, Soran; Rose, Charles; Yalin, Azer P.

    2016-07-01

    An open-path cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) sensor has been developed for measurement of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) and represents the first use of open-path CRDS in the mid-infrared region. The sensor uses a continuous-wave distributed feedback quantum cascade laser at 10.33 μm to target strong absorption features. The optical cavity is constructed with two high-reflectivity mirrors ( R = 0.9995). The open-path configuration removes inlet effects, which are very challenging for closed-path instruments, and can be enabling for compact, low-power designs. Sensor performance was validated in the laboratory by measuring known concentrations in a closed-path configuration. The open-path configuration was validated by comparison against a commercial closed-path CRDS instrument for outdoor measurements at a small feed lot. Ammonia concentrations from the two instruments showed good agreement with slope of 0.990 ( R 2 = 0.92), for 5-min averages. The precision of the open-path instrument was found from Allan variance studies as 1.2 ppb (2-σ) for 3-s measurement durations.

  19. Folded-Light-Path Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koleilat, Ghada I.; Kramer, Illan J.; Wong, Chris T. O.; Thon, Susanna M.; Labelle, André J.; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H.

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics combine low-cost solution processing with quantum size-effect tuning to match absorption to the solar spectrum. Rapid advances have led to certified solar power conversion efficiencies of over 7%. Nevertheless, these devices remain held back by a compromise in the choice of quantum dot film thickness, balancing on the one hand the need to maximize photon absorption, mandating a thicker film, and, on the other, the need for efficient carrier extraction, a consideration that limits film thickness. Here we report an architecture that breaks this compromise by folding the path of light propagating in the colloidal quantum dot solid. Using this method, we achieve a substantial increase in short-circuit current, ultimately leading to improved power conversion efficiency. PMID:23835564

  20. Exploring the origin of high optical absorption in conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    Vezie, Michelle S; Few, Sheridan; Meager, Iain; Pieridou, Galatia; Dörling, Bernhard; Ashraf, Raja Shahid; Goñi, Alejandro R; Bronstein, Hugo; McCulloch, Iain; Hayes, Sophia C; Campoy-Quiles, Mariano; Nelson, Jenny

    2016-07-01

    The specific optical absorption of an organic semiconductor is critical to the performance of organic optoelectronic devices. For example, higher light-harvesting efficiency can lead to higher photocurrent in solar cells that are limited by sub-optimal electrical transport. Here, we compare over 40 conjugated polymers, and find that many different chemical structures share an apparent maximum in their extinction coefficients. However, a diketopyrrolopyrrole-thienothiophene copolymer shows remarkably high optical absorption at relatively low photon energies. By investigating its backbone structure and conformation with measurements and quantum chemical calculations, we find that the high optical absorption can be explained by the high persistence length of the polymer. Accordingly, we demonstrate high absorption in other polymers with high theoretical persistence length. Visible light harvesting may be enhanced in other conjugated polymers through judicious design of the structure. PMID:27183327