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Sample records for absorption rate sar

  1. A Prototype RF Dosimeter for Independent Measurement of the Average Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) During MRI

    PubMed Central

    Stralka, John P; Bottomley, Paul A

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To develop a scanner-independent dosimeter for measuring the average radio frequency (RF) power deposition and specific absorption rates (SAR) for human MRI exposure. Materials and Methods A prototype dosimeter has a transducer with orthogonal conducting loops surrounding a small signal-generating MRI sample. The loops contain resistors whose values are adjusted to load the scanner’s MRI coils equivalent to an average head or body during MRI. The scanner adjusts its power output to normal levels during setup, using the MRI sample. Following calibration, the total power and average SAR deposited in the transducer are measured from the root-mean-square (rms) power induced in the transducer during MRI. Results A 1.5 Tesla head transducer was adjusted to elicit the same load as the average of nine adult volunteers. Once adjusted, the transducer loads other head coils the same as the head does. The dosimeter is calibrated at up to 20 W total deposited power and 4.5 W/kg SAR in the average head, with about 5% accuracy. Conclusion This dosimeter provides a simple portable means of measuring the power deposited in a body-equivalent sample load, independent of the scanner. Further work will develop SAR dosimetry for the torso and for higher fields. PMID:17969145

  2. Combined Acquisition Technique (CAT) for Neuroimaging of Multiple Sclerosis at Low Specific Absorption Rates (SAR)

    PubMed Central

    Biller, Armin; Choli, Morwan; Blaimer, Martin; Breuer, Felix A.; Jakob, Peter M.; Bartsch, Andreas J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare a novel combined acquisition technique (CAT) of turbo-spin-echo (TSE) and echo-planar-imaging (EPI) with conventional TSE. CAT reduces the electromagnetic energy load transmitted for spin excitation. This radiofrequency (RF) burden is limited by the specific absorption rate (SAR) for patient safety. SAR limits restrict high-field MRI applications, in particular. Material and Methods The study was approved by the local Medical Ethics Committee. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. T2- and PD-weighted brain images of n = 40 Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients were acquired by CAT and TSE at 3 Tesla. Lesions were recorded by two blinded, board-certificated neuroradiologists. Diagnostic equivalence of CAT and TSE to detect MS lesions was evaluated along with their SAR, sound pressure level (SPL) and sensations of acoustic noise, heating, vibration and peripheral nerve stimulation. Results Every MS lesion revealed on TSE was detected by CAT according to both raters (Cohen’s kappa of within-rater/across-CAT/TSE lesion detection κCAT = 1.00, at an inter-rater lesion detection agreement of κLES = 0.82). CAT reduced the SAR burden significantly compared to TSE (p<0.001). Mean SAR differences between TSE and CAT were 29.0 (±5.7) % for the T2-contrast and 32.7 (±21.9) % for the PD-contrast (expressed as percentages of the effective SAR limit of 3.2 W/kg for head examinations). Average SPL of CAT was no louder than during TSE. Sensations of CAT- vs. TSE-induced heating, noise and scanning vibrations did not differ. Conclusion T2−/PD-CAT is diagnostically equivalent to TSE for MS lesion detection yet substantially reduces the RF exposure. Such SAR reduction facilitates high-field MRI applications at 3 Tesla or above and corresponding protocol standardizations but CAT can also be used to scan faster, at higher resolution or with more slices. According to our data, CAT is no more uncomfortable than TSE scanning. PMID

  3. Assessment of specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in the head from a TETRA handset.

    PubMed

    Dimbylow, Peter; Khalid, Mohammed; Mann, Simon

    2003-12-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) from a representative TETRA handset have been performed in an anatomically realistic model of the head. TETRA (Terrestrial Trunked Radio) is a modern digital private mobile radio system designed to meet the requirements of professional users, such as the police and fire brigade. The current frequency allocations in the UK are 380-385 MHz and 390-395 MHz for the public sector network. A comprehensive set of calculations of SAR in the head was performed for positions of the handset in front of the face and at both sides of the head. The representative TETRA handset considered. operating at 1 W in normal use, will show compliance with both the ICNIRP occupational and public exposure restrictions. The handset with a monopole antenna operating at 3 W in normal use will show compliance with both the ICNIRP occupational and public exposure restrictions. The handset with a helical antenna operating at 3 W in normal use will show compliance with the ICNIRP occupational exposure restriction but will be over the public exposure restriction by up to approximately 50% if kept in the position of maximum SAR for 6 min continuously. PMID:14703166

  4. Resonance behaviour of whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in the female voxel model, NAOMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimbylow, Peter

    2005-09-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations have been performed of the whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in a female voxel model, NAOMI, under isolated and grounded conditions from 10 MHz to 3 GHz. The 2 mm resolution voxel model, NAOMI, was scaled to a height of 1.63 m and a mass of 60 kg, the dimensions of the ICRP reference adult female. Comparison was made with SAR values from a reference male voxel model, NORMAN. A broad SAR resonance in the NAOMI values was found around 900 MHz and a resulting enhancement, up to 25%, over the values for the male voxel model, NORMAN. This latter result confirmed previously reported higher values in a female model. The effect of differences in anatomy was investigated by comparing values for 10-, 5- and 1-year-old phantoms rescaled to the ICRP reference values of height and mass which are the same for both sexes. The broad resonance in the NAOMI child values around 1 GHz is still a strong feature. A comparison has been made with ICNIRP guidelines. The ICNIRP occupational reference level provides a conservative estimate of the whole-body averaged SAR restriction. The linear scaling of the adult phantom using different factors in longitudinal and transverse directions, in order to match the ICRP stature and weight, does not exactly reproduce the anatomy of children. However, for public exposure the calculations with scaled child models indicate that the ICNIRP reference level may not provide a conservative estimate of the whole-body averaged SAR restriction, above 1.2 GHz for scaled 5- and 1-year-old female models, although any underestimate is by less than 20%.

  5. Hand effect on head specific absorption rate (SAR) exposed by two realistic phone models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshvari, J.; Kivento, M.

    2013-04-01

    There have been some reports about possible effect of the hand presence on the head SAR if hand phantom is included in the measurements of the head SAR compliance assessment procedure. The objective of this computational study was to examine the reported effect by using realistic head models and realistic CAD based phone models. A commercially available FDTD based EM solver was used to carry out the computational work. Based on the results of this study considering the SAR values without hand phantom as reference, following conclusions can be made: 1. In general presence of the hand lead to significantly less conservative SAR values in the head for large majority of cases 2. For lower band GSM frequencies the presence of the hand decreases the head SAR up to ~70%. 3. For the upper band GSM frequencies the presence of the hand decreases the head SAR up to ~55%. Based on the results of this study the present SAR compliance protocol where hand phantom is not included leads to more conservative head SAR results compared to the cases where hand is included.

  6. Outdoor measurement of SAR (specific absorption rate) in a full-sized human model exposed to 29. 9 MHz in the near field

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, R.G.; Griner, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    Localized and averaged specific absorption rates (SARs) were obtained in a full-size muscle-equivalent human model exposed to near-field 29.9-MHz irradiation at an outdoor facility. The model was positioned erect on a metallic groundplane 1.22 m (4 ft) from the base of a 10.8-m (35 ft) whip antenna with an input power of 1.0 kW. For whole-body SAR, a mean value of 0.83 W/kg was determined using two gradient-layer calorimeters in a twin-well configuration. The localized SARs at 12 body locations were measured using nonperturbing temperature probes and were highest in the ankle region. It is concluded that average SAR measurements in a full-size phantom are feasible using a twin-calorimeter approach; measurements in the field are practical when human-size (183 x 61 x 46 cm) calorimeters are used.

  7. Influence of information about specific absorption rate (SAR) upon customers' purchase decisions and safety evaluation of mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Peter M; Schütz, Holger; Clauberg, Martin

    2008-02-01

    This study investigated whether the SAR value is a purchase-relevant characteristic of mobile phones for laypersons and what effect the disclosure of a precautionary SAR value has on laypersons' risk perception. The study consisted of two parts: Study part 1 used a conjoint analysis design to explore the relevance of the SAR value and other features of mobile phones for an intended buying decision. Study part 2 used an experimental, repeated measures design to examine the effect of the magnitude of SAR values and the disclosure of a precautionary SAR value on risk perception. In addition, the study included an analysis of prior concerns of the study participants with regard to mobile phone risks. Part 1 indicates that the SAR value has a high relevance for laypersons' purchase intentions. In the experimental purchase setting it ranks even before price and equipment features. The results of study part 2 show that providing information of a precautionary limit value does not influence risk perception. This result suggests that laypersons' underlying subjective "safety model" for mobile phones resembles more a "margin of safety" concept than a threshold concept. The latter observation holds true no matter how concerned the participants are. PMID:17935161

  8. A specific absorption rate prediction concept for parallel transmission MR.

    PubMed

    Graesslin, Ingmar; Homann, Hanno; Biederer, Sven; Börnert, Peter; Nehrke, Kay; Vernickel, Peter; Mens, Giel; Harvey, Paul; Katscher, Ulrich

    2012-11-01

    The specific absorption rate (SAR) is a limiting factor in high-field MR. SAR estimation is typically performed by numerical simulations using generic human body models. However, SAR concepts for single-channel radiofrequency transmission cannot be directly applied to multichannel systems. In this study, a novel and comprehensive SAR prediction concept for parallel radiofrequency transmission MRI is presented, based on precalculated magnetic and electric fields obtained from electromagnetic simulations of numerical body models. The application of so-called Q-matrices and further computational optimizations allow for a real-time estimation of the SAR prior to scanning. This SAR estimation method was fully integrated into an eight-channel whole body MRI system, and it facilitated the selection of different body models and body positions. Experimental validation of the global SAR in phantoms demonstrated a good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the predictions. An initial in vivo validation showed good qualitative agreement between simulated and measured amplitude of (excitation) radiofrequency field. The feasibility and practicability of this SAR prediction concept was shown paving the way for safe parallel radiofrequency transmission in high-field MR. PMID:22231647

  9. Synthetic aperture design for increased SAR image rate

    DOEpatents

    Bielek, Timothy P.; Thompson, Douglas G.; Walker, Bruce C.

    2009-03-03

    High resolution SAR images of a target scene at near video rates can be produced by using overlapped, but nevertheless, full-size synthetic apertures. The SAR images, which respectively correspond to the apertures, can be analyzed in sequence to permit detection of movement in the target scene.

  10. SPECIFIC ABSORPTION RATE DISTRIBUTIONS IN A HETEROGENEOUS MODEL OF THE HUMAN BODY AT RADIOFREQUENCIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electric field distribution of the rate of energy absorption referred to as the specific absorption rate (SAR) in a biological body is a complex function of several exposure parameters such as frequency, intensity of the incident field, polarization, source to object configur...

  11. Intelligent low rate compression of speckled SAR imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R.W.; Eichel, P.; Magotra, N.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes a compression technique under development at Sandia National Laboratories for the compression of complex synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery at very low overall bit rates. The methods involved combine several elements of existing and new lossy and lossless compression schemes in order to achieve an overall compression ratio of large SAR scenes of at least 50:1, while maintaining reasonable image quality. It is assumed that the end user will be primarily interested in specific regions of interest within the image (called chips), but that the context in which these chips appear within the entire scene is also of importance to an image analyst. The term intelligent is used to signify an external cuer which locates the chips of interest.

  12. Specific absorption rate in models of man and monkey at 225 and 2000 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, R.G.; Griner, T.A.

    1987-01-01

    Full-size models of a man and a rhesus monkey were exposed to radiofrequency (RF) radiation at 225 MHz. The model of man was also exposed to 2000 MHz. Specific absorption rates (SARs) were measured in partial-body sections, such as the arms, legs, etc., using gradient-layer calorimeters. Also, front-surface thermographic images were obtained to qualitatively show the heating patterns. For all of the configurations used, the SAR in the limbs was much higher than in the torso. Agreement (whole-body SARs) with spheroidal models was better for both models at 225 MHz than at 2000 MHz. These results indicate that in the frequency range two orders of magnitude above whole-body resonance, SAR in the limbs significantly contributes to the whole-body average SAR.

  13. Design of Miniaturized Double-Negative Material for Specific Absorption Rate Reduction in Human Head

    PubMed Central

    Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a double-negative triangular metamaterial (TMM) structure, which exhibits a resounding electric response at microwave frequency, was developed by etching two concentric triangular rings of conducting materials. A finite-difference time-domain method in conjunction with the lossy-Drude model was used in this study. Simulations were performed using the CST Microwave Studio. The specific absorption rate (SAR) reduction technique is discussed, and the effects of the position of attachment, the distance, and the size of the metamaterials on the SAR reduction are explored. The performance of the double-negative TMMs in cellular phones was also measured in the cheek and the tilted positions using the COMOSAR system. The TMMs achieved a 52.28% reduction for the 10 g SAR. These results provide a guideline to determine the triangular design of metamaterials with the maximum SAR reducing effect for a mobile phone. PMID:25350398

  14. Quantifying intra- and extracellular aggregation of iron oxide nanoparticles and its influence on specific absorption rate.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seongho; Hurley, Katie R; Bischof, John C; Haynes, Christy L; Hogan, Christopher J

    2016-09-21

    A promising route to cancer treatment is hyperthermia, facilitated by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). After exposure to an alternating external magnetic field, SPIONs generate heat, quantified by their specific absorption rate (SAR, in W g(-1) Fe). However, without surface functionalization, commercially available, high SAR SPIONs (EMG 308, Ferrotec, USA) aggregate in aqueous suspensions; this has been shown to reduce SAR. Further reduction in SAR has been observed for SPIONs in suspensions containing cells, but the origin of this further reduction has not been made clear. Here, we use image analysis methods to quantify the structures of SPION aggregates in the extra- and intracellular milieu of LNCaP cell suspensions. We couple image characterization with nanoparticle tracking analysis and SAR measurements of SPION aggregates in cell-free suspensions, to better quantify the influence of cellular uptake on SPION aggregates and ultimately its influence on SAR. We find that in both the intra- and extracellular milieu, SPION aggregates are well-described by a quasifractal model, with most aggregates having fractal dimensions in the 1.6-2.2 range. Intracellular aggregates are found to be significantly larger than extracellular aggregates and are commonly composed of more than 10(3) primary SPION particles (hence they are "superaggregates"). By using high salt concentrations to generate such superaggregates and measuring the SAR of suspensions, we confirm that it is the formation of superaggregates in the intracellular milieu that negatively impacts SAR, reducing it from above 200 W g(-1) Fe for aggregates composed of fewer than 50 primary particles to below 50 W g(-1) for superaggregates. While the underlying physical mechanism by which aggregation leads to reduction in SAR remains to be determined, the methods developed in this study provide insight into how cellular uptake influences the extent of SPION aggregation, and enable estimation of the

  15. Parallel Transmission Pulse Design with Explicit Control for the Specific Absorption Rate in the Presence of Radiofrequency Errors

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Adrian; Schiavi, Emanuele; Eryaman, Yigitcan; Herraiz, Joaquin L.; Gagoski, Borjan; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Wald, Lawrence L.; Guerin, Bastien

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A new framework for the design of parallel transmit (pTx) pulses is presented introducing constraints for local and global specific absorption rate (SAR) in the presence of errors in the radiofrequency (RF) transmit chain. Methods The first step is the design of a pTx RF pulse with explicit constraints for global and local SAR. Then, the worst possible SAR associated with that pulse due to RF transmission errors (“worst-case SAR”) is calculated. Finally, this information is used to re-calculate the pulse with lower SAR constraints, iterating this procedure until its worst-case SAR is within safety limits. Results Analysis of an actual pTx RF transmit chain revealed amplitude errors as high as 8% (20%) and phase errors above 3° (15°) for spokes (spiral) pulses. Simulations show that using the proposed framework, pulses can be designed with controlled “worst-case SAR” in the presence of errors of this magnitude at minor cost of the excitation profile quality. Conclusion Our worst-case SAR-constrained pTx design strategy yields pulses with local and global SAR within the safety limits even in the presence of RF transmission errors. This strategy is a natural way to incorporate SAR safety factors in the design of pTx pulses. PMID:26147916

  16. Analysis of the role of lead resistivity in specific absorption rate for deep brain stimulator leads at 3T MRI.

    PubMed

    Angelone, Leonardo M; Ahveninen, Jyrki; Belliveau, John W; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2010-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on patients with implanted deep brain stimulators (DBSs) can be hazardous because of the antenna-effect of leads exposed to the incident radio-frequency field. This study evaluated electromagnetic field and specific absorption rate (SAR) changes as a function of lead resistivity on an anatomically precise head model in a 3T system. The anatomical accuracy of our head model allowed for detailed modeling of the path of DBS leads between epidermis and the outer table. Our electromagnetic finite difference time domain (FDTD) analysis showed significant changes of 1 g and 10 g averaged SAR for the range of lead resistivity modeled, including highly conductive leads up to highly resistive leads. Antenna performance and whole-head SAR were sensitive to the presence of the DBS leads only within 10%, while changes of over one order of magnitude were observed for the peak 10 g averaged SAR, suggesting that local SAR values should be considered in DBS guidelines. With rho(lead) = rho(copper) , and the MRI coil driven to produce a whole-head SAR without leads of 3.2 W/kg, the 1 g averaged SAR was 1080 W/kg and the 10 g averaged SAR 120 W/kg at the tip of the DBS lead. Conversely, in the control case without leads, the 1 g and 10 g averaged SAR were 0.5 W/kg and 0.6 W/kg, respectively, in the same location. The SAR at the tip of lead was similar with electrically homogeneous and electrically heterogeneous models. Our results show that computational models can support the development of novel lead technology, properly balancing the requirements of SAR deposition at the tip of the lead and power dissipation of the system battery. PMID:20335090

  17. Comparison of FDTD-calculated specific absorption rate in adults and children when using a mobile phone at 900 and 1800 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Búrdalo, M.; Martín, A.; Anguiano, M.; Villar, R.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the specific absorption rate (SAR) in scaled human head models is analysed to study possible differences between SAR in the heads of adults and children and for assessment of compliance with the international safety guidelines, while using a mobile phone. The finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) has been used for calculating SAR values for models of both children and adults, at 900 and 1800 MHz. Maximum 1 g averaged SAR (SAR1 g) and maximum 10 g averaged SAR (SAR10 g) have been calculated in adults and scaled head models for comparison and assessment of compliance with ANSI/IEEE and European guidelines. Results show that peak SAR1 g and peak SAR10 g all trend downwards with decreasing head size but as head size decreases, the percentage of energy absorbed in the brain increases. So, higher SAR in children's brains can be expected depending on whether the thickness of their skulls and surrounding tissues actually depends on age. The SAR in eyes of different sizes, as a critical organ, has also been studied and very similar distributions for the full size and the scaled models have been obtained. Standard limits can only be exceeded in the unpractical situation where the antenna is located at a very short distance in front of the eye.

  18. Motion measurement of SAR antenna based on high frame rate camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Cao, R.; Feng, H.; Xu, Z.

    2015-03-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is currently in the marine, agriculture, geology and other fields are widely used, while the SAR antenna is one of the most important subsystems. Performance of antenna has a significant impact on the SAR sensitivity, azimuth resolution, image blur degree and other parameter. To improve SAR resolution, SAR antenna is designed and fabricated according to flexible expandable style. However, the movement of flexible antenna will have a greater impact on accuracy of SAR systems, so the motion measurement of the flexible antenna is an urgent problem. This paper studied motion measurements method based on high frame rate camera, designed and completed a flexible antenna motion measurement experiment. In the experiment the main IMU and the sub IMU were placed at both ends of the cantilever, which is simulation of flexible antenna, the high frame rate camera was placed above the main IMU, and the imaging target was set on side of the sub IMU. When the cantilever motion occurs, IMU acquired spatial coordinates of cantilever movement in real-time, and high frame rate camera captured a series of target images, and then the images was input into JTC to obtain the cantilever motion coordinates. Through the contrast and analysis of measurement results, the measurement accuracy of flexible antenna motion is verified.

  19. Application of pixel segmentation to the low rate compression of complex SAR imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R.W.; Eichel, P.; Magotra, N.

    1998-03-01

    This paper describes a technique to identify pixels within a subregion (chip) of a complex or detected SAR image which are to be losslessly compressed while the remainder of the image is subjected to a high compression ratio. This multi-modal compression is required for the intelligent low rate compression of SAR imagery, which addresses the problem of transmitting massive amounts of high resolution complex SAR data from a remote airborne sensor to a ground station for exploitation by an automatic target recognition (ATR) system, in a real time environment, over a narrow bandwidth. The ATR system results might then be presented to an image analyst who, using the contextual information from the SAR image, makes final target determination.

  20. SAR models for estimating the percutaneous absorption of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Roy, T A; Krueger, A J; Mackerer, C R; Neil, W; Arroyo, A M; Yang, J J

    1998-01-01

    A structure-activity relationship (SAR) of the in vitro percutaneous absorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is described. The data set consisted of 60 three to seven ring PAH. Over 50 numeric descriptors were generated from the modeled molecular structures. Computer aided methods were used to evaluate descriptors and develop linear expressions relating the percent of dermally applied PAH dose absorbed through skin (PADA) to PAH structure. Three regression models with one and two variables were developed. The log octanol/water partition coefficient (log P) was the most important variable in determining percutaneous absorption. An inverse relationship between log P and the skin penetration properties of the PAH was observed. Nearly 40 of 60 PAH tested had PADA-values within a factor of two of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP); well over 50 of 60 had PADA-values within a factor of three. The results lend support to the use of isotopically labeled BaP as a surrogate for measuring the dermal flux (in vivo and in vitro) and estimating the dermal bioavailability of PAH from complex mineral oil and coal-tar derived mixtures. PMID:9933958

  1. A wide-frequency range AC magnetometer to measure the specific absorption rate in nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaio, E.; Collantes, J. M.; Garcia, J. A.; Plazaola, F.; Mornet, S.; Couillaud, F.; Sandre, O.

    2014-11-01

    Measurement of specific absorption rate (SAR) of magnetic nanoparticles is crucial to assert their potential for magnetic hyperthermia. To perform this task, calorimetric methods are widely used. However, those methods are not very accurate and are difficult to standardize. In this paper, we present AC magnetometry results performed with a lab-made magnetometer that is able to obtain dynamic hysteresis-loops in the AC magnetic field frequency range from 50 kHz to 1 MHz and intensities up to 24 kA m-1. In this work, SAR values of maghemite nanoparticles dispersed in water are measured by AC magnetometry. The so-obtained values are compared with the SAR measured by calorimetric methods. Both measurements, by calorimetry and magnetometry, are in good agreement. Therefore, the presented AC magnetometer is a suitable way to obtain SAR values of magnetic nanoparticles.

  2. Patch diameter limitation due to high chirp rates in focused SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerry, Armin W.

    1994-10-01

    Polar-format processed synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images have a limited focused patch diameter that results from unmitigated phase errors. Very high chirp rates, encountered with fine-resolution short-pulse radars, exasperate the problem via a residual video phase error term. This letter modifies the traditional maximum patch diameter expression to include effects of very high chirp rates.

  3. FDTD chiral brain tissue model for specific absorption rate determination under radiation from mobile phones at 900 and 1800 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamorano, M.; Torres-Silva, H.

    2006-04-01

    A new electrodynamics model formed by chiral bioplasma, which represents the human head inner structure and makes it possible to analyse its behaviour when it is irradiated by a microwave electromagnetic field from cellular phones, is presented. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numeric technique is used, which allows simulation of the electromagnetic fields, deduced with Maxwell's equations, and allows us to simulate the specific absorption rate (SAR). The results show the SAR behaviour as a function of the input power and the chirality factor. In considering the chiral brain tissue in the proposed human head model, the two more important conclusions of our work are the following: (a) the absorption of the electromagnetic fields from cellular phones is stronger, so the SAR coefficient is higher than that using the classical model, when values of the chiral factor are of order of 1; (b) 'inverse skin effect' shows up at 1800 MHz, with respect to a 900 MHz source.

  4. FDTD chiral brain tissue model for specific absorption rate determination under radiation from mobile phones at 900 and 1800 MHz.

    PubMed

    Zamorano, M; Torres-Silva, H

    2006-04-01

    A new electrodynamics model formed by chiral bioplasma, which represents the human head inner structure and makes it possible to analyse its behaviour when it is irradiated by a microwave electromagnetic field from cellular phones, is presented. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numeric technique is used, which allows simulation of the electromagnetic fields, deduced with Maxwell's equations, and allows us to simulate the specific absorption rate (SAR). The results show the SAR behaviour as a function of the input power and the chirality factor. In considering the chiral brain tissue in the proposed human head model, the two more important conclusions of our work are the following: (a) the absorption of the electromagnetic fields from cellular phones is stronger, so the SAR coefficient is higher than that using the classical model, when values of the chiral factor are of order of 1; (b) "inverse skin effect" shows up at 1800 MHz, with respect to a 900 MHz source. PMID:16552096

  5. Specific absorption rate in electrically coupled biological samples between metal plates.

    PubMed

    Joines, W T; Blackman, C F; Spiegel, R J

    1986-01-01

    The specific absorption rate (SAR) in a biological sample irradiated by electromagnetic fields between the metal plates of a transmission line can be altered significantly by the spacing of the metal plates and the distance between neighboring samples. The SAR in spherical biological samples is calculated for a number of neighboring sample arrangements and metal-plate spacings by using the method of images and induced dipole coupling. For a decrease in metal-plate spacing, the derived equations predict an increase in SAR within a sample and a decrease in SAR with a decrease in neighboring-sample spacing. The calculations are compared with measurements made with the aid of an array of 1-in radius metal hemispheres on the lower plate of two parallel plates (thus forming an image system). The hemisphere on which measurements are taken is insulated from the metal plate and is connected via a coaxial center conductor to an HP 3582A spectrum analyzer that measures the voltage and hence the electric field intensity at the hemisphere. Measurements made at a frequency where wavelength is large compared with sample size (48 Hz) are in good agreement with calculations. PMID:3741491

  6. On the reliable measurement of specific absorption rates and intrinsic loss parameters in magnetic hyperthermia materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildeboer, R. R.; Southern, P.; Pankhurst, Q. A.

    2014-12-01

    In the clinical application of magnetic hyperthermia, the heat generated by magnetic nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field is used as a cancer treatment. The heating ability of the particles is quantified by the specific absorption rate (SAR), an extrinsic parameter based on the clinical response characteristic of power delivered per unit mass, and by the intrinsic loss parameter (ILP), an intrinsic parameter based on the heating capacity of the material. Even though both the SAR and ILP are widely used as comparative design parameters, they are almost always measured in non-adiabatic systems that make accurate measurements difficult. We present here the results of a systematic review of measurement methods for both SAR and ILP, leading to recommendations for a standardised, simple and reliable method for measurements using non-adiabatic systems. In a representative survey of 50 retrieved datasets taken from published papers, the derived SAR or ILP was found to be more than 5% overestimated in 24% of cases and more than 5% underestimated in 52% of cases.

  7. Comparison of specific absorption rate induced in brain tissues of a child and an adult using mobile phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mai; Ueno, Shoogo

    2012-04-01

    The steady increase of mobile phone usage, especially mobile phones by children, has led to a rising concern about the possible adverse health effects of radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure. The objective of this work is to study whether there is a larger radio frequency energy absorption in the brain of a child compared to that of an adult. For this reason, three high-resolution models, two child head models (6 - and 11-year old) and one adult head model (34-year old) have been used in the study. A finite-difference time-domain method was employed to calculate the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the models from exposure to a generic handset at 1750 MHz. The results show that the SAR distributions in the human brain are age-dependent, and there is a deeper penetration of the absorbed SAR in the child's brain. The induced SAR can be significantly higher in subregions of the child's brain. In all of the examined cases, the SAR values in the brains of a child and an adult are well below the IEEE safety standard.

  8. Bioelectromagnetic effects measurements - SAR and induced current.

    PubMed

    Dlugosz, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses several theoretical and practical aspects of the application of currents flowing through the body of a radiotelephone operator and Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). SAR is known as the physical quantity which is a perfect solution for biological experiments. Unfortunately, SAR cannot be measured directly. Contrary to SAR, which is limited to the penetration depth, a current induced in a point of a body is measurable in any other point of the body. The main objective of this paper is to show that the current induced in a human body when using a radiotelephone or mobile phone is significant and should be analyzed as widely as SAR is. Computer simulations of a human's hand with a radiotelephone were made. Experiments were also conducted. The results of the experiments show that induced current is also as important as SAR and it cannot be omitted in bioelectromagnetic experiments. In biomedical studies both parameters: induced current and SAR play a major role. PMID:25585976

  9. Present knowledge about specific absorption rates inside a human body exposed to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Garn, J.; Gabriel, C.

    1995-02-01

    We have compiled results of scientific investigations about the relationship between external field-strengths and specific absorption rates inside the human body. The data were normalized to SAR-values that form the basis for current safety standards. Results were compared to exposure limits given in these standard. This comparison should serve as a reference for the selection of reliable reference levels for personal protection against thermal effects in radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. The need to measure and monitor ankle/wrist currents to protect some exposed workers is explained. The study has also highlighted a scarcity of dosimetric data at frequencies below 3 MHz. 20 refs., 7 figs.

  10. High intraspecific recombination rate in a native population of Candidatus pelagibacter ubique (SAR11).

    PubMed

    Vergin, Kevin L; Tripp, H James; Wilhelm, Larry J; Denver, Dee R; Rappé, Michael S; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2007-10-01

    Recombination is an important process in microbial evolution. Rates of recombination with extracellular DNA matter because models of microbial population structure are profoundly influenced by the degree to which recombination is occurring within the population. Low rates of recombination may be sufficient to ensure the lateral propagation of genes that have a high selective advantage without disrupting the clonal pattern of inheritance for other genes. High rates of recombination potentially can obscure clonal patterns, leading to linkage equilibrium, and give microbial populations a population genetic structure more akin to sexually interbreeding eukaryotic populations. We examined eight loci from nine strains of candidatus Pelagibacter ubique (SAR11), isolated from a single 2L niskin sample of natural seawater, for evidence of genetic recombination between strains. The Shimodaira-Hasegawa test revealed significant phylogenetic incongruence in seven of the genes, indicating that frequent recombination obscures phylogenetic signals from the linear inheritance of genes in this population. Statistical evidence for intragenic recombination was found for six loci. An informative sites matrix showed extensive evidence for a widespread breakdown of linkage disequilibrium. Although the mechanisms of genetic transfer in native SAR11 populations are unknown, we measured recombination rates, rho, that are much higher than point mutation rates, theta, as a source of genetic diversity in this clade. The eukaryotic model of species sharing a common pool of alleles is more apt for this SAR11 population than a strictly clonal model of inheritance in which allelic diversity is controlled by periodic selection. PMID:17803769

  11. Inversion of InSAR Data for the Aseismic Slip-Rate on the Hayward Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, D. A.; Bürgmann, R.; Nadeau, R.; D'Alessio, M.

    2002-12-01

    The Hayward fault is a major strand of the San Andreas fault system, and has received considerable attention because of the seismic hazard it poses to the San Francisco Bay Area. We perform a least-squares inversion of multiple geodetic and seismic data sets to determine the strike-slip distribution of the aseismic slip-rate on the fault. The analysis focuses on the northern 60 km of the fault where surface creep rates appear to be constant over the past several decades. InSAR data from 24 independent ERS interferograms are stacked to obtain range-change rates from 1992 to 2000. Surface displacement rates at 43 sites are observed using GPS from 1994 to 2002. Surface creep observations and estimates of deep slip rates determined from characteristic repeating earthquake sequences are also incorporated in the inversion. The densely spaced InSAR data require a non-planar fault surface to adequately model the near-fault data. The fault is discretized into 283 triangular dislocation elements that approximate the non-planar attributes of the fault surface. South of Hayward, a steeply, east-dipping fault geometry accommodates the divergence of the surface trace and the micro-seismicity at depth. Laplacian smoothing and a positivity constraint are included in the inversion. The InSAR data provide the greatest resolution on the shallow portion of the fault. The additional data sets help to complement the InSAR data and improve the model resolution. The inversion result suggests a heterogeneous distribution of aseismic slip-rate that is characterized by both locked and freely slipping patches. A seismic cluster beneath San Leandro coincides with a creeping patch as resolved by the geodetic data. A locked region at depth coincides with the source region of the 1868 earthquake (M 6.8) on the southern Hayward fault.

  12. Specific absorption rate dependence on temperature in magnetic field hyperthermia measured by dynamic hysteresis losses (ac magnetometry)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaio, Eneko; Sandre, Olivier; Collantes, Juan-Mari; Garcia, Jose Angel; Mornet, Stéphane; Plazaola, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are intensively studied for their potential use for magnetic hyperthermia, a treatment that has passed a phase II clinical trial against severe brain cancer (glioblastoma) at the end of 2011. Their heating power, characterized by the ‘specific absorption rate (SAR)’, is often considered temperature independent in the literature, mainly because of the difficulties that arise from the measurement methodology. Using a dynamic magnetometer presented in a recent paper, we measure here the thermal dependence of SAR for superparamagnetic iron oxide (maghemite) NPs of four different size-ranges corresponding to mean diameters around 12 nm, 14 nm, 15 nm and 16 nm. The article reports a parametrical study extending from 10 to 60 {}^\\circ C in temperature, from 75 to 1031 kHz in frequency, and from 2 to 24 kA m-1 in magnetic field strength. It was observed that SAR values of smaller NPs decrease with temperature whereas for the larger sample (16 nm) SAR values increase with temperature. The measured variation of SAR with temperature is frequency dependent. This behaviour is fully explained within the scope of linear response theory based on Néel and Brown relaxation processes, using independent magnetic measurements of the specific magnetization and the magnetic anisotropy constant. A good quantitative agreement between experimental values and theoretical values is confirmed in a tri-dimensional space that uses as coordinates the field strength, the frequency and the temperature.

  13. Estimation of variability of specific absorption rate with physical description of children exposed to electromagnetic field in the VHF band.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, T; Watanabe, S

    2009-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increasing concern regarding the effects of electromagnetic waves on the health of humans. The safety of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) is evaluated by the specific absorption rate (SAR). In recent years, SAR has been estimated by numerical simulation using fine-resolution and anatomically realistic reference whole-body voxel models of people of various ages. The variation in SAR with a change in the physical features of a real person is hardly studied, although every person has different physical features. In this study, in order to estimate the individual variability in SAR of persons, we obtained considerable 3D body shape data from actual three-year-old children and developed several homogeneous models of these children. The variability in SAR of the homogeneous models of three-year-old children for whole-body exposure to RF electromagnetic fields in the very high frequency (VHF) band calculated using the finite-difference time-domain method has been described. PMID:19964253

  14. The formation of linear aggregates in magnetic hyperthermia: implications on specific absorption rate and magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Saville, Steven L; Qi, Bin; Baker, Jonathon; Stone, Roland; Camley, Robert E; Livesey, Karen L; Ye, Longfei; Crawford, Thomas M; Mefford, O Thompson

    2014-06-15

    The design and application of magnetic nanoparticles for use as magnetic hyperthermia agents has garnered increasing interest over the past several years. When designing these systems, the fundamentals of particle design play a key role in the observed specific absorption rate (SAR). This includes the particle's core size, polymer brush length, and colloidal arrangement. While the role of particle core size on the observed SAR has been significantly reported, the role of the polymer brush length has not attracted as much attention. It has recently been reported that for some suspensions linear aggregates form in the presence of an applied external magnetic field, i.e. chains of magnetic particles. The formation of these chains may have the potential for a dramatic impact on the biomedical application of these materials, specifically the efficiency of the particles to transfer magnetic energy to the surrounding cells. In this study we demonstrate the dependence of SAR on magnetite nanoparticle core size and brush length as well as observe the formation of magnetically induced colloidal arrangements. Colloidally stable magnetic nanoparticles were demonstrated to form linear aggregates in an alternating magnetic field. The length and distribution of the aggregates were dependent upon the stabilizing polymer molecular weight. As the molecular weight of the stabilizing layer increased, the magnetic interparticle interactions decreased therefore limiting chain formation. In addition, theoretical calculations demonstrated that interparticle spacing has a significant impact on the magnetic behavior of these materials. This work has several implications for the design of nanoparticle and magnetic hyperthermia systems, while improving understanding of how colloidal arrangement affects SAR. PMID:24767510

  15. A map of strain rate for Eastern Turkey, from InSAR and GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, R. J.; Parsons, B.; Wright, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    Tectonic deformation in Eastern Turkey is dominated by strain localisation on two major strike-slip faults; the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) and the East Anatolian Fault (EAF). Here we use Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) to map interseismic strain across the Eurasian-Arabian plate boundary zone in Eastern Turkey, covering both the NAF and the EAF. Most previous InSAR interseismic studies of the NAF have used only descending track data, and in these studies it was therefore necessary to assume purely horizontal, fault-parallel motion in modelling deformation. The slip rate of the EAF has been the focus of only a few geological and geodetic studies, and InSAR has not previously been used to measure interseismic strain accumulation across this fault. We construct ~400 Envisat interferograms on three descending and two ascending tracks in Eastern Turkey, covering both the NAF and EAF. We use these data to generate five line-of-sight velocity maps (ratemaps) using the PiRATE software package (Wang et al., GRL, 2009), which implements a multi-interferogram network approach in order to maximise spatial coverage and correct for orbital errors. We find that the five InSAR ratemaps agree best in overlapping regions when all interferograms are first corrected for atmospheric effects using model outputs from the ERA-Interim global atmospheric model (Jolivet et al., GRL, 2011). From these five overlapping ratemaps, we model elastic strain accumulation for both the NAF and EAF, and calculate slip rates of 20×3 mm/yr and 10×2 mm/yr respectively, with associated locking depths of 16×9 km and 13×4 km. We then use the ratemaps, together with a compilation of GPS data in the area, to calculate a velocity field for Eastern Turkey. We find that the velocity field derived from InSAR and GPS data significantly reduces the uncertainty of east-west velocities when compared with the velocity field derived from GPS data alone, and shows that strain is mainly localised

  16. The relationship of temperature rise to specific absorption rate and current in the human leg for exposure to electromagnetic radiation in the high frequency band.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, P R

    2003-10-01

    Of the biological effects of human exposure to radiofrequency and microwave radiation, the best-established are those due to elevation of tissue temperature. To prevent harmful levels of heating, restrictions have been proposed on the specific absorption rate (SAR). However, the relationship between SAR and temperature rise is not an invariant, since not only the heat capacity but also the efficiency of heat dissipation varies between different tissues and exposure scenarios. For small enough SAR, the relationship is linear and may be characterized by a 'heating factor' deltaT/SAR. Under whole-body irradiation the SAR may be particularly high in the ankles due to the concentration of current flowing through a relatively small cross-sectional area. In a previous paper, the author has presented calculations of the SAR distribution in a human leg in the high frequency (HF) band. In this paper, the heating factor for this situation is derived using a finite element approximation of the Pennes bioheat equation. The sensitivity of the results to different blood perfusion rates is investigated, and a simple local thermoregulatory model is applied. Both time-dependent and steady-state solutions are considered. Results confirm the appropriateness of the ICNIRP reference level of 100 mA on current through the leg, but suggest that at higher currents significant thermoregulatory adjustments to muscle blood flow will occur. PMID:14579857

  17. Measurements of ankle specific absorption rate and body-to-ground current in a suit-protected human model for near-field exposures, 2-400 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, R.G.; Van Matre, B.J.

    1994-06-01

    The potential usefulness of a protective-suit ensemble to reduce specific absorption rate (SAR) at submicrowave frequencies was studied using a full-sized, muscle-equivalent human model. In the past, such suits were used predominantly for microwave protection, but some highly conductive suits presented a very real fire hazard when arcing was considered. Suits made from partially conductive fabric were slightly less effective against microwaves but were much less flammable; moreover, their performance against other radiofrequencies (RFs) has not been studied. Recently promulgated exposure standards have imposed theoretical maximum body-currents to limit extremity SAR to 20 W/kg and have impacted certain occupational environments such as those surrounding RF transmitting towers and RF heat sealers. In the present research, reactive near-field irradiation conditions were used at 2.025 and 29.9 MHz, and quasi-near-field conditions were used at 80.0 and 400.0 MHz. Nonperturbing thermal probes were used to measure RF-induced temperature rises from which localized ankle SARs were calculated; a stand-on RF milliammeter recorded RF body-to-ground current over metallic groundplanes. Mean ankle SARs of greater than 23 W/kg were measured for some unprotected conditions, but with full ensemble protection (suit, hood, and overshoes) no mean ankle SAR exceeded 1.1 W/kg. The suit without the overshoes, however, did not reduce ankle SAR. At 29.9 and 80.0 MHz, the presence or absence of the hood caused relatively small SAR changes. We attribute the suit`s ability in reducing ankle SAR to the partially conducting nature of the metal/textile material and to the ability of the overshoes to shunt RF current around the ankles. We recommend that further use of partially conducting fabrics be explored to provide practical means of reducing occupational RF-induced extremity SAR to acceptable levels. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Specific absorption rate and electric field measurements in the near field of six mobile phone base station antennas.

    PubMed

    Toivonen, Tommi; Toivo, Tim; Puranen, Lauri; Jokela, Kari

    2009-05-01

    In this article, the exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields was studied in close proximity (distances of 10, 100, 300, and 600 mm) to six base station antennas. The specific absorption rate (SAR) in 800 mm x 500 mm x 200 mm box phantom as well as unperturbed electric field (E) in air was measured. The results were used to determine whether the measurement of local maximum of unperturbed electric field can be used as a compliance check for local exposure. Also, the conservativeness of this assessment method compared to the ICNIRP basic restriction was studied. Moreover, the assessment of whole-body exposure was discussed and the distance ranges presented in which the ICNIRP limit for local exposure could be exceeded before the limit for whole-body SAR. These results show that the electric field measurement alone can be used for easy compliance check for the local exposure at all distances and for all antenna types studied. However, in some cases when the local peak value of E was compared directly to the ICNIRP reference level for unperturbed E, the exposure was overestimated only very slightly (by factor 1.1) compared to the basic restriction for localized SAR in a human, and hence these results can not be generalized to all antenna types. Moreover, it was shown that the limit for localized exposure could be exceeded before the limit for the whole-body average SAR, if the distance to the antenna was less than 240 mm. PMID:19194889

  19. Magnetic Nanoparticles with High Specific Absorption Rate at Low Alternating Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Kekalo, K.; Baker, I.; Meyers, R.; Shyong, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and properties of a new type of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) for use in the hyperthermia treatment of tumors. These particles consist of 2–4 nm crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 gathered in 20–40 nm aggregates with a coating of carboxymethyl-dextran, producing a zetasize of 110–120 nm. Despite their very low saturation magnetization (1.5–6.5 emu/g), the specific absorption rate (SAR) of the nanoparticles is 22–200 W/g at applied alternating magnetic field (AMF) with strengths of 100–500 Oe at a frequency of 160 kHz. PMID:26884816

  20. Localized specific absorption rate calculations in a realistic phantom leg at 1-30 MHz using a finite element method.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, P R

    1999-04-01

    Protection standards for radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation are principally intended to avoid detrimental thermal effects. To this end the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), and national bodies such as the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB), recommend limitations on the localized specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in various parts of the body. The role of numerical dosimetry is to estimate the SAR from measurable parameters such as external field strengths and total body currents. In recent years there have been significant advances in the sophistication of the anatomical models available, and in our knowledge of the electrical properties of the body tissues. Several groups, including NRPB, have developed mathematical phantoms from medical imaging data, such as MRI scans. It has been known for some time that under certain circumstances SAR restrictions may be violated in the ankle due to the concentration of current in a small area. In this paper the author presents calculations of the SAR distribution in a human leg in the high-frequency (HF) band. This band contains the human whole-body resonance frequency and therefore gives the strongest coupling of the body to the field. The present study uses a finite element model with variable mesh size, derived from a 2 mm resolution voxel phantom of the whole body. It also uses recently acquired data on the electrical properties of the tissues. The results are discussed in the light of the exposure standards promulgated by national and international bodies such as NRPB and ICNIRP, and it is shown that the basic SAR restrictions in the leg are ensured by a current reference level of 100 mA. PMID:10232813

  1. The relationship between specific absorption rate and temperature elevation in anatomically based human body models for plane wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Oizumi, Takuya; Hanatani, Ryuto; Chan, Kwok Hung; Wiart, Joe

    2013-02-01

    According to the international safety guidelines/standard, the whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (Poljak et al 2003 IEEE Trans. Electromagn. Compat. 45 141-5) and the peak spatial average SAR are used as metrics for human protection from whole-body and localized exposures, respectively. The IEEE standard (IEEE 2006 IEEE C95.1) indicates that the upper boundary frequency, over which the whole-body-averaged SAR is deemed to be the basic restriction, has been reduced from 6 to 3 GHz, because radio-wave energy is absorbed around the body surface when the frequency is increased. However, no quantitative discussion has been provided to support this description especially from the standpoint of temperature elevation. It is of interest to investigate the maximum temperature elevation in addition to the core temperature even for a whole-body exposure. In the present study, using anatomically based human models, we computed the SAR and the temperature elevation for a plane-wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz, taking into account the thermoregulatory response. As the primary result, we found that the ratio of the core temperature elevation to the whole-body-averaged SAR is almost frequency independent for frequencies below a few gigahertz; the ratio decreases above this frequency. At frequencies higher than a few gigahertz, core temperature elevation for the same whole-body averaged SAR becomes lower due to heat convection from the skin to air. This lower core temperature elevation is attributable to skin temperature elevation caused by the power absorption around the body surface. Then, core temperature elevation even for whole-body averaged SAR of 4 W kg-1 with the duration of 1 h was at most 0.8 °C, which is smaller than a threshold considered in the safety guidelines/standard. Further, the peak 10 g averaged SAR is correlated with the maximum body temperature elevations without extremities and pinna over the frequencies considered. These findings were confirmed

  2. Rating health and stability of engineering structures via classification indexes of InSAR Persistent Scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratesi, Fabio; Tapete, Deodato; Terenzi, Gloria; Del Ventisette, Chiara; Moretti, Sandro

    2015-08-01

    We propose a novel set of indexes to classify the information content of Persistent Scatterers (PS) and rate the health of engineering structures at urban to local scale. PS are automatically sampled and grouped via 'control areas' coinciding with the building and its surrounding environment. Density over the 'control areas' and velocity of PS are converted respectively into: Completeness of Information Index (Ici) that reflects the PS coverage grade; and Conservation Criticality Indexes (Icc) which rate the health condition of the monument separately for the object and surrounding control areas. The deformation pattern over the structure is classified as isolated (i) or diffused (d) based on the Velocity Distribution Index (Ivd). Both Ici and Icc are rated from A to E classes using a colour-coded system that intentionally emulates an energy-efficiency scale, to encourage the exploitation of PS by stakeholders and end-users in the practise of engineering surveying. Workability and reliability of the classification indexes are demonstrated over the urban heritage of Florence, Italy, using well established ERS-1/2 (1992-2000) descending, ENVISAT (2003-2010) ascending and descending PS datasets. The indexes are designed in perspective of handling outputs from InSAR processing of higher-resolution time series.

  3. Toward Online Adaptive Hyperthermia Treatment Planning: Correlation Between Measured and Simulated Specific Absorption Rate Changes Caused by Phase Steering in Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, H. Petra; Ciampa, Silvia; Kroon-Oldenhof, Rianne de; Steggerda-Carvalho, Eva J.; Stam, Gerard van; Zum Vörde Sive Vörding, Paul J.; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Geijsen, Elisabeth D.; Bardati, Fernando; Bel, Arjan; Crezee, Johannes

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Hyperthermia is the clinical application of heat, in which tumor temperatures are raised to 40°C to 45°C. This proven radiation and chemosensitizer significantly improves clinical outcome for several tumor sites. Earlier studies of the use of pre-treatment planning for hyperthermia showed good qualitative but disappointing quantitative reliability. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) can be used more reliably for online adaptive treatment planning during locoregional hyperthermia treatments. Methods and Materials: This study included 78 treatment sessions for 15 patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. At the start of treatments, temperature rise measurements were performed with 3 different antenna settings optimized for each patient, from which the absorbed power (specific absorption rate [SAR]) was derived. HTP was performed based on a computed tomography (CT) scan in treatment position with the bladder catheter in situ. The SAR along the thermocouple tracks was extracted from the simulated SAR distributions. Correlations between measured and simulated (average) SAR values were determined. To evaluate phase steering, correlations between the changes in simulated and measured SAR values averaged over the thermocouple probe were determined for all 3 combinations of antenna settings. Results: For 42% of the individual treatment sessions, the correlation coefficient between measured and simulated SAR profiles was higher than 0.5, whereas 58% showed a weak correlation (R of <0.5). The overall correlation coefficient between measured and simulated average SAR was weak (R=0.31; P<.001). The measured and simulated changes in average SAR after adapting antenna settings correlated much better (R=0.70; P<.001). The ratio between the measured and simulated quotients of maximum and average SARs was 1.03 ± 0.26 (mean ± SD), indicating that HTP can also correctly predict the relative amplitude of

  4. Specific absorption rate variation in a brain phantom due to exposure by a 3G mobile phone: problems in dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Behari, J; Nirala, Jay Prakash

    2013-12-01

    A specific absorption rate (SAR) measurements system has been developed for compliance testing of personal mobile phone in a brain phantom material contained in a Perspex box. The volume of the box has been chosen corresponding to the volume of a small rat and illuminated by a 3G mobile phone frequency (1718.5 MHz), and the emitted radiation directed toward brain phantom .The induced fields in the phantom material are measured. Set up to lift the plane carrying the mobile phone is run by a pulley whose motion is controlled by a stepper motor. The platform is made to move at a pre-determined rate of 2 degrees per min limited up to 20 degrees. The measured data for induced fields in various locations are used to compute corresponding SAR values and inter comparison obtained. These data are also compared with those when the mobile phone is placed horizontally with respect to the position of the animal. The SAR data is also experimentally obtained by measuring a rise in temperature due to this mobile exposures and data compared with those obtained in the previous set. To seek a comparison with the safety criteria same set of measurements are performed in 10 g phantom material contained in a cubical box. These results are higher than those obtained with the knowledge of induced field measurements. It is concluded that SAR values are sensitive to the angular position of the moving platform and are well below the safety criteria prescribed for human exposure. The data are suggestive of having a fresh look to understand the mode of electromagnetic field -bio interaction. PMID:24579373

  5. Accuracy improvement of the ice flow rate measurements on Antarctic ice sheet by DInSAR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiramizu, Kaoru; Doi, Koichiro; Aoyama, Yuichi

    2015-04-01

    DInSAR (Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) is an effective tool to measure the flow rate of slow flowing ice streams on Antarctic ice sheet with high resolution. In the flow rate measurement by DInSAR method, we use Digital Elevation Model (DEM) at two times in the estimating process. At first, we use it to remove topographic fringes from InSAR images. And then, it is used to project obtained displacements along Line-Of-Sight (LOS) direction to the actual flow direction. ASTER-GDEM widely-used for InSAR prosessing of the data of polar region has a lot of errors especially in the inland ice sheet area. Thus the errors yield irregular flow rates and directions. Therefore, quality of DEM has a substantial influence on the ice flow rate measurement. In this study, we created a new DEM (resolution 10m; hereinafter referred to as PRISM-DEM) based on ALOS/PRISM images, and compared PRISM-DEM and ASTER-GDEM. The study area is around Skallen, 90km south from Syowa Station, in the southern part of Sôya Coast, East Antarctica. For making DInSAR images, we used ALOS/PALSAR data of 13 pairs (Path633, Row 571-572), observed during the period from November 23, 2007 through January 16, 2011. PRISM-DEM covering the PALSAR scene was created from nadir and backward view images of ALOS/PRISM (Observation date: 2009/1/18) by applying stereo processing with a digital mapping equipment, and then the automatically created a primary DEM was corrected manually to make a final DEM. The number of irregular values of actual ice flow rate was reduced by applying PRISM-DEM compared with that by applying ASTER-GDEM. Additionally, an averaged displacement of approximately 0.5cm was obtained by applying PRISM-DEM over outcrop area, where no crustal displacement considered to occur during the recurrence period of ALOS/PALSAR (46days), while an averaged displacement of approximately 1.65 cm was observed by applying ASTER-GDEM. Since displacements over outcrop area are considered

  6. Subsidence rate monitoring of Aghajari oil field based on Differential SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, N. Fouladi; Sahebi, M. R.; Matkan, A. A.; Roostaei, M.

    2013-06-01

    Land subsidence, due to natural or anthropogenic processes, causes significant costs in both economic and structural aspects. That part of subsidence observed most is the result of human activities, which relates to underground exploitation. Since the gradual surface deformation is a consequence of hydrocarbon reservoirs extraction, the process of displacement monitoring is amongst the petroleum industry priorities. Nowadays, Differential SAR Interferometry, in which satellite images are utilized for elevation change detection and analysis - in a millimetre scale, has proved to be a more real-time and cost-effective technology in contrast to the traditional surveying method. In this study, surface displacements in Aghajari oil field, i.e. one of the most industrious Iranian hydrocarbon sites, are being examined using radar observations. As in a number of interferograms, the production wells inspection reveals that surface deformation signals develop likely due to extraction in a period of several months. In other words, different subsidence or uplift rates and deformation styles occur locally depending on the geological conditions and excavation rates in place.

  7. Monitoring land subsidence rates with permanent scatterers SAR interferometry: a case study of Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jun; Li, Xiaojuan; Yu, Jie; Wang, Yanbing; Wan, Yanyan; An, Zhihui

    2015-12-01

    The ground subsidence phenomenon is more serious in Beijing, large-scale land subsidence seriously threats to urban planning and construction and the safety of residents. In order to study the subsidence condition, it is necessary to monitor land subsidence. Choosing 28 scenes Envisat ASAR images covering Beijing city from December 2003 to March 2009, permanent scatterer SAR interferometry (PSI) technique was applied to obtained time series land subsidence information. Then the trend characteristics and factors of subsidence were analyzed, comparing land subsidence result with the groundwater data and geological structure data. Comparison between the PSI-derived subsidence rates and leveling data obtained shows that the result of PSI is agreed with the leveling data. The results indicate that the PSI technique is capable of providing high-level accuracy subsidence information. The results show that:(1) The deformation rates derived PSI ranging from -45.80 to 4.36mm/a;(2) In the study area, the serious subsidence areas distribute in Chaoyang District, Shunyi District, Tongzhou District and Pinggu District;(3) The subsidence tends to become more and more concentrated in 6 years from 2003 to 2009.

  8. Energy transmission transformer for a wireless capsule endoscope: analysis of specific absorption rate and current density in biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kenji; Nagato, Tomohiro; Tsuji, Toshio; Koshiji, Kohji

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports on the electromagnetic influences on the analysis of biological tissue surrounding a prototype energy transmission system for a wireless capsule endoscope. Specific absorption rate (SAR) and current density were analyzed by electromagnetic simulator in a model consisting of primary coil and a human trunk including the skin, fat, muscle, small intestine, backbone, and blood. First, electric and magnetic strength in the same conditions as the analytical model were measured and compared to the analytical values to confirm the validity of the analysis. Then, SAR and current density as a function of frequency and output power were analyzed. The validity of the analysis was confirmed by comparing the analytical values with the measured ones. The SAR was below the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). At the same time, the results for current density show that the influence on biological tissue was lowest in the 300-400 kHz range, indicating that it was possible to transmit energy safely up to 160 mW. In addition, we confirmed that the current density has decreased by reducing the primary coil's current. PMID:18595805

  9. Analysis of current density and specific absorption rate in biological tissue surrounding transcutaneous transformer for an artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kenji; Nukaya, Masayuki; Tsuji, Toshio; Koshiji, Kohji

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the current density and specific absorption rate (SAR) analysis of biological tissue surrounding an air-core transcutaneous transformer for an artificial heart. The electromagnetic field in the biological tissue is analyzed by the transmission line modeling method, and the current density and SAR as a function of frequency, output voltage, output power, and coil dimension are calculated. The biological tissue of the model has three layers including the skin, fat, and muscle. The results of simulation analysis show SARs to be very small at any given transmission conditions, about 2-14 mW/kg, compared to the basic restrictions of the International Commission on nonionizing radiation protection (ICNIRP; 2 W/kg), while the current density divided by the ICNIRP's basic restrictions gets smaller as the frequency rises and the output voltage falls. It is possible to transfer energy below the ICNIRP's basic restrictions when the frequency is over 250 kHz and the output voltage is under 24 V. Also, the parts of the biological tissue that maximized the current density differ by frequencies; in the low frequency is muscle and in the high frequency is skin. The boundary is in the vicinity of the frequency 600-1000 kHz. PMID:18232363

  10. Subcutaneous insulin infusion: change in basal infusion rate has no immediate effect on insulin absorption rate

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrandt, P.; Birch, K.; Jensen, B.M.; Kuehl, C.

    1986-11-01

    Eight insulin-dependent diabetic patients were simultaneously given subcutaneous infusions (1.12 IU/h each) of /sup 125/I-labeled Actrapid insulin in each side of the abdominal wall. After 24 h of infusion, the size of the infused insulin depots was measured by external counting for 5 h. The basal infusion rate was then doubled in one side and halved in the other for the next 4 h. Finally, 1.12 IU/h of insulin was given in both sides of the abdominal wall for an additional 3 h. The changes in the size of the depots were measured, and the absorption rates for each hour were calculated. During the first 5 h of infusion, the depot size was almost constant (approximately 5 IU) with an absorption rate that equaled the infusion rate. Doubling the infusion rate led to a significant increase in depot size, but the absorption rate remained unchanged for the first 3 h, and only thereafter was a significant increase seen. When the infusion rate was reduced to the initial 1.12 IU/h, the absorption rate remained elevated during the next 3 h. Correspondingly, when the infusion rate was decreased, the depot size also decreased, but the absorption rate remained unchanged for the first 3 h. The results show that a change in the basal insulin infusion rate does not lead to any immediate change in the insulin absorption rate. This should be considered when planning an insulin-infusion program that includes alteration(s) in the basal-rate setting.

  11. Relationship between peak spatial-averaged specific absorption rate and peak temperature elevation in human head in frequency range of 1–30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Ryota; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the peak temperature elevation and the peak specific absorption rate (SAR) averaged over 10 g of tissue in human head models in the frequency range of 1–30 GHz. As a wave source, a half-wave dipole antenna resonant at the respective frequencies is located in the proximity of the pinna. The bioheat equation is used to evaluate the temperature elevation by employing the SAR, which is computed by electromagnetic analysis, as a heat source. The computed SAR is post-processed by calculating the peak spatial-averaged SAR with six averaging algorithms that consider different descriptions provided in international guidelines and standards, e.g. the number of tissues allowed in the averaging volume, different averaging shapes, and the consideration of the pinna. The computational results show that the SAR averaging algorithms excluding the pinna are essential when correlating the peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna. In the averaging scheme considering an arbitrary shape, for better correlation, multiple tissues should be included in the averaging volume rather than a single tissue. For frequencies higher than 3–4 GHz, the correlation for peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna is modest for the different algorithms. The 95th percentile value of the heating factor as well as the mean and median values derived here would be helpful for estimating the possible temperature elevation in the head.

  12. Specific absorption rate levels measured in a phantom head exposed to radio frequency transmissions from analog hand-held mobile phones

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, V.; Joyner, K.H.

    1995-05-01

    Electric fields (E-fields) induced within a phantom head from exposure to three different advanced mobile phone system (AMPS) hand-held telephones were measured using an implantable E-Field probe. Measurements were taken in the eye nearest the phone and along a lateral scan through the brain from its center to the side nearest the phone. During measurement, the phones were positioned alongside the phantom head as in typical use and were configured to transmit at maximum power (600 mW nominal). The specific absorption rate (SAR) was calculated from the in situ E-field measurements, which varied significantly between phone models and antenna configuration. The SARs induced in the eye ranged from 0.007 to 0.21 W/kg. Metal-framed spectacles enhanced SAR levels in the eye by 9--29%. In the brain, maximum levels were recorded at the measurement point closest to the phone and ranged from 0.12 to 0.83 W/kg. These SARs are below peak spatial limits recommended in the US and Australian national standards and the IRPA guidelines for safe exposure to radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields. Furthermore, a detailed thermal analysis of the eye indicated only a 0.022 C maximum steady-state temperature rise in the eye from a uniform SAR loading of 0.21 W/kg. A more approximate thermal analysis in the brain also indicated only a small maximum temperature rise of 0.034 C for a local SAR loading of 0.83 W/kg.

  13. Correlation between nasal membrane permeability and nasal absorption rate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hefei; Lin, Chih-Wei; Donovan, Maureen D

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between in vitro permeability (Papp) values obtained from isolated nasal tissues and the absorption rates (ka) of the same compounds following nasal administration in animals and humans. The Papp of a set of 11 drug compounds was measured using animal nasal explants and plasma time-concentration profiles for each of the same compounds following intravenous (IV) and intranasal (IN) administration were experimentally determined or obtained from literature reports. The plasma clearance was estimated from the IV plasma time-concentration profiles, and ka was determined from the IN plasma time-concentration profiles using a deconvolution approach. The level of correlation between Papp and ka was established using Pearson correlation analysis. A good correlation (r=0.77) representing a point-to-point relationship for each of the compounds was observed. This result indicates that the nasal absorption for many drug candidates can be estimated from a readily measured in vitro Papp value. PMID:23225081

  14. Characteristics of the SAR distributions in a head exposed to electromagnetic fields radiated by a hand-held portable radio

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Nojima, Toshio; Fujiwara, Osamu

    1996-10-01

    This paper presents characteristics of the specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions calculated by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method using a heterogeneous and realistic head model and a realistic hand-held portable radio model. The difference between the SAR distributions produced by a 1/4-wavelength monopole antenna and those produced by a 1/2-wavelength dipole antenna is investigated. The dependence of the maximum local SAR on the distance d{sub a} between the auricle of the head and the antenna of the radio is evaluated. It is shown that the maximum local SAR decreases as the antenna length extends from 1/4 to 1/2 of the wavelength. The maximum local SAR`s in a head model with auricles are larger than those in one without auricles. The dependence of the SAR on the electrical inhomogeneity of the tissues in the head model is not significant with regard to the surface distribution and the maximum local SAR when the radio is near the head. It is also shown that the maximum local SAR is not strongly dependent on the position of the hand when the hand does not shade the antenna. Furthermore, the SAR`s experimentally measured in a homogeneous head phantom are compared with the calculated SAR`s.

  15. Multimodal Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles with Unusually Enhanced Specific Absorption Rate for Synergetic Cancer Therapeutics and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Thorat, Nanasaheb D; Bohara, Raghvendra A; Malgras, Victor; Tofail, Syed A M; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M; Wu, Kevin C-W; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-06-15

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) cancer therapy frequently face trade off between a high magnetization saturation and their good colloidal stability, high specific absorption rate (SAR), and most importantly biological compatibility. This necessitates the development of new nanomaterials, as MFH and MRI are considered to be one of the most promising combined noninvasive treatments. In the present study, we investigated polyethylene glycol (PEG) functionalized La1-xSrxMnO3 (LSMO) SPMNPs for efficient cancer hyperthermia therapy and MRI application. The superparamagnetic nanomaterial revealed excellent colloidal stability and biocompatibility. A high SAR of 390 W/g was observed due to higher colloidal stability leading to an increased Brownian and Neel's spin relaxation. Cell viability of PEG capped nanoparticles is up to 80% on different cell lines tested rigorously using different methods. PEG coating provided excellent hemocompatibility to human red blood cells as PEG functionalized SPMNPs reduced hemolysis efficiently compared to its uncoated counterpart. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia of SPMNPs resulted in cancer cell death up to 80%. Additionally, improved MRI characteristics were also observed for the PEG capped La1-xSrxMnO3 formulation in aqueous medium compared to the bare LSMO. Taken together, PEG capped SPMNPs can be useful for diagnosis, efficient magnetic fluid hyperthermia, and multimodal cancer treatment as the amphiphilicity of PEG can easily be utilized to encapsulate hydrophobic drugs. PMID:27197993

  16. The relationship between specific absorption rate and temperature elevation in anatomically based human body models for plane wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Oizumi, Takuya; Hanatani, Ryuto; Chan, Kwok Hung; Wiart, Joe

    2013-02-21

    According to the international safety guidelines/standard, the whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (Poljak et al 2003 IEEE Trans. Electromagn. Compat. 45 141-5) and the peak spatial average SAR are used as metrics for human protection from whole-body and localized exposures, respectively. The IEEE standard (IEEE 2006 IEEE C95.1) indicates that the upper boundary frequency, over which the whole-body-averaged SAR is deemed to be the basic restriction, has been reduced from 6 to 3 GHz, because radio-wave energy is absorbed around the body surface when the frequency is increased. However, no quantitative discussion has been provided to support this description especially from the standpoint of temperature elevation. It is of interest to investigate the maximum temperature elevation in addition to the core temperature even for a whole-body exposure. In the present study, using anatomically based human models, we computed the SAR and the temperature elevation for a plane-wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz, taking into account the thermoregulatory response. As the primary result, we found that the ratio of the core temperature elevation to the whole-body-averaged SAR is almost frequency independent for frequencies below a few gigahertz; the ratio decreases above this frequency. At frequencies higher than a few gigahertz, core temperature elevation for the same whole-body averaged SAR becomes lower due to heat convection from the skin to air. This lower core temperature elevation is attributable to skin temperature elevation caused by the power absorption around the body surface. Then, core temperature elevation even for whole-body averaged SAR of 4 W kg(-1) with the duration of 1 h was at most 0.8 °C, which is smaller than a threshold considered in the safety guidelines/standard. Further, the peak 10 g averaged SAR is correlated with the maximum body temperature elevations without extremities and pinna over the frequencies considered. These findings

  17. Tenfold Disparity Between Decadal InSAR and Millennial Morphochronologic Slip-Rates on the Karakorum Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, M.; Ryerson, F. J.; Tapponnier, P.; Finkel, R. C.; van der Woerd, J.; Li, H.; Liu, Q.

    2004-12-01

    The role of the Karakorum Fault in the kinematics of present-day deformation in Tibet is debated. Although it is the main dextral strike-slip fault north of the Himalayas, recent InSAR data are interpreted to suggest that it is barely active, moving at a rate of 1 ± 3 mm/yr. Surface exposure dating of moraines and terraces south of Bangong lake tell a different story, suggesting it slips ten times as fast. At one site on the west side of the Gar graben (32° 3' N-80° 1' E, 4365 m-4760 m), at the foot of the Aliyari Range, we sampled quartz-rich, rooted blocks on the lateral moraine crests of a large till complex. The moraines are offset right-laterally relative to the valley of the Manikala Daer Glacier. Twenty-seven samples were dated using cosmogenic 10Be. The offsets of 2 well-defined moraine crests (M1 and M2E), obtained from retro-deformation of 1 m-resolution IKONOS images, are 220 ± 10 m and 1520 ± 50 m, respectively. The 10Be exposure ages fall in distinct clusters: 21 ± 0.1 ka and 40 ± 3 ka on M1, and 140 ± 5.5 ka and 180 ± 14 ka on M2. The ages of maximum sample abundance correlate remarkably well with the ages of the coldest periods derived from proxy paleo-temperature records (SPECMAP), suggesting that the Manikala glacier crossed the fault to emplace moraines northeast of the range front only during the LGM and penultimate glacial maximum (late stage 6), and implying little erosion. Pairing the abandonment ages of the two moraines ( ˜ 21 and 140 ka) with their offsets yields concordant dextral slip-rates of 10.9 ± 0.6 and 10.5 ± 0.5 mm/yr. The resulting, average slip rate (10.7 ± 0.7 mm/yr) we derive for the last 150 ka is comparable to the geological rate obtained by Lacassin et al., [2004] (10 ± 3 mm/yr in the last 34 Ma) and to the GPS geodetic rate determined by Banerjee and Burgmann, [2002] (11 ± 4 mm/yr). It is almost 3 times greater than that measured in India by Brown et al., [2002] (4 ± 1 mm/yr) and three times smaller than that

  18. Specific absorption rate and temperature elevation in a subject exposed in the far-field of radio-frequency sources operating in the 10-900-MHz range.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Paolo; Cavagnaro, Marta; Pisa, Stefano; Piuzzi, Emanuele

    2003-03-01

    The exposure of a subject in the far field of radiofrequency sources operating in the 10-900-MHz range has been studied. The electromagnetic field inside an anatomical heterogeneous model of the human body has been computed by using the finite-difference time-domain method; the corresponding temperature increase has been evaluated through an explicit finite-difference formulation of the bio-heat equation. The thermal model used, which takes into account the thermoregulatory system of the human body, has been validated through a comparison with experimental data. The results show that the peak specific absorption rate (SAR) as averaged over 10 g has about a 25-fold increase in the trunk and a 50-fold increase in the limbs with respect to the whole body averaged SAR (SARWB). The peak SAR as averaged over 1 g, instead, has a 30- to 60-fold increase in the trunk, and up to 135-fold increase in the ankles, with respect to SARWB. With reference to temperature increases, at the body resonance frequency of 40 MHz, for the ICNIRP incident power density maximum permissible value, a temperature increase of about 0.7 degrees C is obtained in the ankles muscle. The presence of the thermoregulatory system strongly limits temperature elevations, particularly in the body core. PMID:12669986

  19. Analysis of in situ electric field and specific absorption rate in human models for wireless power transfer system with induction coupling.

    PubMed

    Sunohara, Tetsu; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Onishi, Teruo

    2014-07-21

    This study investigates the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the in situ electric field in anatomically based human models for the magnetic field from an inductive wireless power transfer system developed on the basis of the specifications of the wireless power consortium. The transfer system consists of two induction coils covered by magnetic sheets. Both the waiting and charging conditions are considered. The transfer frequency considered in this study is 140 kHz, which is within the range where the magneto-quasi-static approximation is valid. The SAR and in situ electric field in the chest and arm of the models are calculated by numerically solving the scalar potential finite difference equation. The electromagnetic modelling of the coils in the wireless power transfer system is verified by comparing the computed and measured magnetic field distributions. The results indicate that the peak value of the SAR averaged over a 10 g of tissue and that of the in situ electric field are 72 nW kg(-1) and 91 mV m(-1) for a transmitted power of 1 W, Consequently, the maximum allowable transmitted powers satisfying the exposure limits of the SAR (2 W kg(-1)) and the in situ electric field (18.9 V m(-1)) are found to be 28 MW and 43 kW. The computational results show that the in situ electric field in the chest is the most restrictive factor when compliance with the wireless power transfer system is evaluated according to international guidelines. PMID:24936747

  20. Analysis on the effect of the distances and inclination angles between human head and mobile phone on SAR.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M I; Faruque, M R I; Islam, M T

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of the distances between the human head and internal cellular device antenna on the specific absorption rate (SAR). This paper also analyzes the effects of inclination angles between user head and mobile terminal antenna on SAR values. The effects of the metal-glass casing of mobile phone on the SAR values were observed in the vicinity of the human head model. Moreover, the return losses were investigated in all cases to mark antenna performance. This analysis was performed by adopting finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method on Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio. The results indicate that by increasing the distance between the user head and antenna, SAR values are decreased. But the increase in inclination angle does not reduce SAR values in all cases. Additionally, this investigation provides some useful indication for future design of low SAR mobile terminal antenna. PMID:25863147

  1. Determination of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant from the frequency dependence of the specific absorption rate in a frozen ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, Nathaniel; Perkins-Harbin, Emily; Aho, Brandon; Wang, Lihua; Kumon, Ronald; Rablau, Corneliu; Vaishnava, Prem; Tackett, Ronald; Therapeutic Biomaterials Group Team

    2015-03-01

    Colloidal suspensions of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, known as ferrofluids, are promising candidates for the mediation of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). In such materials, the dissipation of heat occurs as a result of the relaxation of the particles in an applied ac magnetic field via the Brownian and Neel mechanisms. In order to isolate and study the role of the Neel mechanism in this process, the sample can be frozen, using liquid nitrogen, in order to suppress the Brownian relaxation. In this experiment, dextran-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles synthesized via co-precipitation and characterized via transmission electron microscopy and dc magnetization are used as MFH mediators over the temperature range between -70 °C to -10 °C (Brownian-suppressed state). Heating the nanoparticles using ac magnetic field (amplitude ~300 Oe), the frequency dependence of the specific absorption rate (SAR) is calculated between 150 kHz and 350 kHz and used to determine the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the sample. We would like to thank Fluxtrol, Inc. for their help with this project

  2. SAR measurement in MRI: an improved method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Rocco; Acernese, Fausto; Indovina, Pietro Luigi; Barone, Fabrizio

    2009-03-01

    During an MR procedure, the patient absorbs a portion of the transmitted RF energy, which may result in tissue heating and other adverse effects, such as alterations in visual, auditory and neural functions. The Specific Absorption Rate (SAR), in W/kg, is the RF power absorbed per unit mass of tissue and is one of the most important parameters related with thermal effects and acts as a guideline for MRI safety. Strict limits to the SAR levels are imposed by patient safety international regulations (CEI - EN 60601 - 2 - 33) and SAR measurements are required in order to verify its respect. The recommended methods for mean SAR measurement are quite problematic and often require a maintenance man intervention and long stop machine. For example, in the CEI recommended pulse energy method, the presence of a maintenance man is required in order to correctly connect the required instrumentation; furthermore, the procedure is complex and requires remarkable processing and calculus. Simpler are the calorimetric methods, also if in this case long acquisition times are required in order to have significant temperature variations and accurate heat capacity knowledge (CEI - EN 60601 - 2- 33). The phase transition method is a new method to measure SAR in MRI which has the advantages to be very simple and to overcome all the typical calorimetric method problems. It does not require in gantry temperature measurements, any specific heat or heat capacity knowledge, but only mass and time measurement. Furthermore, in this method, it is possible to show that all deposited SAR power can be considered acquired and measured.

  3. Impairment of jejunal absorption rate of carnosine by glycylglycine in man in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, G C

    1976-01-01

    Using a double-lumen tube jejunal perfusion system in vivo, the mutual effects of carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) and glycylglycine on their respective absorption rates have been studied in six Zambian African adults. Data on the effect of the constituent amino-acids of carnosine on glycylglycine absorption rate have similarly been obtained. The solutions infused in each subject contained (A) carnosine (50 mmol l.-1), (B) carnosine (50 mmol l.-1) and glycylglycine (50 mmol l.-1), (C) glycylglycine (50 mmol l.-1), and (D) glycylglycine (50 mmol l.-1), L-histidine (50 mmol l.-1) and beta-alanine (50 mmol l.-1). Glycylglycine produced a significant impairment in the mean rate of histidine absorption from carnosine (P less than 0-01). However, carnosine did not have a significant effect on the mean rate of glycine absorption from glycylglycine. Mean rate of histidine absorption from solution D was significantly higher than that from solution A (P less than 0-01). Mean rate of glycine absorption from glycylglycine was not significantly different during infusion of solutions B, C, and D. The results are consistent with the concept that carnosine on glycylglycine is probably because the affinity of mechanism; the lack of influence of carnosine on glycylglycine is probably because the affinity of carnosine for the dipeptide uptake mechanism is relatively low. A gross difference has been shown between mean absorption rate of histidine from free L-histidine (solution D) (25-8 mmol h-1) and when it is given in the form of carnosine in the presence of another dipeptide (solution B) (8-7 mmol h-1); that emphasizes the complexity of amino acid and peptide interaction during absorption, which must be important in nutrition. PMID:773786

  4. Creeping along the Ismetpasa section of the North Anatolian fault (Western Turkey): Rate and extent from InSAR [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakir, Ziyadin; Akoglu, Ahmet M.; Belabbes, Samir; Ergintav, Semih; Meghraoui, Mustapha

    2005-09-01

    Creeping along the North Anatolian fault (NAF) at Ismetpasa (Turkey) was discovered some thirty years ago, about a decade after the first observations of the phenomenon along the San Andreas fault in California. However, little is known about its lateral extent and rate. In order to study its three dimensional nature and rupture characteristics, we use Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) and elastic dislocation models compared also with field observations. Interferograms with temporal baselines ranging between 1.25 and 5 years show that the creeping section starts at the western termination of the 1943 ( M = 7.6) earthquake rupture. It continues about 70-km to the west, overlapping with the eastern part of the 1944 ( M = 7.3) earthquake rupture. Offsets along strike indicate a maximum creep rate of 11 ± 3 mm/year near the mid point of the creeping section decreasing gradually towards the edges. Near Ismetpasa, InSAR data yield 8 ± 3 mm/year of creep rate, consistent with recent instrumental (triangulation and creepmeter) measurements. Modeling of the InSAR and GPS data suggests that the fault-creep occurs most probably at a shallow depth (0-7 km). Our analysis combined with previous studies suggests that creeping might have commenced following the 1944 earthquake, and thus may be a long-lasting, but transient slip episode.

  5. Correlation analysis of optical absorption cross section and rate coefficient measurements in reacting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hessler, J.P.; Ogren, P.J.

    1992-08-31

    A technique was developed for determining relative importance and correlation between reactions making up a complex kinetic system. This technique was used to investigate measurements of optical absorption cross sections and the correlation between cross sections and measured rate coefficients. It is concluded that (1) species, initial conditions, and temporal regions may be identified where cross sections may be measured without interference from the kinetic behavior of the observed species and (2) experiments designed to measure rate coefficients will always be correlated with the absorption cross section of the observed species. This correlation may reduce the accuracy of rate coefficient measurements.

  6. Numerical analysis of specific absorption rate in the human head due to a 13.56 MHz RFID-based intra-ocular pressure measurement system.

    PubMed

    Hirtl, Rene; Schmid, Gernot

    2013-09-21

    A modern wireless intra-ocular pressure monitoring system, based on 13.56 MHz inductively coupled data transmission, was dosimetrically analyzed with respect to the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced inside the head and the eye due to the electromagnetic field exposure caused by the reader antenna of the transmission system. The analysis was based on numerical finite difference time domain computations using a high resolution anatomical eye model integrated in a modern commercially available anatomical model of a male head. Three different reader antenna configurations, a 7-turn elliptic (30 mm × 50 mm) antenna at 12 mm distance from the eye, a flexible circular antenna (60 mm diameter, 8 turns on 2 mm substrate) directly attached to the skin, and a circular 7-turn antenna (30 mm diameter at 12 mm distance to the eye) were analyzed, respectively. Possible influences of the eye-lid status (closed or opened) and the transponder antenna contained in a contact lens directly attached to the eye were taken into account. The results clearly demonstrated that for typical reader antenna currents required for proper data transmission, the SAR values remain far below the limits for localized exposure of the head, as defined by the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Particularly the induced SAR inside the eye was found to be substantially (orders of magnitudes for typical reader antenna currents in the order of 1 A turn) below values which have been reported to be critical with respect to thermally induced adverse health effects in eye tissues. PMID:24002053

  7. Subpicosecond IR transient absorption spectroscopy: measurement of internal conversion rates in DABCO vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glownia, J. H.; Misewich, J.; Sorokin, P. P.

    1987-09-01

    An apparatus combining subpicosecond 248.5 nm pump pulses with a time-resolved subpicosecond broadband infrared absorption spectroscopy probe has been utilized to measure an internal conversion rate in 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane vapor. A subpicosecond (⪅ 500 fs) internal conversion rate has been determined.

  8. Theory of absorption rate of carriers in fused silica under intense laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hongxiang; Xiang, Xia; Zheng, WG; Yuan, XD; Wu, SY; Jiang, XD; Gao, Fei; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Sun, Kai

    2010-11-15

    A quantum non-perturbation theory for phonon-assisted photon absorption of conduction band electron in intense laser was developed. By carrying out the calculation in fused silica at wavelengths from ultraviolet to infrared in terawatt intensity laser, we show that the Non-perturbation approach can make a uniform description of energy absorption rate at both short wavelengths and long wavelengths on TW / cm2 intensity laser.

  9. Determination of creep rate and extent at Ismetpasa section of the North Anatolian Fault using Persistent Scatterer InSAR and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, E.; Cakir, Z.; Dogan, U.; Akoglu, A. M.; Ozener, H.; Ergintav, S.; Meghraoui, M.

    2012-12-01

    Although fault creep was discovered over half a century ago along the Ismetpasa section of the North Anatolian Fault, its spatiotemporal nature is still poorly known due to lack of geodetic and seismological studies along the fault. Despite the difficulties arising from atmospheric artifacts and low coherency, classical long-term InSAR analysis of ERS (C-band) data between 1992 and 2001 suggested an average creep rate of 9±3 mm along a fault segment of ~70 km long (Cakir et al., 2005). Even though these estimations were obtained from a limited number of available images, these results have been supported by a recent study of stacked PALSAR (L-band) interferograms spanning the period between 2007 and 2010 (Fialko et al., 2011). In this study, we use the Persistent Scatterer InSAR technique to better constrain spatiotemporal characteristics of the surface creep. We analyzed 55 Envisat ASAR images on 2 descending tracks (479 and 207) between 2003 and 2010 and calculated InSAR time series. The PS-InSAR results show clearly the gradual transition between the creeping and locked sections of the NAF west of Ismetpasa. On the contrary, its eastern boundary is crudely determined near 33.4E since the signal is disturbed by the postseismic deformation of the Orta earthquake (June 6, 2000, Mw=6.0). The extent of the creeping section therefore appears to be approximately 81.5 km. The creep rate is also robustly constrained and found to be in the range of 10±2 mm/yr near to Ismetpasa, consistent with the GPS measurements from a small-aperture geodetic network near Ismetpasa and recently reported PALSAR measurements (Fialko et al., 2011). Furthermore, elastic dislocation modeling suggests shallow creeping depth (< 5 km).

  10. Effect of SAR on human head modeling inside cylindrical enclosures.

    PubMed

    Mary, T Anita Jones; Ravichandran, C S

    2013-09-01

    This study intends to discuss enclosed a realistic approach to determine and analyze the effects of radio frequency on human exposure inside a cylindrical enclosure. A scenario in which a mobile phone with inverted-F antenna (IFA) operating in the Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) band (900 MHz) is used inside a cylindrical enclosure. Metallic enclosures are known to have resonance and reflection effects, thereby increasing electric field strength and hence resulting in a change of the human exposure to electromagnetic absorptions. So, this study examines and compares the levels of absorption in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR) values under various conditions. In this study, a human phantom with dielectric properties is designed and its interaction is studied with IFA inside fully enclosed cylindrical enclosures. The results show that SAR values are increased inside cylindrical enclosures compared with those in free space. The method of computation uses method of moments. Simulations are done in FEKO software. PMID:23323517

  11. Effect of a hands-free wire on specific absorption rate for a waist-mounted 1.8 GHz cellular telephone handset.

    PubMed

    Troulis, S E; Scanlon, W G; Evans, N E

    2003-06-21

    A common feature of cellular telephony is the use of a 'hands-free' audio extension lead connected to a waist-worn handset. Interaction between the transmitting antenna, the wire and the user's body can occur, with detrimental effects including polar pattern degradation, reduced efficiency and localized increases in specific absorption rate (SAR). Using a realistic full-body model of an adult male, finite difference time domain analysis was employed to investigate the coupling between a hip-mounted 1.8 GHz handset fitted with a monopole antenna and a 1 m long wire representing a hands-free wire. Conduction current densities were computed for three identifiable coupling modes: magnetic-only, conductive-only and combined conductive-and-magnetic. Magnetic-only coupling was dominant. Without the lead, placing the handset at waist height led to a 42.8% increase in the total energy deposited in the body, compared to use at the head. Introducing the lead further increased the body loss, with a reduction in system radiation efficiency from 52% to 43.7%. Without the hands-free lead, the peak 1 g and 10 g SARs were 0.450 W kg(-1) and 0.265 W kg(-1), respectively, for 125 mW transmit power. With the hands-free lead connected, these values increased to 1.14 W kg(-1) and 0.430 W kg(-1), respectively. PMID:12870576

  12. Effect of a hands-free wire on specific absorption rate for a waist-mounted 1.8 GHz cellular telephone handset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troulis, S. E.; Scanlon, W. G.; Evans, N. E.

    2003-06-01

    A common feature of cellular telephony is the use of a 'hands-free' audio extension lead connected to a waist-worn handset. Interaction between the transmitting antenna, the wire and the user's body can occur, with detrimental effects including polar pattern degradation, reduced efficiency and localized increases in specific absorption rate (SAR). Using a realistic full-body model of an adult male, finite difference time domain analysis was employed to investigate the coupling between a hip-mounted 1.8 GHz handset fitted with a monopole antenna and a 1 m long wire representing a hands-free wire. Conduction current densities were computed for three identifiable coupling modes: magnetic-only, conductive-only and combined conductive-and-magnetic. Magnetic-only coupling was dominant. Without the lead, placing the handset at waist height led to a 42.8% increase in the total energy deposited in the body, compared to use at the head. Introducing the lead further increased the body loss, with a reduction in system radiation efficiency from 52% to 43.7%. Without the hands-free lead, the peak 1 g and 10 g SARs were 0.450 W kg-1 and 0.265 W kg-1, respectively, for 125 mW transmit power. With the hands-free lead connected, these values increased to 1.14 W kg-1 and 0.430 W kg-1, respectively.

  13. Uncertainty of GHz-band Whole-body Average SARs in Infants based on their Kaup Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Hironobu; Hirata, Akimasa; Fujiwara, Osamu; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Soichi

    We previously showed that a strong correlation exists between the absorption cross section and the body surface area of a human for 0.3-2GHz far field exposure, and proposed a formula for estimating whole-body-average specific absorption rates (WBA-SARs) in terms of height and weight. In this study, to evaluate variability in the WBA-SARs in infants based on their physique, we derived a new formula including Kaup indices of infants, which are being used to check their growth, and thereby estimated the WBA-SARs in infants with respect to their age from 0 month to three years. As a result, we found that under the same height/weight, the smaller the Kaup indices are, the larger the WBA-SARs become, and that the variability in the WBA-SARs is around 15% at the same age. To validate these findings, using the FDTD method, we simulated the GHz-band WBA-SARs in numerical human models corresponding to infants with age of 0, 1, 3, 6 and 9 months, which were obtained by scaling down the anatomically based Japanese three-year child model developed by NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology). Results show that the FDTD-simulated WBA-SARs are smaller by 20% compared to those estimated for infants having the median height and the Kaup index of 0.5 percentiles, which provide conservative WBA-SARs.

  14. Evaluation of different indirect measures of rate of drug absorption in comparative pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Lacey, L F; Keene, O N; Duquesnoy, C; Bye, A

    1994-02-01

    As indirect measures of rate of drug absorption (metrics), maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) is confounded by extent of drug absorption and the time to reach Cmax (tmax) is a discrete variable, dependent on blood sampling frequency. Building on the work of Endrenyi et al., we have compared different metrics, including Cmax/area under the curve of concentration versus time from time zero to infinity (AUC infinity), partial AUC from zero to tmax (AUCp), and Cmax.tmax with simulated experiments. Importantly, the performance of these metrics was assessed with the results of actual pharmacokinetic studies involving Glaxo drugs. The results of the simulated and real experiments were consistent and produced the following unambiguous findings: (1) Cmax/AUC infinity is a more powerful metric than Cmax in establishing bioequivalence when the formulations are truly bioequivalent; (2) Cmax/AUC infinity is more sensitive than Cmax at detecting differences in rate of absorption when they exist; and (3) the treatment ratios for AUCp, AUCp/AUC infinity, and Cmax.tmax are very imprecisely estimated and are of no practical value as measures of rate of absorption. Of the metrics examined, Cmax/AUC infinity is the most sensitive and powerful indirect measure of rate of drug absorption in comparative pharmacokinetic studies involving immediate-release dosage forms and should be used instead of Cmax in bioequivalence testing. PMID:8169791

  15. 3D finite element simulation of effects of deflection rate on energy absorption for TRIP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Asuka; Pham, Hang; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, with the requirement of lighter weight and more safety for a design of automobile, energy absorption capability of structural materials has become important. TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity) steel is expected to apply to safety members because of excellent energy absorption capability and ductility. Past studies proved that such excellent characteristics in TRIP steel are dominated by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during plastic deformation. Because SIMT strongly depends on deformation rate and temperature, an investigation of the effects of deformation rate and temperature on energy absorption in TRIP is essential. Although energy absorption capability of material can be estimated by J-integral experimentally by using pre-cracked specimen, it is difficult to determine volume fraction of martensite and temperature rise during the crack extension. In addition, their effects on J-integral, especially at high deformation rate in experiment might be quite hard. Thus, a computational prediction needs to be performed. In this study, bending deformation behavior of pre-cracked specimen until the onset point of crack extension are predicted by 3D finite element simulation based on the transformation kinetics model proposed by Iwamoto et al. (1998). It is challenged to take effects of temperature, volume fraction of martensite and deformation rate into account. Then, the mechanism for higher energy absorption characteristic will be discussed.

  16. Energy absorption at high strain rate of glass fiber reinforced mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenu, Luigi; Forni, Daniele; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the dynamic behaviour of cement mortars reinforced with glass fibers was studied. The influence of the addition of glass fibers on energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate was investigated. Static tests in compression, in tension and in bending were first performed. Dynamic tests by means of a Modified Hopkinson Bar were then carried out in order to investigate how glass fibers affected energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate of the fiber reinforced mortar. The Dynamic Increase Factor (DIF) was finally evaluated.

  17. Metamaterial-Embedded Low SAR PIFA for Cellular Phone.

    PubMed

    Faruque, M R I; Hossain, M I; Misran, N; Singh, M; Islam, M T

    2015-01-01

    A metamaterial-embedded planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) is proposed in this study for cellular phone applications. A dual-band PIFA is designed to operate both GSM 900 MHz and DCS 1800 MHz. The ground plane of a conventional PIFA is modified using a planar one-dimensional metamaterial array. The investigation is performed using the Finite Integration Technique (FIT) of CST Microwave Studio. The performance of the developed antenna was measured in an anechoic chamber. The specific absorption rate (SAR) values are calculated considering two different holding positions: cheek and tilt. The SAR values are measured using COMOSAR measurement system. Good agreement is observed between the simulated and measured data. The results indicate that the proposed metamaterial-embedded antenna produces significantly lower SAR in the human head compared to the conventional PIFA. Moreover, the modified antenna substrate leads to slight improvement of the antenna performances. PMID:26599584

  18. Metamaterial-Embedded Low SAR PIFA for Cellular Phone

    PubMed Central

    Faruque, M. R. I.; Hossain, M. I.; Misran, N.; Singh, M.; Islam, M. T.

    2015-01-01

    A metamaterial-embedded planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) is proposed in this study for cellular phone applications. A dual-band PIFA is designed to operate both GSM 900 MHz and DCS 1800 MHz. The ground plane of a conventional PIFA is modified using a planar one-dimensional metamaterial array. The investigation is performed using the Finite Integration Technique (FIT) of CST Microwave Studio. The performance of the developed antenna was measured in an anechoic chamber. The specific absorption rate (SAR) values are calculated considering two different holding positions: cheek and tilt. The SAR values are measured using COMOSAR measurement system. Good agreement is observed between the simulated and measured data. The results indicate that the proposed metamaterial-embedded antenna produces significantly lower SAR in the human head compared to the conventional PIFA. Moreover, the modified antenna substrate leads to slight improvement of the antenna performances. PMID:26599584

  19. Assessment of induced SAR in children exposed to electromagnetic plane waves between 10 MHz and 5.6 GHz.

    PubMed

    Bakker, J F; Paulides, M M; Christ, A; Kuster, N; van Rhoon, G C

    2010-06-01

    To avoid potentially adverse health effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has defined EMF reference levels from the basic restrictions on the induced whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (SAR(wb)) and the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (SAR(10g)). The objective of this study is to assess if the SAR in children remains below the basic restrictions upon exposure at the reference levels. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling was used to calculate the SAR in six children and two adults when exposed to all 12 orthogonal plane wave configurations. A sensitivity study showed an expanded uncertainty of 53% (SAR(wb)) and 58% (SAR(10g)) due to variations in simulation settings and tissue properties. In this study, we found that the basic restriction on the SAR(wb) is occasionally exceeded for children, up to a maximum of 45% in small children. The maximum SAR(10g) values, usually found at body protrusions, remain under the limit for all scenarios studied. Our results are in good agreement with the literature, suggesting that the recommended ICNIRP reference levels may need fine tuning. PMID:20463374

  20. Estimation of the whole-body averaged SAR of grounded human models for plane wave exposure at respective resonance frequencies.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akimasa; Yanase, Kazuya; Laakso, Ilkka; Chan, Kwok Hung; Fujiwara, Osamu; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Soichi; Conil, Emmanuelle; Wiart, Joe

    2012-12-21

    According to the international guidelines, the whole-body averaged specific absorption rate (WBA-SAR) is used as a metric of basic restriction for radio-frequency whole-body exposure. It is well known that the WBA-SAR largely depends on the frequency of the incident wave for a given incident power density. The frequency at which the WBA-SAR becomes maximal is called the 'resonance frequency'. Our previous study proposed a scheme for estimating the WBA-SAR at this resonance frequency based on an analogy between the power absorption characteristic of human models in free space and that of a dipole antenna. However, a scheme for estimating the WBA-SAR in a grounded human has not been discussed sufficiently, even though the WBA-SAR in a grounded human is larger than that in an ungrounded human. In this study, with the use of the finite-difference time-domain method, the grounded condition is confirmed to be the worst-case exposure for human body models in a standing posture. Then, WBA-SARs in grounded human models are calculated at their respective resonant frequencies. A formula for estimating the WBA-SAR of a human standing on the ground is proposed based on an analogy with a quarter-wavelength monopole antenna. First, homogenized human body models are shown to provide the conservative WBA-SAR as compared with anatomically based models. Based on the formula proposed here, the WBA-SARs in grounded human models are approximately 10% larger than those in free space. The variability of the WBA-SAR was shown to be ±30% even for humans of the same age, which is caused by the body shape. PMID:23202273

  1. A review of lung-to-blood absorption rates for radon progeny.

    PubMed

    Marsh, J W; Bailey, M R

    2013-12-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 66 Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) treats clearance of materials from the respiratory tract as a competitive process between absorption into blood and particle transport to the alimentary tract and lymphatics. The ICRP recommended default absorption rates for lead and polonium (Type M) in ICRP Publication 71 but stated that the values were not appropriate for short-lived radon progeny. This paper reviews and evaluates published data from volunteer and laboratory animal experiments to estimate the HRTM absorption parameter values for short-lived radon progeny. Animal studies showed that lead ions have two phases of absorption: ∼10 % absorbed with a half-time of ∼15 min, the rest with a half-time of ∼10 h. The studies also indicated that some of the lead ions were bound to respiratory tract components. Bound fractions, f(b), for lead were estimated from volunteer and animal studies and ranged from 0.2 to 0.8. Based on the evaluations of published data, the following HRTM absorption parameter values were derived for lead as a decay product of radon: f(r) = 0.1, s(r) = 100 d(-1), s(s) = 1.7 d(-1), f(b) = 0.5 and s(b) = 1.7 d(-1). Effective doses calculated assuming these absorption parameter values instead of a single absorption half-time of 10 h with no binding (as has generally been assumed) are only a few per cent higher. However, as there is some conflicting evidence on the absorption kinetics for radon progeny, dose calculations have been carried out for different sets of absorption parameter values derived from different studies. The results of these calculations are discussed. PMID:23887272

  2. SARS Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... waiting room or office. Top of Page CDC’s response to SARS during the 2003 outbreak CDC worked ... Center to provide round-the-clock coordination and response. Committed more than 800 medical experts and support ...

  3. Updated Long Term Fault Slip Rates and Seismic Hazard in the Central Alborz, Iran: New Constraints From InSAR and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, J. M.; Shirzaei, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Alborz mountain range, located south of the Caspian Sea, accommodates 30% of the 25 mm/yr convergence between Arabia and Eurasia. The resulting shortening and left lateral motion is distributed over several active fault zones within the Central Alborz. Despite earlier efforts using only GPS data, little is known about the long term rate of vertical deformation and aseismic slip. Several historical earthquakes have affected this region, some of the largest of these events occurred on the Mosha fault which is close to the capital city, Tehran, which has a population of over eight million. Thus, constraining the interseismic slip rates in this region is particularly important. In this study we complement existing horizontal velocities from a regional GPS network, with line of sight velocities from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), to provide additional constraints on the vertical deformation and enhance the spatial coverage. Assuming a seismogenic depth of 30 km, based on microseismicity data, we solve for the geometry and long term slip rates on four major fault strands in this region. We obtain a long term slip rate of ~ 3 mm/yr for the Mosha and North Alborz faults, and ~ 10 mm/yr for the Khazar fault and Parchin faults. These rates and fault geometries are in agreement with earlier works, and fit the GPS data well. However, close to the fault traces there are large residuals in the InSAR data, suggesting that there is shallow creep (< 30 km). Therefore, we carry out a subsequent inversion using only the residual InSAR displacements to solve for the distribution of creep within the seismogenic zones on these faults. We find that the Mosha and North Alborz faults remain locked between 0 - 30 km depth, whilst the Parchin and Khazar faults are creeping. This new observation of fault creep has direct implications for the seismic hazard in the region. On the Mosha fault we estimate a slip deficit equivalent to a Mw 7.0 event. The combination of InSAR

  4. CRUCIAL: Cryosat-2 Success over Inland Water and Land: SAR and SARin Full Bit Rate Altimetric Heights and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Philip; Birkinshaw, Stephen; Restano, Marco; Ambrozio, Americo; Benveniste, Jerome

    2016-04-01

    CRUCIAL is an ESA/STSE funded project investigating innovative land and inland water applications from Cryosat-2 with a forward-look component to the future Sentinel-3 and Jason-CS/Sentinel-6 missions. The high along-track sampling and resolution of Cryosat-2 altimeter in SAR and SARin modes offer the opportunity to recover high frequency signals over inland waters. This paper will present the theoretical approach to analysis of the FBR L1A Doppler beams to form a product using ground cell gridding, beam steering and beam stacking from which inland water heights are derivable from the retracked Cryosat-2 altimetric waveforms. Details of the processing strategy will include a comparison of waveforms and heights from the burst echoes (~80 m along-track) and from multi-look waveforms (~320 m along-track). SAR and SARin FBR data are available for the Amazon, Brahmaputra and Mekong. The Mekong and Amazon FBR SAR data has been processed for 2011-2015 and results will be compared against stage data from the nearest gauge. Similarly, heights from Tonle Sap will be compared against Jason-2 data from the United States Department of Agriculture web site. A strategy to select the number of multi-looks over rivers will also be presented. Results of FBR SARin processing will be presented including comparison of heights from the two antennae and the extraction of slope of the ground surface.

  5. Effects of Receive-Only Inserts on SAR, B1+ Field and Tx Coil Performance

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Narayanan; Zhao, Tiejun; Ibrahim, Tamer S

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of different cylindrical and close conforming receive only array designs on spin excitation and specific absorption rate (SAR) of a 7 Tesla transmit only head coil. Materials and Methods We developed FDTD models of different receive only array geometries. Cylindrical and close fitting helmet arrays with varying copper trace widths; a TEM Tx coil model and two head models were used in numerical simulations. Tx coil coupling was experimentally measured and validated with FDTD modeling. Results Changing copper trace width of loops in array models caused subtle changes in RF absorption (<5%). Changes in SAR distribution were observed in the head models with Rx-only inserts. Peak SAR increased (−1 to +15%) in different tissues for a mean B1+ in the brain of 2 μT. Total absorption in the head models for 1 Watt forward power increased (5 to 21%) in the heads with Rx-only inserts. Changes in RF absorption with different Rx-inserts indicate a change in RF radiation of the Tx coil even when changes in B1+ and coupling between ports of Tx coil were minimal. Conclusion Changes in local/global SAR and subtle changes in B1+ field distributions were observed with the presence of Rx-only inserts. Thus, incorporation of the receive-only array effects are needed when evaluating SAR and designing RF transmit pulse waveform parameters for shimming and/or Tx-SENSE for 7 T MRI. PMID:23913474

  6. Differing rates of cholesterol absorption among inbred mouse strains yield differing levels of HDL-cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Sontag, Timothy J; Chellan, Bijoy; Getz, Godfrey S; Reardon, Catherine A

    2013-09-01

    Inbred strains of mice with differing susceptibilities to atherosclerosis possess widely varying plasma HDL levels. Cholesterol absorption and lipoprotein formation were compared between atherosclerosis-susceptible, low-HDL C57BL6/J mice and atherosclerosis-resistant, high-HDL FVBN/J mice. [(3)H]cholesterol and triglyceride appeared in the plasma of FVB mice gavaged with cholesterol in olive oil at a much higher rate than in C57 mice. The plasma cholesterol was found almost entirely as HDL-cholesterol in both strains. Inhibition of lipoprotein catabolism with Tyloxapol revealed that the difference in the rate of [(3)H]cholesterol appearance in the plasma was due entirely to a greater rate of chylomicron secretion from the intestine of the FVB mice. Lipid absorption into the 2nd quarter of the small intestine is greater in the FVB mice and indicates that this region may contain the factors that give rise to the differences in absorption observed between the two mouse strains. Additionally, ad libitum feeding prior to cholesterol gavage accentuates the absorption rate differences compared with fasting. The resultant remodeling of the increased levels of chylomicron in the plasma may contribute to increased plasma HDL. Intestinal gene expression analysis reveals several genes that may play a role in these differences, including microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and ABCG8. PMID:23812556

  7. Mechanism and rate of glucose absorption differ between an Australian honeyeater (Meliphagidae) and a lorikeet (Loriidae).

    PubMed

    Napier, Kathryn R; McWhorter, Todd J; Fleming, Patricia A

    2008-11-01

    Efficient mechanisms of glucose absorption are necessary for volant animals as a means of reducing mass during flight: they speed up gut transit time and require smaller volume and mass of gut tissue. One mechanism that may be important is absorption via paracellular (non-mediated) pathways. This may be particularly true for nectarivorous species which encounter large quantities of sugar in their natural diet. We investigated the extent of mediated and non-mediated glucose absorption in red wattlebirds Anthochaera carunculata (Meliphagidae) and rainbow lorikeets Trichoglossus haematodus (Loriidae) to test the hypothesis that paracellular uptake accounts for a significant proportion of total glucose uptake in these species. We found that routes of glucose absorption are highly dynamic in both species. In lorikeets, absorption of L-glucose (non-mediated uptake) is slower than that of D-glucose (mediated and non-mediated uptake), with as little as 10% of total glucose absorbed by the paracellular pathway initially (contrasting previous indirect estimates of approximately 80%). Over time, however, more glucose may be absorbed via the paracellular route. Glucose absorption by both mediated and non-mediated mechanisms in wattlebirds occurred at a faster rate than in lorikeets, and wattlebirds also rely substantially on paracellular uptake. In wattlebirds, we recorded higher bioavailability of L-glucose (96+/-3%) compared with D-glucose (57+/-2%), suggesting problems with the in vivo use of radiolabeled d-glucose. Further trials with 3-O-methyl-D-glucose revealed high bioavailability in wattlebirds (90+/-5%). This non-metabolisable glucose analogue remains the probe of choice for measuring uptake rates in vivo, especially in birds in which absorption and metabolism occur extremely rapidly. PMID:18978218

  8. Increased absorption rate of diclofenac from fast acting formulations containing its potassium salt.

    PubMed

    Reiner, V; Reiner, A; Reiner, G; Conti, M

    2001-11-01

    Diclofenac (CAS 15307-86-5) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug largely used, mainly to relief pain of various origin. Diclofenac is present on the market as free acid, as sodium salt (CAS 15307-79-6) and as potassium salt (CAS 15307-81-0). The last salification form has shown a prompter absorption rate and a faster onset of analgesic activity than the acid form and sodium salt. This paper extensively reviews three trials carried out on healthy volunteers, where potassium salt of diclofenac present in three fast-acting formulations, namely sachets (Trial 1), tablets (Trial 2) and oral drops (Trial 3), were compared to reference tablet formulations from the market. A very fast absorption rate was encountered with the three test formulations, with the peak reached in one case 5 min and in most cases within 10-15 min after dosing. The quick absorption rate of test formulations was attributed to the special combination of the salt of diclofenac with a dynamic buffering agent, namely bicarbonate, present in the test formulations and covered by an international patent. The prompt absorption of diclofenac from the new fast-acting formulations was accompanied by the presence of only one peak, whereas the reference formulations produced in most cases two peaks, as widely described in literature. This finding suggested the hypothesis that the absorption of test formulations should occur in a shorter tract of the gut. The faster absorption of diclofenac from the three fast-acting formulations is expected to produce a faster onset of analgesic action, which highlights these new formulations as particularly indicated to relief pain of any origin. PMID:11765589

  9. SAR Computation inside Fetus by RF Coil during MR Imaging Employing Realistic Numerical Pregnant Woman Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Satoru; Saito, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Masaharu; Ito, Koichi; Ikehira, Hiroo

    This paper presents the computational electromagnetic dosimetry inside an anatomically based pregnant woman models exposed to electromagnetic wave during magnetic resonance imaging. The two types of pregnant woman models corresponding to early gestation and 26 weeks gestation were used for this study. The specific absorption rate (SAR) in and around a fetus were calculated by radiated electromagnetic wave from highpass and lowpass birdcage coil. Numerical calculation results showed that high SAR region is observed at the body in the vicinity of gaps of the coil, and is related to concentrated electric field in the gaps of human body such as armpit and thigh. Moreover, it has confirmed that the SAR in the fetus is less than International Electrotechnical Commission limit of 10W/kg, when whole-body average SARs are 2W/kg and 4W/kg, which are the normal operating mode and first level controlled operating mode, respectively.

  10. Effects of frequency, irradiation geometry and polarisation on computation of SAR in human brain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongmei; Su, Zhentao; Ning, Jing; Wang, Changzhen; Xie, Xiangdong; Qu, Decheng; Wu, Ke; Zhang, Xiaomin; Pan, Jie; Yang, Guoshan

    2014-12-01

    The power absorbed by the human brain has possible implications in the study of the central nervous system-related biological effects of electromagnetic fields. In order to determine the specific absorption rate (SAR) of radio frequency (RF) waves in the human brain, and to investigate the effects of geometry and polarisation on SAR value, the finite-difference time-domain method was applied for the SAR computation. An anatomically realistic model scaled to a height of 1.70 m and a mass of 63 kg was selected, which included 14 million voxels segmented into 39 tissue types. The results suggested that high SAR values were found in the brain, i.e. ∼250 MHz for vertical polarisation and 900-1200 MHz both for vertical and horizontal polarisation, which may be the result of head resonance at these frequencies. PMID:24399107

  11. Measurement of erosion rate by absorption spectroscopy in a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Naoji; Yokota, Shigeru; Matsui, Makoto; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2005-08-15

    The erosion rate of a Hall thruster was estimated with the objective of building a real-time erosion rate monitoring system using a 1 kW class anode layer type Hall thruster. This system aids the understanding of the tradeoff between lifetime and performance. To estimate the flux of the sputtered wall material, the number density of the sputtered iron was measured by laser absorption spectroscopy using an absorption line from ground atomic iron at 371.9935 nm. An ultravioletAl{sub x}In{sub y}Ga{sub (1-x-y)}N diode laser was used as the probe. The estimated number density of iron was 1.1x10{sup 16} m{sup -3}, which is reasonable when compared with that measured by duration erosion tests. The relation between estimated erosion rate and magnetic flux density also agreed with that measured by duration erosion tests.

  12. A new method for SAR measurement in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Rocco; Acernese, Fausto; Indovina, Pietro Luigi; Barone, Fabrizio

    2008-03-01

    During an MR procedure, the patient absorbs a portion of the transmitted RF energy, which may result in tissue heating and other adverse effects, such as alterations in visual, auditory and neural functions. The Specific Absorption Rate (SAR), in W/kg, is the RF power absorbed per unit mass of tissue and is one of the most important parameters related with thermal effects and acts as a guideline for MRI safety. Strict limits to the SAR levels are imposed by patient safety international regulations (CEI - EN 60601 - 2 - 33) and SAR measurements are required in order to verify its respect. The recommended methods for mean SAR measurement are quite problematic and often require a maintenance man intervention and long stop machine. For example, in the CEI recommended pulse energy method, the presence of a maintenance man is required in order to correctly connect the required instrumentation; furthermore, the procedure is complex and requires remarkable processing and calculus. Simpler are the calorimetric methods, also if in this case long acquisition times are required in order to have significant temperature variations and accurate heat capacity knowledge (CEI - EN 60601 - 2 - 33). The phase transition method is a new method to measure SAR in MRI which has the advantages to be very simple and to overcome all the typical calorimetric method problems. It does not require in gantry temperature measurements, any specific heat or heat capacity knowledge, but only mass and time measurement.

  13. Rate- and Extent-Limiting Factors of Oral Drug Absorption: Theory and Applications.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Kiyohiko; Terada, Katsuhide

    2015-09-01

    The oral absorption of drugs has been represented by various concepts such as the absorption potential, the maximum absorbable dose, the biopharmaceutics classification system, and in vitro-in vivo correlation. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the theoretical relationships between these concepts. It shows how a simple analytical solution for the fraction of a dose absorbed (Fa equation) can offer a theoretical base to tie together the various concepts, and discusses how this solution relates to the rate-limiting cases of oral drug absorption. The article introduces the Fa classification system as a framework in which all the above concepts were included, and discusses its applications for food effect prediction, active pharmaceutical ingredient form selection, formulation design, and biowaiver strategy. PMID:25712830

  14. Fine resolution calculations of SAR in the human body for frequencies up to 3 GHz.

    PubMed

    Dimbylow, P J

    2002-08-21

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) have been performed from 100 MHz to 3 GHz at the basic 2 mm resolution of the voxel (volume pixel) model NORMAN without any rescaling to larger cell sizes. The reduction in the voxel size from previous work allows SAR to be calculated at higher frequencies. Additionally, the calculations have been extended down to 10 MHz, covering the whole-body resonance regions at a resolution of 4 mm. As well as for the adult phantom, SAR values are calculated for scaled versions representing 10-, 5- and 1-year-old children for both grounded and isolated conditions. External electric field levels are derived from limits of whole-body averaged SAR and localized SAR in the ankle, and compared with NRPB investigation levels and ICNIRP reference levels. The ICNIRP field reference levels alone would not provide a conservative estimate of the localized SAR exposure in the leg for grounded conditions. It would be necessary to invoke the secondary reference level on limb current to provide compliance with basic restrictions on localized SAR averaged over 10 g. PMID:12222849

  15. Fine resolution calculations of SAR in the human body for frequencies up to 3 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimbylow, P. J.

    2002-08-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) have been performed from 100 MHz to 3 GHz at the basic 2 mm resolution of the voxel (volume pixel) model NORMAN without any rescaling to larger cell sizes. The reduction in the voxel size from previous work allows SAR to be calculated at higher frequencies. Additionally, the calculations have been extended down to 10 MHz, covering the whole-body resonance regions at a resolution of 4 mm. As well as for the adult phantom, SAR values are calculated for scaled versions representing 10-, 5- and 1-year-old children for both grounded and isolated conditions. External electric field levels are derived from limits of whole-body averaged SAR and localized SAR in the ankle, and compared with NRPB investigation levels and ICNIRP reference levels. The ICNIRP field reference levels alone would not provide a conservative estimate of the localized SAR exposure in the leg for grounded conditions. It would be necessary to invoke the secondary reference level on limb current to provide compliance with basic restrictions on localized SAR averaged over 10 g.

  16. Mass Loss Rates for Solar-like Stars Measured from Lyα Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. E.; Müller, H.-R.; Linsky, J. L.

    2003-10-01

    We present a number of mass loss rate measurements for solar-like stars with coronal winds, computed using a Lyα absorption technique. The collision between the solar wind and the interstellar wind seen by the Sun defines the large scale structure of our heliosphere. Similar structures, ``astrospheres,'' exist around other solar-like stars. The deceleration of the interstellar wind at the solar or stellar bow shock heats the interstellar material. Heated neutral hydrogen in the outer astrosphere (and/or heliosphere) produces a broad Lyα absorption profile that is often detectable in high resolution Hubble Space Telescope spectra. The amount of absorption is dependent upon the strength of the stellar wind. With guidance from hydrodynamic models of astrospheres, we use detected astrospheric Lyα absorption to estimate the stellar mass loss rates. For the solar-like GK stars in our sample, mass loss appears to increase with stellar activity, suggesting that young, active stars have stronger winds than old, inactive stars. However, Proxima Cen (M5.5 Ve) and λ And (G8 IV-III+M V) appear to be inconsistent with this relation.

  17. Specific absorption rate analysis of broadband mobile antenna with negative index metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Touhidul; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a negative index metamaterial-inspired printed mobile wireless antenna that can support most mobile applications such as GSM, UMTS, Bluetooth and WLAN frequency bands. The antenna consists of a semi-circular patch, a 50Ω microstrip feed line and metamaterial ground plane. The antenna occupies a very small space of 37 × 47 × 0.508 mm3, making it suitable for mobile wireless application. The perceptible novelty shown in this proposed antenna is that reduction of specific absorption rate using the negative index metamaterial ground plane. The proposed antenna reduced 72.11 and 75.53 % of specific absorption rate at 1.8 and 2.4 GHz, respectively.

  18. Absorption cross-section and decay rate of rotating linear dilaton black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.; Aslan, O. A.

    2016-02-01

    We analytically study the scalar perturbation of non-asymptotically flat (NAF) rotating linear dilaton black holes (RLDBHs) in 4-dimensions. We show that both radial and angular wave equations can be solved in terms of the hypergeometric functions. The exact greybody factor (GF), the absorption cross-section (ACS), and the decay rate (DR) for the massless scalar waves are computed for these black holes (BHs). The results obtained for ACS and DR are discussed through graphs.

  19. Strain Rate Effects on the Energy Absorption of Rapidly Manufactured Composite Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Brighton, Aaron M; Forrest, Mark; Starbuck, J Michael; ERDMAN III, DONALD L; Fox, Bronwyn

    2009-01-01

    Quasi-static and intermediate rate axial crush tests were conducted on tubular specimens of Carbon/Epoxy (Toray T700/G83C) and Glass/Polypropylene (Twintex). The quasi-static tests were conducted at 10 mm/min (1.67x10-4 m/s); five different crush initiators were used. Tests at intermediate rates were performed at speeds of 0.25 m/s, 0.5 m/s, 0.75 m/s 1m/s, 2 m/s and 4 m/s. Quasi-static tests of tubular specimens showed high specific energy absorption (SEA) values with 86 kJ/kg for Carbon/Epoxy specimens. The specific energy absorption of the Glass/Polypropylene specimens was measured to be 29 kJ/kg. Results from the intermediate test rates showed that while a decrease in specific energy absorbed was observed as speeds increased, values did not fall below 55kj/kg for carbon specimens or 35 kJ/kg for the Glass/Polypropylene specimens. When compared with steel and aluminium, specific energy absorption values of 15 kJ/kg and 30 kJ/kg respectively, the benefits of using composite materials in crash structures are apparent.

  20. Evaluation of Specific Absorption Rate as a Dosimetric Quantity for Electromagnetic Fields Bioeffects

    PubMed Central

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J.; Johansson, Olle; Carlo, George L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate SAR as a dosimetric quantity for EMF bioeffects, and identify ways for increasing the precision in EMF dosimetry and bioactivity assessment. Methods We discuss the interaction of man-made electromagnetic waves with biological matter and calculate the energy transferred to a single free ion within a cell. We analyze the physics and biology of SAR and evaluate the methods of its estimation. We discuss the experimentally observed non-linearity between electromagnetic exposure and biological effect. Results We find that: a) The energy absorbed by living matter during exposure to environmentally accounted EMFs is normally well below the thermal level. b) All existing methods for SAR estimation, especially those based upon tissue conductivity and internal electric field, have serious deficiencies. c) The only method to estimate SAR without large error is by measuring temperature increases within biological tissue, which normally are negligible for environmental EMF intensities, and thus cannot be measured. Conclusions SAR actually refers to thermal effects, while the vast majority of the recorded biological effects from man-made non-ionizing environmental radiation are non-thermal. Even if SAR could be accurately estimated for a whole tissue, organ, or body, the biological/health effect is determined by tiny amounts of energy/power absorbed by specific biomolecules, which cannot be calculated. Moreover, it depends upon field parameters not taken into account in SAR calculation. Thus, SAR should not be used as the primary dosimetric quantity, but used only as a complementary measure, always reporting the estimating method and the corresponding error. Radiation/field intensity along with additional physical parameters (such as frequency, modulation etc) which can be directly and in any case more accurately measured on the surface of biological tissues, should constitute the primary measure for EMF exposures, in spite of similar uncertainty to predict

  1. ERS-1 SAR data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, K.; Bicknell, T.; Vines, K.

    1986-01-01

    To take full advantage of the synthetic aperature radar (SAR) to be flown on board the European Space Agency's Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1) (1989) and the Canadian Radarsat (1990), the implementation of a receiving station in Alaska is being studied to gather and process SAR data pertaining in particular to regions within the station's range of reception. The current SAR data processing requirement is estimated to be on the order of 5 minutes per day. The Interim Digital Sar Processor (IDP) which was under continual development through Seasat (1978) and SIR-B (1984) can process slightly more than 2 minutes of ERS-1 data per day. On the other hand, the Advanced Digital SAR Processore (ADSP), currently under development for the Shuttle Imaging Radar C (SIR-C, 1988) and the Venus Radar Mapper, (VMR, 1988), is capable of processing ERS-1 SAR data at a real time rate. To better suit the anticipated ERS-1 SAR data processing requirement, both a modified IDP and an ADSP derivative are being examined. For the modified IDP, a pipelined architecture is proposed for the mini-computer plus array processor arrangement to improve throughout. For the ADSP derivative, a simplified version is proposed to enhance ease of implementation and maintainability while maintaing real time throughput rates. These processing systems are discussed and evaluated.

  2. Imaging Breathing Rate in the CO2Absorption Band.

    PubMed

    Fei, Jin; Zhu, Zhen; Pavlidis, Ioannis

    2005-01-01

    Following up on our previous work, we have developed one more non-contact method to measure human breathing rate. We have retrofitted our Mid-Wave Infra-Red (MWIR) imaging system with a narrow band-pass filter in the CO2absorption band (4.3 µm). This improves the contrast between the foreground (i.e., expired air) and background (e.g., wall). Based on the radiation information within the breath flow region, we get the mean dynamic thermal signal. This signal is quasi-periodic due to the interleaving of high and low intensities corresponding to expirations and inspirations respectively. We sample the signal at a constant rate and then determine the breathing frequency through Fourier analysis. We have performed experiments on 9 subjects at distances ranging from 6-8 ft. We compared the breathing rate computed by our novel method with ground-truth measurements obtained via a traditional contact device (PowerLab/4SP from ADInstruments with an abdominal transducer). The results show high correlation between the two modalities. For the first time, we report a Fourier based breathing rate computation method on a MWIR signal in the CO2absorption band. The method opens the way for desktop, unobtrusive monitoring of an important vital sign, that is, breathing rate. It may find widespread applications in preventive medicine as well as sustained physiological monitoring of subjects suffering from chronic ailments. PMID:17282279

  3. Analysis of the local worst-case SAR exposure caused by an MRI multi-transmit body coil in anatomical models of the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, Esra; Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Murbach, Manuel; Christ, Andreas; Cabot, Eugenia; Kuster, Niels

    2011-08-01

    Multi-transmit coils are increasingly being employed in high-field magnetic resonance imaging, along with a growing interest in multi-transmit body coils. However, they can lead to an increase in whole-body and local specific absorption rate (SAR) compared to conventional body coils excited in circular polarization for the same total incident input power. In this study, the maximum increase of SAR for three significantly different human anatomies is investigated for a large 3 T (128 MHz) multi-transmit body coil using numerical simulations and a (generalized) eigenvalue-based approach. The results demonstrate that the increase of SAR strongly depends on the anatomy. For the three models and normalization to the sum of the rung currents squared, the whole-body averaged SAR increases by up to a factor of 1.6 compared to conventional excitation and the peak spatial SAR (averaged over any 10 cm3 of tissue) by up to 13.4. For some locations the local averaged SAR goes up as much as 800 times (130 when looking only at regions where it is above 1% of the peak spatial SAR). The ratio of the peak spatial SAR to the whole-body SAR increases by a factor of up to 47 and can reach values above 800. Due to the potentially much larger power deposition, additional, preferably patient-specific, considerations are necessary to avoid injuries by such systems.

  4. Determination of methane emission rates on a biogas plant using data from laser absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Groth, Angela; Maurer, Claudia; Reiser, Martin; Kranert, Martin

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the work was to establish a method for emission control of biogas plants especially the observation of fugitive methane emissions. The used method is in a developmental stage but the topic is crucial to environmental and economic issues. A remote sensing measurement method was adopted to determine methane emission rates of a biogas plant in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. An inverse dispersion model was used to deduce emission rates. This technique required one concentration measurement with an open path tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) downwind and upwind the source and basic wind information, like wind speed and direction. Different operating conditions of the biogas plant occurring on the measuring day (December 2013) could be represented roughly in the results. During undisturbed operational modes the methane emission rate averaged 2.8 g/s, which corresponds to 4% of the methane gas production rate of the biogas plant. PMID:25446786

  5. Effective absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of anthropogenic and biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romonosky, Dian E.; Ali, Nujhat N.; Saiduddin, Mariyah N.; Wu, Michael; Lee, Hyun Ji (Julie); Aiona, Paige K.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2016-04-01

    Mass absorption coefficient (MAC) values were measured for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) samples produced by flow tube ozonolysis and smog chamber photooxidation of a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOC), specifically: α-pinene, β-pinene, β-myrcene, d-limonene, farnesene, guaiacol, imidazole, isoprene, linalool, ocimene, p-xylene, 1-methylpyrrole, and 2-methylpyrrole. Both low-NOx and high-NOx conditions were employed during the chamber photooxidation experiments. MAC values were converted into effective molecular absorption cross sections assuming an average molecular weight of 300 g/mol for SOA compounds. The upper limits for the effective photolysis rates of SOA compounds were calculated by assuming unity photolysis quantum yields and convoluting the absorption cross sections with a time-dependent solar spectral flux. A more realistic estimate for the photolysis rates relying on the quantum yield of acetone was also obtained. The results show that condensed-phase photolysis of SOA compounds can potentially occur with effective lifetimes ranging from minutes to days, suggesting that photolysis is an efficient and largely overlooked mechanism of SOA aging.

  6. New constraints in absorptive capacity and the optimum rate of petroleum output

    SciTech Connect

    El Mallakh, R

    1980-01-01

    Economic policy in four oil-producing countries is analyzed within a framework that combines a qualitative assessment of the policy-making process with an empirical formulation based on historical and current trends in these countries. The concept of absorptive capacity is used to analyze the optimum rates of petroleum production in Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait. A control solution with an econometric model is developed which is then modified for alternative development strategies based on analysis of factors influencing production decisions. The study shows the consistencies and inconsistencies between the goals of economic growth, oil production, and exports, and the constraints on economic development. Simulation experiments incorporated a number of the constraints on absorptive capacity. Impact of other constraints such as income distribution and political stability is considered qualitatively. (DLC)

  7. Specific absorption rate calculations of magnetite, using a modified linear response model for applications in magnetic hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández S, A. E-mail: meduardo2001@hotmail.com; Cano, M. E. E-mail: meduardo2001@hotmail.com; Torres-Arenas, J.

    2014-11-07

    Currently the absorption of electromagnetic radiation by magnetic nanoparticles is studied for biomedical applications of cancer thermotherapy. Several experiments are conduced following the framework of the Rosensweig model, in order to estimate their specific absorption rate. Nevertheless, this linear approximation involves strong simplifications which constrain their accuracy and validity range. The main aim of this work is to incorporate the deviation of the sphericity assumption in particles shapes, to improve the determination of their specific absorption rate. The correction to the effective particles volume is computed as a measure of the apparent amount of magnetic material, interacting with the external AC magnetic field. Preliminary results using the physical properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, exhibit an important correction in their estimated specific absorption rate, as a function of the apparent mean particles radius. Indeed, we have observed using a small deviation (6% of the apparent radius), up to 40% of the predicted specific absorption rate by the Rosensweig linear approximation.

  8. COMPARISON OF FINITE-DIFFERENCE TIME DOMAIN SAR CALCULATIONS WITH MEASUREMENT IN A HETEROGENEOUS MODEL OF MAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A finite-difference time-domain technique was used to calculate the specific absorption rate (SAR) at various sites in a heterogeneous block model of man. he block model represented a close approximation to a full-scale heterogeneous phantom model. oth models were comprised of a ...

  9. The phase transition method for SAR measurement in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Rocco; Acernese, Fausto; Vilasi, Silvia; Barone, Fabrizio

    2010-03-01

    During an MR procedure, the patient absorbs a portion of the transmitted RF energy, which may result in tissue heating and other adverse effects, such as alterations in visual, auditory and neural functions. The Specific Absorption Rate (SAR), in W/kg, is the RF power absorbed per unit mass of tissue and is one of the most important parameters related with thermal effects and acts as a guideline for MRI safety. Strict limits to the SAR levels are imposed by patient safety international regulations (CEI - EN 60601 - 2 - 33) and SAR measurements are required in order to verify its respect. The recommended methods for mean SAR measurement are quite problematic and often require a maintenance man intervention and long stop machine. For example, in the CEI recommended pulse energy method, the presence of a maintenance man is required in order to correctly connect the required instrumentation; furthermore, the procedure is complex and requires remarkable processing and calculus. Simpler are the calorimetric methods, also if in this case long acquisition times are required in order to have significant temperature variations and accurate heat capacity knowledge (CEI - EN 60601 - 2 - 33). The phase transition method is a new method to measure SAR in MRI which has the advantages to be very simple and to overcome all the typical calorimetric method problems. It does not require in gantry temperature measurements, any specific heat or heat capacity knowledge, but only mass and time measurement. On the other hand, it is necessary to establish if all deposited power SAR can be considered acquired and measured. In this paper, that will be shown.

  10. The phase transition method for SAR measurement in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, R.; Canonico, R.; Acernese, F.; Giordano, G.; Barone, F.

    2014-03-01

    During an MR procedure, the patient absorbs a portion of the transmitted RF energy, which may result in tissue heating and other adverse effects, such as alterations in visual, auditory and neural functions. The Specific Absorption Rate (SAR), in W/kg, is the RF power absorbed per unit mass of tissue and is one of the most important parameters related with thermal effects and acts as a guideline for MRI safety. Strict limits to the SAR levels are imposed by patient safety international regulations (CEI - EN 60601 - 2 - 33) and SAR measurements are required in order to verify its respect. The recommended methods for mean SAR measurement are quite problematic and often require a maintenance man intervention and long stop machine. For example, in the CEI recommended pulse energy method, the presence of a maintenance man is required in order to correctly connect the required instrumentation; furthermore, the procedure is complex and requires remarkable processing and calculus. Simpler are the calorimetric methods, also if in this case long acquisition times are required in order to have significant temperature variations and accurate heat capacity knowledge (CEI - EN 60601 - 2 - 33). The phase transition method is a new method to measure SAR in MRI which has the advantages to be very simple and to overcome all the typical calorimetric method problems. It does not require in gantry temperature measurements, any specific heat or heat capacity knowledge, but only mass and time measurement. Nevertheless, in order to consider this method it is necessary to verify that all deposited SAR power can be considered acquired and measured. In this paper considerations about this aspect are conducted.

  11. A no-calorimetric method for measuring SAR in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Rocco; Acernese, Fausto; Barone, Fabrizio

    2011-04-01

    During an MR procedure, the patient absorbs a portion of the transmitted RF energy, which may result in tissue heating and other adverse effects, such as alterations in visual, auditory and neural functions. The Specific Absorption Rate (SAR), in W/kg, is the RF power absorbed per unit mass of tissue and is one of the most important parameters related with thermal effects and acts as a guideline for MRI safety. Strict limits to the SAR levels are imposed by patient safety international regulations (CEI - EN 60601 - 2 - 33) and SAR measurements are required in order to verify its respect. The recommended methods for mean SAR measurement are quite problematic and often require a maintenance man intervention and long stop machine. For example, in the CEI recommended pulse energy method, the presence of a maintenance man is required in order to correctly connect the required instrumentation; furthermore, the procedure is complex and requires remarkable processing and calculus. Simpler are the calorimetric methods, also if in this case long acquisition times are required in order to have significant temperature variations and accurate heat capacity knowledge (CEI - EN 60601 - 2 - 33). The phase transition method is a new no-calorimetric method to measure SAR in MRI which has the advantages to be very simple and to overcome all the typical calorimetric method problems. It does not require in gantry temperature measurements, any specific heat or heat capacity knowledge, but only mass and time measurement. On the other hand, it is necessary to establish if all deposited power SAR can be considered acquired and measured. In this paper, that will be shown.

  12. The relationship between localised SAR in the arm and wrist current.

    PubMed

    Dimbylow, P J

    2001-01-01

    Calculations are presented of the specific energy absorption rate, SAR, in the lower arm of the NRPB anatomically realistic voxel model. NORMAN, for induced currents from 100 kHz to 80 MHz. The wrist region has a narrow cross section and contains little high conductivity muscle, comprising mainly low conductivity bone, tendon and fat. Consequently there is a channelling of the current through the high conductivity muscle, which produces high, localised values of the SAR. Values averaged over 10 g and 100 g of tissue are calculated as a function of the current flowing through the wrist. PMID:11572647

  13. Temporal patterns of slip rate on the Little Lake fault, eastern California shear zone, from terrestrial lidar, cosmogenic radionuclides, and InSAR analysis (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, C. B.; Burgmann, R.; Jayko, A. S.; Fisher, G., III; Rood, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    An ever-expanding inventory of fault slip-rates spanning various time intervals reveals contrasting spatial and temporal patterns of strain for active faults within the Eastern California shear zone (ECSZ). Comparison of data derived from geologic, geomorphic, and paleoseismic records with geodetic estimates of fault loading affords unparalleled opportunity to investigate the dynamics of earthquake processes and the evolution of an intracontinental plate boundary fault system. We focus here on the Little Lake fault, which lies along the western margin of the ECSZ between the Sierra Nevada and the Coso Range in east-central California. The fault accommodates between 10-20% of the total dextral motion within the ECSZ at this latitude and a smaller fraction of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. Relatively high rates of decadal fault loading previously described for the Little Lake fault zone from GPS measurements and InSAR data suggest potential discrepancies with longer, late Quaternary records of fault slip. To address this inconsistency, we targeted a series of fluvial terraces related to overtopping and outflow from pluvial Owens Lake that cross the fault and record dextral offset since Late-Pleistocene time. High-resolution topographic surveying using a tripod-mounted laser scanner suggests between 33 and 38 m of reconstructed right-lateral displacement of two individual terrace risers over this time period. Coupled with cosmogenic 10Be dating of intact, meter-scale outwash boulders preserved on terrace treads bounding each riser, detailed characterization of these geomorphic features provides a robust geologic slip-rate estimate for the Little Lake fault zone at the ~104 year timescale. Preliminary correlation of terrace surfaces with available exposure dating of fluvially scoured basalt upstream at Fossil Falls suggests a right-lateral displacement-rate on the order of ~2 mm/yr. Although more than double the previously reported

  14. The absorption efficiency and respiration rate of the Florida lancelet, Branchiostoma floridae.

    PubMed

    Nash, Troy R; Ruppert, Edward E; Colacino, James M

    2009-12-01

    The present study investigates some aspects of the digestive biology and physiological energetics of the Florida lancelet, Branchiostoma floridae. Florida lancelets are able to remove 47.2-56.9% of the energy from a diet of mixed algae. The respiration rate is 0.100mL O(2) (STPD) h(-1) g(-1) (wet), which estimates a metabolic rate of 0.248 J h(-1), at an average body mass of 0.125 g (wet). Published values of the chlorophyll a concentration in its natural habitat indicate that a 125 mg lancelet would need to filter 0.018-0.031 L h(-1) to remove sufficient food to support its resting metabolism. The filtration rate of lancelets has been reported as 0.138 L h(-1), indicating that the actual filtration rate is 4-7 times greater than the filtration rate needed to meet resting metabolic demands. It appears that lancelets have the potential to be raised in aquaculture, because their absorption efficiency and respiration rate are comparable to suspension-feeding invertebrates that have been successfully aquacultured. PMID:19758577

  15. Outdoor measurement of SAR in a full-sized human model exposed to 29. 9 MHz in the near field

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, R.G.; Griner, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    Localized and averaged specific absorption rates (SARs) were obtained in a full-size muscle-equivalent human model exposed to near-field 29.9 MHz irradiation at an outdoor facility. The model was positioned erect on a metallic groundplane 1.22 m (4 ft) from the base of a 10.8-m (35 ft) whip antenna with an input power of 1.0 kW. For whole-body SAR, a mean value of 0.83 W/kg was determined using two gradient-layer calorimeters in a twin-well configuration. The localized SARs at 12 body locations were measured using nonperturbing temperature probes and were highest in the ankle region. We conclude that averaged SAR measurements in a full-size phantom are feasible using a twin-calorimeter approach; measurements in the field are practical when human-size (183 x 61 x 46 cm) calorimeters are used.

  16. Statistical Simulation of SAR Variability with Geometric and Tissue Property Changes by Using the Unscented Transform

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yu; Zeng, Peng; Wang, Shumin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The local specific absorption rate (SAR) is critical to the safety of radio frequency transmit coils. A statistical simulation approach is introduced to address the local SAR variability related to tissue property and geometric variations. Methods The local SAR is modeled as the output of a nonlinear transformation with factors that may affect its value being treated as random input variables. Instead of using the Monte Carlo method with a large number of sample points, the unscented transform is applied with a small set of deterministic sample points. A sensitivity analysis is further performed to determine the significance of each input variable. Electromagnetic simulations are carried out by the finite-difference time-domain method implemented on graphic processing unit. Results The local SAR variability of a 7 Tesla square loop coil for spine imaging and a 16-element brain imaging array as the result of tissue property and geometric changes were examined respectively. SAR limits were determined based on their means and standard deviations. Conclusion The proposed approach is efficient and general for the study of local SAR variability. PMID:25046818

  17. Confirmation of quasi-static approximation in SAR evaluation for a wireless power transfer system.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akimasa; Ito, Fumihiro; Laakso, Ilkka

    2013-09-01

    The present study discusses the applicability of the magneto-quasi-static approximation to the calculation of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in a cylindrical model for a wireless power transfer system. Resonant coils with different parameters were considered in the 10 MHz band. A two-step quasi-static method that is comprised of the method of moments and the scalar-potential finite-difference methods is applied, which can consider the effects of electric and magnetic fields on the induced SAR separately. From our computational results, the SARs obtained from our quasi-static method are found to be in good agreement with full-wave analysis for different positions of the cylindrical model relative to the wireless power transfer system, confirming the applicability of the quasi-static approximation in the 10 MHz band. The SAR induced by the external electric field is found to be marginal as compared to that induced by the magnetic field. Thus, the dosimetry for the external magnetic field, which may be marginally perturbed by the presence of biological tissue, is confirmed to be essential for SAR compliance in the 10 MHz band or lower. This confirmation also suggests that the current in the coil rather than the transferred power is essential for SAR compliance. PMID:23939244

  18. SAR simulations for high-field MRI: how much detail, effort, and accuracy is needed?

    PubMed

    Wolf, S; Diehl, D; Gebhardt, M; Mallow, J; Speck, O

    2013-04-01

    Accurate prediction of specific absorption rate (SAR) for high field MRI is necessary to best exploit its potential and guarantee safe operation. To reduce the effort (time, complexity) of SAR simulations while maintaining robust results, the minimum requirements for the creation (segmentation, labeling) of human models and methods to reduce the time for SAR calculations for 7 Tesla MR-imaging are evaluated. The geometric extent of the model required for realistic head-simulations and the number of tissue types sufficient to form a reliable but simplified model of the human body are studied. Two models (male and female) of the virtual family are analyzed. Additionally, their position within the head-coil is taken into account. Furthermore, the effects of retuning the coils to different load conditions and the influence of a large bore radiofrequency-shield have been examined. The calculation time for SAR simulations in the head can be reduced by 50% without significant error for smaller model extent and simplified tissue structure outside the coil. Likewise, the model generation can be accelerated by reducing the number of tissue types. Local SAR can vary up to 14% due to position alone. This must be considered and sets a limit for SAR prediction accuracy. All these results are comparable between the two body models tested. PMID:22611018

  19. EEG electrode caps can reduce SAR induced in the head by GSM900 mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Hamblin, Denise L; Anderson, Vitas; McIntosh, Robert L; McKenzie, Ray J; Wood, Andrew W; Iskra, Steve; Croft, Rodney J

    2007-05-01

    This paper investigates the influence of EEG electrode caps on specific absorption rate (SAR) in the head from a GSM900 mobile phone (217-Hz modulation, peak power output 2 W). SAR measurements were recorded in an anthropomorphic phantom using a precision robotic system. Peak 10 g average SAR in the whole head and in just the temporal region was compared for three phantom arrangements; no cap, 64-electrode "Electro-Cap," and 64-electrode "Quick-Cap". Relative to the "no cap" arrangement, the Electro-Cap and Quick-Cap caused a peak SAR (10 g) reduction of 14% and 18% respectively in both the whole head and in the temporal region. Additional computational modeling confirmed that SAR (10 g) is reduced by the presence of electrode leads and that the extent of the effect varies according to the orientation of the leads with respect to the radiofrequency (RF) source. The modeling also indicated that the nonconductive shell between the electrodes and simulated head material does not significantly alter the electrode lead shielding effect. The observed SAR reductions are not likely to be sufficiently large to have accounted for null EEG findings in the past but should nonetheless be noted in studies aiming to measure and report human brain activity under similar exposure conditions. PMID:17518289

  20. A simple parameterization of ozone infrared absorption for atmospheric heating rate calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfield, Joan E.

    1991-01-01

    A simple parameterization of ozone absorption in the 9.6-micron region which is suitable for two- and three-dimensional stratospheric and tropospheric models is presented. The band is divided into two parts, a brand center region and a band wing region, grouping together regions for which the temperature dependence of absorption is similar. Each of the two regions is modeled with a function having the form of the Goody random model, with pressure and temperature dependent band parameters chosen by empirically fitting line-by-line equivalent widths for pressures between 0.25 and 1000 mbar and ozone absorber amounts between 1.0 x 10 to the -7th and 1.0 cm atm. The model has been applied to calculations of atmospheric heating rates using an absorber amount weighted mean pressure and temperature along the inhomogeneous paths necessary for flux computations. In the stratosphere, maximum errors in the heating rates relative to line-by-line calculations are 0.1 K/d, or 5 percent of the peak cooling at the stratopause. In the troposphere the errors are at most 0.005 K/d.

  1. Elementary reaction rate measurements at high temperatures by tunable-laser flash-absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Hessler, J.P.

    1993-12-01

    The major objective of this program is to measure thermal rate coefficients and branching ratios of elementary reactions. To perform these measurements, the authors constructed an ultrahigh-purity shock tube to generate temperatures between 1000 and 5500 K. The tunable-laser flash-absorption technique is used to measure the rate of change of the concentration of species which absorb below 50,000 cm{sup {minus}1} e.g.: OH, CH, and CH{sub 3}. This technique is being extended into the vacuum-ultraviolet spectral region where one can measure atomic species e.g.: H, D, C, O, and N; and diatomic species e.g.: O{sub 2}, CO, and OH.

  2. Chirp Scaling Algorithms for SAR Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, M.; Cheng, T.; Chen, M.

    1993-01-01

    The chirp scaling SAR processing algorithm is both accurate and efficient. Successful implementation requires proper selection of the interval of output samples, which is a function of the chirp interval, signal sampling rate, and signal bandwidth. Analysis indicates that for both airborne and spaceborne SAR applications in the slant range domain a linear chirp scaling is sufficient. To perform nonlinear interpolation process such as to output ground range SAR images, one can use a nonlinear chirp scaling interpolator presented in this paper.

  3. BEHAVIRORAL EFFECTS OF MICROWAVES: RELATIONSHIP OF TOTAL DOSE AND DOSE RATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of the research was to compare the relationship of whole body averaged specific absorption rate (SAR) and specific absorption (SA) to determine whether dose rate or dose was the better predictor of biological effects. Sperm positive Long-Evans female rats were exposed to...

  4. Aquaporins in ovine amnion: responses to altered amniotic fluid volumes and intramembranous absorption rates.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Cecilia Y; Anderson, Debra F; Brace, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are transmembrane channel proteins that facilitate rapid water movement across cell membranes. In amniotic membrane, the AQP-facilitated transfer of water across amnion cells has been proposed as a mechanism for amniotic fluid volume (AFV) regulation. To investigate whether AQPs modulate AFV by altering intramembranous absorption (IMA) rate, we tested the hypothesis that AQP gene expression in the amnion is positively correlated with IMA rate during experimental conditions when IMA rate and AFV are modified over a wide range. The relative abundances of AQP1, AQP3, AQP8, AQP9, and AQP11 mRNA and protein were determined in the amnion of 16 late-gestation ovine fetuses subjected to 2 days of control conditions, urine drainage, urine replacement, or intraamniotic fluid infusion. AQP mRNA levels were determined by RT-qPCR and proteins by western immunoblot. Under control conditions, mRNA levels among the five AQPs differed more than 20-fold. During experimental treatments, mean IMA rate in the experimental groups ranged from 100 ± 120 mL/day to 1370 ± 270 mL/day. The mRNA levels of the five AQPs did not change from control and were not correlated with IMA rates. The protein levels of AQP1 were positively correlated with IMA rates (r(2) = 38%, P = 0.01) while the remaining four AQPs were not. These findings demonstrate that five AQPs are differentially expressed in ovine amnion. Our study supports the hypothesis that AQP1 may play a positive role in regulating the rate of fluid transfer across the amnion, thereby participating in the dynamic regulation of AFV. PMID:27440743

  5. Effective light absorption and absolute electron transport rates in the coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Milán; Wangpraseurt, Daniel; Tamburic, Bojan; Larkum, Anthony W D; Schreiber, Ulrich; Suggett, David J; Kühl, Michael; Ralph, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM) fluorometry has been widely used to estimate the relative photosynthetic efficiency of corals. However, both the optical properties of intact corals as well as past technical constrains to PAM fluorometers have prevented calculations of the electron turnover rate of PSII. We used a new Multi-colour PAM (MC-PAM) in parallel with light microsensors to determine for the first time the wavelength-specific effective absorption cross-section of PSII photochemistry, σII(λ), and thus PAM-based absolute electron transport rates of the coral photosymbiont Symbiodinium both in culture and in hospite in the coral Pocillopora damicornis. In both cases, σII of Symbiodinium was highest in the blue spectral region and showed a progressive decrease towards red wavelengths. Absolute values for σII at 440 nm were up to 1.5-times higher in culture than in hospite. Scalar irradiance within the living coral tissue was reduced by 20% in the blue when compared to the incident downwelling irradiance. Absolute electron transport rates of P. damicornis at 440 nm revealed a maximum PSII turnover rate of ca. 250 electrons PSII(-1) s(-1), consistent with one PSII turnover for every 4 photons absorbed by PSII; this likely reflects the limiting steps in electron transfer between PSII and PSI. Our results show that optical properties of the coral host strongly affect light use efficiency of Symbiodinium. Therefore, relative electron transport rates do not reflect the productivity rates (or indeed how the photosynthesis-light response is parameterised). Here we provide a non-invasive approach to estimate absolute electron transport rates in corals. PMID:25146689

  6. Low SAR planar antenna for multi standard cellular phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Ahmed, M.; Bouhorma, M.; Elouaai, F.; Mamouni, A.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper the design of a multiband compact antenna for the integration into the new multi function mobile phones is presented. The antenna is matched to operate at GSM 920 MHz, WI-Fi 2.4 GHz and HiperLan 5.1 GHz standards with low SAR levels. Return loss coefficient and radiation pattern of this antenna are computed in free space as well as in the presence of head. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of the planar antenna is calculated and compared with that of the monopole antenna. To examine the performance of this antenna, a prototype was designed, fabricated and measured; the simulation analysis was performed using the HFSS software, good agreement with the simulation providing validation of the design procedure.

  7. Fe /Fe oxide nanocomposite particles with large specific absorption rate for hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Q.; Baker, I.; Loudis, J. A.; Liao, Y.; Hoopes, P. J.; Weaver, J. B.

    2007-06-01

    Using a water-in-oil microemulsion with cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide as the surfactant, iron was reduced to form a metallic core on which a passivating oxide shell was grown. Transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, and heating measurements were used to characterize these monodispersed magnetic Fe /Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles with respect to the possible application for magnetic hyperthermia treatments of cancer. The aim is to utilize the fact that an iron core (high saturation magnetization) will give a greater heating effect than iron oxide, while the iron oxide coating will allow the nanoparticles to be observed using magnetic resonance imaging so that therapy can be effectively monitored and targeted. The largest specific absorption rate obtained was 345W/g under an alternating magnetic field of 150Oe at 250kHz.

  8. Quasi-static magnetic measurements to predict specific absorption rates in magnetic fluid hyperthermia experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coral, D. F.; Mendoza Zélis, P.; de Sousa, M. E.; Muraca, D.; Lassalle, V.; Nicolás, P.; Ferreira, M. L.; Fernández van Raap, M. B.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the issue on whether dynamic magnetic properties of polydispersed magnetic colloids modeled using physical magnitudes derived from quasi-static magnetic measurement can be extrapolated to analyze specific absorption rate data acquired at high amplitudes and frequencies of excitation fields is addressed. To this end, we have analyzed two colloids of magnetite nanoparticles coated with oleic acid and chitosan in water displaying, under a radiofrequency field, high and low specific heat power release. Both colloids are alike in terms of liquid carrier, surfactant and magnetic phase composition but differ on the nanoparticle structuring. The colloid displaying low specific dissipation consists of spaced magnetic nanoparticles of mean size around 4.8 nm inside a large chitosan particle of 52.5 nm. The one displaying high specific dissipation consists of clusters of magnetic nanoparticles of mean size around 9.7 nm inside a chitosan particle of 48.6 nm. The experimental evaluation of Néel and Brown relaxation times (˜10-10 s and 10-4 s, respectively) indicate that the nanoparticles in both colloids magnetically relax by Néel mechanism. The isothermal magnetization curves analysis for this mechanism show that the magnetic nanoparticles behave in the interacting superparamagnetic regime. The specific absorption rates were determined calorimetrically at 260 kHz and up to 52 kA/m and were well modeled within linear response theory using the anisotropy density energy retrieved from quasi-static magnetic measurement, validating their use to predict heating ability of a given polydispersed particle suspension. Our findings provide new insight in the validity of quasi-static magnetic characterization to analyze the high frequency behavior of polydispersed colloids within the framework of the linear response and Wohlfarth theories and indicate that dipolar interactions play a key role being their strength larger for the colloid displaying higher dissipation, i

  9. Experimental Evaluation of SAR around an Implanted Cardiac Pacemaker Caused by Mobile Radio Terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Yuta; Saito, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Soichi; Takahashi, Masaharu; Ito, Koichi

    Although the effect of electromagnetic interference on an implanted cardiac pacemaker due to a nearby mobile phone has been investigated, there have been few studies on the enhancement of the specific absorption rate (SAR) around an implanted cardiac pacemaker due to a nearby mobile phone. In this study, the SAR distribution around a pacemaker model embedded in a parallelepiped torso phantom when a mobile phone was nearby was numerically calculated and experimentally measured. The results of both investigations showed a characteristic SAR distribution. The system presented can be used to estimate the effects of electromagnetic interference on implanted electric circuits and thus could lead to the development of guidelines for the safe use of mobile radio terminals near people with medical implants.

  10. Heat equation inversion framework for average SAR calculation from magnetic resonance thermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Alon, Leeor; Sodickson, Daniel K; Deniz, Cem M

    2016-10-01

    Deposition of radiofrequency (RF) energy can be quantified via electric field or temperature change measurements. Magnetic resonance imaging has been used as a tool to measure three dimensional small temperature changes associated with RF radiation exposure. When duration of RF exposure is long, conversion from temperature change to specific absorption rate (SAR) is nontrivial due to prominent heat-diffusion and conduction effects. In this work, we demonstrated a method for calculation of SAR via an inversion of the heat equation including heat-diffusion and conduction effects. This method utilizes high-resolution three dimensional magnetic resonance temperature images and measured thermal properties of the phantom to achieve accurate calculation of SAR. Accuracy of the proposed method was analyzed with respect to operating frequency of a dipole antenna and parameters used in heat equation inversion. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:493-503, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27490064

  11. Measurement of diffusion coefficients important in modeling the absorption rate of carbon dioxide into aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, R.L.; Adams, M.E.; Marshall, T.L.; Oscarson, J.L.; Wilding, W.V.; Anderson, D.J.

    1997-03-01

    Natural gas processors use amine treating processes to remove the acid gases H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} from gas streams. Absorption rates of gaseous CO{sub 2} into aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) solutions were measured in a quiescent, inverted-tube diffusiometer by monitoring the rate of pressure drop. The absorption rate was found to be insensitive to the diffusion coefficient of CO{sub 2} in solution but very sensitive to the diffusion rate of bicarbonate and protonated MDEA ions. Evidence also suggested that chemical reaction equilibrium is rapid relative to diffusion. A numerical model was developed on the basis of these observations. The model was used to regress diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate and protonated amine, which must be equivalent by electroneutrality arguments, from measured absorption rates. Complete modeling of the absorption process also required data for the diffusion coefficient of MDEA in water. These were measured using a Taylor dispersion apparatus. CO{sub 2} absorption rates and diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate and protonated MDEA were obtained at 298.2 K and 318.2 K in solutions containing 20, 35, and 50 mass % MDEA in water.

  12. Study of the influence of the laterality of mobile phone use on the SAR induced in two head models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanmi, Amal; Varsier, Nadège; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; Conil, Emmanuelle; Picon, Odile; Wiart, Joe

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate and to analyse the influence of the laterality of mobile phone use on the exposure of the brain to radio-frequencies (RF) and electromagnetic fields (EMF) from different mobile phone models using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The study focuses on the comparison of the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced on the right and left sides of two numerical adult and child head models. The heads are exposed by both phone models operating in GSM frequency bands for both ipsilateral and contralateral configurations. A slight SAR difference between the two sides of the heads is noted. The results show that the variation between the left and the right sides is more important at 1800 MHz for an ipsilateral use. Indeed, at this frequency, the variation can even reach 20% for the SAR10g and the SAR1g induced in the head and in the brain, respectively. Moreover, the average SAR induced by the mobile phone in the half hemisphere of the brain in ipsilateral exposure is higher than in contralateral exposure. Owing to the superficial character of energy deposition at 1800 MHz, this difference in the SAR induced for the ipsilateral and contralateral usages is more significant at 1800 MHz than at 900 MHz. The results have shown that depending on the phantom head models, the SAR distribution in the brain can vary because of differences in anatomical proportions and in the geometry of the head models. The induced SAR in child head and in sub-regions of the brain is significantly higher (up to 30%) compared to the adult head. This paper confirms also that the shape/design of the mobile and the location of the antenna can have a large influence at high frequency on the exposure of the brain, particularly on the SAR distribution and on the distinguished brain regions.

  13. Measurement and validation of GHz-band whole-body average SAR in a human volunteer using reverberation chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianqing; Suzuki, Tokio; Fujiwara, Osamu; Harima, Katsushige

    2012-12-01

    The World Health Organization’s (WHO) recommendation on the need for further research for radio-frequency dosimetry has promoted studies on the whole-body average-specific absorption rate (WBA-SAR) in various kinds of anatomical-based numerical models. For experimental validation of GHz-band WBA-SARs in a real human, however, there have not so far been any published papers, despite the fact that, in 1982, Hill measured WBA-SARs at frequencies less than 40 MHz in human volunteers using a TEM-cell exposure system. In this study, we provide a measurement technique with a reverberation chamber for validating numerical dosimetry results on GHz-band WBA-SARs in living humans. We measured WBA-SARs at 1, 1.5 and 2 GHz for a 22 year old male volunteer, with a height of 173 cm and a weight of 73 kg, in the reverberation chamber, and compared the results with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. The reverberation chamber was excited by using a signal generator through an amplifier with an output power of 30-40 mW, which produced inside the chamber with the volunteer an average electric field strength of 5 V m-1 equivalent to an average power spectral density of 6.6 μW cm-2. The WBA-SARs were obtained from the measured S11 and S21 together with the power density. On the other hand, the WBA-SARs have been calculated using the FDTD method for an adult male model with almost the same physique as that of the volunteer exposed to the electromagnetic field in the reverberation chamber. From the comparison between the measured and the calculated WBA-SARs, we could confirm that the measured GHz-band WBA-SARs approximately agree with the FDTD calculated results.

  14. Cigarette smoking and rate of gastric emptying: effect on alcohol absorption.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, R D; Horowitz, M; Maddox, A F; Wishart, J M; Shearman, D J

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the effects of cigarette smoking on alcohol absorption and gastric emptying. DESIGN--Randomised crossover study. SETTING--Research project in departments of medicine and nuclear medicine. SUBJECTS--Eight healthy volunteers aged 19-43 who regularly smoked 20-35 cigarettes a day and drank small amounts of alcohol on social occasions. INTERVENTIONS--Subjects drank 400 ml of a radiolabelled nutrient test meal containing alcohol (0.5 g/kg), then had their rates of gastric emptying measured. Test were carried out (a) with the subjects smoking four cigarettes an hour and (b) with the subjects not smoking, having abstained for seven days or more. The order of the tests was randomised and the tests were conducted two weeks apart. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Peak blood alcohol concentrations, absorption of alcohol at 30 minutes, amount of test meal emptied from the stomach at 30 minutes, and times taken for 50% of the meal to leave the proximal stomach and total stomach. RESULTS--Smoking was associated with reductions in (a) peak blood alcohol concentrations (median values in non-smoking versus smoking periods 13.5 (range 8.7-22.6) mmol/l v 11.1 (4.3-13.5) mmol/l), (b) area under the blood alcohol concentration-time curve at 30 minutes (264 x 10(3) (0-509 x 10(3)) mmol/l/min v 140 x 10(3)) (0-217 x 10(3) mmol/l/min), and (c) amount of test meal emptied from the stomach at 30 minutes (39% (5-86%) v 23% (0-35%)). In addition, smoking slowed both the 50% gastric emptying time (37 (9-83) minutes v 56 (40-280) minutes) and the intragastric distribution of the meal. There was a close correlation between the amount of test meal emptied from the stomach at 30 minutes and the area under the blood alcohol concentration-time curve at 30 minutes (r = 0.91; p less than 0.0001). CONCLUSION--Cigarette smoking slows gastric emptying and as a consequence delays alcohol absorption. PMID:1991182

  15. SiSAR: advanced SAR simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, Ferdinand

    1995-11-01

    SiSAR was planned as a realistic as possible, modular, user-friendly and fast SAR raw data simulator running on ordinary workstations. Interest in (interferometric) SAR products is growing on an international scale. There is a concentration of manpower and financial resources. Dead ends, respectively failures, have to be avoided during design and mission of every SAR project by simulating the system thoroughly before the experiment. Another reason to make use of extensive reproducible simulations during design and development is the reduction of time and manpower costs. As it comes down to verifying and comparing different processing algorithms we see that (interferometric) SAR simulation is an indispensable tool for testing individual processing steps. SiSAR is a modular SAR raw data simulator for realistic description of the functions of a SAR-system. It contains an implementation of diverse models to characterize radar targets, various approaches to describe the trajectory and the motion of the footprint on the target surface and different raw data formation algorithms. Beyond there is a wide supply of tools for manipulation, analysis and user-friendly simulation handling. Results obtained by SiSAR and some first simulated interferometric SAR raw data are shown in the paper.

  16. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the virus spread from small mammals in China. When someone with SARS coughs or sneezes, infected ... causes SARS include: Antibody tests for SARS Direct isolation of the SARS virus Rapid polymerase chain reaction ( ...

  17. A multichannel, real-time MRI RF power monitor for independent SAR determination

    PubMed Central

    El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Qian, Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; Edelstein, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate measurements of the RF power delivered during clinical MRI are essential for safety and regulatory compliance, avoiding inappropriate restrictions on clinical MRI sequences, and for testing the MRI safety of peripheral and interventional devices at known RF exposure levels. The goal is to make independent RF power measurements to test the accuracy of scanner-reported specific absorption rate (SAR) over the extraordinary range of operating conditions routinely encountered in MRI. Methods: A six channel, high dynamic range, real-time power profiling system was designed and built for monitoring power delivery during MRI up to 440 MHz. The system was calibrated and used in two 3 T scanners to measure power applied to human subjects during MRI scans. The results were compared with the scanner-reported SAR. Results: The new power measurement system has highly linear performance over a 90 dB dynamic range and a wide range of MRI duty cycles. It has about 0.1 dB insertion loss that does not interfere with scanner operation. The measurements of whole-body SAR in volunteers showed that scanner-reported SAR was significantly overestimated by up to about 2.2 fold. Conclusions: The new power monitor system can accurately and independently measure RF power deposition over the wide range of conditions routinely encountered during MRI. Scanner-reported SAR values are not appropriate for setting exposure limits during device or pulse sequence testing. PMID:22559603

  18. A multichannel, real-time MRI RF power monitor for independent SAR determination

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Qian Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; Edelstein, William A.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Accurate measurements of the RF power delivered during clinical MRI are essential for safety and regulatory compliance, avoiding inappropriate restrictions on clinical MRI sequences, and for testing the MRI safety of peripheral and interventional devices at known RF exposure levels. The goal is to make independent RF power measurements to test the accuracy of scanner-reported specific absorption rate (SAR) over the extraordinary range of operating conditions routinely encountered in MRI. Methods: A six channel, high dynamic range, real-time power profiling system was designed and built for monitoring power delivery during MRI up to 440 MHz. The system was calibrated and used in two 3 T scanners to measure power applied to human subjects during MRI scans. The results were compared with the scanner-reported SAR. Results: The new power measurement system has highly linear performance over a 90 dB dynamic range and a wide range of MRI duty cycles. It has about 0.1 dB insertion loss that does not interfere with scanner operation. The measurements of whole-body SAR in volunteers showed that scanner-reported SAR was significantly overestimated by up to about 2.2 fold. Conclusions: The new power monitor system can accurately and independently measure RF power deposition over the wide range of conditions routinely encountered during MRI. Scanner-reported SAR values are not appropriate for setting exposure limits during device or pulse sequence testing.

  19. NOTE: SAR in a child voxel phantom from exposure to wireless computer networks (Wi-Fi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findlay, R. P.; Dimbylow, P. J.

    2010-08-01

    Specific energy absorption rate (SAR) values have been calculated in a 10 year old sitting voxel model from exposure to electromagnetic fields at 2.4 and 5 GHz, frequencies commonly used by Wi-Fi devices. Both plane-wave exposure of the model and irradiation from antennas in the near field were investigated for a variety of exposure conditions. In all situations studied, the SAR values calculated were considerably below basic restrictions. For a typical Wi-Fi exposure scenario using an inverted F antenna operating at 100 mW, a duty factor of 0.1 and an antenna-body separation of 34 cm, the maximum peak localized SAR was found to be 3.99 mW kg-1 in the torso region. At 2.4 GHz, using a power of 100 mW and a duty factor of 1, the highest localized SAR value in the head was calculated as 5.7 mW kg-1. This represents less than 1% of the SAR previously calculated in the head for a typical mobile phone exposure condition.

  20. SAR measurement due to mobile phone exposure in a simulated biological media.

    PubMed

    Behari, J; Nirala, Jay Prakash

    2012-09-01

    The specific absorption rate (SAR) measurements are carried out for compliance testing of personal 3G Mobile phone. The accuracy of this experimental setup has been checked by comparing the SAR in 10 gm of simulated tissue and an arbitrary shaped box. This has been carried out using a 3G mobile Phone at 1718.5 MHz, in a medium simulating brain and muscle phantom. The SAR measurement system consists of a stepper motor to move a monopole E-field probe in two dimensions inside an arbitrary shaped box. The phantom is filled with appropriate frequency-specific fluids with measured electrical properties (dielectric constant and conductivity). That is close to the average for gray and white matters of the brain at the frequencies of interest (1718.5 MHz). Induced fields are measured using a specially designed monopole probe in its close vicinity. The probe is immersed in the phantom material. The measured data for induced fields are used to compute SAR values at various locations with respect to the mobile phone location. It is concluded that these SAR values are position dependent and well below the safety criteria prescribed for human exposure. PMID:22897400

  1. SAR in a child voxel phantom from exposure to wireless computer networks (Wi-Fi).

    PubMed

    Findlay, R P; Dimbylow, P J

    2010-08-01

    Specific energy absorption rate (SAR) values have been calculated in a 10 year old sitting voxel model from exposure to electromagnetic fields at 2.4 and 5 GHz, frequencies commonly used by Wi-Fi devices. Both plane-wave exposure of the model and irradiation from antennas in the near field were investigated for a variety of exposure conditions. In all situations studied, the SAR values calculated were considerably below basic restrictions. For a typical Wi-Fi exposure scenario using an inverted F antenna operating at 100 mW, a duty factor of 0.1 and an antenna-body separation of 34 cm, the maximum peak localized SAR was found to be 3.99 mW kg(-1) in the torso region. At 2.4 GHz, using a power of 100 mW and a duty factor of 1, the highest localized SAR value in the head was calculated as 5.7 mW kg(-1). This represents less than 1% of the SAR previously calculated in the head for a typical mobile phone exposure condition. PMID:20647607

  2. Assessment of induced SAR in children exposed to electromagnetic plane waves between 10 MHz and 5.6 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, J. F.; Paulides, M. M.; Christ, A.; Kuster, N.; van Rhoon, G. C.

    2010-06-01

    To avoid potentially adverse health effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has defined EMF reference levels from the basic restrictions on the induced whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (SARwb) and the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (SAR10g). The objective of this study is to assess if the SAR in children remains below the basic restrictions upon exposure at the reference levels. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling was used to calculate the SAR in six children and two adults when exposed to all 12 orthogonal plane wave configurations. A sensitivity study showed an expanded uncertainty of 53% (SARwb) and 58% (SAR10g) due to variations in simulation settings and tissue properties. In this study, we found that the basic restriction on the SARwb is occasionally exceeded for children, up to a maximum of 45% in small children. The maximum SAR10g values, usually found at body protrusions, remain under the limit for all scenarios studied. Our results are in good agreement with the literature, suggesting that the recommended ICNIRP reference levels may need fine tuning.

  3. SAR Reduction in 7T C-Spine Imaging Using a “Dark Modes” Transmit Array Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Eryaman, Yigitcan; Guerin, Bastien; Keil, Boris; Mareyam, Azma; Herraiz, Joaquin L.; Kosior, Robert K.; Martin, Adrian; Torrado-Carvajal, Angel; Malpica, Norberto; Hernandez-Tamames, Juan A.; Schiavi, Emanuele; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Local specific absorption rate (SAR) limits many applications of parallel transmit (pTx) in ultra high-field imaging. In this Note, we introduce the use of an array element, which is intentionally inefficient at generating spin excitation (a “dark mode”) to attempt a partial cancellation of the electric field from those elements that do generate excitation. We show that adding dipole elements oriented orthogonal to their conventional orientation to a linear array of conventional loop elements can lower the local SAR hotspot in a C-spine array at 7 T. Methods We model electromagnetic fields in a head/torso model to calculate SAR and excitation B1+ patterns generated by conventional loop arrays and loop arrays with added electric dipole elements. We utilize the dark modes that are generated by the intentional and inefficient orientation of dipole elements in order to reduce peak 10g local SAR while maintaining excitation fidelity. Results For B1+ shimming in the spine, the addition of dipole elements did not significantly alter the B1+ spatial pattern but reduced local SAR by 36%. Conclusion The dipole elements provide a sufficiently complimentary B1+ and electric field pattern to the loop array that can be exploited by the radiofrequency shimming algorithm to reduce local SAR. PMID:24753012

  4. SAR compliance assessment of PMR 446 and FRS walkie-talkies.

    PubMed

    Vermeeren, Günter; Joseph, Wout; Martens, Luc

    2015-10-01

    The vast amount of studies on radiofrequency dosimetry deal with exposure due to mobile devices and base station antennas for cellular communication systems. This study investigates compliance of walkie-talkies to exposure guidelines established by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection and the Federal Communications Committee. The generic walkie-talkie consisted of a helical antenna and a ground plane and was derived by reverse engineering of a commercial walkie-talkie. Measured and simulated values of antenna characteristics and electromagnetic near fields of the generic walkie-talkie were within 2% and 8%, respectively. We also validated normalized electromagnetic near fields of the generic walkie-talkie against a commercial device and observed a very good agreement (deviation <6%). We showed that peak localized specific absorption rate (SAR) induced in the oval flat phantom by the generic walkie-talkie is in agreement with four commercial devices if input power of the generic walkie-talkie is rescaled based on magnetic near field. Finally, we found that SAR of commercial devices is within current SAR limits for general public exposure for a worst-case duty cycle of 100%, that is, about 3 times and 6 times lower than the limit on the 1 g SAR (1.6 W/kg) and 10 g SAR (2 W/kg), respectively. But, an effective radiated power as specified by the Private Mobile Radio at 446 MHz (PMR 446) radio standard can cause localized SAR exceeding SAR limits for 1 g of tissue. PMID:26344699

  5. Potential chlorofluorocarbon replacements: OH reaction rate constants between 250 and 315 K and infrared absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, N.L.; Medhurst, L.J.; Nelson, H.H.

    1993-12-20

    The authors measured the rate constant for reactions of the OH radical with several potential chlorofluorocarbon replacements over the temperature range 251-314 K using laser photolysis laser-induced fluorescence techniques. The compounds studied and Arrhenius parameters determined from fits to the measured rate constants are as follows: CHF{sub 2}OCHF{sub 2} (E 134), k(T) = (5.4 {+-} 3.5) x 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}3.1 {+-} 0.4 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]; CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 3} (FC 236fa), k(T) = (2.0 {+-} 1.0) x 10{sup {minus}14} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}1.8 {+-} 0.3 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]; CF{sub 3}CHFCHF{sub 2} (FC 236ea), k(T) = (2.0 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}2.0 {+-} 0.3 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]; and CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}CH{sub 2}F (FC 236cb), k(T) = (2.6 {+-} 1.6) x 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}2.2 {+-} 0.4 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]. The measured activation energies (2-3 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}) are consistent with a mechanism of H atom abstraction. The tropospheric lifetimes, estimated from the measured OH reaction rates, and measured integrated infrared absorption cross sections over the range 770 to 1430 cm{sup {minus}1} suggest that E 134 and FC 236fa may have significant global warming potential, while FC 236ea and FC 236cb do not. 17 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Association of acute adverse effects with high local SAR induced in the brain from prolonged RF head and neck hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibzadeh, F.; Verhaart, R. F.; Verduijn, G. M.; Fortunati, V.; Rijnen, Z.; Franckena, M.; van Rhoon, G. C.; Paulides, M. M.

    2015-02-01

    To provide an adequate level of protection for humans from exposure to radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) and to assure that any adverse health effects are avoided. The basic restrictions in terms of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) were prescribed by IEEE and ICNIRP. An example of a therapeutic application of non-ionizing EMF is hyperthermia (HT), in which intense RF energy is focused at a target region. Deep HT in the head and neck (H&N) region involves inducing energy at 434 MHz for 60 min on target. Still, stray exposure of the brain is considerable, but to date only very limited side-effects were observed. The objective of this study is to investigate the stringency of the current basic restrictions by relating the induced EM dose in the brain of patients treated with deep head and neck (H&N) HT to the scored acute health effects. We performed a simulation study to calculate the induced peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (psSAR10g) in the brains of 16 selected H&N patients who received the highest SAR exposure in the brain, i.e. who had the minimum brain-target distance and received high forwarded power during treatment. The results show that the maximum induced SAR in the brain of the patients can exceed the current basic restrictions (IEEE and ICNIRP) on psSAR10g for occupational environments by 14 times. Even considering the high local SAR in the brain, evaluation of acute effects by the common toxicity criteria (CTC) scores revealed no indication of a serious acute neurological effect. In addition, this study provides pioneering quantitative human data on the association between maximum brain SAR level and acute adverse effects when brains are exposed to prolonged RF EMF.

  7. Calculated SAR distributions in a human voxel phantom due to the reflection of electromagnetic fields from a ground plane between 65 MHz and 2 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findlay, R. P.; Dimbylow, P. J.

    2008-05-01

    If an electromagnetic field is incident normally onto a perfectly conducting ground plane, the field is reflected back into the domain. This produces a standing wave above the ground plane. If a person is present within the domain, absorption of the field in the body may cause problems regarding compliance with electromagnetic guidelines. To investigate this, the whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR), localised SAR and ankle currents in the voxel model NORMAN have been calculated for a variety of these exposures under grounded conditions. The results were normalised to the spatially averaged field, a technique used to determine a mean value for comparison with guidelines when the field varies along the height of the body. Additionally, the external field values required to produce basic restrictions for whole-body averaged SAR have been calculated. It was found that in all configurations studied, the ICNIRP reference levels and IEEE MPEs provided a conservative estimate of these restrictions.

  8. Influence of dentures on SAR in the visible Chinese human head voxel phantom exposed to a mobile phone at 900 and 1800 MHz.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dong; Zhang, Ruoyu; Liu, Qian

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the influence of dentures on electromagnetic energy absorption during the daily use of a mobile phone, a high-resolution head phantom based on the Visible Chinese Human dataset was reconstructed. Simulations on phantoms with various dentures were performed by using the finite-difference time-domain method with a 0.47 wavelength dipole antenna and a mobile phone model as radiation sources at 900 and 1800 MHz. The Specific energy Absorption Rate (SAR) values including 1 and 10 g average SAR values were assessed. When the metallic dental crowns with resonance lengths of approximately one-third to one-half wavelength in the tissue nearby are parallel to the radiation source, up to 121.6% relative enhancement for 1 g average SAR and 17.1% relative enhancement for 10 g average SAR are observed due to the resonance effect in energy absorption. When the radiation sources operate in the normal configuration, the 10 g average SAR values are still in compliance with the basic restrictions established by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), indicating that the safety limits will not be challenged by the usage of dentures. PMID:22388567

  9. Recovering Seasat SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, T. A.; Arko, S. A.; Rosen, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of orbital remote sensing for global ocean observations, NASA launched Seasat on June 27th, 1978. Being the first space borne SAR mission, Seasat produced the most detailed SAR images of Earth from space ever seen to that point in time. While much of the data collected in the USA was processed optically, a mere 150 scenes had been digitally processed by March 1980. In fact, only an estimated 3% of Seasat data was ever digitally processed. Thus, for over three decades, the majority of the SAR data from this historic mission has been dormant, virtually unavailable to scientists in the 21st century. Over the last year, researchers at the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) have processed the Seasat SAR archives into imagery products. A telemetry decoding system was created and the data were filtered into readily processable signal files. Due to nearly 35 years of bit rot, the bit error rate (BER) for the ASF DAAC Seasat archives was on the order of 1 out of 100 to 1 out of 100,000. This extremely high BER initially seemed to make much of the data undecodable - because the minor frame numbers are just 7 bits and no range line numbers exist in the telemetry even the 'simple' tasks of tracking the minor frame number or locating the start of each range line proved difficult. Eventually, using 5 frame numbers in sequence and a handful of heuristics, the data were successfully decoded into full range lines. Concurrently, all metadata were stored into external files. Recovery of this metadata was also problematic, the BER making the information highly suspect and, initially at least, unusable in any sort of automated fashion. Because of the BER, all of the single bit metadata fields proved unreliable. Even fields that should be constant for a data take (e.g. receiving station, day of the year) showed high variability, each requiring a median filter to be usable. The most challenging, however, were the

  10. SAR Product Control Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, P. J.; Hounam, D.; Rye, A. J.; Rosich, B.; Börner, T.; Closa, J.; Schättler, B.; Smith, P. J.; Zink, M.

    2003-03-01

    As SAR instruments and their operating modes become more complex, as new applications place more and more demands on image quality and as our understanding of their imperfections becomes more sophisticated, there is increasing recognition that SAR data quality has to be controlled more completely to keep pace. The SAR product CONtrol software (SARCON) is a comprehensive SAR product control software suite tailored to the latest generation of SAR sensors. SARCON profits from the most up-to-date thinking on SAR image performance derived from other spaceborne and airborne SAR projects and is based on the newest applications. This paper gives an overview of the structure and the features of this new software tool, which is a product of a co-operation between teams at BAE SYSTEMS Advanced Technology Centre and DLR under contract to ESA (ESRIN). Work on SARCON began in 1999 and is continuing.

  11. SAR change detection MTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Steven; Lemanski, Christopher; Nichols, Howard; Owirka, Gregory; Minardi, Michael; Hale, Todd

    2006-05-01

    This paper examines the theory, application, and results of using single-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data with Moving Reference Processing (MRP) to focus and geolocate moving targets. Moving targets within a standard SAR imaging scene are defocused, displaced, or completely missing in the final image. Building on previous research at AFRL, the SAR-MRP method focuses and geolocates moving targets by reprocessing the SAR data to focus the movers rather than the stationary clutter. SAR change detection is used so that target detection and focusing is performed more robustly. In the cases where moving target returns possess the same range versus slow-time histories, a geolocation ambiguity results. This ambiguity can be resolved in a number of ways. This paper concludes by applying the SAR-MRP method to high-frequency radar measurements from persistent continuous-dwell SAR observations of a moving target.

  12. Between-country comparison of whole-body SAR from personal exposure data in Urban areas.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Wout; Frei, Patrizia; Röösli, Martin; Vermeeren, Günter; Bolte, John; Thuróczy, György; Gajšek, Peter; Trček, Tomaž; Mohler, Evelyn; Juhász, Péter; Finta, Viktoria; Martens, Luc

    2012-12-01

    In five countries (Belgium, Switzerland, Slovenia, Hungary, and the Netherlands), personal radio frequency electromagnetic field measurements were performed in different microenvironments such as homes, public transports, or outdoors using the same exposure meters. From the mean personal field exposure levels (excluding mobile phone exposure), whole-body absorption values in a 1-year-old child and adult male model were calculated using a statistical multipath exposure method and compared for the five countries. All mean absorptions (maximal total absorption of 3.4 µW/kg for the child and 1.8 µW/kg for the adult) were well below the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) basic restriction of 0.08 W/kg for the general public. Generally, incident field exposure levels were well correlated with whole-body absorptions (SAR(wb) ), although the type of microenvironment, frequency of the signals, and dimensions of the considered phantom modify the relationship between these exposure measures. Exposure to the television and Digital Audio Broadcasting band caused relatively higher SAR(wb) values (up to 65%) for the 1-year-old child than signals at higher frequencies due to the body size-dependent absorption rates. Frequency Modulation (FM) caused relatively higher absorptions (up to 80%) in the adult male. PMID:22674152

  13. Millimeter-wave absorption by cutaneous blood vessels: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, Stanislav I; Ziskin, Marvin C

    2009-10-01

    The aims of the present study were to calculate the specific absorption rate (SAR) and E-field distributions inside cutaneous blood vessels and in surrounding tissues (dermis and fat) depending on the frequency of millimeter wave exposure. Most calculations were performed using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique. A rectangular block of homogeneous or multilayer tissue with blood vessels located in the center of the block was used as the basic geometry. We found that the SAR reached its maximal value in a long blood vessel oriented parallel to the E-field. It exceeded the SAR in the surrounding dermis by 40%-42% at 42.25 GHz. However, in the same blood vessel oriented perpendicularly to the E-field, the SAR was lower than that of the surrounding dermis. Absorption of millimeter waves in a cutaneous blood vessel was higher at 61.22 GHz than at 42.25 GHz. The SAR distribution in a blood vessel was nearly uniform. Because of the small sizes of cutaneous blood vessels relative to the wavelength, the SAR distributions in these blood vessels can be calculated by using quasi-static theory. PMID:19527954

  14. SAR distribution in a bio-medium in close proximity with dual segment cylindrical dielectric resonator antenna.

    PubMed

    Gangwar, R K; Singh, S P; Kumar, D

    2012-05-01

    This paper reports simulation and experimental studies of input characteristics of a dual segment cylindrical dielectric resonator antenna (DSCDRA) in free space and in the presence of a bio-medium (synthetic muscle) along with specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution in the synthetic muscle medium due to the antenna at microwave frequencies. The simulation study has been carried out using CST Microwave Studio software. The experimental SAR distribution has been obtained using two 50 Ω L-shaped and straight coaxial probes and Agilent 3 Hz-50 GHz spectrum analyser. The experimental results for variation in return loss versus frequency for the DSCDRA and SAR distribution in synthetic muscle medium due to the antenna are compared with simulated results. PMID:22506808

  15. The generation of simple compliance boundaries for mobile communication base station antennas using formulae for SAR estimation.

    PubMed

    Thors, B; Hansson, B; Törnevik, C

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, a procedure is proposed for generating simple and practical compliance boundaries for mobile communication base station antennas. The procedure is based on a set of formulae for estimating the specific absorption rate (SAR) in certain directions around a class of common base station antennas. The formulae, given for both whole-body and localized SAR, require as input the frequency, the transmitted power and knowledge of antenna-related parameters such as dimensions, directivity and half-power beamwidths. With knowledge of the SAR in three key directions it is demonstrated how simple and practical compliance boundaries can be generated outside of which the exposure levels do not exceed certain limit values. The conservativeness of the proposed procedure is discussed based on results from numerical radio frequency (RF) exposure simulations with human body phantoms from the recently developed Virtual Family. PMID:19531847

  16. Survey on Different Samsung with Nokia Smart Mobile Phones in the Specific Absorption Rate Electrical Field of Head.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Yadolah; Alinejad, Azim; Keramati, Hassan; Bay, Abotaleb; Avazpour, Moayed; Zandsalimi, Yahya; Moradi, Bigard; Rasouli Amirhajeloo, Leila; Mirzaei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    The use of smart phones is increasing in the world. This excessive use, especially in the last two decades, has created too much concern on the effects of emitted electromagnetic fields and specific absorption rate on human health. In this descriptive-analytical study of the electric field resulting from smart phones of Samsung and Nokia by portable measuring device, electromagnetic field, Model HI-3603-VDT/VLF, were measured. Then, head absorption rate was calculated in these two mobiles by ICNIRP equation. Finally, the comparison of specific absorption rate, especially between Samsung and Nokia smart phones, was conducted by T-Test statistics analysis. The mean of electric field for Samsung and Nokia smart mobile phones was obtained 1.8 ±0.19 v/m  and 2.23±0.39 v/m , respectively, while the range of the electric field was obtained as 1.56-2.21 v/m and 1.69-2.89 v/m for them, respectively. The mean of specific absorption rate in Samsung and Nokia was obtained 0.002 ± 0.0005 W/Kg and 0.0041±0.0013 W/Kg at the frequency of 900 MHz and 0.004±0.001 W/Kg and 0.0062±0.0002 W/Kg at the frequency of 1800 MHz respectively. The ratio of mean electronic field to guidance in the Samsung mobile phone at the frequency of 900 MHz and 1800 MHz was 4.36% and 3.34%, while was 5.62% and 4.31% in the Nokia mobile phone, respectively. The ratio of mean head specific absorption rate in smart mobile phones of Samsung and Nokia in the guidance level at the frequency of 900 was 0.15% and 0.25%, respectively, while was 0.23 %and 0.38% at the frequency of 1800 MHz, respectively. The rate of specific absorption of Nokia smart  mobile phones at the frequencies of 900 and 1800 MHz  was significantly higher than Samsung (p value <0.05). Hence, we can say that in a fixed period, health risks of Nokia smart phones is higher than Samsung smart mobile phone. PMID:27157169

  17. Abnormal oral glucose tolerance and glucose malabsorption after vagotomy and pyloroplasty. A tracer method for measuring glucose absorption rates

    SciTech Connect

    Radziuk, J.; Bondy, D.C.

    1982-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying the abnormal glucose tolerance in patients who had undergone vagotomy and pyloroplasty were investigated by measuring the rates of absorption of ingested glucose and the clearance rate of glucose using tracer methods. These methods are based on labeling a 100-g oral glucose load with (1-/sup 14/C)glucose and measuring glucose clearance using plasma levels of infused (3-/sup 3/H)glucose. The rate of appearance of both ingested and total glucose is then calculated continuously using a two-compartment model of glucose kinetics. It was found that about 30% of the ingested glucose (100 g) failed to appear in the systemic circulation. That this was due to malabsorption was confirmed using breath-hydrogen analysis. The absorption period is short (101 +/- 11 min) compared with normal values but the clearance of glucose is identical to that in control subjects, and it peaks 132 +/- 7 min after glucose loading. The peak plasma insulin values were more than four times higher in patients than in normal subjects, and this may afford an explanation of rates of glucose clearance that are inappropriate for the short absorption period. The combination of glucose malabsorption and this clearance pattern could yield the hypoglycemia that may be observed in patients after gastric surgery.

  18. Heating from free-free absorption and the mass-loss rate of the progenitor stars to supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Björnsson, C.-I.; Lundqvist, P. E-mail: peter@astro.su.se

    2014-06-01

    An accurate determination of the mass-loss rate of the progenitor stars to core-collapse supernovae is often limited by uncertainties pertaining to various model assumptions. It is shown that under conditions when the temperature of the circumstellar medium is set by heating due to free-free absorption, observations of the accompanying free-free optical depth allow a direct determination of the mass-loss rate from observed quantities in a rather model-independent way. The temperature is determined self-consistently, which results in a characteristic time dependence of the free-free optical depth. This can be used to distinguish free-free heating from other heating mechanisms. Since the importance of free-free heating is quite model dependent, this also makes possible several consistency checks of the deduced mass-loss rate. It is argued that the free-free absorption observed in SN 1993J is consistent with heating from free-free absorption. The deduced mass-loss rate of the progenitor star is, approximately, 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for a wind velocity of 10 km s{sup –1}.

  19. Skin dose rate conversion factors after contamination with radiopharmaceuticals: influence of contamination area, epidermal thickness and percutaneous absorption.

    PubMed

    Covens, P; Berus, D; Caveliers, V; Struelens, L; Vanhavere, F; Verellen, D

    2013-06-01

    Skin contamination with radiopharmaceuticals can occur during biomedical research and daily nuclear medicine practice as a result of accidental spills, after contact with bodily fluids of patients or by inattentively touching contaminated materials. Skin dose assessment should be carried out by repeated quantification to map the course of the contamination together with the use of appropriate skin dose rate conversion factors. Contamination is generally characterised by local spots on the palmar surface of the hand and complete decontamination is difficult as a result of percutaneous absorption. This specific issue requires special consideration as to the skin dose rate conversion factors as a measure for the absorbed dose rate to the basal layer of the epidermis. In this work we used Monte Carlo simulations to study the influence of the contamination area, the epidermal thickness and the percutaneous absorption on the absorbed skin dose rate conversion factors for a set of 39 medical radionuclides. The results show that the absorbed dose to the basal layer of the epidermis can differ by up to two orders of magnitude from the operational quantity Hp(0.07) when using an appropriate epidermal thickness in combination with the effect of percutaneous absorption. PMID:23519114

  20. AUGMENTATION OF SULFATE ION ABSORPTION FROM THE RATE LUNG BY HEAVY METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of heavy metal cations in enhancing the absorption of sulfate ions from the airways of the rat lung was studied. The cations investigated included Cd(2+), Co(2+), Hg(2+), Ni(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+), and Zn(2+). The cations exhibited differing efficacies. Co(2+), Hg(2+), Cd...

  1. Application of postured human model for SAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuchkovikj, M.; Munteanu, I.; Weiland, T.

    2013-07-01

    In the last two decades, the increasing number of electronic devices used in day-to-day life led to a growing interest in the study of the electromagnetic field interaction with biological tissues. The design of medical devices and wireless communication devices such as mobile phones benefits a lot from the bio-electromagnetic simulations in which digital human models are used. The digital human models currently available have an upright position which limits the research activities in realistic scenarios, where postured human bodies must be considered. For this reason, a software application called "BodyFlex for CST STUDIO SUITE" was developed. In its current version, this application can deform the voxel-based human model named HUGO (Dipp GmbH, 2010) to allow the generation of common postures that people use in normal life, ensuring the continuity of tissues and conserving the mass to an acceptable level. This paper describes the enhancement of the "BodyFlex" application, which is related to the movements of the forearm and the wrist of a digital human model. One of the electromagnetic applications in which the forearm and the wrist movement of a voxel based human model has a significant meaning is the measurement of the specific absorption rate (SAR) when a model is exposed to a radio frequency electromagnetic field produced by a mobile phone. Current SAR measurements of the exposure from mobile phones are performed with the SAM (Specific Anthropomorphic Mannequin) phantom which is filled with a dispersive but homogeneous material. We are interested what happens with the SAR values if a realistic inhomogeneous human model is used. To this aim, two human models, a homogeneous and an inhomogeneous one, in two simulation scenarios are used, in order to examine and observe the differences in the results for the SAR values.

  2. Calculations of Solar Shortwave Heating Rates due to Black Carbon and Ozone Absorption Using in Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, R. S.; Hall, S. R.; Swartz, W. H.; Spackman, J. R.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Aikin, K. C.; Shetter, R. E.; Bui, T. P.

    2008-01-01

    Results for the solar heating rates in ambient air due to absorption by black-carbon (BC) containing particles and ozone are presented as calculated from airborne observations made in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) in January-February 2006. The method uses airborne in situ observations of BC particles, ozone and actinic flux. Total BC mass is obtained along the flight track by summing the masses of individually detected BC particles in the range 90 to 600-nm volume-equivalent diameter, which includes most of the BC mass. Ozone mixing ratios and upwelling and partial downwelling solar actinic fluxes were measured concurrently with BC mass. Two estimates used for the BC wavelength-dependent absorption cross section yielded similar heating rates. For mean altitudes of 16.5, 17.5, and 18.5 km (0.5 km) in the tropics, average BC heating rates were near 0.0002 K/d. Observed BC coatings on individual particles approximately double derived BC heating rates. Ozone heating rates exceeded BC heating rates by approximately a factor of 100 on average and at least a factor of 4, suggesting that BC heating rates in this region are negligible in comparison.

  3. An RF dosimeter for independent SAR measurement in MRI scanners

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Di; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Bottomley, Paul A.; Edelstein, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The monitoring and management of radio frequency (RF) exposure is critical for ensuring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety. Commercial MRI scanners can overestimate specific absorption rates (SAR) and improperly restrict clinical MRI scans or the application of new MRI sequences, while underestimation of SAR can lead to tissue heating and thermal injury. Accurate scanner-independent RF dosimetry is essential for measuring actual exposure when SAR is critical for ensuring regulatory compliance and MRI safety, for establishing RF exposure while evaluating interventional leads and devices, and for routine MRI quality assessment by medical physicists. However, at present there are no scanner-independent SAR dosimeters. Methods: An SAR dosimeter with an RF transducer comprises two orthogonal, rectangular copper loops and a spherical MRI phantom. The transducer is placed in the magnet bore and calibrated to approximate the resistive loading of the scanner's whole-body birdcage RF coil for human subjects in Philips, GE and Siemens 3 tesla (3T) MRI scanners. The transducer loop reactances are adjusted to minimize interference with the transmit RF field (B1) at the MRI frequency. Power from the RF transducer is sampled with a high dynamic range power monitor and recorded on a computer. The deposited power is calibrated and tested on eight different MRI scanners. Whole-body absorbed power vs weight and body mass index (BMI) is measured directly on 26 subjects. Results: A single linear calibration curve sufficed for RF dosimetry at 127.8 MHz on three different Philips and three GE 3T MRI scanners. An RF dosimeter operating at 123.2 MHz on two Siemens 3T scanners required a separate transducer and a slightly different calibration curve. Measurement accuracy was ∼3%. With the torso landmarked at the xiphoid, human adult whole‑body absorbed power varied approximately linearly with patient weight and BMI. This indicates that whole-body torso SAR is on average

  4. An RF dosimeter for independent SAR measurement in MRI scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Edelstein, William A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The monitoring and management of radio frequency (RF) exposure is critical for ensuring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety. Commercial MRI scanners can overestimate specific absorption rates (SAR) and improperly restrict clinical MRI scans or the application of new MRI sequences, while underestimation of SAR can lead to tissue heating and thermal injury. Accurate scanner-independent RF dosimetry is essential for measuring actual exposure when SAR is critical for ensuring regulatory compliance and MRI safety, for establishing RF exposure while evaluating interventional leads and devices, and for routine MRI quality assessment by medical physicists. However, at present there are no scanner-independent SAR dosimeters. Methods: An SAR dosimeter with an RF transducer comprises two orthogonal, rectangular copper loops and a spherical MRI phantom. The transducer is placed in the magnet bore and calibrated to approximate the resistive loading of the scanner's whole-body birdcage RF coil for human subjects in Philips, GE and Siemens 3 tesla (3T) MRI scanners. The transducer loop reactances are adjusted to minimize interference with the transmit RF field (B{sub 1}) at the MRI frequency. Power from the RF transducer is sampled with a high dynamic range power monitor and recorded on a computer. The deposited power is calibrated and tested on eight different MRI scanners. Whole-body absorbed power vs weight and body mass index (BMI) is measured directly on 26 subjects. Results: A single linear calibration curve sufficed for RF dosimetry at 127.8 MHz on three different Philips and three GE 3T MRI scanners. An RF dosimeter operating at 123.2 MHz on two Siemens 3T scanners required a separate transducer and a slightly different calibration curve. Measurement accuracy was ∼3%. With the torso landmarked at the xiphoid, human adult whole‑body absorbed power varied approximately linearly with patient weight and BMI. This indicates that whole-body torso SAR is on

  5. CRUCIAL: Cryosat-2 Success over Inland Water and Land: Analyses and Validation of SAR and SARin Full Bit Rate Altimetric Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Philip; Benveniste, Jérôme; Birkinshaw, Stephen; Ambrózio, Américo; Restano, Marco

    2016-07-01

    CRUCIAL is an ESA/STSE funded project investigating innovative land and inland water applications from Cryosat-2 with a forward-look component to the future Sentinel-3 and Jason-CS/Sentinel-6 missions. The high along-track sampling of Cryosat-2 in its SAR and SARin modes offer the opportunity to recover high frequency signals over inland waters. A theoretical approach has been developed to process the FBR L1A Doppler beams to form a product using ground cell gridding, beam steering and beam stacking from which inland water heights are derivable from the retracked Cryosat-2 altimetric waveforms. Results of the processing strategy will include a comparison of waveforms and heights from the burst echoes (˜80 m along-track) and from multi-look waveforms (˜320 m along-track). SAR and SARin FBR data are available for the Amazon, Brahmaputra and Mekong for 2011-2015. FBR SAR results will be compared against stage data from the nearest gauge where applicable with heights from Tonle Sap compared against Jason-2 data from the United States Department of Agriculture. A strategy to select the number of multi-looks over rivers will also be presented. Results of FBR SARin processing for the Amazon and Brahmaputra will be presented including comparison of heights from the two antennae, extraction of slope of the ground surface and validation against ground data where appropriate.

  6. Evaluation of different partial AUCs as indirect measures of rate of drug absorption in comparative pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, C; Lacey, L F; Keene, O N; Bye, A

    1998-10-01

    The performance of different partial AUCs, including partial AUC from zero to t(max) of the reference formulation (AUC(r)) and partial AUC from zero to tmax of test or reference formulation, whichever occurs earliest (AUC(e), as indirect measures of rate of absorption have been evaluated using simulated experiments. The performance of these metrics relative to C(max), t(max) and C(max)/AUC(infinity) was further assessed using the results of actual studies involving a Glaxo drug. The normalised metrics AUC(r)/AUC(infinity) and AUC(e)/AUC(infinity) have also been evaluated. Our provisional conclusions were: (1) AUC(r)/AUC(infinity) and AUC(e)/AUC(infinity) had greater statistical power than C(max) and the non-normalised partial AUCs at detecting true differences in rate of absorption. Using real data, the performance of AUC(e)/AUC(infinity) was poor, however, the performance of AUC(r)/AUC(infinity) was good; (2) C(max)/AUC(infinity) was more precisely estimated than AUC(r)/AUC(infinity) or AUC(e)/AUC(infinity) and may be a superior metric for assessing absorption rates of highly variable drugs. PMID:9795077

  7. Studies in RF Power Communication, SAR, and Temperature Elevation in Wireless Implantable Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yujuan; Tang, Lin; Rennaker, Robert; Hutchens, Chris; Ibrahim, Tamer S.

    2013-01-01

    Implantable neural interfaces are designed to provide a high spatial and temporal precision control signal implementing high degree of freedom real-time prosthetic systems. The development of a Radio Frequency (RF) wireless neural interface has the potential to expand the number of applications as well as extend the robustness and longevity compared to wired neural interfaces. However, it is well known that RF signal is absorbed by the body and can result in tissue heating. In this work, numerical studies with analytical validations are performed to provide an assessment of power, heating and specific absorption rate (SAR) associated with the wireless RF transmitting within the human head. The receiving antenna on the neural interface is designed with different geometries and modeled at a range of implanted depths within the brain in order to estimate the maximum receiving power without violating SAR and tissue temperature elevation safety regulations. Based on the size of the designed antenna, sets of frequencies between 1 GHz to 4 GHz have been investigated. As expected the simulations demonstrate that longer receiving antennas (dipole) and lower working frequencies result in greater power availability prior to violating SAR regulations. For a 15 mm dipole antenna operating at 1.24 GHz on the surface of the brain, 730 uW of power could be harvested at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) SAR violation limit. At approximately 5 cm inside the head, this same antenna would receive 190 uW of power prior to violating SAR regulations. Finally, the 3-D bio-heat simulation results show that for all evaluated antennas and frequency combinations we reach FCC SAR limits well before 1 °C. It is clear that powering neural interfaces via RF is possible, but ultra-low power circuit designs combined with advanced simulation will be required to develop a functional antenna that meets all system requirements. PMID:24223123

  8. A simplified method for calculating the atmospheric heating rate by absorption of solar radiation in the stratosphere and mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimazaki, T.; Helmle, L. C.

    1979-01-01

    Calculations of the atmospheric heating rate by absorption of solar radiation by O3, H2O, and CO2 are reported. The method needs only seven parameters for each molecule and is particularly useful for heating calculations in three-dimensional global circulation models below 80 km. Applying the formula to the observed distributions of O3, H2O, and CO2 produces reasonable latitudinal and seasonal variations in the heating rate. The calculated heating rate, however, is sensitive to the global distributions of the absorbing gases, and uncertainties in the O3 distribution above approximately 50 km and the H2O distribution below approximately 20 km may seriously affect the global distributions of the heating rate in these regions.

  9. Modifying the high rate algal pond light environment and its effects on light absorption and photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Donna L; Montemezzani, Valerio; Howard-Williams, Clive; Turnbull, Matthew H; Broady, Paul A; Craggs, Rupert J

    2015-03-01

    The combined use of high rate algal ponds (HRAPs) for wastewater treatment and commercial algal production is considered to be an economically viable option. However, microalgal photosynthesis and biomass productivity is constrained in HRAPs due to light limitation. This paper investigates how the light climate in the HRAP can be modified through changes in pond depth, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and light/dark turnover rate and how this impacts light absorption and utilisation by the microalgae. Wastewater treatment HRAPs were operated at three different pond depth and HRT during autumn. Light absorption by the microalgae was most affected by HRT, significantly decreasing with increasing HRT, due to increased internal self-shading. Photosynthetic performance (as defined by Pmax, Ek and α), significantly increased with increasing pond depth and decreasing HRT. Despite this, increasing pond depth and/or HRT, resulted in decreased pond light climate and overall integrated water column net oxygen production. However, increased light/dark turnover was able to compensate for this decrease, bringing the net oxygen production in line with shallower ponds operated at shorter HRT. On overcast days, modelled daily net photosynthesis significantly increased with increased light/dark turnover, however, on clear days such increased turnover did not enhance photosynthesis. This study has showed that light absorption and photosynthetic performance of wastewater microalgae can be modified through changes to pond depth, HRT and light/dark turnover. PMID:25514661

  10. Operation of a low temperature absorption chiller at rating point and at reduced evaporator temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, R.; Biermann, W.; Reimann, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The returned fifteen ton Solar Absorption Machine (SAM) 015 chiller was given a cursory visual inspection, some obvious problems were remedied, and then it was placed on a test stand to get a measure of dirty performance. It was then given a standard acid clean, the water side of the tubes was brushed clean, and then the machine was retested. The before and after cleaning data were compared to equivalent data taken before the machine was shipped. The second part of the work statement was to experimentally demonstrate the technical feasibility of operating the chiller at evaporator temperatures below 0(0)C (32(0)F) and identify any operational problems.

  11. Effects of 2.45 GHz electromagnetic fields with a wide range of SARs on bacterial and HPRT gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shin; Takashima, Yoshio; Sakurai, Tomonori; Suzuki, Yukihisa; Taki, Masao; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2007-01-01

    Present day use of mobile phones is ubiquitous. This causes some concern for human health due to exposure to high-frequency electromagnetic fields (HFEMF) from mobile phones. Consequently, we have examined the effects of 2.45 GHz electromagnetic fields on bacterial mutations and the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene mutations. Using the Ames test, bacteria were exposed to HFEMF for 30 min at specific absorption rates (SARs) from 5 to 200 W/kg. In all strains, there was no significant difference in the frequency of revertant colonies between sham exposure and HFEMF-exposed groups. In examination of mutations of the HPRT gene, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells were exposed to HFEMF for 2 h at SARs from 5 to 200 W/kg. We detected a combination effect of simultaneous exposure to HFEMF and bleomycin at the respective SARs. A statistically significant difference was observed between the cells exposed to HFEMF at the SAR of 200 W/kg. Cells treated with the combination of HFEMF at SARs from 50 to 200 W/kg and bleomycin exhibited increased HPRT mutations. As the exposure to HFEMF induced an increase in temperature, these increases of mutation frequency may be a result of activation of bleomycin by heat. We consider that the increase of mutation frequency may be due to a thermal effect. PMID:17179647

  12. Analysis of the effect of mobile phone base station antenna loading on localized SAR and its consequences for measurements.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Björn; Thors, Björn; Törnevik, Christer

    2011-12-01

    In this work, the effect of antenna element loading on the localized specific absorption rate (SAR) has been analyzed for base station antennas. The analysis was conducted in order to determine whether localized SAR measurements of large multi-element base station antennas can be conducted using standardized procedures and commercially available equipment. More specifically, it was investigated if the antenna shifting measurement procedure, specified in the European base station exposure assessment standard EN 50383, will produce accurate localized SAR results for base station antennas larger than the specified measurement phantom. The obtained results show that SAR accuracy is affected by the presence of lossy material within distances of one wavelength from the tested antennas as a consequence of coupling and redistribution of transmitted power among the antenna elements. It was also found that the existing standardized phantom is not optimal for SAR measurements of large base station antennas. A new methodology is instead proposed based on a larger, box-shaped, whole-body phantom. PMID:21647933

  13. Some present problems and a proposed experimental phantom for SAR compliance testing of cellular telephones at 835 and 1900 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Om P.; Kang, Gang

    2002-05-01

    This paper compares the maximum allowable powers of some typical cellular telephones at 835 and 1900 MHz for compliance with the limits of specific absorption rates (SAR) given in ANSI/IEEE, ICNIRP and the proposed modification of ANSI/IEEE safety guidelines. It is shown that the present ANSI/IEEE guideline is the most conservative with the ICNIRP guidelines allowing a maximum radiated power that is 2.5-3 times higher, and the proposed IEEE modification of treating pinna as an extremity tissue the least conservative allowing even higher radiated powers by up to 50%. The paper also expands the previously reported study of energy deposition in models of adults versus children to two different and distinct anatomically-based models of the adult head, namely the Utah model and the 'Visible Man' model, each of which is increased or reduced by the voxel size to obtain additional head models larger or smaller in all dimensions by 11.1% or -9.1%, respectively. The peak 1 g body-tissue SAR calculated using the widely accepted FDTD method for smaller models is up to 56% higher at 1900 MHz and up to 20% higher at 835 MHz compared to the larger models, with the average models giving intermediate SARs. Also given in the paper is a comparison of the peak 1 g and 10 g SARs for two different anatomically-based models with 6 mm thick smooth plastic ear models used for SAR compliance testing. The SARs obtained with the insulating plastic ear models are up to two or more times smaller than realistic anatomic models. We propose a 2 mm thin shell phantom with lossy ear that should give SARs within +/-15% of those of anatomic models.

  14. The estimation of 3D SAR distributions in the human head from mobile phone compliance testing data for epidemiological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake, Kanako; Varsier, Nadège; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Wiart, Joe; Mann, Simon; Deltour, Isabelle; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2009-10-01

    A worldwide epidemiological study called 'INTERPHONE' has been conducted to estimate the hypothetical relationship between brain tumors and mobile phone use. In this study, we proposed a method to estimate 3D distribution of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the human head due to mobile phone use to provide the exposure gradient for epidemiological studies. 3D SAR distributions due to exposure to an electromagnetic field from mobile phones are estimated from mobile phone compliance testing data for actual devices. The data for compliance testing are measured only on the surface in the region near the device and in a small 3D region around the maximum on the surface in a homogeneous phantom with a specific shape. The method includes an interpolation/extrapolation and a head shape conversion. With the interpolation/extrapolation, SAR distributions in the whole head are estimated from the limited measured data. 3D SAR distributions in the numerical head models, where the tumor location is identified in the epidemiological studies, are obtained from measured SAR data with the head shape conversion by projection. Validation of the proposed method was performed experimentally and numerically. It was confirmed that the proposed method provided good estimation of 3D SAR distribution in the head, especially in the brain, which is the tissue of major interest in epidemiological studies. We conclude that it is possible to estimate 3D SAR distributions in a realistic head model from the data obtained by compliance testing measurements to provide a measure for the exposure gradient in specific locations of the brain for the purpose of exposure assessment in epidemiological studies. The proposed method has been used in several studies in the INTERPHONE.

  15. Variable food absorption by Antarctic krill: Relationships between diet, egestion rate and the composition and sinking rates of their fecal pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, A.; Schmidt, K.; Fielding, S.; Kawaguchi, S.; Geissler, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    The kinetics of food processing by zooplankton affects both their energy budgets and the biogeochemical fate of their fecal pellets. We sampled 40 schools of krill across the Scotia Sea during spring, summer and autumn and found that in all 3 seasons, every aspect of their absorption and defecation varied greatly. The C content of fecal pellets varied from 0.85% to 29% of their dry mass (median 9.8%) and C egestion rates varied 75-fold. C:N mass ratios of pellets ranged from 4.9 to 13.2 (median 7.8), higher than values of 3.9 in the krill and 5.4 in their food, pointing to enhanced uptake of N. Pellet sinking rates equated to 27-1218 m d -1 (median 304 m d -1), being governed mainly by pellet diameter (80-600 μm, mean 183 μm) and density (1.038-1.391 g cm -3, mean 1.121 g cm -3). Pellets showed little loss of C or N in filtered seawater over the first 2 days and were physically robust. When feeding rates were low, slow gut passage time and high absorption efficiency resulted in low egestion rates of pellets that were low in C and N content. These pellets were compact, dense and fast-sinking. Conversely, in good feeding conditions much food tended to pass quickly through the gut and was not efficiently absorbed, producing C and N-rich, slow-sinking pellets. Such "superfluous feeding" probably maximises the absolute rates of nutrient absorption. Food composition was also important: diatom-rich diets depressed the C content of the pellets but increased their sinking rates, likely due to silica ballasting. So depending on how krill process food, their pellets could represent both vehicles for rapid export and slow sinking, C and N-rich food sources for pelagic scavengers. C egestion rates by krill averaged 3.4% of summer primary production (and ingestion rates would be 2-10-fold higher than this) so whatever the fate of the pellets, krill are an important re-packager within the food web. While salp pellets tend to sink faster than those of krill, it is the latter

  16. A method for the quantitative evaluation of SAR distribution in deep regional hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Baroni, C; Giri, M G; Meliadó, G; Maluta, S; Chierego, G

    2001-01-01

    The Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) distribution pattern visualization by a matrix of E-field light-emitting sensors has demonstrated to be a useful tool to evaluate the characteristics of the applicators used in deep regional hyperthermia and to perform a quality assurance programme. A method to quantify the SAR from photographs of the sensor array--the so-called 'Power Stepping Technique'--has already been proposed. This paper presents a new approach to the quantitative determination of the SAR profiles in a liquid phantom exposed to electromagnetic fields from the Sigma-60 applicator (BSD-2000 system for deep regional hyperthermia). The method is based on the construction of a 'calibration curve' modelling the light-output of an E-field sensor as a function of the supplied voltage and on the use of a reference light source to 'normalize' the light-output readings from the photos of the sensor array, in order to minimize the errors introduced by the non-uniformity of the photographic process. Once the calibration curve is obtained, it is possible, with only one photo, to obtain the quantitative SAR distribution in the operating conditions. For this reason, this method is suitable for equipment characterization and also for the control of the repeatability of power deposition in time. PMID:11587076

  17. SAR pattern perturbations from resonance effects in water bolus layers used with superficial microwave hyperthermia applicators.

    PubMed

    Neuman, D G; Stauffer, P R; Jacobsen, S; Rossetto, F

    2002-01-01

    This study examines the effect of various thickness water bolus coupling layers on the SAR (Specific Absorption Rate) patterns from Dual Concentric Conductor (DCC) based Conformal Microwave Array (CMA) superficial hyperthermia applicators. Previous theory has suggested that water bolus coupling layers can be considered as a dielectric resonator; therefore, it is possible for the impinging electric field to stimulate volume oscillations and surface wave oscillations inside the water bolus. These spurious oscillations will destructively or constructively interact with the impinging electric field to cause a perturbation of the applicator SAR pattern. An experiment was designed which consisted of mapping the electric field produced by a four element DCC CMA applicator in liquid muscle phantom at depths of 5 and 10mm in front of four different thickness water boli; 0 (no bolus) 4, 9 and 13mm. Using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method, SAR distributions were calculated for similar test cases. It was found that for water bolus thicknesses of 9mm or greater, there is a marked perturbation of both experimental and theoretical SAR distributions. It is believed that this perturbation is experimental confirmation of the volume and surface wave oscillation theory described by previous investigators. PMID:12028636

  18. Investigation of ionospheric effects on SAR Interferometry (InSAR): A case study of Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wu; Ding, Xiao-Li; Jung, Hyung-Sup; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Bo-Chen; Qu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) has demonstrated its potential for high-density spatial mapping of ground displacement associated with earthquakes, volcanoes, and other geologic processes. However, this technique may be affected by the ionosphere, which can result in the distortions of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, phases, and polarization. Moreover, ionospheric effect has become and is becoming further significant with the increasing interest in low-frequency SAR systems, limiting the further development of InSAR technique. Although some research has been carried out, thorough analysis of ionospheric influence on true SAR imagery is still limited. Based on this background, this study performs a thorough investigation of ionospheric effect on InSAR through processing L-band ALOS-1/PALSAR-1 images and dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) data over Hong Kong, where the phenomenon of ionospheric irregularities often occurs. The result shows that the small-scale ionospheric irregularities can cause the azimuth pixel shifts and phase advance errors on interferograms. Meanwhile, it is found that these two effects result in the stripe-shaped features in InSAR images. The direction of the stripe-shaped effects keep approximately constant in space for our InSAR dataset. Moreover, the GPS-derived rate of total electron content change index (ROTI), an index to reflect the level of ionospheric disturbances, may be a useful indicator for predicting the ionospheric effect for SAR images. This finding can help us evaluate the quality of SAR images when considering the ionospheric effect.

  19. New model for assessing dose, dose rate, and temperature sensitivity of radiation-induced absorption in glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Gilard, Olivier; Quadri, Gianandrea; Caussanel, Matthieu; Duval, Herve; Reynaud, Francois

    2010-11-15

    A new theoretical approach is proposed to explain the dose, dose rate and temperature sensitivity of the radiation-induced absorption (RIA) in glasses. In this paper, a {beta}{sup th}-order dispersive kinetic model is used to simulate the growth of the density of color centers in irradiated glasses. This model yields an explanation for the power-law dependence on dose and dose rate usually observed for the RIA in optical fibers. It also leads to an Arrhenius-like relationship between the RIA and the glass temperature during irradiation. With a very limited number of adjustable parameters, the model succeeds in explaining, with a good agreement, the RIA growth of two different optical fiber references over wide ranges of dose, dose rate and temperature.

  20. Advanced digital SAR processing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, L. W.; Gaffney, B. P.; Liu, B.; Perry, R. P.; Ruvin, A.

    1982-01-01

    A highly programmable, land based, real time synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processor requiring a processed pixel rate of 2.75 MHz or more in a four look system was designed. Variations in range and azimuth compression, number of looks, range swath, range migration and SR mode were specified. Alternative range and azimuth processing algorithms were examined in conjunction with projected integrated circuit, digital architecture, and software technologies. The advaced digital SAR processor (ADSP) employs an FFT convolver algorithm for both range and azimuth processing in a parallel architecture configuration. Algorithm performace comparisons, design system design, implementation tradeoffs and the results of a supporting survey of integrated circuit and digital architecture technologies are reported. Cost tradeoffs and projections with alternate implementation plans are presented.

  1. Rate-equation model for quantitative concentration measurements in flames with picosecond pump-probe absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fiechtner, G J; King, G B; Laurendeau, N M

    1995-02-20

    Measurement of radical concentrations is important in understanding the chemical kinetics involved in combustion. Application of optical techniques allows for the nonintrusive determination of specific radical concentrations. One of the most challenging problems for investigators is to obtain flame data that are independent of the collisional environment. We seek to obviate this difficulty by the use of picosecond pump-probe absorption spectroscopy. A picosecond pump-probe absorption model is developed by rate-equation analysis. Implications are discussed for a laser-pulse width that is much smaller than the excited-state lifetime of the absorbing atom or molecule. The possibility of quantitative, quenching-independent concentration measurements is discussed, and detection limits for atomic sodium and the hydroxyl radical are estimated. For a three-level absorber-emitter, the model leads to a novel pump-probe strategy, called dual-beam asynchronous optical sampling, that can be used to obtain both the electronic quenching-rate coefficient and the doublet mixing-rate coefficient during a single measurement. We discuss the successful demonstration of the technique in a companion paper [Appl. Opt. 34, XXX (1995)]. PMID:21037640

  2. Transient finite element analysis of thermal methods used to estimate SAR and blood flow in homogeneously and nonhomogeneously perfused tumour models.

    PubMed

    Wong, T Z; Mechling, J A; Jones, E L; Strohbehn, J W

    1988-01-01

    A two-dimensional time-dependent finite element model was developed to evaluate thermal techniques for estimating blood flow and specific absorption rate (SAR). In these computer simulations, homogeneously and nonhomogeneously perfused tumour models were heated by a 915 MHz interstitial microwave antenna array. Representative blood flow values were assigned within the tumour, and the applied SAR distribution was based on a previously developed antenna theory. SAR values were estimated from the power-on transient temperatures, and blood flow values were estimated from thermal clearance data after power was discontinued. These estimated parameters were then compared to the known 'true' blood flow and SAR values throughout the treatment region. SAR values could be predicted with reasonable accuracy throughout most of the heated region independent of local blood flow. For a homogeneous model, thermal clearance was found to yield reasonably accurate blood flow estimates at high perfusion rates and less accurate estimates at lower perfusion rates. However, for the inhomogeneous model, the blood perfusion estimates were generally poor, and an average blood flow value for the tumour was obtained with little ability to resolve the differences in perfusion between regions. Using temperatures observed early in the cool-down curve resulted in improved spatial resolution, but increased the contribution of thermal conduction to the blood flow estimates. A single time-constant exponential thermal decay curve was found to be a necessary but not sufficient condition for reliable blood flow estimates using this technique. PMID:3171254

  3. Generalized energy-aperture product limit for multi-beam and spotlight SARs

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, T.J.

    1995-12-21

    The SAR energy-aperture product limit is extended to multi-beam SARS, Spotlight and moving spotlight SARS. This fundamental limit bounds the tradeoff between energy and antenna size. The kinematic relations between design variables such as platform speed, pulse repetition frequency, beam width and area rate are analyzed in a unified framework applicable to a wide variety of SARs including strip maps, spotlights, vermer arrays and multi-beam SARS, both scanning and swept-beam. Then the energy-aperture product limit is derived from the signal-to noise requirement and the kinematic constraints. The derivation clarifies impact of multiple beams and spotlighting on SAR performance.

  4. A fast, programmable hardware architecture for spaceborne SAR processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, J. R.; Cumming, I. G.; Lim, J.; Wedding, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    The launch of spaceborne SARs during the 1980's is discussed. The satellite SARs require high quality and high throughput ground processors. Compression ratios in range and azimuth of greater than 500 and 150 respectively lead to frequency domain processing and data computation rates in excess of 2000 million real operations per second for C-band SARs under consideration. Various hardware architectures are examined and two promising candidates and proceeds to recommend a fast, programmable hardware architecture for spaceborne SAR processing are selected. Modularity and programmability are introduced as desirable attributes for the purpose of HTSP hardware selection.

  5. Quantitative validation of the 3D SAR profile of hyperthermia applicators using the gamma method.

    PubMed

    de Bruijne, Maarten; Samaras, Theodoros; Chavannes, Nicolas; van Rhoon, Gerard C

    2007-06-01

    For quality assurance of hyperthermia treatment planning systems, quantitative validation of the electromagnetic model of an applicator is essential. The objective of this study was to validate a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model implementation of the Lucite cone applicator (LCA) for superficial hyperthermia. The validation involved (i) the assessment of the match between the predicted and measured 3D specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution, and (ii) the assessment of the ratio between model power and real-world power. The 3D SAR distribution of seven LCAs was scanned in a phantom bath using the DASY4 dosimetric measurement system. The same set-up was modelled in SEMCAD X. The match between the predicted and the measured SAR distribution was quantified with the gamma method, which combines distance-to-agreement and dose difference criteria. Good quantitative agreement was observed: more than 95% of the measurement points met the acceptance criteria 2 mm/2% for all applicators. The ratio between measured and predicted power absorption ranged from 0.75 to 0.92 (mean 0.85). This study shows that quantitative validation of hyperthermia applicator models is feasible and is worth considering as a part of hyperthermia quality assurance procedures. PMID:17505090

  6. High Repetition Rate and Frequency Stabilized Ho:YLF Laser for CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros, M.; Petzar, Pau; Trieu, Bo; Lee, Hyung; Singh, U.

    2009-01-01

    High repetition rate operation of an injection seeded Ho:YLF laser has been demonstrated. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy reaches 5.8mJ and the optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W.

  7. Absorbed Dose Rates in Tissue from Prompt Gamma Emissions from Near-thermal Neutron Absorption.

    PubMed

    Schwahn, Scott O

    2015-10-01

    Prompt gamma emission data from the International Atomic Energy Agency's Prompt Gamma-ray Neutron Activation Analysis database are analyzed to determine the absorbed dose rates in tissue to be expected when natural elements are exposed in a near-thermal neutron environment. PMID:26313590

  8. Absorbed dose rates in tissue from prompt gamma emissions from near-thermal neutron absorption

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schwahn, Scott O.

    2015-10-01

    Prompt gamma emission data from the International Atomic Energy Agency s Prompt Gamma-ray Neutron Activation Analysis database are analyzed to determine the absorbed dose rates in tissue to be expected when natural elements are exposed in a near-thermal neutron environment.

  9. Absorption of microwave radiation by the anesthetized rat: electromagnetic and thermal hotspots in body and tail

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, J.A.; Emmerson, R.Y.; DeWitt, J.R.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1987-01-01

    Anatomic variability in the deposition of radiofrequency electromagnetic energy in mammals has been well documented. A recent study reported specific absorption rate (SAR) hotspots in the brain, rectum and tail of rat carcasses exposed to 360- and to 2450-MHz microwave radiation. Regions of intense energy absorption are generally thought to be of little consequence when predicting thermal effects of microwave irradiation because it is presumed that heat transfer via the circulatory system promptly redistributes localized heat to equilibrate tissue temperature within the body. Experiments on anesthetized, male Long-Evans rats (200-260 g) irradiated for 10 or 16 min with 2450, 700, or 360 MHz radiation at SARs of 2 W/kg, 6 W/kg, or 10 W/kg indicated that postirradiation localized temperatures in regions previously shown to exhibit high SARs were appreciably above temperatures at body sites with lower SARs. The postirradiation temperatures in the rectum and tail were significantly higher in rats irradiated at 360 MHz and higher in the tail at 2450 MHz than temperatures resulting from exposure to 700 MHz. This effect was found for whole-body-averaged SARs as low as 6 W/kg at 360 MHz and 10 W/kg at 2450 MHz. In contrast, brain temperatures in the anesthetized rats were not different from those measured in the rest of the body following microwave exposure.

  10. Enhancement of specific absorption rate by exchange coupling of the core-shell structure of magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadatare, M. R.; Meshram, J. V.; Gurav, K. V.; Hyeok Kim, Jin; Pawar, S. H.

    2016-03-01

    Conversion of electromagnetic energy into heat by nanoparticles (NPs) has the potential to be a powerful, non-invasive technique for biomedical applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia, drug release, disease treatment and remote control of single cell functions, but poor conversion efficiencies have hindered practical applications so far. In this paper, an attempt has been made to increase the efficiency of magnetic thermal induction by NPs. To increase the efficiency of magnetic thermal induction by NPs, one can take advantage of the exchange coupling between a magnetically hard core and magnetically soft shell to tune the magnetic properties of the NP and maximize the specific absorption rate, which is the gauge of conversion efficiency. In order to examine the tunability of magnetocrystalline anisotropy and its magnetic heating power, a representative magnetically hard material (CoFe2O4) has been coupled to a soft material (Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4). The synthesized NPs show specific absorption rates that are of an order of magnitude larger than the conventional one.

  11. Rate and composition control by atomic absorption spectroscopy for the coevaporation of high T sub c superconducting films

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, C. ); Missert, N.; Mooij, J.E.; Rosenthal, P.; Matijasevic, V.; Beasley, M.R.; Hammond, R.H. )

    1989-02-01

    Atomic absorption spectroscopy has been used to control the deposition rates during coevaporation processes with multiple electron-beam sources. This technique is material specific and thus allows the deposition rate of each component to be controlled independently. Because only a light beam is needed to interact with the vapor stream, the sampling region can be selected to be very close to the substrate for precise control of the film composition. With its high sensitivity and no limitations on operation pressure, this technique offers some unique advantages for the preparation of high Tc superconducting films by coevaporation in a high oxygen partial pressure environment. The performance of a multi-source deposition controller and the resultant film properties are presented.

  12. SAR antenna calibration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, K. R.; Newell, A. C.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration of SAR antennas requires a measurement of gain, elevation and azimuth pattern shape, boresight error, cross-polarization levels, and phase vs. angle and frequency. For spaceborne SAR antennas of SEASAT size operating at C-band or higher, some of these measurements can become extremely difficult using conventional far-field antenna test ranges. Near-field scanning techniques offer an alternative approach and for C-band or X-band SARs, give much improved accuracy and precision as compared to that obtainable with a far-field approach.

  13. Real-time SAR change-detection using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Christopher J.; White, Richard G.

    1990-11-01

    This paper describes the techniques evolved at RSRE for the production of undistorted, focused synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, target detection using a neural network method and the automatic detection of changes between pairs of SAR images. All these processes are achievable in a single pipelined process operating on an input data rate in excess of 10 Mbytes/second.

  14. Heating rates in furnace atomic absorption using the L'vov platform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koirtyohann, S.R.; Giddings, R.C.; Taylor, H.E.

    1984-01-01

    Heating rate profiles for the furnace tube wall, the furnace atmosphere, and a L'vov platform were established for a range of conditions in a cyclically heated graphite atomizer. The tube wall profile was made by direct observation with a recording optical pyrometer. The sodium line reversal method was used to establish the heating rate of the furnace atmosphere, and appearance temperatures for a series metals of differing volatility was used to establish platform profiles. The tube wall heating rate was nearly linear at 2240??C s- until the desired temperature was reached after which the temperature remained constant. The furnace atmosphere reached a given temperature 0.2-0.4 s later than the tube wall through most of the atomize cycle. The platform lagged the tube wall 0.5-0.8 s. Under typical operating conditions the furnace atmosphere was 100-200??C cooler than the tube wall and at nearly constant temperature when the analyte vaporized from the platform. The L'vov platform causes the cyclically heated commercial furnace to approximate the behavior of a constant temperature furnace during atomization. ?? 1984.

  15. Aqueous suspensions of polymer coated magnetite nanoparticles: Colloidal stability, specific absorption rate, and transverse relaxivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saville, Steven Lee

    The design, functionalization, characterization, and applications of magnetic nanoparticles have garnered significant interest over the past several decades. While this area has garnered increasing attention, several questions remain unanswered about the stability of these systems and it's influence on their biomedical applications. To help answer these questions about the stability of these, a novel tri(nitroDOPA) terminated polymer based ligand has been developed for the stabilization of magnetite nanoparticles. The synthesis involves a process in which ethylene oxide is polymerized using a trivinyl initiator, modified with carboxylic acid using a free radical addition of mercaptoundecanoic acid, and then functionalized with nitroDOPA using N,N-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) chemistry. This polymer has displayed robust adhesion even in harsh chemical environments, out performing many polymers used today for the stabilization of magnetite. Along these same lines, the effects of instability of these systems were analyzed in both MRI and magnetic hyperthermia applications. It is widely known that formation of linear aggregates (i.e. chains) occurs in more concentrated ferrofluids systems and that this has an affect on the ferrofluid properties. It has been recently reported that for some suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles the transverse proton relaxation rate, R2, is dependent on the time that the sample is exposed to an applied magnetic field. This time dependence has been linked to the formation of linear aggregates or chains in an applied magnetic field via numerical modeling. In this work the relationships between colloidal stability, the formation of these linear structures, and changes observed in the proton transverse relaxation rate and heating rate in magnetic hyperthermia of aqueous suspensions of magnetic particles are examined. The results indicate that varying the ligand length has a direct effect on the colloidal

  16. SAR calibration technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. L.; Larson, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) calibration technology including a general description of the primary calibration techniques and some of the factors which affect the performance of calibrated SAR systems are reviewed. The use of reference reflectors for measurement of the total system transfer function along with an on-board calibration signal generator for monitoring the temporal variations of the receiver to processor output is a practical approach for SAR calibration. However, preliminary error analysis and previous experimental measurements indicate that reflectivity measurement accuracies of better than 3 dB will be difficult to achieve. This is not adequate for many applications and, therefore, improved end-to-end SAR calibration techniques are required.

  17. Energy transfer among CP29 chlorophylls: calculated Förster rates and experimental transient absorption at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Cinque, G; Croce, R; Holzwarth, A; Bassi, R

    2000-10-01

    The energy transfer rates between chlorophylls in the light harvesting complex CP29 of higher plants at room temperature were calculated ab initio according to the Förster mechanism (Förster T. 1948, Ann. Physik. 2:55-67). Recently, the transition moment orientation of CP29 chlorophylls was determined by differential linear dichroism and absorption spectroscopy of wild-type versus mutant proteins in which single chromophores were missing (Simonetto R., Crimi M., Sandonà D., Croce R., Cinque G., Breton J., and Bassi R. 1999. Biochemistry. 38:12974-12983). In this way the Q(y) transition energy and chlorophyll a/b affinity of each binding site was obtained and their characteristics supported by reconstruction of steady-state linear dichroism and absorption spectra at room temperature. In this study, the spectral form of individual chlorophyll a and b ligands within the protein environment was experimentally determined, and their extinction coefficients were also used to evaluate the absolute overlap integral between donors and acceptors employing the Stepanov relation for both the emission spectrum and the Stokes shift. This information was used to calculate the time-dependent excitation redistribution among CP29 chlorophylls on solving numerically the Pauli master equation of the complex: transient absorption measurements in the (sub)picosecond time scale were simulated and compared to pump-and-probe experimental data in the Q(y) region on the native CP29 at room temperature upon selective excitation of chlorophylls b at 640 or 650 nm. The kinetic model indicates a bidirectional excitation transfer over all CP29 chlorophylls a species, which is particularly rapid between the pure sites A1-A2 and A4-A5. Chlorophylls b in mixed sites act mostly as energy donors for chlorophylls a, whereas site B5 shows high and bidirectional coupling independent of the pigment hosted. PMID:11023879

  18. Stepped heating procedure for experimental SAR evaluation of ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Iacob, N; Schinteie, G; Palade, P; Ticos, C M; Kuncser, V

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a reliable procedure for the experimental determination of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in case of superparamagnetic Fe oxide nanoparticles dispersed in liquid environments. It is based on the acquisition of consecutive steps of time-temperature dependences along of both heating and cooling processes. Linear fitting of these recorded steps provides the heating and cooling speeds at different temperatures, which finally allow the determination of the heating profile in adiabatic-like conditions over a broad temperature range. The presented methodology represents on one hand, a useful alternative tool for the experimental evaluation of the heating capability of nanoparticulate systems for magnetic hyperthermia applications and on the other hand, gives support for a more accurate modeling of bio-heat transfer phenomena. PMID:26087918

  19. The absorption and metabolism of a single L-menthol oral versus skin administration: Effects on thermogenesis and metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Valente, Angelica; Carrillo, Andres E; Tzatzarakis, Manolis N; Vakonaki, Elena; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Kenny, Glen P; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Flouris, Andreas D

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the absorption and metabolism pharmacokinetics of a single L-menthol oral versus skin administration and the effects on human thermogenesis and metabolic rate. Twenty healthy adults were randomly distributed into oral (capsule) and skin (gel) groups and treated with 10 mg kg(-1) L-menthol (ORALMENT; SKINMENT) or control (lactose capsule: ORALCON; water application: SKINCON) in a random order on two different days. Levels of serum L-menthol increased similarly in ORALMENT and SKINMENT (p > 0.05). L-menthol glucuronidation was greater in ORALMENT than SKINMENT (p < 0.05). Cutaneous vasoconstriction, rectal temperature and body heat storage showed greater increase following SKINMENT compared to ORALMENT and control conditions (p < 0.05). Metabolic rate increased from baseline by 18% in SKINMENT and 10% in ORALMENT and respiratory exchange ratio decreased more in ORALMENT (5.4%) than SKINMENT (4.8%) compared to control conditions (p < 0.05). Levels of plasma adiponectin and leptin as well as heart rate variability were similar to control following either treatment (p > 0.05). Participants reported no cold, shivering, discomfort, stress or skin irritation. We conclude that a single L-menthol skin administration increased thermogenesis and metabolic rate in humans. These effects are minor following L-menthol oral administration probably due to faster glucuronidation and greater blood menthol glucuronide levels. PMID:26429629

  20. Feeding rates affect growth, intestinal digestive and absorptive capabilities and endocrine functions of juvenile blunt snout bream Megalobrama amblycephala.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Li, Xiang-Fei; Tian, Hong-Yan; Jiang, Guang-Zhen; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the optimal feeding rate for juvenile blunt snout bream (average initial weight 23.74 ± 0.09 g) based on the results on growth performance, intestinal digestive and absorptive capabilities and endocrine functions. A total of 840 fish were randomly distributed into 24 cages and fed a commercial feed at six feeding rates ranging from 2.0 to 7.0 % body weight (BW)/day. The results indicated that weight gain rate increased significantly (P < 0.05) as feeding rates increased from 2.0 to 5.0 % BW/day, but decreased with the further increasing feeding rates (P > 0.05). Protein efficiency ratio and nitrogen and energy retention all showed a similar trend. However, feed conversion ratio increased significantly (P < 0.05) with increasing feeding rates. Feeding rates have little effects (P > 0.05) on whole-body moisture, ash and protein contents, but significantly (P < 0.05) affect both lipid and energy contents with the highest values both observed in fish fed 4.0 % BW/day. In addition, moderate ration sizes (2.0-4.0 % BW/day) resulted in the enhanced activities of intestinal enzymes, including lipase, protease, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase, alkaline phosphatase and creatine kinase. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of growth hormone, insulin-like growth factors-I, growth hormone receptor and neuropeptide all increased significantly (P < 0.05) as feeding rates increased from 2.0 to 5.0 % and 6.0 % BW/day, but decreased significantly (P < 0.05) with the further increase in feeding rates, whereas both leptin and cholecystokinin expressions showed an opposite trend. Based on the broken-line regression analysis of SGR against feeding rates, the optimal feeding rate for juvenile blunt snout bream was estimated to be 4.57 % BW/day. PMID:26597852

  1. HCFC-133a (CF3CH2Cl): OH rate coefficient, UV and infrared absorption spectra, and atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillen, Max R.; Bernard, François; Fleming, Eric L.; Burkholder, James B.

    2015-07-01

    HCFC-133a (CF3CH2Cl), an ozone-depleting substance, is primarily removed from the atmosphere by gas-phase reaction with OH radicals and by UV photolysis. The rate coefficient, k, for the OH + HCFC-133a reaction was measured between 233 and 379 K and is given by k(T) = (9.32 ± 0.8) × 10-13 exp(-(1296 ± 28)/T), where k(296 K) was measured to be (1.10 ± 0.02) × 10-14 (cm3 molecule-1 s-1) (2σ precision uncertainty). The HCFC-133a UV absorption spectrum was measured between 184.95 and 240 nm at 213-323 K, and a spectrum parameterization is presented. The HCFC-133a atmospheric loss processes, lifetime, ozone depletion potential, and uncertainties were evaluated using a 2-D atmospheric model. The global annually averaged steady state lifetime and ozone depletion potential (ODP) were determined to be 4.45 (4.04-4.90) years and 0.017 (±0.001), respectively, where the ranges are based solely on the 2σ uncertainty in the kinetic and photochemical parameters. The infrared absorption spectrum of HCFC-133a was measured, and its global warming potential was determined to be 380 on the 100 year time horizon.

  2. EFFECT OF HEATING RATE ON EVAPORATIVE HEAT LOSS IN THE MICROWAVE-EXPOSED MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male CBA/J mice were administered heat loads of 0-28 J. per g at specific absorption rates (SARs) of either 47 or 93 W. per kg by exposure to 2,450-MHz microwave radiation at an ambient temperature of 30 C while evaporative heat loss (EHL) was continuously monitored with dew-poin...

  3. Hydrogen capacity and absorption rate of the SAES St707 non-evaporable getter at various temperatures.

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Irving; Mills, Bernice E.

    2010-08-01

    A prototype of a tritium thermoelectric generator (TTG) is currently being developed at Sandia. In the TTG, a vacuum jacket reduces the amount of heat lost from the high temperature source via convection. However, outgassing presents challenges to maintaining a vacuum for many years. Getters are chemically active substances that scavenge residual gases in a vacuum system. In order to maintain the vacuum jacket at approximately 1.0 x 10{sup -4} torr for decades, nonevaporable getters that can operate from -55 C to 60 C are going to be used. This paper focuses on the hydrogen capacity and absorption rate of the St707{trademark} non-evaporable getter by SAES. Using a getter testing manifold, we have carried out experiments to test these characteristics of the getter over the temperature range of -77 C to 60 C. The results from this study can be used to size the getter appropriately.

  4. Development of a carbonate absorption-based process for post-combustion CO2 capture: The role of biocatalyst to promote CO2 absorption rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Y.; Ye, X.; Zhang, Z.; Khodayari, A.; Djukadi, T.

    2011-01-01

    An Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP) for post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture is described. IVCAP employs potassium carbonate (PC) as a solvent, uses waste or low quality steam from the power plant for CO2 stripping, and employs a biocatalyst, carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme, for promoting the CO2 absorption into PC solution. A series of experiments were performed to evaluate the activity of CA enzyme mixed in PC solutions in a stirred tank reactor system under various temperatures, CA dosages, CO2 loadings, CO2 partial pressures, and the presence of major flue gas contaminants. It was demonstrated that CA enzyme is an effective biocatalyst for CO2 absorption under IVCAP conditions. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. SARS/avian coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Monceyron Jonassen, C

    2006-01-01

    In the hunt for the aetiology of the SARS outbreak in 2003, a newly developed virus DNA micro-array was successfully used to hybridise PCR products obtained by random amplification of nucleic acids extracted from a cell culture infected with material from a SARS patient. The SARS agent was found to hybridise with micro-array probes from both coronaviruses and astroviruses, but one of the coronavirus probes and the four astrovirus probes contained redundant sequences, spanning a highly conserved motif, named s2m, found at the 3' end of the genomes of almost all astroviruses, one picornavirus, and the poultry coronaviruses. The three other coronavirus probes, that hybridised with the SARS agent, were located in the replicase gene, and it could be concluded that the SARS agent was a novel coronavirus, harbouring s2m. The presence of this motif in different virus families is probably the result of recombinations between unrelated viruses, but its presence in both poultry and SARS coronaviruses could suggest a bird involvement in the history of the SARS coronavirus. A recent screening of wild birds for the presence of coronaviruses, using a pan-coronavirus RT-PCR, led to the identification of novel coronaviruses in the three species studied. Phylogenetic analyses performed on both replicase gene and nucleocapsid protein could not add support to a close relationship between avian and SARS coronaviruses, but all the novel avian coronaviruses were found to harbour s2m. The motif is inserted at a homologous place in avian and SARS coronavirus genomes, but in a somewhat different context for the SARS coronavirus. If the presence of s2m in these viruses is a result of two separate recombination events, this suggests that its particular position in these genomes is the only one that would not be deleterious for coronaviral replication, or that it is the result of a copy-choice recombination between coronaviruses, following an ancestral introduction in the coronavirus family by

  6. Magnetic nanoparticles with high specific absorption rate of electromagnetic energy at low field strength for hyperthermia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stigliano, Robert; Baker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), referred to as the Dartmouth MNPs, which exhibit high specific absorption rate at low applied field strength have been developed for hyperthermia therapy applications. The MNPs consist of small (2–5 nm) single crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 with saccharide chains implanted in their crystalline structure, forming 20–40 nm flower-like aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of 110–120 nm. The MNPs form stable (>12 months) colloidal solutions in water and exhibit no hysteresis under an applied quasistatic magnetic field, and produce a significant amount of heat at field strengths as low as 100 Oe at 99–164 kHz. The MNP heating mechanisms under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed and analyzed quantitatively based on (a) the calculated multi-scale MNP interactions obtained using a three dimensional numerical model called the method of auxiliary sources, (b) measured MNP frequency spectra, and (c) quantified MNP friction losses based on magneto-viscous theory. The frequency responses and hysteresis curves of the Dartmouth MNPs are measured and compared to the modeled data. The specific absorption rate of the particles is measured at various AMF strengths and frequencies, and compared to commercially available MNPs. The comparisons demonstrate the superior heating properties of the Dartmouth MNPs at low field strengths (<250 Oe). This may extend MNP hyperthermia therapy to deeper tumors that were previously non-viable targets, potentially enabling the treatment of some of the most difficult cancers, such as pancreatic and rectal cancers, without damaging normal tissue. PMID:25825545

  7. Magnetic nanoparticles with high specific absorption rate of electromagnetic energy at low field strength for hyperthermia therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, Fridon; Kekalo, Katsiaryna; Stigliano, Robert; Baker, Ian

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), referred to as the Dartmouth MNPs, which exhibit high specific absorption rate at low applied field strength have been developed for hyperthermia therapy applications. The MNPs consist of small (2-5 nm) single crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 with saccharide chains implanted in their crystalline structure, forming 20-40 nm flower-like aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of 110-120 nm. The MNPs form stable (>12 months) colloidal solutions in water and exhibit no hysteresis under an applied quasistatic magnetic field, and produce a significant amount of heat at field strengths as low as 100 Oe at 99-164 kHz. The MNP heating mechanisms under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed and analyzed quantitatively based on (a) the calculated multi-scale MNP interactions obtained using a three dimensional numerical model called the method of auxiliary sources, (b) measured MNP frequency spectra, and (c) quantified MNP friction losses based on magneto-viscous theory. The frequency responses and hysteresis curves of the Dartmouth MNPs are measured and compared to the modeled data. The specific absorption rate of the particles is measured at various AMF strengths and frequencies, and compared to commercially available MNPs. The comparisons demonstrate the superior heating properties of the Dartmouth MNPs at low field strengths (<250 Oe). This may extend MNP hyperthermia therapy to deeper tumors that were previously non-viable targets, potentially enabling the treatment of some of the most difficult cancers, such as pancreatic and rectal cancers, without damaging normal tissue.

  8. A study in normal human volunteers to compare the rate and extent of levothyroxine absorption from Synthroid and Levoxine.

    PubMed

    Berg, J A; Mayor, G H

    1992-12-01

    Numerous branded and generic formulations of levothyroxine (LT4) sodium tablets are currently available. Results from previous studies attempting to examine the comparative bioavailability of these formulations are difficult to interpret because of subject heterogeneity, single time-point blood sampling, varying degrees of hypothyroidism, and other factors. This study was devised to compare the rate and extent of absorption of LT4 from different LT4 sodium tablet formulations, in a simple model using a single-dose two-way single-blind, randomized cross-over design in 30 normal, healthy, nonpregnant, female subjects. This design controlled for many factors that limited previous LT4 bioavailability studies. Subjects were given a single 600 micrograms dose of LT4 as either Synthroid (Boots Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Lincolnshire, IL) tablets (formulation A) or Levoxine tablets (Daniels Pharmaceuticals, St. Petersburg, FL; formulation B). Measurements of baseline-corrected total T4 serum concentrations determined at multiple time points demonstrated statistically significant differences between the two formulations at the 1.00, 3.00, 5.00, and 18.00 hour sampling times. Statistically significant differences for area under the curve (AUC) (0 to 48 hours) (formulation A, 159.9 +/- 9.4 micrograms-hour/dL; formulation B, 193.4 +/- 10.1 micrograms-hour/dL) and maximum peak plasma concentration (Cmax) (formulation A, 5.91 +/- .34; formulation B, 7.12 +/- .32) also were demonstrated. Furthermore, the ratio of the baseline-corrected total T4 concentrations (B/A x 100) were 120.9% for AUC and 120.5% for Cmax. These data demonstrate that the administration of Synthroid and Levoxine result in a significantly different rate and extent of absorption of LT4, and therefore these two formulations cannot be considered bioequivalent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1487553

  9. Ingestion of insoluble dietary fibre increased zinc and iron absorption and restored growth rate and zinc absorption suppressed by dietary phytate in rats.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Hara, H; Asvarujanon, P; Aoyama, Y; Luangpituksa, P

    2001-10-01

    We examined the effects of ingestion of five types of insoluble fibre on growth and Zn absorption in rats fed a marginally Zn-deficient diet (6.75 mg (0.103 mmol) Zn/kg diet) with or without added sodium phytate (12.6 mmol/kg diet). The types of insoluble fibre tested were corn husks, watermelon skin, yam-bean root (Pachyrhizus erosus) and pineapple core, and cellulose was used as a control (100 g/kg diet). Body-weight gain in the cellulose groups was suppressed by 57 % by feeding phytate. Body-weight gain in phytate-fed rats was 80 % greater in the watermelon skin fibre and yam-bean root fibre group than that in the cellulose group. Zn absorption ratio in the cellulose groups was lowered by 46 and 70 % in the first (days 7-10) and second (days 16-19) measurement periods with feeding phytate. In the rats fed the phytate-containing diets, Zn absorption ratio in the watermelon skin, yam-bean root and pineapple core fibre groups was 140, 80 and 54 % higher respectively than that in the cellulose group, in the second period. Fe absorption was not suppressed by phytate, however, feeding of these three types of fibre promoted Fe absorption in rats fed phytate-free diets. The concentration of soluble Zn in the caecal contents in the watermelon skin fibre or yam-bean root fibre groups was identical to that in the control group in spite of a higher short-chain fatty acid concentration and lower pH in the caecum. These findings indicate that ingestion of these types of insoluble fibre recovered the growth and Zn absorption suppressed by feeding a high level of phytate, and factors other than caecal fermentation may also be involved in this effect of insoluble fibre. PMID:11591231

  10. SAR Simulation with Magneto Chiral Effects for Human Head Radiated from Cellular Phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Silva, H.

    2008-09-01

    A numerical method for a microwave signal emitted by a cellular phone, propagating in a magneto-chiral media, characterized by an extended Born-Fedorov formalism, is presented. It is shown that the use of a cell model, combined with a real model of the human head, derived from the magnetic resonance of images allows a good determination of the near fields induced in the head when the brain chirality and the battery magnetic field are considered together. The results on a 2-Dim human head model show the evolution of the specific absorption rate, (SAR coefficient) and the spatial peak specific absorption rate which are sensitives to the magneto-chiral factor, which is important in the brain layer. For GSM/PCN phones, extremely low frequency real pulsed magnetic fields (in the order of 10 to 60 milligauss) are added to the model through the whole of the user's head. The more important conclusion of our work is that the head absorption is bigger than the results for a classical model without the magneto chiral effect. Hot spots are produced due to the combination of microwave and the magnetic field produced by the phone's operation. The FDTD method was used to compute the SARs inside the MRI based head models consisting of various tissues for 1.8 GHz. As a result, we found that in the head model having more than four kinds of tissue, the localized peak SAR reaches maximum inside the head for over five tissues including skin, bone, blood and brain cells.

  11. The influence of colloidal parameters on the specific power absorption of PAA-coated magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The suitability of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to act as heat nano-sources by application of an alternating magnetic field has recently been studied due to their promising applications in biomedicine. The understanding of the magnetic relaxation mechanism in biocompatible nanoparticle systems is crucial in order to optimize the magnetic properties and maximize the specific absorption rate (SAR). With this aim, the SAR of magnetic dispersions containing superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles bio-coated with polyacrylic acid of an average particle size of ≈10 nm has been evaluated separately by changing colloidal parameters such as the MNP concentration and the viscosity of the solvent. A remarkable decrease of the SAR values with increasing particle concentration and solvent viscosity was found. These behaviours have been discussed on the basis of the magnetic relaxation mechanisms involved. PACS: 80; 87; 87.85jf PMID:21711915

  12. Unimolecular Decomposition Rate of the Criegee Intermediate (CH3)2COO Measured Directly with UV Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mica C; Chao, Wen; Takahashi, Kaito; Boering, Kristie A; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2016-07-14

    The unimolecular decomposition of (CH3)2COO and (CD3)2COO was measured by direct detection of the Criegee intermediate at temperatures from 283 to 323 K using time-resolved UV absorption spectroscopy. The unimolecular rate coefficient kd for (CH3)2COO shows a strong temperature dependence, increasing from 269 ± 82 s(-1) at 283 K to 916 ± 56 s(-1) at 323 K with an Arrhenius activation energy of ∼6 kcal mol(-1). The bimolecular rate coefficient for the reaction of (CH3)2COO with SO2, kSO2, was also determined in the temperature range 283 to 303 K. Our temperature-dependent values for kd and kSO2 are consistent with previously reported relative rate coefficients kd/kSO2 of (CH3)2COO formed from ozonolysis of tetramethyl ethylene. Quantum chemical calculations of kd for (CH3)2COO are consistent with the experiment, and the combination of experiment and theory for (CD3)2COO indicates that tunneling plays a significant role in (CH3)2COO unimolecular decomposition. The fast rates of unimolecular decomposition for (CH3)2COO measured here, in light of the relatively slow rate for the reaction of (CH3)2COO with water previously reported, suggest that thermal decomposition may compete with the reactions with water and with SO2 for atmospheric removal of the dimethyl-substituted Criegee intermediate. PMID:26985985

  13. From Complex B1 Mapping to Local SAR Estimation for Human Brain MR Imaging Using Multi-channel Transceiver Coil at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Schmitter, Sebastian; Van de Moortel, Pierre-François; Liu, Jiaen

    2014-01-01

    Elevated Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) associated with increased main magnetic field strength remains as a major safety concern in ultra-high-field (UHF) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) applications. The calculation of local SAR requires the knowledge of the electric field induced by radiofrequency (RF) excitation, and the local electrical properties of tissues. Since electric field distribution cannot be directly mapped in conventional MR measurements, SAR estimation is usually performed using numerical model-based electromagnetic simulations which, however, are highly time consuming and cannot account for the specific anatomy and tissue properties of the subject undergoing a scan. In the present study, starting from the measurable RF magnetic fields (B1) in MRI, we conducted a series of mathematical deduction to estimate the local, voxel-wise and subject-specific SAR for each single coil element using a multi-channel transceiver array coil. We first evaluated the feasibility of this approach in numerical simulations including two different human head models. We further conducted experimental study in a physical phantom and in two human subjects at 7T using a multi-channel transceiver head coil. Accuracy of the results is discussed in the context of predicting local SAR in the human brain at UHF MRI using multi-channel RF transmission. PMID:23508259

  14. SAR calibration: A technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. W.; Politis, D. T.; Shuchman, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Various potential applications of amplitude-calibrated SAR systems are briefly described, along with an estimate of calibration performance requirements. A review of the basic SAR calibration problem is given. For background purposes and to establish consistent definition of terms, various conventional SAR performance parameters are reviewed along with three additional parameters which are directly related to calibrated SAR systems. Techniques for calibrating a SAR are described. Included in the results presented are: calibration philosophy and procedures; review of the calibration signal generator technology development with results describing both the development of instrumentation and internal calibration measurements for two SAR systems; summary of analysis and measurements required to determine optimum retroreflector design and configuration for use as a reference for the absolute calibration of a SAR system; and summary of techniques for in-flight measurements of SAR antenna response.

  15. Segmentation Of Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric J. M.; Chellappa, Rama

    1994-01-01

    Report presents one in continuing series of studies of segmentation of polarimetric synthetic-aperture-radar, SAR, image data into regions. Studies directed toward refinement of method of automated analysis of SAR data.

  16. Characterizing and estimating noise in InSAR and InSAR time series with MODIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhart, William D.; Lohman, Rowena B.

    2013-01-01

    InSAR time series analysis is increasingly used to image subcentimeter displacement rates of the ground surface. The precision of InSAR observations is often affected by several noise sources, including spatially correlated noise from the turbulent atmosphere. Under ideal scenarios, InSAR time series techniques can substantially mitigate these effects; however, in practice the temporal distribution of InSAR acquisitions over much of the world exhibit seasonal biases, long temporal gaps, and insufficient acquisitions to confidently obtain the precisions desired for tectonic research. Here, we introduce a technique for constraining the magnitude of errors expected from atmospheric phase delays on the ground displacement rates inferred from an InSAR time series using independent observations of precipitable water vapor from MODIS. We implement a Monte Carlo error estimation technique based on multiple (100+) MODIS-based time series that sample date ranges close to the acquisitions times of the available SAR imagery. This stochastic approach allows evaluation of the significance of signals present in the final time series product, in particular their correlation with topography and seasonality. We find that topographically correlated noise in individual interferograms is not spatially stationary, even over short-spatial scales (<10 km). Overall, MODIS-inferred displacements and velocities exhibit errors of similar magnitude to the variability within an InSAR time series. We examine the MODIS-based confidence bounds in regions with a range of inferred displacement rates, and find we are capable of resolving velocities as low as 1.5 mm/yr with uncertainties increasing to ∼6 mm/yr in regions with higher topographic relief.

  17. PHARUS airborne SAR concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeij, Paul; Pouwels, Henk; Koomen, Peter J.; Hoogeboom, Peter

    1995-11-01

    PHARUS (phased array universal SAR) is an airborne SAR concept which is being developed in the Netherlands. The PHARUS system differs from other airborne SARs by the use of a phased array antenna, which provides both for the flexibility in the design as well as for a compact, light-weight instrument that can be carried on small aircraft. The concept allows for the construction of airborne SAR systems on a common generic basis but tailored to specific user needs and can be seen as a preparation for future spaceborne SAR systems using solid state transmitters with electronically steerable phased array antenna. The whole approach is aimed at providing an economic and yet technically sophisticated solution to remote sensing or surveying needs of a specific user. The solid state phased array antenna consists of a collection of radiating patches; the design flexibility for a large part resides in the freedom to choose the number of patches, and thereby the essential radar performance parameters such as resolution and swath width. Another consequence of the use of the phased array antenna is the system's compactness and the possibility to rigidly mount it on a small aircraft. The use of small aircraft of course considerably improves the cost/benefit ratio of the use of airborne SAR. Flight altitude of the system is flexible between about 7,000 and 40,000 feet, giving much operational freedom within the meteo and airspace control limits. In the PHARUS concept the airborne segment is complemented by a ground segment, which consists of a SAR processor, possibly extended by a matching image processing package. (A quick look image is available in real-time on board the aircraft.) The SAR processor is UNIX based and runs on easily available hardware (SUN station). Although the additional image processing software is available, the SAR processing software is nevertheless designed to be able to interface with commercially available image processing software, as well as being able

  18. Risk factors for SARS infection within hospitals in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Ayako; Wakasugi, Naomi; Kirikae, Teruo; Quy, Tran; Ha, Le Dang; Ban, Vo Van; Long, Hoang Thuy; Keicho, Naoto; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Kuratsuji, Tadatoshi

    2008-09-01

    We investigated a nosocomial infection of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Vietnam in 2003 and attempted to identify risk factors for SARS infection. Of the 146 subjects who came into contact with SARS patients at Hospital A, 43 (29.5%) developed SARS, and an additional 16 (11%) were asymptomatic but SARS-coronavirus (CoV) seropositive. The asymptomatic infection rate accounted for 15.5% of the total number of infected patients at Hospital A, which was higher than that of 6.5% observed at Hospital B, to where all patients from Hospital A were eventually transported (P<0.05). At Hospital A, the risk for developing SARS was 12.6 times higher in individuals not using a mask than in those using a mask. The SARS epidemic in Vietnam resulted in numerous secondary infections due to its unknown etiology and delayed recognition at the beginning of the epidemic. The consistent and proper use of a mask was shown to be crucial for constant protection against infection with SARS. PMID:18806349

  19. Design and optimization for variable rate selective excitation using an analytic RF scaling function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Neville D.; Zur, Yuval

    2007-11-01

    At higher B0 fields, specific absorption rate (SAR) deposition increases. Due to maximum SAR limitation, slice coverage decreases and/or scan time increases. Conventional selective RF pulses are played out in conjunction with a time independent field gradient. Variable rate selective excitation (VERSE) is a technique that modifies the original RF and gradient waveforms such that slice profile is unchanged. The drawback is that the slice profile for off-resonance spins is distorted. A new VERSE algorithm based on modeling the scaled waveforms as a Fermi function is introduced. It ensures that system related constraints of maximum gradient amplitude and slew rate are not exceeded. The algorithm can be used to preserve the original RF pulse duration while minimizing SAR and peak b1 or to minimize the RF pulse duration. The design is general and can be applied to any symmetrical or asymmetrical RF waveform. The algorithm is demonstrated by using it to (a) minimize the SAR of a linear phase RF pulse, (b) minimize SAR of a hyperbolic secant RF pulse, and (c) minimize the duration of a linear phase RF pulse. Images with a T1-FLAIR (T1 FLuid Attenuated Inversion Recovery) sequence using a conventional and VERSE adiabatic inversion RF pulse are presented. Comparison of images and scan parameters for different anatomies and coils shows increased scan coverage and decreased SAR with the VERSE inversion RF pulse, while image quality is preserved.

  20. admetSAR: a comprehensive source and free tool for assessment of chemical ADMET properties.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Li, Weihua; Zhou, Yadi; Shen, Jie; Wu, Zengrui; Liu, Guixia; Lee, Philip W; Tang, Yun

    2012-11-26

    Absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) properties play key roles in the discovery/development of drugs, pesticides, food additives, consumer products, and industrial chemicals. This information is especially useful when to conduct environmental and human hazard assessment. The most critical rate limiting step in the chemical safety assessment workflow is the availability of high quality data. This paper describes an ADMET structure-activity relationship database, abbreviated as admetSAR. It is an open source, text and structure searchable, and continually updated database that collects, curates, and manages available ADMET-associated properties data from the published literature. In admetSAR, over 210,000 ADMET annotated data points for more than 96,000 unique compounds with 45 kinds of ADMET-associated properties, proteins, species, or organisms have been carefully curated from a large number of diverse literatures. The database provides a user-friendly interface to query a specific chemical profile, using either CAS registry number, common name, or structure similarity. In addition, the database includes 22 qualitative classification and 5 quantitative regression models with highly predictive accuracy, allowing to estimate ecological/mammalian ADMET properties for novel chemicals. AdmetSAR is accessible free of charge at http://www.admetexp.org. PMID:23092397

  1. Simulation of SAR in the Human Body to Determine Effects of RF Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michiyama, Tetsuyuki; Nikawa, Yoshio

    The body area network (BAN) has attracted attention because of its potential for high-grade wireless communication technology and its safety and high durability. Also, human area transmission of a BAN propagating at an ultra-wide band (UWB) has been demonstrated recently. When considering the efficiency of electromagnetic (EM) propagation inside the human body for BAN and hyperthermia treatment using RF, it is important to determine the mechanism of EM dissipation in the human body. A body heating system for hyperthermia must deposit EM energy deep inside the body. Also, it is important that the EM field generated by the implant system is sufficiently strong. In this study, the specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution is simulated using an EM simulator to consider the biological transmission mechanism and its effects. To utilize the EM field distribution using an implant system for hyperthermia treatment, the SAR distribution inside the human body is simulated. As a result, the SAR distribution is concentrated on the surface of human tissue, the muscle-bolus interface, the pancreas, the stomach, the spleen and the regions around bones. It can also be concentrated in bone marrow and cartilage. From these results, the appropriate location for the implant system is revealed on the basis of the current distribution and differences in the wave impedance of interfacing tissues. The possibility of accurate data transmission and suitable treatment planning is confirmed.

  2. Occupational exposure assessment on an FM mast: electric field and SAR values.

    PubMed

    Valič, Blaž; Kos, Bor; Gajšek, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Electric field strengths normally exceed the reference levels for occupational exposure in close vicinity to large frequency modulation (FM) transmitters. Thus, a detailed investigation on compliance with basic restrictions is needed before any administrative protection measures are applied. We prepared a detailed numerical model of a 20-kW FM transmitter on a 32-m mast. An electrically isolated anatomical human model was placed in 3 different positions inside the mast in the region where the values of the electric field were highest. The electric field strengths in this region were up to 700 V/m. The highest calculated whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) was 0.48 W/kg, whereas the maximum 10-g average SAR in the head and trunk was 1.66 W/kg. The results show that the reference levels in the FM frequency range are very conservative for near field exposure. SAR values are not exceeded even for fields 10 times stronger than the reference levels. PMID:22721534

  3. Rate-based modeling of reactive absorption of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S into aqueous methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, M.A.; Rochelle, G.T.

    1998-10-01

    A general framework was developed to model the transport processes that take place during reactive absorption when both rate- and equilibrium-controlled reactions occur in the liquid phase. This framework was applied to the selective absorption of H{sub 2}S from fuel gas containing CO{sub 2} using aqueous methyldiethanolamine. A rate-based distillation column module was used for the column integration. The Maxwell-Stefan and enhancement factor theories were utilized. In packed columns, CO{sub 2} absorption is controlled by diffusion with fast chemical reactions; in trayed columns it is controlled primarily by physical absorption. Gas-film resistance is never significant for CO{sub 2} absorption. For H{sub 2}S absorption, gas- and liquid-film resistances are important, and diffusion of bisulfide controls the liquid-film resistance. Heat effects produce temperatures bulges that can cause equilibrium pinches at the maximum temperature. This phenomenon gives an optimum packing height for the H{sub 2}S removal. Trayed columns are more selective than packed columns for H{sub 2}S removal, primarily because of the larger number of liquid-film mass transfer units.

  4. Polarization effects and multipolarization SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    Imaging radar polarimeters are usually implemented using a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) approach to give a high resolution image in two dimensions: range and azimuth. For each pixel in the image a polarimetric SAR gives sufficient information to characterize the polarimetric scattering properties of the imaged area (or target) as seen by the radar. Using a polarimetric SAR system as opposed to a single-polarization SAR system provides significantly more information about the target scattering mechanisms and allows better discrimination between different types of surfaces. In these notes a brief overview of SAR polarimetry is offered. The notes are intended as a text to accompany a lecture on SAR polarimetry as part of an AGARD-NATO course. Covered in the notes are the following: the polarization properties of electromagnetic waves; the concepts of radar scattering and measuring radar backscatter with a SAR; polarization synthesis; scattering matrix, Stokes matrix, and covariance matrix representations of polarimetric SAR data; polarization signature plots; design and calibration of polarimetric SAR systems; polarization filtering for target detection; fitting a simple model to polarimetric SAR measurements of naturally occurring features; and supervised classification of polarimetric SAR data.

  5. Understanding SARS with Wolfram approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Da-Wei; Pan, Yu-Xi; Duan, Yun; Hung, Zhen-De; Xu, Ming-Qing; He, Lin

    2004-01-01

    Stepping acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) as another type of disease has been threatening mankind since late last year. Many scientists worldwide are making great efforts to study the etiology of this disease with different approaches. 13 species of SARS virus have been sequenced. However, most people still largely rely on the traditional methods with some disadvantages. In this work, we used Wolfram approach to study the relationship among SARS viruses and between SARS viruses and other types of viruses, the effect of variations on the whole genome and the advantages in the analysis of SARS based on this novel approach. As a result, the similarities between SARS viruses and other coronaviruses are not really higher than those between SARS viruses and non-coronaviruses. PMID:14732867

  6. Bistatic SAR: Proof of Concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, David A.; Doren, Neall E.; Bacon, Terry A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Eichel, Paul H.; Jakowatz, Charles V,; Delaplain, Gilbert G.; Dubbert, Dale F.; Tise, Bertice L.; White, Kyle R.

    2014-10-01

    Typical synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) imaging employs a co-located RADAR transmitter and receiver. Bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. A bistatic SAR configuration allows for the transmitter and receiver(s) to be in a variety of geometric alignments. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) / New Mexico proposed the deployment of a ground-based RADAR receiver. This RADAR receiver was coupled with the capability of digitizing and recording the signal collected. SNL proposed the possibility of creating an image of targets the illuminating SAR observes. This document describes the developed hardware, software, bistatic SAR configuration, and its deployment to test the concept of a ground-based bistatic SAR. In the proof-of-concept experiments herein, the RADAR transmitter will be a commercial SAR satellite and the RADAR receiver will be deployed at ground level, observing and capturing RADAR ground/targets illuminated by the satellite system.

  7. Real-time optical processor prototype for remote SAR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchese, Linda; Doucet, Michel; Harnisch, Bernd; Suess, Martin; Bourqui, Pascal; Legros, Mathieu; Desnoyers, Nichola; Guillot, Ludovic; Mercier, Luc; Savard, Maxime; Martel, Anne; Châteauneuf, François; Bergeron, Alain

    2009-09-01

    A Compact Real-Time Optical SAR Processor has been successfully developed and tested. SAR, or Synthetic Aperture Radar, is a powerful tool providing enhanced day and night imaging capabilities. SAR systems typically generate large amounts of information generally in the form of complex data that are difficult to compress. Specifically, for planetary missions and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) systems with limited communication data rates this is a clear disadvantage. SAR images are typically processed electronically applying dedicated Fourier transformations. This, however, can also be performed optically in real-time. Indeed, the first SAR images have been optically processed. The optical processor architecture provides inherent parallel computing capabilities that can be used advantageously for the SAR data processing. Onboard SAR image generation would provide local access to processed information paving the way for real-time decision-making. This could eventually benefit navigation strategy and instrument orientation decisions. Moreover, for interplanetary missions, onboard analysis of images could provide important feature identification clues and could help select the appropriate images to be transmitted to Earth, consequently helping bandwidth management. This could ultimately reduce the data throughput requirements and related transmission bandwidth. This paper reviews the design of a compact optical SAR processor prototype that would reduce power, weight, and size requirements and reviews the analysis of SAR image generation using the table-top optical processor. Various SAR processor parameters such as processing capabilities, image quality (point target analysis), weight and size are reviewed. Results of image generation from simulated point targets as well as real satellite-acquired raw data are presented.

  8. EARSEC SAR processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protheroe, Mark; Sloggett, David R.; Sieber, Alois J.

    1994-12-01

    Traditionally, the production of high quality Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery has been an area where a potential user would have to expend large amounts of money in either the bespoke development of a processing chain dedicated to his requirements or in the purchase of a dedicated hardware platform adapted using accelerator boards and enhanced memory management. Whichever option the user adopted there were limitations based on the desire for a realistic throughput in data load and time. The user had a choice, made early in the purchase, for either a system that adopted innovative algorithmic manipulation, to limit the processing time of the purchase of expensive hardware. The former limits the quality of the product, while the latter excludes the user from any visibility into the processing chain. Clearly there was a need for a SAR processing architecture that gave the user a choice into the methodology to be adopted for a particular processing sequence, allowing him to decide on either a quick (lower quality) product or a detailed slower (high quality) product, without having to change the algorithmic base of his processor or the hardware platform. The European Commission, through the Advanced Techniques unit of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) Institute for Remote Sensing at Ispra in Italy, realizing the limitations on current processing abilities, initiated its own program to build airborne SAR and Electro-Optical (EO) sensor systems. This program is called the European Airborne Remote Sensing Capabilities (EARSEC) program. This paper describes the processing system developed for the airborne SAR sensor system. The paper considers the requirements for the system and the design of the EARSEC Airborne SAR Processing System. It highlights the development of an open SAR processing architecture where users have full access to intermediate products that arise from each of the major processing stages. It also describes the main processing stages in the overall

  9. A comparative numerical study of rotating and stationary RF coils in terms of flip angle and specific absorption rate for 7 T MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakic, A.; Jin, J.; Li, M. Y.; McClymont, D.; Weber, E.; Liu, F.; Crozier, S.

    2013-11-01

    While high-field magnetic resonance imaging promises improved image quality and faster scan time, it is affected by non-uniform flip angle distributions and unsafe specific absorption rate levels within the patient, as a result of the complicated radiofrequency (RF) field - tissue interactions. This numerical study explored the possibility of using a single mechanically rotating RF coil for RF shimming and specific absorption rate management applications at 7 T. In particular, this new approach (with three different RF coil element arrangements) was compared against both an 8-channel parallel coil array and a birdcage volume coil, with and without RF current optimisation. The evaluation was conducted using an in-house developed and validated finite-difference time-domain method in conjunction with a tissue-equivalent human head model. It was found that, without current optimisation, the rotating RF coil method produced a more uniform flip angle distribution and a lower maximum global and local specific absorption rate compared to the 8-channel parallel coil array and birdcage resonator. In addition, due to the large number of degrees of freedom in the form of rotated sensitivity profiles, the rotating RF coil approach exhibited good RF shimming and specific absorption rate management performance. This suggests that the proposed method can be useful in the development of techniques that address contemporary RF issues associated with high-field magnetic resonance imaging.

  10. Changes in ruminal volatile fatty acid production and absorption rate during the dry period and early lactation as affected by rate of increase of concentrate allowance.

    PubMed

    Dieho, K; Dijkstra, J; Schonewille, J T; Bannink, A

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present experiment was to study changes in volatile fatty acid (VFA) production using an isotope dilution technique, and changes in VFA fractional absorption rate (kaVFA) using a buffer incubation technique (BIT) during the dry period and early lactation, as affected by the postpartum (pp) rate of increase of concentrate allowance. The current results are complementary to previously reported changes on rumen papillae morphology from the same experiment. From 50 d antepartum to 80 d pp, VFA production rate was measured 5 times and kaVFA was measured 10 times in 12 rumen-cannulated Holstein Friesian cows. Cows had free access to a mixed ration, consisting of grass and corn silage, soybean meal, and (dry period only) chopped straw. Treatment consisted of either a rapid (RAP; 1.0 kg of DM/d; n=6) or gradual (GRAD; 0.25 kg of DM/d; n=6) increase of concentrate allowance (up to 10.9 kg of DM/d), starting at 4 d pp, aimed at creating a contrast in rumen-fermentable organic matter intake. For the BIT, rumen contents were evacuated, the rumen washed, and a standardized buffer fluid introduced [120 mM VFA, 60% acetic (Ac), 25% propionic (Pr), and 15% butyric (Bu) acid; pH 5.9 and Co-EDTA as fluid passage marker]. For the isotope dilution technique, a pulse-dose of (13)C-labeled Ac, Pr, and Bu and Co-EDTA as fluid passage marker was infused. The rate of total VFA production was similar between treatments and was 2 times higher during the lactation (114 mol/d) than the dry period (53 mol/d). Although papillae surface area at 16, 30, and 44 d pp was greater in RAP than GRAD, Bu and Ac production at these days did not differ between RAP and GRAD, whereas at 16 d pp RAP produced more Pr than GRAD. These results provide little support for the particular proliferative effects of Bu on papillae surface area. Similar to developments in papillae surface area in the dry period and early lactation, the kaVFA (per hour), measured using the BIT, decreased from 0.45 (Ac), 0

  11. Ionospheric composition in SAR-arcs. [Stable Auroral Red Arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raitt, W. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Banks, P. M.

    1976-01-01

    Theoretical ion and electron density profiles in the SAR-arc region are calculated using a model of the ionosphere based on the coupled continuity, momentum, and energy equations for O(+), NO(+), and O2(+). It is found that an increase in the reaction O(+) + N2 yields NO(+) + N, which results from enhanced N2 vibrational excitation due to the high electron temperatures found in SAR arcs, can cause a reduction in F-region electron densities by up to a factor of two. The increase in the O(+) + N2 reaction rate is shown to result in a marked change in the ion composition in SAR arcs, with NO(+) being an important ion up to altitudes of about 350 km at night. Since observed electron-density depressions in SAR arcs generally vary between factors of two and seven, it is concluded that the increase in the O(+) + N2 reaction rate cannot account for these depressions by itself.

  12. Evaluation of SAR in a human body model due to wireless power transmission in the 10 MHz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Tsuchida, Shogo; Hirata, Akimasa; Kamimura, Yoshitsugu

    2012-08-01

    This study discusses a computational method for calculating the specific absorption rate (SAR) due to a wireless power transmission system in the 10 MHz frequency band. A two-step quasi-static method comprised of the method of moments and the scalar potential finite-difference method are proposed. The applicability of the quasi-static approximation for localized exposure in this frequency band is discussed by comparing the SAR in a lossy dielectric cylinder computed with a full-wave electromagnetic analysis and the quasi-static approximation. From the computational results, the input impedance of the resonant coils was affected by the existence of the cylinder. On the other hand, the magnetic field distribution in free space and considering the cylinder and an impedance matching circuit were in good agreement; the maximum difference in the amplitude of the magnetic field was 4.8%. For a cylinder-coil distance of 10 mm, the difference between the peak 10 g averaged SAR in the cylinder computed with the full-wave electromagnetic method and our quasi-static method was 7.8%. These results suggest that the quasi-static approach is applicable for conducting the dosimetry of wireless power transmission in the 10 MHz band. With our two-step quasi-static method, the SAR in the anatomically based model was computed for different exposure scenarios. From those computations, the allowable input power satisfying the limit of a peak 10 g averaged SAR of 2.0 W kg-1 was 830 W in the worst case exposure scenario with a coil positioned at a distance of 30 mm from the chest.

  13. SAR based adaptive GMTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Duc; Guo, Bin; Xu, Luzhou; Li, Jian

    2010-04-01

    We consider ground moving target indication (GMTI) and target velocity estimation based on multi-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Via forming velocity versus cross-range images, we show that small moving targets can be detected even in the presence of strong stationary ground clutter. Moreover, the velocities of the moving targets can be estimated, and the misplaced moving targets can be placed back to their original locations based on the estimated velocities. Adaptive beamforming techniques, including Capon and generalizedlikelihood ratio test (GLRT), are used to form velocity versus cross-range images for each range bin of interest. The velocity estimation ambiguities caused by the multi-channel array geometry are analyzed. We also demonstrate the effectiveness of our approaches using the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) publicly-released Gotcha SAR based GMTI data set.

  14. Interseismic deformation and creep along the central section of the North Anatolian Fault (Turkey): InSAR observations and implications for rate-and-state friction properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Y.; Fialko, Y.; Sandwell, D. T.; Tong, X.; Furuya, M.

    2013-01-01

    AbstractWe present high-resolution measurements of interseismic deformation along the central section of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) in Turkey using interferometric synthetic aperture radar data from the Advanced Land Observing Satellite and Envisat missions. We generated maps of satellite line-of-sight velocity using five ascending Advanced Land Observing Satellite tracks and one descending Envisat track covering the NAF between 31.2°E and 34.3°E. The line-of-sight velocity reveals discontinuities of up to ˜5 mm/yr across the Ismetpasa segment of the NAF, implying surface creep at a <span class="hlt">rate</span> of ˜9 mm/yr; this is a large fraction of the inferred slip <span class="hlt">rate</span> of the NAF (21-25 mm/yr). The lateral extent of significant surface creep is about 75 km. We model the inferred surface velocity and shallow fault creep using numerical simulations of spontaneous earthquake sequences that incorporate laboratory-derived <span class="hlt">rate</span> and state friction. Our results indicate that frictional behavior in the Ismetpasa segment is velocity strengthening at shallow depths and transitions to velocity weakening at a depth of 3-6 km. The inferred depth extent of shallow fault creep is 5.5-7 km, suggesting that the deeper locked portion of the partially creeping segment is characterized by a higher stressing <span class="hlt">rate</span>, smaller events, and shorter recurrence interval. We also reproduce surface velocity in a locked segment of the NAF by fault models with velocity-weakening conditions at shallow depth. Our results imply that frictional behavior in a shallow portion of major active faults with little or no shallow creep is mostly velocity weakening.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7699E..0BC','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7699E..0BC"><span id="translatedtitle">Bayesian <span class="hlt">SAR</span> imaging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Zhaofu; Tan, Xing; Xue, Ming; Li, Jian</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>We introduce a maximum a posteriori (MAP) algorithm and a sparse learning via iterative minimization (SLIM) algorithm to synthetic aperture radar (<span class="hlt">SAR</span>) imaging. Both MAP and SLIM are sparse signal recovery algorithms with excellent sidelobe suppression and high resolution properties. The former cyclically maximizes the a posteriori probability density function for a given sparsity promoting prior, while the latter cyclically minimizes a regularized least squares cost function. We show how MAP and SLIM can be adapted to the <span class="hlt">SAR</span> imaging application and used to enhance the image quality. We evaluate the performance of MAP and SLIM using the simulated complex-valued backscattered data from a backhoe vehicle. The numerical results show that both MAP and SLIM satisfactorily suppress the sidelobes and yield higher resolution than the conventional matched filter or delay-and-sum (DAS) approach. MAP and SLIM outperform the widely used compressive sampling matching pursuit (CoSaMP) algorithm, which requires the delicate choice of user parameters. Compared with the recently developed iterative adaptive approach (IAA), MAP and SLIM are computationally more efficient, especially with the help of fast Fourier transform (FFT). Also, the a posteriori distribution given by the algorithms provides us with a basis for the analysis of the statistical properties of the <span class="hlt">SAR</span> image pixels.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9093E..0PP','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9093E..0PP"><span id="translatedtitle">Circular <span class="hlt">SAR</span> GMTI</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Page, Douglas; Owirka, Gregory; Nichols, Howard; Scarborough, Steven</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>We describe techniques for improving ground moving target indication (GMTI) performance in multi-channel synthetic aperture radar (<span class="hlt">SAR</span>) systems. Our approach employs a combination of moving reference processing (MRP) to compensate for defocus of moving target <span class="hlt">SAR</span> responses and space-time adaptive processing (STAP) to mitigate the effects of strong clutter interference. Using simulated moving target and clutter returns, we demonstrate focusing of the target return using MRP, and discuss the effect of MRP on the clutter response. We also describe formation of adaptive degrees of freedom (DOFs) for STAP filtering of MRP processed data. For the simulated moving target in clutter example, we demonstrate improvement in the signal to interference plus noise (SINR) loss compared to more standard algorithm configurations. In addition to MRP and STAP, the use of tracker feedback, false alarm mitigation, and parameter estimation techniques are also described. A change detection approach for reducing false alarms from clutter discretes is outlined, and processing of a measured data coherent processing interval (CPI) from a continuously orbiting platform is described. The results demonstrate detection and geolocation of a high-value target under track. The endoclutter target is not clearly visible in single-channel <span class="hlt">SAR</span> chips centered on the GMTI track prediction. Detections are compared to truth data before and after geolocation using measured angle of arrival (AOA).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ESASP.731E..12M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ESASP.731E..12M"><span id="translatedtitle">Deformation Monitoring of Urban Infrastructure by Tomographic <span class="hlt">SAR</span> Using Multi-View Terra<span class="hlt">SAR</span>-X Data Stacks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Montazeri, Sina; Zhu, Xiaoxiang; Eineder, Michael; Hanssen, Ramon F.; Bamler, Richard</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Synthetic Aperture Radar Tomography (Tomo<span class="hlt">SAR</span>) coupled with data from modern <span class="hlt">SAR</span> sensors, such as the German Terra<span class="hlt">SAR</span>-X (TS-X) produces the most detailed three-dimensional (3D) maps by distinguishing among multiple scatterers within a resolution cell. Furthermore, multi-temporal Tomo<span class="hlt">SAR</span> allows for recording the underlying deformation phenomenon of each individual scatterer. One of the limitations of using In<span class="hlt">SAR</span> techniques, including Tomo<span class="hlt">SAR</span>, is that they only measure deformation along the radar Line-of-Sight (LOS). In order to enhance the understanding of deformation, a decomposition of the observed LOS displacement into the 3D deformation vector in the local coordinate system is desired. In this paper we propose a method, based on L1 norm minimization within local spatial cubes, to reconstruct 3D deformation vectors from Tomo<span class="hlt">SAR</span> point clouds available from, at least, three different viewing geometries. The methodology is applied on two pair of cross-heading TS-X spotlight image stacks over the city of Berlin. The linear deformation <span class="hlt">rate</span> and amplitude of seasonal deformation are decomposed and the results from two individual test sites with remarkable deformation patterns are discussed in details.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.H24C..07W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.H24C..07W"><span id="translatedtitle">Wetland In<span class="hlt">SAR</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>Wetlands are transition zones where the flow of water, the nutrient cycling, and the sun energy meet to produce a unique and very productive ecosystem. They provide critical habitat for a wide variety of plant and animal species, including the larval stages of many ocean fish. Wetlands also have a valuable economical importance, as they filter nutrients and pollutants from fresh water used by human and provide aquatic habitats for outdoor recreation, tourism, and fishing. Globally, many such regions are under severe environmental stress, mainly from urban development, pollution, and rising sea level. However, there is increasing recognition of the importance of these habitats, and mitigation and restoration activities have begun in a few regions. A key element in wetlands conservation, management, and restoration involves monitoring its hydrologic system, as the entire ecosystem depends on its water supply. Heretofore, hydrologic monitoring of wetlands are conducted by stage (water level) stations, which provide good temporal resolution, but suffer from poor spatial resolution, as stage station are typically distributed several, or even tens of kilometers, from one another. Wetland application of In<span class="hlt">SAR</span> provides the needed high spatial resolution hydrological observations, complementing the high temporal resolution terrestrial observations. Although conventional wisdom suggests that interferometry does not work in vegetated areas, several studies have shown that both L- and C-band interferograms with short acquisition intervals (1-105 days) can maintain excellent coherence over wetlands. In this study we explore the usage of In<span class="hlt">SAR</span> for detecting water level changes in various wetland environments around the world, including the Everglades (south Florida), Louisiana Coast (southern US), Chesapeake Bay (eastern US), Pantanal (Brazil), Okavango Delta (Botswana), and Lena Delta (Siberia). Our main study area is the Everglades wetland (south Florida), which is covered by</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012MNRAS.427.1209C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012MNRAS.427.1209C"><span id="translatedtitle">Herschel-ATLAS: the far-infrared properties and star formation <span class="hlt">rates</span> of broad <span class="hlt">absorption</span> line quasi-stellar objects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cao Orjales, J. M.; Stevens, J. A.; Jarvis, M. J.; Smith, D. J. B.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Coppin, K.; Dariush, A.; De Zotti, G.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Hopwood, R.; Hoyos, C.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Maddox, S.; Page, M. J.; Valiante, E.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>We have used data from the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large-Area Survey (H-ATLAS) at 250, 350 and 500 μm to determine the far-infrared (FIR) properties of 50 broad <span class="hlt">absorption</span> line quasars (BAL QSOs). Our sample contains 49 high-ionization BAL QSOs (HiBALs) and one low-ionization BAL QSO (LoBAL) which are compared against a sample of 329 non-BAL QSOs. These samples are matched over the redshift range 1.5 ≤ z < 2.3 and in absolute i-band magnitude over the range -28 ≤ Mi ≤ -24. Of these, three BAL QSOs (HiBALs) and 27 non-BAL QSOs are detected at the >5 σ level. We calculate star formation <span class="hlt">rates</span> (SFRs) for our individually detected HiBAL QSOs and the non-detected LoBAL QSO as well as average SFRs for the BAL and non-BAL QSO samples based on stacking the Herschel data. We find no difference between the HiBAL and non-BAL QSO samples in the FIR, even when separated based on differing BAL QSO classifications. Using Mrk 231 as a template, the weighted mean SFR is estimated to be ≈240 ± 21 M⊙ yr-1 for the full sample, although this figure should be treated as an upper limit if active galactic nucleus (AGN)-heated dust makes a contribution to the FIR emission. Despite tentative claims in the literature, we do not find a dependence of C IV equivalent width on FIR emission, suggesting that the strength of any outflow in these objects is not linked to their FIR output. These results strongly suggest that BAL QSOs (more specifically HiBALs) can be accommodated within a simple AGN unified scheme in which our line of sight to the nucleus intersects outflowing material. Models in which HiBALs are caught towards the end of a period of enhanced spheroid and black hole growth, during which a wind terminates the star formation activity, are not supported by the observed FIR properties. The Herschel-ATLAS is a project with Herschel, which is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015OptMa..46..578A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015OptMa..46..578A"><span id="translatedtitle">Modulation of internal conversion <span class="hlt">rate</span> and nonlinear <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in meso-tetraphenylporphyrins by donor/acceptor substitutes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ao, Guanghong; Qian, Xuemin; Xiao, Zhengguo; Li, Zhongguo; Nie, Zhongquan; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xueru; Song, Yinglin</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>Meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP), (meso-tetrakis(4-cyanophenyl)porphyrin [TPP(CN)4)] and (meso-tetrakis(4-methoxyphenyl)porphyrin [TPP(OMe)4]) are synthesized. The donor methoxy substitute (OMe) and acceptor cyano substitute (CN) are introduced into TPP in order to examine their influence on the photophysical properties of TPP. The nonlinear <span class="hlt">absorption</span> properties of these three porphyrins are studied using open-aperture Z-scan and time-resolved pump-probe techniques in picosecond and nanosecond regimes, and the results are elucidated successfully by a five-level model. As compared to TPP, TPP(OMe)4 exhibits an accelerated internal conversion from S1 to S0 state (0.02 ns), and S1 to T1 state (0.03 ns). Moreover, a changeover from saturable <span class="hlt">absorption</span> to reverse saturable <span class="hlt">absorption</span> is observed in TPP(OMe)4 in the ps regime. Whereas the nonlinear <span class="hlt">absorption</span> behavior of TPP(CN)4 is similar to that of TPP. The results imply that these two substituents, especially the OMe group, could modulate the photophysical properties of TPP, which may provide a useful option for porphyrin-related applications.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18367785','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18367785"><span id="translatedtitle">Variability analysis of <span class="hlt">SAR</span> from 20 MHz to 2.4 GHz for different adult and child models using finite-difference time-domain.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Conil, E; Hadjem, A; Lacroux, F; Wong, M F; Wiart, J</p> <p>2008-03-21</p> <p>This paper deals with the variability of body models used in numerical dosimetry studies. Six adult anthropomorphic voxel models have been collected and used to build 5-, 8- and 12-year-old children using a morphing method respecting anatomical parameters. Finite-difference time-domain calculations of a specific <span class="hlt">absorption</span> <span class="hlt">rate</span> (<span class="hlt">SAR</span>) have been performed for a range of frequencies from 20 MHz to 2.4 GHz for isolated models illuminated by plane waves. A whole-body-averaged <span class="hlt">SAR</span> is presented as well as the average on specific tissues such as skin, muscles, fat or bones and the average on specific parts of the body such as head, legs, arms or torso. Results point out the variability of adult models. The standard deviation of whole-body-averaged <span class="hlt">SAR</span> of adult models can reach 40%. All phantoms are exposed to the ICNIRP reference levels. Results show that for adults, compliance with reference levels ensures compliance with basic restrictions, but concerning children models involved in this study, the whole-body-averaged <span class="hlt">SAR</span> goes over the fundamental safety limits up to 40%. PMID:18367785</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PMB....57..143W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PMB....57..143W"><span id="translatedtitle">Statistical determination of whole-body average <span class="hlt">SARs</span> in a 2 GHz whole-body exposure system for unrestrained pregnant and newborn rats</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Jianqing; Wake, Kanako; Kawai, Hiroki; Watanabe, Soichi; Fujiwara, Osamu</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>A 2 GHz whole-body exposure to rats over a multigeneration has been conducted as part of bio-effect research in Japan. In this study, the rats moved freely in the cage inside the exposure system. From observation of the activity of rats in the cage, we found that the rats do not stay in each position with uniform possibility. In order to determine the specific <span class="hlt">absorption</span> <span class="hlt">rate</span> (<span class="hlt">SAR</span>) during the entire exposure period with high accuracy, we present a new approach to statistically determine the <span class="hlt">SAR</span> level in an exposure system. First, we divided the rat cage in the exposure system into several small areas, and derived the fraction of time the rats spent in each small area based on the classification of the documentary photos of rat activity. Then, using the fraction of time spent in each small area as a weighting factor, we calculated the statistical characteristics of the whole-body average <span class="hlt">SAR</span> for pregnant rats and young rats during the entire exposure period. As a result, this approach gave the statistical distribution as well as the corresponding mean value, median value and mode value for the whole-body <span class="hlt">SAR</span> so that we can reasonably clarify the relationship between the exposure level and possible biological effect.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PMB....53.1511C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PMB....53.1511C"><span id="translatedtitle">Variability analysis of <span class="hlt">SAR</span> from 20 MHz to 2.4 GHz for different adult and child models using finite-difference time-domain</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Conil, E.; Hadjem, A.; Lacroux, F.; Wong, M. F.; Wiart, J.</p> <p>2008-03-01</p> <p>This paper deals with the variability of body models used in numerical dosimetry studies. Six adult anthropomorphic voxel models have been collected and used to build 5-, 8- and 12-year-old children using a morphing method respecting anatomical parameters. Finite-difference time-domain calculations of a specific <span class="hlt">absorption</span> <span class="hlt">rate</span> (<span class="hlt">SAR</span>) have been performed for a range of frequencies from 20 MHz to 2.4 GHz for isolated models illuminated by plane waves. A whole-body-averaged <span class="hlt">SAR</span> is presented as well as the average on specific tissues such as skin, muscles, fat or bones and the average on specific parts of the body such as head, legs, arms or torso. Results point out the variability of adult models. The standard deviation of whole-body-averaged <span class="hlt">SAR</span> of adult models can reach 40%. All phantoms are exposed to the ICNIRP reference levels. Results show that for adults, compliance with reference levels ensures compliance with basic restrictions, but concerning children models involved in this study, the whole-body-averaged <span class="hlt">SAR</span> goes over the fundamental safety limits up to 40%. For more information on this article, see medicalphysicsweb.org</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26406030','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26406030"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">SAR</span> and thermal response effects of a two-arm Archimedean spiral coil in a magnetic induction sensor on a human head.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Ziyi; Liu, Peiguo; Zhou, Dongming; Zhang, Liang; Ding, Liang</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This study investigates the radiation safety of a newly designed magnetic induction sensor. This novel magnetic induction sensor uses a two-arm Archimedean spiral coil (TAASC) as the exciter. A human head model with a real anatomical structure was used to calculate the specific <span class="hlt">absorption</span> <span class="hlt">rate</span> (<span class="hlt">SAR</span>) and temperature change. Computer Simulation Technology (CST) was used to determine the values of the peak 10-g <span class="hlt">SAR</span> under different operating parameters (current, frequency, horizontal distance between the excitation coil and the receiver coil, vertical distance between the top of the head model and the XOY plane, position of excitation coil, and volume of hemorrhage). Then, the highest response for the <span class="hlt">SAR</span> and temperature rise was determined. The results showed that this new magnetic induction sensor is safe in the initial state; for safety reasons, the TAASC current should not exceed 4 A. The scalp tissue absorbed most of the electromagnetic energy. The TAASC's <span class="hlt">SAR</span>/thermal performance was close to that of the circular coil. PMID:26406030</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5575986','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5575986"><span id="translatedtitle">Monomeric C-phycocyanin at room temperature and 77 K. Resolution of the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and fluorescence spectra of the individual chromophores and the energy-transfer <span class="hlt">rate</span> constants</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Debreczeny, M.P.; Sauer, K. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA ); Zhou, J.; Bryant, D.A. )</p> <p>1993-09-23</p> <p>At both room temperature (RT) and 77 K, the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and fluorescence spectra of the three individual chromophore types ([alpha][sub 84], [beta][sub 84], and [beta][sub 155]) found in monomeric C-phycocyanin ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]), isolated from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, were resolved along with the <span class="hlt">rates</span> of energy transfer between the chromophores. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the [beta][sub 155] chromophore, was useful in effecting this resolution. At RT, the single broad peak in the visible region of the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectrum of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) was resolved into its three-component spectra by comparing the steady-state <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra of the isolated wild-type [alpha] subunit of PC ([alpha][sup PC]) (containing only the [alpha][sub 84] chromophore) with those of the monomeric PCs isolated from the mutant strain ([alpha][sup PC][beta]*) and the wild-type strain ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]). At 77 K, the visible region of the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectrum of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) splits into two peaks. This partial resolution at 77 K of the chromophore spectra of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) when compared with the 77 K <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra of [alpha][sup PC], [beta][sup PC], and ([alpha][sup PC][beta]*) provided a confirmation of our RT assignments of the chromophore <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra. 38 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1159447','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1159447"><span id="translatedtitle">Bistatic <span class="hlt">SAR</span>: Imagery & Image Products.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Yocky, David A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Jakowatz, Charles V,</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>While typical <span class="hlt">SAR</span> imaging employs a co-located (monostatic) RADAR transmitter and receiver, bistatic <span class="hlt">SAR</span> imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. The transmitter and receiver geometry determines if the scattered signal is back scatter, forward scatter, or side scatter. The monostatic <span class="hlt">SAR</span> image is backscatter. Therefore, depending on the transmitter/receiver collection geometry, the captured imagery may be quite different that that sensed at the monostatic <span class="hlt">SAR</span>. This document presents imagery and image products formed from captured signals during the validation stage of the bistatic <span class="hlt">SAR</span> research. Image quality and image characteristics are discussed first. Then image products such as two-color multi-view (2CMV) and coherent change detection (CCD) are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15609567','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15609567"><span id="translatedtitle">RF dosimetry: a comparison between power <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of female and male numerical models from 0.1 to 4 ghz.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sandrini, L; Vaccari, A; Malacarne, C; Cristoforetti, L; Pontalti, R</p> <p>2004-11-21</p> <p>Realistic numerical models of human subjects and their surrounding environment represent the basic points of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic dosimetry. This also involves differentiating the human models in men and women, possibly with different body shapes and postures. In this context, the aims of this paper are, firstly, to propose a female dielectric anatomical model (fDAM) and, secondly, to compare the power <span class="hlt">absorption</span> distributions of a male and a female model from 0.1 to 4 GHz. For realizing the fDAM, a magnetic resonance imaging tomographer to acquire images and a recent technique which avoids the discrete segmentation of body tissues into different types have been used. Simulations have been performed with the FDTD method by using a novel filtering-based subgridding algorithm. The latter is applied here for the first time to dosimetry, allowing an abrupt mesh refinement by a factor of up to 7. The results show that the whole-body-averaged specific <span class="hlt">absorption</span> <span class="hlt">rate</span> (WBA-<span class="hlt">SAR</span>) of the female model is higher than that of the male counterpart, mainly because of a thicker subcutaneous fat layer. In contrast, the maximum averaged <span class="hlt">SAR</span> over 1 g (1gA-<span class="hlt">SAR</span>) and 10 g (10gA-<span class="hlt">SAR</span>) does not depend on gender, because it occurs in regions where no subcutaneous fat layer is present. PMID:15609567</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16455589','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16455589"><span id="translatedtitle">The in vitro permeability coefficient and short-term <span class="hlt">absorption</span> <span class="hlt">rates</span> for vinyl toluene using human cadaver skin mounted in a static diffusion cell model.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fasano, William J; Baer, Kevin N</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Vinyl toluene is one of several methylstyrene monomers that provide improved performance in resins for specialty paints, hydrocarbon resins for adhesives, specialty polymers, and unsaturated polyester resins. The purpose of this study was to determine a permeability coefficient (Kp) and short-term <span class="hlt">absorption</span> <span class="hlt">rate</span> for vinyl toluene using human cadaver skin mounted in an in vitro static diffusion cell model with an exposure area of 0.64 cm2. For the Kp determination, vinyl toluene was applied at a <span class="hlt">rate</span> of 100 microL/cm2 to 6 skin replicates representing 4 human subjects. Serial receptor fluid samples were collected at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h postapplication and analyzed for vinyl toluene by HPLC-UV. Based on the slope at steady-state (203.3 microg cm(-2) h(-1) +/- 120.0 microg cm(-2) h(-1)) and the concentration of the applied dose of vinyl toluene, taken as its density (894,600 microg/cm3), the Kp was calculated to be 2.27 x 10(-4) cm/h (+/-1.34 x 10(-4) cm/h). For the short-term <span class="hlt">absorption</span> experiments, 12 skin replicates representing 3 human subjects were employed. Following 10- and 60-min exposures to a finite dose of vinyl toluene (10 microL/cm2), the respective short-term <span class="hlt">absorption</span> <span class="hlt">rates</span> were calculated to be 66.0 (+/-29.9) and 104.2 (+/-63.0) microg cm(-2) h(-1). These data provide industrial hygienists and safety personnel values to estimate the amount of vinyl toluene that may be absorbed via the dermal exposure route, given a variety of exposure scenarios, and the time it takes (skin <span class="hlt">absorption</span> time) to reach a body burden equal to the Occupational Safety and Health Administrative permissible exposure level (OSHA PEL) or ACGIH TLV. PMID:16455589</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ITEIS.124.2427F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ITEIS.124.2427F"><span id="translatedtitle">Thermal Index Evaluation of Local <span class="hlt">SAR</span> in MRI-Based Head Models of Adult and Children for Portable Telephones</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fujiwara, Osamu; Miyamoto, Kayoko; Wang, Jianqing</p> <p></p> <p>Biological hazards due to radio-frequency (RF) waves result mainly from the temperature rise in tissue. It should be, therefore, clarified to what extent the RF waves of portable telephones increase the temperature-rise in human brain that includes the central part governing the body-temperature regulation function. In this paper, we calculated both the specific <span class="hlt">absorption</span> <span class="hlt">rate</span> (<span class="hlt">SAR</span>) and the resultant temperature-rise for 900 MHz and 2 GHz portable telephones using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for three typical use positions, i.e., the vertical position, cheek position and tilt position. As a result, we found that there was an increase for median and 1% value of the cumulative distribution of temperature-rise in children’s brains for any use positions of the portable telephones compared to that in the adult’s brain, and also that the increasing trend in children’s brains for temperature-rise is identical to the temperature-rise trend in children’s hypothalamus. In addition, we found that the ten-gram averaged peak <span class="hlt">SAR</span> among the adult and children heads had the same trend as that of the 0.1% value of the relatively cumulative distribution of temperature-rise, which shows that the ten-gram averaged peak <span class="hlt">SAR</span> reflects only the localized temperature-rise in the brain surface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PMB....55.1041M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PMB....55.1041M"><span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of <span class="hlt">SAR</span> and induced current densities in adults and children exposed to electromagnetic fields from electronic article surveillance devices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Martínez-Búrdalo, M.; Sanchis, A.; Martín, A.; Villar, R.</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>Electronic article surveillance (EAS) devices are widely used in most stores as anti-theft systems. In this work, the compliance with international guidelines in the human exposure to these devices is analysed by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Two sets of high resolution numerical phantoms of different size (REMCOM/Hershey and Virtual Family), simulating adult and child bodies, are exposed to a 10 MHz pass-by panel-type EAS consisting of two overlapping current-carrying coils. Two different relative positions between the EAS and the body (frontal and lateral exposures), which imply the exposure of different parts of the body at different distances, have been considered. In all cases, induced current densities in tissues of the central nervous system and specific <span class="hlt">absorption</span> <span class="hlt">rates</span> (<span class="hlt">SARs</span>) are calculated to be compared with the limits from the guidelines. Results show that induced current densities are lower in the case of adult models as compared with those of children in both lateral and frontal exposures. Maximum <span class="hlt">SAR</span> values calculated in lateral exposure are significantly lower than those calculated in frontal exposure, where the EAS-body distance is shorter. Nevertheless, in all studied cases, with an EAS driving current of 4 A rms, maximum induced current and <span class="hlt">SAR</span> values are below basic restrictions.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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