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Sample records for abu rusheid-sikeit shear

  1. Abu Dhabi presses oil development program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-29

    This paper reports that Abu Dhabi Co. for Onshore Operations (ADCO), the biggest oil producer in the United Arab Emirates, reports 1991 was a successful year despite the Persian Gulf war. Meantime, Abu Dhabi's Zakum, the second largest oil field in the Persian Gulf, boosted production to more than 300,000 b/d, and officials said production will rise further when a platform complex is recommissioned in 1993.

  2. Horizontal drilling improves recovery in Abu Dhabi

    SciTech Connect

    Muhairy, A.A. ); Farid, E.A. )

    1993-09-13

    Both onshore and offshore Abu Dhabi, horizontal wells have increased productivity three to four times more than that from vertical and deviated wells in the same reservoirs. Horizontal drilling technology was first applied in Abu Dhabi in February 1988, and through March 1993, 48 wells have been horizontally drilled. During the 5 years of horizontal drilling, the experience gained by both operating company and service company personnel has contributed to a substantial improvement in drilling rate, and hence, a reduction in drilling costs. The improvements in drilling and completions resulted from the following: The horizontal drilling and completion operations were analyzed daily, and these follow-up analyses helped optimize the planning of subsequent wells. The bits and bottom hole assemblies were continuously analyzed for optimum selections. Steerable drilling assemblies were found very effective in the upper sections of the wells. The paper describes drilling activities onshore and offshore, completion design, and the outlook for future well drilling.

  3. Crimes of obedience: "groupthink" at abu ghraib.

    PubMed

    Post, Jerrold M; Panis, Lara K

    2011-01-01

    Clear evidence of authorization at the highest levels belies administration statements to the effect that the torture at Abu Ghraib was an aberration and simply unauthorized actions by rogue soldiers. The administration reflected a "group mind," demonstrating many qualities of "groupthink." Whatever was necessary, including torture and violation of the Geneva accords, the system in effect authorized, because of the perceived danger to the system and the desperate requirement to get the information out of "them" by whatever means necessary, information that could save lives. The sanctioned violence demonstrated the qualities identified by Kelman and Hamilton (1989) in their study of the Mylai massacre as characteristic of sanctioned massacres: authorization, routinization, and dehumanization. It would seem that officials and participants exhibited all of these characteristics in the decision to conduct extreme interrogation on the "unlawful combatants" imprisoned at Abu Ghraib. PMID:21244200

  4. Tectonic evolution of Abu Gharadig basin

    SciTech Connect

    Meshref, W.M.; Beleity, A.E.H.; Hammouda, H.; Kamel, M.

    1988-08-01

    The Abu Gharadig basin, northwestern desert of Egypt, is considered the most petroliferous basin in the Western Desert as far as hydrocarbon production and potential. The basin is believed to be growing and developing throughout geologic time. Aeromagnteic data and subsurface information, derived from a set of isopach maps from wells including complete sections only, revealed that the Abu Gharadig basin was subjected to different tectonic events that resulted in different tectonic trends. These trends include (1) north-south to north-northwest-south-southeast of Precambrian age, (2) east-west (Y-trends) of Paleozoic to Jurassic age, (3) west-northwest (R-trends) of Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, and (4) east-northeast (P-trends) of Late Cretaceous to Eocene age. The previously mentioned tectonic trends can be explained by a convergent wrench model that affected northern Egypt.

  5. 77 FR 5291 - The Designation of Monir Chouka, also Known as Mounir Chouka, Also Known as Abu Adam, Also Known...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... Germany, also Known as Abu Adam aus Deutschland, as a Specially Designated Global Terrorist Pursuant to... Monir Chouka, also known as Mounir Chouka, also known as Abu Adam from Germany, also known as Abu...

  6. Documentation and Monitoring of Built Heritage in Abu Dhabi, Uae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, S.

    2013-07-01

    The ancient oasis-city of Al Ain in Abu Dhabi Emirate still retains the most important and outstanding cultural heritage of United Arab Emirates (UAE). The larger area of Abu Dhabi Emirate comprised of archaeological sites, cultural landscapes and historic buildings dating back to 3rd millennium to the recent pre-oil era. Traditional materials like stone, earth and palm wood were used in combination with local construction methods. For the last seven years the newly formed Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority (TCA Abu Dhabi)1 has been actively involved in conservation of built heritage in Abu Dhabi Emirate with the help of its Conservation Section. Documentation prior to any conservation and restoration works is considered as a basic pre-requisite for understanding an historic building or site. It is a process which continues during the conservation of any monument and is the only accurate tool for recording information in order to understand the structure, ultimately leading to the management of cultural heritage. Application and use of tools, ranging from basic manual techniques to 3D laser scanning, based on the best practices and international guidelines the exercise will help in establishing a documentation lab with standard procedures, specifications and tools for the documentation and monitoring the built heritage of Abu Dhabi Emirate. This paper will discuss a range of case studies and will demonstrate how documentation and monitoring of the built heritage has augmented the various conservation initiatives on a variety of building types.

  7. UAE-Abu Dhabi: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that production expansion projects remain the focus in Abu Dhabi, with increased drilling operations underway both on and offshore. Only Abu Dhabi Co. for Onshore Operations (Adco) and Abu Dhabi Marine Operating Co. (Adma-Opco) provide any information about activity in the Emirate. Plans call for boosting productive capacity by 1 million bpd to near 3 million bpd. Present sustainable capacity is estimated at 1.8 million bpd by the CIA. This rate has been exceeded recently (it reached over 2 million bpd) to take advantage of higher prices in late 1990 and to make up for the shortfall due to loss of Iraqi and Kuwaiti exports. However, it does not appear higher rates can be sustained for a long period of time. By year-end 1992, sustainable output has been projected to reach 2.3 million bpd.

  8. Genesis of the Abu Marawat gold deposit, central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoheir, Basem A.; Akawy, Ahmed

    2010-06-01

    Gold mineralisation at the Abu Marawat mine, central Eastern Desert of Egypt, is related to a system of massive and sheared, milky quartz veins cutting a sequence of Neoproterozoic island arc metavolcanic/volcaniclastic rocks and related banded iron formation (BIF). Sulphide-bearing quartz veins and related hydrothermal breccia bodies display a range of textures including sheared, boudinaged and recrystallised quartz, open space filling and microbreccia. These variable textures imply a complex history of crack-seal mechanism characterising the relation between mineral deposition and a major N-S-trending shear zone, during a late brittle-ductile deformation event which affected the area at about 550 Ma. Gold-base metal mineralisation is associated with brecciation and fracturing of the iron ore bands, close to silicified shears and related quartz veins. The auriferous quartz lodes are characterised by the occurrence of visible pyrite-chalcopyrite ± pyrrhotite ± sphalerite ± galena mineralisation. Gold is refractory in pyrite and chalcopyrite, but rare visible gold/electrum and telluride specks were observed in a few samples. Hydrothermal alteration includes pervasive silicification, pyritisation, sericitisation, carbonatisation confined to a delicate set of veins and altered shears, and a more widespread propylitic alteration assemblage (quartz + chlorite + pyrite + calcite ± epidote). Fluid inclusion petrography and microthermometric studies suggest heterogeneous trapping of a low-salinity (1.4-6.7 wt.% eq. NaCl) aqueous solution and a carbonic fluid. Evidence for fluid immiscibility during ore formation includes variable liquid/vapour ratios in inclusions along individual trails and bulk inclusion homogenisation into liquid and occasionally to vapour at comparable temperatures. The trapping conditions of intragranular aqueous-carbonic inclusions approximate 264-378 °C at 700-1300 bar. Similar temperature estimates have been obtained from Al

  9. A profile and approach to chronic disease in Abu Dhabi

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    As a country, the United Arab Emirates has developed very rapidly from a developing country with a largely nomadic population, to a modern and wealthy country with a Western lifestyle. This economic progress has brought undoubted social benefits and opportunities for UAE citizens, including a high and increasing life expectancy. However, rapid modernization and urbanization have contributed to a significant problem with chronic diseases, particularly obesity-related cardiovascular risk. In response the Health Authority of Abu Dhabi has significantly strengthened its data systems to better assess the baseline and measure the impact of targeted interventions. The unique population-level Weqaya Programme for UAE Nationals living in Abu Dhabi has recruited more than 94% of adults into a screening programme for the rapid identification of those at risk and the deployment of targeted interventions to control that risk. This article describes the burden of non-communicable disease in Abu Dhabi, and the efforts made by the Health Authority of Abu Dhabi to tackle this burden including the development of a whole population cardiovascular screening programme changes to health policy, particularly in terms of lifestyle and behaviour change, and empowerment of the community to enable individuals to make healthier choices. In addition, recommendations have been made for global responsibility for tackling chronic disease. PMID:22738714

  10. The Abu Dhabi Cardiovascular Program: the continuation of Framingham.

    PubMed

    Hajat, Cother; Harrison, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Sixty years on from its first publication, the Framingham study has made an historic impact in risk identification and prediction of cardiovascular disease (CVD) burden globally. The challenge for the 21st century is in finding practical and scalable methods for effective implementation of population-level interventions that are adaptable to low-, middle-, and high-income settings. Within its first 2 years, the Abu Dhabi Cardiovascular Program, "Weqaya," has delivered a Framingham Risk Score for almost every adult Emirati. This is complemented by a clear and progressive program including the health sector and societal approach to the delivery of interventions for CVD. The health sector response includes the use of clear, evidence-based standards of clinical care, customer-focused service innovation such as the use of mobile and wellness clinics, and attention to the patient experience, and improving compliance using a mixture of encourage, enable, and enforce mechanics. Components of the Abu Dhabi societal approach include "top-down" measures to align the civil sector response including use of policies and regulation, for example, for trade and urban planning. The "bottom-up" measures aim to empower individuals, groups, and populations. Key to the success of this approach lies in central coordination and routine monitoring and evaluation, incorporating the use of simple, shared metrics. The Abu Dhabi approach has created a solid platform for scalable intervention, and for "learning by doing," with impact being monitored at the level of individuals, groups and the whole population. The unique data architecture in Abu Dhabi will enable the first cardiovascular risk score to be developed for the region and the incorporation of novel, modifiable risk factors into the model. The last 2 years have seen huge progress in Abu Dhabi for CVD, but the coming 5 to 10 years promise to unearth real, large-scale solutions, building on the original Framingham model. Furthermore

  11. 75 FR 2921 - In the Matter of the Designation of Said Ali al-Shihri, Also Known as Abu-Sayyaf, Also Known as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... Matter of the Designation of Said Ali al-Shihri, Also Known as Abu-Sayyaf, Also Known as Abu-Sufyan al-Azidi, Also Known as Abu-Sayyaf al-Shihri, Also Known as Abu Sufian Kadhdhaab Matrook, Also Known as Sa'id Ali Jabir al-Khathim al-Shihri, Also Known as Salad, Also Known as Abu Salah Abu Sufyan,...

  12. Coincident Observations of Surface Ozone and NMVOCs over Abu Dhabi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Naveed; Majeed, Tariq; Iqbal, Mazhar; Tarasick, David; Davies, Jonathan; Riemer, Daniel; Apel, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The vertical profiles of ozone are measured coincidently with non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) at the meteorological site located at the Abu Dhabi international airport (latitude 24.45N; longitude 54.22E) during the years 2012 - 2014. Some of the profiles show elevated surface ozone >95 ppbv during the winter months (December, January and February). The ground-level NMVOCs obtained from the gas chromatography-flame ionization detection/mass spectrometry system also show elevated values of acetylene, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, benzene, and toluene. NMVOCs and ozone abundances in other seasons are much lower than the values in winter season. NMVOCs are emitted from an extensive number of sources in urban environments including fuel production, distribution, and consumption, and serve as precursor of ozone. Transport sources contribute a substantial portion of the NMVOC burden to the urban atmosphere in developed regions. Abu Dhabi is located at the edge of the Arabian Gulf and is highly affected by emissions from petrochemical industries in the neighboring Gulf region. The preliminary results indicate that wintertime enhancement in ozone is associated with large values of NMVOCs at Abu Dhabi. The domestic production of surface ozone is estimated from the combination of oxygen recombination and NMVOCs and compared with the data. It is estimated that about 40-50% of ozone in Abu Dhabi is transported from the neighbouring petrochemical industries. We will present ozone sounding and NMVOCs data and our model estimates of surface ozone, including a discussion on the high levels of the tropospheric ozone responsible for contaminating the air quality in the UAE. This work is supported by National Research Foundation, UAE.

  13. 77 FR 5291 - The Designation of Yassin Chouka, Also Known as Yasin Chouka, Also Known as Abu Ibrahim, Also...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... Ibraheem the German, also Known as Abu Ibrahim al Almani, as a Specially Designated Global Terrorist... Ibraheem the German, also known as Abu Ibrahim al Almani, committed, or poses a significant risk...

  14. Geomorphological evolution of the dynamic Abu Dhabi coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokier, S. W.; Onuma, T.; Hamada, H.

    2012-04-01

    The Abu Dhabi coastline provides an ideal setting for studying sedimentation processes in an arid depositional environment directly analogous to that of many of the region's Mesozoic petroleum reservoirs. This coastline displays a low-angle ramp geometry with supratidal evaporite precipitation passing offshore, through a broad carbonate-evaporite intertidal setting with complex depositional facies geometries, into a subtidal carbonate depositional environment. The coast is locally protected from open marine conditions by a number of peninsulas and offshore shoals and islands associated with the east-west trending Great Pearl Bank. This offers an ideal setting for studying the effects of relative sea-level fluctuations on sedimentary systems and shoreline morphology. A late Holocene progradation rate of 0.75 m/yr has previously been established for the Abu Dhabi Sabkha system (Lokier and Steuber, 2008) however we conjecture that the system has now entered a broadly retrogradational phase. By applying current estimates of global sea level rise of 3.3 mm/yr derived from satellite altimetry and tide gauges (Cazenave and Nerem, 2004; Leuliette et al., 2004), we calculate present day marine transgression of the Abu Dhabi shoreline at a rate of 8.25 m/yr. This study utilised 7 years of fieldwork observations and satellite imagery to establish numerous lines of evidence for active retrogradation over an area of Abu Dhabi coastline lying between Al Dabb'iya in the east and Abu al Abyad in the west. The landward advance of spits and beach ridge systems was monitored at several locations with rates of retrogradation of up to 28 m per year being recorded in some instances. These are significantly greater than those predicted from sea-level rise and may indicate a local subsidence. The landward and seaward limits of microbial mat belts are strongly controlled by their location in the intertidal zone. The seaward side of the Recent microbial mat belt in the Abu Dhabi Sabkha is

  15. Designing Professional Development for Principals in a Context of Change: The Case of Abu Dhabi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaik Hourani, Rida; Stringer, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Schools in Abu Dhabi are going through a period of transformation and reform. The Abu Dhabi Education Council commenced a professional development plan for principals to enhance their capabilities to manage and initiate change in light of the reforms. This study was conducted to explore principals' perspectives on professional development…

  16. Who Got to Decide on Nadia Abu El-Haj's Tenure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabinowitz, Dan; Shamir, Ronen

    2008-01-01

    The tension surrounding Barnard College's determination of whether to grant tenure to anthropologist Nadia Abu El-Haj was resolved this fall. Barnard reached a positive decision. The affair, however, leaves a number of important issues open. At the center of this controversy stands Abu El-Haj's first book, "Facts on the Ground: Archaeological…

  17. Introduction of an Emergency Response Plan for flood loading of Sultan Abu Bakar Dam in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, N. F. Md; Sidek, L. M.; Basri, H.; Muda, R. S.; Razad, A. Z. Abdul

    2016-03-01

    Sultan Abu Bakar Dam Emergency Response Plan (ERP) is designed to assist employees for identifying, monitoring, responding and mitigation dam safety emergencies. This paper is outlined to identification of an organization chart, responsibility for emergency management team and triggering level in Sultan Abu Bakar Dam ERP. ERP is a plan that guides responsibilities for proper operation of Sultan Abu Bakar Dam in respond to emergency incidents affecting the dam. Based on this study four major responsibilities are needed for Abu Bakar Dam owing to protect any probable risk for downstream which they can be Incident Commander, Deputy Incident Commander, On-Scene Commander, Civil Engineer. In conclusion, having organization charts based on ERP studies can be helpful for decreasing the probable risks in any projects such as Abu Bakar Dam and it is a way to identify and suspected and actual dam safety emergencies.

  18. Magmatic and solid state structures of the Abu Ziran pluton: Deciphering transition from thrusting to extension in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Harald; Loizenbauer, Jürgen; Wallbrecher, Eckart

    2014-11-01

    The 606 Ma old Abu Ziran granite of the Eastern Desert of Egypt intruded the southern margin of the Meatiq dome in a sinistral shear extensional setting. Its emplacement was enabled by a system of NW-trending sinistral shears, related Riedel shears and N-S extensional shear zones and faults. Magmatic flow was east-directed and controlled by Riedel shears that progressively rotated to an orientation favourable for extension. Strain markers that document magmatic flow show eastward decreasing strain together with strain increase from pluton centre to margins. This is explained by Newtonian flow between non-parallel plates and differences in flow velocities across the pluton. Solid state fabrics including shear fabrics, orientation of late magmatic dykes and quartz tension gashes, together with quartz C-axes distributions, document southward extensional shear within the solidified pluton and adjacent host rocks. Extensional shear is correlated with exhumation of the Meatiq dome coeval and soon after pluton solidification (585 Ma). Pressure temperature evolutionary paths, derived from fluid inclusions, show a clockwise path with exhumation by isothermal decompression in the Meatiq dome. By contrast, the overlying volcanosedimentary nappes experienced an anti-clockwise path released by temperature rise due to pluton emplacement followed by isobaric cooling. Quartz fabrics indicate high-temperature coaxial N-S flow in the northern Meatiq dome and lower-temperature, non-coaxial southward flow within the overlaying superficial nappe. This is explained by the exhumation process itself that progressively localised into simple shear domains when rocks approached higher crustal levels. Late extension at ca. 580 Ma was pure shear dominated and resulted in reversal of shear, now dextral, in the western Meatiq shear zone.

  19. 78 FR 40545 - Designation of Abd Al-Ra'Ouf Abu Zaid Mohamed Hamza, also known as Abdul Rauf Abuzaid, also known...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... Designation of Abd Al-Ra'Ouf Abu Zaid Mohamed Hamza, also known as Abdul Rauf Abuzaid, also known as Abdel... Mohamed Hamza, also known as Abdul Rauf Abuzaid, also known as Abdel Raouf Abu Zayid Hamza, also known as... Abu Zaid Mohamed, also known as Abd-al-Ra'uf Abu Zayd Muhammad Hamza, also known as Abdul Raouf...

  20. Wrench tectonics in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, M.; Mohamed, A.S.

    1995-08-01

    Recent studies of the geodynamics and tectonic history of the Arabian plate throughout geologic time have revealed that Wrench forces played an important role in the structural generation and deformation of Petroleum basins and reservoirs of the United Arab Emirates. The tectonic analysis of Abu Dhabi revealed that basin facies evolution were controlled by wrench tectonics, examples are the Pre-Cambrian salt basin, the Permo-Triassic and Jurassic basins. In addition, several sedimentary patterns were strongly influenced by wrench tectonics, the Lower Cretaceous Shuaiba platform margin and associated reservoirs is a good example. Wrench faults, difficult to identify by conventional methods, were examined from a regional perspective and through careful observation and assessment of many factors. Subsurface structural mapping and geoseismic cross-sections supported by outcrop studies and geomorphological features revealed a network of strike slip faults in Abu Dhabi. Structural modelling of these wench forces including the use of strain ellipses was applied both on regional and local scales. This effort has helped in reinterpreting some structural settings, some oil fields were interpreted as En Echelon buckle folds associated with NE/SW dextral wrench faults. Several flower structures were interpreted along NW/SE sinistral wrench faults which have significant hydrocarbon potential. Synthetic and Antithetic strike slip faults and associated fracture systems have played a significant role in field development and reservoir management studies. Four field examples were discussed.

  1. Petroleum maturation modelling, Abu Gabra Sharaf area, Muglad Basin, Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Abdalla Y.; Pearson, Michael J.; Ashcroft, William A.; Whiteman, A. J.

    2002-08-01

    Structural and maturation studies in the northwest of the Muglad Basin, Sudan showed a thick sedimentary section up to 9000 m in the deep sub-basins and an average of about 6000 m in the Sharaf-Abu Gabra Ridge. The isopach map of the Lower Cretaceous Abu Gabra-Sharaf formations, which contain source rocks, showed a thickness of sedimentary section between 2000 and 5000 m. The burial history showed high subsidence rates during the first rifting phase with relatively low subsidence rates during the following two phases in this part of the basin. Significant erosion of the sedimentary section occurred in the ridge area during Miocene and Cenomanian-Albian times. The geothermal gradients in the modelled wells range between 18 and 27.5 °C/km corresponding to the relatively wide range of present day heat flow of between 37 and 63 mW/m 2, averaging 50 mW/m 2. Heat flow history curves consistent with vitrinite reflectance data were adopted with elevated high heat flow (75 mW/m 2) during the first rifting phase followed by minor peaks (average 60 mW/m 2) during the second and the third rifting phases. Application of a kinetic vitrinite maturation model resulted in a present day oil window between 2000 and 4500 m. The source rock of the Abu Gabra (AG) and Sharaf (SH) formations, which has an average total organic carbon of 1.0% and hydrogen index (HI) of 280, was modelled for hydrocarbon generation. The section was divided into four layers; AG-1 (Albian), AG-2 (Aptian), SH-1 (Barremian) and SH-2 (Neocomian). Conditions for hydrocarbon generation are present throughout the Sharaf formation and in AG-2. The generation model suggests an average generation amount of 4 mgHC/g rock in the lower three modelled layers with a timing range between 120 Ma and the present. Total calculated oil volume is about 370 US billion bbls and the expected volume expelled and migrated (40%) is 150 US billion bbls. The total gas expelled and migrated (90%) is 1600 US trillion cu ft. Retention of

  2. The Cretaceous glauconitic sandstones of Abu Tartur, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestitschek, Brigitte; Gier, Susanne; Essa, Mahmoud; Kurzweil, Johannes

    2010-05-01

    The Abu Tartur mine is located in the Western Desert of Egypt, 50 km west of El Kharga City. Geologically, the Abu Tartur plateau is built by a sequence of Upper Cretaceous (Campanian - Maastrichtian) phosphorites, black shales and glauconitic sandstones. The phosphate deposits are of great economic importance and have been mined since their discovery in 1967. Outcrop sections were measured, sampled, sedimentologically characterized and described. One specific glaucony layer was investigated mineralogically and chemically in detail and compared to a subsurface sample from the mine. Two depositional regimes can be interpreted based on sedimentary architecture and structures: 1) a deeper-water hemipelagic environment, where phosphorites and organic carbon-rich shales were deposited and 2) a shallower, prograding higher energy shelf environment with glauconies. From a sequence stratigraphic perspective 1) was deposited during the transgressive systems tract and the early highstand while 2) was deposited during the remaining highstand and a lowstand prograding wedge (Glenn & Arthur, 1990). Petrographic and SEM investigations show that the glaucony grains are of authochtonous origin. XRF, EMPA and thin-section analyses show that the glaucony grains from the outcrop differ significantly in their chemical composition, morphology and color from the grains of the mine sample. The fresh glauconies are enriched in Fe2O3 and K2O compared to the surface samples. XRD analyses of the clay fraction of the six outcrop samples and the mine sample show that the grains consist of illite(glauconite)/smectite mixed-layers, with more illite layers (80 %) in the mine sample. The charge distribution diagram muscovite-pyrophyllite-celadonite shows a clear trend from smectitic glaucony to illitic glaucony, the mine sample plots exactly in the field for glauconites. All these features indicate that the surface samples are strongly altered by weathering and that glauconite progressively

  3. Source of solutes to the coastal sabkha of Abu Dhabi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, W.W.; Sanford, W.E.; Al Habshi, A.R.S.

    2002-01-01

    An ascending-brine model is proposed to address the observed isotope geochemistry, solute composition, and solute and water fluxes in the coastal sabkha of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. Mass-balance measurements document that >95% of the solutes are derived from ascending continental brines; minor amounts are derived from rainfall and from groundwater entering from upgradient areas. Nearly 100% of the annual water loss is from evaporation and not lateral discharge. Direct rainfall on the sabkha and subsequent recharge to the underlying aquifer account for ~ 90% of the annual water input to the system; the remaining 10% comes from both lateral and ascending groundwater flow. Thus, the water and solutes in this system are from different sources. Solute concentrations of conservative (i.e., nonreactive) elements in the coastal, sabkha-covered aquifer are consistent with the fluid pore volumes of ascending brine calculated from hydrologic properties. Calcium to sulfate ratios and sulfur isotopes are consistent with this source of solute from the underlying Tertiary formations. Recharging rainwater dissolves halite and other soluble minerals on the surface, causing the solution to become more dense and sink to the bottom of the aquifer where it vertically mixes with less dense ascending brines. Solutes are returned to the surface by capillary forces and recycled or lost from the system by eolian or fluvial processes. Thus, the system becomes vertically mixed, consistent with the presence of tritium throughout the aquifer; but there is essentially no horizontal mixing of seawater with groundwater. The observed seawater solutes in the supratidal zone come from interstitial seawater trapped by the rapid progradation of the sediments into the Arabian Gulf and are not refluxed or laterally mixed. The ascending-brine model contrasts significantly with both the seawater-flooding and evaporative-pumping models previously proposed as a source of solutes to the coastal sabkha of the

  4. Abu Dhabi's Masdar project: dazzling? or Just a mirage?

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-15

    The Masdar project is to build a self-contained economic zone creating 70,000 jobs and eventually housing as many as 40,000 residents in the middle of the desert by 2016. The community, which is envisioned to house a science and technology park and housing, is designed to be carbon neutral and virtually waste-free. Two-thirds of the power is to come from a 10 MW solar farm, and nearly all water is to be recycled and reused. There will be virtually no waste, as all packaging and material are to be recycled, used for power generation or turned into compost. The car-free zone will be served by advanced personal rapid transit (PRT) vehicles that will zip residents around the 6.5-square-kilometer area. The problem with Masdar is not so much what goes inside it, but rather what is outside. Masdar is unlikely to change the image of Abu Dhabi as the most carbon-intensive place on earth.

  5. Inhibitors, cladded trees protect sour gas wells in Abu Dhabi

    SciTech Connect

    Morsi, K.M. )

    1994-06-13

    Continuous chemical inhibition has prevented corrosion downhole, and tests indicate that Inconel 625 cladding will protect the christmas trees on wells producing sour gas from the Thamama C reservoir. Metallic corrosion is a costly problem. Estimates indicate that corrosion costs the oil industry several billion dollars per year. In addition, oil companies spend over $100 million/year on corrosion inhibitors for combating downhole tubular and casing corrosion. Abu Dhabi National Oil Co. (Adnoc) has successfully completed wells in extremely harsh operating conditions with high temperatures, pressures, and high concentrations of H[sub 2]S, CO[sub 2], and brine. Such environments require special materials for downhole and surface equipment. The Thamama C reservoir, in an onshore gas field, produces gas containing H[sub 2]S and CO[sub 2] in the range of 0.7--8.0 mole % and 4.0--8.0 mole %, respectively. The Thamama C gas-gathering system comprises 19 wells connected to four trunk lines that transport produced gas and associated condensate to a central processing plant. The paper discusses material and inhibitor selection.

  6. Migration of P-12 Education from Its Current State to One of High Quality: The Aspirations of Abu Dhabi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badri, Masood; Al Khaili, Mugheer

    2014-01-01

    Key system challenges identified by the Abu Dhabi Education Council provided the impetus for an aggressive strategic plan as necessary guidance and support for the development of the P-12 education system to contribute to advancing its positioning in the global knowledge economy. For the Abu Dhabi Education Council, the analysis served as a tool…

  7. Reflections on the Reggio Emilia Approach as Inspiration for Early Childhood Teacher Education in Abu Dhabi, UAE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Fiona S.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses a teacher educator's reflections on her participation in an international study group and visits to the infant-toddler and pre-schools of Reggio Emilia, Italy, as inspiration for early childhood teacher education in Abu Dhabi, UAE. The following five themes are reflected on, for teacher education in the context of Abu Dhabi:…

  8. 77 FR 38127 - The Designation of Abubakar Shekau, Also Known as Abu Mohammed Abubakar bin Mohammed, Also Known...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... Designation of Abubakar Shekau, Also Known as Abu Mohammed Abubakar bin Mohammed, Also Known as Shekau, Also Known as Abu Muhammed Abubakar Bi Muhammed, Also Known as Shehu, Also Known as Shayku, as a Specially Designated Global Terrorist Pursuant to Section 1(b) of Executive Order 13224, as Amended Acting under...

  9. Temporal variability of air-pollutants over Abu Dhabi, UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghedira, H.; Ben Romdhane, H.; Beegum S, N.

    2013-12-01

    Air quality, the measure of the concentrations of gaseous pollutants and size or number of particulate matter, is one of the most important problems worldwide and has strong implications on human health, ecosystems, as well as regional and global climate. The levels of air pollutants such as sulphur dioxide (SO2), particulate matters (PM10, PM2.5), Ozone (O3), Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), Carbon monoxide (CO), etc. show an alarming increase in urban cities across the world and in many cases, the concentrations have grown well above the World Health Organization's guidelines for ambient air-quality standards. Here, we present the periodic fluctuations observed in the concentrations of air pollutants such as SO2, NO2, O3, CO, H2S, NMHC (Non methane Hydro Carbon) and VOC (volatile organic compounds) based on the measurements collected during the period 2008-2010 at Masdar City, Abu Dhabi (24.42oN, 54.61oE, 7m MSL). The measurements were carried out using an Air Quality Monitoring System (AQM60). All these pollutant species showed statistical periodic: diurnal, monthly, seasonal and annual variations. Diurnally, all the species, except ozone, depicted an afternoon low and nighttime/early morning high, attributed to the dynamics of the local atmospheric boundary layer. Whereas, an opposite pattern with daytime high and nighttime low was observed for O3, as the species is formed in the troposphere by catalytic photochemical reactions of NOx with CO, CH4 and other VOCs. Seasonally, the pollutants depicted higher values during summer and relatively lower values during winter, associated with changes in synoptic airmass types and/or removal processes. Concentrations of all the gaseous pollutants are within the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) throughout the year, whereas the PM10 often exceeded the limits, especially during dust storm episodes.

  10. Distribution of heavy metals in the coastal area of Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Al Rashdi, Saeed; Arabi, Alya A; Howari, Fares M; Siad, Abdi

    2015-08-15

    Fifty-seven sediment samples were collected from Abu Dhabi coastal area, United Arab Emirates (UAE). The concentrations of heavy metals including antimony, arsenic, barium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, mercury, lead, molybdenum, nickel and zinc were obtained using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and X-ray fluorescence. Heavy metal contaminations in Abu Dhabi had increased since 2004. Nevertheless, the enrichment factors, geoaccumulation indices and the pollution load index of 0.3 showed no pollution with any of the measured metals except arsenic. PMID:26081249

  11. Prospect evaluation of BED 3 and Sitra oilfields, Abu Gharadig Basin, North Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Ibrahim; Ghazala, Hosni; El Diasty, Waleed

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence of hydrocarbons is closely linked to the elements of petroleum system history of the BED 3 and Sitra 8 oilfields, which has created multiple reservoir and seal combinations. BED 3 Field and Sitra concessions occupy the northwestern part of the Abu Gharadig Basin and extends between latitudes 29°45‧ and 30°05‧N and longitudes 27°30‧ and 28°10‧E. The comprehensive integration of the geo-related data and the interpretation of the well logging, geochemical, seismic data in time domain and depth and sealing mechanisms explain the occurrence of hydrocarbons in some certain reservoirs during cretaceous age and other reservoirs in the same fields don't have any hydrocarbon accumulation. Detailed seismic data interpretation was performed for the target units of BED 3 and Sitra 8 oilfields in time domain and converted to depth domain. Sitra 8 Field is a three-way dip closure bounded by NW-SE faults while BED 3 field is represented by a WNW-ESE trending horst dipping to the east. The Albian-Cenomanian Kharita Formation has a high energy shallow marine shelf environment and considered as the main pay zone in the BED 3 oilfield. On the other hand, Kharita sands are dry in the Sitra 8 Field. Also, the shallow marine shale, sandstone, limestone and dolomite interbeds of the Abu Roash G Member are another hydrocarbon bearing reservoir in the Sitra 8 Field. Sealing mechanisms were applied to explain why certain reservoirs have hydrocarbon and others don't. Allan's juxtaposition diagram for the main faults in the study area shows that Kharita sands in BED 3 area have excellent juxtaposition as Kharita juxtapose to upper Bahariya and intra Bahariya, which consist of shale and limestone. Abu Roash G sands in BED 3 area have bad juxtaposition as the Abu Roash G juxtapose to Abu Roash C sand (sand juxtaposed sand). Allan's diagram shows that the Abu Roash G reservoir (main target) in Sitra 8 is juxtaposing Abu Roash D which is composed of limestone and shale

  12. The Neoproterozoic Abu Dahr ophiolite, South Eastern Desert, Egypt: petrological characteristics and tectonomagmatic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahlan, Hisham A.; Azer, Mokhles K.; Khalil, Ahmed E. S.

    2015-10-01

    The Neoproterozoic Abu Dahr ophiolite, South Eastern Desert, Egypt, is one of the best preserved and least dismembered ophiolite successions in the Arabian-Nubian Shield. It contains a Penrose-type ophiolite sequence from mantle section below mafic crust upward to oceanic sedimentary cover overlying mafic volcanics, although the original magmatic (stratigraphic) contact between the mantle and crustal sections is disrupted by tectonism. The Abu Dahr ophiolite is metamorphosed under greenschist facies conditions, and low-temperature alteration is widespread. Petrography reveals that: (i) the mantle is homogenous, serpentinized, and dominated by harzburgite and less abundant dunite; (ii) the cumulate ultramafics are represented by wehrlite and pyroxenite; and (iii) the crustal section is represented by metagabbros, meta-anorthosites and metabasalts. The Abu Dahr serpentinized peridotites show high Mg# (0.92-0.93), with enrichment of Ni, Cr and Co, and depletion of Al2O3 and CaO, and nearly flat and unfractionated REE chondrite-normalized pattern. Major and trace element characteristics of the Abu Dahr metagabbro and metabasalt (crustal section) indicate a tholeiitic to calc-alkaline affinity. Units of the crustal section have low-Nb and Zr concentrations, low Dy/Yb and relatively elevated La/Yb ratios, high U/Yb and Th/Yb ratios, and LREE enriched chondrite-normalized pattern. All of the Abu Dahr ophiolite units have trace-element signatures characterized by enrichment of LILE over HFSE. Rare and trace element patterns indicate a genetic link between the Abu Dahr mantle, cumulate ultramafics, and crust. Chromian spinel has survived metamorphism and is used as a petrogenetic indicator in the Abu Dahr serpentinized peridotites. The spinel is homogeneous with a limited composition, and shows high-Cr# (>0.6) combined with low-TiO2 character (mostly <0.1 wt.%). The Abu Dahr ophiolite is interpreted as a fragment of depleted oceanic lithosphere that experienced high degrees

  13. Implementing a multifaceted intervention to decrease central line-associated bloodstream infections in SEHA (Abu Dhabi Health Services Company) intensive care units: the Abu Dhabi experience.

    PubMed

    Latif, Asad; Kelly, Bernadette; Edrees, Hanan; Kent, Paula S; Weaver, Sallie J; Jovanovic, Branislava; Attallah, Hadeel; de Grouchy, Kristin K; Al-Obaidli, Ali; Goeschel, Christine A; Berenholtz, Sean M

    2015-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether implementation of a multifaceted intervention would significantly reduce the incidence of central line-associated bloodstream infections. DESIGN Prospective cohort collaborative. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS Intensive care units of the Abu Dhabi Health Services Company hospitals in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. INTERVENTIONS A bundled intervention consisting of 3 components was implemented as part of the program. It consisted of a multifaceted approach that targeted clinician use of evidence-based infection prevention recommendations, tools that supported the identification of local barriers to these practices, and implementation ideas to help ensure patients received the practices. Comprehensive unit-based safety teams were created to improve safety culture and teamwork. Finally, the measurement and feedback of monthly infection rate data to safety teams, senior leaders, and staff in participating intensive care units was encouraged. The main outcome measure was the quarterly rate of central line-associated bloodstream infections. RESULTS Eighteen intensive care units from 7 hospitals in Abu Dhabi implemented the program and achieved an overall 38% reduction in their central line-associated bloodstream infection rate, adjusted at the hospital and unit level. The number of units with a quarterly central line-associated bloodstream infection rate of less than 1 infection per 1,000 catheter-days increased by almost 40% between the baseline and postintervention periods. CONCLUSION A significant reduction in the global morbidity and mortality associated with central line-associated bloodstream infections is possible across intensive care units in disparate settings using a multifaceted intervention. PMID:25871927

  14. Variation by Gender in Abu Dhabi High School Students' Interests in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badri, Masood; Mazroui, Karima Al; Al Rashedi, Asma; Yang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Abu Dhabi high school students' interest in physics in different contexts was investigated with a survey conducted in connection with the international project, The Relevance of Science Education (ROSE). The sample consisted of 2248 students in public and private schools. Means of most items that belong to the school physics context for both girls…

  15. Cognitive Styles in Students of Chemistry in SBS-ABU Zaria, Nigeria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuaibu, M. J.; Ogunsola, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    Cognitive preferences of chemistry students (N=156) in School of Basic Studies (SBS) at Ahmadu Bello University (ABU) were investigated. Results indicate that the four preferences (recall, principles, application, questioning) appear to be unrelated to sex and location of previous school for these Nigerian subjects. (JN)

  16. School Improvements in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates: Asking the "Expert Witnesses"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Martina

    2013-01-01

    Government schools in Abu Dhabi, as part of wide-scale educational reforms undertaken in the whole of the United Arab Emirates, have undergone massive school improvement developments over the past seven years. Over the course of these years, the reality of student life for those in government schools has been widely altered. This research explores…

  17. The Westernization of Arab Pedagogies: Abu Dhabi Attempts to Move towards a Knowledge Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrystall, Steve

    2014-01-01

    As the oil reserves in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) are forecast to become depleted over the next 50 to 150 years, the emirate of Abu Dhabi has set a vision to develop a knowledge economy in order to develop alternative sources of revenue in areas such as tourism, alternative energy and innovative business enterprises. Reformation of its…

  18. High resolution sequence stratigraphic analysis of the Late Miocene Abu Madi Formation, Northern Nile Delta Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarhan, Mohammad Abdelfattah

    2015-12-01

    Abu Madi Formation represents the Upper Miocene Messinian age in the Nile Delta basin. It consists mainly of sandstones and shale intercalations and because of its richness in hydrocarbon, it has been subdivided by the petroleum companies into Level-I, Level-II and Level-III, respectively according to the increase in the sandstone to the shale ratio. The Miocene cycle in the northern subsurface section of the Nile Delta encompasses three main formations namely from the base; Sidi Salim formation, Qawasim Formation and Abu Madi Formation at the top. The high resolution sequence stratigraphic analysis, using gamma ray responses, has been done for the Late Miocene formation in the northern part of the Nile delta subsurface section. For this purpose, the gamma-ray logs of ten deep wells, arranged in four cross-sections trending in almost north-south direction throughout the northern region of the Nile Delta, were analyzed. The analysis has revealed that the interpreted 4th order depositional cycles within Abu Madi Formation display great variations in both number and gamma ray responses in each investigated well, and cannot be traced laterally, even in the nearest well. These variations in the interpreted 4th order depositional sequences could be attributed to the presence of normal faults buried in the inter-area laying between the investigated wells. This finding matches with the conclusion of that Abu Madi Formation represents a part of the Upper Miocene Nile Delta syn-rift megasequence, developed during the Upper Miocene rift phase of the Red Sea - Gulf of Suez province in Egypt. Accordingly, in the sequence stratigraphic approach, the depositional history of Abu Madi Formation was strongly overprinted by the tectonic controls rather than the relative sea-level changes which are assumed to be of a secondary influence. Regarding the hydrocarbon aspects of the Abu Madi Formation, the present work recommends to direct the drilling efforts into the stratigraphic traps

  19. Variation by Gender in Abu Dhabi High School Students' Interests in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badri, Masood; Mazroui, Karima Al; Al Rashedi, Asma; Yang, Guang

    2016-04-01

    Abu Dhabi high school students' interest in physics in different contexts was investigated with a survey conducted in connection with the international project, The Relevance of Science Education (ROSE). The sample consisted of 2248 students in public and private schools. Means of most items that belong to the school physics context for both girls and boys were below the score of (3.0). The most interesting topics for both genders were connected with fantasy items. The least interesting items (particularly for girls) were connected with artifacts and technological processes. Girls assigned the highest scores for "why we dream" and "life and death." Boys assigned the highest scores for "inventions and discoveries" and "life outside of earth." The main message of the study is that new curricular approaches and textbooks can be developed through combining technological and human contexts. The implications for curriculum development, teacher professional development programs, and other education strategies in Abu Dhabi are discussed in light of the ROSE survey.

  20. Transmission of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infections in Healthcare Settings, Abu Dhabi

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Duc; Aden, Bashir; Al Bandar, Zyad; Al Dhaheri, Wafa; Abu Elkheir, Kheir; Khudair, Ahmed; Al Mulla, Mariam; El Saleh, Feda; Imambaccus, Hala; Al Kaabi, Nawal; Sheikh, Farrukh Amin; Sasse, Jurgen; Turner, Andrew; Abdel Wareth, Laila; Weber, Stefan; Al Ameri, Asma; Abu Amer, Wesal; Alami, Negar N.; Bunga, Sudhir; Haynes, Lia M.; Hall, Aron J.; Kallen, Alexander J.; Kuhar, David; Pham, Huong; Pringle, Kimberly; Tong, Suxiang; Whitaker, Brett L.; Gerber, Susan I.; Al Hosani, Farida Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infections sharply increased in the Arabian Peninsula during spring 2014. In Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, these infections occurred primarily among healthcare workers and patients. To identify and describe epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of persons with healthcare-associated infection, we reviewed laboratory-confirmed MERS-CoV cases reported to the Health Authority of Abu Dhabi during January 1, 2013–May 9, 2014. Of 65 case-patients identified with MERS-CoV infection, 27 (42%) had healthcare-associated cases. Epidemiologic and genetic sequencing findings suggest that 3 healthcare clusters of MERS-CoV infection occurred, including 1 that resulted in 20 infected persons in 1 hospital. MERS-CoV in healthcare settings spread predominantly before MERS-CoV infection was diagnosed, underscoring the importance of increasing awareness and infection control measures at first points of entry to healthcare facilities. PMID:26981708

  1. Abu Dhabi Basemap Update Using the LiDAR Mobile Mapping Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshaiba, Omar; Amparo Núñez-Andrés, M.; Lantada, Nieves

    2016-04-01

    Mobile LiDAR system provides a new technology which can be used to update geospatial information by direct and rapid data collection. This technology is faster than the traditional survey ways and has lower cost. Abu Dhabi Municipal System aims to update its geospatial system frequently as the government entities have invested heavily in GIS technology and geospatial data to meet the repaid growth in the infrastructure and construction projects in recent years. The Emirate of Abu Dhabi has witnessed a huge growth in infrastructure and construction projects in recent years. Therefore, it is necessary to develop and update its basemap system frequently to meet their own organizational needs. Currently, the traditional ways are used to update basemap system such as human surveyors, GPS receivers and controller (GPS assigned computer). Then the surveyed data are downloaded, edited and reviewed manually before it is merged to the basemap system. Traditional surveying ways may not be applicable in some conditions such as; bad weather, difficult topographic area and boundary area. This paper presents a proposed methodology which uses the Mobile LiDAR system to update basemap in Abu Dhabi by using daily transactions services. It aims to use and integrate the mobile LiDAR technology into the municipality's daily workflow such that it becomes the new standard cost efficiency operating procedure for updating the base-map in Abu Dhabi Municipal System. On another note, the paper will demonstrate the results of the innovated workflow for the base-map update using the mobile LiDAR point cloud and few processing algorithms.

  2. "Where Is the Love?": The Ethics of Empathy in Abu Ghraib

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Elizabeth M.

    2007-01-01

    Abu Ghraib. The name conjures horrifying images of abuse, torture, and man's inhumanity to man. In one photograph, a pyramid of naked detainees huddles outside a jail cell; in another, a soldier holds the end of a dog leash which is attached at the neck to a prostrate prisoner; in another, a soldier gives the thumbs-up sign in front of a line of…

  3. Paleomagnetism of Abu Aggag and Sabaya Formations at Kalabsha, South Western Desert of Egypt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Reem; Khashaba, Ahmed; El-Hemaly, Ibrahim; Takla, Emad; Abdel Aal, Mohamed; Odah, Hatem

    2015-04-01

    Two profiles have been sampled from the Nubia Sandstone at Aswan, south Western Desert: The 1st profile has been taken from Abu Aggag Formation and the 2nd one was from Sabaya Formation (23.25 oN, 32.75 oE). 136 oriented cores (from 9 sites) have been sampled. Abu Aggag Formation is of Late Cretaceous (Turonian) and Sabaya Formation is of Early Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian). The studied rocks are subjected to rock magnetic measurements as well as demagnetization treatment. It has been found that hematite is the main magnetic mineral in both formations. Four profile sections (normal polarity) from Abu Aggag Formation, yielded a magnetic component with D = 352.7°, I = 36.6° with 95 = 5.2° and the corresponding pole lies at lat. = 82.8 °N and long. = 283.1 °E. Five profile sections (normal polarity) from Sabaya Formation, yielded a magnetic component with D = 348.6°, I = 33.3° with 95 = 5.8° and the corresponding pole lies at lat. = 78.3 °N and long. = 280.4 °E. The obtained paleopole for the two formations lies at lat. = 80.5 °N and long. = 281.7 °E. The obtaind components are considered primary and the corresponding paleopole reflects the age of Nubia Sandstone when compared with the previously obtained Cretaceous poles for Egypt.

  4. Chromium biogeochemical cycle in Abu Kir Bay, east of Alexandria, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboul Dahab, O.

    1989-10-01

    Abu Kir Bay, east of Alexandria, is affected by two main point sources of pollution, namely Tabia Pumping Station and Lake Edku Outlet. Chromium was measured in the Bay effluents, sea water, marine organisms of different trophic levels, and sediments. Chromium concentration and mass emission from TPS (242 μg l -1 and 436 kg d -1) to the Bay are very high compared to those of Lake Edku Outlet (33 μg l -1 and 116 kg d -1). Average Cr concentrations in the Bay coastal waters during the period of study, were 0·120 μg l -1, 0·775 μg l -1 and 1·185 μg l -1, respectively, for Cr(III), Cr(VI), and particulate pphase. The surface distribution of Cr in the coastal waters showed the impact of Tabia Pumping Station on the Bay. On the basis of sediment concentrations of Cr in Abu Kir Bay, two 'hot spots' of the element were identified. The area around Tabia Pumping Station outfall (> 300 μg g -1 dw) and another one in the immediate vincinity of Lake Outlet (> 200 μg g -1 dw). Chromium concentrations in Abu Kir Bay organisms increased in the following order: mixed plankton (68 μg kg -1) > Sardina pilchardus (80 μg kg -1) ⩾ Mugil capito (82 μg kg -1) > Mullus barbatus (111 μ kg -1) > Solea solea (123 μg kg -1) > Penaeus kerathurus (168 μg kg -1 > Donax trunculus (209 μ kg -1) > Neptunus pelagicus (369 μg kg -1) > Ulva species (1867 μg kg -1) > Enteromorpha species (3345 μg kg -1). The sequence is consistent for organisms from both west and east Abu Kir Bay, regardless of the significantly low Cr concentrations of the latter. The study showed that algae and crabs play a critical role in the biological transport of Cr and can be considered the best accumulators of the element. From the total amount of Cr flux to the Bay, 552 kg d -1, flushing of the Bay to the open sea removes 262 kg d -1, and sedimentation within the Bay is 242 kg d -1. Finally, an input/output box model for Cr in Abu Kir Bay was constructed to help in understanding its biogeochemical cycle.

  5. The impact of Merowe Dam on Simulium hamedense vector of onchocerciasis in Abu Hamed focus - Northern Sudan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abu Hamed, the northernmost onchocerciasis focus in the world, is located along the River Nile banks in the Nubian Desert. Hydroelectric dams can alter activity of black flies and may provide breeding sites for black fly. Merowe Dam, the largest hydropower project in Africa, was built west of Abu Hamed focus in 2009. The impact of the Dam on onchocerciasis and its black fly vectors in Abu Hamed focus was measured in this study. Findings Entomological surveys for aquatic stages and adult Simulium hamedense were conducted before and after the inception of Merowe Dam in 2007/2008 and 2010/2011. There was no black fly breeding or adult activity in the previously known breeding sites upstream of the Merowe Dam with the western most breeding site found in AlSarsaf village near the center of the focus. No adult or aquatic stages of black flies were found downstream of the Dam. Conclusions The artificial lake of the Dam flooded all the breeding sites in the western region of the focus and no aquatic stages and/or adult black fly activity were established in the study area upstream of the Dam. The Dam seems to have positive impact on onchocerciasis and its black fly vectors in Abu Hamed focus. These outcomes of the Merowe Dam might have contributed to the recently declared interruption of onchocerciasis transmission in Abu Hamed focus. Continuous entomological surveys are needed to monitor presence of black fly vectors and its impact on the disease. PMID:24708741

  6. Pan-African shear zone-hosted gold mineralization in the Arabian-Nubian shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Alam, Tamer; Grosch, Eugene; Abd El Monsef, Mohamed

    2013-04-01

    A new tectonic model of the exhumation mechanism of the Arabian-Nubian Shield will be presented at the EGU2013 by Abu-Alam and Stüwe (2013). According to this new tectonic model, the shear zones of the Arabian-Nubian Shield can be classified into two types; deep-seated and relatively shallow shear zones. The deep-seated shear zones are accompanied with deep sub-horizontal crustal channel flows which are response to the exhumation of the metamorphic complexes from the peak condition depth to a shallower crustal level (ductile-brittle transition). An example of these deep-seated shear zones is the Najd Fault System - the largest shear zone on the Earth. At the ductile-brittle transition crustal level, the deep-seated shear zones were overprinted by a greenschist facies condition or the ?2 and ?3 of the principle stresses may be flipped with each other. This flipping can produce other conjugate shallow shear zones in a greenschist facies conditions. The Egyptian gold deposits can be classified into three main types (Botros, 2004), These are stratabound deposits, non-stratabound deposits and placer gold deposits. The non-stratabound deposits are the most common (ex: Sukari, Wadi Allaqi, Abu Marawat, Atalla, El-Sid and Atud gold mines). They are found in form of vein type mineralization or as disseminated mineralization hosted in volcanics and volcaniclastic rocks (volcanogenic massive sulphides). Spatial and temporal relationships between gold veins and structures in the Arabian-Nubian Shield suggest a genetic relationship between mineralization and major tectonic events. At Sukari, Wadi Allaqi and Abu Marawat areas, the gold is hosted in quartz veins parallel to a deep-seated NW-SE to NNW-SSE shear zones. For Atud, El-Sid and Atalla area, the gold is hosted in NE-SW veins parallel to a shallow shear zone but at the conjugate point with a deep-seated NW-SE shear zone. According to the new tectonic model, we propose the following model for gold formation (non

  7. 78 FR 29200 - In the Matter of the Designation of Abu Muhammad al-Jawlani Also Known as al-Fatih Also Known as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE In the Matter of the Designation of Abu Muhammad al-Jawlani Also Known as al-Fatih Also Known as Abu Muhammad al-Golani as a Specially Designated Global Terrorist Pursuant to Section 1(b) of Executive Order 13224,...

  8. Epidemiology and referral patterns of patients with chronic kidney disease in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi.

    PubMed

    Richards, Nick; Hassan, Mohamed; Saleh, Abdul Karim; Dastoor, Hormazdiar; Bernieh, Bassam; Abouchacra, Samra; Al Jabri, Omar; Fleischmann, Alan; Richards, Marie; Marcelli, Daniele

    2015-09-01

    According to estimates, the dialysis prevalence in Abu Dhabi is around 370 per million population. The annual growth is 12-15% and the dialysis population is likely to double in the next five years. Most patients present to dialysis as an emergency and only 2.7% have an arteriovenous fistula at the first dialysis. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the Emirate is undefined. A study of the epidemiology of CKD and referral patterns was undertaken. SEHA, the Abu Dhabi Health Service delivery company, has a unified computer system containing all measurements made in its laboratories. This study considered all serum creatinine measurements performed between 1 September 2011 and 31 October 2012 from outpatient departments or emergency rooms. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGRF) was calculated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula (the Schwartz formula was used for children). We identified 331,360 samples from 212,314 individuals. The mean serum creatinine was 61 ± 48 μmol/L in females (59 ± 43 μmol/L in Emiratis, 63 ± 54 μmol/L in expatriates) and 87 ± 69 μmol/L in males (80 ± 59 μmol/L in Emiratis, 92 ± 74 μmol/L in expatriates). Among Emiratis, 4.6% of males and 2.8% of females had an eGFR between CKD 3 and 5. Among expatriates, 4.2% of males and 3.2% of females had an eGFR between CKD 3 and 5. On average, eight months elapsed before a patient with CKD 3, and three months for a patient in CKD 5, to attend the nephrology clinic. This study has defined the prevalence of CKD within Abu Dhabi and demonstrated the need to improve identification and referral of CKD patients. Possible solutions include campaigns to increase public and physician awareness of CKD. PMID:26354587

  9. Detailed Study of Seismic Wave Attenuation in Carbonate Rocks: Application on Abu Dhabi Oil Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchaala, F.; Ali, M. Y.; Matsushima, J.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wave attenuation is a promising attribute for the petroleum exploration, thanks to its high sensitivity to physical properties of subsurface. It can be used to enhance the seismic imaging and improve the geophysical interpretation which is crucial for reservoir characterization. However getting an accurate attenuation profile is not an easy task, this is due to complex mechanism of this parameter, although that many studies were carried out to understand it. The degree of difficulty increases for the media composed of carbonate rocks, known to be highly heterogeneous and with complex lithology. That is why few attenuation studies were done successfully in carbonate rocks. The main objectives of this study are, Getting an accurate and high resolution attenuation profiles from several oil fields. The resolution is very important target for us, because many reservoirs in Abu Dhabi oil fields are tight.Separation between different modes of wave attenuation (scattering and intrinsic attenuations).Correlation between the attenuation profiles and other logs (Porosity, resistivity, oil saturation…), in order to establish a relationship which can be used to detect the reservoir properties from the attenuation profiles.Comparison of attenuation estimated from VSP and sonic waveforms. Provide spatial distribution of attenuation in Abu Dhabi oil fields.To reach these objectives we implemented a robust processing flow and new methodology to estimate the attenuation from the downgoing waves of the compressional VSP data and waveforms acquired from several wells drilled in Abu Dhabi. The subsurface geology of this area is primarily composed of carbonate rocks and it is known to be highly fractured which complicates more the situation, then we separated successfully the intrinsic attenuation from the scattering. The results show that the scattering is significant and cannot be ignored. We found also a very interesting correlation between the attenuation profiles and the

  10. Electromagnetic mapping of buried paleochannels in eastern Abu Dhabi Emirate, U.A.E.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitterman, D.V.; Menges, C.M.; Al Kamali, A.M.; Essa, Jama F.

    1991-01-01

    Transient electromagnetic soundings and terrain conductivity meter measurements were used to map paleochannel geometry in the Al Jaww Plain of eastern Abu Dhabi Emirate, U.A.E. as part of an integrated hydrogeologic study of the Quaternary alluvial aquifer system. Initial interpretation of the data without benefit of well log information was able to map the depth to a conductive clay layer of Tertiary age that forms the base of the aquifer. Comparison of the results with induction logs reveals that a resistive zone exists that was incorporated into the interpretation and its lateral extent mapped with the transient electromagnetic sounding data. ?? 1991.

  11. Habitat of oil in Abu Gharadig and Faiyum basins, Western Desert, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Awad, G.M.

    1984-05-01

    The Abu Gharadig and Faiyum basins are areas which have some of the greatest hydrocarbon potential in the Western Desert of Egypt. Several extensive cycles of marine transgression and regression occurred in these territories through geologic time. The depositional cycles combined with at least 3 tectonic cycles--the Hercynian orogeny at the end of the Paleozoic, from Late Jurassic to early Tertiary, and from Late Cretaceous to middle Tertiary--resulted in a highly deformed, thick sedimentary sequence. This organic-rich Jurassic-Upper Cretaceous-lower Tertiary sequence in large areas of these basins was subjected to enough heat and depth to generate hydrocarbons. It is evident from recent discoveries that these source rocks generated large amounts of highquality oil and gas. Exploration efforts should be concentrated on deep structures close to the main depocenters and inside or very close to the 150/sup 0/F geothermal contour. Contemporaneous structures on the northern rims of the basins should have high potential, resulting from migration of hydrocarbons from the south across major faults. The Jurassic in the northeastern part of the Abu Gharadig basin may provide good hydrocarbon potential. The lower Tertiary sequence present in the troughs also may have large amounts of oil entrapped in situ or resulting in shortdistance migration to the northern structures or to the Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary Syrian arc traps.

  12. Habitat of oil in Abu Gharadig and Faiyum basins, Western Desert, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Awad, G.M.

    1984-05-01

    The Abu Gharadig and Faiyum basins are areas which have some of the greatest hydrocarbon potential in the Western Desert of Egypt. Several extensive cycles of marine transgression and regression occurred in these territories through geologic time. The depositional cycles combined with at least 3 tectonic cycles - (1) the Hercynian orogeny at the end of the Paleozoic, (2) from Late Jurassic to early Tertiary, and (3) from Late Cretaceous to middle Tertiary - resulted in a highly deformed, thick sedimentary sequence. This organic-rich Jurassic-Upper Cretaceous-lower Tertiary sequence in large areas of these basins was subjected to enough heat and depth to generate hydrocarbons. The Abu Gharadig and Faiyum basins are separated structurally by a major ridge. Both basins are bounded on the north by another major ridge associated with Cretaceous and Tertiary faulting. A major platform with tin sedimentary cover forms the southern boundary. The hydrocarbon potential exists in cyclic sequences of sandstone, shale, and carbonate, having moderate porosities and permeabilities. An important hydrologic phenomenon prevails in major parts of the basins; fresh water has flushed the early Cenomanian and older reservoirs. Exploration efforts should be concentrated on deep structures close to the main depocenters and inside or very close to the main depocenter and inside or very close to the 150/sup 0/F (65/sup 0/C) geothermal contour.

  13. The operation, products and promotion of waterpipe businesses in New York City, Abu Dhabi and Dubai.

    PubMed

    Joudrey, P J; Jasie, K A; Pykalo, L; Singer, S T; Woodin, M B; Sherman, S

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the customers, operations, products and advertising of these businesses to explore the unique policy challenges created by the suppliers of waterpipes. We completed a cross-sectional survey consisting of structured site observations and in-person interviews of businesses in New York City, Abu Dhabi and Dubai identified using Google, Yelp, Timeout Dubai and Timeout Abu Dhabi and neighbourhood visits in 2014. Regular customers made up 59% of customers. Franchises or chains were 28% of businesses. Waterpipes made up 39% of sales with 87% of businesses offering food within their menu. Flavoured tobacco made up 94% of sales. Discounts were offered by 47% of businesses and 94% of businesses used advertising, often through social media. The market consists of largely independent businesses, with a large regular customer base, frequently offering diversified services beyond waterpipes. These businesses advertise using both traditional and social media. The economics of waterpipe businesses is very different from the economics of cigarettes, and unique regulatory strategies are needed to control this epidemic. PMID:27432405

  14. Descriptive epidemiology of injury cases: findings from a pilot injury surveillance system in Abu Dhabi.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Hafizur; Allen, Katharine A; Hyder, Adnan A

    2016-06-01

    Considering the high burden of injuries, the Health Authority - Abu Dhabi developed a draft electronic and paper-based injury and poisoning notification system (IPNS) to generate better data on the nature and severity of injuries. The pilot testing and evaluation of IPNS was conducted with the specific objectives to (1) identify the characteristics of injury cases, (2) explore potential risk factors, (3) illustrate the nature and type of data, and (4) the working mechanism of data collection. Data were collected from selected hospitals on patient demographics, injury information and clinical assessment. Descriptive, bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. Of 4226 injury cases, nearly three-fourths were male, majority were non-UAE nationals, and the mean age was 21.9. Multivariate findings suggested that compared to UAE nationals, non-UAE nationals were 27% more likely to experience fatal, severe or moderate injuries (p = 0.01). Individuals with health insurance were 31% less likely to suffer a fatal, severe or moderate injury compared to those having no health insurance (p < 0.001). This is the first systematically standardised collection of injury data across three facilities in Abu Dhabi, and provides initial information on characteristics and injury risk factors that will help identify the need for evidence-based intervention for injury prevention and control. PMID:25262785

  15. Gis-Based Wind Farm Site Selection Model Offshore Abu Dhabi Emirate, Uae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleous, N.; Issa, S.; Mazrouei, J. Al

    2016-06-01

    The United Arab Emirates (UAE) government has declared the increased use of alternative energy a strategic goal and has invested in identifying and developing various sources of such energy. This study aimed at assessing the viability of establishing wind farms offshore the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, UAE and to identify favourable sites for such farms using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) procedures and algorithms. Based on previous studies and on local requirements, a set of suitability criteria was developed including ocean currents, reserved areas, seabed topography, and wind speed. GIS layers were created and a weighted overlay GIS model based on the above mentioned criteria was built to identify suitable sites for hosting a new offshore wind energy farm. Results showed that most of Abu Dhabi offshore areas were unsuitable, largely due to the presence of restricted zones (marine protected areas, oil extraction platforms and oil pipelines in particular). However, some suitable sites could be identified, especially around Delma Island and North of Jabal Barakah in the Western Region. The environmental impact of potential wind farm locations and associated cables on the marine ecology was examined to ensure minimal disturbance to marine life. Further research is needed to specify wind mills characteristics that suit the study area especially with the presence of heavy traffic due to many oil production and shipping activities in the Arabian Gulf most of the year.

  16. Object-based change detection: dimension of damage in residential areas of Abu Suruj, Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demharter, Timo; Michel, Ulrich; Ehlers, Manfred; Reinartz, Peter

    2011-11-01

    Given the importance of Change Detection, especially in the field of crisis management, this paper discusses the advantage of object-based Change Detection. This project and the used methods give an opportunity to coordinate relief actions strategically. The principal objective of this project was to develop an algorithm which allows to detect rapidly damaged and destroyed buildings in the area of Abu Suruj. This Sudanese village is located in West-Darfur and has become the victim of civil war. The software eCognition Developer was used to per-form an object-based Change Detection on two panchromatic Quickbird 2 images from two different time slots. The first image shows the area before, the second image shows the area after the massacres in this region. Seeking a classification for the huts of the Sudanese town Abu Suruj was reached by first segmenting the huts and then classifying them on the basis of geo-metrical and brightness-related values. The huts were classified as "new", "destroyed" and "preserved" with the help of a automated algorithm. Finally the results were presented in the form of a map which displays the different conditions of the huts. The accuracy of the project is validated by an accuracy assessment resulting in an Overall Classification Accuracy of 90.50 percent. These change detection results allow aid organizations to provide quick and efficient help where it is needed the most.

  17. Paving the road for hydraulic fracturing in Paleozoic tight gas reservoirs in Abu Dhabi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzarouni, Asim

    This study contributes to the ongoing efforts of Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC) to improve gas production and supply in view of increasing demand and diminishing conventional gas reservoirs in the region. The conditions of most gas reservoirs with potentially economical volumes of gas in Abu Dhabi are tight abrasive deep sand reservoirs at high temperature and pressures. Thus it inevitably tests the limit of both conventional thinking and technology. Accurate prediction of well performance is a major challenge that arises during planning phase. The primary aim is to determine technical feasibility for the implementation of the hydraulic fracture technology in a new area. The ultimate goal is to make economical production curves possible and pave the road to tap new resource of clean hydrocarbon energy source. The formation targeted in this study is characterized by quartzitic sandstone layers and variably colored shale and siltstones with thin layers of anhydrites. It dates back from late Permian to Carboniferous age. It forms rocks at the lower reservoir permeability ranging from 0.2 to less than 1 millidarcy (mD). When fractured, the expected well flow in Abu Dhabi offshore deep gas wells will be close to similar tight gas reservoir in the region. In other words, gas production can be described as transient initially with high rates and rapidly declining towards a pseudo-steady sustainable flow. The study results estimated fracturing gradient range from 0.85 psi/ft to 0.91 psi/ft. In other words, the technology can be implemented successfully to the expected rating without highly weighted brine. Hence, it would be a remarkable step to conduct the first hydraulic fracturing successfully in Abu Dhabi which can pave the road to tapping on a clean energy resource. The models predicted a remarkable conductivity enhancement and an increase of production between 3 to 4 times after fracturing. Moreover, a sustainable rate above 25 MMSCFD between 6 to 10 years is

  18. Tensions in Policy and Practice: Influences on Play in Abu Dhabi's New School Model KG Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Fiona S.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on three salient socio-cultural and systemic factors that are influential in play in Abu Dhabi Education Council's (ADEC's) kindergarten (KG) framework from the teacher perspective. Anecdotal evidence suggests that during ADEC's progressive educational reform, emphasis has reverted to academic performance…

  19. 75 FR 66360 - Transportation and Energy Products and Services Trade Mission; Doha, Qatar, and Abu Dhabi and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-28

    ..., and Abu Dhabi and Dubai, U.A.E. I. Mission Description The United States Department of Commerce's... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... key decision makers in the U.A.E. and Qatar, and form partnerships which will allow their companies...

  20. 78 FR 62002 - In the Matter of the Designation of Muhammad Jamal, Also Known as Abu Ahmed, Also Known as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE In the Matter of the Designation of Muhammad Jamal, Also Known as Abu Ahmed, Also Known as Muhammad Jamal al-Kashef, as a Specially Designated Global Terrorist Pursuant to Section 1(b) of Executive Order 13224,...

  1. Critical Success Factors in the Curriculum Alignment Process: The Case of the College of Business at Abu Dhabi University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camba, Pitzel; Krotov, Vlad

    2015-01-01

    The main goals of this article are to (a) assist business schools in understanding the curriculum alignment process, and (b) uncover critical success factors in curriculum alignment. Based on a case study conducted at the College of Business at Abu Dhabi University, a detailed curriculum alignment process description is provided. The process…

  2. Economic risk and efficiency assessment of fisheries in Abu-Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE): A stochastic approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fishing industry in Abu-Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE) plays an important role in diversifying food sources in order to enhance national food security. The fishing industry is facing increasing risk that may impact the sustainability (i.e., quantity and quality) of the fish caught and consume...

  3. Challenges Presented to Personal Theories, Beliefs and Practices of Play in Abu Dhabi Kindergartens: The English Medium Teacher Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Fiona S.

    2015-01-01

    Abu Dhabi Education Council's new school model recognizes the value of play, although anecdotal evidence suggests that there are challenges to play in the preschool context. This article reports on challenges from the English Medium teacher perspective. Findings show that challenges are related to: (a) children meeting teacher expectations…

  4. Sequence stratigraphic controls on reservoir characterization and architecture: case study of the Messinian Abu Madi incised-valley fill, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Fattah, Mohamed I.; Slatt, Roger M.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding sequence stratigraphy architecture in the incised-valley is a crucial step to understanding the effect of relative sea level changes on reservoir characterization and architecture. This paper presents a sequence stratigraphic framework of the incised-valley strata within the late Messinian Abu Madi Formation based on seismic and borehole data. Analysis of sand-body distribution reveals that fluvial channel sandstones in the Abu Madi Formation in the Baltim Fields, offshore Nile Delta, Egypt, are not randomly distributed but are predictable in their spatial and stratigraphic position. Elucidation of the distribution of sandstones in the Abu Madi incised-valley fill within a sequence stratigraphic framework allows a better understanding of their characterization and architecture during burial. Strata of the Abu Madi Formation are interpreted to comprise two sequences, which are the most complex stratigraphically; their deposits comprise a complex incised valley fill. The lower sequence (SQ1) consists of a thick incised valley-fill of a Lowstand Systems Tract (LST1)) overlain by a Transgressive Systems Tract (TST1) and Highstand Systems Tract (HST1). The upper sequence (SQ2) contains channel-fill and is interpreted as a LST2 which has a thin sandstone channel deposits. Above this, channel-fill sandstone and related strata with tidal influence delineates the base of TST2, which is overlain by a HST2. Gas reservoirs of the Abu Madi Formation (present-day depth ˜3552 m), the Baltim Fields, Egypt, consist of fluvial lowstand systems tract (LST) sandstones deposited in an incised valley. LST sandstones have a wide range of porosity (15 to 28%) and permeability (1 to 5080mD), which reflect both depositional facies and diagenetic controls. This work demonstrates the value of constraining and evaluating the impact of sequence stratigraphic distribution on reservoir characterization and architecture in incised-valley deposits, and thus has an important impact on

  5. Oil Spill Detection and Monitoring of Abu Dhabi Coastal Zone Using KOMPSAT-5 SAR Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harahsheh, H. A.

    2016-06-01

    Abu Dhabi Government endorsed vision for its Maritime Strategy `A safe, secure and sustainable maritime domain for Abu Dhabi'. This research study share this vision using the concept of monitoring as tool for marine protection against any possible oil pollution. The best technology to detect and monitor oil pollution and in particularly oil spill is SAR imagery In this case study we chose KOMPSAT-5 SAR. KOMPSAT-5 carries X-band SAR for earth observation, and is capable of day-and-night imaging under all weather condition. It provides three operation modes: High Resolution Mode to provide 1 m resolution, Standard Mode to provide 3 m resolution and Wide Swath Mode to provide 20 m resolution with 100 km swath at 550 km altitude, with four modes of polarization. KOMPSAT-5 provides products for various applications; security and defense, mapping, and natural resource management, environmental monitoring, disaster monitoring and more. For our case study we chose to work with Wide Swath mode (WS) with Vertical polarization (VV) to cover a wide area of interest located to the north west of Abu Dhabi including some important islands like "Zirku Island", and areas with oil production activities. The results of data acquired on 4th May 2015 show some spot of oil spill with length estimated about 3 KM, and the daily satellite data acquisition over the period July 24 through July 31 shows serious and many oil spill events some are small, but many others are considered to be big with area size around 20 km2. In the context of oil spill pollution in the seas, we have to consider the development and increase of overseas transportation, which is an important factor for both social and economic sectors. The harmful effects of marine pollution are numerous, from the damage of marine life to the damage of the aquatic ecosystem as whole. As such, the need for oil slick detection is crucial, for the location of polluted areas and to evaluate slick drift to protect the coastline

  6. Reduced shear power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; Shapiro, Charles; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /UC, Berkeley

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  7. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  8. Antibiotic susceptibility profile of Aeromonas spp. isolates from food in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Awan, Mohammad Bashir; Maqbool, Ahmed; Bari, Abdul; Krovacek, Karel

    2009-01-01

    A total of 57 Aeromonas isolates from food samples such as fresh and frozen chicken, game birds, pasteurized milk, baby food, bakery products, fruit and vegetables, fish, and water from Abu Dahbi, UAE were investigated for antibiotic susceptibility profile. Most strains were resistant to penicillins (ticarcillin, mezlocillin, oxacillin, piperacillin), sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and macrolides (erythromycin, vancomycin, clindamycin) but sensitive to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, nitrofurantoin, aminoglycosides (amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin), cephalosporins (cefuroxime, ceftrioxone, cefazolin, cephalexin, cephalothin, cefoxitin, cefotaxime), quinolone (ciprofloxacin), colistin sulphate and SXT (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). On the other hand, many antibiotics showed excellent inhibitory activity (>75% strains were sensitive to them) against all the strains tested. These include cefuroxime, ceftrioxone, ciprofloxacin, colistin, amikacin, gentamicin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, nitrofurantoin, cefotaxime and tobramycin. In conclusion, the results show a detailed pattern of sensitivity of the various Aeromonas spp. isolates to a variety of antibiotics and provide useful information in the context of selective isolation and phenotypic identification of the aeromonads from food. PMID:19382665

  9. Oligocene lacustrine tuff facies, Abu Treifeya, Cairo-Suez Road, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Motelib, Ali; Kabesh, Mona; El Manawi, Abdel Hamid; Said, Amir

    2015-02-01

    Field investigations in the Abu Treifeya area, Cairo-Suez District, revealed the presence of Oligocene lacustrine volcaniclastic deposits of lacustrine sequences associated with an Oligocene rift regime. The present study represents a new record of lacustrine zeolite deposits associated with saponite clay minerals contained within reworked clastic vitric tuffs. The different lithofacies associations of these clastic sequences are identified and described: volcaniclastic sedimentary facies represent episodic volcaniclastic reworking, redistribution and redeposition in a lacustrine environment and these deposits are subdivided into proximal and medial facies. Zeolite and smectite minerals are mainly found as authigenic crystals formed in vugs or crusts due to the reaction of volcanic glasses with saline-alkaline water or as alteration products of feldspars. The presence of abundant smectite (saponite) may be attributed to a warm climate, with alternating humid and dry conditions characterised by the existence of kaolinite. Reddish iron-rich paleosols record periods of non-deposition intercalated with the volcaniclastic tuff sequence.

  10. 78 FR 6172 - In the Matter of the Designation of Ahmed Abdullah Saleh al-Khazmari al-Zahrani Also Known as Abu...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ...-Saudi Also Known as Ahmed Abdullah S al-Zahrani Also Known as Ahmad Abdullah Salih Al- Zahrani Also... Abdullah Saleh al-Khazmari, also known as Abu Maryam al-Saudi; also known as Ahmed Abdullah S...

  11. Visibility Modeling and Forecasting for Abu Dhabi using Time Series Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibedingil, I. G.; Abula, B.; Afshari, A.; Temimi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Land-Atmosphere interactions-their strength, directionality and evolution-are one of the main sources of uncertainty in contemporary climate modeling. A particularly crucial role in sustaining and modulating land-atmosphere interaction is the one of aerosols and dusts. Aerosols are tiny particles suspended in the air ranging from a few nanometers to a few hundred micrometers in diameter. Furthermore, the amount of dust and fog in the atmosphere is an important measure of visibility, which is another dimension of land-atmosphere interactions. Visibility affects all form of traffic, aviation, land and sailing. Being able to predict the change of visibility in the air in advance enables relevant authorities to take necessary actions before the disaster falls. Time Series Analysis (TAS) method is an emerging technique for modeling and forecasting the behavior of land-atmosphere interactions, including visibility. This research assess the dynamics and evolution of visibility around Abu Dhabi International Airport (+24.4320 latitude, +54.6510 longitude, and 27m elevation) using mean daily visibility and mean daily wind speed. TAS has been first used to model and forecast the visibility, and then the Transfer Function Model has been applied, considering the wind speed as an exogenous variable. By considering the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE) as a statistical criteria, two forecasting models namely univarite time series model and transfer function model, were developed to forecast the visibility around Abu Dhabi International Airport for three weeks. Transfer function model improved the MAPE of the forecast significantly.

  12. Electric fabric of Cretaceous clastic rocks in Abu Gharadig basin, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabawy, Bassem S.; ElHariri, Tarek Y. M.

    2008-09-01

    Measuring the petrophysical properties of sedimentary rocks in three-dimensions (3-D) has a high priority for interpretation of their physical behaviour. The present work attempts to study the 3-D electric behaviour of the Upper Cretaceous sandstones and clayey sandstones in the Abu Gharadig basin, Egypt. These rocks belong to the Betty, Bahariya, and Abu Roash Formations. The apparent electrical resistivity ( Ro) was measured in three perpendicular directions, one normal to the bedding plane along Z-axis, and the other two directions parallel to the bedding plane and normal to each other, along X-axis and Y-axis. The electrical resistivity ( Ro) was also studied at three NaCl-saline concentrations of Rw = 0.53, 0.13, and 0.07 Ω m in ambient conditions, using A-C bridge at 1 kHz. It is proposed that, processing and matching the electric data in 3-D as ellipsoids instead of in 2-D, has led to the electric fabric concept. It is a combination of electric foliation ( F) and electric lineation ( L). Statistical analyses of measured electrical resistivity reveal that the electric fabric at the second brine concentration should be taken into consideration to avoid the effect of clay content. The electric lineation and foliation of the studied sandstones and clayey sandstones at the second concentration are mostly small (1.1-1.5) to moderate (1.5-2.5), with few sandstone samples having high (2.5-5.0) to very high foliation (5.0-7.5), whereas the electric anisotropy values for these samples are small to moderate (1.1-2.5). This fabric is contributed mainly from their electric foliation, indicating some load pressure compaction that led to small to moderate anisotropic grains and flow paths/network pore spaces.

  13. Origin and characteristics of brackish groundwater in Abu Madi coastal area, Northern Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Zenhom E.; Al Temamy, A. M.; Salah, Mohamed K.; Kassab, M.

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogeochemical and geoelectrical resistivity investigations were carried out to assess the origin and characteristics of a brackish groundwater in Abu Madi coastal area. Twenty six surface water, shallow and deep groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for various ionic concentrations as well as oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopic contents. In addition, a total of 20 vertical electrical sounding sites were conducted to investigate layers' thicknesses, resistivities, and to detect the water-bearing layers. Then, 2-D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) along two profiles in the study area was conducted to get information about the surface water effect on recharge. The stable isotopic composition and the chloride concentrations strongly suggest that the deep groundwater in Abu Madi area is dominated by inland freshwater with a minor seawater component. This groundwater was recharged during the first and the third Holocene humid climatic cycles where the sea surface was about 125 and 25 m below the current sea level, respectively. The brackish nature and higher piezometric surface of the groundwater, as well as the occurrence of vertical low-salinity seawater zone in front of the study area, support the possibility of submarine groundwater discharge. The geoelectrical resistivity surveying, on the other hand, revealed a number of geoelectrical groundwater-bearing layers. The main water-bearing layer in the study area is represented by the sixth geoelectrical layer, which has relatively high resistivity and a considerable thickness being consistent with the hydrogeochemical observations. ERT results point to the presence of shallow water-bearing layers recharged from the surface water drains with low resistivity and surface rain water of moderate resistivity. Results from the hydrogeochemical analyses and the different hydrogeological data are consistent with the high resistivity values of this geoelectrical layer. However, the overall high specific

  14. Hydrogeochemical analysis and evaluation of groundwater in the reclaimed small basin of Abu Mina, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Zenhom E.; Atwia, Mohamed G.; El-Horiny, Mohamed M.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural reclamation activities during the last few decades in the Western Nile Delta have led to great changes in the groundwater levels and quality. In Egypt, changing the desert land into agricultural land has been done using transferred Nile water (through irrigation canal systems) or/and groundwater. This research investigates the hydrogeochemical changes accompanying the reclamation processes in the small basin of Abu Mina, which is part of the Western Nile Delta region. In summer 2008, 23 groundwater samples were collected and groundwater levels were measured in 40 observation wells. Comparing the groundwater data of the pre-reclamation (1974) and the post-reclamation (2008) periods, groundwater seems to have been subjected to many changes: rise in water level, modification of the flow system, improvement of water quality, and addition of new salts through dissolution processes. Generally, Abu Mina basin is subdivided into two areas, recharge and discharge. The dissolution and mixing were recognized in the recharge areas, while the groundwater of the discharge region carries the signature of the diluted pre-reclamation groundwater. The salts of soil and aquifer deposits play an important role in the salt content of the post and pre-reclamation groundwater. NaCl was the predominant water type in the pre-reclamation groundwater, while CaSO4, NaCl and MgSO4 are the common chemical facies in the post-reclamation groundwater. The post-reclamation groundwater mostly indicates mixing between the pre-reclamation groundwater and the infiltrated freshwater with addition of some ions due to interaction with soil and sediments.

  15. AbuO, a TolC-Like Outer Membrane Protein of Acinetobacter baumannii, Is Involved in Antimicrobial and Oxidative Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Vijaya Bharathi; Vaidyanathan, Vasanth

    2014-01-01

    Although Acinetobacter baumannii is well accepted as a nosocomial pathogen, only a few of the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) have been functionally characterized. In this study, we demonstrate the biological functions of AbuO, a homolog of TolC from Escherichia coli. Inactivation of abuO led to increased sensitivity to high osmolarity and oxidative stress challenge. The ΔabuO mutant displayed increased susceptibility to antibiotics, such as amikacin, carbenicillin, ceftriaxone, meropenem, streptomycin, and tigecycline, and hospital-based disinfectants, such as benzalkonium chloride and chlorhexidine. The reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis indicated increased expression of efflux pumps (resistance nodulation cell division [RND] efflux pump acrD, 8-fold; SMR-type emrE homolog, 12-fold; and major facilitator superfamily [MFS]-type ampG homolog, 2.7-fold) and two-component response regulators (baeR, 4.67-fold; ompR, 10.43-fold) in the ΔabuO mutant together with downregulation of rstA (4.22-fold) and the pilin chaperone (9-fold). The isogenic mutant displayed lower virulence in a nematode model (P < 0.01). Experimental evidence for the binding of MerR-type transcriptional regulator SoxR to radiolabeled abuO promoter suggests regulation of abuO by SoxR in A. baumannii. PMID:25512405

  16. AbuO, a TolC-like outer membrane protein of Acinetobacter baumannii, is involved in antimicrobial and oxidative stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Vijaya Bharathi; Vaidyanathan, Vasanth; Rajamohan, Govindan

    2015-02-01

    Although Acinetobacter baumannii is well accepted as a nosocomial pathogen, only a few of the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) have been functionally characterized. In this study, we demonstrate the biological functions of AbuO, a homolog of TolC from Escherichia coli. Inactivation of abuO led to increased sensitivity to high osmolarity and oxidative stress challenge. The ΔabuO mutant displayed increased susceptibility to antibiotics, such as amikacin, carbenicillin, ceftriaxone, meropenem, streptomycin, and tigecycline, and hospital-based disinfectants, such as benzalkonium chloride and chlorhexidine. The reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis indicated increased expression of efflux pumps (resistance nodulation cell division [RND] efflux pump acrD, 8-fold; SMR-type emrE homolog, 12-fold; and major facilitator superfamily [MFS]-type ampG homolog, 2.7-fold) and two-component response regulators (baeR, 4.67-fold; ompR, 10.43-fold) in the ΔabuO mutant together with downregulation of rstA (4.22-fold) and the pilin chaperone (9-fold). The isogenic mutant displayed lower virulence in a nematode model (P<0.01). Experimental evidence for the binding of MerR-type transcriptional regulator SoxR to radiolabeled abuO promoter suggests regulation of abuO by SoxR in A. baumannii. PMID:25512405

  17. Response to Emergence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Al Hosani, Farida Ismail; Al Mulla, Mariam; Kim, Lindsay; Pham, Huong; Alami, Negar N.; Khudhair, Ahmed; Hall, Aron J.; Aden, Bashir; El Saleh, Feda; Al Dhaheri, Wafa; Al Bandar, Zyad; Bunga, Sudhir; Abou Elkheir, Kheir; Tao, Ying; Hunter, Jennifer C.; Nguyen, Duc; Turner, Andrew; Pradeep, Krishna; Sasse, Jurgen; Weber, Stefan; Tong, Suxiang; Whitaker, Brett L.; Haynes, Lia M.; Curns, Aaron; Gerber, Susan I.

    2016-01-01

    In January 2013, several months after Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was first identified in Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, began surveillance for MERS-CoV. We analyzed medical chart and laboratory data collected by the Health Authority–Abu Dhabi during January 2013–May 2014. Using real-time reverse transcription PCR, we tested respiratory tract samples for MERS-CoV and identified 65 case-patients. Of these patients, 23 (35%) were asymptomatic at the time of testing, and 4 (6%) showed positive test results for >3 weeks (1 had severe symptoms and 3 had mild symptoms). We also identified 6 clusters of MERS-CoV cases. This report highlights the potential for virus shedding by mildly ill and asymptomatic case-patients. These findings will be useful for MERS-CoV management and infection prevention strategies. PMID:27314227

  18. Response to Emergence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Al Hosani, Farida Ismail; Pringle, Kimberly; Al Mulla, Mariam; Kim, Lindsay; Pham, Huong; Alami, Negar N; Khudhair, Ahmed; Hall, Aron J; Aden, Bashir; El Saleh, Feda; Al Dhaheri, Wafa; Al Bandar, Zyad; Bunga, Sudhir; Abou Elkheir, Kheir; Tao, Ying; Hunter, Jennifer C; Nguyen, Duc; Turner, Andrew; Pradeep, Krishna; Sasse, Jurgen; Weber, Stefan; Tong, Suxiang; Whitaker, Brett L; Haynes, Lia M; Curns, Aaron; Gerber, Susan I

    2016-07-01

    In January 2013, several months after Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was first identified in Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, began surveillance for MERS-CoV. We analyzed medical chart and laboratory data collected by the Health Authority-Abu Dhabi during January 2013-May 2014. Using real-time reverse transcription PCR, we tested respiratory tract samples for MERS-CoV and identified 65 case-patients. Of these patients, 23 (35%) were asymptomatic at the time of testing, and 4 (6%) showed positive test results for >3 weeks (1 had severe symptoms and 3 had mild symptoms). We also identified 6 clusters of MERS-CoV cases. This report highlights the potential for virus shedding by mildly ill and asymptomatic case-patients. These findings will be useful for MERS-CoV management and infection prevention strategies. PMID:27314227

  19. Optical/NIR Observations of HBL 1ES 1959+625 from Mt Abu IR Observatory(MIRO), India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baliyan, K. S.; Chandra, Sunil; Kaur, Navpreet; Ganesh, S.; Sameer; Srivastava, M.; Bisht, V.; Jatin; Kumar, Rathna

    2016-05-01

    We report the optical/NIR follow up observations of HBL 1ES 1959+650 (3FGL J2000.0+6509) at redshift (z) = 0.047 (Schachter et al. 1993, ApJ, 412, 541), using 1.2 m telescope at Mount Abu InrfaRed Observatory (MIRO), India after the alert from FACT collaboration (private communication) about TeV activity in this source.

  20. A Review of the Water and Energy Sectors and the Use of a Nexus Approach in Abu Dhabi.

    PubMed

    Paul, Parneet; Al Tenaiji, Ameena Kulaib; Braimah, Nuhu

    2016-04-01

    Rapid population increase coupled with urbanization and industrialization has resulted in shortages of water in the Middle East. This situation is further exacerbated by global climate change due to greenhouse gas emissions. Recent research advocates that solutions to the global water security and scarcity crisis must involve water-energy nexus approaches. This means adopting policies and strategies that harmonize these inter-related sectors to minimize environmental impact while maximizing human benefit. In the case of Abu Dhabi, when designing and locating oil/gas refineries and associated power generation facilities, previous relevant decisions were based on simple economic and geographical grounds, such as nearness to oil rigs, pipelines, existing industries and port facilities, etc. The subsequent design and location of water abstraction and treatment works operated by the waste heat from these refining and/or power generation processes was catered for as an afterthought, meaning that there is now a mismatch between the water and energy supplies and demands. This review study was carried out to show how Abu Dhabi is trying now to integrate its water-energy sectors using a nexus approach so that future water/power infrastructure is designed optimally and operated in harmony, especially in regard to future demand. Based upon this review work, some recommendations are made for designers and policy makers alike to bolster the nexus approach that Abu Dhabi is pursuing. PMID:27023583

  1. A Review of the Water and Energy Sectors and the Use of a Nexus Approach in Abu Dhabi

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Parneet; Al Tenaiji, Ameena Kulaib; Braimah, Nuhu

    2016-01-01

    Rapid population increase coupled with urbanization and industrialization has resulted in shortages of water in the Middle East. This situation is further exacerbated by global climate change due to greenhouse gas emissions. Recent research advocates that solutions to the global water security and scarcity crisis must involve water–energy nexus approaches. This means adopting policies and strategies that harmonize these inter-related sectors to minimize environmental impact while maximizing human benefit. In the case of Abu Dhabi, when designing and locating oil/gas refineries and associated power generation facilities, previous relevant decisions were based on simple economic and geographical grounds, such as nearness to oil rigs, pipelines, existing industries and port facilities, etc. The subsequent design and location of water abstraction and treatment works operated by the waste heat from these refining and/or power generation processes was catered for as an afterthought, meaning that there is now a mismatch between the water and energy supplies and demands. This review study was carried out to show how Abu Dhabi is trying now to integrate its water–energy sectors using a nexus approach so that future water/power infrastructure is designed optimally and operated in harmony, especially in regard to future demand. Based upon this review work, some recommendations are made for designers and policy makers alike to bolster the nexus approach that Abu Dhabi is pursuing. PMID:27023583

  2. Shearing stability of lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiba, Y.; Gijyutsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    Shearing stabilities of lubricating oils containing a high mol. wt. polymer as a viscosity index improver were studied by use of ultrasound. The oils were degraded by cavitation and the degradation generally followed first order kinetics with the rate of degradation increasing with the intensity of the ultrasonic irradiation and the cumulative energy applied. The shear stability was mainly affected by the mol. wt. of the polymer additive and could be determined in a short time by mechanical shearing with ultrasound.

  3. Recent benthic foraminifera and sedimentary facies distribution of the Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates) coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Flavia; Lokier, Stephen W.

    2014-05-01

    The distribution of benthic foraminifera and sedimentary facies from Recent coastline environments adjacent to the coastline of Abu Dhabi (UAE) was studied in detail with the aim to: 1) provide reliable analogs for understanding and interpreting the depositional environment of ancient shallow-marine sediments from the UAE; 2) assess any modifications in the distribution of benthic environments and sedimentary facies in an area affected by significant anthropogenic activities - particular construction and land reclamation. A total of 100 sea-floor sediment samples were collected in different shallow-marine sedimentary environments (nearshore shelf, beach-front, channels, ooid shoals, lagoon and mangals) close to the coastline of Abu Dhabi Island. Where possible, we revisited the sampling sites used in several studies conducted in the middle of last century (prior to any significant anthropogenic activities) to assess temporal changes in Recent benthic foraminifera and sedimentary facies distribution during the last 50 years. Five foraminiferal assemblages were recognized in the studied area. Species with a porcellaneous test mainly belonging to the genera Quinqueloculina, Triloculina, Spiroloculina, Sigmoilinita are common in all studied areas. Larger benthic foraminifera Peneroplis and Spirolina are particularly abundant in samples collected on seaweed. Hyaline foraminifera mostly belonging to the genera Elphidium, Ammonia, Bolivina and Rosalina are also common together with Miliolidae in the nearshore shelf and beach front. Agglutinated foraminifera (Clavulina, Textularia, Ammobaculites and Reophax) are present in low percentages. The species belonging to the genera Ammobaculites and Reophax are present only in the finest grain samples particularly in lagoons and mangal environments and have not been reported previously in the studied area. The majority of the ooid shoal sediments, the coarser sediments of the beach-front and samples collected in dredged channels

  4. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  5. Shear Thinning in Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergm Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Yao, Minwu; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    We measured shear thinning, a viscosity decrease ordinarily associated with complex liquids such as molten plastics or ketchup, near the critical point of xenon. The data span a wide range of dimensionless shear rate: the product of the shear rate and the relaxation time of critical fluctuations was greater than 0.001 and was less than 700. As predicted by theory, shear thinning occurred when this product was greater than 1. The measurements were conducted aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia to avoid the density stratification caused by Earth's gravity.

  6. Application of uphole data from petroleum seismic surveys to groundwater investigations, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodward, D.; Menges, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Velocity data from uphole surveys were used to map the water table and the contact at the base dune sand/top alluvium as part of a joint National Drilling Company-United States Geological Survey Ground Water Research Project in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. During 1981-1983, a reconnaissance seismic survey was conducted for petroleum exploration in the eastern region of Abu Dhabi. Approximately 2800 kilometers of seismic data, consisting of 92 lines, were acquired in the 2500 km2 concession area near Al Ain. Uphole surveys were conducted about 2 km apart along each seismic line, and were used to calculate weathering corrections required to further process in the seismic data. Approximately 1300 uphole surveys were completed in the concession area between March 1981 and June 1983. Reinterpretation of the velocity profiles derived from the uphole surveys provided data for determining the following subsurface layers, listed in descending order: (1) a surficial, unconsolidated weathering layer with a velocity from 300 to 450 m/s; (2) surficial dune sand, from 750 to 900 m/s; (3) unsaturated, unconsolidated alluvium, from 1000 to 1300 m/s; and (4) saturated, unconsolidated alluvium, from 1900 to 2200 m/s. Two interfaces-the water table and the base dune sand/top alluvium - were identified and mapped from boundaries between these velocity layers. Although the regional water table can fluctuate naturally as much as 3 m per year in this area and the water-table determinations from the uphole data span a 27-month period, an extremely consistent and interpretable water-table map was derived from the uphole data throughout the entire concession area. In the northern part of the area, unconfined groundwater moves northward and northwestward toward the Arabian Gulf; and in the central and southern parts of the area, groundwater moves westward away from the Oman Mountains. In the extreme southern area east of Jabal Hafit, groundwater moves southward into Oman. The map of the base

  7. Geochemistry and microprobe investigations of Abu Tartur REE-bearing phosphorite, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awadalla, Gamal S.

    2010-07-01

    Phosphorites in Egypt occur in the Eastern Desert, the Nile Valley and the Western Desert at Abu Tartur area and present in Duwi Formation as a part of the Middle Eastern to North African phosphogenic province of Late Cretaceous to Paleogene age (Campanian-Maastrichtian). The Maghrabi-Liffiya phosphorite sector is considered as the most important phosphorite deposits in the Abu Tartur area due to its large reserve thickness and high-grade of lower phosphorite bed beside high content of REE. Back scattered electron (BSE) images show framboidal pyrite filling the pores of the phosphatic grains, suggesting diagenetic reducing conditions during phosphorites formation. Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) chemical mapping was conducted to examine the variation and distributions of selected elements (P, F, La, Fe, Yb, Si, Ce, W, Eu, S, Ca, Y and Er) within the shark teeth, coprolites and bone fragments. In the teeth W, S, Fe are concentrated along the axis of the teeth, the bone fragments show high concentration of W, Yb, Er and Eu, whereas coprolites are nearly homogenous in composition contains S, Er with some Si as micro-inclusions. Fluorapatite is considered as main phosphate mineral whereas pyrite occurs as pore-filling within the phosphatic grains and cement materials. Maghrabi-Liffiya samples show a wide range in the P 2O 5 content, between 19.8 wt.% and 29.8 wt.% with an average of 24.6 wt.% and shows low U content ranging from 15 ppm to 34 ppm with an average of 22 ppm. The total REE content in nine samples representing the Maghrabi-Liffiya ranges from 519 to 1139 ppm with an average of about 879 ppm. The calculation of LREE (La-Gd) show indeed a marked enrichment relative to the HREE (Tb-Lu) where LREE/HREE ratio attains 8.4 indicating a strong fractionation between the LREE and HREE. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns of the studied phosphorite samples show a negative Eu anomaly.

  8. Adolescents’ perception of substance use and factors influencing its use: a qualitative study in Abu Dhabi

    PubMed Central

    Al Ozaibi, Naseeba; Elarabi, Hisham; El-Kashef, Ahmed; Wanigaratne, Shamil; Almarzouqi, Amna; Alhosani, Ayesha; Al Ghaferi, Hamad

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective The objective of this article is to gain a deeper understanding of the attitudes and perceptions of adolescents in the United Arab Emirates regarding substance and to identify factors that, in their view, may influence the risk of substance use and suggest possible interventions. Design This was a qualitative study that used a focus group approach. Setting The study was carried out in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Participants Male and female teenagers aged 13-18 years residing in the emirate of Abu Dhabi. Main outcome measures Adolescents’ awareness of substance use, patterns of use and associated harm; Adolescents' perceptions about the factors associated with substance use. Results Six focus groups were carried out, and a total of 41 adolescents (20 males and 21 females) participated. Data analysis identified three main themes: (1) adolescents’ awareness of substance use and associated harm; (2) gender role and image and (3) perceived factors affecting substance use among adolescents. Knowledge of substances and related consequences of use varied between groups but was compatible with participants’ age and school years. Factors that participants believed influenced substance use were classified into: (1) parent–adolescent relationship, (2) peer pressure, (3) substance accessibility, (4) religiosity and (5) others. Many factors were believed to increase the risk of substance use among adolescents such as peer pressure, inadequate knowledge of the harmful consequences of drug use, family-related factors (e.g. low monitoring and poor parent–adolescents relationship), affordability and availability of substances, boredom and affluence. On the other hand, religiosity was as a shield against substance use, especially alcohol. Other identified protective factors included carrying out schools- and communities-based educational campaigns, enhancing social workers’ ability to raise awareness and detect early signs of addiction and

  9. Shear flexibility for structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stangeland, Maynard L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    This device comprises a flexible sheet member having cross convolutions oriented 45.degree. to the shear vector with spherical reliefs at the convolution junctions. The spherical reliefs are essential to the shear flexibility by interrupting the principal stress lines that act along the ridges of the convolutions. The spherical reliefs provide convolutions in both directions in the plane of the cross-convolution ridges.

  10. Shear flexibility for structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stangeland, Maynard L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    This device comprises a flexible sheet member having cross convolutions oriented 45.degree. to the shear vector with spherical reliefs at the convolution junctions. The spherical reliefs are essential to the shear flexibility by interrupting the principal stress lines that act along the ridges of the convolutions. The spherical reliefs provide convolutions in both directions in the plane of the cross-convolution ridges.

  11. Optimization of a solar powered absorption cycle under Abu Dhabi's weather conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Alili, A.; Hwang, Y.; Radermacher, R.; Kubo, I.

    2010-12-15

    In order for the solar absorption air conditioners to become a real alternative to the conventional vapour compression systems, their performance has to be improved and their total cost has to be reduced. A solar powered absorption cycle is modeled using the Transient System Simulation (TRNSYS) program and Typical Meteorological Year 2 data of Abu Dhabi. It uses evacuated tube collectors to drive a 10 kW ammonia-water absorption chiller. Firstly, the system performance and its total cost are optimized separately using single objective optimization algorithms. The design variables considered are: the collector slope, the collector mass flow rate, the collector area and the storage tank volume. The single objective optimization results show that MATLAB global optimization methods agree with the TRNSYS optimizer. Secondly, MATLAB is used to solve a multi-objective optimization problem to improve the system's performance and cost, simultaneously. The optimum designs are presented using Pareto curve and show the potential improvements of the baseline system. (author)

  12. Sequence stratigraphy of the Hith/Upper Arab formations offshore Abu Dhabi, U.A.E.

    SciTech Connect

    Azer, S.R.; Peebles, R.G.

    1995-11-01

    The Kimmeridgian Upper Arab zones A, B, and C, are prolific hydrocarbon bearing reservoirs in central and western Offshore Abu Dhabi (OAD). They were deposited in an arid climate which dominated the Arabian peninsula during Late Jurassic times. The Berriasian to Tithonian Hith Formation which overlies the Arab reservoirs constitute the cap rock, which just to the east of central OAD gradually pinches out and forms a N-S feather edge. The Hith and Upper Arab zones A, B, and C form 450 to over 600 feet of massive to interbedded anhydrites with varying proportions of limestones and dolomites in central and western OAD. The Arab Formation in OAD is a major regressive unit which was deposited on a broad carbonate platform and prograded eastwards into an open marine shelf environment. The objectives of this paper are to develop a sequence stratigraphic framework, emphasizing cyclicity, facies architecture and diagenesis. Core and well log data geared with various inorganic geochemical analyses from four wells are used to constrain the current uncertainties in age dating and integrate the diagenetic signatures in the patterns of relative sea level change which considerably control the formation of those parasequences. This effort will help in better understanding and possible prediction of porosity in such prospective reservoirs.

  13. Interruption of Onchocerca volvulus transmission in the Abu Hamed focus, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Higazi, Tarig B; Zarroug, Isam M A; Mohamed, Hanan A; Elmubark, Wigdan A; Deran, Tong Chor M; Aziz, Nabil; Katabarwa, Moses; Hassan, Hassan K; Unnasch, Thomas R; Mackenzie, Charles D; Richards, Frank; Hashim, Kamal

    2013-07-01

    Abu Hamed, Sudan, the northernmost location of onchocerciasis in the world, began community-directed treatment with ivermectin (CDTI) in 1998, with annual treatments enhanced to semiannual in 2007. We assessed the status of the parasite transmission in 2011 entomologically, parasitologically, and serologically. O-150 pool screening showed no parasite DNA in 17,537 black flies collected in 2011 (95% confidence interval upper limit [95% CI UL] = 0.023). Skin microfilariae, nodules, and signs of skin disease were absent in 536 individuals in seven local communities. Similarly, no evidence of Onchocerca volvulus Ov16 antibodies was found in 6,756 school children ≤ 10 years (95% CI UL = 0.03%). Because this assessment of the focus meets the 2001 World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for interrupted transmission, treatment was halted in 2012, and a post-treatment surveillance period was initiated in anticipation of declaration of disease elimination in this area. We provide the first evidence in East Africa that long-term CDTI alone can interrupt transmission of onchocerciasis. PMID:23690554

  14. Multifunction Instrument Tree (MIT) Neutron and Gamma Probe Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU)

    SciTech Connect

    CANNON, N.S.

    1999-08-08

    The multifunction instrument tree (MIT) probe program has been developed to modify existing Liquid Observation Well (LOW) neutron and gamma probes for use in the validation shafts of the two MITs installed in Tank 241-SY-101. One of the program objectives is that the modified MIT probes be completely compatible with the existing LOW van instrumentation and procedures. The major program objective is to produce neutron and gamma scans from Tank 241-SY-101 that would assist in evaluating waste feature structure and elevation. The MIT probe program is described in greater detail in the engineering task plan (HNF-3322). In accordance with the engineering task plan, a test plan (HNF-3595) was written, reduced diameter (allowing insertion into the MIT validation tube) neutron and gamma probes were acquired, an acceptance and operational test procedure (HNF-3838) was written, acceptance and operational testing of the MIT probes was performed, and a report of these test results (HNF-4369) has been issued. A number of neutron and gamma probe scans have been obtained from the Tank 241-SY-101 MITs, starting on February 8, 1999, in cooperation with Operations. Now that the MIT probes are fully demonstrated, this document transfers ownership of these probes to Operations, utilizing the final acceptance for beneficial use (ABU) form that follows in Section 3.0.

  15. Chronostratigraphy and hydrocarbon habitat associated with the Jurassic carbonates of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    SciTech Connect

    Alsharahan, A.S.; Whittle, G.L.

    1995-08-01

    Deposition of Jurassic epeiric shelf carbonates and evaporates were controlled by epeirogenic movement and sea level fluctuations which formed an excellent combination of source rocks, reservoirs and seats in Abu Dhabi. At the end of the Triassic, a relative drop in sea level, caused by eustatic sea level lowering in conjunction with minor tectonic uplift, resulted in non-deposition or erosion. In the Toarcian, deposition of carbonates and terrigenous, clastics produced the Marrat Formation. In the mid-Aalenian, a drop in sea level eroded much of the Marrat and some of the Triassic in offshore U.A.E. The deposition of the Hamlah Formation followed, under neritic, well-oxygenated conditions. The Middle Jurassic was characterized by widespread, normal marine shelf carbonates which formed the cyclic Izhara and Araej formations (reservoirs). In the Upper Jurassic, the carbonate shelf became differentiated into a broad shelf with a kerogen-rich intrashelf basin, formed in response to a eustatic rise coupled with epeirogenic downwarping and marine flooding. The intrashelf basin fill of muddy carbonate sediments constitutes the Diyab Formation and its onshore equivalent, the Dukhan Formation (source rocks). In the late Upper Jurassic, the climate became more arid and cyclic deposition of carbonates and evaporates prevailed, forming alternating peritidal anhydrite, dolomite and limestone in the Arab Formation (reservoir). Arid conditions continued into the Tithonian, fostering the extensive anhydrite of the Hith Formation (seal) in a sabkha/lagoonal setting on the shallow peritidal platform, the final regressive supratidal stage of this major depositional cycle.

  16. Strong motion simulation at Abu Zenima city, Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Amin Esmail

    2013-06-01

    Earthquake hazard assessments are an important task for the design of earthquake resistant structures and insurance industry. Such assessments get more importance when the site of interest is located near an active earthquake zone. Such situation is present for the location of Abu Zenima city. The city is characterized by the presence of industrial and Maritime platform in addition to other Oil production facilities. These industrial facilities motivated the present work. The simulated earthquake ground motion time histories are conducted using stochastic technique. The magnitude used for simulation is obtained using both probabilistic and deterministic approaches. An analysis using both approaches shows that moderate earthquakes in the vicinity of the site could have the largest effects on the area. Thus an earthquake of magnitude 4.5 at a distance of 21 km is chosen as design earthquake. The simulated ground motions are presented in terms of acceleration, velocity, and displacement time histories. In addition the response spectra are also presented that may be used for engineering purposes.

  17. Hydrology of the coastal sabkhas of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, Ward E.; Wood, Warren W.

    2001-01-01

    Water fluxes were estimated and a water budget developed for the land surface and a surficial 10-m-deep section of the coastal sabkhas that extend from the city of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, west to the border with Saudi Arabia. The fluxes were estimated on the basis of water levels and hydraulic conductivities measured in wells and evaporation rates measured with a humidity chamber. In contrast with conceptual models proposed in earlier studies, groundwater inflow is estimated to be small, whereas the largest components of the water budget are recharge from rainfall and evaporation from the water table. Estimates within a rectilinear volume of sabkha, defined as 1 m wide by 10 km long by 10 m deep, indicate that about 1 m3/year of water enters and exits by lateral groundwater flow; 40–50 m3/year enters by upward leakage; and 640 m3/year enters by recharge from rainfall. Based on the water and solute fluxes estimated for the upward leakage into the sabkha, 7–8 pore volumes of brine have entered the sabkha from below since the time the sabkha became saturated (7,000 years ago) as a result of the last global sea-level rise.

  18. Fighting wind shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A “coherent and sustained program” of improved radar detection of weather, pilot training, and better communication between pilots and air controllers can greatly reduce the risk of wind shear to airplanes landing or taking off, according to a National Research Council (NRC) committee.Wind shear, characterized by winds rapidly changing direction and speed, has caused several serious accidents in recent years; among the most notable is the July 8, 1982, crash of a Pan American World Airlines jetliner at the New Orleans International Airport, which killed 153 persons. Following the accident, Congress directed the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to contract with the NRC to study wind shear.

  19. Viscous shear dampers

    SciTech Connect

    Zilahi-Szabo, I.

    1980-10-07

    In a viscous shear damper, the seismic mass is chamfered at all its corners. Thus, the clearances between the seismic mass and its casing are gaps with oppositely widening out sections separated by middle sections of smallest widths.

  20. Intrinsic and scattering attenuation in the crust of the Abu Dabbab area in the eastern desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Fattah, Ali K.; Morsy, M.; El-Hady, Sh.; Kim, K. Y.; Sami, M.

    2008-05-01

    Fifty-five microearthquakes recorded by a digital-temporary seismic network in the Abu Dabbab area in the Eastern Desert of Egypt were used to estimate the direct S-wave ( Qβ), coda ( Qc), intrinsic ( Qi), and scattering quality factors ( Qs). Sato's [Sato H., 1977] single-scattering assumption was used to fit the amplitude envelopes of the coda at seven central frequency bands (1.5, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 Hz), obtaining a Qc varying with frequency as generally observed in tectonically active areas. Lapse time dependence was also studied for the area, with the coda waves analyzed at window lengths ranging from 10 to 40 s starting from the onset of the S-wave arrival. The direct S-wave Qβ was estimated using the coda normalization method [Aki, K., 1980a]. The frequency dependence of Q was investigated for the direct S-waves and coda waves. Results show a low quality factor and a high frequency parameter, indicating that the upper lithosphere of the Abu Dabbab area is seismically active and heterogeneous. Using the independent estimates of Qc and Qβ, the intrinsic quality factor Qi was separated from the scattering quality factor. The results suggest that intrinsic dissipation plays a predominant role with respect to scattering phenomena in the area; the obtained Q values seem closer to those reported by analyzing volcano-tectonic earthquakes. This finding reflects that the cause of Abu Dabbab earthquake swarms might be igneous activity where the magma is ascending through joints or serpentinized joints that are dewatering.

  1. Antioxidant activity and mineral composition of three Mediterranean common seaweeds from Abu-Qir Bay, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Khairy, Hanan M; El-Sheikh, Mohamed A

    2015-09-01

    Antioxidant activity and mineral composition were evaluated seasonally from spring to autumn 2010 in the three common seaweeds Ulva lactuca Linnaeus (Chlorophyta), Jania rubens (Linnaeus) J.V. Lamouroux and Pterocladia capillacea (S.G. Gmelin) Bornet (Rhodophyta). The antioxidant activity was measured with β-carotene, total phenol content and DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl). Seaweeds were collected from the rocky site near Boughaz El-Maadya Abu-Qir Bay of Alexandria, Egypt. The results showed maximum increase of β-carotene in P. capillacea during summer. A significant increase in total phenolic content at P ⩽ 0.05 was found in the red alga (J. rubens) during summer. Also, U. lactuca showed the maximum antioxidant scavenging activity especially during summer. Minerals in all investigated samples were higher than those in conventional edible vegetables. Na/K ratio ranged between 0.78 and 2.4 mg/100 g, which is a favorable value. All trace metals exceeded the recommended doses by Reference Nutrient Intake (RNI). During summer season, it was found that Cu = 2.02 ± 0.13 and Cr = 0.46 ± 0.14 mg/100 g in U. lactuca and Fe had a suitable concentration (18.37 ± 0.5 mg/100 g) in P. capillacea. The studied species were rich in carotenoids, phenolic compounds, DPPH free radicals and minerals, therefore, they can be used as potential source of health food in human diets and may be of use to food industry. PMID:26288568

  2. Late Quaternary paleodune deposits in Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAF: Paleoclimatic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Brouwers, E.M.; Bown, T.M. ); Hadley, D.G. )

    1993-04-01

    Remnants of late Quaternary paleodunes are exposed near the coast of the Arabian Gulf and in large inland playas and interdunal areas in central and western Abu Dhabi Emirate over a distance of >45 km normal to the coast. Paleodunes occur south of Madinat Zayed (lat. 23[degree]35 N), which marks the northern limit of a modern dune field that grades into the mega-dune sand sea of the ar Rub al Khali, Saudi Arabia. Coastal paleodunes are composed of weakly cemented millolid foraminifers, ooids, and rounded biogenic grains, whereas inland and southward the paleodunes show a progressive increase in the proportion of eolian quartz sand. The paleodunes exhibit large-scale trough foresets in remnant exposures 0.5 to 10 m thick, indicating paleowind directions from 65[degree] to 184[degree] (dominantly southeast transport). Scattered paleoplaya remnants provide paleodune scale. Paleoplaya deposits form buttes 30--50 m high. If coeval with the Paleodunes, large-scale paleodune fields are implied (100+ m high), comparable to star dunes and sand mountains at the northwestern edge of the ar Rub al Khali. Based on U-Th isotopic analyses, the carbonate paleodune sands are >160ka and probably >250ka. The carbonate source was a shallow, nearly dry Arabian Gulf at a time when large areas were exposed during a low sea-level stand. Paleowind direction indicates that Pleistocene prevailing winds were northwesterly, the direction of the dominant (winter shamal) wind today. The geographic extend and implied magnitude of the paleodunes suggest large-scale eolian transport of carbonate sand during the Pleistocene disiccation, and admixed quartz sand identifies a youthful stage of contemporaneous evolution of the ar Rub al Khali. Wave-eroded paleodunes probably floor much of the present-day Gulf and extend beneath the modern dunes and sand mountains.

  3. Antioxidant activity and mineral composition of three Mediterranean common seaweeds from Abu-Qir Bay, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Khairy, Hanan M.; El-Sheikh, Mohamed A.

    2015-01-01

    Antioxidant activity and mineral composition were evaluated seasonally from spring to autumn 2010 in the three common seaweeds Ulva lactuca Linnaeus (Chlorophyta), Jania rubens (Linnaeus) J.V. Lamouroux and Pterocladia capillacea (S.G. Gmelin) Bornet (Rhodophyta). The antioxidant activity was measured with β-carotene, total phenol content and DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl). Seaweeds were collected from the rocky site near Boughaz El-Maadya Abu-Qir Bay of Alexandria, Egypt. The results showed maximum increase of β-carotene in P. capillacea during summer. A significant increase in total phenolic content at P ⩽ 0.05 was found in the red alga (J. rubens) during summer. Also, U. lactuca showed the maximum antioxidant scavenging activity especially during summer. Minerals in all investigated samples were higher than those in conventional edible vegetables. Na/K ratio ranged between 0.78 and 2.4 mg/100 g, which is a favorable value. All trace metals exceeded the recommended doses by Reference Nutrient Intake (RNI). During summer season, it was found that Cu = 2.02 ± 0.13 and Cr = 0.46 ± 0.14 mg/100 g in U. lactuca and Fe had a suitable concentration (18.37 ± 0.5 mg/100 g) in P. capillacea. The studied species were rich in carotenoids, phenolic compounds, DPPH free radicals and minerals, therefore, they can be used as potential source of health food in human diets and may be of use to food industry. PMID:26288568

  4. Implementation of improved underbalanced drilling in AbuDhabi onshore field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhammadi, Adel Mohammed

    Abu Dhabi Company for Onshore Oil Operations (ADCO) is considering Underbalanced Drilling (UBD) as a means to develop lower permeability units in its fields. In addition to productivity and recovery gains, ADCO also expects reservoir characterization benefits from UBD. Reservoir screening studies were carried out on all of ADCO's reservoirs to determine their applicability for UBD. The primary business benefits of UBD were determined to be reservoir characterization, damage Mitigation, and rate of Penetration "ROP" Improvement. Apart from the primary benefits, some of the secondary benefits of UBD that were identified beforehand included rig performance. Since it's a trial wells, the challenge was to drill these wells safely, efficiently and of course meeting well objectives. Many operators worldwide drill these well in underbalanced mode but complete it overbalanced. In our case the plan was to drill and complete these wells in underbalanced condition. But we had to challenge most operators and come up with special and unique casing hanger design to ensure well control barriers exists while fishing the control line of the Downhole Deployment Valve "DDV". After intensive studies and planning, the hanger was designed as per our recommendations and found to be effective equipment that optimized the operational time and the cost as well. This report will provide better understanding of UBD technique in general and shade on the special designed casing hanger compared to conventional or what's most used worldwide. Even thought there were some issues while running the casing hanger prior drilling but managed to capture the learning's from each well and re-modified the hanger and come up with better deign for the future wells. Finally, the new design perform a good performance of saving the operation time and assisting the project to be done in a safe and an easy way without a major impact on the well cost. This design helped to drill and complete these wells safely with

  5. Converging shear rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Hyung M.; Mix, Adam W.; Giacomin, A. Jeffrey

    2014-05-01

    For highly viscous fluids that slip in parallel sliding plate rheometers, we want to use a slightly converging flow to suppress this wall slip. In this work, we first attack the steady shear flow of a highly viscous Newtonian fluid between two gently converging plates with no slip boundaries using the equation of motion in cylindrical coordinates, which yields no analytical solution. Then we treat the same problem using the lubrication approximation in Cartesian coordinates to yield exact, explicit solutions for dimensionless velocity, pressure and shear stress. This work deepens our understanding of a drag flow through a gently converging slit of arbitrary convergence angle. We also employ the corotational Maxwell model to explore the role of viscoelasticity in this converging shear flow. We then compare these analytical solutions to finite element calculations for both Newtonian and corotational Maxwell cases. A worked example for determining the Newtonian viscosity using a converging shear rheometer is also included. With this work, we provide the framework for exploring other constitutive equations or other boundary conditions in future work. Our results can also be used to design the linear bearings used for the parallel sliding plate rheometer (SPR). This work can also be used to evaluate the error in the shear stress that is caused by bearing misalignment and specify the parallelism tolerance for the linear bearings incorporated into a SPR.

  6. Cigarette, Water-pipe, and Medwakh Smoking Prevalence Among Applicants to Abu Dhabi's Pre-marital Screening Program, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Aden, Bashir; Karrar, Sara; Shafey, Omar; Al Hosni, Farida

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study assesses self-reported tobacco use prevalence (cigarette, water-pipe, and medwakh) among applicants to Abu Dhabi's Premarital Screening program during 2011. Methods: Premarital Screening data reported to the Health Authority – Abu Dhabi from April to December 2011 were utilized to estimate tobacco use prevalence among applicants. Smoking prevalence was examined by nationality, age group and gender. Results: Overall, 24.7% of Premarital Screening Program applicants were current smokers; 11.5% smoked cigarettes, 5.9% smoked medwakh (hand-held pipe), 4.8% smoked water-pipe and 2.5% smoked a combination (more than one type). Men (19.2%) were more likely than women (3.5%) to be current cigarette smokers. Women were much less likely to smoke medwakh (0.1%) than men (11.5%), with male UAE Nationals having the highest medwakh smoking prevalence (16.1%). The overall prevalence of water-pipe smoking was 6.8% among men and 2.8% for women with the highest water-pipe smoking prevalence (10.2%) among Arab expatriate men. Conclusions: Variations in tobacco use prevalence among Premarital Screening Program applicants reflect preferences for different modes of tobacco consumption by nationality, age group and gender. Enforcement of tobacco control laws, including implementation of clean indoor air laws and tobacco tax increases, and targeted health education programs are required to reduce tobacco consumption and concomitant tobacco-related morbidity and mortality. PMID:24404364

  7. Depositional environments and sequence architecture of the Raha and Abu Qada formations (Cenomanian-Turonian), west central Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anan, Tarek I.; El-Shahat, Adam; Genedi, Adel; Grammer, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Cenomanian-Turonian deposits are important reservoirs for many oil fields in the Western Desert and the Gulf of Suez region of Egypt. Study of the Raha and Abu Qada formations (Cenomanian-Turonian), from five dip-oriented outcrop locations in west central Sinai; indicates deposition of a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate system on a ramp setting. The inner ramp facies (bivalve and benthonic foraminiferal wackestone) grades northward to the mid ramp facies (echinoderm calcisphere packstone, and oyster floatstone), and outer ramp facies (planktonic foraminiferal wackestone and calcisphere wackestone). The two studied formations comprise one second-order depositional sequence (duration of approximately 10 Million years). This large scale sequence includes four third-order depositional sequences, three of which are observed in the Raha Formation, with the other one recorded in the Abu Qada Formation. Because west central Sinai was tectonically stable during the Cenomanian and Turonian, the main factor controlling the lateral and vertical distribution of facies tracts is likely due to changes in the relative sea level. The Cenomanian-Turonian boundary event is known as the largest oceanic anoxic event during the Cretaceous. This global event has been documented in three of the studied sections. The recorded δ13C excursions range from +3.04‰ to +5.24‰. These high positive excursions in δ13C are associated with highly negative values of δ18O (values range from -6.01‰ to -1.38‰).

  8. Naming babies “Baby-of” at birth: A project to encourage earlier naming of infants in Abu Dhabi

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Rodney Jay; Palacios, Luena; Amuan, Rommel

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, Sweihan Healthcare Center, one of several government clinics in Abu Dhabi, catered to 19,349 patients or an average of 52 patients in a day. During the weekdays, close to 80 patients are seen per day, a relatively huge number for a small town clinic. In 2011, the clinic only saw 16,816 patients, which amounts to a 15% increase in two years. Circumstances called for a search for gaps in the system in order to ease the workflow of a steadily increasing patient influx. The focus was mainly on patient identification due to a considerable number of patients having the same name. Data extraction was simplified by the advent of electronic medical records and, as the names of the patients were filtered, one name stood out: “Baby of”. The goal of this project was to track the patients using the name “Baby of”, and change their names in their respective medical records and thus be able to comply with the International Patient Safety Goals (IPSG) of both Joint Commission International [1] and the Health Authority of Abu Dhabi [2]. PMID:26734312

  9. Delineation of the subsurface structures and basement surface of the Abu-Rodaym area, Southwestern Sinai, using ground magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboelkhair, Hatem; Rabei, Mostafa

    2013-07-01

    The present study deals with the analysis of data from a ground magnetic survey that was conducted in the Abu-Rodaym area of the Southwestern Sinai Peninsula, Egypt. This survey was carried out to delineate the subsurface structural framework, and to identify the thickness of the sedimentary basin of the study area. Locating these structures, and determining the localities of maximum sedimentary thicknesses that consist mainly of sandstone, serves as a preliminary process in exploring the confined aquifer beneath the surface of the Abu-Rodaym area. This will greatly benefit Bedouins who suffer greatly from a lack of water in the driest region in the country. The processing, analysis, and interpretation, of the total intensity magnetic data shows that there are three sets of faults striking mainly in the N-S, NW-SE, and NE-SW, directions. The depth to the basement surface was found to fluctuate from about 45 m, to more than 100 m, beneath the ground surface. It was also found that the variations in magnetic observations were produced by the striking structures that are mainly responsible for the variations in thicknesses of the sedimentary rocks in the area.

  10. Free volume under shear.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Moumita; Vinutha, H A; Sastry, Srikanth; Heussinger, Claus

    2015-10-14

    Using an athermal quasistatic simulation protocol, we study the distribution of free volumes in sheared hard-particle packings close to, but below, the random-close packing threshold. We show that under shear, and independent of volume fraction, the free volumes develop features similar to close-packed systems - particles self-organize in a manner as to mimick the isotropically jammed state. We compare athermally sheared packings with thermalized packings and show that thermalization leads to an erasure of these structural features. The temporal evolution in particular the opening-up and the closing of free-volume patches is associated with the single-particle dynamics, showing a crossover from ballistic to diffusive behavior. PMID:26472384

  11. Metal shearing energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, R. J.; Wittrock, E. P. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A metal shearing energy absorber is described. The absorber is composed of a flat thin strip of metal which is pulled through a slot in a cutter member of a metal, harder than the metal of the strip. The slot's length, in the direction perpendicular to the pull direction, is less than the strip's width so that as the strip is pulled through the slot, its edges are sheared off, thereby absorbing some of the pulling energy. In one embodiment the cutter member is a flat plate of steel, while in another embodiment the cutter member is U-shaped with the slot at its base.

  12. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, D.S.; Lanham, R.N.

    1984-04-11

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  13. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Lanham, Ronald N.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  14. Infrared lateral shearing interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, O.

    1980-04-01

    Recently IR interferometry has received much attention for its special capabilities of testing IR materials, diamond-turned metal mirrors, deep aspherics, unpolished rough surface optics, and other unconventional optics. A CW CO2 laser is used as a coherent light source at 10.6 microns, and germanium and zinc selenide optics are used for lenses and beam splitters. A pyroelectric vidicon (PEV) detects the modulated interference pattern through a TV monitor and video recorder-player. This paper presents three methods of IR lateral shear interferometry using (1) a germanium plane-parallel plate, (2) a Ronchi ruling, and (3) a double-grating lateral shear interferometer.

  15. Variability of Surface pollutants and aerosol concentration over Abu Dhabi, UAE - sources, transport and current levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phanikumar, Devulapalli V.; Basha, Ghouse; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2015-04-01

    In the view of recent economic, industrial, and rapid development, Abu Dhabi (24.4oN; 54.4oE; 27m msl) has become one of the most populated regions in the world despite of extreme heat, frequent dust storms, and with distinctive topography. The major sources of air pollution are from the dust and sand storms, greenhouse gas emissions, and to some extent from industrial pollution. In order to realize the accurate and comprehensive understanding of air quality and plausible sources over this region, we have made a detailed analysis of three years simultaneous measurements during 2011-13 of pollutants such as O3, SO2, NO2, CO, and PM10 concentrations. Diurnal variation of meteorological parameters such as temperature and wind speed/relative humidity clearly shows daytime maximum/minimum in summer followed by pre-monsoon, post-monsoon and winter. The prevailing winds over this region are mostly from northwesterly direction (Shamal wind). Diurnal wind pattern showed a clear contrast with the majority of the wind pattern during nighttime and early morning is from the westerly/northwesterly and daytime is from southwesterly/southeasterly directions. The diurnal pattern of O3 shows minimum during 08 LT and increases thereafter reaching maximum at 17 LT and decreases during nighttime. However, the diurnal pattern of SO2 and NO2 show a peak at ~ 08 LT and dip at ~ 14 LT during all the seasons with some variability in each season. On the other hand, the diurnal pattern of CO shows a peculiar picture of elevated levels during daytime peaking at ~ 10 LT (prominent in summer and post-monsoon) followed by a sharp decrease and minimum is ~14 LT. PM10 concentration has an early morning peak at ~ 02 LT and then decreases to a minimum value at ~11 LT and again increases in the afternoon hours (maximum at ~17 LT) depicting a forenoon-afternoon asymmetry. Monthly variation of PM10 shows maximum in pre-monsoon season and minimum in winter. Our observations show the diurnal pattern of

  16. Shear wave transmissivity measurement by color Doppler shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Mayuko; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography is a useful method for evaluating tissue stiffness. We have proposed a novel shear wave imaging method (color Doppler shear wave imaging: CD SWI), which utilizes a signal processing unit in ultrasound color flow imaging in order to detect the shear wave wavefront in real time. Shear wave velocity is adopted to characterize tissue stiffness; however, it is difficult to measure tissue stiffness with high spatial resolution because of the artifact produced by shear wave diffraction. Spatial average processing in the image reconstruction method also degrades the spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel measurement method for the shear wave transmissivity of a tissue boundary. Shear wave wavefront maps are acquired by changing the displacement amplitude of the shear wave and the transmissivity of the shear wave, which gives the difference in shear wave velocity between two mediums separated by the boundary, is measured from the ratio of two threshold voltages required to form the shear wave wavefronts in the two mediums. From this method, a high-resolution shear wave amplitude imaging method that reconstructs a tissue boundary is proposed.

  17. Hydrology of the coastal sabkhas of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Ward; Wood, Warren

    2001-05-01

    Water fluxes were estimated and a water budget developed for the land surface and a surficial 10-m-deep section of the coastal sabkhas that extend from the city of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, west to the border with Saudi Arabia. The fluxes were estimated on the basis of water levels and hydraulic conductivities measured in wells and evaporation rates measured with a humidity chamber. In contrast with conceptual models proposed in earlier studies, groundwater inflow is estimated to be small, whereas the largest components of the water budget are recharge from rainfall and evaporation from the water table. Estimates within a rectilinear volume of sabkha, defined as 1 m wide by 10 km long by 10 m deep, indicate that about 1 m3/year of water enters and exits by lateral groundwater flow; 40-50 m3/year enters by upward leakage; and 640 m3/year enters by recharge from rainfall. Based on the water and solute fluxes estimated for the upward leakage into the sabkha, 7-8 pore volumes of brine have entered the sabkha from below since the time the sabkha became saturated (7,000 years ago) as a result of the last global sea-level rise. Résumé. Les flux d'eau ont été estimés et le bilan hydrique a été réalisé pour la surface et les dix premiers mètres sous la surface de sebkhas littorales qui s'étendent à partir de la ville d'Abou Dhabi (Émirats Arabes Unis) à l'ouest de la frontière avec l'Arabie Saoudite. Les flux ont été estimés à partir des niveaux piézométriques et des conductivités hydrauliques mesurés dans les puits et à partir de mesures d'évaporation au moyen de capteurs d'humidité. En opposition avec les modèles conceptuels proposés dans les premières études, on estime que les apports par les eaux souterraines sont faibles, alors que les termes du bilan hydrique les plus importants sont la recharge par la pluie et l'évaporation à partir de la nappe. Les estimations dans un parallélépipède rectangle de sebkha, d'1 m de large, de

  18. Hydrology of the coastal sabkhas of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Ward; Wood, Warren

    2001-05-01

    Water fluxes were estimated and a water budget developed for the land surface and a surficial 10-m-deep section of the coastal sabkhas that extend from the city of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, west to the border with Saudi Arabia. The fluxes were estimated on the basis of water levels and hydraulic conductivities measured in wells and evaporation rates measured with a humidity chamber. In contrast with conceptual models proposed in earlier studies, groundwater inflow is estimated to be small, whereas the largest components of the water budget are recharge from rainfall and evaporation from the water table. Estimates within a rectilinear volume of sabkha, defined as 1 m wide by 10 km long by 10 m deep, indicate that about 1 m3/year of water enters and exits by lateral groundwater flow; 40-50 m3/year enters by upward leakage; and 640 m3/year enters by recharge from rainfall. Based on the water and solute fluxes estimated for the upward leakage into the sabkha, 7-8 pore volumes of brine have entered the sabkha from below since the time the sabkha became saturated (7,000 years ago) as a result of the last global sea-level rise. Résumé. Les flux d'eau ont été estimés et le bilan hydrique a été réalisé pour la surface et les dix premiers mètres sous la surface de sebkhas littorales qui s'étendent à partir de la ville d'Abou Dhabi (Émirats Arabes Unis) à l'ouest de la frontière avec l'Arabie Saoudite. Les flux ont été estimés à partir des niveaux piézométriques et des conductivités hydrauliques mesurés dans les puits et à partir de mesures d'évaporation au moyen de capteurs d'humidité. En opposition avec les modèles conceptuels proposés dans les premières études, on estime que les apports par les eaux souterraines sont faibles, alors que les termes du bilan hydrique les plus importants sont la recharge par la pluie et l'évaporation à partir de la nappe. Les estimations dans un parallélépipède rectangle de sebkha, d'1 m de large, de

  19. Sheared Electroconvective Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Rhokyun; Pham, Van Sang; Lim, Kiang Meng; Han, Jongyoon

    2012-11-01

    Recently, ion concentration polarization (ICP) and related phenomena draw attention from physicists, due to its importance in understanding electrochemical systems. Researchers have been actively studying, but the complexity of this multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon has been limitation for gaining a detailed picture. Here, we consider electroconvective(EC) instability initiated by ICP under pressure-driven flow, a scenario often found in electrochemical desalinations. Combining scaling analysis, experiment, and numerical modeling, we reveal unique behaviors of sheared EC: unidirectional vortex structures, its size selection and vortex propagation. Selected by balancing the external pressure gradient and the electric body force, which generates Hagen-Poiseuille(HP) flow and vortical EC, the dimensionless EC thickness scales as (φ2 /UHP)1/3. The pressure-driven flow(or shear) suppresses unfavorably-directed vortices, and simultaneously pushes favorably-directed vortices with constant speed, which is linearly proportional to the total shear of HP flow. This is the first systematic characterization of sheared EC, which has significant implications on the optimization of electrodialysis and other electrochemical systems.

  20. Measuring the reduced shear

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun

    2011-11-01

    Neglecting the second order corrections in weak lensing measurements can lead to a few percent uncertainties on cosmic shears, and becomes more important for cluster lensing mass reconstructions. Existing methods which claim to measure the reduced shears are not necessarily accurate to the second order when a point spread function (PSF) is present. We show that the method of Zhang (2008) exactly measures the reduced shears at the second order level in the presence of PSF. A simple theorem is provided for further confirming our calculation, and for judging the accuracy of any shear measurement method at the second order based on its properties at the first order. The method of Zhang (2008) is well defined mathematically. It does not require assumptions on the morphologies of galaxies and the PSF. To reach a sub-percent level accuracy, the CCD pixel size is required to be not larger than 1/3 of the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the PSF, regardless of whether the PSF has a power-law or exponential profile at large distances. Using a large ensemble (∼>10{sup 7}) of mock galaxies of unrestricted morphologies, we study the shear recovery accuracy under different noise conditions. We find that contaminations to the shear signals from the noise of background photons can be removed in a well defined way because they are not correlated with the source shapes. The residual shear measurement errors due to background noise are consistent with zero at the sub-percent level even when the amplitude of such noise reaches about 1/10 of the source flux within the half-light radius of the source. This limit can in principle be extended further with a larger galaxy ensemble in our simulations. On the other hand, the source Poisson noise remains to be a cause of systematic errors. For a sub-percent level accuracy, our method requires the amplitude of the source Poisson noise to be less than 1/80 ∼ 1/100 of the source flux within the half-light radius of the source

  1. Recent benthic foraminifera and sedimentary facies from mangrove swamps and channels of Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Flavia; Odeh, Weaam A. S. Al; Lokier, Stephen W.; Paul, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Zonation of Recent mangrove environments can be defined using benthic foraminifera, however, little is known about foraminifera from mangrove environments of the Arabian Gulf. The objective of this study is to produce a detailed micropaleontological and sedimentological analysis to identify foraminiferal associations in several coastline environments (mangrove swamps and channels) located on the eastern side of Abu Dhabi Island (UAE). Detailed sediment sampling collection in mangal environments of Eastern Abu Dhabi was carried out to assess the distribution of living and dead benthic foraminifera in different sedimentary facies in the mangal and in the surrounding area comprising natural environments of the upper and lower intertidal area (mud flats and channels) and areas modified by anthropogenic activities (dredged channels). The fine-grain sediments collected near mangrove (Avicenna marina) roots presented a high abundance of living and dead foraminifera tests. The assemblages in these samples show very low diversity and are almost entirely constituted of small-sized opportunistic species belonging to the genera Ammonia and Elphidium. In particular: • Samples collected on the mud flat and in ponds at the margin of the channel show a foraminiferal assemblage characterised by abundant foraminifera belonging to the genera Ammonia, Elphidium, Triloculina, Quinqueloculina, Peneroplis and Spirolina. • Samples collected in the lower (wet) intertidal area close to Avicenna marina roots, presented a low-diversity assemblage mostly comprising opportunistic foraminifera of the genera Ammonia and Elphidium along with rare miliolidae. • Samples from the upper intertidal area (dry) close to Avicenna marina roots, produced an assemblage exclusively composed of small-sized opportunistic Ammonia and Elphidium, together with abundant specimens belonging to the genera Trochammina. Throchammina specimens have not been previously recorded from Recent sedimentary samples of

  2. A contemporary look at the sedimentary system of the coastal sabkha of Abu Dhabi (UAE): Primary deposition vs. early diagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Andreas; Wang, Jiayi; Court, Wesley; Lokier, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    More than half a century ago, the Abu Dhabi coastline was subject to intensive research efforts by institutions from all over the world. This activity was mostly related to the onset of oil exploration in the region and the hypothesis that the modern Abu Dhabi Sabkha provides a direct analogue to the ancient deposits of the hydrocarbon-bearing Arab Formation. While research initially concentrated on a characterisation of the bulk depositional system, focus has recently shifted to answer more specific questions such as the role of microbial mats in the formation of dolomite. Through this shift to a smaller scale, the remainder of the sabkha, including its microbial mats, was neglected and little further activity was undertaken to characterise the coastal sabkha using modern, state-of-the-art, research tools and methods. This paper will not attempt to reinvent the wheel with respect to the work of the early researchers; we will instead present an updated model of the sedimentary system of the coastal sabkha of Abu Dhabi. This model will focus on establishing the relationship and controlling factors between primary deposits of the carbonate ramp system and secondary early diagenetic precipitates. Initial results show that primary deposits of the UAE's carbonate ramp are equivalent to carbonate mudstones, packstones, grainstones, and occasional rudstones with a packstone matrix, that form above a Holocene to Recent hardground. These deposits occur mostly in a subtidal to lower intertidal setting, landward of which they are gradually being covered by a green cyanobacterial layer that binds the primarily unconsolidated sediment. Further landward, in the middle and upper intertidal zones, these cyanobacterial layers grade into more complex microbial mat layers of potentially highly diverse bacterial and algal faunal composition. Microbial mat layers in the upper intertidal and the lower supratidal zones are increasingly interspersed with gypsum crystals and white

  3. CAT LIDAR wind shear studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goff, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The studies considered the major meteorological factors producing wind shear, methods to define and classify wind shear in terms significant from an aircraft perturbation standpoint, the significance of sensor location and scan geometry on the detection and measurement of wind shear, and the tradeoffs involved in sensor performance such as range/velocity resolution, update frequency and data averaging interval.

  4. Gravity study of the Central African Rift system: A model of continental disruption 1. The Ngaoundere and Abu Gabra Rifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, S. E.; Fairhead, J. D.

    1983-05-01

    A regional compilation of published and unpublished gravity data for Central Africa is presented and reveals the presence of a major rift system, called here, the Central African Rift System. It is proposed that the junction area between the Ngaoundere and Abu Gabra rift arms in Western Sudan forms an incipient intraplate, triple-junction with the as yet unfractured, but domally uplifted and volcanically active, Darfur swell. It is only the Darfur swell that shows any similarities to the uplift and rift history of East Africa. The other two rifts arms are considered to be structurally similar to the early stages of passive margin development and thus reflect more closely the initial processes of continental fragmentation than the structures associated with rifting in East Africa.

  5. Burials from Wadi Mudayfa'at and Wadi Abu Khasharif, Southern Jordan - Results of a Survey and Salvage Excavations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salameen, Zeyad al; Falahat, Hani

    This paper presents the preliminary results of a survey and excavation conducted in 2006 on small cemeteries at Wadi Mudayfa'at and Wadi Abu Khasharif, which are located c. 30 km southeast of the village of al-Hussayniah on the Desert Highway in southern Jordan. In total five graves were excavated. Preservation was excellent including human and other organic materials (hair, leather, textiles). Preliminary scientific dating points to the period between the second and fourth centuries AD. The research questions discussed are: - the date, the relationship between the cemeteries and surrounding sites, the significance of this area, the identity of the groups buried, the burial techniques and practices adopted and what influenced them and the funerary gifts included with the dead.

  6. Preliminary crustal deformation model deduced from GPS and earthquakes’ data at Abu-Dabbab area, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Abdel-Monem S.; Hosny, A.; Abou-Aly, N.; Saleh, M.; Rayan, A.

    2013-06-01

    A local geodetic network consisting of eleven benchmarks has been established to study the recent crustal deformation in the Abu-Dabbab area. Seven campaigns of GPS measurements have been collected started from October 2008 and ended in March 2012. The collected data were processed using Bernese version 5.0, and the result values were adjusted to get the more accurate positions of the GPS stations. The magnitudes of horizontal displacements are variable from one epoch to another and in the range of 1-3 (±0.2) mm/yr. Due to the differences in rates of the horizontal displacement; the area is divided into two main blocks. The first one, moves to the east direction of about 3 mm/yr, while the second block, moves to the SW direction of about 6 mm/yr. According to the strain fields that were calculated for the different epochs of measurement, the main force is compression force and is taken the NW-SE to NWW-SEE direction. This force could be because of local and regional tectonic processes affecting on the study area. The maximum values of compression stress are found in the southern central and western part of study area. Estimated accumulation of this strain energy may be considered as an indicator of the possibility of earthquake occurrence. From the seismic tomography study, the 3D Vp and Vp/Vs crustal models indicate high Vp/Vs values forms an elongated anomaly, in the central part of the study area, that extends from a depth of 12 km to about 1-2 km of depth is obtained. By using this crustal model in relocations all seismicity informed that most of the seismicity strongly tend to occur in a cluster manner exactly above the southern part of the study area. Based on the conducted source mechanism study, it is noticed that shallow earthquakes are associated by a high CLVD ratio (up to 40%). Furthermore, initiation of a high level seismic activity, without a large seismic main shock is observed in the Abu-Dabbab area. The distribution of micro-earthquakes tends to

  7. Atmospheric bromine flux from the coastal Abu Dhabi sabkhat: A ground-water mass-balance investigation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, W.W.; Sanford, W.E.

    2007-01-01

    A solute mass-balance study of ground water of the 3000 km2 coastal sabkhat (salt flats) of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, documents an annual bromide loss of approximately 255 metric tons (0.0032 Gmoles), or 85 kg/km2. This value is an order of magnitude greater than previously published direct measurements from the atmosphere over an evaporative environment of a salar in Bolivia. Laboratory evidence, consistent with published reports, suggests that this loss is by vapor transport to the atmosphere. If this bromine flux to the atmosphere is representative of the total earth area of active salt flats then it is a significant, and generally under recognized, input to the global atmospheric bromide flux.

  8. Shear-thinning Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Whipped cream and the filling for pumpkin pie are two familiar materials that exhibit the shear-thinning effect seen in a range of industrial applications. It is thick enough to stand on its own atop a piece of pie, yet flows readily when pushed through a tube. This demonstrates the shear-thinning effect that was studied with the Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002. CVX observed the behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The principal investigator was Dr. Robert Berg of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD.

  9. Gelation under shear

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, B.D.; Hanley, H.J.M.; Straty, G.C.; Muzny, C.D.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of dense silica gels, prepared from suspensions of 24 nm colloidal silica particles at several volume fractions {theta} is discussed. Provided that {theta}{approx_lt}0.18, the scattered intensity at small wave vectors q increases as the gelation proceeds, and the structure factor S(q, t {yields} {infinity}) of the gel exhibits apparent power law behavior. Power law behavior is also observed, even for samples with {theta}>0.18, when the gel is formed under an applied shear. Shear also enhances the diffraction maximum corresponding to the inter-particle contact distance of the gel. Difficulties encountered when trying to interpret SANS data from these dense systems are outlined. Results of computer simulations intended to mimic gel formation, including computations of S(q, t), are discussed. Comments on a method to extract a fractal dimension characterizing the gel are included.

  10. Observations of the atmospheric boundary layer height over Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates: Investigating boundary layer climatology in arid regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzooqi, Mohamed Al; Basha, Ghouse; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.; Armstrong, Peter; Molini, Annalisa

    2014-05-01

    Strong sensible heat fluxes and deep turbulent mixing - together with marked dustiness and a low substrate water content - represent a characteristic signature in the boundary layer over hot deserts, resulting in "thicker" mixing layers and peculiar optical properties. Beside these main features however, desert ABLs present extremely complex local structures that have been scarcely addressed in the literature, and whose understanding is essential in modeling processes such as the transport of dust and pollutants, and turbulent fluxes of momentum, heat and water vapor in hyper-arid regions. In this study, we analyze a continuous record of observations of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) height from a single lens LiDAR ceilometer operated at Masdar Institute Field Station (24.4oN, 54.6o E, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates), starting March 2013. We compare different methods for the estimation of the ABL height from Ceilometer data such as, classic variance-, gradient-, log gradient- and second derivation-methods as well as recently developed techniques such as the Bayesian Method and Wavelet covariance transform. Our goal is to select the most suited technique for describing the climatology of the ABL in desert environments. Comparison of our results with radiosonde observations collected at the nearby airport of Abu Dhabi indicate that the WCT and the Bayesian method are the most suitable tools to accurately identify the ABL height in all weather conditions. These two methods are used for the definition of diurnal and seasonal climatologies of the boundary layer conditional to different atmospheric stability classes.

  11. Changes in Soil Chemistry and Agricultural Return Flow in an Integrated Seawater Agriculture System (ISAS) Demonstration in Abu Dhabi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Q.; Matiin, W. A.; Ahmad, F.

    2012-12-01

    Growing halophytes using Integrated Seawater Agriculture Systems (ISAS) offers a sustainable solution for the generation of biomass feedstock for carbon neutral biofuels - halophytes do not enter the foodchain and they do not compete with food-crops for natural resources. A field demonstration of ISAS in the coastal regions of Abu Dhabi, UAE, scheduled to start in 2013, will likely face a number of region-specific challenges not encountered in past demonstrations of ISAS at coastal locations in Mexico and Eritrea. The arid climate, unique soil chemistry (evaporite deposits, especially gypsum), and hypersaline coastal hydrogeology of Abu Dhabi will affect long-term halophyte agricultural productivity when Arabian Gulf seawater is applied to coastal soils as part of ISAS. Therefore, the changes in irrigation return flow quality and soil chemistry must be monitored closely over time to establish transient salt and water balances in order to assess the sustainability of ISAS in the region. As an initial phase of the ISAS demonstration project, numerical modeling of different seawater loadings onto coastal soils was conducted to estimate the chemical characteristics of soil and the irrigation return flow over time. These modeling results will be validated with field monitoring data upon completion of one year of ISAS operation. The results from this study could be used to (i) determine the optimal saline water loading that the soils at the ISAS site can tolerate, (ii) potential for sodicity of the soil with saline water application, (iii) impacts of land application of saline water on underlying coastal groundwater, and (iv) develop strategies to control soil water activities in favor of halophyte agricultural productivity.

  12. Seismicity, arrival time delays of the seismic phases and slowness characteristics study in Abu Dabbab area, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sami, Mahmoud; Hassoup, Awad; Hosny, Ahmed; Mohamed, Gadelkarem A.

    2013-12-01

    The temporal variations of seismicity from the Abu Dabbab area, 25 km west of the Red Sea coast, are collected from the Egyptian national seismic network (ENSN), which has magnified the detection capability in that area to ML < 1 earthquakes. These data show a sequence of the micro earthquake swarm during 2003-2011. This area has experienced larger shocks up to M = 6 during the 20th century and its seismicity is concentrated in a narrow spatial volume. We analyze the digital waveform data of about 1000 seismograms, recorded by portable network of 10 vertical component seismographs that are employed in a temporary survey experiment in the Abu Dabbab area in 2004, and the results indicate: firstly, there are similar waveform seismograms, which are classified into three groups. In each group a master event is identified. Then, the arrival time delays of the P and S phases (Δtp and Δts, respectively) are measured between the master event and its slave events. Δtp and Δts range between -0.01 and 0.02 s, respectively. These values are used to relocate the studied events. Secondly, the slowness vector (Δs) in 3-dimensional pattern, which is estimated using the genetic algorithms, is found Δsx = 0.0153, Δsy = 0.00093 and Δsz = 0.2086 s/km in the three spatial coordinates (X, Y and Z), respectively. These analyses demonstrate the inhomogeneities within the upper crust of the study area. Also, Δs shows little dependence of lateral distances and reasonably high slowness along the depth extent, which is consistent with the seismic velocity structure variations.

  13. 3D Crustal Structure and 3D-b-value in AbuDabbab Seismogenic Source, Northern Red Sea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Arifi, Nassir; El Kherpy, Sami; Koulakov, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    Abu Dabbab seismogenic source region is of unique seismic activity located on the Egyptian Red Sea coast. It's known as earthquake Cannons where the earthquakes are accompanied by a sound of distinct rumbling similar to the sound of a distant quarry blast which is heard by humans for several generations. Seismic activity of Abu Dabbab becomes very well determined after establishing of the Egyptian National Seismic Network 1997. Joint earthquake tomography inversion of local and regional data has been performed in order to image the crustal heterogeneity and the origin of the cannons earthquakes. Most previous studies suggested that this activity is of magmatic origin. We found the seismicity forms an arc shaped cluster that surrounds an aseismic block. This aseismic block has high velocities and a low Vp/Vs ratio. The origin of this seismic activity is probably due an active fault below the non-deformed block of Precambrian Igneous rock reaching a depth of ~10 km. Spatial mapping of the frequency magnitude distribution of the earthquakes and 3D-b-value indicate a strong variation moreover high b-value (1.4) at depth downward the rigid block. The Combined interpretation of the seismic imaging and 3D b-value in addition to the seismological and the geophysical observations revealed the tectonic origin of the earthquake activity in this area which is related strongly to the evolution of the crust in the Red Sea and its tectonic activity. KEYWARD:Three dimensional Crustal Structure - Seismic activity -Three-D b-value- Red Sea tectonics- Tectonic activity

  14. Structure, Aboveground Biomass, and Soil Characterization of Avicennia marina in Eastern Mangrove Lagoon National Park, Abu Dhabi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsumaiti, Tareefa Saad Sultan

    Mangrove forests are national treasures of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and other arid countries with limited forested areas. Mangroves form a crucial part of the coastal ecosystem and provide numerous benefits to society, economy, and especially the environment. Mangrove trees, specifically Avicennia marina, are studied in their native habitat in order to characterize their population structure, aboveground biomass, and soil properties. This study focused on Eastern Mangrove Lagoon National Park in Abu Dhabi, which was the first mangrove protected area to be designated in UAE. In situ measurements were collected to estimate Avicennia marina status, mortality rate (%), height (m), crown spread (m), stem number, diameter at breast height (cm), basal area (m), and aboveground biomass (t ha-1 ). Small-footprint aerial light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data acquired by UAE were processed to characterize mangrove canopy height and aboveground biomass density. This included extraction of LIDAR-derived height percentile statistics, segmentation of the forest into structurally homogenous units, and development of regression relationships between in situ reference and remote sensing data using a machine learning approach. An in situ soil survey was conducted to examine the soils' physical and chemical properties, fertility status, and organic matter. The data of soil survey were used to create soil maps to evaluate key characteristics of soils, and their influence on Avicennia marina in Eastern Mangrove Lagoon National Park. The results of this study provide new insights into Avicennia marina canopy population, structure, aboveground biomass, and soil properties in Abu Dhabi, as data in such arid environments is lacking. This valuable information can help in managing and preserving this unique ecosystem.

  15. Micromechanics of shear banding

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    Shear-banding is one of many instabilities observed during the plastic flow of solids. It is a consequence of the dislocation mechanism which makes plastic flow fundamentally inhomogeneous, and is exacerbated by local adiabatic heating. Dislocation lines tend to be clustered on sets of neighboring glide planes because they are heterogeneously generated; especially through the Koehler multiple-cross-glide mechanism. Factors that influence their mobilities also play a role. Strain-hardening decreases the mobilities within shear bands thereby tending to spread (delocalize) them. Strain-softening has the inverse effect. This paper reviews the micro-mechanisms of these phenomena. It will be shown that heat production is also a consequence of the heterogeneous nature of the microscopic flow, and that dislocation dipoles play an important role. They are often not directly observable, but their presence may be inferred from changes in thermal conductivity. It is argued that after deformation at low temperatures dipoles are distributed a la Pareto so there are many more small than large ones. Instability at upper yield point, the shapes of shear-band fronts, and mechanism of heat generation are also considered. It is shown that strain-rate acceleration plays a more important role than strain-rate itself in adiabatic instability.

  16. Solostamenides paucitesticulatus n. sp. (Monogenoidea: Mazocraeidea: Microcotylidae) from the freshwater mullet Liza abu (Heckel) (Mugiliformes: Mugilidae) from Atatürk Reservoir on the Euphrates River in southern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kritsky, Delane C; Öktener, Ahmet

    2015-06-01

    Solostamenides paucitesticulatus n. sp. (Monogenoidea: Microcotylidae) from the gills of the abu mullet Liza abu (Heckel) in Atatürk Reservoir in southern Turkey is described. Among other features, the new species is easily distinguished from its three congeners, Solostamenides mugilis (Vogt, 1879), Solostamenides pseudomugilis (Hargis, 1956) and Solostamenides polyorchis Zhang & Yang, 2001, by having fewer hooks on the male copulatory organ (11 to 14), testes (5 to 9), and haptoral clamps (31 to 47). PMID:25962461

  17. A GIS-BASED MULTI-CRITERIA EVALUATION SYSTEM FOR SELECTION OF LANDFILL SITES: a case study from Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, S. M.; Shehhi, B. Al

    2012-07-01

    Landfill sites receive 92% of total annual solid waste produced by municipalities in the emirate of Abu Dhabi. In this study, candidate sites for an appropriate landfill location for the Abu Dhabi municipal area are determined by integrating geographic information systems (GIS) and multi-criteria evaluation (MCE) analysis. To identify appropriate landfill sites, eight input map layers including proximity to urban areas, proximity to wells and water table depth, geology and topography, proximity to touristic and archeological sites, distance from roads network, distance from drainage networks, and land slope are used in constraint mapping. A final map was generated which identified potential areas showing suitability for the location of the landfill site. Results revealed that 30% of the study area was identified as highly suitable, 25% as suitable, and 45% as unsuitable. The selection of the final landfill site, however, requires further field research.

  18. TUBE SHEARING VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Wilner, L.B.

    1960-05-24

    Explosive operated valves can be used to join two or more containers in fluid flow relationship, one such container being a sealed reservoir. The valve is most simply disposed by mounting it on the reservoir so thst a tube extends from the interior of the reservoir through the valve body, terminating at the bottom of the bore in a closed end; other containers may be similarly connected or may be open connected, as desired. The piston of the valve has a cutting edge at its lower end which shears off the closed tube ends and a recess above the cutting edge to provide a flow channel. Intermixing of the fluid being transferred with the explosion gases is prevented by a copper ring at the top of the piston which is force fitted into the bore at the beginning of the stroke. Although designed to avoid backing up of the piston at pressures up to 10,000 psi in the transferred fluid, proper operation is independent of piston position, once the tube ends were sheared.

  19. Utilizations and Perceptions of Emergency Medical Services by Patients with ST-Segments Elevation Acute Myocardial Infarction in Abu Dhabi: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Callachan, Edward Lance; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A.; Nair, Satish Chandrasekhar; Bruijns, Stevan; Wallis, Lee A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Data on the use of emergency medical services (EMS) by patients with cardiac conditions in the Gulf region are scarce, and prior studies have suggested underutilization. Patient perception and knowledge of EMS care is critical to proper utilization of such services. Objectives: To estimate utilization, knowledge, and perceptions of EMS among patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. Methods: We conducted a multicenter prospective study of consecutive patients admitted with STEMI in four government-operated hospitals in Abu Dhabi. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients to assess the rationale for choosing their prehospital mode of transport and their knowledge of EMS services. Results: Of 587 patients with STEMI (age 51 ± 11 years, male 95%), only 15% presented through EMS, and the remainder came via private transport. Over half of the participants (55%) stated that they did not know the telephone number for EMS. The most common reasons stated for not using EMS were that private transport was quicker (40%) or easier (11%). A small percentage of participants (7%) did not use EMS because they did not think their symptoms were cardiac-related or warranted an EMS call. Stated reasons for not using EMS did not significantly differ by age, gender, or primary language of the patients. Conclusions: EMS care for STEMI is grossly underutilized in Abu Dhabi. Patient knowledge and perceptions may contribute to underutilization, and public education efforts are needed to raise their perception and knowledge of EMS. PMID:27512532

  20. Excited waves in shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  1. Inductive shearing of drilling pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Wilgen, John; Kisner, Roger; Mcintyre, Timothy

    2016-04-19

    Induction shearing may be used to cut a drillpipe at an undersea well. Electromagnetic rings may be built into a blow-out preventer (BOP) at the seafloor. The electromagnetic rings create a magnetic field through the drillpipe and may transfer sufficient energy to change the state of the metal drillpipe to shear the drillpipe. After shearing the drillpipe, the drillpipe may be sealed to prevent further leakage of well contents.

  2. True Shear Parallel Plate Viscometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin; Kaukler, William

    2010-01-01

    This viscometer (which can also be used as a rheometer) is designed for use with liquids over a large temperature range. The device consists of horizontally disposed, similarly sized, parallel plates with a precisely known gap. The lower plate is driven laterally with a motor to apply shear to the liquid in the gap. The upper plate is freely suspended from a double-arm pendulum with a sufficiently long radius to reduce height variations during the swing to negligible levels. A sensitive load cell measures the shear force applied by the liquid to the upper plate. Viscosity is measured by taking the ratio of shear stress to shear rate.

  3. Hydrocarbon potential evaluation of the source rocks from the Abu Gabra Formation in the Sufyan Sag, Muglad Basin, Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jinqi; Liu, Luofu; An, Fuli; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Ying; Wu, Kangjun; Zhao, Yuanyuan

    2016-06-01

    The Sufyan Sag is one of the low-exploration areas in the Muglad Basin (Sudan), and hydrocarbon potential evaluation of source rocks is the basis for its further exploration. The Abu Gabra Formation consisting of three members (AG3, AG2 and AG1 from bottom to top) was thought to be the main source rock formation, but detailed studies on its petroleum geology and geochemical characteristics are still insufficient. Through systematic analysis on distribution, organic matter abundance, organic matter type, organic matter maturity and characteristics of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion of the source rocks from the Abu Gabra Formation, the main source rock members were determined and the petroleum resource extent was estimated in the study area. The results show that dark mudstones are the thickest in the AG2 member while the thinnest in the AG1 member, and the thickness of the AG3 dark mudstone is not small either. The AG3 member have developed good-excellent source rock mainly with Type I kerogen. In the Southern Sub-sag, the AG3 source rock began to generate hydrocarbons in the middle period of Bentiu. In the early period of Darfur, it reached the hydrocarbon generation and expulsion peak. It is in late mature stage currently. The AG2 member developed good-excellent source rock mainly with Types II1 and I kerogen, and has lower organic matter abundance than the AG3 member. In the Southern Sub-sag, the AG2 source rock began to generate hydrocarbons in the late period of Bentiu. In the late period of Darfur, it reached the peak of hydrocarbon generation and its expulsion. It is in middle mature stage currently. The AG1 member developed fair-good source rock mainly with Types II and III kerogen. Throughout the geological evolution history, the AG1 source rock has no effective hydrocarbon generation or expulsion processes. Combined with basin modeling results, we have concluded that the AG3 and AG2 members are the main source rock layers and the Southern Sub-sag is

  4. Contributions to a shallow aquifer study by reprocessed seismic sections from petroleum exploration surveys, eastern Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodward, D.

    1994-01-01

    The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Drilling Company of Abu Dhabi, is conducting a 4-year study of the fresh and slightly saline groundwater resources of the eastern Abu Dhabi Emirate. Most of this water occurs in a shallow aquifer, generally less than 150 m deep, in the Al Ain area. A critical part of the Al Ain area coincides with a former petroleum concession area where about 2780 km of vibroseis data were collected along 94 seismic lines during 1981-1983. Field methods, acquistion parameters, and section processing were originally designed to enhance reflections expected at depths ranging from 5000 to 6000 m, and subsurface features directly associated with the shallow aquifer system were deleted from the original seismic sections. The original field tapes from the vibroseis survey were reprocessed in an attempt to extract shallow subsurface information (depths less than 550 m) for investigating the shallow aquifer. A unique sequence of reproccessing parameters was established after reviewing the results from many experimental tests. Many enhancements to the resolution of shallow seismic reflections resulted from: (1) application of a 20-Hz, low-cut filter; (2) recomputation of static corrections to a datum nearer the land surface; (3) intensive velocity analyses; and (4) near-trace muting analyses. The number, resolution, and lateral continuity of shallow reflections were greatly enhanced on the reprocessed sections, as was the delineation of shallow, major faults. Reflections on a synthetic seismogram, created from a borehole drilled to a depth of 786 m on seismic line IQS-11, matcheddprecisely with shallow reflections on the reprocessed section. The 33 reprocessed sections were instrumental in preparing a map showing the major structural features that affect the shallow aquifer system. Analysis of the map provides a better understanding of the effect of these shallow features on the regional occurrence, movement, and quality of

  5. APPARATUS FOR SHEARING TUBULAR JACKETS

    DOEpatents

    Simon, J.P.

    1962-09-01

    A machine is designed for removing the jacket from the core of a used rod-like fuel element by shearing the jacket into a spiral ribbon. Three skewed rolls move the fuel element axially and rotatively, and a tool cooperates with one of the rolls to carry out the shearing action. (AEC)

  6. A Piezoelectric Shear Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress suppressing effects of normal stress generated from the vortex lift-up by applying opposite poling vectors to the: piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces and it showed high sensitivity to shear stress (=91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of PMN-33%PT (d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also showed almost no sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is 0-800 Hz. Keywords: Piezoelectric sensor, shear stress, floating element, electromechanical symmetry

  7. Impact of stylolitization on diagenesis of a Lower Cretaceous carbonate reservoir from a giant oilfield, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganoni, Matteo; Al Harthi, Amena; Morad, Daniel; Morad, Sadoon; Ceriani, Andrea; Mansurbeg, Howri; Al Suwaidi, Aisha; Al-Aasm, Ihsan S.; Ehrenberg, Stephen N.; Sirat, Manhal

    2016-04-01

    Bed-parallel stylolites are a widespread diagenetic feature in Lower Cretaceous limestone reservoirs, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE). Diagenetic calcite, dolomite, kaolin and small amounts of pyrite, fluorite, anhydrite and sphalerite occur along and in the vicinity of the stylolites. Petrographic observations, negative δ18OVPDB, fluid inclusion microthermometry, and enrichment in 87Sr suggest that these cements have precipitated from hot basinal brines, which migrated along the stylolites and genetically related microfractures (tension gashes). Fluid migration was presumably related to lateral tectonic compression events related to the foreland basin formation. The low solubility of Al3 + in formation waters suggests that kaolin precipitation was linked to derivation of organic acids during organic matter maturation, probably in siliciclastic source rocks. The mass released from stylolitization was presumably re-precipitated as macro- and microcrystalline calcite cement in the host limestones. The flanks of the oilfield (water zone) display more frequent presence and higher amplitude of stylolites, lower porosity and permeability, higher homogenization temperatures and more radiogenic composition of carbonates compared to the crest (oil zone). This indicates that oil emplacement retards diagenesis. This study demonstrates that stylolitization plays a crucial role in fluid flow and diagenesis of carbonate reservoirs during basin evolution.

  8. Infant Feeding Practices of Emirati Women in the Rapidly Developing City of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Hazel; Green, Katherine; Gardner, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Rapid economic and cultural transition in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) has been accompanied by new challenges to public health; most notably a rapid rise in chronic disease. Breastfeeding is known to improve health outcomes in adulthood, is associated with reduced risk of developing chronic disease, and is therefore an important public health issue for this rapidly increasing population. Factors associated with infant feeding practices were examined in a cohort of 125 Emirati women and their infants, with data collected at birth and 3, 6 and 15 months postpartum by questionnaires and interviews. Participants were recruited in the Corniche Hospital, the main maternity hospital in the city of Abu Dhabi. Factors affecting the duration of breastfeeding and the introduction of complementary foods were investigated using univariate and multivariate statistics. Recommended infant feeding practices, such as exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life and timely introduction of appropriate complementary foods, were poorly adhered to. Factors implicated in early cessation of breastfeeding included: time to first breastfeed, mother’s education level, employment status and early introduction of complementary foods. PMID:26404348

  9. Early guenon from the late Miocene Baynunah Formation, Abu Dhabi, with implications for cercopithecoid biogeography and evolution.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Christopher C; Bibi, Faysal; Hill, Andrew; Beech, Mark J

    2014-07-15

    A newly discovered fossil monkey (AUH 1321) from the Baynunah Formation, Emirate of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, is important in a number of distinct ways. At ∼ 6.5-8.0 Ma, it represents the earliest known member of the primate subfamily Cercopithecinae found outside of Africa, and it may also be the earliest cercopithecine in the fossil record. In addition, the fossil appears to represent the earliest member of the cercopithecine tribe Cercopithecini (guenons) to be found anywhere, adding between 2 and 3.5 million y (∼ 50-70%) to the previous first-appearance datum of the crown guenon clade. It is the only guenon--fossil or extant--known outside the continent of Africa, and it is only the second fossil monkey specimen so far found in the whole of Arabia. This discovery suggests that identifiable crown guenons extend back into the Miocene epoch, thereby refuting hypotheses that they are a recent radiation first appearing in the Pliocene or Pleistocene. Finally, the new monkey is a member of a unique fauna that had dispersed from Africa and southern Asia into Arabia by this time, suggesting that the Arabian Peninsula was a potential filter for cross-continental faunal exchange. Thus, the presence of early cercopithecines on the Arabian Peninsula during the late Miocene reinforces the probability of a cercopithecoid dispersal route out of Africa through southwest Asia before Messinian dispersal routes over the Mediterranean Basin or Straits of Gibraltar. PMID:24982136

  10. Early guenon from the late Miocene Baynunah Formation, Abu Dhabi, with implications for cercopithecoid biogeography and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Christopher C.; Bibi, Faysal; Hill, Andrew; Beech, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    A newly discovered fossil monkey (AUH 1321) from the Baynunah Formation, Emirate of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, is important in a number of distinct ways. At ∼6.5–8.0 Ma, it represents the earliest known member of the primate subfamily Cercopithecinae found outside of Africa, and it may also be the earliest cercopithecine in the fossil record. In addition, the fossil appears to represent the earliest member of the cercopithecine tribe Cercopithecini (guenons) to be found anywhere, adding between 2 and 3.5 million y (∼50–70%) to the previous first-appearance datum of the crown guenon clade. It is the only guenon—fossil or extant—known outside the continent of Africa, and it is only the second fossil monkey specimen so far found in the whole of Arabia. This discovery suggests that identifiable crown guenons extend back into the Miocene epoch, thereby refuting hypotheses that they are a recent radiation first appearing in the Pliocene or Pleistocene. Finally, the new monkey is a member of a unique fauna that had dispersed from Africa and southern Asia into Arabia by this time, suggesting that the Arabian Peninsula was a potential filter for cross-continental faunal exchange. Thus, the presence of early cercopithecines on the Arabian Peninsula during the late Miocene reinforces the probability of a cercopithecoid dispersal route out of Africa through southwest Asia before Messinian dispersal routes over the Mediterranean Basin or Straits of Gibraltar. PMID:24982136

  11. A measure of community health needs and actions in a rural area of Iraq. The Abu-al-Khasib experience.

    PubMed

    Joseph, G; Sugathan, T N; Ramankutty, P; Alkafajei, A M; Antony, R; George, A; Habib, O S; Yacoub, A A; Mahmood, D A; Ajeel, N A

    1982-01-01

    A longitudinal enquiry was carried out among randomly selected households in four villages in Abu-al-Khasib district of Iraq, to study health needs as perceived by the community and actions people take when the need arises. Almost three-quarters of the spells of sickness as perceived by the community were among mothers and children. Most of the morbidity was found to be within the scope of preventive services at the local health centre level. Health centre services were underutilised. Only half of the spells of sickness were reported to the local health centres for medical care; a reason for this phenomenon is the emerging preference for care at the hands of clinical specialists. The action the community takes when a health need arises depends on their perception and this is determined by rapid social and educational development. The need to increase demand for normal care, especially that of mother and child, is stressed; this care may be strengthened through introduction of a domiciliary component. PMID:7179469

  12. Infant Feeding Practices of Emirati Women in the Rapidly Developing City of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Hazel; Green, Katherine; Gardner, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Rapid economic and cultural transition in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) has been accompanied by new challenges to public health; most notably a rapid rise in chronic disease. Breastfeeding is known to improve health outcomes in adulthood, is associated with reduced risk of developing chronic disease, and is therefore an important public health issue for this rapidly increasing population. Factors associated with infant feeding practices were examined in a cohort of 125 Emirati women and their infants, with data collected at birth and 3, 6 and 15 months postpartum by questionnaires and interviews. Participants were recruited in the Corniche Hospital, the main maternity hospital in the city of Abu Dhabi. Factors affecting the duration of breastfeeding and the introduction of complementary foods were investigated using univariate and multivariate statistics. Recommended infant feeding practices, such as exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life and timely introduction of appropriate complementary foods, were poorly adhered to. Factors implicated in early cessation of breastfeeding included: time to first breastfeed, mother's education level, employment status and early introduction of complementary foods. PMID:26404348

  13. Organic tracers in sediments from the coastal zone of Ras Abu el-Darag, Gulf of Suez

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushdi, Ahmed I.; Kassim, Tarek A. T. A.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    2009-10-01

    Sediment samples from the coastal zone of the Gulf of Suez contain a variety of organic compounds from anthropogenic and natural sources. A total of 12 surface samples of bottom sediments were collected with an Ekman grab sampler along an off-shore transect south of Ras Abu el-Darag. The samples were extracted with a mixture of dichloromethane and methanol (3:1 v/v) after drying and sieving through 250 μm mesh. The extracts were derivatized and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in order to characterize the chemical composition and sources of the organic components. Marine with minor terrestrial biota were the major natural sources of organic tracers and included n-alkanoic acids, sterols and saccharides (5.7-76.7%). Anthropogenic sources, from petroleum related activities, detergent usage for spill cleaning and littering, are indicated by the presence of n-alkanes with carbon preference index ≤1.0, hopanes, steranes, unresolved complex mixture of branched and cyclic hydrocarbons, alkyl nitriles, alkamides and plasticizers. Their total relative concentrations ranged from 23.3 to 97.3% of the total extracts. Petroleum residues from natural seepage may also be part of these hydrocarbons. The levels of anthropogenic inputs decrease from about 94% in coastal zone sediments to about 20% in sediments from the reef front.

  14. Estimation of seismic attenuation in carbonate rocks using three different methods: Application on VSP data from Abu Dhabi oilfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchaala, F.; Ali, M. Y.; Matsushima, J.

    2016-06-01

    In this study a relationship between the seismic wavelength and the scale of heterogeneity in the propagating medium has been examined. The relationship estimates the size of heterogeneity that significantly affects the wave propagation at a specific frequency, and enables a decrease in the calculation time of wave scattering estimation. The relationship was applied in analyzing synthetic and Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) data obtained from an onshore oilfield in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Prior to estimation of the attenuation, a robust processing workflow was applied to both synthetic and recorded data to increase the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR). Two conventional methods of spectral ratio and centroid frequency shift methods were applied to estimate the attenuation from the extracted seismic waveforms in addition to a new method based on seismic interferometry. The attenuation profiles derived from the three approaches demonstrated similar variation, however the interferometry method resulted in greater depth resolution, differences in attenuation magnitude. Furthermore, the attenuation profiles revealed significant contribution of scattering on seismic wave attenuation. The results obtained from the seismic interferometry method revealed estimated scattering attenuation ranges from 0 to 0.1 and estimated intrinsic attenuation can reach 0.2. The subsurface of the studied zones is known to be highly porous and permeable, which suggest that the mechanism of the intrinsic attenuation is probably the interactions between pore fluids and solids.

  15. Total dissolved and total particulate copper in Abu-Kir bay a coastal Mediterranean basin under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, M. A. H.; Badr, N. B.

    2003-05-01

    Abu-Kir Bay, a shallow semicircular basin east of Alexandria, has an area of 360 km^2, an average depth of 12 m and a volume of 4.32 km^3. It receives Nile water. brackish lakewater and highly polluted industrial waters. Vertical water samples were collected seasonally from the bay for studying the distribution of total dissolved copper (TDCu), total suspended matter (TSM) and total particulate copper (TPCu). The depth differences of TDCu values were associated with variations in salinities between the water layers. The increase in TDCu content at low salinity in the mixed zone is due to local anthropogenic input from Lake Edku. The stepwise regression model shows that pH was the main factor controlling the TDCu variations, especially at Tabia Sector (TS). Copper was transported mainly to the bay in particulate form, following the considerable input of TSM. During friction of the in-and outflowing water layers with different salinities at the Maadia Sector (MS), a complicated adsorption/desorption behavior of TSM could be expressed as a result of changes in pH, ionic Srength and solution composition. The enrichment of TpCu near the outfalls decreased gradually seaward. A significant positive correlation existed between TPCu and TSM in the surfixe layer of TS.

  16. Smectic Edge Dislocations under Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peilong; Lu, Chun-Yi David

    2011-09-01

    Layer structures around an edge dislocation in a smectic phase under shear are studied with both phase field and order parameter models. It is shown that, contrast to a crystal solid, the conventional picture of the Peach--Koehler force experienced by dislocations when the sample is under a shear stress cannot be readily applied to the smectic phases. Under a uniform shear flow, we obtain the phase field and order parameter solutions around an edge dislocation. The solutions elucidate properties such as the layer distortion range around the dislocation and scaling of inter-dislocation interaction on dislocation separation. Calculations on energy dissipation indicate the extreme shear-thinning behavior that an edge dislocation induces a shear stress independent of the shear rate. Finally in a bulk sample with dislocation forming loops and networks, we argue that the uniform flow component around the dislocation is important to the energy dissipation and we show that its scaling exponent with the shear rate is very close to results from many previous rheology measurements.

  17. Multidirectional direct simple shear apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    DeGroot, D.J.; Germaine, J.T.; Ladd, C.C.

    1993-09-01

    The paper describes a new simple shear testing device, the multidirectional direct simple shear (MDSS) apparatus, for testing soil specimens under conditions that simulate, at the element level, the state of stress acting within the foundation soil of an offshore Arctic gravity structure. The MDSS uses a circular specimen that is consolidated under both a vertical effective stress ({sigma}{sub vc}{prime}) and a horizontal shear stress ({tau}{sub 1}). The specimen is subsequently sheared undrained by applying a second independent horizontal shear stress ({tau}{sub 2}) at an angle {theta} relative to the horizontal consolidation shear stress {tau}{sub 1}. Evaluation of the MDSS first compares conventional K{sub D}-consolidated undrained direct simple shear (CK{sub 0}UDSS) test data ({tau}{sub 1} = 0) on normally consolidated Boston blue clay (BBC) with results obtained in the Geonor DSS device. The MDSS gives lower secant Young`s modulus values and on average 8% lower strengths, but produces remarkably less scatter in the test results than the Geonor DSS. Kinematic proof tests with an elastic material (rubber) confirm that the setup procedure, application of forces, and strain measurement systems in the MDSS work properly and produce repeatable results. Results from a MDSS test program on BBC wherein specimens were first normally consolidated with {sigma}{sub vc}{prime} and {tau}{sub 1} = 0.2{sigma}{sub vc}{prime} and then sheared undrained at {theta} varing in 30{degree} increments from zero (shear in same direction) to 150{degree} show dramatic differences in the response of the soil as a function of {theta}. The peak undrained strength varies almost twofold from 0 = 0 to 120{degree}, while the deformation behavior varies from very brittle at low {theta} angles to becoming ductile at higher angles. 11 refs., 15 figs.

  18. Shear Banding of Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divoux, Thibaut; Fardin, Marc A.; Manneville, Sebastien; Lerouge, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Even in simple geometries, many complex fluids display nontrivial flow fields, with regions where shear is concentrated. The possibility for such shear banding has been known for several decades, but in recent years, we have seen an upsurge in studies offering an ever-more precise understanding of the phenomenon. The development of new techniques to probe the flow on multiple scales with increasing spatial and temporal resolution has opened the possibility for a synthesis of the many phenomena that could only have been thought of separately before. In this review, we bring together recent research on shear banding in polymeric and soft glassy materials and highlight their similarities and disparities.

  19. Fluid-Assisted Shear Failure Within a Ductile Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Compton, K.; Holk, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Exhumed shear zones often contain folded and/or dynamically recrystallized structures such as veins and pseudotachylytes that record contemporaneous brittle and ductile deformation representing mixed bulk rheology. Here, we constrain the conditions that promote the transitions between ductile and brittle deformation by investigating quartz veins with shear offsets in the Saddlebag Lake shear zone in the central Sierra Nevada, California. Mesozoic metasedimentary rocks within the shear zone contain transposed bedding, strong cleavage, dextrally rotated porphyroclasts, and a steep mineral lineation, which together suggest an overall transpressive kinematic regime for the ductile deformation. Foliation sub-parallel veins are one subset of the veins in the shear zone. They have observed horizontal trace lengths of up to around 5 meters, though most are obscured by limited exposure, and displacements range from ~3-30 mm, with 1-5 mm of opening. Foliation sub-parallel veins are folded with the foliation and quartz microstructures and fluid inclusion thermobarometry measurements from vein samples indicate temperatures during vein formation by fracture were between 300-680°C. Quartz δ18O values (+5.9 to +16.5) suggest extended fluid-rock interaction that involved magmatic (δ18O ~ +8 to +10) and meteoric (δ18O down to -1) fluids. Foliation sub-parallel veins are most abundant in relatively massive, quartz-rich rocks where they are boudinaged, indicating they were rigid inclusions after formation. Based on the orientation and spatial distribution of the veins, we infer that they formed under high differential stress with pore pressures sufficiently high for the rocks to be critically stressed for shear failure along mechanically weak foliation planes. These observations suggest high pore pressures and mechanical heterogeneity at a variety of scales are necessary conditions for nucleation of shear fractures within ductile shear zones.

  20. Shear instabilities in granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, David J.; Glasser, Benjamin J.; Shinbrot, Troy

    2002-01-01

    Unstable waves have been long studied in fluid shear layers. These waves affect transport in the atmosphere and oceans, in addition to slipstream stability behind ships, aeroplanes and heat-transfer devices. Corresponding instabilities in granular flows have not been previously documented, despite the importance of these flows in geophysical and industrial systems. Here we report that breaking waves can form at the interface between two streams of identical grains flowing on an inclined plane downstream of a splitter plate. Changes in either the shear rate or the angle of incline cause such waves to appear abruptly. We analyse a granular flow model that agrees qualitatively with our experimental data; the model suggests that the waves result from competition between shear and extensional strains in the flowing granular bed. We propose a dimensionless shear number that governs the transition between steady and wavy flows.

  1. Shear instabilities in granular flows.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, David J; Glasser, Benjamin J; Shinbrot, Troy

    2002-01-17

    Unstable waves have been long studied in fluid shear layers. These waves affect transport in the atmosphere and oceans, in addition to slipstream stability behind ships, aeroplanes and heat-transfer devices. Corresponding instabilities in granular flows have not been previously documented, despite the importance of these flows in geophysical and industrial systems. Here we report that breaking waves can form at the interface between two streams of identical grains flowing on an inclined plane downstream of a splitter plate. Changes in either the shear rate or the angle of incline cause such waves to appear abruptly. We analyse a granular flow model that agrees qualitatively with our experimental data; the model suggests that the waves result from competition between shear and extensional strains in the flowing granular bed. We propose a dimensionless shear number that governs the transition between steady and wavy flows. PMID:11797003

  2. Proteins in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, P.; Cieplak, Marek

    2007-10-01

    The conformational dynamics of a single protein molecule in a shear flow is investigated using Brownian dynamics simulations. A structure-based coarse grained model of a protein is used. We consider two proteins, ubiquitin and integrin, and find that at moderate shear rates they unfold through a sequence of metastable states—a pattern which is distinct from a smooth unraveling found in homopolymers. Full unfolding occurs only at very large shear rates. Furthermore, the hydrodynamic interactions between the amino acids are shown to hinder the shear flow unfolding. The characteristics of the unfolding process depend on whether a protein is anchored or not, and if it is, on the choice of an anchoring point.

  3. Grafted polymer under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Foster, Damien P.; Giri, Debaprasad; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-04-01

    A self-attracting-self-avoiding walk model of polymer chain on a square lattice has been used to gain an insight into the behaviour of a polymer chain under shear flow in a slit of width L. Using exact enumeration technique, we show that at high temperature, the polymer acquires the extended state continuously increasing with shear stress. However, at low temperature the polymer exhibits two transitions: a transition from the coiled to the globule state and a transition to a stem-flower like state. For a chain of finite length, we obtained the exact monomer density distributions across the layers at different temperatures. The change in density profile with shear stress suggests that the polymer under shear flow can be used as a molecular gate with potential application as a sensor.

  4. A piezoelectric shear stress sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress, suppressing effects of normal stress components, by applying opposite poling vectors to the piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces where it demonstrated high sensitivity to shear stress (91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of 0.67Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.33PbTiO3 (PMN-33%PT, d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also exhibited negligible sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is up to 800 Hz.

  5. Cosmic Shear from Galaxy Spins.

    PubMed

    Lee; Pen

    2000-03-20

    We discuss the origin of galactic angular momentum and the statistics of the present-day spin distribution. It is expected that the galaxy spin axes are correlated with the intermediate principal axis of the gravitational shear tensor. This allows one to reconstruct the shear field and thereby the full gravitational potential from the observed galaxy spin fields. We use the direction of the angular momentum vector without any information of its magnitude, which requires a measurement of the position angle and inclination on the sky of each disk galaxy. We present the maximum likelihood shear inversion procedure, which involves a constrained linear minimization. The theory is tested against numerical simulations. We find the correlation strength of nonlinear structures with the initial shear field and show that accurate large-scale density reconstructions are possible at the expected noise level. PMID:10702119

  6. Organic geochemical characteristics of the Lower Cretaceous Abu Gabra Formation in the Great Moga oilfield, Muglad Basin, Sudan: Implications for depositional environment and oil-generation potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makeen, Yousif M.; Abdullah, Wan Hasiah; Hakimi, Mohammed Hail; Elhassan, Osman M. A.

    2015-03-01

    Organic-rich sediments within the Abu Gabra Formation from three wells in the Great Moga oilfield were analyzed using organic geochemistry and organic petrology. The analyzed samples generally contain more than 2.0 wt.% TOC and have a very good to excellent hydrocarbon generative potential. This is supported by high bitumen extract and hydrocarbon (HCs) yields with values exceeding 4000 and 2000 ppm, respectively. The Abu Gabra also have moderate to high hydrogen index (HI) values of 287-865 mg HC/g TOC and large amounts of amorphous organic matter and alginite, consistent with oil-prone Types I and Type II kerogen. Vitrinite reflectance (0.59-0.72) %Ro and pyrolysis Tmax (430-438 °C) indicate an early oil window stage. This is supported by bitumen/TOC ratios (0.04-0.09) and biomarker thermal maturity parameters with equilibrium C32 homohopane 22S/(22S + 22R) ratios (0.50-58), moretane/hopane (0.11-018) and C29ββ/(ββ + αα) (0.53-0.73) and 20S/(20S + 20R) ratios (0.26-0.48). The biomarkers are characterized by a dominance of low to medium molecular weight n-alkane compounds with significant waxy alkanes (n-C25-n-C34), moderately high Pr/Ph ratios (1.17-2.51), high abundance of C27 regular steranes, high C27/C29 regular sterane ratios, the presence of tricyclic terpanes and relatively low sterane/hopane ratios. These data indicate that the organic-rich sediments of the Abu Gabra Formation contain a mixture of aquatic (algal and bacterial) and terrigenous organic matter, deposited in a lacustrine environment and preserved under suboxic conditions.

  7. Perceptions and Attitudes towards Medical Research in the United Arab Emirates: Results from the Abu Dhabi Cohort Study (ADCS) Focus Group Discussions

    PubMed Central

    El Obaid, Yusra; Al Hamiz, Aisha; Abdulle, Abdishakur; Hayes, Richard B.; Sherman, Scott; Ali, Raghib

    2016-01-01

    Background In developing medical research, particularly in regions where medical research is largely unfamiliar, it is important to understand public perceptions and attitudes towards medical research. In preparation for starting the first cohort study in the United Arab Emirates, the Abu Dhabi Cohort Study (ADCS), we sought to understand how we could improve the quality of the research process for participants and increase public trust and awareness of research. Methods We conducted six focus groups (FG), consisting of Emirati men and women aged above 18 years to resemble the target population for the ADCS. Sampling was purposive and convenient. Data collection was an iterative process until saturation was reached with no new themes identified. Text from each FG was analyzed separately by identifying emerging issues and organizing related concepts into categories or themes. A coding tree was developed, consisting of the main concepts, themes, subthemes and corresponding quotes. Both themes and main ideas were identified using inductive analysis. Results Forty-two participants enrolled at 3 academic centers (New York University Abu Dhabi, UAE University, Zayed University) and the Abu Dhabi blood bank. Focus group participants described lack of awareness of research as a challenge to participation in clinical research studies. Altruism, personal relevance of the research, and the use of role models were commonly identified motivators. Participants were generally satisfied with the informed consent process for the ADCS, but would be disappointed if not provided test results or study outcomes. Fear of a breach in confidentiality was a frequently expressed concern. Conclusions Participants join research studies for varied, complex reasons, notably altruism and personal relevance. Based on these insights, we propose specific actions to enhance participant recruitment, retention and satisfaction in the ADCS. We identified opportunities to improve the research experience

  8. Impact of soil and groundwater corrosion on the Hierakonpolis Temple Town archaeological site, Wadi Abu Sufian, Idfu, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Shishtawy, A M; Atwia, M G; El-Gohary, A; Parizek, R R

    2013-06-01

    Hierakonpolis, Greek for City of the Hawk, nearly 25 km NW of Idfu (Egypt), is an important and extensive archaeological discovery covering a large area. Its richness in archaeological artifacts makes it a valuable site. It has a valid claim to be the first nation state, as indicated by the Palette of Narmer discovered in its main mound. Geological and hydrogeological investigations at the Hierakonpolis Temple Town site documented nearly a 4.0-m water table rise from as early as 1892 to the present. In addition to the rising water levels, the increase of both subsoil water salinity and humidity threatens and damages fragile carvings and paintings within tombs in Kingdom Hill, the foundation stability of the site, and the known and still to be discovered artifact that recent pottery finds dates at least 4,000 BCE. Representative rock and soil samples obtained from drilled cores in the study area were chosen for conducting detailed grain size and X-ray analysis, light and heavy mineral occurrences, distribution of moisture and total organic matter, and scanning electron microscopy investigations. Mineralogical analysis of clays indicated that the soil samples are composed of smectite/illite mixed layers with varying proportions of smectite to illite. Kaolinite is the second dominant clay constituent, besides occasional chlorite. Swelling of the clay portion of the soil, due to the presence of capillary groundwater, in contact with buried mudbrick walls expands and causes severe damage to important exposed and buried mudbrick structures, including the massive ancient "fort" believed to date from the Second Dynasty (from 2,890 to 2,686 BC). The "fort" is 1.0 km south of the Temple Town mounds near to confluence of Wadi Abu Sufian. Groundwater samples from the shallow aquifer close by the intersection of Wadi Abu Sufian and the Nile flood plain were analyzed for chemical composition and stable isotope ratios. The groundwater in the upper zone (subsoil water) within fine

  9. Effect of cyclone Nilofar on mesospheric wave dynamics as inferred from optical nightglow observations from Mount Abu, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ravindra P.; Pallamraju, Duggirala

    2016-06-01

    Mesospheric nightglow intensities at three emissions (O2(0-1), OH(6-2) bands, and Na(589.3 nm)) from a low-latitude location, Gurushikhar, Mount Abu (24.6°N, 72.8°E), in India, showed similar wave features on 26 October 2014 with a common periodicity of around 4 h. A convective activity due to the cyclone Nilofar, which had developed in the Arabian Sea during 25-31 October 2014, was found to be the source as this too showed a gravity wave period coherent with that of the mesospheric emissions on the 26th. The periodicities at the source region were obtained using outgoing longwave radiation fluxes (derived from Kalpana-1 satellite) which were used as a tracer of tropospheric activity. Cyclone Nilofar had two centers located at a distance of 1103 and 1665 km from the observational station. From the phase offset in time between residuals of O2 and OH emission intensities and the observed common periodicity the vertical phase speed and wavelength have been found to be 1.13 ms-1 and 16.47 km. From the wavelet analyses it is seen that the travel time of the wave from the convection region to O2 emission height was around 8.1 h. From these observations the horizontal phase speed and wavelength of the wave in the mesosphere were calculated to be 37.8 ms-1 and 553 km. These results thus provide not only unambiguous evidence on the vertical coupling of atmospheres engendered by the tropical cyclone Nilofar but also the characteristics of waves that exist during such cyclonic events.

  10. OPTICAL POLARIMETRY OF THE BLAZAR CGRaBS J0211+1051 FROM MOUNT ABU INFRARED OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Sunil; Baliyan, Kiran S.; Ganesh, Shashikiran; Joshi, Umesh C.

    2012-02-10

    We report the detection of high polarization in the first detailed optical linear polarization measurements on the BL Lac object CGRaBS J0211+1051, which flared in {gamma}-rays on 2011 January 23 as reported by Fermi. The observations were made during 2011 January 30-February 3 using a photo-polarimeter mounted at the 1.2 m telescope of Mount Abu Infrared Observatory. CGRaBS J0211+1051 was detected to have a {approx}21.05% {+-} 0.41% degree of polarization (DP) with a steady position angle (P.A.) at 43 Degree-Sign on 2011 January 30. During January 31 and February 1, while polarization shows some variation, the P.A. remained steady through the night. Several polarization flashes occurred during February 2 and 3 resulting in changes in the DP by more than 4% at short timescales ({approx}17-45 minutes). The intra-night variability shown by the source appears to be related to the turbulence in the relativistic jet. A mild wavelength dependence of polarization is not ruled out during the nights of February 2 and 3. The source exhibited significant inter-night variations in the DP (changing by about 2%-9%) and P.A. (changing by 2 Degree-Sign -22 Degree-Sign ) during the five nights of observations. A sudden change in the P.A. accompanied by a rise in the DP could be indicative of the fresh injection of plasma in the jet. The detection of a high and variable DP suggests that the source is a low-energy peaked blazar.

  11. Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing and Forcing Efficiencies at Surface from the shortwave Irradiance Measurements in Abu Dhabi, UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beegum S, N.; Ben Romdhane, H.; Ghedira, H.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are known to affect the radiation balance of the Earth-Atmospheric system directly by scattering and absorbing the solar and terrestrial radiation, and indirectly by affecting the lifetime and albedo of the clouds. Continuous and simultaneous measurements of short wave global irradiance in combination with synchronous spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements (from 340 nm to 1640 nm in 8 channels), for a period of 1 year from June 2012 to May 2013, were used for the determination of the surface direct aerosol radiative forcing and forcing efficiencies under cloud free conditions in Abu Dhabi (24.42°N, 54.61o E, 7m MSL), a coastal location in United Arab Emirates (UAE) in the Arabian Peninsula. The Rotating Shadow band Pyranometer (RSP, LI-COR) was used for the irradiance measurements (in the spectral region 400-1100 nm), whereas the AOD measurements were carried out using CIMEL Sunphotometer (CE 318-2, under AERONET program). The differential method, which is neither sensitive to calibration uncertainties nor model assumptions, has been employed for estimating forcing efficiencies from the changes in the measured fluxes. The forcing efficiency, which quantifies the net change in irradiance per unit change in AOD, is an appropriate parameter for the characterization of the aerosol radiative effects even if the microphysical and optical properties of the aerosols are not completely understood. The corresponding forcing values were estimated from the forcing efficiencies. The estimated radiative forcing and forcing efficiencies exhibited strong monthly variations. The forcing efficiencies (absolute magnitudes) were highest during March, and showed continuous decrease thereafter to reach the lowest value during September. In contrast, the forcing followed a slightly different pattern of variability, with the highest solar dimming during April ( -60 W m-2) and the minimum during February ( -20 W m-2). The results indicate that the aerosol

  12. The stinging Apidae and Vespidae (Hymenoptera: Apocrita) in Iranian islands, Qeshm, Abu-Musa, Great Tunb and Lesser Tunb on the Persian Gulf

    PubMed Central

    Khoobdel, Mehdi; Tavassoli, Maryam; Salari, Mehdi; Firozi, Fateme

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the stinging flying Hymenoptera (Apidae and Vespidae) fauna in four Iranian Islands, Qeshm, Greater Tunb, Lesser Tunb and Abu-Musa on the Persian Gulf. Methods The flies were captured by used of Malaise trap, fly trap, bottle trap and insect net-hashing from March 2011 to July 2012. Results In this study, 11 species of stinging Hymenoptera were reported for the first time in Persian Gulf region. Conclusions Some of this species such as Vespa orientalis and Polistes olivaceus are more common in the Persian Gulf islands and can cause clinical problem to islands resident and travelers. PMID:25183092

  13. Yield shear stress and disaggregating shear stress of human blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jinmu; Lee, Byoung-Kwon; Shin, Sehyun

    2014-05-01

    This review presents two distinct rheological parameters of blood that have the potential to indicate blood circulation adequacy: yield shear stress (YSS) and disaggregating shear stress (DSS). YSS and DSS reflect the strength of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation in suspension under static and dynamic conditions, respectively. YSS, defined as the critical stress to disperse RBC aggregates under static conditions, was found to be dependent upon hematocrit, fibrinogen, and red cell deformability, but not temperature. DSS, defined as the minimum shear stress to disperse RBC aggregates under dynamic conditions, is dependent upon fibrinogen, red cell deformability, and temperature but not hematocrit. Owing to recent advances in measurement technology, these two parameters can be easily measured, and thus, their clinical significance in blood circulation can be verified.

  14. Hydraulic jumps with upstream shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kelly; Helfrich, Karl

    2013-11-01

    Hydraulic jumps in flows with background shear are investigated, motivated by applications such as the flow over sills in Knight Inlet and the Pre-Bosphorus Channel. The full solution space and allowable solutions to several two-layer theories for hydraulic jumps with upstream shear are identified. The two-layer theories considered, including a recent theory by Borden et al. (JFM, 2012), are distinguished by how dissipation is partitioned between the layers. It is found that upstream shear with a faster and thinner lower layer causes an increase in bore speed, for a given jump height. Further, these two-layer solutions only exist for a limited range of upstream shear. 2D numerical simulations are conducted, guided by the two-layer theory solution space, and the results are compared to the theories. The simulations show the qualitative types of hydraulic transitions that occur, including undular bores, fully turbulent jumps, and conjugate state-like solutions; the type depends on the jump height and upstream shear for fixed upstream layer depths. Numerical simulations are used to investigate the mixing. Finally, a few 3D numerical simulations were made and are found to be consistent with the 2D results.

  15. Isogeometric analysis of shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger-Vergiat, Luc; McAuliffe, Colin; Waisman, Haim

    2014-08-01

    Numerical modeling of shear bands present several challenges, primarily due to strain softening, strong nonlinear multiphysics coupling, and steep solution gradients with fine solution features. In general it is not known a priori where a shear band will form or propagate, thus adaptive refinement is sometimes necessary to increase the resolution near the band. In this work we explore the use of isogeometric analysis for shear band problems by constructing and testing several combinations of NURBS elements for a mixed finite element shear band formulation. Owing to the higher order continuity of the NURBS basis, fine solution features such as shear bands can be resolved accurately and efficiently without adaptive refinement. The results are compared to a mixed element formulation with linear functions for displacement and temperature and Pian-Sumihara shape functions for stress. We find that an element based on high order NURBS functions for displacement, temperature and stress, combined with gauss point sampling of the plastic strain leads to attractive results in terms of rate of convergence, accuracy and cpu time. This element is implemented with a -bar strain projection method and is shown to be nearly locking free.

  16. The application of petrophysics to resolve fluid flow units and reservoir quality in the Upper Cretaceous Formations: Abu Sennan oil field, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lala, Amir Maher Sayed; El-sayed, Nahla Abd El-Aziz

    2015-02-01

    Petrophysical flow unit concept can be used to resolve some of the key challenges faced in the characterization of hydrocarbon reservoirs. The present study deals with petrophysical evaluation of some physical properties of the Upper Cretaceous rock samples obtained from the Abu-Roash and the Bahariya Formations at southwest of Sennan oil field in the Western Desert of Egypt. The aim of this study was achieved through carrying out some petrophysical measurements of porosity, bulk density, permeability, mean hydraulic radius (Rh), irreducible water saturation, and radius of pore throat at mercury saturation of 35% in order to determine reservoir characteristics. In this study, the relationships obtained between the measured petrophysical properties such as porosity, permeability and pore throat flow unit types were established for 53 sandstone core samples obtained from two different stratigraphic units. Flow zone indicator (FZI) has been calculated to quantify the flow character of the Abu-Roash and Bahariya reservoir rocks based on empirically derived equations of robust correlation coefficients. The correlations among porosity, permeability, bulk density, mean hydraulic radius and pore throat flow properties reflect the most important reservoir behavior characteristics. The calculated multiple regression models indicate close correlation among petrophysical properties and Rh and R35%. The obtained models are able to predict Rh and R35% by using porosity and permeability, to map reservoir performance and predict the location of stratigraphic traps.

  17. Shear Instabilities in Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbrot, Troy

    2003-03-01

    Unstable waves have long been studied in fluid shear layers. These waves affect transport in the atmosphere and oceans as well as slipstream stability behind ships, planes, and heat transfer devices. Corresponding instabilities in granular flows have not previously been documented, despite the importance of these flows in geophysical and industrial systems. We report here that breaking waves can form at the interface between two streams of identical grains downstream of a splitter plate. These waves appear abruptly in flow down an inclined plane as either shear rate or angle of incline is changed, and we analyze a granular flow model that qualitatively agrees with our experimental data. The waves appear from the model to be a manifestation of a competition between shear and extensional strains in the flowing granular bed, and we propose a dimensionless group to govern the transition between steady and wavy flows.

  18. Superstrings in Sheared Polymer Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migler, Kalman

    2000-03-01

    We report the discovery of a droplet-string-ribbon transition in concentrated polymer blends which occurs when the droplet size of the dispersed component becomes comparable to the gap between the boundary plates. Above a critical shear rate (or gap width), dispersed droplets continuously coalescence and breakup; the upper limit on their size is set by the Taylor length. Below this critical shear rate, droplets coalesce into strings and then ribbons in a four stage kinetic process. The mass ratio of string / droplet can be as large as 10^4. The transition is sharp, occurring over a shear interval of 2droplet-string transition is a manifestation of the weakening of the Rayleigh-Tomatika instability which occurs when the system becomes quasi two-dimensional. Possible applications of this technology are ultra-thin materials of high one-dimensional strength, polymer blend wires, and novel polymeric scaffolds.

  19. Shear Brillouin light scattering microscope.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moonseok; Besner, Sebastien; Ramier, Antoine; Kwok, Sheldon J J; An, Jeesoo; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-11

    Brillouin spectroscopy has been used to characterize shear acoustic phonons in materials. However, conventional instruments had slow acquisition times over 10 min per 1 mW of input optical power, and they required two objective lenses to form a 90° scattering geometry necessary for polarization coupling by shear phonons. Here, we demonstrate a confocal Brillouin microscope capable of detecting both shear and longitudinal phonons with improved speeds and with a single objective lens. Brillouin scattering spectra were measured from polycarbonate, fused quartz, and borosilicate in 1-10 s at an optical power level of 10 mW. The elastic constants, phonon mean free path and the ratio of the Pockels coefficients were determined at microscopic resolution. PMID:26832263

  20. Squirming through shear thinning fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datt, Charu; Zhu, Lailai; Elfring, Gwynn J.; Pak, On Shun

    2015-11-01

    Many microorganisms find themselves surrounded by fluids which are non-Newtonian in nature; human spermatozoa in female reproductive tract and motile bacteria in mucosa of animals are common examples. These biological fluids can display shear-thinning rheology whose effects on the locomotion of microorganisms remain largely unexplored. Here we study the self-propulsion of a squirmer in shear-thinning fluids described by the Carreau-Yasuda model. The squirmer undergoes surface distortions and utilizes apparent slip-velocities around its surface to swim through a fluid medium. In this talk, we will discuss how the nonlinear rheological properties of a shear-thinning fluid affect the propulsion of a swimmer compared with swimming in Newtonian fluids.

  1. Shear Relaxations of Confined Liquids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, George Amos, Jr.

    Ultrathin (<40 A) films of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS), hexadecane, and dodecane were subjected to linear and non-linear oscillatory shear between flat plates. Shearing frequencies of 0.1 to 800 s^{-1} were applied at pressures from zero to 0.8 MPa using a surface rheometer only recently developed. In most cases the plates were atomically smooth mica surfaces; the role of surface interactions was examined by replacing these with alkyl chain monolayers. OMCTS and hexadecane were examined at a temperature about 5 Celsius degrees above their melting points and tended to solidify. Newtonian plateaus having enormous viscosities were observed at low shear rates. The onset of shear thinning implied relaxation times of about 0.1 s in the linear structure of the confined liquids. Large activation volumes (~80 nm ^3) suggested that shear involved large-scale collective motion. Dodecane was studied at a much higher temperature relative to its melting point and showed no signs of impending solidification though it exhibited well-defined regions of Newtonian response and power law shear thinning. When treated with molecular sieves before use, dodecane had relaxation times which were short (0.02 s) compared to hexadecane, but still exhibited large-scale collective motion. When treated with silica gel, an unexplained long -time relaxation (10 s) was seen in the Newtonian viscosity of dodecane. The relaxation time of the linear structure, 0.005 s was very small, and the storage modulus was unresolvable. The small activation volume (7nm^3) indicated a much lower level of collective motion. The activation volume remained small when dodecane was confined between tightly bound, low energy, alkyl monolayers. At low strains the storage and loss moduli became very large (>10^4 Pa), probably due to interactions with flaws in the monolayers. Dramatic signs of wall slip were observed at large strains even at low pressures.

  2. Shear relaxations of confined liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, G.A. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Ultrathin (<40 [angstrom]) films of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS), hexadecane, and dodecane were subjected to linear and non-linear oscillatory shear between flat plates. Shearing frequencies of 0.1 to 800 s[sup [minus]1] were applied at pressures from zero to 0.8 MPa using a surface rheometer only recently developed. In most cases the plates were atomically smooth mica surfaces; the role of surface interactions was examined by replacing these with alkyl chain monolayers. OMCTS and hexadecane were examined at a temperature about 5 Celcius degrees above their melting points and tended to solidify. Newtonian plateaus having enormous viscosities were observed at low shear rates. The onset of shear thinning implied relaxation times of about 0.1 s in the linear structure of the confined liquids. Large activation volumes ([approximately]80 nm[sup 3]) suggested that shear involved large-scale collective motion. Dodecane was studied at a much higher temperature relative to its melting point and showed no signs of impending solidification though it exhibited well-defined regions of Newtonian response and power law shear thinning. When treated with molecular sieves before use, dodecane had relaxation times which were short (0.02 s) compared to hexadecane, but still exhibited large-scale collective motion. When treated with silica gel, an unexplained long-time relaxation (10 s) was seen in the Newtonian viscosity of dodecane. The relaxation time of the linear structure, 0.005 s was very small, and the storage modulus was unresolvable. The small activation volume (7 nm[sup 3]) indicated a much lower level of collective motion. The activation volume remained small when dodecane was confined between tightly bound, low energy, alkyl monolayers. At low strains the storage and loss moduli became very large (>10[sup 4] Pa), probably due to interactions with flaws in the monolayers. Dramatic signs of wall slip were observed at large strains even at low pressures.

  3. Understanding Intrabasinal Organic Carbon Records: A New Carbon Isotope Record for the Early Cretaceous Abu Dhabi, UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Suwaidi, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Aptian-Albian (~125-100 Ma, Early Cretaceous) is considered to be an interval of elevated greenhouse gases, intensified hydrologic cycle, limited polar ice, and elevated high latitude temperatures, with evidence for Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAE) as recorded by organic matter and carbonate δ13C perturbations in both the marine and continental realm (Jenkyns et al., 2004; Poulsen, 2004; Robinson & Hesselbo, 2004 and Ufnar et al., 2004). In this study four cores from Aptian­-Albian marine sediments from a single offshore basin in Abu Dhabi, UAE were examined petrographically and samples were collected to generate a high resolution organic carbon δ13C chemostratigraphic profile. The cores represent sediments from the Early Cretaceous upper most Thamama and lowermost Wasia Group and represent interbedded shale and limestone units from the Arabian Shelf. Three of the cores, cores A­-C, show a 3‰ negative excursion in δ13Corg with values of -28‰ occurring with a concurrent increase in organic carbon, likely indicative of Aptian OAE 1a. These cores also show a transition from more oxic to euxinic waters as recorded in the pyrite framboid mean diameter. The remaining core, D, shows relatively isotopically light average δ13Corg values of -26‰, with an intervening positive isotope excursion and values of -23‰, and may represent a different event either earlier or later in the sequence, but due to limited biostratigraphic data could not easily be correlated using C-Isotopes alone with the other three cores. The four cores come from different localities within a single basin and highlight issues pertaining to correlating cores across a single basin for the same time interval, as well as variability in organic matter burial and oxygenation within a single basin, and may provide a useful case study specifically related to separating regional signals from global carbon isotope signals for the Aptian-Albian, and understanding how ancient Mesozoic basins are affected

  4. "That's Not the Way I Was Taught Science at School!" How Preservice Primary Teachers in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Are Affected by Their Own Schooling Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, M.; Kadbey, H.

    2014-01-01

    Government schools in Abu Dhabi, as part of widescale educational reforms undertaken in the whole of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), have undergone significant change since 2007 across cycles and across subjects including science. Science had been taught historically in the UAE using fairly traditional "chalk and talk", teacher-centered…

  5. Shear jamming in granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie

    2013-03-01

    For frictionless particles with purely repulsive interactions, there is a critical packing fraction ϕJ below which no jammed states exist. Frictional granular particles in the regime of ϕ <ϕJ act differently under shear: early experiments by Zhang & Behringer at Duke University show jammed states can be created by the application of shear stress. Compared to the states above ϕJ, the shear-jammed states (SJS) are mechanically more fragile, but they can resist shear. Formation of these states requires the anisotropic contact network as a backbone and these new states must be incorporated into a more general jamming picture (Bi et al Nature 2011). If time permits, I will present some new results from recent experiments at SJTU aimed towards understanding the more detailed nature of SJS and the transition from unjammed states to SJS. This work is in collaboration with Bob Behringer at Duke University, Dapeng Bi (now at Syracuse) and Bulbul Chakraborty at Brandeis University. The work at SJTU is in collaboration with Ling Zhang and several undergrads in the physics department.

  6. Shear jamming in granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie

    2013-11-01

    For frictionless particles with purely repulsive interactions, there is a critical packing fraction ϕJ below which no jammed states exist. Recent experiments have shown that applying shear to a stress-free initial state can generate states which are either fragile or shear jammed depending on the way the force-network is percolated (Bi et al. Nature 2011). The nature of the jamming transition however is obscured because the existence of friction between the system and the third dimension. A new apparatus at SJTU has been designed to completely eliminate this friction by letting the particles float on the surface of a shallow water layer, which allows a study of the more detailed nature of the shear-jammed states and the transition from an unjammed state to a shear-jammed state. In this study, we also use high-precision force sensors to monitor the dynamical changes near the jamming transition. We further combine numerical simulations with the experiments to diagnose the nature of this jamming transition and its possible dependence on certain particle properties. The work at SJTU is in collaboration with Ling Zhang and Jie Zheng. The numerical simulations are in collaboration with Maobin Hu at Univ. of Sci. & Tech. of China.

  7. Shear history effect of magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Lei; Chen, Kaikai; Zhou, Ming; Zhang, Xiangjun; Meng, Yonggang; Tian, Yu

    2015-10-01

    The rheological properties of magnetorheological (MR) fluids are usually determined by particle structures and polarized particle interactions. However, the particle structures may undergo various evolutions at different shear states and history; this evolution leads to shear stress hysteresis. Therefore, the shear history effect of MR fluids was experimentally investigated in this study. In a shear rate ramp test, the shear stress at low shear rate was higher in the shear rate ramp-down process than in the shear rate ramp-up process. If the next shear test started after a rest time, the start shear stress decayed slowly and approached the original value of the first test when the interval was long enough. The MR fluids also displayed obvious hysteresis loops during the current ramp test. A high shear rate and magnetic field could reduce the shear history effect by accelerating particle structure evolutions, and then hysteresis decreased. This effect was ascribed to the evolution of particle structures during different test modes and durations, and the evolution is governed by interparticle interactions, viscous forces, and the Brownian motions of particles. These results indicated that the accuracy of the force control of MR fluids could be enhanced under high magnetic fields and high shear rates. Thus, these factors should be considered in MR actuator designs.

  8. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  9. The effect of shearing strain-rate on the ultimate shearing resistance of clay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. Y. K.

    1975-01-01

    An approach for investigating the shearing resistance of cohesive soils subjected to a high rate of shearing strain is described. A fast step-loading torque apparatus was used to induce a state of pure shear in a hollow cylindrical soil specimen. The relationship between shearing resistance and rate of shear deformation was established for various soil densities expressed in terms of initial void ratio or water content. For rate of shearing deformation studies, the shearing resistance increases initially with shearing velocity, but subsequently reaches a terminal value as the shearing velocity increases. The terminal shearing resistance is also found to increase as the density of the soil increases. The results of this investigation are useful in the rheological study of clay. It is particularly important for mobility problems of soil runways, since the soil resistance is found to be sensitive to the rate of shearing.

  10. Dynamics of Sheared Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondic, Lou; Utter, Brian; Behringer, Robert P.

    2002-11-01

    This work focuses on the properties of sheared granular materials near the jamming transition. The project currently involves two aspects. The first of these is an experiment that is a prototype for a planned ISS (International Space Station) flight. The second is discrete element simulations (DES) that can give insight into the behavior one might expect in a reduced-g environment. The experimental arrangement consists of an annular channel that contains the granular material. One surface, say the upper surface, rotates so as to shear the material contained in the annulus. The lower surface controls the mean density/mean stress on the sample through an actuator or other control system. A novel feature under development is the ability to 'thermalize' the layer, i.e. create a larger amount of random motion in the material, by using the actuating system to provide vibrations as well control the mean volume of the annulus. The stress states of the system are determined by transducers on the non-rotating wall. These measure both shear and normal components of the stress on different size scales. Here, the idea is to characterize the system as the density varies through values spanning dense almost solid to relatively mobile granular states. This transition regime encompasses the regime usually thought of as the glass transition, and/or the jamming transition. Motivation for this experiment springs from ideas of a granular glass transition, a related jamming transition, and from recent experiments. In particular, we note recent experiments carried out by our group to characterize this type of transition and also to demonstrate/ characterize fluctuations in slowly sheared systems. These experiments give key insights into what one might expect in near-zero g. In particular, they show that the compressibility of granular systems diverges at a transition or critical point. It is this divergence, coupled to gravity, that makes it extremely difficult if not impossible to

  11. Dynamics of Sheared Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondic, Lou; Utter, Brian; Behringer, Robert P.

    2002-01-01

    This work focuses on the properties of sheared granular materials near the jamming transition. The project currently involves two aspects. The first of these is an experiment that is a prototype for a planned ISS (International Space Station) flight. The second is discrete element simulations (DES) that can give insight into the behavior one might expect in a reduced-g environment. The experimental arrangement consists of an annular channel that contains the granular material. One surface, say the upper surface, rotates so as to shear the material contained in the annulus. The lower surface controls the mean density/mean stress on the sample through an actuator or other control system. A novel feature under development is the ability to 'thermalize' the layer, i.e. create a larger amount of random motion in the material, by using the actuating system to provide vibrations as well control the mean volume of the annulus. The stress states of the system are determined by transducers on the non-rotating wall. These measure both shear and normal components of the stress on different size scales. Here, the idea is to characterize the system as the density varies through values spanning dense almost solid to relatively mobile granular states. This transition regime encompasses the regime usually thought of as the glass transition, and/or the jamming transition. Motivation for this experiment springs from ideas of a granular glass transition, a related jamming transition, and from recent experiments. In particular, we note recent experiments carried out by our group to characterize this type of transition and also to demonstrate/ characterize fluctuations in slowly sheared systems. These experiments give key insights into what one might expect in near-zero g. In particular, they show that the compressibility of granular systems diverges at a transition or critical point. It is this divergence, coupled to gravity, that makes it extremely difficult if not impossible to

  12. Discontinuous Growth of Onion Structure under Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Shuji

    Discontinuous growth process of the Multilamellar vesicle (so called Onion) driven by shear quench was investigated by viscometry and microscopy in detail. Discontinuous Onion growth was observed when the final shear rate corresponded to the intermediate shear rate domain where the shear-thickening and shear-thinning viscosity appeared. In this process, large Onion transformed back into the lamellae and then formed large Onion. Small Onion to lamellae degradation process might be achieved by two modes, first the disruption of the configurational order of densely packed Onions followed by the rupture of Onion as second process. The second process would be characterized by the shear-banding flow pattern composed of the Onion-Lα coexisting state. We suggest that the appearance of the shear-band structure and the Onion reformation developed from the shear-band might be scaled by considering the mechanical energy balance with the bending elastic energy of bilayers.

  13. Shear piezoelectricity in bone at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Yu, Min-Feng

    2010-10-01

    Recent demonstration of shear piezoelectricity in an isolated collagen fibril, which is the origin of piezoelectricity in bone, necessitates investigation of shear piezoelectric behavior in bone at the nanoscale. Using high resolution lateral piezoresponse force microcopy (PFM), shear piezoelectricity in a cortical bone sample was studied at the nanoscale. Subfibrillar structure of individual collagen fibrils with a periodicity of 60-70 nm were revealed in PFM map, indicating the direct contribution of collagen fibrils to the shear piezoelectricity of bone.

  14. Structure of wind-shear turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, G.; Laituri, T. R.

    1988-01-01

    The statistical characteristics of wind-shear turbulence are modelled. Isotropic turbulence serves as the basis of comparison for the anisotropic turbulence which exists in wind shear. The question of how turbulence scales in a wind shear is addressed from the perspective of power spectral density.

  15. Structure of wind-shear turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, G.; Laituri, T. R.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical characteristics of wind shear turbulence are modelled. Isotropic turbulence serves as the basis of comparison for the anisotropic turbulence which exists in wind shear. The question of turbulence scales in wind shear is addressed from the perspective of power spectral density.

  16. Converting the organic fraction of solid waste from the city of Abu Dhabi to valuable products via dark fermentation--Economic and energy assessment.

    PubMed

    Bonk, Fabian; Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan-Rodrigo; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2015-06-01

    Landfilling the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) leads to greenhouse gas emissions and loss of valuable resources. Sustainable and cost efficient solutions need to be developed to solve this problem. This study evaluates the feasibility of using dark fermentation (DF) to convert the OFMSW to volatile fatty acids (VFAs), fertilizer and H2. The VFAs in the DF effluent can be used directly as substrate for subsequent bioprocesses or purified from the effluent for industrial use. DF of the OFMSW in Abu Dhabi will be economically sustainable once VFA purification can be accomplished on large scale for less than 15USD/m(3)(effluent). With a VFA minimum selling price of 330 USD/tCOD, DF provides a competitive carbon source to sugar. Furthermore, DF is likely to use less energy than conventional processes that produce VFAs, fertilizer and H2. This makes DF of OFMSW a promising waste treatment technology and biorefinery platform. PMID:25840736

  17. Controlled shear/tension fixture

    DOEpatents

    Hsueh, Chun-Hway; Liu, Chain-tsuan; George, Easo P.

    2012-07-24

    A test fixture for simultaneously testing two material test samples is provided. The fixture provides substantially equal shear and tensile stresses in each test specimens. By gradually applying a load force to the fixture only one of the two specimens fractures. Upon fracture of the one specimen, the fixture and the load train lose contact and the second specimen is preserved in a state of upset just prior to fracture. Particular advantages of the fixture are (1) to control the tensile to shear load on the specimen for understanding the effect of these stresses on the deformation behavior of advanced materials, (2) to control the location of fracture for accessing localized material properties including the variation of the mechanical properties and residual stresses across the thickness of advanced materials, (3) to yield a fractured specimen for strength measurement and an unfractured specimen for examining the microstructure just prior to fracture.

  18. Lithology, mineral assemblages and microbial fingerprints of the evaporite-carbonate sediments of the coastal sabkha of Abu Dhabi and their extraterrestrial implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadooni, Fadhil N.; Howari, Fares; Edwards, Howell G. M.; El-Saiy, Ayman

    2010-07-01

    Deep-core and surface samples collected from the coastal sabkha of Abu Dhabi were subjected to a multi-proxy study, including petrographic, geochemical and spectroscopic analyses. The sediments studied are composed of biochemical carbonate-evaporite mineral suites, such as calcite, dolomite, aragonite and gypsum, as well as clastic minerals, such as quartz, feldspar and serpentine. These sediments were also strongly influenced by microbial activities as reflected by the presence of cyanobacterial mats, boring, gas bubble structures, pustular and other macro and micro textures. A combination of marine, fluvial, aeolian, and groundwater processes shaped the geomorphology of the area and led to the formation of such mineral suites, as well as their microbial contents. Data collected from Mars indicate that its surface regolith contains sandstone composed of siliciclastic basaltic debris, as well as carbonate (e.g. magnesite) and evaporite (e.g. jarosite and relics of gypsum) mineral assemblages. Additional data suggest the presence of geomorphic features, characteristic of an arid climate, such as sand dunes and desert varnish. The hydrological model for the Late Noachian-Hesperian period of the plant proposed the existence of a surficial layer containing endolithic and stromatolitic cyanobacterial lamina. The combination of the coastal sabkha of Abu Dhabi with its carbonate-evaporite mineral suites, the neighbouring sand dune fields of the Empty Quarter Desert and the basaltic sediments resulted from weathering the ophiolitic Northern Oman Mountains to form a candidate terrestrial geologic province that may explain the mineral association of Mars and its potential biosignatures. The lithological features and the mineral association of the sabkha can be recognized by the present day detection equipment used on Mars, and even if their biosignatures are degraded, their existence may be inferred from these features.

  19. Layered Systems Under Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenšek, Daniel; Brand, Helmut R.

    We discuss and review a generalization of the usual hydrodynamic description of smectic A liquid crystals motivated by the experimentally observed shear-induced destabilization and reorientation of smectic A like systems. We include both the smectic layering (via the layer displacement u and the layer normal hat{p}) and the director hat{n} of the underlying nematic order in our macroscopic hydrodynamic description and allow both directions to differ in non equilibrium situations. In a homeotropically aligned sample the nematic director couples to an applied simple shear, whereas the smectic layering stays unchanged. This difference leads to a finite (but usually small) angle between hat{n} and hat{p}, which we find to be equivalent to an effective dilatation of the layers. This effective dilatation leads, above a certain threshold, to an undulation instability of the layers with a wave vector parallel to the vorticity direction of the shear flow. We include the couplings of the velocity field with the order parameters for orientational and positional order and show how the order parameters interact with the undulation instability. We explore the influence of the magnitude of various material parameters on the instability. Comparing our results to available experimental results and molecular dynamic simulations, we find good qualitative agreement for the first instability. In addition, we discuss pathways to higher instabilities leading to the formation of onions (multilamellar vesicles) via cylindrical structures and/or the break-up of layers via large amplitude undulations.

  20. Amphiphilic Systems under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongxia

    2008-03-01

    Phase behavior and the related physical and rheological properties of the amphiphilic systems including liquid crystals, diblock copolymers and surfactants are of wide-spread interest, e.g. in industrial processing of layered materials or biological applications of lipid membranes. For example, submitted to an applied shear flow, these lamellae show an interesting coupling of the layer orientation and the flow field. Despite an extensive literature dealing with the shear-induced transition, the underlying causes and mechanisms of the transition remain largely speculative. The experimental similarities between systems of different molecular constituents indicate, that the theoretical description of these reorientations can be constructed, from a common generic basis. Hence one can develop an efficient computer model which is able to reproduce the properties pertinent to real amphiphilic systems, and allows for a large-scale simulation. Here, I employed a simplified continuum amphiphilic computer model to investigate the shear--induced disorder-order, order-order and alignment flipping by large-scale parallelized (none) equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation

  1. Haptic Edge Detection Through Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Lipson, Hod; Hayward, Vincent

    2016-03-01

    Most tactile sensors are based on the assumption that touch depends on measuring pressure. However, the pressure distribution at the surface of a tactile sensor cannot be acquired directly and must be inferred from the deformation field induced by the touched object in the sensor medium. Currently, there is no consensus as to which components of strain are most informative for tactile sensing. Here, we propose that shape-related tactile information is more suitably recovered from shear strain than normal strain. Based on a contact mechanics analysis, we demonstrate that the elastic behavior of a haptic probe provides a robust edge detection mechanism when shear strain is sensed. We used a jamming-based robot gripper as a tactile sensor to empirically validate that shear strain processing gives accurate edge information that is invariant to changes in pressure, as predicted by the contact mechanics study. This result has implications for the design of effective tactile sensors as well as for the understanding of the early somatosensory processing in mammals.

  2. Shear Strength of Aluminum Oxynitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandekar, Dattatraya P.; Vaughan, Brian A. M.; Proud, William G.

    2007-06-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (AlON) is a transparent, polycrystalline cubic spinel. The results of investigations^1-4 on shock response of AlON permit determination of the equation of state, and shear strength retained under shock compression. Whereas the values of the HEL of AlON holds no surprises, the inelastic response of AlON reported in Ref. 1-4 differ significantly and is stress dependent. The results of Ref. 1-2 show that AlON retains a shear strength of 3 to 4 GPa when shocked up to around 20 GPa, but the results of Ref, 3-4 seem to suggest a possible loss of shear strength when shocked to 16 GPa and beyond. Our analysis examines the observed differences in the inelastic response of AlON reported in these four studies . 1. J. U. Cazamias, et. al., in Fundamental Issues and Applications of Shock-Wave and High Strain Rate Phenomena, Eds. Staudhammer, Murr, and Meyers, Elsevier, NY, 173 (2001). 2. B. A. M. Vaughn, et.al., Shock Physics, Cavendish Laboratory, Report SP/1092 (2001) 3. T. Sekine, et.al., J. Appl. Phys. 94, 4803 (2003). 4. T. F. Thornhill, et.al., Shock Compression of Matter-2005, Eds. Furnish, Elert, Russell, White, AIP, NY, 143 (2006).

  3. Haptic Edge Detection Through Shear

    PubMed Central

    Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Lipson, Hod; Hayward, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Most tactile sensors are based on the assumption that touch depends on measuring pressure. However, the pressure distribution at the surface of a tactile sensor cannot be acquired directly and must be inferred from the deformation field induced by the touched object in the sensor medium. Currently, there is no consensus as to which components of strain are most informative for tactile sensing. Here, we propose that shape-related tactile information is more suitably recovered from shear strain than normal strain. Based on a contact mechanics analysis, we demonstrate that the elastic behavior of a haptic probe provides a robust edge detection mechanism when shear strain is sensed. We used a jamming-based robot gripper as a tactile sensor to empirically validate that shear strain processing gives accurate edge information that is invariant to changes in pressure, as predicted by the contact mechanics study. This result has implications for the design of effective tactile sensors as well as for the understanding of the early somatosensory processing in mammals. PMID:27009331

  4. Kinematics and shear heat pattern of ductile simple shear zones with `slip boundary condition'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulchrone, Kieran F.; Mukherjee, Soumyajit

    2016-04-01

    Extrusion by Poiseuille flow and simple shear of hot lower crust has been deciphered from large hot orogens, and partial-slip boundary condition has been encountered in analogue models. Shear heat and velocity profiles are deduced from a simplified form of Navier-Stokes equation for simple shear together with extrusive Poiseuille flow and slip boundary condition for Newtonian viscous rheology. A higher velocity at the upper boundary of the shear zone promotes higher slip velocity at the lower boundary. The other parameters that affect the slip are viscosity and thickness of the shear zone and the resultant pressure gradient that drives extrusion. In the partial-slip case, depending on flow parameters (resultant pressure gradient, density and viscosity) and thickness of the shear zone, the velocity profiles can curve and indicate opposite shear senses. The corresponding shear heat profiles can indicate temperature maximum inside shear zones near either boundaries of the shear zone, or equidistant from them.

  5. Apparatus for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Metz, III, Curtis F.

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies of the type comprising an array of fuel pins disposed within an outer metal shell or shroud. A spent fuel assembly is first compacted in a known manner and then incrementally sheared using fixed and movable shear blades having matched laterally projecting teeth which slidably intermesh to provide the desired shearing action. Incremental advancement of the fuel assembly after each shear cycle is limited to a distance corresponding to the lateral projection of the teeth to ensure fuel assembly breakup into small uniform segments which are amenable to remote chemical processing.

  6. Shear fatigue crack growth - A literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Recent studies of shear crack growth are reviewed, emphasizing test methods and data analyses. The combined mode I and mode II elastic crack tip stress fields are considered. The development and design of the compact shear specimen are described, and the results of fatigue crack growth tests using compact shear specimens are reviewed. The fatigue crack growth tests are discussed and the results of inclined cracks in tensile panels, center cracks in plates under biaxial loading, cracked beam specimens with combined bending and shear loading, center-cracked panels and double edge-cracked plates under cyclic shear loading are examined and analyzed in detail.

  7. Transverse shear stiffness of laminated anisotropic shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, G. A.

    1978-01-01

    Equations are derived for the transverse shear stiffness of laminated anisotropic shells. Without making assumptions for thickness distribution for either transverse shear stresses or strains, constitutive equations for the transverse shear deformation theory of anisotropic heterogeneous shells are found. The equations are based on Taylor series expansions about a generic point for stress resultants and couples, identically satisfying plate equilibrium equations. These equations are used to find statically correct expressions for in-surface stresses, transverse shear stresses, and the area density of transverse shear strain energy, in terms of transverse shear stress resultants and redundants. The application of Castigliano's theorem of least work minimizes shear strain energy with respect to the redundants. Examples are presented for several laminated walls. Good agreement is found between the results and those of exact three-dimensional elasticity solutions for the cylindrical bending of a plate.

  8. Magnetic shear. II - Hale region 17244

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athay, R. G.; Jones, H. P.; Zirin, H.

    1985-01-01

    A B-gamma(delta) sunspot group with growing delta-spots of trailing polarity shows evidence in H-alpha filament structure of a transition from a state of weak magnetic shear to a state of strong shear. The shear develops in the chromosphere and transition region to the corona overlying the photospheric magnetic neutral line separating the delta-spots from the leading polarity at a time when the delta-spots are undergoing rapid growth. Several major flares occur along the sheared portion of the neutral line following the shear development. Other segments of the neutral line far removed from the delta-spots show similar evidence of shear in the H-alpha filament structure and in C IV velocity patterns as well. These 'quiescent' regions of shear are relatively steady or decaying with time and show very little related activity.

  9. Magnetogenesis through Relativistic Velocity Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Evan

    Magnetic fields at all scales are prevalent in our universe. However, current cosmological models predict that initially the universe was bereft of large-scale fields. Standard magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) does not permit magnetogenesis; in the MHD Faraday's law, the change in magnetic field B depends on B itself. Thus if B is initially zero, it will remain zero for all time. A more accurate physical model is needed to explain the origins of the galactic-scale magnetic fields observed today. In this thesis, I explore two velocity-driven mechanisms for magnetogenesis in 2-fluid plasma. The first is a novel kinematic 'battery' arising from convection of vorticity. A coupling between thermal and plasma oscillations, this non-relativistic mechanism can operate in flows that are incompressible, quasi-neutral and barotropic. The second mechanism results from inclusion of thermal effects in relativistic shear flow instabilities. In such flows, parallel perturbations are ubiquitously unstable at small scales, with growth rates of order with the plasma frequency over a defined range of parameter-space. Of these two processes, instabilities seem far more likely to account for galactic magnetic fields. Stable kinematic effects will, at best, be comparable to an ideal Biermann battery, which is suspected to be orders of magnitude too weak to produce the observed galactic fields. On the other hand, instabilities grow until saturation is reached, a topic that has yet to be explored in detail on cosmological scales. In addition to investigating these magnetogenesis sources, I derive a general dispersion relation for three dimensional, warm, two species plasma with discontinuous shear flow. The mathematics of relativistic plasma, sheared-flow instability and the Biermann battery are also discussed.

  10. Turbulence in homogeneous shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, Alain

    1996-11-01

    Homogeneous shear flows with an imposed mean velocity U=Syx̂ are studied in a period box of size Lx×Ly×Lz, in the statistically stationary turbulent state. In contrast with unbounded shear flows, the finite size of the system constrains the large-scale dynamics. The Reynolds number, defined by Re≡SL2y/ν varies in the range 2600⩽Re⩽11300. The total kinetic energy and enstrophy in the volume of numerical integration have large peaks, resulting in fluctuations of kinetic energy of order 30%-50%. The mechanism leading to these fluctuations is very reminiscent of the ``streaks'' responsible for the violent bursts observed in turbulent boundary layers. The large scale anisotropy of the flow, characterized by the two-point correlation tensor depends on the aspect ratio of the system. The probability distribution functions (PDF) of the components of the velocity are found to be close to Gaussian. The physics of the Reynolds stress tensor, uv, is very similar to what is found experimentally in wall bounded shear flows. The study of the two-point correlation tensor of the vorticity <ωiωj> suggests that the small scales become isotropic when the Reynolds number increases, as observed in high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers. However, the skewness of the z component of vorticity is independent of the Reynolds number in this range, suggesting that some small scale anisotropy remains even at very high Reynolds numbers. An analogy is drawn with the problem of turbulent mixing, where a similar anisotropy is observed.

  11. Magnetorheological Shear Flow Near Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vågberg, Daniel; Tighe, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Flow in magnetorheological (MR) fluids and systems near jamming both display hallmarks of complex fluid rheology, including yield stresses and shear thinning viscosities. They are also tunable, which means that both phenomena can be used as a switching mechanism in ``smart'' fluids, i.e. fluids where properties can be tuned rapidly and reversibly by changing external parameters. We use numerical simulations to investigate the rheological properties of MR fluids close to the jamming transition as a function of the applied field and volume fraction. We are especially interested in the crossover region where both phenomena are needed to describe the observed dynamics. Funded by the Dutch Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  12. Conductor shears as iceberg encroaches

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    Operators in the Arctic regions must protect wellheads from encroaching icebergs and icepack sheets. Diverting ice masses and excavating large holes below scour depth is expensive. Now an alternate approach allows the conductor to shear, shuts in the well, and provides a method of re-entering the well. The new system has been successfully used by Mobil on two exploratory wells in the Hibernia field off eastern Canada. The wells used 18 3/4-in. wellheads rated at 10,000 psi with 36-in. conductor pipe. The performance of the system is discussed.

  13. Temporal oscillations of the shear stress and scattered light in a shear-banding--shear-thickening micellar solution.

    PubMed

    Azzouzi, H; Decruppe, J P; Lerouge, S; Greffier, O

    2005-08-01

    The results of optical and rheological experiments performed on a viscoelastic solution (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide + sodium salicylate in water) are reported. The flow curve has a horizontal plateau extending between two critical shear rates characteristic of heterogeneous flows formed by two layers of fluid with different viscosities. These two bands which also have different optical anisotropy are clearly seen by direct observation in polarized light. At the end of the plateau, apparent shear thickening is observed in a narrow range of shear rates; in phase oscillations of the shear stress and of the first normal stress difference are recorded in a shearing device operating under controlled strain. The direct observation of the annular gap of a Couette cell in a direction perpendicular to a plane containing the vorticity shows that the turbidity of the whole sample also undergoes time dependent variations with the same period as the shear stress. However no banding is observed during the oscillations and the flow remains homogeneous. PMID:16132153

  14. Nucleation of shear bands in amorphous alloys

    PubMed Central

    Perepezko, John H.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Chen, Ming-Wei; Wang, Jun-Qiang; Gonzalez, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The initiation and propagation of shear bands is an important mode of localized inhomogeneous deformation that occurs in a wide range of materials. In metallic glasses, shear band development is considered to center on a structural heterogeneity, a shear transformation zone that evolves into a rapidly propagating shear band under a shear stress above a threshold. Deformation by shear bands is a nucleation-controlled process, but the initiation process is unclear. Here we use nanoindentation to probe shear band nucleation during loading by measuring the first pop-in event in the load–depth curve which is demonstrated to be associated with shear band formation. We analyze a large number of independent measurements on four different bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) alloys and reveal the operation of a bimodal distribution of the first pop-in loads that are associated with different shear band nucleation sites that operate at different stress levels below the glass transition temperature, Tg. The nucleation kinetics, the nucleation barriers, and the density for each site type have been determined. The discovery of multiple shear band nucleation sites challenges the current view of nucleation at a single type of site and offers opportunities for controlling the ductility of BMG alloys. PMID:24594599

  15. Shear Mechanics of the TMJ Disc

    PubMed Central

    Juran, C.M.; Dolwick, M.F.; McFetridge, P.S.

    2012-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a complex hinge and gliding joint that induces significant shear loads onto the fibrocartilage TMJ disc during jaw motion. The purpose of this study was to assess regional variation in the disc’s shear loading characteristics under physiologically relevant loads and to associate those mechanical findings with common clinical observations of disc fatigue and damage. Porcine TMJ discs were compressed between an axially translating bottom platen and a 2.5-cm-diameter indenter within a hydrated testing chamber. Discs were cyclically sheared at 0.5, 1, or 5 Hz to 1, 3, or 5% shear strain. Within the anterior and intermediate regions of the disc when sheared in the anteroposterior direction, both shear and compressive moduli experienced a significant decrease from instantaneous to steady state, while the posterior region’s compressive modulus decreased approximately 5%, and no significant loss of shear modulus was noted. All regions retained their shear modulus within 0.5% of instantaneous values when shear was applied in the mediolateral direction. The results of the disc’s regional shear mechanics suggest an observable and predictable link with the common clinical observation that the posterior region of the disc is most often the zone in which fatigue occurs, which may lead to disc damage and perforation. PMID:23166043

  16. Does Shear Thickening Occur in Semisolid Metals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Helen V.; Favier, Veronique

    2016-04-01

    In the various forms of semisolid processing such as thixoforming and thixoforging, the entry into the die occurs in a fraction of a second so it is the transient rheological behavior which governs the initial stages of flow. In experiments in the literature, this rheological behavior is probed through applying rapid transitions in shear rate under isothermal conditions. There is contradictory evidence as to whether the behavior during these transitions is shear thinning or shear thickening, although it is clear that once in the die the material is thinning. Here the data in the literature are reanalyzed to obtain a rationalization of the contradictions which has not previously been available. It is argued that if a suspension is initially in a disagglomerated state ( i.e., one which is initially sheared), the instantaneous behavior with a jump-up in shear rate is shear thickening (even if the long-term steady-state behavior is shear thinning) provided the fraction solid is greater than about 0.36 and the final shear rate at the end of the jump is greater than about 100 s-1. If the jump-up in shear rate is made from rest then yield masks the shear thickening.

  17. Shear-Induced Reactive Gelation.

    PubMed

    Brand, Bastian; Morbidelli, Massimo; Soos, Miroslav

    2015-11-24

    In this work, we describe a method for the production of porous polymer materials in the form of particles characterized by narrow pore size distribution using the principle of shear-induced reactive gelation. Poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) primary particles with diameter ranging from 80 to 200 nm are used as building blocks, which are assembled into fractal-like clusters when exposed to high shear rates generated in a microchannel. It was found that independent of the primary particle size, it is possible to modulate the internal structure of formed fractal-like aggregates having fractal dimension ranging from 2.4 to 2.7 by varying the residence time in the microchannel. Thermally induced postpolymerization was used to increase the mechanical resilience of such formed clusters. Primary particle interpenetration was observed by SEM and confirmed by light scattering resulting in an increase of fractal dimension. Nitrogen sorption measurements and mercury porosimetry confirmed formation of a porous material with surface area ranging from 20 to 40 m(2)/g characterized by porosity of 70% and narrow pore size distribution with an average diameter around 700 nm without the presence of any micropores. The strong perfusive character of the synthesized material was confirmed by the existence of a plateau of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate measured at high reduced velocities using a chromatographic column packed with the synthesized microclusters. PMID:26488233

  18. Optical Beam-Shear Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Stefan; Szwaykowski, Piotr

    2007-01-01

    A technique for measuring optical beam shear is based on collecting light from the four quadrants of the beam and comparing the optical power collected from each quadrant with that from the other three quadrants. As used here, "shear" signifies lateral displacement of a beam of light from a nominal optical axis. A sensor for implementing this technique consists of a modified focusing lens and a quad-cell photodetector, both centered on the nominal optical axis. The modification of the lens consists in cutting the lens into four sectors (corresponding to the four quadrants) by sawing along two orthogonal diameters, then reassembling the lens following either of two approaches described next. In one approach, the lens is reassembled by gluing the sectors back together. In the simplest variant of this approach, the kerf of the saw matches the spacing of the photodetector cells, so that the focus of each sector crosses the axis of symmetry to fall on the opposite photodetector cell (see figure). In another variant of this approach, the lens sectors are spaced apart to make their individual foci to fall on separate photodetector cells, without crossing the optical axis. In the case of a sufficiently wide beam, the modified lens could be replaced with four independent lenses placed in a square array, each focusing onto an independent photodetector

  19. Shear-Layer Effects on Trailing Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Z. C.; Baek, K.

    1998-01-01

    Crosswind shear can influence the trailing vortex trajectories significantly, according to both field measurement and numerical simulations. Point vortex models are used in this paper to study the fluid dynamic mechanism in the interactions between trailing vortex pair and shear layers. It has been shown that the shear-layer deformation causes the vortex descent history difference in the two vortices of the vortex pair. When a shear layer is below the vortex pair with the same sign as the left vortex, the right vortex descends less than the left vortex. When the same shear layer is above the vortex pair, the right vortex descends more. The descent altitudes of the two vortices are the same when they go through a constant, non-deformed shear layer. Those trends are in agreement with Navier-Stokes simulations.

  20. Shear wall experiments and design in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.

    1994-12-01

    This paper summarizes the results of recent survey studies on the available experimental data bases and design codes/standards for reinforced concrete (RC) shear wall structures in Japan. Information related to the seismic design of RC reactor buildings and containment structures was emphasized in the survey. The seismic requirements for concrete structures, particularly those related to shear strength design, are outlined. Detailed descriptions are presented on the development of Japanese shear wall equations, design requirements for containment structures, and ductility requirements.

  1. Continuous wave laser for wind shear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Loren

    1991-01-01

    Details of the design and development of a continuous-wave heterodyne carbon dioxide laser which has wind shear detection capabilities are given in viewgraph form. The goal of the development was to investigate the lower cost CW (rather than pulsed) lidar option for look-ahead wind shear detection from aircraft. The device has potential utility for ground based wind shear detection at secondary airports where the high cost of a Terminal Doppler Weather Radar system is not justifiable.

  2. Coronal magnetic fields produced by photospheric shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Yang, W.-H.

    1987-01-01

    The magneto-frictional method is used for computing force free fields to examine the evolution of the magnetic field of a line dipole, when there is relative shearing motion between the two polarities. It found that the energy of the sheared field can be arbitrarily large compared with the potential field. It is also found that it is possible to fit the magnetic energy, as a function of shear, by a simple functional form.

  3. Dynamic shear deformation in high purity Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Cerreta, Ellen K; Bingert, John F; Trujillo, Carl P; Lopez, Mike F; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The forced shear test specimen, first developed by Meyer et al. [Meyer L. et al., Critical Adiabatic Shear Strength of Low Alloyed Steel Under Compressive Loading, Metallurgical Applications of Shock Wave and High Strain Rate Phenomena (Marcel Decker, 1986), 657; Hartmann K. et al., Metallurgical Effects on Impact Loaded Materials, Shock Waves and High Strain rate Phenomena in Metals (Plenum, 1981), 325-337.], has been utilized in a number of studies. While the geometry of this specimen does not allow for the microstructure to exactly define the location of shear band formation and the overall mechanical response of a specimen is highly sensitive to the geometry utilized, the forced shear specimen is useful for characterizing the influence of parameters such as strain rate, temperature, strain, and load on the microstructural evolution within a shear band. Additionally, many studies have utilized this geometry to advance the understanding of shear band development. In this study, by varying the geometry, specifically the ratio of the inner hole to the outer hat diameter, the dynamic shear localization response of high purity Fe was examined. Post mortem characterization was performed to quantify the width of the localizations and examine the microstructural and textural evolution of shear deformation in a bcc metal. Increased instability in mechanical response is strongly linked with development of enhanced intergranular misorientations, high angle boundaries, and classical shear textures characterized through orientation distribution functions.

  4. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  5. Effect of friction on shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Ren, Jie; Dijksman, Joshua; Behringer, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Shear Jamming of granular materials was first found for systems of frictional disks, with a static friction coefficients μs ~= 0 . 6 . Jamming by shear is obtained by starting from a zero-stress state with a packing fraction ϕS <= ϕ <=ϕJ between ϕJ (isotropic jamming) and a lowest ϕS for shear jamming. This phenomenon is associated with strong anisotropy in stress and the contact network in the form of ``force chains,'' which are stabilized and/or enhanced by the presence of friction. We address experimentally how reducing friction affects shear jamming by using either teflon disks of teflon wrapped photoelastic particles. The teflon disks were placed in a wall driven 2D shear apparatus, in which we can probe shear stresses mechanically. Teflon-wrapped disks were placed in a bottom driven 2D shear apparatus (Ren et al., PRL 2013). Both apparatuses provide uniform simple shear. In all low- μ experiments, the shear jamming occurred, as observed through stress increases on the packing. However, the low- μ differences observed for ϕJ -ϕS were smaller than for higher friction particles. Ongoing work is studying systems using hydrogel disks, which have a lower friction coefficient than teflon. We acknowledge support from NSF Grant No. DMR12-06351, ARO Grant No. W911NF-1-11-0110, and NASA Grant No. NNX10AU01G.

  6. Novel shear mechanism in nanolayered composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mara, Nathan; Bhattacharyya, Dhriti; Hirth, John P; Dickerson, Patricia O; Misra, Amit

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that two-phase nanocomposite materials with semicoherent interfaces exhibit enhanced strength, deformability, and radiation damage resistance. The remarkable behavior exhibited by these materials has been attributed to the atomistic structure of the bi-metal interface that results in interfaces with low shear strength and hence, strong barriers for slip transmission due to dislocation core spreading along the weak interfaces. In this work, the low interfacial shear strength of Cu/Nb nanoscale multilayers dictates a new mechanism for shear banding and strain softening during micropillar compression. Previous work investigating shear band formation in nanocrystalline materials has shown a connection between insufficient strain hardening and the onset of shear banding in Fe and Fe-10% Cu, but has also shown that hardening does not necessarily offset shear banding in Pd nanomaterials. Therefore, the mechanisms behind shear localization in nanocrystalline materials are not completely understood. Our findings, supported by molecular dynamics simulations, provide insight on the design of nanocomposites with tailored interface structures and geometry to obtain a combination of high strength and deformability. High strength is derived from the ability of the interfaces to trap dislocations through relative ease of interfacial shear, while deformability can be maximized by controlling the effects of loading geometry on shear band formation.

  7. A biaxial method for inplane shear testing. [shear strain in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, H. G.; Weller, T.

    1978-01-01

    A biaxial method for performing inplane shear tests of materials using a shear frame is described. Aluminum plate and sandwich specimens were used to characterize the uniformity of shear strain imparted by the biaxial method of loading as opposed to the uniaxial method. The inplane stiffening effect of aluminum honeycomb core was determined. Test results for (+ or - 45) graphite-epoxy laminate are presented. Some theoretical considerations of subjecting an anisotropic material to a uniform shear deformation are discussed.

  8. Quadruple Lap Shear Processing Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Tony N.; McCool, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Thiokol, Science and Engineering Huntsville Operations (SEHO) Laboratory has previously experienced significant levels of variation in testing Quadruple Lap Shear (QLS) specimens. The QLS test is used at Thiokol / Utah for the qualification of Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle flex bearing materials. A test was conducted to verify that process changes instituted by SEHO personnel effectively reduced variability, even with normal processing variables introduced. A test matrix was designed to progress in a series of steps; the first establishing a baseline, then introducing additional solvents or other variables. Variables included normal test plan delay times, pre-bond solvent hand-wipes and contaminants. Each condition tested utilized standard QLS hardware bonded with natural rubber, two separate technicians and three replicates. This paper will report the results and conclusions of this investigation.

  9. Shear deformation in granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bardenhagen, S.G.; Brackbill, J.U.; Sulsky, D.L.

    1998-12-31

    An investigation into the properties of granular materials is undertaken via numerical simulation. These simulations highlight that frictional contact, a defining characteristic of dry granular materials, and interfacial debonding, an expected deformation mode in plastic bonded explosives, must be properly modeled. Frictional contact and debonding algorithms have been implemented into FLIP, a particle in cell code, and are described. Frictionless and frictional contact are simulated, with attention paid to energy and momentum conservation. Debonding is simulated, with attention paid to the interfacial debonding speed. A first step toward calculations of shear deformation in plastic bonded explosives is made. Simulations are performed on the scale of the grains where experimental data is difficult to obtain. Two characteristics of deformation are found, namely the intermittent binding of grains when rotation and translation are insufficient to accommodate deformation, and the role of the binder as a lubricant in force chains.

  10. Magnetoconvection in sheared magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, N. H.; Garcia, O. E.

    2008-10-15

    The development of magnetoconvection in a sheared magnetic field is investigated. The equilibrium magnetic field B{sub 0} is horizontal and its orientation varies linearly along the vertical axis. Preliminary consideration of the transition from the inertial to the viscous regime of the gravitational resistive interchange instability, reveals that the latter is characterized by the existence of viscoresistive boundary layers of vertical width which scales as Q{sup -1/6}, where Q is the Chandrasekhar number. The situation is analogous to the one encountered in magnetically confined laboratory plasmas, where convective flows are constrained by the magnetic shear to develop in boundary layers located around resonant magnetic surfaces in order to fulfill the 'interchange condition'k{center_dot}B{sub 0}=0, where k is the wave vector of the magnetic perturbation. It follows that when the effect of thermal diffusion is taken into account in the process, convection can only occur above a certain critical value of the Rayleigh number which scales as Q{sup 2/3} for large Q. At the onset, the convection pattern is a superposition of identically thin convective rolls everywhere aligned with the local magnetic field lines and which therefore adopt the magnetic field geometry, a situation also reminiscent of the penumbra of sunspots. Using this degeneracy, equations describing the weakly nonlinear state are obtained and discussed. A reduced magnetohydrodynamic description of magnetoconvection is introduced. Since it is valid for arbitrary magnetic field configurations, it allows a simple extension to the case where there exists an inclination between the direction of gravity and the plane spanned by the equilibrium magnetic field. These reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations are proposed as a powerful tool for further investigations of magnetoconvection in more complex field line geometries.

  11. Turbulence Suppression by ExB Shear in JET Optimized Shear Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Beer; R.V. Budny; C.D. Challis; G. Conway; C. Gomezano; et al

    1999-07-01

    We calculate microinstability growth rates in JET optimized shear plasmas with a comprehensive gyrofluid model, including sheared E x B flows, trapped electrons, and all dominant ion species in realistic magnetic geometry. We find good correlation between E x B shear suppression of microinstabilities and both the formation and collapse of the internal transport barrier.

  12. Turbulence suppression by E x B shear in JET optimized shear pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, M.A.; Budny, R.V.; Challis, C.D.; Conway, G.

    2000-01-06

    The authors calculate microinstability growth rates in JET optimized shear plasmas with a comprehensive gyrofluid model, including sheared E x B flows, trapped electrons, and all dominant ion species in realistic magnetic geometry. They find good correlation between E x B shear suppression of microinstabilities and both the formation and collapse of the internal transport barrier.

  13. The Multi-Dimensional Nature of Wind Shear Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    The impact of air carrier accidents has lead to investigations into the wind shear phenomenon. This report includes such topics as wind shear characterization, aircraft pilot performance in shear conditions, terminology and language development, wind shear forecasting, ground and flight wind shear displays, wind shear data collection and dissemination, and pilot factors associated with wind shear encounters. Some areas which show promise for short term solutions to the wind shear hazards includes: (1) improved gust front warning through ground based sensors; (2) greater pilot awareness of wind shear through improved training; and (3) airborne displays based on groundspeed/airspeed comparisons.

  14. Effect of Friction on Shear Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Ren, Jie; Dijksman, Joshua; Bares, Jonathan; Behringer, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Shear jamming of granular materials was first found for systems of frictional disks, with a static friction coefficient μ ~ 0 . 6 (Bi et al. Nature (2011)). Jamming by shear is obtained by starting from a zero-stress state with a packing fraction ϕ between ϕJ (isotropic jamming) and a lowest ϕS for shear jamming. This phenomenon is associated with strong anisotropy in stress and the contact network in the form of force chains, which are stabilized and/or enhanced by the presence of friction. Whether shear jamming occurs for frictionless particles is under debate. The issue we address experimentally is how reducing friction affects shear jamming. We put the Teflon-wrapped photoelastic disks, lowering the friction substantially from previous experiments, in a well-studied 2D shear apparatus (Ren et al. PRL (2013)), which provides a uniform simple shear. Shear jamming is still observed; however, the difference ϕJ -ϕS is smaller with lower friction. We also observe larger anisotropies in fragile states compared to experiments with higher friction particles at the same density. In ongoing work we are studying systems using photoelastic disks with fine gears on the edge to generate very large effective friction. We acknowledge support from NSF Grant DMR1206351, NSF Grant DMS-1248071, NASA Grant NNX10AU01G and William M. Keck Foundation.

  15. Tensile and shear strength of adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stibolt, Kenneth A.

    1990-01-01

    This experiment is conducted in a freshman-level course: Introduction to Engineering Materials. There are no prerequisites for the course although students should have some knowledge of basic algebra. The objectives are to tension and shear test adhesives and to determine the tensile and shear properties of adhesives. Details of equipment of procedure are given.

  16. Low shear viscosity due to Anderson localization

    SciTech Connect

    Giannakis, Ioannis; Hou Defu; Ren Haicang; Li Jiarong

    2008-01-15

    We study the Anderson localization effect on the shear viscosity in a system with random medium by Kubo formula. We show that this effect can suppress nonperturbatively the shear viscosity and other transport coefficients. The possible relevancy of such a suppression to the near perfect fluid behavior of the quark-gluon plasma created in heavy-ion collisions is discussed.

  17. Effect of friction on shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Ren, Jie; Dijksman, Joshua; Behringer, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Shear Jamming of granular materials was first found for systems of frictional disks, with a static friction coefficients μs ~= 0 . 6 . Jamming by shear is obtained by starting from a zero-stress state with a packing fraction ϕS <= ϕ <=ϕJ between ϕJ (isotropic jamming) and a lowest ϕS for shear jamming. This phenomenon is associated with strong anisotropy in stress and the contact network in the form of ``force chains,'' which are stabilized and/or enhanced by the presence of friction. The issue that we address experimentally is how reducing friction affects shear jamming. We use photoelastic disks that have been wrapped with Teflon, lowering the friction coefficient substantially from previous experiments. The Teflon-wrapped disks were placed in a well-studied 2D shear apparatus (Ren et al., PRL, 110, 018302 (2013)), which provides uniform simple shear without generating shear bands. Shear jamming is still observed, but the difference ϕJ -ϕS is smaller than for higher friction particles. With Teflon-wrapped disks, we observe larger anisotropies compared to the previous experiment with higher friction particles at the same packing fraction, which indicates force chains tending to be straight in the low friction system. We acknowledge support from NSF Grant No. DMR12-06351, ARO Grant No. W911NF-1-11-0110, and NASA Grant No. NNX10AU01G.

  18. Effect of friction on shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Bares, Jonathan; Dijksman, Joshua; Ren, Jie; Zheng, Hu; Behringer, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Shear jamming of granular materials was first found for systems of frictional disks, with a static friction coefficient μ ~ 0 . 6. Jamming by shear is obtained by starting from a zero-stress state with a packing fraction ϕ between ϕJ (isotropic jamming) and a lowest ϕS for shear jamming. This phenomenon is associated with strong anisotropy in stress and the contact network in the form of force chains, which are stabilized and/or enhanced by the presence of friction. Whether shear jamming occurs for frictionless particles is under debate. The issue we address experimentally is how changing friction affects shear jamming. By applying a homogeneous simple shear, we study the effect of friction by using photoelastic disks either wrapped with Teflon to reduce friction or with fine teeth on the edge to increase friction. Shear jamming is still observed; however, the difference ϕJ -ϕS is smaller with lower friction. We also observe larger fluctuations due to initial configurations both at the lowest and the highest friction systems studied. Ongoing work is to characterize response from different friction systems under shear with information at local scale. We acknowledge support from NSF-DMR1206351, NASA NNX15AD38G and W.M. Keck Foundation.

  19. Study of shear-stiffened elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Tongfei; Li, Weihua; Ding, Jie; Alici, Gursel; Du, Haiping

    2013-06-01

    Shear thickening fluids, which are usually concentrated colloidal suspensions composed of non-aggregating solid particles suspended in fluids, exhibit a marked increase in viscosity beyond a critical shear rate. This increased viscosity is seen as being both 'field-activated', due to the dependence on shearing rate, as well as reversible. Shear thickening fluids have found good applications as protection materials, such as in liquid body armor, vibration absorber or dampers. This research aims to expand the protection material family by developing a novel solid status shear thickening material, called shear-stiffened elastomers. These new shear-stiffened elastomers were fabricated with the mixture of silicone rubber and silicone oil. A total of four SSE samples were fabricated in this study. Their mechanical and rheological properties under both steady-state and dynamic loading conditions were tested with a parallel-plate. The effects of silicone oil composition and angular frequency were summarized. When raising the angular frequency in dynamic shear test, the storage modulus of conventional silicone rubber shows a small increasing trend with the frequency. However, if silicone oil is selected to be mixed with silicone rubber, the storage modulus increases dramatically when the frequency and strain are both beyond the critical values.

  20. Solvable groups and a shear construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freibert, Marco; Swann, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    The twist construction is a geometric model of T-duality that includes constructions of nilmanifolds from tori. This paper shows how one-dimensional foliations on manifolds may be used in a shear construction, which in algebraic form builds certain solvable Lie groups from Abelian ones. We discuss other examples of geometric structures that may be obtained from the shear construction.

  1. Steel shear walls, behavior, modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Astaneh-Asl, Abolhassan

    2008-07-08

    In recent years steel shear walls have become one of the more efficient lateral load resisting systems in tall buildings. The basic steel shear wall system consists of a steel plate welded to boundary steel columns and boundary steel beams. In some cases the boundary columns have been concrete-filled steel tubes. Seismic behavior of steel shear wall systems during actual earthquakes and based on laboratory cyclic tests indicates that the systems are quite ductile and can be designed in an economical way to have sufficient stiffness, strength, ductility and energy dissipation capacity to resist seismic effects of strong earthquakes. This paper, after summarizing the past research, presents the results of two tests of an innovative steel shear wall system where the boundary elements are concrete-filled tubes. Then, a review of currently available analytical models of steel shear walls is provided with a discussion of capabilities and limitations of each model. We have observed that the tension only 'strip model', forming the basis of the current AISC seismic design provisions for steel shear walls, is not capable of predicting the behavior of steel shear walls with length-to-thickness ratio less than about 600 which is the range most common in buildings. The main reasons for such shortcomings of the AISC seismic design provisions for steel shear walls is that it ignores the compression field in the shear walls, which can be significant in typical shear walls. The AISC method also is not capable of incorporating stresses in the shear wall due to overturning moments. A more rational seismic design procedure for design of shear walls proposed in 2000 by the author is summarized in the paper. The design method, based on procedures used for design of steel plate girders, takes into account both tension and compression stress fields and is applicable to all values of length-to-thickness ratios of steel shear walls. The method is also capable of including the effect of

  2. Simple shear of deformable square objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treagus, Susan H.; Lan, Labao

    2003-12-01

    Finite element models of square objects in a contrasting matrix in simple shear show that the objects deform to a variety of shapes. For a range of viscosity contrasts, we catalogue the changing shapes and orientations of objects in progressive simple shear. At moderate simple shear ( γ=1.5), the shapes are virtually indistinguishable from those in equivalent pure shear models with the same bulk strain ( RS=4), examined in a previous study. In theory, differences would be expected, especially for very stiff objects or at very large strain. In all our simple shear models, relatively competent square objects become asymmetric barrel shapes with concave shortened edges, similar to some types of boudin. Incompetent objects develop shapes surprisingly similar to mica fish described in mylonites.

  3. DYNAMO EFFICIENCY WITH SHEAR IN HELICAL TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Leprovost, Nicolas; Kim, Eun-jin

    2009-05-10

    To elucidate the influence of shear flow on the generation of magnetic fields through the modification of turbulence property, we consider the case where a large-scale magnetic field is parallel to a large-scale shear flow without direct interaction between the two in the kinematic limit where the magnetic field does not backreact on the velocity. By nonperturbatively incorporating the effect of shear in a helically forced turbulence, we show that turbulence intensity and turbulent transport coefficients (turbulent viscosity, {alpha} and {beta} effect) are enhanced by a weak shear, while strongly suppressed for strong shear. In particular, {beta} is shown to be much more strongly suppressed than {alpha} effect. We discuss its important implications for dynamo efficiency, i.e., on the scaling of the dynamo number with differential rotation.

  4. WEAK LENSING MASS RECONSTRUCTION: FLEXION VERSUS SHEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Pires, S.

    2010-11-10

    Weak gravitational lensing has proven to be a powerful tool to map directly the distribution of dark matter in the universe. The technique, currently used, relies on the accurate measurement of the gravitational shear that corresponds to the first-order distortion of the background galaxy images. More recently, a new technique has been introduced that relies on the accurate measurement of the gravitational flexion that corresponds to the second-order distortion of the background galaxy images. This technique should probe structures on smaller scales than that of shear analysis. The goal of this paper is to compare the ability of shear and flexion to reconstruct the dark matter distribution by taking into account the dispersion in shear and flexion measurements. Our results show that the flexion is less sensitive than shear for constructing the convergence maps on scales that are physically feasible for mapping, meaning that flexion alone should not be used to do convergence map reconstruction, even on small scales.

  5. Three dimensional fabric evolution of sheared sand

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Alsidqi; Alshibli, Khalid

    2012-10-24

    Granular particles undergo translation and rolling when they are sheared. This paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) experimental assessment of fabric evolution of sheared sand at the particle level. F-75 Ottawa sand specimen was tested under an axisymmetric triaxial loading condition. It measured 9.5 mm in diameter and 20 mm in height. The quantitative evaluation was conducted by analyzing 3D high-resolution x-ray synchrotron micro-tomography images of the specimen at eight axial strain levels. The analyses included visualization of particle translation and rotation, and quantification of fabric orientation as shearing continued. Representative individual particles were successfully tracked and visualized to assess the mode of interaction between them. This paper discusses fabric evolution and compares the evolution of particles within and outside the shear band as shearing continues. Changes in particle orientation distributions are presented using fabric histograms and fabric tensor.

  6. Sheared Ising models in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hucht, Alfred; Angst, Sebastian

    2013-03-01

    The nonequilibrium phase transition in sheared three-dimensional Ising models is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations in two different geometries corresponding to different shear normals [A. Hucht and S. Angst, EPL 100, 20003 (2012)]. We demonstrate that in the high shear limit both systems undergo a strongly anisotropic phase transition at exactly known critical temperatures Tc which depend on the direction of the shear normal. Using dimensional analysis, we determine the anisotropy exponent θ = 2 as well as the correlation length exponents ν∥ = 1 and ν⊥ = 1 / 2 . These results are verified by simulations, though considerable corrections to scaling are found. The correlation functions perpendicular to the shear direction can be calculated exactly and show Ornstein-Zernike behavior. Supported by CAPES-DAAD through PROBRAL as well as by the German Research Society (DFG) through SFB 616 ``Energy Dissipation at Surfaces.''

  7. Shear layer excitation, experiment versus theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.; Stahl, B.

    1984-01-01

    The acoustical excitation of shear layers is investigated. Acoustical excitation causes the so-called orderly structures in shear layers and jets. Also, the deviations in the spreading rate between different shear layer experiments are due to the same excitation mechanism. Measurements in the linear interaction region close to the edge from which the shear layer is shed are examined. Two sets of experiments (Houston 1981 and Berlin 1983/84) are discussed. The measurements were carried out with shear layers in air using hot wire anemometers and microphones. The agreement between these measurements and the theory is good. Even details of the fluctuating flow field correspond to theoretical predictions, such as the local occurrence of negative phase speeds.

  8. Trapped Electron Precession Shear Induced Fluctuation Decorrelation

    SciTech Connect

    T.S. Hahm; P.H. Diamond; E.-J. Kim

    2002-07-29

    We consider the effects of trapped electron precession shear on the microturbulence. In a similar way the strong E x B shear reduces the radial correlation length of ambient fluctuations, the radial variation of the trapped electron precession frequency can reduce the radial correlation length of fluctuations associated with trapped electrons. In reversed shear plasmas, with the explicit dependence of the trapped electron precession shearing rate on B(subscript)theta, the sharp radial gradient of T(subscript)e due to local electron heating inside qmin can make the precession shearing mechanism more effective, and reduce the electron thermal transport constructing a positive feedback loop for the T(subscript)e barrier formation.

  9. Determining Shear Stress Distribution in a Laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Yarrington, Phillip W.

    2010-01-01

    A "simplified shear solution" method approximates the through-thickness shear stress distribution within a composite laminate based on an extension of laminated beam theory. The method does not consider the solution of a particular boundary value problem; rather, it requires only knowledge of the global shear loading, geometry, and material properties of the laminate or panel. It is thus analogous to lamination theory in that ply-level stresses can be efficiently determined from global load resultants at a given location in a structure and used to evaluate the margin of safety on a ply-by-ply basis. The simplified shear solution stress distribution is zero at free surfaces, continuous at ply boundaries, and integrates to the applied shear load. The method has been incorporated within the HyperSizer commercial structural sizing software to improve its predictive capability for designing composite structures. The HyperSizer structural sizing software is used extensively by NASA to design composite structures. In the case of through-thickness shear loading on panels, HyperSizer previously included a basic, industry-standard, method for approximating the resulting shear stress distribution in sandwich panels. However, no such method was employed for solid laminate panels. The purpose of the innovation is to provide an approximation of the through-thickness shear stresses in a solid laminate given the through-thickness shear loads (Qx and Qy) on the panel. The method was needed for implementation within the HyperSizer structural sizing software so that the approximated ply-level shear stresses could be utilized in a failure theory to assess the adequacy of a panel design. The simplified shear solution method was developed based on extending and generalizing bi-material beam theory to plate-like structures. It is assumed that the through-thickness shear stresses arise due to local bending of the laminate induced by the through-thickness shear load, and by imposing

  10. Converting the organic fraction of solid waste from the city of Abu Dhabi to valuable products via dark fermentation – Economic and energy assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Bonk, Fabian Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan-Rodrigo Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The cost and energy demand for dark fermentation using OFMSW were established. • Dark fermentation using OFMSW can produce a carbon source for bioprocesses of about 330 USD/t{sub COD}. • A maximum purification cost of VFAs from dark fermentation using OFMSW was established to 15 USD/m{sup 3}. • Replacing fossil fuel based products by dark fermentation will probably lead to net energy savings. - Abstract: Landfilling the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) leads to greenhouse gas emissions and loss of valuable resources. Sustainable and cost efficient solutions need to be developed to solve this problem. This study evaluates the feasibility of using dark fermentation (DF) to convert the OFMSW to volatile fatty acids (VFAs), fertilizer and H{sub 2}. The VFAs in the DF effluent can be used directly as substrate for subsequent bioprocesses or purified from the effluent for industrial use. DF of the OFMSW in Abu Dhabi will be economically sustainable once VFA purification can be accomplished on large scale for less than 15 USD/m{sup 3}{sub effluent}. With a VFA minimum selling price of 330 USD/t{sub COD}, DF provides a competitive carbon source to sugar. Furthermore, DF is likely to use less energy than conventional processes that produce VFAs, fertilizer and H{sub 2}. This makes DF of OFMSW a promising waste treatment technology and biorefinery platform.

  11. Dual shear wave induced laser speckle contrast signal and the improvement in shear wave speed measurement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sinan; Cheng, Yi; Eckersley, Robert J; Elson, Daniel S; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Shear wave speed is quantitatively related to tissue viscoelasticity. Previously we reported shear wave tracking at centimetre depths in a turbid optical medium using laser speckle contrast detection. Shear wave progression modulates displacement of optical scatterers and therefore modulates photon phase and changes the laser speckle patterns. Time-resolved charge-coupled device (CCD)-based speckle contrast analysis was used to track shear waves and measure the time-of-flight of shear waves for speed measurement. In this manuscript, we report a new observation of the laser speckle contrast difference signal for dual shear waves. A modulation of CCD speckle contrast difference was observed and simulation reproduces the modulation pattern, suggesting its origin. Both experimental and simulation results show that the dual shear wave approach generates an improved definition of temporal features in the time-of-flight optical signal and an improved signal to noise ratio with a standard deviation less than 50% that of individual shear waves. Results also show that dual shear waves can correct the bias of shear wave speed measurement caused by shear wave reflections from elastic boundaries. PMID:26114021

  12. Reversible shear thickening at low shear rates of electrorheological fluids under electric fields.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Zhang, Minliang; Jiang, Jile; Pesika, Noshir; Zeng, Hongbo; Israelachvili, Jacob; Meng, Yonggang; Wen, Shizhu

    2011-01-01

    By shearing electrorheological (ER) fluids between two concentric cylinders, we show a reversible shear thickening of ER fluids above a low critical shear rate (<1 s(-1)) and a high critical electric field strength (>100 V/mm), which can be characterized by a critical apparent viscosity. Shear thickening and electrostatic particle interaction-induced interparticle friction forces are considered to play an important role in the origin of lateral shear resistance of ER fluids, while the applied electric field controls the extent of shear thickening. The electric-field-controlled reversible shear thickening has implications for high-performance electrorheological-magnetorheological fluid design, clutch fluids with high friction forces triggered by applying a local electric field, other field-responsive materials, and intelligent systems. PMID:21405692

  13. Periodic Viscous Shear Heating Instability in Fine-Grained Shear Zones: Mechanism for Intermediate Depth Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coon, E.; Kelemen, P.; Hirth, G.; Spiegelman, M.

    2005-12-01

    Kelemen and Hirth (Fall 2004 AGU) presented a model for periodic, viscous shear heating instabilities along pre-existing, fine grained shear zones. This provides an attractive alternative to dehydration embrittlement for explaining intermediate-depth earthquakes, especially those in a narrow thermal window within the mantle section of subducting oceanic plates (Hacker et al JGR03). Ductile shear zones with widths of cm to m are common in shallow mantle massifs and peridotite along oceanic fracture zones. Pseudotachylites in a mantle shear zone show that shear heating temperatures exceeded the mantle solidus (Obata & Karato Tectonophys95). Olivine grain growth in shear zones is pinned by closely spaced pyroxenes; thus, once formed, these features do not `heal' on geological time scales in the absence of melt or fluid (Warren & Hirth EPSL05). Grain-size sensitive creep will be localized within these shear zones, in preference to host rocks with olivine grain size from 1 to 10 mm. Inspired by the work of Whitehead & Gans (GJRAS74), we proposed that such pre-existing shear zones might undergo repeated shear heating instabilities. This is not a new concept; what is new is that viscous deformation is limited to a narrow shear zone, because grain boundary sliding, sensitive to both stress and grain size, may accommodate creep even at high stress and high temperature. These new ideas yield a new result: simple models for a periodic shear heating instability. Last year, we presented a 1D numerical model using olivine flow laws, assuming that viscous deformation remains localized in shear zones, surrounded by host rocks undergoing elastic deformation. Stress evolves due to elastic strain and drives viscous deformation in a shear zone of specified width. Shear heating and thermal diffusion control T. A maximum of 1400 C (substantial melting of peridotite ) was imposed. Grain size evolves due to recrystallization and diffusion. For strain rates of E-13 to E-14 per sec and

  14. Inverse magnetic/shear catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Brett

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that very large magnetic fields are generated when the Quark-Gluon Plasma is formed during peripheral heavy-ion collisions. Lattice, holographic, and other studies strongly suggest that these fields may, for observationally relevant field values, induce "inverse magnetic catalysis", signalled by a lowering of the critical temperature for the chiral/deconfinement transition. The theoretical basis of this effect has recently attracted much attention; yet so far these investigations have not included another, equally dramatic consequence of the peripheral collision geometry: the QGP acquires a large angular momentum vector, parallel to the magnetic field. Here we use holographic techniques to argue that the angular momentum can also, independently, have an effect on transition temperatures, and we obtain a rough estimate of the relative effects of the presence of both a magnetic field and an angular momentum density. We find that the shearing angular momentum reinforces the effect of the magnetic field at low values of the baryonic chemical potential, but that it can actually decrease that effect at high chemical potentials.

  15. Impact response of shear thickening suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric; Ozgen, Oktar; Kallmann, Marcelo; Allen, Benjamin

    2013-11-01

    Dense suspensions of hard particles such as cornstarch in water exhibit shear thickening, in which the energy dissipation rate under shear dramatically increases with increasing shear rate. Recent work has established that in steady-state shear this phenomena is a result of a dynamic jamming of the particles in suspension. Several dynamic phenomena observed in such suspensions have long been assumed to be a consequence of this shear thickening; strong impact resistance, the ability of a person to run on the fluid surface, fingering and hole instabilities under vibration, and oscillations in the speed of sinking of an object in the fluid. However, I will present results of experiments consisting of an indenter impacting a dense suspension which demonstrate that the strong impact resistance cannot be explained by existing models for steady-state shear thickening. I will show these dynamic phenomena can be reproduced by graphical simulations based on a minimal phenomenological model in which the fluid has a stiffness with a dependence on velocity history. These and other recent results suggest a need for new models to understand the dynamic phenomena associated with shear thickening fluids.

  16. Effect of friction on shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Bares, Jonathan; Dijksman, Joshua; Ren, Jie; Zheng, Hu; Behringer, Robert

    Shear jamming of granular materials was first found for systems of frictional disks, with a static friction coefficient μ ~ 0 . 6 (Bi et al. Nature (2011)). Jamming by shear is obtained by starting from a zero-stress state with a packing fraction ϕ between ϕJ (isotropic jamming) and a lowest ϕS for shear jamming. This phenomenon is associated with strong anisotropy in stress and the contact network in the form of force chains, which are stabilized and/or enhanced by the presence of friction. Whether shear jamming occurs for frictionless particles is under debate. The issue we address experimentally is how changing friction affects shear jamming. By applying a homogeneous simple shear, we study the effect of friction by using photoelastic disks either wrapped with Teflon to reduce friction or with fine teeth on the edge to increase friction. Shear jamming is still observed; however, the difference ϕJ -ϕS is smaller with lower friction. We also observe larger fluctuations due to initial configurations both at the lowest and the highest friction systems studied. Ongoing work is to use particles made of gelatin to reduce the friction coefficient to the order of 0.01. We acknowledge support from NSF Grant DMR1206351, NASA Grant NNX15AD38G and the William M. Keck Foundation.

  17. Hierarchical cosmic shear power spectrum inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsing, Justin; Heavens, Alan; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Kiessling, Alina; Wandelt, Benjamin; Hoffmann, Till

    2016-02-01

    We develop a Bayesian hierarchical modelling approach for cosmic shear power spectrum inference, jointly sampling from the posterior distribution of the cosmic shear field and its (tomographic) power spectra. Inference of the shear power spectrum is a powerful intermediate product for a cosmic shear analysis, since it requires very few model assumptions and can be used to perform inference on a wide range of cosmological models a posteriori without loss of information. We show that joint posterior for the shear map and power spectrum can be sampled effectively by Gibbs sampling, iteratively drawing samples from the map and power spectrum, each conditional on the other. This approach neatly circumvents difficulties associated with complicated survey geometry and masks that plague frequentist power spectrum estimators, since the power spectrum inference provides prior information about the field in masked regions at every sampling step. We demonstrate this approach for inference of tomographic shear E-mode, B-mode and EB-cross power spectra from a simulated galaxy shear catalogue with a number of important features; galaxies distributed on the sky and in redshift with photometric redshift uncertainties, realistic random ellipticity noise for every galaxy and a complicated survey mask. The obtained posterior distributions for the tomographic power spectrum coefficients recover the underlying simulated power spectra for both E- and B-modes.

  18. Electrorheological fluid under elongation, compression, and shearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Meng, Y.; Mao, H.; Wen, S.

    2002-03-01

    Electrorheological (ER) fluid based on zeolite and silicone oil under elongation, compression, and shearing was investigated at room temperature. Dc electric fields were applied on the ER fluid when elongation and compression were carried out on a self-constructed test system. The shear yield stress, presenting the macroscopic interactions of particles in the ER fluid along the direction of shearing and perpendicular to the direction of the electric field, was also obtained by a HAAKE RV20 rheometer. The tensile yield stress, presenting the macroscopic interactions of particles in the ER fluid along the direction of the electric field, was achieved as the peak value in the elongating curve with an elongating yield strain of 0.15-0.20. A shear yield angle of about 15°-18.5° reasonably connected tensile yield stress with shear yield stress, agreeing with the shear yield angle tested well by other researchers. The compressing tests showed that the ER fluid has a high compressive modulus under a small compressive strain lower than 0.1. The compressive stress has an exponential relationship with the compressive strain when it is higher than 0.1, and it is much higher than shear yield stress.

  19. Surface shear inviscidity of soluble surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Zell, Zachary A.; Nowbahar, Arash; Mansard, Vincent; Leal, L. Gary; Deshmukh, Suraj S.; Mecca, Jodi M.; Tucker, Christopher J.; Squires, Todd M.

    2014-01-01

    Foam and emulsion stability has long been believed to correlate with the surface shear viscosity of the surfactant used to stabilize them. Many subtleties arise in interpreting surface shear viscosity measurements, however, and correlations do not necessarily indicate causation. Using a sensitive technique designed to excite purely surface shear deformations, we make the most sensitive and precise measurements to date of the surface shear viscosity of a variety of soluble surfactants, focusing on SDS in particular. Our measurements reveal the surface shear viscosity of SDS to be below the sensitivity limit of our technique, giving an upper bound of order 0.01 μN·s/m. This conflicts directly with almost all previous studies, which reported values up to 103–104 times higher. Multiple control and complementary measurements confirm this result, including direct visualization of monolayer deformation, for SDS and a wide variety of soluble polymeric, ionic, and nonionic surfactants of high- and low-foaming character. No soluble, small-molecule surfactant was found to have a measurable surface shear viscosity, which seriously undermines most support for any correlation between foam stability and surface shear rheology of soluble surfactants. PMID:24563383

  20. Complex shear modulus of a magnetorheological elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, G. Y.

    2004-10-01

    In our previous study (Zhou 2003 Smart Mater. Struct. 12 139-46), a technique to extract the field-induced shear modulus through an experiment testing the responded acceleration of a system composed of a magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) and a cuprous mass was introduced. In this paper, we present a different data processing method, based on the Steiglitz-McBride iteration method, to recover the complex shear modulus of an MRE in the frequency domain through the measured force excitation and responded acceleration of the mass in the above-mentioned experiment. The recovered complex shear modulus is analyzed in three ranges of the frequency domain: low-frequency range, moderate-frequency range, and high-frequency range. In the low-frequency range (<250 Hz), the shear modulus is a bell-type curve rising with the applied magnetic field. The average shear modulus over this frequency range is proportional to the applied magnetic field until magnetic saturation is reached. The maximum change of the average shear modulus over this range is found to be above 55% of the zero-field value. The above phenomenon reaffirms that the subquadratic field dependence, which arises from the saturation of the magnetization near the poles of closely spaced pairs of spheres, must be taken into account. In the moderate-frequency range and high-frequency range, the shear modulus is too complex to be analyzed completely by the proposed method. However, some interesting phenomena are also revealed by the proposed method. For instance, the shear modulus increases with frequency at least with the order of a quadratic polynomial, and the shear modulus is not significantly affected by the applied magnetic field.

  1. Fan-structure waves in shear ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    This presentation introduces a recently identified shear rupture mechanism providing a paradoxical feature of hard rocks - the possibility of shear rupture propagation through the highly confined intact rock mass at shear stress levels significantly less than frictional strength. According to the fan-mechanism the shear rupture propagation is associated with consecutive creation of small slabs in the fracture tip which, due to rotation caused by shear displacement of the fracture interfaces, form a fan-structure representing the fracture head. The fan-head combines such unique features as: extremely low shear resistance (below the frictional strength), self-sustaining stress intensification in the rupture tip (providing easy formation of new slabs), and self-unbalancing conditions in the fan-head (making the failure process inevitably spontaneous and violent). An important feature of the fan-mechanism is the fact that for the initial formation of the fan-structure an enhanced local shear stress is required, however, after completion of the fan-structure it can propagate as a dynamic wave through intact rock mass at shear stresses below the frictional strength. Paradoxically low shear strength of pristine rocks provided by the fan-mechanism determines the correspondingly low transient strength of the lithosphere, which favours generation of new earthquake faults in the intact rock mass adjoining pre-existing faults in preference to frictional stick-slip instability along these faults. The new approach reveals an alternative role of pre-existing faults in earthquake activity: they represent local stress concentrates in pristine rock adjoining the fault where special conditions for the fan-mechanism nucleation are created, while further dynamic propagation of the new fault (earthquake) occurs at low field stresses even below the frictional strength.

  2. Coherent motion in excited free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wygnanski, Israel J.; Petersen, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the inviscid instability approach to externally excited turbulent free shear flows at high Reynolds numbers is explored. Attention is given to the cases of a small-deficit plane turbulent wake, a plane turbulent jet, an axisymmetric jet, the nonlinear evolution of instabilities in free shear flows, the concept of the 'preferred mode', vortex pairing in turbulent mixing layers, and experimental results for the control of free turbulent shear layers. The special features often attributed to pairing or to the preferred mode are found to be difficult to comprehend; the concept of feedback requires further substantiation in the case of incompressible flow.

  3. Problems pilots face involving wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melvin, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    Educating pilots and the aviation industry about wind shears presents a major problem associated with this meteorological phenomenon. The pilot's second most pressing problem is the need for a language to discuss wind shear encounters with other pilots so that the reaction of the aircraft to the wind shear encounter can be accurately described. Another problem is the flight director which gives a centered pitch command for a given angular displacement from the glide slope. It was suggested that they should instead be called flight path command and should not center unless the aircraft is actually correcting to the flight path.

  4. German bundle shear - cold test results

    SciTech Connect

    Kunze, P.

    1986-01-01

    In the planned Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) reprocessing plant, the mechanical decladding of the fuel elements will be done with a bundle shear. This shear was designed and built with Thyssen Henschel by adapting the experiences of the Wiederaufarbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe (WAK), the FRG reprocessing pilot plant. The tests included boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) dummy elements filled with porcelain as well as steel fuel rod simulators. During the test period with prototype bundle shear, some technical improvements have been found that refer both to operating conditions and to remote handling. In 1987 the acceptance tests will be run.

  5. Method for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Watson, Clyde D.

    1977-01-01

    A method is disclosed for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies of the type wherein a plurality of long metal tubes packed with ceramic fuel are supported in a spaced apart relationship within an outer metal shell or shroud which provides structural support to the assembly. Spent nuclear fuel assemblies are first compacted in a stepwise manner between specially designed gag-compactors and then sheared into short segments amenable to chemical processing by shear blades contoured to mate with the compacted surface of the fuel assembly.

  6. Modeling of shear localization in materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.; LeBlanc, M.; Riddle, B.; Jorgensen, B.

    1998-02-11

    The deformation response of a Ti alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, has been studied during shear localization. The study has involved well-controlled laboratory tests involving a double-notch shear sample. The results have been used to provide a comparison between experiment and the predicted response using DYNA2D and two material models (the Johnson-Cook model and an isotropic elastic-plastic-hydrodynamic model). The work will serve as the basis for the development of a new material model which represents the different deformation mechanisms active during shear localization.

  7. A magnetorheological elastomer compressive and shear sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoorianfar, Nima; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2015-04-01

    A magnetorheological elastomer (MRE)-based wireless sensor is designed, developed and tested, which is capable of sensing compression and shear forces. The MRE wireless sensor system consists of a disk-shape MRE sample with two thin steel electrodes attached to both sides and two wires connected to electrodes. Electrical resistance of MRE sensor samples changes due to piezoresistance behavior of MRE as various axial and shear stresses are applied. Electrical resistance decreases as the applied compressive axial forces increases, on the other hand, the electrical resistance increases as the applied shear force increases. Different MRE sensor configurations are evaluated for design optimization.

  8. Time accurate simulations of compressible shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Steinberger, Craig J.; Vidoni, Thomas J.; Madnia, Cyrus K.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to employ direct numerical simulation (DNS) to study the phenomenon of mixing (or lack thereof) in compressible free shear flows and to suggest new means of enhancing mixing in such flows. The shear flow configurations under investigation are those of parallel mixing layers and planar jets under both non-reacting and reacting nonpremixed conditions. During the three-years of this research program, several important issues regarding mixing and chemical reactions in compressible shear flows were investigated.

  9. High-Shear Stress Sensitizes Platelets to Subsequent Low-Shear Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sheriff, Jawaad; Bluestein, Danny; Girdhar, Gaurav; Jesty, Jolyon

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with mechanical heart valve implants are plagued by flow-induced thromboembolic complications, which are undoubtedly caused by platelet activation. Flow fields in or around the affected regions involve brief exposure to pathologically high-shear stresses on the order of 100 to 1000 dyne/cm2. Although high shear is known to activate platelets directly, their subsequent behavior is not known. We hypothesize that the post-high-shear activation behavior of platelets is particularly relevant in understanding the increased thrombotic risk associated with blood-recirculating prosthetic cardiovascular devices. Purified platelets were exposed to brief (5–40 s) periods of high-shear stress, and then exposed to longer periods (15–60 min) of low shear. Their activation state was measured using a prothrombinase-based assay. Platelets briefly exposed to an initial high-shear stress (e.g., 60 dyne/cm2 for 40 s) activate a little, but this study shows that they are now sensitized, and when exposed to subsequent low shear stress, they activate at least 20-fold faster than platelets not initially exposed to high shear. The results show that platelets in vitro exposed beyond a threshold of high-shear stress are primed for subsequent activation under normal cardiovascular circulation conditions, and they do not recover from the initial high-shear insult. PMID:20135353

  10. Determination of the Shear Stress Distribution in a Laminate from the Applied Shear Resultant--A Simplified Shear Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Yarrington, Phillip W.

    2007-01-01

    The simplified shear solution method is presented for approximating the through-thickness shear stress distribution within a composite laminate based on laminated beam theory. The method does not consider the solution of a particular boundary value problem, rather it requires only knowledge of the global shear loading, geometry, and material properties of the laminate or panel. It is thus analogous to lamination theory in that ply level stresses can be efficiently determined from global load resultants (as determined, for instance, by finite element analysis) at a given location in a structure and used to evaluate the margin of safety on a ply by ply basis. The simplified shear solution stress distribution is zero at free surfaces, continuous at ply boundaries, and integrates to the applied shear load. Comparisons to existing theories are made for a variety of laminates, and design examples are provided illustrating the use of the method for determining through-thickness shear stress margins in several types of composite panels and in the context of a finite element structural analysis.

  11. Simplified Shear Solution for Determination of the Shear Stress Distribution in a Composite Panel from the Applied Shear Resultant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Yarrington, Phillip W.; Collier, Craig S.

    2008-01-01

    The simplified shear solution method is presented for approximating the through-thickness shear stress distribution within a composite laminate or panel based on laminated beam theory. The method does not consider the solution of a particular boundary value problem; rather it requires only knowledge of the global shear loading, geometry, and material properties of the laminate or panel. It is thus analogous to lamination theory in that ply level stresses can be efficiently determined from global load resultants (as determined, for instance, by finite element analysis) at a given location in a structure and used to evaluate the margin of safety on a ply by ply basis. The simplified shear solution stress distribution is zero at free surfaces, continuous at ply boundaries, and integrates to the applied shear load. Comparisons to existing theories are made for a variety of laminates, and design examples are provided illustrating the use of the method for determining through-thickness shear stress margins in several types of composite panels and in the context of a finite element structural analysis.

  12. Magnetized stratified rotating shear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, A.; Lehner, T.; Godeferd, F.; Cambon, C.

    2012-02-01

    We present a spectral linear analysis in terms of advected Fourier modes to describe the behavior of a fluid submitted to four constraints: shear (with rate S), rotation (with angular velocity Ω), stratification, and magnetic field within the linear spectral theory or the shearing box model in astrophysics. As a consequence of the fact that the base flow must be a solution of the Euler-Boussinesq equations, only radial and/or vertical density gradients can be taken into account. Ertel's theorem no longer is valid to show the conservation of potential vorticity, in the presence of the Lorentz force, but a similar theorem can be applied to a potential magnetic induction: The scalar product of the density gradient by the magnetic field is a Lagrangian invariant for an inviscid and nondiffusive fluid. The linear system with a minimal number of solenoidal components, two for both velocity and magnetic disturbance fields, is eventually expressed as a four-component inhomogeneous linear differential system in which the buoyancy scalar is a combination of solenoidal components (variables) and the (constant) potential magnetic induction. We study the stability of such a system for both an infinite streamwise wavelength (k1=0, axisymmetric disturbances) and a finite one (k1≠0, nonaxisymmetric disturbances). In the former case (k1=0), we recover and extend previous results characterizing the magnetorotational instability (MRI) for combined effects of radial and vertical magnetic fields and combined effects of radial and vertical density gradients. We derive an expression for the MRI growth rate in terms of the stratification strength, which indicates that purely radial stratification can inhibit the MRI instability, while purely vertical stratification cannot completely suppress the MRI instability. In the case of nonaxisymmetric disturbances (k1≠0), we only consider the effect of vertical stratification, and we use Levinson's theorem to demonstrate the stability of the

  13. Magnetized stratified rotating shear waves.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Lehner, T; Godeferd, F; Cambon, C

    2012-02-01

    We present a spectral linear analysis in terms of advected Fourier modes to describe the behavior of a fluid submitted to four constraints: shear (with rate S), rotation (with angular velocity Ω), stratification, and magnetic field within the linear spectral theory or the shearing box model in astrophysics. As a consequence of the fact that the base flow must be a solution of the Euler-Boussinesq equations, only radial and/or vertical density gradients can be taken into account. Ertel's theorem no longer is valid to show the conservation of potential vorticity, in the presence of the Lorentz force, but a similar theorem can be applied to a potential magnetic induction: The scalar product of the density gradient by the magnetic field is a Lagrangian invariant for an inviscid and nondiffusive fluid. The linear system with a minimal number of solenoidal components, two for both velocity and magnetic disturbance fields, is eventually expressed as a four-component inhomogeneous linear differential system in which the buoyancy scalar is a combination of solenoidal components (variables) and the (constant) potential magnetic induction. We study the stability of such a system for both an infinite streamwise wavelength (k(1) = 0, axisymmetric disturbances) and a finite one (k(1) ≠ 0, nonaxisymmetric disturbances). In the former case (k(1) = 0), we recover and extend previous results characterizing the magnetorotational instability (MRI) for combined effects of radial and vertical magnetic fields and combined effects of radial and vertical density gradients. We derive an expression for the MRI growth rate in terms of the stratification strength, which indicates that purely radial stratification can inhibit the MRI instability, while purely vertical stratification cannot completely suppress the MRI instability. In the case of nonaxisymmetric disturbances (k(1) ≠ 0), we only consider the effect of vertical stratification, and we use Levinson's theorem to demonstrate the

  14. Influence of magnetic shear on impurity transport

    SciTech Connect

    Nordman, H.; Fueloep, T.; Candy, J.; Strand, P.; Weiland, J.

    2007-05-15

    The magnetic shear dependence of impurity transport in tokamaks is studied using a quasilinear fluid model for ion temperature gradient (ITG) and trapped electron (TE) mode driven turbulence in the collisionless limit and the results are compared with nonlinear gyrokinetic results using GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys 186, 545 (2003)]. It is shown that the impurity transport is sensitive to the magnetic shear, in particular for weak, negative, and large positive shear where a strong reduction of the effective impurity diffusivity is obtained. The fluid and gyrokinetic results are in qualitative agreement, with the gyrokinetic diffusivities typically a factor 2 larger than the fluid diffusivities. The steady state impurity profiles in source-free plasmas are found to be considerably less peaked than the electron density profiles for moderate shear. Comparisons between anomalous and neoclassical transport predictions are performed for ITER-like profiles [R. Aymar, P. Barabaschi, and Y. Shimomura, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 44, 519 (2002)].

  15. Turbulent shear stresses in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laderman, A. J.; Demetriades, A.

    1979-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometer measurements of turbulent shear stresses in a Mach 3 compressible boundary layer were performed in order to investigate the effects of heat transfer on turbulence. Measurements were obtained by an x-probe in a flat plate, zero pressure gradient, two dimensional boundary layer in a wind tunnel with wall to freestream temperature ratios of 0.94 and 0.71. The measured shear stress distributions are found to be in good agreement with previous results, supporting the contention that the shear stress distribution is essentially independent of Mach number and heat transfer for Mach numbers from incompressible to hypersonic and wall to freestream temperature ratios of 0.4 to 1.0. It is also found that corrections for frequency response limitations of the electronic equipment are necessary to determine the correct shear stress distribution, particularly at the walls.

  16. Stress diffusion in models for shear banding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masnada, Elian; Olmsted, Peter

    Understanding shear banding is of utmost importance from both theoretical and experimental point of view and consequently it has been studied for several decades. Despite this study numerous aspects of shear banding remains poorly understood. Because of the intrinsic inhomogeneity in the shear banded state, applicable constitutive models must be include spatial inhomogeneities, leading to a so-called 'diffusive' term in the equation of motion for the slow variables that carry stress. Such terms are also vital in describing the interaction of bulk shear banding flows with walls and incorporation of wall slip. In this work, we consider different sources of 'diffusion' in polymer models in which concentration degrees of freedom are negligible. The simplest models used are consistent with diffusive terms whose origin is intrinsically dissipative, such as due to hydrodynamic interactions. By contrast, models in which elastic effects such as finite chain stiffness contribute to stress diffusion are inconsistent with simple diffusive models, and we propose alternative consistent models

  17. Recent progress in shear punch testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, M.L.; Toloczko, M.B.; Lucas, G.E.

    1994-09-01

    The shear punch test was developed in response to the needs of the materials development community for small-scale mechanical properties tests. Such tests will be of great importance when a fusion neutron simulation device is built, since such a device is expected to have a limited irradiation volume. The shear punch test blanks a circular disk from a fixed sheet metal specimen, specifically a TEM disk. Load-displacement data generated during the test can be related to uniaxial tensile properties such as yield and ultimate strength. Shear punch and tensile tests were performed at room temperature on a number of unirradiated aluminum, copper, vanadium, and stainless steel alloys and on several irradiated aluminum alloys. Recent results discussed here suggest that the relationship between shear punch strength and tensile strength varies with alloy class, although the relationship determined for the unirradiated condition remains valid for the irradiated aluminum alloys.

  18. Wind shear related research at Princeton University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The topics addressed are: (1) real-time decision aiding-aircraft guidance for wind shear avoidance; (2) reducing the thrust-manual recovery strategies; and (3) dynamic behaviour of and aircraft encountering a single axis vortex.

  19. Shear joint capability versus bolt clearance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a conservative analysis approach into the determination of shear joint strength capability for typical space-flight hardware as a function of the bolt-hole clearance specified in the design are presented. These joints are comprised of high-strength steel fasteners and abutments constructed of aluminum alloys familiar to the aerospace industry. A general analytical expression was first arrived at which relates bolt-hole clearance to the bolt shear load required to place all joint fasteners into a shear transferring position. Extension of this work allowed the analytical development of joint load capability as a function of the number of fasteners, shear strength of the bolt, bolt-hole clearance, and the desired factor of safety. Analysis results clearly indicate that a typical space-flight hardware joint can withstand significant loading when less than ideal bolt hole clearances are used in the design.

  20. Shear-Joint Capability Versus Bolt Clearance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. M.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Technical Memorandum presents theoretical study of relationships between load-bearing capabilities of shear joints that comprise plates clamped together by multiple bolts and clearances between bolts and boltholes in those joints.

  1. Flight in low-level wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1983-01-01

    Results of studies of wind shear hazard to aircraft operation are summarized. Existing wind shear profiles currently used in computer and flight simulator studies are reviewed. The governing equations of motion for an aircraft are derived incorporating the variable wind effects. Quantitative discussions of the effects of wind shear on aircraft performance are presented. These are followed by a review of mathematical solutions to both the linear and nonlinear forms of the governing equations. Solutions with and without control laws are presented. The application of detailed analysis to develop warning and detection systems based on Doppler radar measuring wind speed along the flight path is given. A number of flight path deterioration parameters are defined and evaluated. Comparison of computer-predicted flight paths with those measured in a manned flight simulator is made. Some proposed airborne and ground-based wind shear hazard warning and detection systems are reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of both types of systems are discussed.

  2. Pulsed laser Doppler measurements of wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimarzio, C.; Harris, C.; Bilbro, J. W.; Weaver, E. A.; Burnham, D. C.; Hallock, J. N.

    1979-01-01

    There is a need for a sensor at the airport that can remotely detect, identify, and track wind shears near the airport in order to assure aircraft safety. To determine the viability of a laser wind-shear system, the NASA pulsed coherent Doppler CO2 lidar (Jelalian et al., 1972) was installed in a semitrailer van with a rooftop-mounted hemispherical scanner and was used to monitor thunderstorm gust fronts. Wind shears associated with the gust fronts at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) between 5 July and 4 August 1978 were measured and tracked. The most significant data collected at KSC are discussed. The wind shears were clearly visible in both real-time velocity vs. azimuth plots and in postprocessing displays of velocities vs. position. The results indicate that a lidar system cannot be used effectively when moderate precipitation exists between the sensor and the region of interest.

  3. Wind shear modeling for aircraft hazard definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Camp, D. W.; Wang, S. T.

    1978-01-01

    Mathematical models of wind profiles were developed for use in fast time and manned flight simulation studies aimed at defining and eliminating these wind shear hazards. A set of wind profiles and associated wind shear characteristics for stable and neutral boundary layers, thunderstorms, and frontal winds potentially encounterable by aircraft in the terminal area are given. Engineering models of wind shear for direct hazard analysis are presented in mathematical formulae, graphs, tables, and computer lookup routines. The wind profile data utilized to establish the models are described as to location, how obtained, time of observation and number of data points up to 500 m. Recommendations, engineering interpretations and guidelines for use of the data are given and the range of applicability of the wind shear models is described.

  4. Electrostatic ion cyclotron velocity shear instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, D. S.; Winske, D.; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    A local electrostatic dispersion equation is derived for a shear flow perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field, which includes all kinetic effects and involves only one important parameter. The dispersion equation is cast in the form of Gordeyev integrals and is solved numerically. Numerical solutions indicate that an ion cyclotron instability is excited. The instability occurs roughly at multiples of the ion cyclotron frequency (modified by the shear), with the growth rate or the individual harmonics overlapping in the wavenumber. At large values of the shear parameter, the instability is confined to long wavelengths, but at smaller shear, a second distinct branch at shorter wavelengths also appears. The properties of the instability obtained are compared with those obtained in the nonlocal limit by Ganguli et al. (1985, 1988).

  5. Summary Proceedings of a Wind Shear Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enders, J. H.; Melvin, W. W.; Frost, W.; Camp, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    A number of recent program results and current issues were addressed: the data collection phase of the highly successful Joint Airport Weather Study (JAWS) Project and the NASA-B5f7B Gust Gradient Program, the use of these data for flight crew training through educational programs (e.g., films) and with manned flight training simulators, methods for post-accident determination of wind conditions from flight data recorders, the microburst wind shear phenomenon which was positively measured and described the ring vortex as a possible generating mechanism, the optimum flight procedure for use during an unexpected wind shear encounter, evaluation of the low-level wind shear alert system (LLWSAS), and assessment of the demonstrated and viable application of Doppler radar as an operational wind shear warning and detection system.

  6. Turbulent diffusion with memories and intrinsic shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    The first part of the present theory is devoted to the derivation of a Fokker-Planck equation. The eddies smaller than the hydrodynamic scale of the diffusion cloud form a diffusivity, while the inhomogeneous, bigger eddies give rise to a nonuniform migratory drift. This introduces an eddy-induced shear which reflects on the large-scale diffusion. The eddy-induced shear does not require the presence of a permanent wind shear and is intrinsic to the diffusion. Secondly, a transport theory of diffusivity is developed by the method of repeated-cascade and is based upon a relaxation of a chain of memories with decreasing information. The full range of diffusion consists of inertia, composite, and shear subranges, for which variance and eddy diffusivities are predicted. The coefficients are evaluated. Comparison with experiments in the upper atmosphere and oceans is made.

  7. Shear wavelength estimation based on inverse filtering and multiple-point shear wave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazaki, Tomoaki; Kondo, Kengo; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Elastography provides important diagnostic information because tissue elasticity is related to pathological conditions. For example, in a mammary gland, higher grade malignancies yield harder tumors. Estimating shear wave speed enables the quantification of tissue elasticity imaging using time-of-flight. However, time-of-flight measurement is based on an assumption about the propagation direction of a shear wave which is highly affected by reflection and refraction, and thus might cause an artifact. An alternative elasticity estimation approach based on shear wavelength was proposed and applied to passive configurations. To determine the elasticity of tissue more quickly and more accurately, we proposed a new method for shear wave elasticity imaging that combines the shear wavelength approach and inverse filtering with multiple shear wave sources induced by acoustic radiation force (ARF). The feasibility of the proposed method was verified using an elasticity phantom with a hard inclusion.

  8. Rotationally shearing interferometer employing modified Dove prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paez, Gonzalo; Strojnik, Marija; Moreno, Ivan

    2003-12-01

    We describe the rotationally shearing interferometer (RSI) employing modified Dove prisms, designed with a widened aperture to increase throughput and with larger base angles to minimize the wave-front tilt introduced due to manufacturing errors. Experimental results obtained with the RSI ascertain the feasibility of the design. This work demonstrates that the rotationally shearing interferometry may be used to perform some functions of the traditional astronomical instruments.

  9. Shear dispersion in dense granular flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-04-18

    We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor–Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extension to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

  10. Measurement of shear impedances of viscoelastic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, A.C.

    1996-12-31

    Shear-wave reflection coefficients from a solid/fluid interface are derived for non-Newtonian fluids that can be described by Maxwell, Voigt, and power-law fluid models. Based on model calculations, we have identified the measurable effects on the reflection coefficients due to fluid non-Newtonian behavior. The models are used to interpret the viscosity data obtained by a technique based on shear impedance measurement.

  11. Topographic control of mat-surface structures evolution: Examples from modern evaporitic carbonate (Abu Dhabi) and evaporitic siliciclastic (Tunisia) tidal flats.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafid Bouougri, El; Porada, Hubertus

    2010-05-01

    In terms of optimal light utilization, mat surfaces ideally are flat. In nature, however, flat mat surfaces are observed rarely or in restricted patches only. Rather they are shaped by a variety of linear and subcircular to irregular protrusions at various scales, including overgrown upturned crack margins, bulges (‘petees'), domes (‘blisters' and ‘pustules'), reticulate networks with tufts and pinnacles etc. These features are so characteristic that ‘mat types' have been established according to their prevalence, e.g., film, flat, smooth, crinkle, blister, tufted, cinder, mammilate, pustular and polygonal mats (Kendall and Skipwith, 1969; Logan et al., 1974). Responsible for the development of such mat surface features are environmental (physical and chemical) factors and, in reaction, the opportunistic growth behaviour of the participating bacterial taxa. Theoretically, a ‘juvenile' mat may be assumed as being flat, evolving into various forms with typical surface morphologies according to environmental impacts and respective bacterial reactions. Observations in the Abu Dhabi evaporitic carbonate tidal flats and Tunisian evaporitic siliciclastic tidal flats demonstrate that topography plays a fundamental role, both on the large scale of the tidal flat and on the small scale of mat surface morphology. It controls, together with related factors like, e.g., frequency of tidal flooding; duration of water cover; frequency and duration of subaerial exposure, the spatial distribution and the temporal evolution of mat surface structures. On the tidal flat scale, topographic differences result a priori from its seaward gradient and may arise additionally from physical processes which may modify the substrate surface and produce in the intertidal and lower supratidal zones narrow creeks and shallow depressions meandering perpendicular to the slope. Within a wide tidal flat without local topographic changes in the tidal zones, mat surface structures display a

  12. The Radiation Hydrodynamics of Relativistic Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Eric R.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-07-01

    We present a method for analyzing the interaction between radiation and matter in regions of intense, relativistic shear that can arise in many astrophysical situations. We show that there is a simple velocity profile that should be manifested in regions of large shear that have “lost memory” of their boundary conditions, and we use this self-similar velocity profile to construct the surface of last scattering, or the τ ≃ 1 surface, as viewed from any comoving point within the flow. We demonstrate that a simple treatment of scattering from this τ ≃ 1 surface exactly conserves photon number, and we derive the rate at which the radiation field is heated due to the shear present in the flow. The components of the comoving radiation energy–momentum tensor are calculated, and we show that they have relatively simple, approximate forms that interpolate between the viscous (small shear) and streaming (large shear) limits. We put our expression for the energy–momentum tensor in a covariant form that does not depend on the explicit velocity profile within the fluid and, therefore, represents a natural means for analyzing general, radiation-dominated, relativistic shear flows.

  13. Two-dimensional magnetic colloids under shear.

    PubMed

    Mohorič, Tomaž; Dobnikar, Jure; Horbach, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Complex rheological properties of soft disordered solids, such as colloidal gels or glasses, inspire a range of novel applications. However, the microscopic mechanisms of their response to mechanical loading are not well understood. Here, we elucidate some aspects of these mechanisms by studying a versatile model system, i.e. two-dimensional superparamagnetic colloids in a precessing magnetic field, whose structure can be tuned from a hexagonal crystal to a disordered gel network by varying the external field opening angle θ. We perform Langevin dynamics simulations subjecting these structures to a constant shear rate and observe three qualitatively different types of material response. In hexagonal crystals (θ = 0°), at a sufficiently low shear rate, plastic flow occurs via successive stress drops at which the stress releases due to the formation of dislocation defects. The gel network at θ = 48°, on the contrary, via bond rearrangement and transient shear banding evolves into a homogeneously stretched network at large strains. The latter structure remains metastable after switching off of the shear. At θ = 50°, the external shear makes the system unstable against phase separation and causes a failure of the network structure leading to the formation of hexagonal close packed clusters interconnected by particle chains. At a microcopic level, our simulations provide insight into some of the mechanisms by which strain localization as well as material failure occur in a simple gel-like network. Furthermore, we demonstrate that new stretched network structures can be generated by the application of shear. PMID:26877059

  14. Cosmology with cosmic shear observations: a review.

    PubMed

    Kilbinger, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Cosmic shear is the distortion of images of distant galaxies due to weak gravitational lensing by the large-scale structure in the Universe. Such images are coherently deformed by the tidal field of matter inhomogeneities along the line of sight. By measuring galaxy shape correlations, we can study the properties and evolution of structure on large scales as well as the geometry of the Universe. Thus, cosmic shear has become a powerful probe into the nature of dark matter and the origin of the current accelerated expansion of the Universe. Over the last years, cosmic shear has evolved into a reliable and robust cosmological probe, providing measurements of the expansion history of the Universe and the growth of its structure. We review here the principles of weak gravitational lensing and show how cosmic shear is interpreted in a cosmological context. Then we give an overview of weak-lensing measurements, and present the main observational cosmic-shear results since it was discovered 15 years ago, as well as the implications for cosmology. We then conclude with an outlook on the various future surveys and missions, for which cosmic shear is one of the main science drivers, and discuss promising new weak cosmological lensing techniques for future observations. PMID:26181770

  15. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  16. Analysis of shear banding in twelve materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, R. C.; Kim, C. H.

    The problem of the initiation and growth of shear bands in 12 different materials, namely, OFHC copper, Cartridge brass, Nickel 200, Armco IF (interstitial free) iron, Carpenter electric iron, 1006 steel, 2024-T351 aluminum, 7039 aluminum, low alloy steel, S-7 tool steel, Tungsten alloy, and Depleted Uranium (DU -0.75 Ti) is studied with the objectives of finding out when a shear band initiates, and upon what parameters does the band width depend. The nonlinear coupled partial differential equations governing the overall simple shearing deformations of a thermally softening viscoplastic block are analyzed. It is assumed that the thermomechanical response of these materials can be adequately represented by the Johnson-Cook law, and the only inhomogeneity present in the block is the variation in its thickness. The effect of the defect size on the initiation and subsequent growth of the band is also studied. It is found that, for each one of these 12 materials, the deformation has become nonhomogeneous by the time the maximum shear stress occurs. Also the band width, computed when the shear stress has dropped to 85 percent of its peak value, does not correlate well with the thermal conductivity of the material. The band begins to grow rapidly when the shear stress has dropped to 90 percent of its maximum value.

  17. Shear induced structures in crystallizing cocoa butter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Guthrie, Sarah E.; Sirota, Eric B.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2004-03-01

    Cocoa butter is the main structural component of chocolate and many cosmetics. It crystallizes in several polymorphs, called phases I to VI. We used Synchrotron X-ray diffraction to study the effect of shear on its crystallization. A previously unreported phase (phase X) was found and a crystallization path through phase IV under shear was observed. Samples were crystallized under shear from the melt in temperature controlled Couette cells, at final crystallization temperatures of 17.5^oC, 20^oC and 22.5^oC in Beamline X10A of NSLS. The formation of phase X was observed at low shear rates (90 s-1) and low crystallization temperature (17.5^oC), but was absent at high shear (720 s-1) and high temperature (20^oC). The d-spacing and melting point suggest that this new phase is a mixture rich on two of the three major components of cocoa butter. We also found that, contrary to previous reports, the transition from phase II to phase V can happen through the intermediate phase IV, at high shear rates and temperature.

  18. On shearing fluids with homogeneous densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, D. C.; Srivastava, V. C.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study shearing spherically symmetric homogeneous density fluids in comoving coordinates. It is found that the expansion of the four-velocity of a perfect fluid is homogeneous, whereas its shear is generated by an arbitrary function of time M( t), related to the mass function of the distribution. This function is found to bear a functional relationship with density. The field equations are reduced to two coupled first order ordinary differential equations for the metric coefficients g_{11} and g_{22}. We have explored a class of solutions assuming that M is a linear function of the density. This class embodies, as a subcase, the complete class of shear-free solutions. We have discussed the off quoted work of Kustaanheimo (Comment Phys Math XIII:12, 1, 1947) and have noted that it deals with shear-free fluids having anisotropic pressure. It is shown that the anisotropy of the fluid is characterized by an arbitrary function of time. We have discussed some issues of historical priorities and credentials related to shear-free solutions. Recent controversial claims by Mitra (Astrophys Space Sci 333:351, 2011 and Gravit Cosmol 18:17, 2012) have also been addressed. We found that the singularity and the shearing motion of the fluid are closely related. Hence, there is a need for fresh look to the solutions obtained earlier in comoving coordinates.

  19. A new look on blood shear thinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Lanotte, Luca; Fromental, Jean-Marc; Mendez, Simon; Fedosov, Dmitry; Gompper, Gerhard; Mauer, Johannes; Claveria, Viviana

    2015-11-01

    Blood is a shear-thinning fluid. At shear rates γ˙ < 1 s-1 , its drop of viscosity has been related primarily to the breaking-up of networks of ``rouleaux'' formed by stacked red blood cells (RBCs). For higher γ˙ in the range 10 - 1000 s-1 , where RBCs flow as single elements, studies demonstrated that RBCs suspended in a viscous fluid mimicking the viscosity of whole blood, deformed into ellipsoids aligned steadily in the direction of the flow, while their membrane rotated about their center of mass like a tank-tread. Such drop-like behavior seemed to explain shear-thinning. Here, using rheometers, microfluidics and simulations, we show that the dynamics of single RBCs in plasma-like fluids display a different sequence of deformation for increasing shear rates going from discocytes to successively, stomatocytes, folded stomatocytes, trilobes and tetralobes, but never ellipsoids. This result is also identical for physiological hematocrits. We correlate this shape diagram to the different regimes in blood rheology for high shear rates and propose a new-look on the interpretation of blood shear-thinning behavior.

  20. Behavior of Tilted Angle Shear Connectors

    PubMed Central

    Khorramian, Koosha; Maleki, Shervin; Shariati, Mahdi; Ramli Sulong, N. H.

    2015-01-01

    According to recent researches, angle shear connectors are appropriate to transfer longitudinal shear forces across the steel-concrete interface. Angle steel profile has been used in different positions as L-shaped or C-shaped shear connectors. The application of angle shear connectors in tilted positions is of interest in this study. This study investigates the behaviour of tilted-shaped angle shear connectors under monotonic loading using experimental push out tests. Eight push-out specimens are tested to investigate the effects of different angle parameters on the ultimate load capacity of connectors. Two different tilted angles of 112.5 and 135 degrees between the angle leg and steel beam are considered. In addition, angle sizes and lengths are varied. Two different failure modes were observed consisting of concrete crushing-splitting and connector fracture. By increasing the size of connector, the maximum load increased for most cases. In general, the 135 degrees tilted angle shear connectors have a higher strength and stiffness than the 112.5 degrees type. PMID:26642193

  1. 3D Depositional Model in a Complex Incised Valley Fill: An Example from the Late Messinian Abu Madi Formation, Nile Delta Basin, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasr El-Deen Badawy, A. M. E. S.

    2015-12-01

    The study area lies in the Central Marine Delta, which is located in the Baltim offshore concession, about 25 kms from the shoreline and 40 kms North Abu Madi-El Qara fields. The current study is aiming to give a comprehensive combined and conjugated study between well data and seismic survey interpretations. The former includes well logging data, acquired results of actual drilling and biostratigraphic study, to give an integrated picture for the considered area in a true attempt to visualize the geological and geophysical data given from both wells and seismic reflection surveys, and hence introduce an updated sequence stratigraphic framework for the Messinian sequence at the offshore Nile Delta area. The 3D geological model, based on all the available well data (faunal contents, litho-facies, log signatures…...etc.) and the seismic expressions (facies and geometry), has been constructed for the study area. This model shows that, the study area was changed from shelf (considered as erosional), to delta channels and then directed to the north. It changed to delta front mouth bars on the shoreface and affected by the main Rosetta fault to collect deposits as sand bars in the southern part on the downthrown side of the fault. Most deposits on this face were highstand system tracts. This deduced from the sequence stratigraphy study. The area was then sloped to the north, as shelf slope with the deposition of slumps, which was formed during erosions and mass flows. Some mud diapers also formed upon this slope. After dropping the sea level with the activity of some syn-sedimentary faults, some channels with sediment supply started their activities to dig their ways to the north.

  2. Prevalence of Undiagnosed Diabetes and Quality of Care in Diabetic Patients Followed at Primary and Tertiary Clinics in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Saadi, Hussein; Al-Kaabi, Jumaa; Benbarka, Mahmoud; Khalili, Ali; Almahmeed, Wael; Nagelkerke, Nicolaas; Abdel-Wareth, Laila; Al Essa, Awad; Yasin, Javed; Al-Dabbagh, Bayan; Kazam, Elsadig

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the prevalence of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2D) at primary health care (PHC) clinics, and to assess the quality of care of diabetic patients followed at a tertiary hospital diabetes center in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE). METHODS: Between May 2009 and October 2010, adult patients attending two PHC clinics, and adult diabetic patients attending the diabetes center, were invited to participate in the study. After overnight fast, participants returned for interview and laboratory tests. Undiagnosed T2D was defined by FPG ≥ 7.0 mmol/l or HbA1c ≥ 6.5%. Quality of care was assessed by reported care practices and achievement of internationally recognized targets. RESULTS: Out of 239 patients at PHC clinics without history of T2D, 14.6% had undiagnosed T2D, and 31% had increased risk of diabetes (FPG 5.6-7.0 mmol/l or HbA1c 5.7-6.5%). The independent predictors of undiagnosed T2D were age (adjusted OR per year 1.07, 95% CI 1.04-1.11, p < 0.001) and BMI ≥ 25 (adjusted OR 4.2, 95% CI 0.91-19.7, p = 0.033). Amongst all 275 diagnosed T2D patients, including those attending PHC clinics and those followed at the diabetes center, it was found that 40.1% followed dietary recommendations, 12% reported visiting a diabetes educator, 28.2% walked for exercise, and 13.5% attained recognized targets of HbA1c < 7%, blood pressure < 130/80 mmHg, and LDL cholesterol < 2.6 mmol/l. CONCLUSIONS: Almost half of the adult patients attending PHC clinics had undiagnosed T2D, or increased diabetes risk. Care practices, and achievement of treatment targets, were suboptimal. PMID:21713317

  3. Shear time dependent viscosity of polystyrene-ethylacrylate based shear thickening fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qian; Xuan, Shouhu; Jiang, Wanquan; Cao, Saisai; Gong, Xinglong

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the influence of the shear rate and shear time on the transient viscosity of polystyrene-ethylacrylate based shear thickening fluid (STF) is investigated. If the shear rate is stepwise changed, it is found that both the viscosity and critical shear rate are affected by the shear time. Above the critical shear rate, the viscosity of the STF with larger power law exponent (n) increases faster. However, the viscosity tends to decrease when the shear time is long enough. This phenomenon can be responsible for the reversible structure buildup and the break-down process. An effective volume fraction (EVF) mechanism is proposed to analyze the shear time dependent viscosity and it is found that viscosity changes in proportion to EVF. To further clarify the structure evolution, a structural kinetic model is studied because the structural kinetic parameter (λ) could describe the variation in the effective volume fraction. The theoretical results of the structural kinetic model agree well with the experimental results. With this model, the change in viscosity and EVF can be speculated from the variation of λ and then the structure evolution can be better illustrated.

  4. The shear-stress intensity factor for a centrally cracked stiff-flanged shear web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    By use of the principle of superposition the stiff-flanged shear web is modeled mathematically by an infinite elastic strip with fixed longitudinal edges. The shear-stress intensity factor for a central longitudinal crack is calculated for various values of the ratio of strip width to crack length, h/a, in the range 0.1-10. The interaction of the crack with the boundaries is illustrated by boundary shear-stress distributions for three values of h/a. Some implications of the results for the design of damage-tolerant shear webs are discussed briefly.

  5. The brittle-viscous-plastic evolution of shear bands in the South Armorican Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukovská, Zita; Jeřábek, Petr; Morales, Luiz F. G.; Lexa, Ondrej; Milke, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Shear bands are microscale shear zones that obliquely crosscut an existing anisotropy such as a foliation. The resulting S-C fabrics are characterized by angles lower than 45° and the C plane parallel to shear zone boundaries. The S-C fabrics typically occur in granitoids deformed at greenschist facies conditions in the vicinity of major shear zones. Despite their long recognition, mechanical reasons for localization of deformation into shear bands and their evolution is still poorly understood. In this work we focus on microscale characterization of the shear bands in the South Armorican Shear Zone, where the S-C fabrics were first recognized by Berthé et al. (1979). The initiation of shear bands in the right-lateral South Armorican Shear Zone is associated with the occurrence of microcracks crosscutting the recrystallized quartz aggregates that define the S fabric. In more advanced stages of shear band evolution, newly formed dominant K-feldspar, together with plagioclase, muscovite and chlorite occur in the microcracks, and the shear bands start to widen. K-feldspar replaces quartz by progressively bulging into the grain boundaries of recrystallized quartz grains, leading to disintegration of quartz aggregates and formation of fine-grained multiphase matrix mixture. The late stages of shear band development are marked by interconnection of fine-grained white mica into a band that crosscuts the original shear band matrix. In its extremity, the shear band widening may lead to the formation of ultramylonites. With the increasing proportion of shear band matrix from ~1% to ~12%, the angular relationship between S and C fabrics increases from ~30° to ~40°. The matrix phases within shear bands show differences in chemical composition related to distinct evolutionary stages of shear band formation. The chemical evolution is well documented in K-feldspar, where the albite component is highest in porphyroclasts within S fabric, lower in the newly formed grains within

  6. How to create mylonitic shear zones in the presence of shear heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielmann, Marcel; Rozel, Antoine; Kaus, Boris; Ricard, Yanick

    2013-04-01

    Lithospheric-scale shear zones are commonly defined as regions inhomogeneous and localized deformation. Strain softening has been demonstrated to be necessary for localization in those shear zones, but there is still debate about the physical cause of this softening. Here, we investigate the interplay between two mechanisms that have been suggested to have a significant impact on lithospheric localization: shear heating and grain size reduction. Shear heating has been suggested to play an important role in i) creating deep focus as well as intermediate-depth earthquakes (Ogawa (1987), Kelemen and Hirth (2007)) and ii) creating lithospheric-scale shear zones, thus creating a weak decoupling interface that enables subsequent subduction initiation (Kaus and Podlatchikov (2006), Crameri and Kaus (2010)). As natural shear zones typically have a significantly reduced grain size, it has been put forward that grain size reduction provides the necessary strain softening to localize deformation. As grain size reduces, the dominant deformation mechanism switches from dislocation to diffusion creep, thus requiring less stress to deform the rock. Usually, the equilibrium grain size is thought to follow a piezometric relationship, thus indicating the stress under which a shear zone deformed. Recent work (Austin and Evans (2007), Rozel et al. (2011)) suggests that the equilibrium grain size is not dependent on stress, but rather on the deformational work. In our study, we employ the grain size evolution law of Rozel et al. and use 1D viscoelastic numerical models of simple shear deformation to investigate the influence of both weakening mechanisms and their interaction for a variety of boundary conditions. We find that grain size reduction in pure olivine does not localize very efficiently, as grain size very rapidly reaches a steady state. Even when a fraction of the deformational work is used by grain size reduction processes, shear heating is found to localize very efficiently

  7. 49 CFR 230.28 - Higher shearing strength of rivets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Higher shearing strength of rivets. 230.28 Section... Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.28 Higher shearing strength of rivets. A higher shearing strength may... quality as to justify a higher allowable shearing strength. Inspection and Repair...

  8. Aging of a colloidal glass under a periodic shear.

    PubMed

    Kaloun, Soulaimane; Skouri, Mohammed; Knaebel, Alexandra; Münch, Jean-Pierre; Hébraud, Pascal

    2005-07-01

    The aging dynamics under a periodic shear of a concentrated suspension of saponite particles is measured. It is observed that the dynamics is fastened by the application of a moderate shear amplitude. Nevertheless, this acceleration does not affect the dynamics of the suspension when the shear is ceased. By applying a succession of shear of various amplitudes, we conclude that the dynamics of the suspension at a time t(w) after complete rejuvenation is independent of the shear history between times 0 and t(w) , as soon as the amplitude of the applied shear is smaller than the characteristic shear gamma(c) necessary to completely rejuvenate the suspension. PMID:16089955

  9. Precursors to the shear failure of rock discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayat, Ahmadreza; Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J.; Bobet, Antonio

    2014-08-01

    Active geophysical monitoring of potential failure along mechanical discontinuities in rock requires identification of precursory signatures to failure in geophysical signals. Active ultrasonic monitoring of shear failure along frictional discontinuities was performed to determine the signatures of potential failure. An instrumented direct shear apparatus was used to apply a constant shearing rate to a discontinuity that was held under a constant normal stress. Transmitted and reflected compressional and shear waves were recorded during the shearing process. Ultrasonic precursors were identified as distinct maxima in the amplitude of transmitted shear waves as well as minima in the amplitude of reflected shear waves that occurred well before the peak shear strength of a frictional discontinuity. The precursors are linked to changes in the local shear specific stiffness along the discontinuity, while the discontinuity's macroscopic shear strength continues to increase prior to failure.

  10. Mechanical properties of graphynes under shearing and bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Lijun; Zhang, Yingyan; Feng, Xiqiao; Chang, Tienchong; Wang, Ji; Du, Jianke; Zhou, Jianxin

    2016-05-01

    Graphynes are the allotrope of graphene. In this work, extensive molecular dynamics simulations are performed on four different graphynes ( α - , β - , γ - , and 6,6,12-graphynes) to explore their mechanical properties (shear modulus, shear strength, and bending rigidity) under shearing and bending. While the shearing properties are anisotropic, the bending rigidity is almost independent of the chirality of graphynes. We also find that the shear modulus and shear fracture strength of graphynes decrease with increasing temperature. The effect of the percentage of the acetylenic linkages on the shear mechanical properties and bending rigidity is investigated. It is shown that the fracture shear strengths and bending rigidities of the four types of graphynes decrease, while the fracture shear strain increases, with increasing percentages of the acetylenic linkages. Significant wrinkling is observed in graphyne under shear strain. The influence of the temperatures and percentages of the acetylenic linkages on the ratio of amplitude-to-wavelength in the wrinkles are examined.

  11. Repeated buckling of composite shear panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Josef; Weller, Tanchum

    1990-01-01

    Failures in service of aerospace structures and research at the Technion Aircraft Structures Laboratory have revealed that repeatedly buckled stiffened shear panels might be susceptible to premature fatigue failures. Extensive experimental and analytical studies have been performed at Technion on repeated buckling, far in excess of initial buckling, for both metal and composite shear panels with focus on the influence of the surrounding structure. The core of the experimental investigation consisted of repeated buckling and postbuckling tests on Wagner beams in a three-point loading system under realistic test conditions. The effects of varying sizes of stiffeners, of the magnitude of initial buckling loads, of the panel aspect ratio and of the cyclic shearing force, V sub cyc, were studied. The cyclic to critical shear buckling ratios, (V sub cyc/V sub cr) were on the high side, as needed for efficient panel design, yet all within possible flight envelopes. The experiments were supplemented by analytical and numerical analyses. For the metal shear panels the test and numerical results were synthesized into prediction formulas, which relate the life of the metal shear panels to two cyclic load parameters. The composite shear panels studied were hybrid beams with graphite/epoxy webs bonded to aluminum alloy frames. The test results demonstrated that composite panels were less fatigue sensitive than comparable metal ones, and that repeated buckling, even when causing extensive damage, did not reduce the residual strength by more than 20 percent. All the composite panels sustained the specified fatigue life of 250,000 cycles. The effect of local unstiffened holes on the durability of repeatedly buckled shear panels was studied for one series of the metal panels. Tests on 2024 T3 aluminum panels with relatively small unstiffened holes in the center of the panels demonstrated premature fatigue failure, compared to panels without holes. Preliminary tests on two graphite

  12. Extreme model reduction of shear layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qawasmeh, Bashar Rafee

    The aim of this research is to develop nonlinear low-dimensional models (LDMs) to describe vortex dynamics in shear layers. A modified Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD)/Galerkin projection method is developed to obtain models at extremely low dimension for shear layers. The idea is to dynamically scale the shear layer along y direction to factor out the shear layer growth and capture the dynamics by only a couple of modes. The models are developed for two flows, incompressible spatially developing and weakly compressible temporally developing shear layers, respectively. To capture basic dynamics, the low-dimensional models require only two POD modes for each wavenumber/frequency. Thus, a two-mode model is capable of representing single-wavenumber/frequency dynamics such as vortex roll-up, and a four-mode model is capable of representing the nonlinear dynamics involving a fundamental wavenumber/frequency and its subharmonic, such as vortex pairing/merging. Most of the energy is captured by the first mode of each wavenumber/frequency, the second POD mode, however, plays a critical role and needs to be included. In the thesis, we first apply the approach on temporally developing weakly compressible shear layers. In compressible flows, the thermodynamic variables are dynamically important, and must be considered. We choose isentropic Navier-Stokes equations for simplicity, and choose a proper inner product to present both kinetic energy and thermal energy. Two cases of convective Mach numbers are studied for low compressibility and moderate compressibility. Moreover, we study the sensitivity of the compressible four-mode model to several flow parameters: Mach number, the strength of initial perturbations of the fundamental and its subharmonic, and Reynolds number. Secondly we apply the approach on spatially developing incompressible shear layers with periodicity in time. We consider a streamwise parabolic form of the Navier-Stokes equations. When we add arbitrary

  13. Colloidal Aggregate Structure under Shear by USANS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Tirtha; van Dyk, Antony K.; Ginzburg, Valeriy V.; Nakatani, Alan I.

    2015-03-01

    Paints are complex formulations of polymeric binders, inorganic pigments, dispersants, surfactants, colorants, rheology modifiers, and other additives. A commercially successful paint exhibits a desired viscosity profile over a wide shear rate range from 10-5 s-1 for settling to >104 s-1 for rolling, and spray applications. Understanding paint formulation structure is critical as it governs the paint viscosity profile. However, probing paint formulation structure under shear is a challenging task due to the formulation complexity containing structures with different hierarchical length scales and their alterations under the influence of an external flow field. In this work mesoscale structures of paint formulations under shear are investigated using Ultra Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (rheo-USANS). Contrast match conditions were utilized to independently probe the structure of latex binder particle aggregates and the TiO2 pigment particle aggregates. Rheo-USANS data revealed that the aggregates are fractal in nature and their self-similarity dimensions and correlations lengths depend on the chemistry of the binder particles, the type of rheology modifier present and the shear stress imposed upon the formulation. These results can be explained in the framework of diffusion and reaction limited transient aggregates structure evolution under simple shear.

  14. Internal hydraulic jumps with large upstream shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kelly; Helfrich, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Internal hydraulic jumps in approximately two-layered flows with large upstream shear are investigated using numerical simulations. The simulations allow continuous density and velocity profiles, and a jump is forced to develop by downstream topography, similar to the experiments conducted by Wilkinson and Wood (1971). High shear jumps are found to exhibit significantly more entrainment than low shear jumps. Furthermore, the downstream structure of the flow has an important effect on the jump properties. Jumps with a slow upper (inactive) layer exhibit a velocity minimum downstream of the jump, resulting in a sub-critical downstream state, while flows with the same upstream vertical shear and a larger barotropic velocity remain super-critical downstream of the jump. A two-layer theory is modified to account for the vertical structure of the downstream density and velocity profiles and entrainment is allowed through a modification of the approach of Holland et al. (2002). The resulting theory can be matched reasonably well with the numerical simulations. However, the results are very sensitive to how the downstream vertical profiles of velocity and density are incorporated into the layered model, highlighting the difficulty of the two layer approximation when the shear is large.

  15. A Refined Shear Deformation Plate Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yucheng

    2011-04-01

    An improved higher-order shear deformation theory of plates is presented in this paper. The theory is developed from the transverse shear deformation theory presented by Ambartsumian [11]. The present plate theory contains kinematics of higher-order displacement field of plates, a system of higher-order differential equilibrium equations in terms of the three generalized displacements of bending plates, and a system of boundary conditions at each edge of plate boundaries. The present shear deformation theory of plates is validated by applying it to solve torsional plates and simply supported plates. The obtained solutions using the present theory are compared with the solutions of other shear-deformation theories. A good agreement is achieved through these comparisons and the advantages of the present theory are clearly verified. The shear deformation plate theory presented here can be applied to the analysis of laminated composite plates to better predict their dynamic and static behaviors. The proposed theory should also be supplemented to the theory of finite element analysis for developing new shell elements.

  16. The shear fracture toughness, KIIc, of graphite

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Erdman, III, Donald L.

    2015-11-05

    In this study, the critical shear stress intensity factor, KIIc, here-in referred to as the shear fracture toughness, KIIc (MPa m), of two grades of graphite are reported. The range of specimen volumes was selected to elucidate any specimen size effect, but smaller volume specimen tests were largely unsuccessful, shear failure did not occur between the notches as expected. This was probably due to the specimen geometry causing the shear fracture stress to exceed the compressive failure stress. In subsequent testing the specimen geometry was altered to reduce the compressive footprint and the notches (slits) made deeper to reduce themore » specimen's ligament length. Additionally, we added the collection of Acoustic Emission (AE) during testing to assist with the identification of the shear fracture load. The means of KIIc from large specimens for PCEA and NBG-18 are 2.26 MPa m with an SD of 0.37 MPa m and 2.20 MPa m with an SD of 0.53 MPa m, respectively. The value of KIIc for both graphite grades was similar, although the scatter was large. In this work we found the ratio of KIIc/KIc ≈ 1.6. .« less

  17. Sheath fold morphology in simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reber, Jacqueline E.; Dabrowski, Marcin; Galland, Olivier; Schmid, Daniel W.

    2013-08-01

    Sheath folds are highly non-cylindrical structures often associated with shear zones. We investigate the formation of sheath folds around a weak inclusion acting as a slip surface in simple shear by means of an analytical model. We present results for different slip surface orientations and shapes. Cross-sections perpendicular to the shear direction through the sheath fold display closed contours, so called eye-structures. The aspect ratio of the outermost closed contour is strongly dependent on the initial slip surface configuration. The center of the eye-structure is subject to change in height with respect to the upper edge of the outermost closed contour for different cross-sections perpendicular to the shear direction. This results in a large variability in layer thickness across the sheath fold length, questioning the usefulness of eye-structures as shear sense indicators. The location of the center of the eye structure is largely invariant to the initial configurations of the slip surface as well as to strain. The values of the aspect ratios of the closed contours within the eye-pattern are dependent on the strain and the cross-section location. The ratio (R') of the aspect ratios of the outermost closed contour (Ryz) and the innermost closed contour (Ry'z') shows values above and below 1. R' shows dependence on the slip surface shape and orientation but not on the number of involved contours. Using R' measurements to deduce the bulk strain type may be erroneous.

  18. Pressure-shear experiments on granular materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III; Vogler, Tracy John; Alexander, C. Scott

    2011-10-01

    Pressure-shear experiments were performed on granular tungsten carbide and sand using a newly-refurbished slotted barrel gun. The sample is a thin layer of the granular material sandwiched between driver and anvil plates that remain elastic. Because of the obliquity, impact generates both a longitudinal wave, which compresses the sample, and a shear wave that probes the strength of the sample. Laser velocity interferometry is employed to measure the velocity history of the free surface of the anvil. Since the driver and anvil remain elastic, analysis of the results is, in principal, straightforward. Experiments were performed at pressures up to nearly 2 GPa using titanium plates and at higher pressure using zirconium plates. Those done with the titanium plates produced values of shear stress of 0.1-0.2 GPa, with the value increasing with pressure. On the other hand, those experiments conducted with zirconia anvils display results that may be related to slipping at an interface and shear stresses mostly at 0.1 GPa or less. Recovered samples display much greater particle fracture than is observed in planar loading, suggesting that shearing is a very effective mechanism for comminution of the grains.

  19. Dynamic shear jamming in granular suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo; Majumdar, Sayantan; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2014-11-01

    Jamming by shear allows a frictional granular packing to transition from an unjammed state into a jammed state while keeping the system volume and average packing fraction constant. Shear jamming of dry granular media can occur quasi-statically, but boundaries are crucial to confine the material. We perform experiments in aqueous starch suspension where we apply shear using a rheometer with a large volume (400 ml) cylindrical Couette cell. In our suspensions the packing fraction is sufficiently low that quasi-static deformation does not induce a shear jammed state. Applying a shock-like deformation however, will turn the suspension into a jammed solid. A fully jammed state is reached within tens of microseconds, and can be sustained for at least several seconds. High speed imaging of the initial process reveals a jamming front propagating radially outward through the suspension, while the suspension near the outer boundary remains quiescent. This indicates that granular suspensions can be shear jammed without the need of confining solid boundaries. Instead, confinement is most likely provided by the dynamics in the front region.

  20. Shear-enhanced adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecuyer, Sigolene; Rusconi, Roberto; Shen, Yi; Forsyth, Alison; Stone, Howard

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial adhesion is the first step in the development of surface-associated communities known as biofilms, which are the cause of many problems in medical devices and industrial water systems. However the underlying mechanisms of initial bacterial attachment are not fully understood. We have investigated the effects of hydrodynamics on the probability of adsorption and detachment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 on model surfaces under flow, in straight microfluidic channels, and measured the distribution of bacteria residence time as a function of the shear rate. Our main discovery is a counter-intuitive enhanced adhesion as the shear stress is increased over a wide range of shear rates. In order to identify the origin of this phenomenon, we have performed experiments with several mutant strains. Our results show that shear-enhanced adhesion is not regulated by primary surface organelles, and that this process is not specific to a certain type of surface, but rather appears a general feature of the adhesive behavior of P. aeruginosa. These results suggest that shear-induced adhesion could be a very widespread strategy in nature.

  1. Evaluation of shear mounted elastomeric damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorzi, E.; Walton, J.

    1982-01-01

    Viton-70 elastomeric shear mounted damper was built and tested on a T-55 power turbine spool in the rotor's high speed balancing rig. This application of a shear mounted elastomeric damper demonstrated for the first time, the feasibility of using elastomers as the primary rotor damping source in production turbine engine hardware. The shear damper design was selected because it was compatible with actual gas turbine engine radial space constraints, could accommodate both the radial and axial thrust loads present in gas turbine engines, and was capable of controlled axial preload. The shear damper was interchangeable with the production T-55 power turbine roller bearing support so that a direct comparison between the shear damper and the production support structure could be made. Test results show that the Viton-70 elastomer damper operated successfully and provided excellent control of both synchronous and nonsynchronous vibrations through all phases of testing up to the maximum rotor speed of 16,000 rpm. Excellent correlation between the predicted and experienced critical speeds, mode shapes and log decrements for the power turbine rotor and elastomer damper assembly was also achieved.

  2. Mitigating shear lag in tall buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Himanshu; Goliya, Ravindra K.

    2015-09-01

    As the height of building increases, effect of shear lag also becomes considerable in the design of high-rise buildings. In this paper, shear lag effect in tall buildings of heights, i.e., 120, 96, 72, 48 and 36 stories of which aspect ratio ranges from 3 to 10 is studied. Tube-in-tube structural system with façade bracing is used for designing the building of height 120 story. It is found that bracing system considerably reduces the shear lag effect and hence increases the building stiffness to withstand lateral loads. Different geometric patterns of bracing system are considered. The best effective geometric configuration of bracing system is concluded in this study. Lateral force, as wind load is applied on the buildings as it is the most dominating lateral force for such heights. Wind load is set as per Indian standard code of practice IS 875 Part-3. For analysis purpose SAP 2000 software program is used.

  3. Strength of Footing with Punching Shear Preventers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Sup; Moon, Jiho; Park, Keum-Sung; Bae, Kyu-Woong

    2014-01-01

    The punching shear failure often governs the strength of the footing-to-column connection. The punching shear failure is an undesirable failure mode, since it results in a brittle failure of the footing. In this study, a new method to increase the strength and ductility of the footing was proposed by inserting the punching shear preventers (PSPs) into the footing. The validation and effectiveness of PSP were verified through a series of experimental studies. The nonlinear finite element analysis was then performed to demonstrate the failure mechanism of the footing with PSPs in depth and to investigate the key parameters that affect the behavior of the footing with PSPs. Finally, the design recommendations for the footing with PSPs were suggested. PMID:25401141

  4. Shear viscosity in magnetized neutron star crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofengeim, D. D.; Yakovlev, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    The electron shear viscosity due to Coulomb scattering of degenerate electrons by atomic nuclei throughout a magnetized neutron star crust is calculated. The theory is based on the shear viscosity coefficient calculated neglecting magnetic fields but taking into account gaseous, liquid and solid states of atomic nuclei, multiphonon scattering processes, and finite sizes of the nuclei albeit neglecting the effects of electron band structure. The effects of strong magnetic fields are included in the relaxation time approximation with the effective electron relaxation time taken from the field-free theory. The viscosity in a magnetized matter is described by five shear viscosity coefficients. They are calculated and their dependence on the magnetic field and other parameters of dense matter is analyzed. Possible applications and open problems are outlined.

  5. Undulatory Swimming in Shear-thinning Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiaoning; Gagnon, David; Arratia, Paulo

    2012-11-01

    Many fluids in which microorganisms move, feed, and reproduce possess shear-rate dependent viscosity behavior (e.g. shear-thinning). Such fluids include wet soil, clay suspension, mucus, and gels. In this talk, we experimentally investigate the effects of shear-rate dependent viscosity on the swimming behavior of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans using velocimetry and tracking methods. Here, aqueous solutions of xanthan gum, which is a rod-like stiff polymer, are used with concentrations varying from the semi-dilute to the concentrated regime. The data is compared to swimming in simple, Newtonian fluids. We find that the nematode swims at an approximately constant speed in the semi-dilute regime. Surprisingly, the nematode exhibits 40% increases in swimming speed once immersed in a concentrated solution. The enhancement in swimming speed seems to be related to the dynamics of rod-like polymer networks formed in concentrated solutions. This work was supported by NSF-CAREER (CBET)-0954084.

  6. Magnetic shear. III - Hale region 17255

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athay, R. G.; Jones, H. P.; Zirin, H.

    1986-01-01

    Hale active region 17255, which in many respects was the most vigorous active region observed during the first operational period of SMM, appears to lie between two large areas of flow (observed in C IV) converging toward the major axis of the region. In the 6-day period from November 6-12, 1980, the major axis of the region rotates by about 25 deg. Several segments of the magnetic neutral line show C IV flow velocities of opposite sign on either side of the neutral line. Those segments whose orientation is favorable for measuring velocity components parallel to the neutral line show evidence that such flow is present, which is interpreted as evidence for magnetic shear. This, together with other evidence, suggests that magnetic shear is widespread in this region, as in the two previous regions studied. It is concluded that magnetic shear is often associated with flaring activity but is not a sufficient condition for flaring to occur.

  7. Scaling effects in direct shear tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orlando, A.D.; Hanes, D.M.; Shen, H.H.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory experiments of the direct shear test were performed on spherical particles of different materials and diameters. Results of the bulk friction vs. non-dimensional shear displacement are presented as a function of the non-dimensional particle diameter. Simulations of the direct shear test were performed using the Discrete Element Method (DEM). The simulation results show Considerable differences with the physical experiments. Particle level material properties, such as the coefficients of static friction, restitution and rolling friction need to be known a priori in order to guarantee that the simulation results are an accurate representation of the physical phenomenon. Furthermore, laboratory results show a clear size dependency on the results, with smaller particles having a higher bulk friction than larger ones. ?? 2009 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Shear and extensional properties of kefiran.

    PubMed

    Piermaría, Judith; Bengoechea, Carlos; Abraham, Analía Graciela; Guerrero, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    Kefiran is a neutral polysaccharide constituted by glucose and galactose produced by Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens. It is included into kefir grains and has several health promoting properties. In the present work, shear and extensional properties of different kefiran aqueous dispersions (0.5, 1 and 2% wt.) were assessed and compared to other neutral gums commonly used in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutics industries (methylcellulose, locust bean gum and guar gum). Kefiran showed shear flow characteristics similar to that displayed by other representative neutral gums, although it always yielded lower viscosities at a given concentration. For each gum system it was possible to find a correlation between dynamic and steady shear properties by a master curve including both the apparent and complex viscosities. When studying extensional properties of selected gums at 2% wt. by means of a capillary break-up rheometer, kefiran solutions did not show important extensional properties, displaying a behaviour close the Newtonian. PMID:27516254

  9. Observations of velocity shear driven plasma turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Electrostatic and magnetic turbulence observations from HAWKEYE-1 during the low altitude portion of its elliptical orbit over the Southern Hemisphere are presented. The magnetic turbulence is confined near the auroral zone and is similar to that seen at higher altitudes by HEOS-2 in the polar cusp. The electrostatic turbulence is composed of a background component with a power spectral index of 1.89 + or - .26 and an intense component with a power spectral index of 2.80 + or - .34. The intense electrostatic turbulence and the magnetic turbulence correlate with velocity shears in the convective plasma flow. Since velocity shear instabilities are most unstable to wave vectors perpendicular to the magnetic field, the shear correlated turbulence is anticipated to be two dimensional in character and to have a power spectral index of 3 which agrees with that observed in the intense electrostatic turbulence.

  10. Shear banding in soft glassy materials.

    PubMed

    Fielding, S M

    2014-10-01

    Many soft materials, including microgels, dense colloidal emulsions, star polymers, dense packings of multilamellar vesicles, and textured morphologies of liquid crystals, share the basic 'glassy' features of structural disorder and metastability. These in turn give rise to several notable features in the low frequency shear rheology (deformation and flow properties) of these materials: in particular, the existence of a yield stress below which the material behaves like a solid, and above which it flows like a liquid. In the last decade, intense experimental activity has also revealed that these materials often display a phenomenon known as shear banding, in which the flow profile across the shear cell exhibits macroscopic bands of different viscosity. Two distinct classes of yield stress fluid have been identified: those in which the shear bands apparently persist permanently (for as long as the flow remains applied), and those in which banding arises only transiently during a process in which a steady flowing state is established out of an initial rest state (for example, in a shear startup or step stress experiment). Despite being technically transient, such bands may in practice persist for a very long time and so be mistaken for the true steady state response of the material in experimental practice. After surveying the motivating experimental data, we describe recent progress in addressing it theoretically, using the soft glassy rheology model and a simple fluidity model. We also briefly place these theoretical approaches in the context of others in the literature, including elasto-plastic models, shear transformation zone theories, and molecular dynamics simulations. We discuss finally some challenges that remain open to theory and experiment alike. PMID:25303030

  11. Shear banding in soft glassy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, S. M.

    2014-10-01

    Many soft materials, including microgels, dense colloidal emulsions, star polymers, dense packings of multilamellar vesicles, and textured morphologies of liquid crystals, share the basic ‘glassy’ features of structural disorder and metastability. These in turn give rise to several notable features in the low frequency shear rheology (deformation and flow properties) of these materials: in particular, the existence of a yield stress below which the material behaves like a solid, and above which it flows like a liquid. In the last decade, intense experimental activity has also revealed that these materials often display a phenomenon known as shear banding, in which the flow profile across the shear cell exhibits macroscopic bands of different viscosity. Two distinct classes of yield stress fluid have been identified: those in which the shear bands apparently persist permanently (for as long as the flow remains applied), and those in which banding arises only transiently during a process in which a steady flowing state is established out of an initial rest state (for example, in a shear startup or step stress experiment). Despite being technically transient, such bands may in practice persist for a very long time and so be mistaken for the true steady state response of the material in experimental practice. After surveying the motivating experimental data, we describe recent progress in addressing it theoretically, using the soft glassy rheology model and a simple fluidity model. We also briefly place these theoretical approaches in the context of others in the literature, including elasto-plastic models, shear transformation zone theories, and molecular dynamics simulations. We discuss finally some challenges that remain open to theory and experiment alike.

  12. Compressible homogeneous shear: Simulation and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.; Erlebacher, G.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Compressibility effects were studied on turbulence by direct numerical simulation of homogeneous shear flow. A primary observation is that the growth of the turbulent kinetic energy decreases with increasing turbulent Mach number. The sinks provided by compressible dissipation and the pressure dilatation, along with reduced Reynolds shear stress, are shown to contribute to the reduced growth of kinetic energy. Models are proposed for these dilatational terms and verified by direct comparison with the simulations. The differences between the incompressible and compressible fields are brought out by the examination of spectra, statistical moments, and structure of the rate of strain tensor.

  13. Shear-flow Effects in Open Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2008-11-01

    Interaction between shear flows and plasma instabilities and turbulence in open traps can lead to improved confinement both in experiments and in simulations. Shear flows, driven by biasing end-plates and limiters or by off-axis electron heating, in combination with the finite-larmor-radius (FLR) effects are shown to be efficient in confining plasmas even with unstable flute modes. Interpretation of the observed effects as the ''vortex confinement,'' i.e., confinement of the plasma core in the dead-flow zone of the driven vortex, is shown to agree well with simulations.

  14. Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, H. P. Thakor, P. B. Prajapati, A. V.; Sonvane, Y. A.

    2015-05-15

    Present paper deals with the computation of shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides. The effective pair potential v(r) is calculated through our newly constructed model potential. The Pair distribution function g(r) is calculated from PYHS reference system. To see the influence of local field correction function, Hartree (H), Tailor (T) and Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function are used. Present results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical data. Lastly, we found that our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides.

  15. Shear representations of beam transfer matrices.

    PubMed

    Başkal, S; Kim, Y S

    2001-05-01

    The beam transfer matrix, often called the ABCD matrix, is one of the essential mathematical instruments in optics. It is a unimodular matrix whose determinant is 1. If all the elements are real with three independent parameters, this matrix is a 2 x 2 representation of the group Sp(2). It is shown that a real ABCD matrix can be generated by two shear transformations. It is then noted that, in para-axial lens optics, the lens and translation matrices constitute two shear transformations. It is shown that a system with an arbitrary number of lenses can be reduced to a system consisting of three lenses. PMID:11415030

  16. Shear and Compression Bioreactor for Cartilage Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Kifah; Doran, Pauline M

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical forces, including hydrodynamic shear, hydrostatic pressure, compression, tension, and friction, can have stimulatory effects on cartilage synthesis in tissue engineering systems. Bioreactors capable of exerting forces on cells and tissue constructs within a controlled culture environment are needed to provide appropriate mechanical stimuli. In this chapter, we describe the construction, assembly, and operation of a mechanobioreactor providing simultaneous dynamic shear and compressive loading on developing cartilage tissues to mimic the rolling and squeezing action of articular joints. The device is suitable for studying the effects of mechanical treatment on stem cells and chondrocytes seeded into three-dimensional scaffolds. PMID:26445842

  17. Unresolved issues in wind shear encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    Much remains to be learned about the hazards of low altitude wind shear to aviation. New research should be conducted on the nature of the atmospheric environment, on aircraft performance, and on guidance and control aids. In conducting this research, it is important to distinguish between near-term and far-term objectives, between basic and applied research, and between uses of results for aircraft design or for real-time implementation. Advances in on-board electronics can be applied to assuring that aircraft of all classes have near optimal protection against wind shear hazards.

  18. Shear wave velocities in the earth's mantle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R.; Kovach, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Direct measurement of the travel time gradient for S waves together with travel time data are used to derive a shear velocity model for the earth's mantle. In order to satisfy the data it is necessary to discard the usual assumption of lateral homogeneity below shallow depths. A shear velocity differential is proposed for a region between western North America and areas of the Pacific Ocean. Distinctive features of the velocity model for the upper mantle beneath western North America are a low-velocity zone centered at 100 km depth and zones of high velocity gradient beginning at 400, 650, and 900 km.

  19. Enhancing Rotational Diffusion Using Oscillatory Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Brian D.; Cheng, Xiang; Ong, Desmond C.; Liddell-Watson, Chekesha; Cohen, Itai

    2013-05-01

    Taylor dispersion—shear-induced enhancement of translational diffusion—is an important phenomenon with applications ranging from pharmacology to geology. Through experiments and simulations, we show that rotational diffusion is also enhanced for anisotropic particles in oscillatory shear. This enhancement arises from variations in the particle’s rotation (Jeffery orbit) and depends on the strain amplitude, rate, and particle aspect ratio in a manner that is distinct from the translational diffusion. This separate tunability of translational and rotational diffusion opens the door to new techniques for controlling positions and orientations of suspended anisotropic colloids.

  20. Leukocyte margination at arteriole shear rate

    PubMed Central

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Nakaaki, Keita; Yamaguchi, Takami; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We numerically investigated margination of leukocytes at arteriole shear rate in straight circular channels with diameters ranging from 10 to 22 μm. Our results demonstrated that passing motion of RBCs effectively induces leukocyte margination not only in small channels but also in large channels. A longer time is needed for margination to occur in a larger channel, but once a leukocyte has marginated, passing motion of RBCs occurs continuously independent of the channel diameter, and leukocyte margination is sustained for a long duration. We also show that leukocytes rarely approach the wall surface to within a microvillus length at arteriole shear rate. PMID:24907300

  1. Petrophysical analysis of geophysical logs of the National Drilling Company-U.S. Geological Survey ground-water research project for Abu Dhabi Emirate, United Arab Emirates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgensen, Donald G.; Petricola, Mario

    1994-01-01

    A program of borehole-geophysical logging was implemented to supply geologic and geohydrologic information for a regional ground-water investigation of Abu Dhabi Emirate. Analysis of geophysical logs was essential to provide information on geohydrologic properties because drill cuttings were not always adequate to define lithologic boundaries. The standard suite of logs obtained at most project test holes consisted of caliper, spontaneous potential, gamma ray, dual induction, microresistivity, compensated neutron, compensated density, and compensated sonic. Ophiolitic detritus from the nearby Oman Mountains has unusual petrophysical properties that complicated the interpretation of geophysical logs. The density of coarse ophiolitic detritus is typically greater than 3.0 grams per cubic centimeter, porosity values are large, often exceeding 45 percent, and the clay fraction included unusual clays, such as lizardite. Neither the spontaneous-potential log nor the natural gamma-ray log were useable clay indicators. Because intrinsic permeability is a function of clay content, additional research in determining clay content was critical. A research program of geophysical logging was conducted to determine the petrophysical properties of the shallow subsurface formations. The logging included spectral-gamma and thermal-decay-time logs. These logs, along with the standard geophysical logs, were correlated to mineralogy and whole-rock chemistry as determined from sidewall cores. Thus, interpretation of lithology and fluids was accomplished. Permeability and specific yield were calculated from geophysical-log data and correlated to results from an aquifer test. On the basis of results from the research logging, a method of lithologic and water-resistivity interpretation was developed for the test holes at which the standard suite of logs were obtained. In addition, a computer program was developed to assist in the analysis of log data. Geohydrologic properties were

  2. A dynamic jamming point for shear thickening suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2008-11-01

    Densely packed suspensions can shear thicken, in which the viscosity increases with shear rate. We performed rheometry measurements on two model systems: corn starch in water and glass spheres in oils. In both systems we observed shear thickening up to a critical packing fraction φc (=0.55 for spherical grains) above which the flow abruptly transitions to shear thinning. The viscosity and yield stress diverge as power laws at φc. Extrapolating the dynamic ranges of shear rate and stress in the shear thickening regime up to φc suggests a finite change in shear stress with zero change in shear rate. This is a dynamic analog to the jamming point with a yield stress at zero shear rate.

  3. High-shear-rate capillary viscometer for inkjet inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Carr, Wallace W.; Bucknall, David G.; Morris, Jeffrey F.

    2010-06-01

    A capillary viscometer developed to measure the apparent shear viscosity of inkjet inks at high apparent shear rates encountered during inkjet printing is described. By using the Weissenberg-Rabinowitsch equation, true shear viscosity versus true shear rate is obtained. The device is comprised of a constant-flow generator, a static pressure monitoring device, a high precision submillimeter capillary die, and a high stiffness flow path. The system, which is calibrated using standard Newtonian low-viscosity silicone oil, can be easily operated and maintained. Results for measurement of the shear-rate-dependent viscosity of carbon-black pigmented water-based inkjet inks at shear rates up to 2×105 s-1 are discussed. The Cross model was found to closely fit the experimental data. Inkjet ink samples with similar low-shear-rate viscosities exhibited significantly different shear viscosities at high shear rates depending on particle loading.

  4. Iosipescu shear properties of graphite fabric/epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walrath, D. E.; Adams, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    The Iosipescu shear test method is used to measure the in-plane and interlaminar shear properties of four T300 graphite fabric/934 epoxy composite materials. Different weave geometries tested include an Oxford weave, a 5-harness satin weave, an 8-harness satin weave, and a plain weave with auxiliary warp yarns. Both orthogonal and quasi-isotropic layup laminates were tested. In-plane and interlaminar shear properties are obtained for laminates of all four fabric types. Overall, little difference in shear properties attributable to the fabric weave pattern is observed. The auxiliary warp material is significantly weaker and less stiff in interlaminar shear parallel to its fill direction. A conventional strain gage extensometer is modified to measure shear strains for use with the Iosipescu shear test. While preliminary results are encouraging, several design iterations failed to produce a reliable shear transducer prototype. Strain gages are still the most reliable shear strain transducers for use with this test method.

  5. High-shear-rate capillary viscometer for inkjet inks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xi; Carr, Wallace W.; Bucknall, David G.; Morris, Jeffrey F.

    2010-06-15

    A capillary viscometer developed to measure the apparent shear viscosity of inkjet inks at high apparent shear rates encountered during inkjet printing is described. By using the Weissenberg-Rabinowitsch equation, true shear viscosity versus true shear rate is obtained. The device is comprised of a constant-flow generator, a static pressure monitoring device, a high precision submillimeter capillary die, and a high stiffness flow path. The system, which is calibrated using standard Newtonian low-viscosity silicone oil, can be easily operated and maintained. Results for measurement of the shear-rate-dependent viscosity of carbon-black pigmented water-based inkjet inks at shear rates up to 2x10{sup 5} s{sup -1} are discussed. The Cross model was found to closely fit the experimental data. Inkjet ink samples with similar low-shear-rate viscosities exhibited significantly different shear viscosities at high shear rates depending on particle loading.

  6. Shear rupture under constant normal stiffness boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewick, R. P.; Kaiser, P. K.; Bawden, W. F.

    2014-11-01

    A grain based Distinct Element Method and its embedded Grain Based Method are used to simulate the fracturing processes leading to shear rupture zone creation in a calibrated massive (non-jointed) brittle rock specimen deformed in direct shear under constant normal stiffness boundary conditions. Under these boundary conditions, shear rupture zone creation relative to the shear stress versus applied horizontal displacement (load-displacement) curve occurs pre-peak, before the maximum peak shear strength is reached. This is found to be the result of a normal stress feedback process caused by the imposed shear displacement which couples increases in normal stress, due to rupture zone dilation, with shear stress, producing a complex normal-shear stress-path that reaches and then follows the rock's yield (strength) envelope. While the yield envelope is followed, the shear strength increases further and shear stress oscillations (repeated stress drops followed by re-strengthening periods) in the load-displacement curves occur due to fracture creation as the rupture zone geometry smoothens. Once the maximum peak strength is reached (after a series of shear stress oscillations) the largest stress drops occur as the ultimate or residual shear strength is approached. The simulation results provide insight into the fracturing process during rupture zone creation and improve the understanding of the shear stress versus applied horizontal displacement response, as well as the stick-slip behaviour of shear rupture zones that are being created under constant normal stiffness boundary conditions.

  7. Acute Shear Stress Direction Dictates Adherent Cell Remodeling and Verifies Shear Profile of Spinning Disc Assays

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrmann, Alexander; Engler, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    Several methods have been developed to quantify population level changes in cell attachment strength given its large heterogeneity. One such method is the rotating disc chamber or “spinning disc” in which a range of shear forces are applied to attached cells to quantify detachment force, i.e. attachment strength, which can be heterogeneous within cell populations. However, computing the exact force vectors that act upon cells is complicated by complex flow fields and variable cell morphologies. Recent observations suggest that cells may remodel their morphology and align during acute shear exposure, but contrary to intuition, shear is not orthogonal to the radial direction. Here we theoretically derive the magnitude and direction of applied shear and demonstrate that cells, under certain physiological conditions, align in this direction within minutes. Shear force magnitude is also experimentally verified which validates that for spread cells shear forces and not torque or drag dominate in this assay, and demonstrates that the applied force per cell area is largely independent of initial morphology. These findings suggest that direct quantified comparison of the effects of shear on a wide array of cell types and conditions can be made with confidence using this assay without the need for computational or numerical modeling. PMID:25619322

  8. Laboratory study of fabric development in shearing till: The importance of effective pressure and shearing rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, William R.; Hooyer, Thomas S.

    2015-12-01

    Herein we present data on the shearing rate (glacier velocity) and effective pressure (difference between the ice-overburden pressure and pore-water pressure) in the development of magnetic fabric (anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility) using a rotary ring-shear device. A Wisconsin-age basal till was used in the experiments and deformed to its critical state at shear strains as high as 93. We also present data from hysteresis and high temperature susceptibility experiments to identify the magnetic carrier in the basal till. Results showed little change in fabric strength when varying the shearing rate in the speed range of 110-860 m year- 1. Moreover, the effective pressure tests also showed an inconsistency in fabric between 30 and 150 kPa; however, a slight strengthening effect was documented. Thus, the k1 magnetic fabric strength is independent of the shearing rate and effective pressure. This suggests that the fabric strength upon these variables cannot be used as a benchmark for estimating shear deformation to the geological record. The k1 fabric strength in this study; however, remained consistent with respect to other till particle fabric methods (e.g., sand and pebble) in which the same conclusion was drawn; all particles align parallel to the direction of shear and plunge mildly up glacier.

  9. A new method for shear wave speed estimation in shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Engel, Aaron J; Bashford, Gregory R

    2015-12-01

    Visualization of mechanical properties of tissue can aid in noninvasive pathology diagnosis. Shear wave elastography (SWE) measures the elastic properties of soft tissues by estimation of local shear wave propagation speed. In this paper, a new robust method for estimation of shear wave speed is introduced which has the potential for simplifying continuous filtering and real-time elasticity processing. Shear waves were generated by external mechanical excitation and imaged at a high frame rate. Three homogeneous phantoms of varying elastic moduli and one inclusion phantom were imaged. Waves propagating in separate directions were filtered and shear wave speed was estimated by inversion of the 1-D first-order wave equation. Final 2-D shear wave speed maps were constructed by weighted averaging of estimates from opposite traveling directions. Shear wave speed results for phantoms with gelatin concentrations of 5%, 7%, and 9% were 1.52 ± 0.10 m/s, 1.86 ± 0.10 m/s, and 2.37 ± 0.15 m/s, respectively, which were consistent with estimates computed from three other conventional methods, as well as compression tests done with a commercial texture analyzer. The method was shown to be able to reconstruct a 2-D speed map of an inclusion phantom with good image quality and variance comparable to conventional methods. Suggestions for further work are given. PMID:26670851

  10. Shear Wave Propagation Across Filled Joints with the Effect of Interfacial Shear Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Liu, T. T.; Li, H. B.; Liu, Y. Q.; Liu, B.; Xia, X.

    2015-07-01

    The thin-layer interface model for filled joints is extended to analyze shear wave propagation across filled rock joints when the interfacial shear strength between the filling material and the rocks is taken into account. During the wave propagation process, the two sides of the filled joint are welded with the adjacent rocks first and slide on each other when the shear stress on the joint is greater than the interfacial shear strength. By back analysis, the relation between the shear stress and the relative tangential deformation of the filled joints is obtained from the present approach, which is shown as a cycle parallelogram. Comparison between the present approach and the existing method based on the zero-thickness interface model indicates that the present approach is efficient to analyze shear wave propagation across rock joints with slippery behavior. The calculation results show that the slippery behavior of joints is related to the interfacial failure. In addition, the interaction between the shear stress wave and the two sides of the filling joint influences not only the wave propagation process but also the dynamic response of the filled joint.

  11. Shear thinning behavior of linear polymer melts under shear flow via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaolei; Chen, Jizhong; An, Lijia

    2014-05-01

    The properties of both untangled and entangled linear polymer melts under shear flow are studied by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The results reveal that the dependence of shear viscosity η on shear rate dot{γ }, expressed by η ˜ dot{γ }^{-n}, exhibits three distinct regimes. The first is the well-known Newtonian regime, namely, η independent of shear rate at small shear rates dot{γ }<τ 0^{-1} (where τ0 is the longest polymer relaxation time at equilibrium). In the non-Newtonian regime (dot{γ }>τ 0^{-1}), the shear dependence of viscosity exhibits a crossover at a critical shear rate dot{γ }c dividing this regime into two different regimes, shear thinning regime I (ST-I) and II (ST-II), respectively. In the ST-I regime (τ ^{-1}_0dot{γ }c) a universal power law η ˜ dot{γ }^{-0.37} is found for considered chain lengths. Furthermore, the longer the polymer chain is, the smaller the shear viscosity for a given shear rate in the ST-II regime. The simulation also shows that a characteristic chain length, below which dot{γ }c will be equal to τ 0^{-1}, lies in the interval 30 < N < 50. For all considered chain lengths in the ST-II regime, we also find that the first and second normal stress differences N1 and N2 follow power laws of N1 ˜ dot{γ }^{2/3} and N2 ˜ dot{γ }^{0.82}, respectively; the orientation resistance parameter mG follows the relation mG ˜ dot{γ }^{0.75} and the tumbling frequency ftb follows f_{tb} ˜ dot{γ }^{0.75}. These results imply that the effects of entanglement on the shear dependences of these properties may be negligible in the ST-II regime. These findings may shed some light on the nature of shear thinning in flexible linear polymer melts.

  12. Coupling of dust acoustic and shear mode through velocity shear in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Garai, S. Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2015-07-15

    In the strongly coupled limit, the generalized hydrodynamic model shows that a dusty plasma, acquiring significant rigidity, is able to support a “shear” like mode. It is being demonstrated here that in presence of velocity shear gradient, this shear like mode gets coupled with the dust acoustic mode which is generated by the compressibility effect of the dust fluid due to the finite temperatures of the dust, electron, and ion fluids. In the local analysis, the dispersion relation shows that velocity shear gradient not only couples the two modes but is also responsible for the instabilities of that coupled mode which is confirmed by nonlocal analysis with numerical techniques.

  13. Zonal flow formation in the presence of ambient mean shear

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Pei-Chun; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-02-15

    The effect of mean shear flows on zonal flow formation is considered in the contexts of plasma drift wave turbulence and quasi-geostrophic turbulence models. The generation of zonal flows by modulational instability in the presence of large-scale mean shear flows is studied using the method of characteristics as applied to the wave kinetic equation. It is shown that mean shear flows reduce the modulational instability growth rate by shortening the coherency time of the wave spectrum with the zonal shear. The scalings of zonal flow growth rate and turbulent vorticity flux with mean shear are determined in the strong shear limit.

  14. Integration of the TDWR and LLWAS wind shear detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornman, Larry

    1991-01-01

    Operational demonstrations of a prototype TDWR/LLWAS (Terminal Doppler Weather Radar/Low Level Wind shear Alarm System) integrated wind shear detection system were conducted. The integration of wind shear detection systems is needed to provide end-users with a single, consensus source of information. A properly implemented integrated system provides wind shear warnings of a higher quality than stand-alone LLWAS or TDWR systems. The algorithmic concept used to generate the TDWR/LLWAS integrated products and several case studies are discussed, indicating the viability and potential of integrated wind shear detection systems. Implications for integrating ground and airborne wind shear detection systems are briefly examined.

  15. Analysis of shear test method for composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergner, H. W., Jr.; Davis, J. G., Jr.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1977-01-01

    An elastic plane stress finite element analysis of the stress distributions in four flat test specimens for in-plane shear response of composite materials subjected to mechanical or thermal loads is presented. The shear test specimens investigated include: slotted coupon, cross beam, losipescu, and rail shear. Results are presented in the form of normalized shear contour plots for all three in-plane stess components. It is shown that the cross beam, losipescu, and rail shear specimens have stress distributions which are more than adequate for determining linear shear behavior of composite materials. Laminate properties, core effects, and fixture configurations are among the factors which were found to influence the stress distributions.

  16. Shear flow induced unfolding of collapsed polymers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Netz, Roland

    2006-03-01

    In the process of clotting in small vessels, platelets form a plug in an injured zone only in the presence of a protein known as the von Willebrand Factor (vWF). The absence or malfunction of the vWF leads to a bleeding disorder, the so-called von Willebrand disease. It is believed that the protein is collapsed (or globular) when released into the blood flow, and that it undergoes a transition at high shear rates that allows it to bind platelets. Using hydrodynamic simulations of a simple model of the vWF in shear flow, we show that a globular polymer undergoes a globule-stretch transition at a critical shear rate. Below this threshold shear rate the polymer remains collapsed and slightly deformed, while above it the chain displays strong elongations in the direction of the flow. Finally, we discuss the relevance of our results in the case of blood flow, and compare them to the physiological values present in the body.

  17. Velocity shear stabilization of centrifugally confined plasma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y M; Hassam, A B

    2001-12-01

    A magnetized, centrifugally confined plasma is subjected to a 3D MHD stability test. Ordinarily, the system is expected to be grossly unstable to "flute" interchanges of field lines. Numerical simulation shows though that the system is stable on account of velocity shear. This allows consideration of a magnetically confined plasma for thermonuclear fusion that has a particularly simple coil configuration. PMID:11736455

  18. Control of shear flows by artificial excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    1987-01-01

    Investigations involving artificial excitation of various shear flows are reviewed. Potential applications of excitation in flow control, e.g., in enhancing mixing, and in delaying transition and separation are discussed. An account is given of the current activities at NASA Lewis Research Center in this regard.

  19. History of wind shear turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cusimano, Lou

    1987-01-01

    The Office of Flight Operations, Flight Technical Programs Div., at the FAA Headquarters, interfaces with industry, R&D communities and air carriers during the introduction of new types of equipment into operational services. A brief highlight of the need which FAA operations sees for new wind shear and turbulence data sets from the viewpoint of equipment certification and simulation is presented.

  20. SUPERSONIC SHEAR INSTABILITIES IN ASTROPHYSICAL BOUNDARY LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2012-06-20

    Disk accretion onto weakly magnetized astrophysical objects often proceeds via a boundary layer (BL) that forms near the object's surface, in which the rotation speed of the accreted gas changes rapidly. Here, we study the initial stages of formation for such a BL around a white dwarf or a young star by examining the hydrodynamical shear instabilities that may initiate mixing and momentum transport between the two fluids of different densities moving supersonically with respect to each other. We find that an initially laminar BL is unstable to two different kinds of instabilities. One is an instability of a supersonic vortex sheet (implying a discontinuous initial profile of the angular speed of the gas) in the presence of gravity, which we find to have a growth rate of order (but less than) the orbital frequency. The other is a sonic instability of a finite width, supersonic shear layer, which is similar to the Papaloizou-Pringle instability. It has a growth rate proportional to the shear inside the transition layer, which is of order the orbital frequency times the ratio of stellar radius to the BL thickness. For a BL that is thin compared to the radius of the star, the shear rate is much larger than the orbital frequency. Thus, we conclude that sonic instabilities play a dominant role in the initial stages of nonmagnetic BL formation and give rise to very fast mixing between disk gas and stellar fluid in the supersonic regime.

  1. Granular dynamics under shear with deformable boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Drew; Backhaus, Scott; Ecke, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Granular materials under shear develop complex patterns of stress as the result of granular positional rearrangements under an applied load. We consider the simple planar shear of a quasi two-dimensional granular material consisting of bi-dispersed nylon cylinders confined between deformable boundaries. The aspect ratio of the gap width to total system length is 50, and the ratio of particle diameter to gap width is about 10. This system, designed to model a long earthquake fault with long range elastic coupling through the plates, is an interesting model system for understanding effective granular friction because it essentially self tunes to the jamming condition owing to the hardness of the grains relative to that of the boundary material, a ratio of more than 1000 in elastic moduli. We measure the differential strain displacements of the plates, the inhomogeneous stress distribution in the plates, the positions and angular orientations of the individual grains, and the shear force, all as functions of the applied normal stress. There is significant stick-slip motion in this system that we quantify through our quantitative measurements of both the boundary and the grain motion, resulting in a good characterization of this sheared 2D hard sphere system.

  2. Shear Stress in Magnetorheological FInishing for Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, C.; Shafrir, S.N.; Lambropoulos, J.C.; Mici, J.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2009-04-28

    We report in situ, simultaneous measurements of both drag and normal forces in magnetorheological finishing (MRF) for what is believed to be the first time, using a spot taking machine (STM) as a test bed to take MRF spots on stationary parts. The measurements are carried out over the entire area where material is being removed, i.e., the projected area of the MRF removal function/spot on the part surface, using a dual force sensor. This approach experimentally addresses the mechanisms governing material removal in MRF for optical glasses in terms of the hydrodynamic pressure and shear stress, applied by the hydrodynamic flow of magnetorheological fluid at the gap between the part surface and the STM wheel. This work demonstrates that the volumetric removal rate shows a positive linear dependence on shear stress. Shear stress exhibits a positive linear dependence on a material figure of merit that depends upon Young’s modulus, fracture toughness, and hardness. A modified Preston’s equation is proposed that better estimates MRF material removal rate for optical glasses by incorporating mechanical properties, shear stress, and velocity.

  3. Shear stress in magnetorheological finishing for glasses.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chunlin; Shafrir, Shai N; Lambropoulos, John C; Mici, Joni; Jacobs, Stephen D

    2009-05-01

    We report in situ, simultaneous measurements of both drag and normal forces in magnetorheological finishing (MRF) for what is believed to be the first time, using a spot taking machine (STM) as a test bed to take MRF spots on stationary parts. The measurements are carried out over the entire area where material is being removed, i.e., the projected area of the MRF removal function/spot on the part surface, using a dual force sensor. This approach experimentally addresses the mechanisms governing material removal in MRF for optical glasses in terms of the hydrodynamic pressure and shear stress, applied by the hydrodynamic flow of magnetorheological fluid at the gap between the part surface and the STM wheel. This work demonstrates that the volumetric removal rate shows a positive linear dependence on shear stress. Shear stress exhibits a positive linear dependence on a material figure of merit that depends upon Young's modulus, fracture toughness, and hardness. A modified Preston's equation is proposed that better estimates MRF material removal rate for optical glasses by incorporating mechanical properties, shear stress, and velocity. PMID:19412219

  4. Shear bands as bottlenecks in force transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Pucilowski, Sebastian; Tobin, Steven; Kuhn, Matthew R.; Andò, Edward; Viggiani, Gioacchino; Druckrey, Andrew; Alshibli, Khalid

    2015-06-01

    The formation of shear bands is a key attribute of degradation and failure in soil, rocks, and many other forms of amorphous and crystalline materials. Previous studies of dense sand under triaxial compression and two-dimensional analogues from simulations have shown that the ultimate shear band pattern may be detected in the nascent stages of loading, well before the band's known nucleation point (i.e., around peak stress ratio), as reported in the published literature. Here we construct a network flow model of force transmission to identify the bottlenecks in the contact networks of dense granular media: triaxial compression of Caicos ooid and Ottawa sand and a discrete element simulation of simple shear. The bottlenecks localise in the nascent stages of loading —in the location where the persistent shear band ultimately forms. This corroborates recent findings on vortices that suggest localised failure is a progressive process of degradation, initiating early in the loading history at sites spanning the full extent, yet confined to a subregion, of the sample. Bottlenecks are governed by the local and global properties of the sample fabric and the grain kinematics. Grains with large rotations and/or contacts having minimal load-bearing capacities per se do not identify the bottlenecks early in the loading history.

  5. Excitation of vortex meandering in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröttle, Josef; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Schumann, Ulrich

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates the evolution of a streamwise aligned columnar vortex with vorticity {\\boldsymbol{ ω }} in an axial background shear of magnitude Ω by means of linear stability analysis and numerical simulations. A long wave mode of vorticity normal to the plane spanned by the background shear vector {\\boldsymbol{ Ω }} and the vorticity of the vortex are excited by an instability. The stationary wave modes of the vertical and lateral vorticity are amplified. In order to form a helical vortex, the lateral and vertical vorticity can be phase shifted by half a wavelength. The linear and nonlinear evolutions of the vortex in the shear flow are studied numerically. Linearized simulations confirm the results of the stability analysis. The nonlinear simulations reveal further evolution of the helix in the shear flow. The linearly excited mode persists in co-existence with evolving smaller scale instabilities until the flow becomes fully turbulent at the time of O(100 {{Ω }-1}). Turbulent mixing dampens the amplifying mode. The described phenomenon of vortex meandering may serve as an alternative explanation for the excitation of wind turbine wake meandering in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  6. Infrared low-level wind shear work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, Pat

    1988-01-01

    Results of field experiments for the detection of clear air disturbance and low level wind shear utilizing an infrared airborne system are given in vugraph form. The hits, misses and nuisance alarms scores are given. Information is given on the infrared spatial resolution technique. The popular index of aircraft hazard (F= WX over g - VN over AS) is developed for a remote temperature sensor.

  7. Integrated Shear Stress/Temperature Micromachined Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark; Cattafesta, Louis N., III; Nishida, Toshikazu

    2002-01-01

    During this project we were able to design and initiate the fabrication of an integrated Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS)-based shear stress/temperature sensor for flow control applications. A brief summary of the completed activities during this project is presented.

  8. Modeling of Turbulent Free Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Dennis A.; DeBonis, James R.; Georgiadis, Nicolas J.

    2013-01-01

    The modeling of turbulent free shear flows is crucial to the simulation of many aerospace applications, yet often receives less attention than the modeling of wall boundary layers. Thus, while turbulence model development in general has proceeded very slowly in the past twenty years, progress for free shear flows has been even more so. This paper highlights some of the fundamental issues in modeling free shear flows for propulsion applications, presents a review of past modeling efforts, and identifies areas where further research is needed. Among the topics discussed are differences between planar and axisymmetric flows, development versus self-similar regions, the effect of compressibility and the evolution of compressibility corrections, the effect of temperature on jets, and the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers for reacting shear flows. Large eddy simulation greatly reduces the amount of empiricism in the physical modeling, but is sensitive to a number of numerical issues. This paper includes an overview of the importance of numerical scheme, mesh resolution, boundary treatment, sub-grid modeling, and filtering in conducting a successful simulation.

  9. Unsteady behavior of a reattaching shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, D. M.; Seegmiller, H. L.; Marvin, J.

    1983-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the unsteadiness in a reattaching, turbulent shear layer is reported. Laser-Doppler velocimeter measurements were conditionally sampled on the basis of instantaneous flow direction near reattachment. Conditions of abnormally short reattachment and abnormally long reattachment were considered. Ensemble-averaging of measurements made during these conditions was used to obtain mean velocities and Rreynolds stresses. In the mean flow, conditional streamlines show a global change in flow pattern which correlates with wall-flow direction. This motion can loosely be described as a 'flapping' of the shear layer. Tuft probes show that the flow direction reversals occur quite randomly and are shortlived. Streses shown also vary with the change in flow pattern. Yet, the global'flapping' motion does not appear to contribute significantly to the stress in the flow. A second type of unsteady motion was identified. Spectral analysis of both wall static pressure and streamwise velocity shows that most of the energy in the flow resides in frequencies that are significantly lower than that of the turbulence. The dominant frequency is at a Strouhal number equal to 0.2, which is the characteristic frequency of roll-up and pairing of vortical structure seen in free shear layers. It is conjectured that the 'flapping' is a disorder of the roll-up and pairing process occurring in the shear layer.

  10. Shear flow promotes amyloid-{beta} fibrilization.

    PubMed

    Dunstan, Dave E; Hamilton-Brown, Paul; Asimakis, Peter; Ducker, William; Bertolini, Joseph

    2009-12-01

    The rate of formation of amyloid fibrils in an aqueous solution of amyloid-beta (Abeta) is greatly increased when the solution is sheared. When Abeta solution is stirred with a magnetic stirrer bar at 37 degrees C, a rapid increase in thioflavin T fluorescence is observed. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) images show the formation of aggregates, the growth of fibrils and the intertwining of the fibrils with time. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy of samples taken after stirring shows a transition from random coil to alpha-helix to beta-sheet secondary structure over 20 h at 37 degrees C. The fluorescence, AFM and CD measurements are all consistent with the formation of amyloid fibrils. Quiescent, non-stirred solutions incubated at 37 degrees C showed no evidence of amyloid formation over a period of 3 days. Couette flow was found to accelerate the formation of amyloid fibrils demonstrating that the primary effect of stirring is not mixing but shearing. Only very small shear forces are applied to individual molecules in our experiments. Simple calculation suggests that the force is too small to support a hypothesis that shearing promotes partial unfolding of the protein as is observed. PMID:19850675

  11. The critical shear load of rectangular plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seydel, Edgar

    1933-01-01

    This report gives formulas for analyzing the critical shear load of a simply supported square, isotropic (simple flat plate), or orthogonal anisotropic plate (a plate in which the rigidity in two directions perpendicular to each other is different, i.e. plywood or corrugated sheet), these formulas, although arrived at by approximation method, seem to agree fairly well with experimental results.

  12. Shear deformation in thick auxetic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Teik-Cheng

    2013-08-01

    This paper aims to understand the effect of auxeticity on shear deformation in thick plates. Three models for the shear correction factor of plates as a function of Poisson’s ratio were proposed: an analytical model, a cubic fit model and a modified model. Of these three, the cubic fit model exhibits the best accuracy over the entire range of Poisson’s ratio from -1 to 0.5. The extent of shear deformation is herein investigated using the example of uniformly loaded circular plates. It was found that the maximum deformation of such plates based on Mindlin theory approximates to those according to Kirchhoff theory when the Poisson’s ratio of the plate material is highly negative. When the Poisson’s ratio of the plate material is -1 and the edge of the plate is simply supported, the calculation of the maximum deflection by Mindlin theory simplifies into that by Kirchhoff theory. These results suggest that auxeticity reduces shear deformation in thick plates, permitting the use of classical plate theory for thick plates only if the plate material is highly auxetic.

  13. BOUNDARY SHEAR STRESS ALONG VEGETATED STREAMBANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research is intended to improve our understanding of the role of riparian vegetation in stream morphology by evaluating the effects of vegetation on boundary shear stress, providing insight to the type and density of vegetation required for streambank stability. The resu...

  14. Laboratory model of flight through wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1985-01-01

    The simulation of an aircraft flying through a downdraft or microburst is presented. The simulation was performed under the conditions of constant takeoff thrust. The resulting wind shear conditions were filmed and examined for possible pilot corrective action in the future.

  15. Red blood cell in simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Wei; Hew, Yayu; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBC) in blood flow is critical for oxygen transport, and it also influences inflammation (white blood cells), thrombosis (platelets), and circulatory tumor migration. The physical properties of a RBC can be captured by modeling RBC as lipid membrane linked to a cytoskeletal spectrin network that encapsulates cytoplasm rich in hemoglobin, with bi-concave equilibrium shape. Depending on the shear force, RBC elasticity, membrane viscosity, and cytoplasm viscosity, RBC can undergo tumbling, tank-treading, or oscillatory motion. We investigate the dynamic state diagram of RBC in shear and pressure-driven flow using a combined immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method with a multi-scale RBC model that accurately captures the experimentally established RBC force-deformation relation. It is found that the tumbling (TU) to tank-treading (TT) transition occurs as shear rate increases for cytoplasm/outer fluid viscosity ratio smaller than 0.67. The TU frequency is found to be half of the TT frequency, in agreement with experiment observations. Larger viscosity ratios lead to the disappearance of stable TT phase and unstable complex dynamics, including the oscillation of the symmetry axis of the bi-concave shape perpendicular to the flow direction. The dependence on RBC bending rigidity, shear modulus, the order of membrane spectrin network and fluid field in the unstable region will also be discussed.

  16. Shear strength of metal-sapphire contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1976-01-01

    The shear strength of polycrystalline Ag, Cu, Ni, and Fe contacts on clean (0001) sapphire has been studied in ultrahigh vacuum. Both clean metal surfaces and surfaces exposed to O2, Cl2, and C2H4 were used. The results indicate that there are two sources of strength of Al2O3-metal contacts: an intrinsic one that depends on the particular clean metal in contact with Al2O3 and an additional one due to intermediate films. The shear strength of the clean metal contacts correlated directly with the free energy of oxide formation for the lowest metal oxide, in accord with the hypothesis that a chemical bond is formed between metal cations and oxygen anions in the sapphire surface. Contacts formed by metals exposed to chlorine exhibited uniformly low shear strength indicative of van der Waals bonding between chlorinated metal surfaces and sapphire. Contacts formed by metals exposed to oxygen exhibited enhanced shear strength, in accord with the hypothesis that an intermediate oxide layer increases interfacial strength.

  17. Shear wave mapping of skeletal muscle using shear wave wavefront reconstruction based on ultrasound color flow imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Iijima, Tomohiro; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2015-07-01

    We have proposed a quantitative shear wave imaging technique for continuous shear wave excitation. Shear wave wavefront is observed directly by color flow imaging using a general-purpose ultrasonic imaging system. In this study, the proposed method is applied to experiments in vivo, and shear wave maps, namely, the shear wave phase map, which shows the shear wave propagation inside the medium, and the shear wave velocity map, are observed for the skeletal muscle in the shoulder. To excite the shear wave inside the skeletal muscle of the shoulder, a hybrid ultrasonic wave transducer, which combines a small vibrator with an ultrasonic wave probe, is adopted. The shear wave velocity of supraspinatus muscle, which is measured by the proposed method, is 4.11 ± 0.06 m/s (N = 4). This value is consistent with those obtained by the acoustic radiation force impulse method.

  18. Buoyancy Driven Shear Flows of Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, D. L.; Hill, R. J.; Chellppannair, T.; Zenit, R.; Zenit, R.; Spelt, P. D. M.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the gas volume fraction and the root-mean-squared fluid velocity are measured in buoyancy driven shear flows of bubble suspensions in a tall, inclined, rectangular channel. The experiments are performed under conditions where We << 1a nd Re >> 1, for which comparisons are made with kinetic theory and numerical simulations. Here Re = gamma(a(exp 2)/nu is the Reynolds number and We = rho(gamma(exp 2))a(exp 3)/sigma is the Weber number; gamma is the shear rate, a is the bubble radius, nu is the kinematic viscosity of the liquid, rho is the density of the liquid, and sigma is the surface tension of the gas/liquid interface. Kang et al. calculated the bubble phase pressure and velocity variance of sheared bubble suspensions under conditions where the bubbles are spherical and the liquid phase velocity field can be approximated using potential flow theory, i.e. We= 0 and Re >> 1. Such conditions can be achieved in an experiment using gas bubbles, with a radius of O(0.5mm), in water. The theory requires that there be no average relative motion of the gas and liquid phases, hence the motivation for an experimental program in microgravity. The necessity of performing preliminary, Earth based experiments, however, requires performing experiments where the gas phase rises in the liquid, which significantly complicates the comparison of experiments with theory. Rather than comparing experimental results with theory for a uniform, homogeneous shear flow, experiments can be compared directly with solutions of the averaged equations of motion for bubble suspensions. This requires accounting for the significant lift force acting on the gas phase when the bubbles rise parallel to the average velocity of the sheared suspension. Shear flows can be produced in which the bubble phase pressure gradient, arising from shear induced collisions amongst the bubbles, balances a body force (centrifugal or gravitational) on the gas phase. A steady, non-uniform gas volume fraction

  19. Direct Shear of Olivine Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tielke, Jacob; Zimmerman, Mark; Kohlstedt, David

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the strength of individual dislocation slip systems in olivine is fundamental to understanding the flow behavior and the development of lattice-preferred orientation in olivine-rich rocks. The most direct measurements of the strengths of individual slip systems are from triaxial compression experiments on olivine single crystals. However, such experiments only allow for determination of flow laws for two of the four dominate slip systems in olivine. In order to measure the strengths of the (001)[100] and (100)[001] slip systems independently, we performed deformation experiments on single crystals of San Carlos olivine in a direct shear geometry. Experiments were carried out at temperatures of 1000° to 1300°C, a confining pressure of 300 MPa, shear stresses of 60 to 334 MPa, and resultant shear strain rates of 7.4 x 10‑6 to 6.7 x 10‑4 s‑1. At high-temperature (≥1200°C) and low-stress (≤200 MPa) conditions, the strain rate of crystals oriented for direct shear on either the (001)[100] or the (100)[001] slip system follows a power law relationship with stress, whereas at lower temperatures and higher stresses, strain rate depends exponentially on stress. The flow laws derived from the mechanical data in this study are consistent with a transition from the operation of a climb-controlled dislocation mechanism during power-law creep to the operation of a glide-controlled dislocation mechanism during exponential creep. In the climb-controlled regime, crystals oriented for shear on the (001)[100] slip system are weaker than crystals orientated for shear on the (100)[001] slip system. In contrast, in the glide-controlled regime the opposite is observed. Extrapolation of flow laws determined for crystals sheared in orientations favorable for slip on these two slip systems to upper mantle conditions reveals that the (001)[100] slip system is weaker at temperatures and stresses that are typical of the asthenospheric mantle, whereas the (100

  20. Effects of shear load on frictional healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, K. L.; Marone, C.

    2014-12-01

    During the seismic cycle of repeated earthquake failure, faults regain strength in a process known as frictional healing. Laboratory studies have played a central role in illuminating the processes of frictional healing and fault re-strengthening. These studies have also provided the foundation for laboratory-derived friction constitutive laws, which have been used extensively to model earthquake dynamics. We conducted laboratory experiments to assess the affect of shear load on frictional healing. Frictional healing is quantified during slide-hold-slide (SHS) tests, which serve as a simple laboratory analog for the seismic cycle in which earthquakes (slide) are followed by interseismic quiescence (hold). We studied bare surfaces of Westerly granite and layers of Westerly granite gouge (thickness of 3 mm) at normal stresses from 4-25 MPa, relative humidity of 40-60%, and loading and unloading velocities of 10-300 μm/s. During the hold period of SHS tests, shear stress on the sample was partially removed to investigate the effects of shear load on frictional healing and to isolate time- and slip-dependent effects on fault healing. Preliminary results are consistent with existing works and indicate that frictional healing increases with the logarithm of hold time and decreases with normalized shear stress τ/τf during the hold. During SHS tests with hold periods of 100 seconds, healing values ranged from (0.013-0.014) for τ/τf = 1 to (0.059-0.063) for τ/τf = 0, where τ is the shear stress during the hold period and τf is the shear stress during steady frictional sliding. Experiments on bare rock surfaces and with natural and synthetic fault gouge materials are in progress. Conventional SHS tests (i.e. τ/τf = 1) are adequately described by the rate and state friction laws. However, previous experiments in granular quartz suggest that zero-stress SHS tests are not well characterized by either the Dieterich or Ruina state evolution laws. We are investigating

  1. Predicting km-scale shear zone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbi, Christopher; Culshaw, Nicholas; Shulman, Deborah; Foley, Maura; Marsh, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Because km-scale shear zones play a first-order role in lithospheric kinematics, accurate conceptual and numerical models of orogenic development require predicting when and where they form. Although a strain-based algorithm in the upper crust for weakening due to faulting appears to succeed (e.g., Koons et al., 2010, doi:10.1029/2009TC002463), a comparable general rule for the viscous crust remains unestablished. Here we consider two aspects of the geological argument for a similar algorithm in the viscous regime, namely (1) whether predicting km-scale shear zone development based on a single parameter (such as strain or shear heating) is reasonable; and (2) whether lithologic variability inherent in most orogenic systems precludes a simple predictive rule. A review of tectonically significant shear zones worldwide and more detailed investigations in the Central Gneiss belt of the Ontario segment of the Grenville Province reveals that most km-scale shear zones occur at lithological boundaries and involve mass transfer, but have fairly little else in common. As examples, the relatively flat-lying Twelve Mile Bay shear zone in the western Central Gneiss belt bounds the Parry Sound domain and is likely the product of both localized anatexis and later retrograde hydration with attendant metamorphism. Moderately dipping shear zones in granitoids of the Grenville Front Tectonic Zone apparently resulted from cooperation among several complementary microstructural processes, such as grain size reduction, enhanced diffusion, and a small degree of metamorphic reaction. Localization into shear zones requires the operation of some spatially restricted processes such as stress concentration, metamorphism/fluid access, textural evolution, and thermal perturbation. All of these could be due in part to strain, but not necessarily linearly related to strain. Stress concentrations, such as those that form at rheological boundaries, may be sufficient to nucleate high strain

  2. Management of distal humeral coronal shear fractures

    PubMed Central

    Yari, Shahram S; Bowers, Nathan L; Craig, Miguel A; Reichel, Lee M

    2015-01-01

    Coronal shear fractures of the distal humerus are rare, complex fractures that can be technically challenging to manage. They usually result from a low-energy fall and direct compression of the distal humerus by the radial head in a hyper-extended or semi-flexed elbow or from spontaneous reduction of a posterolateral subluxation or dislocation. Due to the small number of soft tissue attachments at this site, almost all of these fractures are displaced. The incidence of distal humeral coronal shear fractures is higher among women because of the higher rate of osteoporosis in women and the difference in carrying angle between men and women. Distal humeral coronal shear fractures may occur in isolation, may be part of a complex elbow injury, or may be associated with injuries proximal or distal to the elbow. An associated lateral collateral ligament injury is seen in up to 40% and an associated radial head fracture is seen in up to 30% of these fractures. Given the complex nature of distal humeral coronal shear fractures, there is preference for operative management. Operative fixation leads to stable anatomic reduction, restores articular congruity, and allows initiation of early range-of-motion movements in the majority of cases. Several surgical exposure and fixation techniques are available to reconstruct the articular surface following distal humeral coronal shear fractures. The lateral extensile approach and fixation with countersunk headless compression screws placed in an anterior-to-posterior fashion are commonly used. We have found a two-incision approach (direct anterior and lateral) that results in less soft tissue dissection and better outcomes than the lateral extensile approach in our experience. Stiffness, pain, articular incongruity, arthritis, and ulnohumeral instability may result if reduction is non-anatomic or if fixation fails. PMID:25984515

  3. Spurious Shear in Weak Lensing with LSST

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Kahn, S.M.; Jernigan, J.G.; Peterson, J.R.; AlSayyad, Y.; Ahmad, Z.; Bankert, J.; Bard, D.; Connolly, A.; Gibson, R.R.; Gilmore, K.; Grace, E.; Hannel, M.; Hodge, M.A.; Jee, M.J.; Jones, L.; Krughoff, S.; Lorenz, S.; Marshall, P.J.; Marshall, S.; Meert, A.

    2012-09-19

    The complete 10-year survey from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will image {approx} 20,000 square degrees of sky in six filter bands every few nights, bringing the final survey depth to r {approx} 27.5, with over 4 billion well measured galaxies. To take full advantage of this unprecedented statistical power, the systematic errors associated with weak lensing measurements need to be controlled to a level similar to the statistical errors. This work is the first attempt to quantitatively estimate the absolute level and statistical properties of the systematic errors on weak lensing shear measurements due to the most important physical effects in the LSST system via high fidelity ray-tracing simulations. We identify and isolate the different sources of algorithm-independent, additive systematic errors on shear measurements for LSST and predict their impact on the final cosmic shear measurements using conventional weak lensing analysis techniques. We find that the main source of the errors comes from an inability to adequately characterise the atmospheric point spread function (PSF) due to its high frequency spatial variation on angular scales smaller than {approx} 10{prime} in the single short exposures, which propagates into a spurious shear correlation function at the 10{sup -4}-10{sup -3} level on these scales. With the large multi-epoch dataset that will be acquired by LSST, the stochastic errors average out, bringing the final spurious shear correlation function to a level very close to the statistical errors. Our results imply that the cosmological constraints from LSST will not be severely limited by these algorithm-independent, additive systematic effects.

  4. Edge Sheared Flows and Blob Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myra, J. R.

    2012-10-01

    The dynamics of blob-filaments [S. I. Krasheninnikov, et al. J. Plasma Phys. 74, 679 (2008); D. A. D'Ippolito, et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 060501 (2011)] in the strongly radially inhomogeneous edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) region of a tokamak plasma is considered, with emphasis on sheared flow generation and interaction. The work is motivated by the potential importance of edge sheared flows for turbulence regulation, (e.g. the L-H transition), and the influence of flows on the character of emitted blob-filament structures which ultimately contact plasma-facing components. To study the dynamics of blobs and sheared flows, we employ both numerical simulations and experimental data analysis. The simulations use the fluid-based 2D curvature-interchange model embedded in the SOLT (SOL turbulence) code [D. A. Russell, et al, Phys. Plasmas 16, 122304 (2009)]. A blob-tracking algorithm has also been developed and applied to NSTX and Alcator C-Mod data. The algorithm is based on 2D time-resolved images from the gas puff imaging (GPI) diagnostic [S. J. Zweben, et al. Phys. Plasmas 9, 1981 (2002)]. The algorithm is able to track the blob motion and changes in blob structure, such as elliptical deformations, that can be affected by sheared flows. Results of seeded blob simulations are compared with the experimental data to determine the role of plasma parameters on the blob tracks and to evaluate the exchange of momentum between the blobs and flows. Seeded blob simulations are shown to reproduce many qualitative and quantitative features of the data including size, scale and direction of perpendicular (approximately poloidal) flows and the inferred Reynolds forces, poloidal reversal of blob tracks, and blob trapping and/or ejection. Simulation and experimental data comparisons permit the inference of dynamical mechanisms associated with blob motion and sheared flow generation in these shots, and their relation to previous theoretical work.

  5. High strength semi-active energy absorbers using shear- and mixedmode operation at high shear rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becnel, Andrew C.

    This body of research expands the design space of semi-active energy absorbers for shock isolation and crash safety by investigating and characterizing magnetorheological fluids (MRFs) at high shear rates ( > 25,000 1/s) under shear and mixed-mode operation. Magnetorheological energy absorbers (MREAs) work well as adaptive isolators due to their ability to quickly and controllably adjust to changes in system mass or impact speed while providing fail-safe operation. However, typical linear stroking MREAs using pressure-driven flows have been shown to exhibit reduced controllability as impact speed (shear rate) increases. The objective of this work is to develop MREAs that improve controllability at high shear rates by using pure shear and mixed shear-squeeze modes of operation, and to present the fundamental theory and models of MR fluids under these conditions. A proof of concept instrument verified that the MR effect persists in shear mode devices at shear rates corresponding to low speed impacts. This instrument, a concentric cylinder Searle cell magnetorheometer, was then used to characterize three commercially available MRFs across a wide range of shear rates, applied magnetic fields, and temperatures. Characterization results are presented both as flow curves according to established practice, and as an alternate nondimensionalized analysis based on Mason number. The Mason number plots show that, with appropriate correction coefficients for operating temperature, the varied flow curve data can be collapsed to a single master curve. This work represents the first shear mode characterization of MRFs at shear rates over 10 times greater than available with commercial rheometers, as well as the first validation of Mason number analysis to high shear rate flows in MRFs. Using the results from the magnetorheometer, a full scale rotary vane MREA was developed as part of the Lightweight Magnetorheological Energy Absorber System (LMEAS) for an SH-60 Seahawk helicopter

  6. Conjugate-shear folding: A model for the relationships between foliations, folds and shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerden, Domingo G. A. M.; Sayab, Mohammad; Bouybaouene, Mohamed L.

    2010-08-01

    Microstructural mapping of whole thin sections cut from two samples of micaschist containing cm-scale folds plus garnet porphyroblasts has provided new insight in the relationships between folding, shearing and foliation development. The garnets exhibit coherent inclusion-trail patterns that place important constraints on the kinematic development of both samples, which are shown to be representative of coaxial versus non-coaxial deformation in rocks containing a pre-existing schistosity. A comparison of crenulations-cleavages geometries in both samples and a review of the geometry of natural and experimental multilayer folds leads to the conclusion that folding involves conjugate shearing at different scales. At microscopic scales, crenulation cleavages nucleate as conjugate-kink or shear instabilities and develop further as a function of the macroscopic partitioning of deformation. In fold-hinge domains, bulk-coaxial deformation results in equal development of conjugate crenulations that progressively coalescence into symmetrical crenulation patterns so that, macroscopically, parallelism is achieved between foliation, fold-axial planes and long axes of strain ellipses. Fold-limb domains represent a system of conjugate-shear zones where single sets of crenulation instabilities with synthetic shearing component preferentially develop producing oblique relationships between the aforementioned elements. Cleavage fanning is inferred as a direct consequence of this conjugate-shear origin of folds. The model implies that crenulation cleavages and S-C fabrics in shear zones form by analogous processes, in both cases involving a component of shearing along foliation planes. The development of conjugate sets of foliation planes surrounding porphyroblasts during early, relatively coaxial stages of deformation explains continued "gyrostatic" behaviour during more advanced non-coaxial stages, as indicated by consistently oriented inclusion trails in the studied samples.

  7. Structural Evidence for Fluid-Assisted Shear Failure within a Ductile Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, K.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Recent observations of seismic slip occurring below the seismogenic zone of large fault zones have emphasized the significance of coeval ductile and brittle processes at high temperatures. We present observations of a shear zone contained within the Saddlebag Lake pendant of the eastern Sierra Nevada, CA, where Triassic and Jurassic metavolcanics and metasediments are highly strained in a high-temperature shear zone. Transposed bedding and cleavage that define a flattening fabric, dextrally rotated porphyroclasts, and a steep, pervasive lineation together suggest an overall transpressive kinematic regime for the ductile deformation. The high-strain rocks exhibit multiple episodes of vein formation, indicating a prolonged migration of hydrothermal fluids throughout the system. Crosscutting relationships and mineral assemblages define discrete sets of differently oriented veins. The veins form by fracture, but many veins are folded and boudinaged, showing synkinematic brittle and ductile deformation. We document foliation-parallel quartz veins that show shear displacement from the geometry of pull-apart structures and offsets of earlier veins. Synkinematic equilibrium mineral assemblages within the host rock and dynamic recrystallization of the quartz veins show they formed at temperatures around 400 to 500°C. The shear fractures have horizontal trace lengths of up to a few meters and displacements range from 2-3 mm to ~3 cm, with 1-5 mm of opening. Assuming the observed offset in the fractures occurred in a single event, these measurements are consistent with stress drops of 1 to 10 MPa. We interpret these observations to show that the veins formed as a result of high pore fluid pressure that caused shear failure at low effective stresses. Because foliated rocks are mechanically anisotropic, the foliation provided planes of weakness for failure with a preferred orientation. Evidence for shear failure occurring within crystal-plastic shear zones at high temperatures

  8. Volcano-sedimentary characteristics in the Abu Treifiya Basin, Cairo-Suez District, Egypt: Example of dynamics and fluidization over sedimentary and volcaniclastic beds by emplacement of syn-volcanic basaltic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf, E. A.; Abdel Motelib, A.; Hammed, M. S.; El Manawi, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the Neogene lava-sediment mingling from the Abu Treifiya Basin, Cairo-Suez district, Egypt. The lava-sediment interactions as peperites have been identified for the first time at the study area and can be used as paleoenvironmental indicators. The identification of peperite reflects contemporaneous time relationship between volcanism and sedimentation and this finding is of primary importance to address the evolutional reconstruction of the Abu Treifiya Basin. Characterization of the facies architecture and textural framework of peperites was carried out through detailed description and interpretation of their outcrops. The peperites and sedimentary rocks are up to 350 m thick and form a distinct stratigraphic framework of diverse lithology that is widespread over several kilometers at the study area. Lateral and vertical facies of the peperites vary from sediment intercalated with the extrusive/intrusive basaltic rocks forming peperitic breccias to lava-sediment contacts at a large to small scales, respectively. Peperites encompass five main facies types ascribed to: (i) carbonate sediments-hosted fluidal and blocky peperites, (ii) lava flow-hosted blocky peperites, (iii) volcaniclastics-hosted fluidal and blocky peperites, (iv) sandstone/siltstone rocks-hosted blocky peperites, and (iv) debris-flows-hosted blocky peperites. Soft sediment deformation structures, vesiculated sediments, sediments filled-vesicles, and fractures in lava flows indicate that lava flows mingled with unconsolidated wet sediments. All the peperites in this study could be described as blocky or fluidal, but mixtures of different clast shapes occur regardless of the host sediment. The presence of fluidal and blocky juvenile clasts elucidates different eruptive styles, reflecting a ductile and brittle fragmentation. The gradual variation from fluidal to blocky peperite texture, producing the vertical grading is affected by influencing factors, e.g., the viscosity, magma

  9. Microstructural evolution of a model, shear-banding micellar solution during shear startup and cessation.

    PubMed

    López-Barrón, Carlos R; Gurnon, A Kate; Eberle, Aaron P R; Porcar, Lionel; Wagner, Norman J

    2014-04-01

    We present direct measurements of the evolution of the segmental-level microstructure of a stable shear-banding polymerlike micelle solution during flow startup and cessation in the plane of flow. These measurements provide a definitive, quantitative microstructural understanding of the stages observed during flow startup: an initial elastic response with limited alignment that yields with a large stress overshoot to a homogeneous flow with associated micellar alignment that persists for approximately three relaxation times. This transient is followed by a shear (kink) band formation with a flow-aligned low-viscosity band that exhibits shear-induced concentration fluctuations and coexists with a nearly isotropic band of homogenous, highly viscoelastic micellar solution. Stable, steady banding flow is achieved only after approximately two reptation times. Flow cessation from this shear-banded state is also found to be nontrivial, exhibiting an initial fast relaxation with only minor structural relaxation, followed by a slower relaxation of the aligned micellar fluid with the equilibrium fluid's characteristic relaxation time. These measurements resolve a controversy in the literature surrounding the mechanism of shear banding in entangled wormlike micelles and, by means of comparison to existing literature, provide further insights into the mechanisms driving shear-banding instabilities in related systems. The methods and instrumentation described should find broad use in exploring complex fluid rheology and testing microstructure-based constitutive equations. PMID:24827245

  10. Estimation of seabed shear-wave velocity profiles using shear-wave source data.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hefeng; Nguyen, Thanh-Duong; Duffaut, Kenneth

    2013-07-01

    This paper estimates seabed shear-wave velocity profiles and their uncertainties using interface-wave dispersion curves extracted from data generated by a shear-wave source. The shear-wave source generated a seismic signature over a frequency range between 2 and 60 Hz and was polarized in both in-line and cross-line orientations. Low-frequency Scholte- and Love-waves were recorded. Dispersion curves of the Scholte- and Love-waves for the fundamental mode and higher-order modes are extracted by three time-frequency analysis methods. Both the vertically and horizontally polarized shear-wave velocity profiles in the sediment are estimated by the Scholte- and Love-wave dispersion curves, respectively. A Bayesian approach is utilized for the inversion. Differential evolution, a global search algorithm is applied to estimate the most-probable shear-velocity models. Marginal posterior probability profiles are computed by Metropolis-Hastings sampling. The estimated vertically and horizontally polarized shear-wave velocity profiles fit well with the core and in situ measurements. PMID:23862796

  11. Flexible Micropost Arrays for Shear Stress Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Palmieri, Frank L.; Hopkins, John W.; Jackson, Allen M.; Connell, John W.; Lin, Yi; Cisotto, Alexxandra A.

    2015-01-01

    Increased fuel costs, heightened environmental protection requirements, and noise abatement continue to place drag reduction at the forefront of aerospace research priorities. Unfortunately, shortfalls still exist in the fundamental understanding of boundary-layer airflow over aerodynamic surfaces, especially regarding drag arising from skin friction. For example, there is insufficient availability of instrumentation to adequately characterize complex flows with strong pressure gradients, heat transfer, wall mass flux, three-dimensionality, separation, shock waves, and transient phenomena. One example is the acoustic liner efficacy on aircraft engine nacelle walls. Active measurement of shear stress in boundary layer airflow would enable a better understanding of how aircraft structure and flight dynamics affect skin friction. Current shear stress measurement techniques suffer from reliability, complexity, and airflow disruption, thereby compromising resultant shear stress data. The state-of-the-art for shear stress sensing uses indirect or direct measurement techniques. Indirect measurements (e.g., hot-wire, heat flux gages, oil interferometry, laser Doppler anemometry, small scale pressure drag surfaces, i.e., fences) require intricate knowledge of the studied flow, restrictive instrument arrangements, large surface areas, flow disruption, or seeding material; with smaller, higher bandwidth probes under development. Direct measurements involve strain displacement of a sensor element and require no prior knowledge of the flow. Unfortunately, conventional "floating" recessed components for direct measurements are mm to cm in size. Whispering gallery mode devices and Fiber Bragg Gratings are examples of recent additions to this type of sensor with much smaller (?m) sensor components. Direct detection techniques are often single point measurements and difficult to calibrate and implement in wind tunnel experiments. In addition, the wiring, packaging, and installation

  12. Interfacial Shear Strength Evaluation of Jute/Poly(Lactic Acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Tatsuro; Nakai, Asami

    In order to evaluate the interfacial shear strength between fiber bundle and matrix of jute/poly(lactic acid) (PLA), a fiber bundle pull-out test method is proposed. Shear stress distribution was calculated based on the parabolic shear-lag analysis. Fiber bundle pull-out tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of molding condition on the interfacial shear strength. The interfacial shear strength increased with increasing molding temperature up to 185°C. Then gradual decrease in the interfacial shear strength with molding temperature was observed. Similar tendency was also observed in the effect of molding time, whereas the interfacial shear strength decreased with increasing molding pressure. Comparing the result of the tensile tests in the previous study, interfacial shear strength has corelations with tensile strength.

  13. 3. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH SHOWING PUNCH AND SHEAR MACHINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH SHOWING PUNCH AND SHEAR MACHINE (manufactured by Cleveland Punch and Shear Works Company, USA) - Cambria & Indiana Railroad, Blacksmith Shop, .25 miles northwest of Colver, Colver, Cambria County, PA

  14. Disentangling the role of structure and friction in shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinutha, H. A.; Sastry, Srikanth

    2016-06-01

    Amorphous sphere packings have been intensely investigated to understand mechanical and flow behaviour of dense granular matter and to explore universal aspects of the jamming transition, from fluid to structurally arrested states. Considerable recent research has focused on anisotropic packings of frictional grains generated by shear deformation leading to shear jamming, occurring below the jamming density for isotropic packings of frictionless grains. Here, with the aim of disentangling the role of shear-deformation-induced structures and friction in generating shear jamming, we computationally study sheared assemblies of frictionless spheres, over a wide range of densities. We demonstrate that shear deformation alone leads to the emergence of geometric features characteristic of jammed packings, with the increase of shear strain. We also show that such emergent geometry, together with friction, leads to mechanically stable, shear-jammed, packings above a threshold density that lies well below the isotropic jamming point.

  15. 49 CFR 178.338-12 - Shear section.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... breakage groove adjacent to, and outboard of, the valve. The shear section or breakage groove must yield or... protection specified in § 178.338-10 is not a substitute for a shear section or breakage groove....

  16. Turbulent Transport in Tokamak Plasmas with Rotational Shear

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.; Highcock, E. G.; Cowley, S. C.; Roach, C. M.

    2011-04-29

    Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations are conducted to investigate turbulent transport in tokamak plasmas with rotational shear. At sufficiently large flow shears, linear instabilities are suppressed, but transiently growing modes drive subcritical turbulence whose amplitude increases with flow shear. This leads to a local minimum in the heat flux, indicating an optimal ExB shear value for plasma confinement. Local maxima in the momentum fluxes are observed, implying the possibility of bifurcations in the ExB shear. The critical temperature gradient for the onset of turbulence increases with flow shear at low flow shears; at higher flow shears, the dependence of heat flux on temperature gradient becomes less stiff. The turbulent Prandtl number is found to be largely independent of temperature and flow gradients, with a value close to unity.

  17. The Intensification of Sheared Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Leon Trungduong

    Environmental vertical wind shear has been shown to have a generally detrimental impact on tropical cyclone (TC) intensity change. However, many cases of rapidly intensifying (RI) sheared TCs have been observed, and TCs in moderate (5-10 m s-1) shear often have the largest intensity forecast errors. Thus, advancing the understanding of TC-shear interactions is vital to improving TC intensity forecasts, which have not seen much improvement over the past few decades. This dissertation employs both observational and high-resolution numerical modeling approaches to investigate how some TCs are able to resist shear and intensify. The rapid intensification of Hurricane Irene (1999) was studied using observations, while the short-term RI of Tropical Storm Gabrielle (2001) was simulated using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model run at 1-km horizontal resolution. Both storms exhibited a downshear-left vortex tilt and a marked azimuthal wavenumber-1 convective asymmetry. However, the azimuthally averaged diabatic heating also increased, suggesting that TC intensity may be more sensitive to the azimuthally averaged component of diabatic heating rather than the asymmetric component. Furthermore, this increase occurred within the radius of maximum winds (RMW), a region theorized to favor rapid spinup of the vortex. A key difference between the Irene and Gabrielle cases was that the latter underwent a downshear reformation. The circulation associated with an intense mesovortex and other localized cyclonic vorticity anomalies comprised a developing "inner vortex" on the downshear-left (downtilt) periphery of the broader parent vortex. This inner vortex was nearly upright within a parent vortex that was tilted significantly with height. The inner vortex became the dominant vortex of the system, advecting and absorbing the broad, tilted parent vortex. A method was developed for diagnosing vortex tilt in the simulation. The reduction of TC vortex tilt from 65 km to 20 km

  18. A microcomputer-based data acquisition and control system for the direct shear, ring shear, triaxial shear, and consolidation tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, Philip S.

    1983-01-01

    This report is intended to provide internal documentation for the U.S. Geological Survey laboratory's automatic data acquisition system. The operating procedures for each type of test are designed to independently lead a first-time user through the various stages of using the computer to control the test. Continuing advances in computer technology and the availability of desktop microcomputers with a wide variety of peripheral equipment at a reasonable cost can create an efficient automated geotechnical testing environment. A geotechnical testing environment is shown in figure 1. Using an automatic data acquisition system, laboratory test data from a variety of sensors can be collected, and manually or automatically recorded on a magnetic device at the same apparent time. The responses of a test can be displayed graphically on a CRT in a matter of seconds, giving the investigator an opportunity to evaluate the test data, and to make timely, informed decisions on such matters as whether to continue testing, abandon a test, or modify procedures. Data can be retrieved and results reported in tabular form, or graphic plots, suitable for publication. Thermistors, thermocouples, load cells, pressure transducers, and linear variable differential transformers are typical sensors which are incorporated in automated systems. The geotechnical tests which are most practical to automate are the long-term tests which often require readings to be recorded outside normal work hours and on weekends. Automation applications include incremental load consolidation tests, constant-rate-of-strain consolidation tests, direct shear tests, ring shear tests, and triaxial shear tests.

  19. ISIS: An Instrument for Measuring Erosion Shear Stress In Situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Helen; Ockenden, Mary

    1996-01-01

    An instrument for measuring shear stress for erosion in situ(ISIS) has been developed to measure the erosion shear stress of muddy sediments on intertidal mud flats. Erosion shear stress is defined in this paper as the minimum applied bed shear stress required to initiate erosion and remove sediment from the bed surface. An applied shear stress is generated by the flow through and around a specially shaped bell head, which draws water radially across the bed into the centre of the bell head. The applied shear stress is a function of the distance from the bell head to the bed surface and the discharge through the system. The design of ISIS was assisted by the use of a computational numerical flow modelling package. The operating conditions giving the most even shear stress across the whole test section were discharges of 0·01-0·6 ls -1, and bell-to-bed distance of 4-8 mm giving a shear stress of 0·02-5 Nm -2. The ISIS system was calibrated using hot film shear stress probes. The calibration data gave a 92% fit to the calibration function for shear stress. Laboratory measurements with ISIS of the erosion shear stress of mud beds consolidated for c. 1·5 days, showed surface shear stresses of 0·11-0·24 Nm -2. These were very similar to values of surface erosion shear stress measured for the same mud in an annular flume. The ISIS system was used to measure surface erosion shear stresses on the mud flats at Portishead and Blue Anchor Bay in the Severn Estuary, U.K. Surface erosion shear stresses at Portishead were generally in the range 0·2-0·5 Nm -2. The surface erosion shear stresses measured at Blue Anchor Bay, which included mud and sand, ranged between 0·1-1·9 Nm -2.

  20. Dynamic pore-pressure fluctuations in rapidly shearing granular materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; LaHusen, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    Results from two types of experiments show that intergranular pore pressures fluctuated dynamically during rapid, steady shear deformation of water-saturated granular materials. During some fluctuations, the pore water locally supported all normal and shear stresses, while grain-contact stresses transiently fell to zero. Fluctuations also propagated outward from the shear zone; this process modifies grain-contact stresses in adjacent areas and potentially instigates shear-zone growth.

  1. Aligning self-assembled gelators by drying under shear.

    PubMed

    Draper, Emily R; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Adams, Dave J

    2016-05-25

    We show how drying under shear can be used to prepare aligned fibres and worm-like micelles from low molecular weight gelators. Shearing followed by drying leads to the dealignment before the water can be removed; continuous shear whilst drying is required to maintain the alignment. Combining a slow pH change with continuous shear allows alignment of the gelling fibres, which can then be dried. PMID:27146964

  2. Turbulent transport across shear layers in magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nold, B.; Ramisch, M.; Manz, P.; Birkenmeier, G.; Ribeiro, T. T.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D.; Fuchert, G.; Stroth, U.

    2014-10-15

    Shear layers modify the turbulence in diverse ways and do not only suppress it. A spatial-temporal investigation of gyrofluid simulations in comparison with experiments allows to identify further details of the transport process across shear layers. Blobs in and outside a shear layer merge, thereby exchange particles and heat and subsequently break up. Via this mechanism particles and heat are transported radially across shear layers. Turbulence spreading is the immanent mechanism behind this process.

  3. Progress on Intelligent Guidance and Control for Wind Shear Encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stratton, D. Alexander

    1990-01-01

    Low altitude wind shear poses a serious threat to air safety. Avoiding severe wind shear challenges the ability of flight crews, as it involves assessing risk from uncertain evidence. A computerized intelligent cockpit aid can increase flight crew awareness of wind shear, improving avoidance decisions. The primary functions of a cockpit advisory expert system for wind shear avoidance are discussed. Also introduced are computational techniques being implemented to enable these primary functions.

  4. The stability of Rossby waves in a stratified shear fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Benkui

    1990-11-01

    An investigation is undertaken of the stability of linear Rossby waves in a stratified shear fluid by means of a qualitative theory employing ordinary differential equations. It is noted that, while the basic current has no detectable shear, the Rossby waves are always stable. If the basic current possesses only horizontal shear, the unstable criterion for waves takes one form, but it takes entirely another in the case where the basic current possesses only vertical shear.

  5. Shear-Sensitive Liquid Crystal Coating Method: Surface-Inclination Effects on Shear Vector Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.; Wilder, Michael C.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The shear-sensitive liquid crystal coating (SSLCC) method is an image-based technique for both visualizing dynamic surface-flow phenomena, such as transition and separation, and for measuring the continuous shear-stress vector distribution acting on an aerodynamic surface. Under proper lighting and viewing conditions (discussed below), the coating changes color in response to an applied aerodynamic shear. This color-change response is continuous and reversible, with a response time of milliseconds, and is a function of both the shear magnitude and the shear vector orientation relative to the observer. The liquid crystal phase of matter is a weakly-ordered, viscous, non-Newtonian fluid state that exists between the nonuniform liquid phase and the ordered solid phase of certain organic compounds. Cholesteric liquid crystal compounds possess a helical molecular arrangement that selectively scatters white light, incident along the helical axis, as a three-dimensional spectrum. This property is linked to the helical pitch length, which is within the range of wavelengths in the visible spectrum. The pitch length, and hence the wavelength of the scattered light, is influenced by shear stress normal to the helical axis. This unique optical property produces a measurable color change in response to an applied shearing force. The full-surface shear stress vector measurement method, developed at NASA-Ames, is schematically illustrated. As with the visualization method, the coated test surface is illuminated from the normal direction with white light and the camera is positioned at an above-plane view angle of approximately 30 deg. Experiments have been initiated at NASA Ames to begin the process of quantifying surface-inclination (surface-curvature) effects on shear vector measurement accuracy. In preliminary experiments, surface-inclination angles theta(sub x), theta(sub y) of 0, +/-5, +/-10, and +/-15 deg were employed. In this arrangement, white-light illumination was

  6. 49 CFR 230.27 - Maximum shearing strength of rivets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maximum shearing strength of rivets. 230.27 Section 230.27 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.27 Maximum shearing strength of rivets. The maximum shearing...

  7. Wind shear training applications for 91/135

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbon, ED

    1991-01-01

    The requirement for wind shear training of all pilots has been demonstrated too often by the accident statistics of past years. Documents were developed to train airline crews on specific aircraft and to teach recognition of the meteorological conditions that are conducive to wind shear and microburst formation. A Wind Shear Training Aid program is discussed.

  8. 49 CFR 230.28 - Higher shearing strength of rivets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.28 Higher shearing strength of rivets. A higher shearing strength may be used for rivets when it can be shown through testing that the rivet material used is of such... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Higher shearing strength of rivets. 230.28...

  9. 49 CFR 230.28 - Higher shearing strength of rivets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.28 Higher shearing strength of rivets. A higher shearing strength may be used for rivets when it can be shown through testing that the rivet material used is of such... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Higher shearing strength of rivets. 230.28...

  10. 49 CFR 230.27 - Maximum shearing strength of rivets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.27 Maximum shearing strength of rivets. The maximum shearing strength... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maximum shearing strength of rivets....

  11. 49 CFR 230.28 - Higher shearing strength of rivets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.28 Higher shearing strength of rivets. A higher shearing strength may be used for rivets when it can be shown through testing that the rivet material used is of such... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Higher shearing strength of rivets. 230.28...

  12. 49 CFR 230.27 - Maximum shearing strength of rivets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.27 Maximum shearing strength of rivets. The maximum shearing strength... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maximum shearing strength of rivets....

  13. 49 CFR 230.28 - Higher shearing strength of rivets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.28 Higher shearing strength of rivets. A higher shearing strength may be used for rivets when it can be shown through testing that the rivet material used is of such... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Higher shearing strength of rivets. 230.28...

  14. 49 CFR 230.27 - Maximum shearing strength of rivets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.27 Maximum shearing strength of rivets. The maximum shearing strength... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Maximum shearing strength of rivets....

  15. Non-homogeneous flow profiles in sheared bacterial suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Devranjan; Cheng, Xiang

    Bacterial suspensions under shear exhibit interesting rheological behaviors including the remarkable ``superfluidic'' state with vanishing viscosity at low shear rates. Theoretical studies have shown that such ``superfluidic'' state is linked with non-homogeneous shear flows, which are induced by coupling between nematic order of active fluids and hydrodynamics of shear flows. However, although bulk rheology of bacterial suspensions has been experimentally studied, shear profiles within bacterial suspensions have not been explored so far. Here, we experimentally investigate the flow behaviors of E. coli suspensions under planar oscillatory shear. Using confocal microscopy and PIV, we measure velocity profiles across gap between two shear plates. We find that with increasing shear rates, high-concentration bacterial suspensions exhibit an array of non-homogeneous flow behaviors like yield-stress flows and shear banding. We show that these non-homogeneous flows are due to collective motion of bacterial suspensions. The phase diagram of sheared bacterial suspensions is systematically mapped as functions of shear rates an bacterial concentrations. Our experiments provide new insights into rheology of bacterial suspensions and shed light on shear induced dynamics of active fluids. Chemical Engineering and Material Science department.

  16. 49 CFR 230.27 - Maximum shearing strength of rivets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.27 Maximum shearing strength of rivets. The maximum shearing strength... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum shearing strength of rivets....

  17. Wrinkling of reinforced plates subjected to shear stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seydel, Edgar

    1931-01-01

    An analysis is made here of the problem of long plates with transverse stiffeners subject to shear. A typical example would be a long Wagner beam. The shear stress is calculated at which the web wrinkles and shear stress becomes a maximum. The equation is solved for both a condition of free support and rigidity of support on the edges.

  18. Pulsatile Fluid Shear in Bone Remodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frangos, John A.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to elucidate the sensitivity to transients in fluid shear stress in bone remodeling. Bone remodeling is clearly a function of the local mechanical environment which includes interstitial fluid flow. Traditionally, load-induced remodeling has been associated with low frequency (1-2 Hz) signals attributed to normal locomotion. McLeod and Rubin, however, demonstrated in vivo remodeling events associated with high frequency (15-30 Hz) loading. Likewise, other in vivo studies demonstrated that slowly applied strains did not trigger remodeling events. We therefore hypothesized that the mechanosensitive pathways which control bone maintenance and remodeling are differentially sensitive to varying rates of applied fluid shear stress.

  19. Flocculation of model algae under shear.

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Flint; Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2010-11-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of the flocculation of model algae particles under shear. We study the evolution of the cluster size distribution as well as the steady-state distribution as a function of shear rates and algae interaction parameters. Algal interactions are modeled through a DLVO-type potential, a combination of a HS colloid potential (Everaers) and a yukawa/colloid electrostatic potential. The effect of hydrodynamic interactions on aggregation is explored. Cluster strucuture is determined from the algae-algae radial distribution function as well as the structure factor. DLVO parameters including size, salt concentration, surface potential, initial volume fraction, etc. are varied to model different species of algae under a variety of environmental conditions.

  20. Shear Stress Sensing with Elastic Microfence Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisotto, Alexxandra; Palmieri, Frank L.; Saini, Aditya; Lin, Yi; Thurman, Christopher S; Kim, Jinwook; Kim, Taeyang; Connell, John W.; Zhu, Yong; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Jiang, Xiaoning; Wohl, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, elastic microfences were generated for the purpose of measuring shear forces acting on a wind tunnel model. The microfences were fabricated in a two part process involving laser ablation patterning to generate a template in a polymer film followed by soft lithography with a two-part silicone. Incorporation of a fluorescent dye was demonstrated as a method to enhance contrast between the sensing elements and the substrate. Sensing elements consisted of multiple microfences prepared at different orientations to enable determination of both shear force and directionality. Microfence arrays were integrated into an optical microscope with sub-micrometer resolution. Initial experiments were conducted on a flat plate wind tunnel model. Both image stabilization algorithms and digital image correlation were utilized to determine the amount of fence deflection as a result of airflow. Initial free jet experiments indicated that the microfences could be readily displaced and this displacement was recorded through the microscope.

  1. Shear modulus of structured electrorheological fluid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Shitara, Kyohei; Sakaue, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    Some immiscible blends under a strong electric field often exhibit periodic structures, bridging the gap between two electrodes. Upon shear, the structures tilt, and exhibit an elastic response which is mostly governed by the electric energy. Assuming a two-dimensional stripe structure, we calculate the Maxwell stress, and derive an expression for the shear modulus, demonstrating how it depends on the external electric field, the composition, and the dielectric properties of the blend. We also suggest the notion of effective interfacial tension, which renormalizes the effect of the electric field. This leads to a simple derivation of the scaling law for the selection of the wavelength of the structure formed under an electric field. PMID:27300947

  2. Hyperscaling violation and the shear diffusion constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolekar, Kedar S.; Mukherjee, Debangshu; Narayan, K.

    2016-09-01

    We consider holographic theories in bulk (d + 1)-dimensions with Lifshitz and hyperscaling violating exponents z , θ at finite temperature. By studying shear gravitational modes in the near-horizon region given certain self-consistent approximations, we obtain the corresponding shear diffusion constant on an appropriately defined stretched horizon, adapting the analysis of Kovtun, Son and Starinets. For generic exponents with d - z - θ > - 1, we find that the diffusion constant has power law scaling with the temperature, motivating us to guess a universal relation for the viscosity bound. When the exponents satisfy d - z - θ = - 1, we find logarithmic behaviour. This relation is equivalent to z = 2 +deff where deff =di - θ is the effective boundary spatial dimension (and di = d - 1 the actual spatial dimension). It is satisfied by the exponents in hyperscaling violating theories arising from null reductions of highly boosted black branes, and we comment on the corresponding analysis in that context.

  3. Shear modulus of structured electrorheological fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitara, Kyohei; Sakaue, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    Some immiscible blends under a strong electric field often exhibit periodic structures, bridging the gap between two electrodes. Upon shear, the structures tilt, and exhibit an elastic response which is mostly governed by the electric energy. Assuming a two-dimensional stripe structure, we calculate the Maxwell stress, and derive an expression for the shear modulus, demonstrating how it depends on the external electric field, the composition, and the dielectric properties of the blend. We also suggest the notion of effective interfacial tension, which renormalizes the effect of the electric field. This leads to a simple derivation of the scaling law for the selection of the wavelength of the structure formed under an electric field.

  4. Fiber optic plantar pressure/shear sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soetanto, William; Nguyen, Ngoc T.; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2011-04-01

    A full-scale foot pressure/shear sensor that has been developed to help diagnose the cause of ulcer formation in diabetic patients is presented. The design involves a tactile sensor array using intersecting optical fibers embedded in soft elastomer. The basic configuration incorporates a mesh that is comprised of two sets of parallel optical fiber plane; the planes are configured so the parallel rows of fiber of the top and bottom planes are perpendicular to each other. Threedimensional information is determined by measuring the loss of light from each of the waveguide to map the overall pressure distribution and the shifting of the layers relative to each other. In this paper we will present the latest development on the fiber optic plantar pressure/shear sensor which can measure normal force up from 19.09 kPa to 1000 kPa.

  5. Viscosity of Sheared Helical filament Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartucci, Matthew; Urbach, Jeff; Blair, Dan; Schwenger, Walter

    The viscosity of suspensions can be dramatically affected by high aspect ratio particles. Understanding these systems provides insight into key biological functions and can be manipulated for many technological applications. In this talk, the viscosity as a function of shear rate of suspensions of helical filaments is compared to that of suspensions of straight rod-like filaments. Our goal is to determine the impact of filament geometry on low volume fraction colloidal suspensions in order to identify strategies for altering viscosity with minimal volume fraction. In this research, the detached flagella of the bacteria Salmonella Typhimurium are used as a model system of helical filaments and compared to mutated straight flagella of the Salmonella. We compare rheological measurements of the suspension viscosity in response to shear flow and use a combination of the rheology and fluorescence microscopy to identify the microstructural changes responsible for the observed rheological response.

  6. Drop impact of shear thickening liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, François; Sandoval-Nava, Enrique; Snoeijer, Jacco H.; Dijksman, J. Frits; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-05-01

    The impact of drops of concentrated non-Brownian suspensions (cornstarch and polystyrene spheres) onto a solid surface is investigated experimentally. The spreading dynamics and maximal deformation of the droplet of such shear thickening liquids are found to be markedly different from the impact of Newtonian drops. A particularly striking observation is that the maximal deformation is independent of the drop velocity and that the deformation suddenly stops during the impact phase. Both observations are due to the shear thickening rheology of the suspensions, as is explained theoretically from a balance between the kinetic energy and the viscously dissipated energy, from which we establish a scaling relation between the maximal deformation of the drop and rheological parameters of concentrated suspensions.

  7. Wind shear predictive detector technology study status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandolfi, C.

    1990-01-01

    Among the different elements to be investigated when considering the Wind Shear hazard, the Aeronautical Navigation Technical Service (STNA/3E), whose task is to participate in the development of new technologies and equipments, focused its effort on airborne and ground sensors for the detection of low-level wind shear. The first task, initiated in 1986, consists in the evaluation of three candidate techniques for forward-looking sensors: lidar, sodar, and radar. No development is presently foreseen for an infrared based air turbulence advance warning system although some flight experiments took place in the 70's. A Thomson infrared radiometer was then installed on an Air France Boeing 707 to evaluate its capability of detecting clear air turbulence. The conclusion showed that this technique was apparently able to detect cloud layers but that additional experiments were needed; on the other hand, the rarity of the phenomenon and the difficulty in operating on a commercial aircraft were also mentioned.

  8. Behavior of Rapidly Sheared Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangani, A. S.; Kushch, V. I.; Hoffmann, M.; Nahra, H.; Koch, D. L.; Tsang, Y.

    2002-01-01

    An experiment to be carried out aboard the International Space Station is described. A suspension consisting of millimeter-sized bubbles in water containing some dissolved salt, which prevents bubbles from coalescing, will be sheared in a Couette cylindrical cell. Rotation of the outer cylinder will produce centrifugal force which will tend to accumulate the bubbles near the inner wall. The shearing will enhance collisions among bubbles creating thereby bubble phase pressure that will resist the tendency of the bubbles to accumulate near the inner wall. The bubble volume fraction and velocity profiles will be measured and compared with the theoretical predictions. Ground-based research on measurement of bubble phase properties and flow in vertical channel are described.

  9. Implications of Orientation in Sheared Cocoa Butter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthrie, Sarah E.; Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Marangoni, Alejandro; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2004-03-01

    We will present x-ray and mechanical studies of oriented phases of cocoa butter. The structural elements of foods play an important role in determining such things as quality and shelf stability. The specific structure and properties of cocoa butter, however, are complicated due to the ability of the cocoa butter to form crystals in six polymorphic forms. Recent work has shown that the application of shear not only accelerates the transitions to more stable polymorphs, but also causes orientation of the crystallites[1]. The implications of orientation on the structures formed under conditions of shear and cooling will be described using x-ray diffraction and mechanical measurements. 1 G. Mazzanti, S. E. Guthrie, E. B. Sirota et al., Crystal Growth & Design 3 (5), 721 (2003).

  10. Direct measurement of shear properties of microfibers

    SciTech Connect

    Behlow, H.; Saini, D.; Durham, L.; Simpson, J.; Skove, M. J.; Rao, A. M.; Oliveira, L.; Serkiz, S. M.

    2014-09-15

    As novel fibers with enhanced mechanical properties continue to be synthesized and developed, the ability to easily and accurately characterize these materials becomes increasingly important. Here we present a design for an inexpensive tabletop instrument to measure shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of a micrometer-sized monofilament fiber sample, such as nonlinearities and hysteresis. This automated system applies twist to the sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector that tracks a torsion reference. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers, for which G is well known. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and Kevlar{sup ®} 119, were also characterized with this system and were found to have G = 16.5 ± 2.1 and 2.42 ± 0.32 GPa, respectively.

  11. Radiative instabilities in sheared magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, J. F.; Sparks, L.; Van Hoven, G.

    1988-01-01

    The structure and growth rate of the radiative instability in a sheared magnetic field B have been calculated analytically using the Braginskii fluid equations. In a shear layer, temperature and density perturbations are linked by the propagation of sound waves parallel to the local magnetic field. As a consequence, density clumping or condensation plays an important role in driving the instability. Parallel thermal conduction localizes the mode to a narrow layer where K(parallel) is small and stabilizes short wavelengths k larger-than(c) where k(c) depends on the local radiation and conduction rates. Thermal coupling to ions also limits the width of the unstable spectrum. It is shown that a broad spectrum of modes is typically unstable in tokamak edge plasmas and it is argued that this instability is sufficiently robust to drive the large-amplitude density fluctuations often measured there.

  12. Bac clones generated from sheared dna

    SciTech Connect

    Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Vessere, Gery M.; Shu, Chung Li; Hoskins,Roger A.; Abad, Jose P.; de Pablos, Beatriz; Villasante, Alfredo; deJong, Pieter J.

    2006-08-09

    BAC libraries generated from restriction-digested genomic DNA display representational bias and lack some sequences. To facilitate completion of genome projects, procedures have been developed to create BACs from DNA physically sheared to create fragments extending up to 200kb. The DNA fragments were repaired to create blunt ends and ligated to a new BAC vector. This approach has been tested by generating BAC libraries from Drosophila DNA, with insert lengths of 50 kb to 150 kb. The libraries lack chimeric clone problems as determined by mapping paired BAC-end sequences of one library to the D. melanogaster genome sequence. The utility of ''sheared'' libraries was demonstrated by closure of a previous clone gap and by isolation of clones from telomeric regions, which were notably absent from previous Drosophila BAC libraries.

  13. Atmospheric soundings from Mount Abu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Som; Sinha, H. S. S.

    2005-06-01

    An atmospheric science laboratory was set up at Gurushikhar, in the campus of PRL's Infrared observatory, in 1994. A variety of scientific instruments were housed in the atmospheric science laboratory to explore the Earth's ionosphere and neutral atmosphere. A powerful Nd-YAG laser based Lidar, a multi-wavelength all sky imaging system, Day-night-airglow photometer/spectrometer and a proton precession magnetometer are in operation along with a surface ozone sampler, a carbon mono-oxide analyzer and a UV radiometer (measures solar ultraviolet irradiance between 280 and 320 nm). This article highlights the neutral density and temperature measurements by the lidar as well as Atmospheric/Ionospheric parameters derived by other instruments.

  14. Axisymmetric single shear element combustion instability experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1993-06-01

    The combustion stability characteristics of a combustor consisting of a single shear element and a cylindrical chamber utilizing LOX and gaseous hydrogen as propellants are presented. The combustor geometry and the resulting longitudinal mode instability are axisymmetric. Hydrogen injection temperature and pyrotechnic pulsing were used to determine stability boundaries. Mixture ratio, fuel annulus gap, and LOX post configuration were varied. Performance and stability data are presented for chamber pressures of 300 and 1000 psia.

  15. Testing modified gravity with cosmic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnois-Déraps, J.; Munshi, D.; Valageas, P.; van Waerbeke, L.; Brax, P.; Coles, P.; Rizzo, L.

    2015-12-01

    We use the cosmic shear data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey to place constraints on f(R) and Generalized Dilaton models of modified gravity. This is highly complementary to other probes since the constraints mainly come from the non-linear scales: maximal deviations with respects to the General Relativity (GR) + Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) scenario occurs at k ˜ 1 h Mpc-1. At these scales, it becomes necessary to account for known degeneracies with baryon feedback and massive neutrinos, hence we place constraints jointly on these three physical effects. To achieve this, we formulate these modified gravity theories within a common tomographic parametrization, we compute their impact on the clustering properties relative to a GR universe, and propagate the observed modifications into the weak lensing ξ± quantity. Confronted against the cosmic shear data, we reject the f(R) \\lbrace |f_{R_0}| = 10^{-4}, n = 1\\rbrace model with more than 99.9 per cent confidence interval (CI) when assuming a ΛCDM dark matter only model. In the presence of baryonic feedback processes and massive neutrinos with total mass up to 0.2 eV, the model is disfavoured with at least 94 per cent CI in all different combinations studied. Constraints on the \\lbrace |f_{R_0}| = 10^{-4}, n = 2\\rbrace model are weaker, but nevertheless disfavoured with at least 89 per cent CI. We identify several specific combinations of neutrino mass, baryon feedback and f(R) or Dilaton gravity models that are excluded by the current cosmic shear data. Notably, universes with three massless neutrinos and no baryon feedback are strongly disfavoured in all modified gravity scenarios studied. These results indicate that competitive constraints may be achieved with future cosmic shear data.

  16. Stent implantation influence wall shear stress evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, S. I.; Totorean, A. F.; Bosioc, A. I.; Petre, I.; Bernad, E. S.

    2016-06-01

    Local hemodynamic factors are known affect the natural history of the restenosis critically after coronary stenting of atherosclerosis. Stent-induced flows disturbance magnitude dependent directly on the strut design. The impact of flow alterations around struts vary as the strut geometrical parameters change. Our results provide data regarding the hemodynamic parameters for the blood flow in both stenosed and stented coronary artery under physiological conditions, namely wall shear stress and pressure drop.

  17. Standing shear waves in anisotropic viscoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krit, T.; Golubkova, I.; Andreev, V.

    2015-10-01

    We studied standing shear waves in anisotropic resonator represented by a rectangular parallelepiped (layer) fixed without slipping between two wooden plates of finite mass. The viscoelastic layer with edges of 70 mm × 40 mm × 15 mm was made of a rubber-like polymer plastisol with rubber bands inside. The bands were placed vertical between the top and the bottom plate. Mechanical properties of the plastisol itself were carefully measured previously. It was found that plastisol shows a cubic nonlinear behavior, i.e. the stress-strain curve could be represented as: σ = μɛ + βμɛ3, where ɛ stands for shear strain and σ is an applied shear stress. The value of shear modulus μ depends on frequency and was found to be several kilopascals which is common for such soft solids. Nonlinear parameter β is frequency dependent too and varies in range from tenths to unity at 1-100 Hz frequency range, decreasing with frequency growth. Stretching the rubber bands inside the layer leads to change of elastic properties in resonator. Such effect could be noticed due to frequency response of the resonator. The numerical model of the resonator was based on finite elements method (FEM) and performed in MatLab. The resonator was cut in hundreds of right triangular prisms. Each prism was provided with viscoelastic properties of the layer except for the top prisms provided with the wooden plate properties and the prisms at the site of the rubber bands provided with the rubber properties. The boundary conditions on each prism satisfied the requirements that resonator is inseparable and all its boundaries but bottom are free. The bottom boundary was set to move horizontally with constant acceleration amplitude. It was shown numerically that the resonator shows anisotropic behavior expressed in different frequency response to oscillations applied to a bottom boundary in different directions.

  18. Wind shear measuring on board an airliner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauspe, P.

    1984-01-01

    A measurement technique which continuously determines the wind vector on board an airliner during takeoff and landing is introduced. Its implementation is intended to deliver sufficient statistical background concerning low frequency wind changes in the atmospheric boundary layer and extended knowledge about deterministic wind shear modeling. The wind measurement scheme is described and the adaptation of apparatus onboard an A300 airbus is shown. Preliminary measurements made during level flight demonstrate the validity of the method.

  19. An implementation of Bayesian lensing shear measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, Erin S.

    2014-10-01

    The Bayesian gravitational shear estimation algorithm developed by Bernstein & Armstrong can potentially be used to overcome multiplicative noise bias and recover shear using very low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) galaxy images. In that work, the authors confirmed that the method is nearly unbiased in a simplified demonstration, but no test was performed on images with realistic pixel noise. Here, I present a full implementation for fitting models to galaxy images, including the effects of a point spread function (PSF) and pixelization. I tested the implementation using simulated galaxy images modelled as Sérsic profiles with n = 1 (exponential) and n = 4 (De Vaucouleurs'), convolved with a PSF and a flat pixel response function. I used a round Gaussian model for the PSF to avoid potential PSF-fitting errors. I simulated galaxies with mean observed, post-PSF full width at half-maximum equal to approximately 1.2 times that of the PSF, with lognormal scatter. I also drew fluxes from a lognormal distribution. I produced independent simulations, each with pixel noise tuned to produce different mean S/N ranging from 10-1000. I applied a constant shear to all images. I fitted the simulated images to a model with the true Sérsic index to avoid modelling biases. I recovered the input shear with fractional error Δg/g < 2 × 10-3 in all cases. In these controlled conditions, and in the absence of other multiplicative errors, this implementation is sufficiently unbiased for current surveys and approaches the requirements for planned surveys.

  20. Axisymmetric single shear element combustion instability experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1993-01-01

    The combustion stability characteristics of a combustor consisting of a single shear element and a cylindrical chamber utilizing LOX and gaseous hydrogen as propellants are presented. The combustor geometry and the resulting longitudinal mode instability are axisymmetric. Hydrogen injection temperature and pyrotechnic pulsing were used to determine stability boundaries. Mixture ratio, fuel annulus gap, and LOX post configuration were varied. Performance and stability data are presented for chamber pressures of 300 and 1000 psia.

  1. Surface shear rheology of saponin adsorption layers.

    PubMed

    Golemanov, Konstantin; Tcholakova, Slavka; Denkov, Nikolai; Pelan, Edward; Stoyanov, Simeon D

    2012-08-21

    Saponins are a wide class of natural surfactants, with molecules containing a rigid hydrophobic group (triterpenoid or steroid), connected via glycoside bonds to hydrophilic oligosaccharide chains. These surfactants are very good foam stabiliziers and emulsifiers, and show a range of nontrivial biological activities. The molecular mechanisms behind these unusual properties are unknown, and, therefore, the saponins have attracted significant research interest in recent years. In our previous study (Stanimirova et al. Langmuir 2011, 27, 12486-12498), we showed that the triterpenoid saponins extracted from Quillaja saponaria plant (Quillaja saponins) formed adsorption layers with unusually high surface dilatational elasticity, 280 ± 30 mN/m. In this Article, we study the shear rheological properties of the adsorption layers of Quillaja saponins. In addition, we study the surface shear rheological properties of Yucca saponins, which are of steroid type. The experimental results show that the adsorption layers of Yucca saponins exhibit purely viscous rheological response, even at the lowest shear stress applied, whereas the adsorption layers of Quillaja saponins behave like a viscoelastic two-dimensional body. For Quillaja saponins, a single master curve describes the data for the viscoelastic creep compliance versus deformation time, up to a certain critical value of the applied shear stress. Above this value, the layer compliance increases, and the adsorption layers eventually transform into viscous ones. The experimental creep-recovery curves for the viscoelastic layers are fitted very well by compound Voigt rheological model. The obtained results are discussed from the viewpoint of the layer structure and the possible molecular mechanisms, governing the rheological response of the saponin adsorption layers. PMID:22830458

  2. Axisymmetric single shear element combustion instability experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1993-01-01

    The combustion stability characteristics of a combustor consisting of a single shear element and a cylindrical chamber utilizing LOX and gaseous hydrogen as propellants are presented. The combustor geometry and the resulting longitudinal mode instability are axisymmetric. Hydrogen injection temperature and pyrotechnic pulsing were used to determine stability boundaries. Mixture ratio, fuel annulus gap, and LOX post configuration were varied. Performance and stability data were obtained for chamber pressures of 300 and 1000 psia.

  3. The MSU free shear flow facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disimile, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    A free shear layer wind tunnel has been constructed in order to undertake detailed, high quality transverse vorticity measurements in an isothermal, single stream mixing layer. The large 50 x 80 cm primary flow and 3-m test section length allows the generation of large, isolated vortical motions in high Reynolds number flow. A uniformly developed, irrotational secondary flow is achieved by means of an entrainment module.

  4. Shear rheological characterization of motor oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, Scott; Winer, Ward O.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of high pressure viscosity, traction coefficient, and EHD film thickness were performed on twelve commercial automotive engine oils, a reference oil, two unformulated base oils and two unformated base oil and polymer blends. An effective high shear rate inlet viscosity was calculated from film thickness and pressure viscosity coefficient. The difference between measured and effective viscosity is a function of the polymer type and concentration. Traction measurements did not discriminate mileage formulated oils from those not so designated.

  5. Vertical shear in the Jovian equatorial zone.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layton, R. G.

    1971-01-01

    Jupiter photographs taken in two different wavelength regions (blue and red) are studied for clues to differing Jovian atmosphere motions. The relative motions of features visible on these photographs may be interpreted as a vertical shear at visible cloud level. The value obtained implies that the north equatorial zone must be about 0.35 deg K warmer than the adjacent equatorial zone. Deeper in the atmosphere the reverse must hold.

  6. Formation of a sheared flow Z pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golingo, R. P.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.

    2005-06-01

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch project is experimentally studying the effect of sheared flows on Z-pinch stability. It has been shown theoretically that when dVz/dr exceeds 0.1kVA the kink (m =1) mode is stabilized. [U. Shumlak and C. W. Hartman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 3285 (1995).] Z pinches with an embedded axial flow are formed in ZaP with a coaxial accelerator coupled with a 1m assembly region. Long-lived, quiescent Z pinches are generated throughout the first half cycle of the current. During the initial plasma acceleration phase, the axial motion of the current sheet is consistent with snowplow models. Magnetic probes in the assembly region measure the azimuthal modes of the magnetic field. The amplitude of the m =1 mode is proportional to the radial displacement of the Z-pinch plasma current. The magnetic mode levels show a quiescent period which is over 2000 times the growth time of a static Z pinch. The axial velocity is measured along 20 chords through the plasma and deconvolved to provide a radial profile. Using data from multiple pulses, the time evolution of the velocity profile is measured during formation, throughout the quiescent period, and into the transition to instability. The evolution shows that a sheared plasma flow develops as the Z pinch forms. Throughout the quiescent period, the flow shear is greater than the theoretically required threshold for stability. As the flow shear decreases, the magnetic mode fluctuations increase. The coaxial accelerator provides plasma throughout the quiescent period and may explain the evolution of the velocity profile and the sustainment of the flow Z pinch.

  7. Shear adhesion strength of aligned electrospun nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Najem, Johnny F; Wong, Shing-Chung; Ji, Guang

    2014-09-01

    Inspiration from nature such as insects' foot hairs motivates scientists to fabricate nanoscale cylindrical solids that allow tens of millions of contact points per unit area with material substrates. In this paper, we present a simple yet robust method for fabricating directionally sensitive shear adhesive laminates. By using aligned electrospun nylon-6, we create dry adhesives, as a succession of our previous work on measuring adhesion energies between two single free-standing electrospun polymer fibers in cross-cylinder geometry, randomly oriented membranes and substrate, and peel forces between aligned fibers and substrate. The synthetic aligned cylindrical solids in this study are electrically insulating and show a maximal Mode II shear adhesion strength of 27 N/cm(2) on a glass slide. This measured value, for the purpose of comparison, is 270% of that reported from gecko feet. The Mode II shear adhesion strength, based on a commonly known "dead-weight" test, is 97-fold greater than the Mode I (normal) adhesion strength of the same. The data indicate a strong shear binding on and easy normal lifting off. Anisotropic adhesion (Mode II/Mode I) is pronounced. The size and surface boundary effects, crystallinity, and bending stiffness of fibers are used to understand these electrospun nanofibers, which vastly differ from otherwise known adhesive technologies. The anisotropic strength distribution is attributed to a decreasing fiber diameter and an optimized laminate thickness, which, in turn, influences the bending stiffness and solid-state "wettability" of points of contact between nanofibers and surface asperities. PMID:25105533

  8. Flight penetration of wind shear: Control strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Amit S.

    1988-01-01

    Wind shear is a dangerous condition where there is a sharp change in the direction and magnitude of the wind velocity over a short distance or time. This condition is especially dangerous to aircraft during landing and takeoff and can cause a sudden loss of lift and thereby height at a critical time. A numerical simulation showed the effective performance of the Linear Quadratic Regulator and the Nonlinear Inverse Dynamics controllers. The major conclusions are listed and discussed.

  9. Buoyancy Driven Shear Flows of Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, R. J.; Zenit, R.; Chellppannair, T.; Koch, D. L.; Spelt, P. D. M.; Sangani, A.

    1998-11-01

    In this work the gas volume fraction and the root-mean-squared fluid velocity are measured in buoyancy driven shear flows of bubble suspensions in a tall, inclined, rectangular channel. The experiments are performed under conditions where We << 1 and Re >> 1 , so that the bubbles are relatively undeformed and the flow is inviscid and approximately irrotational. Nitrogen is introduced through an array of capillaries at the base of a .2x.02x2 m channel filled with an aqueous electrolyte solution (0.06 molL-1 MgSO_4). The rising bubbles generate a unidirectional shear flow, where the denser suspension at the lower surface of the channel falls, while the less dense suspension at the upper surface rises. Hot-film anemometry is used to measure the resulting gas volume fraction and fluid velocity profiles. The bubble collision rate with the sensor is related to the gas volume fraction and the mean and variance of the bubble velocity using an experimentally measured collision surface area for the sensor. Bubble collisions with the sensor are identified by the characteristic slope of the hot-film anemometer signal when bubbles collide with the sensor. It is observed that the steady shear flow develops a bubble phase pressure gradient across the channel gap as the bubbles interchange momentum through direct collisions. The discrete phase presssure gradient balances the buoyancy force driving bubbles toward the upper surface resulting in a steady void fraction profile across the gap width. The strength of the shear flow is controlled by the extent of bubble segregation and by the effective viscosity of the bubble phase. The measurements are compared with solutions of the averaged equations of motion (Kang et al. 1997; Spelt and Sangani, 1998), for a range of gas volume fractions and channel inclination angles.

  10. Fabric variables in dense sheared suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radjai, Farhang; Amarsid, Lhassan; Delenne, Jean-Yves

    The rheology of granular flows and dense suspensions can be described in terms of their effective shear and bulk viscosities as a function of packing fraction. Using stress partition and equivalence between frictional and viscous descriptions in the dense state, we show that the effective viscosities can be expressed in terms of the force-network anisotropy. This is supported by our extensive DEM-LBM simulations for a broad range of inertial and viscous parameters.

  11. Shear fragmentation of unstable flux flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunchur, Milind N.; Ivlev, Boris I.; Knight, James M.

    2002-08-01

    When free flux flow is pushed beyond its instability, the homogeneous flow becomes spatially distorted leading to a new class of dynamic phases with steps in resistivity. At high-flux densities B, the relatively incompressible vortex matter fragments into domains of constant shear curvature, leading to a horizontal-sawtooth-shaped current-voltage characteristic. Measurements on Y1Ba2Cu3O7-δ films confirm this behavior and are quantitatively consistent with the model, which has no adjustable parameters.

  12. Excitation of fundamental shear horizontal wave by using face-shear (d36) piezoelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Hongchen; Dong, Shuxiang; Li, Faxin

    2016-05-01

    The fundamental shear horizontal (SH0) wave in plate-like structures is extremely useful for non-destructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) as it is non-dispersive. However, currently, the SH0 wave is usually excited by electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT) whose energy conversion efficiency is fairly low. The face-shear ( d 36 ) mode piezoelectrics is more promising for SH0 wave excitation, but this mode cannot appear in conventional piezoelectric ceramics. Recently, by modifying the symmetry of poled PbZr1-xTixO3 (PZT) ceramics via ferroelastic domain engineering, we realized the face-shear d 36 mode in both soft and hard PZT ceramics. In this work, we further improved the face-shear properties of PZT-4 and PZT-5H ceramics via lateral compression under elevated temperature. It was found that when bonded on a 1 mm-thick aluminum plate, the d 36 type PZT-4 exhibited better face-shear performance than PZT-5H. We then successfully excite SH0 wave in the aluminum plate using a face-shear PZT-4 square patch and receive the wave using a face-shear 0.72[Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3]-0.28[PbTiO3] (PMN-PT) patch. The frequency response and directionality of the excited SH0 wave were also investigated. The SH0 wave can be dominated over the Lamb waves (S0 and A0 waves) from 160 kHz to 280 kHz. The wave amplitude reaches its maxima along the two main directions (0° and 90°). The amplitude can keep over 80% of the maxima when the deviate angle is less than 30°, while it vanishes quickly at the 45° direction. The excited SH0 wave using piezoelectric ceramics could be very promising in the fields of NDT and SHM.

  13. Singular eigenfunctions for shearing fluids I

    SciTech Connect

    Balmforth, N.J.; Morrison, P.J.

    1995-02-01

    The authors construct singular eigenfunctions corresponding to the continuous spectrum of eigenvalues for shear flow in a channel. These modes are irregular as a result of a singularity in the eigenvalue problem at the critical layer of each mode. They consider flows with monotonic shear, so there is only a single critical layer for each mode. They then solve the initial-value problem to establish that these continuum modes, together with any discrete, growing/decaying pairs of modes, comprise a complete basis. They also view the problem within the framework of Hamiltonian theory. In that context, the singular solutions can be viewed as the kernel of an integral, canonical transformation that allows us to write the fluid system, an infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian system, in action-angle form. This yields an expression for the energy in terms of the continuum modes and provides a means for attaching a characteristic signature (sign) to the energy associate with each eigenfunction. They follow on to consider shear-flow stability within the Hamiltonian framework. Next, the authors show the equivalence of integral superpositions of the singular eigenfunctions with the solution derived with Laplace transform techniques. In the long-time limit, such superpositions have decaying integral averages across the channel, revealing phase mixing or continuum damping. Under some conditions, this decay is exponential and is then the fluid analogue of Landau damping. Finally, the authors discuss the energetics of continuum damping.

  14. Wave anisotropy of shear viscosity and elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Sarvazyan, A. P.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents the theory of shear wave propagation in a "soft solid" material possessing anisotropy of elastic and dissipative properties. The theory is developed mainly for understanding the nature of the low-frequency acoustic characteristics of skeletal muscles, which carry important diagnostic information on the functional state of muscles and their pathologies. It is shown that the shear elasticity of muscles is determined by two independent moduli. The dissipative properties are determined by the fourth-rank viscosity tensor, which also has two independent components. The propagation velocity and attenuation of shear waves in muscle depend on the relative orientation of three vectors: the wave vector, the polarization vector, and the direction of muscle fiber. For one of the many experiments where attention was distinctly focused on the vector character of the wave process, it was possible to make a comparison with the theory, estimate the elasticity moduli, and obtain agreement with the angular dependence of the wave propagation velocity predicted by the theory.

  15. Shear mode properties of single crystal ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, E. A.; Robinson, H. C.

    2003-10-01

    Single crystal ferroelectrics or piezocrystals were recently introduced into the electroactive materials community. The 33-mode electromechanical coupling factor of piezocrystals is typically greater than 0.90, which is significantly larger than typical values for piezoelectric ceramics (0.62-0.74). For sonar projector applications this large k33 has been responsible for more than doubling the bandwidth of active sonar arrays over what is currently achievable with ceramics. Last year a crystal grower produced a cut of lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) single crystal with piezoelectric shear coefficient values of 7000 pm/V and shear coupling factors of 0.97. (For PZT5H, d15 is 730 pm/V.) This piezocrystal d15 coefficient implies significantly improved sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio for accelerometers and hydrophones, while the high coupling promises bandwidth increases greater than those realized in 33-mode projectors using piezocrystals. This research studies the shear-mode behavior of PMN-PT piezocrystals for use in sensors and projectors. By measuring the response of the materials to high and low level electrical bias and excitation fields, frequency, and temperature, the materials' effective material properties as a function of these operational variables were determined. [Work sponsored by ONR and NUWC ILIR.

  16. Structure of a reattaching supersonic shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samimy, M.; Abu-Hijleh, B. A. K.

    1988-01-01

    A Mach 1.83 fully developed turbulent boundary layer with boundary layer thickness, free stream velocity, and Reynolds number of 7.5 mm, 476 m/s, and 6.2 x 10 to the 7th/m, respectively, was separated at a 25.4-mm backward step and formed a shear layer. Fast-response pressure transducers, schlieren photography, and LDV were used to study the structure of this reattaching shear flow. The preliminary results show that large-scale relatively organized structures with limited spanwise extent form in the free shear layer. Some of these structures appear to survive the recompression and reattachment processes, while others break down into smaller scales and the flow becomes increasingly three-dimensional. The survived large-scale structures lose their organization through recompression/reattachment, but regain it after reattachment. The structures after reattachment form a 40-45-degree angle relative to the free stream and deteriorate gradually as they move downstream.

  17. Turbulent structures in Kolmogorovian shear flows: DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuckerman, Laurette S.; Chantry, Matthew; Barkley, Dwight

    2015-11-01

    Patterns of turbulent and laminar flow form a vital step in the transition to turbulent in wall-bounded shear flows. In flows with two unconstrained directions these patterns form oblique bands, whereas in pipe flow the structures are streamwise-localized puffs. To understand these structures we examine Waleffe flow, a sinusoidal shear flow, Usinπ/2 y , driven by a body force and stress-free boundary conditions at y = +/- 1 . Introduced as a model for plane Couette flow we demonstrate the existence of turbulence bands which match those found in plane Couette flow, excluding the boundary layer regions of the latter flow. This agreement is reiterated in the studies of uniform turbulence and linear stability; highlighting the surprising unimportance of this region to transitional turbulence. Building upon this we consider two other canonical flows: plane Pouiseuille flow and pipe flow. Attacking these flows with the approach that succeeded in plane Couette flow we attempt to clarify the role of boundary layers to transitionally turbulent shear flows.

  18. Turbulent shear control with oscillatory bubble injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyun Jin; Oishi, Yoshihiko; Tasaka, Yuji; Murai, Yuichi; Takeda, Yasushi

    2009-02-01

    It is known that injecting bubbles into shear flow can reduce the frictional drag. This method has advantages in comparison to others in simplicity of installation and also in environment. The amount of drag reduction by bubbles depends on the void fraction provided in the boundary layer. It means, however, that certain power must be consumed to generate bubbles in water, worsening the total power-saving performance. We propose oscillatory bubble injection technique to improve the performance in this study. In order to prove this idea of new type of drag reduction, velocity vector field and shear stress profile in a horizontal channel flow are measured by ultrasonic velocity profiler (UVP) and shear stress transducer, respectively. We measure the gas-liquid interface from the UVP signal, as well. This compound measurement with different principles leads to deeper understanding of bubble-originated drag reduction phenomena, in particular for unsteady process of boundary layer alternation. At these experiments, the results have demonstrated that the intermittency promotes the drag reduction more than normal continuous injection for the same void fraction supplied.

  19. Shear sensitive silicon piezoresistive tactile sensor prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Beebe, David J.

    1998-09-01

    Shear sensing ability it important in many fields such as robotics, rehabilitation, teleoperation and human computer interfaces. A shear sensitive tactile sensor prototype is developed based on the principles of the piezoresistive effect in silicon, and using microfabrication technology. Analogous to the conventional silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor, piezoresistive resistors embedded in a silicon diaphragm are used to sense stress change. An additional mesa is fabricated on the top of the diaphragm and serves to transform an applied force to a stress. Both the shear and normal components of the force are resolved by measuring the resistance changes of the four resistors placed at the corners of a prism mesa. The prototype is tested both statically and dynamically when a spatial force of 0 - 300 gram is applied. Good linearity (R > 0.98) and high repeatability are observed. In this paper, the force sensing mechanism and force determination approach are described. The fabrication process is presented. The preliminary testing results are presented and discussed.

  20. Shear Stress Sensing using Elastomer Micropillar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Palmieri, Frank L.; Lin, Yi; Jackson, Allen M.; Cissoto, Alexxandra; Sheplak, Mark; Connell, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of shear stress developed as a fluid moves around a solid body is difficult to measure. Stresses at the fluid-solid interface are very small and the nature of the fluid flow is easily disturbed by introducing sensor components to the interface. To address these challenges, an array of direct and indirect techniques have been investigated with various advantages and challenges. Hot wire sensors and other indirect sensors all protrude significantly into the fluid flow. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices, although facilitating very accurate measurements, are not durable, are prone to contamination, and are difficult to implement into existing model geometries. One promising approach is the use of engineered surfaces that interact with fluid flow in a detectable manner. To this end, standard lithographic techniques have been utilized to generate elastomeric micropillar arrays of various lengths and diameters. Micropillars of controlled length and width were generated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer using a soft-lithography technique. The 3D mold for micropillar replication was fabricated using laser ablative micromachining and contact lithography. Micropillar dimensions and mechanical properties were characterized and compared to shear sensing requirements. The results of this characterization as well as shear stress detection techniques will be discussed.

  1. Horizontal Shear Wave Imaging of Large Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Quarry, M J

    2007-09-05

    When complete the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be the world's largest and most energetic laser and will be capable of achieving for the first time fusion ignition in the laboratory. Detecting optics features within the laser beamlines and sizing them at diameters of 0.1 mm to 10 mm allows timely decisions concerning refurbishment and will help with the routine operation of the system. Horizontally polarized shear waves at 10 MHz were shown to accurately detect, locate, and size features created by laser operations from 0.5 mm to 8 mm by placing sensors at the edge of the optic. The shear wave technique utilizes highly directed beams. The outer edge of an optic can be covered with shear wave transducers on four sides. Each transducer sends a pulse into the optic and any damage reflects the pulse back to the transmitter. The transducers are multiplexed, and the collected time waveforms are enveloped and replicated across the width of the element. Multiplying the data sets from four directions produces a map of reflected amplitude to the fourth power, which images the surface of the optic. Surface area can be measured directly from the image, and maximum depth was shown to be correlated to maximum amplitude of the reflected waveform.

  2. Coupling to extension in a thickness-shear resonator due to relatively large thickness-shear deformation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiashi; Shen, Xuechun

    2008-03-01

    We show that in a plate thickness-shear mode resonator of rotated Y-cut quartz coupling to extension occurs when the shear deformation is no longer infinitesimal. A set of coupled equations is derived with which the effect of coupling to extension on the thickness-shear operating mode is examined. PMID:18407862

  3. Ferroelastic shear bands in Pb3(PO4)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suzhi; Bismayer, Ulli; Ding, Xiangdong; Salje, Ekhard K. H.

    2016-01-01

    We report shear bands as a precursor structure of deformation twinning in Pb3(PO4)2. Atomic force microscopy shows "slip-line" like traces on the surface of untwinned regions of the sample. The traces are shear bands oriented along twin boundaries of the ferroelastic R 3 ¯ m -C2/c transition. Computer simulations reproduce the shear band patterns and show that each shear band is a precursor embryo of a twin wall that forms under higher shear stress. This observation reveals the structural origin of twin boundaries under stress conditions just before ferroelastic switching occurs.

  4. Avalanche contribution to shear modulus of granular materials.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Michio; Hayakawa, Hisao

    2014-10-01

    Shear modulus of frictionless granular materials near the jamming transition under oscillatory shear is numerically investigated. It is found that the shear modulus G satisfies a scaling law to interpolate between G∼(ϕ-ϕJ)(1/2) and G∼γ0(-1/2)(ϕ-ϕJ) for a linear spring model of the elastic interaction between contacting grains, where ϕ, ϕJ, and γ0 are, respectively, the volume fraction of grains, the fraction at the jamming point, and the amplitude of the oscillatory shear. The linear relation between the shear modulus and ϕ-ϕJ can be understood by slip avalanches. PMID:25375484

  5. Shear induced orientation of edible fat and chocolate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Welch, Sarah E.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Sirota, Eric B.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2003-03-01

    Shear-induced orientation of fat crystallites was observed during crystallization of cocoa butter, milk fat, stripped milk fat and palm oil. This universal effect was observed in systems crystallized under high shear. The minor polar components naturally present in milk fat were found to decrease the shear-induced orientation effect in this system. The competition between Brownian and shear forces, described by the Peclet number, determines the crystallite orientation. The critical radius size, from the Gibbs-Thomson equation, provides a tool to understand the effect of shear at the onset stages of crystallization.

  6. Development of Shear Banding in Berea Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, J. J.; Labuz, J. F.

    2004-05-01

    Closed-loop, servo-controlled testing was used to investigate the development of shear failure in Berea sandstone under low confining pressure. The experiments were performed with the University of Minnesota Plane-Strain Apparatus, designed to allow the failure plane to propagate in an unrestricted manner. Deformation was imposed into the strain softening regime and controlled so that the specimens remained intact. Thin-section microscopy provided direct observation in, adjacent to, and around the tip of the rupture zone. The shear band appeared to initiate near a stress concentration, either the corner of the specimen or, when present, an imperfection (3 mm diameter hole) introduced into the specimen. Intragranular microcracking was the dominant observable failure mechanism. The intensity of grain cracking was greatest near the initiation point and decreased as the failure surface was traced towards the tip. Areas of high crack density also appeared to have the greatest amount of grain size reduction and there seemed to be a larger amount of pore space. In areas where intragranular microcracks were distinguishable, (e.g. near the tip of the rupture zone), microcracks showed very little or no shear displacement, suggesting the features were not reoriented after formation. Microcrack orientations showed a dominant direction of -16 degrees from the maximum principal stress direction and -26 degrees from the failure surface. A numerical imaging technique was developed to provide an efficient means for analyzing the relative porosity of epoxy-impregnated thin-sections. The code was set up to receive a digital image (*.bmp), where three parameters (R, G, and B) describe the color of each pixel. The intensity of the R channel consistently defined the boundary of grain and pore space and was used to differentiate blue pore space from the white grains composing the matrix. Porosity increase within the rupture zone was 3-4 grain diameters wide. An absence of notable

  7. Nucleation in a Sheared Liquid Binary Mixture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Kyung-Yang

    When a binary liquid mixture of lutidine plus water (LW) is quenched to a temperature T and is exposed to a continuous shear rate S, the result is a steady-state droplet distribution. This steady state can be probed by measuring the unscattered intensity I_{f}, or the scattered intensity I_{s}, as a function of delta T and S. In the experiments described here, S is fixed and delta T is varied in a step-wise fashion. The absence of hysteresis was probed in two separate experiments: First, I_{f} was measured as a function of S for a given delta T. Next, I_{f} was measured as a function of delta T for a given S. In either case, the hysteresis associated with the shear-free nucleation is absent. In addition, a flow-history dependent hysteresis was studied. In the 2-dimensional parameter space consisting of S and delta T, the onset of nucleation uniquely determines a cloud point line. A plot of the cloud point line exhibits two segments of different slopes with a cross-over near the temperature corresponding to the Becker-Doring limit. The classical picture of a free energy barrier was reformulated to explain this cross-over behavior. Next, photon correlation spectroscopy was used to study the dependence of the transient nucleation behavior on the initial states. A unique feature of this study is that this initial state can be conveniently adjusted by varying the shear rate S to which the mixture is initially exposed. The shear is then turned off, and the number density N(t), as well as the mean radius of the growing droplets, is monitored as a function of time. It was possible to measure the droplet density at a very early stage of phase separation where the nucleation rate J was close to zero. The measurement reveals that N(t) depends critically on the initial state of the metastable system. When the shear is large enough to rupture the droplets as small as the critical size, N(t) increases very slowly. Measurements of the nucleation rates vs. the square of the

  8. A multi-shear perfusion bioreactor for investigating shear stress effects in endothelial cell constructs.

    PubMed

    Rotenberg, Menahem Y; Ruvinov, Emil; Armoza, Anna; Cohen, Smadar

    2012-08-01

    Tissue engineering research is increasingly relying on the use of advanced cultivation technologies that provide rigorously-controlled cell microenvironments. Herein, we describe the features of a micro-fabricated Multi-Shear Perfusion Bioreactor (MSPB) designed to deliver up to six different levels of physiologically-relevant shear stresses (1-13 dyne cm(-2)) to six cell constructs simultaneously, during a single run. To attain a homogeneous fluid flow within each construct, flow-distributing nets photo-etched with a set of openings for fluid flow were placed up- and down-stream from each construct. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) seeded in alginate scaffolds within the MSPB and subjected to three different levels of shear stress for 24 h, responded accordingly by expressing three different levels of the membranal marker Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and the phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthetase (eNOS). A longer period of cultivation, 17 d, under two different levels of shear stress resulted in different lengths of cell sprouts within the constructs. Collectively, the HUVEC behaviour within the different constructs confirms the feasibility of using the MSPB system for simultaneously imposing different shear stress levels, and for validating the flow regime in the bioreactor vessel as assessed by the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model. PMID:22622237

  9. Direct Numerical Simulation of Surfactant-Stabilized Emulsions Morphology and Shear Viscosity in Starting Shear Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Roar Skartlien; Espen Sollum; Andreas Akselsen; Paul Meakin

    2012-07-01

    A 3D lattice Boltzmann model for two-phase flow with amphiphilic surfactant was used to investigate the evolution of emulsion morphology and shear stress in starting shear flow. The interfacial contributions were analyzed for low and high volume fractions and varying surfactant activity. A transient viscoelastic contribution to the emulsion rheology under constant strain rate conditions was attributed to the interfacial stress. For droplet volume fractions below 0.3 and an average capillary number of about 0.25, highly elliptical droplets formed. Consistent with affine deformation models, gradual elongation of the droplets increased the shear stress at early times and reduced it at later times. Lower interfacial tension with increased surfactant activity counterbalanced the effect of increased interfacial area, and the net shear stress did not change significantly. For higher volume fractions, co-continuous phases with a complex topology were formed. The surfactant decreased the interfacial shear stress due mainly to advection of surfactant to higher curvature areas. Our results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data for polymer blends in terms of transient interfacial stresses and limited enhancement of the emulsion viscosity at larger volume fractions where the phases are co-continuous.

  10. Simultaneous shear and pressure sensor array for assessing pressure and shear at foot/ground interface.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Jeffrey R; Davis, Brian L

    2006-01-01

    Foot ulceration is a diabetic complication estimated to result in over $1 billion worth of medical expenses per year in the United States alone. This multifaceted problem involves the response of plantar soft tissue to both external forces applied to the epidermis and internal changes such as vascular supply and neuropathy. Increasing evidence indicates that a combination of elevated external forces (pressure and shear) and altered tissue properties is key to the etiology of foot ulcers. The overall goal of this research is to develop a platform-type hardware system that will allow a clinician to measure three-dimensional stress tensors (i.e. pressure and shear patterns) on the plantar surface and identify areas of concern. Experimental results have demonstrated that an optical approach can provide clear indication of both shear and pressure from 50 to 400 kPa with a frequency response of 100 Hz, a stress measurement accuracy of 100 Pa and a spatial resolution of 8.0mm. Initial evaluation of the system shows strong correlation between (i) applied shear and normal stress loads and (ii) the optical phase retardance computed for each stress axis of the polymer-based stress-sensing elements. These special sensing elements are designed to minimize the need for repeated calibration procedures-an issue that has plagued other attempts to develop multisensor shear and pressure systems. PMID:16297920

  11. Shear-stress relaxation and ensemble transformation of shear-stress autocorrelation functions.

    PubMed

    Wittmer, J P; Xu, H; Baschnagel, J

    2015-02-01

    We revisit the relation between the shear-stress relaxation modulus G(t), computed at finite shear strain 0<γ≪1, and the shear-stress autocorrelation functions C(t)|(γ) and C(t)|(τ) computed, respectively, at imposed strain γ and mean stress τ. Focusing on permanent isotropic spring networks it is shown theoretically and computationally that in general G(t)=C(t)|(τ)=C(t)|(γ)+G(eq) for t>0 with G(eq) being the static equilibrium shear modulus. G(t) and C(t)|(γ) thus must become different for solids and it is impossible to obtain G(eq) alone from C(t)|(γ) as often assumed. We comment briefly on self-assembled transient networks where G(eq)(f) must vanish for a finite scission-recombination frequency f. We argue that G(t)=C(t)|(τ)=C(t)|(γ) should reveal an intermediate plateau set by the shear modulus G(eq)(f=0) of the quenched network. PMID:25768458

  12. Shear Capacity of C-Shaped and L-Shaped Angle Shear Connectors

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasbi, Farzad; Maleki, Shervin; Shariati, Mahdi; Ramli Sulong, N. H.; Tahir, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the behaviour of C-shaped and L-shaped angle shear connectors embedded in solid concrete slabs. An effective finite element model is proposed to simulate the push out tests of these shear connectors that encompass nonlinear material behaviour, large displacement and damage plasticity. The finite element models are validated against test results. Parametric studies using this nonlinear model are performed to investigate the variations in concrete strength and connector dimensions. The finite element analyses also confirm the test results that increasing the length of shear connector increases their shear strength proportionately. It is observed that the maximum stress in L-shaped angle connectors takes place in the weld attachment to the beam, whereas in the C-shaped angle connectors, it is in the attached leg. The location of maximum concrete compressive damage is rendered in each case. Finally, a new equation for prediction of the shear capacity of C-shaped angle connectors is proposed. PMID:27478894

  13. Shear Capacity of C-Shaped and L-Shaped Angle Shear Connectors.

    PubMed

    Tahmasbi, Farzad; Maleki, Shervin; Shariati, Mahdi; Ramli Sulong, N H; Tahir, M M

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the behaviour of C-shaped and L-shaped angle shear connectors embedded in solid concrete slabs. An effective finite element model is proposed to simulate the push out tests of these shear connectors that encompass nonlinear material behaviour, large displacement and damage plasticity. The finite element models are validated against test results. Parametric studies using this nonlinear model are performed to investigate the variations in concrete strength and connector dimensions. The finite element analyses also confirm the test results that increasing the length of shear connector increases their shear strength proportionately. It is observed that the maximum stress in L-shaped angle connectors takes place in the weld attachment to the beam, whereas in the C-shaped angle connectors, it is in the attached leg. The location of maximum concrete compressive damage is rendered in each case. Finally, a new equation for prediction of the shear capacity of C-shaped angle connectors is proposed. PMID:27478894

  14. Shear-accelerated crystallization in a supercooled atomic liquid.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhen; Singer, Jonathan P; Liu, Yanhui; Liu, Ze; Li, Huiping; Gopinadhan, Manesh; O'Hern, Corey S; Schroers, Jan; Osuji, Chinedum O

    2015-02-01

    A bulk metallic glass forming alloy is subjected to shear flow in its supercooled state by compression of a short rod to produce a flat disk. The resulting material exhibits enhanced crystallization kinetics during isothermal annealing as reflected in the decrease of the crystallization time relative to the nondeformed case. The transition from quiescent to shear-accelerated crystallization is linked to strain accumulated during shear flow above a critical shear rate γ̇(c)≈0.3 s(-1) which corresponds to Péclet number, Pe∼O(1). The observation of shear-accelerated crystallization in an atomic system at modest shear rates is uncommon. It is made possible here by the substantial viscosity of the supercooled liquid which increases strongly with temperature in the approach to the glass transition. We may therefore anticipate the encounter of nontrivial shear-related effects during thermoplastic deformation of similar systems. PMID:25768445

  15. Shear strength of municipal solid waste for stability analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Timothy D.; Huvaj-Sarihan, Nejan; Li, Guocheng

    2009-06-01

    This paper investigates the shear strength of municipal solid waste (MSW) using the back analysis of failed waste slopes as well as field and laboratory test results. Shear strength of MSW is a function of many factors such as waste type, composition, compaction, daily cover, moisture conditions, age, decomposition, overburden pressure, etc. These factors together with non-standardized sampling methods, insufficient sample size to be representative of in situ conditions, and limited shear displacement or axial strain imposed during the laboratory shear testing have created considerable scatter in reported results. Based on the data presented herein, large shear displacements are required to mobilize the peak shear strength of MSW which can lead to displacement incompatibility between MSW and the underlying material(s) such as geosynthetic interfaces and foundation soils. The data presented herein are used to develop displacement compatible shear strength parameters for MSW. Recommendations are presented for modeling the displacement and stress dependent strength envelope in stability analyses.

  16. Magnetic shear. IV - Hale regions 16740, 16815, and 16850

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athay, R. G.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Jones, H. P.; Zirin, H.

    1986-01-01

    Dopplergrams made in C IV 1548 A are studied for evidence of velocity shear near H-alpha dark filaments and for large-scale flow convergent on active regions. The three regions studied support earlier conclusions that shear is a common property of active regions and that active regions may be the foci of converging plasma flow. Flow patterns near filaments show divergence or convergence as well as shear. Also the sense of the shear can be either cyclonic or anticyclonic. No preference is noted for convergence or divergence or for a particular sense of shear, and there appears to be no correlation between the sense of the shear and the sign of the velocity gradient normal to the filament. The close association of H-alpha dark filaments with shear lines leads to the suggestion that the filaments may arise from a cooling instability induced by the Bernoulli effect.

  17. Shear-accelerated crystallization in a supercooled atomic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhen; Singer, Jonathan P.; Liu, Yanhui; Liu, Ze; Li, Huiping; Gopinadhan, Manesh; O'Hern, Corey S.; Schroers, Jan; Osuji, Chinedum O.

    2015-02-01

    A bulk metallic glass forming alloy is subjected to shear flow in its supercooled state by compression of a short rod to produce a flat disk. The resulting material exhibits enhanced crystallization kinetics during isothermal annealing as reflected in the decrease of the crystallization time relative to the nondeformed case. The transition from quiescent to shear-accelerated crystallization is linked to strain accumulated during shear flow above a critical shear rate γ˙c≈0.3 s-1 which corresponds to Péclet number, Pe˜O (1 ) . The observation of shear-accelerated crystallization in an atomic system at modest shear rates is uncommon. It is made possible here by the substantial viscosity of the supercooled liquid which increases strongly with temperature in the approach to the glass transition. We may therefore anticipate the encounter of nontrivial shear-related effects during thermoplastic deformation of similar systems.

  18. Shear strength of non-shear reinforced concrete elements. Part 3: Prestressed hollow-core slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, L.C.

    1997-12-31

    This paper deals with the shear strength of prestressed hollow-core slabs determined by the theory of plasticity. Two failure mechanisms are considered in order to derive the solutions. In the case of sliding failure in a diagonal crack, the shear strength is determined by means of the crack sliding model developed by Jin-Ping Zhang. The model takes into account the resistance against the formation of cracks due to prestressing as well as the variation of the prestressing force in the transfer zone. Due to the fact that the anchorage of the reinforcement takes place by bond, a rotation failure, which is indeed by a crack formed at the support with subsequent slip of the reinforcement, is also considered. This failure mode is likely to occur in cases with a high prestressing force combined with a short shear span. The theoretical calculations are compared with test results form the literature. A good agreement has been found.

  19. Shear strength of irradiated insulation under combined shear/compression loading

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.; Fabian, P.; Hazelton, C.

    1997-06-01

    The shear strengths of irradiated insulation systems were measured at 4 K under combined shear and compression loads. Sandwich-type (316LN/bonded insulation/316LN) specimens were irradiated at 4 K and tested at 4 K after storage at room temperature. Some specimens were stored at room temperature; others, at 77 K. Insulation systems included diglycidylether of bisphenol-A and tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenyl methane epoxies and polyimide resins reinforced with S-2 glass. Some contained polyimide film or mica electrical barriers. All specimens were irradiated to a fast neutron fluence of 1.8 X 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2}. Insulation systems are compared on the basis of their irradiated and unirradiated shear strengths.

  20. Shear and loading in channels: Oscillatory shearing and edge currents of superconducting vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wambaugh, J. F.; Marchesoni, F.; Nori, Franco

    2003-04-01

    Via computer simulations we study the motion of quantized magnetic flux-lines, or vortices, confined to a straight pin-free channel in a strong-pinning superconducting sample. We find that, when a constant current is applied across this system, a very unusual oscillatory shearing appears, in which the vortices moving at the edges of the channel periodically trail behind and then suddenly leapfrog past the vortices moving in the inner rows. For small enough driving forces, this oscillatory shearing dynamic phase is replaced by a continuous shearing phase in which the distance between initially-nearby vortices grows in time, quickly destroying the order of the lattice. An animation of this novel “oscillatory leapfrogging shear” effect of the vortex edge currents appears in http://www-personal.engin.umich.edu/˜nori/channel/

  1. Two-dimensional nonlinear cylindrical equilibria with reversed magnetic shear and sheared flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiroukidis, Ap; Throumoulopoulos, G. N.; Throumoulopoulos

    2014-02-01

    Nonlinear translational symmetric equilibria with up to quartic flux terms in free functions, reversed magnetic shear, and sheared flow are constructed in two ways: (i) quasi-analytically by an ansatz, which reduces the pertinent generalized Grad-Shafranov equation to a set of ordinary differential equations and algebraic constraints which is then solved numerically, and (ii) completely numerically by prescribing analytically a boundary having an X-point. This latter case presented in Sec. 4 is relevant to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project. The equilibrium characteristics are then examined by means of pressure, safety factor, current density, and electric field. For flows parallel to the magnetic field, the stability of the equilibria constructed is also examined by applying a sufficient condition. It turns out that the equilibrium nonlinearity has a stabilizing impact, which is slightly enhanced by the sheared flow. In addition, the results indicate that the stability is affected by the up-down asymmetry.

  2. Effects of dynamic shear and transmural pressure on wall shear stress sensitivity in collecting lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Gasheva, Olga Y; Mukherjee, Anish; Zawieja, David C; Dixon, J Brandon

    2015-11-01

    Given the known mechanosensitivity of the lymphatic vasculature, we sought to investigate the effects of dynamic wall shear stress (WSS) on collecting lymphatic vessels while controlling for transmural pressure. Using a previously developed ex vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling both transaxial pressure gradient and average transmural pressure on an isolated lymphatic vessel, we imposed a multitude of flow conditions on rat thoracic ducts, while controlling for transmural pressure and measuring diameter changes. By gradually increasing the imposed flow through a vessel, we determined the WSS at which the vessel first shows sign of contraction inhibition, defining this point as the shear stress sensitivity of the vessel. The shear stress threshold that triggered a contractile response was significantly greater at a transmural pressure of 5 cmH2O (0.97 dyne/cm(2)) than at 3 cmH2O (0.64 dyne/cm(2)). While contraction frequency was reduced when a steady WSS was applied, this inhibition was reversed when the applied WSS oscillated, even though the mean wall shear stresses between the conditions were not significantly different. When the applied oscillatory WSS was large enough, flow itself synchronized the lymphatic contractions to the exact frequency of the applied waveform. Both transmural pressure and the rate of change of WSS have significant impacts on the contractile response of lymphatic vessels to flow. Specifically, time-varying shear stress can alter the inhibition of phasic contraction frequency and even coordinate contractions, providing evidence that dynamic shear could play an important role in the contractile function of collecting lymphatic vessels. PMID:26333787

  3. Monitoring of thermal therapy based on shear modulus changes: II. Shear wave imaging of thermal lesions.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2011-08-01

    The clinical applicability of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for noninvasive therapy is currently hampered by the lack of robust and real-time monitoring of tissue damage during treatment. The goal of this study is to show that the estimation of local tissue elasticity from shear wave imaging (SWI) can lead to a precise mapping of the lesion. HIFU treatment and monitoring were respectively performed using a confocal setup consisting of a 2.5-MHz single element transducer focused at 34 mm on ex vivo samples and an 8-MHz ultrasound diagnostic probe. Ultrasound-based strain imaging was combined with shear wave imaging on the same device. The SWI sequences consisted of 2 successive shear waves induced at different lateral positions. Each wave was created with pushing beams of 100 μs at 3 depths. The shear wave propagation was acquired at 17,000 frames/s, from which the elasticity map was recovered. HIFU sonications were interleaved with fast imaging acquisitions, allowing a duty cycle of more than 90%. Thus, elasticity and strain mapping was achieved every 3 s, leading to real-time monitoring of the treatment. When thermal damage occurs, tissue stiffness was found to increase up to 4-fold and strain imaging showed strong shrinkages that blur the temperature information. We show that strain imaging elastograms are not easy to interpret for accurate lesion characterization, but SWI provides a quantitative mapping of the thermal lesion. Moreover, the concept of shear wave thermometry (SWT) developed in the companion paper allows mapping temperature with the same method. Combined SWT and shear wave imaging can map the lesion stiffening and temperature outside the lesion, which could be used to predict the eventual lesion growth by thermal dose calculation. Finally, SWI is shown to be robust to motion and reliable in vivo on sheep muscle. PMID:21859579

  4. Monitoring of thermal therapy based on shear modulus changes: I. shear wave thermometry.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2011-02-01

    The clinical applicability of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for noninvasive therapy is today hampered by the lack of robust and real-time monitoring of tissue damage during treatment. The goal of this study is to show that the estimation of local tissue elasticity from shear wave imaging (SWI) can lead to the 2-D mapping of temperature changes during HIFU treatments. This new concept of shear wave thermometry is experimentally implemented here using conventional ultrasonic imaging probes. HIFU treatment and monitoring were, respectively, performed using a confocal setup consisting of a 2.5-MHz single-element transducer focused at 30 mm on ex vivo samples and an 8-MHz ultrasound diagnostic probe. Thermocouple measurements and ultrasound-based thermometry were used as a gold standard technique and were combined with SWI on the same device. The SWI sequences consisted of 2 successive shear waves induced at different lateral positions. Each wave was created using 100-μs pushing beams at 3 depths. The shear wave propagation was acquired at 17,000 frames/s, from which the elasticity map was recovered. HIFU sonications were interleaved with fast imaging acquisitions, allowing a duty cycle of more than 90%. Elasticity and temperature mapping was achieved every 3 s, leading to realtime monitoring of the treatment. Tissue stiffness was found to decrease in the focal zone for temperatures up to 43°C. Ultrasound-based temperature estimation was highly correlated to stiffness variation maps (r² = 0.91 to 0.97). A reversible calibration phase of the changes of elasticity with temperature can be made locally using sighting shots. This calibration process allows for the derivation of temperature maps from shear wave imaging. Compared with conventional ultrasound-based approaches, shear wave thermometry is found to be much more robust to motion artifacts. PMID:21342822

  5. Determining the shear angle, forces, and sizes of shearing elements during metal cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovrizhnykh, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    A new solution for the shear angle is proposed which is a generalization of the solution Lee-Shaffer solution and allows the determination of the cutting force and the shearing-element size. Merchant’s experimental data are processed taking into account the resistance force at the cutting edge, and it is shown that accounting for this force leads to the need to increase the internal friction angle in the calculated dependences in order to match theory with experiment. It is shown that the obtained theoretical results agree well with experimental results.

  6. Rotation-driven Shear Flow Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiueh, Tzihong

    1996-10-01

    A general treatment of stability is considered for an isentropic flow equilibrium against three-dimensional incompressible perturbations by taking into account the difference in the orientations of the system rotation and flow vorticity. It is shown that the aforementioned orientation difference can indeed generate a coupling that drives instabilities at the expense of the rotational energy. Two types of instability are identified, with one growing algebraically and the other growing exponentially; the parameter regimes for both instabilities are also located. The algebraically growing modes are destabilized more easily than the exponentially growing modes; for example, the former can be unstable when the angle between the rotation axis and the vorticity is beyond 70°.5, whereas the latter becomes unstable when this angle is greater than 90°. In addition, we find that even in the limit of small vorticity, the system may still be unstable algebraically at a considerable strength, in contrast to the case of exact zero vorticity, which is absolutely stable. This finding indicates the existence of structural instability for a rotating fluid. The present analysis is applied also to examination of the problem of shear mixing interior of an accreting white dwarf in the context of nova explosions. In order for the nuclear fuels to be blended deep inside the star and make the explosion, the high angular momentum accreted materials combined with the stellar materials should undergo shear flow instabilities. We find that the shear flow instabilities happen when the disk rotation axis is off by more than 900 from the star rotation axis. The instability has in general an exponential growth, on a timescale much shorter than that of the runaway nuclear burning.

  7. Multifractal spectra in homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deane, A. E.; Keefe, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    Employing numerical simulations of 3-D homogeneous shear flow, the associated multifractal spectra of the energy dissipation, scalar dissipation and vorticity fields were calculated. The results for (128) cubed simulations of this flow, and those obtained in recent experiments that analyzed 1- and 2-D intersections of atmospheric and laboratory flows, are in some agreement. A two-scale Cantor set model of the energy cascade process which describes the experimental results from 1-D intersections quite well, describes the 3-D results only marginally.

  8. Shear wave logging using guided waves

    SciTech Connect

    Winbow, G.A.; Chen, S.T.; Rice, J.A.

    1988-09-27

    This patent describes a method for acoustically logging an earth formation surrounding a borehole which contains a liquid where the approximate shear wave velocity v of the formation is known. The method consists of: vibrating a dipole source in the liquid to generate in the liquid a guided wave the frequencies of which include a critical frequency f given by zeta = ..nu..12a where a is the borehole radius, so that the fastest component of the guided wave has velocity substantially equal to ..nu..; and detecting the arrival of the fastest component of the guided wave at least one location in the liquid spaced longitudinally along the borehole from the dipole source.

  9. Propagation of sound through a sheared flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolley, J. P.; Smith, C. A.; Karamcheti, K.

    1978-01-01

    Sound generated in a moving fluid must propagate through a shear layer in order to be measured by a fixed instrument. These propagation effects were evaluated for noise sources typically associated with single and co-flowing subsonic jets and for subcritical flow over airfoils in such jets. The techniques for describing acoustic propagation fall into two categories: geometric acoustics and wave acoustics. Geometric acoustics is most convenient and accurate for high frequency sound. In the frequency range of interest to the present study (greater than 150 Hz), the geometric acoustics approach was determined to be most useful and practical.

  10. Pahranagat Shear System, Lincoln County, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liggett, M. A. (Principal Investigator); Ehrenspreck, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A structural model which relates strike-slip deformation to Basin Range extensional tectonics was formulated on the basis of analysis and interpreatation of ERTS-1 MSS imagery over southern Lincoln County, Nevada. Study of published geologic data and field reconnaissance of key areas has been conducted to support the ERTS-1 data interpretation. The structural model suggests that a left-lateral strike-slip fault zone, called the Pahranagat Shear System, formed as a transform fault separating two areas of east-west structural extension.

  11. Turbulence Spreading through Shear Flow Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, T. S.; Diamond, P. H.; Lin, Z.

    2005-10-01

    A recent study of turbulence spreading [1] has shown that a significant level of turbulence can penetrate from the linearly unstable region to the region dominated by self-generated zonal flows. In this work, we study turbulence spreading through a mean ExB shear layer using both simple analytic model and nonlinear gyrokinetic particle (GTC) simulations. [1] T.S. Hahm, P.H. Diamond, Z. Lin et al., On the dynamics of edge-core coupling, To appear in Phys. Plasmas (2005).

  12. Dynamics of flexible fibers in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słowicka, Agnieszka M.; Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Ekiel-JeŻewska, Maria L.

    2015-09-01

    Dynamics of flexible non-Brownian fibers in shear flow at low-Reynolds-number are analyzed numerically for a wide range of the ratios A of the fiber bending force to the viscous drag force. Initially, the fibers are aligned with the flow, and later they move in the plane perpendicular to the flow vorticity. A surprisingly rich spectrum of different modes is observed when the value of A is systematically changed, with sharp transitions between coiled and straightening out modes, period-doubling bifurcations from periodic to migrating solutions, irregular dynamics, and chaos.

  13. Explosion Shear Wave Generation and Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, G. E.; Stevens, J. L.; Xu, H.

    2004-12-01

    We use observations of explosion-generated Lg together with three separate types of numerical models to determine how underground nuclear explosions generate shear wave phases. This question is fundamental to how Lg phases are interpreted for use in explosion yield estimation and earthquake/explosion discrimination. A simple point explosion in a uniform medium generates no shear waves, so the Lg phase is generated entirely by non-spherical components of the source and conversions through reflections and scattering. Our results indicate that the most important sources of high frequency explosion shear waves are P to S conversions at the free surface and S waves generated directly by a realistic distributed explosion source including nonlinear effects due to the free surface and gravity. In addition, Rg scattering may contribute to lower frequency Lg. Near source S is observed on both radial and tangential component records from a diverse set of explosion data. The data sets include 1) Degelen Mountain explosions recorded at distances less than 100 km and corresponding recordings at Borovoye (BOR) at 650 km; 2) recordings from Russian deep seismic sounding experiments; 3) Nevada Test Site (NTS) explosion sources including the Nonproliferation Experiment (NPE) and nuclear tests covering a range of source depths and media properties. We model the overburied NPE, and underburied and overburied Degelen explosions, using point sources and two-dimensional nonlinear finite difference calculations to quantify the source effects. We use energy conservation to determine an upper bound on Rg to Lg scattering. Results indicate that Rg to Lg scattering may be important at frequencies less than 1 Hz, and in Lg coda, but is less than Lg generated directly by the explosion at higher frequencies. We use 2D and 3D finite difference calculations, using the known topography and velocity structure at Degelen Mt. and lateral heterogeneities within the crust, to estimate the effect of

  14. Shear stress cleaning for surface departiculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musselman, R. P.; Yarbrough, T. W.

    1986-01-01

    A cleaning technique widely used by the nuclear utility industry for removal of radioactive surface contamination has proven effective at removing non-hazardous contaminant particles as small as 0.1 micrometer. The process employs a controlled high velocity liquid spray inside a vapor containment enclosure to remove particles from a surface. The viscous drag force generated by the cleaning fluid applies a shear stress greater than the adhesion force that holds small particles to a substrate. Fluid mechanics and field tests indicate general cleaning parameters.

  15. Dynamics of flexible fibers in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Słowicka, Agnieszka M; Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Ekiel-Jeżewska, Maria L

    2015-09-28

    Dynamics of flexible non-Brownian fibers in shear flow at low-Reynolds-number are analyzed numerically for a wide range of the ratios A of the fiber bending force to the viscous drag force. Initially, the fibers are aligned with the flow, and later they move in the plane perpendicular to the flow vorticity. A surprisingly rich spectrum of different modes is observed when the value of A is systematically changed, with sharp transitions between coiled and straightening out modes, period-doubling bifurcations from periodic to migrating solutions, irregular dynamics, and chaos. PMID:26429038

  16. Microbursts as an aviation wind shear hazard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.

    1981-01-01

    The downburst-related accidents or near-misses of jet aircraft have been occurring at the rate of once or twice a year since 1975. A microburst with its field comparable to the length of runways can induce a wind shear which endangers landing or liftoff aircraft; the latest near miss landing of a 727 aircraft at Atlanta, Ga. in 1979 indicated that some microbursts are too small to trigger the warning device of the anemometer network at major U.S. airports. The nature of microbursts and their possible detection by Doppler radar are discussed, along with proposed studies of small-scale microbursts.

  17. Waves in Turbulent Stably Stratified Shear Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobitz, F. G.; Rogers, M. M.; Ferziger, J. H.; Parks, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Two approaches for the identification of internal gravity waves in sheared and unsheared homogeneous stratified turbulence are investigated. First, the phase angle between the vertical velocity and density fluctuations is considered. It was found, however, that a continuous distribution of the phase angle is present in weakly and strongly stratified flow. Second, a projection onto the solution of the linearized inviscid equations of motion of unsheared stratified flow is investigated. It was found that a solution of the fully nonlinear viscous Navier-Stokes equations can be represented by the linearized inviscid solution. The projection yields a decomposition into vertical wave modes and horizontal vortical modes.

  18. Dynamics of flexible fibers in shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Słowicka, Agnieszka M.; Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Ekiel-Jeżewska, Maria L.

    2015-09-28

    Dynamics of flexible non-Brownian fibers in shear flow at low-Reynolds-number are analyzed numerically for a wide range of the ratios A of the fiber bending force to the viscous drag force. Initially, the fibers are aligned with the flow, and later they move in the plane perpendicular to the flow vorticity. A surprisingly rich spectrum of different modes is observed when the value of A is systematically changed, with sharp transitions between coiled and straightening out modes, period-doubling bifurcations from periodic to migrating solutions, irregular dynamics, and chaos.

  19. Powder fed sheared dispersal particle generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrisette, E. L.; Bushnell, D. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A particle generating system is described which is capable of breaking up agglomerations of particles and producing a cloud of uniform, submicron-sized particles at high pressure and high flow rates. This is achieved by utilizing a tubular structure which has injection microslits on is periphery to accept and disperse the desired particle feed. By suppling a carrying fluid at a pressure, of approximately twice the ambient pressure of the velocimeter's settling chamber, the microslits operate at choked flow conditions. The shearing action of this choked flow is sufficient to overcome interparticle bonding forces, thereby breaking up the agglomerates of the particles feed into individual particles.

  20. Shear viscosity in the postquasistatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Peralta, C.; Rosales, L.; Rodriguez-Mueller, B.; Barreto, W.

    2010-05-15

    We apply the postquasistatic approximation, an iterative method for the evolution of self-gravitating spheres of matter, to study the evolution of anisotropic nonadiabatic radiating and dissipative distributions in general relativity. Dissipation is described by viscosity and free-streaming radiation, assuming an equation of state to model anisotropy induced by the shear viscosity. We match the interior solution, in noncomoving coordinates, with the Vaidya exterior solution. Two simple models are presented, based on the Schwarzschild and Tolman VI solutions, in the nonadiabatic and adiabatic limit. In both cases, the eventual collapse or expansion of the distribution is mainly controlled by the anisotropy induced by the viscosity.