Sample records for abundance carbon isotope

  1. The Relative Abundances of Carbon and its Isotopes in Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Thomas E.; Osborne, Heather; Howell, Steve; Johnson, Joni

    2002-02-01

    We have an NSF-funded program to investigate the chemical and isotopic abundances of carbon in the photospheres of the secondary stars of cataclysmic variables. We propose to use OSIRIS on the CTIO 4 m to obtain medium resolution K-band spectra of a sample of ~ 15 cataclysmic variables (CVs). We will use these spectra to examine the chemical and isotopic abundances of carbon in the photospheres of their secondary stars. Models of close binary star evolution predict that both the abundance and isotopic ratio (^12C/^13C) decrease as the secondary star losses mass. Observations we have obtained using CRSP on the KPNO 2.1m confirm this scenario for a number of longer- period CV systems. We propose to observe a larger sample of CVs covering the entire observed range in orbital period to determine if the model predictions are correct. In addition, the chemical and isotopic abundances depend on the evolutionary history of the CV. Models by Marks & Sarna (1998) predict that if the CV accreted significant material from the common envelope phase, or from earlier classical novae eruptions, the chemical and isotopic abundances will be different from scenarios where this did not occur. To examine this, we will observe a few classical novae to investigate whether their secondary stars reveal evidence for this isotopic enrichment. Our program requires two nights with OSIRIS on the CTIO 4m in 2002A.

  2. Natural abundances of carbon isotopes in acetate from a coastal marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, N. E.; Martens, C. S.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the natural abundances of carbon isotopes were made in acetate samples isolated from the anoxic marine sediment of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina. The typical value of the total acetate carbon isotope ratio (delta 13C) was -16.1 +/- 0.2 per mil. The methyl and carboxyl groups were determined to be -26.4 +/- 0.3 and -6.0 +/- 0.3 per mil, respectively, for one sample. The isotopic composition of the acetate is thought to have resulted from isotopic discriminations that occurred during the cycling of that molecule. Measurements of this type, which have not been made previously in the natural environment, may provide information about the dominant microbial pathways in anoxic sediments as well as the processes that influence the carbon isotopic composition of biogenic methane from many sources.

  3. Abundance, distribution, and isotopic composition of particulate black carbon in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weifeng; Guo, Laodong

    2014-11-01

    There exists increasing evidence supporting the important role of black carbon in global carbon cycles. Particulate black carbon (PBC) is allochthonous and has distinct reactivities compared to the bulk particulate organic carbon (tot-POC) in marine environments. However, the abundance, geochemical behavior of PBC and its importance in oceanic carbon budget remain poorly understood. Here we report the abundance, distribution, and stable isotopic signatures of BC derived from the chemo-thermal oxidation (CTO-375) method (BCCTO) in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results show that BCCTO abundance decreased from shelf to basin, and more than a half of riverine BCCTO could be removed over the shelf. Moreover, BCCTO is much more refractory compared to the tot-POC and has ?13C values lower than those of BC-excluded POC. These results highlight the significance of PBC in marine carbon cycles and potentially suggest the need for a new end-member term in quantifying POC sources in the ocean.

  4. Carbon and nitrogen biogeochemistry in the ocean: A study using stable isotope natural abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rau, G. H.; Desmarais, David J.

    1985-01-01

    Determining the biogeochemical pathways traveled by carbon and nitrogen in the ocean is fundamental to the understanding of how the ocean participates in the cycling of these elements within the biosphere. Because biological production, metabolism, and respiration can significantly alter the natural abundance of C-13 and N-15, these abundances can provide important information about the nature of these biological processes and their variability in the marine environment. The research initially seeks to characterize the spatial and temporal patterns of stable isotope abundances in organic matter, and to relate these abundances to C and N biogeochemical processes within selected areas of the northeastern Pacific Ocean.

  5. Investigating microbial carbon cycling using natural abundance isotope analysis of PLFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, G. G.; Brady, A.; Cowie, B.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding microbial carbon sources and cycling is fundamental to our conceptualization of microbial ecosystems and their role in biogeochemical cycling in natural systems. Achieving this understanding requires application of a wide range of approaches. Natural abundance isotope analysis of individual compounds, particularly cellular components such as Phospholipids Fatty Acids (PLFA) can provide insights into the carbon sources and metabolic activities of the in situ microbial community from environmental samples. This is primarily because specific PLFA can be well resolved by gas chromatography even from complex matrices where confounding biological/organic compound abound. These PLFA can then be attributed to the viable microbial community, in some cases to specific components of this community and due to characteristic biosynthetic fractionations of stable isotope ratios, ?13C analysis of PLFA can: differentiate isotopically distinct primary carbon sources of heterotrophic communities; identify isotopic patterns characteristic of autotrophic versus heterotrophic processes; and elucidate microbial biosynthetic pathways. In cases where there ?13C cannot provide resolution of carbon sources, new approaches in ?14C of PLFA can be applied. The vast range in ?14C of ancient and modern carbon provides an easily traceable signal that can differentiate uptake and utilization of these carbon sources. This is particularly useful in cases such as contaminated sites where petroleum based contamination has occurred, or in natural systems where microbial communities may be utilizing geologic versus recently photosynthetically fixed carbon. This talk will present several examples demonstrating the utility of this approach.

  6. Measurement for isotopic abundances

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1973-01-01

    Review was made on the determination of isotopic abundance ratio by the ; mass spectroscopic method, relation between the abundance ratio and atomic ; weight, problems in the relative measurement of the ratio, standard materials for ; the determination of the abundance ratio and extraterrestrial materials, and ; specific topics on varlous elements. Use of mass spectrographs is classified ;

  7. Abundances in red giant stars - Nitrogen isotopes in carbon-rich molecular envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannier, P. G.; Andersson, B.-G.; Olofsson, H.; Ukita, N.; Young, K.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of millimeter- and submillimeter-wave observations of HCN and HCCCN that were made of the circmustellar envelopes of eight carbon stars, including the two protoplanetary nebulae CRL 618 and CRL 2688. The observations yield a measure of the double ratio (N-14)(C-13)/(N-15)(C-12). Measured C-12/C-13 ratios are used to estimate the N-14/N-15 abundance ratio, with the resulting lower limits in all eight envelopes and possible direct determinations in two envelopes. The two determinations and four of the remaining six lower limits are found to be in excess of the terrestrial value of N-14/N-15 = 272, indicating an evolution of the nitrogen isotope ratio, which is consistent with stellar CNO processing. Observations of thermal SiO (v = 0, J = 2-1) emission show that the Si-29/Si-28 ratio can be determined in carbon stars, and further observations are indicated.

  8. Carbon Isotopic Abundances in the Red Giants of Omega Centauri (NGC5139)

    E-print Network

    Verne V. Smith; Donald M. Terndrup; Nicholas B. Suntzeff

    2002-07-19

    Carbon-12 and carbon-13 abundances are measured in eleven red-giant members of the globular cluster Omega Centauri via observations of first-overtone CO bands near 2.3 microns. The mean value for the entire sample is = 4.3 +/-0.4, with nine giants equal, within the errors, to the equilibrium ration of 12C/13C= 3.5. No correlation is found within Omega Cen between 12C/13C and the abundance of iron. The relation between 12C/13C and other abundance ratios, such as [O/Fe], {Na/Fe], or [Al/Fe] are also discussed.

  9. Determination of the abundance and carbon isotope composition of elemental carbon in sediments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael I. Bird; Darren R. Gröcke

    1997-01-01

    We report measurements of the susceptibility of a variety of elemental and organic carbon samples to oxidative degradation using both acid dichromate and basic peroxide reagents. Organic carbon is rapidly oxidized using either reagent, or both reagents sequentially. Elemental carbon exhibits a wide range of susceptibilities to oxidation related both to the degree to which the precursor plant material was

  10. Isotopic abundance ratios for carbon and nitrogen in Nova Herculis 1934

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sneden, C.; Lambert, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Spectra of Nova Herculis 1934 taken during an episode of intense CN absorption are analyzed to determine the isotopic abundance ratios of C12/C13 and N14/N15. Synthetic spectrum analysis, based on the wavelengths, excitation potentials, and oscillator strengths for the CN lines, and radial velocity measurements indicate that C(12)N(14) was the dominant species in the Nova, and that the minimum abundance limit for C12/C13 is about 1.5, while the minimum for N14/N15 is about 2. The results are compared with predictions based on models of thermonuclear runaways in hydrogen-rich envelopes of white dwarfs. It is noted that the nova material may have been contaminated with C13-rich material prior to or during the eruption. Possible causes of this isotope enrichment are presented.

  11. Carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in lunar fines 15012 and 15013 - Abundances, distributions and isotopic compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Lawless, J.; Romiez, M.; Kaplan, I. R.; Petrowski, C.; Sakai, H.; Smith, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Lunar fines 15012,16 and 15013,3 were analyzed by stepwise pyrolysis and acid hydrolysis as well as complete combustion in oxygen to determine carbon, nitrogen and sulfur. In addition, hydrogen was analysed during pyrolysis as well as during hydrolysis. By comparison of the distribution frequencies of C, N, S, H2 and Fe with He-4, considered to have arisen from solar wind contribution, it is concluded that nitrogen and hydrogen have largely a solar origin. Carbon has a significant solar contribution, and metallic iron may have resulted from solar wind interaction with ferrous minerals on the lunar surface. Sulfur probably has a predominantly lunar origin. There is no direct evidence for meteorotic contribution to these samples. Solar wind interaction also has a marked effect on the stable isotope distribution of C-13/C-12, N-15/N-14, and S-34/S-32. In all cases, the heavy isotope was most enriched in the smallest grain-size fraction.

  12. Temporal variation in mycorrhizal diversity and carbon and nitrogen stable isotope abundance in the wintergreen meadow orchid Anacamptis morio.

    PubMed

    Ercole, Enrico; Adamo, Martino; Rodda, Michele; Gebauer, Gerhard; Girlanda, Mariangela; Perotto, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    Many adult orchids, especially photoautotrophic species, associate with a diverse range of mycorrhizal fungi, but little is known about the temporal changes that might occur in the diversity and functioning of orchid mycorrhiza during vegetative and reproductive plant growth. Temporal variations in the spectrum of mycorrhizal fungi and in stable isotope natural abundance were investigated in adult plants of Anacamptis morio, a wintergreen meadow orchid. Anacamptis morio associated with mycorrhizal fungi belonging to Tulasnella, Ceratobasidium and a clade of Pezizaceae (Ascomycetes). When a complete growing season was investigated, multivariate analyses indicated significant differences in the mycorrhizal fungal community. Among fungi identified from manually isolated pelotons, Tulasnella was more common in autumn and winter, the pezizacean clade was very frequent in spring, and Ceratobasidium was more frequent in summer. By contrast, relatively small variations were found in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotope natural abundance, A. morio samples showing similar (15)N enrichment and (13)C depletion at the different sampling times. These observations suggest that, irrespective of differences in the seasonal environmental conditions, the plant phenological stages and the associated fungi, the isotopic content in mycorrhizal A. morio remains fairly constant over time. PMID:25382295

  13. The Solar Oxygen Abundance, and the Rare Isotopes of C and O, Derived from Infrared Spectra of Carbon Monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, T. R.; Plymate, C.; Keller, C.; Kurucz, R. L.

    2005-05-01

    A detailed abundance analysis is presented for solar oxygen based on the ?V=1 fundamental (4.6~?m) and ?V=2 (2.3~?m) first-overtone rovibrational bands of carbon monoxide observed above the Earth's atmosphere at very high spectral resolution and high signal-to-noise by the Shuttle-borne ATMOS Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). Additional observations to define the reference photospheric thermal structure were taken of the CO fundamental bands in an atmospheric window at 2145~cm-1 (4.6~?m) using the 1~m FTS of the McMath-Pierce telescope at Kitt Peak and a fast tip/tilt image stabilization system. The latter allowed measurements at the extreme limb where the highly slanted rays probe into the outer layers of the photosphere. High spatial resolution "movies" of weak CO lines at disk center taken under excellent seeing conditions with the Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS), also on the McMath-Pierce telescope, further constrained thermal and velocity fluctuations in the layers in which the abundance-sensitive CO lines form. This work is meant to complement a series of recent studies which have revised the previously recommended solar oxygen abundance downward by nearly a factor of two; although in fact our conclusions do not support such a revision. The oxygen abundance recovered in the present work is 700±70~ppm (parts per million relative to hydrogen) compared with the proposed downward revision to 460±60~ppm, and the recommended value of 650±100~ppm of a decade ago. In our analysis, a fixed C/O ratio of 0.5, derived in independent work, was assumed; so the associated carbon abundance is 350~ppm. New accurate values for the solar abundance ratios of the rare isotopes of C and O also are reported: 12C/13C= 70, 16O/17O= 400, and 16O/18O= 2000. All three ratios are lower than terrestrial or meteoritic values (indicating higher isotopic abundances). We find no evidence in the ATMOS3 spectra for measurable 14C16O lines.

  14. Millimeter-scale variations of stable isotope abundances in carbonates from banded iron-formations in the Hamersley Group of Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baur, M. E.; Hayes, J. M.; Studley, S. A.; Walter, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Several diamond drill cores from formations within the Hamersley Group of Western Australia have been studied for evidence of short-range variations in the isotopic compositions of the carbonates. For a set of 32 adjacent microbands analyzed in a specimen from the Marra Mamba Iron Formation, carbon isotope compositions of individual microbands ranged from -2.8 to -19.8 per mil compared to PDB and oxygen isotope compositions ranged from 10.2 to 20.8 per mil compared to SMOW. A pattern of alternating abundances was present, with the average isotopic contrasts between adjacent microbands being 3.0 per mil for carbon and 3.1 per mil for oxygen. Similar results were obtained for a suite of 34 microbands (in four groups) from the Bruno's Band unit of the Mount Sylvia Formation. Difficulties were experienced in preparing samples of single microbands from the Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation, but overall isotopic compositions were in good agreement with values reported by previous authors. Chemical analyses showed that isotopically light carbon and oxygen were correlated with increased concentrations of iron. The preservation of these millimeter-scale variations in isotopic abundances is interpreted as inconsistent with a metamorphic origin for the isotopically light carbon in the BIF carbonates. A biological origin is favored for the correlated variations in 13C and Fe, and it is suggested that the 13C-depleted carbonates may derive either from fermentative metabolism or from anaerobic respiration. A model is presented in which these processes occur near the sediment-water interface and are coupled with an initial oxidative precipitation of the iron.

  15. Changes in carbon sources fueling benthic secondary production over depth and time: coupling Chironomidae stable carbon isotopes to larval abundance.

    PubMed

    Frossard, Victor; Verneaux, Valérie; Millet, Laurent; Magny, Michel; Perga, Marie-Elodie

    2015-06-01

    Stable C isotope ratio (?(13)C) values of chironomid remains (head capsules; HC) were used to infer changes in benthic C sources over the last 150 years for two French sub-Alpine lakes. The HCs were retrieved from a series of sediment cores from different depths. The HC ?(13)C values started to decrease with the onset of eutrophication. The HC ?(13)C temporal patterns varied among depths, which revealed spatial differences in the contribution of methanotrophic bacteria to the benthic secondary production. The estimates of the methane (CH4)-derived C contribution to chironomid biomass ranged from a few percent prior to the 1930s to up to 30 % in recent times. The chironomid fluxes increased concomitantly with changes in HC ?(13)C values before a drastic decrease due to the development of hypoxic conditions. The hypoxia reinforced the implication for CH4-derived C transfer to chironomid production. In Lake Annecy, the HC ?(13)C values were negatively correlated to total organic C (TOC) content in the sediment (Corg), whereas no relationship was found in Lake Bourget. In Lake Bourget, chironomid abundances reached their maximum with TOC contents between 1 and 1.5 % Corg, which could constitute a threshold for change in chironomid abundance and consequently for the integration of CH4-derived C into the lake food webs. Our results indicated that the CH4-derived C contribution to the benthic food webs occurred at different depths in these two large, deep lakes (deep waters and sublittoral zone), and that the trophic transfer of this C was promoted in sublittoral zones where O2 gradients were dynamic. PMID:25630956

  16. Abundance and isotope systematics of carbon in subglacial basalts, geothermal gases and fluids from Iceland's rift zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P. H.; Hilton, D. R.; Fueri, E.; Halldorsson, S. A.; Fischer, T. P.; Gronvold, K.

    2010-12-01

    P. H. BARRY1*, D. R. HILTON1, E. FÜRI1, S.A. HALLDÓRSON1, T.P. FISCHER2, K. GRONVOLD3 1 Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, La Jolla, California 92093, USA (*Correspondence: pbarry@ucsd.edu). 2University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA. 3University of Iceland, Askja, Sturlugata 7, IS-101, Reykjavik, Iceland Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the dominant non-aqueous volatile species found in oceanic basalts and geothermal fluids and serves as the carrier gas for trace volatiles such as He and other noble gases. The aim of this study is to identify the superimposed effects of degassing and crustal contamination on the CO2 systematics of the Icelandic hotspot in order to reveal and characterize the carbon abundance and isotopic features of the underlying mantle source. Our approach involves coupling CO2 with He, utilizing the sensitivity of 3He/4He ratios to reveal mantle and crustal inputs. We report new C-isotope (?13C) and abundance characteristics for a suite of 47 subglacial basalts and 50 geothermal gases and fluids from Iceland. CO2 contents in hyaloclastite glasses are extremely low (10-100 ppm) and likely residual following extensive degassing whereas geothermal fluids are dominated by CO2 (>90 %). C-isotopes range from -27.2 to -3.6 ‰ (vs. PDB) for basalts and from -18.8 to 2.86 ‰ (vs. PDB) for geothermal samples (mean = -4.2 ± 3.6 ‰). CO2/3He ratios range from 108 to 1012 for basalts and from 105 to 1012 for geothermal samples: In both cases, our results extend He-CO2 relationships over a much broader range than reported previously [1]. Taken together, these data suggest that several processes including mixing, degassing, and/or syn- or post-eruptive crustal contamination may act to modify CO2 source characteristics. Equilibrium degassing models are compatible with ~75 % of the basalt data, and preliminary results indicate that initial Icelandic source characteristics are ~500 ppm CO2 and ?13C ~ -5 ‰ (vs. PDB). These values are high compared to N-MORB mantle source estimates (72-134 ppm) based upon CO2/Nb ratios [2, 3]; however, they are in good agreement with those from submarine glasses on adjacent segments from the Reykjanes and Kolbeinsey ridges [4,5]. Significantly, the model-derived ?13C estimate is close to the mean Icelandic geothermal value, implying that fluids closely resemble source values, i.e. they likely represent the exsolved component. Integrating the estimated source CO2 content with magma production values of 0.079 km3/yr [6] yields a CO2 flux of ~1.2 x 1011 mol CO2 yr-1for Iceland, representing ~ 5.4 % of the total carbon ridge flux of 2.2 x 1012 mol CO2 yr-1 [7]. Thus, the average CO2 flux estimate for Iceland is ~2.2 x 108 mol CO2 yr-1km-1 strike of ridge axis, which compares to an overall ridge flux (including Iceland) of ~2.9 x 107 mol CO2 yr-1km-1. This difference highlights both heterogeneity in source volatile contents and magma production rates as important controls for determining mantle CO2 fluxes. [1] Poreda et al., 1992 [2] Saal et al., 2002. [3] Shaw et al., 2010. [4] de Leeuw, 2007 [5] Macpherson et al., 2005. [6] Thordarson et al., 2007 [7] Marty et al., 1998.

  17. [Effects of intensive agricultural production on farmland soil carbon and nitrogen contents and their delta13C and delta15N isotope abundances].

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang-Rong; Hao, Xiying; Li, Chun-Li; Wang, Zi-Lin; Li, Yong-Mei

    2012-03-01

    Farmland soil carbon and nitrogen contents under intensive agricultural production are the important indices for the assessment of the soil fertility sustainability. This paper measured the soil pH, electrical conductivity (EC), organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN), and delta13C and delta15N isotope abundances of four types of farmland, i.e., conventional rice-broad bean rotation field, open vegetable field, 3-year plastic covered greenhouse field, and > 10-year plastic covered greenhouse field, aimed to understand the effects of intensive agricultural production degree on soil properties. In the open vegetable field, 3-year plastic covered greenhouse field, and > 10-year plastic covered greenhouse field, the soil (0-20 cm) pH decreased by 1.1, 0.8, and 0.7, and the soil EC was 4.2, 4.9, and 5.2 folds of that in conventional rice-broad bean rotation field, respectively. With the increasing year of plastic covered greenhouse production, the soil SOC and TN contents decreased after an initial increase. Comparing with those under rice-broad bean rotation, the SOC content in 0-20, 20-40, 40-60, 60-80 and 80-100 cm soil layers in >10-year plastic covered greenhouse decreased by 54%, 46%, 60%, 63%, and 59%, and the TN content decreased by 53%, 53%, 71%, 82%, and 85%, respectively. Intensive agricultural production degree had significant effects on the soil SOC and TN contents and delta13C and delta15N abundances. The delta13C abundance was significantly negatively correlated with the soil SOC, suggesting that the soil delta13C abundance could be regarded as an index for the assessment of carbon cycle in farmland soils under effects of human activities. PMID:22720621

  18. Simultaneous analysis of abundance and isotopic composition of nitrogen, carbon, and noble gases in lunar basalts: Insights into interior and surface processes on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortimer, J.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Anand, M.; Gilmour, I.; Pillinger, C. T.

    2015-07-01

    Simultaneous static-mode mass spectrometric measurements of nitrogen, carbon, helium, neon, and argon extracted from the same aliquot of sample by high-resolution stepped combustion have been made for a suite of six lunar basalts. Collecting abundance and isotopic data for several elements simultaneously from the same sample aliquot enables more detailed identification of different volatile components present in the basalts by comparing release patterns for volatiles across a range of temperature steps. This approach has yielded new data, from which new insights can be gained regarding the indigenous volatile inventory of the Moon. By taking into account N and C data for mid-temperature steps, unaffected by terrestrial contamination or cosmogenic additions, it is possible to determine the indigenous N and C signatures of the lunar basalts. With an average ?15N value of around +0.35‰, the indigenous N component seen in these samples is similar within error to other (albeit limited in number) isotopic measurements of indigenous lunar N. Average C/N ratios for indigenous volatiles in these six basalt samples are much lower than those of the terrestrial depleted mantle, or bulk silicate Earth, possibly suggesting much less C in the lunar interior, relative to N, than on Earth. Cosmogenic isotopes in these samples are well-correlated with published sample exposure ages, and record the rate of in situ production of spallogenic volatiles within material on the lunar surface.

  19. Detection of Correlations in Stellar Isotopic Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, K. A.; Smith, M. S.

    2012-10-01

    The composition of a star changes with time via sequences of thermonuclear reactions. These sequences strongly couple the abundances of all elements to each other. The resulting complex interdependencies often make it difficult to ascertain which isotopic abundances most influence one another. To investigate this, a FORTRAN program has been written which analyzes these abundances over time as predicted by a simulation to determine if they may be correlated. This is accomplished via a looping over all possible pairs of tracked isotopes, quantitatively ascertaining the shapes of the abundance versus time curves for each, and assigning numerical scores to determine if these pairs of curves are correlated, anticorrelated, or uncorrelated. Preliminary results from this study will be presented.

  20. Distribution, abundance and carbon isotopic composition of gaseous hydrocarbons in Big Soda Lake, Nevada - An alkaline, meromictic lake

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. S. Oremland; D. J. Des Marais

    1983-01-01

    The study of the distribution and isotopic composition of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases at the Big Soda Lake, Nevada, has shown that while neither ethylene nor propylene were found in the lake, ethane, propane, isobutane and n-butane concentrations all increased with water column depth. It is concluded that methane has a biogenic origin in both the sediments and the

  1. 1, 393412, 2004 Carbon isotope

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    BGD 1, 393­412, 2004 Carbon isotope anomaly in the major plant C1 pool F. Keppler et al. Title Page Biogeosciences Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Carbon isotope anomaly.keppler@qub.ac.uk) 393 #12;BGD 1, 393­412, 2004 Carbon isotope anomaly in the major plant C1 pool F. Keppler et al. Title

  2. ISOTOPIC TITANIUM ABUNDANCES IN LOCAL M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Joy [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station, C1400 Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Lambert, David L. [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1402 Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)], E-mail: jchavez@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2009-07-10

    Relative abundances of the five stable isotopes of titanium ({sup 46}Ti to {sup 50}Ti) are measured for 11 M dwarfs belonging to the thin disk (four stars), thick disk (three stars), the halo (one star), and either the thick or the thin disk (three stars). Over the metallicity range of the sample (-1< [Fe/H] <0), the isotopic ratios are approximately constant at the solar system ratios. There is no discernible difference between the isotopic ratios for thin and thick disk stars. Isotopic ratios are in fair accord with recent calculations of Galactic chemical evolution despite the fact that such calculations underpredict [Ti/Fe] by about 0.4 dex at all metallicities.

  3. NITROGEN AND CARBON STABLE ISOTOPE ABUNDANCES SUPPORT THE MYCO-HETEROTROPHIC NATURE AND HOST-SPECIFICITY OF CERTAIN ACHLOROPHYLLOUS PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ? Over 400 species of achlorophyllous vascular plants are thought to obtain all carbon from symbiotic fungi. Consequently, they are termed ?myco-heterotrophic.' However, direct evidence of myco-heterotrophy in these plants is limited. ? During an investigation of the pat...

  4. Isotope-abundance variations of selected elements (IUPAC technical report)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; De Bievre, P.; Ding, T.; Holden, N.E.; Hopple, J.A.; Krouse, H.R.; Lamberty, A.; Peiser, H.S.; Revesz, K.; Rieder, S.E.; Rosman, K.J.R.; Roth, E.; Taylor, P.D.P.; Vocke, R.D., Jr.; Xiao, Y.K.

    2002-01-01

    Documented variations in the isotopic compositions of some chemical elements are responsible for expanded uncertainties in the standard atomic weights published by the Commission on Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. This report summarizes reported variations in the isotopic compositions of 20 elements that are due to physical and chemical fractionation processes (not due to radioactive decay) and their effects on the standard atomic-weight uncertainties. For 11 of those elements (hydrogen, lithium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, sulfur, chlorine, copper, and selenium), standard atomic-weight uncertainties have been assigned values that are substantially larger than analytical uncertainties because of common isotope-abundance variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin. For 2 elements (chromium and thallium), recently reported isotope-abundance variations potentially are large enough to result in future expansion of their atomic-weight uncertainties. For 7 elements (magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, molybdenum, palladium, and tellurium), documented isotope variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin are too small to have a significant effect on their standard atomic-weight uncertainties. This compilation indicates the extent to which the atomic weight of an element in a given material may differ from the standard atomic weight of the element. For most elements given above, data are graphically illustrated by a diagram in which the materials are specified in the ordinate and the compositional ranges are plotted along the abscissa in scales of (1) atomic weight, (2) mole fraction of a selected isotope, and (3) delta value of a selected isotope ratio.

  5. Distribution, abundance and carbon isotopic composition of gaseous hydrocarbons in Big Soda Lake, Nevada - An alkaline, meromictic lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The study of the distribution and isotopic composition of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases at the Big Soda Lake, Nevada, has shown that while neither ethylene nor propylene were found in the lake, ethane, propane, isobutane and n-butane concentrations all increased with water column depth. It is concluded that methane has a biogenic origin in both the sediments and the anoxic water column, and that C2-C4 alkanes have biogenic origins in the monimolimnion water and shallow sediments. The changes observed in delta C-13/CH4/ and CH4/(C2H6 + C3H8) with depth in the water column and sedimeents are probably due to bacterial processes, which may include anaerobic methane oxidation and different rates of methanogenesis, and C2-to-C4 alkane production by microorganisms.

  6. Use of carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in termite research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ichiro Tayasu

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, I review carbon and nitrogen isotopic (natural abundance levels) studies of termites. The carbon isotope ratio of CH 4 emitted from termites, together with the emission rates of CO 2, CH 4 and H 2, showed several trends corresponding to the kinds of symbiotic microbes and feeding habits. The fraction of methane oxidized in the nest structure

  7. Exploring Marine Carbon Isotope Excursions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Jones, Geology Department, Amherst College Topic: stable isotopes, geochemistry, oceanography, carbon cycle Course type: Upper level undergraduate course Description The exercise is designed to introduce ...

  8. Carbon isotope and abundance systematics of Icelandic geothermal gases, fluids and subglacial basalts with implications for mantle plume-related CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P. H.; Hilton, D. R.; Füri, E.; Halldórsson, S. A.; Grönvold, K.

    2014-06-01

    We report new carbon dioxide (CO2) abundance and isotope data for 71 geothermal gases and fluids from both high-temperature (HT > 150 °C at 1 km depth) and low-temperature (LT < 150 °C at 1 km depth) geothermal systems located within neovolcanic zones and older segments of the Icelandic crust, respectively. These data are supplemented by CO2 data obtained by stepped heating of 47 subglacial basaltic glasses collected from the neovolcanic zones. The sample suite has been characterized previously for He-Ne (geothermal) and He-Ne-Ar (basalt) systematics (Füri et al., 2010), allowing elemental ratios to be calculated for individual samples. Geothermal fluids are characterized by a wide range in carbon isotope ratios (?13C), from -18.8‰ to +4.6‰ (vs. VPDB), and CO2/3He values that span eight orders of magnitude, from 1 × 104 to 2 × 1012. Extreme geothermal values suggest that original source compositions have been extensively modified by hydrothermal processes such as degassing and/or calcite precipitation. Basaltic glasses are also characterized by a wide range in ?13C values, from -27.2‰ to -3.6‰, whereas CO2/3He values span a narrower range, from 1 × 108 to 1 × 1012. The combination of both low ?13C values and low CO2 contents in basalts indicates that magmas are extensively and variably degassed. Using an equilibrium degassing model, we estimate that pre-eruptive basaltic melts beneath Iceland contain ?531 ± 64 ppm CO2 with ?13C values of -2.5 ± 1.1‰, in good agreement with estimates from olivine-hosted melt inclusions (Metrich et al., 1991) and depleted MORB mantle (DMM) CO2 source estimates (Marty, 2012). In addition, pre-eruptive CO2 compositions are estimated for individual segments of the Icelandic axial rift zones, and show a marked decrease from north to south (Northern Rift Zone = 550 ± 66 ppm; Eastern Rift Zone = 371 ± 45 ppm; Western Rift Zone = 206 ± 24 ppm). Notably, these results are model dependent, and selection of a lower ?13C fractionation factor will result in lower source estimates and larger uncertainties associated with the initial ?13C estimate. Degassing can adequately explain low CO2 contents in basalts; however, degassing alone is unlikely to generate the entire spectrum of observed ?13C variations, and we suggest that melt-crust interaction, involving a low ?13C component, may also contribute to observed signatures. Using representative samples, the CO2 flux from Iceland is estimated using three independent methods: (1) combining measured CO2/3He values (in gases and basalts) with 3He flux estimates (Hilton et al., 1990), (2) merging basaltic emplacement rates of Iceland with pre-eruptive magma source estimates of ?531 ± 64 ppm CO2, and (3) combining fluid CO2 contents with estimated regional fluid discharge rates. These methods yield CO2 flux estimates from of 0.2-23 × 1010 mol a-1, which represent ?0.1-10% of the estimated global ridge flux (2.2 × 1012 mol a-1; Marty and Tolstikhin, 1998).

  9. Organic chemistry of Murchison meteorite: Carbon isotopic fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, G. U.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Cronin, J. R.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual organic compounds of meteoritic origin remains unknown, as most reported carbon isotopic ratios are for bulk carbon or solvent extractable fractions. The researchers managed to determine the carbon isotopic ratios for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids isolated from a Murchison sample by a freeze-thaw-ultrasonication technique. The abundances of monocarboxylic acids and saturated hydrocarbons decreased with increasing carbon number and the acids are more abundant than the hydrocarbon with the same carbon number. For both classes of compounds, the C-13 to C-12 ratios decreased with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic number than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with a kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues for lower ones.

  10. Climatic/Hydrologic Oscillations since 155,000 yr B.P. at Owens Lake, California, Reflected in Abundance and Stable Isotope Composition of Sediment Carbonate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menking, K.M.; Bischoff, J.L.; Fitzpatrick, J.A.; Burdette, J.W.; Rye, R.O.

    1997-01-01

    Sediment grain size, carbonate content, and stable isotopes in 70-cm-long (???1500-yr) channel samples from Owens Lake core OL-92 record many oscillations representing climate change in the eastern Sierra Nevada region since 155,000 yr B.P. To first order, the records match well the marine ??18O record. At Owens Lake, however, the last interglaciation appears to span the entire period from 120,000 to 50,000 yr B.P., according to our chronology, and was punctuated by numerous short periods of wetter conditions during an otherwise dry climate. Sediment proxies reveal that the apparent timing of glacial-interglacial transitions, notably the penultimate one, is proxy-dependent. In the grain-size and carbonate-content records this transition is abrupt and occurs at ??? 120,000 yr B.P. In contrast, in the isotopic records the transition is gradual and occurs between 145,000 and 120,000 yr B. P. Differences in timing of the transition are attributed to variable responses by proxies to climate change. ?? 1997 University of Washington.

  11. The abundances of isotopes in the cosmic radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A. Mewaldt

    1989-01-01

    Studies of the isotopic composition of nuclei in the cosmic radiation are reviewed, including abundances of the isotopes of elements from H to Ni (nuclear charge 1isotopic

  12. The abundances of isotopes in the cosmic radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A. Mewaldt

    1989-01-01

    Studies of the isotopic composition of nuclei in the cosmic radiation are reviewed, including abundances of the isotopes of elements from H to Ni, together with their implications for cosmic ray origin, acceleration, and transport in the Galaxy. The review focuses on determinations of the composition of cosmic ray source material, and the extent to which the isotopic composition of

  13. Carbon isotopes in mollusk shell carbonates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ted A. McConnaughey; David Paul Gillikin

    2008-01-01

    Mollusk shells contain many isotopic clues about calcification physiology and environmental conditions at the time of shell\\u000a formation. In this review, we use both published and unpublished data to discuss carbon isotopes in both bivalve and gastropod\\u000a shell carbonates. Land snails construct their shells mainly from respired CO2, and shell ?13C reflects the local mix of C3 and C4 plants

  14. Ce isotope abundance in chondritic and HED meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Asahara, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Lee, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    138La, 136Ce and 138Ce are p-process nuclides, and their isotopic abundances are generally low due to their modes of nucleosynthesis compared with other isotopes of La and Ce (139La, 140Ce and 142Ce). Tanimizu et al. (2004) mentioned that, using the 140Ce/142Ce ratio as the normalizing value, 136Ce isotope abundance could be acted as an indicator of p-process nuclide anomaly for extra-terrestrial materials to understand the nucleosynthetic origins of solar system matter. Then, meteoritic primordial composition of Ce isotope provides useful information related with 138La decay system. Especially, combined Ce/Nd isotope data in geological and cosmological materials enable us the modeling of the light REE profiles of the source material. We measured Ce isotope ratio for fifteen meteorites, using 140Ce/142Ce=7.941 as the normalizing value, in order to compare Ce isotope abundance between chondritic and HED meteorites. Of them, Ce isotope abundances from two chondritic meteorites were deviated from the average abundances of other 13 meteorites. In this report, we will discuss cosmochemical significance of Ce isotope anomaly.

  15. The abundances of elements and isotopes in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, George; Geiss, Johannes

    1988-01-01

    Studies of the chemical and isotopic composition of the solar wind are reviewed. Solar wind abundance measurements are discussed and solar wind, coronal, and photospheric abundances for elements between H and Fe are presented. Also, consideration is given to the determination of the solar wind isotopic composition of the noble gases using foil collection techniques and the observation of solar wind heavy ions with the mass per charge spectrometer on ISEE-3. Other topics include solar wind observations with solid state detectors, solar wind abundances in the magnetosheath and the plasma sheet, and high-mass resolution measurements of chemical elements and isotopes in the solar wind.

  16. (Carbon isotope fractionation inplants)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  17. Free Air Respiratory Carbon Isotope Enrichment Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, L. D.; Greaver, T.; Schaffer, B.; Moreno, T.

    2003-12-01

    Recycling of respiratory carbon in canopies is difficult to measure. Other than a steady state model, there are currently no direct methods of measuring recycling. Respiratory carbon recycling not only will affect the carbon isotope ratio signature of the canopy, but is also important in partitioning gross photosynthesis and respiration from net ecosystem exchange (NEE). In order to better understand recycling, we empirically derived an integrated measure of recycling in a cover crop (Crotalaria juncea L.) and compared it with that derived by the steady state model. A measured dose of nitrogen gas having CO2 with a high Carbon-13 abundance (41%) was applied at ground level ( ˜10 cm above the soil surface) with a system of hoses in a 10 by 10 m plot embedded in a 30 by 30 m plot. We adjusted the flux rate of this enriched gas weekly to correspond to weekly measurements of soil respiration rates. The gas application rates at ground level were sufficiently low so as to not affect the carbon dynamics of the treatment plot relative to that of a control plot with only nitrogen (no CO2) applied. The isotopic composition of the applied gas, however, was high enough to significantly increase the isotopic composition of respired CO2. Using the carbon isotopic composition of respiration and biomass from the control and treatment plots and mass balance principles we calculated that 45% of the total respired CO2 is recycled by this crop, which compares well with that derived by the steady state model (48%). Partitioning of gross photosynthesis and respiration by isotopic methods usually assumes no recycling. Recycling, however, will have an effect on the isotopic composition of respired CO2. After correcting for the recycling effects on the carbon isotope ratios of respired CO2 leaving the canopy, we calculated that the average gross photosynthesis for this crop was 40.4? moles/m2s and gross respiration was in the order of 17.8 ? moles/m2s. These values are similar to those previously observed in agricultural crops.

  18. Lithium Isotopic Abundances in Metal-poor Halo Stars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Asplund; David L. Lambert; Poul Erik Nissen; Francesca Primas; Verne V. Smith

    2006-01-01

    Very high quality spectra of 24 metal-poor halo dwarfs and subgiants have been acquired with ESO's VLT\\/UVES for the purpose of determining Li isotopic abundances. The derived one-dimensional, non-LTE 7Li abundances from the Li I 670.8 nm line reveal a pronounced dependence on metallicity but with negligible scatter around this trend. Very good agreement is found between the abundances from

  19. LITERATURE SURVEY ON ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO MEASUREMENTS - 2001-2005

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-13

    Along with my usual weekly review of the published literature for new nuclear data, I also search for new candidates for best measurements of isotopic abundances from a single source. Most of the published articles, that I previously had found in the Research Library at the Brookhaven Lab, have already been sent to the members of the Atomic Weights Commission, by either Michael Berglund or Thomas Walczyk. In the last few days, I checked the published literature for any other articles in the areas of natural variations in isotopic abundance ratios, measurements of isotopic abundance ratios on samples of extra-terrestrial material and isotopic abundance ratio measurements performed using ICPMS instruments. Hopefully this information will be of interest to members of the Commission, the sub-committee on isotopic abundance measurements (SIAM), members of the former sub-committee on natural isotopic fractionation (SNIF), the sub-committee on extra-terrestrial isotope ratios (SETIR), the RTCE Task Group and the Guidelines Task Group, who are dealing with ICPMS and TIMS comparisons. In the following report, I categorize the publications in one of four areas. Measurements performed using either positive or negative ions with Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer, TIMS, instruments; measurements performed on Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer, ICPMS, instruments; measurements of natural variations of the isotopic abundance ratios; and finally measurements on extra-terrestrial samples with instrumentation of either type. There is overlap in these areas. I selected out variations and ET results first and then categorized the rest of the papers by TIMS and ICPMS.

  20. Isotope analyses of molecular and total organic carbon from miocene sediments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Pagani; KATHERINE H. FREEMAN; MICHAEL A. ARTHUR

    2000-01-01

    Carbon-isotope compositions of n-alkanes, pristane and phytane, and total organic carbon were measured and compared against isotopic trends of coeval alkadienones from Miocene sediments containing very low organic-carbon contents. Compound-specific isotope analysis of n-alkanes and isoprenoid lipids, in conjunction with abundance distributions of n-alkanes reveal the influence of terrestrially derived organic carbon at all sites analyzed. In general, n-alkanes are

  1. Isotopic abundance in atom trap trace analysis

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Zheng-Tian; Hu, Shiu-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Mueller, Peter

    2014-03-18

    A method and system for detecting ratios and amounts of isotopes of noble gases. The method and system is constructed to be able to measure noble gas isotopes in water and ice, which helps reveal the geological age of the samples and understand their movements. The method and system uses a combination of a cooled discharge source, a beam collimator, a beam slower and magneto-optic trap with a laser to apply resonance frequency energy to the noble gas to be quenched and detected.

  2. On the enrichment of low-abundant isotopes of light chemical elements by gas centrifuges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisevich, V. D.; Morozov, O. E.; Zaozerskiy, Yu. P.; Shmelev, G. M.; Shipilov, Yu. D.

    2000-08-01

    A brief review of the main areas for the application of the isotopes 15N and 13C is made. Separation of the nitrogen isotopes in a single gas centrifuge in the form of pure nitrogen, ammonia, and trifluoride of nitrogen as well as the carbon isotopes in the form of carbon dioxide has been studied by means of numerical simulation. The parameters of the centrifugal machine investigated were close to the parameters of the Iguassu machine. The dependence of the efficiency criterion versus the basic parameters of the separation process has been explored in the computational experiments. Comparisons of the calculated results with the experimental data have shown good agreement. The results obtained have demonstrated the possibility of using gas centrifuge technology to enrich successfully the low-abundant isotopes of light chemical elements.

  3. Comprehensive study of carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions, trace element abundances, and cathodoluminescence intensities of calcite in the Murchison CM chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiya, Wataru; Sugiura, Naoji; Marrocchi, Yves; Takahata, Naoto; Hoppe, Peter; Shirai, Kotaro; Sano, Yuji; Hiyagon, Hajime

    2015-07-01

    We have performed in situ analyses of C and O isotopic compositions, trace element concentrations, and cathodoluminescence (CL) intensities on calcite in Murchison, a weakly altered CM chondrite. We found that the trace element (Mg, Mn, and Fe) concentrations are heterogeneous within single calcite grains. Grain to grain heterogeneity is even more pronounced. The analyzed calcite grains can be separated into two distinct types with respect to their C isotopic ratios, trace element concentrations, and CL characteristics: Calcite grains with higher ?13CPDB values (?75‰) have low trace element concentrations and uniformly dark CL, while grains with lower ?13C values (?35‰) have higher trace element concentrations and CL zoning. In contrast to the C isotopic ratios, O isotopic ratios are similar for both types of calcites (?18OSMOW ? 34‰). The O isotopic ratios, trace element concentrations, and CL characteristics provide no evidence for C-isotope evolution in fluids from a single C reservoir by Rayleigh-type isotope fractionation (i.e., removal of C-bearing gaseous species). Also, it seems difficult to explain the O and C isotopic compositions of the two types of calcites by their formation at different temperatures from a single fluid. Instead, the ?13C variation suggests the presence of at least two C reservoirs with different isotopic ratios in the aqueous fluids from which the calcites precipitated. The C reservoirs with lower ?13C values are likely to be organic matter. The same holds for the C reservoirs with higher ?13C values which might have significant contributions from the 13C-enriched grains identified in meteoritic insoluble organic matter. Thermodynamic calculations show that calcite with lower Fe concentrations formed under more reduced conditions than calcite with higher Fe concentrations. If this is the case, the 13C-rich organic grains may have been destroyed and dissolved in the fluids under more reduced conditions than other organic components. The fact that the two types of calcites were found in different domains in the same thin section suggests that microenvironments with diverse physicochemical conditions such as redox states were present at scales of 100's ?m.

  4. Report on carbon and nitrogen abundance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the proposal was to determine the nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios from transition layer lines in stars with different T(sub eff) and luminosities. The equations which give the surface emission line fluxes and the measured ratio of the NV to CIV emission line fluxes are presented and explained. The abundance results are compared with those of photospheric abundance studies for stars in common with the photospheric investigations. The results show that the analyses are at least as accurate as the photospheric determinations. These studies can be extended to F and early G stars for which photospheric abundance determinations for giants are hard to do because molecular bands become too weak. The abundance determination in the context of stellar evolution is addressed. The N/C abundance ratio increases steeply at the point of evolution for which the convection zone reaches deepest. Looking at the evolution of the rotation velocities v sin i, a steep decrease in v sin i is related to the increasing depth of the convection zone. It is concluded that the decrease in v sin i for T(sub eff) less than or approximately = 5800 K is most probably due to the rearrangement of the angular momentum in the stars due to deep convective mixing. It appears that the convection zone is rotating with nearly depth independent angular momentum. Other research results and ongoing projects are discussed.

  5. Isotopic composition of carbon in diamonds of diamondites: record of mass fractionation in the upper mantle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Teruyuki Maruoka; Gero Kurat; Gabor Dobosi; Christian Koeberl

    2004-01-01

    Carbon isotope data have been obtained for diamonds in diamondites (framesites, polycrystalline diamond) of unknown origin (presumably from southern Africa), which contain minor amounts of garnet (plus rare clinopyroxene). The carbon isotope abundance ratios show wide inter- and intra-sample ranges. The 13C variations of diamonds from diamondites with \\

  6. Probing the Isotopic Composition of Surface Waters Across Isotopic Extremes of Cryogenian Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosak, T.; Matys, E. D.; Bird, L. R.; Macdonald, F. A.; Freeman, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    Neoproterozoic carbonate strata record unusually large and positive carbon isotope values (?13Ccarb from 4 to 10 per mil), and stratigraphically extensive large negative carbon isotope excursions (?13Ccarb < -5 per mil). Mechanisms that account for the magnitude, the facies distribution and the global abundance of these isotopically extreme carbonates in Neoproterozoic successions remain poorly understood. Little is also known about organisms and metabolisms that cycled carbon in these carbonate strata, because they rarely contain well-preserved organic-rich fossils. To better understand the cycling of carbon during the deposition of the 715-635 Ma Tayshir member of the Tsagaan Oloom Formation, Mongolia, we analyzed ?13Cfossil of two types of organic fossils that occur in 13C- enriched carbonates (+ 5 to 9.9 per mil) and within 13C-depleted carbonates of the Tayshir anomaly (-3 to -6 per mil). Because these organic microfossils are remarkably similar to the tests of modern planktonic, herbivorous tintinnid ciliates and benthic macroscopic red algae, respectively, they can be used as tracers of organic matter production in surface waters. Fossil tests were extracted by acid maceration, cleaned and analyzed morphologically and microscopically. Their carbon isotopic composition was measured using a nano-scaled elemental analyzer inlet (nano-EA-IRMS), with ±1 per mil analytical precision. To date, we analyzed 12 samples of 100-150 organic tests, representing 3 different fossiliferous parts of the Tayshir anomaly (?13Ccarb < -3 per mil) and 3 different strata predating the Tayshir anomaly (?13Ccarb > +5 per mil), respectively. More samples, including those of fossil algae and tests from the carbonate strata overlying the Tayshir anomaly, are currently being analyzed. Initial data reveal a rather constant isotopic composition of organic carbon in fossil tests (?13Cfossil), with values of -23 ±1 per mil both within 13C-enriched and 13C-depleted carbonates. The isotopic difference between ?13Cfossil and 13C-enriched carbonates is 28 to 30 per mil, suggesting maximal isotopic fractionation by primary producers, and little environmental (or diagenetic) processing of primary photosynthetic carbon. The carbonates of the Tayshir anomaly preserve two organic materials: matrix or bulk carbon characterized by a ?13Corg that covaries with ?13Ccarb, and a small, but morphologically diagnostic component whose ?13Cfossil values do not covary with ?13Ccarb. The stratigraphic thickness (~ 50 m) and isotopic heterogeneity of the organic matter within the Tayshir anomaly (~ 50 m) suggest a prolonged and large contribution of organic carbon remineralization.

  7. Boron isotopic composition and concentration in modern marine carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Hemming, N.G.; Hanson, G.N. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The boron isotopic compositions and boron concentrations of selected modern marine carbonates were analyzed by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry with a 2{sigma} reproducibility of standards and samples better than 0.7{per thousand}. It was found that the boron isotopic compositions of modern marine carbonates fall within a relatively narrow range (+22.1 {plus minus} 3{per thousand} relative to NBS SRM951 boric acid standard) for all samples (biogenic, nonbiogenic, warm water, cold water, aragonitic, or calcitic). This is about 17{per thousand} lighter than seawater. This indicates that mineralogy, temperature, and vital effects are not primary controls on the observed isotopic composition. The narrow range in isotopic composition is no contrast to the wide range in boron concentrations of these samples (10.9-71.4 ppm). The boron isotopic compositions and boron concentrations in modern marine carbonates are consistent with preferential adsorption of the isotopically lighter B(OH){sub 4}{sup 1 {minus}} aqueous species over the B(OH){sub 3} species before incorporation into the carbonate site. Because there is a pH control on the availability of B(OH){sub 4}{sup 1{minus}}, the result is a pH control on the boron abundance in the carbonates. Possible second-order biomineralogic controls on pH may account for boron concentrations in calcareous organisms that produce low pH microenvironments at the site of CaCO{sub 3} precipitation.

  8. Carbon and oxygen abundances of field RR Lyrae stars. I. Carbon abundances

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, D.; Manduca, A.; Deming, D.; Bell, R.A.

    1982-04-01

    From an analysis of KPNO 4-m echelle plates and simultaneous uvby..beta.. photometry, we have determined carbon abundances and carbon-to-iron ratios for a large number of field RR Lyrae stars having (Fe/H)> or approx. =-1.2. It is found that these field RR Lyrae stars: stars which are known to be in an advanced evolutionary state: have carbon-to-iron ratios which are similar to those of unevolved stars.

  9. A Clumped Isotope Calibration for Lacustrine Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsunaga, B. A.; Mering, J. A.; Petryshyn, V. A.; Dunbar, R. B.; Cohen, A. S.; Liu, X.; Kaufman, D. S.; Eagle, R.; Tripati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our capacity to understand Earth's environmental history is highly dependent on the accuracy of past climate reconstructions. Unfortunately, many terrestrial proxies—tree rings, speleothems, leaf margin analyses, etc.—are influenced by the effects of both temperature and precipitation. Methods that can isolate the effects of temperature alone are needed, and clumped isotope thermometry has the potential to be a useful tool for determining terrestrial climates. Multiple studies have shown that the fraction of 13C—18O bonds in carbonates is inversely related to the temperature at which the rocks formed and may be a useful proxy for reconstructing temperatures on land. An in-depth survey of lacustrine carbonates, however, has not yet been published. Therefore we have been measuring the abundance of 13C18O16O in the CO2 produced by the dissolution of modern lake samples' carbonate minerals in phosphoric acid and comparing results to independently known estimates of lake water temperature and air temperature. Some of the sample types we have investigated include endogenic carbonates, freshwater gastropods, bivalves, microbialites, and ooids.

  10. Carbon isotope effects in carbonate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deines, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Global carbon cycle models require a complete understanding of the ? 13C variability of the Earth's C reservoirs as well as the C isotope effects in the transfer of the element among them. An assessment of ? 13C changes during CO 2 loss from degassing magmas requires knowledge of the melt-CO 2 carbon isotope fractionation. In order to examine the potential size of this effect for silicate melts of varying composition, 13C reduced partition functions were computed in the temperature range 275 to 4000 K for carbonates of varying bond strengths (Mg, Fe, Mn, Sr, Ba, Pb, Zn, Cd, Li, and Na) and the polymorphs of calcite. For a given cation and a given pressure the 13C content increases with the density of the carbonate structure. For a given structure the tendency to concentrate 13C increases with pressure. The effect of pressure (‰/10 kbar) on the size of the reduced partition function of aragonite varies with temperature; in the pressure range 1 to 10 5 bars the change is given by: ? 13C p average=-0.01796+0.06635? 10 3/T+0.006875? 10 6/T2 For calcite III the pressure effect is on average 1.4× larger than that for aragonite at all temperatures. The nature of the cation in a given structure type has a significant effect on the carbon isotope fractionation properties. The tendency to concentrate 13C declines in the series magnesite, aragonite, dolomite, strontianite, siderite, calcite, smithonite, witherite, rhodochrosite, otavite, cerrusite. For divalent cations a general expression for an estimation of the reduced partition function (?) from the reduced mass (? = [M Cation × M Carbonate]/[M Cation + M Carbonate]) is: 1000 ln?=(0.032367-0.072563? 10 3/T-0.01073? 10 6/T2)??-14.003+29.953? 10 3/T+9.4610? 10 6/T2 For Mg-calcite the 13C content varies with the Mg concentration. The fractionation between Mg-calcite (X = mole fraction of MgCO 3) and calcite is given by: 1000 ln(? MgCalite- Calcite)=[0.013702-0.10957× 10 3/T+1.35940× 10 6/T2-0.329124× 10 9/T3+0.0304160× 10 12/T4]× X1.5 The results of the computations were used together with previously published experimental vaporous CO 2-silicate melt fractionations to determine, at 1200°C, a relationship between melt-CO 213C fractionation and melt composition, expressed as molecular proportions of the cations Mg, Fe, Mn, Ca, Na, K and Si and Al: 1000 ln? Melt- CO2=5.14× Mg+ Fe+ Mn+ Ca+ Na+ K/Si+ Al+0.86 A conceptual model to understand this relationship was developed. The results of the computations approximate closely the experimentally determined vaporous CO 2-CaCO 3 fractionations at high temperatures. Empirically derived dolomite-calcite and calcite-graphite 13C isotope geothermometers agree with results of the present work.

  11. The Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Hg in Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauretta, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    During the past three year grant period we made excellent progress in our study of the abundances and isotopic compositions of Hg and other volatile trace elements in extraterrestrial materials. As part of my startup package I received funds to construct a state-of-the-art experimental facility to study gas-solid reaction kinetics. Much of our effort was spent developing the methodology to measure the abundance and isotopic composition of Hg at ultratrace levels in solid materials. In our first study, the abundance and isotopic composition of Hg was determined in bulk samples of the Murchison (CM) and Allende (CV) carbonaceous chondrites. We have continued our study of mercury in primitive meteorites and expanded the suite of meteorites to include other members of the CM and CV chondrite group as well as CI and CO chondrites. Samples of the CI chondrite Orgueil, the CM chondrites Murray, Nogoya, and Cold Bokkeveld, the CO chondrites Kainsaz, Omans, and Isna, and the CV chondrites Vigarano, Mokoia, and Grosnaja were tested. We have developed a thermal analysis ICP-MS technique and applied it to the study of a suite of thermally labile elements (Zn, As, Se, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, Hg, Au, Tl, Pb, and Bi) in geologic materials as well.

  12. Mass Spectrometric Measurement of Martian Krypton and Xenon Isotopic Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P.; Mauersberger, K.

    1993-01-01

    The Viking gas chromatograph mass spectrometer experiment provided significant data on the atmospheric composition at the surface of Mars, including measurements of several isotope ratios. However, the limited dynamic range of this mass spectrometer resulted in marginal measurements for the important Kr and Xe isotopic abundance. The Xe-129 to Xe-132 ratio was measured with an uncertainty of 70%, but none of the other isotope ratios for these species were obtained. Accurate measurement of the Xe and Kr isotopic abundance in this atmosphere provides an important data point in testing theories of planetary formation and atmospheric evolution. The measurement is also essential for a stringent test for the Martian origin of the SNC meteorites, since the Kr and Xe fractionation pattern seen in gas trapped in glassy nodules of an SNC (EETA 79001) is unlike any other known solar system resevoir. Current flight mass spectrometer designs combined with the new technology of a high-performance vacuum pumping system show promise for a substantial increase in gas throughput and the dynamic range required to accurately measure these trace species. Various aspects of this new technology are discussed.

  13. Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopes in Type II Supernova Diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Donald D.; Meyer, Bradley S.; Sanderson, Chris I.; Russell, Sara S.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1995-07-01

    We construct a model for the origin of the abundant nanometer diamonds found in meteorites. We interpret them as interstellar particles that were grown during the expansions of supernova interiors. The physical setting and the chemical-vapor-deposition process that we describe present clear reasons both for the small sizes (nm) of the diamonds and for their mean isotopic composition being not greatly different from solar. To delineate the isotopic requirements for collections of diamonds (which are too small for analysis individually) we present measurements of carbon and nitrogen isotopes obtained by stepped combustion of diamond collections. Our model for the growth of supernova diamonds is motivated by a series of postulates, unremarkable as single postulates, that together produce a successful calculation. The computed growth occurs in the continuously mixing envelopes of expanding Type II supernova remnants. It provides a good characterization of these facts: (1) the C isotopic composition is not far from solar; (2) both carbon and nitrogen become isotopically lighter as the diamonds are combusted; (3) the C/N ratio changes during combustion; (4) the diamonds are individually tiny; (5) collections of diamonds are carriers of Xe-HL. We show that the isotopic gradient during combustion may be interpreted in this model as either an isotopic gradient within each diamond or as a correlation between isotopic composition and size of individual diamonds contained in the bulk collections.

  14. Carbon isotope effects associated with autotrophic acetogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Risatti, J. B.; Hayes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The carbon kinetic isotope effects associated with synthesis of acetate from CO2 and H2 during autotrophic growth of Acetobacterium woodii at 30 degrees C have been measured by isotopic analyses of CO2, methyl-carbon, and total acetate. Closed systems allowing construction of complete mass balances at varying stages of growth were utilized, and the effects of the partitioning of carbon between CO2 and HCO3- were taken account. For the overall reaction, total carbonate --> total acetate, isotope effects measured in replicate experiments ranged from -59.0 +/- 0.9% to -57.2 +/- 2.3%. Taking into account all measurements, the weighted mean and standard deviation are -58.6 +/- 0.7%. There is no evidence for intramolecular ordering in the acetate. The carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary acetate, otherwise expected to be near that of sedimentary organic carbon, is likely to be depleted in environments in which autotrophic acetogenesis is occurring.

  15. The abundances of elements and isotopes in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Gloeckler, G. (The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland 20707, USA (USA)); Geiss, J. (Physikalisches Institut, University of Bern (Switzerland))

    1989-03-01

    Solar wind abundances have now been measured for eleven elements and the isotopes of the noble gases. The composition of all elements up to and including Ni, as well as most of their isotopes, should become known when new high-mass-resolution solar wind spectrometers are launched in the next decade. Aside from solar wind protons and alpha particles, which have been studied extensively since the 1960's, our information for heavier elements is limited. Nevertheless, two effects stand out. First is the enrichment of abundances of elements with low first ionizaiton potential (FIP), most likely the combined result of (a) an atom-ion separation process in the upper chromosphere, and (b) a marginal coupling of low-charge-state heavy ions to protons and alphas during the acceleration of the solar wind. Second, there is variability in the solar wind composition over a whole range of time scales. Recent measurements carried out in the Earth's magnetosheath during times that included high-speed coronal-hole-associated flows indicate a significantly lower overabundance of low FIP elements. Given the fact that the He/H ratio is remarkably constant in the coronal hole solar wind, this result suggests that both enrichment and variability are reduced in such flows. Studies by the ULYSSES spacecraft of the characteristics and composition of the least complicated solar wind, i.e., the flow emanating from the polar coronal holes, should significantly increase our understanding of coronal processes and solar wind acceleration. By combining these studies with measurements of the complete elemental and isotopic composition of the solar wind, we will be able to derive solar abundances for elements and isotopes that otherwise are poorly known.

  16. Ultimate Isotope Precision for Carbonates Thermo Scientific

    E-print Network

    Lachniet, Matthew S.

    precision of carbonates · Two independent reaction lines with acid dosing valves for high sample throughputUltimate Isotope Precision for Carbonates Thermo Scientific KIEL IV Carbonate Device Part of Thermo phosphorolysis are removed from the CO2 gas phase under high vacuum in the first trap. Prior to transfer

  17. Martian carbon dioxide: Clues from isotopes in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, H. R.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.; Jull, A. J. T.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Attempts to unravel the origin and evolution of the atmosphere and hydrosphere on Mars from isotopic data have been hampered by the impreciseness of the measurements made by the Viking Lander and by Earth-based telescopes. The SNC meteorites which are possibly pieces of the Martian surface offer a unique opportunity to obtain more precise estimates of the planet's volatile inventory and isotopic composition. Recently, we reported results on oxygen isotopes of water extracted by pyrolysis from samples of Shergotty, Zagami, Nakhla, Chassigny, Lafayette, and EETA-79001. Now we describe complementary results on the stable isotopic composition of carbon dioxide extracted simultaneously from those same samples. We will also report on C-14 abundances obtained by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for some of these CO2 samples.

  18. The abundance of carbon in HU 2-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    A logarithmic carbon abundance of 8.61 + or - 0.3 is derived for the planetary nebula Hu 2-1 using data taken with the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite. This value is close to the logarithmic carbon abundance of 8.67 + or - 0.1, found for the sun by other investigators. The carbon abundance of Hu 2-1 is compared to those of other planetary nebulae and to the predictions of stellar evolution calculations.

  19. The Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Hg in Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, J. D.; Klaue, Bjorn

    2005-01-01

    During the three year grant period we made excellent progress in our study of the abundances and isotopic compositions of Hg and other volatile trace elements in extraterrestrial materials. At the time the grant started, our collaborating PI, Dante Lauretts, was a postdoctoral research associate working with Peter Buseck at Arizona State University. The work on chondritic Hg was done in collaboration with Dante Lauretta and Peter Buseck and this study was published in Lauretta et a1 (2001a). In July, 2001 Dante Lauretta accepted a position as an Assistant Professor in the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory at the University of Arizona. His funding was transferred and this grant has supported much of his research activities during his first two years at the U of A. Several other papers are in preparation and will be published soon. We presented papers on this topic at Goldschmidt Conferences, the Lunar and Planetary Science Conferences, and the Annual Meetings of the Meteoritical Society. The work done under this grant has spurred several new directions of inquiry, which we are still pursuing. Included in this paper are the studies of bulk abundances and isotopic compositions of metreoritic Mercury, and the development of a thermal analysis ICP-MS technique applied to thermally liable elements.

  20. Clumped Isotopes Applied to Carbonate Diagenesis and High Temperature Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, C. M.; Jourdan, A.; Kluge, T.; Dale, A.; Davis, S.; Vandeginste, V.

    2012-12-01

    The field of clumped isotopes is concerned with the state of ordering of natural substances and aims at constraining the abundance of 18O-13C bonds (i.e. a 'clump') within the lattice of carbonate minerals. Measuring the difference between the abundance of 18O-13C bonds in a sample relative to a stochastic distribution of isotopologues offers a single-phase paleothermometer applicable to all carbonate phases. Most of the applications of clumped isotopes to date have been in the field of paleoclimate, but applications to diagenetic systems are becoming more common. The independence of clumped isotopes from the isotopic composition of the diagenetic fluid reduces ambiguities when interpreting paragenesis, fluid flow history, and thermal history of basins. This presentation will synthesize the results of several projects within our group that collectively aim at understanding and applying clumped isotopes to diagenetic systems. One example of project including diagenesis and clumped isotope is a study of low-temperature diagenetic calcite in a salt dome in Oman (Jebel Madar). Jebel Madar is an ideal case study as large fracture-related crystals can be sampled for both clumped isotopes and fluid inclusions. Results show a good match between single-phase fluid inclusions suggesting temperature of precipitations below 90-50°C, and clumped isotope data measured on the same crystals. The low-temperature study reveals the history of gradual cooling and progressive mixing between two sources of diagenetic fluids in the fracture of Jebel Madar, and highlights the potential of clumped isotope for diagenetic studies. However, applications at high-temperatures are currently more challenging because of the lack of empirical calibrations above 50°C. A second project is thus focused on a series of high-temperature lab precipitation experiments for calibrations at high temperature, while a third project explores applicability of clumped isotopes to cemented siliciclastic units. The long-term aim of our research efforts is thus calibration at subsurface conditions, and application of clumped isotope to unravel the diagenetic history of both carbonate and siliciclastic sequences. We would like to acknowledge the financial support of QCCSRC (funded jointly by Qatar Petroleum, Shell and the Qatar Science & Technology Park) and a BP Case studentship from the EPSRC.

  1. Carbon Isotopes in an Earth System Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Cuntz; C. H. Reick; E. Maier-Reimer; M. Heimann; M. Scholze; T. Naegler

    2009-01-01

    We present first calculations of the carbon isotopic composition of carbon dioxide in the Earth System Model (ESM) COSMOS. Earth System models consist of coupled models of the ocean, the atmosphere, the land surface, the biosphere (marine and terrestrial, plants and soils), and the cryosphere (snow and ice). In COSMOS from the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany, these

  2. Influence of paleoenvironment on the carbon isotope compositions of pedogenic carbonate formed in Paleozoic vertic paleosols

    SciTech Connect

    Mora, C.I.; Driese, S.G.; Seager, P.G. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Pedogenic carbonate occurs in numerous vertic-featured paleosols developed in Paleozoic red bed successions of the southern and central Appalachians. The authors note systematic differences in the delta C-13 values of soil carbonate developed during pedogenesis in coastal-marine and distal alluvial plain environments as compared to pedogenesis in proximal alluvial plain environments. These differences have been measured in pedogenic carbonate occurring in late Silurian (Bloomsburg Fm.) vertic-featured paleosols. Evidence for pre-existing marine skeletal material in these paleosols has been observed only in the lowermost portions of the Bloomsburg Fm.; other paleosols were apparently devoid of any precursor carbonate phase. Therefore, the heavier isotopic signatures of pedogenic carbonate within coastal-marine and distal alluvial plain environments may be due to contributions from marine spray, marine or brackish groundwaters, or to less-extensive biological activity. Although carbonate nodules are commonly developed in all environments, rhizoliths appear to be more abundant in paleosols developed in proximal alluvial plain environments. Despite the large differences in carbon isotope compositions attributed to paleoenvironment, these vertic-featured paleosols share common patterns of carbonate cementation and isotopic trends (nodules enriched in C-13 relative to rhizoliths). Thus, despite the different pedogenic paleoenvironments, there were similar physico-chemical controls on soil carbonate precipitation. Better understanding of the paleoclimatic information retained in paleosols will require thorough petrographic, sedimentologic and geochemical studies.

  3. STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF NUCLEIC ACIDS TO TRACE SOURCES OF DISSOLVED SUBSTRATES USED BY ESTUARINE BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The natural abundance of stable carbon isotopes measured in bacterial nucleic acids that were extracted from estuarine bacterial concentrates were used to trace sources of organic matter for bacteria in.aquatic environments. he stable carbon isotope ratios of P. aeruginosa and nu...

  4. Production of carbon isotopes by laser separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Vladimir Y.; Dyad'kin, A. P.; Maluta, D. D.; Kuzmenko, V. A.; Pigulskiy, S. V.; Mezhevov, Vladimir S.; Letokhov, Vladilen S.; Laptev, Vladimir B.; Ryabov, Evgeny A.; Yarovoi, I. V.; Zarin, V. B.; Podoryashy, A. S.

    2000-07-01

    Since the advent of lasers, these unique sources of highly intense and monochromatic radiation have been proposed as excellent tools to induce or catalyze chemical reactions. Due to the great interest to the problem of isotope production, investigation and application, the laser method of isotope separation has received the most attention worldwide and may be the first major commercial application of lasers to chemistry. Laser methods of isotope separation are based on high selectivity and power of laser sources of radiation. One of the most prominent method is based on the effect is isotope-selective multiphoton dissociation of molecules by IR-radiation (MLIS-method). This phenomena was discovered in Russia in 1974 and developed from scientific investigations to industrial scale production of 13C isotopes in collaboration between the Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy, TRINITI and Institute of Spectroscopy of RAS. Demonstration facilities for sulfur and carbon isotope separation with average productivity up to 2 g/h have been created as a result of collaboration and these systems are aimed at optimization of MLIS process and evaluation of its cost efficiency. Experiments show that laser produced isotopes are far cheaper as compared to any conventional technique. Results of basic scientific research, existing technological cooperation allow to start building a laser isotope separation plant. Light element isotopes produced there can answer a wide variety of demands in many technologies. These isotopes can be readily used in medicine, agriculture, environmental monitoring, etc.

  5. The carbon isotope geochemistry of mantle xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deines, Peter

    2002-10-01

    Carbon occurs in mantle samples in several chemical, mineralogical and morphological forms. It has been observed as CO 2, CH 4 and CO in fluid inclusions, as carbonate, graphite, diamond, moissanite, solid solution in silicates, and organic compounds. The total carbon concentration reported for mantle xenoliths varies by four orders of magnitude from below 1 ppm to close to 10 000 ppm. About 40% of these samples contain less than 50 ppm, 70% less than 100 ppm and 95% less than 500 ppm C. Carbon with ?13C of about -5‰ has been identified as a major isotopic composition signature for the mantle (carbonatite and kimberlite carbonates, diamonds and volcanic CO 2 exhalations); it is also observed in mantle xenoliths. However, there may also be a minor signature of C depleted in 13C ( ?13C=-22‰ to -26‰). Such light carbon has been observed in the dissolution residue of mantle minerals (olivine, pyroxene) and rocks, C fractions that have been interpreted as C dissolved in silicates, in diamonds, graphite, carbide, and hydrocarbons which are thought to be indigenous to the mantle. The data on xenoliths from basalts indicate that their ?13C distribution is essentially bimodal with peaks at -5‰ and -25‰ although the geologic occurrence of this light carbon has not yet been clearly delineated. Xenoliths from both hotspot and non-hotspot volcanoes cover the whole C isotopic composition range observed in mantle xenoliths; however, on average, xenoliths from non-hotspot volcanoes contain isotopically lighter carbon. Xenoliths from kimberlites cover the whole isotopic composition range as well, but, on average, probably show the lowest degree of 13C depletion. In addition, the second, low ?13C, mode may occur just above -20‰, coincident with the low 13C mode of southern African diamonds. Differences in the C concentration and isotopic composition have been observed between mantle minerals. The data are too few, however, to support firm conclusions on their size, or on how systematic these differences might be. Chemically more fractionated xenoliths tend to have higher ?13C values than less chemically fractionated ones. Processes that have been considered to be responsible for the considerable ?13C range in mantle C include the subduction of organic material and degassing. The observations on mantle xenoliths do not provide support for either, but indicate that as yet unexplored thermodynamic isotope effects, probably involving dissolved C in minerals and Si?C bonds, may be responsible for the observed mantle carbon isotope distribution. The occurrence of such isotope effects would help to understand a number of observations on the carbon isotope geochemistry of diamonds. In so far as mantle-degassing models have been based, in part, on the carbon isotopic composition and C/ 3He ratios, an understanding of the mantle carbon isotope geochemistry is essential to support or refute their validity. The xenolith data do not support degassing models based on the assumption of limited indigenous carbon isotope variability within the mantle, nor the supposition that all 13C depleted carbon is of surface origin. The relative proportions of mantle C's of differing isotope signature are not known; they will have to be established for well-founded C cycle models to be developed.

  6. On the isotopic composition of carbon in soil carbon dioxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. E. Cerling; D. K. Solomon; J. Quade; J. R. Bowman

    1991-01-01

    In this study it is shown that the isotopic composition of carbon in soil Coâ differs from the isotopic composition of carbon in soil-respired COâ. Soil COâ collected from a montane soil has an endmember δ¹³C value of -23.3% whereas soil-respired COâ in this system has a δ¹³C value of -27.5%. This difference is very close to the theoretical difference

  7. The effect of rising atmospheric oxygen on carbon and sulfur isotope anomalies in the Neoproterozoic Johnnie Formation, Death Valley, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan J. Kaufman; Frank A. Corsetti; Michael A. Varni

    2007-01-01

    Carbonates within the Rainstorm Member in the terminal Neoproterozoic Johnnie Formation of Death Valley, California record a remarkable negative carbon isotope anomaly – to a nadir of near ?11‰ – that accompanies a dramatic rise in trace sulfate abundance and fall of carbonate associated sulfate ?34S values. The carbonates, including the laterally extensive Johnnie Oolite, were deposited during marine flooding

  8. The abundances of elements and isotopes in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, George; Geiss, Johannes

    1989-01-01

    Solar wind abundances have now been measured for eleven elements and the isotopes of the noble gases. Aside from solar wind protons and alpha particles, which have been studied extensively since the 1960's, information for heavier elements is limited. Nevertheless, two effects stand out. First is the enrichment of abundances of elements with low first ionization potential (FIP), most likely the combined result of an atom-ion separation process in the upper chromosphere, and a marginal coupling of low-charge-state heavy ions to protons and alphas during the acceleration of the solar wind. Second, there is variability in the solar wind composition over a whole range of time scales. Recent measurements carried out in the earth's magnetosheath during times that included high-speed coronal-hole-associated flows indicate a significantly lower overabundance of low FIP elements. Given the fact that the He/H ratio is remarkably constant in the coronal hole solar wind, this result suggests that both enrichment and variability are reduced in such flows.

  9. A NEW CALCULATION FOR THE AGE OF THE EARTH FROM ABUNDANCES OF LEAD ISOTOPES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. G. Ostic; R. D. Russell; P. H. Reynolds

    1963-01-01

    A new method, basically distinct from the two most common methods, is ; suggested for calculating the age of the Earth from lead isotope abundances. In ; common with other methods, the new method assumes that the samples used in the ; calculation can be interpreted by equations appropriate to evolution of the lead ; isotope abundances in a single

  10. Coprecipitation and isotopic fractionation of boron in modern biogenic carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Vengosh, A. (Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia) Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel)); Chivas, A.R.; McCulloch, M.T. (Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia)); Kolodny, Y.; Starinsky, A. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel))

    1991-10-01

    The abundances and isotopic composition of boron in modern, biogenic calcareous skeletons from the Gulf of Elat, Israel, the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and in deep-sea sediments have been examined by negative thermal-ionization mass spectrometry. The selected species (Foraminifera, Pteropoda, corals, Gastropoda, and Pelecypoda) yield large variations in boron concentration that range from 1 ppm in gastropod shells to 80 ppm in corals. The variations of {delta}{sup 11}B may be controlled by isotopic exchange of boron species in which {sup 10}B is preferentially partitioned into the tetrahedral species, and coprecipitation of different proportions of trigonal and tetrahedral species in the calcium carbonates. The B content and {delta}{sup 11}B values of deep-sea sediments, Foraminifera tests, and corals are used to estimate the global oceanic sink of elemental boron by calcium carbonate deposition. As a result of enrichment of B in corals, a substantially higher biogenic sink of 6.4 {plus minus} 0.9 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr is calculated for carbonates. This is only slightly lower than the sink for desorbable B in marine sediments (10 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr) and approximately half that of altered oceanic crust (14 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr). Thus, carbonates are an important sink for B in the oceans being {approximately}20% of the total sinks. The preferential incorporation of {sup 10}B into calcium carbonate results in oceanic {sup 11}B-enrichment, estimated as 1.2 {plus minus} 0.3 {times} 10{sup 12} per mil {center dot} g/yr. The boron-isotope composition of authigenic, well-preserved carbonate skeletons may provide a useful tool to record secular boron-isotope variations in seawater at various times in the geological record.

  11. Stable carbon isotope measurements using laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauke, T. B.; Becker, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    The 2300 cm(exp -1) spectral region is especially interesting because (12)CO2 and (13)CO2 bands overlap in such a way that their rotational lines have approximately equal absorbance at the anticipated isotopic ratio (approximately 90) of carbon on Earth and Mars. Pairs of rotational lines we have studied are separated by as little as 0.050 cm(exp -1), but are well resolved with a tunable diode laser. Using sophisticated sweep integration and signal averaging techniques, we have measured the stable isotope ratio in carbon dioxide to a precision of better than 1 percent.

  12. Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Solar-Wind-Implanted Methane in Lunar Soil and Breccias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecluse, C.; Morse, A. D.; Butterworth, A. L.; Brilliant, D. R.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1995-09-01

    Early analyses of lunar soils have revealed the presence of ppm amounts of indigenous methane and ethane thought to originate from the interaction of carbon and hydrogen in the solar wind [1]. The carbon abundance of lunar soils are typically between 50 to 300 ppm with isotopic compositions ranging from 0 to +20 per mil [2]. Solar wind hydrogen is generally accepted to contain delta D = -1000 per mil i.e. O ppm deuterium content; as indicated from D/H measurements of lunar hydrogen, after correction for contamination effects of terrestrial water from the sample [3]. In addition, recent solar spectroscopic measurements have detected hydrogen bearing molecules e.g. water [4]. Hence, isotopic analyses of methane in lunar samples can provide valuable information about isotopic composition of solar wind implanted species. For this study, we have analyzed methane from lunar soil A12023 and a breccia fragment taken from soil A10086. The methane from these samples was released by stepped pyrolysis and introduced into a new static vacuum mass spectrometer, MIRANDA (capable of measuring the delta l3C of ng amounts of methane to a precision of +/- 0.2 per mil. Isotopic compositions and abundances are calculated from 17M/l6M ratios in methane from which the delta 13C values can be determined assuming that solar wind hydrogen is delta D = -1000 per mil. Results from A12023 are presented in Figure 1, results from A10086 are discussed elsewhere [5]. Both samples displayed a broad release of methane between 400 degrees C and 800 degrees C with yields of 1.3 ppm and 1.9 ppm for the soil and the breccia respectively, consistent with previous measurements of ppm amounts of methane [1]. Figure 1 illustrates that methane in A12023 is isotopically heavy with a plateau of delta 13C = +55 per mil at a temperature between 500 degrees C and 600 degrees C. This is consistent with the previous measurement of A10086 [5] which also revealed isotopically heavy carbon with delta 13C approximately of +60 per mil. There is a possibility of hydrogen isotope exchange between water in the sample and methane, although unlikely below 600 degrees C. The delta l3C values have also been recalculated using a delta D of -360 per mil, the average delta D of water extracted from lunar material [6]. In this case a delta l3C of +20 per mil is obtained for the methane, in closer agreement to previous analyses which have a maximum delta 13C = +15 per mil [7]. Our preliminary investigations have indicated that the carbon in the methane is isotopically distinct from other lunar carbon sources. However further analyses are required to measure both delta 13C and delta D in a variety of lunar samples to verify the hypothesis that the methane is of solar wind origin. References: [1] Abell P. I. et al. (1970) Nature, 226, 251-252. [2] Epstein S. and Taylor H. P.(1973) Proc. LSC 4th, 1559-1575. [3] Epstein S. and Taylor H. P. (1972) Proc. LSC 3rd, 1429-1454. [4] Wallace L. et al. (1995) Science, 268, 1155-1158. [5] Brilliant D. R. et al. (1994) LPS XXV, 173-174. [6] Merlivat L. et al. (1972) Proc. LSC 3rd, 1473-1477. [7] Chang S. et al. (1974) GCA, 38, 853-872.

  13. Carbon dioxide solubility and carbon isotope fractionation in basaltic melt

    SciTech Connect

    Mattey, D.P. (Univ. of London, Egham Hill (United Kingdom) Univ. of Tasmania, Hobart (Australia))

    1991-11-01

    Carbon dioxide solubility and isotope fractionation data for a MORB composition at 1,200-1,400C and 5-20 kbar have been obtained using piston-cylinder apparatus and stepped-heating mass spectrometry. Carbon dioxide solubility in basalt melt at 5, 10 and 20 kbar is 0.15-0.17%, 0.45-0.51%, and 1.49%, respectively. Values for {Delta}Co{sub 2}(vap) - CO 2/3{sup {minus}} (basalt melt), obtained from the difference between the isotopic compositions for coexisting vapor and melt, vary from 1.8% to 2.2%. A review of measured and estimated values for carbon isotope fractionation between CO{sub 2} vapor and carbon dissolved in basic melts shows variation from 1.8% to 4.6%. Results of this study and other considerations favor relatively small equilibrium CO{sub 2} vapor melt fractionation factors around 2%.

  14. Stable isotope analysis of carbon and nitrogen in angrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abernethy, F. A. J.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Starkey, N. A.; Anand, M.; Franchi, I. A.; Grady, Monica M.

    2013-09-01

    Angrites are a small group of ancient basaltic achondrites, notable for their unusual chemistry and extreme volatile depletion. No comprehensive study of indigenous light elements currently exists for the group. Measurement of the abundances and isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen could provide information pertaining to the evolution of the angrite parent body. Bulk-sample stepped combustion analyses of five angrites and a glass separate from D'Orbigny were combined with earlier data and acid dissolution experiments of carbonates found in D'Orbigny to compile an inventory of indigenous carbon and nitrogen. Indigenous carbon combusted between 700 °C and 1200 °C, with abundances of 10-140 ppm and a mass-weighted ?13C of -25 to -20‰ with the exception of D'Orbigny (?13C approximately -5‰). Nitrogen was released at 850-1200 ºC, 1-20 ppm with a ?15N -3‰ to +4‰; again, D'Orbigny (?15N approximately +20 to +25‰) was an exception. We interpret these components as largely indigenous and decoupled; the carbon in graphitic or amorphous form, while the nitrogen is present as a dissolved component in the silicates. No relationship with the textural sub-classification of angrites is apparent. We suggest that the angrite parent body contains a reservoir of reduced carbon and thus may have undergone a change in redox conditions, although the timing and mechanism for this remain unclear.

  15. Carbon isotopic characterization of formaldehyde emitted by vehicles in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ping; Wen, Sheng; Liu, Yonglin; Bi, Xinhui; Chan, Lo Yin; Feng, Jialiang; Wang, Xinming; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2014-04-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant carbonyl compound in the atmosphere, and vehicle exhaust emission is one of its important anthropogenic sources. However, there is still uncertainty regarding HCHO flux from vehicle emission as well as from other sources. Herein, automobile source was characterized using HCHO carbon isotopic ratio to assess its contributions to atmospheric flux and demonstrate the complex production/consumption processes during combustion in engine cylinder and subsequent catalytic treatment of exhaust. Vehicle exhausts were sampled under different idling states and HCHO carbon isotopic ratios were measured by gas chromatograph-combustion-isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). The HCHO directly emitted from stand-alone engines (gasoline and diesel) running at different load was also sampled and measured. The HCHO carbon isotopic ratios were from -30.8 to -25.7‰ for gasoline engine, and from -26.2 to -20.7‰ for diesel engine, respectively. For diesel vehicle without catalytic converter, the HCHO carbon isotopic ratios were -22.1 ± 2.1‰, and for gasoline vehicle with catalytic converter, the ratios were -21.4 ± 0.7‰. Most of the HCHO carbon isotopic ratios were heavier than the fuel isotopic ratios (from -29 to -27‰). For gasoline vehicle, the isotopic fractionation (?13C) between HCHO and fuel isotopic ratios was 7.4 ± 0.7‰, which was higher than that of HCHO from stand-alone gasoline engine (?13Cmax = 2.7‰), suggesting additional consumption by the catalytic converter. For diesel vehicle without catalytic converter, ?13C was 5.7 ± 2.0‰, similar to that of stand-alone diesel engine. In general, the carbon isotopic signatures of HCHO emitted from automobiles were not sensitive to idling states or to other vehicle parameters in our study condition. On comparing these HCHO carbon isotopic data with those of past studies, the atmospheric HCHO in a bus station in Guangzhou might mainly come from vehicle emission for the accordance of carbon isotopic data.

  16. Carbon and nitrogen abundances determined from transition layer lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika; Mena-Werth, Jose

    1992-01-01

    The possibility of determining relative carbon, nitrogen, and silicon abundances from the emission-line fluxes in the lower transition layers between stellar chromospheres and coronae is explored. Observations for main-sequence and luminosity class IV stars with presumably solar element abundances show that for the lower transition layers Em = BT sup -gamma. For a given carbon abundance the constants gamma and B in this relation can be determined from the C II and C IV emission-line fluxes. From the N V and S IV lines, the abundances of these elements relative to carbon can be determined from their surface emission-line fluxes. Ratios of N/C abundances determined in this way for some giants and supergiants agree within the limits of errors with those determined from molecular bands. For giants, an increase in the ratio of N/C at B-V of about 0.8 is found, as expected theoretically.

  17. Oxygen isotope partitioning between phosphate and carbonate in mammalian apatite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Daniel Bryant; Paul L. Koch; Philip N. Froelich; William J. Showers; Bernard J. Genna

    1996-01-01

    The oxygen isotope compositions of phosphate and structural carbonate in mammalian enamel and bone apatite are linked to that of body water at constant body temperature near 37°C, but the isotope systematics of oxygen in structural carbonate are not well understood. Using coupled measurements of the oxygen isotope composition of structural carbonate and phosphate from horse tooth enamel, the apparent

  18. CARBON ISOTOPE EFFECTS (C\\/C) IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander A. Ivlev

    2001-01-01

    Carbon isotope (C\\/C) fractionation (CIF) occurring in cells of organisms of different types is considered. Three metabolic points are shown to have an exceptional significance for the observed carbon isotope distribution in a living matter: 1) ribulose bisphosphate carboxylation in CO2 photoassimilation; 2) glycine decarboxylation in photorespiration; and 3) pyruvate decarboxylation in respiration metabolism. Carbon isotope effects (CIE) in ribulose

  19. The Valanginian terrestrial carbon-isotope record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocke, D. R.; Price, G. D.; Baraboshkin, E.; Mutterlose, J.; Ruffell, A. H.

    2003-04-01

    A stratigraphic, biostratigraphic and isotopic investigation has been performed on a Crimean section located on the Kacha River, Verkhorechie Village, SW Crimea. This clastic-dominated succession consists of a series of bioturbated inter-bedded shallow-marine silty sands, claystones and some oolitic sands. A published detailed study of the ammonite fauna has been undertaken and has revealed that the succession can be compared to standard Tethyan schemes. The lower part of the succession is dated on the basis of the ammonite fauna as Early Valanginian (otopeta-campylotoxus ammonite Zones), although this latter zone is highly condensed. A more expanded Late Valanginian is present (verrucosum, callidiscus and tauricum ammonite Zones), and is overlain by sand-dominated sediments of Early Hauterivian age. Throughout this section woody plant matter ranging in preservation from charcoal to coal has been collected and analyzed for stable carbon-isotope ratios. There is no correlation between state of preservation and carbon-isotope ratios. Carbon-isotope ratios range in the Early Valanginian from -24 ppm to -22 ppm, and in the mid-verrucosum Zone values shift abruptly towards more positive values and peak at -18 ppm in the lower callidiscus Zone. Wood carbon-isotope ratios decrease gradually through the remainder of the callidiscus Zone and return to pre-excursion values in the tauricum Zone. The remaining Hauterivian values fluctuate between -24 ppm to -21 ppm. The structure, magnitude and timing of the terrestrial carbon-isotope curve is very similar to the marine carbonate curve (from +1 ppm to +3 ppm) for the Valanginian. This would indicate, based on a delta-delta relationship between organic matter and carbonate, that there was very little change in atmospheric CO_2 concentrations during the Valanginian, and that the isotopic composition of the global carbon reservoir shifted. Future research on an Early Cretaceous (Valanginian-Hauterivian) interval from the Yatria River, sub-polar Urals, Western Siberia, which contains both belemnites and terrestrial wood fragments will provide another section from which to determine whether the delta-delta relationship for the Valanginian from Crimea is a global phenomenon or that it can be explained via latitudinal variation.

  20. Deciphering Carbon Isotope Excursions in Separated Biogenic and Diagenetic Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermoso, M.; Minoletti, F.; Hesselbo, S.; Jenkyns, H.; Rickaby, R.; Diester-Haass, L.; Delsate, D.

    2008-12-01

    The long-term evolution of the carbon-isotope ratio in the sedimentary archive is classically linked with changes in primary productivity and organic matter burial. There have been sudden and pronounced shifts, so-called Carbon Isotope Excursions (CIEs) in the long-term trends as evidenced by synchronous shifts from various basins. These geochemical perturbations may have various explanations such as changes of the efficiency of the carbon sink; sudden infusion of isotopically-light carbon into the Ocean-Atmosphere system; or advection of 12C-rich source from bottom water in a stratified water column. Beside the record of primary changes in seawater chemistry, a possible diagenetic overprint may also mime such CIEs in the sedimentary record. The aim of this contribution is to illustrate through three critical intervals (the Early Toarcian, the K-P boundary and the Mid-Miocene Montery Event) how the various micron-sized sedimentary particles specifically record these CIEs, which are respectively associated with major paleoceanographical events. New techniques for getting monotaxic calcareous nannofossil assemblages from the sediment (Minoletti et al., accepted) enable the isotopic measurement at various depths within the surface water and from bottom water by analyzing early diagenetic precipitations (rhombs and micarbs). The integration of these high-resolution isotopic signals in terms of amplitudes affords to recognize diagenetic artifacts in some sections displaying coeval decrease in the carbonate content. For both Early Toarcian and K-P events, corroborative records of CIE records in both primary calcite and bottom water carbonate indicate a global C-isotope perturbation of the water column. For the Monterey event, the evolution of calcareous nannoplankton and the foraminifera isotopic records are in overall agreement, but in detail, the coccolith-discoaster and foraminifer ratio in the sediment, related to environmental changes, is likely to produce isotopic shift in the bulk carbonate record. Contrasts in the amplitude of the carbon-isotope excursion at the single-species level compared to inorganic calcite and organic subtrate, should improve our understanding of the evolution of the water column composition through these major C-cycling perturbation events, and how marine calcifiers have fedback during such events, and eventually contribute for better understanding ocean-climate dynamics through time and into the future. Minoletti, F., Hermoso, M. and Gressier, V. (accepted). Separation of sedimentary micron-sized particles for palaeoceanography and calcareous nannoplankton biogeochemistry. Nature protocols.

  1. CARBON ISOTOPE STRATIGRAPHY AND DIAGENESIS OF PENNSYLVANIAN (DESMOINESIAN-MISSOURIAN) CARBONATES IN EAST-CENTRAL IDAHO 

    E-print Network

    Wood, Stephanie

    2011-05-10

    Carbon isotope stratigraphy of carbonate sediments is instrumental in examining major perturbations in the global carbon cycle and in correlating strata. However, the primary isotopic signal recorded in these sediments can vary with depositional...

  2. Carbon isotope gradients on early Paleozoic platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmden, C.

    2008-12-01

    Large positive ?13C excursions occur during sea level lowstands in the Ordovician and Silurian. In some cases, the sedimentary units hosting these excursions are stratigraphically equivalent to known glacial deposits. There has been considerable speculation on the significance of this linkage. Some workers view the inferred carbon cycle perturbations as evidence for a biotic response to the deteriorating climate, which may have invigorated thermohaline circulation and nutrient upwelling, thus increasing ocean productivity and organic carbon burial. Others believe that the excursions were driven by a positive shift in the isotope value of the global carbon weathering flux, reflecting increased weathering of calcareous sediments exposed by eustatic regressions. A closer examination of one of the excursion intervals, the Hirnantian, with examples from three basins on two paleocontinents, reveals a recurrent pattern: excursions in shallower nearshore settings are larger than deeper offshore ones. This implies shore-to-basin gradients in sedimentary ?13C, with values higher in nearshore settings. What gradients signify is a question that bears importantly on interpretations of carbon isotope records in ancient marine settings. If shelf sedimentary gradients reflect original seawater gradients in ?13C values, then local scale carbon cycling is implied, which profoundly affects the way that we 'read' carbon isotope signals in epeiric carbonate successions. In this talk, the evidence for carbon isotope gradients is reviewed, with particular emphasis on the Hirnantian sea level lowstand. A sea level driven, local scale, carbonate weathering model is presented that is consistent with shelf gradients. The main feature of the model is that sea level fluctuations, globally, cause adjustments in the isotope value of the carbonate weathering flux, locally, which in turn causes seawater ?13C values to increase in restricted nearshore settings of epeiric seas. If this interpretation of shelf gradients is correct, the model predicts that: (1) ocean ?13C changes are smaller than the largest excursions recorded in epeiric sea deposits, (2) ?13C excursions may behave like chemostratigraphic sea level curves, and (3) the global secular ?13C curve of seawater is overprinted by local scale carbon cycling processes in epeiric seas, and is unlikely to be a true representation of the ocean's secular evolution during the Paleozoic.

  3. Carbon isotopes in biological carbonates: Respiration and photosynthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Burdett, J.; Whelan, J.F.; Paull, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    Respired carbon dioxide is an important constituent in the carbonates of most air breathing animals but is much less important in the carbonates of most aquatic animals. This difference is illustrated using carbon isotope data from freshwater and terrestrial snails, ahermatypic corals, and chemoautotrophic and methanotrophic pelecypods. Literature data from fish otoliths and bird and mammal shell and bone carbonates are also considered. Environmental CO2/O2 ratios appear to be the major controlling variable. Atmospheric CO2/O2 ratios are about thirty times lower than in most natural waters, hence air breathing animals absorb less environmental CO2 in the course of obtaining O2. Tissue CO2 therefore, does not isotopically equilibrate with environmental CO2 as thoroughly in air breathers as in aquatic animals, and this is reflected in skeletal carbonates. Animals having efficient oxygen transport systems, such as vertebrates, also accumulate more respired CO2 in their tissues. Photosynthetic corals calcify mainly during the daytime when photosynthetic CO2 uptake is several times faster than respiratory CO2 release. Photosynthesis, therefore, affects skeletal ??13C more strongly than does respiration. Corals also illustrate how "metabolic" effects on skeletal isotopic composition can be estimated, despite the presence of much larger "kinetic" isotope effects. Copyright ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  4. Carbon abundances of sdO stars from SPY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Heiko; Heber, Uli

    2009-06-01

    Ströer et al. (2007) recently suggested a classification of sdOs according to supersolar and subsolar helium abundances, with only the helium-enriched stars showing signes of carbon and/or nitrogen in their optical spectra. We aim to derive reliable carbon and nitrogen abundances by fitting synthetic spectra to data obtained with the UVES spectrograph at ESO. Here we present our first results of the analysis of carbon abundances in hot subdwarf O stars. By constructing a grid of model atmospheres consisting of hydrogen, helium and carbon we were able to derive atmospheric parameters of nine carbon rich sdOs. We find log(NC/Ntotal) up to ten times higher than the solar value, while the mean value for the effective temperature and the surface gravity is slightly lower than derived by helium-hydrogen models only. Surprisingly, we also find three fast rotators among our program stars.

  5. Daily Variation of Isotope Ratios in Mars Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livengood, Timothy A.; Kostiuk, Theodor; Kolasinski, John R.; Hewagama, Tilak; Henning, Wade G.; Sornig, Manuela; Stangier, Tobias; Krause, Pia; Sonnabend, Guido; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2014-11-01

    The atmosphere of Mars has been shown by ground based high-resolution infrared spectroscopy and in situ measurements with the Phoenix lander and Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover to be enriched in C and O heavy isotopes, consistent with preferential loss of light isotopes in eroding Mars’ primordial atmosphere. The relative abundance of heavy isotopes, combined with contemporary measurements of loss rates to be obtained with MAVEN, will enable estimating the primordial atmospheric inventory on Mars. IR spectroscopy of Mars collected in May 2012 as well as in March and May of 2014 from the NASA IRTF has resolved transitions of all three singly-substituted minor isotopologues of carbon dioxide in addition to the normal isotope, enabling remote measurements of all the carbon and oxygen isotope ratios as a function of latitude, longitude, and time of day. Earlier measurements obtained in October 2007 demonstrated that the relative abundance of O-18 increased linearly with increasing surface temperature over a relatively warm early-afternoon temperature range, but did not extend far enough to inspect the effect of late-afternoon cooling. These results imply that isotopically enriched gas is sequestered overnight when surface temperature is minimum and desorbs through the course of the day as temperature increases. Current spectroscopic constants indicate that the peak isotopic enrichment could be significantly greater than what has been measured in situ, apparently due to sampling the atmosphere at different time of day and surface temperature. The observing runs in 2012 and 2014 measured O-18 enrichment at several local times in both morning and afternoon sectors as well as at the subsolar, equatorial, and anti-subsolar latitudes. The two runs in 2014 have additionally observed O-17 and C-13 transitions in the morning sector, from local dawn to noon. These observations include a limited sampling of measurements over Gale Crater, which can be compared with contemporary in situ measurements by the Curiosity rover to investigate the degree of agreement between in situ and remote methods and potentially to calibrate the spectroscopic constants required to accurately evaluate isotope ratios all over Mars.

  6. Natural gas constituent and carbon isotopic composition in petroliferous basins, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangyou; Wang, Zhengjun; Dai, Jinxing; Su, Jing

    2014-02-01

    There are abundant gas resources in petroliferous basins of China. Large to midsize gas fields are found in Eastern, central and Western of China. However, origin, constituents and isotopic composition of natural gas in different gas fields are varied distinctly, and some present strong chemical secondary alteration and show variation both in age and space. Based on the systematic analysis of constituents and carbon isotope of a large number of gas samples, combined with the geological characteristics, this paper classifies the origins of the gases, explores the gas isotope characteristics and evolutionary regulation with the variation time and space, and further discusses the distinctive geochemistry of the gases in China. These gases are dominated by dry gas, its methane carbon isotope values range from -10‰ to -70‰, ethane from -16‰ to -52‰, propane from -13‰ to -43‰, and butane from -18‰ to -34‰. The carbon isotopes of most gases show the characteristics of humic-derived gas and crude oil cracked gas. In addition, large primary biogenic gas fields have been discovered in the Qaidam basin; inorganic-derived alkane gases have been discovered in deep of the Songliao Basin. Half of these gas fields are characterized by the alkane carbon isotope reversal in different degrees. Research indicates there are several reasons can result in carbon isotope reversal. Firstly, gas charge of different genetic types or different source in one gas reservoir may cause carbon isotope reversal. Besides, high-over mature evolution of gas can also lead to the carbon isotopic reversal of alkanes. Thirdly, secondary alteration of hydrocarbons may also result in abnormal distribution of carbon isotope, isotope transforms to unusual light and heavy.

  7. Abundances of Linear Carbon-Chain Molecules in Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.; Deneault, E.; Meyer, B. S.; The, L.-S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper evaluates the condensation of carbon solids in a gas of pure C and O atoms when these exist within the interior of an expanding young supernova. We calculate the abundances of large carbon molecules, which serve as nucleations for condensation of graphites. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Precision performance of a Cavity Ring-down isotope spectrometer for carbon and oxygen isotopes of carbonate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, K. L.; Hoffnagle, J.; He, Y.; Fleck, D.; Saad, N.; Dennis, K.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a novel laser spectrometer intended specifically for the measurement of ?18O and ?13C in solid carbonate material. Carbonate carbon and oxygen isotopes provide key contributions into our understanding of climate, biogeochemical processes and the carbon cycle. For this reason, the isotopic measurements of carbonates are one of the most abundant measures made by Earth scientists today. Conventional measurement techniques using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), although optimized and prevalent, require dedicated personnel and can be expensive to operate. Here we present a new laser-based technique that will simplify measurements of ?18Ocarb and ?13Ccarb without compromising precision. To date, there have been no laser-based instruments with a demonstrated ability to meet the requirements of the carbonates community -- typically better than 0.1 ‰ for ?13C and ?18O for CO2 evolved from 1 mg of pure CaCO3. We will present data showing that the new Picarro G2171-i spectrometer meets these requirements. The spectrometer uses the laser-based spectroscopy technique of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS), a technology that has been successfully applied to many other isotopic ratio measurements including ?13C of CO2, ?13C of CH4, and ?18O and ?D of H2O. The spectrometer has been optimized to analyze the absorption spectra of concentrated CO2, specifically the isotopologues 12C16O16O, 13C16O16O, 12C16O18O, and 12C18O16O. We employ a new sample delivery technique that enables a longer integration time period, and hence more precise data. Long-term results for a run of 540 pulses of tank CO2 (90 hours) records a 1? standard deviation precision for ?18O and ?13C of < 0.08 ‰ and < 0.055 ‰, respectively. We coupled the CRDS spectrometer to an optimized sample acidification system and analyzed standards to assess the accuracy of the CRDS. We will present an inter-comparison between CRDS and IRMS for carbonates using standards commonly used as isotopic reference material for the calibration of IRMS instruments. The new CRDS spectrometer will provide researchers with a simplified option to accelerate the pace and breadth of carbonates-based research.

  9. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-02-01

    Consol R D is developing and demonstrating stable carbon isotope analysis as a method to quantitatively distinguish coal-derived and petroleum-derived carbon in products from coal/petroleum coprocessing. The approach taken is develop the method, then demonstrate its application on authentic continuous-unit products. The significance of selective isotopic fractionation is being determined and, when necessary, corrections are applied to account for it. Precision, accuracy and range of applicability are being defined. The value of accessory analytical techniques also is being assessed. Previously reported data on samples from HRI bench-scale coprocessing Runs 227-53 (Texas lignite/Maya ASB and Texas lignite/Maya VSB) and 238-1 (Westerholt coal/Cold Lake VSB) were corrected for selective isotopic fractionation. Carbon sourcing was performed on samples from HRI bench-scale coprocessing Run 227-60 (Texas lignite/Maya VSB) and samples from UOP bench-scale coprocessing Run 26 (Illinois 6 coal/Lloydminster vacuum resid); the latter data were corrected for isotopic fractionation, though the former could not be corrected. A paper presented at the 1990 DOE Direct Liquefaction Contractor's Review Meeting is appended. 15 refs., 21 figs., 22 tabs.

  10. Atmospheric Trace Gas Abundances and Stable Isotope Ratios via IR-LIF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Geoffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    We propose to develop new technologies with support provided by PIDDP that will enable the in situ measurements of abundances and stable isotope ratios in important radiatively and biogenically active gases such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, water, methane, nitrous oxide, and hydrogen sulfide to very high precision (0.1 per mil or better for the isotopic ratios, for example). Such measurements, impossible at present, could provide pivotal new constraints on the global (bio)geochemical budgets of these critical species, and could also be used to examine the dynamics of atmospheric transport on Mars, Titan, and other solar system bodies. We believe the combination of solid state light sources with imaging of the IR laser induced fluorescence (IR-LIF) via newly available detector arrays will make such in situ measurements possible for the first time. Even under ambient terrestrial conditions, the LIF yield from vibrational excitation of species such as water and carbon dioxide should produce emission measures well in excess of ten billion photons/sec from samples volumes of order 1 c.c. These count rates can, in principle, yield detection limits into the sub-ppt range that are required for the in situ isotopic study of atmospheric trace gases. While promising, such technologies are relatively immature, but developing rapidly, and there are a great many uncertainties regarding their applicability to in situ IR-LIF planetary studies. We therefore feel PIDDP support will be critical to developing these new tools, and propose a three-year program to combine microchip near-IR lasers with low background detection axes and state-of-the-art HgCdTe detectors developed for astronomical spectroscopy to investigate the sensitivity of IR-LIF under realistic planetary conditions, to optimize the optical pumping and filtering schemes for important species, and to apply the spectrometer to the non-destructive measurement of stable isotopes in a variety of test samples. These studies form the necessary precursors to the development of compact, lightweight stable isotope/trace gas sensors for future planetary missions.

  11. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, C. H.; Schopf, J. W.; McKeegan, K. D.; Coath, C. D.; Harrison, T. M.; Stetter, K. O.

    2000-01-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the approximately 850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the approximately 2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The delta 13C(PDB) values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 +/- 1.7% to -31.9 +/- 1.2% and the delta 13C(PDB) values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 +/- 0.7% to -45.4 +/- 1.2%. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  12. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Christopher H.; Schopf, J. William; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Coath, Christopher D.; Harrison, T. Mark; Stetter, Karl O.

    2000-08-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the ˜850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the ˜2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The ?13CPDB values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 ± 1.7‰ to -31.9 ± 1.2‰, and the ?13CPDB values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 ± 0.7‰ to -45.4 ± 1.2‰. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  13. Oxygen isotopic composition of carbon dioxide in the middle atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Mao-Chang; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Lewis, Brenton R.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2007-01-01

    The isotopic composition of long-lived trace molecules provides a window into atmospheric transport and chemistry. Carbon dioxide is a particularly powerful tracer, because its abundance remains >100 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in the mesosphere. Here, we successfully reproduce the isotopic composition of CO2 in the middle atmosphere, which has not been previously reported. The mass-independent fractionation of oxygen in CO2 can be satisfactorily explained by the exchange reaction with O(1D). In the stratosphere, the major source of O(1D) is O3 photolysis. Higher in the mesosphere, we discover that the photolysis of 16O17O and 16O18O by solar Lyman-? radiation yields O(1D) 10–100 times more enriched in 17O and 18O than that from ozone photodissociation at lower altitudes. This latter source of heavy O(1D) has not been considered in atmospheric simulations, yet it may potentially affect the “anomalous” oxygen signature in tropospheric CO2 that should reflect the gross carbon fluxes between the atmosphere and terrestrial biosphere. Additional laboratory and atmospheric measurements are therefore proposed to test our model and validate the use of CO2 isotopic fractionation as a tracer of atmospheric chemical and dynamical processes. PMID:17190796

  14. BOREAS TE-5 Leaf Carbon Isotope Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Ehleriinger, Jim; Brooks, J. Renee; Flanagan, Larry

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-5 team collected measurements in the NSA and SSA on gas exchange, gas composition, and tree growth. This documentation describes leaf carbon isotope data that were collected in 1993 and 1994 at the NSA and SSA OJP sites, the SSA OBS site, and the NSA UBS site. In addition, leaf carbon isotope data were collected in 1994 only at the NSA and SSA OA sites. These data was collected to provide seasonal integrated physiological information for 10 to 15 common species at these 6 BOREAS sites. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  15. Low temperature Rosseland opacities with varied abundances of carbon and nitrogen

    E-print Network

    Michael T. Lederer; Bernhard Aringer

    2008-12-09

    We attempt to produce low temperature opacity data incorporating the effects of varied abundances of the elements carbon and nitrogen. For our temperature range of interest, molecules represent the dominant opacity source. Our dataset covers a wide metallicity range and is meant to provide important input data for stellar evolution models and other applications. We conduct chemical equilibrium calculations to evaluate the partial pressures of neutral atoms, ions, and molecules. Based on a large dataset containing atomic line and continuum data and, most importantly, a plethora of molecular lines, we calculate Rosseland mean opacity coefficients not only for a number of different metallicities, but also for varied abundances of the isotopes ^{12}C and ^{14}N at each metallicity. The molecular data comprise the main opacity sources for either an oxygen-rich or carbon-rich chemistry. We tabulate the opacity coefficients as a function of temperature and, basically, density. Due to the special role of the CO molecule, within a certain chemistry regime an alteration to the carbon abundance causes considerable changes in the Rosseland opacity. The transition from a scaled solar (i. e. oxygen-rich) mixture to a carbon-rich regime results in opacities that can, at low temperatures, differ by orders of magnitude from to the initial situation. The reason is that the mean opacity in either case is due to different molecular absorbers. Variations in the abundance of nitrogen have less pronounced effects but, nevertheless, cannot be neglected. [abridged

  16. Equations for Lipid Normalization of Carbon Stable Isotope Ratios in Aquatic Bird Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Kyle H.; Davis, Mikaela; Elliott, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios are biogeochemical tracers that can be used to determine the source of nutrients and contaminants in avian eggs. However, the interpretation of stable carbon ratios in lipid-rich eggs is complicated because 13C is depleted in lipids. Variation in 13C abundance can therefore be obscured by variation in percent lipids. Past attempts to establish an algebraic equation to correct carbon isotope ratios for lipid content in eggs have been unsuccessful, possibly because they relied partly on data from coastal or migratory species that may obtain egg lipids from different habitats than egg protein. We measured carbon, nitrogen and sulphur stable isotope ratios in 175 eggs from eight species of aquatic birds. Carbon, nitrogen and sulphur isotopes were enriched in lipid-extracted egg samples compared with non extracted egg samples. A logarithmic equation using the C?N ratio and carbon isotope ratio from the non extracted egg tissue calculated 90% of the lipid-extracted carbon isotope ratios within ±0.5‰. Calculating separate equations for eggs laid by species in different habitats (pelagic, offshore and terrestrial-influenced) improved the fit. A logarithmic equation, rather than a linear equation as often used for muscle, was necessary to accurately correct for lipid content because the relatively high lipid content of eggs compared with muscle meant that a linear relationship did not accurately approximate the relationship between percent lipids and the C?N ratio. Because lipid extraction alters sulphur and nitrogen isotope ratios (and cannot be corrected algebraically), we suggest that isotopic measurement on bulk tissue followed by algebraic lipid normalization of carbon stable isotope ratio is often a good solution for homogenated eggs, at least when it is not possible to complete separate chemical analyses for each isotope. PMID:24465384

  17. The cosmic ray source abundance of CSi isotopes: Dependence upon nuclear interaction cross sections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guzik

    1993-01-01

    New measurements of the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) isotopic composition in the charge range C to Si are now becoming available. The GCR source composition of these isotopes are particularly interesting as they are synthesized by a broad range of processes requiring very different astrophysical conditions. However, these source abundances are obtained from the GCR measurements only by unfolding the

  18. Simulations of water isotope abundances in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere and implications

    E-print Network

    Gettelman, Andrew

    Simulations of water isotope abundances in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere and implications for stratosphere troposphere exchange Andrew Gettelman National Center for Atmospheric Research in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere (UT/LS). The model is able to reproduce the range of isotopic

  19. Determination of lithium isotopes at natural abundance levels by atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationships of the absorption of 6Li and 7Li hollow cathode lamp emissions are used to determine lithium isotopic composition in the natural abundance range of geologic materials. Absorption was found to have a nonlinear dependence upon total lithium concentration and isotopic composition. A method using nonlinear equations to describe the relationship of the absorption of 6Li and 7Li lamp radiation is proposed as a means of calculating isotopic composition that is independent of total lithium concentration.

  20. Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances in Sirius and Vega

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.L.; Roby, S.W.; Bell, R.A.

    1982-03-15

    Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances are obtained from C I, N I, and O I high excitation permitted lines in the spectra of the standard A star Vega and the ''hot'' Am star Sirius. Vega has normal abundances. Relative to Vega, Sirius is C deficient by 0.60 dex, N enhanced by 0.22 dex, and O deficient by 0.27 dex.

  1. Calcium isotope evidence for suppression of carbonate dissolution in carbonate-bearing organic-rich sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchyn, Alexandra V.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2011-11-01

    Pore fluid calcium isotope, calcium concentration and strontium concentration data are used to measure the rates of diagenetic dissolution and precipitation of calcite in deep-sea sediments containing abundant clay and organic material. This type of study of deep-sea sediment diagenesis provides unique information about the ultra-slow chemical reactions that occur in natural marine sediments that affect global geochemical cycles and the preservation of paleo-environmental information in carbonate fossils. For this study, calcium isotope ratios (? 44/40Ca) of pore fluid calcium from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 984 (North Atlantic) and 1082 (off the coast of West Africa) were measured to augment available pore fluid measurements of calcium and strontium concentration. Both study sites have high sedimentation rates and support quantitative sulfate reduction, methanogenesis and anaerobic methane oxidation. The pattern of change of ? 44/40Ca of pore fluid calcium versus depth at Sites 984 and 1082 differs markedly from that of previously studied deep-sea Sites like 590B and 807, which are composed of nearly pure carbonate sediment. In the 984 and 1082 pore fluids, ? 44/40Ca remains elevated near seawater values deep in the sediments, rather than shifting rapidly toward the ? 44/40Ca of carbonate solids. This observation indicates that the rate of calcite dissolution is far lower than at previously studied carbonate-rich sites. The data are fit using a numerical model, as well as more approximate analytical models, to estimate the rates of carbonate dissolution and precipitation and the relationship of these rates to the abundance of clay and organic material. Our models give mutually consistent results and indicate that calcite dissolution rates at Sites 984 and 1082 are roughly two orders of magnitude lower than at previously studied carbonate-rich sites, and the rate correlates with the abundance of clay. Our calculated rates are conservative for these sites (the actual rates could be significantly slower) because other processes that impact the calcium isotope composition of sedimentary pore fluid have not been included. The results provide direct geochemical evidence for the anecdotal observation that the best-preserved carbonate fossils are often found in clay or organic-rich sedimentary horizons. The results also suggest that the presence of clay minerals has a strong passivating effect on the surfaces of biogenic carbonate minerals, slowing dissolution dramatically even in relation to the already-slow rates typical of carbonate-rich sediments.

  2. Present-Day Carbon Abundances of Early-Type Stars

    E-print Network

    M. F. Nieva; N. Przybilla

    2007-03-23

    Carbon is one of the most abundant metals in the universe because of its synthesis in the fundamental triple alpha reaction. The knowledge of carbon abundances in different environments is one key ingredient to our understanding of stellar and galactochemical evolution. Studies of luminous OB-type stars allow us to address both topics even in galaxies beyond our own. Unfortunately the history of carbon abundance determinations from these objects in the last three decades is one of limited success. Analyses of the strong and weak line spectra of C II as well as C III tend to be largely discrepant. We present results of quantitative spectral analyses based on a sophisticated model atom for non-LTE line-formation calculations of C II-IV. As a first application, carbon abundances in a sample of B-type dwarfs and giants in nearby associations and in the field are determined. Consistency is finally achieved for all measurable lines (up to 40) from the three ionization stages. This includes in particular the notorious C II 4267 and 6578/6582 A features which are highly important for abundance determinations of fast-rotating and extragalactic objects. The long-standing problem of carbon line-formation can now be regarded as solved, with the previous difficulties related to the use of inaccurate atomic data and stellar parameters. A highly homogeneous and slightly sub-solar present-day carbon abundance from young stars in the solar vicinity of log C/H+12= 8.32+/-0.04 is derived

  3. Carbon Abundances in the Small Magellanic Cloud Planetary Nebulae

    E-print Network

    T. -H. Lee; L. Stanghellini; R. A. Shaw; B. Balick; E. Villaver

    2006-05-31

    As an ongoing study of Magellanic Cloud PNe we have obtained UV spectra of 9 PNe in the SMC to measure their carbon abundances. The spectra have been acquired with ACS HRC/PR200L and SBC/PR130L. The ACS prisms give a reasonable resolution in the range of 1200 -- 2500 A to detect the C IV, C III], and C II] nebular emission, essential for chemical studies of the PNe. The carbon abundances of SMC PNe, together with those of the LMC previously determined with STIS spectroscopy, will allow a comparative study of nebular enrichment and provide the basis for comparison with stellar evolution models at various metallicity.

  4. Carbon Isotope Chemostratigraphy, the Baby and the Bathwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    Secular variations in the carbon isotopic values of carbonate sediments and rocks and their individual components have been applied successfully to problems of stratigraphic correlation and for interpretation of past changes in the global carbon cycle. However, this methodology is not without problems. A major tenet of stable isotope chemostratigraphy involves sampling and analyzing multiple, widely separated sequences, and, if possible, multiple carbon-bearing components (e.g., carbonate and organic carbon) in order to demonstrate a global signal. In some cases, this methodology has been short-circuited in the zeal to reveal a new event or excursion, particularly for time intervals for which adequate sequences are somewhat rare. Likewise, although most carbonate researchers are quite aware of the possible importance of diagenesis, particularly in organic-carbon rich sequences or in shoal-water carbonate sequences with longer-term subaerial exposure events, such overprints commonly go unrecognized or are considered of minor impact. Studies of stable isotope variations in carbonate sequences should always employ textural and geochemical methodologies for detecting and even quantifying diagenesis, if possible. Although some diagenetically overprinted or misinterpreted geochemical data have undoubtedly appeared in the literature, there are many excellent examples of global carbon isotope variations in records expressed in pelagic biogenic carbonate, marine organic carbon, platform carbonates, and terrestrial organic matter. Arguably, one of the best-documented examples is the Cenomanian-Turonian (ca. 93 Ma) positive carbon isotope excursion. The amplitude of the Cenomanian-Turonian carbon isotope excursion is similar among all types of records, but there are subtle pattern differences that arise from differences in sedimentation rate among and within sequences. Organic carbon and carbonate carbon isotope signals also may differ in phasing and amplitude for certain events, which may provide information regarding changes in atmospheric- oceanic carbon isotope variations versus changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The early Aptian carbon isotope excursions serve as a key example of this. The platform-basin carbonate carbon isotope correspondence undoubtedly works best during times of "calcite seas," such as during the Cretaceous when the complication of greater dominance of more 13-C enriched aragonite in platform settings, such as during the late Neogene, is generally absent. The baby remains robust. Indeed, carbon isotopes still have great utility for reconstructing water-column isotope gradients, global changes in carbon cycling, and for pattern-based long-distance correlation. However, we do need to be judicious in our choice of samples and to temper our enthusiasm for seeking out and interpreting extreme signals.

  5. Carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation in scleractinian corals: a review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter K. Swart

    1983-01-01

    Swart, P.K., 1983. Carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation in scleractinian corals: a review. Earth-Sci. Rev., 19: 51-80. The present theories on the fractionation of stable isotopes in scleractinian corals are critically discussed in the light of data available on primary productivity, respiration and stable isotope chemistry. These data support a model of fractionation in which the carbon and oxygen isotopes

  6. Theoretical calculation of oxygen isotope fractionation factors in carbonate systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Chacko; Peter Deines

    2008-01-01

    Using established methods of statistical mechanical calculation and a recent compilation of vibrational frequency data, we have computed oxygen isotope reduced partition function ratios (? values) for a large number of carbonate minerals. The oxygen isotope ? values of carbonates are inversely correlated to both the mass and radius of the cation bonded to the carbonate anion but neither correlation

  7. Isotope labeling pattern study of central carbon metabolites using GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joon-Young; Oh, Min-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Determination of fluxes by (13)C tracer experiments depends on monitoring the (13)C labeling pattern of metabolites during isotope experiments. In metabolome-based (13)C metabolic flux analysis, liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry or tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS or LC/MS/MS, respectively) has been mainly used as an analytical platform for isotope pattern studies of central carbon metabolites. However, gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has several advantages over LC/MS, such as high sensitivity, low cost, ease of operation, and availability of mass spectra databases for comparison. In this study, analysis of isotope pattern for central carbon metabolites using GC/MS was demonstrated. First, a proper set of mass ions for central carbon metabolites was selected based on carbon backbone information and structural isomers of mass fragment ions. A total of 34 mass fragment ions was selected and used for the quantification of 25 central carbon metabolites. Then, to quantify isotope fractions, a natural mass isotopomer library for selected mass fragment ions was constructed and subtracted from isotopomer mass spectra data. The results revealed a surprisingly high abundance of partially labeled (13)C intermediates, such as 56.4% of fructose 6-phosphate and 47.6% of dihydroxyacetone phosphate at isotopic steady state, which were generated in the pentose phosphate pathway. Finally, dynamic changes of isotope fragments of central metabolites were monitored with a U-(13)C glucose stimulus response experiment in Kluyveromyces marxianus. With a comprehensive study of isotope patterns of central carbon metabolites using GC/MS, 25 central carbon metabolites and their isotopic fractions were successfully quantified. Dynamic and precise acquisition of isotope pattern can then be used in combination with proper kinetic models to calculate metabolic fluxes. PMID:25463204

  8. Kinetic fractionation of carbon and oxygen isotopes during hydration of carbon dioxide

    E-print Network

    Zeebe, Richard E.

    Kinetic fractionation of carbon and oxygen isotopes during hydration of carbon dioxide Richard E of the carbon and oxygen kinetic isotope fractionation (KIF) during hydration of CO2. Here I use transition into various geo- chemical processes, including formation of cryogenic car- bonates, non-equilibrium isotope

  9. DETERMINING INTERSTELLAR CARBON ABUNDANCES FROM STRONG-LINE TRANSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sofia, U. J. [Physics Department, American University, Washington, DC 20016 (United States); Parvathi, V. S.; Babu, B. R. S. [Physics Department, University of Calicut, Kerala (India); Murthy, J. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Kormangala, Bengaluru (India)

    2011-01-15

    Carbon is arguably the most important element in the interstellar medium, yet its abundance in gas and dust is poorly understood due to a paucity of data. We explore the possibility of substantially increasing our knowledge of interstellar carbon by applying and assessing a new method for determining the column density of the dominant ion of interstellar carbon in diffuse neutral lines of sight. The method relies on profile fitting of the strong transition of C II at 1334 A in spectra continuum normalized with stellar models. We apply our method to six sight lines for which the carbon abundance has previously been determined with a weak intersystem absorption transition. Our strong-line method consistently shows a significantly lower gas-phase C abundance than the measurements from the weak lines. This result implies that more carbon could reside in dust than was previously thought. This has implications for dust models, which often suffer from a lack of sufficient carbon to plausibly explain extinction. There is no immediately clear explanation for the difference found between the strong- and weak-line C II determinations, but there are indications that the results from the method presented here have advantages over the weak-line column densities. If this is the case, then the reported oscillator strength for the C II transition at 2325 A may be too small. Our findings further suggest that damping wings modeled with a single absorption component may not produce accurate abundances. This problem could affect a large number of H I abundances determined through absorption line analysis that are reported in the literature.

  10. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in body tissue and mucus of feeding and fasting earthworms ( Lumbricus festivus )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olaf Schmidt; Charles M. Scrimgeour; James P. Curry

    1999-01-01

    We used natural abundance stable isotope techniques to estimate carbon and nitrogen turnover rates in body tissue and mucus\\u000a of earthworms. Isotope ratios of carbon (?13C) and nitrogen (?15N) were monitored simultaneously in body tissue and mucus for up to 101?days in feeding or fasting Lumbricus festivus kept in an artificial substrate. When the diet of the earthworms was switched

  11. Helium and carbon isotopes in Indian diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, R.; Lal, D.; Craig, H.

    1990-09-01

    Helium and carbon isotope measurements in Indian diamonds (from Andhra Pradesh) were carried out using samples that included mined diamonds from primary kimberlite source rocks and alluvial diamonds from river gravel. The He and C isotope concentrations in diamonds from these two sources were compared, and the Indian diamonds were compared to those from other regions. Results indicate that most of the He-3 in the alluvial diamonds is of cosmogenic origin and that the alluvial diamonds may also have a significant He-4 component due to alpha particles implanted during storage in a secondary matrix. One diamond, a mined kimberlite specimen, was found to have the lowest He-4 content (0.018 microcc/g) so far recorded in diamonds.

  12. Radiogenic Carbon Isotopes in Authigenic Carbonate from Lake Neusiedl, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhuber, Stephanie; Steier, Peter; Gier, Susanne; Draganits, Erich; Kogelbauer, Ilse

    2015-04-01

    Formation of authigenic carbonate in Lake Neusiedl, Austia, has been reported since the 1960ies. The reaction pathways resulting in carbonate precipitation (protodolomite and high magnesium calcite) have yet to be identified. Lake Neusiedl is a shallow lake without significant sediment accumulation but constant reworking of sediment due to its shallow depth (1.8m) and influence by wind. The sediments are water-saturated silts and clays that overly Neogene sediments. The age of Lake Neusiedl is unknown due to its low sedimentation rate and constant remixing of sediment. Dating of authigenic minerals is an alternative method to determine the minimum age of water present - even episodically - at the location. We characterize the sediments mineralogy in different size fractions by X-Ray Diffractometry (XRD), Simultaneous Themo Analysis (STA) and Fourier Transform Infra Red Spectroscopy, stable carbon and oxygen isotopes as well as radiogenic carbon. To describe the authigenic carbonates and find the fractions with highest authigenic carbonate minerals we investigate the size fractions <4 µm, <3 µm, <2 µm, <1 µm, 0.5 µm and <0.2 µm. The "coarser" fractions (4 µm to 2 µm) contain detrital minerals such as chlorite, muscovite, quartz, feldspar, stoichiometric calcite and stoichiometric dolomite as well as authigenic high Mg calcite. Radiogenic carbon ages increase with increasing grain size from 850 years before present to 2300 years before present and indicate a very slow growth rate or episodic growth of authigenic carbonate phases.

  13. Carbon isotope fractionation in autotrophic Chromatium

    E-print Network

    Wong, William Wai-Lun

    1974-01-01

    has been shown to be insignificant (DE(:ENS et al. , 1968). CALDER (1973) also reported no significant carbon isotope fractionation on algae grown on media at pH 7 and 8. Therefore the change in pH of the culture media in this experiment.... Yearbook 69, 629-632. BUCHANAN, B. B. , BACHOFEN, R. and ARNON, D. I. (1964) Role of ferredoxin in the reductive assimilation of CO2 and acetate by extracts of the photosynthetic bacterium, Chromatium. Biochemistry 52, 839-847. CALDER...

  14. Biomarker and molecular isotope approaches to deconvolve the terrestrial carbon isotope record: modern and Eocene calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diefendorf, A. F.; Freeman, K. H.; Wing, S.; Currano, E. D.

    2010-12-01

    Climate, biome, and plant community are important predictors of carbon isotope patterns recorded in leaves and leaf waxes. However, signatures recorded by terrestrial organic carbon and lipids that have mixed floral sources (e.g., n-alkanes) potentially reflect both plant community changes and climate. More taxonomically specific proxies for plants (i.e., di- and tri-terpenoids for conifers and angiosperms, respectively), can help to resolve the relative influences of changing community and climate, provided differences in biomarker production and lipid biosynthetic fractionation among plants can be better constrained. We present biomarker abundance and carbon isotope values for lipids from leaves, branches and bark of 44 tree species, representing 21 families including deciduous and evergreen conifers and angiosperms. n-alkane production differs greatly between conifer and angiosperm leaves. Both deciduous and evergreen angiosperms make significantly more n-alkanes than conifers, with n-alkanes not detected in over half of the conifers in our study. Terpenoid abundances scale strongly with leaf habit: evergreen species have significantly higher abundances. We combine these relative differences in lipid production with published estimates of fluxes for leaf litter from conifer and angiosperm trees to develop a new proxy approach for estimating paleo plant community inputs to ancient soils and sediments. To test our modern calibration results, we have evaluated n-alkanes and terpenoids from laterally extensive (~18 km) carbonaceous shales and mudstones in Eocene sediments (52.6 Ma) at Fifteenmile Creek in the Bighorn Basin (WY, USA). Our terpenoid-based proxy predicts on average a 40% conifer community, which is remarkably close in agreement with a fossil-based estimate of 36%. n-alkane carbon isotope fractionation (leaf-lipid) differs among plant types, with conifer n-alkanes about 2-3‰ 13C enriched relative to those in angiosperms. Since conifer leaves are generally 2-3‰ enriched relative to angiosperm leaves, we project that the far more abundant angiosperm lipids will be about 4-6 ‰ depleted relative to small amounts of conifer n-alkanes in natural samples. In addition, we report carbon isotope values of the terpenoids from the MVA (triterpenoids) and MEP (diterpenoids) synthesis pathways for our plant sample set. Bulk leaf tissue-to-lipid fractionation factors for terpenoids are similar and generally small, -0.4 and -0.6‰, for MVA and MEP products, respectively. Estimates of precipitation from fossil leaves at the Fifteenmile site allow us to predict leaf fractionation values for different plant types (bulk) and for triterpenoid and diterpenoid compound classes. Our fractionation factors, when applied to an estimate for the ?13C value of late Eocene CO2, agree well with bulk and molecular data. An understanding of molecular production biases greatly improves our ability to reconstruct both paleovegetation and ?13C of atmospheric CO2.

  15. The Oxidant Budget of Dissolved Organic Carbon Driven Isotope Excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, T. F.; Kennedy, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Negative carbon isotope values, falling below the mantle average of about -5 per mil, in carbonate phases of Ediacaran age sedimentary rocks are widely regarded as reflecting negative excursions in the carbon isotopic composition of seawater lasting millions of years. These isotopic signals form the basis of chemostratigraphic correlations between Ediacaran aged sections in different parts of the world, and have been used to track the oxidation of the biosphere. However, these isotopic values are difficult to accommodate within limits prescribed by the current understanding of the carbon cycle, and a hypothetical Precambrian ocean dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool 100 to 1000 times the size of the modern provides a potential source of depleted carbon not considered in Phanerozoic carbon cycle budgets. We present box model results that show the remineralization of such a DOC pool to drive an isotope excursion of the magnitude observed in the geological record exhausts global budgets of free oxygen and sulfate in 800 k.y. These results are incompatible with the estimated duration of late Ediacaran isotope excursions of more than 10 m.y., as well as geochemical and biological indicators that oceanic sulfate and oxygen levels were maintained or even increased at the same time. Therefore the carbon isotope record is probably not a useful tool for monitoring oxygen levels in the atmosphere and ocean. Covariation between the carbon and oxygen isotope records is often observed during negative excursions and is indicative of local processes or diagenetic overprinting.

  16. Carbon allocation in plants and ecosystems - insights from stable isotope studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessler, Arthur

    2014-05-01

    Trees are large global stores of carbon (C) that will be impacted by increased carbon dioxide levels and climate change. However, at present we cannot properly predict the carbon balance of forests in future as we lack knowledge on how plant physiological processes, the transfer of carbon within the plant, carbon storage, and remobilization in the plant tissues as well as the release of carbon from the roots to the soil interact with environmental drivers and ecosystem-scale processes. This paper will summarise how stable isotope techniques can give new insights in the fate of newly assimilated C in plants and ecosystems on time scales from hours to seasons and it will include studies either characterizing temporal and spatial variation in the natural abundance of carbon and oxygen isotopes or applying isotopically enriched tracers. It comprises the assessment of the mechanisms of C partitioning among specific metabolic pathways, between plant organs and into various ecosystem C pools with different residence times. Moreover stable isotopes are highly suitable tools to characterise the role of the phloem, which is the central long-distance conveyer distributing C from source to sinks and thus plays a central role in linking sites and structures of storage, growth and other metabolic activities. A deeper understanding of these processes and their interaction with environmental drivers is critical for predicting how trees and ecosystems will respond to coming global environmental changes, including increased temperature, altered precipitation, and elevated carbon dioxide concentrations.

  17. Hydrology & isotope tools to quantify carbon sources and sinks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johannes A. C. Barth; Gunnar Lischeid; Arthur Gessler

    2010-01-01

    Vegetation is fundamental for carbon uptake and usually assumes the largest portion in the evapotranspiration term. While interception can be separated by mapping various plant types in a catchment, the water isotope method yields numbers for pure evaporation. The latter causes enrichment of the heavier isotope in the remaining water phase, while transpiration leaves the isotope signal of water unaltered

  18. Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yang

    Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes Yonghoon Choi and Yang Wang Department of Geological Sciences, Florida State. Measurements of stable carbon isotopic ratios as well as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) contents

  19. Oxygen and carbon isotope disequilibria in Galapagos corals: isotopic thermometry and calcification physiology

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Biological carbonate skeletons are built largely from carbon dioxide, which reacts to form carbonate ion within thin extracellular solutions. The light isotopes of carbon and oxygen react faster than the heavy isotopes, depleting the resulting carbonate ions in /sup 13/C and /sup 18/O. Calcium carbonate precipitation occurs sufficiently fast that the skeleton remains out of isotopic equilibrium with surrounding fluids. This explanation for isotopic disequilibrium in biological carbonates was partially simulated in vitro, producing results similar to those seen in non-photosynthetic corals. Photosynthetic corals have higher /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratios due to the preferential removal of /sup 12/C (as organic carbon) from the reservoir of dissolved inorganic carbon. The oxygen isotopic variations in corals can be used to reconstruct past sea surface temperatures to an accuracy of about 0.5/sup 0/C. The carbon isotopic content of photosynthetic corals provides an indication of cloudiness. Using isotopic data from Galapagos corals, it was possible to construct proxy histories of the El Nino phenomenon. The physiology of skeletogenesis appears to be surprisingly similar in calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, and silica precipitating systems.

  20. On the Evolution of Stars That Form Electron-degenerate Cores Processed by Carbon Burning. II. Isotope Abundances and Thermal Pulses in a 10 Msun Model with an ONe Core and Applications to Long-Period Variables, Classical Novae, and Accretion-induced Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritossa, Claudio; Garcia-Berro, Enrique; Iben, Icko, Jr.

    1996-03-01

    A 10 Msun model of Population I composition is evolved from the hydrogen-burning main sequence to the thermally pulsing `super' asymptotic giant branch (TPSAGB) stage, where it has an oxygen-neon (ONe) core of mass 1.196 Msun and is experiencing thermal pulses driven by helium-burning thermonuclear flashes. Interior abundance characteristics are relevant to an understanding of the core collapse of massive acereting white dwarfs in close binary star systems. At mass point 0.2 Msun., abundances by mass are X(16O) = 0.656, X(20Ne) = 0.215, X(23Na) = 0.0467, X(24Mg) = 0.0325, X(25Mg) = 0.0115, X(12 C)= 0.0112, X(22Ne) = 0.00893, X(21Ne) = 0.00689, X(26Mg) = 0.00560, and X(27Al) = 0.00528. Abundances near the surface of the core are relevant to an understanding of nova outbursts in cataclysmic variables. At mass point 1.17 Msun, abundances by mass are X(16O) = 0.511, X(20Ne) = 0.313, X(23Na) = 0.0644, X(24Mg) = 0.0548, X(25Mg) = 0.0158, X(27 Al)= 0.0108, X(12C) = 0.00916, X(26Mg) = 0.00989, X(21Ne) = 0.00598, and X(22Ne) = 0.00431. Carbon burning is quenched at the beginning of the thermally pulsing phase, and a layer of CO matter of mass 0.015 Msun separates the ONe core from overlying helium- and hydrogen-rich layers. The outer 0.01 M of the CO layer contains essentially no neon: very little new 20Ne has been made, and most of the 22Ne which has been made from the original CNO elements has been converted into 25Mg and neutrons which have been captured to form neutron-rich isotopes. If the observational counterpart of the model is in a close binary and fills its Roche lobe near the end of the carbon-burning phase, and if the binary evolves into a cataclysmic variable, one expects that the ejecta of approximately 1000 nova outbursts will exhibit an under- abundance of neon and overabundance of carbon, oxygen, and magnesium. During the TPSAGB phase, characteristics of a pulse cycle approach local limit-cycle values after ˜30 pulses. Helium-shell flashes are of about the same strength (LmaxHe ˜3 × 106 Lsun, LminHe ˜ 100 Lsun) as in AGB models with CO cores of mass ˜1 Msun, but the time between flashes (˜200 yr) and the mass of helium fuel built up between flashes (˜1.3 x 10-4 Msun) are much smaller. The amount of energy released in a flash is not enough to propel matter at the hydrogen-helium discontinuity far enough outward that associated cooling extinguishes hydrogen burning LminH ˜ 6 × 104 Lsun, (LmaxH ˜ 6 × 104 Lsun). The temperature at the base of the convective shell forced by helium burning attains a maximum of TmaxCSB ˜ 360 × 106 K. Depending on the choice of cross section for the 22Ne(?, n)25Mg reaction, 50%-80% the 22Ne initially in the convective shell is converted into 25Mg, providing 20-30 neutrons for every 56Fe seed nucleus. The neutron density (˜6 x 1012 cm-3) is presumably much larger than is appropriate for producing s-process isotopes in the solar system distribution at critical branch points. During pulse powerdown, at least 7% and perhaps as much as 30% of the matter which has been in the convective shell is dredged up into the convective envelope. Thus, an observational counterpart of the model may exhibit an enhancement of heavy s-process isotopes in a nonsolar distribution and Mg isotopes in a distinctly nonsolar distribution, but because of the large mass of the convective envelope, these anomalies may not be detectable in a typical TPSAGB star. The abundance of Li relative to H in a model may be much larger or much smaller than Li/H ˜ 10-10, depending on the treatment of convection and on where the model is in the TPSAGB phase. At the beginning of the TPSAGB phase, the surface abundances by number of CNO elements are in the ratio (C:N:0) = (2.4:4.3:6.3), compared with the initial ratios (C:N:0) = (3.6:1.0:8.0). During the TPSAGB phase, the ratio of C to N decreases, and the ratio of 12C to 13C decreases from ˜25 to ˜4. A test of these predictions involves abundance estimates of the brightest long-period variables in the Galaxy and in the Magellanic Clouds. Perhaps the major signature

  1. Current and relic carbon using natural abundance carbon-13

    SciTech Connect

    layse,MF; Clapp,CE; Allmaras,RR; Linden,D.R; Molina, JAE.; Copeland,SM; Dowdy,RH

    2002-05-01

    The role of agricultural practices on soil carbon (C) dynamics is critical to improved soil management. The main objective was to examine the C interactions resulting from crop changes under different tillage and residue treatments.

  2. Phanerozoic and Neoproterozoic Negative Carbon Isotope Excursions, Diagenesis and Terrestrialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, K.; Kennedy, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Comprehensive data sets of Phanerozoic and late Precambrian carbon isotope data derived from carbonate rocks show a similar positive relation when cross-plotted with oxygen isotope values. The range and slope between the time periods is identical and the processes responsible for the relation have been well documented in Quaternary sediments. These processes include the stabilization of isotope values to ambient meteoric water values during shallow burial and flushing of carbonate sediments. Both data sets show strongly depleted carbon (-9 per mil PDB) and oxygen isotope values that retain seemingly systematic stratigraphic patterns with the Quaternary and Phanerozoic examples that demonstrably record meteroric water values. Similar values and patterns in the Precambrian are interpreted as primary marine in origin with significant implications for an ocean carbon mass balance not possible in the Phanerozoic carbon cycle. A similar compilation of carbonates older than one billion years do not show a relation between carbon and oxygen isotopes, lacking the negative carbon values evident in the younger record. We hypothesize that this difference records the onset of significant organic carbon on the land surface and the alteration of meteoric waters toward Phanerozoic values. We demonstrate the meteoric affinities of Neoproterozoic carbonates containing prominent negative isotope excursions recorded in the Shuram and Wonoka Formations of Oman and South Australia commonly attributed to whole ocean isotope variation. The conspicuous absence of negative carbon isotope values with normal marine oxygenisotope values in the Phanerozoic and Neoproterozic identifies a consistent relation between these time intervals and suggests that, as well accepted in the Phanerozoic, negative carbon isotope excursions less than -3 per mil are not a record of marine processes, but rather the later terrestrial biotic influence on meteoric water values.

  3. Boron isotopic composition and concentration in modern marine carbonates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. G. Hemming; G. N. Hanson

    1992-01-01

    The boron isotopic compositions and boron concentrations of selected modern marine carbonates were analysed by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry with a 2 reproducibility of standards and samples better than 0.7%. It was found that the boron isotopic compositions of modern marine carbonates fall within a relatively narrow range (+22.1 ± 3%. relative to NBS SRM951 boric acid standard) for

  4. A carbon isotope mass balance for an anoxic marine sediment: Isotopic signatures of diagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehme, Susan E.

    1993-01-01

    A carbon isotope mass balance was determined for the sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, NC to constrain the carbon budgets published previously. The diffusive, ebullitive and burial fluxes of sigma CO2 and CH4, as well as the carbon isotope signatures of these fluxes, were measured. The flux-weighted isotopic signature of the remineralized carbon (-18.9 plus or minus 2.7 per mil) agreed with the isotopic composition of the remineralized organic carbon determined from the particulate organic carbon (POC) delta(C-13) profiles (-19.2 plus or minus 0.2), verifying the flux and isotopic signature estimates. The measured delta(C-13) values of the sigma CO2 and CH4 diffusive fluxes were significantly different from those calculated from porewater gradients. The differences appear to be influenced by methane oxidation at the sediment-water interface, although other potential processes cannot be excluded. The isotope mass balance provides important information concerning the locations of potential diagenetic isotope effects. Specifically, the absence of downcore change in the delta(C-13) value of the POC fraction and the identical isotopic composition of the POC and the products of remineralization indicate that no isotopic fractionation is expressed during the initial breakdown of the POC, despite its isotopically heterogeneous composition.

  5. The CH stars. II - Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanture, Andrew D.

    1992-11-01

    Complete CNO abundances are obtained for a sample of red-giant CH stars. Analysis of the abundances shows that there are large excesses of carbon and nitrogen in the atmosphere while all indications are that the oxygen abundances follow the normal pattern observed among field G and K giants. A correlation between the C/N and C-13/C-12 seems to exist in the red giant CH stars. Taken together, the excess of C and N nuclei, the large C/O ratios, and the C-12/C-13 and C/N ratios favor a scenario for the creation of CH stars in which Roche lobe overflow followed by some mechanism which mixes the accreted material into regions of the star, where it participates in CN burning to some degree. The s-process element abundance patterns of the CH stars are investigated, and it is found that the overall level of enhancement is greater in the CH stars than in barium stars. The distribution of the element favors the heavy s-process peak more than in barium stars. The abundance pattern are best modeled by exposure of s-process seed nuclei to a single irradiation. These abundance patterns are shown to arise naturally from the operation of the C-13 neutron source in low-mass low-metallicity AGB stars.

  6. Preservation of carbonate clumped isotopes in sedimentary paleoclimate archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, G. A.; Passey, B. H.; Grossman, E. L.; Shenton, B.; Perez-Huerta, A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is increasingly used to reconstruct paleotemperatures of ancient terrestrial environments. One promising application is elucidating paleoelevation from carbonate archives such as paleosols, lacustrine marls, and fossil freshwater shells. Unlike conventional stable isotope approaches (e.g., mineral ?18O or ?D), clumped isotope thermometry is independent of the isotopic composition of the precipitating waters and can therefore be used to reconstruct elevation by both the temperature-altitude relationship and the rainfall ?18O-altitude relationship. However, interpretation of clumped isotope data is not without its own complications. Like conventional stable isotopes, clumped isotope paleotemperatures can be effectively reset to warmer values by dissolution/reprecipitation-type diagenesis during sedimentary burial. It is also known that carbonate clumped isotope bonds (i.e., 13C-18O) are susceptible to 'reordering' in the solid mineral lattice at warmer burial temperatures, with laboratory studies of natural carbonates indicating activation of this phenomenon at temperatures as low as 100 °C over geologic timescales. A challenge in applying carbonate clumped isotope thermometry to natural samples is now evaluating terrestrial archives with respect to both types of alteration: 'open-system' alteration and 'closed-system' bond reordering. In this talk we will review our experimental efforts to constrain the kinetics of clumped isotope reordering, with relevance to low-temperature carbonates like fossil shells and early diagenetic minerals, and present new laboratory data that further inform our theoretical framework for the mechanism(s) of 13C-18O bond reordering. Together with traditional analytical and petrographic screening for recrystallization, empirical and laboratory studies of carbonate clumped isotope reordering represent the next steps in evaluating isotopic records of paleoclimate, paleobiology, and paleoelevation that are emerging from clumped isotope analyses.

  7. Carbon Isotope Stratigraphy of the Triassic-Jurassic Boundary, Northern Calcareous Alps, Southern Bavaria.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, Vincent P. C.; Prave, Anthony R.; Raub, Timothy D.

    2014-05-01

    The end Triassic is recognized as a period of increased marine biotic turnover, culminating in one of the five major mass extinction events of the Phanerozoic at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. Carbon isotope excursions have been reported globally that may be in response to a perturbation to the earth system. Here we present findings from a succession of early Mesozoic Tethyan carbonate strata from the Northern Calcareous Alps (NCA) of southern Bavaria, Germany. The succession ranges from Carnian to Middle Jurassic in age and is part of the Bavarian Syncline, which trends East-West along the northern extent of the NCA. The two field areas studied, Wallberg and Buchstein, contain the Tr-J boundary, which is marked by an abrupt change from underlying reefal carbonate rocks to a deeper basinal setting dominated by marls, as well as the disappearance of abundant brachiopod, bivalve and colonial coral populations. The boundary is also characterized by a carbonate carbon isotope excursion. Carbonate C isotope values in the underlying reefal carbonate rocks are marked by values of 2.0 to 2.5‰. Above the contact, the carbonate C isotopes show a 1.5 - 2.0‰ decline, which coincides with the change from shallow to deeper marine carbonate sedimentation. Following the excursion, and whilst the succession maintains a basinal palaeoenvironmental setting, the C isotopes return to values similar to those present beneath the Tr-J boundary ranging from 2.0 - 2.5‰. The negative excursion may be recording a global perturbation to the carbon cycle, however the change from a shallow to deep marine depositional environment must also be considered as a possible influence on isotopic composition. Cross-plots of C and O isotopes show no correlation hence we prefer to interpret the carbonate C isotopic data to record original seawater values. Post-depositional diagenetic and lithification processes, however, likely modified the O isotope values. Our results urge caution in identifying C isotopic excursions as global until potential palaeoenvironmental-related changes can be excluded.

  8. Calcium Isotopic Ratios and Rare Earth Element Abundances in Refractory Inclusions from Allende CV3 Chondrite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shichun Huang; Juraj Farkaš; Gang Yu; Michail I. Petaev; Stein B. Jacobsen

    Refractory inclusions in primitive meteorites are the oldest objects formed in the Solar System. They exhibit large mass-dependent isotopic effects in many elements, including Si, Mg and Ca, indicative of their complex origin. We report data for both mass-dependent (?) and mass-independent (?) Ca isotopic effects, and rare earth element (REE) abundances in six refractory inclusions from the Allende CV3

  9. Global simulation of the carbon isotope exchange of terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.; Terao, Y.; Mukai, H.

    2009-12-01

    There remain large uncertainties in our quantification of global carbon cycle, which has close interactions with the climate system and is subject to human-induced global environmental change. Information on carbon isotopes is expected to reduce the uncertainty by providing additional constraints on net atmosphere-ecosystem exchange. This study attempted to simulate the dynamics of carbon isotopes at the global scale, using a process-based terrestrial ecosystem model: Vegetation Integrative SImulator for Trace gases (VISIT). The base-model of carbon cycle (Sim-CYCLE, Ito 2003) has already considered stable carbon isotope composition (13C/12C), and here radioactive carbon isotope (14C) was included. The isotope ratios characterize various aspects of terrestrial carbon cycle, which is difficult to be constrained by sole mass balance. For example, isotopic discrimination by photosynthetic assimilation is closely related with leaf stomatal conductance and composition of C3 and C4 plant in grasslands. Isotopic disequilibrium represents mean residence time of terrestrial carbon pools. In this study, global simulations (spatial resolution 0.5-deg, time-step 1-month) were conducted during the period 1901 to 2100 on the basis of observed and projected atmospheric CO2, climate, and land-use conditions. As anthropogenic CO2 accumulates in the atmosphere, heavier stable carbon isotope (13C) was diluted, while radioactive carbon isotope (14C) is strongly affected by atomic bomb experiments mainly in the 1950s and 1960s. The model simulated the decadal change in carbon isotope compositions. Leaf carbon with shorter mean residence time responded rapidly to the atmospheric change, while plant stems and soil humus showed substantial time-lag, leading to large isotopic disequilibrium. In the future, the isotopic disequilibrium was estimated to augment, due to accelerated rate of anthropogenic CO2 accumulation. Spatial distribution of stable isotope composition (12C/13C, or d13C) was primarily dominated by C3/C4 plant composition and then ancillary environmental conditions. Along latitude, plant and litter carbon pools in northern ecosystems have slower turnover rates (i.e., higher 14C/12C) than those in tropical ecosystems. However, humus carbon in northern ecosystems with very long mean residence times has lower 14C/12C ratio, most of bomb-derived radioactive carbon lingered still in plant biomass. Now, we are attempting to examine the model estimations by comparing with atmospheric measurements.

  10. s-process studies - Xenon and krypton isotopic abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.; Ward, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    We propose an analysis of the s-process contributions to the isotopes of xenon and krypton. The object is to aid studies of the possibility that meteorites may contain gas that was carried in presolar grains that were grown in stellar ejecta and that were not degassed prior to incorporation into parent bodies. That model suggests routine interstellar fractionation of s-isotopes from r-isotopes owing to differential incorporation into dust. We show that a deficiency of s-process nuclei cannot yield details of Xe-X, but the gross similarities are strong enough to lead one to think that such a deficiency may play a role in a more complicated explanation. We predict the existence of an s-rich complement somewhere if fractional separation of this type has played a role in Xe-X. We show that the analogous decomposition of krypton is more uncertain, and we call for measurements of neutron-capture cross sections to alleviate these uncertainties.

  11. Carbon isotopic fractionation in the biosynthesis of bacterial fatty acids. Ozonolysis of unsaturated fatty acids as a means of determining the intramolecular distribution of carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monson, K. David; Hayes, J. M.

    1982-02-01

    Methods for the determination of 13C abundances at individual olefinic carbon positions have been developed, tested, and shown to perform accurately. (1) The double bond is oxidized with ozone; (2) silver oxide is used to cleave the resulting ozonide quantitatively to carboxylic-acid fragments; (3) a modified Schmidt decarboxylation is used to produce CO 2 quantitatively from the carboxyl groups of the separated cleavage products; (4) the CO 2 is utilized for mass spectrometric analysis. The results of intramolecular isotopic analyses are combined with molecular-average isotopic compositions determined by total combustion in order to show that fatty acids biosynthesized by Escherichia coli grown aerobically with glucose as the sole carbon source and harvested at late log phase are depleted by approximately 3%. in 13C relative to the glucose. This fractionation arises in the formation of acetylcoenzyme A by pyruvate dehydrogenase and is localized at the carboxyl position in the acetyl-CoA product. The isotopic order in that two-carbon subunit is carried through the biosynthesis of fatty acids so that alternate positions in the fatty-acid chains are depleted in 13C by an amount equal to twice the molecular-average depletion. The kinetic isotope effect at C-2 for pyruvate dehydrogenase in vivo is shown to be approximately 2.3%. While it appears that no other fractionation mechanism has controlled the overall depletion of 13C in these fatty acids, a separate process responsible for control of isotopic abundances in the carboxyl groups has been identified and described elsewhere [Monson K.D. and Hayes J.M. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 11435-11441]. It is concluded that kinetic, rather than thermodynamic, factors have controlled isotopic distributions in these cells and that kinetic factors will be dominant in most biological reactions.

  12. A new solar carbon abundance based on non-LTE CN molecular spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, G. H.; Linsky, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed non-LTE analysis of solar CN spectra strongly suggest a revised carbon abundance for the sun. We recommend a value of log carbon abundance = 8.35 plus or minus 0.15 which is significantly lower than the presently accepted value of log carbon abundance = 8.55. This revision may have important consequences in astrophysics.

  13. Distribution and carbon isotope patterns of diterpenoids and triterpenoids in modern temperate C3 trees and their geochemical significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diefendorf, Aaron F.; Freeman, Katherine H.; Wing, Scott L.

    2012-05-01

    Tricyclic diterpenoids and pentacyclic triterpenoids are nearly exclusively produced by gymnosperms and angiosperms, respectively. Even though both classes of terpenoids have long been recognized as plant biomarkers, their potential use as phylogenetically specific ?13C proxies remains largely unexplored. Little is known of how terpenoid abundance and carbon isotope composition vary either with plant phylogenetic position, functional group, or during synthesis. Here, we report terpenoid abundances and isotopic data for 44 tree species in 21 families, representing both angiosperms and gymnosperms, and both deciduous and evergreen leaf habits. Di- and triterpenoid abundances are significantly higher in evergreens compared to deciduous species, reflecting differences in growth strategies and increased chemical investment in longer-lived leaves. Carbon isotope abundances of terpenoid lipids are similar to leaf tissues, indicating biosynthetic isotope effects are small for both the MVA (-0.4‰) and MEP (-0.6‰) pathways. Leaf and molecular isotopic patterns for modern plants are consistent with observations of amber, resins and plant biomarkers in ancient sediments. The ?13C values of ancient diterpenoids are higher than triterpenoids by 2-5‰, consistent with observed isotopic differences between gymnosperms and angiosperms leaves, and support the relatively small lipid biosynthetic effects reported here. All other factors being equal, evergreen plants will dominate the abundance of terpenoids contributed to soils, sediments and ancient archives, with similar inputs estimated for angiosperm and gymnosperm trees when scaled by litter flux.

  14. Chemical and Isotopic Study of Lab-formed Carbonates Under Cryogenic and Hydrothermal Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L. A.; Socki, R. A.; Guan, Y.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Gibson, E. K.

    2004-01-01

    Aqueous environments on early Mars were probably relatively short-lived and localized, as evidenced by the lack of abundant secondary minerals detected by the TES instrument. In order to better understand the aqueous history of early Mars we need to be able to interpret the evidence preserved in secondary minerals formed during these aqueous events. Carbonate minerals, in particular, are important secondary minerals for interpreting past aqueous environments as illustrated by the carbonates preserved in ALH84001. Carbonates formed in short-lived, dynamic aqueous events often preserve kinetic rather than equilibrium chemical and isotopic processes, and predicting the behavior of such systems is facilitated by empirical data.

  15. Stable carbon and sulfur isotopes as records of the early biosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmarais, David J.

    1989-01-01

    The abundance ratios of the stable isotopes of light elements such as carbon and sulfur can differ between various naturally-occurring chemical compounds. If coexisting compounds have achieved mutual chemical and isotopic equilibrium, then the relative isotopic composition can record the conditions at which equilibrium was last maintained. If coexisting chemical compounds indeed formed simultaneously but had not achieved mutual equilibrium, then their relative isotopic compositions often reflect the conditions and mechanisms associated with the kinetically controlled reactions responsible for their production. In the context of Mars, the stable isotopic compositions of various minerals might record not only the earlier environmental conditions of the planet, but also whether or not the chemistry of life ever occurred there. Two major geochemical reservoirs occur in Earth's crust, both for carbon and sulfur. In rocks formed in low temperature sedimentary environments, the oxidized forms of these elements tend to be enriched in the isotope having the larger mass, relative to the reduced forms. In sediments where the organics and sulfides were formed by biological processes, these isotopic contrasts were caused by the processes of biological CO2 fixation and dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Such isotopic contrasts between oxidized and reduced forms of carbon and sulfur are permitted by thermodynamics at ambient temperatures. However, nonbiological chemical reactions associated with the production of organic matter and the reduction of organics and sulfides are extremely slow at ambient temperatures. Thus the synthesis of organics and sulfides under ambient conditions illustrates life's profound role as a chemical catalyst that has altered the chemistry of Earth's crust. Because the stable isotopes of carbon and sulfur can reflect their chemistry, they are useful probes of the Martian surface.

  16. Molecular and stable carbon isotopic compositions of hopanoids in seep carbonates from the South China Sea continental slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Hongxiang; Sun, Yongge; Mao, Shengyi; Zhu, Xiaowei; Wu, Nengyou

    2014-10-01

    The lipid biomarkers of hopanoids in cold seep carbonates from the South China Sea continental slope were investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) and gas chromatography-isotope ratio-mass spectrometer (GC-ir-MS). The distribution of hopanes/hopenes shows a preference for the ‘biological’ 17?(H), 21?(H)-over the ‘geological’ 17?(H), 21?(H)-configuration. This interpretation is in agreement with the strong odd-even preference of long-chain n-alkanes in those samples, suggesting that the ?? hopanes may be the early diagenetic products of biohopanoids and the ??, ?? configurations of hopanes were mainly derived from allochthonous sources contributing to the organic matter of the carbonates. In terms of hopanoid acids, the C30 to C33 17?(H), 21?(H)-hopanoid acids were detected with C32 17?(H), 21?(H)-hopanoid acid being the most abundant. However, there is a significant difference in stable carbon isotopic compostions of the C32 17?(H), 21?(H)-hopanoic acid among samples (-30.7‰ to -69.8‰). The ?13C values match well with the carbon isotopic compositions of SRB-derived iso-/anteiso-C15:0 fatty acids in the samples, which strongly depend on the carbon utilization types by microbe. The most abundant compound of hopanols detected in the samples, C30-17?(H), 21?(H)-hopanol, may be a good indicator of diagenetic product of type I methanotrophs. The molecular and carbon isotopic compositions of hopanoids demonstrate clearly that there is a combination contribution of both SRB and type I or type X methanotrophs to the source organism in the seep carbonates from the South China Sea continental slope.

  17. An automated method for 'clumped-isotope' measurements on small carbonate samples.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Thomas W; Bernasconi, Stefano M

    2010-07-30

    Clumped-isotope geochemistry deals with the state of ordering of rare isotopes in molecules, in particular with their tendency to form bonds with other rare isotopes rather than with the most abundant ones. Among its possible applications, carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry is the one that has gained most attention because of the wide potential of applications in many disciplines of earth sciences. Clumped-isotope thermometry allows reconstructing the temperature of formation of carbonate minerals without knowing the isotopic composition of the water from which they were formed. This feature enables new approaches in paleothermometry. The currently published method is, however, limited by sample weight requirements of 10-15 mg and because measurements are performed manually. In this paper we present a new method using an automated sample preparation device coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The method is based on the repeated analysis (n = 6-8) of 200 microg aliquots of sample material and completely automated measurements. In addition, we propose to use precisely calibrated carbonates spanning a wide range in Delta(47) instead of heated gases to correct for isotope effects caused by the source of the mass spectrometer, following the principle of equal treatment of the samples and standards. We present data for international standards (NBS 19 and LSVEC) and different carbonates formed at temperatures exceeding 600 degrees C to show that precisions in the range of 10 to 15 ppm (1 SE) can be reached for repeated analyses of a single sample. Finally, we discuss and validate the correction procedure based on high-temperature carbonates instead of heated gases. PMID:20552704

  18. Predicted Abundances of Carbon Compounds in Volcanic Gases on IO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Laura; Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    We use chemical equilibrium calculations to model the speciation of carbon in volcanic gases on Io. The calculations cover wide temperature (500-2000 K), pressure (10-8 to 10+2 bars), and composition ranges (bulk O/S atomic ratios ~0 to 3), which overlap the nominal conditions at Pele (1760 K, 0.01 bars, O/S~1.5). Bulk C/S atomic ratios ranging from 10-6 to 10-1 in volcanic gases are used with a nominal value of 10-3 based on upper limits from Voyager for carbon in the Loki plume on Io. Carbon monoxide and CO2 are the two major carbon gases under all conditions studied. Carbonyl sulfide and CS2 are orders of magnitude less abundant. Consideration of different loss processes (photolysis, condensation, kinetic reactions in the plume) indicates that photolysis is probably the major loss process for all gases. Both CO and CO2 should be observable in volcanic plumes and in Io's atmosphere at abundances of several hundred parts per million by volume for a bulk C/S ratio of 10-3.

  19. Carbon isotope fractionation in protoplanetary disks

    E-print Network

    Paul M. Woods; Karen Willacy

    2008-12-01

    We investigate the gas-phase and grain-surface chemistry in the inner 30 AU of a typical protoplanetary disk using a new model which calculates the gas temperature by solving the gas heating and cooling balance and which has an improved treatment of the UV radiation field. We discuss inner-disk chemistry in general, obtaining excellent agreement with recent observations which have probed the material in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. We also apply our model to study the isotopic fractionation of carbon. Results show that the fractionation ratio, 12C/13C, of the system varies with radius and height in the disk. Different behaviour is seen in the fractionation of different species. We compare our results with 12C/13C ratios in the Solar System comets, and find a stark contrast, indicative of reprocessing.

  20. Isotope Dependence of Chemical Erosion of Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, Carlos O [ORNL; Krstic, Predrag S [ORNL; Stuart, S. J. [Clemson University; Zhang, Hengda [ORNL; Harris, Peter R [ORNL; Meyer, Fred W [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    We study the chemical erosion of hydrogen-supersaturated carbon due to bombardment by hydrogen isotopes H, D, and T at energies of 1 30 eV using classical molecular dynamics simulations. The chemical structure at the hydrogen-saturated interface (the distribution of terminal hydrocarbon moieties, in particular) shows a weak dependence on the mass of the impinging atoms. However the sputtering yields increase considerably with increasing projectile mass. We analyze the threshold energies of chemical sputtering reaction channels and show that they are nearly mass independent, as expected from elementary bond-breaking chemical reactions involving hydrocarbons. Chemical sputtering yields for D impact are compared with new experimental data. Good agreement is found for small hydrocarbons but the simulations overestimate the production of large hydrocarbons for energies larger than 15 eV. We present a thorough analysis of the dependence of our simulations on the parameters of the bombardment schemes and discuss open questions and possible avenues for development.

  1. Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.; Wickland, K.P.; Moscati, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and palehydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the {sup 13}C content of soil CO{sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The {sup 13}C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: Decreasing {sup 13}C content with depth decreasing {sup 13}C with altitude and reduced {sup 13}C during spring. These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO{sub 2} loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids.

  2. Upper limits on argon isotope abundances in the Venus thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauersberger, K.; Von Zahn, U.; Krankowsky, D.

    1979-01-01

    On December 9, 1978 the neutral gas mass spectrometer aboard the NASA Pioneer Venus multiprobe bus has measured density, composition, and temperature of the Venus dayside thermosphere. There was no positive identification of argon down to the lowest measuring altitude of 130 km. For the altitude level of 135 km the following upper limits for the number densities of argon isotopes were derived: n(Ar-36) less than 1.3 times 10 to the 6th power per cu cm and n(Ar-40) less than 2.8 times 10 to the 6th power per cu cm. From our upper atmosphere observations we infer for the troposphere of Venus the following upper limits for the mixing ratios: n(Ar-36)/total number density less than 9 times 10 to the minus 6th power and n(Ar-40)/total number density less than 20 times 10 to the minus 6th power.

  3. An isotopic study of biogeochemical relationships between carbonates and organic carbon in the Greenhorn Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.; Popp, Brian N.; Takigiku, Ray; Johnson, Marcus W.

    1989-01-01

    Carbon-isotopic compositions of total carbonate, inoceramid carbonate, micritic carbonate, secondary cements, total organic carbon, and geoporphyrins have been measured in 76 different beds within a 17-m interval of a core through the Greenhorn Formation, an interbedded limestone and calcareous shale unit of Cretaceous age from the Western Interior Seaway of North America. Results are considered in terms of variations in the processes of primary production and in secondary processes. It is shown that the porphyrin isotopic record reflects primary isotopic variations more closely than the TOC isotopic record and that, in these sediments, TOC is enriched in C-13 relative to its primary precursor by 0.6 to 2.8 percent. This enrichment is attributed to isotope effects within the consumer foodweb and is associated with respiratory heterotrophy. Variation in this secondary enrichment are correlated with variations in the isotopic composition of marine carbonate.

  4. Isotope composition of carbon in amino acids of solid bitumens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanina, S. N.; Bushnev, D. A.

    2014-06-01

    Primary data are presented on the isotope composition of carbon in individual amino acids from solid bitumens and several biological objects. The amino acids of biological objects are characterized by wide variations of the isotope composition of carbon. This fact occurs owing to the difference in biochemical paths of metabolism resulting in the synthesis of individual amino acids. The ?13C values are somewhat decreased for individual amino acids in asphaltenes, varying from -7.7 to -31.7‰. The carbon of amino acids is weighted in kerits from Bad'el' compared to asphaltenes. All the natural bitumens retain the characteristic trend for natural substances: the isotopically heavy and light amino acids by carbon are glycine and leucine, respectively. The isotope composition of amino-acid carbon is lightened compared to natural bitumens in the samples formed under a pronounced thermal impact (asphalt-like crust and kirishite).

  5. Organic carbon isotope constraints on the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reservoir at the Cryogenian–Ediacaran transition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ganqing Jiang; Xinqiang Wang; Xiaoying Shi; Shihong Zhang; Shuhai Xiao; Jin Dong

    2010-01-01

    Prominent negative carbonate carbon isotope (?13Ccarb) anomalies from some Ediacaran successions are accompanied by invariant or decoupled organic carbon isotope (?13Corg) values and have been interpreted as resulting from the remineralization of a large dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reservoir capable of buffering carbon isotopes of organic matter. This inferred oceanic DOC reservoir was thought to have initiated with the onset

  6. Reconstructing grassland vegetation and paleotemperatures using carbon isotope ratios of bison tooth enamel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathryn A. Hoppe; Adina Paytan; Page Chamberlain

    2006-01-01

    Carbon isotope ratios (delta13C values) of herbivores reflect the delta13C values of dietary plants, and the delta13C values of grazers (animals that consume >90% grass) reflect the local abundance of C3 versus C4 grasses. Because grassland C3\\/C4 ratios correlate with climate, the delta13C of fossil grazers may serve as a proxy for reconstructing paleoclimates and paleovegetation patterns. However, the accuracy

  7. The Origin of Fluorine: Abundances in AGB Carbon Stars Revisited

    E-print Network

    Abia, C; Cristallo, S; de Laverny, P

    2015-01-01

    Revised spectroscopic parameters for the HF molecule and a new CN line list in the 2.3 mu region have been recently available, allowing a revision of the F content in AGB stars. AGB carbon stars are the only observationally confirmed sources of fluorine. Nowadays there is not a consensus on the relevance of AGB stars in its Galactic chemical evolution. The aim of this article is to better constrain the contribution of these stars with a more accurate estimate of their fluorine abundances. Using new spectroscopic tools and LTE spectral synthesis, we redetermine fluorine abundances from several HF lines in the K-band in a sample of Galactic and extragalactic AGB carbon stars of spectral types N, J and SC spanning a wide range of metallicities. On average, the new derived fluorine abundances are systematically lower by 0.33 dex with respect to previous determinations. This may derive from a combination of the lower excitation energies of the HF lines and the larger macroturbulence parameters used here as well as...

  8. Carbon isotopic characterisation of dissolved organic matter during water treatment.

    PubMed

    Bridgeman, John; Gulliver, Pauline; Roe, Jessie; Baker, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Water treatment is a series of physio-chemical processes to aid organic matter (OM) removal, which helps to minimise the formation of potentially carcinogenic disinfection by-products and microbial regrowth. Changes in OM character through the treatment processes can provide insight into the treatment efficiency, but radiogenic isotopic characterisation techniques have yet to be applied. Here, we show for the first time that analysis of (13)C and (14)C of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) effectively characterises dissolved OM through a water treatment works. At the sites investigated: post-clarification, DOC becomes isotopically lighter, due to an increased proportion of relatively hydrophilic DOC. Filtration adds 'old' (14)C-DOC from abrasion of the filter media, whilst the use of activated carbon adds 'young' (14)C-DOC, most likely from the presence of biofilms. Overall, carbon isotopes provide clear evidence for the first time that new sources of organic carbon are added within the treatment processes, and that treated water is isotopically lighter and typically younger in (14)C-DOC age than untreated water. We anticipate our findings will precipitate real-time monitoring of treatment performance using stable carbon isotopes, with associated improvements in energy and carbon footprint (e.g. isotopic analysis used as triggers for filter washing and activated carbon regeneration) and public health benefits resulting from improved carbon removal. PMID:24075722

  9. The carbon isotope biogeochemistry of methane production in anoxic sediments. 1: Field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, Neal E.; Boehme, Susan E.; Carter, W. Dale, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The natural abundance C-13/C-12 ratio of methane from anoxic marine and freshwater sediments in temperate climates varies seasonally. Carbon isotopic measurements of the methanogenic precursors, acetate and dissolved inorganic carbon, from the marine sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina were used to determine the sources of the seasonal variations at that site. Movement of the methanogenic zone over an isotopic gradient within the dissolved CO2 pool appears to be the dominant control of the methane C-13/C-12 ratio from February to June. The onset of acetoclastic methane-production is a second important controlling process during mid-summer. An apparent temperature dependence on the fractionation factor for CO2-reduction may have a significant influence on the isotopic composition of methane throughout the year.

  10. Glaciation, aridification, and carbon sequestration in the Permo-Carboniferous: The isotopic record from low latitudes

    E-print Network

    Grossman, Ethan L.

    Glaciation, aridification, and carbon sequestration in the Permo-Carboniferous: The isotopic record and carbon sequestration in the Late Paleozoic, we have compiled new and published oxygen and carbon isotopic Carboniferous Stable isotopes Carbon cycling Brachiopods To evaluate the isotopic record of climate change

  11. Model-based estimation of the global carbon budget and its uncertainty from carbon dioxide and carbon isotope records

    E-print Network

    Jain, Atul K.

    Model-based estimation of the global carbon budget and its uncertainty from carbon dioxide and the terrestrial biosphere based on carbon dioxide and carbon isotope records, and prior information on model of carbon dioxide and the resulting atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide determined from the behavior

  12. Carbon and Nitrogen Abundances in Early-type Galaxies

    E-print Network

    Elisa Toloba; Patricia Sanchez-Blazquez; Javier Gorgas; Brad K. Gibson

    2008-11-21

    For the first time, we undertake a systematic examination of the nitrogen abundances for a sample of 35 early-type galaxies spanning a range of masses and local environment. The nitrogen-sensitive molecular feature at 3360\\AA has been employed in conjunction with a suite of atomic- and molecular-sensitive indices to provide unique and definitive constraints on the chemical content of these systems. By employing NH3360, we are now able to break the carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen degeneracies inherent to the use of the CN-index. We demonstrate that the NH3360 feature shows little dependency upon the velocity dispersion (our proxy for mass) of the galaxies, contrary to what is seen for carbon- and magnesium-sensitive indices. At face value, these results are at odds with conclusions drawn previously using indices sensitive to both carbon and nitrogen, such as cyanogen (CN). With the aid of stellar population models, we find that the N/Fe ratios in these galaxies are consistent with being mildly-enhanced with respect to the solar ratio. We also explore the dependence of these findings upon environment, by analyzing the co-added spectra of galaxies in the field and the Coma cluster. We confirm the previously found differences in carbon abundances between galaxies in low- and high-density environments, while showing that these differences do not seem to exist for nitrogen. We discuss the implications of these findings for the derivation of the star formation histories in early-type galaxies, and for the origin of carbon and nitrogen, themselves.

  13. Carbon isotope fractionation of benzene and toluene by progressive evaporation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Woo-Jin; Lee, Kwang-Sik

    2010-06-15

    Evaporation is one of the key attenuation processes for near-surface volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the upper soil zone. Evaporation experiments were performed to investigate the carbon isotope fractionation of benzene and toluene during progressive and non-equilibrium evaporation at room temperature. Considerable carbon isotope fractionation occurred during evaporative enrichment of benzene and toluene. The carbon isotope compositions of residual compounds increased exponentially with increasing evaporation. Thus, the remaining liquids become isotopically heavier, and the process follows a Rayleigh trend. This result is compatible with the direction of isotopic changes associated with both microbial degradation and volatilization of hydrocarbons previously observed in soil columns, but shows exactly the opposite behavior to previous equilibrium volatilization findings. PMID:20486260

  14. Eocene-Miocene carbon-isotope and floral record from brown coal seams in the Gippsland Basin of southeast Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdgate, Guy R.; McGowran, Brian; Fromhold, Tom; Wagstaff, Barbara E.; Gallagher, Stephen J.; Wallace, Malcolm W.; Sluiter, Ian R. K.; Whitelaw, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The carbon-isotope and palynological record through 580 m thick almost continuous brown coal in southeast Australia's Gippsland Basin is a relatively comprehensive southern hemisphere Middle Eocene to Middle Miocene record for terrestrial change. The carbon isotope ? 13C coal values of these coals range from - 27.7‰ to - 23.2. This isotopic variability follows gymnosperm/angiosperm fluctuations, where higher ratios coincide with heavier ?13C values. There is also long-term variability in carbon isotopes through time. From the Eocene greenhouse world of high gymnosperm-heavier ?13C coal values, there is a progressive shift to lighter ?13C coal values that follows the earliest (Oi1?) glacial events around 33 Ma (Early Oligocene). The overlying Oligocene-Early Miocene brown coals have lower gymnosperm abundance, associated with increased % Nothofagus (angiosperm), and lightening of isotopes during Oligocene cooler conditions. The Miocene palynological and carbon-isotope record supports a continuation to the Oligocene trends until around the late Early Miocene (circa 19 Ma) when a warming commenced, followed by an even stronger isotope shift around 16 Ma that peaked in the Middle Miocene when higher gymnosperm abundance and heavier isotopes prevailed. The cycle between the two major warm peaks of Middle Eocene and Middle Miocene was circa 30 Ma long. This change corresponds to a fall in inferred pCO 2 levels for the same period. The Gippsland data suggest a link between gymnosperm abundance, long-term plant ?13C composition, climatic change, and atmospheric pCO 2. Climatic deterioration in the Late Miocene terminated peat accumulation in the Gippsland Basin and no further significant coals formed in southeast Australia. The poor correspondence between this terrestrial isotope data and the marine isotope record is explained by the dominant control on ?13C by the gymnosperm/angiosperm abundance, although in turn this poor correspondence may reflect palaeoclimate control. From the brown coal seam dating, the coal appears to have accumulated during a considerable part of the allocated 30 Ma Cenozoic time period. These brown coal carbon isotope and palynological data appear to record a more gradual atmospheric carbon isotope change compared to the marine record.

  15. Origin of petroporphyrins. 2. Evidence from stable carbon isotopes.

    PubMed

    Boreham, C J; Fookes, C J; Popp, B N; Hayes, J M

    1990-01-01

    Compared with the carbon-13 isotopic composition of the ubiquitous C32DPEP (DPEP, deoxophylloerythroetioporphyrin) the heavy but equivalent carbon-13 isotopic composition for the porphyrin structures 15(2)-methyl-15,17-ethano-17-nor-H-C30DPEP and 15,17-butano-, 13,15-ethano-13(2),17-propano-, and 13(1)-methyl-13,15-ethano-13(2),17-propanoporphyrin suggests a common precursor, presumably chlorophyll c, for these petroporphyrins isolated from the marine Julia Creek oil shale and the lacustrine Condor oil shale. Similarly, the heavy but variable carbon-13 isotopic composition of 7-nor-H-C31DPEP compared with C32DPEP is consistent with an origin from both chlorophyll b and chlorophyll c3. The equivalent carbon-13 isotopic composition for 13(2)-methyl-C33DPEP compared with C32DPEP suggests a common origin resulting from a weighted average of chlorophyll inputs. PMID:11538479

  16. BIODEGRADATION OF FLUORANTHENE AS MONITORED USING STABLE CARBON ISOTOPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The measurement of stable isotope ratios of carbon (d13C values) was investigated as a viable technique to monitor the intrinsic bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Biometer-flask experiments were conducted in which the bacterium, Sphingomonas paucimobilis,...

  17. The Oxygen Isotopic Composition of MIL 090001: A CR2 Chondrite with Abundant Refractory Inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; McKeegan, K. D.; Sharp, Z. D.

    2012-01-01

    MIL 090001 is a large (>6 kg) carbonaceous chondrite that was classified as a member of the CV reduced subgroup (CVred) that was recovered during the 2009-2010 ANSMET field season [1]. Based on the abundance of refractory inclusions and the extent of aqueous alteration, Keller [2] suggested a CV2 classification. Here we report additional mineralogical and petrographic data for MIL 090001, its whole-rock oxygen isotopic composition and ion microprobe analyses of individual phases. The whole rock oxygen isotopic analyses show that MIL 090001 should be classified as a CR chondrite.

  18. Microbial carbonate abundance compared with fluctuations in metazoan diversity over geological time

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Riding

    2006-01-01

    Secular variation in microbial carbonate abundance may be reflected by stromatolite morphotype diversity and reefal microbial carbonate abundance. These datasets reveal long-term changes over the past 3000 Myr that include a peak of abundance 1250 Myr ago, Late Proterozoic decline, Cambrian resurgence, and fluctuating decline during the remainder of the Phanerozoic. It is conceivable that Proterozoic metazoan diversification coincided with

  19. Stable Isotopes in Foraminiferal Carbonate Steve Cooke and Eelco J. Rohling

    E-print Network

    Rohling, Eelco

    .1.5. Advection 2.2. Oxygen isotope ratios in foraminiferal carbonate 2.2.1. Equilibrium fractionation 2.2.5.2. Inorganic carbon 3.3. Carbon isotope ratios in foraminiferal carbonate 3.3.1. Equilibrium fractionation 31 Stable Isotopes in Foraminiferal Carbonate Steve Cooke and Eelco J. Rohling School of Ocean

  20. Isotopic fractionation of alkali earth metals during carbonate precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yotsuya, T.; Ohno, T.; Muramatsu, Y.; Shimoda, G.; Goto, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    The alkaline earth metals such as magnesium, calcium and strontium play an important role in a variety of geochemical and biological processes. The element ratios (Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) in marine carbonates have been used as proxies for reconstruction of the past environment. Recently several studies suggested that the study for the isotopic fractionation of the alkaline earth metals in marine carbonates has a potentially significant influence in geochemical research fields (e.g. Eisenhauer et al., 2009). The aim of this study is to explore the influence of carbonate polymorphs (Calcite and Aragonite) and environmental factors (e.g., temperature, precipitation rate) on the level of isotopic fractionation of the alkaline earth metals. We also examined possible correlations between the level of isotopic fractionation of Ca and that of other alkaline earth metals during carbonate precipitation. In order to determine the isotope fractionation factor of Mg, Ca and Sr during carbonate precipitation, calcite and aragonite were synthesized from calcium bicarbonate solution in which the amount of magnesium was controlled based on Kitano method. Calcium carbonates were also prepared from the mixture of calcium chlorite and sodium hydrogen carbonate solutions. The isotope fractionation factors were measured by MC-ICPMS. Results suggested that the level of isotopic fractionation of Mg during carbonate precipitation was correlated with that of Sr and that the change of the carbonate crystal structure could make differences of isotopic fractionations of Mg and Ca, however no difference was found in the case of Sr. In this presentation, the possible mechanism will be discussed.

  1. Carbon isotope systematics of a mantle ``hotspot'': a comparison of Loihi Seamount and MORB glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exley, R. A.; Mattey, D. P.; Clague, D. A.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1986-06-01

    The carbon isotope geochemistry of glasses from Loihi Seamount has been compared with that of MORB glasses. Stepped heating shows two carbon components in both sample suites: (1) isotopically light carbon ( avg. ? 13C = -26.3‰ ) released < 600°C, ascribed to surficial contamination, and (2) isotopically heavy carbon released > 600°C, regarded as indigenous. The high-temperature component in MORB samples varied from 52 to 169 ppm C, average ? 13C = -6.6‰ , consistent with previous studies (overall MORD average ? 13C = -6.4 ± 0.9‰ ), and new results for Indian Ocean glasses are similar to Atlantic and Pacific Ocean samples. Carbon release profiles produced by stepped heating may be typical of locality, but there are no significant differences in ? 13C values between MORB samples from different areas. Lower yields (17-110 ppm C) correlated with depth in the Loihi samples suggest that they are partially degassed. This degassing has not affected ? 13C values significantly (avg. -5.8‰). Loihi tholeiites have higher ? 13C (avg. -5.6‰) than the alkali basalts (avg. -7.1‰). Carbon abundances correlate well with He concentration data. Comparison of the ? 13C values with trace element and He, Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope data from the literature suggests that the Loihi samples with highest ? 13C have high 3He/ 4He and possibly the least depleted 143Nd/ 144Nd and 87Sr/ 86Sr. The carbon isotope data are consistent with previous models for Loihi involving several mantle sources, lithospheric contamination, and mixing. The slightly higher ? 13C of Loihi tholeiites suggests that the undegassed "plume" component manifested by high 3He/ 4He values might have ? 13C about 1‰ higher than the MORB average.

  2. Biological control of calcium isotopic abundances in the global calcium cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Skulan, J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); DePaolo, D.J.; Owens, T.L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Measurements of {sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca, expressed as {delta}{sup 44}Ca, were made on igneous rocks and on shell and bone material from modern organisms to investigate the magnitude and origins of calcium isotopic fractionation in nature. The results document a span of 4{per_thousand} in {delta}{sup 44}Ca, measured with the double spike technique to a precision of {+-}0.15{per_thousand}. Volcanic rocks, including basalt and rhyolite, show little variability and cluster near {delta}{sup 44}Ca = 0 {+-}0.2. Systematic analysis of biological samples indicates that biological processing of calcium discriminates against heavy isotopes, and that biological fractionation is the primary generator of calcium isotopic fractionation in nature. Preliminary data suggest that calcium becomes isotopically lighter as it moves through food chains. Calcium carbonate shells of marine microorganisms and deep-sea carbonate ooze have {delta}{sup 44}Ca about 1.0{per_thousand}, lower than seawater; this fractionation causes seawater to be enriched in heavy calcium ({delta}{sup 44}Ca = +0.9) relative to igneous rocks. Marine organisms consequently are isotopically heavier than their terrestrial counterparts at similar trophic level. The calcium isotopic composition of living and fossil organisms may record information on diet and environment. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Isotopic anomalies from neutron reactions during explosive carbon burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T.; Schramm, D. N.; Wefel, J. P.; Blake, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    The heavy isotopic anomalies observed recently in the fractionation and unknown nuclear inclusions from the Allende meteorite are explained by neutron reactions during the explosive carbon burning (ECB). This model produces heavy anomalies in the same zone where Al-26 and O-16 are produced, thus reducing the number of source zones required for the isotopic anomalies. Unlike the classical r-process, the ECB n-process avoids the problem with the Sr anomaly and may resolve the problem of conflicting time scales between Al-26 and the r-process isotopes I-129 and Pu-244. Experimental studies of Zr and Ce isotopic composition are proposed to test this model.

  4. Natural abundances of stable isotopes trace anthropogenic N and C in an urban stream

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amber J. Ulseth; Anne E. Hershey

    2005-01-01

    Important ecological services of low-order streams are greatly affected by urbaniza- tion. North Buffalo Creek, in the headwaters of the Cape Fear River basin in Greensboro, North Carolina, receives point- and nonpoint-source pollutants. Natural abundances of the stable isotopes of C( 13C) and N (15N) were used to determine the influence of anthropogenic nutrients on seston d15N, nutrient concentrations, C\\/N

  5. Isotopic compositions of carbonates and organic carbon from upper Proterozoic successions in Namibia: stratigraphic variation and the effects of diagenesis and metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A. J.; Hayes, J. M.; Knoll, A. H.; Germs, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    The carbon isotope geochemistry of carbonates and organic carbon in the late Proterozoic Damara Supergroup of Namibia, including the Nama, Witvlei, and Gariep groups on the Kalahari Craton and the Mulden and Otavi groups on the Congo Craton, has been investigated as an extension of previous studies of secular variations in the isotopic composition of late Proterozoic seawater. Subsamples of microspar and dolomicrospar were determined, through petrographic and cathodoluminescence examination, to represent the "least-altered" portions of the rock. Carbon-isotopic abundances in these phases are nearly equal to those in total carbonate, suggesting that 13C abundances of late Proterozoic fine-grained carbonates have not been significantly altered by meteoric diagenesis, although 18O abundances often differ significantly. Reduced and variable carbon-isotopic differences between carbonates and organic carbon in these sediments indicate that isotopic compositions of organic carbon have been altered significantly by thermal and deformational processes, likely associated with the Pan-African Orogeny. Distinctive stratigraphic patterns of secular variation, similar to those noted in other, widely separated late Proterozoic basins, are found in carbon-isotopic compositions of carbonates from the Nama and Otavi groups. For example, in Nama Group carbonates delta 13C values rise dramatically from -4 to +5% within a short stratigraphic interval. This excursion suggests correlation with similar excursions noted in Ediacaran-aged successions of Siberia, India, and China. Enrichment of 13C (delta 13C> +5%) in Otavi Group carbonates reflects those in Upper Riphean successions of the Akademikerbreen Group, Svalbard, its correlatives in East Greenland, and the Shaler Group, northwest Canada. The widespread distribution of successions with comparable isotopic signatures supports hypotheses that variations in delta 13C reflect global changes in the isotopic composition of late Proterozoic seawater. Within the Damara basin, carbon-isotopic compositions of carbonates provide a potentially useful tool for the correlation of units between the Kalahari and Congo cratons. Carbonates depleted in 13C were deposited during and immediately following three separate glacial episodes in Namibia. The correspondence between ice ages and negative delta 13C excursions may reflect the effects of lowered sea levels; enhanced circulation of deep, cold, O2-rich seawater; and/or the upwelling of 13C-depleted deep water. Iron-formation is additionally associated with one of the glacial horizons, the Chuos tillite. Carbon-13 enriched isotopic abundances in immediately pre-glacial carbonates suggest that oceanographic conditions favored high rates of organic burial. It is likely that marine waters were stratified, with deep waters anoxic. A prolonged period of ocean stratification would permit the build-up of ferrous iron, probably from hydrothermal sources. At the onset of glaciation, upwelling would have brought 13C-depleted and iron-rich deep water onto shallow shelves where contact with cold, oxygenated surface waters led to the precipitation of ferric iron.

  6. Carbon isotopic studies of organic matter in Precambrian rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehler, D. Z.; Schopf, J. W.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    A survey has been undertaken of the carbon composition of the total organic fraction of a suite of Precambrian sediments to detect isotopic trends possibly correlative with early evolutionary events. Early Precambrian cherts of the Fig Tree and upper and middle Onverwacht groups of South Africa were examined for this purpose. Reduced carbon in these cherts was found to be isotopically similar to photosynthetically produced organic matter of younger geological age. Reduced carbon in lower Onverwacht cherts was found to be anomalously heavy; it is suggested that this discontinuity may reflect a major event in biological evolution.

  7. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of alkyl porphyrins from the Triassic Serpiano oil shale.

    PubMed

    Chicarelli, M I; Hayes, J M; Popp, B N; Eckardt, C B; Maxwell, J R

    1993-01-01

    The carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of seven of the most abundant alkylporphyrins from the Serpiano oil shale (marine, Triassic) were determined. For the C31 and C32 butanoporphyrins, values of delta 13CPDB and delta 15NAIR averaged -24.0% and -3.1%. In contrast, the C31 and C32 methylpropanoporphyrins, DPEP, and a C30 13-nor etioporphyrin had delta 13C and delta 15N values averaging -27.5 and -3.3%, respectively. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic values for kerogen averaged -30.8 and -0.9, whereas those for total extract averaged -31.6, and -4.0%. The butanoporphyrins apparently derive from a biological source different from that giving rise to the other porphyrins, their 13C enrichment not being related to carbon isotopic fractionation accompanying diagenetic reactions. The delta 15N values for all the porphyrins indicate that the depletion of 15N observed in the kerogen is of primary origin. Consistent with the very high abundance of hopanoids and methyl hopanoids in the aliphatic hydrocarbon fraction, it is suggested that cyanobacterial fixation of N2 may have been the main cause of 15N depletion. PMID:11537805

  8. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of alkyl porphyrins from the Triassic Serpiano oil shale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicarelli, M. I.; Hayes, J. M.; Popp, B. N.; Eckardt, C. B.; Maxwell, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    The carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of seven of the most abundant alkylporphyrins from the Serpiano oil shale (marine, Triassic) were determined. For the C31 and C32 butanoporphyrins, values of delta 13CPDB and delta 15NAIR averaged -24.0% and -3.1%. In contrast, the C31 and C32 methylpropanoporphyrins, DPEP, and a C30 13-nor etioporphyrin had delta 13C and delta 15N values averaging -27.5 and -3.3%, respectively. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic values for kerogen averaged -30.8 and -0.9, whereas those for total extract averaged -31.6, and -4.0%. The butanoporphyrins apparently derive from a biological source different from that giving rise to the other porphyrins, their 13C enrichment not being related to carbon isotopic fractionation accompanying diagenetic reactions. The delta 15N values for all the porphyrins indicate that the depletion of 15N observed in the kerogen is of primary origin. Consistent with the very high abundance of hopanoids and methyl hopanoids in the aliphatic hydrocarbon fraction, it is suggested that cyanobacterial fixation of N2 may have been the main cause of 15N depletion.

  9. Table I. Column 4, labelled f, lists isotopic abundance fractions from Anders and Grevesse [11]. Columns 5 through 7 are from Table of Isotopes [12]. Column

    E-print Network

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    Table I. Column 4, labelled f, lists isotopic abundance fractions from Anders and Grevesse [11]. Columns 5 through 7 are from Table of Isotopes [12]. Column 5, labelled I, is the nuclear spin. Column 6, labelled ¯, is the magnetic dipole moment in nuclear magnetons. Column 7, labelled Q, is the electric

  10. Carbon dioxide in the Paleozoic atmosphere: Evidence from carbon-isotope composition of pedogenic carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Mora, C.I.; Driese, S.G.; Seager, P.G. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States))

    1991-10-01

    Stable carbon-isotope compositions of pedogenic carbonate occurring in three clay-rich vertic paleosols within Paleozoic red-bed successions in central Pennsylvania provide a record of past pedogenic environments and can be used to estimate CO{sub 2} pressure (P{sub CO{sub 2}}) of the Paleozoic atmosphere. The {delta}{sup 13}C values of carbonate nodules from paleosols in the deltaic lower Bloomsburg Formation (Upper Silurian) reflect the contribution of carbon from marine groundwater or fossils, coupled with low biological activity. The {delta}{sup 13}C values of carbonate rhizocretions from stratigraphically high paleosols in the Bloomsburg Formation, and in the alluvial Catskill (Upper Devonian) and Mauch Chunk (Upper Mississippian) Formations, suggest an extensive C{sub 3} flora and significant contribution of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Paleozoic atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels inferred from {delta}{sup 13}C of pedogenic carbonate are significantly higher than present levels.

  11. Carbon isotope fractionation and the acetyl-CoA pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaser, Martin; Conrad, Ralf

    2010-05-01

    Homoacetogenic bacteria can catalyze the reductive synthesis of acetate from CO2 via the acetyl-CoA pathway. Besides this unifying property homoacetogenic bacteria constitute a metabolically and phylogenetically diverse bacteriological group. Therefore their environmental role is difficult to address. It has been recognized that in methanogenic environments homoacetogenic bacteria contribute to the degradation of organic matter. The natural abundance of 13C may be used to understand the functional impact of homoacetogenic bacteria in the soil environment. To distinguish the acetyl-CoA pathway from other dominant processes, the isotopic composition of acetate and CO2 can be determined and the fractionation factors of the individual processes may be used to discriminate between the dominant pathways. To characterize the fractionation factor associated with the acetyl-CoA pathway the phylogenetic and metabolic diversity needs to be considered. Therefore the fractionation factor of substrate utilization and product formation of different homoacetogens (Acetobacterium woodii, Sporomusa ovata, Thermoanaerobacter kivui, Morella thermoautotrophica) has been studied under pure culture conditions in two defined minimal medium with H2/CO2 as sole source of carbon and energy. It became obvious that the cultivation conditions have a major impact on the obtained fractionation factors.

  12. A Novel Airborne Carbon Isotope Analyzer for Methane and Carbon Dioxide Source Fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, E. S.; Huang, Y. W.; Owano, T. G.; Leifer, I.

    2014-12-01

    Recent field studies on major sources of the important greenhouse gas methane (CH4) indicate significant underestimation of methane release from fossil fuel industrial (FFI) and animal husbandry sources, among others. In addition, uncertainties still exist with respect to carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements, especially source fingerprinting. CO2 isotopic analysis provides a valuable in situ measurement approach to fingerprint CH4 and CO2as associated with combustion sources, leakage from geologic reservoirs, or biogenic sources. As a result, these measurements can characterize strong combustion source plumes, such as power plant emissions, and discriminate these emissions from other sources. As part of the COMEX (CO2 and MEthane eXperiment) campaign, a novel CO2 isotopic analyzer was installed and collected data aboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft. Developing methods to derive CH4 and CO2 budgets from remote sensing data is the goal of the summer 2014 COMEX campaign, which combines hyperspectral imaging (HSI) and non-imaging spectroscopy (NIS) with in situ airborne and surface data. COMEX leverages the synergy between high spatial resolution HSI and moderate spatial resolution NIS. The carbon dioxide isotope analyzer developed by Los Gatos Research (LGR) uses LGR's patented Off-Axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) technology and incorporates proprietary internal thermal control for high sensitivity and optimal instrument stability. This analyzer measures CO2 concentration as well as ?13C, ?18O, and ?17O from CO2 at natural abundance (100-3000 ppm). The laboratory accuracy is ±1.2 ppm (1?) in CO2 from 370-1000 ppm, with a long-term (1000 s) precision of ±0.012 ppm. The long-term precision for both ?13C and ?18O is 0.04 ‰, and for ?17O is 0.06 ‰. The analyzer was field-tested as part of the COWGAS campaign, a pre-cursor campaign to COMEX in March 2014, where it successfully discriminated plumes related to combustion processes associated with dairy activities (tractor exhaust) from plumes and sources in air enriched in methane and ammonia from bovine activities including waste maintenance. Methodology, laboratory data, field data from COWGAS, and field data from the COMEX campaign acquired by LGR's carbon isotope analyzer as well as other COMEX analyzers are presented.

  13. A Comparison of Oxidized Carbon Abundances among Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiSanti, Michael A.; Mumma, M. J.; Bonev, B. P.; Villanueva, G. L.; Magee-Sauer, K.; Gibb, E. L.; Anderson, W. M.; Radeva, Y. L.

    2007-10-01

    Comets contain relatively primitive icy material remaining from the epoch of Solar System formation, however the extent to which they are modified from their initial state is a fundamental question in cometary science. One means of assessing the degree to which ices were processed prior to their incorporation into the nucleus is to measure the relative abundances of chemically related parent volatiles. For example, formation of C2H6 by hydrogen atom addition reactions (e.g., to C2H2) on surfaces of icy-mantled grains prior to their incorporation into the nucleus was proposed to explain the high C2H6 to CH4 abundance observed first in C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake)1 and then in subsequent comets. Comparing the abundance ratio C2H6/C2H2 among comets can provide information on the efficiency of this process. CO should also be hydrogenated on grain surfaces. Laboratory irradiation experiments on interstellar ice analogs have shown this process to be efficient only at very low temperatures, the resulting yields of H2CO and CH3OH being highly dependent both on hydrogen density (i.e., fluence) and on temperature in the range 10-25 K.2,3 Here, we compare the oxidation sequence of carbon in comets observed with NIRSPEC at Keck-2 and CSHELL at the NASA-IRTF. Their compositions are used to assess the efficiency of H-atom addition. Possible implications regarding formation conditions will be discussed. This work is supported by the NASA Astrobiology Program under RTOP 344-53-51, and by the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program under RTOPs 344-32-30-07 and 344-32-98. References: 1Mumma et al. 1996 Science 272:1310 2Hiraoka et al. 2002 Astrophys. J. 577:265 3Watanabe et al. 2004 Astrophys. J. 616:638

  14. LITHIUM ABUNDANCES IN CARBON-ENHANCED METAL-POOR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Masseron, Thomas; Johnson, Jennifer A. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Lucatello, Sara [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, 35122 Padova (Italy); Karakas, Amanda [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Plez, Bertrand [LUPM cc072, Universite Montpellier II, F-34095 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Beers, Timothy C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and JINA: Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Christlieb, Norbert, E-mail: masseron@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: jaj@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Landessternwarte, Koenigstuhl 12, 69117, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-05-20

    Carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars are believed to show the chemical imprints of more massive stars (M {approx}> 0.8 M{sub Sun }) that are now extinct. In particular, it is expected that the observed abundance of Li should deviate in these stars from the standard Spite lithium plateau. We study here a sample of 11 metal-poor stars and a double-lined spectroscopic binary with -1.8 < [Fe/H] < -3.3 observed with the Very Large Telescope/UVES spectrograph. Among these 12 metal-poor stars, there are 8 CEMP stars for which we measure or constrain the Li abundance. In contrast to previous arguments, we demonstrate that an appropriate regime of dilution permits the existence of 'Li-Spite plateau and C-rich' stars, whereas some of the 'Li-depleted and C-rich' stars call for an unidentified additional depletion mechanism that cannot be explained by dilution alone. We find evidence that rotation is related to the Li depletion in some CEMP stars. Additionally, we report on a newly recognized double-lined spectroscopic binary star in our sample. For this star, we develop a new technique from which estimates of stellar parameters and luminosity ratios can be derived based on a high-resolution spectrum alone, without the need for input from evolutionary models.

  15. Behavior of carbon isotopes during the hyperfiltration of calcium carbonate solutions through calcium bentonites 

    E-print Network

    Hinz, David William

    1987-01-01

    first by the heavy cement, tne lighter cement will precipitate upstream and adjacent to the early cement. Therefore, a carbon isotopic profile through a cement precipitated by hyperfi ltration will show heavy cement at the sandstone shale contact...BEHAVIOR OF CARBON ISOTOPES DURING THE HYPERFILTRATION OF CALCIUM CARBONATE SOLUTIONS THROUGH CALCIUM BENTONITES A Thesis DAVID WILLIAM HINZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  16. Evolution of Graphene Growth on Ni and Cu by Carbon Isotope Labeling

    E-print Network

    Evolution of Graphene Growth on Ni and Cu by Carbon Isotope Labeling Xuesong Li, Weiwei Cai, Luigi used carbon isotope labeling in conjunction with Raman spectroscopic mapping to track carbon during-limiting. In this work, we used isotopic labeling of the carbon precursor to study the mechanism and kinetics of CVD

  17. Carbon cycle for Lake Washington - a stable isotope study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. D. Quay; S. R. Emerson; B. M. Quay; A. H. Devol

    1986-01-01

    The authors investigate the carbon cycle in Lake Washington for the year 1980 using monthly measurements of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and its ¹³C:¹²C isotopic composition. Mass balances of DIC and its ¹³C:¹²C yield estimates of COâ gas exchange rates and net organic carbon production rates. Between 24 June and 13 August, the calculated COâ gas invasion rate of

  18. [Carbon isotope fractionation inplants]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O`Leary, M.H.

    1990-12-31

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  19. The Carboniferous carbon isotope record from sedimentary organic matter: can we disentangle the carbon cycle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, S. J.; Bennett, C. E.; Leng, M. J.; Kearsey, T.; Marshall, J. E.; Millward, D.; Reeves, E. J.; Snelling, A.; Sherwin, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the ?13C composition of sedimentary organic matter from Euramerican Carboniferous successions indicates there are significant shifts in ?13C through this key time interval. Our studies have revealed that, at an individual location, the source and delivery mechanism of the sediment contribute to the type of organic matter preserved and, in turn this influences the measured ?13C values from bulk sedimentary organic matter of organic matter. In general, where marine-derived organic matter is dominant in these Carboniferous successions then ?13C values are characteristically lower compared to the higher values encountered where terrestrial plant-derived material is most abundant. The implication of these observations is that an apparent carbon isotope excursion identified from the bulk organic matter may reflect a change in transport processes, or depositional environment, rather than a perturbation in the global carbon cycle. In our most recent studies, however, we compare ?13C values from specific wood fragments and bulk sedimentary organic matter from non-marine, marine basinal, and marine shelfal successions from the earliest Mississippian through to the early Pennsylvanian. These data indicate that early Mississippian ?13C of organic matter is far less negative (around -22%0) than material of Late Mississippian age (around -26%0), however by the early Pennsylvanian, ?13C values return to -22%0. There are some ?13C data from brachiopod carbonate from this time interval and similar shifts are indicated. Our data are beginning to address whether we can identify a primary carbon cycle signal from the Carboniferous record using ?13C from a range of sedimentary environments. If we can, there are still questions around what the record is telling us about the global carbon cycle during a period when plant groups, including lycopods and seed ferns, rapidly diversified.

  20. Carbon isotopic composition of particulate organic carbon in Ross Sea surface waters during austral summer

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.C.; Dunbar, R.B. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Marine organic matter isotopic carbon 13 is increasingly used in studies of the global carbon cycle. As part of the Ross Sea flux experiment, a systematic survey of carbon 13 in total dissolved carbon dioxide as well as sinking, suspended, sea-ice and seafloor organic matter was done in the Ross Sea. The degree of uniformity of carbon 13 depletion in polar end-member' setting was assessed. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Stable carbon isotope fractionation during aerobic biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kung-Hui Chu; Shaily Mahendra; Donald L. Song; Mark E. Conrad; Lisa Alvarez-Cohen

    2003-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis is recognized as a powerful tool for monitoring, assessing, and validating in-situ bioremediation processes. In this study, kinetic carbon isotope fractionation factors () associated with the aerobic biodegradation of vinyl chloride (VC), cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (cDCE), and trichloroethylene (TCE) were examined. Of the three solvents, the largest fractionation effects were observed for biodegradation of VC. Both metabolic and cometabolic

  2. Stable carbon isotope biogeochemistry of lakes along a trophic gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kluijver, A.; Schoon, P. L.; Downing, J. A.; Schouten, S.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2014-05-01

    The stable carbon (C) isotope variability of dissolved inorganic and organic C (DIC and DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), glucose and polar-lipid derived fatty acids (PLFA) were studied in a survey of 22 North American oligotrophic to eutrophic lakes. The ?13C of different PLFA were used as proxy for phytoplankton producers and bacterial consumers. Lake pCO2 was primarily determined by autochthonous production (phytoplankton biomass), especially in eutrophic lakes, and governed the ?13C of DIC. All organic-carbon pools showed larger isotopic variability in eutrophic lakes compared to oligo-mesotrophic lakes because of the high variability in ?13C at the base of the food web (both autochthonous and allochthonous carbon). Phytoplankton ?13C was negatively related to lake pCO2 over all lakes and positively related to phytoplankton biomass in eutrophic lakes, which was also reflected in a large range in photosynthetic isotope fractionation (ϵCO2-phyto, 8-25 ‰). The carbon isotope ratio of allochthonous carbon in oligo-mesotrophic lakes was rather constant, while it varied in eutrophic lakes because of maize cultivation in the watershed.

  3. Isotopic anomalies from neutron reactions during explosive carbon burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T.; Schramm, D. N.; Wefel, J. P.; Blake, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    The possibility that the newly discovered correlated isotopic anomalies for heavy elements in the Allende meteorite were synthesized in the secondary neutron capture episode during the explosive carbon burning, the possible source of the O-16 and Al-26 anomalies, is examined. Explosive carbon burning calculations under typical conditions were first performed to generate time profiles of temperature, density, and free particle concentrations. These quantities were inputted into a general neutron capture code which calculates the resulting isotopic pattern from exposing the preexisting heavy seed nuclei to these free particles during the explosive carbon burning conditions. The interpretation avoids the problem of the Sr isotopic data and may resolve the conflict between the time scales inferred from 1-129, Pu-244, and Al-26.

  4. Morphology and isotope heterogeneity of Late Quaternary pedogenic carbonates: Implications for paleosol carbonates as paleoenvironmental proxies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Deutz; I. P. Montañez; H. C. Monger; J. Morrison

    2001-01-01

    Stable isotope values and radiocarbon ages were determined for pedogenic carbonate microsamples from relict soils and palaeosols from the Rio Grande Rift region of New Mexico. Carbonate nodules and clusters were sampled from fluvial and piedmont soils and palaeosols with widely varying exposure durations (7–900ky). Pedogenic carbonates from individual soils exhibited irregular relationships between age and depth, ranging in radiocarbon

  5. Variability in the carbon isotopic composition of foliage carbon pools (soluble carbohydrates, waxes) and respiration fluxes

    E-print Network

    Martin, Timothy

    Variability in the carbon isotopic composition of foliage carbon pools (soluble carbohydrates measured the d13 C of assimilated carbon (foliage organic matter (dCOM), soluble carbohydrates (d pools (soluble carbohydrates, waxes) and respiration fluxes in southeastern U.S. pine forests, J

  6. Carbon isotope systematics of a mantle "hotspot": a comparison of Loihi Seamount and MORB glasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Exley, R.A.; Mattey, D.P.; Clague, D.A.; Pillinger, C.T.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotope geochemistry of glasses from Loihi Seamount has been compared with that of MORB glasses. Stepped heating shows two carbon components in both sample suites: (1) isotopically light carbon (avg. ??13C = -26.3???) released 600??C, regarded as indigenous. The high-temperature component in MORB samples varied from 52 to 169 ppm C, average ??13C = -6.6???, consistent with previous studies (overall MORD average ??13C = -6.4 ?? 0.9???), and new results for Indian Ocean glasses are similar to Atlantic and Pacific Ocean samples. Carbon release profiles produced by stepped heating may be typical of locality, but there are no significant differences in ??13C values between MORB samples from different areas. Lower yields (17-110 ppm C) correlated with depth in the Loihi samples suggest that they are partially degassed. This degassing has not affected ??13C values significantly (avg. -5.8???). Loihi tholeiites have higher ??13C (avg. -5.6???) than the alkali basalts (avg. -7.1???). Carbon abundances correlate well with He concentration data. Comparison of the ??13C values with trace element and He, Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope data from the literature suggests that the Loihi samples with highest ??13C have high 3He/4He and possibly the least depleted 143Nd/144Nd and 87Sr/86Sr. The carbon isotope data are consistent with previous models for Loihi involving several mantle sources, lithospheric contamination, and mixing. The slightly higher ??13C of Loihi tholeiites suggests that the undegassed "plume" component manifested by high 3He/4He values might have ??13C about 1??? higher than the MORB average. ?? 1986.

  7. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of New Zealand geothermal gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, G. L.; Hulston, J. R.

    1984-06-01

    Carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions are reported for methane, hydrogen and carbon dioxide from four New Zealand geothermal areas: Ngawha, Wairakei, Broadlands and Tikitere. Carbon-13 contents are between -24.4 and -29.5%. (PDB) for methane, and between -3.2 and -9.1%. for carbon dioxide. Deuterium contents are between -142 and -197%. (SMOW) for methane and between -310 and -600%. for hydrogen. The different areas have different isotopic compositions with some general relationships to reservoir temperature. The isotopic exchange of hydrogen with water indicates acceptable reservoir temperatures of 180-260°C from most spring samples but often higher than measured temperatures in well samples. Indicated temperatures assuming 13C equilibria between CH 4 and CO 2 are 100-200°C higher than measured maxima. This difference may be due to partial isotopic equilibration or may reflect the origin of the methane. Present evidence cannot identify whether the methane is primordial, or from decomposing sediments or from reduction of magmatic CO 2. The isotopic equilibria between CH 4, CO 2, H 2 and H 2O are reviewed and a new semi-empirical temperature scale proposed for deuterium exchange between methane and water.

  8. Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Gases in the Martian Atmosphere from the Curiosity Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Webster, Christopher R.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Franz, Heather; Wong, Michael; Conrad, Pamela G.; Harpold, Dan; Jones, John J.; Leshin, Laurie A.; Manning, Heidi; Owen, Tobias; Pepin, Robert O.; Squyres, Steven; Trainer, Melissa; Kemppinen, Osku; Bridges, Nathan; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Minitti, Michelle; Cremers, David; Bell, James F.; Edgar, Lauren; Farmer, Jack; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; King, Penelope; Blank, Jennifer; Weigle, Gerald; Schmidt, Mariek; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Baker, Michael; Edwards, Christopher; Ehlmann, Bethany; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Grotzinger, John; Miller, Hayden; Newcombe, Megan; Pilorget, Cedric; Rice, Melissa; Siebach, Kirsten; Stack, Katie; Stolper, Edward; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Léveillé, Richard; Marchand, Geneviève; Sánchez, Pablo Sobrón; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Israël, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Pérez, René; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Rodríguez, Javier Caride; Blázquez, Isaías Carrasco; Gómez, Felipe Gómez; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Hettrich, Sebastian; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Jiménez, Mercedes Marín; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Caro, Guillermo Muñoz; López, Sara Navarro; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pla-García, Jorge; Manfredi, José Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planelló, Julio José; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Mier, María-Paz Zorzano; Chipera, Steve; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Mauchien, Patrick; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Fairén, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; DeMarines, Julia; Grinspoon, David; Reitz, Günther; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Kemppinen, Osku; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Fabre, Cécile; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Gupta, Sanjeev; Bish, David; Schieber, Juergen; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Berger, Gilles; Cros, Alain; d'Uston, Claude; Forni, Olivier; Gasnault, Olivier; Lasue, Jérémie; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Maurice, Sylvestre; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Pinet, Patrick; Schröder, Susanne; Toplis, Mike; Lewin, Éric; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Israël, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Dromart, Gilles; Robert, François; Sautter, Violaine; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Mangold, Nicolas; Nachon, Marion; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; François, Pascaline; Raulin, François; Teinturier, Samuel; Cameron, James; Clegg, Sam; Cousin, Agnès; DeLapp, Dorothea; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Lanza, Nina; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Wiens, Roger C.; Williams, Richard B.; Jones, Andrea; Kirkland, Laurel; Treiman, Allan; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Edgett, Kenneth; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; Malin, Michael; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Dyar, M. Darby; Fassett, Caleb; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Dworkin, Jason P.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Floyd, Melissa; Freissinet, Caroline; Garvin, James; Glavin, Daniel; Jones, Andrea; Martin, David K.

    2013-07-01

    Volume mixing and isotope ratios secured with repeated atmospheric measurements taken with the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument suite on the Curiosity rover are: carbon dioxide (CO2), 0.960(±0.007); argon-40 (40Ar), 0.0193(±0.0001); nitrogen (N2), 0.0189(±0.0003); oxygen, 1.45(±0.09) × 10-3; carbon monoxide, < 1.0 × 10-3; and 40Ar/36Ar, 1.9(±0.3) × 103. The 40Ar/N2 ratio is 1.7 times greater and the 40Ar/36Ar ratio 1.6 times lower than values reported by the Viking Lander mass spectrometer in 1976, whereas other values are generally consistent with Viking and remote sensing observations. The 40Ar/36Ar ratio is consistent with martian meteoritic values, which provides additional strong support for a martian origin of these rocks. The isotopic signature ?13C from CO2 of ~45 per mil is independently measured with two instruments. This heavy isotope enrichment in carbon supports the hypothesis of substantial atmospheric loss.

  9. Carbon Stars in the Hamburg/ESO Survey: Abundances

    E-print Network

    Judith G. Cohen; Andrew McWilliam; Stephen Shectman; Ian Thompson; Norbert Christlieb; Jorge Melendez; Solange Ramirez; Amber Swensson; Franz-Josef Zickgraf

    2006-03-21

    We have carried out a detailed abundance analysis for a sample of 16 carbon stars found among candidate extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars from the Hamburg/ESO Survey. We find that the Fe-metallicities for the cooler C-stars (Teff ~ 5100K) have been underestimated by a factor of ~10 by the standard HES survey tools. The results presented here provided crucial supporting data used by Cohen et al (2006) to derive the frequency of C-stars among EMP stars. C-enhancement in these EMP C-stars appears to be independent of Fe-metallicity and approximately constant at ~1/5 the solar C/H. The mostly low C12/C13 ratios (~4) and the high N abundances in many of these stars suggest that material which has been through proton burning via the CN cycle comprises most of the stellar envelope. C-enhancement is associated with strong enrichment of heavy nuclei beyond the Fe-peak for 12 of the 16 stars. The remaining C-stars from the HES, which tend to be the most Fe-metal poor, show no evidence for enhancement of the heavy elements. Very high enhancements of lead are detected in some of the C-stars with highly enhanced Ba. (We show that) the s-process is responsible for the enhancement of the heavy elements for the majority of the C-stars in our sample. We suggest that both the s-process rich and Ba-normal C-stars result from phenomena associated with mass transfer in binary systems. This leads directly to the progression from C-stars to CH stars and then to Ba stars as the Fe-metallicity increases. (abridged and slightly edited to shorten)

  10. ISO/GUM UNCERTAINTIES AND CIAAW (UNCERTAINTY TREATMENT FOR RECOMMENDED ATOMIC WEIGHTS AND ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCES)

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2007-07-23

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has published a Guide to the expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM). The IUPAC Commission on Isotopic Abundance and Atomic Weight (CIAAW) began attaching uncertainty limits to their recommended values about forty years ago. CIAAW's method for determining and assigning uncertainties has evolved over time. We trace this evolution to their present method and their effort to incorporate the basic ISO/GUM procedures into evaluations of these uncertainties. We discuss some dilemma the CIAAW faces in their present method and whether it is consistent with the application of the ISO/GUM rules. We discuss the attempt to incorporate variations in measured isotope ratios, due to natural fractionation, into the ISO/GUM system. We make some observations about the inconsistent treatment in the incorporation of natural variations into recommended data and uncertainties. A recommendation for expressing atomic weight values using a tabulated range of values for various chemical elements is discussed.

  11. The influence of kinetics on the oxygen isotope composition of calcium carbonate

    E-print Network

    Watkins, Jim

    on equilibrium fractionation of oxygen isotopes between calcium carbonate and water. Equili- brium oxygen isotope isotopes equilibrium kinetic carbonic anhydrase paleothermometry a b s t r a c t Paleotemperature reconstructions rely on knowledge of the equilibrium separation of oxygen isotopes between aqueous solution

  12. Behaviour of Structural Carbonate Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Compositions in Bioapatite During Burning of Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, L. E.; Longstaffe, F. J.; White, C. D.

    2003-12-01

    Bioapatite, the principal inorganic phase comprising bone, commonly contains a small fraction of carbonate, which has been substituted into the phosphate structure during bone formation. The isotopic compositions of both the phosphate oxygen and the structural carbonate oxygen are now commonly used in palaeoclimatological and bioarchaeological investigations. The potential for post-mortem alteration of these isotopic compositions, therefore, is of interest, with the behaviour of structural carbonate being of most concern. In bioarchaeological studies, alteration of bone isotopic compositions has the potential to occur not only during low-temperature processes associated with burial but also during food preparation involving heating (burning, boiling). Here, we examine the stable isotopic behaviour of structural carbonate oxygen and carbon, and coexisting phosphate oxygen during the burning of bone. Freshly deceased (6<8 months) white-tailed deer leg bones (Odocoileus virginianus) were collected from Pinery Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada. Each long bone was sectioned and incrementally heated from 25 to 900° C, in 25° intervals. The samples were then ground to a standardized grain-size (45<63? m), and changes in bioapatite crystallinity (CI) were determined using powder X-ray diffraction (pXRD), and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). Combined differential thermal and thermogravimetric analyses (DTA/TG) were used to evaluate weight loss and associated reactions during heating. Stable carbon isotope compositions of the bioapatite remain relatively constant (+/-1‰ ) during heating to 650° C. A 4‰ increase in stable carbon isotopic composition then occurs between 650-750° C, accompanied by an increase in CI, followed by a 10‰ decline at temperatures above 800° C, as carbonate carbon is lost. Carbonate and phosphate oxygen isotopic compositions are correlated over the entire heating range, with carbonate being enriched relative to phosphate by about 8-10‰ below 500° C, 5-6‰ between 500-700° C, and 8-10‰ above 700° C. CI and oxygen isotopic compositions of carbonate and phosphate are not well correlated. Only modest CI changes are recorded from 25-675° C, compared with much larger changes in oxygen isotopic composition, especially above 300° C. On average, original isotopic compositions are largely preserved for both phosphate (+/-1‰ ) and carbonate (+/-2‰ ) oxygen at <300° C. At higher temperatures, however, both phosphate and carbonate oxygen in the bioapatite are systematically depleted of oxygen-18 relative to original values.

  13. The carbon isotope geochemistry of mantle xenoliths

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Deines

    2002-01-01

    Carbon occurs in mantle samples in several chemical, mineralogical and morphological forms. It has been observed as CO2, CH4 and CO in fluid inclusions, as carbonate, graphite, diamond, moissanite, solid solution in silicates, and organic compounds. The total carbon concentration reported for mantle xenoliths varies by four orders of magnitude from below 1 ppm to close to 10000 ppm. About

  14. Combining stable isotope isotope geochemistry and carbonic anhydrase activity to trace vital effect in carbonate precipitation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, C.; Ader, M.; Menez, B.; Guyot, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    Carbonates precipitated by skeleton-forming eukaryotic organisms are often characterized by non-equilibrium isotopic signatures. This specificity is referred to as the "vital effect" and can be used as an isotopic evidence to trace life. Combining stable isotope geochemistry and enzymology (using the enzyme carbonic anhydrase) we aim to demonstrate that prokaryotes are also able to precipitate carbonate with a non-equilibrium d18OCaCO3. Indeed, if in an biomineralization experiment carbonates are precipitated with a vital effect, the addition of carbonic anhydrase should drive the system to isotope equilibrium, And provide a comparison point to estimate the vital effect range. This protocol allowed us to identify a -20‰ vital effect for the d18O of carbonates precipitated by Sporosarcina pasteurii, a bacterial model of carbonatogen metabolisms. This approach is thus a powerfull tool for the understanding of microbe carbonatogen activity and will probably bring new insights into the understanding of bacterial activity in subsurface and during diagenesis.

  15. ­­A Clumped Isotope Calibration for Terrestrial Microbial Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryshyn, V. A.; Mering, J. A.; Mitsunaga, B. A.; Eagle, R.; Dunbar, R. B.; Bhattacharya, A.; Tripati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate terrestrial paleotemperature records are key pieces of information in the paleoenvironmental reconstruction of Earth history. These records aid in building reliable climate models and help scientists understand the links between continental and oceanic climate data. Many different types of analyses are used to estimate terrestrial climate shifts, including leaf margin analysis, palynology, glacial deposits, elemental ratios, organic geochemistry, and stable isotopes of lacustrine deposits. Here we report a carbonate clumped isotope calibration for microbial carbonates. Application of the clumped isotope paleothermometer can potentially provide a direct temperature measurement of the water at the time of carbonate formation. Although different calibrations of the paleothermometer have been published for both inorganic and biotic carbonate minerals, the effects of clumping in microbialites (structures built under the influence of microbial activity) have not yet been quantified. Lacustrine microbialites present a potentially large, untapped archive of terrestrial climate data, however they are not strictly biotic or abiotic, but bio-induced carbonate, meaning that organisms (such as photosynthetic bacteria) influence but do not directly control precipitation. We have measured modern microbialites from multiple lacustrine sites and will report a comparison of these results to known water temperatures. Additionally we will compare lacustrine samples to marine microbialites (e.g., samples from Shark Bay) to assess potential differences between lacustrine and marine intertidal environments on clumped isotope compositions.

  16. Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

    2014-01-01

    Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e. equivalent to ~ 8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Our results obtained from ?13C analysis of amino sugars in selected marine sediment samples showed that muramic acid had isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities, whereas glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus. The analysis of stable carbon isotopic compositions of amino sugars opens a promising window for the investigation of microbial metabolisms in marine sediments and the deep marine biosphere.

  17. Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

    2014-09-01

    Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment, employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e., equivalent to ~8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars obtained from marine sediment extracts indicated that glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus, whereas muramic acid showed isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities. The ?13C analysis of amino sugars provides a valuable addition to the biomarker-based characterization of microbial metabolism in the deep marine biosphere, which so far has been lipid oriented and biased towards the detection of archaeal signals.

  18. Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen in the study of avian and mammalian trophic ecology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey F. Kelly

    2000-01-01

    Differential fractionation of stable isotopes of carbon during photosynthesis causes C 4 plants and C3 plants to have distinct carbon-isotope signatures. In addition, marine C 3 plants have stable-isotope ratios of carbon that are intermediate between C4 and terrestrial C3 plants. The direct incorporation of the carbon-isotope ratio ( 13C\\/12C) of plants into consumers' tissues makes this ratio useful in

  19. Alkane distribution and carbon isotope composition in fossil leaves: An interpretation of plant physiology in the geologic past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, H. V.; Freeman, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    The relative chain-length distribution and carbon-isotope composition of n-alkanes extracted from sedimentary rocks are important geochemical tools for investigating past terrestrial ecosystems. Alkanes preserved in ancient sediments are assumed to be contemporaneous, derived from the same ecosystem, and integrated from the biomass present on the landscape at the time of deposition. Further, there is an underlying assumption that ancient plants exhibited the same metabolic and physiological responses to climate conditions that are observed for modern plants. Interpretations of alkane abundances and isotopic signatures are complicated by the strong influence of phylogenetic affiliation and ecological factors, such as canopy structure. A better understanding of how ecosystem and taxa influence alkane properties, including homologue abundance patterns and leaf-lipid carbon isotope fractionation would help strengthen paleoecological interpretations based on these widely employed plant biomarkers. In this study, we analyze the alkane chain-length distribution and carbon-isotope composition of phytoleim and alkanes (d13Cleaf and d13Clipid) extracted from a selection of Cretaceous and Paleocene fossil leaves from the Guaduas and Cerrejon Formations of Colombia. These data were compared with data for the same families in a modern analogue biome. Photosynthetic and biosynthetic fractionation (?leaf and elipid) values determined from the fossil material indicate carbon metabolism patterns were similar to modern plants. Fossil data were incorporated in a biomass-weighted mixing model to represent the expected lipid complement of sediment arising from this ecosystem and compared with alkane measurements from the rock matrix. Modeled and observed isotopic and abundance patterns match well for alkane homologs most abundant in plants (i.e., n-C27 to n-C33). The model illustrates the importance of understanding biases in litter flux and taphonomic pressures inherent in the fossil lipid record, and it highlights the influence of community composition and forest structure on sedimentary lipids.

  20. High Spatial Resolution Isotopic Abundance Measurements by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry: Status and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeegan, K. D.

    2007-12-01

    Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, SIMS or ion microprobe analysis, has become an important tool for geochemistry because of its ability study the distributions of elemental and isotopic abundances in situ on polished samples with high (typically a few microns to sub-micron) spatial resolution. In addition, SIMS exhibits high sensitivity for a wide range of elements (H to Pu) so that isotope analyses can sometimes be performed for elements that comprise only trace quantities of some mineral phase (e.g., Pb in zircon) or on major and/or minor elements in very small samples (e.g., presolar dust grains). Offsetting these positive attributes are analytical difficulties due to the complexity of the sputtering source of analyte ions: (1) relatively efficient production of molecular ion species (especially from a complex matrix such as most natural minerals) that cause interferences at the same nominal mass as atomic ions of interest, and (2) quantitation problems caused by variations in the ionization efficiencies of different elements and/or isotopes depending upon the chemical state of the sample surface during sputtering--the so-called "matrix effects". Despite the availability of high mass resolution instruments (e.g., SHRIMP II/RG, CAMECA 1270/1280/NanoSIMS), the molecular ion interferences effectively limit the region of the mass table that can be investigated in most samples to isotope systems at Ni or lighter or at Os or heavier. The matrix effects and the sensitivity of instrumental mass discrimination to the physical state of the sample surface can hamper reproducibility and have contributed to a view that SIMS analyses, especially for so- called stable isotopes, are most appropriate for extraterrestrial samples which are often small, rare, and can exhibit large magnitude isotopic effects. Recent improvements in instrumentation and technique have extended the scope of SIMS isotopic analyses and applications now range from geochronology to paleoclimatology to volcanology to biogeochemistry and cosmochemistry. Multiple collector (static magnetic field) measurements at high mass resolving power have enabled high precision (sub-permil) for several stable isotopes systems (e.g., C, O, Mg, S). Applied to geochronology, the multiple collector approach permits very rapid survey of zircon Pb-Pb ages to identify candidate Hadean grains for further detailed analysis. Ion imaging has been used to correlate isotope compositions with biochemistry (e.g., FISH-SIMS) or to search for especially rare samples among larger populations (e.g., supernova grains of Stardust). For favorable sample geometries with lateral homogeneity, SIMS isotope analyses may be conducted in depth-profiling mode which brings spatial resolution into the tens of nm range. Applications of this approach include experimental petrology, thermochronology, and isotopic analyses of shallowly-implanted solar wind ions. New approaches to removal of molecular ion interferences include reverse- geometry instrumentation and accelerator-based SIMS. There always exists trade-offs between microanalysis and trace analysis on the one hand, and high precision on the other. In this contribution, I will review current status for isotope precision and accuracy of SIMS for applications in stable and radiogenic isotopes as a function of spatial scale. A discussion of current limits and future prospects for improvement in understanding matrix effects will be given. Examples from ion imaging/ depth profiling/ geochronology and cosmochemistry will be provided.

  1. Carbon and sulfur isotopes as tracers of fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interaction in geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefansson, A.; Keller, N. S.; Gunnarsson Robin, J.; Kjartansdottir, R.; Ono, S.; Sveinbjörnsdottir, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon and sulfur are among major components in geothermal systems. They are found in various oxidation state and present in solid phases and fluids (water and vapor). In order to study the reactions and mass movement within multiphase geothermal systems, we have combined geochemical fluid-fluid and fluid-rock modelling with sulfur and carbon isotope fractionation modelling and compared the results with measured carbon and sulfur isotopes in geothermal fluids (water and vapor) for selected low- and high-enthalpy geothermal systems in Iceland. In this study we have focused on ?34S for H2S in vapor and water and SO4 in water as well as ?13C for CO2 in vapor and water phases. Isotope fractionations for CO2 and H2S between vapor and liquid water, upon aqueous speciation and upon carbonate and sulfide mineral formation were revised. These were combined with reaction modelling involving closed system boiling and progressive water-rock interaction to constrain the mass movement and isotope abundance between various phases. The results indicate that for a closed system, carbon and sulfur isotope abundance is largely dependent on progressive fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interaction and the initial total ?34S and ?13C value of the system. Initially, upon progressive fluid rock interaction the ?34S and ?13C values for the bulk aqueous phase approach that of the host rocks. Secondary mineral formation may alter these values, the exact isotope value of the mineral and resulting aqueous phase depending on aqueous speciation and isotope fractionation factor. In turn, aqueous speciation and mineral saturation depends on progressive fluid-rock interaction, fluid-fluid interaction, temperature and acid supply to the system. Depressurization boiling also results in isotope fractionation, the exact isotope value of the vapor and aqueous phase depending on aqueous speciation and isotope fractionation fractor. In this way, carbon and sulfur isotopes may be used combined with measured values for natural fluids to constrain mass movement upon fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interaction in geothermal systems.

  2. Isotopic fractionations associated with phosphoric acid digestion of carbonate minerals: Insights from first-principles theoretical modeling and clumped isotope measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Weifu Guo; Jed L. Mosenfelder; William A. Goddard III; John M. Eiler

    2009-01-01

    Phosphoric acid digestion has been used for oxygen- and carbon-isotope analysis of carbonate minerals since 1950, and was recently established as a method for carbonate ‘clumped isotope’ analysis. The CO2 recovered from this reaction has an oxygen isotope composition substantially different from reactant carbonate, by an amount that varies with temperature of reaction and carbonate chemistry. Here, we present a

  3. Stable Carbon Isotope Characterization of Non-Methane Hydrocarbons in Vancouver and Toronto Airsheds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. MacIsaac; M. J. Whiticar; J. Rudolph; S. Gao

    2004-01-01

    We have developed an approach using stable carbon isotopes as tool to understanding distribution and free radical chemistry of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in urban airsheds. Carbon isotope ratios are indirect tracers for the reactions of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) with OH radicals. The carbon isotope signatures are diagnostic of the source inputs and trajectories and potentially fingerprint emissions. Compound Specific

  4. Carbon Reservoir History of Mars Constrained by Atmospheric Isotope Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, R.; Kass, D. M.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Yung, Y. L.

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of the atmosphere on Mars is one of the most intriguing problems in the exploration of the Solar System, and the climate of Mars may have evolved from a warmer, wetter early state to the cold, dry current state. Because CO2 is the major constituent of Mars's atmosphere, its isotopic signatures offer a unique window to trace the evolution of climate on Mars. Here we use a box model to trace the evolution of the carbon reservoir and its isotopic signature on Mars, with carbonate deposition and atmospheric escape as the two sinks and magmatic activity as the sole source. We derive new quantitative constraints on the amount of carbonate deposition and the atmospheric pressure of Mars through time, extending into the Noachian, ~3.8 Gyr before present. This determination is based on recent Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) isotopic measurements of Mars's atmosphere, recent orbiter, lander, and rover measurements of Mars's surface, and a newly identified mechanism (photodissociation of CO) that efficiently enriches the heavy carbon isotope. In particular, we find that escape via CO photodissociation on Mars has a fractionation factor of 0.6 and hence, photochemical escape processes can effectively enrich 13C in the Mars's atmosphere during the Amazonian. As a result, modest carbonate deposition must have occurred early in Mars's history to compensate the enrichment effects of photochemical processes and also sputtering, even when volcanic outgassing up to 200 mbar occurred during the Hesperian. For a photochemical escape flux that scales as the square of the solar EUV flux or more, at least 0.1 bar of CO2 must have been deposited as carbonates in the Noachian and Hesperian. More carbonate deposition would be required if carbonate deposition only occurred in the Noachian or with low fractionation factors.

  5. Fractionation of Sulfur and Carbon Isotopes in a Meromictic Lake.

    PubMed

    Deevey, E S; Nakai, N; Stuiver, M

    1963-02-01

    In the permanently stagnant depths of Green Lake (near Syracuse, N.Y.), sulfide made by bacteria is depleted in heavy sulfur (S(34)), and sulfate is enriched. The fractionation factor, 1.0575, is the greatest yet observed. Isotopic resemblance to salt-dome sulfur deposits is evident, and, like saltdome calcite, the lake's carbon dioxide is depleted in heavy carbon (C(13)). PMID:17742167

  6. Calcium Isotope Fractionation of Inorganic and Biogenic Calcium Carbonates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Boehm; N. Gussone; J. Tang; M. Dietzel; B. Kisakurek; M. Amini; S. Reynaud; J. Reitner; W. Dullo; A. Eisenhauer

    2006-01-01

    Calcium isotope fractionation during precipitation of various experimental and biogenic calcium carbonates depends on mineralogy. Fractionation of 44Ca\\/40Ca increases from calcite to aragonite by about 0.7 permil. The temperature dependence of the fractionation is similar in calcites and aragonites (0.015 permil\\/K) and can be explained by the temperature-control on the carbonate ion concentration and consequently on precipitation rate. Following theoretical

  7. Sims Analysis of Water Abundance and Hydrogen Isotope in Lunar Highland Plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Guan, Yunbin; Chen, Yang; Peslier, Anne H.; Zhang, Youxue; Liu, Yang; Rossman, George R.; Eiler, John M.; Neal, Clive R.

    2015-01-01

    The detection of indigenous water in mare basaltic glass beads has challenged the view established since the Apollo era of a "dry" Moon. Since this discovery, measurements of water in lunar apatite, olivine-hosted melt inclusions, agglutinates, and nominally anhydrous minerals have confirmed that lunar igneous materials contain water, implying that some parts of lunar mantle may have as much water as Earth's upper mantle. The interpretation of hydrogen (H) isotopes in lunar samples, however, is controversial. The large variation of H isotope ratios in lunar apatite (delta Deuterium = -202 to +1010 per mille) has been taken as evidence that water in the lunar interior comes from the lunar mantle, solar wind protons, and/or comets. The very low deuterium/H ratios in lunar agglutinates indicate that solar wind protons have contributed to their hydrogen content. Conversely, H isotopes in lunar volcanic glass beads and olivine-hosted melt inclusions being similar to those of common terrestrial igneous rocks, suggest a common origin for water in both Earth and Moon. Lunar water could be inherited from carbonaceous chondrites, consistent with the model of late accretion of chondrite-type materials to the Moon as proposed by. One complication about the sources of lunar water, is that geologic processes (e.g., late accretion and magmatic degassing) may have modified the H isotope signatures of lunar materials. Recent FTIR analyses have shown that plagioclases in lunar ferroan anorthosite contain approximately 6 ppm H2O. So far, ferroan anorthosite is the only available lithology that is believed to be a primary product of the lunar magma ocean (LMO). A possible consequence is that the LMO could have contained up to approximately 320 ppm H2O. Here we examine the possible sources of water in the LMO through measurements of water abundances and H isotopes in plagioclase of two ferroan anorthosites and one troctolite from lunar highlands.

  8. ORIGINAL PAPER Carbon isotope ratio measurements of glyphosate

    E-print Network

    ORIGINAL PAPER Carbon isotope ratio measurements of glyphosate and AMPA by liquid chromatography- plied herbicide glyphosate and its metabolite aminome- thylphosphonic acid (AMPA) by liquid of commercial glyphosate her- bicide samples show its principal applicability and reveals a wide range of 13 C

  9. Carbon isotope discrimination by plants follows latitudinal and altitudinal trends

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ch. Körner; G. D. Farquhar; S. C. Wong

    1991-01-01

    In an earlier paper we provided evidence that carbon isotope discrimination during photosynthesis of terrestrial C3 plants decreases with altitude, and it was found that this was associated with greater carboxylation efficiency at high altitudes. Changing partial pressures of CO2 and O2 and changing temperature are possible explanations, since influences of moisture and light were reduced to a minimum by

  10. The chromium isotopic composition of seawater and marine carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnand, P.; James, R. H.; Parkinson, I. J.; Connelly, D. P.; Fairchild, I. J.

    2013-11-01

    Chromium isotopes are fractionated during redox reactions and have the potential to provide a record of changes in the oxygenation levels of the oceans in the geological past. However, Cr is a trace metal in seawater and its low concentrations make isotopic measurements challenging. Here we report the first determinations of ?Cr53 for seawater from open ocean (Argentine Basin) and coastal (Southampton Water) settings, using a double-spike technique. The total chromium concentration in seawater from Southampton Water is 1.85 nM, whereas the Cr content of Argentine Basin samples is 5.8-6.6 nM. The ?Cr53 value of seawater from the Argentine Basin is 0.491-0.556‰ in intermediate and deep waters, and varies between 0.412 and 0.664‰ in surface waters (<150 m). The ?Cr53 value of Southampton Water seawater is 1.505‰, which may reflect in situ reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). All of our seawater samples have higher ?Cr53 than crustal and mantle silicates, and mass balance modelling demonstrates that river water must also be enriched in heavy Cr isotopes, indicating that Cr isotopes are fractionated during weathering and/or during transport to the oceans. We also show that the Cr isotopic composition of modern non-skeletal marine carbonates (0.640- 0.745‰) encompasses the range that we measure for Argentine Basin seawater. Thus, fractionation of Cr isotopes during precipitation of these marine carbonates is likely to be small (<0.2‰), and they have the potential to provide a record of the Cr isotopic composition of ancient seawater. Phanerozoic carbonates are also characterised by heavy ?Cr53 and a correlation between ?Cr53 and Ce/Ce* suggests that the Cr and Ce cycles in the ocean are linked.

  11. Stable carbon isotope fractionation by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Londry, Kathleen L.; Des Marais, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Biogeochemical transformations occurring in the anoxic zones of stratified sedimentary microbial communities can profoundly influence the isotopic and organic signatures preserved in the fossil record. Accordingly, we have determined carbon isotope discrimination that is associated with both heterotrophic and lithotrophic growth of pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). For heterotrophic-growth experiments, substrate consumption was monitored to completion. Sealed vessels containing SRB cultures were harvested at different time intervals, and delta(13)C values were determined for gaseous CO(2), organic substrates, and products such as biomass. For three of the four SRB, carbon isotope effects between the substrates, acetate or lactate and CO(2), and the cell biomass were small, ranging from 0 to 2 per thousand. However, for Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans, the carbon incorporated into biomass was isotopically heavier than the available substrates by 8 to 9 per thousand. SRB grown lithoautotrophically consumed less than 3% of the available CO(2) and exhibited substantial discrimination (calculated as isotope fractionation factors [alpha]), as follows: for Desulfobacterium autotrophicum, alpha values ranged from 1.0100 to 1.0123; for Desulfobacter hydrogenophilus, the alpha value was 0.0138, and for Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans, the alpha value was 1.0310. Mixotrophic growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans on acetate and CO(2) resulted in biomass with a delta(13)C composition intermediate to that of the substrates. The extent of fractionation depended on which enzymatic pathways were used, the direction in which the pathways operated, and the growth rate, but fractionation was not dependent on the growth phase. To the extent that environmental conditions affect the availability of organic substrates (e.g., acetate) and reducing power (e.g., H(2)), ecological forces can also influence carbon isotope discrimination by SRB.

  12. Global Synchronous Changes in the Carbon Isotopic Composition of Carbonate Sediments Unrelated to Changes in the Global Carbon Cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter K. Swart

    2008-01-01

    The carbon isotopic (?¹³C) composition of bulk carbonate sediments deposited off the margins of four carbonate platforms\\/ramp systems (Bahamas, Maldives, Queensland Plateau, and Great Australian Bight) show synchronous changes over the past 0 to 10 million years. However, these variations are different from the established global pattern in the ?¹³C measured in the open oceans over the same time period.

  13. How the oxygen isotope ratio of rain water influences the isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Gregory; Grimes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The stable oxygen isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate was analysed from chicken eggs laid under free range, and organic farming regimes from across the UK. The eggshell carbonate oxygen isotope data shows a clear depletion in delta18O distribution from the southwest to the northeast. Although consistently offset by around 1 permil, the same isotopic distribution as that seen in eggshell carbonate is observed in the delta18O ratio of rainfall and groundwater from across the UK. This distribution is related to the Rayleigh distillation of rainfall driven by westerly winds across the UK landmass. The clear relationship observed between eggshell delta18O values and that of rainwater presumably reflects the nature of free range chickens which must be drinking locally derived rainwater and supplementing their diet and water intake with locally derived food. These results suggest that the oxygen isotope value of chicken eggshells can be used as a forensic tool to identify the locality that free range and organic eggs were laid within the UK. Furthermore, if suitable material is preserved in the archaeological and geological record then such a relationship can potentially be used to establish the oxygen isotope value of rainwater from which ancient and / or ancestral birds lived.

  14. Analysis of isotope and organic carbon signatures in hillslope hydrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; Dohnal, Michal; Jankovec, Jakub; Sanda, Martin; Votrubova, Jana

    2015-04-01

    Headwater catchments are among the most important areas for investigation of isotope and carbon fluxes because their small sizes best enable separation of above- and below ground compartments for improved understanding of the respective transport mechanisms. So far, only few studies utilized stable isotope information in modeling and even fewer linked dissolved carbon fluxes to mixing or transport models. Stable isotopes of water and dissolved organic carbon provide basis for studying transport processes ranging from soil profile scale to hillslope and catchment scale. In this study, stormflow dynamics of oxygen-18 and dissolved organic carbon was analyzed using a physically based modeling approach. One-dimensional dual-continuum vertical flow and transport model, based on Richards and advection-dispersion equations, was used to simulate the subsurface processes during significant rainfall-runoff episodes of a summer season. Water flow and transport of solutes were assumed to take place in two mutually communicating continua, the soil matrix and the network of preferential pathways. Oxygen-18 and dissolved organic carbon were observed in soil water, stormflow discharge in the experimental hillslope trench, and stream discharge at the catchment outlet. In the present study, we analyzed the transformation of input solute signals into signatures observed in the stormflow discharge. The research was supported by the Czech Science Foundation Project No. 14-15201J.

  15. Using the Carbon Isotope Ratios of Bison Tooth Enamel and Bone Collagen as a Quantitative Proxy for Reconstructing Grassland Vegetation and Paleotemperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, K. A.; Paytan, A.; Chamberlain, P.

    2005-12-01

    The carbon isotope ratios of tissues from grazing herbivores reflect the average carbon isotope ratios of local grasslands, which vary with the abundance of cool-season (C-3) versus warm-season (C-4) grasses. Since the C-3/C-4 ratios of grasslands correlate with climate, the carbon isotope ratios of fossil grazers may serve as a proxy for reconstructing paleovegetation and paleoclimatic conditions. Analyses of fossil and subfossil bison hold particular promise for use as a proxy for paleoenvironmental conditions in North America because bison remains are abundant in Holocene and Pleistocene deposits across most of the continent. However, the accuracy and precision of paleoenvironmental reconstructions based on bison is currently uncertain because the relationship between bison isotope and the abundance of C-3 and C-4 grasses has not been precisely quantified across different environments. We have analyzed the carbon isotope ratios of tooth enamel carbonate and bone collagen from 88 modern free ranging bison ( Bison bison) from ten locations in the Central United States. The C-4 biomass at these locations ranged from less than 1 percent to 95 percent of the total grass biomass. The mean carbon isotope ratios of enamel for each population correlated well with the local abundance of C-4 grasses (R2 = 0.93, p = 0.0001) and with variations in mean annual temperatures (R2 = 0.83, p = 0.001). The mean carbon isotope ratios of collagen for each population also correlated well with the C-4 grass abundance (R2 = 0.97, p = 0.0001) and mean annual temperature (R2 = 0.84, p = 0.0002). Enamel and collagen display similar variability (mean standard deviation = 0.7 per mil), and the variability does not change with climate, habitat, or C-4 abundance. These results demonstrate that analyses of the carbon isotope ratios of fossil bison can be used as a quantitative proxy for reconstructing grassland C-3/C-4 ratios and paleotemperatures, and they will serve as a baseline for interpreting isotopic analyses of fossil bison and other large herbivores from North America.

  16. Sources of carbon isotope variation in kangaroo bone collagen and tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Brett P.; Bowman, David M. J. S.; Gagan, Michael K.

    2007-08-01

    The stable carbon isotopic composition (expressed as ? 13C) of herbivore remains is commonly used to reconstruct past changes in the relative abundance of C 4 versus C 3 grass biomass (C 4 relative abundance). However, the strength of the relationship between herbivore ? 13C and C 4 relative abundance in extant ecosystems has not been thoroughly examined. We determined sources of variation in ? 13C of bone collagen and tooth enamel of kangaroos ( Macropus spp.) collected throughout Australia by measuring ? 13C of bone collagen (779 individuals) and tooth enamel (694 individuals). An index of seasonal water availability, i.e. the distribution of rainfall in the C 4 versus C 3 growing seasons, was used as a proxy for C 4 relative abundance, and this variable explained a large proportion of the variation in both collagen ? 13C (68%) and enamel ? 13C (68%). These figures increased to 78% and 77%, respectively, when differences between kangaroo species were accounted for. Vegetation characteristics, such as woodiness and the presence of an open forest canopy, had no effect on collagen or enamel ? 13C. While there was no relationship between collagen ? 13C and kangaroo age at death, tooth enamel produced later in life, following weaning, was enriched in 13C by 3.5‰ relative to enamel produced prior to weaning. From the observed relationships between seasonal water availability and collagen and enamel ? 13C, enrichment factors ( ??) for collagen-diet and enamel-diet (post-weaning) were estimated to be 5.2‰ ± 0.5 (95% CI) and 11.7‰ ± 0.6 (95% CI), respectively. The findings of this study confirm that at a continental scale, collagen and enamel ? 13C of a group of large herbivores closely reflect C 4 relative abundance. This validates a fundamental assumption underpinning the use of isotopic analysis of herbivore remains to reconstruct changes in C 4 relative abundance.

  17. Reconstructing grassland vegetation and paleotemperatures using carbon isotope ratios of bison tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Kathryn A.; Paytan, Adina; Chamberlain, Page

    2006-08-01

    Carbon isotope ratios (?13C values) of herbivores reflect the ?13C values of dietary plants, and the ?13C values of grazers (animals that consume >90% grass) reflect the local abundance of C3 versus C4 grasses. Because grassland C3/C4 ratios correlate with climate, the ?13C of fossil grazers may serve as a proxy for reconstructing paleoclimates and paleovegetation patterns. However, the accuracy of environmental reconstructions based on herbivore ?13C values is often uncertain, because the relationship between the ?13C of many animals and the abundance of C4 and C3 grasses has not been precisely quantified. We analyzed the ?13C of tooth enamel carbonate from modern bison (Bison bison bison) from nine localities in the United States. The C4 grass biomass at these sites ranged from <1% to ˜95% of the total grass biomass. The mean ?13C of enamel for each population correlated well with the local abundance of C4 grasses and with variations in mean annual temperatures. The variability of enamel ?13C values did not differ among habitats and was not correlated with the abundance of C4 grasses. These results demonstrate that analyses of the ?13C values of fossil bison can be used as a quantitative proxy for reconstructing grassland C3/C4 ratios and paleotemperatures, and they will serve as a baseline for interpreting the ?13C of fossil bison and other large herbivores in North America.

  18. Carbon Isotope Ratios in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plants

    PubMed Central

    Szarek, Stan R.; Troughton, John H.

    1976-01-01

    A year round study of photosynthesis and carbon isotope fractionation was conducted with plants of Opuntia phaeacantha Engelm. and Yucca baccata Torr. occurring in natural stands at elevations of 525, 970, 1450 and 1900 m. Plant water potentials and the daytime pattern of 14CO2 photosynthesis were similar for all cacti along the elevational gradient, despite significant differences in temperature regime and soil water status. Carbon isotope ratios of total tissue and soluble extract fractions were relatively constant throughtout the entire year. Additionally, the ?13C values were similar in all plants of the same species along the elevational gradient, i.e. ?12.5 ± 0.86 ‰ for O. phaeacantha and ?15.7 ± 0.95 ‰ for Y. baccata. The results of this study indicate Crassulacean acid metabolism predominates as the major carbon pathway of these plants, which do not facultatively utilize the reductive pentose phosphate cycle of photosynthesis as the primary carboxylation reaction. PMID:16659680

  19. Major and trace element abundances, and Sr and Nd isotopic composition of Carbonatites from Amba Dongar, Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Jyoti; Paul, Debajyoti; Viladkar, Shrinivas G.; Sensarma, Sarajit

    2015-04-01

    Despite significant progress during the last decade, the petrogenesis of carbonatites is still highly debated regarding the exact mechanism of carbonatite magma generation (fractional crystallization of carbonated-silicate magmas, liquid immiscibility of carbonated-silicate magmas, partial melting of carbonated mantle peridotite or carbonated lherzolitic mantle) and its evolution. The Amba Dongar carbonatite complex in Chhota Udaipur district, Gujarat is the youngest Indian carbonatite complex, which intruded into the ~ 90 Ma Bagh sandstones and limestone and 68-65 Ma Deccan flood basalts. The emplacement age (40Ar/39Ar age of 65±0.3 Ma; Ray and Pande, 1999) coincides with the age of main pulse of Deccan flood basalts at ca. 65 Ma. We report new geochemical data (major oxide and trace element abundances, and Sr and Nd isotopic ratios) on 23 carbonatite samples from Amba Dongar. The Amba Dongar carbonatite complex consists of carbonatite (sövite, and ankerite), and associated nephelinite, phonolite, and both pre- and post-carbonatite basalts. Detailed minerology of carbonatite include dominant calcite along with pyrochlore, apatite, magnetite, aegirine-augite and accessory phases. Apatite crystals are observed in carbonatite as well as in nephelinite. In sövites, apatite occur in various forms including cumulus, clusters and scattered within and along the boundary of calcite crystals. Two generation of apatite crystals are commonly observed in sövite and nephelinite; textural changes suggest presence of different five pulses of sövitic magma during the emplacement of the sövite ring dike. Bulk major oxides and trace element (including REEs) compositions of carbonatites and associated silicate rocks are determined by WD-XRF and ICP-MS, respectively. Major oxides abundances are consistent with the already available data on the Amba Dongar carbonatite complex. Trace element concentrations for the sövite reveals high concentrations of Sr (929-7476 ppm), Ba (344-52072 ppm) and Nb (35-2115 ppm). The ankeritic carbonatites are extremely enriched in the incompatible trace elements (e.g., ~7-32 times higher Ba, highest REE ~40,000 ppm and ~600 ppm of Th). Chondrite-normalized REE patterns show high degree of LREE enrichment suggesting low-degree partial melting of the source. The chondrite normalized La/Yb ratio of sövite and ankeritic carbonatite vary in the range 70-411. The radiogenic Sr-Nd isotopic composition of sövites (87Sr/86Sr: 0.7055-0.7066; É?Nd: -6.0 to -2.2) and ankerites (0.7058-0.7081; -3.8 to -1.9) reveal more isotopic variability compared to the available data (sövites 0.7054-0.706; -2.5 to -1.5; ankerites 0.7056-0.7065; -2.5 to -1.5). It is likely that EM I and II type sources are involved in the generation of Amba Dongar carbonatite complex. More data on carbonatites and associated silicate rocks will be helpful to establish the composition of parental carbonatite melts, depth of generation (lithosphere vs asthenosphere), their spatial relation with associated silicate rocks, and the evolution of the primary carbonatite melt over time.

  20. Isotopic Hg in an Allende carbon-rich residue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, G. W., Jr.; Jovanovic, S.

    1990-01-01

    A carbon-rich residue from Allende subjected to stepwise heating yielded two isotopically resolvable types of Hg: one with an (Hg-196)/(Hg-202) concentration ratio the same as terrestrial (monitor) Hg; the other enriched in Hg-196 relative to Hg-202 by about 60 percent. Hg with the 202 isotope enriched relative to 196, as is found in bulk Allende, was not observed. Whether the result of mass fractionation or nucleosynthesis, the distinct types of Hg entered different carrier phases and were not thermally mobilized since the accretion of the Allende parent body.

  1. Triple oxygen isotopes in biogenic and sedimentary carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Hu, Huanting; Ji, Haoyuan; Montanari, Shaena; Li, Shuning; Henkes, Gregory A.; Levin, Naomi E.

    2014-09-01

    The 17O anomaly (?17O) of natural waters has been shown to be sensitive to evaporation in a way analogous to deuterium excess, with evaporated bodies of water (e.g., leaf waters, lake waters, animal body waters) tending to have lower ?17O than primary meteoric waters. In animal body water, ?17O relates to the intake of evaporated waters, evaporative effluxes of water, and the ?17O value of atmospheric O2, which itself carries signatures of global carbon cycling and photochemical reactions in the stratosphere. Carbonates have the potential to record the triple oxygen isotope compositions of parent waters, allowing reconstruction of past water compositions, but such investigations have awaited development of methods for high-precision measurement of ?17O of carbonate. We describe optimized methods based on a sequential acid digestion/reduction/fluorination approach that yield ?17O data with the high precision (?0.010‰, 1?) needed to resolve subtle environmental signals. We report the first high-precision ?17O dataset for terrestrial carbonates, focusing on vertebrate biogenic carbonates and soil carbonates, but also including marine invertebrates and high-temperature carbonates. We determine apparent three-isotope fractionation factors between the O2 analyte derived from carbonate and the parent waters of the carbonate. These in combination with appropriate temperature estimates (from clumped isotope thermometry, or known or estimated body temperatures) are used to calculate the ?18O and ?17O of parent waters. The clearest pattern to emerge is the strong 17O-depletion in avian, dinosaurian, and mammalian body water (from analyses of eggshell and tooth enamel) relative to meteoric waters, following expected influences of evaporated water (e.g., leaf water) and atmospheric O2 on vertebrate body water. Parent waters of the soil carbonates studied here have ?17O values that are similar to or slightly lower than global precipitation. Our results suggest that ?17O will have useful application to paleoenvironmental studies of continental environments where the effects of evaporation are important, and where vertebrate body water may record an isotopic signal of evaporated water sources and atmospheric oxygen.

  2. Silicon isotopic abundance toward evolved stars and its application for presolar grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, T.-C.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Testi, L.; Baudry, A.; Wittkowski, M.; Rawlings, M. G.; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Vlemmings, W.; Nyman, L.-A.; Gray, M. D.; de Breuck, C.

    2013-11-01

    Aims: Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) is important for understanding the composition of the present-day interstellar medium (ISM) and of our solar system. In this paper, we aim to track the GCE by using the 29Si/30Si ratios in evolved stars and tentatively relate this to presolar grain composition. Methods: We used the APEX telescope to detect thermal SiO isotopologue emission toward four oxygen-rich M-type stars. Together with the data retrieved from the Herschel science archive and from the literature, we were able to obtain the 29Si/30Si ratios for a total of 15 evolved stars inferred from their optically thin 29SiO and 30SiO emission. These stars cover a range of masses and ages, and because they do not significantly alter 29Si/30Si during their lifetimes, they provide excellent probes of the ISM metallicity (or 29Si/30Si ratio) as a function of time. Results: The 29Si/30Si ratios inferred from the thermal SiO emission tend to be lower toward low-mass oxygen-rich stars (e.g., down to about unity for W Hya), and close to an interstellar or solar value of 1.5 for the higher-mass carbon star IRC+10216 and two red supergiants. There is a tentative correlation between the 29Si/30Si ratios and the mass-loss rates of evolved stars, where we take the mass-loss rate as a proxy for the initial stellar mass or current stellar age. This is consistent with the different abundance ratios found in presolar grains. Before the formation of the Sun, the presolar grains indicate that the bulk of presolar grains already had 29Si/30Si ratios of about 1.5, which is also the ratio we found for the objects younger than the Sun, such as VY CMa and IRC+10216. However, we found that older objects (up to possibly 10 Gyr old) in our sample trace a previous, lower 29Si/30Si value of about 1. Material with this isotopic ratio is present in two subclasses of presolar grains, providing independent evidence of the lower ratio. Therefore, the 29Si/30Si ratio derived from the SiO emission of evolved stars is a useful diagnostic tool for the study of the GCE and presolar grains. This publication is based on data acquired with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX). APEX is a collaboration between the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, the European Southern Observatory, and the Onsala Space Observatory. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Tables 2, 3, and Fig. 4 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Variation in Peat Bogs in the Midwestern US: Implications for Holocene Climate Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, D.; Paytan, A.; Jackson, S.

    2008-12-01

    A peat core, from near the center of Minden Bog in Michigan, representing about 3500 years of accumulation was previously analyzed for plant macrofossils, colorimetric humification, and testate amoebae to yield three independent climate proxies (Booth and Jackson, 2003). The plant macrofossil data show the site to be sensitive to bog water table fluctuations. The data suggest that this may be related to regional climatic changes. We analyzed the carbon and nitrogen isotopes, as well as the carbon-nitrogen ratios in the bulk peat samples to determine if fluctuations of these records correspond to climate events as seen in the plant microfossil and amoebae records. The degree to which peat-based carbon and nitrogen isotope records reflect changes in the relative distribution of vegetation and, in turn, reflect temperature changes in effective precipitation (precipitation minus evapotranspiration) will be assessed. Peat carbon and nitrogen isotope records will be compared with existing proxy climate records and with a temperature reconstruction based on testate amoebae in bogs. We expect that climate-related changes, in the relative abundance of vegetation remains accumulating in the peat bogs, will be recorded in the organic matter in forms of carbon and nitrogen isotopes.

  4. Hydrology & isotope tools to quantify carbon sources and sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Johannes A. C.; Lischeid, Gunnar; Gessler, Arthur

    2010-05-01

    Vegetation is fundamental for carbon uptake and usually assumes the largest portion in the evapotranspiration term. While interception can be separated by mapping various plant types in a catchment, the water isotope method yields numbers for pure evaporation. The latter causes enrichment of the heavier isotope in the remaining water phase, while transpiration leaves the isotope signal of water unaltered over longer time periods. Evaporation can thus be quantified in an integral manner over large areas by measuring water stable isotopes at points of river discharge and by comparing them to incoming precipitation. This method has been applied on scales of several thousand square kilometres and its calibration on scales of few square kilometres will allow to better constrain uncertainties. This necessitates comparison with hydrometric methods of well-instrumented catchments in several climatic regimes. Innovative small-scale methods involve determination of effective rainfall by time series analyses of hydrological data. This in turn requires temporal resolution of daily to hourly values to apply methods such as runoff recession or principal component analyses. It is also known that continental water fluxes are related to carbon fluxes through photosynthesis that in turn recycles large amounts of water via transpiration. This is usually described by the water use efficiency (WUE) term that quantifies how many moles of water transpire to accumulate one mole of CO2. However, so far only few empirical numbers are available for the spatio-temporal variability in WUE of plants and plant communities and further field experiments combined with isoscape approaches are necessary to constrain this term on a regional scale and its dependencies on factors such as light, temperature, water availability, plant type and height. Combined data can then serve to determine catchment-wide carbon uptake via the transpiration rates. Carbon accumulation can also be determined with eddy covariance methods, which usually yield local information. Furthermore, eddy covariance methods yield valuable information about ecosystem respiration. The latter needs to be subtracted from carbon uptake to determine net ecosystem CO2 exchange and to define sources or sinks. Eddy covariance and their upscaling combined with area-integrating water isotope methods thus provide cross validation of large scale carbon budgets with independent approaches. This combination may therefore provide new insights into relations between carbon and water balance of the biosphere as affected by various environmental conditions.

  5. Contrasting the CO2-He Isotope and Relative Abundance Systematics of the Central American and IBM Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, D. R.; Fischer, T. P.; Shaw, A. M.; Hauri, E.; Walker, J.

    2006-12-01

    We report CO2 and He isotope and relative abundance data obtained utilizing high-T fumaroles, geothermal wells, boiling mud pots, hot springs and phenocryst-bearing lavas from both MARGINS-targeted regions. In Central America, we collected ~140 fluid and ~30 lava samples covering a total of 41 volcanic centers in Costa Rica (7), Nicaragua (8), El Salvador (10), Honduras (9) and Guatemala (7). Along the IBM arc, we sampled the islands of Uracas, Agrigan, Pagan and Alamagan in the CNMI and Oshima, Niijima, Shikinajima, Hachijojima and Aogashima in the Izu islands. Helium isotope ratios (3He/4He) reach a maximum of 8RA (where RA = air 3He/4He) with most values > 5 RA. The majority of samples have CO2/3He ratios between 1010 and 1011, as at other arcs. The ?13C of the CO2 for the majority of samples fall between -5 and 0 ‰ (PDB) consistent with a major slab input to the carbon inventory. The entire database has been assessed to identify samples unmodified by localised crustal processes (~75% of total), thereby defining the He and C systematics of the underlying mantle source. At both arcs, we utilize along-strike He-C variations to consider the relative influence of various subduction zone forcing functions on the output C-flux. We show that subducted sediment lithology, particularly down-hole C distribution and the nature (oxidized/reduced) of the C, is a major control on the output as opposed to other factors such as angle of slab dip, convergence rate, and thickness of overlying arc crust.

  6. A stable carbon isotope and biological marker study of Polish bituminous coals and carbonaceous shales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kotarba, M.J.; Clayton, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Biological marker and carbon isotopic compositions of coals and carbonaceous shales from the Upper Carboniferous strata of the Upper Silesian (USCB), Lower Silesian (LSCB), and Lublin (LCB) coal basins were determined to assess depositional conditions and sources of the organic matter. n-Alkane, sterane, and isoprenoid distribution, and carbon isotope ratios are consistent with an origin from higher plants. In some cases, pristane/phytane (Pr/Ph) ratios of carbonaceous shales (roof and floor shales) are < 1.0, while the associated coals have high ratios (??? 1.0). This suggests that reducing conditions prevailed during deposition of the shales, but a period of oxidizing conditions accompanied deposition of the coals. Steranes present in coal extracts are dominated by the 14??(H)17??(H)20R C29 stereoisomers, typical, but not conclusive, of higher plant origin. Carbonaceous shales exhibit a wider range of sterane composition, suggesting local, significant input of algal organic matter. Significant amounts of benzohopanes and gammacerane are present in some coals. Although benzohopanes are present at least in small amounts in samples from many different environments, they have been reported to occur most commonly in marine environments. The present study seems to provide the first example where benzohopanes have been reported in significant amounts in terrestrial organic matter. Gammacerane is abundant in rocks or sediments deposited in carbonate or highly saline marine environments. The finding of high gammacerane concentrations in the coals expands the depositional settings in which it has been observed and questions its utility as an independent indicator of hypersaline carbonate environments. Stable carbon isotope composition of coals, and type III kerogen in carbonaceous shales as well as correlation of stable carbon isotope composition of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons in carbonaceous shales from both the USCB and the LSCB indicate terrigenous origin. Bitumens are always co-genetic with associated coals and kerogens. Isotopic data reveal that Sofer's genetic classification of oils is not applicable to organic matter in coals. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Kinetic isotope effects during carbonate mineral formation Z. Sade*, R. Yam, A. Shemesh and I. Halevy

    E-print Network

    Simon, Emmanuel

    Kinetic isotope effects during carbonate mineral formation Z. Sade*, R. Yam, A. Shemesh and I. Halevy Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel *ziv.sade@weizmann.ac.il The oxygen isotopic ambient water to determine the temperature at which the carbonates formed and the oxygen isotope

  8. Carbon isotope chemostratigraphy of the Middle Riphean type section (Avzyan Formation, Southern Urals, Russia)

    E-print Network

    Perfect, Ed

    Carbon isotope chemostratigraphy of the Middle Riphean type section (Avzyan Formation, Southern preserve all or part of the mid- Mesoproterozoic isotopic shift. This shift represents a significant, the character of the carbon isotopic curve is most similar to that of the Dismal Lakes Group, arctic Canada

  9. Temporal Dynamics and Environmental Controls on Carbon Isotope Discrimination at the Canopy Scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. A. Billmark; T. J. Griffis; X. Lee; L. R. Welp; J. M. Baker

    2007-01-01

    Much is currently known about 13C isotopic discrimination by C3 plants at the leaf scale. Multidisciplinary techniques from micrometeorology and the stable isotope community have exploited this knowledge to better understand the dynamic processes and environmental controls on atmosphere\\/biosphere exchange. Unfortunately, there remains a dearth of measurements relating carbon isotope discrimination at the canopy scale (Deltacanopy) with the net carbon

  10. Carbon isotope ratio of Cenozoic CO2: A comparative evaluation of available geochemical proxies

    E-print Network

    Tipple, Brett

    CCO2 values are assigned after careful consideration of equilibrium and nonequilibrium isotope effects] The d13 C value of atmospheric CO2 (d13 CCO2), along with isotopic fractionations associated with carbonClick Here for Full Article Carbon isotope ratio of Cenozoic CO2: A comparative evaluation

  11. Canopy-scale kinetic fractionation of atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapor isotopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xuhui Lee; Tim J. Griffis; John M. Baker; Kaycie A. Billmark; Kyounghee Kim; Lisa R. Welp

    2009-01-01

    Received 18 August 2008; revised 16 October 2008; accepted 21 October 2008; published 4 February 2009. (1) The carbon and oxygen isotopes of CO2 and the oxygen isotopes of H2 Oa re powerful tracers for constraining the dynamics of carbon uptake and water flux on land. The role of land biota in the atmospheric budgets of these isotopes has been

  12. Natural Abundance Carbon13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectra of the Canine Sciatic Nerve

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Williams; J. A. Hamilton; M. K. Jain; A. Allerhand; E. H. Cordes; S. Ochs

    1973-01-01

    The proton-decoupled natural abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the canine sciatic nerve is virtually identical to that of canine adipose tissue and markedly similar to that of liquid triolein. No resonances assignable to cholesterol, glycolipids, or sphingolipids are detectable in the sciatic nerve spectrum despite their abundance in the myelin sheath of this nerve. However, many such resonances

  13. Fatty acid and stable carbon isotope characterization of Camelina sativa oil: implications for authentication.

    PubMed

    Hrastar, Robert; Petrisic, Marinka G; Ogrinc, Nives; Kosir, Iztok Joze

    2009-01-28

    The importance of authenticity characterization is an increasing and pressing requirement for all foods. Vegetable oil is one of the most studied foods because of its nutritional and medicinal properties in a correct diet. In this study, a total of 53 Camelina sativa samples, from all known growing areas, were chemically and isotopically characterized. The fatty acid content of camelina oil was determined by gas chromatography (GC), and the ratios of stable carbon isotopes ((13)C/(12)C) of individual fatty acids and seed/bulk oil were determined by gas chromatography-combustion-stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) and elemental analysis-stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). A total of 17 different fatty acids were detected by GC, with omega3 R-linolenic acid (C(18:3n3)) being the most abundant (29.7-40.0 wt %). Oleic acid (C(18:1n9)), linoleic acid (C(18:2n6)) and eicosenoic acid (C(20:1n9)) all belong to the second group of major fatty acids. The stable carbon isotopic values (delta(13)C) fell into a range typical for C(3) plants. The use of delta(13)C(18:2n6) vs delta(13)C(18:3n3) correlation could show cases where impurity or adulteration is suspected, whereas principal component analysis clearly separates oil samples from different continents. Preliminary results on the camelina oil authentication procedure provide a basis for the investigation of geographical origin and the further distinction between camelina and camelina refined or other, less expensive oils. PMID:19123821

  14. Isotope Effects on Heat Conduction of Carbon Nanotubes Shigeo Maruyama, Yuki Taniguchi and Yasushi Shibuta

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Isotope Effects on Heat Conduction of Carbon Nanotubes Shigeo Maruyama, Yuki Taniguchi and Yasushi that the inclusion of only 1 % of 13 C natural isotope dramatically reduces the thermal conductivity of diamond. However, isotope effects on heat conduction of SWNTs have not been elucidated. We estimated isotope

  15. Growth of Adlayer Graphene on Cu Studied by Carbon Isotope Qiongyu Li,

    E-print Network

    Growth of Adlayer Graphene on Cu Studied by Carbon Isotope Labeling Qiongyu Li, Harry Chou, Jin and multilayer graphene on copper foils was studied by isotopic labeling of the methane precursor. Isotope: Graphene, adlayer, isotope-labeling, micro-Raman mapping, TOF SIMS Chemical vapor deposition (CVD

  16. Carbonate concretions as a significant component of ancient marine carbon cycles: Insights from paired organic and inorganic carbon isotope analyses of a Cretaceous shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate concretions often occur within fine-grained, organic-rich sedimentary rocks. This association reflects the common production of diagenetic minerals through biologic cycling of organic matter. Chemical analysis of carbonate concretions provides the rare opportunity to explore ancient shallow diagenetic environments, which are inherently transient due to progressive burial but are an integral component of the marine carbon cycle. The late Cretaceous Holz Shale (~80 Ma) contains abundant calcite concretions that exhibit textural and geochemical characteristics indicative of relatively shallow formation (i.e., near the sediment-water interface). Sampled concretions contain between 5.4 and 9.8 wt.% total inorganic carbon (TIC), or ~45 and 82 wt.% CaCO3, compared to host shale values which average ~1.5 wt.% TIC. Organic carbon isotope compositions (?13Corg) are relatively constant in host and concretion samples ranging from ­-26.3 to -24.0‰ (VPDB). Carbonate carbon isotope compositions (?13Ccarb) range from -22.5 to -3.4‰, indicating a significant but not entirely organic source of carbon. Concretions of the lower Holz Shale exhibit considerably elevated ?13Ccarb values averaging -4.8‰, whereas upper Holz Shale concretions express an average ?13Ccarb value of -17.0‰. If the remaining carbonate for lower Holz Shale concretions is sourced from marine fluids and/or dissolved marine carbonate minerals (e.g., shells), a simple mass balance indicates that ~28% of concretion carbon was sourced from organic matter and ~72% from late Cretaceous marine inorganic carbon (with ?13C ~ +2.5‰). Upper Holz Shale calculations indicate a ~73% contribution from organic matter and a ~27% contribution from inorganic carbon. When normalized for carbonate, organic contents within the concretions are ~2-13 wt.% enriched compared to host contents. This potentially reflects the protective nature of cementation that acts to limit permeability and chemical destruction of organic material. These data imply that concretion growth in shallow sediments can act as a significant and long-term sink for both marine inorganic and organic carbon.

  17. Studies on the spectra of K-giants. III - Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, R. G.

    1985-07-01

    Carbon, nitrogen and oxygen abundances are derived for 23 bright K giants by means of a model atmosphere analysis of blends of the G and 4216 A bands and of literature data about the 6300 A of forbidden line of OI. The resulting abundances are accurate to + or - 0.1 dex and compare well with the published data, though the use of a lower gravity scale results in lower oxygen abundances. The results confirm the low value of the C/N ratio for Population I giants, this ratio being larger for low mass stars, in agreement with stellar evolution theory predictions. The sum of the carbon and nitrogen abundances is on the mean near the solar value and correlates well with the iron abundance, while the oxygen abundances are mildly dependent on the iron abundance. The carbon abundances exhibit a decline while nitrogen abundances increase with increasing luminosity. The C/N ratio anticorrelates with the C-12/C-13 ratio in evolved giants, indicating that non-standard processes must be included in the evolution of low mass stars.

  18. Local and regional oscillations of carbon and oxygen isotopes in terestrial carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipityt?, Raminta; Stan?ikait?, Migl?

    2014-05-01

    Stable isotope ratios of carbon and oxygen in sediment carbonates are used as a tool to identify climatic changes in the past [1], [2]. Carbon is more related to humidity whereas oxygen is thought to respond the temperature [2]. Nevertheless number of questions about local, regional and global scale impacts to these records is left. In this research work carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in lacustrine carbonates are used to identify palaeoenvironmental dynamics of different locations. Samples of lacutrine carbonates were obtained from 8 sequences of different sites in Lithuania (4), Poland (1), Belarus (1) and Kaliningrad (1). Every sequence was divided into 2 cm intervals. The study showed differences in average carbon and oxygen isotope ratios between Lithuania and other countries (Poland, Belarus and Kaliningrad). Carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in 4 sites in Lithuania are: ¯U la ?13C -4.72± 2.11, o and ?18O -9.46± 1.9, o ; Zervynos ?13C -4.79± 1.82, o and ?18O -9.57± 1.69, o ; Rudnia ?13C -4.94± 7.53, o and ?18O -9.3± 3.92, o ; Pauliai ?13C -4.15± 0.67, o and ?18O -9.94± 1.07, o : In other countries: Poland ?13C -1.07± 1.94, o and ?18O -7.69± 0.95, o ; Belarus ?13C 0.97± 1.94, o and ?18O -7.61± 1.42, o ; Kaliningrad ?13C -1.14± 1.43, o and ?18O -6.51± 1.00, o : Average stable carbon and oxygen isotope values from four sites in Lithuania were -4.65 o for carbon and -9.51 o for oxygen. Despite homogeneity of average isotope signals in these four sites there are relatively large oscillations of isotopic values in Rudnia and relatively small in Pauliai. These oscillations could be related to local characteristics of particular place such as environmental conditions, water balance, input of terrigenous materials into basin, etc. Total amount of CaCO3 could also play a significant role in reconstructing palaeoenvironment from stable isotopes and creating isomaps. The comparison of isotope records from different locations could enable to separate local, regional and even global environment condition impact to isotopic values in the past. 1. Hammarlund, Dan, et al. "Climate and environment during the Younger Dryas (GS-1) as reflected by composite stable isotope records of lacustrine carbonates at Torreberga, southern Sweden." Journal of Quaternary Science 14.1 (1999): 17-28. 2. Makhnach, N., et al. "Stable oxygen and carbon isotopes in Late Glacial-Holocene freshwater carbonates from Belarus and their palaeoclimatic implications." Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 209.1 (2004): 73-101.

  19. Descriptions of carbon isotopes within the energy density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Atef [Fundamental and Applied Sciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak, Malaysia and Department of Physics, Al-Azhar University, 71524 Assiut (Egypt); Cheong, Lee Yen; Yahya, Noorhana [Fundamental and Applied Sciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Tammam, M. [Department of Physics, Al-Azhar University, 71524 Assiut (Egypt)

    2014-10-24

    Within the energy density functional (EDF) theory, the structure properties of Carbon isotopes are systematically studied. The shell model calculations are done for both even-A and odd-A nuclei, to study the structure of rich-neutron Carbon isotopes. The EDF theory indicates the single-neutron halo structures in {sup 15}C, {sup 17}C and {sup 19}C, and the two-neutron halo structures in {sup 16}C and {sup 22}C nuclei. It is also found that close to the neutron drip-line, there exist amazing increase in the neutron radii and decrease on the binding energies BE, which are tightly related with the blocking effect and correspondingly the blocking effect plays a significant role in the shell model configurations.

  20. Stable Carbon Isotopes As Indicators of Plant Water Use Efficiency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. M. Powers; J. D. Marshall; N. Ubierna Lopez

    2007-01-01

    Stable carbon isotopes have been utilized to better understand how environmental variables influence the efficiency of photosynthesis, specifically what factors limit the uptake and absorption of CO2 during photosynthesis. An understanding of the controls over both gas exchange and stomatal conductance can provide an explanation for the possible environmental influences on plant WUE. The delta13C of extractive-free wood was used

  1. The use of stable carbon isotope analysis in rooting studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tony J. Svejcar; Thomas W. Boutton

    1985-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis was evaluated as a means of predicting the relative proportions of C3 and C4 root phytomass in species mixtures. The following mixtures of C3 and C4 species were used: 1) big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii)\\/cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), 2) little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium)\\/cheatgrass, and 3) sorghum (Sorghum bicolor)\\/sunflower (Helianthus annuus). There was a significant correlation (P4 phytomass and

  2. Sr Incorporation and Calcium Isotopic Fractionation during Calcium Carbonate Precipitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Niedermayr; M. Dietzel; S. J. Köhler; F. Böhm; B. Kisakurek; A. Eisenhauer

    2009-01-01

    Element substitution and calcium isotopic fractionation can provide information about the mechanisms of CaCO3 precipitation, precipitation rates, temperatures and solution chemistry. In the present study precipitation experiments for the formation of the CaCO3 polymorphs: calcite, aragonite and vaterite were carried out. Calcium carbonates are formed at various Mg\\/Ca ratios or in presence of polyaspartic acid at temperatures between 5 and

  3. Kinetic fractionation of carbon and oxygen isotopes during hydration of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeebe, Richard E.

    2014-08-01

    Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) during the inorganic hydration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in aqueous solution cause reduced stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios (13C/12C and 18O/16O) in the reaction product carbonic acid (H2CO3) or bicarbonate ion (HCO3-), relative to CO2. While such KIEs are of importance in various physicochemical, geochemical, and biological systems, very few experimental and theoretical studies have attempted to determine the magnitude of the carbon and oxygen kinetic isotope fractionation (KIF) during hydration of CO2. Here I use transition state theory (TST) and quantum chemistry calculations to investigate the reaction rates of isotopic reactants CO2+nH2O (n = 1-8) along the hydration pathway to H2CO3 or HCO3-. Locating transition states is difficult and the quantum chemistry calculations time-consuming at large n. My results suggest that the hydration mechanism for n = 1-3 is unlikely to be the dominant pathway producing KIFs during CO2 hydration in aqueous solution; hydration mechanisms for n ? 4 appear more likely. For n = 4-8, the predicted KIF based on MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ calculations at 25 °C is ?1.023-1.033 and ?1.013-1.015, for carbon and oxygen, respectively. However, these values are uncertain and the results of the present study suggest that new experimental work is required to accurately determine the KIF of carbon and oxygen during CO2 hydration.

  4. Siderophile and chalcophile element abundances in oceanic basalts, Pb isotope evolution and growth of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, H. E.; White, W. M.; Jochum, K. P.; Hofmann, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis that the mantle Pb isotope ratios reflect continued extraction of Pb into the earth's core over geologic time is evaluated by studying the depeletion of chalcophile and siderophile elements in the mantle. Oceanic basalt samples are analyzed in order to determine the Pb, Sr, and Nd isotropic compositions and the abundances of siderophile and chalcophile elements and incompatible lithophile elements. The data reveal that there is no systematic variation of siderophile or chalcophile element abundances relative to abundances of lithophile elements and the Pb/Ce ratio of the mantle is constant. It is suggested that the crust formation involves nonmagmatic and magmatic processes.

  5. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Magdas, D. A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Cristea, G., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Bot, A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Mirel, V., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in ?{sup 13}C between batches from ?29.7 to ?31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between ?31.3 to ?34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

  6. ANALYSIS OF RICIN TOXIN PREPARATIONS FOR CARBOHYDRATE AND FATTY ACID ABUNDANCE AND ISOTOPE RATIO INFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Colburn, Heather A.; Moran, James J.; Melville, Angela M.

    2009-12-01

    This report describes method development and preliminary evaluation for analyzing castor samples for signatures of purifying ricin. Ricin purification from the source castor seeds is essentially a problem of protein purification using common biochemical methods. Indications of protein purification will likely manifest themselves as removal of the non-protein fractions of the seed. Two major, non-protein, types of biochemical constituents in the seed are the castor oil and various carbohydrates. The oil comprises roughly half the seed weight while the carbohydrate component comprises roughly half of the remaining “mash” left after oil and hull removal. Different castor oil and carbohydrate components can serve as indicators of specific toxin processing steps. Ricinoleic acid is a relatively unique fatty acid in nature and is the most abundant component of castor oil. The loss of ricinoleic acid indicates a step to remove oil from the seeds. The relative amounts of carbohydrates and carbohydrate-like compounds, including arabinose, xylose, myo-inositol fucose, rhamnose, glucosamine and mannose detected in the sample can also indicate specific processing steps. For instance, the differential loss of arabinose relative to mannose and N-acetyl glucosamine indicates enrichment for the protein fraction of the seed using protein precipitation. The methods developed in this project center on fatty acid and carbohydrate extraction from castor samples followed by derivatization to permit analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Method descriptions herein include: the source and preparation of castor materials used for method evaluation, the equipment and description of procedure required for chemical derivatization, and the instrument parameters used in the analysis. Two types of derivatization methods describe analysis of carbohydrates and one procedure for analysis of fatty acids. Two types of GC-MS analysis is included in the method development, one employing a quadrupole MS system for compound identification and an isotope ratio MS for measuring the stable isotope ratios of deuterium and hydrogen (D/H) in fatty acids. Finally, the method for analyzing the compound abundance data is included. This study indicates that removal of ricinoleic acid is a conserved consequence of each processing step we tested. Furthermore, the stable isotope D/H ratio of ricinoleic acid distinguished between two of the three castor seed sources. Concentrations of arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucosamine and myo-inositol differentiated between crude or acetone extracted samples and samples produced by protein precipitation. Taken together these data illustrate the ability to distinguish between processes used to purify a ricin sample as well as potentially the source seeds.

  7. The cause of carbon isotope minimum events on glacial terminations.

    PubMed

    Spero, Howard J; Lea, David W

    2002-04-19

    The occurrence of carbon isotope minima at the beginning of glacial terminations is a common feature of planktic foraminifera carbon isotopic records from the Indo-Pacific, sub-Antarctic, and South Atlantic. We use the delta13C record of a thermocline-dwelling foraminifera, Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, and surface temperature estimates from the eastern equatorial Pacific to demonstrate that the onset of delta13C minimum events and the initiation of Southern Ocean warming occurred simultaneously. Timing agreement between the marine record and the delta13C minimum in an Antarctic atmospheric record suggests that the deglacial events were a response to the breakdown of surface water stratification, renewed Circumpolar Deep Water upwelling, and advection of low delta13C waters to the convergence zone at the sub-Antarctic front. On the basis of age agreement between the absolute delta13C minimum in surface records and the shift from low to high delta13C in the deep South Atlantic, we suggest that the delta13C rise that marks the end of the carbon isotope minima was due to the resumption of North Atlantic Deep Water influence in the Southern Ocean. PMID:11964477

  8. Noble gas abundance and isotope ratios in the atmosphere of Jupiter from the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. R. Mahaffy; H. B. Niemann; A. Alpert; S. K. Atreya; J. Demick; T. M. Donahue; D. N. Harpold; T. C. Owen

    2000-01-01

    The Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer provided the first data on the noble gas mixing and isotope ratios in the Jovian atmosphere. These measurements and the comparison with solar values constrain models of Jupiter's formation. Significant refinements to the initially reported abundances of argon, krypton, and xenon have been enabled through post-encounter laboratory calibrations using a refurbished engineering unit mass spectrometer

  9. The R Coronae Borealis stars - carbon abundances from forbidden carbon lines

    E-print Network

    Gajendra Pandey; David L. Lambert; N. Kameswara Rao; Bengt Gustafsson; Nils Ryde; David Yong

    2004-05-29

    Spectra of several R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars at maximum light were examined for the [C I] 9850 A and 8727 A absorption lines. The 9850 A line is variously blended with a Fe II and CN lines but positive identifications of the [C I] line are made for R CrB and SU Tau. The 8727 A line is detected in the spectrum of the five stars observed in this wavelength region. Carbon abundances are derived from the [C I] lines using the model atmospheres and atmospheric parameters used by Asplund et al. (2000). Although the observed strength of a C I line is constant from cool to hot RCB stars, the strength is weaker than predicted by an amount equivalent to a factor of four reduction of a line's gf-value. Asplund et al. dubbed this 'the carbon problem' and discussed possible solutions. The [C I] 9850 A line seen clearly in R CrB and SU Tau confirms the magnitude of the carbon problem revealed by the C I lines. The [C I] 8727 A line measured in five stars shows an enhanced carbon problem. The gf-value required to fit the observed [C I] 8727 A line is a factor of 15 less than the well-determined theoretical gf-value. We suggest that the carbon problem for all lines may be alleviated to some extent by a chromospheric-like temperature rise in these stars. The rise far exceeds that predicted by our non-LTE calculations, and requires a substantial deposition of mechanical energy.

  10. A continuous 250,000 yr record of oxygen and carbon isotopes in ostracode and bulk-sediment carbonate from Bear Lake, Utah-Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bright, Jordon; Kaufman, D.S.; Forester, R.M.; Dean, W.E.

    2006-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotopes from a continuous, 120-m-long, carbonate-rich core from Bear Lake, Utah-Idaho, document dramatic fluctuations in the hydrologic budget of the lake over the last 250,000 yr. Isotopic analyses of bulk sediment samples capture millennial-scale variability. Ostracode calcite was analyzed from 78 levels, mainly from the upper half of the core where valves are better preserved, to compare the isotopic value of purely endogenic carbonate with the bulk sediment, which comprises both endogenic and detrital components. The long core exhibits three relatively brief intervals with abundant endogenic aragonite (50??10%) and enriched ??18O and ??13C. These intervals are interpreted as warm/dry periods when the lake retracted into a topographically closed basin. We correlate these intervals with the interglacial periods of marine oxygen-isotope stages 1, 5e, and 7a, consistent with the presently available geochronological control. During most of the time represented by the core, the lake was fresher than the modern lake, as evidenced by depleted ??18O and ??13C in bulk-sediment carbonate. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biogeochemistry of a mesotrophic lake and it's carbon isotope geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, S.; Ehresman, W.; Sadurski, S. E.

    2010-12-01

    Crystal Lake, located in west-central Ohio, is the main lake of a series of 4 interconnected lakes. The location and orientation indicate that they are most likely moulin-induced glacial lakes. Crystal Lake is about 5 hectares (12.5 acres). The maximum depth and mean depth are about 11.9 meters and 3.8 meters, respectively. As a result of this high depth-to-surface area ratio, it creates a strong thermal stratification during warm season. The lake was classified as eutrophic lake. However, the water quality has improved in the past decades. The chlorophyll in the epillimnion and upper metalimlion is about 4 ?g/l and the Secchi disk depth is about 3.0 meters (10 feet). It is therefore reclassified as mesotrophic lake. Dissolved oxygen maximum (15.6 ppm) and pH peak (8.6) existed at 4.1 meter on August 16, 2010. At around 7.3 meter, where redox potential reading shows a sudden change from oxidizing to reducing , a ~half meter layer of dense purple sulfur bacteria coincides with turbidity, chlorophyll, and sulfate maxima. The chemical depth profiles are a result of thermal stratification, oxygenic photosynthesis by algae, non-oxygenic photosynthesis by purple sulfur bacteria, and respiration in the hypolimnion. Precipitation of calcium carbonate in the epilimnion and metalimnion is coupled by it’s dissolution in the hypolimnion. The purpose of the current project is to present extensive background study to form the framework for quantifying the carbon isotope evolution with multiple reaction pathways. Carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon is being analyzed. Wigley-Plummer-Pearson mass transfer model will be used for the quantification of carbon isotope reaction pathways.

  12. Boron Isotope Intercomparison Project (BIIP): Development of a new carbonate standard for stable isotopic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutjahr, Marcus; Bordier, Louise; Douville, Eric; Farmer, Jesse; Foster, Gavin L.; Hathorne, Ed; Hönisch, Bärbel; Lemarchand, Damien; Louvat, Pascale; McCulloch, Malcolm; Noireaux, Johanna; Pallavicini, Nicola; Rodushkin, Ilia; Roux, Philippe; Stewart, Joseph; Thil, François; You, Chen-Feng

    2014-05-01

    Boron consists of only of two isotopes with a relatively large mass difference (~10 %). It is also volatile in acidic media and prone to contamination during analytical treatment. Nevertheless, an increasing number of isotope laboratories are successfully using boron isotope compositions (expressed in ?11B) in marine biogenic carbonates to reconstruct seawater pH. Recent interlaboratory comparison efforts [1] highlighted the existence of a relatively high level of disagreement between laboratories when measuring such material, so in order to further strengthen the validity of this carbonate system proxy, appropriate reference materials need to be urgently characterised. We describe here the latest results of the Boron Isotope Intercomparison Project (BIIP) where we aim to characterise the boron isotopic composition of two marine carbonates: Japanese Geological Survey carbonate standard materials JCp-1 (coral porites) [2] and JCt-1 (Giant Clam) [3]. This boron isotope interlaboratory comparison study has two aims: (i) to assess to what extent chemical pre-treatment, aimed at removing organic material, can influence the resulting carbonate ?11B; (ii) to determine the isotopic composition of the two reference materials with a number of analytical techniques to provide the community with reference ?11B values for JCp-1 and JCt-1 and to further explore any differences related to analytical technique. In total eight isotope laboratories participated, of which one determined ?11B via negative thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (NTIMS) and seven used multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). For the latter several different introduction systems and chemical purification methods were used. Overall the results are strikingly consistent between the participating labs. The oxidation of organic material slightly lowered the median ?11B by ~0.1 ‰ for both JCp-1 and JCt-1, while the mean ?11B of all labs for both standards was lowered by 0.20 ‰ for JCp-1 and 0.15 ‰ for JCt-1, hence within uncertainty of the reported values. With the exception of one MC-ICPMS lab that provided significantly lower JCp-1 ?11B data for unoxidised material (1.7 ‰ below median), the remaining JCp-1 results reproduced within ± 0.54 ‰ for unoxidised (n=21) and ± 0.37 ‰ for oxidised standards (n=21). The JCt-1 standards did not reproduce as well, resulting in a 2 s.d. of 1.0 ‰ for both unoxidised and oxidised powders (n=21) and in places the effect of oxidation appeared to be laboratory dependent. Exclusion of one MC-ICPMS lab resulted in an improved reproducibility of 0.52 ‰ (n=18) for oxidised JCt-1 material. The mean difference for the two standard materials in the respective labs (i.e., ??11B = mean ?11B(JCp-1) - mean ?11B(JCt-1)) was 7.9 ± 0.9 ‰ for unoxidised (n=7) and 8.1 ± 0.7 ‰ for oxidised standards (n=7). In this presentation emphasis will also be placed on distinguishing factors leading to increased/decreased interlaboratory consistency during the preparation and analysis of biogenic carbonates for other isotopic systems. References [1] Foster, G.L. et al. (2013) Chemical Geology 358: p. 1-14. [2] Okai, T. et al. (2002) Geostandards Newsletter 26: p. 95-99. [3] Inoue, M. et al. (2004) Geostandards and Geoanalytical Research 28: p. 411-416.

  13. Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Variation in Sphagnum from Peat Bogs in the Midwestern Us: Implications for Holocene Climate Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, D.; Paytan, A.; Jackson, S. T.

    2009-12-01

    A peat core taken from near the center of Minden Bog in Michigan, representing about 3500 years of accumulation was previously analyzed for plant macrofossils, colorimetric humification, and testate amoebae to yield three independent climate proxies. The data show the site to be sensitive to bog water table fluctuations and suggest that this may be related to regional climatic changes. We analyzed the carbon and nitrogen isotopes and the carbon-nitrogen ratios in the bulk peat samples and determined that the changes in these isotopes and ratios can be attributed to one or more of the following: (1) changes in the relative abundance of vegetation taxa in the site, (2) changes in the metabolism that impact isotope ratios in the vegetation contributing to the bulk organic, and (3) selective preservation and regeneration of specific organic compounds within the bulk organic matter. We analyzed the carbon and nitrogen isotopes and the carbon-nitrogen ratios in a specific taxum, Sphagnum, to differentiate between these mechanisms and relate the record to water level and climate in the region.

  14. Stable carbon isotope ratios in Asian elephant collagen: implications for dietary studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Sukumar; R. Ramesh

    1992-01-01

    Summary  Stable carbon isotope ratios in bone collagen have been used in a variety of dietary studies in modern and fossil animals,\\u000a including humans. Inherent in the stable isotope technique is the assumption that the isotopic signature is a reflection of\\u000a the diet and is persistent in collagen because this is a relatively inert protein. Carbon isotope analyses of bones from

  15. PHOTOCHEMICALLY-INDUCED ALTERATION OF STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS (DELTA C-13) IN TERRIGENOUS DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of riverine waters to natural sunlight initiated alterations in stable carbon isotope ratios (delta C-13) of the associated dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Water samples were collected from two compositionally distinct coastal river systems in the southeastern United Sta...

  16. Dynamic and transfert of carbon in Loire catchment using carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coularis, Cindy; Fontugne, Michel; Tisnérat-Laborde, Nadine; Pastor, Lucie; Siclet, Françoise

    2014-05-01

    Rivers have a major role in carbon transfer between continent and ocean. The organic matter exported from land represents a major source of DOC and POC in oceans. The composition and reactivity of this matter will influence its behavior and fate within the coastal areas and continental shelf. It is thus important to characterize the exported matter and its temporal variability. Stable carbon isotope ratios (d13C) and 14C activity can provide unique information on carbon sources, turnover and exchange processes. We present here a study of the carbon cycle in the Loire River and its major tributaries by combining carbon isotopes measurements and classical biogeochemical parameters (DOC, POC, DIC, pH, Temperature, Alkalinity, pH, chlorophyll …). Three campaigns were performed in April, July and October 2013. The changes in 14C signature due to the controlled liquid release of five nuclear power plants are used to get additional information on the carbon dynamics within the river. First results show a conservative behavior of the organic carbon concentrations contrary to the inorganic carbon all along the Loire River. However, the reactivity of the organic matter varies with rivers catchments and seasons. An inventory of the distribution of the different carbon phases within the Loire River and its tributaries is presented.

  17. Calcium-isotope fractionation in selected modern and ancient marine carbonates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Steuber; Dieter Buhl

    2006-01-01

    The calcium-isotope composition (?44\\/42Ca) was analyzed in modern, Cretaceous and Carboniferous marine skeletal carbonates as well as in bioclasts, non-skeletal components, and diagenetic cements of Cretaceous and Carboniferous limestones. In order to gain insight in Ca2+aq–CaCO3-isotope fractionation mechanisms in marine carbonates, splits of samples were analyzed for Sr, Mg, Fe, and Mn concentrations and for their oxygen and carbon isotopic

  18. Late Early Triassic climate change: Insights from carbonate carbon isotopes, sedimentary evolution and ammonoid paleobiogeography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Galfetti; Hugo Bucher; Arnaud Brayard; Peter A. Hochuli; Helmut Weissert; Kuang Guodun; Viorel Atudorei; Jean Guex

    2007-01-01

    The late Early Triassic sedimentary–facies evolution and carbonate carbon-isotope marine record (?13Ccarb) of ammonoid-rich, outer platform settings show striking similarities between the South China Block (SCB) and the widely distant Northern Indian Margin (NIM). The studied sections are located within the Triassic Tethys Himalayan belt (Losar section, Himachal Pradesh, India) and the Nanpanjiang Basin in the South China Block (Jinya

  19. Carbon isotope relationships in winonaites and forsterite chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, M. M.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1986-02-01

    Carbon content and C-isotope composition studies were conducted on the stone meteorites Winona, Mt. Morris (WI), Pontlyfni, Acapulco, and Kakangari, and on a chondritic inclusion from the Cumberland Falls aubrite, to search for similarities that might exist between these meteorites. To compare the C-release profiles, the samples were subjected to step combustion in the 200-1200 C range. The isotopic composition of released C gas was measured with a mass spectrometer. Samples from Winona, Mt. Morris, Pontlyfni, and the Cumberland Falls chondrite behave in a common fashion during combustion, with graphite being the major indigenous carbon component. Similar delta-C-13 values, which were close to the range reported for enstatite chondrites and IAB irons, indicated commonality in the origin of all these samples. Acapulco has a slightly different C distribution, with more of the element possibility still in the metal than as graphite. Both the graphite and the C in metal are isotopically lighter in the Acapulso sample than in the first meteorite group. Kakangari showed no relation to any of the other meteorites, supporting the view that this meteorite might be unique.

  20. Stable carbon isotope fractionation by acetotrophic sulfur-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Goevert, Dennis; Conrad, Ralf

    2010-02-01

    Acetate is the most important intermediate in anaerobic degradation of organic matter. The carbon isotope effects associated with the oxidation of acetate (epsilon(ac)) were examined for four acetotrophic sulfur reducers, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, Desulfuromonas thiophila, Desulfurella acetivorans, and Hippea maritima. During the consumption of acetate and sulfur, acetate was enriched in (13)C by 11.5 and 11.2 per thousand in Desulfuromonas acetoxidans and Desulfuromonas thiophila, respectively. By contrast, isotope fractionation in D. acetivorans and H. maritima resulted in isotope enrichment factors of epsilon(ac)=-6.3 per thousand and -8.4 per thousand, respectively. These sulfur-reducing bacteria all metabolize acetate via the tricarboxylic acid cycle, but have different mechanisms for the initial activation of acetate. In Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, acetyl-CoA is formed by succinyl-CoA : acetate-CoA-transferase, and in D. acetivorans by acetate kinase and phosphate acetyltransferase. Hence, values of epsilon(ac) seem to be characteristic for the type of activation of acetate to acetyl-CoA in acetotrophic sulfur reducers. Summarizing epsilon(ac)-values in anaerobic acetotrophic microorganisms, it appears that isotope fractionation depends on the mechanism of acetate activation to acetyl-CoA, on the key enzyme of the acetate dissimilation pathway, and on the bioavailability of acetate, which all have to be considered when using delta(13)C of acetate in environmental samples for diagnosis of the involved microbial populations. PMID:20002180

  1. Hydrogen and carbon isotopic measurements of methane from agricultural combustion: Implications for isotopic signatures of global biomass burning sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keita Yamada; Yoko Ozaki; Fumiko Nakagawa; Shigeto Sudo; Haruo Tsuruta; Naohiro Yoshida

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogen and carbon isotope ratios of CH4 emitted from one bonfire and two laboratory combustions of agricultural residues were determined in this study as ?196 to ?262‰ for ?D and ?19.9 to ?35.1‰ for ?13C. The isotopic difference between CH4 emitted from biomass burning and fuel biomass, that is, the apparent isotopic fractionation occurring during combustion ($\\\\varepsilon$Burn), was within

  2. Physiological and environmental factors related to carbon isotopic variations in mollusc shell carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Krantz, D.E.; Williams, D.F.; Jones, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of mollusc shell carbonate has been used as a general environmental indicator in numerous studies, but relatively little is known of the factors which affect within-shell variation. Primary control of delta/sup 13/C values in shell carbonate comes from the dissolved bicarbonate source, particularly as related to marine versus fresh water. Present models explain cyclic variations in the delta/sup 13/C profiles of mollusc shells due to upwelling, phytoplankton productivity and stratification, disequilibrium with rapid shell growth, and infaunal versus epifaunal habitat. Carbon and oxygen isotopic profiles in this study were obtained from specimens of Spisula solidissima (surf clam) and Placopecten magellanicus (sea scallop) collected alive from 14 to 57 m water depths off the Virginia coast. Three main factors appear to affect the delta/sup 13/C profiles in these specimens. Isotopically light values commonly associated with the spring and occasionally the fall correspond with seasonal phytoplankton productivity. A significant negative delta/sup 13/C offset of the infaunal Spisula relative to the epifaunal Placopecten probably relates to the inclusion of isotopically more negative pore-water bicarbonate by Spisula. Additionally, occasional transient spikes in both the delta/sup 18/O and delta/sup 13/C profiles correspond to intrusion of reduced-salinity water.

  3. Stable isotopes, ecological integration and environmental change: wolves record atmospheric carbon isotope trend better than tree rings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph K. Bump; Kena Fox-Dobbs; Jeffrey L. Bada; Paul L. Koch; Rolf O. Peterson; John A. Vucetich

    2007-01-01

    Large-scale patterns of isotope ratios are detectable in the tissues of organisms, but the variability in these patterns often obscures detection of environmental trends. We show that plants and animals at lower trophic levels are relatively poor indicators of the temporal trend in atmospheric carbon isotope ratios (d13C) when compared with animals at higher trophic levels. First, we tested how

  4. CNO ABUNDANCES OF HYDROGEN-DEFICIENT CARBON AND R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS: A VIEW OF THE NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN A WHITE DWARF MERGER

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Hernandez, D. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/ Via Lactea s/n, 38200 La Laguna (Spain); Hinkle, K. H. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Lambert, David L. [W. J. McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400. Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Eriksson, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 515, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden)], E-mail: agarcia@iac.es, E-mail: hinkle@noao.edu, E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: Kjell.Eriksson@astro.uu.se

    2009-05-10

    We present high-resolution (R {approx} 50, 000) observations of near-IR transitions of CO and CN of the five known hydrogen-deficient carbon (HdC) stars and four R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars. We perform an abundance analysis of these stars by using spectrum synthesis and state-of-the-art MARCS model atmospheres for cool hydrogen-deficient stars. Our analysis confirms reports by Clayton and colleagues that those HdC stars exhibiting CO lines in their spectrum and the cool RCB star S Aps are strongly enriched in {sup 18}O (with {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O ratios ranging from 0.3 to 16). Nitrogen and carbon are in the form of {sup 14}N and {sup 12}C, respectively. Elemental abundances for CNO are obtained from C I, C{sub 2}, CN, and CO lines. Difficulties in deriving the carbon abundance are discussed. Abundances of Na from Na I lines and S from S I lines are obtained. Elemental and isotopic CNO abundances suggest that HdC and RCB stars may be related objects, and that they probably formed from a merger of an He white dwarf with a C-O white dwarf.

  5. Chlorine and carbon isotopes fractionation during volatilization and diffusive transport of trichloroethene in the unsaturated zone.

    PubMed

    Jeannottat, Simon; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2012-03-20

    To apply compound-specific isotope methods to the evaluation of the origin and fate of organic contaminants in the unsaturated subsurface, the effect of physicochemical processes on isotope ratios needs to be known. The main objective of this study is to quantify chlorine and carbon isotope fractionation during NAPL-vapor equilibration, air-water partitioning, and diffusion of trichloroethene (TCE) and combinations of these effects during vaporization in porous media. Isotope fractionation is larger during NAPL-vapor equilibration than air-water partitioning. During NAPL-vapor equilibration, carbon, and chlorine isotope ratios evolve in opposite directions although both elements are present in the same bond, with a normal isotope effect for chlorine (?(Cl) = -0.39 ± 0.03‰) and an inverse effect for carbon (?(C) = +0.75 ± 0.04‰). During diffusion-controlled vaporization in a sand column, no significant carbon isotope fractionation is observed (?(C) = +0.10 ± 0.05‰), whereas fairly strong chlorine isotope fractionation occurs (?(Cl) = -1.39 ± 0.06‰) considering the molecular weight of TCE. In case of carbon, the inverse isotope fractionation associated with NAPL-vapor equilibration and normal diffusion isotope fractionation cancel, whereas for chlorine both processes are accompanied by normal isotope fractionation and hence they cumulate. A source of contamination that aged might thus show a shift toward heavier chlorine isotope ratios. PMID:22313159

  6. Stable carbon isotopic evidence for carbon limitation in hydrothermal vent vestimentiferans.

    PubMed

    Fisher, C R; Kennicutt, M C; Brooks, J M

    1990-03-01

    Stable carbon isotope composition (delta(13)C values) can be used to evaluate an animal's source of nutritional carbon. Most animals with chemoautotrophic endosymbionts have quite negative tissue delta(13)C values due to discrimination against (13)C associated with chemoautotrophic assimilation of inorganic carbon. However, the delta(13)C values of hydrothermal vent (HTV) vestimentiferans are significantly higher than the values reported for non-HTV vestimentiferans or other invertebrates with chemoautotrophic endosymbionts. Tissue delta(13)C values of two species of HTV vestimentiferans increase with increasing size of the animals. This relation supports the hypothesis that the relatively high delta(13)C values are the result of inorganic carbon limitation during carbon fixation. A more favorable relation between gas exchange and carbon fixation in the smaller individuals is expected, due to differences in the geometric scaling of gas-exchange surfaces and trophosome volume. PMID:17800067

  7. Interpreting carbonate and organic carbon isotope covariance in the sedimentary record.

    PubMed

    Oehlert, Amanda M; Swart, Peter K

    2014-01-01

    Many negative ?(13)C excursions in marine carbonates from the geological record are interpreted to record significant biogeochemical events in early Earth history. The assumption that no post-depositional processes can simultaneously alter carbonate and organic ?(13)C values towards more negative values is the cornerstone of this approach. However, the effects of post-depositional alteration on the relationship between carbonate and organic ?(13)C values have not been directly evaluated. Here we present paired carbonate and organic ?(13)C records that exhibit a coupled negative excursion resulting from multiple periods of meteoric alteration of the carbonate ?(13)C record, and consequent contributions of isotopically negative terrestrial organic matter to the sedimentary record. The possibility that carbonate and organic ?(13)C records can be simultaneously shifted towards lower ?(13)C values during periods of subaerial exposure may necessitate the reappraisal of some of the ?(13)C anomalies associated with noteworthy biogeochemical events throughout Earth history. PMID:25135457

  8. {sup 39}Ar Detection at the 10{sup -16} Isotopic Abundance Level with Atom Trap Trace Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, W.; Williams, W.; Bailey, K.; O'Connor, T. P.; Mueller, P. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Davis, A. M. [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)] [Department of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Hu, S.-M.; Sun, Y. R. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Lu, Z.-T. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Purtschert, R. [Climate and Environmental Physics, University of Bern, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Sturchio, N. C. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

    2011-03-11

    Atom trap trace analysis, a laser-based atom counting method, has been applied to analyze atmospheric {sup 39}Ar (half-life=269 yr), a cosmogenic isotope with an isotopic abundance of 8x10{sup -16}. In addition to the superior selectivity demonstrated in this work, the counting rate and efficiency of atom trap trace analysis have been improved by 2 orders of magnitude over prior results. The significant applications of this new analytical capability lie in radioisotope dating of ice and water samples and in the development of dark matter detectors.

  9. Precambrian Research 148 (2006) 145180 Carbon isotope record for the onset of the Lomagundi carbon isotope

    E-print Network

    Kaufman, Alan Jay

    2006-01-01

    isotope excursion in the Great Lakes area, North America A. Bekkera,, J.A. Karhub, A.J. Kaufmanc a Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., N.W., Washington, DC 20015 Group in the Lake Superior area, USA and the Gordon Lake Formation of the correlative upper Huronian

  10. Carbon isotope ratios and impurities in diamonds from Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidane, Abiel; Koch-Müller, Monika; Morales, Luiz; Wiedenbeck, Michael; De Wit, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    We are investigating the sources of diamonds from southern Africa by studying both their carbon isotopic composition and chemical impurities. Our samples include macro-sized diamonds from River Ranch kimberlite in Zimbabwe and the Helam and Klipspringer kimberlitic deposits from South Africa, as well as micro-sized diamonds from Klipspringer and Premier kimberlites in South Africa. We have characterized the samples for their structurally bounded nitrogen, hydrogen and platelets defect using a Fourier Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Using the DiaMap routine, open source software (Howell et al., 2012), IR spectra were deconvulated and quantified for their nitrogen (A, B and D components) and hydrogen contents. High to moderate nitrogen concentrations (1810 to 400 µg/g; 400 to 50 µg/g respectively) were found in diamonds from Klipspringer and Helam. Moderate to low (<50 µg/g) nitrogen concentrations were observed in diamonds from Premier and River Ranch. Type II diamonds, i.e. diamonds with no N impurities, which are presumed to have been derived from ultramafic sources, are found in the River Ranch deposit. The macro- and micro-size diamonds from the Klipspringer deposit display similar nitrogen defects, with higher nitrogen concentration and more frequent D components found in the macro-size diamonds. One of the first steps towards reliable carbon isotope studies is the development of calibration materials for SIMS carbon isotopic analyses. We have investigated candidate materials both from a polycrystalline synthetic diamond sheet and two natural gem quality diamonds from Juina (Brazil). Electron-based images of the synthetic diamond sheet, obtained using GFZ Potsdam's dual beam FIB instrument, show many diamond grains with diameters greater than 35 µm. SIMS testing of the isotopic homogeneity of the back and front sides of the synthetic sheets reveal similar 13C/12C ratio within a RSD of <1 ‰ . SIMS isotopic analyses of the two natural diamond RMs yield a constant 13C/12C ratio with RSD of better than 0.5 ‰ . Using the natural diamond as calibratrant, a preliminary result on a selected diamond from the four kimberlitic sample suites yields a ?13C in range between -3 to -7 ‰ . Reference: Howell, D., O'Neill, C. J., Grant, K. J., Griffin, W. L., Pearson, N. J., & O'Reilly, S. Y. (2012). ?-FTIR mapping: Distribution of impurities in different types of diamond growth. Diamond and Related Materials, 29, 29-36. doi:10.1016/j.diamond.2012.06.003.

  11. Abundance Anomaly of the 13C Isotopic Species of c-C3H2 in the Low-mass Star Formation Region L1527

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kento; Sakai, Nami; Tokudome, Tomoya; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Takano, Shuro; Lefloch, Bertrand; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Bachiller, Rafael; Caux, Emmanuel; Vastel, Charlotte; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-07-01

    The rotational spectral lines of c-C3H2 and two kinds of the 13C isotopic species, c-{}13{{CCCH}}2 ({C}2v symmetry) and c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2 (Cs symmetry), have been observed in the 1–3 mm band toward the low-mass star-forming region L1527. We have detected 7, 3, and 6 lines of c-C3H2, c-{}13{{CCCH}}2, and c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2, respectively, with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope and 34, 6, and 13 lines, respectively, with the IRAM 30 m telescope, where seven, two, and two transitions, respectively, are observed with both telescopes. With these data, we have evaluated the column densities of the normal and 13C isotopic species. The [c-C3H2]/[c-{}13{{CCCH}}2] ratio is determined to be 310 ± 80, while the [c-C3H2]/[c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2] ratio is determined to be 61 ± 11. The [c-C3H2]/[c-{}13{{CCCH}}2] and [c-C3H2]/[c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2] ratios expected from the elemental 12C/13C ratio are 60–70 and 30–35, respectively, where the latter takes into account the statistical factor of 2 for the two equivalent carbon atoms in c-C3H2. Hence, this observation further confirms the dilution of the 13C species in carbon-chain molecules and their related molecules, which are thought to originate from the dilution of 13C+ in the gas-phase C+ due to the isotope exchange reaction: {}13{{{C}}}++{CO}\\to {}13{CO}+{{{C}}}+. Moreover, the abundances of the two 13C isotopic species are different from each other. The ratio of c-{}13{{CCCH}}2 species relative to c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2 is determined to be 0.20 ± 0.05. If 13C were randomly substituted for the three carbon atoms, the [c-{}13{{CCCH}}2]/[c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2] ratio would be 0.5. Hence, the observed ratio indicates that c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2 exists more favorably. Possible origins of the different abundances are discussed. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope and the NRO 45 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain). NRO is a branch of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Japan.

  12. Modeling Chemical and Isotopic Variations in Lab Formed Hydrothermal Carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L. A.; Golden, D. C.; Socki, R. A.; Guan, Y.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    Chemical and mineralogical data (e.g. [1]) from Mars suggest that the history of liquid water on the planet was more sporadic in nature than long-lived. The non-equilibrium chemical and isotopic compositions of the carbonates preserved in the martian meteorite ALH84001 are direct evidence of ancient secondary minerals that have not undergone significant diagenesis or stabilization processes typical of long-lived aqueous systems on Earth. Thus secondary minerals and sediments on Mars may primarily record the characteristics of the aqueous environment in which they formed without being significantly overprinted by subsequent diagenetic processes during burial.

  13. Abundance and Characterization of Dissolved Organic Carbon in Suburban Streams of Baltimore, Maryland, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, G.; Fazekas, M.

    2014-12-01

    The contribution of streams and rivers to the carbon cycle is significant, transporting to the oceans ~1.4 Pg C/yr, with dissolved carbon corresponding to as much as 0.7 Pg C/yr. Changes in land use have the potential effect of modifying this flux, particularly in urban areas where impervious areas are common. To investigate the effect of urbanization on riverine carbon transport, we studied four first-order streams in Towson, a suburb of Baltimore, Maryland, USA. The watersheds from the studied streams exhibit different levels of urbanization as measured by the percentage of impervious areas. Samples from these four streams were taken weekly, and several chemical constituents were measured either in the field or in the laboratory. These constituents included nitrate, dissolved organic nitrogen, pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total carbon, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), phosphate, the carbon isotopic compositions of DOC and DIC, and fluorescence intensity of the DOC. Results show that DOC concentrations were consistently below 5 mg C/L regardless of the level of imperviousness of the watershed. Similarly, carbon isotope ratios were consistent across the studied streams, with values centered around -26.4 per mil, thus suggesting a significant influx of soil-derived organic carbon originated from C3 plants that are common in the watersheds. Confirming this interpretation, fluorescence spectroscopy data suggest a humic-like origin for the DOC of the streams, thus pointing to the heterotrophic nature of the streams. The combined results suggest that the studied streams exhibit similar DOC concentrations, carbon isotopic values, and fluorescence spectra, despite their level of impervious surfaces in their watersheds.

  14. Tethyan carbonate carbon isotope stratigraphy across the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary: An indicator of decelerated global carbon cycling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissert, H.; Channell, J. E. T.

    1989-08-01

    The carbon isotope record in four pelagic carbonate sections from the Southern Alps (northern Italy) across the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary has been correlated to biostratigraphy and magnetostratigraphy. The carbon isotope curve from bulk carbonates shows a decrease from Kimmeridgian to Early Tithonian (CM24-CM22) values of ?13C=+2.07 (± 0.14)‰ to Late Tithonian and Berriasian (CM18-CM14) values of ?13C=+1.26 (± 0.16)‰. The change in the carbon isotope record coincides with changes in Tethyan calcite and silica accumulation rates, with a drop in the calcite compensation depth in the Atlantic and Tethys oceans and with changes in organic carbon burial along the Eurasian margin of the Tethys. Reduced surface water productivity due to diminished transfer rates of biolimiting elements into the Atlantic and Tethys oceans can explain these observations. The decreased transfer rates of elements such as silica or phosphorus from continents into the oceans resulted from drier climatic conditions and decreased water runoff on continents bordering the Tethys and Atlantic oceans. The proposed changes in Tithonian - Berriasian ocean chemistry and paleoclimate suggest that variations in the global carbon cycle were coupled with changes in the global hydrological cycle and in associated material cycles.

  15. Isotope Tutorial (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Diane Pataki

    This isotope tutorial explains what isotopes are and what units are used to express them, how measurements of isotopes are made, and how natural variation in stable isotope abundances come about. The site describes processes affecting isotope ratios such as photosynthesis, evapotranspiration, and respiration; biosphere-atmosphere exchange of isotopes in water and carbon; and how stable isotopes are used to study environmental history. There is information on courses in stable isotopes and the Biosphere - Atmosphere Stable Isotope Network (BASIN) project aimed at improving understanding of carbon cycle processes at the ecosystem, regional, and global scale. Links are provided to analytical labs.

  16. Helium-carbon isotopic composition of thermal waters from Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourré, E.; Aiuppa, A.; di Napoli, R.; Parello, F.; Gaubi, E.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Allard, P.; Calabrese, S.; Ben Mammou, A.

    2010-12-01

    Tunisia has numerous thermo-mineral springs. Previous studies have shown that their chemical composition and occurrence are strongly influenced by the regional geology, however little work has been conducted to date to investigate the isotopic composition of volatiles associated with these geothermal manifestations. Here, we report the results of an extensive survey of both natural hot springs and production wells across Tunisia aimed at investigating the spatial distribution of the 3He/4He ratio and associated carbon isotopic compositions. With respect to helium isotopes, not unexpectedly, the lowest 3He/4He values (0.01-0.02 Ra) are associated with the old groundwaters of the “Continental Intercalaire” aquifer of the stable Saharan Platform. The 3He/4He values are equal to the crustal production ratio, with no detectable amount of mantle-derived 3He, in agreement with previous studies of helium isotopes in sedimentary basin, which conclude that tectonically-stable regions are essentially impermeable to mantle volatiles. The low 3He/4He domain extends to the entire Atlasic domain of central Tunisia. This Atlasic domain also displays the highest helium concentrations : along the Gafsa Fault, helium concentrations of 1777 and 4723 x 10-8 cm3STP/g (the highest value of our data set) are observed in the production wells of Sidi Ahmed Zarrouk. This emphasizes the role of deep tectonic features in channelling and transporting deep crustal volatiles to shallow levels. The eastern margin of Tunisia displays higher 3He/4He values indicative of a substantial mantle volatile input. The highest value is recorded in the carbo-gaseous mineral water of Ain Garci (2.4 Ra). This northeastern part of the African plate commonly referred to as the Pelagian block extends from Tunisia to Sicily and is characterized by strong extensional tectonics (Pantelleria rift zone) and present-day magmatic activity. This lithospheric stretching and decompressional mantle melts production in the central portion of the Pelagian Block may facilitate the transport of mantle helium through the thinned crust away from the rift zone across the existing network of fractures and deep faults. Samples were also collected for water chemistry, ?D, ?18O, and carbon isotopic composition. ?13C(TDC) data are highly heterogeneous (ranging from -11.2 to +2.9 ‰ vs. V-PDB), in particular, revealing a complex origin for total dissolved carbon (TDC) in groundwaters. We interpret these variable isotopic compositions as reflecting mixture of biogenically derived carbon with abiogenic (mantle-derived or metamorphic) CO2. A detailed discussion of the whole chemistry and isotopic data set will be presented and the results will be examined in relation to the geological and structural framework of Tunisia.

  17. Stable Isotopes James R Ehleringer and Thure E Cerling

    E-print Network

    Ehleringer, Jim

    for introduction into the mass spectrometer. The most commonly used approaches involve introducing hydrogen as H2 Element Isotope Abundance (%) Hydrogen 1 H 99.985 2 H 0.015 Carbon 12 C 98.89 13 C 1.11 Nitrogen 14 N 99? Of particular interest for global change studies are vari- ations in the isotopic abundances of hydrogen, carbon

  18. Characterization of ganoderma spore lipid by stable carbon isotope analysis: implications for authentication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Xu, Shi-Ping; Wang, Jiang-Hai; Yuan, Jian-Ping; Guo, Lian-Xian; Li, Xin; Huang, Xiao-Ni

    2007-06-01

    The ratios of stable carbon isotopes ((13)C/(12)C) of ganoderma fruiting body, ganoderma spore, ganoderma spore lipid (GSL) and individual fatty acids in GSL were determined by gas chromatography-stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry and elemental analysis-stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry. These values fall into a range from -26.9 to -23.3 per thousand, suggesting that the cut log as the Ganoderma-cultivated substrate in Fujian, China, may belong to C3 plants. Eighteen fatty acids were identified and their abundances measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in the six GSL samples with C(16:0), C(18:0), C(18:1) and C(18:2) as major constituents, and C(16:1) is evidently enriched compared with the other edible vegetable oils. On the basis of the compositions of fatty acids and stable carbon isotopes in GSL, we have developed a novel method to detect the adulteration of GSL products with cheaper edible vegetable oils. An example of ideal blending between GSL and C4 or C3 vegetable oil is further provided to expound the discrimination procedures and corresponding sensitive indicators. Simultaneously, the carbon isotope fractionation in the biosynthesis of individual fatty acids was observed, revealing that the formation of C(18:0) from C(16:0) in ganodema spores had no conspicuous (13)C enrichment of +0.4 per thousand for Ganoderma sinensis spore and +0.1 per thousand for G. lucidum spore; the desaturation of C(18:0) to C(18:1) resulted in a distinct (13)C depletion of -1.4 per thousand for G. sinensis spore and -0.9 per thousand for G. lucidum spore; and the next desaturation from C(18:1) to C(18:2) displayed no evident (13)C fractionation of -0.1 per thousand for G. sinensis spore and -0.2 per thousand for G. lucidum spore. PMID:17447054

  19. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation in bivalve (Placopecten magellanicus) larval aragonite

    E-print Network

    Schöne, Bernd R.

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation in bivalve (Placopecten magellanicus) larval depleted from oxygen isotope equilibrium. Further studies are nec- essary to determine the variable The relationship between stable isotope composition (d13 C and d18 O) in seawater and in larval shell aragonite

  20. From isotope labeled CH3CN to N2 inside single-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    From isotope labeled CH3CN to N2 inside single-walled carbon nanotubes Christian Kramberger to this peculiar place? We have used N15 and C13 isotope labeled acetonitrile during the synthesis of single- cation of the reaction pathway by isotope labeling has not yet been achieved. Moreover, it remains

  1. Contrasting the CO2He Isotope and Relative Abundance Systematics of the Central American and IBM Arcs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. Hilton; T. P. Fischer; A. M. Shaw; E. Hauri; J. Walker

    2006-01-01

    We report CO2 and He isotope and relative abundance data obtained utilizing high-T fumaroles, geothermal wells, boiling mud pots, hot springs and phenocryst-bearing lavas from both MARGINS-targeted regions. In Central America, we collected ~140 fluid and ~30 lava samples covering a total of 41 volcanic centers in Costa Rica (7), Nicaragua (8), El Salvador (10), Honduras (9) and Guatemala (7).

  2. Resolving Isotopic Fine Structure to Detect and Quantify Natural Abundance- and Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange-Derived Isotopomers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Easterling, Michael L.; Agar, Jeffrey N.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) is used for analyzing protein dynamics, protein folding/unfolding, and molecular interactions. Until this study, HDX MS experiments employed mass spectral resolving powers that afforded only one peak per nominal mass in a given peptide’s isotope distribution, and HDX MS data analysis methods were developed accordingly. A level of complexity that is inherent to HDX MS remained unaddressed, namely, various combinations of natural abundance heavy isotopes and exchanged deuterium shared the same nominal mass and overlapped at previous resolving powers. For example, an A + 2 peak is comprised of (among other isotopomers) a two-2H-exchanged/zero-13C isotopomer, a one-2H-exchanged/one-13C isotopomer, and a zero-2H-exchanged/two-13C isotopomer. Notably, such isotopomers differ slightly in mass as a result of the ~3 mDa mass defect between 2H and 13C atoms. Previous HDX MS methods did not resolve these isotopomers, requiring a natural-abundance-only (before HDX or “time zero”) spectrum and data processing to remove its contribution. It is demonstrated here that high-resolution mass spectrometry can be used to detect isotopic fine structure, such as in the A + 2 profile example above, deconvolving the isotopomer species resulting from deuterium incorporation. Resolving isotopic fine structure during HDX MS therefore permits direct monitoring of HDX, which can be calculated as the sum of the fractional peak magnitudes of the deuterium-exchanged isotopomers. This obviates both the need for a time zero spectrum as well as data processing to account for natural abundance heavy isotopes, saving instrument and analysis time. PMID:24328359

  3. Tunable Diode Laser Measurements of Leaf-scale Carbon Isotope Discrimination and Ecosystem Respired Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios in a Semi-arid Woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, N.; Chris, B.; Hanson, D.; Kern, S.; Meyer, C.; Pockman, W.; Powers, H.

    2005-12-01

    We present results and speculative interpretation of leaf-level carbon isotope discrimination and ecosystem respired carbon and oxygen isotope ratios from a semi-arid, C3/C4 woodland located in northern New Mexico, USA. Overstory leaf area index (LAI) is dominated by live juniper (Juniperus monosperma) trees with an LAI value of approximately 1.0 m2 per m2 ground area, and has a seasonally dynamic understory of mixed C3 forbs and C4 grasses and cacti, with a maximum LAI of 0.30 m2 per m2 ground area. Ecosystem respired carbon isotope ratios showed values characteristic of C3 dominated photosynthesis (Keeling plot intercepts of -35 to -22 per mil). Seasonal variation was typical of that found in wetter, C3 dominated forests, as was the dependence on climate (e.g. relationships with vapor pressure deficit, soil water content, and canopy conductance). Leaf-level carbon isotope discrimination of the junipers, measured by coupling a Li-Cor 6400 photosynthesis system to the TDL, provided discrimination-Ci and discrimination-vpd relationships consistent with measured ecosystem respired carbon isotope ratios. The oxygen isotope ratio of ecosystem respiration was dependent on rain water isotope composition, but was correlated with soil water content during rain-free periods. The cumulative effect of vapor pressure deficit after a rain event was tightly correlated with the oxygen isotope ratio of ecosystem respiration, suggesting the primary drivers are evaporative enrichment of soil water and perhaps nocturnal leaf enrichment. Instrument precision for carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of carbon dioxide is 0.06 to 0.18 per mil; however, overall precision is somewhat lower due to pressure and sampling effects.

  4. A Widely Tunable Infrared Laser Spectrometer for Measurements of Isotopic Ratios of Carbon Cycle Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Joanne H. Shorter; J. Barry McManus; David D. Nelson; Charles E. Kolb; Mark S. Zahniser; Ray Bambha; Uwe Lehmann; Tomas Kulp; Stanley C. Tyler

    2005-01-31

    The atmospheric abundances of carbon dioxide and methane have increased dramatically during the industrial era. Measurements of the isotopic composition of these gases can provide a powerful tool for quantifying their sources and sinks. This report describes the development of a portable instrument for isotopic analysis CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} using tunable infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. This instrument combines novel optical design and signal processing methods with a widely tunable mid-infrared laser source based on difference frequency generation (DFG) which will can access spectral regions for all the isotopes of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} with a single instrument. The instrument design compensates for the large difference in concentration between major and minor isotopes by measuring them with path lengths which differ by a factor of 100 within the same multipass cell. During Phase I we demonstrated the basic optical design and signal processing by determining {sup 13}CO{sub 2} isotopic ratios with precisions as small as 0.2{per_thousand} using a conventional lead salt diode laser. During Phase II, the DFG laser source was coupled with the optical instrument and was demonstrated to detect {sup 13}CH{sub 4}/{sup 12}CH{sub 4} ratios with a precision of 0.5{per_thousand} and an averaging time of 20 s using concentrated methane in air with a mixing ratio of 2700 ppm. Methods for concentrating ambient air for isotopic analysis using this technique have been evaluated. Extensions of this instrument to other species such as {sup 13}CO{sub 2}, C{sup 18}OO, and CH{sub 3}D are possible by substituting lasers at other wavelengths in the DFG source module. The immediate commercial application of this instrument will be to compete with existing mass spectrometric isotope instruments which are expensive, large and relatively slow. The novel infrared source developed in this project can be applied to the measurement of many other gas species and will have wide application in atmospheric monitoring, industrial process control, and medical research and diagnostic development.

  5. Effect of Water Regime on Carbon Isotope Composition of Lichens

    PubMed Central

    Shomer-Ilan, Adiva; Nissenbaum, Arie; Galun, Margalith; Waisel, Yoav

    1979-01-01

    ?13C values of the lichens Ramalina duriaei and Teloschistes villosus collected in their natural habitat were repeatedly measured during 2 years. Results show variations in the stable carbon isotope ratios (13C/12C). Such variations are correlated to the seasonal rainfall, i.e. low values of ?13C of the lichens during the winter and high values of ?13C during the dry summer. Relatively low ?13C values were obtained also in laboratory experiments with lichens grown under controlled humid conditions and in lichens collected from humid habitats. The variations in carbon isotopes were associated with quantitative metabolic changes. Under humid conditions an increase was obtained in the total amount of the extracted water-soluble fraction of the plant tissues as well as in the relative content of soluble carbohydrates. Analysis of the possible factors which may cause such variations indicates that the quantity of precipitation and the exposure time to high humidity were the main environmental factors causing seasonal variations in the ?13C values of the lichens. Such variations are dependent mainly on enzymic reactions and are probably less influenced by purely physicochemical processes. In view of the data presented here the balance between carboxylation and decarboxylation reactions seems to be the major factor for the observed seasonal differences. Winter accumulation of 12C enriched components causes an over-all decrease in ?13C. During the summer, those storage materials are respired with concomitant increase in the ?13C of the residual plant material. PMID:16660679

  6. Physiological influences on carbon isotope discrimination in huon pine ( Lagarostrobos franklinii )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Francey; R. M. Gifford; T. D. Sharkey; B. Weir

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the light environment and stomatal and photosynthetic behaviour are reported for Huon Pine (Lagarostrobos franklinii, family Podocarpaceae) in western Tasmanian rainforest. For a variety of microenvironments, these are used in an analysis of stable carbon isotope measurements in the air, and in branch and leaf material, using a model for carbon isotope fractionation in leaves (Farquhar et al.

  7. Leaf carbon isotope and mineral composition in subtropical plants along an irradiance cline

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Ehleringer; C. B. Field; Zhi-fang Lin; Chun-yen Kuo

    1986-01-01

    Leaf carbon isotope ratios and leaf mineral composition (Ca, K, Mg, Mn, N, and P) were measured on the dominant species along an irradiance cline in a subtropical monsoon forest of southern China. This irradiance cline resulted from disturbance caused by fuel-harvesting. Leaf carbon isotope ratios increased from undisturbed to disturbed sites for all species, indicating that leaf intercellular CO2

  8. Isotope-induced elastic scattering of optical phonons in individual suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    of optical phonons into acoustic phonons [3, 4]. We propose that this process is allowed because of soIsotope-induced elastic scattering of optical phonons in individual suspended single-walled carbon 10, 2011) Isotope-induced scattering of optical phonons in individual single-walled carbon nanotubes

  9. A comparison of lignin and stable carbon isotope compositions in quaternary marine sediments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JOHN I. HEDGES; ALEXANDER VAN GEEN

    1982-01-01

    Heges, J.I. and van Geen, A., 1982. A comparison of lignin and stable carbon isotope compositions in quaternary marine sediments. Mar. Chem., 11: 43--53. Organic matter in four Quaternary sediment cores from the Gulf of Mexico and one core from the Washington State coast have been analyzed for lignin and stable carbon isotope compositions. Holocene sequences of all five cores

  10. Stable carbon isotope distributions of thermocatalytically generated low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    McCarty; H. B. Jr

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory simulations of petroleum formation were examined by stable carbon isotope studies of five cryogenic distillation fractions of the gases produced by thermal treatment of organic substrate. Simple heat treatment of substrates was contrasted with heat treatment in the presence of nickel and vanadium sulfides, ammonia, and water. Other reactions examined the effects of clay and carbonate on the isotopic

  11. Carbon isotope evidence for recent climate-related enhancement of CO2 assimilation and peat accumulation

    E-print Network

    Carbon isotope evidence for recent climate-related enhancement of CO2 assimilation and peat change. In this study, peat cores up to 2 m in depth from four moss banks on Signy Island were used included radiocarbon dating (to determine peat accumulation rates) and stable carbon isotope composition

  12. Tunable Diode Laser Measurements of Leaf-scale Carbon Isotope Discrimination and Ecosystem Respired Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios in a Semi-arid Woodland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. McDowell; B. Chris; D. Hanson; S. Kern; C. Meyer; W. Pockman; H. Powers

    2005-01-01

    We present results and speculative interpretation of leaf-level carbon isotope discrimination and ecosystem respired carbon and oxygen isotope ratios from a semi-arid, C3\\/C4 woodland located in northern New Mexico, USA. Overstory leaf area index (LAI) is dominated by live juniper (Juniperus monosperma) trees with an LAI value of approximately 1.0 m2 per m2 ground area, and has a seasonally dynamic

  13. Atmospheric Parameters and Carbon Abundance for Hot DB White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Detlev; Provencal, Judi; Gänsicke, Boris T.

    2015-06-01

    Accurate atmospheric parameters for DB (helium atmosphere) white dwarfs near 25000 K are difficult to determine, but are needed to help or confirm the asteroseismic analysis of these objects. Another important aspect is the new class of white dwarfs – the hot DQ – whose spectra are dominated by carbon lines. The origin of these stars is not yet understood, but they may have an evolutionary link with the hotter DBs as studied here. We use absolutely calibrated high-resolution UV spectra of five DBs in addition to available optical spectroscopy. We find photospheric C and no other heavy elements – with extremely high limits on the C/Si ratio – in two of the five objects. We compare various explanations for this unusual composition that have been proposed in the literature: accretion of interstellar or circumstellar matter, radiative levitation, carbon dredge-up from the deeper interior below the helium layer, and a residual stellar wind. None of these explanations is completely satisfactory, and the problem of the origin of the hot DQ remains an open question.

  14. Canopy-scale kinetic fractionation of atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapor isotopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xuhui Lee; Tim J. Griffis; John M. Baker; Kaycie A. Billmark; Kyounghee Kim; Lisa R. Welp

    2009-01-01

    The carbon and oxygen isotopes of CO2 and the oxygen isotopes of H2O are powerful tracers for constraining the dynamics of carbon uptake and water flux on land. The role of land biota in the atmospheric budgets of these isotopes has been extensively explored through the lens of leaf-scale observations. At the ecosystem scale, kinetic fractionation is associated with molecular

  15. First results on stable isotopes in fluid inclusions in cryogenic carbonates from Ural Mountains (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dublyansky, Yuri; Luetscher, Mark; Spötl, Christoph; Töchterle, Paul; Kadebskaya, Olga

    2015-04-01

    Cryogenic cave carbonates (CCC) were found in a number of caves in the Ural. In contrast to the CCC previously reported from Central Europe, the Uralian CCC have larger sizes (up to 4-5 cm), which allows for more detailed petrographic and geochemical studies. CCCs from Uralian caves commonly show spherulitic shapes due to crystal splitting, supporting the model of calcite precipitating in a freezing water pond. ?18O values of studied CCCs are lower by 1 to 14 o compared to noncryogenic speleothems of Pleistocene and Holocene age from the same caves. ?18O and ?13C values are inversely correlated and typically show a fractionation between the core and the rim of individual samples. These trends are similar to those reported for CCCs from European caves (Žák et al., 2004). Petrographic observations performed on doubly polished, 100-150 micron-thick sections revealed abundant fluid inclusions, trapped between fibres of the spherulites. Petrographic relationships suggest that these inclusions are primary. The isotopic composition of water trapped in fluid inclusions in CCCs from two caves was analyzed following mechanical crushing at 120 °C, cryo-trapping of released water, pyrolysis on glassy carbon at 1400 °C (TC/EA device; Thermo), and analysis of the evolved gases on an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (Delta V Advantage; Thermo Fisher). The lack of peaks on the m/z 2 trace during the heating of the loaded crushing cell attests for a good sealing of the fluid inclusions. The measured ?D values range between -136 o and -145 o VSMOW. The values measured in CCCs are more negative than the typical values of fluid inclusion water measured in the Holocene stalagmites from central Ural (-99 to -108 ). This shift toward more negative values is attributed to the isotopic fractionation between ice and water during the freezing. Reference: Žák et al., 2004, Chemical Geology, 2006, 119-136.

  16. Mineral-fluid partitioning and isotopic fractionation of boron in synthetic calcium carbonate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. G. Hemming; R. J. Reeder; G. N. Hanson

    1995-01-01

    Aragonite, high-Mg calcite, and Mg-free calcite have been grown under monitored laboratory conditions to investigate mineral-fluid partitioning and isotopic fractionation of boron into carbonates. At pH ? 8, both polymorphs have boron isotopic compositions I6.5%0 lower than the boron isotopic composition of the experimental fluid (?11B = 0 ± 0.7?.). The isotopic composition of the synthetic minerals is identical to

  17. The Stable and Radio- Carbon Isotopic Content of Labile and Refractory Carbon in Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNichol, A. P.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Gerlach, D. S.; Hayes, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    Studies of the isotopic content of atmospheric particulate matter are hampered by difficulties in chemically defining the pools of carbon and analytically isolating the different pools. We are conducting studies on reference materials and atmospheric aerosol samples to develop a method to measure stable and radio- carbon isotopes on the labile and refractory carbon. We are using a flow-through combustion system that allows us to combust, collect and measure the isotopic content of the gases produced at all stages of heating/oxidizing. We compare our results to those measured using a chemothermal oxidation method (CTO) (Gustafsson et al., 2001). In this method, refractory carbon is defined as the material remaining after pre- combusting a sample at 375°C in the presence of oxygen for 24 hours. The reference materials are diesel soot, apple leaves and a hybrid of the two (DiesApple), all from NIST. These provide carbon with two well-defined fractions -- the soot provides refractory carbon that is radiocarbon dead and the apple leaves provide organic carbon that is radiocarbon modern. Radiocarbon results from DiesApple indicate that the "refractory" carbon defined by the CTO method is actually a mixture of old and modern carbon that contains over 25% modern carbon. This suggests that charred material formed from the apples leaves during the pre-combustion step is contributing to the fraction we identify as refractory carbon. We are studying this by analyzing the individual materials and the mixture using our flow-through system. First results with this system indicate that the refractory fraction trapped from the DiesApple contains much less modern carbon than the CTO method, less than 7%. We will present detailed concentration and isotopic results of the generation of carbon dioxide during programmed combustion of each of the reference materials. We studied the radiocarbon content of both the total carbon (TC) and refractory carbon in the fine particulate matter (PM2.5) collected on quartz fiber filters as part of the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) program. The five samples were collected at two sites (Birmingham, AL and Atlanta, GA) with very different sources of atmospheric particulate matter. In all instances, the refractory carbon contained significantly less radiocarbon than the TC suggesting, not unexpectedly, a source of particulate carbon from the combustion of fossil material. We will present results from the analysis of the same filters in the flow-through system. The implication of our results for the use of radiocarbon in the quantitative apportionment of atmospheric particulate matter sources will be discussed. Gustafsson O., T. Bucheli, Z. Kukulska, M. Andersson, C. Largeau, J-N. Rouzaud, C. Reddy and T. Eglinton (2001) Evaluation of a protocol for the quantification of black carbon in sediments. GBD 15, 881-890.

  18. A New Look at Carbon Abundances in Planetary Nebulae. IV. Implications for Stellar Nucleosynthesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. B. C. Henry; K. B. Kwitter; J. A. Bates

    2000-01-01

    This paper is the fourth and final report on a project designed to study carbon abundances in a sample of planetary nebulae representing a broad range in progenitor mass and metallicity. We present newly acquired optical spectrophotometric data for three Galactic planetary nebulae, IC 418, NGC 2392, and NGC 3242, and combine them with UV data from the IUE Final

  19. Paleoceanographic significance of high-resolution carbon isotope records across the CenomanianTuronian boundary in the

    E-print Network

    Bralower, Timothy J.

    by a prominent, positive C-isotope excur- sion near the CTB in a number of sections measured on the calciumPaleoceanographic significance of high-resolution carbon isotope records across the Cenomanian Abstract Carbon isotope measurements have been made on bulk carbonate and organic matter in three sections

  20. Lipid Biomarkers and Molecular Carbon Isotopes for Elucidating Carbon Cycling Pathways in Hydrothermal Vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. L.; Dai, J.; Campbell, B.; Cary, C.; Sun, M.

    2003-12-01

    Increasing molecular evidence suggests that hydrothermal vents in mid-ocean ridges harbor large populations of free-living bacteria, particularly the epsilon Proteobacteria. However, pathways for carbon metabolism by these bacteria are poorly known. We are addressing this question by analyzing the lipid biomarkers and their isotope signatures in environments where the epsilon Proteobacteria are likely predominant. Solid materials were collected from hydrothermal vents in the East Pacific Rise and at the Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California. Fatty acids extracted from these samples are dominated by 16:0 (27-41%), 18:0 (16-48%), 18:1 (11-42%), 16:1 (7-12%), and 14:0 (5-28%). In addition, 15:0 and anteiso-15:0 are significantly present (2-3%) in samples from the Guaymas Basin. The isotopic compositions of these fatty acids range from -15.0\\permil to -33.1\\permil with the most positive values occurring only in monounsaturated fatty acids (16:1 and 18:1). We are currently unable to assign these biomarkers to any of the epsilon Proteobacteria because biomarkers are poorly known for these organisms isolated from the vents. However, no polyunsaturated fatty acids were detected in these samples, which are consistent with the absence of vent animals at the sampling sites. Signature biomarkers of 20:1 and cy21:0, which are characteristic of the thermophilic chemolithoautotrophs such as Aquificales, are also absent in these samples. These results imply that the deeply branched Aquificales species do not constitute the major microbial community in these vent environments. The large range of molecular isotopic compositions suggests that these lipids are synthesized from various carbon sources with different isotopic compositions or through different biosynthetic pathways, or both. We are currently measuring the isotopic compositions of the total organic carbon in the bulk samples and will determine the fractionations between lipid biomarkers and the total organic carbon. Molecular DNA data from these vent environments indicate that the reversed TCA cycle may be used for CO2 fixation by the epsilon Proteobacteria for chemolithoautotrophic growth. Isotopic fractionation patterns between lipid biomarkers and the bulk organic carbon can provide independent information on this unique biosynthetic pathway.

  1. Abundance anomalies of carbon and nitrogen in the IUE spectra of Algol-type interacting binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluskey, Carolina P. S.

    1990-01-01

    There are two primary ways in which the products of nucleosynthesis in stellar interiors may appear at the surface of a star. These are mixing and/or loss of the original unburned stellar envelope. In interacting binaries, overflow can contribute dramatically to envelope loss. The simplest abundance anomalies to be expected from nuclear burning of hydrogen, helium, or carbon would be under or over abundances H, He, C, O, Ne, and Mg. In addition, it is expected that carbon is initially severely depleted, while nitrogen is enhanced during hydrogen burning via the CNO cycle in stars above two solar masses. Other, more subtle anomalies are also expected, and elements heavier than magnesium can be created during very late evolution by nuclear burning in massive stars. Consequently, it is expected that abundance anomalies of various kinds should occur in interacting binaries where one or both stars have lost significant amounts of mass.

  2. Stable Isotopic Composition of Interstitial Waters and Authigenic Carbonates, New Jersey Shelf: Origin of Carbonates and Implication for Methane Flux

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Malone; G. Claypool; J. B. Martin; G. R. Dickens

    2001-01-01

    We report the oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of interstitial waters and authigenic carbonate nodules and cemented layers from the New Jersey shelf, which are used to interpret the origin of the carbonates and make inferences about evolution of methane within the shelf sediments. Mineralogically, most of the nodules are siderites, the exception being two calcite nodules. Dolomite is found

  3. Carbon fluxes, pCO 2 and substrate weathering in a large northern river basin, Canada: carbon isotope perspectives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin Telmer; Jan Veizer

    1999-01-01

    Isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (?13CDIC) in the Ottawa River basin is about ?8 and ?16‰ for lowland carbonate and upland silicate tributaries, respectively. This suggests that (1) the source of DIC to the Ottawa River is soil respiration and carbonate weathering, (2) exchange with the atmosphere is unidirectional or volumetrically unimportant, and (3) in-river respiration and photosynthesis are

  4. Laboratory calibration of the calcium carbonate clumped isotope thermometer in the 25-250 °C temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, Tobias; John, Cédric M.; Jourdan, Anne-Lise; Davis, Simon; Crawshaw, John

    2015-05-01

    Many fields of Earth sciences benefit from the knowledge of mineral formation temperatures. For example, carbonates are extensively used for reconstruction of the Earth's past climatic variations by determining ocean, lake, and soil paleotemperatures. Furthermore, diagenetic minerals and their formation or alteration temperature may provide information about the burial history of important geological units and can have practical applications, for instance, for reconstructing the geochemical and thermal histories of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is a relatively new technique that can provide the formation temperature of carbonate minerals without requiring a priori knowledge of the isotopic composition of the initial solution. It is based on the temperature-dependent abundance of the rare 13C-18O bonds in carbonate minerals, specified as a ?47 value. The clumped isotope thermometer has been calibrated experimentally from 1 °C to 70 °C. However, higher temperatures that are relevant to geological processes have so far not been directly calibrated in the laboratory. In order to close this calibration gap and to provide a robust basis for the application of clumped isotopes to high-temperature geological processes we precipitated CaCO3 (mainly calcite) in the laboratory between 23 and 250 °C. We used two different precipitation techniques: first, minerals were precipitated from a CaCO3 supersaturated solution at atmospheric pressure (23-91 °C), and, second, from a solution resulting from the mixing of CaCl2 and NaHCO3 in a pressurized reaction vessel at a pressure of up to 80 bar (25-250 °C). The calibration lines of both experimental approaches overlap and agree in the slopes with theoretical estimates and with other calibration experiments in which carbonates were reacted with phosphoric acid at temperatures above 70 °C. Our study suggests a universal ?47-T calibration (T in K, ?47 in ‰):

  5. Theoretical calculation of oxygen isotope fractionation factors in carbonate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Thomas; Deines, Peter

    2008-08-01

    Using established methods of statistical mechanical calculation and a recent compilation of vibrational frequency data, we have computed oxygen isotope reduced partition function ratios ( ? values) for a large number of carbonate minerals. The oxygen isotope ? values of carbonates are inversely correlated to both the mass and radius of the cation bonded to the carbonate anion but neither correlation is good enough to be used as a precise and accurate predictor of ? values. There is an approximately 0.6% relative increase in the ? values of aragonite per 10 kbar increase in pressure. These estimates of the pressure effect on ? values are broadly similar to those deduced previously for calcite using the methods of mineral physics. In comparing the ? values of our study with those derived recently from first-principles lattice dynamics calculations, we find near-perfect agreement for calcite and witherite (<0.3% deviation), reasonable agreement for dolomite (<0.9% deviation) and somewhat poorer agreement for aragonite and magnesite (1.5-2% deviation). In the system for which we have the most robust constraints, CO 2-calcite, there is excellent agreement between our calculations and experimental data over a broad range of temperatures (0-900 °C). Similarly, there is good to excellent correspondence between calculation and experiment for most other low to moderate atomic mass carbonate minerals (aragonite to strontianite). The agreement is not as good for high atomic mass carbonates (witherite, cerussite, otavite). In the case of witherite and cerussite, the discrepancy may be due, in part, to our calculation methodology, which does not account for the effect of cation mass on the magnitude of vibrational frequency shifts associated with heavy isotope substitution. However, the calculations also reveal an incompatibility between the high- and low-temperature experimental datasets for witherite and cerussite. Specifically, the shapes of fractionation factor versus 1/ T2 curves in the calcite-witherite and calcite-cerussite systems do not conform to the robust constraints on the basic shape of these curves provided by theory. This suggests that either the high- or low-temperature datasets for both minerals is in error. Dolomite-calcite fractionation factors derived from our calculations fall within the wide range of fractionations for this system given by previous experimental and natural sample studies. However, our compilation of available low-temperature (25-80 °C) experimental data reveal an unusual temperature dependence of fractionations in this system; namely, the data indicate an increase in the magnitude of fractionations between dolomite (or proto-dolomite) and calcite with increasing temperature. Such a trend is incompatible with theory, which stipulates that fractionations between carbonate minerals must decrease monotonically with increasing temperature. We propose that the anomalous temperature dependence seen in the low-temperature experimental data reflect changes in the crystallinity and degree of cation ordering of the dolomite phase over this temperature interval and the effect these changes have on the vibrational frequencies of dolomite. Similar effects may be present in natural systems at low-temperature and must be considered in applying experimental or theoretical fractionation data to these systems. In nearly all cases, carbonate mineral-calcite fractionation factors given by the present calculations are in as good or better agreement with experimental data than are fractionations derived from semi-empirical bond strength methods.

  6. Strontium isotope composition of runoff from a glaciated carbonate terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Martin; Creaser, Robert A.; Skidmore, Mark

    2002-02-01

    The relationship between subglacial chemical weathering processes and the Sr isotope composition of runoff from Robertson Glacier, Alberta, Canada, is investigated. This glacier rests on predominantly carbonate bedrock of Upper Devonian age, but silicate minerals are also present. The provenance of solute in meltwaters is found to vary systematically with solute concentration and, by inference, subglacial water residence time. In dilute waters, the principal process of solute acquisition is calcite dissolution fueled by protons derived from the dissolution of CO 2 and subsequent dissociation of carbonic acid. At higher solute concentrations, dolomite dissolution coupled to sulfide oxidation is more important. Sr concentration is found to increase with total solute concentration in two separate meltwater streams draining from the glacier, but 87Sr/ 86Sr only increases in the eastern melt stream. Carbonate and K-feldspar sources are shown to dominate the Sr content of the western stream, irrespective of concentration. They also dominate the Sr content of the eastern stream at low and intermediate concentrations, but at higher concentrations, muscovite (with high 87Sr/ 86Sr) is also an important Sr source. This reflects the outcrop of muscovite-bearing lithologies in the catchment of the eastern stream and an increase in the rate of weathering of K-silicates relative to that of carbonates as more concentrated solutions approach saturation with respect to carbonates. Nonstoichiometric release of 87Sr/ 86Sr and preferential release of Sr over K from freshly ground K-silicate surfaces may also occur. This may help to explain the radiogenic nature of runoff from distributed subglacial drainage systems, which are characterized by long water:rock contact times and water flow through environments in which crushing and grinding of bedrock are active processes. Although the exchangeable Sr in tills has higher 87Sr/ 86Sr than local carbonate bedrock, only the more concentrated meltwaters from the eastern stream display similarly high values. The most dilute waters, which probably transport the bulk of the dissolved Sr flux from the glacier, have 87Sr/ 86Sr characteristic of local carbonate bedrock. Thus, the results suggest that although enhanced weathering of silicate minerals containing radiogenic Sr (such as muscovite) does occur in glaciated carbonate terrains, it is unlikely to contribute to any enhanced flux of radiogenic Sr from glaciated continental surfaces to the oceans.

  7. Equilibrium carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation in iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies (e.g., [1-3]) have suggested that Si- and Fe-isotopic signatures can be used to characterize the compositions and conditions of segregation of metallic cores in planetary interiors. This study expands the theoretical framework to include carbon and hydrogen, which may also be alloying elements. Hydrogen (D/H) and carbon (13C/12C) fractionations in iron-rich metallic melts are estimated by modeling analogous iron-rich crystals, i.e., dhcp-FeH and ?-Fe2C. C- and H-atoms in these crystals are completely coordinated by iron. The driving energy for equilibrium fractionation is assumed to come from the reduction of vibrational frequencies when heavy isotopes are substituted for light ones; vibrations are assumed to be harmonic. This treatment is crude at high temperature, and for the relatively anharmonic vibrations typical of hydrogen-bearing substances, but may provide a reasonably accurate, semi-quantitative approximation of real fractionation behavior. Vibrational frequencies of all crystals are modeled with density functional theory, using gradient-corrected functionals and ultrasoft pseudopotentials. For both carbon and hydrogen, the models suggest that the metal phase will be strongly depleted in heavy isotopes. At 2000 K, 1 atm, ?-Fe2C will have 3‰ lower 13C/12C than coexisting diamond. Combining this result with previous high-temperature theoretical and experimental studies (e.g., [4]), metal-graphite fractionation is expected to be very similar, while metal-CO2 fractionation will be almost twice as large, ca. -5‰. Deuterium/hydrogen fractionations are expected to be an order of magnitude larger, with 50-70‰ lower D/H in dhcp-FeH than in coexisting H2 gas at 2000 K, and approximately 100‰ lower D/H than water vapor. These fractionations are much larger than those inferred for silicon and iron, as expected given the differences in atomic mass. References: 1. Georg et al. (2007) Nature 447:1102; 2. Rustad & Yin (2009) Nature Geoscience doi:10.1038/ngeo546; 3. Polyakov (2009) Science 323:912; 4. Polyakov & Kharlashina (1995) GCA 59:2561.

  8. Calculation of isotope shifts and relativistic shifts in C I, C II, C III, and C IV J. C. Berengut*

    E-print Network

    Kozlov, Mikhail G

    Calculation of isotope shifts and relativistic shifts in C I, C II, C III, and C IV J. C. Berengut of calculating isotope shifts and relativistic shifts in atomic spectra. We test the method on neutral carbon the lifetime of the Universe. Carbon isotope shifts can be used to measure isotope abundances in gas clouds

  9. Breath carbon stable isotope ratios identify changes in energy balance and substrate utilization in humans.

    PubMed

    Whigham, L D; Butz, D E; Johnson, L K; Schoeller, D A; Abbott, D H; Porter, W P; Cook, M E

    2014-09-01

    Rapid detection of shifts in substrate utilization and energy balance would provide a compelling biofeedback tool for individuals attempting weight loss. As a proof of concept, we tested whether the natural abundance of exhaled carbon stable isotope ratios (breath ?(13)C) reflects shifts between negative and positive energy balance. Volunteers (n=5) consumed a 40% energy-restricted diet for 6 days followed by 50% excess on day 7. Breath was sampled immediately before and 1?h and 2?h after breakfast, lunch and dinner. Exhaled breath ?(13)C values were measured by cavity ring-down spectroscopy. Using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Dunnett's contrasts, pre-breakfast breath values on days 2-6 were compared with day 1, and postprandial day 7 time points were compared with pre-breakfast day 7. Energy restriction diminished pre-breakfast breath ?(13)C by day 3 (P<0.05). On day 7, increased energy intake was first detected immediately before dinner (-23.8±0.6 vs -21.9±0.7‰, P=0.002 (means±s.d.)), and breath ?(13)C remained elevated at least 2?h post dinner. In conclusion, when shifting between negative and positive energy balance, breath ?(13)C showed anticipated isotopic changes. Although additional research is needed to determine specificity and repeatability, this method may provide a biomarker for marked increases in caloric intake. PMID:24441037

  10. Carbon isotopic composition of assimilated and respired CO2 in Southeastern US pine forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, B.; Conte, M. H.; Chanton, J.; Martin, T.; Teklemerian, T.; Cropper, W.; Weber, J.

    2010-12-01

    We measured the 13C of assimilated carbon [foliage organic matter (?COM), leaf soluble carbohydrates ((?CSC), and leaf waxes ((?CW)] and respiratory carbon [foliage (?CF), soil (?CS) and ecosystem respired CO2 (?CR)] over a two-year period at two sites in central Florida that are typical of Southeastern US coastal plain pine ecosystems. Our objective was to determine how climatic variables, operating by affecting plant physiology and photosynthetic discrimination (?), influence the isotopic composition of assimilated carbon pools and of ecosystem respired CO2. The first site was a naturally regenerated 32 m tall stand of mature longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) with mature slash pine (Pinus elliottii) subdominants, while the second was a planted, mid-rotation 13 m tall stand of slash pine (Pinus elliottii var. elliottii Engelm.). ?COM, ?CSC, ?CW, and ?CF of P. palustris were 13C enriched by about 2‰ relative to that of P. elliottii in the mid-rotation plantation. Despite this enrichment, mean ?CR of the P. palustris stand was similar to that at the P. elliottii plantation, reflecting additional respiratory inputs from the more isotopically depleted P. elliottii subdominant and understory. In both P. palustris and P. elliottii, a small decrease was observed in ?COM over the two year study, but not in ?CSC, ?CF, ?CS or ?CR. Intriguingly, a significant 2‰ decrease was also observed in the very long chain needlewaxes (C32-36 n-alkanoic acids), but not the more abundant C24-28 waxes. As the carbon in waxes is supplied by internal storage reserves, our data suggest there may be distinct carbon source pathways for waxes of differing chain lengths. The long-term decrease in the 13C of foliar carbon and waxes also suggests recovery from severe drought conditions prior to our study. ?CF and ?CR were consistently 13C enriched relative to assimilated C and were insensitive to variations in vapor pressure deficit (D). The small variability in ?CA and ?CR at this site is likely due to the shallow water table that mediates moisture stress as well as the low sensitivity of stomatal conductance to D in these species.

  11. Double-comparison method for mass spectrometric determination of hydrogen isotopic abundances

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Schoeller; D. W. Peterson; J. M. Hayes

    1983-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratio analysis is subject to interference from Hâ\\/sup +\\/, and the uncertainty in the Hâ\\/sup +\\/ correction is generally the limiting factor in the precision of hydrogen isotopic analyses. Mathematical modeling indicates that the precision of the analysis can be improved through the use of a double-comparison technique employing a second reference gas. In order to compare the

  12. The Suess Effect and Additional Impacts on the Carbon Isotope Composition of a Belizean Coral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, L.; Bunn, S.; Humston, R.; Swart, P. K.; Curran, H.; Rose, L. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent work has shown that the geochemistry of coral skeletons can reflect large-scale changes in the ocean carbon isotope budget as influenced by the anthropogenic influx of fossil fuel carbon to the atmosphere (the Suess Effect). Yet not all coral carbon records reflect just atmospheric controls on carbon. This study assesses the relative influence of the Suess Effect on carbon chemistry within a Belizean Montastrea faveolota colony and interprets deviations from the Suess Effect signal. The coral sample used for this study was collected off Wee Wee Caye, in South-Central Belize offshore of the Sittee River, Stann Creek District in 2003. Coral carbonate was sampled at an average resolution of 15 samples per coral year. Carbon isotope data from the Belizean coral were compared with mean annual carbon isotope data from Atlantic corals in a study by Swart et. al (2010) to analyze the relative contribution of the Suess Effect and competing controls on the carbon isotope composition of Belizean waters. The observed pattern in the Belize coral suggested two distinct trends in carbon isotopic composition, and segmented regression analysis indicated a significant breakpoint occurs in this record in approximately 1965. Deforestation rates in Belize after the 1960's have been almost double that for the rest of Central America (2.3% vs. 1.2% annually) corresponding with a general shift from rural farming to large scale agriculture in Belize. Consequently, increased rates of deforestation in Belize may have been an important factor in carbon isotope budgets of the area over the last several decades. Compared with data averaged from Atlantic coral samples, annual carbon isotope values in Belizean coral declined more rapidly since the 1960's. We attribute this sharper decline in the Belizean coral to enhanced influx of terrestrial 'light' organic carbon to the reef over the study period.

  13. The carbon abundance in the Magellanic Clouds from IUE observations of H II regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, R. J.; Shields, G. A.; Talbot, R. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Results are given of observations of the UV spectra of several H II regions in the Magellanic Clouds, with emphasis on obtaining the carbon abundance from the UV lines of C II, C III, and C IV. The observations and results are described, and theoretical model calculations are presented of the H II regions and the relative abundances of H, He, C, N, O, S, Cl, and Ar computed from the UV and visual spectra. In addition, the abundance results for the Magellanic Clouds are compared with the sun, the Orion Nebula, and galactic planetary nebulae. In comparison with solar abundances, carbon is found to be depleted relative to hydrogen in the Magellanic Clouds by an amount larger than that of nitrogen and oxygen in the SMC and by an amount between that of nitrogen and oxygen in the LMC. It is noted that the results are consistent with a scenario that nitrogen and oxygen have greater primary yields in massive stars than carbon, which may be produced predominantly in less massive stars (such that C/N and C/O in galaxies are initially very low and subsequently increase with evolution). Subsequently, the C/N ratio may decrease as secondary production of nitrogen in less massive stars becomes significant.

  14. Verifying Southern Hemisphere trends in atmospheric carbon dioxide stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, C. E.; Francey, R. J.

    2007-11-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon dioxide distinguish between oceanic and terrestrial uptake of accumulating atmospheric carbon dioxide. At Cape Grim (41°S, 141°E), two Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation programs provide ?13C and ?18O of CO2 employing different collection, sample pretreatment, and calibration strategies that exemplify calibration problems. A comprehensive reexamination of methods results in ?13C agreement of 0.005 ± 0.004‰ through 14 overlapping years of data and suggests we have described and accounted for the main sources of bias. For ?18O, flask storage effects and early standard assignment problems contribute to larger variation and the comparable differences are 0.024 ± 0.184‰. Cape Grim records are reissued with uncertainties reflecting the histories of each method, as well as selected "best" records for ?13C from 1981, and for ?18O from 1978. The uncertainties reflect the internal consistency against an in-house reference, of most interest in determining the limits of temporal behavior, and can be combined with a larger fixed uncertainty if a Cape Grim record is used to quantify spatial differences from sites operated by different measurement laboratories. Marked variability on seasonal and interannual timescales is observed in both isotope records. The geographical location and sampling strategy at Cape Grim ensures large-scale (hemispheric) representativeness on interannual timescales, and we show differences from comparable records maintained by the University of Colorado (using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration flasks) and Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The long-term Southern Hemisphere relationships between ?13C and CO2 are explored for the seasonal and interannual variability in the Cape Grim record. The interannual relationship is characterized by distinct periods of ?13C leveling immediately following increased global CO2 growth rate.

  15. On strontium isotopic anomalies and odd-A p-process abundances. [in solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    Several aspects of the nucleosynthesis of Sr isotopes are considered in an attempt to shed light on the problem of the Sr isotopic anomalies discovered in an inclusion of the Allende meteorite. Decomposition of the Sr isotopes into average r-, s-, and p-process nucleosynthetic classes is performed. It is suggested that the Allende inclusion most likely has an excess of s-process Sr and that the initial Sr-87/Sr-86 isotopic ratio is probably slightly more primitive than basaltic achondrites. The results also show that Sn-115 is mostly due to the r-process and that odd-A yields are very small. It is concluded that if the Sr anomaly in the inclusion is an average s enhancement, it argues somewhat in favor of a model of gas/dust fractionation of s and r isotopes during accumulation of the inclusion parent in the protosolar cloud.

  16. Effects of environmental and biotic factors on carbon isotopic fractionation during decomposition of soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoan; Jia, Yufu; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle because the CO2 emitted from soil respiration is an important source of atmospheric CO2. Carbon isotopic fractionation occurs during SOM decomposition, which leads to (12)C to enrich in the released CO2 while (13)C to enrich in the residual SOM. Understanding the isotope fractionation has been demonstrated to be helpful for studying the global carbon cycle. Soil and litter samples were collected from soil profiles at 27 different sites located along a vertical transect from 1200 to 4500?m above sea level (a.s.l.) in the south-eastern side of the Tibetan Plateau. Their carbon isotope ratios, C and N concentrations were measured. In addition, fiber and lignin in litter samples were also analyzed. Carbon isotope fractionation factor (?) during SOM decomposition was estimated indirectly as the slope of the relationship between carbon isotope ratios of SOM and soil C concentrations. This study shows that litter quality and soil water play a significant role in isotope fractionation during SOM decomposition, and the carbon isotope fractionation factor, ?, increases with litter quality and soil water content. However, we found that temperature had no significant impact on the ? variance. PMID:26056012

  17. Absolute quantification of protein and post-translational modification abundance with stable isotope–labeled synthetic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kettenbach, Arminja N; Rush, John; Gerber, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    In the analysis of biological systems, it is of interest to identify the components of the system and to monitor their changes in abundance under different conditions. The AQUA (for ‘absolute quantification’) method allows sensitive and specific targeted quantification of protein and post-translational modifications in complex protein mixtures using stable isotope–labeled peptides as internal standards. Each AQUA experiment is composed of two stages: method development and application to a biological scenario. In the method development stage, peptides from the protein of interest are chosen and then synthesized with stable isotopes such as 13C, 2H or 15N. The abundance of these internal standards and their endogenous counterparts can be measured by mass spectrometry with selected reaction monitoring or selected ion monitoring methods. Once an AQUA method is established, it can be rapidly applied to a wide range of biological samples, from tissue culture cells to human plasma and tissue. After AQUA peptide synthesis, the development, optimization and application of AQUA analyses to a specific biological problem can be achieved in ~1 week. Here we demonstrate the usefulness of this method by monitoring both Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) protein abundance in multiple lung cancer cell lines and the extent of Plk1 activation loop phosphorylation (pThr-210) during release from S phase. PMID:21293459

  18. Maize Residue Decomposition Measurement Using Soil Surface Carbon Dioxide Fluxes and Natural Abundance of Carbon13

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philippe Rochette; Denis A. Angers; Lawrence B. Flanagan

    1999-01-01

    organic matter content and nutrient cycling. We hypothesized that mation obtained is mostly relevant to aboveground crop natural abundance 13 C analyses could be used with soil CO2 flux measurements to quantify the short-term decomposition rates of residues. The natural abundance of 13 C has also been maize (Zea mays L.) residues under undisturbed field conditions. For used to study

  19. The Paleocene Eocene carbon isotope excursion in higher plant organic matter: Differential fractionation of angiosperms and conifers in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouten, Stefan; Woltering, Martijn; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Sluijs, Appy; Brinkhuis, Henk; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2007-06-01

    A study of upper Paleocene-lower Eocene (P-E) sediments deposited on the Lomonosov Ridge in the central Arctic Ocean reveals relatively high abundances of terrestrial biomarkers. These include dehydroabietane and simonellite derived from conifers (gymnosperms) and a tetra-aromatic triterpenoid derived from angiosperms. The relative percentage of the angiosperm biomarker of the summed angiosperm + conifer biomarkers was increased at the end of the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM), different when observed with pollen counts which showed a relative decrease in angiosperm pollen. Stable carbon isotopic analysis of these biomarkers shows that the negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) during the PETM amounts to 3‰ for both conifer biomarkers, dehydroabietane and simonellite, comparable to the magnitude of the CIE inferred from marine carbonates, but significantly lower than the 4.5‰ of the terrestrial C 29n-alkane [M. Pagani, N. Pedentchouk, M. Huber, A. Sluijs, S. Schouten, H. Brinkhuis, J.S. Sinninghe Damsté, G.R. Dickens, and the IODP Expedition 302 Expedition Scientists (2006), Arctic's hydrology during global warming at the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum. Nature, 442, 671-675.], which is a compound sourced by both conifers and angiosperms. Conspicuously, the angiosperm-sourced aromatic triterpane shows a much larger CIE of 6‰ and suggests that angiosperms increased in their carbon isotopic fractionation during the PETM. Our results thus indicate that the 4.5‰ C 29n-alkane CIE reported previously represents the average CIE of conifers and angiosperms at this site and suggest that the large and variable CIE observed in terrestrial records may be partly explained by the variable contributions of conifers and angiosperms. The differential response in isotopic fractionation of angiosperms and conifers points to different physiological responses of these vegetation types to the rise in temperature, humidity, and greenhouse gases during the PETM.

  20. Stable Carbon Isotopes As Indicators of Plant Water Use Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, E. M.; Marshall, J. D.; Ubierna Lopez, N.

    2007-12-01

    Stable carbon isotopes have been utilized to better understand how environmental variables influence the efficiency of photosynthesis, specifically what factors limit the uptake and absorption of CO2 during photosynthesis. An understanding of the controls over both gas exchange and stomatal conductance can provide an explanation for the possible environmental influences on plant WUE. The ?13C of extractive-free wood was used as an index of plant water use efficiency at Mica Creek Experimental Watershed, Shoshone County, ID. The ?13C values of tree rings were used to determine the effects of clear cut and partial cut harvesting practices, the effect of elevation, and species differences in intrinsic water use efficiency (WUE) among coniferous species including: Thuja plicata, Larix occidentalis, Picea engelmannii, Pseudotsuga menziesii, Abies lasiocarpa, and Abies grandis. We found significant effects of harvest treatments (p=0.0197), elevation (p= 0.0268), and species (p<0.001) on tree ?13C. The significantly more enriched isotopic signatures observed in Thuja plicata (?13C = -23.37 ±0.17‰), indicate that it is a more water use efficient species compared to Larix occidentalis (?13C = -25.66 ±0.43‰), and Abies grandis (?13C = -25.83 ±0.15‰). There was also an overall trend of ?13C enrichment with elevation. The isotopic composition of tree rings has been estimated to increase by 0.003 ‰ per meter of elevation gain, which may be related to a decrease in soil moisture with elevation. Finally, the mean ?13C values observed on partial cut (?13C = -24.73 ±0.10‰) and clear cut treatments (?13C = -24.45 ±0.29‰) were significantly more enriched than the mean value for the control treatment (?13C = -25.25 ±0.19‰). The more enriched isotopic signatures observed on the harvested treatments indicate that the trees are more water use efficient, which may be a result of increased photosynthetic capacity with an increase in the availability of water, foliar nitrogen, and light to individual trees on the harvested treatments. The reduction of stand density through harvesting may reduce the transpirational water losses on a stand level, thus increasing the water availability for individual trees.

  1. Global synchronous changes in the carbon isotopic composition of carbonate sediments unrelated to changes in the global carbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Peter K.

    2008-01-01

    The carbon isotopic (?13C) composition of bulk carbonate sediments deposited off the margins of four carbonate platforms/ramp systems (Bahamas, Maldives, Queensland Plateau, and Great Australian Bight) show synchronous changes over the past 0 to 10 million years. However, these variations are different from the established global pattern in the ?13C measured in the open oceans over the same time period. For example, from 10 Ma to the present, the ?13C of open oceanic carbonate has decreased, whereas platform margin sediments analyzed here show an increase. It is suggested that the ?13C patterns in the marginal platform deposits are produced through admixing of aragonite-rich sediments, which have relatively positive ?13C values, with pelagic materials, which have lower ?13C values. As the more isotopically positive shallow-water carbonate sediments are only produced when the platforms are flooded, there is a connection between changes in global sea level and the ?13C of sediments in marginal settings. These data indicate that globally synchronous changes in ?13C can take place that are completely unrelated to variations in the global carbon cycle. Fluctuations in the ?13C of carbonate sediments measured during previous geological periods may also be subject to similar processes, and global synchroniety of ?13C can no longer necessarily be considered an indicator that such changes are related to, or caused by, variations in the burial of organic carbon. Inferences regarding the interpretation of changes in the cycling of organic carbon derived from ?13C records should be reconsidered in light of the findings presented here. PMID:18772393

  2. Geochemistry (Isotopic Geochemistry) Trace element variations in an archeological carbonate deposit

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geochemistry (Isotopic Geochemistry) Trace element variations in an archeological carbonate deposit that trace elements analysis in archaeological carbonates have the potential to provide high- resolution ablation ICP-MS analyses are performed along the growth axis of an archaeological carbonate deposit from

  3. Boron and calcium isotope composition in Neoproterozoic carbonate rocks from Namibia: evidence for extreme environmental change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simone A. Kasemann; Chris J. Hawkesworth; Anthony R. Prave; Anthony E. Fallick; Paul N. Pearson

    2005-01-01

    The level and evolution of atmospheric carbon dioxide throughout Earth's history are key issues for palaeoclimate reconstructions, especially during times of extreme climate change such as those that marked the Neoproterozoic. The carbon isotope ratios of marine carbonates are crucial in the correlation and identification of Neoproterozoic glacial deposits, and they are also used as a record for biogeochemical cycling

  4. Standard test method for uranium and plutonium concentrations and isotopic abundances by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the concentration and isotopic composition of uranium and plutonium in solutions. The purified uranium or plutonium from samples ranging from nuclear materials to environmental or bioassay matrices is loaded onto a mass spectrometric filament. The isotopic ratio is determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry, the concentration is determined by isotope dilution. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  5. Isotopic composition of Murchison organic compounds: Intramolecular carbon isotope fractionation of acetic acid. Simulation studies of cosmochemical organic syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, G. U.; Cronin, J. R.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Chang, S.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, in our laboratories, samples of Murchison acetic acid were decarboxylated successfully and the carbon isotopic composition was measured for the methane released by this procedure. These analyses showed significant differences in C-13/C-12 ratios for the methyl and carboxyl carbons of the acetic acid molecule, strongly suggesting that more than one carbon source may be involved in the synthesis of the Murchison organic compounds. On the basis of this finding, laboratory model systems simulating cosmochemical synthesis are being studied, especially those processes capable of involving two or more starting carbon sources.

  6. Measuring Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Uptake into Inorganic Calcite using Crystal Growth Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. B.; Watkins, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopes measured on natural calcite crystals provide a record of paleo-environment conditions. Despite the importance of measuring stable isotopes in calcite for paleo-environment reconstructions, there is neither a general theory nor an experimental data set that fully separates the effects of pH, temperature, and precipitation rate on isotope discrimination during calcite growth. Many stable isotope studies of calcite have focused on either carbon or oxygen isotope compositions individually, but few have measured both carbon and oxygen isotope uptake in the same set of crystals. We are precipitating inorganic calcite across a range in temperature, pH, and precipitation rate to guide the development of a general theory for combined carbon and oxygen isotope uptake into calcite crystals grown on laboratory timescales. In our experiments, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is added to an aqueous solution (15 mM CaCl2 + 5 mM NH4Cl) by CO2 bubbling. Once a critical supersaturation is reached, calcite crystals nucleate spontaneously and grow on the beaker walls. A key aspect of this experimental approach is that the ?13C of DIC is relatively constant throughout the crystal growth period, because there is a continuous supply of DIC from the CO2-bearing bubbles. Carbonic anhydrase, an enzyme promoting rapid equilibration of isotopes between DIC and water, was added to ensure that the solution remained isotopically equilibrated during calcite growth. We have conducted experiments at T = 25°C and pH = 8.3 - 9.0. We observe that the fractionation of oxygen isotopes between calcite and water decreases with increasing pH, consistent with available data from experiments in which the enzyme carbonic anhydrase was used. Our results for carbon isotopes extend the available data set, which previously ranged from pH 6.62 to 7.75, to higher pH. At pH 8.3, we observe that calcite is isotopically heavier than DIC with respect to carbon isotopes by about 0.25‰. At pH 9.0, calcite is isotopically indistinguishable from, or perhaps slightly lighter than, DIC. We will present data from additional high-pH experiments and discuss the results in the context of recently developed ion-by-ion growth models for calcite.

  7. Comparison of Bulk and Compound-Specific Carbon Isotope Analyses and Determination of Carbon Sources to Salt Marsh Sediments Using n-Alkane Distributions (Maine, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, B. R.; Uhle, M. E.; Kelley, J. T.; Mora, C. I.

    2005-12-01

    Sources of sedimentary organic matter to a Morse River, Maine (USA) salt marsh over the last 3390+/-60 RCYBP are determined using distribution patterns of n-alkanes as well as bulk and compound-specific carbon isotopic analysis. Marsh foraminiferal counts indicate the ubiquitous presence of zone 1B deposits, suggesting that the deposits were laid down ~0.2 to 0.5m above mean high water. Distributions of n-alkanes show a primary contribution from higher plants, confirmed by an average ACL value of 27.5 for the core sediments and CPI values above 3. Many sample depths have a maximum abundance at the C25 alkane. Ten low marsh, high marsh, and higher-high marsh plant species common to Maine salt marshes were sampled, including Spartina alterniflora, Spartina patens, Juncus gerardi and Solidago sempervirens. The ACL value for the average of the 10 marsh species is 29.1. Salicornia europa, usually not considered to be a dominant species in Maine marshes, has a similar n-alkane distribution to many of the salt marsh sediments, suggesting that it is an important source to the biomass of the marsh through time. Bacterial degradation or algal inputs to the marsh sediments appear to be minor. Compound specific carbon isotopic analyses of the C27 alkanes are, on average, 7.2ppt. depleted relative to bulk values, but the two records are strongly correlated (R2 = 0.87), suggesting that marsh plants are "swamping" the bulk carbon isotopic signal. The apparent abundance of a subordinate (though common) salt marsh plant species (Salicornia europa) within our core underscores the importance of using caution when applying mixing models of relatively few plant species to marsh sediments.

  8. A molecular organic carbon isotope record of miocene climate changes

    SciTech Connect

    Schoell, M. (Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States)); Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damste', J.S.; Leeuw, J.W. de (Netherlands Institute of Sea Research, Texel (Netherlands)); Summons, R.E. (Australian Geological Survey Organization, Canberra (Australia))

    1994-02-25

    The difference in carbon-13 ([sup 13]C) contents of hopane and sterane biomarkers in the Monterey formation (Naples Beach, California) parallels the Miocene inorganic record of the change in [sup 18]O ([delta][sup 18]O), reflecting the Miocene evolution from a well-mixed to a highly stratified photic zone (upper 100 meters) in the Pacific. Steranes ([delta][sup 13]C = 25.4 [+-] 0.7 per mil versus the Pee Dee belemnite standard) from shallow photic-zone organisms do not change isotopically throughout the Miocene. In contrast, sulfur-bound C[sub 35] hopanes (likely derived from bacterial plankton living at the base of the photic zone) have systematically decreasing [sup 13]C concentrations in Middle and Late Miocene samples ([delta][sup 13]C = 29.5 to [minus]31.5 per mil), consistent with the Middle Miocene formation of a carbon dioxide-rich cold water mass at the base of the photic zone.

  9. Quantum-Chemical Calculations of Carbon-Isotope Fractionation in CO2(g), Aqueous Carbonate Species, and Carbonate Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, James R.; Nelmes, Sierra L.; Jackson, Virgil E.; Dixon, David A.

    2008-01-24

    Quantum chemical calculations on large supermolecular carbonate-water and carbonate mineral clusters are used to predict equilibrium constants for 13,12C-isotope-exchange reactions between CO2(g), aqueous carbonate species, and the common carbonate minerals. For the aqueous species, we evaluate the influence of the size and conformational variability of the solvation shell, the exchange-correlation functional, and the basis set. The choice of exchange-correlation functional (PBE vs B3LYP), the basis set (6-31G* vs aug-cc-pVDZ), and solvation shell size (first shell only vs first shell and a partial second shell) each produce changes of ~5-10 per mil in the reduced partition function ratio. Conformational variability gives rise to a standard error of ~0.5 per mil using ~10 solute-solvent conformations. The best results are obtained with the B3LYP/ aug-cc-pVDZ combination, but because the improvements in the basis set and exchange correlation functional drive the reduced partition function ratios in opposite directions, reasonably good results are also obtained with the PBE/6-31G* combination. To construct molecular clusters representative of mineral environments, a new method is introduced on the basis of conservation of Pauling bond strength. Using these clusters as models for minerals, calculations of mineral-gas and mineral-aqueous carbon-isotope fractionation factors, are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Carbon-isotope fractionation factors for gas, aqueous, and mineral phases are thus integrated into a single theoretical/computational framework.

  10. Quantum-chemical calculations of carbon-isotope fractionation in CO2(g), aqueous carbonate species, and carbonate minerals.

    PubMed

    Rustad, James R; Nelmes, Sierra L; Jackson, Virgil E; Dixon, David A

    2008-01-24

    Quantum chemical calculations on large supermolecular carbonate-water and carbonate mineral clusters are used to predict equilibrium constants for 13,12C-isotope-exchange reactions between CO2(g), aqueous carbonate species, and the common carbonate minerals. For the aqueous species, we evaluate the influence of the size and conformational variability of the solvation shell, the exchange-correlation functional, and the basis set. The choice of exchange-correlation functional (PBE vs B3LYP), the basis set (6-31G* vs aug-cc-pVDZ), and solvation shell size (first shell only vs first shell and a partial second shell) each produce changes of approximately 5-10 per mil in the reduced partition function ratio. Conformational variability gives rise to a standard error of approximately 0.5 per mil using approximately 10 solute-solvent conformations. The best results are obtained with the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ combination, but because the improvements in the basis set and exchange correlation functional drive the reduced partition function ratios in opposite directions, reasonably good results are also obtained with the PBE/6-31G* combination. To construct molecular clusters representative of mineral environments, a new method is introduced on the basis of conservation of Pauling bond strength. Using these clusters as models for minerals, calculations of mineral-gas and mineral-aqueous carbon-isotope fractionation factors, are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Carbon-isotope fractionation factors for gas, aqueous, and mineral phases are thus integrated into a single theoretical/computational framework. PMID:18166027

  11. Carbon and hydrogen isotope effects during sorption of organic contaminants on carbonaceous materials.

    PubMed

    Schüth, Christoph; Taubald, Heinrich; Bolaño, Nerea; Maciejczyk, Kirsten

    2003-07-01

    Stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes can be an efficient means to validate biodegradation of organic contaminants in groundwater since it results in an isotopic fractionation. A prerequisite in applying this method in the field is the proof that other processes decreasing the contaminant concentration are conservative with respect to isotope effects. In this paper we show for carbon isotopes of halogenated hydrocarbon compounds [trichloroethene (TCE), cis-dichloroethene (c-DCE), vinylchloride (VC)] and carbon and hydrogen isotopes of BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, p-xylene) that no significant fractionation occurs during equilibrium sorption onto activated carbon, lignite coke and lignite. In general, effects were in the range of the reproducibility limit of the analytical instrument (0.5 per thousand for delta13C, and 8 per thousand for delta2H). This observation was made for fractions sorbed of less than 5% to more than 95%. Also for rate-limited sorption of TCE onto activated carbon, no significant fractionation in carbon isotopes could be observed. These findings support the assumption that for these classes of compounds, sorption processes in aquifer systems are conservative with respect to isotope effects. PMID:12814884

  12. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane

    E-print Network

    Wang, David T.

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its ...

  13. Model-based estimation of the global carbon budget and its uncertainty from carbon dioxide and carbon isotope records

    SciTech Connect

    Kheshgi, Haroon S. [Corporate Research Laboratories, Exxon Research and Engineering Company, Annandale, New Jersey (United States)] [Corporate Research Laboratories, Exxon Research and Engineering Company, Annandale, New Jersey (United States); Jain, Atul K. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana (United States)] [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana (United States); Wuebbles, Donald J. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana (United States)] [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana (United States)

    1999-12-27

    A global carbon cycle model is used to reconstruct the carbon budget, balancing emissions from fossil fuel and land use with carbon uptake by the oceans, and the terrestrial biosphere. We apply Bayesian statistics to estimate uncertainty of carbon uptake by the oceans and the terrestrial biosphere based on carbon dioxide and carbon isotope records, and prior information on model parameter probability distributions. This results in a quantitative reconstruction of past carbon budget and its uncertainty derived from an explicit choice of model, data-based constraints, and prior distribution of parameters. Our estimated ocean sink for the 1980s is 17{+-}7 Gt C (90% confidence interval) and is comparable to the estimate of 20{+-}8 Gt C given in the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment [Schimel et al., 1996]. Constraint choice is tested to determine which records have the most influence over estimates of the past carbon budget; records individually (e.g., bomb-radiocarbon inventory) have little effect since there are other records which form similar constraints. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union.

  14. Relative isomer abundance of fullerenes and carbon nanotubes correlates with kinetic stability.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, A S; Fedorov, D A; Kuzubov, A A; Avramov, P V; Nishimura, Y; Irle, S; Witek, Henryk A

    2011-10-21

    A methodology to evaluate the kinetic stability of carbon nanostructures is presented based on the assumption of the independent and random nature of thermal vibrations. The kinetic stability is directly correlated to the cleavage probability for the weakest bond of a given nanostructure. The application of the presented method to fullerenes and carbon nanotubes yields clear correlation to their experimentally observed relative isomer abundances. The general and simple formulation of the method ensures its applicability to other nanostructures for which formation is controlled by kinetic factors. PMID:22107538

  15. Analysis of Fragments from Cluster Particles: Carbon Abundances, Bulk Chemistry, and Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, K. L.; Klock, W.; Keller, L. P.; Blanford, G. E.; McKay, D. S.

    1993-07-01

    Anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) containing fine-grained aggregates (FGAs) have chondritic element abundances, characteristic textures, and high 4He and Zn abundances. These FGAs can account for >75 vol% of some anhydrous IDPs [1]. We previously noted a correlation of carbon abundance with modal pyroxene content in anhydrous particles [2]. In this study, we analyzed multiple fragments from individual cluster particles to determine (1) if carbon content is correlated with the abundance of FGAs and (2) the extent of chemical and mineralogical heterogeneities of particle clusters. We examined 15 IDPs from 7 distinct clusters of particles on the large area collectors using methods described in [2]. Optically light and dark fragments were selected from each cluster in order to sample a variety of material. Major-, minor-, and light-element compositions and mineralogical data are given for the cluster particle fragments in Table 1. Of the seven clusters sampled, two are coarse-grained and five are dominated by FGAs (>50% of the particle volume). Four of the seven clusters have pyroxene as the dominant crystalline silicate, one has a subequal mixture of pyroxene and olivine, one is dominated by sulfides, and one is dominated by olivine. L2005, #17 and L2005, #26 contain FeZnS grains. The C abundance is chondritic (<3x CI) for five of the clusters; only two clusters have high C abundances. All major and minor elements are within 2x CI for all clusters with the exception of Na, which is typically >2x CI. Solar flare tracks were observed in L2005,, #19. Compositional differences were observed between light and dark fragments from all clusters except cluster L2006, #28, indicating that most clusters are heterogeneous at the 10-micrometer scale. In general, the C abundance and the sulfide content in the dark fragments are greater than or equal to that in the light fragments. Carbon abundance does not appear to correlate with the content of FGAs. Another example of heterogeneity within clusters is L2005, #26; mineralogical analysis of one of the fragments of this cluster showed it to be dominated by Fe sulfides, whereas SEM analysis of two other fragments showed no evidence of sulfide enrichment. Our study suggests that conclusions drawn from one fragment of a cluster are not necessarily representative of other fragments from the same cluster. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by NASA RTOPs 152-17-40-23 and 199- 52-11-02. References: [1] Bradley J. P.(1992) LPSC, 24, 171-172. [2] Thomas K. L. et al. (1993) GCA, 57, 1551-1566.

  16. Radioactive Carbon Isotope Monitoring System Based on Cavity Ring-down Laser Spectroscopy for Decommissioning Process of Nuclear Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Hideki; Watanabe, Kenichi; Takiguchi, Yu; Kawarabayashi, Jun; Iguchi, Tetsuo

    In decommissioning process of nuclear facilities, large amount of radioactive isotopes are discharged as waste. Radioactive carbon isotope (14C) is one of the key nuclides to determine the upper limit of concentration in the waste disposal. In particular, 14C on the graphite reactor decommissioning should be separated from stable carbon isotopes (12C and 13C) and monitored for the public health and safety. We propose an isotope analysis system based on cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy (CRDS) to monitor the carbon isotopes (12C, 13C and 14C) in the isotope separation process for the graphite reactor decommissioning. This system is compact and suitable for a continuous monitoring, because the concentration of molecules including the carbon isotope is derived from its photo absorbance with ultra high sensitive laser absorption spectroscopy. Here are presented the necessary conditions of CRDS system for 14C isotope analysis through the preliminary experimental results of 13C isotope analysis with a prototype system.

  17. Of Island Arcs and Icebergs? Strontium and Carbon Isotope Stratigraphy of Ethiopian Snowball Earth Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, N. R.; Stern, R. J.; Avigad, D.; Beyth, M.; Küster, D.; Gebresilassie, S.; Mehari, K.

    2004-12-01

    Neoproterozoic low-grade metasedimentary exposures uniquely preserved in synclinoria of the Tigrai region of northern Ethiopia offer excellent opportunities to assess the sedimentary response to extreme climatic changes encompassed by the Snowball Earth Hypothesis within the framework of the tectonic evolution of the Arabian-Nubian shield. Basement exposures consist of two major sequences; an older predominantly island arc metavolcanic sequence named the Tsaliet Group, and a younger metasedimentary succession named the Tambien Group. An intervening phyllite unit displays a transitional lithology variously interpreted by previous workers as metasedimentary and metavolcanic. We report Sr and C isotope results for Tambien Group carbonates from three prospective Snowball Earth successions flanking the Mekelle outlier: Negash, Mai Kenetal, and Samre. These localities display excellent exposures of the transition from Tsaliet metavolcaniclastics into distinctive carbonate exposures of the Tambien Group. Distinctive volcanic polymict conglomerates occur close to the basal Tambien contact in the upper Tsaliet Group in two localities. Presence of evaporite pseudomorphs and persistence of microbially laminated lithologies including stromatolites suggests that Tambien carbonate deposition occurred in a shallow marine setting that was initially hypersaline. A distinct black limestone unit, with abundant organic matter and indications of variable energy conditions in a slope setting, occurs higher in the section. Accompanying this transition in gross carbonate depositional style is a pronounced enrichment of carbon isotopes from values between -4 and -1 per mil in the lower interval to values between +4 and +7 per mil in the overlying black limestone. A similar excursion to more radiogenic 87Sr/87Sr compositions is observed from values between 0.7060 to 0.7064 in the lower interval to values "plateauing" between 0.7067 and 0.7069 in the black limestone. Thus far, only the Negash syncline preserves a diamictite of probable glacial origin (i.e., dropstones, faceted clasts, cobbles of diverse composition) where a pronounced negative carbon excursion from values of +7 to -2 per mil accompanies the transition from upper black carbonate to diamictite deposition. The diamictite is the youngest preserved unit within the investigated structures so it is unknown if a superjacent cap carbonate was ever deposited. Zircon evaporation dates from granites intruding the base of the sequence but post-dating early deformation of the entire sequence suggest that the Tambien Group is older than 613Ma, and therefore diamictite genesis is incompatible with younger Varanger, or `Ediacaran' glacial intervals. Ages of ~800 Ma for Tsaliet equivalents in Eritrea provide an upper age constraint. The range of measured Sr isotopic compositions best overlaps Sturtian portions of available reference curves (ca. 720-750 Ma or a little older) and strongly supports the prospect that the Negash diamictite is the product of a Sturtian glacial episode.

  18. Stable carbon isotope fractionation by methanogens growing on different Mars regolith analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Navita; Kral, Timothy A.

    2015-07-01

    In order to characterize stable carbon (13C/12C) isotope fractionation of metabolically produced methane by methanogens in martian settings, Methanothermobacter wolfeii, Methanosarcina barkeri, and Methanobacterium formicicum were cultured on four different Mars regolith analogs - JSC Mars-1, Artificial Mars Simulant, montmorillonite, and Mojave Mars Simulant - and also in their growth supporting media. These chemoautotrophic methanogens utilize CO2 for their carbon source and H2 for their energy source. When compared to the carbon isotope signature of methane when grown on their respective growth media, M. wolfeii and M. barkeri demonstrated variability in carbon isotope fractionation values during methanogenesis on the Mars analogs, while M. formicicum showed subtle or negligible difference in carbon isotope fractionation values. Interestingly, M. wolfeii and M. barkeri have shown relatively consistent enriched values of 12C on montmorillonite, a kind of clay found on Mars, compared to other Mars regolith analogs. In general, M. barkeri showed large carbon isotope fractionation compared to M. wolfeii and M. formicicum during methanognesis on various kinds of analogs. Stable carbon isotope fractionation is one of the techniques used to infer different origins, environments, and pathways of methanogensis. The results obtained in this novel research can provide clues to determine ambiguous sources of methane on Mars.

  19. Polyynes and cyanopolyynes: their synthesis with the carbon arc gives the same abundances occurring in carbon-rich stars.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Franco

    2006-12-01

    Carbon vapour generated from a carbon arc or by laser ablation of graphite is reactive with simple molecules and atoms producing end-capped polyyne chains. With these techniques both hydrogen-terminated polyynes as well as monocyano- and dicyanopolyynes have been produced. Experiments based on arcing graphite electrodes can reproduce the molecular distribution of polyynes existing around carbon-rich AGB stars. In fact, it has been found that the relative abundances of the polyynes produced in carbon arc in vacuum decreases by a factor between 3 and 5 as the chain length increases by a C(2) unit. An analogous trend has been observed both for polyynes and cyanopolyynes in the circumstellar environment around carbon-rich stars. This fact suggests that the mechanism of formation of the polyynes in the carbon arc may be similar to that occurring in the surroundings of the carbon-rich stars. Polyynes and cyanopolyynes represent authentic prebiotic molecules which appear quite ubiquitous in the cosmos and should have played a role in the early organic chemistry preceding the appearance of life. PMID:17131087

  20. sup 13 C and sup 18 O isotopic disequilibrium in biological carbonates: II. In vitro simulation of kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Biological carbonates are built largely from CO{sub 2}, which diffuses across the skeletogenic membrane and reacts to form HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Kinetic discrimination against the heavy isotopes {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C during CO{sub 2} hydration and hydroxylation apparently causes most of the isotopic disequilibrium observed in biological carbonates. These kinetic isotope effects are expressed when the extracytosolic calcifying solution is thin and alkaline, and HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} precipitates fairly rapidly as CaCO{sub 3}. In vitro simulation of the calcifying environment produced heavy isotope depletions qualitatively similar to, but somewhat more extreme than, those seen in biological carbonates. Isotopic equilibration during biological calcification occurs through CO{sub 2} exchange across the calcifying membrane and by admixture ambient waters (containing HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) into the calcifying fluids. Both mechanisms tend to produce linear correlations between skeletal {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O.

  1. Characterization of ganoderma spore lipid by stable carbon isotope analysis: implications for authentication

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xin Liu; Shi-Ping Xu; Jiang-Hai Wang; Jian-Ping Yuan; Lian-Xian Guo; Xin Li; Xiao-Ni Huang

    2007-01-01

    The ratios of stable carbon isotopes (13C\\/12C) of ganoderma fruiting body, ganoderma spore, ganoderma spore lipid (GSL) and individual fatty acids in GSL were determined\\u000a by gas chromatography–stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry and elemental analysis–stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry.\\u000a These values fall into a range from ?26.9 to ?23.3‰, suggesting that the cut log as the Ganoderma-cultivated substrate in Fujian,

  2. A Test of Carbon and Oxygen Stable Isotope Ratio Process Models in Tree Rings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, J. S.; Farquhar, G. D.

    2008-12-01

    Stable isotopes ratios of carbon and oxygen in tree ring cellulose have been used to infer environmental change. Process-based models have been developed to clarify the potential of historic tree ring records for meaningful paleoclimatic reconstructions. However, isotopic variation can be influenced by multiple environmental factors making simplistic interpretations problematic. Recently, the dual isotope approach, where the variation in one stable isotope ratio (e.g. oxygen) is used to constrain the interpretation of variation in another (e.g. carbon), has been shown to have the potential to de-convolute isotopic analysis. However, this approach requires further testing to determine its applicability for paleo-reconstructions using tree-ring time series. We present a study where the information needed to parameterize mechanistic models for both carbon and oxygen stable isotope ratios were collected in controlled environment chambers for two species (Pinus radiata and Eucalyptus globulus). The seedlings were exposed to treatments designed to modify leaf temperature, transpiration rates, stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity. Both species were grown for over 100 days under two humidity regimes that differed by 20%. Stomatal conductance was significantly different between species and for seedlings under drought conditions but not between other treatments or humidity regimes. The treatments produced large differences in transpiration rate and photosynthesis. Treatments that effected photosynthetic rates but not stomatal conductance influenced carbon isotope discrimination more than those that influenced primarily conductance. The various treatments produced a range in oxygen isotope ratios of 7 ‰. Process models predicted greater oxygen isotope enrichment in tree ring cellulose than observed. The oxygen isotope ratios of bulk leaf water were reasonably well predicted by current steady-state models. However, the fractional difference between models that predict bulk leaf water versus the site of evaporation did not increase with transpiration rates. In conclusion, although the dual isotope approach may better constrain interpretation of isotopic variation, more work is required before its predictive power can be applied to tree-ring archives.

  3. Fractionation between inorganic and organic carbon during the Lomagundi (2.22 2.1 Ga) carbon isotope excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekker, A.; Holmden, C.; Beukes, N. J.; Kenig, F.; Eglinton, B.; Patterson, W. P.

    2008-07-01

    The Lomagundi (2.22-2.1 Ga) positive carbon isotope excursion in shallow-marine sedimentary carbonates has been associated with the rise in atmospheric oxygen, but subsequent studies have demonstrated that the carbon isotope excursion was preceded by the rise in atmospheric oxygen. The amount of oxygen released to the exosphere during the Lomagundi excursion is constrained by the average global fractionation between inorganic and organic carbon, which is poorly characterized. Because dissolved inorganic and organic carbon reservoirs were arguably larger in the Paleoproterozoic ocean, at a time of lower solar luminosity and lower ocean redox state, decoupling between these two variables might be expected. We determined carbon isotope values of carbonate and organic matter in carbonates and shales of the Silverton Formation, South Africa and in the correlative Sengoma Argillite Formation, near the border in Botswana. These units were deposited between 2.22 and 2.06 Ga along the margin of the Kaapvaal Craton in an open-marine deltaic setting and experienced lower greenschist facies metamorphism. The prodelta to offshore marine shales are overlain by a subtidal carbonate sequence. Carbonates exhibit elevated 13C values ranging from 8.3 to 11.2‰ vs. VPDB consistent with deposition during the Lomagundi positive excursion. The total organic carbon (TOC) contents range from 0.01 to 0.6% and ?13C values range from - 24.8 to - 13.9‰. Thus, the isotopic fractionation between organic and carbonate carbon was on average 30.3 ± 2.8‰ ( n = 32) in the shallow-marine environment. The underlying Sengoma shales have highly variable TOC contents (0.14 to 21.94%) and ?13C values (- 33.7 to - 20.8‰) with an average of - 27.0 ± 3.0‰ ( n = 50). Considering that the shales were also deposited during the Lomagundi excursion, and taking ?13C values of the overlying carbonates as representative of the ?13C value of dissolved inorganic carbon during shale deposition, a carbon isotope fractionation as large as ~ 37‰ appears to characterize the production of bulk organic matter in the deeper part of the Pretoria Basin at that time. This enhanced fractionation relative to that observed in shallow-water environments likely reflects heterotrophic (secondary) and chemotrophic productivity at and below a pronounced redoxcline, consistent with the euxinic conditions inferred from independent evidence for the deeper part of the Pretoria Basin. Greater variability in organic carbon vs. carbonate carbon isotopic values on the shallow-marine carbonate platform suggests that the carbon cycling was dominated by a large dissolved inorganic carbon reservoir during the Lomagundi excursion. Our study suggests that in contrast to the Late Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic, when carbon isotope fractionation between carbonate and organic carbon in the open ocean was mostly controlled by primary producers, in the Paleoproterozoic redox-stratified ocean heterotrophic and chemotrophic productivity overprinted a signal of primary productivity below the redoxcline. This strong imprint of heterotrophic and chemotrophic productivity on organic carbon isotope records complicates the reconstruction of spatial patterns and secular trends in the ?13C values of dissolved inorganic carbon in the Paleoproterozoic seawater.

  4. [Stable carbon isotope of black carbon from typical emission sources in China].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Jun; Cai, Wei-Wei; Huang, Guo-Pei; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2012-03-01

    Smoke particles from the three typical BC emission sources (biomass burning, household coal combustion, and vehicular exhaust) were collected and analyzed for stable carbon isotopes (delta13C) of black carbon (BC), total carbon (TC), as well as the original fuels. The results show that corn stalk (a typical C4 plant, -13.62 per thousand) has the highest delta13C(BC) value, and the average values for C3 plants, bituminous coals, and vehicle exhaust are -26.49 per thousand +/- 1.17 per thousand, -23.46 per thousand +/- 0.37 per thousand, and -25.17 per thousand +/- 0.40 per thousand, respectively. delta13C(BC) values from the three sources are similar to the corresponding fuels, and the ranges of these values are different from each other. Carbon fractionation occurs during the process of BC formation. delta13C(BC) for C4 plant (corn stalk) is lower than that of the fuel by 1.62 per thousand, while the values for C3 plants and coals are higher than that of the fuels by 0.63 per thousand and 0.52 per thousand, respectively. CTO-375 method, which is used to extract BC from TC, affects the stable carbon isotope of smokes from biomass burning to some extent (the difference between delta13C(BC) and delta13C(TC) is nearly 0.50 per thousand), but has little effect on fossil fuel smokes. This delta13C database for typical emission sources provides scientific information on BC source apportionment. PMID:22624354

  5. Dissolution of barite for the analysis of strontium isotopes and other chemical and isotopic variations using aqueous sodium carbonate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breit, G.N.; Simmons, E.C.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    A simple procedure for preparing barite samples for chemical and isotopic analysis is described. Sulfate ion, in barite, in the presence of high concentrations of aqueous sodium carbonate, is replaced by carbonate. This replacement forms insoluble carbonates with the cations commonly in barite: Ba, Sr, Ca and Pb. Sulfate is released into the solution by the carbonate replacement and is separated by filtration. The aqueous sulfate can then be reprecipitated for analysis of the sulfur and oxygen isotopes. The cations in the carbonate phase can be dissolved by acidifying the solid residue. Sr can be separated from the solution for Sr isotope analysis by ion-exchange chromatography. The sodium carbonate used contains amounts of Sr which will affect almost all barite 87Sr 86Sr ratios by less than 0.00001 at 1.95?? of the mean. The procedure is preferred over other techniques used for preparing barite samples for the determination of 87Sr 86Sr ratios because it is simple, rapid and enables simultaneous determination of many compositional parameters on the same material. ?? 1985.

  6. Carbon and Sulfur Stable Isotope Records of the Early Paleogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickens, G.; Backman, J.

    2012-12-01

    Secular records of stable carbon isotopes and stable sulfur isotopes from marine sediment provide primary tools for understanding past changes in global biogeochemical cycling. Over the Cenozoic, the most pronounced changes in ?13C and ?34S records happened during the late Paleocene and Early Eocene. The cause of these variations remains the source of debate, in part because the ?13C and ?34S records are not linked very well in the time domain. The early Cenozoic ?34S record principally comes from analyses of barite extracted from DSDP Sites 366 and 577 (Paytan et al., Science, 1996). However, Site 366 has no ?13C record and poorly preserved microfossil assemblages, and Site 577 has a problematic stratigraphy because of misplaced datums, and unrecognized core gaps and core overlaps. Here we generate a ?13C record at Site 366, realign the stratigraphy at Site 577, and place both records on a current time scale for the early Paleogene (Option 1; Westerhold et al., P3, 2008). There is now very little play in the relative and absolute timing of ?13C and ?34S changes across the early Paleogene. Between about 62 and 58 Ma, the ?13C of carbonate increased while the ? 34S of barite decreased. A marked change occurred at about 58 Ma: form this time to about 52 Ma, the ?13C of carbonate decreased but the ? 34S of barite continued to decrease. At about 52 Ma and a few million years after, both ?13C and ? 34S increased. Thus, the records are coupled but in a complex manner, and the series of hyperthermals happened when both ?13C and ? 34S decreased together. No model to date explains these basic observations satisfactorily. For example, volcanism as a cause for the ?34C drop does not explain the initial 4 Myr rise in ?13C and apparent coeval removal of carbon from the ocean and atmosphere; storage and release of terrestrial organic carbon as a cause for the rise and fall in ?13C does not explain the drop or subsequent rise in ?34S. Clearly, however, the idea that methane build-up in marine sediment during the late Paleocene and its subsequent discharge over the early Eocene is wrong, at least as presented (Dickens, Clim. Past, 2011). This is because such storage and release must drive significant anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and the formation of Fe sulfides, which if depleted in 34S relative to seawater, would cause a positive ?34S excursion. Indeed, seafloor methane cannot be a significant player in global biogeochemical cycling during the early Paleogene, unless one invokes an unconventional notion: AOM leads to burial of 34S-enriched Fe sulfides.

  7. Effects of Water Vapor on the Data Quality of the Stable Oxygen Isotopic Ratio of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. U. Evans; J. W. White; B. Vaughn; P. P. Tans; L. Pardo

    2007-01-01

    The stable oxygen isotopic ratio of carbon dioxide can potentially track fundamental indicators of environmental change such as the balance between photosynthesis and respiration on regional to global scales. The Stable Isotope Laboratory (SIL) at the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR), University of Colorado at Boulder, has measured the stable isotopes of atmospheric carbon dioxide from more than

  8. Carbon, nitrogen, sulfur and silicon isotopic ratios in the envelope of IRC + 10216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahane, C.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J.; Cernicharo, J.; Guelin, M.

    1988-01-01

    Using high sensitivity observations of optically thin lines, made at 2 mm and 3 mm with the IRAM 30 m telescope, a redetermination has been made of the carbon, sulfur, and silicon elemental isotopic ratios in the envelope of the carbon star IRC + 10216. Except for (N-14)/(N-15), which was estimated only from H(C-13)N and HC(N-15) observations, each ratio was derived from two or three different molecules; in all cases, the molecular isotopic ratios were found to be consistent. The silicon and sulfur isotopic ratios are found to be very close to their solar system values. The carbon (C-12)/(C-13) ratio is smaller than the terrestrial elemental ratio by almost exactly a factor of 2. (N-15) is underabundant relative to (N-14) by at least a factor of 15. These carbon and nitrogen ratios reflect the isotopic enrichments expected for a late-type star.

  9. An experimental study of carbon-isotope fractionation between diet, hair, and feces of

    E-print Network

    Ehleringer, Jim

    ) feces reflected the new diet within 60 h, but alpaca (Lama pacos) feces did not equilibrate with the new-fermenting horses than foregut-fermenting alpacas. 876 Résumé : La composition en isotopes de carbone du poil et des

  10. Depth dependency of the Paleocene-Eocene carbon isotope excursion: Paired benthic and terrestrial biomarker records

    E-print Network

    Zachos, James

    biomarker records (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 208, Walvis Ridge) H. McCarren Earth and Planetary Sciences of the Paleocene-Eocene carbon isotope excursion: Paired benthic and terrestrial biomarker records (Ocean Drilling

  11. SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF STABLE HYDROGEN AND CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS OF METHANE IN SUBTROPICAL FRESHWATER SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable hydrogen (D) and carbon (13C) isotope ratios of sedimentary methane from five subtropical Florida freshwater sites exhibited smaller, less distinct seasonal variations than previously observed in temperate sediments, apparently due to the smaller range of temperatures forc...

  12. Analysis of the ecology of Anchialine Caves using carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes 

    E-print Network

    Pohlman, John William

    1995-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes were used to investigate the biogeochemical and ecological processes that govern anchialine cave ecosystems in the Yucatan Peninsula, Quintana Roo, Mexico. Anchialine caves are subterranean passages...

  13. Clumped Isotope Thermometry in Deeply Buried Sedimentary Carbonates: The Effects of Bond Reordering Kinetics and Recrystallization 

    E-print Network

    Shenton, Brock Jay

    2014-08-06

    I utilize clumped isotope thermometry to explore the diagenetic and thermal histories of exhumed brachiopods, crinoids, cements, and host rock in the Palmarito Formation, Venezuela and the Bird Spring Formation, Nevada, USA. Carbonate components...

  14. Soil Drying Effects on the Carbon Isotope Composition of Soil Respiration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. L. Phillips; N. Nickerson; D. Risk; Z. E. Kayler; W. Rugh; A. C. Mix; B. J. Bond

    2008-01-01

    Stable isotopes are used widely as a tool for determining sources of carbon (C) fluxes in ecosystem C studies. Environmental factors that change over time, such as moisture, can create dynamic changes in the isotopic composition of C assimilated by plants, and offers a unique opportunity to distinguish fast- responding plant C from slower-responding soil C pools, which under steady-state

  15. Stable carbon and oxygen isotopes in sub-fossil Sphagnum: Assessment of their applicability for palaeoclimatology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Moschen; Norbert Kühl; Ingo Rehberger; Andreas Lücke

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the potential of stable isotopes of Sphagnum peat deposits for palaeoclimate research and to inform sampling strategies, we present results from a study of selected Sphagnum plant constituents. We report a combined stable carbon and oxygen isotope record of cellulose separately extracted from Sphagnum branches and stem sections manually sampled from a ?4000 year old peat, deposited in a

  16. Measurement of lithium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS: application to seawater and natural carbonates

    E-print Network

    Weston, Ken

    Measurement of lithium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS: application to seawater and natural method for lithium isotope ratio (7 Li/6 Li) determinations with low total lithium consumption ( of natural carbonates (foraminifera) containing 1 to 2 ppm lithium. This lithium separation method

  17. PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation under continuous

    E-print Network

    for plants under continuous light conditions during a 24-h transpiration cycle. Apparent hydrogen isotope light: implications for paleoenvironmental interpretations of the High Arctic during Paleogene warming intensity continuous light, e.g., in the High Arctic summer, on plant carbon and hydrogen isotope

  18. Lipid Correction for Carbon Stable Isotope Analysis of Deep-sea Fishes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lipid extraction is used prior to stable isotope analysis of fish tissues to remove variability in the carbon stable isotope ratio (d13C) caused by varying lipid content among samples. Our objective was to evaluate an application of a mass balance correction for the effect of lip...

  19. Lipid correction for carbon stable isotope analysis of deep-sea fishes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joel C. Hoffman; Tracey T. Sutton

    2010-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis of fish tissue can aid studies of deep-sea food webs because sampling difficulties severely limit sample sizes of fish for traditional diet studies. The carbon stable isotope ratio (?13C) is widely used in food web studies, but it must be corrected to remove variability associated with varying lipid content in the tissue. A lipid correction has not

  20. Hydration in solution is critical for stable oxygen isotope fractionation between carbonate ion and water

    E-print Network

    Zeebe, Richard E.

    Hydration in solution is critical for stable oxygen isotope fractionation between carbonate ion fractionation factors (a's) between different chemical compounds in thermody- namic equilibrium. Although isotope fractionation between dissolved CO2À 3 and H2O (hereafter aðCO2À 3 ­H2OÞ). Simple force field

  1. Stable carbon isotope ratio variations in marine macrophytes along intertidal gradients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. W. Cooper; C. P. McRoy

    1988-01-01

    The hypothesis that relative water motion and boundary layer diffusion processes affect carbon isotope ratios of aquatic plants was tested in tidal pool and surge zone comparisons of the surfgrass Phyllospadix spp. No evidence was found that submerged plants growing in still upper tidal pools were isotopically different from those growing submerged in lower tidal surge zones. Significant decreases in

  2. Soil drying effects on the carbon isotope composition of soil respiration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotopes are used widely as a tool for determining sources of carbon (C) fluxes in ecosystem C studies. Environmental factors that change over time, such as moisture, can create dynamic changes in the isotopic composition of C assimilated by plants, and offers a unique opp...

  3. Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopic Signatures and Nitrogen Profile To Identify Adulteration in Organic Fertilizers

    E-print Network

    Mazumder, Asit

    Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopic Signatures and Nitrogen Profile To Identify Adulteration in Organic shown that stable isotopes of nitrogen can be used to discriminate between organic and synthetic that is far more robust in identifying an adulteration of organic nitrogen fertilizers. Organic fertilizers

  4. Using Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopes in Lake Sediments to Detect Land Use Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, C. M.; Dettman, D. L.; Cohen, A. S.

    2001-05-01

    Stable isotopes in lakes sediments are often used to reconstruct past environmental conditions. Carbon and nitrogen isotopes can provide information about both internal processes and terrestrial inputs to a lake. As such, they offer a powerful approach to detecting human impacts on aquatic systems. We investigated the potential of stable isotopes to trace anthropogenic land use changes by comparing stable isotopic composition of sedimentary organic matter at several river deltas in Lake Tanganyika, East Africa. Lake Tanganyika is a large rift valley lake draining watersheds that differ greatly in size, with land use patterns that vary from low-impact, protected areas (such as Gombe Steam National Park) to deforested and intensely cultivated regions. We found that carbon isotopes were related to both watershed disturbance and size, while nitrogen isotopes were related only to watershed disturbance. The direct relationship between 13C and C:N ratios across all watersheds suggests that differences in ? 13C may be attributed to terrestrial inputs rather than internal changes in the lake, such as increased productivity. Stable isotope analyses of cores taken at two sites were consistent with patterns seen in surface sediments. Our results suggest that nitrogen isotopes may be a better indicator of land use than carbon isotopes and that watershed size can be a confounding factor in the interpretation of geochemical signals in lake sediments.

  5. PRODUCTION AND TRANSPORT OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN A CONTAMINATED VADOSE ZONE: A STABLE AND RADIOACTIVE CARBON ISOTOPE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses of soil gas compositions and stable and radioactive carbon isotopes in the vadose zone above an alluvial aquifer were conducted at an organic solvent disposal site in southeast Phoenix, AZ. he study investigated the source and movement of carbon dioxide above a plume of ...

  6. PRODUCTION AND TRANSPORT OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN A CONTAMINATED VADOSE ZONE: A STABLE AND RADIOACTIVE CARBON ISOTOPE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses of soil gas compositions and stable and radioactive carbon isotopes in the vadose zone above an alluvial aquifer were conducted at an organic solvent disposal site in southeast Phoenix, AZ. The study investigated the source and movement of carbon dioxide above a plume of...

  7. The reduction and oxidation of ceria: A natural abundance triple oxygen isotope perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayles, Justin; Bao, Huiming

    2015-06-01

    Ceria (CeO2) is a heavily studied material in catalytic chemistry for use as an oxygen storage medium, oxygen partial pressure regulator, fuel additive, and for the production of syngas, among other applications. Ceria powders are readily reduced and lose structural oxygen when subjected to low pO2 and/or high temperature conditions. Such dis-stoichiometric ceria can then re-oxidize under higher pO2 and/or lower temperature by incorporating new oxygen into the previously formed oxygen site vacancies. Despite extensive studies on ceria, the mechanisms for oxygen adsorption-desorption, dissociation-association, and diffusion of oxygen species on ceria surface and within the crystal structure are not well known. We predict that a large kinetic oxygen isotope effect should accompany the release and incorporation of ceria oxygen. As the first attempt to determine the existence and the degree of the isotope effect, this study focuses on a set of simple room-temperature re-oxidation experiments that are also relevant to a laboratory procedure using ceria to measure the triple oxygen isotope composition of CO2. Triple-oxygen-isotope labeled ceria powders are heated at 700 °C and cooled under vacuum prior to exposure to air. By combining results from independent experimental sets with different initial oxygen isotope labels and using a combined mass-balance and triangulation approach, we have determined the isotope fractionation factors for both high temperature reduction in vacuum (?10-4 mbar) and room temperature re-oxidation in air. Results indicate that there is a 1.5‰ ± 0.8‰ increase in the ?18O value of ceria after being heated in vacuum at 700 °C for 1 h. When the vacuum is broken at room temperature, the previously heated ceria incorporates 3-19% of its final structural oxygen from air, with a ?18O value of 2.1-4.1+7.7 ‰ for the incorporated oxygen. The substantial incorporation of oxygen from air supports that oxygen mobility is high in vacancy-rich ceria during re-oxidation at room temperature. The quantified oxygen isotope fractionation factors are consistent with the direct involvement of O2 in the rate limiting step for ceria reoxidation in air at room temperature. While additional parameters may reduce some of the uncertainties in our approach, this study demonstrates that isotope effects can be an encouraging tool for studying oxygen transport kinetics in ceria and other oxides. In addition, our finding warns of the special cares and limits in using ceria as an exchange medium for laboratory triple oxygen isotope analysis of CO2 or other oxygen-bearing gases.

  8. Carbon isotopic ratio of dissolved inorganic carbon in the spring water around Asama volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tase, Norio

    In order to determine the source and formation process of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in spring water and to evaluate quantitatively the contribution of volcanic gas to water chemistry of springs distributed on and around Asama volcano, the carbon isotopic ratio of DIC (?13CDIC) with major dissolved solids has been measured. The measurements of carbon isotopic ratios of volcanic and soil CO2, which are the source materials of DIC, were also carried out in Jigokudani fumarole and in the forest soil of several points of volcano flank, respectively. The spring waters in Asama volcano have been classified into nine groups (A?I) based on the physicochemical characteristics, such as water temperature, electrical conductivity and chemical compositions. As ?13CDIC increase with increasing DIC content, the origin of DIC in spring water from Asama volcano was can be assessed by mixing process between isotopically light soil CO2 (organic origin) and 13C-enriched volcanic CO2 (deep origin with mantle component), except for the springs of group B. On the basis of two components mixing, the contribution rate of volcanic CO2 to DIC in spring water was computed by using the carbon isotopic ratio of CO2 equilibrated with DIC (?13CCO2) as an indicator. Consequently, the contribution rates of volcanic CO2 were ranged from 40 to 60% in the groups C, F and H located on the flank of the mountain. In particular, the strong contribution of more than 90% was confirmed in the group I located on the higher part of the mountain, that is near the crater. These groups were correspondent with those in which influence of volcanic gases was assumed from the geochemical characteristics of spring water. By contrast, influence of volcanic CO2 was almost not found in other groups A, D, E and G. The spring waters of group B which are not plotted on the two components mixing line and located at the terminal of Onioshidashi lava flow have highest ?13CDIC in spite of low DIC content. These 13C-enriched spring waters are probably derived from dissolved CO2 degassing of thegroundwater affected by volcanic CO2 during the discharge process. Since the groundwater moves in the clinker, which is fractured zone developed in lower and upper part of the lava flow and is extremely porous, as not laminar flow but turbulent flow, the CO2 degassing would be effectively caused.

  9. Carbon concentrations and isotopic ratios of eclogites from the Dabie and Sulu terranes in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yong-Fei Zheng; Bing Gong; Yiliang Li; Zhengrong Wang; Bin Fu

    2000-01-01

    Both concentration and isotope composition of bulk carbon in apatite and host eclogites from the Dabie–Sulu ultrahigh pressure (UHP) terranes in China have been determined along with their oxygen isotope composition. The results show significant 13C-depletion in the apatite (?13C=?27.7‰ to ?20.8‰) with the carbon concentrations of 0.59 to 1.65 wt.% CO2 despite a large variation in ?18O (?6.5‰ to

  10. Can algal photosynthetic inorganic carbon isotope fractionation be predicted in lakes using existing models?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darren L. Bade; Michael L. Pace; Jonathan J. Cole; Stephen R. Carpenter

    2006-01-01

    .  Differential fractionation of inorganic carbon stable isotopes during photosynthesis is an important cause of variability\\u000a in algal carbon isotope signatures. Several physiological models have been proposed to explain algal photosynthetic fractionation\\u000a factors (?p). These models generally consider CO2 concentration, growth rate, or cell morphometry and have been supported by empirical evidence from laboratory cultures. Here,\\u000a we explore the applicability of

  11. Forest savanna ecotone dynamics in India as revealed by carbon isotope ratios of soil organic matter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Mariotti; E. Peterschmitt

    1994-01-01

    In India, the stability of the forest savanna boundary (ecotone) has been questioned. To investigate the possibility of vegetation change at this boundary, we used the natural difference in the stable carbon isotope ratio (13C\\/12C, expressed as d13C) of C3 (forest) and C4 (savanna) plants, which is preserved in the isotopic composition of soil organic carbon. Past changes in the

  12. A new automated setup for stable isotope analysis of dissolved organic carbon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Bouillon; Michael Korntheuer; Willy Baeyens; Frank Dehairs

    The measurement of stable isotope ratios on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) has long posed analytical prob- lems and limited the use of this powerful tracer in biogeochemical studies in aquatic systems. Here, we provide a detailed description of a successful coupling of a custom-modified total organic carbon analyzer (Thermo HiPerTOC) to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The method is based

  13. Carbon allocation belowground in Pinus pinaster using stable carbon isotope pulse labeling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannoura, M.; Bosc, A.; Chipeaux, C.; Sartore, M.; Lambrot, C.; Trichet, P.; Bakker, M.; Loustau, D.; Epron, D.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon allocation belowground competes with aboveground growth and biomass production. In the other hand, it contributes to resource acquisition such as nutrient, water and carbon sequestration in soil. Thus, a better characterization of carbon flow from plant to soil and its residence time within each compartment is an important issue for understanding and modeling forest ecosystem carbon budget. 13C pulse labeling of whole crown was conducted at 4 seasons to study the fate of assimilated carbon by photosynthesis into the root on 12 year old Pinus pinaster planted in the INRA domain of Pierroton. Maritime pine is the most widely planted species in South-West Europe. Stem, root and soil CO2 effluxes and their isotope composition were measured continuously by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy with a trace gas analyzer (TGA 100A; Campbell Scientific) coupled to flow-through chambers. 13CO2 recovery and peak were observed in respiration of each compartment after labeling. It appeared sequentially from top of stem to bottom, and to coarse root. The maximum velocity of carbon transfer was calculated as the difference in time lag of recovery between two positions on the trunk or on the root. It ranged between 0.08-0.2 m h-1 in stem and between 0.04-0.12 m h-1 in coarse root. This velocity was higher in warmer season, and the difference between time lag of recovery and peak increased after first frost. Photosynthates arrived underground 1.5 to 5 days after labeling, at similar time in soil CO2 effluxes and coarse root respiration. 0.08-1.4 g of carbon was respired per tree during first 20 days following labeling. It presented 0.6 -10% of 13C used for labeling and it is strongly related to seasons. The isotope signal was detected in fine root organs and microbial biomass by periodical core sampling. The peak was observed 6 days after labeling in early summer while it was delayed more than 10 days in autumn and winter with less amount of carbon allocated belowground.

  14. Organic carbon isotope constraints on the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reservoir at the Cryogenian-Ediacaran transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ganqing; Wang, Xinqiang; Shi, Xiaoying; Zhang, Shihong; Xiao, Shuhai; Dong, Jin

    2010-10-01

    Prominent negative carbonate carbon isotope (? 13C carb) anomalies from some Ediacaran successions are accompanied by invariant or decoupled organic carbon isotope (? 13C org) values and have been interpreted as resulting from the remineralization of a large dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reservoir capable of buffering carbon isotopes of organic matter. This inferred oceanic DOC reservoir was thought to have initiated with the onset of Cryogenian glaciations (ca. 720 Ma) and lasted for millions of years until the late Ediacaran Period (< 560 Ma). Carbon isotope analyses of the basal Doushantuo Formation (ca. 635 Ma) in south China reveal that (1) the cap carbonate has ? 13C org around -26‰ (VPDB) and relatively low ?? 13C (22 ± 2‰) and (2) the overlying organic-rich black shale and shaly dolostone have more negative ? 13C org (-28‰ to -35‰) and higher ?? 13C (28‰-30‰). Both ? 13C carb and ? 13C org show a + 6‰ shift within a 4-m-thick interval overlying the Doushantuo cap carbonate. The ? 13C org values of the cap carbonate are associated with low TOC (mostly < 0.1%); their paleoceanographic significance requires further tests in other Ediacaran basins. The co-varying positive shift in ? 13C carb and ? 13C org following cap carbonate deposition is best interpreted as resulting from a rapid increase in organic carbon burial, which may have resulted in the rise of oxygen and heralded the first appearance of animals a few meters above the Doushantuo cap carbonate. The data suggest that a large oceanic DOC reservoir did not exist in the early Ediacaran ocean. Excess oceanic DOC required to explain the Ediacaran Shuram and upper Doushantuo ? 13C excursions, if it existed, had to be developed during the Ediacaran Period after cap carbonate deposition.

  15. Space telescope Imaging Spectrograph ultraviolet spectra of LMC planetary nebulae. A study of carbon abundances and stellar evolution

    E-print Network

    L. Stanghellini; R. A. Shaw; D. Gilmore

    2004-11-23

    We acquired spectra of 24 LMC PNe in the 1150--3000 \\AA range in order to determine carbon and other ionic abundances. The sample more than doubles the number of LMC PNe with good quality UV spectra in this wavelength range, and whose optical images are available in the {\\it HST} archive. The {\\it Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph} was used with a very large aperture to obtain virtually slit-less spectra, thus the monochromatic images in the major nebulae emission lines are also available. The analysis of the data shows extremely good quality spectra. This paper presents the emission lines identified and measured, and the calculation of the ionic abundances of the emitting carbon and other ions, and total carbon abundance. P-Cygni profiles have been found in a fraction of the nebulae, and the limiting velocities of the stellar winds estimated. The total carbon abundance can be inferred reliably in most nebulae. We found that the average carbon abundance in round and elliptical PNe is one order of magnitude larger than that of the bipolar PNe, while elliptical and round PNe with a bipolar core have a bimodal behavior. This results confirm that bipolarity in LMC PNe is tightly correlated with high mass progenitors. When compared to predicted yields, we found that the observed abundance ratio show a shift toward higher carbon abundances, that may be due to initial conditions assumed in the models not appropriate for LMC PNe.

  16. Determining the Local Abundance of Martian Methane and its 13-C/l2-C and D/H Isotopic Ratios for Comparison with Related Gas and Soil Analysis on the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Christopher R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the origin of Martian methane will require numerous complementary measurements from both in situ and remote sensing investigations and laboratory work to correlate planetary surface geophysics with atmospheric dynamics and chemistry. Three instruments (Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), Gas Chromatograph (GC) and Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS)) with sophisticated sample handling and processing capability make up the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) analytical chemistry suite on NASA s 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission. Leveraging off the SAM sample and gas processing capability that includes methane enrichment, TLS has unprecedented sensitivity for measuring absolute methane (parts-per-trillion), water, and carbon dioxide abundances in both the Martian atmosphere and evolved from heated soil samples. In concert with a wide variety of associated trace gases (e.g. SO2, H2S, NH3, higher hydrocarbons, organics, etc.) and other isotope ratios measured by SAM, TLS will focus on determining the absolute abundances of methane, water and carbon dioxide, and their isotope ratios: 13C/12C and D/H in methane; 13C/12C and 18O/17O/16O in carbon dioxide; and 18O/17O/16O and D/H in water. Measurements near the MSL landing site will be correlated with satellite (Mars Express, Mars 2016) and ground-based observations.

  17. Carbonate petrography, kerogen distribution, and carbon and oxygen isotope variations in an early Proterozoic transition from limestone to iron-formation deposition, Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Beukes, N J; Klein, C; Kaufman, A J; Hayes, J M

    1990-01-01

    The transition zone comprises Campbellrand microbialaminated (replacing "cryptalgalaminate") limestone and shale, with minor dolomite, conformably overlain by the Kuruman Iron Formation of which the basal part is characterized by siderite-rich microbanded iron-formation with minor magnetite and some hematite-containing units. The iron-formation contains subordinate intraclastic and microbialaminated siderite mesobands and was deposited in deeper water than the limestones. The sequence is virtually unaltered with diagenetic mineral assemblages reflecting a temperature interval of about 110 degrees to 170 degrees C and pressures of 2 kbars. Carbonate minerals in the different rock types are represented by primary micritic precipitates (now recrystallized to microsparite), early precompactional sparry cements and concretions, deep burial limpid euhedral sparites, and spar cements precipitated from metamorphic fluids in close contact with diabase sills. Paragenetic pathways of the carbonate minerals are broadly similar in all lithofacies with kerogen intimately associated with them. Kerogen occurs as pigmentation in carbonate crystals, as reworked organic detritus in clastic-textured carbonate units, and as segregations of kerogen pigment around late diagenetic carbonate crystals. Locally kerogen may also be replaced by carbonate spar. Carbon isotope compositions of the carbonate minerals and kerogen are dependent on their mode of occurrence and on the composition of the dominant carbonate species in a specific lithofacies. Integration of sedimentary, petrographic, geochemical, and isotopic results makes it possible to distinguish between depositional, early diagenetic, deep burial, and metamorphic effects on the isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals and the kerogen in the sequence. Major conclusions are that deep burial thermal decarboxylation led to 13C depletion in euhedral ferroan sparites and 13C enrichment in kerogen (organic carbon). Metamorphic sparites are most depleted in 13C. Carbonates in oxide-rich iron-formations are more depleted in 13C than those in siderite-rich iron-formation whereas the kerogens in oxide banded iron-formations (BIF) are more enriched. This implies that the siderite-rich iron-formations were not derived from oxide-rich iron-formation through reduction of ferric iron by organic matter. Organic matter oxidation by ferric iron did, however, decrease the abundance of kerogen in oxide-rich iron-formation and led to the formation of isotopically very light sparry carbonates. Siderite and calcmicrosparite both represent recrystallized primary micritic precipitates but differ in their 13C composition, with the siderites depleted in 13C by 4.6 per mil on average relative to calcmicrosparite. This means that the siderites were precipitated from water with dissolved inorganic carbon depleted in 13C by about 9 per mil relative to that from which the limestones precipitated. This implies an ocean system stratified with regard to total carbonate, with the deeper water, from which siderite-rich iron-formation formed, depleted in 13C. Iron-formations were deposited in areas of very low organic matter supply. Depletion of 13C may, therefore, derive not from degradation of organic matter but from hydrothermal activity, a conclusion which is supported by 18O composition of the carbonate minerals and trace element and rare earth element (REE) compositions of the iron-formations. PMID:11538478

  18. Carbonate petrography, kerogen distribution, and carbon and oxygen isotope variations in an early Proterozoic transition from limestone to iron-formation deposition, Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beukes, N. J.; Klein, C.; Kaufman, A. J.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The transition zone comprises Campbellrand microbialaminated (replacing "cryptalgalaminate") limestone and shale, with minor dolomite, conformably overlain by the Kuruman Iron Formation of which the basal part is characterized by siderite-rich microbanded iron-formation with minor magnetite and some hematite-containing units. The iron-formation contains subordinate intraclastic and microbialaminated siderite mesobands and was deposited in deeper water than the limestones. The sequence is virtually unaltered with diagenetic mineral assemblages reflecting a temperature interval of about 110 degrees to 170 degrees C and pressures of 2 kbars. Carbonate minerals in the different rock types are represented by primary micritic precipitates (now recrystallized to microsparite), early precompactional sparry cements and concretions, deep burial limpid euhedral sparites, and spar cements precipitated from metamorphic fluids in close contact with diabase sills. Paragenetic pathways of the carbonate minerals are broadly similar in all lithofacies with kerogen intimately associated with them. Kerogen occurs as pigmentation in carbonate crystals, as reworked organic detritus in clastic-textured carbonate units, and as segregations of kerogen pigment around late diagenetic carbonate crystals. Locally kerogen may also be replaced by carbonate spar. Carbon isotope compositions of the carbonate minerals and kerogen are dependent on their mode of occurrence and on the composition of the dominant carbonate species in a specific lithofacies. Integration of sedimentary, petrographic, geochemical, and isotopic results makes it possible to distinguish between depositional, early diagenetic, deep burial, and metamorphic effects on the isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals and the kerogen in the sequence. Major conclusions are that deep burial thermal decarboxylation led to 13C depletion in euhedral ferroan sparites and 13C enrichment in kerogen (organic carbon). Metamorphic sparites are most depleted in 13C. Carbonates in oxide-rich iron-formations are more depleted in 13C than those in siderite-rich iron-formation whereas the kerogens in oxide banded iron-formations (BIF) are more enriched. This implies that the siderite-rich iron-formations were not derived from oxide-rich iron-formation through reduction of ferric iron by organic matter. Organic matter oxidation by ferric iron did, however, decrease the abundance of kerogen in oxide-rich iron-formation and led to the formation of isotopically very light sparry carbonates. Siderite and calcmicrosparite both represent recrystallized primary micritic precipitates but differ in their 13C composition, with the siderites depleted in 13C by 4.6 per mil on average relative to calcmicrosparite. This means that the siderites were precipitated from water with dissolved inorganic carbon depleted in 13C by about 9 per mil relative to that from which the limestones precipitated. This implies an ocean system stratified with regard to total carbonate, with the deeper water, from which siderite-rich iron-formation formed, depleted in 13C. Iron-formations were deposited in areas of very low organic matter supply. Depletion of 13C may, therefore, derive not from degradation of organic matter but from hydrothermal activity, a conclusion which is supported by 18O composition of the carbonate minerals and trace element and rare earth element (REE) compositions of the iron-formations.

  19. Plutonium isotopic abundance measurements on CBNM NRM 271 analyzed with the FRAM and MGA codes

    SciTech Connect

    Friar, R.J.; Sampson, T.E.

    1992-05-01

    We report results of gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements of the isotopic distributions of plutonium in the reference-material set CBNM NRM 271 as analyzed by the FRAM and MGA plutonium isotopic codes. We acquired high-quality spectral data under measurement conditions approximating field-use conditions recommended by the code developers. Bias and precision results from these measurements are presented for both codes. Both codes performed very well for these measurements. These standards have proven to be very useful for testing the Los Alamos FRAM code in the high-burnup region where well-characterized materials have been unavailable at Los Alamos.

  20. Phosphoprotein Isotope-coded Affinity Tags: Application to the Enrichment and Identification of Low-Abundance Phosphoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Goshe, Michael (Case Western reserve University) [Case Western reserve University; Veenstra, Timothy D.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)) [BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB); Panisko, Ellen A.(ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY) [ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY; Conrads, Thomas P.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)) [BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB); Angell, Nicolas H.(Imperial College of Science) [Imperial College of Science; Smith, Richard D.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)) [BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)

    2002-02-01

    A novel approach using different isotopic labeling and biotinylation has been developed for the enrichment and quantitation of phosphoseryl and phosphothreonyl-peptides. The phosphoprotein isotope-coded affinity tag (PhIAT) exploits the high affinity biotin-avidin interaction to isolate modified phosphopeptides from a complex mixture of peptides. The PhIAT strategy for quantifying and enriching mixtures for phosphopeptides was demonstrated using a commercially available sample of the phosphoprotein B-casein. A denatured solution of B-casein was labeled using the PhIAT method and after proteolytic digestion, the labeled peptides were isolated using immobilize avidin. The recovered peptides were separated by capillary reversed-phase liquid chromatography and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. PhIAT-labeled peptides corresponding to known O-phosphorylated peptides from B-casein were identified as were phosphorylated peptides from as1-casein and ase-casein, known low-level (< 5%) contaminants of commercially available B-casein. All of the identified phosphopeptides from these caseins have been previously documented to be phosphorylated at the sites elucidated by the PhIAT approach. The results illustrate the efficancy of the PhIAT-labeling strategy to enrich mixtures for phosphopeptides and permit the detection and identification of low abundance phosphopeptides. In addition, experiments using light and heavy isotopic version of the PhIAT reagents demonstrated that a 10% difference in phosphorylation state could be determined between phosphopeptides in comparative samples.

  1. Origin of volcanic-hydrothermal hydrocarbons from Nisyros as revealed by carbon isotope distribution patterns of n-alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiebig, J.; Tassi, F.; D'Alessandro, W.; Schoell, M.

    2013-12-01

    The origin of hydrocarbons discharging from subduction related volcanic-hydrothermal systems has remained unclear. Methane emitted from the volcanic-hydrothermal system of Nisyros, Greece, has C1/C2+ concentration ratios up to one to two orders of magnitude higher than those commonly observed in thermogenic gases. In addition, methane seems to be in chemical and isotopic equilibrium with co-discharged CO2. Based on these observations Nisyros methane has been inferred to be of an abiogenic origin (Fiebig et al., 2007; 2009). Ethane and propane concentrations, on the contrary, do not correspond to equilibrium concentrations and, therefore, supposedly derive from a distinct source (Fiebig et al., 2009). Carbon isotope distribution patterns between methane and the C2+ n-alkanes are often used as a diagnostic tool to distinguish between hydrocarbons of biogenic vs abiogenic origins (e.g., Sherwood Lollar et al., 2008). However, carbon isotope analysis of the C2+ n-alkanes contained in subduction-related volcanic-hydrothermal gases has been hampered by their relatively low abundance. We have set up an enrichment technique that allows to analyze the carbon isotopic composition of C2+ hydrocarbons at ppb concentrations. Nisyros gases display the following carbon isotope distribution pattern between methane, ethane and propane: Ethane always occurs enriched in 13C relative to methane by 2-5‰, whereas propane occurs both depleted and enriched in 13C with respect to ethane, pending on C1/C2+ concentration ratios. Interestingly, hydrothermal gases characterized by the lowest C1/C2+ concentration ratios display a trend of inceasing ?13C with increasing chain length, indicative of a thermogenic origin. In contrast, vent gases that exhibit the highest C1/C2+ ratio reveal an inversion between ethane and propane, whereas gases with intermediate C1/C2+ ratios show no fractionation between these two constituents. Though, in general, mixing of hydrocarbons from different thermogenic sources can generate isotopic reversals between ethane and propane, a pure thermogenic origin would be at odds with the proposed equilibrium between CO2 and CH4. Alternatively, mixing between different thermogenic and abiogenic endmembers might have occurred, as already proposed by Fiebig et al. (2009). We intend to present more data on other subduction-related volcanic-hydrothermal systems, too, to be able to better constrain the sources contributing to hydrocarbon production in these environments. References: Fiebig, J. et al (2007) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 71, 3028-3039 Fiebig, J. et al. (2009) Geology 37, 495-498 Sherwood Lollar, B. et al. (2008) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 72, 4778-4795

  2. Carbon cycling and carbon metabolism by soil fungi in a boreal forest: impacts of wildfire and permafrost on functional genes, isotope signatures, and ectomycorrhizae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrop, M. P.; Harden, J. W.

    2006-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that control the stabilization and destabilization of soil carbon within boreal forest ecosystems is of great importance to the global carbon budget. Much is currently known about boreal soil carbon dynamics in relation to biophysical and landscape variables such as temperature, moisture, wildfire intensity, and stand age. We have less information regarding the controls on decomposition at the molecular scale, where interactions between microbial communities, their genetic `potential' for decomposition, functional genes, enzyme synthesis, and organic matter transformations occur. We have entered an age in which these connections can be made at the molecular scale, but what form do they take, and can they scale up to affect carbon dynamics at the level of the ecosystem? We examined these molecular scale processes in mature boreal forest soils and soils that had been impacted by wildfire near Delta Junction, Alaska. We also examined the interactive effect of permafrost presence, which reduces soil drainage, with wildfire. We focused on three themes: linking microbial communities and laccase functional genes to soil laccase enzyme activity and lignin decomposition, assessing substrate availability using the natural abundance ?13C isotope ratios of microbial biomass, and the influence of ectomycorrhizal mats on decomposition. Wildfire reduced fungal biomass, laccase functional gene abundance, laccase activity, and ?13C-lignin decomposition. Relationships between gene abundance and microbial activity were significant and logarithmic in form. Soil drainage, which is mediated by the presence of permafrost, had little effect on the abundance of fungi, functional genes, or potential process rates. Microbial biomass ?13C was always enriched relative to soil organic matter, and this difference was greater in control soils compared to wildfire-affected soils, indicating that Ä??13C MB-SOIL may indicate the level of bioavailability of soil carbon for microbial metabolism. Ectomycorrhizal mats occurred only in control soils and increased fungal biomass, functional gene abundance, enzyme activities and process rates compared to non-mat soils. Taken together these results indicate that linkages can be made between the distribution of soil microbial communities, molecular scale information, and soil carbon dynamics.

  3. Elemental abundances of metal poor carbon rich lead star: CS29497-030

    E-print Network

    T. Sivarani; P. Bonifacio; P. Molaro; R. Cayrel; M. Spite; F. Spite; B. Plez; J. Andersen; B. Barbuy; T. C. Beers; E. Depagne; V. Hill; P. Francois; B. Nordstrom; F. Primas

    2002-12-18

    We present here the abundance analysis of a metal poor carbon rich lead star, CS29497-030. High resolution and high signal to noise spectra were obtained using the UVES spectrograph on the 8.2m VLT-Kueyen telescope. The observations were made as a part of the Large Programme 165.N-0276, P.I. R. Cayrel. Abundance analysis was done using the latest version of the MARCS model atmospheres (Plez et. al. 1992) and the turbospectrum spectrum synthesis code. We have derived Teff = 6650K from the FeI lines. Visible and infrared broad band colours using the Alonso et al. (1996) calibration, gives similar temperatures. A log g value of 3.5 was obtained from the ionisation equilibrium of FeI and FeII, we remark that this gravity also satisfies the MgI/MgII, TiI/TiII and MnI/MnII equilibria, within errors. The abundance analysis indicates a metallicity, [Fe/H] = --2.7. A large overabundance of carbon ([C/Fe]=2.7) was found. We have also found large enhancement in the s-process elements and in particular lead shows an extremely high abundance of [Pb/Fe]=3.5, which makes this the star with the highest Pb/Fe ratio, up to date. The Pb/Ba ratio is found to be high ([Pb/Ba]=1.2) and the same s true for other second-peak s-process elements(e.g La, Ce, Nd). The star is a known spectroscopic binary with a period of 346 days (Preston & Sneden 2000). The abundance pattern suggests that CS 29497-30 has accreted matter from its companion, when it was in the AGB phase.

  4. Carbon-bearing iron phases and the carbon isotope composition of the deep Earth

    PubMed Central

    Horita, Juske; Polyakov, Veniamin B.

    2015-01-01

    The carbon budget and dynamics of the Earth’s interior, including the core, are currently very poorly understood. Diamond-bearing, mantle-derived rocks show a very well defined peak at ?13C ? ?5 ± 3‰ with a very broad distribution to lower values (??40‰). The processes that have produced the wide ?13C distributions to the observed low ?13C values in the deep Earth have been extensively debated, but few viable models have been proposed. Here, we present a model for understanding carbon isotope distributions within the deep Earth, involving Fe?C phases (Fe carbides and C dissolved in Fe?Ni metal). Our theoretical calculations show that Fe and Si carbides can be significantly depleted in 13C relative to other C-bearing materials even at mantle temperatures. Thus, the redox freezing and melting cycles of lithosphere via subduction upwelling in the deep Earth that involve the Fe?C phases can readily produce diamond with the observed low ?13C values. The sharp contrast in the ?13C distributions of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds may reflect differences in their carbon cycles, controlled by the evolution of geodynamical processes around 2.5–3 Ga. Our model also predicts that the core contains C with low ?13C values and that an average ?13C value of the bulk Earth could be much lower than ??5‰, consistent with those of chondrites and other planetary body. The heterogeneous and depleted ?13C values of the deep Earth have implications, not only for its accretion?differentiation history but also for carbon isotope biosignatures for early life on the Earth. PMID:25512520

  5. Sulfur and carbon isotope biogeochemistry of a rewetted brackish fen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koebsch, Franziska; Gehre, Matthias; Winkel, Matthias; Koehler, Stefan; Koch, Marian; Jurasinski, Gerald; Spitzy, Alejandro; Liebner, Susanne; Sachs, Torsten; Schmiedinger, Iris; Kretzschmann, Lisett; Saborowski, Anke; Böttcher, Michael E.

    2015-04-01

    Coastal wetlands are at the interface between terrestrial freshwater and marine and exhibit very specific biogeochemical conditions. Intermittent sea water intrusion affects metabolic pathways, i. e. anaerobic carbon metabolism is progressively dominated by sulfate reduction with lower contribution of methanogenesis whilst methane production is increasingly shifted from acetoclastic to hydrogenotrophic. Due to expanding anthropogenic impact a large proportion of coastal ecosystems is degraded with severe implications for the biogeochemical processes. We use concentration patterns and stable isotope signatures of water, sulfate, dissolved carbonate, and methane (?2H, ?13C, ?18O, ?34S) to investigate the S and C metabolic cycle in a rewetted fen close to the southern Baltic Sea border. Such studies are crucial to better predict dynamic ecosystem feedback to global change like organic matter (OM) decomposition or greenhouse gas emissions. Yet, little is known about the metabolic pathways in such environments. The study site is part of the TERENO Observatory "Northeastern German Lowlands' and measurements of methane emissions have run since 2009. High methane fluxes up to 800 mg m-2 hr-1 indicate that methanogenesis is the dominant C metabolism pathway despite of high sulfate concentrations (up to 37 mM). The presented data are part of a comprehensive biogeochemical investigation that we conducted in autumn 2014 and that comprises 4 pore water profiles and sediment samples within a transect of 300-1500 m distance to the Baltic Sea. Depth of organic layers ranged from 25 to 140 cm with high OM contents (up to 90 dwt.%). Sulfate/chloride ratios in the pore waters were lower than in the Baltic Sea for most sites and sediment depths indicated a substantial net sulfate loss. Sulfide concentrations were negligible at the top and increased parallel to the sulfate concentrations with depth to values of up to 0.3 mM. One pore water profiles situated 1150 m from the Baltic Sea coast line exhibited a significant excess of sulfate. Preliminary sulfur isotope analysis of pore water sulfate from a location nearest to this profile revealed an enrichment in 34S (24.9 to 41.8o ) in comparison to Baltic Sea sulfate (21o ). This confirms high degrees of net sulfate reduction. Considering the yet high sulfate concentrations we hypothesize that local processes might supply additional sulfate and that the sulfide produced from sulfate reduction might either be lost by upwards diffusion towards the atmosphere or converted into other S compounds such as pyrite or organic compounds. The isotopic signatures of methane (?13C: -68 to -57o and ?2H: -133 to -157o respectively) indicated acetoclastic methanogenesis to be the most dominant methane production pathway. However, estimated fractionation factors are comparatively high (1.050-1.065). Enrichment of heavy 13C in methane at the top of the sediment was either caused by methane oxidation or variation in substrate availability (e. g. due to peat degradation). The interpretation of our data in the light of further results will provide deeper insights into metabolic pathways and possible interactions between both coupled element cycles for coastal ecosystems.

  6. Uptake of Dissolved Sulfide by Spartina alterniflora: Evidence from Natural Sulfur Isotope Abundance Ratios

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul R. Carlson; Joseph Forrest

    1982-01-01

    The difference in the stable sulfur isotope ratios of sulfate and sulfide in marsh pore water was used to verify the uptake of hydrogen sulfide by the salt marsh cordgrass Spartina alterniflora in a North Carolina salt marsh. Most of the plant sulfur derived from pore-water sulfide was recovered as sulfate, an indication that the sulfide had been oxidized within

  7. Biological control of calcium isotopic abundances in the global calcium cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph Skulan; Donald J. Depaolo; Thomas L. Owens

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of 44 Ca\\/ 40 Ca, expressed as 44 Ca, were made on igneous rocks and on shell and bone material from modern organisms to investigate the magnitude and origins of calcium isotopic fractionation in nature. The results document a span of 4 in 44 Ca, measured with the double spike technique to a precision of ±0.15 . Volcanic rocks,

  8. Stable-carbon isotope variability in tree foliage and wood. [Iunipeus; Pinus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, S.W.; Long, A.

    1986-08-01

    This study documents variation of stable-carbon isotope ratios (/sup 13/C//sup 12/C) in trees of genera Juniperus and Pinus under field conditions. Results are from cellulose analysis on leaves, twigs, and wood from a number of localities in the southwestern US. Substantial variability, typically 1-3%, exists among leaves, within wood (radially, vertically, circumferentially), and between individuals at a site. These results may help guide sampling in tracer-type studies with stable-carbon isotope ratios and aid in the interpretation of isotopic results from such studies.

  9. Oxygen and Carbon Isotope Variations in a Modern Rodent Community – Implications for Palaeoenvironmental Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Gehler, Alexander; Tütken, Thomas; Pack, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background The oxygen (?18O) and carbon (?13C) isotope compositions of bioapatite from skeletal remains of fossil mammals are well-established proxies for the reconstruction of palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatic conditions. Stable isotope studies of modern analogues are an important prerequisite for such reconstructions from fossil mammal remains. While numerous studies have investigated modern large- and medium-sized mammals, comparable studies are rare for small mammals. Due to their high abundance in terrestrial ecosystems, short life spans and small habitat size, small mammals are good recorders of local environments. Methodology/Findings The ?18O and ?13C values of teeth and bones of seven sympatric modern rodent species collected from owl pellets at a single locality were measured, and the inter-specific, intra-specific and intra-individual variations were evaluated. Minimum sample sizes to obtain reproducible population ?18O means within one standard deviation were determined. These parameters are comparable to existing data from large mammals. Additionally, the fractionation between coexisting carbonate (?18OCO3) and phosphate (?18OPO4) in rodent bioapatite was determined, and ?18O values were compared to existing calibration equations between the ?18O of rodent bioapatite and local surface water (?18OLW). Specific calibration equations between ?18OPO4 and ?18OLW may be applicable on a taxonomic level higher than the species. However, a significant bias can occur when bone-based equations are applied to tooth-data and vice versa, which is due to differences in skeletal tissue formation times. ?13C values reflect the rodents’ diet and agree well with field observations of their nutritional behaviour. Conclusions/Significance Rodents have a high potential for the reconstruction of palaeoenvironmental conditions by means of bioapatite ?18O and ?13C analysis. No significant disadvantages compared to larger mammals were observed. However, for refined palaeoenvironmental reconstructions a better understanding of stable isotope signatures in modern analogous communities and potential biases due to seasonality effects, population dynamics and tissue formation rates is necessary. PMID:23226212

  10. Neutron rich Carbon and Oxygen isotopes with an odd number of neutrons

    E-print Network

    Benoit Laurent; Nicole Vinh Mau

    2013-04-02

    We describe odd isotopes as formed of a core plus one neutron. We have calculated the modification of single neutron energies brought by couplings of the neutron with collective $2^+$ phonons in the cores. The results reproduce very well the inversion of $2s$ and $1d_{5/2}$ shells in carbon isotopes up to $^{19}$C while in oxygen isotopes the correction is also large but do not show any inversion in agreement with experiments. The calculated energies are close to the experimental ones in both series of isotopes except in $^{21}$C for the $2s$ state for which our coupling is too weak.

  11. Isotopic and elemental abundances of copper and zinc in lunar samples, Zagami, Pele’s hairs, and a terrestrial basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, G. F.; Moynier, F.; Albarède, F.; Berezhnoy, A. A.

    2009-10-01

    We used ICP-MS to measure the elemental concentrations and isotopic abundances of Cu and Zn in: nine Ti-rich lunar basalts (10017, 10022, 10024, 10057, 70215, 71055, 74255, 75055, and 75075); size-separated samples prepared by sieving of pyroclastic black glass 74001, orange glass 74022, and the lunar soils 15021, 15231, 70181, and 79221; a basalt from the Piton des Neiges volcano, Reunion Island; two samples of Pele's hairs from the Nyiragongo volcano, Democratic Republic of Congo, and the martian meteorite Zagami. The isotopic fractionation of zinc in lunar basalts and Zagami is mass dependent relative to a terrestrial standard (JMC 400882B). These and published results imply that lunar, terrestrial, meteoritic, and perhaps martian zinc all come from one or more reservoirs linked by mass-dependent fractionation processes. Relative to terrestrial basalts, Ti-rich lunar basalts are enriched in the heavier isotopes of Cu and Zn: we find for Ti-rich lunar basalts the following ranges and averages ±1 - ? (‰): ? 65Cu/ 63Cu ? ? 65Cu, 0.1-1.4, 0.5 ± 0.1‰ ( N = 7); ? 66Zn/ 64Zn ? ? 66Zn = 0.2-1.9, 1.2 ± 0.2‰ ( N = 8; 10017 excluded). For two terrestrial samples, we find ? 66Zn ˜ +0.3‰ and ? 65Cu ˜ 0‰, which are consistent with published values. The differences between the lunar basalts and terrestrial basalts could reflect minor, planetary-scale vaporization or igneous processes on the Moon. Data for size separates of the pyroclastic glasses 74001 and 74220 confirm the well-known surface correlation of Cu and Zn, but modeling calculations reveal no sharp differences between either the elemental ratios or the isotopic composition of grain interiors and exteriors. The absence of such differences indicates that the isotopic compositions for bulk samples are dominated by a light-isotope-rich surface component. Data for size separates of lunar soils also confirm the surface correlation of Cu and Zn, but an enrichment of heavy rather than light isotopes. Averages for bulk lunar soils from this work and the literature are (‰): ? 65Cu, from 1.4 to 4.1, average 3.0 ± 0.3 ( N = 9); ? 66Zn, from 2.2 to 6.4, average 4.0 ± 0.3 ( N = 14). As with the glasses, in all but soil 15231 our data show no strong differences between the isotopic composition of soil sub-samples with small and large grains. The size of the isotopic fractionation inferred for the surface component in the soils is 3× smaller than predicted by a published model of sputtering primarily by solar particles. At the same time, the observed fractionation is larger than predicted by calculations based on a model of micrometeorite impact heating and hydrodynamic quenching. Because impact heating appears unable to explain the observations, we conclude that sputtering must be important even though samples with very large isotopic fractionation of Cu and Zn have not yet been found.

  12. Calcium isotopic ratios and rare earth element abundances in refractory inclusions from the Allende CV3 chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shichun; Farkaš, Juraj; Yu, Gang; Petaev, Michail I.; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2012-01-01

    Refractory inclusions in primitive meteorites are the oldest objects formed in the Solar System. They exhibit large mass-dependent isotopic effects in many elements, including Si, Mg and Ca, indicative of their complex origin. We report data for both mass-dependent (?) and mass-independent (?) Ca isotopic effects, and rare earth element (REE) abundances in six refractory inclusions from the Allende CV3 meteorite. Our data reveal large mass-dependent Ca isotopic effects in these refractory inclusions, with ?44/40Ca ranging from -5.60 to +0.35 (relative to NIST SRM 915a), which are significantly lower than that of the bulk silicate Earth (?44/40Ca = 1.05 ± 0.04). Importantly, ?44/40Ca is correlated with REE patterns: refractory inclusions with Group II REE patterns have lighter Ca isotope compositions compared to those with Group I REE patterns. Specifically, the studied refractory inclusions form negative 44Ca/40Ca-Tm/Er and 44Ca/40Ca-Nd/Er trends, implying segregation of up to 3% of an ultrarefractory evaporation residue from a chondritic reservoir prior to the formation of refractory inclusions. This residue would have to be characterized by high 44Ca/40Ca and low Tm/Er and Nd/Er. At 2? levels of ±0.5 and ±1.5 for ?40/44Ca and ?43/44Ca, respectively, the six refractory inclusions studied show no detectable 40Ca or 43Ca anomalies relative to the terrestrial standards. However, five out of the six refractory inclusions do show a 48Ca excess of several ?-units, clearly resolvable from the terrestrial standards.

  13. Assessing carbon and hydrogen isotopic fractionation of diesel fuel n-alkanes during progressive evaporation.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Syahidah A; Hayman, Alan R; Van Hale, Robert; Frew, Russell D

    2015-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis offers potential for fingerprinting of diesel fuels, however, possible confounding effects of isotopic fractionation due to evaporation need to be assessed. This study measured the fractionation of the stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes in n-alkane compounds in neat diesel fuel during evaporation. Isotope ratios were measured using a continuous flow gas chromatograph/isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Diesel samples were progressively evaporated at 24 ± 2°C for 21 days. Increasing depletion of deuterium in nC12-nC17 alkanes in the remaining liquid with increasing carbon chain length was observed. Negligible carbon isotope fractionation was observed. Preferential vaporization was measured for the shorter chain n-alkanes and the trend decreased with increasing chain length. The decrease in ?(2) H values indicates the preferential vaporization of the isotopically heavier species consistent with available quantitative data for hydrocarbons. These results are most important in the application of stable isotope technology to forensic analysis of diesel. PMID:25131396

  14. Stable Isotope Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas Using Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak-Lovato, K.

    2014-12-01

    Seepage from enhanced oil recovery, carbon storage, and natural gas sites can emit trace gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen sulfide. Trace gas emission at these locations demonstrate unique light stable isotope signatures that provide information to enable source identification of the material. Light stable isotope detection through surface monitoring, offers the ability to distinguish between trace gases emitted from sources such as, biological (fertilizers and wastes), mineral (coal or seams), or liquid organic systems (oil and gas reservoirs). To make light stable isotope measurements, we employ the ultra-sensitive technique, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS). FMS is an absorption technique with sensitivity enhancements approximately 100-1000x more than standard absorption spectroscopy with the advantage of providing stable isotope signature information. We have developed an integrated in situ (point source) system that measures carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen sulfide with isotopic resolution and enhanced sensitivity. The in situ instrument involves the continuous collection of air and records the stable isotope ratio for the gas being detected. We have included in-line flask collection points to obtain gas samples for validation of isotopic concentrations using our in-house isotope ratio mass spectroscopy (IRMS). We present calibration curves for each species addressed above to demonstrate the sensitivity and accuracy of the system. We also show field deployment data demonstrating the capabilities of the system in making live dynamic measurements from an active source.

  15. CARBON ABUNDANCES FOR RED GIANTS IN THE DRACO DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Shetrone, Matthew D.; Stanford, Laura M. [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Smith, Graeme H. [University of California ObservatoriesLick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UC Santa Cruz, 1156 High St., Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Siegel, Michael H. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, State College, PA 16801 (United States); Bond, Howard E., E-mail: shetrone@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: graeme@ucolick.org, E-mail: siegel@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: bond@stsci.edu [9615 Labrador Ln., Cockeysville, MD 21030 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Measurements of [C/Fe], [Ca/H], and [Fe/H] have been derived from Keck I LRISb spectra of 35 giants in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The iron abundances are derived by a spectrum synthesis modeling of the wavelength region from 4850 to 5375 A, while calcium and carbon abundances are obtained by fitting the Ca II H and K lines and the CH G band, respectively. A range in metallicity of -2.9 {<=} [Fe/H] {<=} -1.6 is found within the giants sampled, with a good correlation between [Fe/H] and [Ca/H]. The great majority of stars in the sample would be classified as having weak absorption in the {lambda}3883 CN band, with only a small scatter in band strengths at a given luminosity on the red giant branch. In this sense the behavior of CN among the Draco giants is consistent with the predominantly weak CN bands found among red giants in globular clusters of metallicity [Fe/H] < -1.8. Over half of the giants in the Draco sample have [Fe/H] > -2.25, and among these there is a trend for the [C/Fe] abundance to decrease with increasing luminosity on the red giant branch. This is a phenomenon that is also seen among both field and globular cluster giants of the Galactic halo, where it has been interpreted as a consequence of deep mixing of material between the base of the convective envelope and the outer limits of the hydrogen-burning shell. However, among the six Draco giants observed that turn out to have metallicities -2.65 < [Fe/H] < -2.25 there is no such trend seen in the carbon abundance. This may be due to small sample statistics or primordial inhomogeneities in carbon abundance among the most metal-poor Draco stars. We identify a potential carbon-rich extremely metal-poor star in our sample. This candidate will require follow-up observations for confirmation.

  16. Stable Isotopic Evidence for a Pedogenic Origin of Carbonates in Trench 14 near Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Quade, J; Cerling, T E

    1990-12-14

    Layered carbonate and silica encrust fault fractures exposed in Trench 14 near Yucca Mountain, site of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository in southern Nevada. Comparison of the stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of the fracture carbonates with those of modern soil carbonates in the area shows that the fracture carbonates are pedogenic in origin and that they likely formed in the presence of vegetation and rainfall typical of a glacial climate. Their isotopic composition differs markedly from that of carbonate associated with nearby springs. The regional water table therefore remained below the level of Trench 14 during the time that the carbonates and silica precipitated, a period probably covering parts of at least the last 300,000 years. PMID:17818282

  17. Changes in soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, and abundance of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi along a large-scale aridity gradient

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Haishui Yang; Yongge Yuan; Qian Zhang; Jianjun Tang; Yu Liu; Xin Chen

    2011-01-01

    Changes in soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, pH, and the abundance of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are examined along a large-scale aridity gradient from southeast to northwest in China. Soil organic carbon and total nitrogen decreased but pH increased with increased aridity. Aboveground plant biomass, spore abundance, and colonization of roots by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi also declined as the aridity increased.

  18. Seasonal Variation in Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Values of Bats Reflect Environmental Baselines

    PubMed Central

    Popa-Lisseanu, Ana G.; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Quetglas, Juan; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; Kelm, Detlev H.; Ibáñez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of animal tissues is commonly used to trace wildlife diets and analyze food chains. Changes in an animal’s isotopic values over time are generally assumed to indicate diet shifts or, less frequently, physiological changes. Although plant isotopic values are known to correlate with climatic seasonality, only a few studies restricted to aquatic environments have investigated whether temporal isotopic varia-tion in consumers may also reflect environmental baselines through trophic propagation. We modeled the monthly variation in carbon and nitrogen isotope values in whole blood of four insectivorous bat species occupying different foraging niches in southern Spain. We found a common pattern of isotopic variation independent of feeding habits, with an overall change as large as or larger than one trophic step. Physiological changes related to reproduction or to fat deposition prior to hibernation had no effect on isotopic variation, but juvenile bats had higher ?13C and ?15N values than adults. Aridity was the factor that best explained isotopic variation: bat blood became enriched in both 13C and 15N after hotter and/or drier periods. Our study is the first to show that consumers in terrestrial ecosystems reflect seasonal environmental dynamics in their isotope values. We highlight the danger of misinterpreting stable isotope data when not accounting for seasonal isotopic baselines in food web studies. Understanding how environmental seasonality is inte-grated in animals’ isotope values will be crucial for developing reliable methods to use stable isotopes as dietary tracers. PMID:25700080

  19. Stable carbon isotope signatures preserved in authigenic gibbsite from a forested granitic–regolith: Panola Mt., Georgia, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul A. Schroeder; Nathan D. Melear

    1999-01-01

    Six samples, selected from a weathering profile developed on a granite in the Panola Mountain Research Watershed in the Georgia Piedmont were studied for their stable carbon isotopic properties. The purpose was to understand the relationship between the stable carbon isotopic composition of the organic matter pool and the preservation of carbon in the authigenic soil minerals. The method for

  20. Detritus derived from eelgrass and macroalgae as potential carbon source for Mytilus edulis in Kiel Fjord, Germany: a preliminary carbon isotopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemeyer, W. L.; Schwamborn, R.

    1996-09-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios were measured for the muscle tissue of blue mussel Mytilus edulis, eelgrass Zostera marina, macroalgae Fucus vesiculosus, and phytoplankton in two areas in Kiel Fjord, Germany. Carbon isotope evidence is presented to show the predominance of phytoplanktonic production as a carbon source for M. edulis tissue carbon. Via decomposition processes for both eelgrass and macroalgal primary production, each contributed 0.5 6.5% to mussel carbon.

  1. Stable Carbon Isotope Constraints on the Timing and Magnitude of Phytoplankton Blooms in San Francisco Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, D.; Roopnarine, P. D.

    2010-12-01

    Recent work on phytoplankton dynamics in San Francisco Bay (SFB) revealed new seasonal blooms. Historic observations (1978-1998) of chlorophyll a (Chl a) showed an annual pattern of short-lived spring blooms. In 1999, this pattern changed with the appearance of autumnal blooms in addition to the characteristic large vernal blooms. This change was attributed to decreases in bivalve mollusk populations concurrent with increases in macro invertebrate and vertebrate mollusk predators. Previous work, however, suggests that inter-annual variation in phytoplankton biomass is a function of river discharge. These observations suggest phytoplankton abundances in SFB reflect multiple forcing mechanisms and underscore the importance of understanding prehistoric variations in bloom dynamics. Here, we present stable isotope data from the exotic oyster Crassostrea gigas, which record the timing and magnitude of past phytoplankton blooms. These data may be useful for identifying patterns of phytoplankton bloom dynamics prior to instrumental observations. Stable oxygen (?18O) and carbon (?13C) isotope profiles from recent live-collected (2006) specimens of the oyster C. gigas collected in southern SFB were analyzed in conjunction with in situ records of environmental variability (water temperature and ?18Owater calculated from salinity). Their observed ?18Ocarb profiles are characterized by several unique features that correlate with predicted ?18Ocarb values calculated from water temperature and ?18Owater measurements indicating that these oysters were recruited at the end of 2001 or early in 2002. A prominent 1-2 ‰ spike characterizes the carbon isotope profile from each of these specimens. These positive excursions most likely reflect a large phytoplankton bloom, during which algae preferentially assimilated 12C, resulting in the enrichment of 13C in the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of seawater. Furthermore, phytoplankton blooms may appear as positive spikes in a shell’s carbon isotope profile because bivalve shell ?13C, in part, reflects ?13CDIC. Chl a concentrations, collected by the USGS at two locations in southern SFB, show that a large phytoplankton bloom (Chl a >60 mg/m3) occurred in the spring of 2003. These data suggest C. gigas record phytoplankton blooms with Chl a concentrations >60 mg/m3. However, because several smaller blooms (Chl a 10-50 mg/m3) occurred during the lifetime of these individuals, it appears that 60 mg/m3 represents a threshold, below which blooms are not recorded. On the other hand, the inability to observe smaller blooms may reflect limits imposed by sample resolution. This study suggests prehistoric oysters—and perhaps other bivalve mollusk species—that lived in SFB contain a valuable archive of large phytoplankton blooms. Furthermore, high-resolution sampling approaches may shed light on past smaller scale intra- and inter-annual bloom dynamics.

  2. Variability in carbon and nitrogen isotope fractionation associated with bacterial hydrolysis of atrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, A.; Penning, H.; Elsner, M.

    2009-04-01

    Even after legislative prohibition in 1991 by the European Union, the pesticide atrazine and its metabolites are still detected in surface and ground water frequently exceeding the permitted drinking water concentration limit of 0,1 g/L. Despite much recent research on atrazine, its risk assessment in the environment is still a major challenge because of the difficulty of establishing mass balances in the subsurface. To obtain a better insight into the fate of atrazine, we developed compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) for atrazine. CSIA has proven valuable for assessing organic contaminants in subsurface environments, on the one hand for source identification and on the other hand to trace (bio)chemical degradation reactions through isotope fractionation in the compounds. Such assessment is based on the Rayleigh equation and therein on the isotope enrichment factor É?, which must be determined experimentally beforehand. In ongoing work, we therefore measured carbon and nitrogen isotope fractionation associated with biotic hydrolsis of atrazine. C and N isotope enrichment factors were determined in resting cell experiments for Pseudomonas sp. ADP, Chelatobacter heintzii and Arthrobacter aurescens TC1, strains that hydrolyse atrazine in the initial transformation reaction. Carbon and nitrogen isotope enrichment factors were distinctly different between the bacterial strains. However, when plotting shifts in carbon isotope ratios versus shifts in nitrogen isotope ratios the slopes of the different degradation experiments coincided well. These results give evidence that all bacterial strains were carrying out the same initial biochemical degradation reaction, but that the associated isotope fractionation, as represented by the enrichment factors, was masked to a different extent owing to different rate determining steps prior to the isotopically sensitive bond cleavage (commitment to catalysis). Our study therefore illustrates the benefit of multi-element isotope approaches to assess the environmental fate of atrazine by CSIA.

  3. The Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Water in Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, T. J.; Tartèse, R.; Anand, M.; Franchi, I. A.; Grady, M. M.; Greenwood, R. C.; Charlier, B. L. A.

    2014-09-01

    Using SIMs techniques we measure OH abundances and D/H ratios in apatite grains from two Eucrites (DaG 945, DaG 844).The average ?D values of these two samples are also similar to carbonaceous chondrites, the Earth and the Moon.

  4. MGA: A gamma-ray spectrum analysis code for determining plutonium isotopic abundances. Volume 3, FORTRAN listing of the GA code

    SciTech Connect

    Gunnink, R

    1991-09-01

    Nondestructive measurements of x-ray and gamma-ray emissions can be used to determine the abundances of various actinides in a sample. Volume 1 of this report describes the methods and algorithms we have developed to determine the relative isotopic abundances of actinides in a sample, by analyzing gamma-ray spectra obtained using germanium detector systems. Volume 2 is a guide to using the MGA (Multiple Group Analysis) computer program we have written to perform plutonium isotopic analyses. This report contains a listing of the FORTRAN instructions of the code.

  5. Comparison of the isotopic abundance of U235 and U238 and the radium activity ratios in Colorado Plateau uranium ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Stieff, L.; Cuttitta, F.; Kuroda, P.K.

    1957-01-01

    The isotopic abundances of uranium and the radium activity ratios of eleven samples of uranium ore from the Colorado Plateau have been measured. No significant variation in the isotopic abundance of the uranium was noted; with'in the experimental error, the average U235/U238 ratio is 137.7. There is a significant variation in the Ra226/Ra223 activity ratios (0.048-0.143), which indicates a relatively recent alteration of the ore samples. The variations do not, however, explain the lead-uranium and lead-lead age discrepancies. ?? 1957.

  6. Theoretical effect of diffusion on isotopic abundance ratios in rocks and associated fluids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Bracken, J.T.

    1955-01-01

    Diffusion is considered as a possible process of isotope fractionation taking place throughout geologic time. Both diffusion in solids and diffusion in liquids are taken as possible mechanisms, the latter being more important. Arguments are presented to show that if significant fractionation takes place within a crystal by outward diffusion under solid-state conditions, enrichment will be evident only in elements of minor concentration. Similar conclusions are inferred for solid-state diffusion across a boundary or for diffusion in liquids. No isotopic enrichment can be expected in relatively large bodies of diffusion transported material. Although the necessary data to confirm these conclusions are scanty, it seems worth while to undertake further work in this direction. ?? 1955.

  7. Sources of carbon and the evolution of the abundance of CNO elements

    E-print Network

    Y. C. Liang; G. Zhao; J. R. Shi

    2001-06-09

    Using the standard infall model of Galactic chemical evolution, we explore the origin of carbon and calculate the abundance evolution of CNO elements for 8 different models of stellar nucleosynthesis yields. The results show that, in the early stage of the Galaxy, massive stars are the main producer of carbon, and that as our Galaxy evolves to the late stage, the longer lived intermediate- and low-mass stars play an increasingly important role, while at the same time, metal-rich Wolf-Rayet stars eject a significant amount of carbon into the ISM by radiative-driven stellar winds. However, from the present published nucleosynthesis yields we cannot distinguish whether the main source of carbon in the late Galactic stage is just the massive stars ($M>8M_{\\odot}$) alone, or just the intermediate-, low-mass stars and $M\\leq 40M_{\\odot}$ massive stars that do not go through the Wolf-Rayet stage. The $^{12}$C$(\\alpha,\\gamma)^{16}$O reaction rate is very important in the stellar nucleosynthesis calculations: a lower rate will give a higher yield of carbon. The contribution to nitrogen is dominated by intermediate- and low-mass stars, and the secondary source of massive stars cannot explain the observed [N/Fe] in metal-poor stars. Most of oxygen is produced by massive stars. The fact that a higher O abundance in metal-poor stars is derived from the \\ion{O}{i} 7771$-$7775 \\AA triplet than from the forbidden [\\ion{O}{i}] line at 6300 \\AA poses a problem.

  8. Cretaceous shales from the western interior of North America: sulfur/carbon ratios and sulfur-isotope composition.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gautier, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Sulphur/carbon ratios in cores of selected Cretaceous marine shales average 0.67, a value greater than that observed in recent marine sediments and much higher than global values calculated for the Cretaceous. This may be ascribed to generally low levels of bioturbation and enhanced efficiency of sulphate reduction due to low oxygen levels in Cretaceous seaways. Isotopic compositions of pyrite sulphur vary systematically with level of oxygenation of the depositional environment and therefore with organic carbon abundance and type of organic matter. Samples with >4% organic carbon are extremely depleted in 34S (mean delta 34S -31per mille) and contain hydrogen-rich organic matter. Samples containing <1.5% organic carbon display relatively 'heavy' but wide-ranging delta 34S values (-34.6 to +16.8per mille) and contain hydrogen-poor organic matter. Samples with intermediate amounts of organic carbon have average delta 34S of -25.9per mille and contain both types of organic matter. Relations between the nature of these shales, and their sedimentation rate and depositional environment are discussed.-L.C.H.

  9. New methods for fully automated isotope ratio determination from hydrogen at the natural abundance level.

    PubMed

    Brand, W A; Avak, H; Seedorf, R; Hofmann, D; Conradi, T

    1996-08-01

    Abstract A variety of methods for measurement of (2)H/(1)H from H(2) are evaluated for their ability to be fully automated and for applicability to automated isotopic analysis of water and organic compounds. Equilibration of water with H(2) gas with the aid of a platinum catalyst has been commercialized into a fully automated sample preparation device. A second and newer technique, involving injecting water, methane, or other volatile organic compounds onto hot chromium in a reactor attached to the dual inlet system of a gas isotope ratio mass spectrometer, can be integrated with a conventional GC-autosampler to allow automated analysis of a variety of substrates. Both techniques result in precisions around 1‰ (? notation) on the VSMOW scale, and are fast and accurate, and with appropriate mass spectrometers require only negligible scaling for the SLAP/VSMOW difference. Several experimental methods which show considerable promise employ "isotope ratio monitoring" (irm) inlet systems, in which a carrier gas is used for transport of H(2) to the mass spectrometer. Any such method has to address the problem of He ions corrupting the measurement of the H(2) ions. One such approach uses a heated palladium membrane for selective introduction of H(2) into the mass spectrometer, and a second involves modifications to the ion optics to control the stray helium ions. Both approaches have significant limitations that must be overcome before irm techniques can be used in routine applications, in particular for measuring hydrogen isotopes from GC effluents (irm-GCMS). PMID:22088118

  10. Biological control of calcium isotopic abundances in the global calcium cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph Skulan; Donald J. DePaolo; Thomas L. Owens

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of 44Ca\\/40Ca, expressed as ?44Ca, were made on igneous rocks and on shell and bone material from modern organisms to investigate the magnitude and origins of calcium isotopic fractionation in nature. The results document a span of 4‰ in ?44Ca, measured with the double spike technique to a precision of ±0.15‰. Volcanic rocks, including basalt and rhyolite, show little

  11. Canopy-scale kinetic fractionation of atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapour isotopes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The isotopic fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapour (H2O) between the atmosphere and terrestrial plants provide powerful constraints on carbon sequestration on land 1-2, changes in vegetation cover 3 and the Earth’s Dole effect 4. Past studies, relying mainly on leaf-scale observations, hav...

  12. Balancing the Cenozoic carbon and alkalinity cycles: Constraints from isotopic records

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Goddéris; L. M. François

    1996-01-01

    A simple model of the carbon, alkalinity and strontium cycles is built up and used to interpret the carbon and strontium isotopic evolution of seawater over the Cenozoic as recorded in marine limestones. The idea that weathering fluxes have increased globally over the Cenozoic in response to the Himalayan uplift is critically examined. It is shown that such an increase

  13. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of bacterial fatty acids in a seagrass dominated system

    E-print Network

    Jones, Walter Brian

    2001-01-01

    remineralized by the bacterial community has yet to be quantified (Jahnke and Craven 1995). Stable carbon isotopes (O' C) have been used as a tool to determine carbon sources for by meio- and macrofauna in seagrass beds (Riera er al. 1999, Moncreiff...

  14. Oxygen Isotopic Constraints on the Genesis of Carbonates from Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leshin, Laurie A.; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Carpenter, Paul K.; Harvey, Ralph P.

    1998-01-01

    Ion microprobe oxygen isotopic measurements of a chemically diverse suite of carbonates from Martian meteorite ALH84001 are reported. The delta(sup 18)O values are highly variable, ranging from +5.4 to + 25.3%, and are correlated with major element compositions of the carbonate. The earliest forming (Ca-rich) carbonates have the lowest delta(sup 18)O values and the late-forming (Mg-rich) carbonates have the highest delta(sup 18)O values. Two models are presented which can explain the isotopic variations. The carbonates could have formed in a water rich environment at relatively low, but highly variable temperatures. In this open-system case the lower limit to the temperature variation is approx. 125 C, with fluctuations of over 250 C possible within the constraints of the model. Alternatively, the data can be explained by a closed-system model in which the carbonates precipitated from a limited amount of CO2-rich fluid. This scenario can reproduce the isotopic variations observed at a range of temperatures, including relatively high temperatures (less than 500 C). Thus the oxygen isotopic compositions do not provide unequivocal evidence for formation of the carbonates at low temperature. Although more information is needed in order to distinguish between the models, neither of the implied environments is consistent with biological activity. Thus, we suggest that features associated with the carbonates which have been interpreted to be the result of biological activity were most probably formed by inorganic processes.

  15. The Precambrian Biogeochemical Carbon Isotopic Record: Contributions of Thermal Versus Biological Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Superplumes offer a new approach for understanding global C cycles. Isotopes help to discern the impacts of geological, environmental and biological processes ujpun the evolution of these cycles. For example, C-13/C-12 values of coeval sedimentary organics and carbonates give global estimates of the fraction of C buried as organics (Forg), which today lies near 0.2. Before Oxygenic photosynthesis arose, our biosphere obtained reducing power for biosynthesis solely from thermal volatiles and rock alteration. Thus Forg was dominated by the mantle redox state, which has remained remarkably constant for greater than Gy. Recent data confirm that the long-term change in Forg had been small, indicating that the mantle redox buffer remains important even today. Oxygenic photosynthesis enabled life to obtain additional reducing power by splitting the water molecule. Accordingly, biological organic production rose above the level constrained by the mantle-derived flux of reduced species. For example, today, chemoautotrophs harvesting energy from hydrothermal emanations can synthesize at most between 0.2 x 10(exp 12) and 2x 10(exp 12) mol C yr-1 of organic C globally. In contrast, global photosynthetic productivity is estimated at 9000 x 10(exp 12) mol C yr-1. Occasionally photosynthetic productivity did contribute to dramatically -elevated Forg values (to 0.4 or more) as evidenced by very high carbonate C-13/C-12. The interplay between biological, tectonic and other environmental factors is illustrated by the mid-Archean to mid-Proterozoic isotopic record. The relatively constant C-13/C-12 values of Archean carbonates support the view that photosynthetically-driven Forg increases were not yet possible. In contrast, major excursions in C-13/C-12, and thus also in Forg, during the early Proterozoic confirmed the global importance of oxygenic photosynthesis by that time. Remarkably, the superplume event at 1.9 Ga did not trigger another major Forg increase, despite the favorable conditions for organic burial that were evidenced by elevated sea levels and higher black shale abundances. Perhaps those superplume-rated processes that favored enhanced organic burial were offset by the ability of mantle-derived redox buffering, which was enhanced during the superplume event, to limit excursions in Forg.

  16. Carbonate minerals, oxygen and carbon isotopes in modern temperate bryozoa, eastern Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasada Rao, C.

    1993-12-01

    X-ray analysis of cool temperate bryozoa from eastern shelf carbonates indicates the occurrence of a spectrum of low-Mg calcite to high-Mg calcite with variable amounts of aragonite. Bryozoa contain variable amounts of CaCO 3 cements. In bryozoa ?18O values increase and ?13C values decrease with increasing aragonite content probably due to the occurrence of vaterite. Aragonite contents decrease with decreasing water temperatures as established by oxygen isotope thermometry. Tasmanian bryozoa may be enriched in ?18O up to 0.7‰ due to aragonite and high Mg-calcite contents. ?13C values of bryozoa composed of pure calcite are similar to those of associated brachiopods. ?18O and ?13C values of bryozoa are unaffected by kinetic and metabolic effects. The isotopic field of temperate bryozoa differs from tropical carbonates by having heavier ?18O ( 1.3‰ ± 0.5) and lighter ?13C ( 1.8‰ ± 0.8) values than bulk tropical carbonates. The bryozoa are in equilibrium with upwelling deep seawater and surface subantarctic water and therefore intersect seafloor diagenesis and upwelling water trend lines. Mol% MgCO 3 content ranges from 2 to 11 in calcite and corresponds to 5-14°C water temperatures. The ?18O values of bryozoa give a range of temperatures from 7° to 13°C, slightly less than the 4-15°C obtained from ?18O of Tasmanian brachiopods. This discrepancy is probably due to either minor biochemical fractionation or to bryozoa being in equilibrium with warmer waters.

  17. Towards a Mechanistic Understanding of Boron Isotope Ratios in Biogenic Carbonates as Recorders of Seawater pH

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Bijma; B. Hoenisch; R. Zeebe; A. Sanyal; H. J. Spero; D. W. Lea; A. Amat; D. Ruiz-Pino; A. Juillet-Leclerc; Y. Suzuki; A. Eisenhauer

    2001-01-01

    Based on first principles, the boron isotopic composition of carbonates can be used to reconstruct oceanic pH (Kakihana, 1977). Experimental relationships between the boron isotopic fractionation of carbonates and pH are consistent with theory and demonstrate the potential of the isotopic signature in biogenic carbonates as a reliable paleo-pH proxy. Culture experiments with the planktic foraminifers O. universa (Sanyal et

  18. Interpreting Oxygen and Carbon Isotope Signals in Lacustrine Carbonates Using Case Studies from Swiss Lakes: A Tribute to Kerry Kelts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, J. A.; Teranes, J. L.; Anderson, W.

    2001-12-01

    During his doctoral studies at the ETH-Zürich in the 1970's, Kerry Kelts, together with his fellow budding limnogeologists under the supervision of Prof. K.J. Hsü, initiated a radical new approach to the study of lakes. They considered lakes to be like small ocean basins and, consequently, thought lakes should be investigated using oceanographic techniques and methodologies, similar to those applied in the Deep Sea Drilling Program. To quote from the introduction of Kerry's doctoral thesis (1978): "Lakes represent a relatively large natural laboratory and the study of lacustrine sediments and sedimentary processes may provide important steps towards understanding some fossil and recent geological processes in marine environments." From his own first-hand shipboard experience onboard the Glomar Challenger, Kerry brought home exciting new ideas, which he incorporated into the newly established Limnogeological Laboratory at the ETH. Beginning with geophysical surveys to heat-flow studies to site selection to core handling, the ETH team emulated marine geologists helping to develop a new field, which Kerry called limnogeology. By the mid-1970's, a few papers had already been published using the stable isotopic composition of lacustrine carbonates to interpret paleoclimate changes, but the meaning of these isotopic signals remained ambiguous. Using the natural laboratory concept developed at the ETH, we began our studies of the processes controlling carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation in selected Swiss lakes. Initial results of the isotopic composition of bulk carbonate from short cores showed unusual variations in the record for the last 200 years. Were we measuring a predominately pelagic signal with more or less variations in the detrital carbonate input? Was the carbonate precipitating in isotopic equilibrium under ambient conditions? Could we use isotope stratigraphy to interpret past environmental/climatic changes? Small perialpine lakes in north-central Switzerland, with their limited catchment areas and varved sediments with high carbonate contents, proved to be ideal laboratories in which to study isotope fractionation processes in the water column during the annual productivity cycle. These calibration studies demonstrated that the carbon isotope signal was controlled by surface-water productivity and the oxygen isotope signal was primarily recording changes in climatically controlled precipitation patterns. These signals could be traced into the sub-recent annual records derived from the study of varved sediments. We have now corroborated our lacustrine isotope records for the past 100 years with oxygen-isotope studies of tree-ring cellulose grown in the same catchment area as our studied lake. The results derived from these combined continental climate proxies help us to better interpret the paleo-lacustrine isotope records of past climate change. Early on, Kerry recognized the potential to use the isotopic composition of lacustrine carbonates to reconstruct paleoclimates and enthusiastically promoted the application of isotope stratigraphy to the study of lacustrine sequences. During the course of his career, he was himself responsible for the unraveling of numerous climate records using stable isotope studies in lakes around the globe.

  19. A 400 million year carbon isotope record of pedogenic carbonate: Implications for paleoatmospheric carbon dioxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. D. Ekart; T. E. Cerling; I. P. Montanez; N. J. Tabor

    1999-01-01

    A 400 record of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels has been estimated by applying a COâ paleobarometer to a database of 758 analyses of paleosol (fossil soil) carbonates. This database is a compilation of new data and previously published values from the literature. Many new analyses of Mesozoic paleosols are reported, an era poorly represented in the literature. Results indicate that

  20. Biogeochemistry of the Stable Isotopes of Hydrogen and Carbon in Salt Marsh Biota 1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bruce N.; Epstein, Samuel

    1970-01-01

    Deuterium to hydrogen ratios of 14 plant species from a salt marsh and lagoon were 55‰ depleted in deuterium relative to the environmental water. Carbon tetrachloride-extractable material from these plants was another 92‰ depleted in deuterium. This gave a fractionation factor from water to CCl4 extract of 1.147. This over-all fractionation was remarkably constant for all species analyzed. Plants also discriminate against 13C, particularly in the lipid fraction. Data suggest that different mechanisms for carbon fixation result in different fractionations of the carbon isotopes. Herbivore tissues reflected the isotopic ratios of plants ingested. Apparently different metabolic processes are responsible for the different degrees of fractionation observed for hydrogen and carbon isotopes. PMID:16657539

  1. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of bacterial methane in a shallow freshwater lake

    SciTech Connect

    Woltemate, I.; Whiticar, M.J.; Schoell, M.

    1984-09-01

    Anoxic sediments from freshwater environments such as bogs, swamps, and lakes undergoing early diagenesis are frequently characterized by the formation of biogenic methane. Freshwater biogenic methanes exhibit carbon and hydrogen isotopic values strongly depleted in C-13 and deuterium relative to the respective values for carbon dioxide and formation water. The percentages of methane generated by fermentation and carbon dioxide reduction can be estimated by comparison of hydrogen isotopes in the formation water and methane. On the basis of these hydrogen isotope data, about 75% of the methane formation in Wurmsee comes from acetate reduction. Fermentation is thus the dominant although not exclusive process. Carbon dioxide reduction contributed the balance of the bacterial methane generated. 35 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  2. Fluids in the damage zone: Insights from clumped isotope thermometry of fault-hosted carbonate cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, Juliet G.; Hodson, Keith R.; Huntington, Katharine W.

    2015-04-01

    Carbonate cements in fault zone rocks contain both chemical and physical information about the interaction and coevolution of their source fluids with surrounding fault rock. In this work, we present an analysis of textural relationships and isotopic compositions of carbonate cements in sandstone, within a well-characterized upper-crustal fault intersection zone, 'Courthouse Junction' along the Moab Fault in southeast Utah, USA. Structures exposed at the outcrop record several phases of overprinting brittle deformation, including cataclastic deformation bands, fracturing and faulting. Carbonate diagenesis is thought to be a later stage, possibly facilitated by an increase in fault parallel permeability. Calcite is hosted within joints and concretions associated with both deformation-band faults and fracture-based faults. We have used cathodoluminescence, oxygen and carbon isotopes, and clumped isotope paleothermometry to differentiate two populations of calcite cement in the fault intersection zone: cool (

  3. Carbon and nitrogen abundance determinations from transition layer lines. [giant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika; Mena-Werth, Jose

    1988-01-01

    For red giants a smooth increase in the nitrogen to carbon abundance ratio for increasing B-V as is expected for the first dredge up phase when the outer convection zone deepens is found. An average increase in the nitrogen to silicon ratio for B-V = 0.6 which goes back to almost solar values for cool giants with B - V approximately 1.0 is reported. It looks as if Si would be enriched for deeper mixing contrary to expectations from standard evolution theory.

  4. Experimental fractionation of stable carbon isotopes during degassing of carbon dioxide and precipitation of calcite from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, K.; Winde, V.; Escher, P.; von Geldern, R.; Böttcher, M. E.

    2012-04-01

    Processes in the carbonate system of surface waters are in particular sensitive to variations of boundary conditions as, for instance, the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the aqueous solution. Examples range from streams, rivers, to coastal marine waters. The flux of carbon dioxide from continental flowing waters was recently included into calculations of the global carbon budget (Butman & Raymond, 2011, Nature Geo.). These solutions, are often supersaturated in carbon dioxide with respect to the atmosphere. The degassing of carbon dioxide is associated with a kinetically controlled fractionation of the stable carbon isotopes, which has to be considered in balancing water-air carbon dioxide fluxes. The degassing process additionally leads to the super-saturation of the aqueous solution with respect to calcium carbonate. Stable isotope fractionation is of particular value to identify and quantify processes at the water-gas phase interface and link these non-equilibrium processes to the formation mechanisms of calcite and the hydrodynamics of surface waters. Experiments were carried out with or without inert N2 gas flow to degas carbon dioxide from initially supersaturated solutions. Natural solutions used are from different stations of the Elbe estuary, the Jade Bay, the backbarrier tidal area of Spiekeroog Island, carbonate springs of Rügen Island, and the Baltic Sea coastline. Results are compared experiments using bottled mineral waters. By following the (physico) chemical changes in the solutions (pH, TA, Ca PHREEQC modeling) it was found, that two evolutionary stages can be differentiated. Reaction progress led to the preferential liberation of carbon dioxide containing the light carbon isotope, following a Rayleigh-type process. After an induction period, where only degassing of carbon dioxide took place, a second stage was observed where calcite began to form from the highly supersaturated solutions. In this stage the carbonate system of the solution was controlled by both, degassing and carbonate precipitation, still leading to an enrichment of the heavier carbon isotope in the residual DIC. The experimental results are evaluated for both periods, and the influence of salinity and pH is extracted. Acknowledgement: Parts of this study were supported by BMBF within the BIOACID project

  5. A balloon measurement of the isotopic composition of galactic cosmic ray boron, carbon and nitrogen. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumberge, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of galactic cosmic ray boron, carbon, and nitrogen were measured at energies near 300 MeV amu, using a balloon-borne instrument at an atmospheric depth of approximately 5 g/sq cm. The calibrations of the detectors comprising the instrument are described. The saturation properties of the cesium iodide scintillators used for measurement of particle energy are studied in the context of analyzing the data for mass. The achieved rms mass resolution varies from approximately 0.3 amu at boron to approximately 0.5 amu at nitrogen, consistent with a theoretical analysis of the contributing factors. Corrected for detector interactions and the effects of the residual atmosphere the results are B-10/B=0.33 (+0.17, -0.11), C-13/C=0.06 (+0.13, -0.11), and N-15/N=0.42 (+0.19, -0.17). A model of galactic propagation and solar modulation is described. Assuming a cosmic ray source composition of solar-like isotopic abundances, the model predicts abundances near Earth consistent with the measurements.

  6. Decoupling of Organic and Inorganic Carbon Isotope Records during the Coniacian-Santonian in the Western Interior Seaway: Implications for Carbon Cycling during OAE 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessin, A. C.; Sheldon, N. D.; Hendy, I. L.

    2014-12-01

    The sedimentary record of the Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway is characterized by periods of enhanced organic carbon burial known as Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs). Compared to older OAEs, the last Cretaceous OAE, the Coniacian-Santonian OAE 3 (~86 Ma), is more enigmatic and its driving mechanisms less well understood. In contrast to the nearly global OAE 2, OAE 3 was geographically limited to restricted basins and shallow seaways. Due to significant organic carbon burial, OAEs are traditionally identified by large, rapid positive carbon isotope excursions, whereas OAE 3 is characterized by a relatively muted carbonate positive carbon "plateau" that persists for ~3 myrs, which suggests significantly different carbon burial processes or paleoceanographic conditions. Here we present new high-resolution paired organic-inorganic carbon isotope records from the Niobrara Formation recovered in the USGS #1 Portland core from Cañon City Basin, Colorado. At the onset of OAE 3, there is a distinct decoupling of the organic and inorganic carbon isotope records. ?13Ccarb exhibits an abrupt ~1‰ positive isotope excursion at the onset of carbon burial superimposed on a larger ~2‰ isotope trend. Coeval with this shift, is a ~3‰ negative ?13Corg excursion. These results indicate that during OAE 3 in the Western Interior Seaway, while significant organic carbon was being buried, organic carbon was depleted in 13C. The carbon isotope records will be compared to records of organic carbon, C:N ratios, and redox sensitive metals such as U and Mo to evaluate how carbon cycling changed during OAE 3.

  7. Seasonal variation in kangaroo tooth enamel oxygen and carbon isotopes in southern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookman, Tom H.; Ambrose, Stanley H.

    2012-09-01

    Serial sampling of tooth enamel growth increments for carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses of Macropus (kangaroo) teeth was performed to assess the potential for reconstructing paleoseasonality. The carbon isotope composition of tooth enamel apatite carbonate reflects the proportional intake of C3 and C4 vegetation. The oxygen isotopic composition of enamel reflects that of ingested and metabolic water. Tooth enamel forms sequentially from the tip of the crown to the base, so dietary and environmental changes during the tooth's formation can be detected. ?13C and ?18O values were determined for a series of enamel samples drilled from the 3rd and 4th molars of kangaroos that were collected along a 900 km north-south transect in southern Australia. The serial sampling method did not yield pronounced seasonal isotopic variation patterns in Macropus enamel. The full extent of dietary isotopic variation may be obscured by attenuation of the isotopic signal during enamel mineralisation. Brachydont (low-crowned) Macropus teeth may be less sensitive to seasonal variation in isotopic composition due to time-averaging during mineralisation. However, geographic variations observed suggest that there may be potential for tracking latitudinal shifts in vegetation zones and seasonal environmental patterns in response to climate change.

  8. Insights into early Earth from the Pt-Re-Os isotope and highly siderophile element abundance systematics of Barberton komatiites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchtel, Igor S.; Walker, Richard J.; Touboul, Mathieu; Nisbet, Euan G.; Byerly, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    Highly siderophile element (HSE: Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, and Re) abundance and Pt-Re-Os isotopic data are reported for well-preserved komatiites from the Komati and Weltevreden Formations of the Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa. The Re-Os data for whole-rock samples and olivine and chromite separates define isochrons with ages of 3484 ± 38 and 3263 ± 12 Ma for the Komati and Weltevreden systems, respectively. The respective initial 187Os/188Os = 0.10335 ± 15 (?187Os = +0.34 ± 0.15) and 0.10442 ± 4 (?187Os = -0.14 ± 0.04) are well within the range defined by chondritic meteorites. When considered together with the Re-Os data for late Archean komatiite systems, these data indicate that the mantle sources of most Archean komatiites evolved with essentially uniform long-term Re/Os that is well within the chondritic range. By contrast, the initial 186Os/188Os = 0.1198283 ± 9 (?186Os = -0.12 ± 0.08) and 0.1198330 ± 8 (?186Os = +0.22 ± 0.07) for the Komati and Weltevreden systems, respectively, are outside of known chondritic evolution paths, indicating that the mantle sources of these two komatiite systems evolved with fractionated time-integrated Pt/Os. The new 186,187Os isotopic data for these early Archean komatiite systems, combined with published 142,143Nd and 176Hf isotopic data for these systems, are consistent with formation and long-term isolation of deep-seated mantle domains with fractionated time-integrated Sm/Nd, Lu/Hf, and Pt/Os ratios, at ca. 4400 Ma. These domains may have been generated as a result of late-stage crystallization of a primordial magma ocean involving Mg-perovskite, Ca-perovskite and Pt-alloys acting as the fractionating phases. The inferred fractionated mantle domains were sampled by the early Archean komatiites, but were largely mixed away by 2.7 Ga, as evidenced by uniform time-integrated Sm/Nd, Lu/Hf, and Pt/Os ratios inferred for the sources of most late Archean komatiite systems. The calculated total Pt + Pd abundances present in the sources of the early Archean komatiite systems fall only 7-14% short of those present in estimates for the modern primitive mantle. These are also within the range of the total Pt + Pd abundances present in the sources of late Archean komatiite systems, indicating little change in the HSE abundances in the Archean mantle between 3.5 and 2.7 Ga. The new HSE data for the early Archean komatiite systems may implicate late accretion of HSE to the mantle prior to completion of crystallization of a final terrestrial magma ocean, followed by sluggish mixing of diverse, post-magma ocean domains characterized by variably fractionated lithophile element and HSE abundances.

  9. Elemental carbon in sediments - Determination and isotopic analysis in the presence of kerogen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wendy S. Wolbach; Edward Anders

    1989-01-01

    A procedure is described that makes it possible to separately measure and analyze isotopically two types of carbon in sedimentary rocks: the elemental carbon (charcoal, soot, metamorphic carbon) and kerogen. The procedure is based on oxidation of the sample dissolved in HF-HCl with 0.1 M K2Cr2O7 in 2 M H2SO4 at 50 C, upon which kerogen, which reacts with a

  10. Maximum carbon isotope fractionation in photosynthesis by blue-green algae and a green alga

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph W. Pardue; Richard S. Scalan; Chase van Baalen; Patrick L. Parker

    1976-01-01

    The maximum carbon isotope fractionation occurring in photosynthetic fixation of carbon dioxide in pure cultures of blue-green algae was -23.9%. and for a green alga was -22.6%., Maximum fractionations were obtained where cell densities were low and carbon dioxide concentrations were greater than 0.5%. Fractionation was reduced at higher temperatures using a thermophilic blue-green alga. For filamentous blue-green algae wherein

  11. Carbon Stable Isotopes as Indicators of Coastal Eutrophication

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal ecologists and managers have frequently used nitrogen stable isotopes (d15N) to trace and monitor anthropogenic nitrogen (N) in coastal ecosystems. However, the interpretation of d15N data can often be challenging, if not confounding, as the isotope values fractionate su...

  12. Effectiveness of leaded petrol phase-out in Tianjin, China based on the aerosol lead concentration and isotope abundance ratio.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wan; Liu, Xiande; Zhao, Liwei; Guo, Dongfa; Tian, Xiaodan; Adams, Freddy

    2006-07-01

    The phase-out of leaded petrol has been a measure widely used to reduce atmospheric lead pollution. Since the 1980s, China began to promote unleaded petrol. In order to assess the effectiveness of the measure an isotope fingerprint technique was applied for aerosol samples in the city of Tianjin. After dilute acid leaching, the lead concentration and isotope abundance ratios were determined for 123 samples collected in Tianjin during eight years (1994-2001). The 206Pb/207Pb ratio was lower in summer, when coal combustion emission was low and vehicle exhaust became more important, indicating that the 206Pb/207Pb ratio of leaded petrol in Tianjin is lower than that of aerosol samples. The 206Pb/207Pb ratio gradually increased from 1994 to 2001, a trend that suggests that the contribution from vehicle exhaust was diminishing. Overall, the measurements matched well with national statistical data of leaded and unleaded petrol production. After the nationwide switch to unleaded gasoline, comprehensive control measures are urgently needed to reduce air lead pollution in China, as aerosol lead reduced slightly but remains at a relatively high level. PMID:16165188

  13. Calibration strategies for the determination of stable carbon absolute isotope ratios in a glycine candidate reference material by elemental analyser-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Philip J H; Malinovsky, Dmitry; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi

    2015-04-01

    We report a methodology for the determination of the stable carbon absolute isotope ratio of a glycine candidate reference material with natural carbon isotopic composition using EA-IRMS. For the first time, stable carbon absolute isotope ratios have been reported using continuous flow rather than dual inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Also for the first time, a calibration strategy based on the use of synthetic mixtures gravimetrically prepared from well characterised, highly (13)C-enriched and (13)C-depleted glycines was developed for EA-IRMS calibration and generation of absolute carbon isotope ratio values traceable to the SI through calibration standards of known purity. A second calibration strategy based on converting the more typically determined delta values on the Vienna PeeDee Belemnite (VPDB) scale using literature values for the absolute carbon isotope ratio of VPDB itself was used for comparison. Both calibration approaches provided results consistent with those previously reported for the same natural glycine using MC-ICP-MS; absolute carbon ratios of 10,649?×?10(-6) with an expanded uncertainty (k?=?2) of 24?×?10(-6) and 10,646?×?10(-6) with an expanded uncertainty (k?=?2) of 88?×?10(-6) were obtained, respectively. The absolute carbon isotope ratio of the VPDB standard was found to be 11,115?×?10(-6) with an expanded uncertainty (k?=?2) of 27?×?10(-6), which is in excellent agreement with previously published values. PMID:24908413

  14. Stable isotopes, ecological integration and environmental change: wolves record atmospheric carbon isotope trend better than tree rings.

    PubMed

    Bump, Joseph K; Fox-Dobbs, Kena; Bada, Jeffrey L; Koch, Paul L; Peterson, Rolf O; Vucetich, John A

    2007-10-01

    Large-scale patterns of isotope ratios are detectable in the tissues of organisms, but the variability in these patterns often obscures detection of environmental trends. We show that plants and animals at lower trophic levels are relatively poor indicators of the temporal trend in atmospheric carbon isotope ratios (delta13C) when compared with animals at higher trophic levels. First, we tested how differences in atmospheric delta13C values were transferred across three trophic levels. Second, we compared contemporary delta13C trends (1961-2004) in atmospheric CO2 to delta13C patterns in a tree species (jack pine, Pinus banksiana), large herbivore (moose, Alces alces) and large carnivore (grey wolf, Canis lupus) from North America. Third, we compared palaeontological (approx. 30000 to 12000 14C years before present) atmospheric CO2 trends to delta13C patterns in a tree species (Pinus flexilis, Juniperus sp.), a megaherbivore (bison, Bison antiquus) and a large carnivore (dire wolf, Canis dirus) from the La Brea tar pits (southern California, USA) and Great Basin (western USA). Contrary to previous expectations, we found that the environmental isotope pattern is better represented with increasing trophic level. Our results indicate that museum specimens of large carnivores would best reflect large-scale spatial and temporal patterns of carbon isotopes in the palaeontological record because top predators can act as ecological integrators of environmental change. PMID:17686730

  15. Stable isotopes, ecological integration and environmental change: wolves record atmospheric carbon isotope trend better than tree rings

    PubMed Central

    Bump, Joseph K; Fox-Dobbs, Kena; Bada, Jeffrey L; Koch, Paul L; Peterson, Rolf O; Vucetich, John A

    2007-01-01

    Large-scale patterns of isotope ratios are detectable in the tissues of organisms, but the variability in these patterns often obscures detection of environmental trends. We show that plants and animals at lower trophic levels are relatively poor indicators of the temporal trend in atmospheric carbon isotope ratios (?13C) when compared with animals at higher trophic levels. First, we tested how differences in atmospheric ?13C values were transferred across three trophic levels. Second, we compared contemporary ?13C trends (1961–2004) in atmospheric CO2 to ?13C patterns in a tree species (jack pine, Pinus banksiana), large herbivore (moose, Alces alces) and large carnivore (grey wolf, Canis lupus) from North America. Third, we compared palaeontological (approx. 30?000 to 12?000 14C years before present) atmospheric CO2 trends to ?13C patterns in a tree species (Pinus flexilis, Juniperus sp.), a megaherbivore (bison, Bison antiquus) and a large carnivore (dire wolf, Canis dirus) from the La Brea tar pits (southern California, USA) and Great Basin (western USA). Contrary to previous expectations, we found that the environmental isotope pattern is better represented with increasing trophic level. Our results indicate that museum specimens of large carnivores would best reflect large-scale spatial and temporal patterns of carbon isotopes in the palaeontological record because top predators can act as ecological integrators of environmental change. PMID:17686730

  16. Determination of nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios from transition layer emission lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1992-01-01

    We have finished studying the nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios for stars with different effective temperatures T(sub eff) and luminosities using transition layer emission lines and using spectra available in the IUE archives. The N/C abundance ratio determinations using transition layer emission lines are as accurate as the photospheric abundance determinations as found by comparison of results obtained by both methods for the same stars. Our measurements confirm photospheric abundance determinations in regions of the HR diagram where they can be obtained. Our studies have extended the temperature range to higher temperatures. They have shown the exact positions in the HR diagram where the mixing due to the outer convection zones reaches deep enough to bring nuclear processed material to the surface. This occurs at effective temperatures which are higher by delta log T(sub eff) approximately 0.04 or roughly 400 K than expected theoretically. Since the depth of the convection zone increases rapidly with decreasing T(sub eff) this may indicate considerable overshoot beyond the lower boundary of the convection zone. Our N/C abundance ratio determinations from transition layer emission lines have confirmed that the actual enrichment observed for some cool giants is larger than expected theoretically, again indicating a larger degree of mixing in several stars either from below or from above. For the supergiants it probably indicates overshoot above the convective core in the progenitor main sequence stars. For the more massive giants this may also be the case, though we did not find a correlation between delta log N/C and the absolute magnitudes, but these are rather uncertain. As byproducts of these studies we also found anomalies in Si/C and N/C abundance ratios for F giants which can be understood as the relict of surface abundance changes for their main sequence progenitors due to diffusion. This anomaly disappears for G giants, for which the depths of the convection zones are apparently deep enough to wipe out these element separations (Bohm-Vitense 1992).

  17. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in vertical peat profiles of natural and drained boreal peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykänen, Hannu; Mpamah, Promise; Rissanen, Antti; Pitkänen, Aki; Turunen, Jukka; Simola, Heikki

    2015-04-01

    Peatlands form a significant carbon pool in the global carbon cycle. Change in peat hydrology, due to global warming is projected to change microbiological processes and peat carbon pool. We tested if bulk stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes serve as indicators of severe long term drying in peatlands drained for forestry. Depth profile analysis of peat, for their carbon and nitrogen content as well as their carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic signatures, were conducted for peatlands in southern and eastern Finland, having ombrotrophic and minerotrophic natural and corresponding drained pairs or separate drained sites. The selection of sites allowed us to compare changes due to different fertility and changes due to long term artificial drying. Drainage lasting over 40 years has led to changes in hydrology, vegetation, nutrient mineralization and respiration. Furthermore, increased nutrient uptake and possible recycling of peat nitrogen and carbon trough vegetation back to the peat surface, also possibly has an effect on the stable isotopic composition of peat carbon and nitrogen. We think that drainage induced changes somehow correspond to those caused by changed hydrology due to climate change. We will present data from these measurements and discuss their implications for carbon and nitrogen flows in peatlands.

  18. Large carbon isotope fractionation associated with oxidation of methyl halides by methylotrophic bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Kalin, Robert M.; McCauley, S.E.; Hamilton, John T.G.; Harper, D.B.; Millet, D.B.; Oremland, R.S.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2001-01-01

    The largest biological fractionations of stable carbon isotopes observed in nature occur during production of methane by methanogenic archaea. These fractionations result in substantial (as much as ???70???) shifts in ??13C relative to the initial substrate. We now report that a stable carbon isotopic fractionation of comparable magnitude (up to 70???) occurs during oxidation of methyl halides by methylotrophic bacteria. We have demonstrated biological fractionation with whole Cells of three methylotrophs (strain IMB-1, strain CC495, and strain MB2) and, to a lesser extent, with the purified cobalamin-dependent methyltransferase enzyme obtained from strain CC495. Thus, the genetic similarities recently reported between methylotrophs, and methanogens with respect to their pathways for C1-unit metabolism are also reflected in the carbon isotopic fractionations achieved by these organisms. We found that only part of the observed fractionation of carbon isotopes could be accounted for by the activity of the corrinoid methyltransferase enzyme, suggesting fractionation by enzymes further along the degradation pathway. These observations are of potential biogeochemical significance in the application of stable carbon isotope ratios to constrain the tropospheric budgets for the ozone-depleting halocarbons, methyl bromide and methyl chloride.

  19. Fractionation of carbon and hydrogen isotopes by methane-oxidizing bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, D.D.; Risatti, J.B.; Schoell, M.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon isotopic analysis of methane has become a popular technique in the exploration for oil and gas because it can be used to differentiate between thermogenic and microbial gas and can sometimes be used for gas-source rock correlations. Methane-oxidizing bacteria, however, can significantly change the carbon isotopic composition of methane; the origin of gas that has been partially oxidized by these bacteria could therefore be misinterpreted. We cultured methane-oxidizing bacteria at two different temperatures and monitored the carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of the residual methane. The residual methane was enriched in both 13C and D. For both isotopic species, the enrichment at equivalent levels of conversion was greater at 26??C than at 11.5??C. The change in ??D relative to the change in ??13C was independent of temperature within the range studied. One culture exhibited a change in the fractionation pattern for carbon (but not for hydrogen) midway through the experiment, suggesting that bacterial oxidation of methane may occur via more than one pathway. The change in the ??D value for the residual methane was from 8 to 14 times greater than the change in the ??13C value, indicating that combined carbon and hydrogen isotopic analysis may be an effective way of identifying methane which has been subjected to partial oxidation by bacteria. ?? 1981.

  20. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient secondary organic aerosols in Toronto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Huang, L.; Moukhtar, S.; Rudolph, J.

    2015-06-01

    A method to quantify concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been applied to study atmospheric nitrophenols in Toronto, Canada. The sampling of five nitrophenols, all primarily formed from the photo-oxidation of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOC), in the gas phase and particulate matter (PM) together and PM alone was conducted. Since all of the target compounds are secondary products, their concentrations in the atmosphere are in the low ng m-3 range and consequently a large volume of air (> 1000 m3) is needed to analyze samples for stable carbon isotope ratios, resulting in sampling periods of typically 24 h. While this extended sampling period increases the representativeness of average values, it at the same time reduces possibilities to identify meteorological conditions or atmospheric pollution levels determining nitrophenol concentrations and isotope ratios. Average measured carbon isotope ratios of the different nitrophenols are between -34 and -33‰, which is well within the range predicted by mass balance calculations. However, the observed carbon isotope ratios cover a range of nearly 9‰, and approximately 20% of the isotope ratios of the products have isotope ratios lower than predicted from the kinetic isotope effect of the first step of the reaction mechanism and the isotope ratio of the precursor. This can be explained by isotope fractionation during reaction steps following the initial reaction of the precursor VOCs with the OH radical. Limited evidence for local production of nitrophenols is observed since sampling was done in the Toronto area, an urban centre with significant anthropogenic emission sources. Strong evidence for significant local formation of nitrophenols is only found for samples collected in summer. On average, the difference in carbon isotope ratios between nitrophenols in the particle phase and in the gas phase is insignificant, but for a limited number of observations in summer, a substantial difference is observed. This indicates that at high OH radical concentrations, photochemical formation or removal of nitrophenols can be faster than exchange between the two phases. The dependence between the concentrations and isotope ratios of the nitrophenols and meteorological conditions as well as pollution levels (NO2, O3, SO2 and CO) demonstrate that the influence of precursor concentrations on nitrophenol concentrations is far more important than the extent of photochemical processing.

  1. Petrology, trace element abundances and oxygen isotopic compositions of a compound CAI-chondrule object from Allende

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakaki, S.; Itoh, S.; Tanaka, T.; Yurimoto, H.

    2013-02-01

    We report the petrology, trace element abundances and oxygen isotopic characteristics of a compound CAI-chondrule object, WI-025, found in the Allende CV3 chondrite. The WI-025 is an irregularly shaped inclusion consisting of three texturally and chemically distinct portions: the interior portion, the igneous rim and the intermediate zone located between these two portions. The interior portion consists of anorthite, spinel, olivine and Al-bearing low-Ca pyroxene. The major element chemistry of the interior portion corresponds to that of Al-rich chondrules and is of intermediate character between fine-grained spinel-rich CAIs and ferromagnesian chondrules. The interior portion has abundant 16O-rich spinel (?17O = -14.2 to -24.7) and displays a group II CAI-like REE composition. These observations indicate that the interior portion contains a CAI component formed by fractional condensation. The major and trace element chemistry of the interior portion indicate that the CAI had subsequently assimilated chondrule materials through partial melting. The maximum heating temperature of the partial melting is estimated at approximately 1400 °C, similar to the maximum heating temperature of Type-B CAIs. The oxygen isotopic compositions of the olivine and low-Ca pyroxene (?17O = -6.3) in the interior portion indicate that the partial melting and chondrule assimilation took place under a moderately 16O-poor nebular gas. The igneous rim is texturally and chemically similar to ferromagnesian chondrules and entirely surrounds the interior portion. The oxygen isotopic compositions of the olivine and low-Ca pyroxene in the igneous rim are indistinguishable from those of the interior olivine and Al-bearing low-Ca pyroxenes. These observations indicate that a chondrule material, which was melted in the same nebular gas as the interior portion, was accreted to the interior portion. The intermediate zone represents a reaction zone accompanying the igneous rim formation. The formation history of WI-025 can be summarized by the following processes: (1) original CAI formation, (2) partial melting and chondrule assimilation, (3) igneous rim formation and (4) secondary alteration on the parent body.

  2. Carbon and nitrogen abundances along the evolutionary sequence of M67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jeffery Allan

    A spectroscopic study of stars in the old galactic star cluster M67 was made to find the first dredge-up, that stage of stellar evolution where the surface abundances of carbon and nitrogen are altered by convective mixing with material processed by the CN cycle in the stellar interior. A high-resolution study of three bright cluster stars was made to determine the oxygen abundance of the cluster. Techniques and linelists for large-scale spectrum synthesis of the CHA x X delta v = 0 and CN B x X delta v = 1 bands were developed and used to determine the C/N abundance ratio in giant and subgiant stars. Nineteen M67 stars were analyzed with this method. It was found that the C/N ratio changes abruptly at the elbow in the cluster Hertzsprung-Russell diagram; at (BxV)sub 0 = 0.94 the C/N ratio drops by about 0.6 dex between Mv approx. = + 3.5 and Mv approx. = + 2.8. If probable systematic errors are allowed for, the C/N ratio does not change elsewhere on the cluster evolutionary sequence. The location of this change in the Hertzsprung Russell diagram is in accordance with theoretical predictions of stellar evolution although the amount of change in C/N is greater than that predicted by standard evolution calculations.

  3. Carbon and nitrogen abundances in F- and G-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clegg, R. E. S.

    1977-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen abundances have been obtained for a sample of 11-F- and G-type dwarfs covering a range in Fe/H abundance ratio from -0.8 to +0.3. Model atmospheres, which included the effects of convection and line blanketing, were used to calculate synthetic spectra of the CH, CN, and NH molecular bands. Effective oscillator strengths for the bands studied were found by matching synthetic spectra calculated from a model solar atmosphere with the observed solar bands. Many of the metal-poor stars, and particularly the high-velocity stars, were found to have substantial nitrogen over-deficiencies, suggesting that N is manufactured mostly in a secondary manner. The carbon-to-iron ratios were similar to the solar ratio, although there may be slight C over-deficiencies in metal-poor stars. However, the variation in C/Fe is not as marked as that found recently by Hearnshaw (1974). A comprehensive discussion of the theoretical errors is given, and some applications to Galactic evolution are noted.

  4. Patterns of intramolecular carbon isotopic heterogeneity within amino acids of autotrophs and heterotrophs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William B. Savidge; Neal E. Blair

    2004-01-01

    A survey of the intramolecular C isotopic composition of a variety of organisms was conducted to investigate the potential of intramolecular isotopic measurements as a tracer of biological or geochemical processes. Based on a consideration of inorganic C sources and enzymatic fractionations, contrasting predictions were made for the relative 13C enrichments of the a-carboxyl carbons fixed by the anapleurotic (ß)-carboxylation

  5. Fractionation of carbon and oxygen isotopes and magnesium between coexisting metamorphic calcite and dolomite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simon M. F. Sheppard; Henry P. Schwarcz

    1970-01-01

    Fractionations of carbon and oxygen isotopes and magnesium between coexisting dolomite and calcite have been determined for\\u000a marbles and calcareous schists of a wide variety of metamorphic environments from Vermont and the Grenville Province of Ontario.\\u000a Concordant equilibrium fractionations are given by 83% of the samples. Calibration of the isotopic thermometers using the\\u000a Mg-calcite solvus thermometer gave in the temperature

  6. Isotopic and Elemental Variations of Carbon and Nitrogen in a Mangrove Estuary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. A. Cifuentes; R. B. Coffin; L. Solorzano; W. Cardenas; J. Espinoza; R. R. Twilley

    1996-01-01

    Variations in elemental and isotopic ratios of suspended particulate matter (SPM) were investigated in the Guayas River Estuary Ecosystem (GREE) that empties into the Gulf of Guayaquil, Ecuador. Detritus in the system was identified on the basis of extremely high carbon:chlorophyllaratios (>1000). This material had mean ?13C of ?26·4±0·3, ?15N of +4·8±0·2, and (C:N)atomicof 14·1±0·9. The isotopic data were comparable

  7. Fractionation of stable carbon isotopes by phosphoenopyruvate carboxylase from C4 plants 

    E-print Network

    Reibach, Paul Howard

    1976-01-01

    need to be considered, in order to determine the resultant fractionation. Clearly the active species of C02 used is important, and must be considered first in determining the amount of isotope fractionation by C plants. Determinations of the active...FRACTIONATION OP STABLE CARBON ISOTOPES BY PHOSPHOENOLPYRUYATE CARBOXYLASE FROM C& PLANTS A Thesis by PAUL HOWARD REIBACH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

  8. Calcium isotopic composition of marine biogenic carbonates: influences of mineralogy and biology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Böhm; N. Gussone; A. Eisenhauer; A. Heuser; A. Haase-Schramm; J. Vacelet; J. Reitner; W.-C. Dullo

    2003-01-01

    We measured the calcium isotopic composition (Ca-44\\/Ca-40 ratios, delta44Ca) of reef corals, coralline sponges, and benthic and planktonic gastropods. The resulting values are compared to published data of planktonic foraminifera and inorganic aragonite precipitates (Gussone et al., in press). All carbonates are depleted in Ca-44 with respect to seawater. The isotope data form three distinct clusters: (1) inorganic aragonite, aragonitic

  9. Stable carbon isotope ratios of fatty acids in seagrass and redhead ducks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beth Trust Hammer; Marilyn L. Fogel; Thomas C. Hoering

    1998-01-01

    Fatty acids were extracted from roots and rhizomes of the seagrass, Halodule wrightii, and from subcutaneous fat tissues of eight redhead ducks (Aythya americana) collected either in Texas or South Dakota. Stable carbon isotope ratios (?13C) of individual fatty acids were measured by gas chromatography\\/combustion\\/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC\\/C\\/IRMS). In cases where individual fatty acids were not completely resolved by

  10. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Sodium and Potassium Cyanide as a Forensic Signature

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzer, Helen W [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Horita, Juske [ORNL; Moran, James J [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Tomkins, Bruce A [ORNL; Janszen, Derek B [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Carman, April [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2012-01-01

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a future chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. A few of these samples displayed non-homogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of these, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples.

  11. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Sodium and Potassium Cyanide as a Forensic Signature

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J.; Tomkins, Bruce; Janszen, Derek B.; Carman, April J.

    2012-01-03

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a future chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. A few of these samples displayed non-homogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of these, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples.

  12. Enigmatic origin of the largest-known carbon isotope excursion in Earth's history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotzinger, John P.; Fike, David A.; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2011-05-01

    Carbonate rocks from the Middle Ediacaran period in locations all over the globe record the largest excursion in carbon isotopic compositions in Earth history. This finding suggests a dramatic reorganization of Earth's carbon cycle. Named the Shuram excursion for its original discovery in the Shuram Formation, Oman, the anomaly closely precedes impressive events in evolution, including the rise of large metazoans and the origin of biomineralization in animals. Instead of a true record of the carbon cycle at the time of sedimentation, the carbon isotope signature recorded in the Shuram excursion could be caused by alteration following deposition of the carbonate sediments, a scenario supported by several geochemical indicators. However, such secondary processes are intrinsically local, which makes it difficult to explain the coincident occurrence of carbon isotope anomalies in numerous records around the globe. Both possibilities are intriguing: if the Shuram excursion preserves a genuine record of ancient seawater chemistry, it reflects a perturbation to the carbon cycle that is stronger than any known perturbations of the modern Earth. If, however, it represents secondary alteration during burial of sediments, then marine sediments must have been globally preconditioned in a unique way, to allow ordinary and local processes to produce an extraordinary and widespread response.

  13. Carbon and oxygen isotope geochemistry of live (stained) benthic foraminifera from the Aleutian Margin and the Southern Australian Margin

    E-print Network

    Levin, Lisa

    Carbon and oxygen isotope geochemistry of live (stained) benthic foraminifera from the Aleutian October 2008 Accepted 4 November 2008 Keywords: stable isotopes benthic foraminifera 13C 18O deep sea-water geochemistry and stable isotopic values of the tests of living (stained) calcareous benthic foraminifera from

  14. Factors That Influence Assimilation Rates and Fractionation of Nitrogen and Carbon Stable Isotopes in Avian Blood and Feathers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stuart Bearhop; Susan Waldron; Stephen C. Votier; Robert W. Furness

    2002-01-01

    By switching great skuas Catharacta skua from one isotopically distinct diet to another, we measured diet-tissue discrimination factors and tested the assumption that dietary nitrogen and carbon isotope signatures are incorporated into blood and feathers at similar rates. We also examined the effects of meta- bolic rate and looked for evidence of isotopic routing. We found that blood d 15

  15. Carbon Isotopic Fractionation in Fischer-Tropsch Type Reactions and Relevance to Meteorite Organics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Natasha M; Elsila, Jamie E.; Kopstein, Mickey; Nuth, Joseph A., III

    2012-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch-Type (FTT) reactions have been hypothesized to contribute to the formation of organic compounds in the early solar system, but it has been difficult to identify a signature of such reactions in meteoritic organics. The work reported here examined whether temperature-dependent carbon isotopic fractionation of FTT reactions might provide such a signature. Analyses of bulk organic deposits resulting from FTT experiments show a slight trend towards lighter carbon isotopic ratios with increasing temperature. It is unlikely, however, that these carbon isotopic signatures could provide definitive provenance for organic compounds in solar system materials produced through FTT reactions, because of the small scale of the observed fractionations and the possibility that signatures from many different temperatures may be present in any specific grain.

  16. Experimental Study of Abiotic Organic Synthesis at High Temperature and Pressure Conditions: Carbon Isotope and Mineral Surface Characterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, R. A.; Niles, P. B.

    2010-01-01

    Abiotic organic synthesis processes have been proposed as potential mechanisms for methane generation in subseafloor hydrothermal systems on Earth, and on other planets. To better understand the detailed reaction pathways and carbon isotope fractionations in this process under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions, hydrothermal experiments at high temperature (750 C) and pressure (0.55 GPa) were performed using piston cylinder apparatus. Formic acid was used as the source of CO2 and H2, and magnetite was the mineral catalyst. The chemical and carbon isotopic compositions of dissolved organic products were determined by GC-C-MS-IRMS, while organic intermediaries on the mineral catalyst were characterized by Pyrolysis-GC-MS. Among experimental products, dissolved CO2 was the dominant carbon species with a relative abundance of 88 mol%. Dissolved CH4 and C2H6 were also identified with a mole ratio of CH4 over C2H6 of 15:1. No dissolved CO was detected in the experiment, which might be attributable to the loss of H2 through the Au capsule used in the experiments at high temperature and pressure conditions and corresponding conversion of CO to CO2 by the water-gas shift reaction. Carbon isotope results showed that the 13C values of CH4 and C2H6 were -50.3% and -39.3% (V-PDB), respectively. CO2 derived from decarboxylation of formic acid had a (sigma)C-13 value of -19.2%, which was 3.2% heavier than its source, formic acid. The (sigma)C-13 difference between CO2 and CH4 was 31.1%, which was higher than the value of 9.4% calculated from theoretical isotopic equilibrium predictions at experimental conditions, suggesting the presence of a kinetic isotope effect. This number was also higher than the values (4.6 to 27.1%) observed in similar experiments previously performed at 400 C and 50 MPa with longer reaction times. CH4 is 11.0% less enriched in C-13 than C2H6. Alcohols were observed as carbon compounds on magnetite surfaces by Pyrolysis-GC-MS, which confirms the hypothesis regarding the reaction pathways of hydrothermal abiotic organic synthesis proposed by Fu et al. (2007, 2008). In this proposed pathway, hydroxymethylene (-CHOH) groups serve as organic intermediaries on mineral surfaces while dissolved H2 serves as a chain terminator/breaker to generate short chain hydrocarbons and oxygenated compounds. This pathway is different from the carbide polymerization theory of Fischer- Tropsch-type (FTT) synthesis in a gas phase. The observed increase of (sigma)C-13 values of C1 and C2 alkanes with carbon number in our hydrothermal experiments can be readily interpreted by hydroxymethylene pathway, and might be used to differentiate between hydroxymethylene and carbide polymerization pathways. Carbon isotope analysis of alcohols on mineral catalyst surfaces is under way to provide further constraints on formation of organic compounds by FTT in hydrothermal systems.

  17. Mg isotope fractionation in biogenic carbonates of deep-sea coral, benthic foraminifera, and hermatypic coral

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshihiro Yoshimura; Masaharu Tanimizu; Mayuri Inoue; Atsushi Suzuki; Nozomu Iwasaki; Hodaka Kawahata

    High-precision Mg isotope measurements by multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry were applied for\\u000a determinations of magnesium isotopic fractionation of biogenic calcium carbonates from seawater with a rapid Mg purification\\u000a technique. The mean ?26Mg values of scleractinian corals, giant clam, benthic foraminifera, and calcite deep-sea corals were ?0.87‰, ?2.57‰, ?2.34‰,\\u000a and ?2.43‰, suggesting preferential precipitation of light Mg isotopes

  18. Carbonate Mineral Formation on Mars: Clues from Stable Isotope Variation Seen in Cryogenic Laboratory Studies of Carbonate Salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard; Niles, Paul B.; Sun, Tao; Fu, Qi; Romanek, Christopher S.; Gibson, Everett K.

    2013-01-01

    The geologic history of water on the planet Mars is intimately connected to the formation of carbonate minerals through atmospheric CO2 and its control of the climate history of Mars. Carbonate mineral formation under modern martian atmospheric conditions could be a critical factor in controlling the martian climate in a means similar to the rock weathering cycle on Earth. The combination of evidence for liquid water on the martian surface and cold surface conditions suggest fluid freezing could be very common on the surface of Mars. Cryogenic calcite forms readily when a rise in pH occurs as a result of carbon dioxide degassing quickly from freezing Ca-bicarbonate-rich water solutions. This is a process that has been observed in some terrestrial settings such as arctic permafrost cave deposits, lakebeds of the Dry Valleys of Antarctica, and in aufeis (river icings) from rivers of N.E. Alaska. We report here the results of a series of laboratory experiments that were conducted to simulate potential cryogenic carbonate formation on the planet Mars. These results indicate that carbonates grown under martian conditions (controlled atmospheric pressure and temperature) show enrichments from starting bicarbonate fluids in both carbon and oxygen isotopes beyond equilibrium values with average delta13C(DIC-CARB) values of 20.5%0 which exceed the expected equilibrium fractionation factor of [10(sup 3) ln alpha = 13%0] at 0 degC. Oxygen isotopes showed a smaller enrichment with delta18O(H2O-CARB) values of 35.5%0, slightly exceeding the equilibrium fractionation factor of [10(sup 3) ln alpha = 34%0 ] at 0degC. Large kinetic carbon isotope effects during carbonate precipitation could substantially affect the carbon isotope evolution of CO2 on Mars allowing for more efficient removal of 13C from the Noachian atmosphere enriched by atmospheric loss. This mechanism would be consistent with the observations of large carbon isotope variations in martian materials despite the relative paucity of carbonate minerals in the martian crust.

  19. Textural and Carbon Isotopic Analyses of Modern Carbonate Microbialites: Possible Ancient and Martian Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Joel B.

    1998-01-01

    Many modem and ancient carbonate deposits around the world have been recognized as microbial buildups or microbialites. Ancient microbialite structures have been divided into two basic categories based on their internal fabric or texture. They include stromatolites which have a predominantly laminated internal fabric and thrombolites which have an open-porous clotted fabric, that lacks laminae. The origin of these two basic microbial fabrics is still being debated in the literature. Understanding the origin and the various microorganisms involved in forming these modem fabrics is the key to the interpretation of similar fabrics in ancient and possibly Martian rocks. Therefore, detailed studies are needed on the microbiological makeup and origin of the fabrics in modem microbialites. Such studies may serve as analogs for ancient and Martian microbialites in the future. The purpose of this study is to examine the textures and carbon isotopic signatures of the following modem microbialites from the Bahamas: 1) a modem subtidal microbialite from Iguana Cay, Bahamas and 2) a modem microbial mat (stromatolite) from a hypersaline pond on Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas.

  20. A 400 million year carbon isotope record of pedogenic carbonate: Implications for paleoatmospheric carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ekart, D.D.; Cerling, T.E.; Montanez, I.P.; Tabor, N.J.

    1999-12-01

    A 400 record of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels has been estimated by applying a CO{sub 2} paleobarometer to a database of 758 analyses of paleosol (fossil soil) carbonates. This database is a compilation of new data and previously published values from the literature. Many new analyses of Mesozoic paleosols are reported, an era poorly represented in the literature. Results indicate that large fluctuations in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels have occurred over the study interval, ranging from the current level up to ten times the current level. Declining pCO{sub 2} levels through the middle Paleozoic culminate in low levels in the Early Permian. An abrupt increase in pCO{sub 2} in the Early Permian is followed by a decrease prior to the Permo-Triassic boundary. Carbon dioxide levels increase through the Triassic to approx. 3,000 ppmV, a level maintained through the Jurassic period. Levels lowered through the Cretaceous, dropping to less than 1,000 ppmV prior to the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. Relatively low levels persisted throughout the Cenozoic, with some evidence of higher levels in the Eocene and Oligocene.

  1. Using PLFA Biomarkers and Natural Abundance Stable and Radiocarbon Isotopes to Characterize the Microbial Ecology and Metabolism of Methane Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, C. T.; Mandernack, K. W.; Slater, G. F.; Dias, R. F.

    2008-12-01

    Methane generated in the subsurface is a major source of atmospheric CH4, but its release is mitigated by CH4-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs). Therefore, it is important to understand the ecology of methanotroph communities in various environments. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analyses are a particularly useful method for characterizing these communities for two reasons: (1) Many type I and II methanotrophs produce specific PLFA biomarkers that can be used to estimate their populations, and (2) because CH4 is often very depleted in 13C and sometimes 14C, natural abundance ?13CPLFA and ?14CPLFA values can be used to trace the flow of CH4- derived carbon through microbial ecosystems. We used these tools to evaluate the role of methanotrophs in carbon flow in three different environments: (1) a soil column overlying a coal bed methane (CBM) seep in southwest CO, and pristine, oligotrophic groundwaters within (2) sedimentary and (3) granitic host rocks in Japan. In the soil column impacted by CBM seepage, concentrations of the biomarker PLFAs for type I (16:1?8cis) and type II (18:1?8cis) methanotrophs were as high as 13 and 18 nmoles (g dry soil)-1, respectively. Depth profiles of methanotroph PLFA concentrations varied over different sampling dates indicating dynamic populations. ?13CPLFA values of the CBM soils (-25.1 to - 66.9‰) were substantially more negative than those for the control soil (-14.5 to -32.5‰) indicating that CBM is an important carbon source for the CBM-impacted soil microbial community. ?14CPLFA values (-351 to -936‰) indicate the importance of 14C-dead CBM as a carbon source to the microbial communities, contributing 32 to 66% of total carbon in PLFA structures isolated from shallow soils and 67 to 97% for those isolated from deeper soils. The biomarker for type II methanotrophs, comprised 3 and 18% of total PLFAs in sedimentary and granitic groundwaters, respectively. The ?14C values determined for type II methanotroph PLFAs in the sedimentary (- 861‰) and granite (-867‰) waters were very similar to the ?14C values of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in each water (ca -850‰) suggesting that type II methanotrophs ultimately derive all of their carbon from DIC. In contrast, ?13C values of type II PLFAs in the sedimentary (- 93‰) and granite (-60‰) waters indicate that these organisms use different carbon assimilation schemes in each environment. These studies show the utility of PLFA biomarkers and ?13CPLFA and ?14CPLFA values to characterize the in situ metabolisms of methanotrophic bacteria and overall CH4 recycling in diverse environments.

  2. Isotopic variations of dissolved inorganic carbon in the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-print Network

    Kan, David Lan-Rong

    1970-01-01

    ISOTOPIC VARIATIONS OF DISSOLVED INORGANIC CARBON IN THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis DAVID LAN-RONG RAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... l9IO Maj or Subject: Oceanography ISOTOPIC VARIATIONS OF DISSOLVED INORGANIC CARBON IN THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by DAVID LAN-RONG ZAN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Departm at) ember) g~& (Member...

  3. Stable hydrogen and carbon isotope ratios of extractable hydrocarbons in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, R. V.; Epstein, S.; Pizzarello, S.; Cronin, J. R.; Yuen, G. U.

    1991-01-01

    A fairly fool-proof method to ensure that the compounds isolated from meteorites are truly part of the meteorites and not an artifact introduced by exposure to the terrestrial environment, storage, or handling is presented. The stable carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios in several of the chemical compounds extracted from the Murchison meteorite were measured. The results obtained by studying the amino acids in this meteorite gave very unusual hydrogen and carbon isotope ratios. The technique was extended to the different classes of hydrocarbons and the hydrocarbons were isolated using a variety of separation techniques. The results and methods used in this investigation are described in this two page paper.

  4. Scope for use of stable carbon isotopes in discerning the incorporation of forest detritus into aquatic foodwebs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. France

    1996-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis of carbon has been proposed as a means for discerning the incorporation of terrestrial forest detritus into aquatic foodwebs, and as such, has the potential to be used as a biomonitor of the aquatic effects of riparian deforestation. A synthesis of 13C\\/12C data from the literature indicates, however, that the scope for successful use of carbon isotope

  5. Transient carbon isotope changes in complex systems: Finding the global signal, embracing the local signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, G. J.; Schneider-Mor, A.; Filley, T. R.

    2008-12-01

    Global, transient carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) in the geological record are increasingly invoked as evidence of short-lived changes in carbon fluxes to/from the ocean-atmosphere-biosphere (exogenic) system. Reconstructing the dynamics of carbon cycle perturbation and response during such events requires that the global extent, magnitude, and temporal pattern of carbon isotope change are well understood. Unfortunately, no simple, globally integrated measure of exogenic ?13C change exists in the geological record: during major global perturbations even the best-case candidates such as deep-ocean carbonate ?13C values likely respond to a complex of factors including ocean carbonate chemistry and circulation. Here we consider the utility of organic carbon isotope records from two complex depositional systems common in the geological record, fossil soils and continental margin sediments, which are of interest in terms of their relationship to organic carbon cycling and records of past ecological change. Within both systems changes in ecology, climate, carbon source, residence time, and molecular composition have clear potential to modulate the preserved record of global exogenic ?13C change, compromising 1st-order interpretations of bulk or compound-specific isotopic records. Process-explicit eco- geochemical models, ideally combined with multi-substrate data, provide one approach to the isolation of global ?13C change and identification of local or regional processes reflected in such records. Examples from both systems drawn from ongoing work on the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum illustrate the potential pitfalls, as well as opportunities, afforded by coupled data/model assessment of transient ?13C changes in complex systems.

  6. Sources of particulate organic matter in rivers from the continental usa: lignin phenol and stable carbon isotope compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstad, Gretchen D.; Canfield, Donald E.; Quay, Paul D.; Hedges, John I.

    2000-10-01

    The origins and forms of particulate organic matter (POM) suspended in rivers are major considerations in assessing how fluvial materials integrate landscape and climate properties and ultimately record these characteristics in marine sedimentary deposits. We examined the elemental, stable carbon isotope and lignin-phenol compositions of well-characterized samples of suspended POM collected from rivers draining the south central United States. The atomic C/N ratios of 17 fine-grained samples (˜11 ± 2, n = 17) are similar to those reported worldwide for texturally similar soil and riverine POM. The corresponding ? 13C values vary from -18.5 to -26.4‰, in patterns that correspond to the relative abundances of C3 and C4 plants in the drainage basins, and hence to temperature and hydrologic patterns. Lignin-phenol yields from 12 samples indicate input of angiosperm-rich plant materials in distributions that also reflect upstream climate and vegetation. The lignin associated with these plant remains has been substantially degraded, as is typical of soil organic matter. The mass- and surface-area-normalized organic carbon contents of the river-borne POM also correspond to drainage basin properties in patterns characteristic of soils. These results indicate that highly degraded soil organic matter is a major component of fine-grained POM transported by rivers of the central US. The Mississippi River currently discharges "heavy" (? 13C ? -20‰) lignin-poor POM. The isotopic composition of this organic matter is difficult to distinguish from marine plankton remains in fine-grained sediments of the northern Gulf of Mexico, whose isotopic compositions have been previously interpreted to broadly indicate limited offshore transport of terrigenous organic matter.

  7. Serum Carbon Isotope Values Change in Adults in Response to Changes in Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake12

    PubMed Central

    Fakhouri, Tala H. I.; Jahren, A. Hope; Appel, Lawrence J.; Chen, Liwei; Alavi, Reza; Anderson, Cheryl A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Serum carbon isotope values [13C-to-12C serum carbon isotope ratio (?13C)], which reflect consumption of corn- and cane-based foods, differ between persons consuming high and low amounts of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). In this study, we determined whether serum ?13C changes in response to change in SSB intake during an 18-mo behavioral intervention trial. Data were from a subset of 144 participants from the PREMIER trial, a completed behavioral intervention (Maryland, 1998–2004). SSB intake was assessed using 2 24-h dietary recall interviews. Blinded serum samples were assayed for ?13C by natural abundance stable isotope mass spectroscopy. Multiple linear regression models with generalized estimating equations and robust variance estimation were used. At baseline, mean SSB intake was 13.8 ± 14.2 fl oz/d, and mean ?13C serum value was ?19.3 ± 0.6 units per mil (designated ‰). A reduction of 12 oz (355 mL)/d SSB (equivalent to 1 can of soda per day) was associated with 0.17‰ (95% CI: 0.08‰, 0.25‰ P < 0.0001) reduction in serum ?13C values over 18 mo (equivalent to a 1% reduction in ?13C from baseline). After adjusting for potential confounders, a reduction of 12 oz/d SSB (equivalent to 1 can of soda per day), over an 18-mo period, was associated with 0.12‰ (95% CI: 0.01‰, 0.22‰ P = 0.025) reduction in serum ?13C. These findings suggest that serum ?13C can be used as a measure of dietary changes in SSB intake. PMID:24717368

  8. Climatic forcing of carbon-oxygen isotopic covariance in temperate-region marl lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, C. N.; Patterson, W. P.; Walker, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon and oxygen stable isotopic compositions of lacustrine carbonate from a southeastern Michigan marl lake display linear covariance over a range of 4.0% Peedee belemnite (PDB) in oxygen and 3.9% (PDB) in carbon. Mechanisms of delta 13 C-delta 18 O coupling conventionally attributed to lake closure in arid-region basins are inapplicable to hydrologically open lake systems. Thus, an alternative explanation of isotopic covariance in temperate region dimictic marl lakes is required. We propose that isotopic covariance is a direct record of change in regional climate. In short-residence-time temperate-region lake basins, summer meteoric precipitation is enriched in 18O relative to winter values, and summer organic productivity enriches epilimnic dissolved inorganic carbon in 13C. Thus, climate change toward longer summers and/or shorter winters could result in greater proportions of warm-month meteoric precipitation, longer durations of warm-month productivity, and net long-term enrichment in carbonate 18O and 13C. Isotopic covariance observed in the Michigan marl lake cores is interpreted to reflect postglacial warming from 10 to 3 ka followed by cooler mean annual temperature, a shift toward greater proportions of seasonal summer precipitation, a shortening of the winter season, or some combination of these three factors.

  9. Biometrics from the carbon isotope ratio analysis of amino acids in human hair.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Glen P; An, Yan; Konstantynova, Kateryna I; Rashaid, Ayat H B

    2015-01-01

    This study compares and contrasts the ability to classify individuals into different grouping factors through either bulk isotope ratio analysis or amino-acid-specific isotope ratio analysis of human hair. Using LC-IRMS, we measured the isotope ratios of 14 amino acids in hair proteins independently, and leucine/isoleucine as a co-eluting pair, to provide 15 variables for classification. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the essential amino acids and non-essential amino acids were mostly independent variables in the classification rules, thereby enabling the separation of dietary factors of isotope intake from intrinsic or phenotypic factors of isotope fractionation. Multivariate analysis revealed at least two potential sources of non-dietary factors influencing the carbon isotope ratio values of the amino acids in human hair: body mass index (BMI) and age. These results provide evidence that compound-specific isotope ratio analysis has the potential to go beyond region-of-origin or geospatial movements of individuals-obtainable through bulk isotope measurements-to the provision of physical and characteristic traits about the individuals, such as age and BMI. Further development and refinement, for example to genetic, metabolic, disease and hormonal factors could ultimately be of great assistance in forensic and clinical casework. PMID:25577006

  10. Normalization of stable isotope data for carbonate minerals: Implementation of IUPAC guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Tae; Coplen, Tyler B.; Horita, Juske

    2015-06-01

    Carbonate minerals provide a rich source of geochemical information because their ?13C and ?18O values provide information about surface and subsurface Earth processes. However, a significant problem is that the same ?18O value is not reported for the identical carbonate sample when analyzed in different isotope laboratories in spite of the fact that the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has provided reporting guidelines for two decades. This issue arises because (1) the ?18O measurements are performed on CO2 evolved by reaction of carbonates with phosphoric acid, (2) the acid-liberated CO2 is isotopically fractionated (enriched in 18O) because it contains only two-thirds of the oxygen from the solid carbonate, (3) this oxygen isotopic fractionation factor is a function of mineralogy, temperature, concentration of the phosphoric acid, and ?18O value of water in the phosphoric acid, (4) researchers may use any one of an assortment of oxygen isotopic fractionation factors that have been published for various minerals at various reaction temperatures, and (5) it sometimes is not clear how one should calculate ?18OVPDB values on a scale normalized such that the ?18O value of SLAP reference water is -55.5 ‰ relative to VSMOW reference water. To enable researchers worldwide to publish the same ?18O value (within experimental uncertainty) for the same carbonate sample, we have re-evaluated reported acid fractionation factors for calcite at 25, 50, and 75 °C and propose a revised relation for the temperature dependence of oxygen isotopic acid fractionation factor, ?CO2(ACID)-calcite , of where T is temperature in kelvin. At 25 °C, ?CO2(ACID)-calcite = 1.01025 , the most commonly accepted value for this quantity. We propose a normalization protocol in which (1) the internationally distributed carbonate isotopic reference materials NBS 18 and NBS 19 are interspersed among carbonate samples analyzed by treatment with phosphoric acid, (2) the ?18O values of the calcite reference materials and the carbonate samples are calculated, respectively, by using the ?CO2(ACID)-calcite relation above and oxygen-isotope acid fractionation factors appropriate for the sample mineralogy and reaction temperature, (3) the ?18O values of solid carbonate samples are determined on the VPDB scale (?18OVPDB) with IUPAC-recommended scale expansion such that the ?18O of SLAP reference water is -55.5 ‰ relative to VSMOW reference water by normalizing ?18O values of carbonate samples with 2014-IUPAC-recommended ?18O values of NBS 18 and NBS 19, and (4) ?18O values on the VPDB scale are converted to ?18O values on the VSMOW-SLAP scale by using IUPAC recommendations. To ease calculations in the protocol, a software application titled "Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Normalization Tool for Carbonates" is available that relies upon IUPAC-recommended ?13C and ?18O values of carbonate isotopic reference materials (http://isotopes.usgs.gov/research/topics/carbonatesnormalizationtool.html).

  11. A novel sample decomposition technique at atmospheric pressure for the determination of Os abundances in iron meteorites using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hattori, M; Hirata, T

    2001-06-01

    A safe and reliable analytical technique for the determination of Os abundances in ten iron meteorites of various chemical groups was developed using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry coupled with a sample decomposition technique. A major advantage of the sample decomposition technique developed here is that the pressure inside the reaction flask is not increased through the decomposition reaction because the flask is a fully opened system, obviating the risk of explosion of the glass apparatus. Another advantage is that there is no restriction in the sample size being decomposed. In this study, about 2 g of metallic sample were decomposed safely, and this sample size, > 10 times larger than that typically used for the Carius tube technique, allows one to obtain more reliable Os data for heterogeneous samples. The metallic samples were decomposed in a glass flask purged with Ar. Since the O2 was purged from the reaction flask, Os was not oxidised to volatile OsO4, thereby preventing significant evaporation loss of Os. The typical recovery of Os throughout the sample decomposition and separation processes was > 80%, and the total Os blank through the decomposition of a 1 g amount of sample was less than 20 pg. Os abundances were determined by means of stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry using a 190Os-enriched isotopic tracer. Except for Sikhote-Alin, the measured Os abundances in almost all the iron meteorites exhibited a good agreement with the previously published Os abundance data, within the analytical uncertainty achieved in this study (2-5%). For the Sikhote-Alin meteorite, on the basis of a better correlation between Os and Ir abundances, we believe that our Os abundance data should be more reliable. The Os abundance data obtained in this work clearly demonstrated the suitability of the newly developed sample decomposition procedure for low level Os determinations. PMID:11445949

  12. Carbon fluxes in soil food webs of increasing complexity revealed by 14C labelling and 13C natural abundance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea Ruf; Yakov Kuzyakov; Olga Lopatovskaya

    2006-01-01

    Soil food webs are mainly based on three primary carbon (C) sources: root exudates, litter, and recalcitrant soil organic matter (SOM). These C sources vary in their availability and accessibility to soil organisms, which could lead to different pathways in soil food webs. The presence of three C isotopes (12C, 13C and 14C) offers an unique opportunity to investigate all