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1

Using computer models of stable isotope abundance to trace and understand NOx transformation to HNO3  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Advances in our understanding of stable isotope fractionation and transformation have occurred recently in the study of the NOx cycle. In particular, stable isotopes have been used to elucidate the transformation of NOx to HNO3, and to understand specific sources of NOx to this important atmospheric cycle. Many uncertainties still exist within this chemistry however, and models of stable isotope abundance within these compounds can help to answer important questions relating to the source and transformation of NOx. Using computer modeling techniques and tools focused on stable isotope abundance, we explore NOx source and transformation in the atmosphere. Two models are the specific focus of this study: a photochemical box model based on the Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (RACM) as well as the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. Modeling results are compared to samples of wet and dry deposition for verification. Implications for future research will also be discussed.

Mase, D. F.; Michalski, G. M.

2013-12-01

2

Atmospheric Trace Gas Abundances and Stable Isotope Ratios via IR-LIF  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We propose to develop new technologies with support provided by PIDDP that will enable the in situ measurements of abundances and stable isotope ratios in important radiatively and biogenically active gases such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, water, methane, nitrous oxide, and hydrogen sulfide to very high precision (0.1 per mil or better for the isotopic ratios, for example). Such measurements, impossible at present, could provide pivotal new constraints on the global (bio)geochemical budgets of these critical species, and could also be used to examine the dynamics of atmospheric transport on Mars, Titan, and other solar system bodies. We believe the combination of solid state light sources with imaging of the IR laser induced fluorescence (IR-LIF) via newly available detector arrays will make such in situ measurements possible for the first time. Even under ambient terrestrial conditions, the LIF yield from vibrational excitation of species such as water and carbon dioxide should produce emission measures well in excess of ten billion photons/sec from samples volumes of order 1 c.c. These count rates can, in principle, yield detection limits into the sub-ppt range that are required for the in situ isotopic study of atmospheric trace gases. While promising, such technologies are relatively immature, but developing rapidly, and there are a great many uncertainties regarding their applicability to in situ IR-LIF planetary studies. We therefore feel PIDDP support will be critical to developing these new tools, and propose a three-year program to combine microchip near-IR lasers with low background detection axes and state-of-the-art HgCdTe detectors developed for astronomical spectroscopy to investigate the sensitivity of IR-LIF under realistic planetary conditions, to optimize the optical pumping and filtering schemes for important species, and to apply the spectrometer to the non-destructive measurement of stable isotopes in a variety of test samples. These studies form the necessary precursors to the development of compact, lightweight stable isotope/trace gas sensors for future planetary missions.

Blake, Geoffrey A.

2004-01-01

3

Temporal variation in mycorrhizal diversity and carbon and nitrogen stable isotope abundance in the wintergreen meadow orchid Anacamptis morio.  

PubMed

Many adult orchids, especially photoautotrophic species, associate with a diverse range of mycorrhizal fungi, but little is known about the temporal changes that might occur in the diversity and functioning of orchid mycorrhiza during vegetative and reproductive plant growth. Temporal variations in the spectrum of mycorrhizal fungi and in stable isotope natural abundance were investigated in adult plants of Anacamptis morio, a wintergreen meadow orchid. Anacamptis morio associated with mycorrhizal fungi belonging to Tulasnella, Ceratobasidium and a clade of Pezizaceae (Ascomycetes). When a complete growing season was investigated, multivariate analyses indicated significant differences in the mycorrhizal fungal community. Among fungi identified from manually isolated pelotons, Tulasnella was more common in autumn and winter, the pezizacean clade was very frequent in spring, and Ceratobasidium was more frequent in summer. By contrast, relatively small variations were found in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotope natural abundance, A.morio samples showing similar (15) N enrichment and (13) C depletion at the different sampling times. These observations suggest that, irrespective of differences in the seasonal environmental conditions, the plant phenological stages and the associated fungi, the isotopic content in mycorrhizal A.morio remains fairly constant over time. PMID:25382295

Ercole, Enrico; Adamo, Martino; Rodda, Michele; Gebauer, Gerhard; Girlanda, Mariangela; Perotto, Silvia

2015-02-01

4

Natural-abundance stable carbon isotopes of small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) from Guaymas Basin (Mexico)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) is a phylogenetically informative molecule found in all species. Because it is poorly preserved in most environments, it is a useful marker for active microbial populations. We are using the natural-abundance stable carbon isotopic composition of specific microbial groups to help identify the carbon substrates contributing to microbial biomass in a variety of marine environments. At Guaymas Basin, hydrothermal fluids interact with abundant sedimentary organic carbon to produce natural gas and petroleum. Where this reaches the sediment surface, it can support dense patches of seafloor life, including Beggiatoa mats. We report here on the stable carbon isotopic composition of SSU rRNA from a Beggiatoa mat transect, a cold background site, a warm site with high oil concentration, and a second Beggiatoa mat. The central part of the transect mat overlay the steepest temperature gradient, and was visually dominated by orange Beggiatoa. This was fringed by white Beggiatoa mat and bare, but still warm, sediment. Methane concentrations were saturating beneath the orange and white mats and at the oily site, lower beneath bare sediment, and below detection at the background site. Our initial hypotheses were that rRNA isotopic composition would be strongly influenced by methane supply, and that archaeal rRNA might be lighter than bacterial due to contributions from methanogens and anaerobic methane oxidizers. We used biotin-labeled oligonucleotides to capture Bacterial and Archaeal SSU rRNA for isotopic determination. Background-site rRNA was isotopically heaviest, and bacterial RNA from below 2 cm at the oily site was lightest, consistent with control by methane. Within the transect mat, however, the pattern was more complicated; at some sediment depths, rRNA from the mat periphery was isotopically lightest. Part of this may be due to the spatially and temporally variable paths followed by hydrothermal fluid, which can include horizontal flow. There was no consistent isotopic difference between rRNAs captured by the two probes, although RNA recoveries were too low for isotopic determinations at depths where methanogens and methane oxidizers are expected. Our prediction that rRNA stable carbon isotopic composition would correlate with methane supply was borne out by the comparison between background and mat sediments, but may be an oversimplification for sites within hydrothermal features. Future work will include the isotopic characterization of other potential carbon substrates, such as acetate. We are also investigating cold-seep sediments and brine pools in the Gulf of Mexico, where methane is significantly more 13C-depleted than at Guaymas Basin and may therefore leave a stronger imprint on microbial biomass.table carbon isotopes of rRNA captured with Bacterial and Archaeal probes at mat transect and background sites.

MacGregor, B. J.; Mendlovitz, H.; Albert, D.; Teske, A. P.

2012-12-01

5

Stable isotope studies  

SciTech Connect

The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

Ishida, T.

1992-01-01

6

Natural abundance stable carbon isotope evidence for the routing and de novo synthesis of bone FA and cholesterol.  

PubMed

This research reported in this paper investigated the relationship between diet and bone FA and cholesterol in rats raised on a variety of isotopically controlled diets comprising 20% C3 or C4 protein (casein) and C3 and/or C4 nonprotein or energy (sucrose, starch, and oil) macronutrients. Compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis (delta13C) was performed on the FA (16:0, 18:0, 18:1, and 18:2) and cholesterol isolated from the diet (n = 4) and bone (n = 8) of these animals. The dietary signals reflected by the bone lipids were investigated using linear regression analysis. delta13C values of bone cholesterol and stearic (18:0) acid were shown to reflect whole-diet delta13C values, whereas the delta13C values of bone palmitic (16:0), oleic (18:1), and linoleic (18:2) acids reflected dietary FA delta13C values. Dietary signal differences are a result of the balance between direct incorporation (or routing) and de novo synthesis of each of these bone lipids. Estimates of the degree of routing of these bone lipids gleaned from correlations between delta13C(dlipid-wdiet) (= delta13C(diet lipid) - delta13C(whole diet)) spacings and delta13C(blipid-wdiet) (= delta13C(bone lipid) - delta13C(whole diet)) fractionations demonstrated that the extent of routing, where 18:2 > 16:0 > 18:1 > 18:0 > cholesterol, reflected the relative abundances of these lipids in the diet. These findings provide the basis for more accurate insights into diet when the delta13C analysis of bone fatty FA or cholesterol is employed. PMID:12733751

Jim, Susan; Ambrose, Stanley H; Evershed, Richard P

2003-02-01

7

Evaluating microbial carbon sources in Athabasca oil sands tailings ponds using natural abundance stable and radiocarbon isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Natural abundance stable (?13C) and radiocarbon (?14C) isotopes of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) were used to evaluate the carbon sources utilized by the active microbial populations in surface sediments from Athabasca oil sands tailings ponds. The absence of algal-specific PLFAs at three of the four sites investigated, in conjunction with ?13C signatures for PLFAs that were generally within ~3 of that reported for oil sands bitumen (~ -30), indicated that the microbial communities growing on petroleum constituents were dominated by aerobic heterotrophs. The ?14C values of PLFAs ranged from -906 to -586 and pointed to a significant uptake of fossil carbon (up to ~90% of microbial carbon derived from petroleum), particularly in PLFAs (e.g., cy17:0 and cy19:0) often associated with petroleum hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. The comparatively higher levels of 14C in other, less specific PLFAs (e.g., 16:0) indicated the preferential uptake of younger organic matter by the general microbial population (~50-80% of microbial carbon derived from petroleum). Since the main carbon pools in tailings sediment were essentially 'radiocarbon dead' (i.e., no detectable 14C), the principal source for this modern carbon is considered to be the Athabasca River, which provides the bulk of the water used in the bitumen extraction process. The preferential uptake of the minor amount of young and presumably more biodegradable material present in systems otherwise dominated by recalcitrant petroleum constituents has important implications for remediation strategies. On the one hand, it implies that mining-related organic contaminants could persist in the environment long after tailings pond reclamation has begun. Alternatively, it may be that the young, labile organic matter provided by the Athabasca River plays an important role in stimulating or supporting the microbial utilization of petroleum carbon in oil sands tailings ponds via co-metabolism or priming processes. Further research needs to examine the role which priming processes play in controlling the fate of organic contaminants in Athabasca oil sands tailings ponds, such as understanding to what extent the addition of labile material may hinder or enhance microbial uptake of fossil carbon. This knowledge can be subsequently used to optimize conditions which favour natural attenuation processes in reclamation sites following mine closure.

Ahad, J. M.; Pakdel, H.

2013-12-01

8

Tracing the source of cooking oils with an integrated approach of using stable carbon isotope and fatty acid abundance.  

PubMed

We report a new approach to identify swill-cooked oils that are recycled from tainted food and livestock waste from commercial vegetable and animal oils by means of carbon isotope values and relative abundance of fatty acids. We test this method using 40 cooking oil samples of different types with known sources. We found significant differences in both total organic carbon isotope as well as compound-specific isotope values and fatty acid C(14)/C(18) ratios between commercial vegetable oils refined from C(3) plants (from -35.7 to -27.0 and from 0 to 0.15) and animal oils (from -28.3 to -14.3 and from 0.1 to 0.6). Tested swill-cooked oils, which were generally refined by mixing with animal waste illegally, fall into a narrow ?(13)C/fatty acid ratio distribution: from -25.9 to -24.1 and from 0.1 to 0.2. Our data demonstrate that the index of a cross-plotting between fatty acid ?(13)C values and C(14)/C(18) ratios can be used to distinguish clean commercial cooking oils from illegal swill-cooked oils. PMID:22813234

Liu, Weiguo; Yang, Hong; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Jinzhao

2012-08-15

9

Colorado Plateau Stable Isotope Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website, hosted by Northern Arizona University, describes stable isotopes. The site defines stable isotopes and how to measure them, and lists their research applications. Many of the advances in ecology and environmental sciences in the past decade have relied on stable isotopes.

Colorado Plateau Stable Isotope Laboratory (CPSIL); University, Northern A.

10

Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios of Individual Pollen Grains as a Proxy for C3- Versus C4-Grass Abundance in Paleorecords: A Validation Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

C3 and C4 grasses have distinct influences on major biogeochemical processes and unique responses to important environmental controls. Difficulties in distinguishing between these two functional groups of grasses have hindered paleoecological studies of grass-dominated ecosystems. We recently developed a technique to analyze the stable carbon isotope composition of individual grass-pollen grains using a spooling- wire microcombustion device interfaced with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (Nelson et al. 2007). This technique holds promise for improving C3 and C4 grass reconstructions. It requires ~90% fewer grains than typical methods and avoids assumptions associated with mixing models. However, our previous work was based on known C3 and C4 grasses from herbarium specimens and field collections and the technique had not been test using geological samples. To test the ability of this technique to reproduce the abundance of C3 and C4 grasses on the landscape, we measured ?13C values of >1500 individual grains of grass pollen isolated from the surface sediments of 10 North American lakes that span a large gradient of C3 and C4 grass abundance. Results indicate a strong positive correlation (r=0.94) between % C4-grass pollen (derived from classifying ?13C values from single grains as C3 and C4) and the literature-reported abundance of C4 grasses on the landscape. However, the measured % C4-grass pollen shows some deviation from the actual abundance at sites with high proportions of C4 grasses. This is likely caused by uncertainty in the magnitude, composition, and variability of the analytical blank associated with these measurements. Correcting for this deviation using regression analysis improves the estimation of the abundance of C4 grasses on the landscape. Comparison of the % C4-grass pollen with C/N and ?13C measurements of total organic matter in the same lake-sediment samples illustrates the distinct advantage of grass-pollen ?13C as a proxy for distinguishing C3 and C4 shifts. At 9 of the 10 sites C/N values indicate that surface-sediment organic matter was derived primarily from aquatic production. At the one site where organic matter was produced primarily by vascular plants the ?13C value (-29.3) suggests organic matter derived exclusively from C3 plants. However, ~80% of the grasses on the landscape at this site are C4 grasses. The C3- like bulk-sediment ?13C value likely represents woody species, which comprise >90% of the pollen spectra. Thus ?13C analysis of single grains of grass pollen offers a new tool to classify grass pollen into two major functional groups and promises to advance our understanding of grassland ecology and evolution. Reference Nelson, D.M., Hu, F.S., Mikucki, J., Tian, J., and Pearson, A., 2007, Carbon isotopic analysis of individual pollen grains from C3 and C4 grasses using a spooling wire microcombustion interface: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, v. 71, p. 4005-4014.

Nelson, D. M.; Hu, F.; Pearson, A.

2007-12-01

11

Millimeter-scale variations of stable isotope abundances in carbonates from banded iron-formations in the Hamersley Group of Western Australia  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Several diamond drill cores from formations within the Hamersley Group of Western Australia have been studied for evidence of short-range variations in the isotopic compositions of the carbonates. For a set of 32 adjacent microbands analyzed in a specimen from the Marra Mamba Iron Formation, carbon isotope compositions of individual microbands ranged from -2.8 to -19.8 per mil compared to PDB and oxygen isotope compositions ranged from 10.2 to 20.8 per mil compared to SMOW. A pattern of alternating abundances was present, with the average isotopic contrasts between adjacent microbands being 3.0 per mil for carbon and 3.1 per mil for oxygen. Similar results were obtained for a suite of 34 microbands (in four groups) from the Bruno's Band unit of the Mount Sylvia Formation. Difficulties were experienced in preparing samples of single microbands from the Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation, but overall isotopic compositions were in good agreement with values reported by previous authors. Chemical analyses showed that isotopically light carbon and oxygen were correlated with increased concentrations of iron. The preservation of these millimeter-scale variations in isotopic abundances is interpreted as inconsistent with a metamorphic origin for the isotopically light carbon in the BIF carbonates. A biological origin is favored for the correlated variations in 13C and Fe, and it is suggested that the 13C-depleted carbonates may derive either from fermentative metabolism or from anaerobic respiration. A model is presented in which these processes occur near the sediment-water interface and are coupled with an initial oxidative precipitation of the iron.

Baur, M. E.; Hayes, J. M.; Studley, S. A.; Walter, M. R.

1985-01-01

12

[Distribution characteristics of soil humus fractions stable carbon isotope natural abundance (delta 13C) in paddy field under long-term ridge culture].  

PubMed

A 16-year field experiment was conducted in a ridge culture paddy field in the hilly region of Sichuan Basin, aimed to investigate the distribution characteristics of stable carbon isotope natural abundance (delta 13C) in soil humus fractions. The soil organic carbon (SOC) content in the paddy field under different cultivation modes ranked in the order of wide ridge culture > ridge culture > paddy and upland rotation. In soil humus substances (HS), humin (HU) was the main composition, occupying 21% - 30% of the total SOC. In the extracted soil carbon, humic acid (HA) dominated, occupying 17% - 21% of SOC and 38% - 65% of HS. The delta 13C value of SOC ranged from -27.9 per thousand to -25.6 per thousand, and the difference of the delta 13C value between 0-5 cm and 20-40 cm soil layers was about 1.9 per thousand. The delta 13C value of HA under different cultivation modes was 1 per thousand - 2 per thousand lower than that of SOC, and more approached to the delta 13C value of rapeseed and rice residues. As for fulvic acid (FA), its delta 13C value was about 2 per thousand and 4 per thousand higher than that of SOC and HA, respectively. The delta 13C value of HU in plough layer (0-20 cm) and plow layer (20-40 cm) ranged from -23.7 per thousand - -24.9 per thousand and -22.6 per thousand - -24.2 per thousand, respectively, reflecting the admixture of young and old HS. The delta 13C value in various organic carbon fractions was HU>FA>SOC>rapeseed and rice residues>HA. Long-term rice planting benefited the increase of SOC content, and cultivation mode played an important role in affecting the distribution patterns of soil humus delta 13C in plough layer and plow layer. PMID:21774322

Tang, Xiao-hong; Luo, You-jin; Ren, Zhen-jiang; L, Jia-ke; Wei, Chao-fu

2011-04-01

13

Environmental and biomedical applications of natural metal stable isotope variations  

USGS Publications Warehouse

etal stable isotopes are now being used to trace metal contaminants in the environment and as indicators of human systemic function where metals play a role. Stable isotope abundance variations provide information about metal sources and the processes affecting metals in complex natural systems, complementing information gained from surrogate tracers, such as metal abundance ratios or biochemical markers of metal metabolism. The science is still in its infancy, but the results of initial studies confirm that metal stable isotopes can provide a powerful tool for forensic and biomedical investigations.

Bullen, T.D.; Walczyk, T.

2009-01-01

14

Stable Isotopes and M&Ms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students are often confused by the concepts of stable isotope signatures and conventional notation. This activity is designed to introduce students to the del notation (isotopic signature), fractionation, and end member mixing of stable isotopes using familiar objects disguised as isotopes. The activity does not explain the physical manifestation of why isotopic fractionation occurs, but does explain the concepts that one easily observes when interpreting stable isotope data sets.

De Jesus, Roman

15

Bayesian stable isotope mixing models  

EPA Science Inventory

In this paper we review recent advances in Stable Isotope Mixing Models (SIMMs) and place them into an over-arching Bayesian statistical framework which allows for several useful extensions. SIMMs are used to quantify the proportional contributions of various sources to a mixtur...

16

Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic inventory of the most abundant demersal fish captured by benthic gears in southwestern Iceland (North Atlantic)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stable isotopes (?13C and ?15N) were used to examine the origin of organic matter for the most representative demersal species of the SW Icelandic fishery, accounting for over 70% of landings of those species in the North Atlantic. Samples were collected during a 2-week period in early September 2004 from landings and directly during fishing cruises. Stable isotopes showed that particulate organic matter and sedimentary organic matter were at the base of the food web and appeared to fill two different compartments: the pelagic and the benthic. The pelagic realm was composed of only capelin and sandeel; krill and redfish occupied an intermediate position between pelagic and benthic realms; while anglerfish, haddock, cod and ling resulted as the true demersal species while tusk, rays and plaice were strongly linked to the benthic habitat.

Sar, Gianluca; de Pirro, Maurizio; Sprovieri, Mario; Rumolo, Paola; Halldrsson, Halldr Plmar; Svavarsson, Jrundur

2009-12-01

17

Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopic  

Microsoft Academic Search

The perennially ice-covered lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, are part of the coldest and driest ecosystem on earth. To understand lacustrine carbon and nitrogen cycling in this end-member ecosystem, and to define paleolimnological proxies for ice-covered lakes, we measured the stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of particulate organic matter (POM) and benthic organic matter (BOM) within the

Jennifer Lawson; PETER T. DORAN; Fabien Kenig; DAVID J. DES MARAIS; JOHN C. PRISCU

2004-01-01

18

Chlorine stable isotopes in sedimentary systems: does size matter?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Stable isotope abundances vary because of size differences. The chlorine stable isotope system was one of the first described theoretically, but had a slow, disappointment strewn development, relative to other elements. Method improvement gave only small, but significant, differences in compositions of geological materials. Eventually, brines and groundwater chlorides gave larger differences. Physical processes like diffusion and adsorption, probably are the main controls of groundwater compositions. Recent work on anthropogenic groundwater contaminants shows variations resulting from manufacturing processes; implying possibilities of tracing sources.

Coleman, Max

2004-01-01

19

Climatic/Hydrologic Oscillations since 155,000 yr B.P. at Owens Lake, California, Reflected in Abundance and Stable Isotope Composition of Sediment Carbonate  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Sediment grain size, carbonate content, and stable isotopes in 70-cm-long (???1500-yr) channel samples from Owens Lake core OL-92 record many oscillations representing climate change in the eastern Sierra Nevada region since 155,000 yr B.P. To first order, the records match well the marine ??18O record. At Owens Lake, however, the last interglaciation appears to span the entire period from 120,000 to 50,000 yr B.P., according to our chronology, and was punctuated by numerous short periods of wetter conditions during an otherwise dry climate. Sediment proxies reveal that the apparent timing of glacial-interglacial transitions, notably the penultimate one, is proxy-dependent. In the grain-size and carbonate-content records this transition is abrupt and occurs at ??? 120,000 yr B.P. In contrast, in the isotopic records the transition is gradual and occurs between 145,000 and 120,000 yr B. P. Differences in timing of the transition are attributed to variable responses by proxies to climate change. ?? 1997 University of Washington.

Menking, K.M.; Bischoff, J.L.; Fitzpatrick, J.A.; Burdette, J.W.; Rye, R.O.

1997-01-01

20

Uses of stable isotopes in fish ecology  

EPA Science Inventory

Analyses of fish tissues (other than otoliths) for stable isotope ratios can provide substantial information on fish ecology, including physiological ecology. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon frequently are used to determine the mix of diet sources for consumers. Stable i...

21

Stable isotope deltas: Tiny, yet robust signatures in nature  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including 14C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. 13C, 2H, and 18O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as?25 per mil can be written as?25 mUr (or?2.5 cUr or?0.25 dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg units are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 or+15 per meg can be written as+15 ?Ur.

Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, Tyler B.

2012-01-01

22

Stable isotope deltas: tiny, yet robust signatures in nature.  

PubMed

Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including (14)C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. (13)C, (2)H, and (18)O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as-25 per mil can be written as-25mUr (or-2.5cUr or-0.25dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg 'units' are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 or+15 per meg can be written as+15?Ur. PMID:22462621

Brand, Willi A; Coplen, Tyler B

2012-09-01

23

Europium Isotopic Abundances in Very Metal-poor Stars  

E-print Network

Europium isotopic abundance fractions are reported for the very metal-poor, neutron-capture-rich giant stars CS 22892-052, HD 115444, and BD +17 3248. The abundance fractions, derived from analysis of several strong Eu II lines appearing in high-resolution spectra of these stars, are in excellent agreement with each other and with their values in the Solar System: fraction(\\iso{Eu}{151}) ~= fraction(\\iso{Eu}{153}) ~= 0.5. Detailed abundance studies of very metal-poor stars have previously shown that the total elemental abundances of stable atoms with atomic numbers z >= 56 typically match very closely those of a scaled solar-system r-process abundance distribution. The present results for the first time extend this agreement to the isotopic level.

Christopher Sneden; John J. Cowan; James E. Lawler; Scott Burles; Timothy C. Beers; George M. Fuller

2002-01-28

24

Substitution of stable isotopes in Chlorella  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Replacement of biologically important isotopes in the alga Chlorella by corresponding heavier stable isotopes produces increasingly greater deviations from the normal cell size and changes the quality and distribution of certain cellular components. The usefulness of isotopically altered organisms increases interest in the study of such permuted organisms.

Flaumenhaft, E.; Katz, J. J.; Uphaus, R. A.

1969-01-01

25

Stable Isotope Signatures for Microbial Forensics  

SciTech Connect

The isotopic distribution of the atoms composing the molecules of microorganisms is a function of the substrates used by the organisms. The stable isotope content of an organism is fixed so long as no further substrate consumption and biosynthesis occurs, while the radioactive isotopic content decays over time. The distribution of stable isotopes of C, N, O and H in heterotrophic microorganisms is a direct function of the culture medium, and therefore the stable isotope composition can be used to associate samples with potential culture media and also with one another. The 14C content depends upon the 14C content, and therefore the age, of the organic components of the culture medium, as well as on the age of the culture itself. Stable isotope signatures can thus be used for sample matching, to associate cultures with specific growth media, and to predict characteristics of growth media.

Kreuzer, Helen W.

2012-01-03

26

Measurement of isotope abundance variations in nature by gravimetric spiking isotope dilution analysis (GS-IDA).  

PubMed

Subtle variations in the isotopic composition of elements carry unique information about physical and chemical processes in nature and are now exploited widely in diverse areas of research. Reliable measurement of natural isotope abundance variations is among the biggest challenges in inorganic mass spectrometry as they are highly sensitive to methodological bias. For decades, double spiking of the sample with a mix of two stable isotopes has been considered the reference technique for measuring such variations both by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) and multicollector-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS). However, this technique can only be applied to elements having at least four stable isotopes. Here we present a novel approach that requires measurement of three isotope signals only and which is more robust than the conventional double spiking technique. This became possible by gravimetric mixing of the sample with an isotopic spike in different proportions and by applying principles of isotope dilution for data analysis (GS-IDA). The potential and principle use of the technique is demonstrated for Mg in human urine using MC-TIMS for isotopic analysis. Mg is an element inaccessible to double spiking methods as it consists of three stable isotopes only and shows great potential for metabolically induced isotope effects waiting to be explored. PMID:23419016

Chew, Gina; Walczyk, Thomas

2013-04-01

27

Sourcing drugs with stable isotopes James R. Ehleringer  

E-print Network

and trafficking information. These stable isotope ratio measurements are conducted on an isotope ratioing massSourcing drugs with stable isotopes James R. Ehleringer Stable Isotope Ratio Facility@erols.com Michael J. Lott Stable Isotope Ratio Facility for Environmental Research (SIRFER) Department of Biology

Ehleringer, Jim

28

Bone stable isotope studies in archaeology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen in bone have become increasingly frequent inclusions in archaeological reports over the past few decades. The majority of such studies has been done in North America, where the use of marine foods and the introduction of maize have been monitored. Similar questions have been addressed in Mesoamerica and South America. In Europe, stable

Margaret J. Schoeninger; Katherine Moore

1992-01-01

29

Resources on Isotopes: Fundamentals of Stable Isotope Geochemistry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a brief review of some of the fundamentals of stable isotope geochemistry, including definitions, terminology, basic principles, standards, and guidelines on reporting data. Users can follow the link on the top right for the periodic table and read about the isotopic systems of several dozen elements.

30

Stable Isotope-Based Paleoaltimetry  

E-print Network

paleoelevation. These studies rely on the preservation of ancient surface water composi- tions in authigenic minerals to reconstruct the elevation at the time the minerals were forming. In this review we provide this theory to test cases using modern precipitation and surface water isotopic compositions to demonstrate

Garzione, Carmala N.

31

Uncertainty in source partitioning using stable isotopes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable isotope analyses are often used to quan- tify the contribution of multiple sources to a mixture, such as proportions of food sources in an animal's diet, or C3 and C4 plant inputs to soil organic carbon. Linear mixing models can be used to partition two sources with a single isotopic signature (e.g., ?13C) or three sources with a second

Donald L. Phillips; Jillian W. Gregg

2001-01-01

32

Carbonate abundances and isotopic compositions in chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the bulk C abundances, and C and O isotopic compositions of carbonates in 64 CM chondrites, 14 CR chondrites, 2 CI chondrites, LEW 85332 (C2), Kaba (CV3), and Semarkona (LL3.0). For the unheated CMs, the total ranges of carbonate isotopic compositions are ?13C ? 25-75 and ?18O ? 15-35, and bulk carbonate C contents range from 0.03 to 0.60 wt%. There is no simple correlation between carbonate abundance and isotopic composition, or between either of these parameters and the extent of alteration. Unless accretion was very heterogeneous, the uncorrelated variations in extent of alteration and carbonate abundance suggests that there was a period of open system behavior in the CM parent body, probably prior to or at the start of aqueous alteration. Most of the ranges in CM carbonate isotopic compositions can be explained by their formation at different temperatures (0-130 C) from a single fluid in which the carbonate O isotopes were controlled by equilibrium with water (?18O ? 5) and the C isotopes were controlled by equilibrium with CO and/or CH4 (?13C ? -33 or -20 for CO- or CH4-dominated systems, respectively). However, carbonate formation would have to have been inefficient, otherwise carbonate compositions would have resembled those of the starting fluid. A quite similar fluid composition (?18O ? -5.5, and ?13C ? -31 or -17 for CO- or CH4-dominated systems, respectively) can explain the carbonate compositions of the CIs, although the formation temperatures would have been lower (~10-40 C) and the relative abundances of calcite and dolomite may play a more important role in determining bulk carbonate compositions than in the CMs. The CR carbonates exhibit a similar range of O isotopes, but an almost bimodal distribution of C isotopes between more (?13C ? 65-80) and less altered samples (?13C ? 30-40). This bimodality can still be explained by precipitation from fluids with the same isotopic composition (?18O ? -9.25, and ?13C ? -21 or -8 for CO- or CH4-dominated systems, respectively) if the less altered CRs had higher mole fractions of CO2 in their fluids. Semarkona and Kaba carbonates have some of the lightest C isotopic compositions of the meteorites studied here, probably because they formed at higher temperatures and/or from more CO2-rich fluids. The fluids responsible for the alteration of chondrites and from which the carbonates formed were almost certainly accreted as ices. By analogy with cometary ices, CO2 and/or CO would have dominated the trapped volatile species in the ices. The chondrites studied are too oxidized for CO-dominated fluids to have formed in their parent bodies. If CH4 was the dominant C species in the fluids during carbonate formation, it would have to have been generated in the parent bodies from CO and/or CO2 when oxidation of metal by water created high partial pressures of H2. The fact that the chondrite carbonate C/H2O mole ratios are of the order predicted for CO/CO2-H2O ices that experienced temperatures of >50-100 K suggests that the chondrites formed at radial distances of <4-15 AU.

Alexander, C. M. O'd.; Bowden, R.; Fogel, M. L.; Howard, K. T.

2015-01-01

33

Stable isotopic compositions of hydrothermal vent organisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable isotopic analyses were used to study trophic relationships in two communities of deep-sea hydrothermal vent organism in the Pacific Ocean. The community at Hanging Gardens on the East Pacific Rise (21N), sampled in 1985, is dominated by two species of vestimentiferan tubeworms; communities at Alice Springs and Snail Pits on the Marianas Back Arc Spreading Center (western Pacific), sampled

C. L. Dover; B. Fry

1989-01-01

34

UNCERTAINTY IN SOURCE PARTITIONING USING STABLE ISOTOPES  

EPA Science Inventory

Stable isotope analyses are often used to quantify the contribution of multiple sources to a mixture, such as proportions of food sources in an animal's diet, C3 vs. C4 plant inputs to soil organic carbon, etc. Linear mixing models can be used to partition two sources with a sin...

35

Electrochemical Fractionation of Molybdenum Stable Isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stable isotope signatures were measured from Molybdenum (Mo) electrodeposited from aqueous solution. As potential varied from -1.35 V to -2.00 V (relative to Ag/AgCl), fractionation decreases from ?97/95Mo = -1.3 to -0.9 (?97/95Mo defined as the difference in the 97Mo/95Mo ratio of deposited Mo relative to aqueous Mo). Natural variations of ?97/95Mo span a range of ~ 3 [Barling, J. and Anbar, A. D., EPSL. 2004, 217: 315], therefore, charge transfer driven fractionation may be responsible for some of the observed variation in Mo stable isotope geochemistry. Following previous approaches with Fe and Zn [Kavner, A. et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. 2005, 69: 2971; 2008, 72: 1731], Mo was plated in a three-electrode cell from a neutral to slightly alkaline solution (pH ~ 8.7). Voltage was held constant during electrodeposition using an Autolab Potentiostat. In all experiments, less than 0.5 % of the Mo was deposited, which insures that the plating reservoir remains at an approximately constant isotopic composition. Plated Mo was then recovered in acid, and the isotopic composition of samples and stock solutions were measured using a Thermo Scientific Neptune MC-ICP-MS. These experiments show that the redox process induces an isotopic signature with respect to the starting material, with a trend showing that fractionation decreases as a function of applied voltage.

Crawford, J.; Black, J.; Wasylenki, L.; Gordon, G.; Anbar, A.; Kavner, A.

2008-12-01

36

Stable isotope enrichment using a plasma centrifuge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A primary goal of the Department of Energy's Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program (Isotope Program) within the Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) is to produce isotopes that are in short supply in the U.S. and of which there exists no or insufficient domestic commercial production capability. A vacuum arc plasma centrifuge is a rigid rotor column of metal plasma in which centrifugal forces re-distribute ions radially according to their mass/charge ratio. Early work demonstrated rotation at 2 million rpm and separation of various stable isotopes. The spinning plasma column had a Gaussian flux profile, peaked on the rigid rotor axis. This work adopts a more efficient approach, with the plasma created as a hollow column, wherein the flux is concentrated at larger radii where the centrifugal action is highest. By tailoring the vacuum arc discharge geometry, the rotation rate can also be increased to 10 million rpm. Data from Cu, Al and other metal plasmas will be presented and discussed in light of enriched stable isotopes needed for research and medicine.

Krishnan, Mahadevan; Bures, Brian; Madden, Robert

2012-10-01

37

Stable Frequencies for Animal Abundance Estimation  

E-print Network

Estimate Model Inversion Multifrequency Abundance Estimation #12; Exploits the size and shape dependent by uncorrelated Gaussian noise. How will this noise effect the error in the estimate? Model: E. superba (DWBA) SNR = 50dB R: 3x3 Sizes: 18mm,36.5mm,55mm 10,000 simulated estimates Frequencies used: Cond(R) = 28 @ 38

Jaffe, Jules

38

Paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the Asbole fauna (Busidima Formation, Afar, Ethiopia) using stable isotopes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Middle Pleistocene environmental and climatic conditions at Asbole, lower Awash Valley, Ethiopia were reconstructed using stable carbon and oxygen isotopic composition (13C, 18O) of fossil tooth enamel coupled with faunal abundance data. We analyzed the isotopic composition of a total of 80 herbivorous tooth enamel samples from 15 mammalian taxa, which archive the dietary preferences and drinking behavior from

Zelalem Bedaso; Jonathan G. Wynn; Zeresenay Alemseged; Denis Geraads

2010-01-01

39

The stable isotope ecology of terrestrial plant succession  

Microsoft Academic Search

We review the relevance and use of stable isotopes for the study of plant community succession. Stable isotope measurements provide information on the origin of resources acquired by plants, the processes governing resource uptake and transformation, and the physiological and environmental conditions of plant growth. When combined with measurements of the stable isotope ratio values of soil microbial biomass, soil

Vctor Resco; Juan P. Ferrio; Jos A. Carreira; Leonor Calvo; Pere Casals; ngel Ferrero-Serrano; Elena Marcos; Jos M. Moreno; David A. Ramrez; M. Teresa Sebasti; Fernando Valladares; David G. Williams

2011-01-01

40

Production of Stable Isotopes by Selective Channel Photofission of Pd  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A conservative modeling and analysis were attempted to explain the presence of nonradioactive fission-like products with nonnatural isotopic ratios observed in some D2O/Pd electrolysis experiments. The collective deformation of a Pd nucleus by multiphoton E1 resonance absorption in a dynamic PdDx lattice was assumed to induce low-energy photofissions via the selective scission channels within the lowest band (11-20 MeV) of channel-dependent fission barriers. Values of channel dependent fission barriers were calculated by using liquid drop model potentials for Pd isotopes. Fission products were analyzed in detail. Major fission products (FPs) are stable isotopes and the isotopic ratios of FP elements are very different from those of natural abundances. The present theoretical results have shown good agreement with the experimental data of Mizuno ?l. [Denki Kagaku 64 (1996) 1660] and others in terms of Z-distribution, mass distribution and isotopic ratios. Selective channel photofissions with positive Q-values are possible for A>90 nuclei, which may provide us with a clean method for the incineration for the radio isotope (RI) waste of nuclear plants.

Takahashi, Akito; Ohta, Masayuki; Mizuno, Tadahiko

2001-12-01

41

Stable Isotope Spectroscopy for Diagnostic Medicine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Isotopic tracers have been used in medical research for more than fifty years. Radioactive isotopes have been most used because of the high detection efficiencies possible. With increased awareness of the effects of low level radiation and radioactive waste management problems, the need for safe non radioactive tracers has become apparent. Rare stable isotopes of biologically active elements can be used for metabolic and pharmacokinetic studies provided that both sufficient detection sensitivity can be achieved and reliable cost effective instruments can be developed. High resolution optical spectroscopic methods which can determine isotopic ratios with high precision and accuracy are viable for research and clinical use. The study of 13C/12C ratios in CO2 for breath test diagnostics will be described in detail. Using the laser optogalvonic effect with isotopic lasers a specific medical diagnostic for h-pylori infection, has recently received FDA approval. Opportunities exist to study D/H ratios in water and 18O/16O ratios in CO2 and water for basic metabolism diagnostics and 15N/14N ratios in urine for liver function and related studies.

Murnick, D. E.

2000-06-01

42

Modelling fractionation of stable isotopes in stalagmites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High resolution ?13C and ?18O profiles recorded in precisely dated speleothems are widely used proxies for the climate of the past. Both ?13C and ?18O depend on several climate related effects including meteorological processes, processes occurring in the soil zone above the cave and isotope fractionation processes occurring in the solution layer on the stalagmite surface. Here we model the latter using a stalagmite isotope and growth model and determine the relationship between the stable isotope values in speleothem calcite and cave parameters, such as temperature, drip interval, water p and a mixing coefficient describing mixing processes between the solution layer and the impinging drop. The evolution of ?13C values is modelled as a Rayleigh distillation process and shows a pronounced dependence on the residence time of the solution on the stalagmite surface and the drip interval, respectively. The evolution of ?18O values, in contrast, is also influenced by buffering reactions between the bicarbonate in the solution and the drip water driving the ?18O value of the bicarbonate towards the value expected for equilibrium isotope fractionation between drip water and calcite. This attenuates the dependence of the ?18O values on drip interval. The temperature dependence of ?18O, however, is more pronounced than for ?13C and in a similar range as expected for fractionation under equilibrium conditions. We also investigate the isotopic enrichment of the ?13C and ?18O values along individual growth layers and, thus, the slopes expected for Hendy tests. The results show that a positive Hendy test is only possible if isotope fractionation occurred under disequilibrium conditions. However, a negative Hendy test does not exclude that isotope fractionation occurred under disequilibrium conditions. A more reliable indicator for disequilibrium fractionation is the enrichment of the ?13C values along an individual growth layer.

Mhlinghaus, Christian; Scholz, Denis; Mangini, Augusto

2009-12-01

43

Modeling the dynamics of stable isotope tissue-diet enrichment.  

PubMed

Reconstructions of dietary composition and trophic level from stable isotope measurements of animal tissue rely on predictable offsets of stable isotope ratios from diet to tissue. Physiological processes associated with metabolism shape tissue stable isotope ratios, and as such the spacing between stable isotope ratios of diet and tissue may be influenced by processes such as growth, nutritional stress, and disease. Here, we develop a model of incorporation stable isotopes in diet to tissues by coupling stable isotope dynamics to a model of macronutrient energy metabolism. We use the model to explore the effect of changes in dietary intake, both composition and amount, and in energy expenditure, on body mass and carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of tissue. PMID:25457228

Remien, Christopher H

2015-02-21

44

Environmental controls on stable isotope ratios in New Zealand Podocarpaceae: Implications for palaeoclimate reconstruction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stable isotope ratios of various proxies are widely used for palaeoclimate reconstruction, and it is often assumed that isotope ratios reflect vegetation abundance or type. However, very little research exists on the isotopic equilibration of extant biomes under variable environmental conditions. In this study, carbon and oxygen isotope ratios from leaves of various Podocarpaceae genera, endemic to New Zealand, are linked to environmental parameters from the Land Environments New Zealand model. The dominant influence on stable isotope ratios within the majority of Podocarpaceae studied here is vapour pressure deficit (VPD). A simple latitudinal trend does not exist, and neither temperature nor rainfall (decoupled from VPD) controls the stable isotope ratios. The results suggest that modern spatial heterogeneity in VPD affects the stable isotope values of vegetation, and that historic VPD variability would change the stable isotope ratios of Podocarpaceae without necessitating a change in vegetation type, density, or productivity. This represents an alternative model for temporal isotope change within geochemical proxies and reinforces the need for increased stable isotopic research in modern plant ecosystems to better understand modern, and eventually palaeoclimatic processes affecting the terrestrial biosphere.

Brett, Marianne J.; Baldini, James U. L.; Grcke, Darren R.

2014-09-01

45

Electrochemical Fractionation of Molybdenum Stable Isotopes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable isotope signatures were measured from Molybdenum (Mo) electrodeposited from aqueous solution. As potential varied from -1.35 V to -2.00 V (relative to Ag\\/AgCl), fractionation decreases from Delta97\\/95Mo = -1.3 0\\/00 to -0.9 0\\/00 (Delta97\\/95Mo defined as the difference in the 97Mo\\/95Mo ratio of deposited Mo relative to aqueous Mo). Natural variations of delta97\\/95Mo span a range of ~ 3

J. Crawford; J. Black; L. Wasylenki; G. Gordon; A. Anbar; A. Kavner

2008-01-01

46

Stable isotope probing linking microbial identity to function  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable isotope probing (SIP) is a technique that is used to identify the microorganisms in environmental samples that use a particular growth substrate. The method relies on the incorporation of a substrate that is highly enriched in a stable isotope, such as 13C, and the identification of active microorganisms by the selective recovery and analysis of isotope-enriched cellular components. DNA

Marc G. Dumont; J. Colin Murrell

2005-01-01

47

STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF NUCLEIC ACIDS TO TRACE SOURCES OF DISSOLVED SUBSTRATES USED BY ESTUARINE BACTERIA  

EPA Science Inventory

The natural abundance of stable carbon isotopes measured in bacterial nucleic acids that were extracted from estuarine bacterial concentrates were used to trace sources of organic matter for bacteria in.aquatic environments. he stable carbon isotope ratios of P. aeruginosa and nu...

48

Strontium stable isotopes fractionate in the soil environments?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study shows that the stable isotopic composition of strontium (the 88Sr/ 86Sr ratio expressed as ? 88/86Sr value relative to the NBS987 standard) varies significantly in sedimentary terrestrial environments. The abundances of 86Sr, 88Sr isotopes were analyzed by MC-ICP-MS "Nu Plasma". All studied rocks and waters show ? 88/86Sr values that are distinctly different from the measured NBS987 standard (yielding 0.01 0.05, all errors are reported as 2 ?). Modern corals from the northern Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea yielded significantly different value than seawater (? 88/86Sr = 0.22 0.07, compared to 0.35 0.06, respectively), in an excellent correlation with the ? 88/86Sr analyses reported by Fietzke and Eisenhauer [Fietzke, J., Eisenhauer, A., 2006. Determination of temperature-dependent stable strontium isotopes ( 88Sr/ 86Sr) fractionation via bracketing standard MC-ICP-MS. Geochm. Geophys. Geosyst. 7 (no. 8)] on other coral samples. All carbonate samples that originated in the marine environment: corals ( porites and acropora from the northern Gulf of Aqaba); Cretaceous limestone and runoff from the Judea Mountains as well as lacustrine evaporitic aragonite (Dead Sea); and Red Sea and Atlantic seawater yield an average ? 88/86Sr value of 0.26 0.1. On the other hand, secondary materials (products of chemical weathering) from the terrestrial environment of the Judea Mountain such as terra rossa soil and speleothem calcite (that derives its Sr from the above-lying soil) yielded significantly lower ? 88/86Sr value of - 0.17 0.06. This indicates that strontium isotopes fractionate in the soil environment calling for a possible development of strontium isotopes as a tracer for processes of chemical weathering and pedogenesis.

Halicz, Ludwik; Segal, Irina; Fruchter, Noa; Stein, Mordechai; Lazar, Boaz

2008-07-01

49

Uncertainty in source partitioning using stable isotopes.  

PubMed

Stable isotope analyses are often used to quantify the contribution of multiple sources to a mixture, such as proportions of food sources in an animal's diet, or C3 and C4 plant inputs to soil organic carbon. Linear mixing models can be used to partition two sources with a single isotopic signature (e.g., ?(13)C) or three sources with a second isotopic signature (e.g., ?(15)N). Although variability of source and mixture signatures is often reported, confidence interval calculations for source proportions typically use only the mixture variability. We provide examples showing that omission of source variability can lead to underestimation of the variability of source proportion estimates. For both two- and three-source mixing models, we present formulas for calculating variances, standard errors (SE), and confidence intervals for source proportion estimates that account for the observed variability in the isotopic signatures for the sources as well as the mixture. We then performed sensitivity analyses to assess the relative importance of: (1) the isotopic signature difference between the sources, (2) isotopic signature standard deviations (SD) in the source and mixture populations, (3) sample size, (4) analytical SD, and (5) the evenness of the source proportions, for determining the variability (SE) of source proportion estimates. The proportion SEs varied inversely with the signature difference between sources, so doubling the source difference from 2 to 4 reduced the SEs by half. Source and mixture signature SDs had a substantial linear effect on source proportion SEs. However, the population variability of the sources and the mixture are fixed and the sampling error component can be changed only by increasing sample size. Source proportion SEs varied inversely with the square root of sample size, so an increase from 1 to 4 samples per population cut the SE in half. Analytical SD had little effect over the range examined since it was generally substantially smaller than the population SDs. Proportion SEs were minimized when sources were evenly divided, but increased only slightly as the proportions varied. The variance formulas provided will enable quantification of the precision of source proportion estimates. Graphs are provided to allow rapid assessment of possible combinations of source differences and source and mixture population SDs that will allow source proportion estimates with desired precision. In addition, an Excel spreadsheet to perform the calculations for the source proportions and their variances, SEs, and 95% confidence intervals for the two-source and three-source mixing models can be accessed at http://www.epa.gov/wed/pages/models.htm. PMID:24577646

Phillips, D L; Gregg, J W

2001-04-01

50

STABLE ISOTOPE DYNAMICS IN SUMMER FLOUNDER TISSUES, WITH APPLICATION TO DIETARY ASSESSMENTS IN CHESAPEAKE BAY  

E-print Network

STABLE ISOTOPE DYNAMICS IN SUMMER FLOUNDER TISSUES, WITH APPLICATION TO DIETARY ASSESSMENTS Growth rates........................................................................18 Isotopic turnover 2: STABLE ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF SUMMER FLOUNDER DIETS IN CHESAPEAKE BAY

Newman, Michael C.

51

The potential for application of ink stable isotope analysis in questioned document examination.  

PubMed

We investigated a novel application of stable isotope abundance analysis of nitrogen ((15)N), carbon ((13)C), hydrogen ((2)H), and oxygen ((18)O) to characterize pen ink. We focused on both ballpoint and gel pen inks. We found that the isotope ratios of ink from pens purchased together in a package were similar and within-package stable isotope ratio variability was not significantly larger than the variability of isotope reference materials used during analysis. In contrast, the isotope ratios of ink from pens of the same brand purchased in three states of the continental USA were significantly different from each other and there was isotope ratio variation among pens of the same brand but different, unknown production periods. The stable isotope ratios of inked paper were statistically distinguishable using measured ?(15)N values. Paper inked with different gel pens was statistically distinguishable using measured ?(2)H values. The capacity of stable isotope ratios to differentiate among ballpoint inks as well as gel inks shows that stable isotope analysis may be a useful and quantifiable investigative technique for questioned document examination, although current sample size requirements limit its utility. Application of the technique in casework will require the development of micro-scale sampling and analysis methods. PMID:25577004

Chesson, Lesley A; Tipple, Brett J; Barnette, Janet E; Cerling, Thure E; Ehleringer, James R

2015-01-01

52

Stable Isotopes James R Ehleringer and Thure E Cerling  

E-print Network

for introduction into the mass spectrometer. The most commonly used approaches involve introducing hydrogen as H2 Element Isotope Abundance (%) Hydrogen 1 H 99.985 2 H 0.015 Carbon 12 C 98.89 13 C 1.11 Nitrogen 14 N 99? Of particular interest for global change studies are vari- ations in the isotopic abundances of hydrogen, carbon

Ehleringer, Jim

53

Isotope Shift Measurements of Stable and Short-Lived Lithium Isotopes for Nuclear Charge Radii Determination  

E-print Network

Isotope Shift Measurements of Stable and Short-Lived Lithium Isotopes for Nuclear Charge Radii along the lithium isotopic chain were determined using a combination of precise isotope shift of lithium isotopes which combines high sensitivity, speed, and accuracy to measure the extremely small field

Pachucki, Krzysztof

54

Supporting Information Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils  

E-print Network

S 1 Supporting Information for Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil, Ames IA 50011, USA. 3 Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853: 7 (including this cover page) Number of figures: 3 Number of tables: 1 #12;S 2 Proof of COO bonding

Lehmann, Johannes

55

APPROACHES FOR MEASURING STABLE CARBON AND NITROGEN ISOTOPES IN BACTERIA  

EPA Science Inventory

Stable isotopes have been used successfully over the past three decades to trace through aquatic food chairs. his technique, however, has only recently been used to examine aquatic microbial roles in elemental cycling. he major obstacle to measuring stable isotope compositions in...

56

Stable Isotopes and Mineral Resource Investigations in the United States  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This USGS handout is a page providing a good, brief summary of stable isotope techniques and applications in the geosciences. A map indicating the locations of current USGS stable isotopic studies accompanies the text. A discussion of mineral weathering effects and case studies from ore deposits in Maine and North Carolina complement the general overview.

57

Use of stable isotope analysis in determining aquatic food webs  

EPA Science Inventory

Stable isotope analysis is a useful tool for describing resource-consumer dynamics in ecosystems. In general, organisms of a given trophic level or functional feeding group will have a stable isotope ratio identifiable different than their prey because of preferential use of one ...

58

Stable Isotope Tracers in Large Scale Hydrological Models  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen (deuterium and oxygen-18) have been shown to be effective tracers for characterizing hydrological processes in small river basins. Their application in large river basins has lagged behind due to the lack of sufficient isotope data. Recent availability of isotope data from most US rivers and subsequent efforts by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

B. M. Fekete; P. Aggarwal

2004-01-01

59

Stable isotopes as one of nature's ecological recorders  

E-print Network

and spatial analysis with those in isotope analyses and modeling sophistication opens the door to an exciting], to reconstructing climate from tree rings [3], stable isotope analyses are an important part of the ecologist]; and hydrogen (d2 H) and oxygen isotope ratios (d18 O) record water-related dynamics in plants and animals [9

Ehleringer, Jim

60

Intraseasonal variability in South America recorded in stable water isotopes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent number isotopic records extracted from Andean ice cores (South America) has illustrated the key role such archives can play in past climate reconstructions. Nevertheless, interpreting isotopic archives as quantified climate proxies requires an understanding of which climate parameters control the stable isotopic composition of water. Mesoscale modeling sheds new light on the meteorological mechanisms dominant during austral summer.

Christophe Sturm; Franoise Vimeux; Gerhard Krinner

2007-01-01

61

Incorporating concentration dependence in stable isotope mixing models  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable isotopes are often used as natural labels to quantify the contributions of multiple sources to a mixture. For example, C and N isotopic signatures can be used to determine the fraction of three food sources in a consumer's diet. The standard dual isotope, three source linear mixing model assumes that the proportional contribution of a source to a mixture

Donald L. Phillips; Paul L. Koch

2002-01-01

62

Does avian malaria infection affect feather stable isotope signatures?  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is widely accepted that stable isotope ratios in inert tissues such as feather keratin reflect the dietary isotopic signature\\u000a at the time of the tissue synthesis. However, some elements such as stable nitrogen isotopes can be affected by individual\\u000a physiological state and nutritional stress. Using malaria infection experiment protocols, we estimated the possible effect\\u000a of malaria parasite infections on

Elizabeth Yohannes; Vaidas Palinauskas; Gediminas Valki?nas; Raymond W. Lee; Casimir V. Bolshakov; Staffan Bensch

63

MEASURING TERRESTRIAL SUBSIDIES TO AQUATIC FOOD WEBS USING STABLE ISOTOPES OF HYDROGEN  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding river food webs requires distinguishing energy derived from primary production in the river itself (autochthonous) from that produced externally (allochthonous), yet there are no universally applicable and reliable techniques for doing so. We compared the natural abundance stable isotope ratios of hydrogen (dD) of allochthonous and autochthonous energy sources in four different aquatic ecosystems. We found that autochthonous organic

Richard R. Doucett; Jane C. Marks; Dean W. Blinn; Melanie Caron; Bruce A. Hungate

2007-01-01

64

LITERATURE SURVEY ON ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO MEASUREMENTS - 2001-2005  

SciTech Connect

Along with my usual weekly review of the published literature for new nuclear data, I also search for new candidates for best measurements of isotopic abundances from a single source. Most of the published articles, that I previously had found in the Research Library at the Brookhaven Lab, have already been sent to the members of the Atomic Weights Commission, by either Michael Berglund or Thomas Walczyk. In the last few days, I checked the published literature for any other articles in the areas of natural variations in isotopic abundance ratios, measurements of isotopic abundance ratios on samples of extra-terrestrial material and isotopic abundance ratio measurements performed using ICPMS instruments. Hopefully this information will be of interest to members of the Commission, the sub-committee on isotopic abundance measurements (SIAM), members of the former sub-committee on natural isotopic fractionation (SNIF), the sub-committee on extra-terrestrial isotope ratios (SETIR), the RTCE Task Group and the Guidelines Task Group, who are dealing with ICPMS and TIMS comparisons. In the following report, I categorize the publications in one of four areas. Measurements performed using either positive or negative ions with Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer, TIMS, instruments; measurements performed on Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer, ICPMS, instruments; measurements of natural variations of the isotopic abundance ratios; and finally measurements on extra-terrestrial samples with instrumentation of either type. There is overlap in these areas. I selected out variations and ET results first and then categorized the rest of the papers by TIMS and ICPMS.

HOLDEN, N.E.

2005-08-13

65

Use of stable isotopes in mineral nutrition research  

SciTech Connect

Stable isotopes are valuable tools for research on mineral bioavailability and metabolism. They can be used as tracers with no exposure to radiation and they do not decay over time. Attempts to use stable isotopes of minerals as metabolic tracers were first described only 25 years ago. There were relatively few reports of their use over the next 15 years, but interest in stable isotopes has expanded markedly in the last 10 years. The advantages of stable isotope tracers are so great that scientists have been willing to accept the laborious and costly nature of mineral isotope analysis, and substantial progress has been made in the field. New applications for stable isotopes and new analytical methods have been introduced recently. However, limitations to the approach and methodological problems remain to be resolved. This review describes early work in the field and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of stable isotope tracers and of the various methods of analysis. Information discovered with stable isotopes is reviewed, and probable future applications are discussed.69 references.

Turnlund, J.R.

1989-01-01

66

Evidence for mass-independent and mass-dependent fractionation of the stable isotopes of mercury by natural processes in aquatic ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Isotopic and chemical analyses were performed on crustaceans, forage fish, top predator fish, and sediment cores from Lake Ontario and two boreal forest lakes to investigate fractionation of the stable isotopes of Hg in aquatic ecosystems. Multicollector inductively coupled mass spectrometry was used to determine Hg isotope abundances. The Hg isotope data for all three lakes showed mass-independent variation in

Togwell A. Jackson; D. Michael Whittle; Marlene S. Evans; Derek C. G. Muir

2008-01-01

67

Stable Isotope Database: present and past archives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Paleoclimate data provide benchmarks against which the realism of the processes simulated by climate models can be assessed. Within this framework, it is essential to avoid introducing uncertainties associated with transfer functions and therefore to operate with robust proxies. The implementation of stable isotopes of water or carbon inside climate models motivates a synthesis of available data. Supported by the LABEX L-IPSL and involving a team of climate modelers and paleoclimatologists, this project aims to establish a worldwide database of ?18O, ?D ?17O and ?13C from oceanic microfossils, corals, ice cores, cave speleothems, lakes, tree rings, and vegetation leaves wax. The aim is to provide a global vision of the hydrological cycle during the LGM and other selected key periods (last 2000 years, Mid-Holocene, Dansgaard-Oeschger events, and the Eemian). It requires screening through hundreds of published oceanic and continental records, validating the selection of the data based on resolution and chronological information. We extracted ~900 dated ?18O records from 650 marine sediment cores, 65 ?18O records from 50 ice cores, ~200 ?18O speleothems records from 60 caves, and 540 ?13C records from 290 marine sediment cores. An additional aspect of this project consists in the construction of an online portal providing an intuitive and interactive platform allowing selecting, visualizing, and downloading of the records included in this database, thus improving the distribution and comparison of paleoclimatic records from various sites.

Bolliet, Timoth

2014-05-01

68

Isotopic abundance in atom trap trace analysis  

DOEpatents

A method and system for detecting ratios and amounts of isotopes of noble gases. The method and system is constructed to be able to measure noble gas isotopes in water and ice, which helps reveal the geological age of the samples and understand their movements. The method and system uses a combination of a cooled discharge source, a beam collimator, a beam slower and magneto-optic trap with a laser to apply resonance frequency energy to the noble gas to be quenched and detected.

Lu, Zheng-Tian; Hu, Shiu-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Mueller, Peter

2014-03-18

69

Stable isotope views on ecosystem function: challenging or challenged?  

PubMed Central

Stable isotopes and their potential for detecting various and complex ecosystem processes are attracting an increasing number of scientists. Progress is challenging, particularly under global change scenarios, but some established views have been challenged. The IX meeting of the Spanish Association of Terrestrial Ecology (AAET, beda, 1822 October 2009) hosted a symposium on the ecology of stable isotopes where the linear mixing model approach of partitioning sinks and sources of carbon and water fluxes within an ecosystem was challenged, and new applications of stable isotopes for the study of plant interactions were evaluated. Discussion was also centred on the need for networks that monitor ecological processes using stable isotopes and key ideas for fostering future research with isotopes. PMID:20015858

Resco, Vctor; Querejeta, Jos I.; Ogle, Kiona; Voltas, Jordi; Sebasti, Maria-Teresa; Serrano-Ortiz, Penlope; Linares, Juan C.; Moreno-Gutirrez, Cristina; Herrero, Asier; Carreira, Jos A.; Torres-Caabate, Patricia; Valladares, Fernando

2010-01-01

70

Multivariate Stable Isotope Analysis to Determine Linkages between Benzocaine Seizures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In July 2010, a woman was jailed for nine years in the UK after the prosecution successfully argued that attempting to import a cutting agent was proof of involvement in a conspiracy to supply Cocaine. That landmark ruling provided law enforcement agencies with much greater scope to tackle those involved in this aspect of the drug trade, specifically targeting those importing the likes of benzocaine or lidocaine. Huge quantities of these compounds are imported into the UK and between May and August 2010, four shipments of Benzocaine amounting to more then 4 tons had been seized as part of Operation Kitley, a joint initiative between the UK Border Agency and the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA). By diluting cocaine, traffickers can make it go a lot further for very little cost, leading to huge profits. In recent years, dealers have moved away from inert substances, like sugar and baby milk powder, in favour of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including anaesthetics like Benzocaine and Lidocaine. Both these mimic the numbing effect of cocaine, and resemble it closely in colour, texture and some chemical behaviours, making it easier to conceal the fact that the drug has been diluted. API cutting agents have helped traffickers to maintain steady supplies in the face of successful interdiction and even expand the market in the UK, particularly to young people aged from their mid teens to early twenties. From importation to street-level, the purity of the drug can be reduced up to a factor of 80 and street level cocaine can have a cocaine content as low as 1%. In view of the increasing use of Benzocaine as cutting agent for Cocaine, a study was carried out to investigate if 2H, 13C, 15N and 18O stable isotope signatures could be used in conjunction with multivariate chemometric data analysis to determine potential linkage between benzocaine exhibits seized from different locations or individuals to assist with investigation and prosecution of drug distribution network. More than 40 Benzocaine samples comprising both seized and control samples were analysed by two stable isotope forensic laboratories in two different countries (Australia and Scotland) to assess intra-lab reproducibility as well as inter-lab repeatability of measured stable isotope abundance values.

Kemp, H. F.; Meier-Augenstein, W.; Collins, M.; Salouros, H.; Cunningham, A.; Harrison, M.

2012-04-01

71

STABLE ISOTOPIC RESPONSE TO THE LATE EOCENE EXTRATERRESTRIAL IMPACT EVENTS  

E-print Network

STABLE ISOTOPIC RESPONSE TO THE LATE EOCENE EXTRATERRESTRIAL IMPACT EVENTS by AIMEE E PUSZ A thesis to the Late Eocene Extraterrestrial Impact Events by AIMEE ELIZABETH PUSZ Thesis Director: Dr. Kenneth G

72

Stable isotopes in precipitation in the Asian monsoon region  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of the Asian monsoon on the delta18O composition of precipitation is investigated on the basis of the ECHAM-4 Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM), fitted with stable isotopic tracers. The model is forced with prescribed sea surface temperatures (SST) over the last few decades of the 20th century. The simulated climate and climate-stable isotope relationships are validated with observational

M. Vuille; M. Werner; R. S. Bradley; F. Keimig

2005-01-01

73

Carbon Stable Isotopes as Indicators of Coastal Eutrophication  

EPA Science Inventory

Coastal ecologists and managers have frequently used nitrogen stable isotopes (?15N) to trace and monitor anthropogenic nitrogen (N) in coastal ecosystems. However, the interpretation of ?15N data can often be challenging, if not confounding, as the isotope values fr...

74

Stable Isotope Tracers of Process in Great Lakes Food Webs  

EPA Science Inventory

Stable isotope analyses of biota are now commonly used to discern trophic pathways between consumers and their foods. However, those same isotope data also hold information about processes that influence the physicochemical setting of food webs as well as biological processes ope...

75

SOURCE PARTITIONING USING STABLE ISOTOPES: COPING WITH TOO MANY SOURCES  

EPA Science Inventory

Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers in environmental studies. One application is to use isotopic ratios to quantitatively determine the proportional contribution of several sources to a mixture, such as the proportion of various pollution sources in a waste st...

76

Stable isotopes sales: Mound customer and shipment summaries, FY 1985  

SciTech Connect

A listing is given of Mound's sales of stable isotopes of noble gases, deuterium, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, bromine, and sulfur for fiscal year 1985. Purchasers are listed alphabetically and are divided into domestic and foreign groups. A cross-reference index by location is included for domestic and foreign customers. Cross-reference listings by isotope purchased are included for all customers.

Flayler, K.A. (comp.)

1987-12-15

77

Stable isotope sales: Mound customer and shipment summaries, FY 1986  

SciTech Connect

A listing is given of Mound's sales of stable isotopes of noble gases, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, and sulfur for fiscal year 1986. Purchasers are listed alphabetically and are divided into domestic and foreign groups. Cross-reference indexes by location and by isotope are included for all customers. 3 tabs.

Kramer, L.R. (ed.); Flayler, K.A. (comp.)

1988-05-20

78

Isotope-abundance variations of selected elements (IUPAC technical report)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Documented variations in the isotopic compositions of some chemical elements are responsible for expanded uncertainties in the standard atomic weights published by the Commission on Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. This report summarizes reported variations in the isotopic compositions of 20 elements that are due to physical and chemical fractionation processes (not due to radioactive decay) and their effects on the standard atomic-weight uncertainties. For 11 of those elements (hydrogen, lithium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, sulfur, chlorine, copper, and selenium), standard atomic-weight uncertainties have been assigned values that are substantially larger than analytical uncertainties because of common isotope-abundance variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin. For 2 elements (chromium and thallium), recently reported isotope-abundance variations potentially are large enough to result in future expansion of their atomic-weight uncertainties. For 7 elements (magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, molybdenum, palladium, and tellurium), documented isotope variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin are too small to have a significant effect on their standard atomic-weight uncertainties. This compilation indicates the extent to which the atomic weight of an element in a given material may differ from the standard atomic weight of the element. For most elements given above, data are graphically illustrated by a diagram in which the materials are specified in the ordinate and the compositional ranges are plotted along the abscissa in scales of (1) atomic weight, (2) mole fraction of a selected isotope, and (3) delta value of a selected isotope ratio.

Coplen, T.B.; Bhlke, J.K.; De Bievre, P.; Ding, T.; Holden, N.E.; Hopple, J.A.; Krouse, H.R.; Lamberty, A.; Peiser, H.S.; Revesz, K.; Rieder, S.E.; Rosman, K.J.R.; Roth, E.; Taylor, P.D.P.; Vocke, R.D., Jr.; Xiao, Y.K.

2002-01-01

79

An investigation of techniques for the measurement and interpretation of cosmic ray isotopic abundances. Ph.D. Thesis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An instrument, the Caltech High Energy Isotope Spectrometer Telescope was developed to measure isotopic abundances of cosmic ray nuclei by employing an energy loss - residual energy technique. A detailed analysis was made of the mass resolution capabilities of this instrument. A formalism, based on the leaky box model of cosmic ray propagation, was developed for obtaining isotopic abundance ratios at the cosmic ray sources from abundances measured in local interstellar space for elements having three or more stable isotopes, one of which is believed to be absent at the cosmic ray sources. It was shown that the dominant sources of uncertainty in the derived source ratios are uncorrelated errors in the fragmentation cross sections and statistical uncertainties in measuring local interstellar abundances. These results were applied to estimate the extent to which uncertainties must be reduced in order to distinguish between cosmic ray production in a solar-like environment and in various environments with greater neutron enrichments.

Wiedenbeck, M. E.

1977-01-01

80

Stable isotope composition of human fingernails from Slovakia.  

PubMed

Stable isotope composition of human fingernails has proven to be useful for documenting human dietary information and geographical patterns in archeological, forensic, anthropological and biological studies. Therefore, it is of interest to detect all factors influencing the stable isotopic composition in the certain regions in the world. Carbon and nitrogen isotope data of human fingernail keratin from 52 individuals from Slovakia were reported in this study. The online combustion and continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer Delta V Advantage was used for ?(13)C and ?(15)N analysis of fingernail keratin samples from 24 vegetarian and 28 omnivorous individuals. A group of people with frequent meat consumption showed enrichment in (13)C and (15)N isotopes in fingernails. A similar trend was observed with increasing seafood in an individual's diet. Moreover a significant difference was revealed between smokers and nonsmokers for both ?(13)C and ?(15)N values. These data were compared to previously published ?(13)C and ?(15)N fingernail values from across the globe. This study brings new information on the stable isotope signature of individuals from Slovakia and characterizes the Central European region for the first time. The stable isotope composition of fingernails is influenced by the frequency of meat and seafood consumption as well as smoking. PMID:25086300

Grolmusov, Zuzana; Rap?anov, Anna; Michalko, Juraj; ?ech, Peter; Veis, Pavel

2014-10-15

81

Stable isotope ecology in the Omo-Turkana Basin.  

PubMed

Stable isotopes provide an independent assessment of paleoenvironments in the Omo-Turkana Basin. Stable isotopes track the flow of oxygen and carbon through ecosystems and accordingly are not directly related to changes in mammalian faunal composition or sedimentology. Therefore, isotope studies give insight into the paleoenvironmental conditions in which human evolutionary trends have been recorded. The development of stable isotopes as indicators of continental environmental conditions has proceeded in parallel with questions about the conditions of human environment. What was the vegetation? How hot was it? How dry? What were the diets of animals living among early humans? And most persistently, how important were "savannas" to early hominids? In this review, we take the opportunity to provide extensive background on the use of isotopes in anthropological sites. The application of stable isotope ecology to anthropological sites in the Turkana Basin has a long history, but in many ways the Omo-Turkana Basin has been a proving ground for the development of new proxy methods for understanding tropical terrestrial environments in the Neogene and Quaternary. For that reason, we also describe some of the fundamental aspects of isotope ecology that developed outside the field of paleoanthropology. PMID:22170692

Cerling, Thure E; Levin, Naomi E; Passey, Benjamin H

2011-01-01

82

Source Partitioning Using Stable Isotopes: Coping with Too Much Variation  

PubMed Central

Background Stable isotope analysis is increasingly being utilised across broad areas of ecology and biology. Key to much of this work is the use of mixing models to estimate the proportion of sources contributing to a mixture such as in diet estimation. Methodology By accurately reflecting natural variation and uncertainty to generate robust probability estimates of source proportions, the application of Bayesian methods to stable isotope mixing models promises to enable researchers to address an array of new questions, and approach current questions with greater insight and honesty. Conclusions We outline a framework that builds on recently published Bayesian isotopic mixing models and present a new open source R package, SIAR. The formulation in R will allow for continued and rapid development of this core model into an all-encompassing single analysis suite for stable isotope research. PMID:20300637

Parnell, Andrew C.; Inger, Richard; Bearhop, Stuart; Jackson, Andrew L.

2010-01-01

83

Stable Isotope Tracers in Large Scale Hydrological Models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen (deuterium and oxygen-18) have been shown to be effective tracers for characterizing hydrological processes in small river basins. Their application in large river basins has lagged behind due to the lack of sufficient isotope data. Recent availability of isotope data from most US rivers and subsequent efforts by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to collect comprehensive global information on isotope compositions of river runoff is changing this situation. These data sets offer new opportunities to utilize stable isotopes in studies of large river basins. Recent work carried out jointly by the Water Systems Analysis Group of the University of New Hampshire and the Isotope Hydrology Section of the IAEA applied isotope-enabled global water balance and transport models to assess the feasibility of using isotope data for improving water balance estimations at large scales. The model implemented simple mixing in the various storage pools (e.g. snow pack, soil moisture, groundwater, and river channel) and fractionation during evapotranspiration. Sensitivity tests show that spatial and temporal distributions of isotopes in precipitation and their mixing in the various storage pools are the most important factors affecting the isotopic composition of river discharge. The groundwater storage pool plays a key role in the seasonal dynamics of stable isotope composition of river discharge. Fractionation during phase changes appears to have a less pronounced impact. These findings are consistent with those in small scale catchments where ``old water'' and ``new water'' (i.e. pre-event water and storm runoff) can be easily separated by using isotopes. Model validation using available data from the US rivers showed remarkable performance considering the inconsistencies in the temporal sampling of precipitation and runoff isotope composition records. The good model performance suggests that seasonal variations of the isotopic composition of the precipitation and as a consequence the runoff follow a regular pattern that is less affected by inter-annual variations. The presentation will discuss the design and implementation of the isotope enabled water balance/transport model, its application and the potential of using global isotope information as (``soft'') calibration/validation data. Because of the sensitivity of runoff isotopic composition to groundwater storage pools, isotope data may offer new opportunities to assess the volumes of these storage terms and to evaluate their sustainability for human use.

Fekete, B. M.; Aggarwal, P.

2004-05-01

84

Stable Chlorine Isotope Study: Application to Early Solar System Materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A significantly large mass fractionation between two stable chlorine isotopes is expected during planetary processes In addition, in view of the isotopic heterogeneity of other light elements, the chlorine isotopes can potentially be used as a tracer for the origins and evolutionary processes of early solar system materials. Due to analytical difficulties, however, current chlorine isotope studies on planetary materials are quite controversial among IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and/or TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1-3]. Although a cross-calibration of IRMS and TIMS indicates that both techniques are sufficiently consistent with each other [4], some authors have claimed that the Cl-37/Cl-35 ratio of geological samples obtained by TIMS technique are, in general, misleadingly too high and variable compared to those of IRMS [3]. For example, almost no differences of Cl isotope composition were observed among mantle materials and carbonaceous meteorites by [3]. On the other hand, according to more recent IRMS work [2], significant Cl isotope variations are confirmed for mantle materials. Therefore, additional careful investigation of Cl isotope analyses are now required to confirm real chlorine isotope variations for planetary materials including carbonaceous chondrites [5]. A significantly large mass fractionation between two stable chlorine isotopes is expected during planetary processes In addition, in view of the isotopic heterogeneity of other light elements, the chlorine isotopes can potentially be used as a tracer for the origins and evolutionary processes of early solar system materials. Due to analytical difficulties, however, current chlorine isotope studies on planetary materials are quite controversial among IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and/or TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1-3]. Although a cross-calibration of IRMS and TIMS indicates that both techniques are sufficiently consistent with each other [4], some authors have claimed that the 37Cl/35Cl ratio of geological samples obtained by TIMS technique are, in general, misleadingly too high and variable compared to those of IRMS [3]. For eample, almost no differences of Cl isotope composition were observed among mantle materials and carbonaceous meteorites by [3]. On the other hand, according to more recent IRMS work [2], significant Cl isotope variations are confirmed for mantle materials. Therefore, additional careful investigation of Cl isotope analyses are now required to confirm real chlorine isotope variations for planetary materials including carbonaceous chondrites [5]. In order to clarify the stable chlorine isotope features of early solar system materials, we have initiated development of the TIMS technique at NASA JSC applicable to analysis of small amounts of meteoritic and planetary materials. We report here the current status of chlorine isotope analysis at NASA JSC.

Mala,ira. M/; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

2010-01-01

85

Stable Isotopic Analysis of Porcine, Bovine, and Ovine Heparins.  

PubMed

The assessment of provenance of heparin is becoming a major concern for the pharmaceutical industry and its regulatory bodies. Batch-specific [carbon (?(13) C), nitrogen (?(15) N), oxygen (?(18) O), sulfur (?(34) S), and hydrogen (?D)] stable isotopic compositions of five different animal-derived heparins were performed. Measurements readily allowed their differentiation into groups and/or subgroups based on their isotopic provenance. Principle component analysis showed that a bivariate plot of ?(13) C and ?(18) O is the best single, bivariate plot that results in the maximum discrimination ability when only two stable isotopes are used to describe the variation in the data set. Stable isotopic analyses revealed that (1) stable isotope measurements on these highly sulfated polysaccharide (molecular weight ?15 kDa) natural products ("biologics") were feasible; (2) in bivariate plots, the ?(13) C versus ?(18) O plot reveals a well-defined relationship for source differentiation of hogs raised in the United States from hogs raised in Europe and China; (3) the ?D versus ?(18) O plot revealed the most well-defined relationship for source differentiation based on the hydrologic environmental isotopes of water (D/H and (18) O/(16) O); and (4) the ?(15) N versus ?(18) O and ?(34) S versus ?(18) O relationships are both very similar, possibly reflecting the food sources used by the different heparin producers. 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci. PMID:25186630

Jasper, John P; Zhang, Fuming; Poe, Russell B; Linhardt, Robert J

2014-09-01

86

Use of Stable Isotopes in Forensic Analysis of Microorganisms  

SciTech Connect

The use of isotopic signatures for forensic analysis of biological materials is well-established, and the same general principles that apply to interpretation of stable isotope content of C, N, O, and H apply to the analysis of microorganisms. Heterotrophic microorganisms derive their isotopic content from their growth substrates, which are largely plant and animal products, and the water in their culture medium. Thus the isotope signatures of microbes are tied to their growth environment. The C, N, O, and H isotope ratios of spores have been demonstrated to constitute highly discriminating signatures for sample matching. They can rule out specific samples of media and/or water as possible production media, and can predict isotope ratio ranges of the culture media and water used to produce a given sample. These applications have been developed and tested through analyses of approximately 250 samples of Bacillus subtilis spores and over 500 samples of culture media, providing a strong statistical basis for data interpretation. A Bayesian statistical framework for integrating stable isotope data with other types of signatures derived from microorganisms has been able to characterize the culture medium used to produce spores of various Bacillus species, leveraging isotopic differences in different medium types and demonstrating the power of data integration for forensic investigations.

Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Hegg, Eric L.

2012-01-18

87

Partitioning peat respiration with stable carbon isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Equimolar production of CO2 and CH4 is assumed with methanogenesis. However, in both field and incubation studies of peat respiration, CO2 is continually reported to be in higher concentrations than CH4. It was assumed that this is due to loss of methane with ebullition and additional CO2 production by HMW organic matter fermentation. To determine the proportions of CO2 formed from both organic matter fermentation and methanogenesis and to determine the percent loss of CH4 from ebullition, isotope mass balance equations were developed. The 13C-CO2 measured in pore water represents a mixture between the 13C-CO2 from organic matter decomposition and methanogenesis. By collecting and analyzing pore water samples for ?13C and concentrations of both CO2 and CH4, the proportion of CO2 formed from organic matter fermentation and methanogenesis was calculated. It was found that, at 0, 154, and 261 cm depths, the percent CO2 from methanogenesis was 56%, 88%, and 91%, and the percent CH4 loss due to ebullition was 69%, 79%, and 85%, respectively. These findings indicate that with increasing depth both the percent CO2 formed from methanogenesis and the percent CH4 lost increased. Incubation experiments consisting of peat from five depth intervals (30-40, 70-80, 130-140, 170-180, and 270-280cm) were used to determine the accuracy of the isotope mass balance equations based on in situ concentrations and isotopic values. Measurements were made biweekly for concentrations and ?13C of CO2 and CH4. The percents of CO2 formed from methanogenesis based on the isotope mass balance equations were found to be to be 53%, 44%, 12%, 51%, and 54% corresponding to the respective depth ranges. The ratios of CH4/CO2 measured were 51%, 39%, 4%, 41%, and 54%, respectively. The average standard deviation between these sample sets was found to be 3.5%. This indicates that the isotope mass balance equations are an appropriate model for determining in situ CO2 partitioning in these systems.

Chanton, J.; Corbett, J.; Burdige, D. J.; Glaser, P. H.; Cooper, W. T.; Tfaily, M. M.

2010-12-01

88

Stable platinum isotope measurements in presolar nanodiamonds by TEAMS.  

PubMed

Nanodiamonds are stardust grains commonly found in primitive meteorites. They survived the formation of the solar system and kept their own individuality. Measurements of trace-element isotopic signatures in these grains will help understanding heavy element nucleosynthesis in massive stars and dust formation from their ejecta. We have continued previous attempts to search for stable Pt isotope anomalies in nanodiamonds via trace element accelerator mass spectrometry (TEAMS). The installation of a new injector beam line at the VERA facility allowed studying low traces of stable elements in different materials. Moreover, recent experiments showed that VERA provides the required measurement precision together with a low Pt machine background. Here, we observed for the first time an indication for enhancements of (198)Pt/(195)Pt isotope ratios in two diamond residues prepared by different chemical separation techniques from the Allende meteorite. Variations in other isotopic ratios were within analytical uncertainty, and no anomaly was identified in a third diamond fraction. PMID:23565017

Wallner, A; Melber, K; Merchel, S; Ott, U; Forstner, O; Golser, R; Kutschera, W; Priller, A; Steier, P

2013-01-01

89

Stable platinum isotope measurements in presolar nanodiamonds by TEAMS  

PubMed Central

Nanodiamonds are stardust grains commonly found in primitive meteorites. They survived the formation of the solar system and kept their own individuality. Measurements of trace-element isotopic signatures in these grains will help understanding heavy element nucleosynthesis in massive stars and dust formation from their ejecta. We have continued previous attempts to search for stable Pt isotope anomalies in nanodiamonds via trace element accelerator mass spectrometry (TEAMS). The installation of a new injector beam line at the VERA facility allowed studying low traces of stable elements in different materials. Moreover, recent experiments showed that VERA provides the required measurement precision together with a low Pt machine background. Here, we observed for the first time an indication for enhancements of 198Pt/195Pt isotope ratios in two diamond residues prepared by different chemical separation techniques from the Allende meteorite. Variations in other isotopic ratios were within analytical uncertainty, and no anomaly was identified in a third diamond fraction. PMID:23565017

Wallner, A.; Melber, K.; Merchel, S.; Ott, U.; Forstner, O.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Steier, P.

2013-01-01

90

Stable Carbon Isotope Fractionation by Methylotrophic Methanogenic Archaea  

PubMed Central

In natural environments methane is usually produced by aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic archaea. However, some methanogens can use C1 compounds such as methanol as the substrate. To determine the contributions of individual substrates to methane production, the stable-isotope values of the substrates and the released methane are often used. Additional information can be obtained by using selective inhibitors (e.g., methyl fluoride, a selective inhibitor of acetoclastic methanogenesis). We studied stable carbon isotope fractionation during the conversion of methanol to methane in Methanosarcina acetivorans, Methanosarcina barkeri, and Methanolobus zinderi and generally found large fractionation factors (?83 to ?72). We further tested whether methyl fluoride impairs methylotrophic methanogenesis. Our experiments showed that even though a slight inhibition occurred, the carbon isotope fractionation was not affected. Therefore, the production of isotopically light methane observed in the presence of methyl fluoride may be due to the strong fractionation by methylotrophic methanogens and not only by hydrogenotrophic methanogens as previously assumed. PMID:22904062

Penger, Jrn; Conrad, Ralf

2012-01-01

91

Stable isotope geochemistry of East African waters. [Abstract only  

SciTech Connect

Lakes and Rivers in East Africa have varied stable isotopic compositions. Lakes exhibit enriched delta13-C values (-2 to +5%), while their inflowing rivers show depleted values (-15 to -8%). Hot springs and standing pools of water have intermediate values. Some small lakes are extremely variable in delta18-0 or deltaD (+2 to +8% and +20 to +40%, respectively for Lake Naivasha), whereas larger lakes are relatively constant for long periods of time (+5.6 to 6.1 and +36 to 40, respectively for Lake Turkana). Isotopic values are unrelated to salinity for comparison between lakes. Stable isotopes also reveal the sources of hot spring discharges: the Kapedo hot springs probably originate from Maralel and not from Lake Baringo as local legend has it; the hot springs north of Lake Naivasha are of meteoric origin while those to the south of Lake Naivasha have similar isotopic compositions to Lake Naivasha.

Sayer, M.D.; Cerling, T.E.; Bowman, J.R.

1983-03-01

92

Stable carbon isotope fractionation during aerobic biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable isotope analysis is recognized as a powerful tool for monitoring, assessing, and validating in-situ bioremediation processes. In this study, kinetic carbon isotope fractionation factors () associated with the aerobic biodegradation of vinyl chloride (VC), cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (cDCE), and trichloroethylene (TCE) were examined. Of the three solvents, the largest fractionation effects were observed for biodegradation of VC. Both metabolic and cometabolic

Kung-Hui Chu; Shaily Mahendra; Donald L. Song; Mark E. Conrad; Lisa Alvarez-Cohen

2003-01-01

93

Estimating the timing of diet shifts using stable isotopes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable isotope analysis has become an important tool in studies of trophic food webs and animal feeding patterns. When animals\\u000a undergo rapid dietary shifts due to migration, metamorphosis, or other reasons, the isotopic composition of their tissues\\u000a begins changing to reflect that of their diet. This can occur both as a result of growth and metabolic turnover of existing\\u000a tissue.

Donald L. Phillips; Peter M. Eldridge

2006-01-01

94

The Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Hg in Extraterrestrial Materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the past three year grant period we made excellent progress in our study of the abundances and isotopic compositions of Hg and other volatile trace elements in extraterrestrial materials. As part of my startup package I received funds to construct a state-of-the-art experimental facility to study gas-solid reaction kinetics. Much of our effort was spent developing the methodology to measure the abundance and isotopic composition of Hg at ultratrace levels in solid materials. In our first study, the abundance and isotopic composition of Hg was determined in bulk samples of the Murchison (CM) and Allende (CV) carbonaceous chondrites. We have continued our study of mercury in primitive meteorites and expanded the suite of meteorites to include other members of the CM and CV chondrite group as well as CI and CO chondrites. Samples of the CI chondrite Orgueil, the CM chondrites Murray, Nogoya, and Cold Bokkeveld, the CO chondrites Kainsaz, Omans, and Isna, and the CV chondrites Vigarano, Mokoia, and Grosnaja were tested. We have developed a thermal analysis ICP-MS technique and applied it to the study of a suite of thermally labile elements (Zn, As, Se, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, Hg, Au, Tl, Pb, and Bi) in geologic materials as well.

Lauretta, D. S.

2004-01-01

95

The abundance and isotopic composition of Cd in iron meteorites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cadmium is a highly volatile element and its abundance in meteorites may help better understand volatility-controlled processes in the solar nebula and on meteorite parent bodies. The large thermal neutron capture cross section of 113Cd suggests that Cd isotopes might be well suited to quantify neutron fluences in extraterrestrial materials. The aims of this study were (1) to evaluate the range and magnitude of Cd concentrations in magmatic iron meteorites, and (2) to assess the potential of Cd isotopes as a neutron dosimeter for iron meteorites. Our new Cd concentration data determined by isotope dilution demonstrate that Cd concentrations in iron meteorites are significantly lower than in some previous studies. In contrast to large systematic variations in the concentration of moderately volatile elements like Ga and Ge, there is neither systematic variation in Cd concentration amongst troilites, nor amongst metal phases of different iron meteorite groups. Instead, Cd is strongly depleted in all iron meteorite groups, implying that the parent bodies accreted well above the condensation temperature of Cd (i.e., ?650 K) and thus incorporated only minimal amounts of highly volatile elements. No Cd isotope anomalies were found, whereas Pt and W isotope anomalies for the same iron meteorite samples indicate a significant fluence of epithermal and higher energetic neutrons. This observation demonstrates that owing to the high Fe concentrations in iron meteorites, neutron capture mainly occurs at epithermal and higher energies. The combined Cd-Pt-W isotope results from this study thus demonstrate that the relative magnitude of neutron capture-induced isotope anomalies is strongly affected by the chemical composition of the irradiated material. The resulting low fluence of thermal neutrons in iron meteorites and their very low Cd concentrations make Cd isotopes unsuitable as a neutron dosimeter for iron meteorites.

Kruijer, Thomas S.; Sprung, Peter; Kleine, Thorsten; Leya, Ingo; Wieler, Rainer

2013-12-01

96

Stable isotope tracers: natural and anthropogenic recharge, Orange County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stable isotopic techniques have been utilized to locate occurrences and trace movements of a variety of naturally and anthropogenically recharged waters in aquifers of Orange County, California. This basin is of particular interest not only because it provides the dominant water supply for the two million residents of this well-populated county, but also because it is representative of a common arid environment where natural recharge is dominated by distant, high-elevation precipitation transported by a major river. Such arid basins are particularly sensitive to climatic and anthropogenic disturbance of their recharge and their subsurface hydrology. In order to identify distinctive waters, oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope ratios from Orange County wells have been compared with a regional database including an array of surface water samples representative of watershed runoff. Four distinctive subsurface water types can be resolved. Waters of "local" rainfall and imported, "Colorado" River aqueduct origins are easily distinguished from dominant, "native" Santa Ana river compositions by use of hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope analysis. Recent human interference with Santa Ana river flow and recharge is also marginally resolvable by isotopic techniques. Distinguishable isotopic signatures of "recent" Santa Ana recharge appear to be due to evaporative loss, perhaps during storage in the Prado Reservoir or in percolation ponds, prior to recharge into Orange County aquifers. Characterization of traceable isotopic signatures of distinct natural and anthropogenic recharge components provides a major advance towards use of such techniques for developing a well constrained, three-dimensional hydrologic model for this complex basin.

Williams, Alan E.

1997-12-01

97

Copper stable isotopes to trace copper behavior in wetland systems.  

PubMed

Wetlands are reactive zones of the landscape that can sequester metals released by industrial and agricultural activities. Copper (Cu) stable isotope ratios (?(65)Cu) have recently been used as tracers of transport and transformation processes in polluted environments. Here, we used Cu stable isotopes to trace the behavior of Cu in a stormwater wetland receiving runoff from a vineyard catchment (Alsace, France). The Cu loads and stable isotope ratios were determined in the dissolved phase, suspended particulate matter (SPM), wetland sediments, and vegetation. The wetland retained >68% of the dissolved Cu and >92% of the SPM-bound Cu, which represented 84.4% of the total Cu in the runoff. The dissolved Cu became depleted in (65)Cu when passing through the wetland (?(65)Cuinlet-outlet from 0.03 to 0.77), which reflects Cu adsorption to aluminum minerals and organic matter. The ?(65)Cu values varied little in the wetland sediments (0.04 0.10), which stored >96% of the total Cu mass within the wetland. During high-flow conditions, the Cu flowing out of the wetland became isotopically lighter, indicating the mobilization of reduced Cu(I) species from the sediments and Cu reduction within the sediments. Our results demonstrate that the Cu stable isotope ratios may help trace Cu behavior in redox-dynamic environments such as wetlands. PMID:24787375

Babcsnyi, Izabella; Imfeld, Gwenal; Granet, Mathieu; Chabaux, Franois

2014-05-20

98

Chlorine stable isotope fractionation in evaporites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chlorine isotope fractionation (37Cl35Cl) between NaCl, KCI, and MgCl26H2O and their saturated solutions was determined in laboratory experiments at 22 2C. The results are as follows: 103ln ?(NaClsolution) = +0.26 0.07 (1?)103ln ?(KClsolution) = ?0.09 0.09 (1?)103ln ?(MgCl26H2Osolution) = ?0.06 0.10 (1?) where fractionation factor a is defined as: ? = ? (37Cl\\/35Cl)precipitate(37Cl\\/35Cl)solution These data were

H. G. M. Eggenkamp; R. Kreulen; A. F. Koster Van Groos

1995-01-01

99

Stable Isotopic TracingA Way Forward for Nanotechnology  

PubMed Central

Numerous publications and reports have expressed health and safety concerns about the production and use of nanoparticles, especially in areas of exposure monitoring, personal use, and environmental fate and transport. We suggest that stable isotopic tracers, which have been used widely in the earth sciences and in metabolic and other health-related studies for several decades, could be used to address many of these issues. One such example we are pursuing is the use of stable isotopes to monitor dermal absorption of zinc and titanium oxides in sunscreen preparations and other personal care products. Other potential applications of this tracing approach are discussed. PMID:17035130

Gulson, Brian; Wong, Herbert

2006-01-01

100

Martian stable isotopes: volatile evolution, climate change and exobiological implications.  

PubMed

Measurements of the ratios of stable isotopes in the martian atmosphere and crust provide fundamental information about the evolution of the martian volatile and climate system. Current best estimates of the isotope ratios indicate that there has been substantial loss of gases to space and exchange of gases between the atmosphere and the crust throughout geologic time; exchange may have occurred through circulation of water in hydrothermal systems. Processes of volatile evolution and exchange will fractionate the isotopes in a manner that complicates the possible interpretation of isotopic data in terms of any fractionation that may have been caused by martian biota, and must be understood first. Key measurements are suggested that will enhance our understanding of the non-biological fractionation of the isotopes and of the evolution of the martian volatile system. PMID:10077868

Jakosky, B M

1999-01-01

101

Does avian malaria infection affect feather stable isotope signatures?  

PubMed

It is widely accepted that stable isotope ratios in inert tissues such as feather keratin reflect the dietary isotopic signature at the time of the tissue synthesis. However, some elements such as stable nitrogen isotopes can be affected by individual physiological state and nutritional stress. Using malaria infection experiment protocols, we estimated the possible effect of malaria parasite infections on feather carbon (?(13)C) and nitrogen (?(15)N) isotope signatures in juvenile common crossbills Loxia curvirostra. The birds were experimentally infected with Plasmodium relictum (lineage SGS1) and P. ashfordi (GRW2), two widespread parasites of passerines. Experimental birds developed heavy parasitemia of both parasites and maintained high levels throughout the experiment (33 days). We found no significant difference between experimental and control birds in both ?(13)C and ?(15)N values of feathers re-grown. The study shows that even heavy primary infections of malaria parasites do not affect feather ?(13)C and ?(15)N isotopic signatures. The results of this experiment demonstrate that feather isotope values of wild-caught birds accurately reflect the dietary isotopic sources at the time of tissue synthesis even when the animal's immune system might be challenged due to parasitic infection. PMID:21671039

Yohannes, Elizabeth; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Valki?nas, Gediminas; Lee, Raymond W; Bolshakov, Casimir V; Bensch, Staffan

2011-12-01

102

Middle Pleistocene ecology and Neanderthal subsistence: insights from stable isotope analyses in Payre (Ardche, southeastern France).  

PubMed

The Middle Palaeolithic site of Payre in southeastern France yields abundant archaeological material associated with fossil hominid remains. With its long sequence of Middle Pleistocene deposits, Payre is a key site to study the Middle Palaeolithic chronology of this region. This study is the first to investigate carbon and oxygen isotope contents of Neanderthal tooth enamel bioapatite, together with a wide range of herbivorous and carnivorous species. The aim is to contribute to the understanding of hunting behaviour, resource partitioning, diet and habitat use of animals and Neanderthals through a palaeoecological reconstruction. Local topography had a visible influence on carbon and oxygen stable isotope values recorded in herbivore tooth enamel. This was used to investigate possible habitats of herbivores. The different herbivorous species do not show large variations of their carbon and oxygen isotope values through time, indicating niche conservatism from OIS 8-7 to OIS 6-5, i.e., independently of palaeoclimatic and palaeoenvironmental variations. Based on these new observations, we conclude that Neanderthals employed a stable subsistence strategy over time, using a variety of local resources, with resource partitioning visible between humans and carnivores, especially wolves. A comparison of the results of stable isotopic investigation with the results of tooth wear analyses previously conducted on the same teeth allowed us to demonstrate that grazing and browsing do not bind animals to a specific habitat in a C3 environment as reflected in the isotopic values. PMID:23920410

Ecker, Michaela; Bocherens, Herv; Julien, Marie-Anne; Rivals, Florent; Raynal, Jean-Paul; Moncel, Marie-Hlne

2013-10-01

103

Stable isotope separation in calutrons: Forty years of production and distribution  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stable isotope separation program, established in 1945, has operated continually to provide enriched stable isotopes and selected radioactive isotopes, including the actinides, for use in research, medicine, and industrial applications. This report summarizes the first forty years of effort in the production and distribution of stable isotopes. Evolution of the program along with the research and development, chemical processing,

W. A. Bell; J. G. Tracy

1987-01-01

104

Abundance, distribution, and isotopic composition of particulate black carbon in the northern Gulf of Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

exists increasing evidence supporting the important role of black carbon in global carbon cycles. Particulate black carbon (PBC) is allochthonous and has distinct reactivities compared to the bulk particulate organic carbon (tot-POC) in marine environments. However, the abundance, geochemical behavior of PBC and its importance in oceanic carbon budget remain poorly understood. Here we report the abundance, distribution, and stable isotopic signatures of BC derived from the chemo-thermal oxidation (CTO-375) method (BCCTO) in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results show that BCCTO abundance decreased from shelf to basin, and more than a half of riverine BCCTO could be removed over the shelf. Moreover, BCCTO is much more refractory compared to the tot-POC and has ?13C values lower than those of BC-excluded POC. These results highlight the significance of PBC in marine carbon cycles and potentially suggest the need for a new end-member term in quantifying POC sources in the ocean.

Yang, Weifeng; Guo, Laodong

2014-11-01

105

Method for determination of stable carbon isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric PM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A technique for the measurement of the stable isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is presented. It has been found in numerous laboratory studies that these compounds are photooxidation products of toluene in PM. Atmospheric samples from rural and suburban areas were collected for evaluation of the procedure. PM was collected on quartz fibre filters using dichotomous high volume air samplers for PM 2.5. Methylnitrophenols were extracted from the filters using acetonitrile. The sample was then purified using a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and solid phase extraction (SPE). The final solution was then divided into two aliquots. To one aliquot, a derivatising agent, Bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA), was added to the solution for Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS) analysis. The second half of the sample was stored at low temperature. When GC/MS analysis showed high enough concentrations the remaining sample was derivatized with BSTFA and analysed for stable isotope ratio using a Gas Chromatography/Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (GC-IRMS). In all atmospheric PM samples analysed, 2-methyl-4-nitrophenol was found to be the most abundant methylnitrophenol. Nevertheless, due to low pollution levels occurring in the rural area, no samples had concentrations high enough to perform stable carbon isotope composition measurements of the methylnitrophenols. Samples collected in the suburban area could be analysed for carbon stable isotope ratio using GC-IRMS. The procedure described in this paper provides a very sensitive and selective method for the analysis of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric PM at concentrations as low as 1 pg m-3. For accurate (within 0.5) stable isotope ratio analysis significantly higher concentrations in the range of 100 pg m-3 or more are required.

Moukhtar, S.; Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Irei, S.; Huang, L.; Rudolph, J.

2011-05-01

106

MixSIAR: advanced stable isotope mixing models in R  

EPA Science Inventory

Background/Question/Methods The development of stable isotope mixing models has coincided with modeling products (e.g. IsoSource, MixSIR, SIAR), where methodological advances are published in parity with software packages. However, while mixing model theory has recently been ext...

107

Stable Isotopic Constraints of the Turpan Basin in Northwestern China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable isotopic analysis of sedimentary rocks can be used to reconstruct past geologic changes in the elevation and climate of topographic features such as mountain ranges and plateaus. The Tibetan Plateau is an ideal field laboratory for conducting this type of study because of the Plateau's extreme topographic relief and relatively recent geologic growth. Here we present oxygen and carbon

A. J. Schaen

2010-01-01

108

Standards for stable isotope measurements in natural compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

RESEARCH based on stable isotope variations in natural compounds is expanding in scientific fields such as geochemistry, hydrology, environmental studies and biochemistry. However, intercomparison of results obtained in different laboratories is often not fully reliable and therefore to improve the intercalibration of deuterium and 18O measurements in natural waters, two water standards have been distributed by the International Atomic Energy

R. Gonfiantini

1978-01-01

109

STABLE ISOTOPES AS INDICATORS OF SOIL WATER DYNAMICS IN WATERSHEDS  

EPA Science Inventory

Stream water quality and quantity depend on discharge rates of water and nutrients from soils. However, soil-water storage is very dynamic and strongly influenced by plants. We analyzed stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen to quantify spatial and temporal changes in evaporati...

110

Historical Variations in the Stable Isotope Composition of Mercury in  

E-print Network

Historical Variations in the Stable Isotope Composition of Mercury in Arctic Lake Sediments T O G W, and biological data, could yield important new information about the biogeochemical cycle of Hg. Introduction could provide valuable information on the sources and biogeochemical cycling of the Hg, but until

Vincent, Warwick F.

111

From birds to butterflies: animal movement patterns and stable isotopes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Establishing patterns of movement of wild animals is crucial for our understanding of their ecology, life history and behavior, and is a prerequisite for their effective conservation. Advances in the use of stable isotope markers make it possible to track a diversity of animal species in a variety of habitats. This approach is revolutionizing the way in which we make

Dustin R. Rubenstein; Keith A. Hobson

2004-01-01

112

Apparatus and method for monitoring of gas having stable isotopes  

DOEpatents

Gas having stable isotopes is monitored continuously by using a system that sends a modulated laser beam to the gas and collects and transmits the light not absorbed by the gas to a detector. Gas from geological storage, or from the atmosphere can be monitored continuously without collecting samples and transporting them to a lab.

Clegg, Samuel M; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna E

2013-03-05

113

Development of stable isotope mixing models in ecology - Perth  

EPA Science Inventory

More than 40 years ago, stable isotope analysis methods used in geochemistry began to be applied to ecological studies. One common application is using mathematical mixing models to sort out the proportional contributions of various sources to a mixture. Examples include contri...

114

Development of stable isotope mixing models in ecology - Dublin  

EPA Science Inventory

More than 40 years ago, stable isotope analysis methods used in geochemistry began to be applied to ecological studies. One common application is using mathematical mixing models to sort out the proportional contributions of various sources to a mixture. Examples include contri...

115

Development of stable isotope mixing models in ecology - Fremantle  

EPA Science Inventory

More than 40 years ago, stable isotope analysis methods used in geochemistry began to be applied to ecological studies. One common application is using mathematical mixing models to sort out the proportional contributions of various sources to a mixture. Examples include contri...

116

Historical development of stable isotope mixing models in ecology  

EPA Science Inventory

More than 40 years ago, stable isotope analysis methods used in geochemistry began to be applied to ecological studies. One common application is using mathematical mixing models to sort out the proportional contributions of various sources to a mixture. Examples include contri...

117

Development of stable isotope mixing models in ecology - Sydney  

EPA Science Inventory

More than 40 years ago, stable isotope analysis methods used in geochemistry began to be applied to ecological studies. One common application is using mathematical mixing models to sort out the proportional contributions of various sources to a mixture. Examples include contri...

118

APPLICATION OF STABLE ISOTOPE TECHNIQUES TO AIR POLLUTION RESEARCH  

EPA Science Inventory

Stable isotope techniques provide a robust, yet under-utilized tool for examining pollutant effects on plant growth and ecosystem function. Here, we survey a range of mixing model, physiological and system level applications for documenting pollutant effects. Mixing model examp...

119

Stable isotope mass balance of lakes: a contemporary perspective (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stable isotopes are widely used in paleoclimate studies of lakes to reconstruct water balance and/or climatic conditions, but there are a variety of assumptions that are often made to simplify and operationalize the isotope transfer functions. Based on recent studies conducted on a wide range of lakes across North America, as well as a comprehensive compilation of existing data from around the globe, we present contemporary examples of stable-isotope mass-balance studies based on site-specific to regional lake datasets. We illustrate the need in most cases to understand and characterize the local climate and hydrological setting to accurately model the observed isotopic enrichment, as well as the importance of amount-weighting liquid fluxes and evaporation-flux-weighting vapour fluxes. Potential complications due to atmospheric feedback are also explored by presenting a new analysis of the Laurentian Great Lakes where we apply a model that considers the timing of evaporation, which occurs mainly in the winter, and accounts for downwind lake effects, humidity and isotopic build-up in the boundary layer. One future opportunity of lake-based paleoclimate research may be to develop controlled studies that allow for specific atmospheric or water-balance processes to be targeted and reconstructed. We also show relationships between selected water quality indicators and isotope-based water balance indicators that should, in principle, be preserved in the lake sediment record.

Gibson, J. J.; Birks, S. J.; YI, Y.; Jasechko, S.

2013-12-01

120

Stable isotopes may provide evidence for starvation in reptiles.  

PubMed

Previous studies have attempted to correlate stable isotope signatures of tissues with the nutritional condition of birds, mammals, fishes, and invertebrates. Unfortunately, very little is known about the relationship between food limitation and the isotopic composition of reptiles. We examined the effects that starvation has on delta13C and delta15N signatures in the tissues (excreta, carcass, scales, and claws) of six, distantly related squamate reptiles (gaboon vipers, Bitis gabonica; ball pythons, Python regius; ratsnakes, Elaphe obsoleta; boa constrictors, Boa constrictor; western diamondback rattlesnakes, Crotalus atrox, and savannah monitor lizards, Varanus exanthematicus). Analyses revealed that the isotopic composition of reptile carcasses did not change significantly in response to bouts of starvation lasting up to 168 days. In contrast, the isotopic signatures of reptile excreta became significantly enriched in 15N and depleted in 13C during starvation. The isotopic signatures of reptile scales and lizard claws were less indicative of starvation time than those of excreta. We discuss the physiological mechanisms that might be responsible for the starvation-induced changes in 13C and 15N signatures in the excreta, and present a mixing model to describe the shift in excreted nitrogen source pools (i.e. from a labile source pool to a nonlabile source pool) that apparently occurs during starvation in these animals. The results of this study suggest that naturally occurring stable isotopes might ultimately have some utility for characterizing nitrogen and carbon stress among free-living reptiles. PMID:18613003

McCue, Marshall D; Pollock, Erik D

2008-08-01

121

Heavy element stable isotope ratios: analytical approaches and applications.  

PubMed

Continuous developments in inorganic mass spectrometry techniques, including a combination of an inductively coupled plasma ion source and a magnetic sector-based mass spectrometer equipped with a multiple-collector array, have revolutionized the precision of isotope ratio measurements, and applications of inorganic mass spectrometry for biochemistry, geochemistry, and marine chemistry are beginning to appear on the horizon. Series of pioneering studies have revealed that natural stable isotope fractionations of many elements heavier than S (e.g., Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ce, Nd, Mo, Cd, W, Tl, and U) are common on Earth, and it had been widely recognized that most physicochemical reactions or biochemical processes induce mass-dependent isotope fractionation. The variations in isotope ratios of the heavy elements can provide new insights into past and present biochemical and geochemical processes. To achieve this, the analytical community is actively solving problems such as spectral interference, mass discrimination drift, chemical separation and purification, and reduction of the contamination of analytes. This article describes data calibration and standardization protocols to allow interlaboratory comparisons or to maintain traceability of data, and basic principles of isotope fractionation in nature, together with high-selectivity and high-yield chemical separation and purification techniques for stable isotope studies. PMID:23397089

Tanimizu, Masaharu; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Hirata, Takafumi

2013-03-01

122

Stable isotope analysis of breath using the optogalvanic effect  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new technique based on the optogalvanic effect has been developed for the measurement of stable isotope ratios in the carbon dioxide of exhaled breath. Data obtained before and after ingestion of harmless stable isotope labeled compounds, metabolized to carbon dioxide, can be used for sensitive noninvasive diagnostics of various disease conditions. The technique uses the specificity of laser resonance spectroscopy and achieves sensitivity and accuracy typical of sophisticated isotope ratio mass spectrometers. Using fixed frequency carbon dioxide lasers, 13C/12C ratios can be determined with a precision of 2 ppm with 100 second averaging times. Multiple samples can be analyzed simultaneously providing real time continuous calibration. In a first application, analysis of 13C/12C ratios in exhaled human breath after ingestion of 13C labeled urea is being developed as a diagnostic for the bacterium H-pylori, known to be the causative agent for most peptic and duodenal ulcers.

Murnick, Daniel E.; Colgan, M. J.; Lie, H. P.; Stoneback, D.

1996-05-01

123

Biomedical research applications of electromagnetically separated enriched stable isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The current and projected annual requirements through 1985 for stable isotopes enriched by electromagnetic separation methods were reviewed for applications in various types of biomedical research: (1) medical radiosiotope production, labeled compounds, and potential radio-pharmaceuticals; (2) nutrition, food science, and pharmacology: (3) metallobiochemistry and environmental toxicology; (4) nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, and moessbauer spectroscopy in biochemical, biophysical, and biomedical research; and (5) miscellaneous advances in radioactive and nonradioactive tracer technology. Radioisotopes available from commercial sources or routinely used in clinical nuclear medicine were excluded. Current requirements for enriched stable isotopes in biomedical research are not being satisfied. Severe shortages exist for Mg 26, Ca 43, Zn 70, Se 76, Se 77, Se 78, Pd 102, Cd 111, Cd 113, and Os 190. Many interesting and potentially important investigations in biomedical research require small quantities of specific elements at high isotopic enrichments.

Lambrecht, R. M.

124

Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in body tissue and mucus of feeding and fasting earthworms ( Lumbricus festivus )  

Microsoft Academic Search

We used natural abundance stable isotope techniques to estimate carbon and nitrogen turnover rates in body tissue and mucus\\u000a of earthworms. Isotope ratios of carbon (?13C) and nitrogen (?15N) were monitored simultaneously in body tissue and mucus for up to 101?days in feeding or fasting Lumbricus festivus kept in an artificial substrate. When the diet of the earthworms was switched

Olaf Schmidt; Charles M. Scrimgeour; James P. Curry

1999-01-01

125

Lipid Extraction and the Fugacity of Stable Isotope Values  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stable isotope analysis of blood, feathers, and other tissues are often used to infer migration patterns, diet composition and trophic status of seabirds. Tissues contain variable amounts of lipids that are depleted in the heavy carbon isotope (13C) and may introduce a bias in these values. There is evidence that lipid extraction may affect other stable isotope ratios, such as ?15N. Consequently, correction factors need to be applied to appropriately interpret ?13C and ?15N values for individual species and tissue type. In this study, we collected seven species of seabirds from the Near Islands, the western most group of islands in the Aleutian Island archipelago. We sampled kidney, liver, heart and muscle samples from each bird and after freeze drying, individual tissue samples were divided into two subsamples. We left one subsample unaltered and extracted lipids from the other subsample using a 2:1 chloroform-methanol solution. We found that the change in ?13C values after lipid extraction (??13C) varied widely among categories (eg., species, tissue type) from 0 - 4 , while ??15N values ranged from 0 to 2. Notably, within category variation was nonsignificant and the ?? values were linear against the covariant C:N ratio of the isotopic data, which allows us to use arithmetic corrections for categorical values. Our data strongly indicate that the effects of lipid extraction on stable isotopic values, while linear within category, vary widely by species, tissue, geographic area, year of collection, and isotope. Fugacity is usually employed as a thermodynamic quantity related to the chemical potential or activity that characterizes the escaping tendency from a phase (eg. Mackay & Paterson 1982). Here we use fugacity in the earlier, broader sense of fleeting, transitory, or instable states (eg., S. Johnson 1751), and its measure may be approximated by the higher order variance of ??13C and ??15N among data categories. Clearly, understanding the nature of variation and the physiological processes responsible for stable isotope values from biological tissues are critical for their interpretation. Change in carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes (??C13, ??15N) after lipid extraction for Tufted Puffins (Fratercula cirrhata) collected July 2010 at Attu Island, Aleutians.

Padula, V.; Causey, D.; Wolf, N.; Welker, J. M.

2013-12-01

126

Analytical techniques in biomedical stable isotope applications: (isotope ratio) mass spectrometry or infrared spectrometry?  

PubMed

An overview is presented of biomedical applications of stable isotopes in general, but mainly focused on the activities of the Center for Liver, Digestive and Metabolic Diseases of the University Medical Center Groningen. The aims of metabolic studies in the areas of glucose, fat, cholesterol and protein metabolism are briefly explained, as well as the principle of breath testing and the techniques to study body composition and energy expenditure. Much attention is paid to the analytical considerations based upon metabolite concentrations, sample size restrictions, the availability of stable isotope labelled substrates and dose requirements in relation to compound-specific isotope analysis. The instrumental advantages and limitations of the generally used techniques gas chromatography/reaction/isotope ratio mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry are described as well as the novelties of the recently commercialised liquid chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The present use and future perspective of infrared (IR) spectrometry for clinical and biomedical stable isotope applications are reviewed. In this respect, the analytical demands on IR spectrometry are discussed to enable replacement of isotope ratio mass spectrometry by IR spectrometry, in particular, for the purpose of compound-specific isotope ratio analysis in biological matrices. PMID:16543190

Stellaard, Frans; Elzinga, Henk

2005-12-01

127

Seasonal water uptake and movement in root systems of Australian phraeatophytic plants of dimorphic root morphology: a stable isotope investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A natural abundance hydrogen stable isotope technique was used to study seasonal changes in source water utilization and water movement in the xylem of dimorphic root systems and stem bases of several woody shrubs or trees in mediterranean-type ecosystems of south Western Australia. Samples collected from the native treeBanksia prionotes over 18 months indicated that shallow lateral roots and deeply

Todd E. Dawson; John S Pate

1996-01-01

128

Stable Isotope Fractionation of Cr in Carbonaceous and Ordinary Chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Difficulties with chemical separation and mass spectrometry combined with little expectation of isotopic fractionation at high temperature left the stable isotope geochemistry of Cr almost unknown [1]. The search for ^{53}Cr excess resulting from the decay of the radioactive nuclide ^{53}Mn (T1/2 = 3.5 My) was very successful but the small amount of data produced to date attests to the particularly difficult measurement by TIMS. This preliminary report describes evidence of mass-dependent fractionation of the stable Cr isotopes 50, 52, and 53 as measured by MC-ICPMS in meteorites relative to SRM 979 Cr standard. Cr was purified using cation-exchange chemistry. The yield is ~100 %. The samples were run on the Nu- Plasma HR of UC Davis in pseudo high-resolution mode. The absence of isotopic fractionation induced by the chemical purification has been double checked by 1) processing the standard through the column and 2) running the same sample several times through the columns. In both cases, we observe no difference in the measured isotopic ratio. The external reproducibility, estimated from 13 replicates of Bjurbole, is 50 ppm. The range of the fractionation per mass unit among 7 carbonaceous chondrites (CI, CM, CO, CV and CK) and 5 ordinary chondrites (H, L and LL) is 0.3 . Individual chondrules from Chainpur and Bjurbole have a wider range (0.6 ). All the chondrites analyzed so far are isotopically lighter than the bulk silicate earth (? ^{50/52}Cr=0, [1]). As for Zn [2], Cr isotopes seem to be heavier in ordinary chondrites (-0.23 ) than in carbonaceous chondrites (-0.35 ). Also as for Zn and Cu [2-3], Cr stable isotopes in carbonaceous chondrites are correlated with ? 17O, suggesting a mixing between an isotopically heavy component and an isotopically light one. The correlation between mass-dependent fractionation of Cr and non-mass-dependent ? 17O requires attention and adequate interpretation. References: [1] Johnson and Bullen, 2004, Review in Mineralogy and Geochemistry. [2] Luck et al., 2005 GCA. [3] Luck et al., 2003 GCA.

Moynier, F.; Jacobsen, B.; Yin, Q.

2006-12-01

129

BOREAS TE-5 CO2 Concentration and Stable Isotope Composition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The BOREAS TE-5 team collected measurements in the NSA and SSA on gas exchange, gas composition, and tree growth. This data set contains measurements of the concentration and stable carbon (C-13/C-12 and oxygen (O-18/O-16) isotope ratios of atmospheric CO2 in air samples collected at different heights within forest canopies. The data were collected to determine the influence of photosynthesis and respiration by the forest ecosystems on the concentration and stable isotope ratio of atmospheric CO2 These measurements were collected at the SSA during each 1994 IFC at OJP, OBS, and OA sites. Measurements were also collected at the NSA during each 1994 IFC at the OJP, T6R5S TE UBS, and T2Q6A TE OA sites. The stable isotope ratios are expressed using standard delta notation and in units of per mil. The isotope ratios are expressed relative to the international standard, PDB, for both carbon and oxygen samples. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Ehleriinger, Jim; Brooks, J. Renee; Flanagan, Larry

2000-01-01

130

Stable isotope patterns in micronekton from the Mozambique Channel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We measured the stable carbon (?13C) and nitrogen (?15N) isotopic composition of tissues of micronektonic organisms (fishes, squids, crustaceans and gelatinous organisms) collected in the Mozambique Channel during two scientific cruises in 2008 and 2009. The oceanic circulation in the Mozambique Channel is dominated by mesoscale cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies which play a key role in biological processes of less-productive deep-sea ecosystems. We investigated the potential impact of mesoscale features on the ?13C and ?15N values of 32 taxa of micronekton. Fishes, squids, crustaceans and gelatinous organisms encompassed a wide range of isotopic niches, with large overlaps among species. Our results showed that mesoscale features did not really influence the isotopic signatures of the sampled organisms, although cyclonic eddies can occasionally impact the nitrogen signatures of micronekton. We show that ?13C values were intermediate between standard offshore and nearshore signatures, suggesting that pelagic production in the Mozambique Channel could be partly supported by the transport and export of inorganic and organic particles from the Mozambican coast toward the offshore area. Trophic levels calculated from ?15N values ranged from 2.6 to 4.2, showing that micronekton taxa can be tertiary consumers in the Mozambique Channel. Our findings evidenced clusters of micronektonic organisms according to their ?15N or ?13C isotopic signatures, but variations in stable isotope values reflect a complex set of embedded processes linked to physical mesoscale dynamics (rotational dynamics of eddies) and basic biology and ecology of micronektonic organisms (vertical habitat, migration pattern, dietary habits, body length) that are discussed with regard to the stable isotope method based on time-integrated assimilated food.

Mnard, Frdric; Benivary, Hermann Doris; Bodin, Nathalie; Coffineau, Nathalie; Le Loc'h, Franois; Mison, Thomas; Richard, Pierre; Potier, Michel

2014-02-01

131

Method for determination of stable carbon isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A technique for the measurement of the stable isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter is presented. Atmospheric samples from rural and suburban areas were collected for evaluation of the procedure. Particulate matter was collected on quartz fibre filters using dichotomous high volume air samplers. Methylnitrophenols were extracted from the filters using acetonitrile. The sample was then purified using a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and solid phase extraction. The final solution was then divided into two aliquots. To one aliquot, a derivatising agent, Bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide, was added for Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry analysis. The second half of the sample was stored in a refrigerator. For samples with concentrations exceeding 1 ng ?l-1, the second half of the sample was used for measurement of stable carbon isotope ratios by Gas Chromatography-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry. The procedure described in this paper provides a method for the analysis of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter at concentrations as low as 0.3 pg m-3 and for stable isotope ratios with an accuracy of better than 0.5 for concentrations exceeding 100 pg m-3. In all atmospheric particulate matter samples analysed, 2-methyl-4-nitrophenol was found to be the most abundant methylnitrophenol, with concentrations ranging from the low pg m-3 range in rural areas to more than 200 pg m-3 in some samples from a suburban location.

Moukhtar, S.; Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Irei, S.; Huang, L.; Rudolph, J.

2011-11-01

132

Intrinsic and Synthetic Stable Isotope Marking of Tsetse Flies  

PubMed Central

The sterile insect technique has been successfully used to eliminate tsetse populations in a number of programs. Program monitoring in the field relies on the ability to accurately differentiate released sterile insects from wild insects so that estimates can be made of the ratio of sterile males to wild males. Typically, released flies are marked with a dye, which is not always reliable. The difference in isotopic signatures between wild and factory-reared populations could be a reliable and intrinsic secondary marker to complement existing marking methods. Isotopic signatures are natural differences in stable isotope composition of organisms due to discrimination against the heavier isotopes during some biological processes. As the isotopic signature of an organism is mainly dependent on what it eats; by feeding factory-reared flies isotopically different diets to those of the wild population it is possible to intrinsically mark the flies. To test this approach unlabeled samples of Glossina pallidipes (Austen) (Diptera: Glossinidae) from a mass rearing facility and wild populations were analyzed to determine whether there were any natural differences in signatures that could be used as markers. In addition experiments were conducted in which the blood diet was supplemented with isotopically enriched compounds and the persistence of the marker in the offspring determined. There were distinct natural isotopic differences between factory reared and wild tsetse populations that could be reliably used as population markers. It was also possible to rear artificially isotopically labeled flies using simple technology and these flies were clearly distinguishable from wild populations with greater than 95% certainty after 85 days of release. These techniques could be readily adopted for use in SIT programs as complimentary marking techniques. PMID:21870965

Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca; Watzka, Margarete; Mayr, Leo; Mekonnen, Solomon; Kapitano, Berisha; Parker, Andrew

2011-01-01

133

Stable Isotope Mapping of Alaskan Grasses and Marijuana  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spatial variation of isotope signatures in organic material is a useful forensic tool, particularly when applied to the task of tracking the production and distribution of plant-derived illicit drugs. In order to identify the likely grow-locations of drugs such as marijuana from unknown locations (i.e., confiscated during trafficking), base isotope maps are needed that include measurements of plants from known grow-locations. This task is logistically challenging in remote, large regions such as Alaska. We are therefore investigating the potential of supplementing our base (marijuana) isotope maps with data derived from other plants from known locations and with greater spatial coverage in Alaska. These currently include >150 samples of modern C3 grasses (Poaceae) as well as marijuana samples (n = 18) from known grow-locations across the state. We conducted oxygen, carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analyses of marijuana and grasses (Poaceae). Poaceae samples were obtained from the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) Museum of the North herbarium collection, originally collected by field botanists from around Alaska. Results indicate that the oxygen isotopic composition of these grasses range from 10 to 30, and broadly mirror the spatial pattern of water isotopes in Alaska. Our marijuana samples were confiscated around the state of Alaska and supplied to us by the UAF Police Department. ?13C, ?15N and ?18O values exhibit geographic patterns similar to the modern grasses, but carbon and nitrogen isotopes of some marijuana plants appear to be influenced by additional factors related to indoor growing conditions (supplementary CO2 sources and the application of organic fertilizer). As well as providing a potential forensic resource, our Poaceae isotope maps could serve additional value by providing resources for studying ecosystem nutrient cycling, for tracing natural ecological processes (i.e., animal migration and food web dynamics) and providing modern data for comparison with isotope analyses conducted on fossil leaf material in paleoecological studies.

Booth, A. L.; Wooller, M. J.

2008-12-01

134

Tracing Cadmium in the Environment: an Evolving Stable Isotope Approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cadmium (Cd) is a trace constituent in rocks and waters, and like many transition metals is an essential dietary nutrient at low levels but highly toxic in elevated doses. In many respects, cadmium behaves chemically like calcium (Ca) and thus substitutes for Ca in liquid-solid partitioning reactions and generally follows Ca through biogeochemical cycles and metabolic processes. Cd is comprised of 8 stable isotopes, and given the isotopic systematics of environmental Ca it is likely that variations in the stable isotope composition of Cd in natural materials will result from both inorganic and biologic processes. In order to assess the potential of Cd isotope variations to reveal information about sources, metabolic and biogeochemical pathways and fates of environmental Cd, we have initiated a broad study of the stable isotope composition of Cd in a variety of natural and anthropogenically-influenced systems. As an example, here we report the results of the first systematic study of the stable isotope composition of Cd in biologic materials. We focused on the isotopic variability of Cd in tissues of two species of clam collected from the San Francisco Bay estuary, Potamocorbula amurensis which resides in brackish water and Corbicula fluminea which resides in fresh and slightly brackish water. Both clam species concentrate Cd in their soft and hard tissues. During both low-flow conditions in August and high-flow conditions in April, ?116Cd of soft tissues of Potamocorbula was consistently negative and increased down-estuary with increasing salinity (?116Cd is defined as the per mil difference of the 116Cd/110Cd ratio between a sample and our standard, igneous rock BIR-1). Samples collected in August were systematically displaced to higher ?116Cd than those collected in April. Soft tissues of Corbicula collected in both August and April from upstream, fully fresh-water sampling sites had identical ?116Cd, while soft tissues of Corbicula collected from our site at the fresh water-brackish water interface had variable ?116Cd that was approximately 0.4 less negative than that of co-sampled Potamocorbula. These results point to a variety of potential controls on the isotopic distribution of Cd, including differences in aqueous speciation of Cd in saline and fresh waters, species-specific and temporal variations of nutritional sources and distribution of Cd between soft and hard tissues, and changing influences of Cd contamination to the ecosystem.

Bullen, T. D.; Bouse, R. M.; Brown, C. L.; Croteau, M.; Luoma, S. N.; Topping, B. R.

2005-05-01

135

Infrared Spectroscopy and Stable Isotope Geochemistry of Hydrous Silicate Glasses  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this DOE-funded project has been the study of volatile components in magmas and the atmosphere. Over the twenty-one year period of this project, we have used experimental petrology and stable isotope geochemistry to study the behavior and properties of volatile components dissolved in silicate minerals and melts and glasses. More recently, we have also studied the concentration and isotopic composition of CO2 in the atmosphere, especially in relation to air quality issues in the Los Angeles basin.

Stolper, Edward

2007-03-05

136

Stable Isotope Analyses of water and Aqueous Solutions by Conventional Dual-inlet Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The foundation of various analytical methods for the stable isotope composition of water and other aqueous samples (natural abundance, {sup 1}H : {sup 2}H (D) = 99.985 : 0.015 atom%, and {sup 16}O : {sup 17}O : {sup 18}O = 99.762 : 0.038 : 0.200 atom%) was established during the Manhatten Project in the U.S.A., when large amounts of heavy water were produced for nuclear reactors (see Kirshenbaum, 1951, for a detailed account). From early on, there was great interest in the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions of water, because they are the ideal tracers of water sources and reactions. The increased analytical precisions made possible by the subsequent development of modern gas-source isotope-ratio mass spectrometers with dual-inlets and multi-collectors, have caused the proliferation of new analytical methods and applications for the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions of water. These stable isotopes have found wide applications in basic as well as applied sciences (chemistry, geology, hydrology, biology, medical sciences, and food sciences). This is because water is ubiquitous, is an essential and predominant ingredient of living organisms, and is perhaps the most reactive compound in the Earth.

Horita, Juske [ORNL; Kendall, C. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA

2004-01-01

137

Magnesium stable isotope fractionation in marine biogenic calcite and aragonite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This survey of magnesium stable isotope compositions in marine biogenic aragonite and calcite includes samples from corals, sclerosponges, benthic porcelaneous and planktonic perforate foraminifera, coccolith oozes, red algae, and an echinoid and brachiopod test. The analyses were carried out using MC-ICP-MS with an external repeatability of 0.22 (2SD for ? 26Mg; n = 37), obtained from a coral reference sample (JCp-1). Magnesium isotope fractionation in calcitic corals and sclerosponges agrees with published data for calcitic speleothems with an average ? 26Mg calcite-seawater = -2.6 0.3 that appears to be weakly related to temperature. With one exception ( Vaceletia spp.), aragonitic corals and sclerosponges also display uniform Mg isotope fractionations relative to seawater with ? 26Mg biogenic aragonite-seawater = -0.9 0.2. Magnesium isotopes in high-Mg calcites from red algae, echinoids and perhaps some porcelaneous foraminifera as well as in all low-Mg calcites (perforate foraminifera, coccoliths and brachiopods) display significant biological influences. For planktonic foraminifera, the Mg isotope data is consistent with the fixation of Mg by organic material under equilibrium conditions, but appears to be inconsistent with Mg removal from vacuoles. Our preferred model, however, suggests that planktonic foraminifera synthesize biomolecules that increase the energetic barrier for Mg incorporation. In this model, the need to remove large quantities of Mg from vacuole solutions is avoided. For the high-Mg calcites from echinoids, the precipitation of amorphous calcium carbonate may be responsible for their weaker Mg isotope fractionation. Disregarding superimposed biological effects, it appears that cation light isotope enrichments in CaCO 3 principally result from a chemical kinetic isotope effect, related to the incorporation of cations at kink sites. In this model, the systematics of cation isotope fractionations in CaCO 3 relate to the activation energy required for cation incorporation, which probably reflects the dehydration of the cation and the crystal surface and bond formation at the incorporation site. This kinetic incorporation model predicts (i) no intrinsic dependence on growth rate, unless significant back reaction upon slow growth reduces the isotope fractionation towards that characteristic for equilibrium isotope partitioning (this may be observed for Ca isotopes in calcites), (ii) a small decrease of isotope fractionation with increasing temperature that may be amplified if higher temperatures promote back reaction and (iii) a sensitivity to changes in the activation barrier caused by additives such as anions or biomolecules or by the initial formation of amorphous CaCO 3.

Wombacher, F.; Eisenhauer, A.; Bhm, F.; Gussone, N.; Regenberg, M.; Dullo, W.-Chr.; Rggeberg, A.

2011-10-01

138

Cr stable isotope fractionation and reaction kinetics in aqueous milieu  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mass-dependent stable Cr isotope variations show great potential to monitor the natural attenuation of anthropogenic chromate pollution as well as to investigate changes in environmental conditions in the present and the past. However, accurate interpretation of mass-dependent Cr isotope variations requires profound knowledge of the Cr isotope fractionation behaviour during redox transitions and the isotope exchange kinetics of the reactions involved. Here, we present a comprehensive dataset of stable Cr isotope fractionation and reaction kinetics during Cr(III) oxidation, Cr(VI) reduction and isotopic exchange between soluble Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in aqueous milieu. All experiments were carried out with both oxidation states (i.e. Cr(III) and Cr(VI)) in solution, using H2O2 as oxidising as well as reducing agent. The pH conditions were varied to investigate the influence of the different Cr(III) and Cr(VI) species on the Cr isotope fractionation and on the reaction mechanisms during the enforced redox transitions. All Cr stable isotope measurements were performed by high-resolution MC-ICP-MS [1]. The reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) with H2O2 under strongly acidic conditions shows an equilibrium isotope fractionation of ?(53,52Cr)Cr(III)-Cr(VI) of -3.54 0.35 . This value is within uncertainty equal to that of -3.4 0.1 reported by Ellis et al. [2], who used natural sediment and magnetite as reducing agents at pH 6 to 7. At pH = 7 our reduction experiments show a unidirectional, kinetic isotope fractionation ?(53,52Cr)Cr(III)-Cr(VI) of approximately -5 for reduction rates of up to 80 %, but a strong deviation from this Rayleigh-type process for higher reduction rates. However, at a pH value of 7 H2O2 supports the temporary formation and decomposition of Cr(V)-peroxo complexes that might explain this fractionation behaviour and deviation from a single Rayleigh type trend. The oxidation experiments of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) were carried out in alkaline media using H2O2 as reducing agent. The observed, small Cr isotope fractionation can not be explained by one, unidirectional oxidation process. The high energy needed to oxidise Cr(III) to Cr(VI), potential Cr(III) oligomerisation and the formation of Cr(IV) and/or Cr(V) intermediates make the oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) a very complex fractionation mechanism. Our best-fit modelling points to an overall isotope fractionation ?(53,52Cr)Cr(VI)-Cr(III) of +0.15 during the different oxidation steps, which is overprinted by a much larger isotope fractionation ?(53,52Cr)Cr(III)-Cr(VI) of -3.4 during the back reduction of approximately 15 % of the chromium. No isotope exchange between soluble Cr(VI) and Cr(III) species at pH values of 5.5 and 7 was revealed by our experiments over a timescale of 120 hours. This observation is in good agreement with the lack of isotope exchange between oxygen bound in dissolved chromate CrO42- and that of the surrounding water [3]. [1] Schoenberg, R. et al. (2008) Chemical Geology, 249, 294ff. [2] Ellis, A. et al. (2002) Science, 295, 2060ff. [3] Bullen, T. et al. (2009) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 73 (13), Suppl. 1, A173

Zink, S.; Schoenberg, R.; Staubwasser, M.

2009-12-01

139

Research review paper Stable isotope probing in the metagenomics era: A bridge towards  

E-print Network

Research review paper Stable isotope probing in the metagenomics era: A bridge towards improved: Bioremediation Biodegradation Stable isotope probing Metagenomics Sequence-based screening Function Microbial biodegradation and biotransformation reactions are essential to most bioremediation processes, yet

140

Mercury abundances and isotopic compositions in the Murchison (CM) and Allende (CV) carbonaceous chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The abundance and isotopic composition of Hg was determined in bulk samples of both the Murchison (CM) and Allende (CV) carbonaceous chondrites using single- and multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The bulk abundances of Hg are 294 15 ng/g in Murchison and 30.0 1.5 ng/g in Allende. These values are within the range of previous measurements of bulk Hg abundances by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Prior studies suggested that both meteorites contain isotopically anomalous Hg, with ? 196/202Hg values for the anomalous, thermal-release components from bulk samples ranging from -260 to +440 in Murchison and from -620 to +540 in Allende (Jovanovic and Reed, 1976a; 1976b; Kumar and Goel, 1992). Our multi-collector ICP-MS measurements suggest that the relative abundances of all seven stable Hg isotopes in both meteorites are identical to terrestrial values within 0.2 to 0.5 . On-line thermal-release experiments were performed by coupling a programmable oven with the single-collector ICP-MS. Powdered aliquots of each meteorite were linearly heated from room temperature to 900C over twenty-five minutes under an Ar atmosphere to measure the isotopic composition of Hg released from the meteorites as a function of temperature. In separate experiments, the release profiles of S and Se were determined simultaneously with Hg to constrain the Hg distribution within the meteorites and to evaluate the possibility of Se interferences in previous NAA studies. The Hg-release patterns differ between Allende and Murchison. The Hg-release profile for Allende contains two distinct peaks, at 225 and 343C, whereas the profile for Murchison has only one peak, at 344C. No isotopically anomalous Hg was detected in the thermal-release experiments at a precision level of 5 to 30 , depending on the isotope ratio. In both meteorites the Hg peak at 340C correlates with a peak in the S-release profile. This correlation suggests that Hg is associated with S-bearing phases and, thus, that HgS is a major Hg-bearing phase in both meteorites. The Hg peak at 225C for Allende is similar to release patterns of physically adsorbed Hg on silicate and metal grains. Prior studies suggested that the isotopic anomalies reported from NAA resulted from interference between 203Hg and 75Se. However, the amount of Se released from both meteorites, relative to Hg, is insufficient to produce all of the observed anomalies.

Lauretta, Dante S.; Klaue, Bjoern; Blum, Joel D.; Buseck, Peter R.

2001-09-01

141

The Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Hg in Extraterrestrial Materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the three year grant period we made excellent progress in our study of the abundances and isotopic compositions of Hg and other volatile trace elements in extraterrestrial materials. At the time the grant started, our collaborating PI, Dante Lauretts, was a postdoctoral research associate working with Peter Buseck at Arizona State University. The work on chondritic Hg was done in collaboration with Dante Lauretta and Peter Buseck and this study was published in Lauretta et a1 (2001a). In July, 2001 Dante Lauretta accepted a position as an Assistant Professor in the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory at the University of Arizona. His funding was transferred and this grant has supported much of his research activities during his first two years at the U of A. Several other papers are in preparation and will be published soon. We presented papers on this topic at Goldschmidt Conferences, the Lunar and Planetary Science Conferences, and the Annual Meetings of the Meteoritical Society. The work done under this grant has spurred several new directions of inquiry, which we are still pursuing. Included in this paper are the studies of bulk abundances and isotopic compositions of metreoritic Mercury, and the development of a thermal analysis ICP-MS technique applied to thermally liable elements.

Blum, J. D.; Klaue, Bjorn

2005-01-01

142

[Terrestrial plant stable carbon isotope composition and global change].  

PubMed

Stable carbon isotope analysis is a rapid and reliable technique developed in recent years, and has been widely applied to reconstruct the sequences of atmospheric CO2 concentration changes, clarify the hysteresis effect and junior effect of temperature and precipitation on tree growth, and distinguish the distributions of plants with different photosynthetic pathways. The water use efficiency (WUE) of different plant functional groups and the variations of plant WUE with tempo-spatial and climatic changes can be also indicated by determining plant carbon isotope composition. In this paper, the effects of environmental factors, e.g., atmospheric CO2 concentration, air temperature, precipitation, and altitude on terrestrial plant carbon isotope composition were discussed, and the advances and applications of carbon isotope technique in global change research were summarized. Furthermore, the existing and disputed problems in carbon isotope analysis were discussed, and the future trends of carbon isotope technique in global change research were prospected, aimed to widen people's knowledge and promote the development of this technique. PMID:16836111

Zheng, Shuxi; Shangguan, Zhouping

2006-04-01

143

Elemental and isotopic abundances in the solar wind  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of collecting foils and lunar material to assay the isotopic composition of the solar wind is reviewed. Arguments are given to show that lunar surface correlated gases are likely to be most useful in studying the history of the solar wind, though the isotopic abundances are thought to give a good approximation to the solar wind composition. The results of the analysis of Surveyor material are also given. The conditions leading to a significant component of the interstellar gas entering the inner solar system are reviewed and suggestions made for experimental searches for this fraction. A critical discussion is given of the different ways in which the basic solar composition could be modified by fractionation taking place between the sun's surface and points of observation such as on the Moon or in interplanetary space. An extended review is made of the relation of isotopic and elemental composition of the interplanetary gas to the dynamic behavior of the solar corona, especially processes leading to fractionation. Lastly, connection is made between the subject of composition, nucleosynthesis and the convective zone of the sun, and processes leading to modification of initial accretion of certain gases on the Earth and Moon.

Geiss, J.

1972-01-01

144

Stable Isotope Characterization of TICs/TIMs: Analytical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

We measured twelve alkali cyanide samples that were also sent to ORNL and PNNL collaborators. While results indicate distinct {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N values that would be useful to signature studies, the alkali cyanides, especially NaCN, show chemical breakdown during storage that will influence forensic analysis. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic compositions of raw materials used to synthesis TETS were measured. Results indicate wide ranges in {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N values. Using these raw materials, LLNL scientists synthesized three batches of TETS following published procedures. Stable isotopic measurements of TETS synthesis products indicates nitrogen ({var_epsilon} {sup 15}N = -1.7 to -0.8) and carbon ({var_epsilon} {sup 13}C = -1.0 to -0.1) fractionation during production.

Volpe, A M; Singleton, M J

2009-06-05

145

Tracing anthropogenic thallium in soil using stable isotope compositions.  

PubMed

Thallium stable isotope data are used in this study, for the first time, to apportion Tl contamination in soils. In the late 1970s, a cement plant near Lengerich, Germany, emitted cement kiln dust (CKD) with high Tl contents, due to cocombustion of Tl-enriched pyrite roasting waste. Locally contaminated soil profiles were obtained down to 1 m depth and the samples are in accord with a binary mixing relationship in a diagram of Tl isotope compositions (expressed as ?(205)Tl, the deviation of the (205)Tl/(203)Tl ratio of a sample from the NIST SRM 997 Tl isotope standard in parts per 10(4)) versus 1/[Tl]. The inferred mixing endmembers are the geogenic background, as defined by isotopically light soils at depth (?(205)Tl ? -4), and the Tl emissions, which produce Tl-enriched topsoils with ?(205)Tl as high as 0. The latter interpretation is supported by analyses of the CKD, which is also characterized by ?(205)Tl ? 0, and the same ?(205)Tl value was found for a pyrite from the deposit that produced the cocombusted pyrite roasting waste. Additional measurements for samples from a locality in China, with outcrops of Tl sulfide mineralization and associated high natural Tl backgrounds, reveal significant isotope fractionation between soils (?(205)Tl ? +0.4) and locally grown green cabbage (?(205)Tl between -2.5 and -5.4). This demonstrates that biological isotope fractionation cannot explain the isotopically heavy Tl in the Lengerich topsoils and the latter are therefore clearly due to anthropogenic Tl emissions from cement processing. Our results thus establish that isotopic data can reinforce receptor modeling for the toxic trace metal Tl. PMID:25055714

Kersten, Michael; Xiao, Tangfu; Kreissig, Katharina; Brett, Alex; Coles, Barry J; Rehkmper, Mark

2014-08-19

146

Project EARTH-13-AH4: The Origin of the Moon: a stable vanadium isotope perspective  

E-print Network

Project EARTH-13-AH4: The Origin of the Moon: a stable vanadium isotope perspective Supervisor Museum, London sara.russell@nhm.ac.uk) AIM 1) Determine the stable vanadium isotopic composition of lunar a stable vanadium isotope perspective BACKGROUND The most widely accepted current theory for the origin

147

Climatic signals in multiple highly resolved stable isotope records from Greenland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty ice cores drilled in medium to high accumulation areas of the Greenland ice sheet have been used to extract seasonally resolved stable isotope records. Relationships between the seasonal stable isotope data and Greenland and Icelandic temperatures as well as atmospheric flow are investigated for the past 150200 years. The winter season stable isotope data are found to be influenced

B. M. Vinther; P. D. Jones; K. R. Briffa; H. B. Clausen; K. K. Andersen; D. Dahl-Jensen; S. J. Johnsen

2010-01-01

148

Realistic Fasting Does Not Affect Stable Isotope Levels of a Metabolically Efficient Salamander  

EPA Science Inventory

Stable isotopes are commonly used to examine various aspects of animal ecology. The use of stable isotopes generally proceeds under the implicit assumption that resource use is the only factor driving variation in stable isotope levels; however, a wealth of studies demonstrate a...

149

Analysis of the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios of beverage waters without prior water extraction  

E-print Network

Analysis of the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios of beverage waters without prior water August 2010; Accepted 23 August 2010 Hydrogen (d2 H) and oxygen (d18 O) stable isotope analysis is useful that the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios of some widely available bottled beverages co

Ehleringer, Jim

150

The use of stable carbon isotope analysis in rooting studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable carbon isotope analysis was evaluated as a means of predicting the relative proportions of C3 and C4 root phytomass in species mixtures. The following mixtures of C3 and C4 species were used: 1) big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii)\\/cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), 2) little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium)\\/cheatgrass, and 3) sorghum (Sorghum bicolor)\\/sunflower (Helianthus annuus). There was a significant correlation (P4 phytomass and

Tony J. Svejcar; Thomas W. Boutton

1985-01-01

151

Stable Isotope Studies of Paleoenvironment and Paleoclimate from Afar, Ethiopia  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000aThe sedimentary deposits of the Hadar Formation at Dikika and the Mount Galili Formation at Galili preserve a wealth of paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic records spanning the last 5.29 Ma. Stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of herbivore tooth enamel were analyzed for more than 600 specimens of 15 different taxa from 10 stratigraphic intervals. The application of carbon and oxygen

Zelalem K. Bedaso

2011-01-01

152

Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope biogeochemistry in the Delaware estuary  

Microsoft Academic Search

,Qbstract Seasonal variability in stable carbon (S'XZ) and nitrogen (b15N) isotope ratios was observed in suspended particulate matter of the Delaware estuary. Two major pools of organic matter were found in the estuary-phytoplankton growing in situ and a mixture of planktonic and terrestrial detritus. In general, the 6C and 615N of suspended particulate matter reflected planktonic dom- inance. With the

L. A. Cifuentesl; J. H. SHARP; MARILYN L. FOGEL

1988-01-01

153

Paleoclimate and Amerindians: Evidence from stable isotopes and atmospheric circulation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Two Amerindian demographic shifts are attributed to climate change in the northwest plains of North America: at ???11,000 calendar years before present (yr BP), Amerindian culture apparently split into foothills-mountains vs. plains biomes; and from 8,000-5,000 yr BP, scarce archaeological sites on the open plains suggest emigration during xeric "Altithermal" conditions. We reconstructed paleoclimates from stable isotopes in prehistoric bison bone and relations between weather and fractions of C4 plants in forage. Further, we developed a climate-change model that synthesized stable isotope, existing qualitative evidence (e.g., palynological, erosional), and global climate mechanisms affecting this midlatitude region. Our isotope data indicate significant warming from ???12,400 to 11,900 yr BP, supporting climate-driven cultural separation. However, isotope evidence of apparently wet, warm conditions at 7,300 yr BP refutes emigration to avoid xeric conditions. Scarcity of archaeological sites is best explained by rapid climate fluctuations after catastrophic draining of the Laurentide Lakes, which disrupted North Atlantic Deep Water production and subsequently altered monsoonal inputs to the open plains.

Lovvorn, M.B.; Frison, G.C.; Tieszen, L.L.

2001-01-01

154

Paleoclimate and Amerindians: Evidence from stable isotopes and atmospheric circulation  

PubMed Central

Two Amerindian demographic shifts are attributed to climate change in the northwest plains of North America: at ?11,000 calendar years before present (yr BP), Amerindian culture apparently split into foothillsmountains vs. plains biomes; and from 8,0005,000 yr BP, scarce archaeological sites on the open plains suggest emigration during xeric Altithermal conditions. We reconstructed paleoclimates from stable isotopes in prehistoric bison bone and relations between weather and fractions of C4 plants in forage. Further, we developed a climate-change model that synthesized stable isotope, existing qualitative evidence (e.g., palynological, erosional), and global climate mechanisms affecting this midlatitude region. Our isotope data indicate significant warming from ?12,400 to 11,900 yr BP, supporting climate-driven cultural separation. However, isotope evidence of apparently wet, warm conditions at 7,300 yr BP refutes emigration to avoid xeric conditions. Scarcity of archaeological sites is best explained by rapid climate fluctuations after catastrophic draining of the Laurentide Lakes, which disrupted North Atlantic Deep Water production and subsequently altered monsoonal inputs to the open plains. PMID:11226265

Lovvorn, Marjorie Brooks; Frison, George C.; Tieszen, Larry L.

2001-01-01

155

Diets of introduced predators using stable isotopes and stomach contents  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In a study of predation on ground-nesting birds at South San Francisco Bay (South Bay), California, USA, we analyzed stomach contents and stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen to identify commonly consumed prey. We obtained the stomach contents from 206 nonnative red foxes (Vulpes vulpes regalis) collected in the South Bay area and Monterey County during 1995-2001 and from 68 feral cats (Felis silvestris) from the South Bay area during 2001-2002. We determined prey identity, biomass, and frequency, described seasonal diet trends, and derived an Index of Relative Importance. Avian species were the most frequent prey we found in the stomachs of red foxes from South Bay (61%), whereas small rodents were most frequent for red foxes from Monterey County (62%). Small rodents were the most frequent prey we found in feral cats (63%). Carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures for foxes supported stomach content findings. However, isotope results indicated that cats received a majority of their energy from a source other than rodents and outside the natural system, which differed from the stomach content analysis. We demonstrated the utility of both stable isotope and stomach content analyses to establish a more complete understanding of predators' diets. This information aids natural resource managers in planning and evaluating future predator-removal programs and increases our understanding of the impacts of nonnative foxes and cats on native species.

Meckstroth, A.M.; Miles, A.K.; Chandra, S.

2007-01-01

156

Paleoclimate and Amerindians: evidence from stable isotopes and atmospheric circulation.  

PubMed

Two Amerindian demographic shifts are attributed to climate change in the northwest plains of North America: at approximately 11,000 calendar years before present (yr BP), Amerindian culture apparently split into foothills-mountains vs. plains biomes; and from 8,000-5,000 yr BP, scarce archaeological sites on the open plains suggest emigration during xeric "Altithermal" conditions. We reconstructed paleoclimates from stable isotopes in prehistoric bison bone and relations between weather and fractions of C(4) plants in forage. Further, we developed a climate-change model that synthesized stable isotope, existing qualitative evidence (e.g., palynological, erosional), and global climate mechanisms affecting this midlatitude region. Our isotope data indicate significant warming from approximately 12,400 to 11,900 yr BP, supporting climate-driven cultural separation. However, isotope evidence of apparently wet, warm conditions at 7,300 yr BP refutes emigration to avoid xeric conditions. Scarcity of archaeological sites is best explained by rapid climate fluctuations after catastrophic draining of the Laurentide Lakes, which disrupted North Atlantic Deep Water production and subsequently altered monsoonal inputs to the open plains. PMID:11226265

Lovvorn, M B; Frison, G C; Tieszen, L L

2001-02-27

157

Late Glacial Tropical Savannas in Sundaland Inferred From Stable Carbon Isotope Records of Cave Guano  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the Last Glacial Period (LGP), reduced global sea level exposed the continental shelf south of Thailand to Sumatra, Java, and Borneo to form the contiguous continent of Sundaland. However, the type and extent of vegetation that existed on much of this exposed landmass during the LGP remains speculative. Extensive bird and bat guano deposits in caves throughout this region span beyond 40,000 yr BP, and contain a wealth of untapped stratigraphic palaeoenvironmental information. Stable carbon isotope ratios of insectivorous bird and bat guano contain a reliable record of the animal's diet and, through non-specific insect predation, reflect the relative abundance of major physiological pathways in plants. Various physiological pathways of carbon fixation in plants yield differing stable carbon isotope ratios. Stable carbon isotope values of C3 plants are lower than C4 vegetation due to different enzymatic discriminations of the heavy isotope through the carbon fixing pathways. In tropical locales, grasses nearly always follow the C4 photosynthetic pathway, whereas tropical rainforest uses C3 photosynthesis, providing a proxy for vegetation and therefore climate change in the past. Here we discuss four guano stable-isotope records, based on insect cuticle and n-alkane analysis, supplemented by pollen analysis. All sites suggest a C3 dominated ecosystem for the Holocene, consistent with the wet tropical forest vegetation present at all locations. Two sites from Palawan Island, Philippines, record stable carbon isotope values of guano that document a drastic change from C3 (forest) to C4 (savanna) dominated ecosystems during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). A third location, at Niah Great Cave, Malaysia, indicates C3-dominant vegetation throughout the record, but does display variation in stable carbon isotope values likely linked to humidity changes. A fourth location, Batu Caves in Peninsular Malaysia, also indicates open vegetation during the LGM. Vegetation models disagree as to the nature of vegetation during the LGM in Sundaland, but our results suggest major contraction of forest area with significant implications for carbon storage during the LGM and also for understanding the development of modern biogeographic and genetic patterns in the region. Additional cave guano sites will provide further constraints on the nature of environmental change in the region over the last glacial cycle.

Wurster, C. M.; Bird, M. I.; Bull, I.; Dungait, J.; Bryant, C. L.; Ertun, T.; Hunt, C.; Lewis, H. A.; Paz, V.

2008-12-01

158

Geographic variation of stable isotopes in African elephant ivory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1989, the international community listed the African elephant in Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) thus prohibiting commercial ivory trade. Recent surveillance data show that the illegal trade in ivory has been growing worldwide. Long-term preservation of many of the African elephant populations can be supported with a control mechanism that helps with the implementation of remedial conservation action. Therefore, setting up a reference database that predicts the origin of ivory specimens can assist in determining smuggling routes and the provenance of illegal ivory. Our research builds on earlier work to seek an appropriate method for determining the area of origin for individual tusks. Several researchers have shown that the provenance of elephant ivory can be traced by its isotopic composition, but this is the first attempt to produce an integrated isotopic reference database of elephant ivory provenance. We applied a combination of various routine geochemical analyses to measure the stable isotope ratios of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulphur. Up to now, we analysed 606 ivory samples of known geographical origin from African range states, museums and private collections, comprising 22 African elephant range states. The isotopic measurements were superimposed with data layers from vegetation, geology and climate. A regression function for the isotope composition of the water isotopes in precipitation and collagen in ivory was developed to overcome the problem of imprecise origin of some of the sampled material. Multivariate statistics, such as nearest neighborhood and discriminate analysis were applied to eventually allow a statistical determination of the provenance for ivory of unknown origin. Our results suggest that the combination of isotopic parameters have the potential to provide predictable and complementary markers for estimating the origin of seized elephant ivory.

Ziegler, S.; Merker, S.; Jacob, D.

2012-04-01

159

Guidelines and recommended terms for expression of stable-isotope-ratio and gas-ratio measurement results  

USGS Publications Warehouse

To minimize confusion in the expression of measurement results of stable isotope and gas-ratio measurements, recommendations based on publications of the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) are presented. Whenever feasible, entries are consistent with the Systme International d'Units, the SI (known in English as the International System of Units), and the third edition of the International Vocabulary of Basic and General Terms in Metrology (VIM, 3rd edition). The recommendations presented herein are approved by the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights and are designed to clarify expression of quantities related to measurement of isotope and gas ratios to ensure that quantity equations instead of numerical value equations are used for quantity definitions. Examples of column headings consistent with quantity calculus (also called the algebra of quantities) and examples of various deprecated usages connected with the terms recommended are presented.

Coplen, Tyler B.

2011-01-01

160

Enantioselective stable isotope analysis (ESIA) of polar Herbicides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The complexity of aquatic systems makes it challenging to assess the environmental fate of chiral micropolutants. As an example, chiral herbicides are frequently detected in the environment (Buser and Muller, 1998); however, hydrological data is needed to determine their degradability from concentration measurements. Otherwise declining concentrations cannot unequivocally be attributed to degradation, but could also be caused by dilution effects. In contrast, isotope ratios or enantiomeric ratios are elegant alternatives that are independent of dilution and can even deliver insights into reaction mechanisms. To combine the advantages of both approaches we developed an enatioselective stable isotope analysis (ESIA) method to investigate the fate of the chiral herbicides 4-CPP ((RS)-2-(4-chlorophenoxy)-propionic acid), mecoprop (2-(4-Chloro-2-methylphenoxy)-propionic acid) and dichlorprop (2-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy)-propionic acid). After testing the applicable concentration range of the method, enantioselective isotope fractionation was investigated by microbial degradation using dichlorprop as a model compound. The method uses enantioselective gas-chromatography (GC) to separate enantiomers. Subsequently samples are combusted online to CO2 and carbon isotope ratios are determined for each enantiomer by isotope-ratio-mass-spectrometry (IRMS). Because the analytes contain a polar carboxyl-group, samples were derivatised prior to GC-IRMS analysis with methanolic BF3 solution. Precise carbon isotope analysis (2? ?0.5) was achieved with a high sensitivity of ? 7 ng C that is needed on column for one analysis. Microbial degradation of the model compound dichlorprop was conducted with Delftia acidovorans MC1 and pronounced enantiomer fractionation, but no isotope fractionation was detected. The absence of isotope fractionation can be explained by two scenarios: either the degrading enzyme has no isotopic preference, or another step in the reaction without an isotopic preference was rate determining. Our findings are in contrast to previously reported results for the degradation of ?-hexachlorocyclohexane (Badea et al., 2012), where isotope fractionation, but no enantiomeric fractionation was observed. Hence the two lines of evidence seem to be independent of each other. Enhanced insight maybe provided when both effects appear simultaneously, as shown downstream of a landfill site under anaerobic conditions for the chiral herbicide 4-CPP (Milosevic et al., 2013). Buser HR, Muller MD (1998): Occurrence and transformation reactions of chiral and achiral phenoxyalkanoic acid herbicides in lakes and rivers in Switzerland. Environmental Science & Technology 32 (5):626-633. Badea S-L, Vogt C, Gehre M, Fischer A, Danet A-F, Richnow H-H (2011): Development of an enantiomer-specific stable carbon isotope analysis (ESIA) method for assessing the fate of alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane in the environment. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry 25 (10):1363-1372. Milosevic N, Qiu S, Elsner M, Einsiedl F, Maier MP, Bensch HKV, Albrechtsen HJ, Bjerg PL (2013): Combined isotope and enantiomer analysis to assess the fate of phenoxy acids in a eterogeneous geologic setting at an old landfill. Water Research 47 (2): 637-649.

Maier, Michael; Qiu, Shiran; Elsner, Martin

2013-04-01

161

Stable isotope-resolved metabolomics and applications for drug development  

PubMed Central

Advances in analytical methodologies, principally nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS), during the last decade have made large-scale analysis of the human metabolome a reality. This is leading to the reawakening of the importance of metabolism in human diseases, particularly cancer. The metabolome is the functional readout of the genome, functional genome, and proteome; it is also an integral partner in molecular regulations for homeostasis. The interrogation of the metabolome, or metabolomics, is now being applied to numerous diseases, largely by metabolite profiling for biomarker discovery, but also in pharmacology and therapeutics. Recent advances in stable isotope tracer-based metabolomic approaches enable unambiguous tracking of individual atoms through compartmentalized metabolic networks directly in human subjects, which promises to decipher the complexity of the human metabolome at an unprecedented pace. This knowledge will revolutionize our understanding of complex human diseases, clinical diagnostics, as well as individualized therapeutics and drug response. In this review, we focus on the use of stable isotope tracers with metabolomics technologies for understanding metabolic network dynamics in both model systems and in clinical applications. Atom-resolved isotope tracing via the two major analytical platforms, NMR and MS, has the power to determine novel metabolic reprogramming in diseases, discover new drug targets, and facilitates ADME studies. We also illustrate new metabolic tracer-based imaging technologies, which enable direct visualization of metabolic processes in vivo. We further outline current practices and future requirements for biochemoinformatics development, which is an integral part of translating stable isotope-resolved metabolomics into clinical reality. PMID:22212615

Fan, Teresa W-M.; Lorkiewicz, Pawel; Sellers, Katherine; Moseley, Hunter N.B.; Higashi, Richard M.; Lane, Andrew N.

2012-01-01

162

Magnesium stable isotope ecology using mammal tooth enamel.  

PubMed

Geochemical inferences on ancient diet using bone and enamel apatite rely mainly on carbon isotope ratios (?(13)C) and to a lesser extent on strontium/calcium (Sr/Ca) and barium/calcium (Ba/Ca) elemental ratios. Recent developments in nontraditional stable isotopes provide an unprecedented opportunity to use additional paleodietary proxies to disentangle complex diets such as omnivory. Of particular relevance for paleodietary reconstruction are metals present in large quantity in bone and enamel apatite, providing that biologically mediated fractionation processes are constrained. Calcium isotope ratios (?(44)Ca) meet these criteria but exhibit complex ecological patterning. Stable magnesium isotope ratios (?(26)Mg) also meet these criteria but a comprehensive understanding of its variability awaits new isotopic data. Here, 11 extant mammal species of known ecology from a single locality in equatorial Africa were sampled for tooth enamel and, together with vegetation and feces, analyzed for ?(26)Mg, ?(13)C, Sr/Ca, and Ba/Ca ratios. The results demonstrate that ?(26)Mg incorporated in tooth enamel becomes heavier from strict herbivores to omnivores/faunivores. Using data from experimentally raised sheep, we suggest that this (26)Mg enrichment up the trophic chain is due to a (26)Mg enrichment in muscle relative to bone. Notably, it is possible to distinguish omnivores from herbivores, using ?(26)Mg coupled to Ba/Ca ratios. The potential effects of metabolic and dietary changes on the enamel ?(26)Mg composition remain to be explored but, in the future, multiproxy approaches would permit a substantial refinement of dietary behaviors or enable accurate trophic reconstruction despite specimen-limited sampling, as is often the case for fossil assemblages. PMID:25535375

Martin, Jeremy E; Vance, Derek; Balter, Vincent

2015-01-13

163

Using stable isotopes to assess dietary changes of American black bears from 1980 to 2001.  

PubMed

We measured stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in 117 hair samples from American black bears (Ursus americanus) in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee, during 1980-2001 from live-trapped bears. We also collected hair from bears with known diets to compare with the wild bears. We hypothesized that biological factors (age, mass, and sex), food availability (hard mast and wild hogs (Sus scrofa)), and nuisance status would influence food selection by black bears and changes in their feeding history would be measureable using stable isotopes. We developed a set of a priori models using nine variables to examine changes in black bear stable isotope values. We found no support for changes in ?(13)C values associated with any of the nine variables we analyzed. Bears had enriched (15)N in years with low white oak mast production and depleted (15)N when white oak mast was abundant. Subadults had enriched (15)N compared with adults and older adults. Variation in ?(15)N increased from 1980-1991 to 1992-2000 when hard mast production had greater fluctuations. Bears in a better physical condition appeared more likely to access foods with higher protein content. In years of low white oak acorn production, larger bears and subadults likely turned to alternative food sources. The long-term variation detected in this study was important in identifying which bears were potentially more susceptible to changes in availability of hard mast. PMID:24998986

Teunissen van Manen, Jennapher L; Muller, Lisa I; Li, Zheng-hua; Saxton, Arnold M; Pelton, Michael R

2014-01-01

164

Potassium isotope abundances in Australasian tektites and microtektites.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report electron microprobe determinations of the elemental compositions of 11 Australasian layered tektites and 28 Australasian microtektites; and ion microprobe determinations of the 41K/39K ratios of all 11 tektites and 13 of the microtektites. The elemental compositions agree well with literature values, although the average potassium concentrations measured here for microtektites, 1.1 1.6 wt%, are lower than published average values, 1.9 2.9 wt%. The potassium isotope abundances of the Australasian layered tektites vary little. The average value of ?41K, 0.02 0.12 (1? mean), is indistinguishable from the terrestrial value (= 0 by definition) as represented by our standard, thereby confirming four earlier tektite analyses of Humayun and Koeberl (2004). In agreement with those authors, we conclude that evaporation has significantly altered neither the isotopic nor the elemental composition of Australasian layered tektites for elements less volatile than potassium. Although the average 41K/39K ratio of the microtektites, 1.1 1.7 (1? mean), is also statistically indistinguishable from the value for the standard, the individual ratios vary over a very large range, from -10.6 1.4 to +13.8 1.5 and at least three of them are significantly different from zero. We interpret these larger variations in terms of the evaporation of isotopically light potassium; condensation of potassium in the vapor plume; partial or complete stirring and quenching of the melts; and the possible uptake of potassium from seawater. That the average 41K/39K ratio of the microtektites equals the terrestrial value suggests that the microtektite-forming system was compositionally closed with respect to potassium and less volatile elements. The possibility remains open that 41K/39K ratios of microtektites vary systematically with location in the strewn field.

Herzog, G. F.; O'D. Alexander, C. M.; Berger, E. L.; Delaney, J. S.; Glass, B. P.

2008-10-01

165

Stable lead isotopes evidence anthropogenic contamination in Alaskan sea otters  

SciTech Connect

Lead concentrations and stable isotopic compositions were measured in teeth of preindustrial and contemporary sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from Amchitka Island, AK, to determine if changes had occurred in the magnitude and source of assimilated lead. Although there was no significant difference in lead concentrations between the two groups of otters ({bar x} {plus minus} {sigma}Pb/Ca atomic = 3.6 {plus minus} 2.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}), differences in stable lead isotopic compositions revealed a pronounced change in the source of accumulated lead. Lead {bar x} {plus minus} 2{sigma}{sub {bar x}} in the preindustrial otters ({sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb = 0.828 {plus minus} 0.006) was derived from natural deposits in the Aleutian arc, while lead in the contemporary animals ({sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb = 0.856 {plus minus} 0.003) was primarily industrial lead from Asia and western Canada. The isotopic ratios demonstrate anthropogenic perturbations of the lead cycle in present-day coastal food webs and indicate that lead concentration measurements alone are inadequate in assessing the introduction and transport of contaminant lead in the environment.

Smith, D.R.; Estes, J.A.; Flegal, A.R. (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (USA)); Niemeyer, S. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (USA))

1990-10-01

166

The abundances of elements and isotopes in the solar wind  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Solar wind abundances have now been measured for eleven elements and the isotopes of the noble gases. Aside from solar wind protons and alpha particles, which have been studied extensively since the 1960's, information for heavier elements is limited. Nevertheless, two effects stand out. First is the enrichment of abundances of elements with low first ionization potential (FIP), most likely the combined result of an atom-ion separation process in the upper chromosphere, and a marginal coupling of low-charge-state heavy ions to protons and alphas during the acceleration of the solar wind. Second, there is variability in the solar wind composition over a whole range of time scales. Recent measurements carried out in the earth's magnetosheath during times that included high-speed coronal-hole-associated flows indicate a significantly lower overabundance of low FIP elements. Given the fact that the He/H ratio is remarkably constant in the coronal hole solar wind, this result suggests that both enrichment and variability are reduced in such flows.

Gloeckler, George; Geiss, Johannes

1989-01-01

167

Stable carbon isotope fractionation during aerobic biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes  

SciTech Connect

Stable isotope analysis is recognized as a powerful tool for monitoring, assessing, and validating in-situ bioremediation processes. In this study, kinetic carbon isotope fractionation factors () associated with the aerobic biodegradation of vinyl chloride (VC), cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (cDCE), and trichloroethylene (TCE) were examined. Of the three solvents, the largest fractionation effects were observed for biodegradation of VC. Both metabolic and cometabolic VC degradation were studied using Mycobacterium aurum L1 (grown on VC), Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b (grown on methane), Mycobacterium vaccae JOB 5 (grown on propane), and two VC enrichment cultures seeded from contaminated soils of Alameda Point and Travis Air Force Base, CA. M. aurum L1 caused the greatest fractionation (= -5.7) while for the cometabolic cultures, values ranged from -3.2 to -4.8. VC fractionation patterns for the enrichment cultures were within the range of those observed for the metabolic and cometabolic cultures (= -4.5 to -5.5). The fractionation for cometabolic degradation of TCE by Me. trichosporium OB3b was low (= -1.1), while no quantifiable carbon isotopic fractionation was observed during the cometabolic degradation of cDCE. For all three of the tested chlorinated ethenes, isotopic fractionation measured during aerobic degradation was significantly smaller than that reported for anaerobic reductive dechlorination. This study suggests that analysis of compound-specific isotopic fractionation could assist in determining whether aerobic or anaerobic degradation of VC and cDCE predominates in field applications of in-situ bioremediation. In contrast, isotopic fractionation effects associated with metabolic and cometabolic reactions are not sufficiently dissimilar to distinguish these processes in the field.

Chu, Kung-Hui; Mahendra, Shaily; Song, Donald L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

2003-06-01

168

Stable isotope values of North Atlantic water masses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A comprehensive study of seawater stable isotope properties in the mid-latitude North Atlantic is still missing, especially for the intermediate and deep-water masses. To fill this gap seawater samples were collected since 2006 along various transects in the Northeast Atlantic. During the Atlantic Meridional Transect (AMT) 18 expedition the upper 300 m were sampled between 46.6 and 24.7N. RV Poseidon cruises POS334, POS349, POS377, and POS383 to the Azores Front region (38.3-30N; 22-20W) generally yielded samples down to 2000 m. High-resolution sampling over the whole water column was performed during the OVIDE 2010 (Portugal to Reykjanes ridge) and KN199-4 cruises. Cruise KN199-4 implemented the section from Lisbon to the Cape Verde Islands of the US GEOTRACES North Atlantic transect. Additional stations collected samples along the Iberian margin during the EUROFLEETS Iberia-Forams cruise on RV Garcia del Cid in September 2012. The isotope results clearly indicate the different water masses and hydrographic fronts, although variability in some regions is higher than expected, potentially an affect of the different years and seasons sampled and/ or meandering of the Azores Current. Higher isotope values are observed in the surface waters of the central subtropical gyre and on the southern side of the Azores Front, i.e. within the Azores Current. Lower isotope values are observed in the North Atlantic Deep Water and the Antarctic Intermediate Water upwelled off NW Africa. Mediterranean Outflow Water is best depicted in the Deuterium values because the salinity signal is less rapidly diluted than temperature. Combining the isotope with the respective station's CTD data will allow establishing regional relationships between isotope and temperature/ salinity.

Voelker, Antje

2013-04-01

169

Quantitative imaging of subcellular metabolism with stable isotopes and multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry  

PubMed Central

Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) is the quantitative imaging of stable isotope labels in cells with a new type of secondary ion mass spectrometer (NanoSIMS). The power of the methodology is attributable to (i) the immense advantage of using non-toxic stable isotope labels, (ii) high resolution imaging that approaches the resolution of usual transmission electron microscopy and (iii) the precise quantification of label down to 1 part-per-million and spanning several orders of magnitude. Here we review the basic elements of MIMS and describe new applications of MIMS to the quantitative study of metabolic processes including protein and nucleic acid synthesis in model organisms ranging from microbes to humans. PMID:23660233

Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Lechene, Claude P.

2014-01-01

170

Linking Diversity and Stable Isotope Fractionation in Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria play a key role in the regeneration of nitrate (NO3) and the production of nitrous oxide (N2O) in many marine, estuarine, and terrestrial ecosystems. While isotopic ratios (15N/14N) of dissolved inorganic nitrogen pools (NH4+ and NO3) can serve as in situ tracers for overall nitrification activity, genetic characterization of bacterial communities can provide information about the diversity and relative abundance of specific groups of ammonia-oxidizers. An important question facing microbial ecologists is how diversity in gene or protein sequences is reflected in diversity in biogeochemical activity. Here we investigate the link between similarity in amino acid sequence for ammonia monooxygenase (AmoA) and its isotopic discrimination (?AMO) for B-subdivision ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Isotope effects for ammonia-oxidation were measured for 5 cultured nitrifier strains. A 20 permil range in isotope effects was observed among these nitrifiers, which could not be explained by differential rates of ammonia oxidation, transport of NH4+, accumulation of NH2OH, or N2O production among the strains. The major similarities and differences observed in ?AMO are, however, paralleled by similarities and differences in AmoA amino sequences from these organisms. These results suggest that combining genetic and stable isotopic tools may provide complementary information regarding the activity of particular groups of ammonia-oxidizers in the environment.

Casciotti, K. L.; Sigman, D. M.; Ward, B. B.

2002-12-01

171

A Hydrogen Gas-Water Equilibration Method Produces Accurate and Precise Stable Hydrogen Isotope Ratio Measurements in Nutrition Studies12  

PubMed Central

Stable hydrogen isotope methodology is used in nutrition studies to measure growth, breast milk intake, and energy requirement. Isotope ratio MS is the best instrumentation to measure the stable hydrogen isotope ratios in physiological fluids. Conventional methods to convert physiological fluids to hydrogen gas (H2) for mass spectrometric analysis are labor intensive, require special reagent, and involve memory effect and potential isotope fractionation. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy and precision of a platinum catalyzed H2-water equilibration method for stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements. Time to reach isotopic equilibrium, day-to-day and week-to-week reproducibility, accuracy, and precision of stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements by the H2-water equilibration method were assessed using a Thermo DELTA V Advantage continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. It took 3 h to reach isotopic equilibrium. The day-to-day and week-to-week measurements on water and urine samples with natural abundance and enriched levels of deuterium were highly reproducible. The method was accurate to within 2.8 o/oo and reproducible to within 4.0 o/oo based on analysis of international references. All the outcome variables, whether in urine samples collected in 10 doubly labeled water studies or plasma samples collected in 26 body water studies, did not differ from those obtained using the reference zinc reduction method. The method produced highly accurate estimation on ad libitum energy intakes, body composition, and water turnover rates. The method greatly reduces the analytical cost and could easily be adopted by laboratories equipped with a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. PMID:23014490

Wong, William W.; Clarke, Lucinda L.

2012-01-01

172

Assessing sources of human methylmercury exposure using stable mercury isotopes.  

PubMed

Seafood consumption is the primary route of methylmercury (MeHg) exposure for most populations. Inherent uncertainties in dietary survey data point to the need for an empirical tool to confirm exposure sources. We therefore explore the utility of Hg stable isotope ratios in human hair as a new method for discerning MeHg exposure sources. We characterized Hg isotope fractionation between humans and their diets using hair samples from Faroese whalers exposed to MeHg predominantly from pilot whales. We observed an increase of 1.75 in ?(202)Hg values between pilot whale muscle tissue and Faroese whalers' hair but no mass-independent fractionation. We found a similar offset in ?(202)Hg between consumed seafood and hair samples from Gulf of Mexico recreational anglers who are exposed to lower levels of MeHg from a variety of seafood sources. An isotope mixing model was used to estimate individual MeHg exposure sources and confirmed that both ?(199)Hg and ?(202)Hg values in human hair can help identify dietary MeHg sources. Variability in isotopic signatures among coastal fish consumers in the Gulf of Mexico likely reflects both differences in environmental sources of MeHg to coastal fish and uncertainty in dietary recall data. Additional data are needed to fully refine this approach for individuals with complex seafood consumption patterns. PMID:24967674

Li, Miling; Sherman, Laura S; Blum, Joel D; Grandjean, Philippe; Mikkelsen, Bjarni; Weihe, Pl; Sunderland, Elsie M; Shine, James P

2014-08-01

173

Stable carbon isotope biogeochemistry of lakes along a trophic gradient  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The stable carbon (C) isotope variability of dissolved inorganic and organic C (DIC and DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), glucose and polar-lipid derived fatty acids (PLFAs) was studied in a survey of 22 North American oligotrophic to eutrophic lakes. The ?13C of different PLFAs were used as proxy for phytoplankton producers and bacterial consumers. Lake pCO2 was primarily determined by autochthonous production (phytoplankton biomass), especially in eutrophic lakes, and governed the ?13C of DIC. All organic-carbon pools showed overall higher isotopic variability in eutrophic lakes (n = 11) compared to oligo-mesotrophic lakes (n = 11) because of the high variability in ?13C at the base of the food web (both autochthonous and allochthonous carbon). Phytoplankton ?13C was negatively related to lake pCO2 over all lakes and positively related to phytoplankton biomass in eutrophic lakes, which was also reflected in a large range in photosynthetic isotope fractionation (ϵCO2-phyto, 8-25). The carbon isotope ratio of allochthonous carbon in oligo-mesotrophic lakes was rather constant, while it varied in eutrophic lakes because of maize cultivation in the watershed.

de Kluijver, A.; Schoon, P. L.; Downing, J. A.; Schouten, S.; Middelburg, J. J.

2014-11-01

174

Intramolecular stable isotope distributions detect plant metabolic responses on century time scales  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plants respond to environmental changes on a vast range of time scales, and plant gas exchanges constitute important feedback mechanisms in the global C cycle. Responses on time scales of decades to centuries are most important for climate models, for prediction of crop productivity, and for adaptation to climate change. Unfortunately, responses on these timescale are least understood. We argue that the knowledge gap on intermediate time scales is due to a lack of adequate methods that can bridge between short-term manipulative experiments (e.g. FACE) and paleo research. Manipulative experiments in plant ecophysiology give information on metabolism on time scales up to years. However, this information cannot be linked to results from retrospective studies in paleo research, because little metabolic information can be derived from paleo archives. Stable isotopes are prominent tools in plant ecophysiology, biogeochemistry and in paleo research, but in all applications to date, isotope ratios of whole molecules are measured. However, it is well established that stable isotope abundance varies among intramolecular groups of biochemical metabolites, that is each so-called "isotopomer" has a distinct abundance. This intramolecular variation carries information on metabolic regulation, which can even be traced to individual enzymes (Schleucher et al., Plant, Cell Environ 1999). Here, we apply intramolecular isotope distributions to study the metabolic response of plants to increasing atmospheric [CO2] during the past century. Greenhouse experiments show that the deuterium abundance among the two positions in the C6H2 group of photosynthetic glucose depends on [CO2] during growth. This is observed for all plants using C3 photosynthesis, and reflects the metabolic flux ratio between photorespiration and photosynthesis. Photorespiration is a major C flux that limits assimilation in C3 plants, which encompass the overwhelming fraction of terrestrial photosynthesis and the vast majority of crop species. To access century time scales, we traced this metabolic signal in historic material of two crop species during the past 100 years and find the same response as predicted from the greenhouse experiments. This allows estimating how much photorespiration has been reduced due to the anthropogenic CO2 emission during the 20th century, and shows that plants have not acclimated to increasing [CO2] during more than 100 generations. In summary, we demonstrate that metabolic responses of plants to environmental changes create intramolecular isotope signals. These signals can be identified in manipulation experiments and can be retrieved from plant archives. The isotope abundance of each intramolecular position is set by specific isotope fractionations, such as enzyme isotope effects or hydrogen exchange with xylem water (Augusti et al., Chem. Geol. 2008). Therefore it may be possible to simultaneously reconstruct several physiologic or climate signals from an archive of a single molecule. The principles governing intramolecular isotope distributions are general for all metabolites and isotopes (D, 13C), therefore intramolecular isotope distributions can multiply the information content of paleo archives. In particular, they allow extraction of metabolic information on long time scales, thereby connecting plant physiology with paleo research.

Schleucher, Jrgen; Ehlers, Ina; Augusti, Angela; Betson, Tatiana

2014-05-01

175

The Stable Carbon Isotope Ratio of Biogenic Emissions of Isoprene and the Potential Use of Stable Isotope Ratio Measurements to Study Photochemical Processing of Isoprene in the Atmosphere  

Microsoft Academic Search

A technique was developed that allows the determination of the stable carbon isotope ratio of isoprene in air. The method was used for a limited number of ambient measurements as well as laboratory studies of isoprene emitted from Velvet Bean (Mucana pruriens L. var. utilis), including the light and temperature dependence. The mean stable carbon isotope ratio (d 13C) of

J. Rudolph; R. S. Anderson; K. V. Czapiewski; E. Czuba; D. Ernst; T. Gillespie; L. Huang; C. Rigby; A. E. Thompson

2003-01-01

176

Isotopic profiling of seized benzylpiperazine and trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine tablets using ?(13)C and ?(15)N stable isotopes.  

PubMed

This paper demonstrates the use of isotopic analysis of 23 benzylpiperazine (BZP) and trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine (TFMPP) containing tablets seized on two independent occasions by the Northern Territory (NT) Police, Australia. Isolation (High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)) of BZP and TFMPP followed by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) (carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes) analysis was performed. Results are presented for ?(13)C and ?(15)N values of the respective piperazine analogues. The isotopic data and statistical analysis suggest a common source of manufacture for the BZP samples but suggest different sources for the TFMPP isolated from the corresponding BZP containing tablets investigated. The use of IRMS in this case study demonstrated the ability to obtain information regarding the BZP/TFMPP sources unattainable via conventional chemical analysis. PMID:25577007

Beckett, Nicola M; Cresswell, Sarah L; Grice, Darren I; Carter, James F

2015-01-01

177

A NEW CALCULATION FOR THE AGE OF THE EARTH FROM ABUNDANCES OF LEAD ISOTOPES  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new method, basically distinct from the two most common methods, is ; suggested for calculating the age of the Earth from lead isotope abundances. In ; common with other methods, the new method assumes that the samples used in the ; calculation can be interpreted by equations appropriate to evolution of the lead ; isotope abundances in a single

R. G. Ostic; R. D. Russell; P. H. Reynolds

1963-01-01

178

Issues and opportunities in accelerator mass spectrometry for stable isotopes.  

PubMed

Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has developed in the last 30 years many notable applications to the spectrometry of radioisotopes, particularly in radiocarbon dating. The instrumentation science of trace element AMS (TEAMS) that analyzes stable isotopes, also called Accelerator SIMS or MegaSIMS, while unique in many features, has also shared in many of these significant advances and has pushed TEAMS sensitivity to concentration levels surpassing many competing mass spectroscopic technologies. This review examines recent instrumentation developments, the capabilities of the new instrumentation and discernable trends for future development. PMID:18553556

Matteson, Sam

2008-01-01

179

High-precision measurement of chlorine stable isotope ratios  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We present an analysis procedure that allows stable isotopes of chlorine to be analyzed with precision sufficient for geological and hydrological studies. The total analytical precision is ?????0.09%., and the present known range of chloride in the surface and near-surface environment is 3.5???. As Cl- is essentially nonreactive in natural aquatic environments, it is a conservative tracer and its ??37Cl is also conservative. Thus, the ??37Cl parameter is valuable for quantitative evaluation of mixing of different sources of chloride in brines and aquifers. ?? 1993.

Long, A.; Eastoe, C.J.; Kaufmann, R.S.; Martin, J.G.; Wirt, L.; Finley, J.B.

1993-01-01

180

Analysis of stable isotopes in fish to identify habitat use and switching  

EPA Science Inventory

In our isotopic studies of fish in Oregon Coast Range streams we have found stable isotopes of carbon, oxygen and sulfur to be surprisingly useful in identifying and discriminating specific habitat or tributary use by a variety of fish species. Stable isotopes of carbon can be u...

181

Prospects and problems of using the methods of geochemistry of stable carbon isotopes in soil studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review of world investigations into the geochemistry of stable isotopes---a new area for soil science---is presented. Studies of the behavior of stable isotopes in soils are being developed in two major directions: reconstruction of the environmental conditions and indication of the soil processes. Investigations into the reconstruction of the environmental conditions are based on the assumption that the isotopic

E. G. Morgun; I. V. Kovda; Ya. G. Ryskov; S. A. Oleinik

2008-01-01

182

Stable isotope models to predict geographic origin and cultivation conditions of marijuana  

E-print Network

: Marijuana Geographic origin Drug trafficking Drug intelligence Stable isotopes Isotope ratio mass to analyses of marijuana trafficking in the USA. The models were developed on the basis of eradication to significantly improve our understanding of marijuana production and trafficking because stable isotopes function

Ehleringer, Jim

183

Extreme changes in stable hydrogen isotopes and precipitation characteristics in a landfalling Pacific storm  

E-print Network

Extreme changes in stable hydrogen isotopes and precipitation characteristics in a landfalling decrease of 51% in the hydrogen isotope ratio (d2 H) of precipitation over a 60-minute period during. M. Landwehr, F. M. Ralph, and M. D. Dettinger (2008), Extreme changes in stable hydrogen isotopes

184

Using phylogenetic probes for quantification of stable isotope labeling and microbial community analysis  

DOEpatents

Herein is described methods for a high-sensitivity means to measure the incorporation of stable isotope labeled substrates into RNA following stable isotope probing experiments (SIP). RNA is hybridized to a set of probes such as phylogenetic microarrays and isotope incorporation is quantified such as by secondary ion mass spectrometer imaging (NanoSIMS).

Brodie, Eoin L; DeSantis, Todd Z; Karaoz, Ulas; Andersen, Gary L

2014-12-09

185

UNiquant, a Program for Quantitative Proteomics Analysis Using Stable Isotope Labeling  

PubMed Central

Stable isotope labeling (SIL) methods coupled with nanoscale liquid chromatography and high resolution tandem mass spectrometry are increasingly useful for elucidation of the proteome-wide differences between multiple biological samples. Development of more effective programs for the sensitive identification of peptide pairs and accurate measurement of the relative peptide/protein abundance are essential for quantitative proteomic analysis. We developed and evaluated the performance of a new program, termed UNiquant, for analyzing quantitative proteomics data using stable isotope labeling. UNiquant was compared with two other programs, MaxQuant and Mascot Distiller, using SILAC-labeled complex proteome mixtures having either known or unknown heavy/light ratios. For the SILAC-labeled Jeko-1 cell proteome digests with known heavy/light ratios (H/L = 1:1, 1:5, and 1:10), UNiquant quantified a similar number of peptide pairs as MaxQuant for the H/L = 1:1 and 1:5 mixtures. In addition, UNiquant quantified significantly more peptides than MaxQuant and Mascot Distiller in the H/L = 1:10 mixtures. UNiquant accurately measured relative peptide/protein abundance without the need for post-measurement normalization of peptide ratios, which is required by the other programs. PMID:21158445

Huang, Xin; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Shen, Yulei; Liu, Miao; Huang, Lin; Zhang, Zhixin; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Chan, Wing C.; Hinrichs, Steven H.; Fu, Kai; Ding, Shi-Jian

2011-01-01

186

UNiquant, a program for quantitative proteomics analysis using stable isotope labeling.  

PubMed

Stable isotope labeling (SIL) methods coupled with nanoscale liquid chromatography and high resolution tandem mass spectrometry are increasingly useful for elucidation of the proteome-wide differences between multiple biological samples. Development of more effective programs for the sensitive identification of peptide pairs and accurate measurement of the relative peptide/protein abundance are essential for quantitative proteomic analysis. We developed and evaluated the performance of a new program, termed UNiquant, for analyzing quantitative proteomics data using stable isotope labeling. UNiquant was compared with two other programs, MaxQuant and Mascot Distiller, using SILAC-labeled complex proteome mixtures having either known or unknown heavy/light ratios. For the SILAC-labeled Jeko-1 cell proteome digests with known heavy/light ratios (H/L = 1:1, 1:5, and 1:10), UNiquant quantified a similar number of peptide pairs as MaxQuant for the H/L = 1:1 and 1:5 mixtures. In addition, UNiquant quantified significantly more peptides than MaxQuant and Mascot Distiller in the H/L = 1:10 mixtures. UNiquant accurately measured relative peptide/protein abundance without the need for postmeasurement normalization of peptide ratios, which is required by the other programs. PMID:21158445

Huang, Xin; Tolmachev, Aleksey V; Shen, Yulei; Liu, Miao; Huang, Lin; Zhang, Zhixin; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Chan, Wing C; Hinrichs, Steven H; Fu, Kai; Ding, Shi-Jian

2011-03-01

187

Protein Stable Isotope Fingerprinting (P-SIF): Multidimensional Protein Chromatography Coupled to Stable Isotope-Ratio Mass Spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As metagenomics increases our insight into microbial community diversity and metabolic potential, new approaches are required to determine the biogeochemical expression of this potential within ecosystems. Because stable isotopic analysis of the major bioactive elements (C, N) has been used historically to map flows of substrates and energy among macroscopic food webs, similar principles may apply to microbes. To address this challenge, we have developed a new analytical approach called Protein Stable Isotope Fingerprinting (P-SIF). P-SIF generates natural stable isotopic fingerprints of microbial individual or community proteomes. The main advantage of P-SIF is the potential to bridge the gap between diversity and function, thereby providing a window into the "black box" of environmental microbiology and helping to decipher the roles of uncultivated species. Our method implements a three-way, orthogonal scheme to separate mixtures of whole proteins into subfractions dominated by single or closely-related proteins. Protein extracts first are isoelectrically focused in a gel-free technique that yields 12 fractions separated over a gradient of pH 3-10. Each fraction then is separated by size-exclusion chromatography into 20 pools, ranging from >100kD to ~10kD. Finally, each of these pools is subjected to HPLC and collected in 40 time-slices based on protein hydrophobicity. Theoretical calculation reveals that the true chromatographic resolution of the total scheme is 5000, somewhat less than the 9600 resulting fractions. High-yielding fractions are subjected to ?13C analysis by spooling-wire microcombustion irMS (SWiM-irMS) optimized for samples containing 1-5 nmol carbon. Here we will present the method, results for a variety of pure cultures, and preliminary data for a sample of mixed environmental proteins. The data show the promise of this method for unraveling the metabolic complexity hidden within microbial communities.

Pearson, A.; Bovee, R. J.; Mohr, W.; Tang, T.

2012-12-01

188

Winds, Water Budgets and Stable Isotopes in Tropical Cyclones using TRMM and QUICKSCAT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Water vapor is the most abundant greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. Changes in its concentration and distribution are controlled by the hydrologic cycle. Because of its capacity to absorb and emit long wave radiation, release latent heat during condensation in storms and reflect short wave radiation when clouds form it has a major impact on Global climate change. The stable isotope ratios of water are H20 H2l6O and H0 H2l6O. These ratios change whenever water undergoes a phase change. They also change in both rain and water vapor whenever an air parcel is exposed to rain. In addition the relative changes in the two ratios differ as a &nction of the relative humidity. In short, the stable isotope ratios in water vapor in the atmosphere contain an integrated history of the processes affecting the concentration and distribution of water vapor in the atmosphere. Therefore the measurement and interpretation of changes in these stable isotope ratios are a powerful tool matched by no other method in tracing the transport history of water in the atmosphere. Our initial studies under this grant focused on the changes of the stable isotope ratios of precipitation and water vapor in tropical cyclones. The changes in time and space were found to be very large and to trace the transport of water in the storms reflecting changes in basic structural features. Because the stable isotope ratios of rains from tropical cyclones are so low flooding associated with land falling tropical cyclones introduces a negative isotopic spike into the coastal surface waters. In addition the stable isotope ratios of water vapor in the vicinity of tropical cyclones is anomalously low. This suggests that carbonate shelled organisms such as ostracoda living in coastal waters have the potential to record the isotopic spike and thereby provide a long term record of tropical storm activity in sediment cores containing fossil shells. Likewise, tree rings in coastal environments offer a similar potential. We have analyzed the oxygen isotopic composition of ostrcoda shells formed in the floodwaters of Tropical Storm Allison (2001) and discovered the negative isotopic 1 16 spike. Because we had learned that storm activity has a major impact on the stable isotope ratios of water vapor in the tropics and sub-tropics we decided to analyze the isotopic compositions of water vapor in different locations in the tropics. We did this in Puerto Escondido, Mexico in July 1998, near Kwajalein Island in the Pacific in 1999 as part of a TRMM summer field program and in 2001 in Key West, Florida as part of the CAMEX 4 summer field program. Our isotopic studies along with our earlier tropical cyclone studies showed that the low isotopic ratios in water vapor induced by exposure to rains the storms persisted for 48 hours often far away from the original storm site. We also noted that positive isotopic spikes were introduced into atmospheric water vapor if winds were high and extensive sea spray was present. These findings have a significant impact on the interpretation of the stable isotope studies of tropical ice cores found in the high mountain regions of the tropics. The assumption made in interpreting the ice core record is that the source water vapor evaporated from the sea surface is in near isotopic equilibrium with the seawater and undergoes a decrease during its transport that reflects the change in temperature from the sea surface to the site of the ice core. Because an additional isotopic depletion occurs at the sea surface source area that depends on the intensity, duration and size of the tropical rain system the isotopic variations found in the ice cores must take into account changes in past storm activity in the tropics. These systems must be an important source of water vapor to the ice cores because they charge the troposphere with water vapor to a far greater vertical height than evaporation in quiescent regions. Finally, an interest in increased heat transfer in thnterior of tropical cyclones resulting from greater amounts of sea spray is a topic of considerab

Lawrence, James R.

2004-01-01

189

Monitoring Bacterial Transport by Stable Isotope Enrichment of Cells  

PubMed Central

Understanding the transport and behavior of bacteria in the environment has broad implications in diverse areas, ranging from agriculture to groundwater quality, risk assessment, and bioremediation. The ability to reliably track and enumerate specific bacterial populations in the context of native communities and environments is key to developing this understanding. We report a novel bacterial tracking approach, based on altering the stable carbon isotope value (?13C) of bacterial cells, which provides specific and sensitive detection and quantification of those cells in environmental samples. This approach was applied to the study of bacterial transport in saturated porous media. The transport of introduced organisms was indicated by mass spectrometric analysis of groundwater samples, where the presence of 13C-enriched bacteria resulted in increased ?13C values of the samples, allowing specific and sensitive detection and enumeration of the bacteria of interest. We demonstrate the ability to produce highly 13C-enriched bacteria, present data indicating that results obtained with this approach accurately represent intact introduced bacteria, and include field data on the use of this stable isotope approach to monitor in situ bacterial transport. This detection strategy allows sensitive detection of an introduced, unmodified bacterial strain in the presence of the indigenous bacterial community, including itself in its unenriched form. PMID:11055946

Holben, William E.; Ostrom, Peggy H.

2000-01-01

190

Carbon stable isotopes as indicators of coastal eutrophication.  

PubMed

Coastal ecologists and managers have frequently used nitrogen stable isotopes (delta15N) to trace and monitor sources of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) in coastal ecosystems. However, the interpretation of delta15N data can often be challenging, as the isotope values fractionate substantially due to preferential retention and uptake by biota. There is a growing body of evidence that carbon isotopes may be a useful alternative indicator for eutrophication, as they may be sensitive to changes in primary production that result from anthropogenic nutrient inputs. We provide three examples of systems where delta13C values sensitively track phytoplankton production. First, earlier (1980s) mesocosm work established positive relationships between delta13C and dissolved inorganic nitrogen and dissolved silica concentrations. Consistent with these findings, a contemporary mesocosm experiment designed to replicate a temperate intertidal salt marsh environment also demonstrated that the system receiving supplementary nutrient additions had higher nutrient concentrations, higher chlorophyll concentrations, and higher delta13C values. This trend was particularly pronounced during the growing season, with differences less evident during senescence. And finally, these results were replicated in the open waters of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, USA, during a spring phytoplankton bloom. These three examples, taken together with the pre-existing body of literature, suggest that, at least in autotrophic, phytoplankton-dominated systems, delta13C values can be a useful and sensitive indicator of eutrophication. PMID:24834733

Oczkowski, Autumn; Markham, Erin; Hanson, Alana; Wigand, Cathleen

2014-04-01

191

Stable isotope fractionation by thermal diffusion through partially molten wet and dry silicate rocks  

E-print Network

Stable isotope fractionation by thermal diffusion through partially molten wet and dry silicate 2012 Editor: T.M. Harrison Keywords: thermal diffusion hydrogen isotope separation oxygen isotopes lithium isotopes 17-O meteoric hydrothermal systems a b s t r a c t Water plays a fundamental role

Bindeman, Ilya N.

192

Stable isotope studies. Final report, March 1, 1972--February 29, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

Ishida, T.

1992-10-01

193

Preservation of terrestrial plant biomarkers from Nachukui Formation sediments and their viability for stable isotope analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary records from the Turkana Basin in eastern Africa provide a unique opportunity to compare a high-resolution record of climate and terrestrial vegetation with important changes in the record of human evolution. Molecular biomarkers from terrestrial vegetation can yield stable isotope ratios of hydrogen and carbon that reflect ancient climate and vegetation. However, the preservation of long-chain plant wax biomarkers in these paleosol, fluvial, and lacustrine sediments is not known, and this preservation must be studied to establish their utility for molecular stable isotope studies. We investigated leaf wax biomarkers in Nachukui Formation sediments deposited between 2.3 and 1.7 Ma to assess biomarker preservation. We analyzed n alkane and n alkanoic acid concentrations and, where suitable, molecular carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios. Molecular abundance distributions show a great deal of variance in biomarker preservation and plant-type source as indicated by the carbon preference index and average chain length. This variation suggests that some samples are suitable for isotopic analysis, while other samples lack primary terrestrial plant biomarker signatures. The biomarker signal in many samples contains significant additional material from unidentified sources. For example, the n-alkane distributions contain an unresolved complex mixture underlying the short and mid-chain n-alkanes. Samples from lacustrine intervals include long-chain diacids, hydroxy acids and (?-1) ketoacids that suggest degradation of the original acids. Degradation of poorly preserved samples and the addition of non-terrestrial plant biomarkers may originate from a number of processes including forest fire or microbial alteration. Isotopic analysis of well-preserved terrestrial plant biomarkers will be presented along with examples where the original biomarker distribution has been altered.

Kahle, E.; Uno, K. T.; Polissar, P. J.; Lepre, C. J.; deMenocal, P. B.

2013-12-01

194

Subterranean Sympatry: An Investigation into Diet Using Stable Isotope Analysis  

PubMed Central

In the Western Cape three species of mole-rat occur in sympatry, however, little is known about differences in their dietary preferences. Dietary composition of the three species; the common mole-rat (Cryptomys hottentotus hottentotus), the Cape mole-rat (Georychus capensis) and the Cape dune mole-rat (Bathyergus suillus) were examined using stable isotope analysis. Blood, fur and claw samples were collected from 70 mole-rats, in addition to several potential food items, to assess food selection of the three species under natural conditions. Overall there was a significant difference in the isotopic composition (?13C and ?15N) between all three species and significant differences in their diet composition. There were also significant differences between tissues in all three species suggesting temporal variation in diet. The small size and colonial lifestyle of C. h. hottentotus allows it to feed almost 100% on bulbs, while the solitary and larger species G. capensis and B. suillus fed to a greater extent on other resources such as grasses and clover. B. suillus, the largest of the species, had the most generalized diet. However, overall all species relied most heavily upon geophytes and consumed the same species suggesting competition for resources could exist. We also showed a high level of individual variation in diet choices. This was most pronounced in B. suillus and G. capensis and less so in C. h. hottentotus. We demonstrate that stable isotope analysis can successfully be applied to examine dietary patterns in subterranean mammals and provide insights into foraging patterns and dietary variation at both the inter and intra population level. PMID:23139795

Robb, Gillian N.; Woodborne, Stephan; Bennett, Nigel C.

2012-01-01

195

Stable Isotopic Constraints of the Turpan Basin in Northwestern China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stable isotopic analysis of sedimentary rocks can be used to reconstruct past geologic changes in the elevation and climate of topographic features such as mountain ranges and plateaus. The Tibetan Plateau is an ideal field laboratory for conducting this type of study because of the Plateaus extreme topographic relief and relatively recent geologic growth. Here we present oxygen and carbon isotope compositions from a suite of sedimentary rock samples taken from the western Turpan Basin in northwestern China. This area of the basin collects sediment from weathering and erosion of the Bogda Shan located to the north. The goal of this study is to analyze changes in the stable isotope composition as a function of stratigraphic position to reconstruct paleoelevations and paleoclimates in this part of the Tibetan Plateau. The sedimentary rock samples analyzed in this study are Late Jurassic to Neogene age and are primarily mudstone, siltstone, fine sandstone along with lesser limestone. Samples were powered and then dissolved with phosphoric acid at 72?C. The liberated CO2 gas was then analyzed using a Finnigan Delta Plus XL mass spectrometer with a gasbench inlet system. Oxygen isotope values range from -13.72 to -1.62 (PDB) and exhibit a large scale trend to more negative values toward the top of the stratigraphic sequence. Superimposed on this large scale trend are systematic variations in isotopic composition as a function of age. The most positive ?18O values occur at approximately 160, 115, 60, and 5 ma. Conversely, ?18O minima are observed at 150, 90, and 40 ma. ?13C values range from -10.69 to 1.40 (PDB). The most positive ?13C values (-4.3 to 1.4) occur from 120-160 ma. Younger samples display small scale variations with age with notable ?13C minima of -10.7, -14.7, and -7.6 at 108, 80, and 17 ma, respectively. The variable ?18O and positive ?13C values from the Jurassic (145-160 ma) are consistent with an arid climate and high atmospheric PCO2 levels during the warm Mesozoic Era. The overall decrease in ?18O values observed during the Cretaceous (145-65 ma) can be explained by the global climatic transition from a warm Mesozoic to a relatively cool Cenozoic Era. We take into account other possible influences on the isotopic record including detrital effects, diagensis, and evaporation, but infer the primary control on the isotopic records to be changes in climate during these time periods. Because the magnitude of oxygen isotope changes is consistent with that expected due to global climate change, we infer that there were not significant changes in the elevation of the Bogda Shan during this time period. This conclusion is also supported by the similar grain size/lithology (siltstone-finer grained sandstones) from bottom to top through the stratigraphic sequence, consistent with dormant topography prior to the Tertiary Period.

Schaen, A. J.

2010-12-01

196

The quality control of fruit juices by using the stable isotope ratios and trace metal elements concentrations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last years, a growing number of research articles detailing the use of natural abundance light stable isotopes variations and trace metal elements concentration as geographic "tracers" to determine the provenance of food have been published. These investigations exploit the systematic global variations of stable hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotope ratios in (combination) relation with trace metal element concentrations. The trace metal elements content of plants and also their light stable isotopic ratios are mainly related to the geological and pedoclimatic characteristics of the site of growth. The interpretation of such analysis requires an important number of data for authentic natural juices regarding the same seasonal and regional origin, because the isotopic analysis parameters of fruit juices show remarkable variability depending on climatologically factors. In this work was mesured H, C, O stable isotope ratios and the concentrations of 16 elements (P, K, Mg, Na, Ca, Cu, Cr, Ni, Zn, Pb, Co, As, Cd, Mn, Fe and Hg) from 12 single strength juices. The natural variations that appear due to different environmental and climatic conditions are presented and discussed.

Magdas, D. A.; Dehelean, A.; Puscas, R.; Cristea, G.; Tusa, F.; Voica, C.

2012-02-01

197

STABLE ISOTOPES IN ECOLOGICAL STUDIES: NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN MIXING MODELS (BRAZIL)  

EPA Science Inventory

Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers in ecological studies. One application uses isotopic ratios to quantify the proportional contributions of multiple sources to a mixture. Examples include pollution sources for air or water bodies, food sources for animals, ...

198

Subcutaneous infusion and capillary "finger stick" sampling of stable isotope tracer in metabolic studies  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Metabolic studies utilizing stable isotope tracer in humans have typically used intravenous tracer infusions and venous blood sampling. These studies explore subcutaneous infusion of isotope and "finger stick" capillary blood sampling to measure glucose turnover. Five subjects received simultaneous ...

199

A quantitative approach to combine sources in stable isotope mixing models  

EPA Science Inventory

Stable isotope mixing models, used to estimate source contributions to a mixture, typically yield highly uncertain estimates when there are many sources and relatively few isotope elements. Previously, ecologists have either accepted the uncertain contribution estimates for indiv...

200

STABLE ISOTOPIC EVIDENCE OF CARBON AND NITROGEN USE IN CULTURED ECTOMYCORRHIZAL AND SAPROTROPHIC FUNGI  

EPA Science Inventory

Stable isotopes in sporocarps have proven useful for inferring ectomycorrhizal or saprotrophic status and understanding carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) utilization. However, greater understanding of processes producing isotopic concentrations is needed. We measured natural abundanc...

201

Sources of organic matter for intertidal consumers on Ascophyllum-shores (SW Iceland): a multi-stable isotope approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stable isotopes were used to examine the origin of organic matter in Icelandic Ascophyllum-based habitats, the role of different organic matters in filling intertidal food webs and the food preferences of the most abundant suspension feeders, grazers and predators. We selected three intertidal sites on the SW coast of Iceland where we sampled in early September 2004, organic matter sources (POM, SOM and most abundant primary producers, A. nodosum and F. vesciculosus) and the most abundant macrofauna species (barnacles, mussels, gastropods, sponge and crabs). Even though the primary production ( Ascophyllum-based) was the same at the three study sites, the isotopic composition of common-among-sites organisms varied due to local differences in the origin of available POM and SOM and in food web structures.

Sar, G.; de Pirro, M.; Romano, C.; Rumolo, P.; Sprovieri, M.; Mazzola, A.

2007-12-01

202

Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen in the study of avian and mammalian trophic ecology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Differential fractionation of stable isotopes of carbon during photosynthesis causes C 4 plants and C3 plants to have distinct carbon-isotope signatures. In addition, marine C 3 plants have stable-isotope ratios of carbon that are intermediate between C4 and terrestrial C3 plants. The direct incorporation of the carbon-isotope ratio ( 13C\\/12C) of plants into consumers' tissues makes this ratio useful in

Jeffrey F. Kelly

2000-01-01

203

Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment, employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e., equivalent to ~8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars obtained from marine sediment extracts indicated that glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus, whereas muramic acid showed isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities. The ?13C analysis of amino sugars provides a valuable addition to the biomarker-based characterization of microbial metabolism in the deep marine biosphere, which so far has been lipid oriented and biased towards the detection of archaeal signals.

Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

2014-09-01

204

Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e. equivalent to ~ 8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Our results obtained from ?13C analysis of amino sugars in selected marine sediment samples showed that muramic acid had isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities, whereas glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus. The analysis of stable carbon isotopic compositions of amino sugars opens a promising window for the investigation of microbial metabolisms in marine sediments and the deep marine biosphere.

Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

2014-01-01

205

Measurements of stable isotope ratios in milk samples from a farm placed in the mountains of Transylvania  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Product origin is of great importance for consumers especially because its association in consumer's perception with food quality, freedom from disease or pollution. Stable isotope ratio analysis is a powerful technique in food authenticity and traceability control which has been introduced within the European wine industry to ensure authenticity of wine provenance and to detect adulteration. Isotopic ratios measurements have also been successfully to other food commodities like: fruit juices, honey and dairy foods. The ?18O and ?2H content in milk water reflects the isotope composition of the ground water drunk by animals. Seasonal effects are also very important: in summer, milk water contains higher ?18O and ?2H values due to the fresh plants that are ate by animals. Relative carbon stable isotope abundances in total milk reflect the isotopic composition of the diet fed to the dairy cows. In this study the hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of 15 milk samples coming from a unit placed in the mountains of Transylvania was investigated. The distribution of the obtained isotopic values was than discussed taking into account that all the animals were feed with the same type of forage and consumed water was taken from the same source.

Magdas, D. A.; Cristea, G.; Cordea, D. V.; Bot, A.; Puscas, R.; Radu, S.; Mirel, V.; Mihaiu, M.

2013-11-01

206

Measurements of stable isotope ratios in milk samples from a farm placed in the mountains of Transylvania  

SciTech Connect

Product origin is of great importance for consumers especially because its association in consumer's perception with food quality, freedom from disease or pollution. Stable isotope ratio analysis is a powerful technique in food authenticity and traceability control which has been introduced within the European wine industry to ensure authenticity of wine provenance and to detect adulteration. Isotopic ratios measurements have also been successfully to other food commodities like: fruit juices, honey and dairy foods. The ?{sup 18}O and ?{sup 2}H content in milk water reflects the isotope composition of the ground water drunk by animals. Seasonal effects are also very important: in summer, milk water contains higher ?{sup 18}O and ?{sup 2}H values due to the fresh plants that are ate by animals. Relative carbon stable isotope abundances in total milk reflect the isotopic composition of the diet fed to the dairy cows. In this study the hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of 15 milk samples coming from a unit placed in the mountains of Transylvania was investigated. The distribution of the obtained isotopic values was than discussed taking into account that all the animals were feed with the same type of forage and consumed water was taken from the same source.

Magdas, D. A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Cristea, G., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Bot, A.; Puscas, R.; Radu, S.; Mirel, V. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cordea, D. V.; Mihaiu, M. [University of Agricultural Science and Veterinary Medicine, 3-5 Calea Manastur, 400372 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [University of Agricultural Science and Veterinary Medicine, 3-5 Calea Manastur, 400372 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

2013-11-13

207

Production of yeastolates for uniform stable isotope labelling in eukaryotic cell culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Preparation of stable isotope-labelled yeastolates opens up ways to establish more cost-effective stable isotope labelling\\u000a of biomolecules in insect and mammalian cell lines and hence to employ higher eukaryotic cell lines for stable isotope labelling\\u000a of complex recombinant proteins. Therefore, we evaluated several common yeast strains of the Saccharomycetoideae family as\\u000a a source of high-quality, non-toxic yeastolates with the major

T. A. Egorova-Zachernyuk; G. J. C. G. M. Bosman; A. M. A. Pistorius; W. J. DeGrip

2009-01-01

208

Investigation of tubular handling of bicarbonate in man. A new approach utilizing stable carbon isotope fractionation.  

PubMed Central

Two alternative mechanisms have been proposed for tubular reabsorption of bicarbonate: (a) H+ secretion and CO2 reabsorption and (b) direct reabsorption of HCO-3. In an attempt to differentiate between the two mechanisms, the present study utilized the natural abundance of stable carbon isotopes (13C, 12C) in the urinary total CO2. This novel methodology used mass spectrometric analysis of 13C/12C ratios in urinary total CO2 under normal conditions and during acetazolamide treatment. Blood and respiratory CO2 were analyzed to yield reference values. The results demonstrate that alkaline urine is preferentially enriched with 13C relative to the blood. It is suggested that this fractionation results from reaction out of isotopic equilibrium in which HCO-3 converts to CO2 during the reabsorption process in the distal nephron. The presence of carbonic anhydrase in the proximal nephron results in rapid isotopic exchange between CO2 and HCO-3 and keeps them in isotopic equilibrium. The ratio of urinary 13C/12C increases strikingly after acetazolamide administration and consequent inhibition of carbonic anhydrase in the proximal tubule. Although it is possible that in the latter case high HCO-3 generates the CO2 (ampholyte effect), the isotope fractionation indicates that CO2 rather than HCO-3 is reabsorbed. In contrast, at low urinary pH and total CO2 values, the carbon isotope composition approaches that of blood CO2. This indicates rapid CO2 exchange between urine and blood, through luminal membrane highly permeable to CO2. These results could be anticipated by a mathematical model constructed to plot 13C concentration of urinary total CO2. It is concluded that the mechanism of HCO-3 reclamation in man (and, by inference, in other mammals as well) works by conversion of HCO-3 to CO2 and reabsorption of CO2. PMID:6417168

Burbea, Z H; Luz, B; Lazar, B; Winaver, J; Better, O S

1983-01-01

209

Stable isotope analysis of carbon and nitrogen in angrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Angrites are a small group of ancient basaltic achondrites, notable for their unusual chemistry and extreme volatile depletion. No comprehensive study of indigenous light elements currently exists for the group. Measurement of the abundances and isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen could provide information pertaining to the evolution of the angrite parent body. Bulk-sample stepped combustion analyses of five angrites and a glass separate from D'Orbigny were combined with earlier data and acid dissolution experiments of carbonates found in D'Orbigny to compile an inventory of indigenous carbon and nitrogen. Indigenous carbon combusted between 700 C and 1200 C, with abundances of 10-140 ppm and a mass-weighted ?13C of -25 to -20 with the exception of D'Orbigny (?13C approximately -5). Nitrogen was released at 850-1200 C, 1-20 ppm with a ?15N -3 to +4; again, D'Orbigny (?15N approximately +20 to +25) was an exception. We interpret these components as largely indigenous and decoupled; the carbon in graphitic or amorphous form, while the nitrogen is present as a dissolved component in the silicates. No relationship with the textural sub-classification of angrites is apparent. We suggest that the angrite parent body contains a reservoir of reduced carbon and thus may have undergone a change in redox conditions, although the timing and mechanism for this remain unclear.

Abernethy, F. A. J.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Starkey, N. A.; Anand, M.; Franchi, I. A.; Grady, Monica M.

2013-09-01

210

Stable isotope analysis of white paints and likelihood ratios.  

PubMed

Architectural paints are commonly found as trace evidence at scenes of crime. Currently the most widely used technique for the analysis of architectural paints is Fourier Transformed Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR). There are, however, limitations to the forensic analysis of white paints, and the ability to discriminate between samples. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has been investigated as a potential tool for the analysis of architectural white paints, where no preparation of samples prior to analysis is required. When stable isotope profiles (SIPs) are compared, there appears to be no relationship between paints from the same manufacturer, or between paints of the same type. Unlike existing techniques, IRMS does not differentiate resin samples solely on the basis of modifier or oil-type, but exploits additional factors linked to samples such as geo-location where oils added to alkyd formulations were grown. In combination with the use of likelihood ratios, IRMS shows potential, with a false positive rate of 2.6% from a total of 1275 comparisons. PMID:19606590

Farmer, N; Meier-Augenstein, W; Lucy, D

2009-06-01

211

Investigating the contribution of mussel N regeneration to coastal primary production using stable isotope tracers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Determining the sources, pathways and sinks of inorganic nitrogen is integral to our understanding of one of the main determinants of primary productivity in the marine environment. The current view of rocky shore productivity is that it is largely fuelled by new inorganic nitrogen brought to surface waters by the physical process of upwelling. However, along the rocky shores of the Washington State outer coast, the high densities of mussels (Mytilus californianus) colonizing these shores produce significant quantities of regenerated inorganic nitrogen in the form of ammonium, a preferred nitrogen source for primary production. In this study, we seek to determine to what extent regenerated nitrogen is responsible for fueling primary production in these environments. To this end, we employed stable isotope tracers (15NH4 and 15NO3) to track the pathway of inorganic nitrogen in several rocky shore tidepools over the course of half a tidal cycle. Half of all the pools contained mussels in their natural abundance, while half were mussel control pools in which most of the mussels had been physically removed. Discrete water and algal tissue samples were taken at several time points within the study period for mass spectrometric stable isotope analysis. Preliminary results show isotope dilution of tidepool ammonium in pools containing mussels over half a tidal cycle, due to continued ammonium production by mussels. Combined concentration data, regeneration rates as well as removal rates due to autotrophic uptake and/or microbially-mediated ammonium oxidation (nitrification) will be calculated. Isotopic analysis of algal tissue samples and of the other nitrogen pools will shed further light on the contribution of regenerated ammonium to tidepool biogeochemical cycling and ultimately to coastal primary production.

Pather, S.; Altabet, M. A.; Pfister, C. A.; Post, D. M.

2010-12-01

212

Variations in Lead Isotopic Abundances in Sprague-Dawley Rat Tissues: Possible Reason of Formation  

PubMed Central

It has been reported in previous research that the lead isotopic composition of blood, urine and feces samples statistically differed from the given lead sources in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. However, the reason for this phenomenon is still unclear. An animal experiment was performed to investigate the lead isotope fractionation in diverse biological samples (i.e., lungs, liver, kidneys, bone) and to explore the possible reasons. SD rats were intratracheally instilled with lead acetate at the concentrations of 0, 0.02, 0.2, and 2 mg/kg body weight. Biological samples were collected for lead isotope analysis using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Significant differences are observed in lead isotope abundances among the diverse biological samples. The lead isotope abundances (206Pb, 207Pb and 208Pb) in diverse biological samples show different degrees and directions of departure from the given lead source. The results suggest that differences in enrichment or depletion capacity for each lead isotope in the various tissues might lead to the variation in lead isotopic abundances in tissues. Moreover, a nonlinear relationship between the blood lead level and the lead isotope abundances in liver and bone is observed. When the whole-blood level is higher than 50 ng/mL, the lead isotopic compositions of biological samples tend to be the same. Thus, the data support the speculation of a fractionation functional threshold. PMID:24587048

Liu, Duojian; Wu, Jing; Ouyang, Li; Wang, Jingyu

2014-01-01

213

Insights from Stable Isotopes on the Role of Terrestrial Ecosystems in the Global Carbon Cycle  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of isotopic tracers in organic matter, water, and atmospheric gases has become an important component of the study of ecology and global change. Physiological and physical processes discriminate against heavy isotopes in predictable ways, so that measurements of isotopes at natural abundance, i.e., naturally occurring concentrations as opposed to artificial labeling experiments, can provide useful information about biological

Diane E. Pataki; Chun-Ta Lai; Charles D. Keeling; James R. Ehleringer

214

Holocene environmental fluctuations of Lake Bosten (Xinjiang, China) inferred from ostracods and stable isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lake Bosten is an oligohaline lake in an intermontane basin of the Tianshan Mountains in northwestern China. The open-basin lake receives water from a large catchment area (56,000 km2) with the Kaidu River as its main tributary. A core of 9.25 m length was drilled at 6.25 m water depth in the southwestern part of the lake near the Kaidu river inflow. Sediments of the core contain authigenic carbonate materials, including calcitic shells of ostracods, charophyte-oogonia and stem incrustations. Five AMS-dating results provided the base to establish the chronology of the core which extends back to about 8.4 cal. ka BP. The majority of the ostracod taxa from the core may be classified into two different groups comprising littoral taxa (Cyclocypris ovum, Cypridopsis vidua, Darwinula stevensoni, Fabaeformiscandona hyalina, Herpetocypris chevreuxi, Heterocypris salina) and taxa reflecting profundal conditions (Candona neglecta, Cytherissa lacustris and Fabaeformiscandona caudata). Among these taxa, C. neglecta and D. stevensoni were the most abundant ostracod species providing more than 50 % of the fossil shells in most core samples. Where C. neglecta peaks D. stevensoni often shows minima abundances and vice versa. Stable isotope data derived from ostracod calcite display large variations throughout the core. d18O and d13C values vary over a range of 10 and 6.7 respectively. These large ranges may reflect that Lake Bosten responded like a semi-closed lake at least. Low lake levels inferred from species assemblages correspond to lowest d18O values thus indicating the influence of isotopically light river water at the core site and a low residence time and salinity. High d18O values correspond to higher abundances of Candona neglecta and low abundances of littoral taxa pointing towards deeper conditions, a higher distance of the core site from the river inflow, a higher residence time and corresponding salinity of the lake water. On the base of ostracod and stable isotope data deepest conditions occurred between 8.2 and 5.7 cal. ka BP, interrupted by a brief return to lower levels at about 7.2 cal. ka BP. Low levels were reconstructed in the following period between 5.7 and 5.1 cal. ka BP and between 4.4 and 4.2 cal. ka BP. Spells of shallow conditions were recorded at 3.9, 3.6, 2.7, 2.3 and 1.8 cal. ka BP and for a longer period between 1.4 and 0.6 cal. ka BP.

Mischke, S.

2003-04-01

215

Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios of Lipid Biomarkers of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria  

PubMed Central

We examined the potential use of natural-abundance stable carbon isotope ratios of lipids for determining substrate usage by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Four SRB were grown under autotrophic, mixotrophic, or heterotrophic growth conditions, and the ?13C values of their individual fatty acids (FA) were determined. The FA were usually 13C depleted in relation to biomass, with ??13C(FA ? biomass) of ?4 to ?17; the greatest depletion occurred during heterotrophic growth. The exception was Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans, for which substrate limitation resulted in biomass and FA becoming isotopically heavier than the acetate substrate. The ?13C values of FA in Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans varied with the position of the double bond in the monounsaturated C16 and C18 FA, with FA becoming progressively more 13C depleted as the double bond approached the methyl end. Mixotrophic growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans resulted in little depletion of the i17:1 biomarker relative to biomass or acetate, whereas growth with lactate resulted in a higher proportion of i17:1 with a greater depletion in 13C. The relative abundances of 10Me16:0 in Desulfobacter hydrogenophilus and Desulfobacterium autotrophicum were not affected by growth conditions, yet the ??13C(FA ? substrate) values of 10Me16:0 were considerably greater during autotrophic growth. These experiments indicate that FA ?13C values can be useful for interpreting carbon utilization by SRB in natural environments. PMID:14766550

Londry, K. L.; Jahnke, L. L.; Des Marais, D. J.

2004-01-01

216

Anatomy of a cluster IDP. Part 2: Noble gas abundances, trace element geochemistry, isotopic abundances, and trace organic chemistry of several fragments from L2008#5  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The topics discussed include the following: noble gas content and release temperatures; trace element abundances; heating summary of cluster fragments; isotopic measurements; and trace organic chemistry.

Thomas, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Mckay, David S.; Messenger, S.; Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Walker, R. M.

1994-01-01

217

Insights from stable isotopic tracers on reproductive allocation under stress.  

PubMed

Fecundity is affected by changes in the nutritional and energetic environment, as a result of changes in acquisition, assimilation, or allocation of macro-nutrients and micro-nutrients. Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen offer a window into the processes underlying these changes. In insects that feed on nectar as adults, carbon isotopes can be used to trace allocation of carbon to eggs from larval (capital) and adult (income) sources. If adults are fed sugar-water, there is no source of nitrogen from the adult diet. Thus, nitrogen isotopes in eggs reflect fractionation of larval nitrogen due to protein catabolism and anabolism. We subjected adult females of two butterfly species, Speyeria mormonia and Colias eurytheme, to dietary restriction (DR), larval female S. mormonia to DR, and adult female S. mormonia to extra flight. Females subjected to extra flight were previously found to eat more as adults and to have a higher resting metabolic rate. As predicted, significantly less carbon obtained by feeding as adults was incorporated into eggs in both species under DR when adult. Speyeria mormonia eggs contained significantly more carbon derived from adult feeding under DR as larvae and when subjected to extra flight as adult females. Again as predicted, eggs from females of both species subjected to DR when adults were enriched for (15)N, suggesting that increased protein catabolism or anabolism generated additional carbon compounds. Speyeria mormonia eggs from females subjected to DR when larvae or to additional flight as adults were depleted for (15)N. The result for DR of larvae suggests minimization of protein catabolism when protein reserves are relatively scarce. The results for flight were not as predicted, and deserve further exploration. In most cases, isotopic signature in eggs changed with females' age. Eggs were progressively more enriched for the carbon signature of adults, consistent with a two-compartment mixing model for the carbon sources of larvae and adults. Eggs laid across the life of a female were progressively depleted for (15)N, followed by stabilization. This could be due to high total investment in eggs early in life, as the results are consistent with those for other growing animals. Overall, these results indicate shifts in allocation of incoming and stored (capital) carbon in response to various environmental stresses. The results for nitrogen suggest hypotheses to be tested concerning nitrogen metabolism under environmental stress. PMID:24920750

Boggs, C L; Niitepld, K

2014-11-01

218

Evaluation of stable isotope fingerprinting techniques for the assessment of the predominant methanogenic pathways in anaerobic digesters.  

PubMed

Laboratory biogas reactors were operated under various conditions using maize silage, chicken manure, or distillers grains as substrate. In addition to the standard process parameters, the hydrogen and carbon stable isotopic composition of biogas was analyzed to estimate the predominant methanogenic pathways as a potential process control tool. The isotopic fingerprinting technique was evaluated by parallel analysis of mcrA genes and their transcripts to study the diversity and activity of methanogens. The dominant hydrogenotrophs were Methanomicrobiales, while aceticlastic methanogens were represented by Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina at low and high organic loading rates, respectively. Major changes in the relative abundance of mcrA transcripts were observed compared to the results obtained from DNA level. In agreement with the molecular results, the isotope data suggested the predominance of the hydrogenotrophic pathway in one reactor fed with chicken manure, while both pathways were important in the other reactors. Short-term changes in the isotopic composition were followed, and a significant change in isotope values was observed after feeding a reactor digesting maize silage. This ability of stable isotope fingerprinting to follow short-term activity changes shows potential for indicating process failures and makes it a promising technology for process control. PMID:23299457

Nikolausz, M; Walter, R F H; Struber, H; Liebetrau, J; Schmidt, T; Kleinsteuber, S; Bratfisch, F; Gnther, U; Richnow, H H

2013-03-01

219

Stable isotope dilution multidimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for pancreatic cancer serum biomarker discovery.  

PubMed

A novel approach to pancreatic cancer biomarker discovery has been developed, which employs a stable isotope labeled proteome (SILAP) standard coupled with extensive multidimensional separation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Secreted proteins from CAPAN-2 human pancreatic cancer derived cells were collected after conducting stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). The resulting SILAP standard contained <0.5% of individual unlabeled proteins. Pooled sera from patients with early stage pancreatic cancer or controls were prepared, and an equal amount of the SILAP standard was added to each sample. Proteins were separated by isoelectric focusing (IEF) prior to two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC)-MS/MS analysis. A total of 1065 proteins were identified of which 121 proteins were present at 1.5-fold or greater concentrations in the sera of patients with pancreatic cancer. ELISA validation of these findings was successfully performed for two proteins, ICAM-1 and BCAM. Results of these studies have provided proof of principle that a SILAP standard derived from the CAPAN-2 secreted proteome can be used in combination with extensive multidimensional LC-MS/MS for the identification and relative quantitation of potential biomarkers of pancreatic cancer. This technique allows for the detection of low-abundance proteins, and focuses only on biologically relevant proteins derived from pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:19199705

Yu, Kenneth H; Barry, Colin G; Austin, David; Busch, Christine M; Sangar, Vineet; Rustgi, Anil K; Blair, Ian A

2009-03-01

220

Stable isotope probing to study functional components of complex microbial ecosystems.  

PubMed

This protocol presents a method of dissecting the DNA or RNA of key organisms involved in a specific biochemical process within a complex ecosystem. Stable isotope probing (SIP) allows the labelling and separation of nucleic acids from community members that are involved in important biochemical transformations, yet are often not the most numerically abundant members of a community. This pure culture-independent technique circumvents limitations of traditional microbial isolation techniques or data mining from large-scale whole-community metagenomic studies to tease out the identities and genomic repertoires of microorganisms participating in biological nutrient cycles. SIP experiments can be applied to virtually any ecosystem and biochemical pathway under investigation provided a suitable stable isotope substrate is available. This versatile methodology allows a wide range of analyses to be performed, from fatty-acid analyses, community structure and ecology studies, and targeted metagenomics involving nucleic acid sequencing. SIP experiments provide an effective alternative to large-scale whole-community metagenomic studies by specifically targeting the organisms or biochemical transformations of interest, thereby reducing the sequencing effort and time-consuming bioinformatics analyses of large datasets. PMID:24515369

Mazard, Sophie; Schfer, Hendrik

2014-01-01

221

Stable isotopes (?13C and ?15N) of organic matrix from coral skeleton  

PubMed Central

The evolutionary success of reef-building corals in nutrient-poor tropical waters is attributed to endosymbiotic dinoflagellates. The algae release photosynthetic products to the coral animal cells, augment nutrient flux, and enhance the rate of coral calcification. Natural abundance of stable isotopes (?13C and ?18O) provides answers to modern and paleobiological questions about the effect of photosymbiosis on sources of carbon and oxygen in coral skeletal calcium carbonate. Here we compare 17 species of symbiotic and nonsymbiotic corals to determine whether evidence for photosymbiosis appears in stable isotopes (?13C and ?15N) of an organic skeletal compartment, the coral skeletal organic matrix (OM). Mean OM ?13C in symbiotic and nonsymbiotic corals was similar (-26.08 vs. -24.31), but mean OM ?15N was significantly depleted in 15N in the former (4.09) relative to the latter (12.28), indicating an effect of the algae on OM synthesis and revealing OM ?15N as a proxy for photosymbiosis. To answer an important paleobiological question about the origin of photosymbiosis in reef-building corals, we applied this proxy test to a fossil coral (Pachythecalis major) from the Triassic (240 million years ago) in which OM is preserved. Mean OM ?15N was 4.66, suggesting that P. major was photosymbiotic. The results show that symbiotic algae augment coral calcification by contributing to the synthesis of skeletal OM and that they may have done so as early as the Triassic. PMID:15671164

Muscatine, Leonard; Goiran, Claire; Land, Lynton; Jaubert, Jean; Cuif, Jean-Pierre; Allemand, Denis

2005-01-01

222

MetaProSIP: Automated Inference of Stable Isotope Incorporation Rates in Proteins for Functional Metaproteomics.  

PubMed

We propose a joint experimental and theoretical approach to the automated reconstruction of elemental fluxes in microbial communities. While stable isotope probing of proteins (protein-SIP) has been successfully applied to study interactions and elemental carbon and nitrogen fluxes, the volume and complexity of mass spectrometric data in protein-SIP experiments pose new challenges for data analysis. Together with a flexible experimental setup, the novel bioinformatics tool MetaProSIP offers an automated high-throughput solution for a wide range of (13)C or (15)N protein-SIP experiments with special emphasis on the analysis of metaproteomic experiments where differential labeling of organisms can occur. The information calculated in MetaProSIP includes the determination of multiple relative isotopic abundances, the labeling ratio between old and new synthesized proteins, and the shape of the isotopic distribution. These parameters define the metabolic capacities and dynamics within the investigated microbial culture. MetaProSIP features a high degree of reproducibility, reliability, and quality control reporting. The ability to embed into the OpenMS framework allows for flexible construction of custom-tailored workflows. Software and documentation are available under an open-source license at www.openms.de/MetaProSIP . PMID:25412983

Sachsenberg, Timo; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Taubert, Martin; Kermer, Ren; Jehmlich, Nico; von Bergen, Martin; Seifert, Jana; Kohlbacher, Oliver

2014-12-01

223

Amino-group-specific natural abundance nitrogen isotope ratio analysis in amino acids.  

PubMed

Amino acid (AA) nitrogen (N) stable isotope ratio analysis has found a wide variety of important applications including indication of the trophic level of an organism, tracing N transfer within food webs, and monitoring of AA resynthesis during heterotrophic microbial reworking of organic matter. Despite its utility, the current methodology is difficult to employ consistently for natural abundance level precision. Here, we report a new and robust method for high-precision N-compound-specific isotope analysis (N-PCIA) for single-N-containing AAs and N-position-specific isotope analysis (N-PSIA) for poly-N AAs. First the amino-N in AAs was liberated and oxidized to NO2(-) by hypochlorite at high pH. The NO2(-) produced was then quantified colorimetrically with excess hypochlorite quenched using arsenite. Subsequently, buffered azide was used to reduce NO2(-) to N2O for isotope ratio analysis using a purge-and-trap isotope ratio mass spectrometer. In the case of glycine delta15N, the average precision was SD = 0.3 per thousand. Reaction yields and labeling experiments show that this oxidation reaction is highly specific, targeting the alpha-amino group (peptide-N) of most poly-N AAs. This permits specific determination of the delta15N of peptide-N in arginine, tryptophan, and histidine. In the case of lysine, however, the side-chain amino group was found to be partially labile to hypochlorite oxidation. Using isotope fractionation factors estimated from single-N analogues of lysine, the intramolecular delta15N of lysine was calculated by mass balance, and this generally agreed with results for the same sample material analyzed by a previously published enzymatic method. Our method has the advantages of being relatively rapid, robust, and applicable to all poly-N AAs. We have also found it to work well for determining total delta15N of amino-N in complex sample matrices that have not been susceptible to previous approaches. PMID:18231965

Zhang, Lin; Altabet, Mark A

2008-01-01

224

ANALYSIS OF RICIN TOXIN PREPARATIONS FOR CARBOHYDRATE AND FATTY ACID ABUNDANCE AND ISOTOPE RATIO INFORMATION  

SciTech Connect

This report describes method development and preliminary evaluation for analyzing castor samples for signatures of purifying ricin. Ricin purification from the source castor seeds is essentially a problem of protein purification using common biochemical methods. Indications of protein purification will likely manifest themselves as removal of the non-protein fractions of the seed. Two major, non-protein, types of biochemical constituents in the seed are the castor oil and various carbohydrates. The oil comprises roughly half the seed weight while the carbohydrate component comprises roughly half of the remaining mash left after oil and hull removal. Different castor oil and carbohydrate components can serve as indicators of specific toxin processing steps. Ricinoleic acid is a relatively unique fatty acid in nature and is the most abundant component of castor oil. The loss of ricinoleic acid indicates a step to remove oil from the seeds. The relative amounts of carbohydrates and carbohydrate-like compounds, including arabinose, xylose, myo-inositol fucose, rhamnose, glucosamine and mannose detected in the sample can also indicate specific processing steps. For instance, the differential loss of arabinose relative to mannose and N-acetyl glucosamine indicates enrichment for the protein fraction of the seed using protein precipitation. The methods developed in this project center on fatty acid and carbohydrate extraction from castor samples followed by derivatization to permit analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Method descriptions herein include: the source and preparation of castor materials used for method evaluation, the equipment and description of procedure required for chemical derivatization, and the instrument parameters used in the analysis. Two types of derivatization methods describe analysis of carbohydrates and one procedure for analysis of fatty acids. Two types of GC-MS analysis is included in the method development, one employing a quadrupole MS system for compound identification and an isotope ratio MS for measuring the stable isotope ratios of deuterium and hydrogen (D/H) in fatty acids. Finally, the method for analyzing the compound abundance data is included. This study indicates that removal of ricinoleic acid is a conserved consequence of each processing step we tested. Furthermore, the stable isotope D/H ratio of ricinoleic acid distinguished between two of the three castor seed sources. Concentrations of arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucosamine and myo-inositol differentiated between crude or acetone extracted samples and samples produced by protein precipitation. Taken together these data illustrate the ability to distinguish between processes used to purify a ricin sample as well as potentially the source seeds.

Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Colburn, Heather A.; Moran, James J.; Melville, Angela M.

2009-12-01

225

Concentration and natural stable isotope profiles of nitrogen species in the Clara A. Fuchsman a,  

E-print Network

: Nitrogen cycle Nitrogen isotopes Anoxic basin Denitrification Anammox Nitrogen fixation Regional indexConcentration and natural stable isotope profiles of nitrogen species in the Black Sea Clara A particulate organic nitrogen (PON) and total organic nitrogen (TON) concentrations and nitrogen stable

Murray, James W.

226

STABLE ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF HUMAN REMAINS: A TOOL FOR CAVE ARCHAEOLOGY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable isotope analysis of human remains is a research tool that can provide paleodiet infor- mation for archaeological sites, such as caves, where traditional evidence may be missing or out of context. Unlike other lines of evidence, the stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen in human bone reflect the chemistry of the diet and therefore provide a direct measure of

CARMEN C. TRIMBLE; STEPHEN A. MACKO

227

The fish of Lake Titicaca: implications for archaeology and changing ecology through stable isotope analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on past human diets in the southern Lake Titicaca Basin has directed us to investigate the carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of an important dietary element, fish. By completing a range of analyses on modern and archaeological fish remains, we contribute to two related issues regarding the application of stable isotope analysis of archaeological fish remains and in turn

Melanie J. Miller; Jos M. Capriles; Christine A. Hastorf

2010-01-01

228

Relationships between stable isotopes and metal contaminants in feathers are spurious and biologically uninformative  

E-print Network

f o Article history: Received 7 January 2010 Accepted 9 January 2010 Keywords Stable isotopes Trace elements Mercury Feathers Ecotoxicology a b s t r a c t Stable isotopes of carbon (d13 C) and nitrogen (d15's diet at the time of synthesis (Hobson and Clark, 1992a, 1993). While there remains much to be learned

Jones, Ian L.

229

Bioavailability of xenobiotics in unsaturated soils implications for nucleic acid based stable isotope probing  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The use of stable isotopes to label phylogenetically informative biomolecules (phospholipid fatty acids, DNA, or RNA), typically referred to as stable isotope probing (SIP) has the potential of providing definitive evidence that a detected population is active in a specific process, if that process ...

230

Using Bayesian Stable Isotope Mixing Models to Enhance Marine Ecosystem Models  

EPA Science Inventory

The use of stable isotopes in food web studies has proven to be a valuable tool for ecologists. We investigated the use of Bayesian stable isotope mixing models as constraints for an ecosystem model of a temperate seagrass system on the Atlantic coast of France. d13C and d15N i...

231

Lipid Correction for Carbon Stable Isotope Analysis of Deep-sea Fishes  

EPA Science Inventory

Lipid extraction is used prior to stable isotope analysis of fish tissues to remove variability in the carbon stable isotope ratio (d13C) caused by varying lipid content among samples. Our objective was to evaluate an application of a mass balance correction for the effect of lip...

232

What is the main food source of the shipworm (Teredo navalis)? A stable isotope approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stable isotope analysis of soft bodies of the shipworm Teredo navalis demonstrated that this species is mainly feeding on seston by filter feeding in contrast to wood consumption. T. navalis showed similar stable isotope values (?13C, ?15N) as Mytilus edulis and Crassostrea gigas, which species were attached to the wood instead of boring into.

Paalvast, Peter; van der Velde, Gerard

2013-07-01

233

Determination of lithium isotopes at natural abundance levels by atomic absorption spectrometry  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The relationships of the absorption of 6Li and 7Li hollow cathode lamp emissions are used to determine lithium isotopic composition in the natural abundance range of geologic materials. Absorption was found to have a nonlinear dependence upon total lithium concentration and isotopic composition. A method using nonlinear equations to describe the relationship of the absorption of 6Li and 7Li lamp radiation is proposed as a means of calculating isotopic composition that is independent of total lithium concentration.

Meier, A.L.

1982-01-01

234

Using Stable Isotopes to Estimate Trophic Position: Models, Methods, and Assumptions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stable isotopes of nitrogen (d15N) and carbon (d13C) provide powerful tools for estimating the trophic positions of and carbon flow to consumers in food webs; however, the isotopic signature of a consumer alone is not generally sufficient to infer trophic position or carbon source without an appropriate isotopic baseline. In this paper, I develop and discuss methods for generating

David M. Post

2002-01-01

235

Stable isotope ecology of the common hippopotamus T. E. Cerling1,2  

E-print Network

Stable isotope ecology of the common hippopotamus T. E. Cerling1,2 , J. M. Harris3 , J. A. Hart4 Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA Keywords carbon isotope ratio; diet; Hippopotamus amphibius; isotope ecology. Correspondence Thure E. Cerling, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah

Lewison, Rebecca

236

Application of Stable Isotope `Techniques to Tracing Recharge of Geothenmal Systems  

E-print Network

geochemical and isotope analyses are developeld and discussed. The geothermal systems of the Reykjanes the hydrogen isotope composition of the host rocks. It is concluded that caution should be exercisedSGP-TR-79 Application of Stable Isotope `Techniques to Tracing Recharge of Geothenmal Systems

Stanford University

237

The Role of Naturally Occurring Stable Isotopes in Mass Spectrometry, Part II: The Instrumentation  

PubMed Central

In the second instalment of this tutorial, the authors explain the instrumentation for measuring naturally occurring stable isotopes, specifically the magnetic sector mass spectrometer. This type of instrument remains unrivalled in its performance for isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and the reader is reminded of its operation and its technical advantages for isotope measurements. PMID:23772101

Bluck, Les; Volmer, Dietrich A.

2013-01-01

238

Fast or feast: reconstructing diet in later medieval England by stable isotope analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this pilot-study, which was designed to assess the range of isotopic variation in English medieval populations, we present the results of stable isotope analysis of carbon and nitrogen of human and animal bone collagen from three later medieval sites in Northern England.The isotopic values observed for the rural hospital of St. Giles by Brompton Bridge (N. Yorks.), the Augustinian

Gundula Mldner; Michael P. Richards

2005-01-01

239

Caution on the Use of Liquid Nitrogen Traps in Stable Hydrogen Isotope-Ratio Mass Spectrometry  

E-print Network

other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN2 is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen to a VG Micromass model 602 dual inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometer.3,4,6 Gaseous hydrogenCaution on the Use of Liquid Nitrogen Traps in Stable Hydrogen Isotope-Ratio Mass Spectrometry

240

A Teaching Exercise to Introduce Stable Isotope Fractionation of Metals into Geochemistry Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Variations in the isotopic composition of elements have been widely used to study earth's climate, biosphere, and interior, and more recently to track the fate of contaminants. Within the broad range of elements that exhibit measureable isotopic variations, metal stable isotopes are increasingly applied across the biological, geological,

Weiss, Dominik J.; Harris, Caroline; Maher, Kate; Bullen, Thomas

2013-01-01

241

Deuterium stable isotope ratios as tracers of water resource use: an experimental test with rock doves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Naturally-occurring deuterium stable isotope ratios can potentially be used to trace water resource use by animals, but estimating the contribution of isotopically distinct water sources requires the accurate prediction of isotopic discrimination factors between water inputs and an animals body water pool. We examined the feasibility of using estimates of water fluxes between a bird and its environment with a

Andrew E. McKechnie; Blair O. Wolf; Carlos Martnez del Rio

2004-01-01

242

Documenting the diet in ancient human populations through stable isotope analysis of hair.  

PubMed Central

Fundamental to the understanding of human history is the ability to make interpretations based on artefacts and other remains which are used to gather information about an ancient population. Sequestered in the organic matrices of these remains can be information, for example, concerning incidence of disease, genetic defects and diet. Stable isotopic compositions, especially those made on isolates of collagen from bones, have been used to help suggest principal dietary components. A significant problem in the use of collagen is its long-term stability, and the possibility of isotopic alteration during early diagenesis, or through contaminating condensation reactions. In this study, we suggest that a commonly overlooked material, human hair, may represent an ideal material to be used in addressing human diets of ancient civilizations. Through the analysis of the amino-acid composition of modern hair, as well as samples that were subjected to radiation (thus simulating ageing of the hair) and hair from humans that is up to 5200 years old, we have observed little in the way of chemical change. The principal amino acids observed in all of these samples are essentially identical in relative abundances and content. Dominating the compositions are serine, glutamic acid, threonine, glycine and leucine, respectively accounting for approximately 15%, 17%, 10%, 8% and 8% of the total hydrolysable amino acids. Even minor components (for example, alanine, valine, isoleucine) show similar constancy between the samples of different ages. This constancy clearly indicates minimal alteration of the amino-acid composition of the hair. Further, it would indicate that hair is well preserved and is amenable to isotopic analysis as a tool for distinguishing sources of nutrition. Based on this observation, we have isotopically characterized modern individuals for whom the diet has been documented. Both stable nitrogen and carbon isotope compositions were assessed, and together provide an indication of trophic status, and principal type (C3 or C4) of vegetation consumed. True vegans have nitrogen isotope compositions of about 7/1000 whereas humans consuming larger amounts of meat, eggs, or milk are more enriched in the heavy nitrogen isotope. We have also analysed large cross-sections of modern humans from North America and Europe to provide an indication of the variability seen in a population (the supermarket diet). There is a wide diversity in both carbon and nitrogen isotope values based at least partially on the levels of seafood, corn-fed beef and grains in the diets. Following analysis of the ancient hair, we have observed similar trends in certain ancient populations. For example, the Coptics of Egypt (1000 BP) and Chinchorro of Chile (5000-800 BP) have diets of similar diversity to those observed in the modern group but were isotopically influenced by local nutritional sources. In other ancient hair (Egyptian Late Middle Kingdom mummies, ca. 4000 BP), we have observed a much more uniform isotopic signature, indicating a more constant diet. We have also recognized a primary vegetarian component in the diet of the Neolithic Ice Man of the Oetztaler Alps (5200 BP). In certain cases, it appears that sulphur isotopes may help to further constrain dietary interpretations, owing to the good preservation and sulphur content of hair. It appears that analysis of the often-overlooked hair in archaeological sites may represent a significant new approach for understanding ancient human communities. PMID:10091248

Macko, S A; Engel, M H; Andrusevich, V; Lubec, G; O'Connell, T C; Hedges, R E

1999-01-01

243

Methodological Considerations for the Use of Stable Isotope Probing in Microbial Ecology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable isotope probing (SIP) is a method used for labeling uncultivated microorganisms in environmental samples or directly\\u000a in field studies using substrate enriched with stable isotope (e.g., 13C). After consumption of the substrate, the cells of microorganisms that consumed the substrate become enriched in the isotope.\\u000a Labeled biomarkers, such as phospholipid-derived fatty acid (PLFA), ribosomal RNA, and DNA can be

Josh D. Neufeld; Marc G. Dumont; Jyotsna Vohra; J. Colin Murrell

2007-01-01

244

Prospects and problems of using the methods of geochemistry of stable carbon isotopes in soil studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review of world investigations into the geochemistry of stable isotopesa new area for soil scienceis presented. Studies\\u000a of the behavior of stable isotopes in soils are being developed in two major directions: reconstruction of the environmental\\u000a conditions and indication of the soil processes. Investigations into the reconstruction of the environmental conditions are\\u000a based on the assumption that the isotopic

E. G. Morgun; I. V. Kovda; Ya. G. Ryskov; S. A. Oleinik

2008-01-01

245

Applications of stable isotopes to study plant-animal relationships in terrestrial ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

As natural tracers, stable isotopes have been extensively used in plant physiological, ecological and environmental research.\\u000a Recently, animal physiological ecologists have also applied stable isotope techniques to study plantanimal relationships.\\u000a The isotopic compositions of animal body generally reflect and integrate their diets over a time period ranging from hours\\u000a to years to the lifetime of an individual. When animal living

Jianzhu Wang; Guanghui Lin; Jianhui Huang; Xingguo Han

2004-01-01

246

Climatic signals in multiple highly resolved stable isotope records from Greenland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Twenty ice cores drilled in medium to high accumulation areas of the Greenland ice sheet have been used to extract seasonally resolved stable isotope records. Relationships between the seasonal stable isotope data and Greenland and Icelandic temperatures as well as atmospheric flow are investigated for the past 150-200 years. The winter season stable isotope data are found to be influenced by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and very closely related to SW Greenland temperatures. The linear correlation between the first principal component of the winter season stable isotope data and Greenland winter temperatures is 0.71 for seasonally resolved data and 0.83 for decadally filtered data. The summer season stable isotope data display higher correlations with Stykkisholmur summer temperatures and North Atlantic SST conditions than with SW Greenland temperatures. The linear correlation between Stykkisholmur summer temperatures and the first principal component of the summer season stable isotope data is 0.56, increasing to 0.66 for decadally filtered data. Winter season stable isotope data from ice core records that reach more than 1400 years back in time suggest that the warm period that began in the 1920s raised southern Greenland temperatures to the same level as those that prevailed during the warmest intervals of the Medieval Warm Period some 900-1300 years ago. This observation is supported by a southern Greenland ice core borehole temperature inversion. As Greenland borehole temperature inversions are found to correspond better with winter stable isotope data than with summer or annual average stable isotope data it is suggested that a strong local Greenland temperature signal can be extracted from the winter stable isotope data even on centennial to millennial time scales.

Vinther, B. M.; Jones, P. D.; Briffa, K. R.; Clausen, H. B.; Andersen, K. K.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Johnsen, S. J.

2010-02-01

247

Status of stable isotope enrichment, products, and services at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been supplying enriched stable and radioactive isotopes to the research, medical, and industrial communities for over 50 y. Very significant changes have occurred in this effort over the past several years, and, while many of these changes have had a negative impact on the availability of enriched isotopes, more recent developments are actually improving the situation for both the users and the producers of enriched isotopes. ORNL is still a major producer and distributor of radioisotopes, but future isotope enrichment operations to be conducted at the Isotope Enrichment Facility (IEF) will be limited to stable isotopes. Among the positive changes in the enriched stable isotope area are a well-functioning, long-term contract program, which offers stability and pricing advantages; the resumption of calutron operations; the adoption of prorated conversion charges, which greatly improves the pricing of isotopes to small users; ISO 9002 registration of the IEF's quality management system; and a much more customer-oriented business philosophy. Efforts are also being made to restore and improve upon the extensive chemical and physical form processing capablities that once existed in the enriched stable isotope program. Innovative ideas are being pursued in both technical and administrative areas to encourage the beneficial use of enriched stable isotopes and the development of related technologies.

Scott Aaron, W.; Tracy, Joe G.; Collins, Emory D.

1997-02-01

248

Coral cavity sponges depend on reef-derived food resources: stable isotope and fatty acid constraints.  

PubMed

The diet of cavity sponges on the narrow fringing reefs of Curaao, Caribbean was studied. The origin and resources of the bulk food of these sponges, i.e., dissolved organic matter (DOM), were identified using stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes and fatty acid biomarkers. We found that phytoplankton and its derived DOM from the adjacent open sea and from reef overlying water is not the main source of food for most of the sponges examined nor is bacterioplankton. Interestingly, dual stable isotope signatures (?(13)Corg, ?(15)Norg) and fatty acid biomarkers appoint coral mucus and organic matter derived from crustose coralline algae (CCA) as probable food sources for encrusting sponges. Mucus-derived DOM may contribute up to 66% to the diet of examined sponges based on results of dual isotope mixing model analysis. The contribution of CCA (as purported representative for benthic algae) was smaller with values up to 31%. Together, mucus- and CCA-derived substrates contributed for 48-73% to the diet of sponges. The presence of the exogenous fatty acid 20:4?6 in sponges, which is abundant in coral mucus of Madracis mirabilis and in CCA, highlights these reef-derived resources as sources of nutrition for DOM feeding cavity sponges. The relatively high concentrations of exogenous 20:4?6 in all sponges examined supports our hypothesis that the bulk of the food of the cavity sponge community is reef-derived. Our results imply that cavity sponges play an important role in conserving food and energy produced within the reef. PMID:24391268

van Duyl, Fleur C; Moodley, Leon; Nieuwland, Gerard; van Ijzerloo, Lennart; van Soest, Rob W M; Houtekamer, Marco; Meesters, Erik H; Middelburg, Jack J

2011-01-01

249

Climatic and physiological controls on the stable isotope composition of modern and ancient Cupressaceae  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Unique and abundant secondary metabolites found in waxes and resins of the Callitroid, Cupressoid, and Taxodioid clades of the Cupressaceae family can be identified and quantified in complex mixtures of sedimentary organic compounds. This unusual feature makes it possible to study relatively simple (taxon-specific) isotope systems back in time across the broad array of environments in which these conifers are found. Work on these systems can potentially provide both robust paleoenvironmental proxies (i.e. for source water ?D and growing season relative humidity) and quantitative probes into the ecophysiology of these plants in modern and ancient environments. Our research focuses on three genera representing environmental end-members of Cupressaceae - Juniperus, Thuja, and Chamaecyparis - (1) across geographic and environmental gradients in the field, and (2) in specific Holocene and late Pleistocene environmental records. The latter research focuses on peat cores from New England and Oregon and fossil packrat middens from the southwestern United States. Modern transects highlight the sensitivity of Cupressaceae to climatic variables. These include both variables during growth (relative humidity, soil moisture, etc.) and variables affecting seasonal and diurnal growth rates (temperature, winter precipitation, insolation, microhabitat, etc.). Work on ancient records has demonstrated the sensitivity of these unique taxon-specific archives to both subtle and dramatic climate shifts during the Pleistocene and Holocene. This work will result in an improved understanding of climatic and physiological controls on the stable isotopic composition of modern and ancient Cupressaceae - and by extension, other arborescent gymnosperms and C3 plants - providing a framework for understanding more complexly sourced organic inputs to sediments, coals, and petroleum prior to the advent of C4 plants. This research also has direct implications for stratigraphic stable isotope studies of gymnosperm markers across the last millenium, the Pleistocene, and important climatic events in the Mesozoic and Tertiary.

Zinniker, D.; Tipple, B.; Pagani, M.

2007-12-01

250

Stable nitrogen isotopes of nestling tree swallows indicate exposure to different types of oil sands reclamation.  

PubMed

Tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) inhabiting reclaimed wetlands on the oil sands in northern Alberta are potentially exposed to elevated levels of oil sands constituents such as polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC) through diet. While increased detoxification enzyme activity as measured using 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase in nestlings is a generally accepted indicator of exposure to oil sands constituents, there is no apparent method to detect dietary exposure specific to oil sands processed material (OSPM). In this study, stable C and N isotopes were analyzed from muscle and feathers of nestling tree swallows (15 d old) to distinguish dietary exposure of birds near reference and OSPM wetlands. High ??N and low ?C values in the nestling tissues differentiated those from the OSPM wetlands and reference sites. Lower ??N values of nestlings compared to the ??N values of larval chironomids from an earlier study suggested that the majority of the diet of the nestlings was derived from non-OSPM sources, despite residence near and on the OSPM wetlands. Our finding of limited utilization of OSPM resources by tree swallows indicates either low abundance or diversity of dietary items emerging from OSPM wetlands, or sensory avoidance of prey from those wetlands. Minimal consumption of OSPM-derived dietary sources may be attributed to published findings of limited adverse effects on tree swallow reproduction, or growth and development for these same nestlings. This study demonstrated that stable isotope analysis, particularly for N isotopes, may serve as a useful tool to trace dietary exposure to OSPM constituents as part of avian ecotoxicology assessments of reclaimed wetlands on the oil sands. PMID:24627996

Farwell, A J; Harms, N J; Smits, J E G; Dixon, D G

2014-01-01

251

Nitrate stable isotopes: Tools for determining nitrate sources among different land uses in the Mississippi River Basin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study was conducted to determine whether NO3- stable isotopes (??15N and ??18O), at natural abundance levels, could discriminate among NO3- sources from sites with different land uses at the basin scale. Water samples were collected from 24 sites in the Mississippi River Basin from five land-use categories: (1) large river basins (>34 590 km2) draining multiple land uses and smaller basins in which the predominant land use was (2) urban (3) undeveloped, (4) crops, or (5) crops and livestock. Our data suggest that riverine nitrates from different land uses have overlapping but moderately distinct isotopic signatures. ??18O data were critical in showing abrupt changes in NO3- source with discharge. The isotopic values of large rivers resembled crop sites, sites with livestock tended to have ??15N values characteristic of manure, and urban sites tended to have high ??18O values characteristic of atmospheric nitrate.

Chang, C.C.Y.; Kendall, C.; Silva, S.R.; Battaglin, W.A.; Campbell, D.H.

2002-01-01

252

Stable Isotope Probing of Peat and Forest Floor Amendments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Alberta, Canada, land reclamation efforts utilize peat as an organic amendment to help reclaim decommissioned oil sands mine sites to upland boreal forests. This study investigates the rhizosphere microbial communities of two pioneer species, aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), a species not known for strong associations with the soil microbial community, and alder (Alnus crispa Ait.), a species well known for mutualism with actinomycetes. Specifically, the objective was to determine how different organic amendments (peat versus forest floor) influenced the rhizosphere microbial communities and how this could be linked to plant growth. Seedlings were grown for 20 weeks in forest floor material, peat, and a combination of both. They were pulse labelled with 13CO2 (g) and subsequently harvested for plant growth measurements. While analysis of plant growth attributes did not indicate any effect of the organic amendment on aspen growth, alder reported significantly less growth in peat treatments. The rhizosphere soils were extracted for compound-specific analysis of ?13C in microbial phospholipid fatty acids. Stable isotope probing showed greater carbon flow between trees and their rhizosphere communities when seedlings were grown in forest floor material.

Quideau, Sylvie; Basse, Mark

2013-04-01

253

Stable isotope-based diet reconstructions of Turkana Basin hominins  

PubMed Central

Hominin fossil evidence in the Turkana Basin in Kenya from ca. 4.1 to 1.4 Ma samples two archaic early hominin genera and records some of the early evolutionary history of Paranthropus and Homo. Stable carbon isotopes in fossil tooth enamel are used to estimate the fraction of diet derived from C3 or C4 resources in these hominin taxa. The earliest hominin species in the Turkana Basin, Australopithecus anamensis, derived nearly all of its diet from C3 resources. Subsequently, by ca. 3.3 Ma, the later Kenyanthropus platyops had a very wide dietary rangefrom virtually a purely C3 resource-based diet to one dominated by C4 resources. By ca. 2 Ma, hominins in the Turkana Basin had split into two distinct groups: specimens attributable to the genus Homo provide evidence for a diet with a ca. 65/35 ratio of C3- to C4-based resources, whereas P. boisei had a higher fraction of C4-based diet (ca. 25/75 ratio). Homo sp. increased the fraction of C4-based resources in the diet through ca. 1.5 Ma, whereas P. boisei maintained its high dependency on C4-derived resources. PMID:23733966

Cerling, Thure E.; Manthi, Fredrick Kyalo; Mbua, Emma N.; Leakey, Louise N.; Leakey, Meave G.; Leakey, Richard E.; Brown, Francis H.; Grine, Frederick E.; Hart, John A.; Kaleme, Prince; Roche, Hlne; Uno, Kevin T.; Wood, Bernard A.

2013-01-01

254

NMR-based stable isotope resolved metabolomics in systems biochemistry  

PubMed Central

An important goal of metabolomics is to characterize the changes in metabolic networks in cells or various tissues of an organism in response to external perturbations or pathologies. The profiling of metabolites and their steady state concentrations does not directly provide information regarding the architecture and fluxes through metabolic networks. This requires tracer approaches. NMR is especially powerful as it can be used not only to identify and quantify metabolites in an unfractionated mixture such as biofluids or crude cell/tissue extracts, but also determine the positional isotopomer distributions of metabolites derived from a precursor enriched in stable isotopes such as 13C and 15N via metabolic transformations. In this article we demonstrate the application of a variety of 2-D NMR editing experiments to define the positional isotopomers of compounds present in polar and non-polar extracts of human lung cancer cells grown in either [U13C]-glucose or [U13C,15N]-glutamine as source tracers. The information provided by such experiments enabled unambiguous reconstruction of metabolic pathways, which is the foundation for further metabolic flux modeling. PMID:21350847

Fan, Teresa W-M.

2011-01-01

255

Stable isotope-based diet reconstructions of Turkana Basin hominins.  

PubMed

Hominin fossil evidence in the Turkana Basin in Kenya from ca. 4.1 to 1.4 Ma samples two archaic early hominin genera and records some of the early evolutionary history of Paranthropus and Homo. Stable carbon isotopes in fossil tooth enamel are used to estimate the fraction of diet derived from C3 or C4 resources in these hominin taxa. The earliest hominin species in the Turkana Basin, Australopithecus anamensis, derived nearly all of its diet from C3 resources. Subsequently, by ca. 3.3 Ma, the later Kenyanthropus platyops had a very wide dietary range--from virtually a purely C3 resource-based diet to one dominated by C4 resources. By ca. 2 Ma, hominins in the Turkana Basin had split into two distinct groups: specimens attributable to the genus Homo provide evidence for a diet with a ca. 65/35 ratio of C3- to C4-based resources, whereas P. boisei had a higher fraction of C4-based diet (ca. 25/75 ratio). Homo sp. increased the fraction of C4-based resources in the diet through ca. 1.5 Ma, whereas P. boisei maintained its high dependency on C4-derived resources. PMID:23733966

Cerling, Thure E; Manthi, Fredrick Kyalo; Mbua, Emma N; Leakey, Louise N; Leakey, Meave G; Leakey, Richard E; Brown, Francis H; Grine, Frederick E; Hart, John A; Kaleme, Prince; Roche, Hlne; Uno, Kevin T; Wood, Bernard A

2013-06-25

256

Stable isotope analysis indicates a lack of inter- and intra-specific dietary redundancy among ecologically important coral reef fishes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Parrotfish are critical consumers on coral reefs, mediating the balance between algae and corals, and are often categorised into three functional groups based on adult morphology and feeding behaviour. We used stable isotope analysis (?13C, ?15N) to investigate size-related ontogenetic dietary changes in multiple species of parrotfish on coral reefs around Zanzibar. We compared signatures among species and functional groups (scrapers, excavators and browsers) as well as ontogenetic stages (immature, initial and terminal phase) within species. Stable isotope analysis suggests that ontogenetic dietary shifts occurred in seven of the nine species examined; larger individuals had enriched ?13C values, with no relationship between size and ?15N. The relationship between fish length and ?13C signature was maintained when species were categorised as scrapers and excavators, but was more pronounced for scrapers than excavators, indicating stronger ontogenetic changes. Isotopic mixing models classified the initial phase of both the most abundant excavator ( Chlorurus sordidus) as a scraper and the immature stage of the scraper Scarus ghobban (the largest species) as an excavator, indicating that diet relates to size rather than taxonomy. The results indicate that parrotfish may show similar intra-group changes in diet with length, but that their trophic ecology is more complex than suggested by morphology alone. Stable isotope analyses indicate that feeding ecology may differ among species within functional groups, and according to ontogenetic stage within a species.

Plass-Johnson, J. G.; McQuaid, C. D.; Hill, J. M.

2013-06-01

257

Stable water isotope patterns in a climate change hotspot: the isotope hydrology framework of Corsica (western Mediterranean).  

PubMed

The Mediterranean is regarded as a region of intense climate change. To better understand future climate change, this area has been the target of several palaeoclimate studies which also studied stable isotope proxies that are directly linked to the stable isotope composition of water, such as tree rings, tooth enamel or speleothems. For such work, it is also essential to establish an isotope hydrology framework of the region of interest. Surface waters from streams and lakes as well as groundwater from springs on the island of Corsica were sampled between 2003 and 2009 for their oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions. Isotope values from lake waters were enriched in heavier isotopes and define a local evaporation line (LEL). On the other hand, stream and spring waters reflect the isotope composition of local precipitation in the catchment. The intersection of the LEL and the linear fit of the spring and stream waters reflect the mean isotope composition of the annual precipitation (?P) with values of-8.6( 0.2) for ?(18)O and-58( 2) for ?(2)H. This value is also a good indicator of the average isotope composition of the local groundwater in the island. Surface water samples reflect the altitude isotope effect with a value of-0.17( 0.02) per 100 m elevation for oxygen isotopes. At Vizzavona Pass in central Corsica, water samples from two catchments within a lateral distance of only a few hundred metres showed unexpected but systematic differences in their stable isotope composition. At this specific location, the direction of exposure seems to be an important factor. The differences were likely caused by isotopic enrichment during recharge in warm weather conditions in south-exposed valley flanks compared to the opposite, north-exposed valley flanks. PMID:24437609

van Geldern, Robert; Kuhlemann, Joachim; Schiebel, Ralf; Taubald, Heinrich; Barth, Johannes A C

2014-06-01

258

The link between assimilation and below-ground processes - stable isotopes as tools to assess carbon transfer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At present, there is lack of knowledge on how plant physiological processes, the transfer of carbon within the plant, carbon storage and remobilization in the plant tissues as well as the release of carbon from the roots to the soil interact with ecosystem-scale processes. On the background of global climate change, we need to mechanistically link plant physiology, CO2 net exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere and plant biomass accumulation. This is the basis for predicting productivity of forests as well as their carbon sequestration potential in future. This paper will give an overview on how stable isotope studies can give insights into the fate of newly assimilated carbon transported within trees and transferred to the soil and atmosphere. The paper includes assessments characterizing temporal and spatial variation in the natural abundance of carbon and oxygen isotopes or applying isotopically enriched tracers. In addition, it highlights the fact that the stable isotope composition of assimilates transported within the plant contains important time integrated information on environmental conditions, leaf physiology, and post-photosynthetic metabolism. The paper on the one hand focuses on the fast turn over carbon pools, which fuel plant respiration and soil microbial activity and on the other hand explores the transfer of the isotope information to long-lived compounds in plant archives such as tree rings.

Gessler, A.; Wingate, L.; Oge, J.; Offermann, C.; Kodama, N.

2011-12-01

259

A stable carbon isotope and biological marker study of Polish bituminous coals and carbonaceous shales  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Biological marker and carbon isotopic compositions of coals and carbonaceous shales from the Upper Carboniferous strata of the Upper Silesian (USCB), Lower Silesian (LSCB), and Lublin (LCB) coal basins were determined to assess depositional conditions and sources of the organic matter. n-Alkane, sterane, and isoprenoid distribution, and carbon isotope ratios are consistent with an origin from higher plants. In some cases, pristane/phytane (Pr/Ph) ratios of carbonaceous shales (roof and floor shales) are < 1.0, while the associated coals have high ratios (??? 1.0). This suggests that reducing conditions prevailed during deposition of the shales, but a period of oxidizing conditions accompanied deposition of the coals. Steranes present in coal extracts are dominated by the 14??(H)17??(H)20R C29 stereoisomers, typical, but not conclusive, of higher plant origin. Carbonaceous shales exhibit a wider range of sterane composition, suggesting local, significant input of algal organic matter. Significant amounts of benzohopanes and gammacerane are present in some coals. Although benzohopanes are present at least in small amounts in samples from many different environments, they have been reported to occur most commonly in marine environments. The present study seems to provide the first example where benzohopanes have been reported in significant amounts in terrestrial organic matter. Gammacerane is abundant in rocks or sediments deposited in carbonate or highly saline marine environments. The finding of high gammacerane concentrations in the coals expands the depositional settings in which it has been observed and questions its utility as an independent indicator of hypersaline carbonate environments. Stable carbon isotope composition of coals, and type III kerogen in carbonaceous shales as well as correlation of stable carbon isotope composition of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons in carbonaceous shales from both the USCB and the LSCB indicate terrigenous origin. Bitumens are always co-genetic with associated coals and kerogens. Isotopic data reveal that Sofer's genetic classification of oils is not applicable to organic matter in coals. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Kotarba, M.J.; Clayton, J.L.

2003-01-01

260

The influence of authigenic clay formation on the mineralogy and stable isotopic record of lacustrine carbonates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mineralogical, compositional and stable isotopic variability of lacustrine carbonates are frequently used as proxies for ancient paleoenvironmental change in continental settings, under the assumption that precipitated carbonates reflect conditions and chemistry of ancient lake waters. In some saline and alkaline lake systems, however, authigenic clay minerals, forming at or near the sediment water interface, are a major sedimentary component. Often these clays are rich in Mg, influencing the geochemical budget of lake waters, and are therefore expected to influence the properties of contemporaneous authigenic carbonate precipitates (which may also contain Mg). This paper documents evidence for a systematic feedback between clay mineral and carbonate authigenesis through multiple precessionally driven, m-scale sedimentary cycles in lacustrine oil-shale deposits of the Eocene Green River Formation from the Uinta Basin (NE Utah). In the studied section, authigenic, Mg-rich, trioctahedral smectite content varies cyclically between 9 and 39 wt.%. The highest concentrations occur in oil-shales and calcareous mudstones deposited during high lake level intervals that favored sedimentary condensation, lengthening the time available for clay diagenesis and reducing dilution by other siliciclastic phases. An inverse relation between dolomite percentage of carbonate and trioctahedral smectite abundance suggests the Mg uptake during clay authigenesis provides a first order control on carbonate mineralogy that better explains carbonate mineralogical trends than the possible alternative controls of (1) variable Mg/Ca ratios in lake water and (2) degree of microbial activity in sediments. We also observe that cyclical change in carbonate mineralogy, believed to be induced by clay authigenesis, also causes isotopic covariation between ?13CPDB and ?18OPDB of bulk sediments because of differences in the equilibrium fractionation factors of dolomite and calcite (2 and 2.6%, respectively). This provides an alternative mechanism for the common pattern of isotopic covariation, which is typically attributed to the effect of simultaneous changes in water balance and biological activity on the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of lake waters. These findings may help improve paleoenvironmental reconstructions based on lacustrine carbonate records by adding to the factors known to influence the mineralogical, compositional and stable isotopic signals recorded by lacustrine carbonates.

Bristow, Thomas F.; Kennedy, Martin J.; Morrison, Keith D.; Mrofka, David D.

2012-08-01

261

Forensic Applications of Light-Element Stable Isotope Ratios of Ricinus communis Seeds and Ricin Preparations  

SciTech Connect

Seeds of the castor plant Ricinus communis, also known as castor beans, are of forensic interest because they are the source of the poison ricin. We have tested whether stable isotope ratios of castor seeds and ricin prepared by various methods can be used as a forensic signature. We collected over 300 castor seed samples from locations around the world and measured the C, N, O, and H stable isotope ratios of the whole seeds, oil, and three types of ricin preparations. Our results demonstrate that N isotope ratios can be used to correlate ricin prepared by any of these methods to source seeds. Further, stable isotope ratios distinguished >99% of crude and purified ricin protein samples in pair-wise comparison tests. Stable isotope ratios therefore constitute a valuable forensic signature for ricin preparations.

Kreuzer, Helen W.; West, Jason B.; Ehleringer, James

2013-01-01

262

Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of brines - comparing isotope ratio mass spectrometry and isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Today's standard analytical methods for high precision stable isotope analysis of fluids are gas-water equilibration and high temperature pyrolysis coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometers (IRMS). In recent years, relatively new laser-based analytical instruments entered the market that are said to allow high isotope precision data on nearly every media. This optical technique is referred to as isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS). The objective of this study is to evaluate the capability of this new instrument type for highly saline solutions and a comparison of the analytical results with traditional IRMS analysis. It has been shown for the equilibration method that the presence of salts influences the measured isotope values depending on the salt concentration (see Lcuyer et al, 2009; Martineau, 2012). This so-called 'isotope salt effect' depends on the salt type and salt concentration. These factors change the activity in the fluid and therefore shift the isotope ratios measured by the equilibration method. Consequently, correction factors have to be applied to these analytical data. Direct conversion techniques like pyrolysis or the new laser instruments allow the measurement of the water molecule from the sample directly and should therefore not suffer from the salt effect, i.e. no corrections of raw values are necessary. However, due to high salt concentrations this might cause technical problems with the analytical hardware and may require labor-intensive sample preparation (e.g. vacuum distillation). This study evaluates the salt isotope effect for the IRMS equilibration technique (Thermo Gasbench II coupled to Delta Plus XP) and the laser-based IRIS instruments with liquid injection (Picarro L2120-i). Synthetic salt solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, MgCl2, MgSO4, CaSO4) and natural brines collected from the Stassfurt Salt Anticline (Germany; Stadler et al., 2012) were analysed with both techniques. Salt concentrations ranged from seawater salinity up to full saturation. References Lcuyer, C. et al. (2009). Chem. Geol., 264, 122-126. [doi:10.1016/j.chemgeo.2009.02.017] Martineau, F. et al. (2012). Chem. Geol., 291, 236-240. [doi:10.1016/j.chemgeo.2011.10.017] Stadler, S. et al. (2012). Chem. Geol., 294-295, 226-242. [doi:10.1016/j.chemgeo.2011.12.006

Ahrens, Christian; Koeniger, Paul; van Geldern, Robert; Stadler, Susanne

2013-04-01

263

Stable isotope methods: The effect of gut contents on isotopic ratios of zooplankton  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the past decade there has been an increased awareness of the potential for methodological bias resulting from multiple pre-analytical procedures in foodweb interpretations based on stable isotope techniques. In the case of small organisms, this includes the effect of gut contents on whole body signatures. Although gut contents may not reflect actual assimilation, their carbon and nitrogen values will be isotopically lighter than after the same material has been assimilated. The potential skewing of isotopic ratios in whole organism samples is especially important for aquatic environments as many studies involve trophic relationships among small zooplankton. This is particularly important in pelagic waters, where herbivorous zooplankton comprise small taxa. Hence this study investigated the effect of gut contents on the ?13C and ?15N ratios of three size classes of zooplankton (1.0-2.0, 2.0-4.0 and >4.0 mm) collected using bongo net tows in the tropical waters of the south-west Indian Ocean. Animals were collected at night, when they were likely to be feeding, sieved into size classes and separated into genera. We focused on Euphausia spp which dominated zooplankton biomass. Three treatment types were processed: bulk animals, bulk animals without guts and tail muscle from each size class at 10 bongo stations. The ?15N ratios were influenced by zooplankton size class, presumably reflecting ontogenetic changes in diet. ANOVA post hoc results and correlations in ?15N signatures among treatments suggest that gut contents may not affect overall nitrogen signatures of Euphausia spp., but that ?13C signatures may be significantly altered by their presence. Carbon interpretations however, were complicated by potential effects of variation in chitin, lipids and metabolism among tissues and the possibility of opportunistic omnivory. Consequently we advocate gut evacuation before sacrifice in euphausiids if specific tissue dissection is impractical and recommend caution when using isotopic ratios of whole body zooplankton for trophic interpretations.

Hill, J. M.; McQuaid, C. D.

2011-05-01

264

Atmospheric Aerosol Investigation In Vilnius using Stable Carbon Isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effects of aerosols on the atmosphere, climate, and public health are among the central topics in current environmental research. Spatially urban air pollution is a major public concern world-wide.In this study the results of experimental research are presented, the basis of which is the investigation of 13C/12C variations ?13C of stable carbon isotopes in total carbonaceous aerosols in Vilnius city, Lithuania. The main aim of the work is to identify the origin of carbonaceous aerosols. Two autumns and one spring sampling campaign were designed with the aim to determine the changes in the air caused by the beginning/end of the heating season. The experiment was performed during several sampling periods. The first period lasted from 26 November to 06 December 2010. The second was from 04 April to 16 May 2011. The third was from 12 to 29 October 2012. Atmospheric aerosols, according to their aerodynamic diameters, were collected with an eleven-stage impactor "MOUDI". The stages have 50% aerodynamic diameter cut-offs of 18.0, 10.0, 5.6, 3.2, 1.8, 1.0, 0.56, 0.32, 0.18, 0.1 and 0.056 ?m, for stages 1-11, respectively. The analysis proceeds essentially in two stages. In the first, MOUDI foils were analyzed with EA-IRMS (FlashEA 1112 coupled to ThermoFinnigan Delta Plus Advantage). Half of the foil was measured directly (TC ?13C values). The rest was heated in the oven (400 C) to remove organic part and measured EC+CC ?13C values (carbonates were not removed with acid). During the second stage of the analysis, corrections are made and OC ?13C values were calculated using isotopic balance equation: . As the main aim of the study was to identify the origin of incoming carbonaceous aerosols, air mass back trajectories were calculated using the HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model.

Masalaite, Agne; Garbaras, Andrius; Remeikis, Vidmantas

2013-04-01

265

Measurement of stable isotope activities in saline aqueous solutions using optical spectroscopy methods.  

PubMed

The requirement to measure the stable isotopic compositions of saline pore fluids by optical methods has prompted a re-evaluation of the isotopic salt effect for common salts. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopic salt effects were measured at room temperature (21C) by optical methods. For hydrogen isotopes, our results agree well with those of previous studies and better define these effects at low temperatures. In contrast, measured oxygen isotope salt effects disagree within error for NaCl and CaCl2 solutions from those reported previously. Subtle differences between measurement methods may account for the discrepancy. In studies that involve highly saline fluids, the isotopic salt effect must be taken into account because modern methods that measure stable isotopic compositions as activities or concentrations may be not directly comparable to historical data sets. PMID:24117431

Koehler, Geoff; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Hendry, Jim

2013-01-01

266

Barium even-to-odd isotope abundance ratios in thick disk and thin disk stars  

E-print Network

We present the Ba even-to-odd isotope abundance ratios in 25 cool dwarf stars with the metallicity [Fe/H] ranged between 0.25 and --1.35. Our method takes advantage of the hyperfine structure (HFS) affecting the \\ion{Ba}{ii} resonance line of the odd isotopes. The fractional abundance of the odd isotopes of Ba is derived from a requirement that Ba abundances from the resonance line $\\lambda 4554$ and subordinate lines $\\lambda 5853$ and $\\lambda 6496$ must be equal. The results are based on NLTE line formation and analysis of high resolution (R $\\sim60000$) high signal-to-noise (S/N $\\ge 200$) observed spectra. We find that the fraction of the odd isotopes of Ba grows toward the lower Ba abundance (or metallicity) and the mean value in the thick disk stars equals 33 $\\pm$ 4%. This indicates the higher contribution of the $r-$process to barium in the thick disk stars compared to the solar system matter. The obtained fraction increases with the [Eu/Ba] abundance ratio growth in agreement with expectations. A significant fraction of the \\emph{even} isotopes of Ba found in old Galactic stars (the thick disk stars), $\\sim67$%, is in contrast to the prediction of the "classical" model of the $s-$process and favors the value predicted by the "stellar" models of Arlandini et al. (1999) and Travaglio et al. (1999).

L. Mashonkina; G. Zhao

2006-07-06

267

Water Stable Isotopes: Atmospheric Composition and Applications in Polar Ice Core Studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Natural waters formed of 99.7% of H216O are also constituted of other stable isotopic molecules, mainly H218O (2), H217O (0.5), and HD16O (0.3), where H and D (deuterium) correspond to 1H and 2H, respectively. Owing to slight differences in physical properties of these molecules, essentially their saturation vapor pressure, and their molecular diffusivity in air, fractionation processes occur at each phase change of the water except sublimation and melting of compact ice. As a result, the distribution of these water isotopes varies both spatially and temporally in the atmosphere, in the precipitation, and, in turn, in the various reservoirs of the hydrosphere and of the cryosphere. These isotopic variations have applications in such fields as climatology and cloud physics. More importantly, they are at the origin of two now well-established disciplines: isotope hydrology and isotope paleoclimatology. The various aspects dealing with isotope hydrology are reviewed by Kendall (see Chapter 5.11). In this chapter, we focus on this field known as "isotope paleoclimatology." As the behavior of H217O in the atmospheric water is very similar to that of H218O (more abundant and easier to precisely determine), isotope paleoclimatology is only based on the changes in concentrations of HDO and H218O. These concentrations are given with respect to a standard as ?=(Rsample-RSMOW)/RSMOW and expressed in per mil ? units (?D and ?18O, respectively). In this definition, Rsample and RSMOW are the isotopic ratios of the sample and of the Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (V-SMOW) with D/H and 18O/16O atomic ratios of 155.7610-6 and 2005.210-6, respectively (Hageman et al., 1970; Baerstchi, 1976; Gonfiantini, 1978).The use of water stable isotopes in paleoclimatology is based on the fact that their present-day distribution in precipitation is strongly related to climatological parameters. Of primary interest is the linear relationship between annual values of ?D and ?18O and mean annual temperature at the precipitation site, Ts, that is observed at middle and high latitudes (Figure 1). This relationship, which, as discussed in Section 4.08.3, is well explained by both simple and complex isotopic models, has given rise to the notion of "isotopic paleothermometer." In a conventional approach, the present-day spatial relationship between the isotopic concentration of the precipitation ?p (where ?p stands either for ?D or for ?18O of the precipitation, which can indifferently be used as paleothermometers) and Ts, defined over a certain region, is assumed to hold in time throughout this region. In this approach, it is assumed that the temporal slope, which applies to the isotope-temperature relationship through different climates over time at a single geographic location and should be used to interpret isotopic variations, observed at this site in terms of temperature changes, and the spatial slope (Sspat=d?p/dTs) are similar. A so-called "modern analogue method" is thus used, similar to that adopted in most other methods for reconstructing paleoclimates. Of course, the fact that present-day isotope concentrations and local temperatures are correlated is not sufficient to validate this critical assumption. Such factors as the evaporative origin and the seasonality of precipitation can also affect ?D and ?18O. If these factors change markedly under different climates, the spatial slope can no longer be taken as a reliable surrogate of the temporal slope for interpreting the isotopic signal. For example, there is now ample evidence that temporal slopes are considerably lower (by up to a factor of 2) than the observed present-day spatial slope, for Greenland sites. (13K)Figure 1. Annual ?18O in precipitation versus annual surface temperature for: (a) 3 yr run and (b) observations as simulated by the NASA/GISS isotopic GCM (after Jouzel et al., 1987a). Present-day ?p distributions are characterized by two other interesting large-scale properties. First, there is no clear relationship be

Jouzel, J.

2003-12-01

268

Stable isotope geochemistry of sulfur bearing minerals and clay mineralogy of some soils and sediments in Loot Desert, central Iran  

E-print Network

Stable isotope geochemistry of sulfur bearing minerals and clay mineralogy of some soils Desert Stable isotope geochemistry is a unique technique to study the source of salts in soils and sediments. In the present research, sources of gypsum and other sulfur bearing minerals using stable isotope

Ahmad, Sajjad

269

Carbon and Sulfur Stable Isotope Records of the Early Paleogene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Secular records of stable carbon isotopes and stable sulfur isotopes from marine sediment provide primary tools for understanding past changes in global biogeochemical cycling. Over the Cenozoic, the most pronounced changes in ?13C and ?34S records happened during the late Paleocene and Early Eocene. The cause of these variations remains the source of debate, in part because the ?13C and ?34S records are not linked very well in the time domain. The early Cenozoic ?34S record principally comes from analyses of barite extracted from DSDP Sites 366 and 577 (Paytan et al., Science, 1996). However, Site 366 has no ?13C record and poorly preserved microfossil assemblages, and Site 577 has a problematic stratigraphy because of misplaced datums, and unrecognized core gaps and core overlaps. Here we generate a ?13C record at Site 366, realign the stratigraphy at Site 577, and place both records on a current time scale for the early Paleogene (Option 1; Westerhold et al., P3, 2008). There is now very little play in the relative and absolute timing of ?13C and ?34S changes across the early Paleogene. Between about 62 and 58 Ma, the ?13C of carbonate increased while the ? 34S of barite decreased. A marked change occurred at about 58 Ma: form this time to about 52 Ma, the ?13C of carbonate decreased but the ? 34S of barite continued to decrease. At about 52 Ma and a few million years after, both ?13C and ? 34S increased. Thus, the records are coupled but in a complex manner, and the series of hyperthermals happened when both ?13C and ? 34S decreased together. No model to date explains these basic observations satisfactorily. For example, volcanism as a cause for the ?34C drop does not explain the initial 4 Myr rise in ?13C and apparent coeval removal of carbon from the ocean and atmosphere; storage and release of terrestrial organic carbon as a cause for the rise and fall in ?13C does not explain the drop or subsequent rise in ?34S. Clearly, however, the idea that methane build-up in marine sediment during the late Paleocene and its subsequent discharge over the early Eocene is wrong, at least as presented (Dickens, Clim. Past, 2011). This is because such storage and release must drive significant anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and the formation of Fe sulfides, which if depleted in 34S relative to seawater, would cause a positive ?34S excursion. Indeed, seafloor methane cannot be a significant player in global biogeochemical cycling during the early Paleogene, unless one invokes an unconventional notion: AOM leads to burial of 34S-enriched Fe sulfides.

Dickens, G.; Backman, J.

2012-12-01

270

Trophic ecology of mullets during their spring migration in a European saltmarsh: A stable isotope study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mullet populations are abundant in littoral waters throughout the world and play a significant role in organic matter fluxes. Mullets are opportunistic feeders: adults have frequently been shown to feed on primary producers (e.g. fresh or detrital plant material, microphytobenthos) but they may also feed on meiofauna. The population structure and stomach contents of mullets that colonize saltmarsh creeks in Aiguillon Bay (French Atlantic coast) were studied to determine if they use saltmarshes as a feeding ground in spring. Stable isotope analyses were carried out on mullets sampled to assess their diet during their spring migration. The mullet population was primarily composed of young-of-the-year (G0), 1 year-old (G1) of both Liza ramada and Liza aurata species and 3 year-old or older (G3+) L. ramada individuals. G0 and G3+ population densities increased during the spring period: catch per unit effort (CPUE) increased from 0.22 to 1.49 ind min -1 for the G0 age group; but stomach content analyses revealed that only G1 and G3+ feed in the saltmarsh. Isotopic signatures of G1 (spring: ? 13C: -14.8, ? 15N: 14.1) and G3+ mullets (spring: ? 13C: -16.9, ? 15N: 13.8) indicate that mullet growth is supported largely by primary consumers, such as benthic meiofauna or small macrofauna. Mullets are thus positioned at a much higher trophic level than true primary consumers.

Lebreton, Benoit; Richard, Pierre; Parlier, Emmanuel P.; Guillou, Gal; Blanchard, Grard F.

2011-03-01

271

Retrograde fluids in granulites: Stable isotope evidence of fluid migration  

SciTech Connect

Widespread retrograde alteration assemblages document the migration of mixed H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} fluids into granulite facies rocks in the Adirondack Mountains. Fluid migration is manifest by (1) veins and patchy intergrowths of chlorite {plus minus} sericite {plus minus} calcite, (2) small veins of calcite, many only identifiable by cathodoluminescence, and (3) high-density, CO{sub 2}-rich or mixed H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} fluid inclusions. The distinct and varied textural occurrences of the alteration minerals indicate that fluid-rock ratios were low and variable on a local scale. Stable isotope ratios of C, O, and S have been determined in retrograde minerals from samples of the Marcy anorthosite massif and adjacent granitic gneisses (charnockites). Retrograde calcite in the anorthosite has a relatively small range in both {delta}{sup 18}O{sub SMOW} and {delta}{sup 13}C{sub PDB} (8.6 to 14.9% and {minus}4.1 to 0.4%, respectively), probably indicating that the hydrothermal fluids that precipitated the calcite had exchanged with a variety of crustal lithologies including marbles and orthogneisses, and that calcite was precipitated over a relatively narrow temperature interval. Values of {delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT} that range from 2.8 to 8.3% within the anorthosite can also be interpreted to reflect exchange between orthogneisses and metasediments. The recognition of retrograde fluid migration is particularly significant in granulite facies terranes because the controversy surrounding the origin of granulites arises in part from differing interpretations of fluid inclusion data, specifically, the timing of entrapment of high-density, CO{sub 2}-rich inclusions. Results indicate that retrograde fluid migration, which in some samples may leave only cryptic petrographic evidence, is a process capable of producing high-density, CO{sub 2}-rich fluid inclusions.

Morrison, J. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)); Valley, J.W. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

1991-07-01

272

Using stable isotope probing to obtain a targeted metatranscriptome of aerobic methanotrophs in lake sediment.  

PubMed

In this study, we demonstrate the possibility of obtaining a targeted metatranscriptome from a functional group of microorganisms using a stable isotope probing (SIP) approach. Methanotrophs in lake sediment were labelled using (13)CH4, and both labelled and unlabelled-RNA were isolated and sequenced by 454 pyrosequencing. The unlabelled metatranscriptome had a large diversity of bacterial, archaeal, eukaryotic and viral sequences as expected from a diverse sediment community. In contrast, the labelled-RNA metatranscriptome was dominated by methanotroph sequences, particularly from Methylococcaceae. Transcripts of the methane monooxygenase genes pmoCAB were the most abundant in this metatranscriptome, and the pathway of methane oxidation to CO2 could be traced, as well as many steps in the ribulose monophosphate pathway for carbon assimilation. A high abundance of mRNA transcripts for proteins related to motility was detected, suggesting an importance for methanotrophs in lake sediments. This combination of SIP and metatranscriptomics should be broadly applicable, and will enhance the detection and identification of mRNA from target organisms. PMID:24115627

Dumont, Marc G; Pommerenke, Bianca; Casper, Peter

2013-10-01

273

The plasma centrifuge: A compact, low cost, stable isotope separator. Phase 2 final technical report, September 15, 1991--September 14, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Enriched stable isotopes are required for production of radionuclides as well as for research and diagnostic uses. Science Research Laboratory (SRL) has developed a plasma centrifuge for moderate throughput of enriched stable isotopes, such as {sup 13}C, {sup 17}O, {sup 18}O, and {sup 203}Tl, for medical as well as other applications. Dwindling isotope stocks have restricted the use of enriched isotopes and their associated labeled organic molecules in medical imaging to very few research facilities because of high costs of isotope separation. With the introduction of the plasma centrifuge separator, the cost per separated gram of even rarely occurring isotopes ({le} 1% natural abundance) is potentially many times lower than with other separation technologies (cryogenic distillation and calutrons). The centrifuge is a simple, robust, pulsed electrical discharge device that has successfully demonstrated isotope separation of small (mg) quantities of {sup 26}Mg. Based on the results of the Phase 2 program, modest enhancements to the power supplies and cooling systems, a centrifuge separator will have high repetition rate (60 pps) and high duty cycle (60%) to produce in one month kilogram quantities of highly enriched stable isotopes. The centrifuge may be used in stand-alone operation or could be used as a high-throughput pre-separation stage with calutrons providing the final separation.

Guss, W.

1996-09-05

274

Measurement of the turnover of glycogen phosphorylase by GC/MS using stable isotope derivatives of pyridoxine (vitamin B6).  

PubMed Central

The majority of vitamin B6 in the body is in skeletal muscle, bound as the cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate to one abundant protein, glycogen phosphorylase. Previous work has established that radiolabelled vitamin B6 can be used as a turnover label for glycogen phosphorylase. In this study, a stable isotope derivative of pyridoxine dideuterated pyridoxine; 3-hydroxy-4-(hydroxymethyl) -5-[hydroxymethyl-2H2]-2-methylpyridine ([2H2]PN) has been used as a metabolic tracer to study the kinetics of labelling of the body pools of vitamin B6 in mice. A non-invasive method was developed in which the isotope abundance of the urinary excretory product of vitamin B6 metabolism, 4-pyridoxic acid, was analysed by GC/MS. The change in isotope abundance of urinary 4-pyridoxic acid following administration of [2H2]PN reflects the kinetics of labelling of the body pools of vitamin B6, and yields, non-invasively, the rate of degradation of glycogen phosphorylase. PMID:8713093

Beynon, R J; Leyland, D M; Evershed, R P; Edwards, R H; Coburn, S P

1996-01-01

275

Stable Isotopes in Ecological Sceinces: Bird and Fish Diet and Migration in Virginia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The preservation of ecologically sensitive habitats for birds and fishes in Virginia requires a detailed understanding of the important changes in diet and migration over the life span of the animal. Stable isotope analysis offers the potential to assess migration and trophic level variability in birds and fishes from southeastern Virginia and the greater Chesapeake Bay. Fish of various species and ages from different locations throughout the Chesapeake Bay were analyzed for carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 bulk natural abundance. Of particular note, blue fish were found to have significantly higher d15N values than striped bass which are believed to be trophic competitors. Observations are discussed relative to the maturity of the different fish, variation in water-mass chemistry (N-inputs), local environmental habitats, trophic relationships and migratory habits. In conjunction with banding studies being conducted by Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries in the Great Dismal Swamp (VA), breast feathers from Carolina Wren, Common Yellowthroat, Northern Cardinal, Ovenbird, and Prothonotary Warbler were analyzed for carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 bulk natural abundance. Given the preliminary nature of this work our ability to identify trends between species was less than satisfying, thus highlighting the need for larger sample populations over more than one breeding season. However, within a given species (most notably the Prothonotary Warbler) we are able to discern a change in diet. The hatching year Prothonotary warbler were more enriched in both carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 than the after-hatching-year (AHY) birds, indicating a change in food sources between the two age groups. By sampling over time and at various sample sites, isotopic analyses allow a more detailed investigation of the spatial and temporal variation in the diets and migratory habits of fishes and birds in Virginia and the Chesapeake Bay.

Schmidt, S.; Dias, R. F.; Ake, R.; Jones, C. M.

2002-12-01

276

Measurement of isotopic abundances in collected stratospheric ozone samples  

SciTech Connect

Enrichment of heavy O{sub 3} isotopes has been measured in collected stratospheric samples. A balloon-borne cryogenic sampler was used to gather six O{sub 3} samples between 26 and 35 km in three flights. Subsequent laboratory mass spectrometer analysis of rare O{sub 3} isotopes at both mass 49 and 50 has resulted in more precise measurements than have previously been reported with in situ and ground-based techniques. In one flight, {sup 50}O{sub 3} was enriched by 12-16% and {sup 49}O{sub 3} by 9-11%, both increasing with altitude. In the remaining two flights, the isotope enrichment was nearly mass-independent at 8-9%. The enrichments in O{sub 3} at mass 50 are less than the large 40% value observed in some stratospheric measurements but similar to {sup 49}O{sub 3} and {sup 50}O{sub 3} fractionations produced in laboratory-generated ozone.

Schueler, B.; Morton, J.; Mauersberger, K. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (USA))

1990-08-01

277

The changing trophic status of shallow Minnesota lakes: evidence from stable isotopic and biological proxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Shallow lakes can exist in two alternative stable regimes: a clear-water regime dominated by macrophytes with little phytoplankton abundance, or a turbid-water regime where conditions are the opposite. There is a need for more historical studies of shallow lakes as these systems constitute a critical habitat for waterfowl across a large region of the upper Midwestern U.S. and Canada and evidence suggests that the clear regime is preferable for healthy communities of the waterfowl and desired fish populations. Recent work also suggests that the clear regime favors the enhanced burial of organic carbon and thus might constitute an important natural sink for greenhouse gases. Here, we report on our study of C and N elemental and stable isotopic values of organic matter and biological proxies from the sediment core records of numerous shallow lakes in west-central MN and in other areas of the state. These records span the last few centuries including the time of settlement of the region and they have been age dated using 210Pb and ambrosia pollen counts. Results of our work suggest that in the past 50-60 years the majority of the lakes have shifted towards a generally more turbid, eutrophic, and algal-dominated condition that is less favorable to both carbon burial and desired animal habitat.

Theissen, K. M.; Zimmer, K.; Cotner, J. B.; Sugita, S.; Hobbs, W.; Ramstack, J. M.

2010-12-01

278

Stable isotopes (delta13C and delta15N) of organic matrix from coral skeleton.  

PubMed

The evolutionary success of reef-building corals in nutrient-poor tropical waters is attributed to endosymbiotic dinoflagellates. The algae release photosynthetic products to the coral animal cells, augment nutrient flux, and enhance the rate of coral calcification. Natural abundance of stable isotopes (delta13C and delta18O) provides answers to modern and paleobiological questions about the effect of photosymbiosis on sources of carbon and oxygen in coral skeletal calcium carbonate. Here we compare 17 species of symbiotic and nonsymbiotic corals to determine whether evidence for photosymbiosis appears in stable isotopes (delta13C and delta15N) of an organic skeletal compartment, the coral skeletal organic matrix (OM). Mean OM delta13C in symbiotic and nonsymbiotic corals was similar (-26.08 per thousand vs. -24.31 per thousand), but mean OM delta15N was significantly depleted in 15N in the former (4.09 per thousand) relative to the latter (12.28 per thousand), indicating an effect of the algae on OM synthesis and revealing OM delta15N as a proxy for photosymbiosis. To answer an important paleobiological question about the origin of photosymbiosis in reef-building corals, we applied this proxy test to a fossil coral (Pachythecalis major) from the Triassic (240 million years ago) in which OM is preserved. Mean OM delta15N was 4.66 per thousand, suggesting that P. major was photosymbiotic. The results show that symbiotic algae augment coral calcification by contributing to the synthesis of skeletal OM and that they may have done so as early as the Triassic. PMID:15671164

Muscatine, Leonard; Goiran, Claire; Land, Lynton; Jaubert, Jean; Cuif, Jean-Pierre; Allemand, Denis

2005-02-01

279

Stable Isotopes in Evaluation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Isotopes offer a unique way to have natural tracers present in the ecosystem to track produced greenhouse gases (GHG) through multiple scales. Isotopes are simply atoms of the same element (same number of protons) with differing number of neutrons. This differing number of neutrons leads to differen...

280

Hydrogen isotopic composition of NBS and IAEA stable isotope water reference samples  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hydrogen isotopic compositions of several isotope water reference samples have been determined on a cycloidal double-collecting isotope ratio mass spectrometer that can resolve HD + from the `contaminant' H 3 + ion beam.

Tyler B. Coplen; Robert N. Clayton

1973-01-01

281

INCORPORATING CONCENTRATION DEPENDENCE IN STABLE ISOTOPE MIXING MODELS: A REPLY TO ROBBINS, HILDERBRAND AND FARLEY (2002)  

EPA Science Inventory

Phillips & Koch (2002) outlined a new stable isotope mixing model which incorporates differences in elemental concentrations in the determinations of source proportions in a mixture. They illustrated their method with sensitivity analyses and two examples from the wildlife ecolog...

282

SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF STABLE HYDROGEN AND CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS OF METHANE IN SUBTROPICAL FRESHWATER SEDIMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Stable hydrogen (D) and carbon (13C) isotope ratios of sedimentary methane from five subtropical Florida freshwater sites exhibited smaller, less distinct seasonal variations than previously observed in temperate sediments, apparently due to the smaller range of temperatures forc...

283

Stable carbon isotopes as an indicator of petroleum biodegradation in estuarine sediments  

E-print Network

STABLE CARBON ISOTOPES AS AN INDICATOR OF PETROLEUM BIODEGRADATION IN ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS A Thesis by DEBORAH LOUISE HESSE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1994 Major Subject: Oceanography STABLE CARBON ISOTOPES AS INDICATORS OF PETROLEUM BIODEGRADATION IN ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS A Thesis by DEBORAH LOUISE HESSE Submitted to Texas A8 M University in partial fulfillment...

Hesse, Deborah Louise

2012-06-07

284

Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy for stable isotope studies of ecosystematmosphere CO 2 exchange  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stable isotope content of atmospheric CO2 provides information about ecosystem carbonwater relations and biosphereatmosphere carbon exchange. Virtually every isotope study within these fields has required air sample collection at remote locations followed by isotope analysis at a laboratory. This requirement severely limits sampling frequency and experiment duration. In this paper, we evaluate a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDL)

David R. Bowling; Steve D. Sargent; Bert D. Tanner; James R. Ehleringer

2003-01-01

285

Stable Isotope Ratios Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy: Determination of 13  

E-print Network

Stable Isotope Ratios Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy: Determination of 13 C/12 C for Carbon-down spectrometer employing a near-IR external cavity diode laser capable of measuring 13C/12C isotopic ratios in CO.2 ? 10-11 cm-1 Hz-1/2, determines the isotopic ratio of 13C16O16O/12C16O16O by measuring the intensities

Zare, Richard N.

286

Food web analysis of southern California coastal wetlands using multiple stable isotopes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur stable isotopes were used to characterize the food webs (i.e., sources of carbon and trophic\\u000a status of consumers) in Tijuana Estuary and San Dieguito Lagoon. Producer groups were most clearly differentiated by carbon,\\u000a then by sulfur, and least clearly by nitrogen isotope measurements. Consumer 15N isotopic enrichment suggested that there are four trophic levels in the

Thomas J. Kwak; Joy B. Zedler

1997-01-01

287

Stable Isotope Composition of Ophicalcites from Pyrenean Peridotite Bodies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Serpentinized mantle peridotites are known to outcrop in numerous deepsea geodynamical settings including ocean-continent transition (OCT) at distal passive margins and all types of plate margin : slow-spreading ridges, transform-faults, and fore-arc domains in subduction zones. In these settings, exposure of mantle rocks on the seafloor is commonly characterized by the occurrence of brecciated serpentinites cemented by carbonates. Carbonates also appear within a network of veins and within fissures cross-cutting the massive peridotites. The brecciated and fractured serpentinized peridotites with a carbonate matrix are named ophicalcites (or ophicarbonates). Ophicalcites have been found in close association with massive peridotites forming the numerous ultramafic bodies scattered along the North Pyrenean Zone (NPZ), on the northern flank of the Pyrenean belt. Occurrence of ophicalcites confirms that mantle rocks have been exposed on the floor of some Albian bassins along the future NPZ. Our field observations show that pyrenean ophicalcites belong to two main types : (1) a wide variety of breccias composed of sorted or unsorted millimeter- to metre-sized clasts of fresh or oxidized ultramafic material, in a fine-grained calcitic matrix and (2) calcitic veins penetrating into fractured peridotites. We present the results of the first petrological, textural and geochemical study of the Pyrenean ophicalcites. Stable isotope analysis (O,C) have been conducted on the carbonate matrix and veins of samples from different ultramafic bodies (X et Y). We show that the Pyrenean ophicalcites are the product of three distinct genetic processes, all related to the exhumation history of the peridotites: i) pervasive ophicalcite resulting of relatively deep and hot hydrothermal activity, ii) ophicalcites in veins resulting of tectonic fracturation and cooler hydrothermal activity and iii) polymictic breccias resulting of sedimentary processes, occurring after the exposure of subcontinental mantle onto the seafloor, possibly in continental endoreic basins. We discuss the consequences of these results on our understanding of the evolution of the OCT and more particularly of the exhumation history of the Pyrenean mantle in a distal passive margin setting.

Clerc, C.; Boulvais, P.; Lagabrielle, Y.; De Saint Blanquat, M.

2011-12-01

288

Simultaneous stable isotope analysis of methane and nitrous oxide on ice core samples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methane and nitrous oxide are important greenhouse gases which show a strong increase in atmospheric mixing ratios since pre-industrial time as well as large variations during past climate changes. The understanding of their biogeochemical cycles can be improved using stable isotope analysis. However, high-precision isotope measurements on air trapped in ice cores are challenging because of the high susceptibility to

C. J. Sapart; C. van der Veen; I. Vigano; M. Brass; M. Bock; H. Fischer; T. Sowers; C. Buizert; P. Sperlich; T. Blunier; M. Behrens; J. Schmitt; B. Seth; T. Rckmann

2011-01-01

289

Analytical system for carbon stable isotope measurements of light non-methane hydrocarbons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Isotope analysis can be a useful tool in constraining the budgets (sources and sinks) of atmospheric trace species and is increasingly applied for organic constituents. This may be useful in particular for investigating the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere and studying long-range. We present setup, testing and initial results from a new automated system for carbon stable isotope ratio measurements

A. Zuiderweg; R. Holzinger; T. Rckmann

2011-01-01

290

Paleodietary reconstruction of a Neolithic population in Slovenia: A stable isotope approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The nutritional habits of Neolithic farmers living during the period 6400 to 5300 years cal BP in the interior of Slovenia were determined using stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen. Human and domesticated and wild animals bone collagen samples found in Ajdovska jama cave, as well as food residuals composed of wheat grains and plants in associated ceramics were isotopically

Nives Ogrinc; Mihael Budja

2005-01-01

291

Stable isotope analysis of termite food habits in East African grasslands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable carbon isotope techniques were employed to study the food habits of the termite Macrotermes michaelseni (Isoptera: Termitidae) in a semiarid savanna habitat in Kenya. At Kajiado this species utilized approximately 70% herbaceous vegetation (mostly grass) and 30% woody vegetation, while at Ruiru approximately 64% of the vegetation utilized was woody and 36% herbaceous. Stabel carbon isotope ratios varied between

T. W. Boutton; M. A. Arshad; L. L. Tieszen

1983-01-01

292

Detecting intraannual dietary variability in wild mountain gorillas by stable isotope analysis of feces  

E-print Network

Detecting intraannual dietary variability in wild mountain gorillas by stable isotope analysis of wild mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei) to test the hypothesis that diet shifts within a single year the full shift. Variation in the isotopic and nutritional com- position of gorilla foods is largely

Rothman, Jessica M.

293

ENRICHED STABLE ISOTOPE TARGET PREPARATION AT THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

Since the 1960s the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Program, through the Isotope Development Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has been developing and supplying, among other things, enriched stable isotope targets for nuclear research around the world. This group also maintains and distributes the DOE inventory of enriched stable isotopes. Chemical and pyrochemical techniques are used to prepare enriched stable isotopes from this inventory in the desired chemical form. Metallurgical, ceramic, or vacuum processing methods are then used to prepare the isotopes in a wide range of physical forms from thin films, foils, and coatings to large fabricated shapes to meet the needs of experimenters. Significant characterization capabilities are also available to assist in the preparation and evaluation of these custom materials. This work is part of the DOE Isotope Program, which recently transferred to the Office of Nuclear Physics, DOE Office of Science, resulting in a stronger emphasis on enabling R&D. This presentation will focus on the custom preparation of enriched stable isotope targets and other research materials.

Aaron, W Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Zevenbergen, Lee [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01

294

Stable Isotope Variations in Extraterrestrial Materials Kevin D. McKeegan 1  

E-print Network

1 Stable Isotope Variations in Extraterrestrial Materials by Kevin D. McKeegan 1 and Laurie A the isotopic records of extraterrestrial materials range widely in environmental conditions from very high in the solar nebula to lower temperature fluid-rock interactions in asteroids and planets. In extraterrestrial

295

Stable hydrogen isotopic composition of fishes reflects that of their environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Otolith microchemistry and isotopic analyses have emerged as effective techniques for providing insights into fish environmental history that are difficult to obtain by other means. Stable hydrogen isotope ratio (2H\\/1 Ho r D\\/H, expressed as ?D) is a possible environmental marker that has not been employed in fish provenance research, although it has been applied as a natural tracer of

Gregory W. Whitledge; Brett M. Johnson; Patrick J. Martinez

2006-01-01

296

Quaternary International 164165 (2007) 139150 Stable isotope compositions of mammoth teeth from Niederweningen,  

E-print Network

, evolving over several stages from Mammuthus meridionalis, Mammuthus trogontherii to the woolly mammothQuaternary International 164­165 (2007) 139­150 Stable isotope compositions of mammoth teeth from Oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of well-preserved mammoth teeth from the Middle Wu¨ rmian (40

Schöne, Bernd R.

297

More than who eats who: Discerning ecological processes from stable isotopes data  

EPA Science Inventory

Stable isotope analyses of biota are now commonly used to discern trophic pathways between consumers and their foods. However, those same isotope data also hold information about processes that influence the physicochemical setting of food webs as well as biological processes ope...

298

Stable isotope sales: Mound Facility customer and shipment summaries, FY 1981  

SciTech Connect

A listing is given of Mound Facility's sales of stable isotopes of noble gases, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, and sulfur for Fiscal Year 1981. Purchasers are listed alphabetically and are divided into domestic and foreign groups. A cross-reference index by location is included for domestic customers. Cross-reference listings by isotope purchased are included for all customers.

Ruwe, Jr, A H [comp.

1982-10-01

299

Bioaccumulation of newly deposited mercury by fish and invertebrates: an enclosure study using stable mercury isotopes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Enriched stable mercury (Hg) isotopes were added to four 10 m diameter enclosures in Lake 239 at the Experimental Lakes Area to increase inorganic Hg loading. Our main objectives were to (i) follow low-level additions (spikes) of isotope-enriched Hg through the biogeochemical cycle and into the food web and (ii) determine the relative contribution of newly deposited Hg to methyl

Michael J. Paterson; Paul J. Blanchfield; Cheryl Podemski; Holger H. Hintelmann; Cynthia C. Gilmour; Reed Harris; Nives Ogrinc; John W. M. Rudd; Ken A. Sandilands

2006-01-01

300

Stable carbon and oxygen isotopes in Sphagnum fuscum peat from subarctic Canada: Implications for palaeoclimate studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in single plant components in Sphagnum peat have a good potential to reveal environmental changes in peat archives. Two peat profiles, covering the past ?6000years, and a Sphagnum hummock from a discontinuous permafrost area in west central Canada were studied in order to evaluate the effect of decomposition rate on isotope records and to

Pivi Kaislahti Tillman; Steffen Holzkmper; Peter Kuhry; A. Britta K. Sannel; Neil J. Loader; Iain Robertson

2010-01-01

301

Intramolecular distribution of stable nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrous oxide emitted during coal combustion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intramolecular distribution of stable isotopes in nitrous oxide that is emitted during coal combustion was analyzed using an isotopic ratio mass spectrometer equipped with a modified ion collector system (IRMS). The coal was combusted in a test furnace fitted with a single burner and the flue gases were collected at the furnace exit following removal of SOx, NOx, and

Mitsuteru Ogawa; Naohiro Yoshida

2005-01-01

302

Late Quaternary Precipitation Seasonality of SW North America Reconstructed from Stable Isotopes in Fossil Packrat Pellets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stable isotopic values of Carbon 13, Nitrogen 15, Oxygen 18, and Deuterium were measured from modern and fossil packrat pellets from throughout the southwestern United States using a gas isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Late Twentieth Century climate observations were extrapolated to the locations of 41 modern pellet reference samples ranging across Arizona, Utah, Nevada, and California, U.S.A. The reference samples demonstrated correlations between the amount and percent of annual precipitation falling in the winter to early spring (December through April) for ?15N, and percent monsoon precipitation (July through September) for ?D. Isotope values were not well correlated with temperature variables. Isotopes of Carbon and Oxygen were poorly correlated with the climate variables investigated, although previous studies have indicated that ?13C often reflects the abundance of CAM species within the middens as packrats usually feed upon either succulent CAM or C3 conifer species. The modern isotopic values were next compared to series of fossil values from the Grand Canyon, AZ, Glen Canyon, UT, Wupatki National Monument, AZ, and Picacho Peak, CA. Fifty to 100 fossil pellets were ground to dust and homogenized to create a sample from each midden deposit. This sample should represent an average from local plants consumed by the packrat over at least several years. The two most complete series of ?D values, from upper and lower elevations within the Grand Canyon, suggested extremely low monsoon percentages from 23.5 to 18.0 ka (full-glacial Wisconsinan), but higher than current values from 13.7 to 13.0 ka (Allerd Period) and from 11.7 to 7.6 ka (early Holocene). The increased monsoon amounts during the Allerd and early Holocene reinforce earlier conclusions based upon plant fossils from these midden series. Fossil series of ?15N values showed fewer clear trends through time. Our results suggest that ?D values from fossil packrat pellets can serve as a valuable complement to plant fossils in reconstructing past precipitation seasonality in the monsoonal deserts of southwestern North America.

Cole, K. L.; Ironside, K.; Cole, E. A.; Fisher, J.

2011-12-01

303

Potassium Stable Isotopic Compositions Measured by High-Resolution MC-ICP-MS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Potassium isotopic (K-41/K-39) compositions are notoriously difficult to measure. TIMS measurements are hindered by variable fractionation patterns throughout individual runs and too few isotopes to apply an internal spike method for instrumental mass fractionation corrections. Internal fractionation corrections via the K-40/K-39 ratio can provide precise values but assume identical K-40/K-39 ratios (e.g. 0.05% (1sigma) in [1]); this is appropriate in some cases (e.g. identifying excess K-41) but not others (e.g., determining mass fractionation effects and metrologically traceable isotopic abundances). SIMS analyses have yielded measurements with 0.25% precisions (1sigma) [2]. ICP-MS analyses are significantly affected by interferences from molecular species such as Ar-38H(+) and Ar-40H(+) and instrument mass bias. Single collector ICP-MS instruments in "cold plasma" mode have yielded uncertainties as low as 2% (1sigma, e.g. [3]). Although these precisions may be acceptable for some concentration determinations, they do not resolve isotopic variation in terrestrial materials. Here we present data from a series of measurements made on the Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus multi-collector ICP-MS that demonstrate the ability to make K-41/K-39 ratio measurements with 0.07% precisions (1sigma). These data, collected on NIST K standards, indicate the potential for MC-ICP-MS measurements to look for K isotopic variations at the sub-permil level. The NEPTUNE Plus can sufficiently resolve 39K and 41K from the interfering 38ArH+ and 40ArH+ peaks in wet cold plasma and high-resolution mode. Measurements were made on small but flat, interference-free, plateaus (ca. 50 ppm by mass width for K-41). Although ICP-MS does not yield accurate K-41/K-39 values due to significant instrumental mass fractionation (ca. 6%), this bias can be sufficiently stable over the time required for several measurements so that relative K-41/K-39 values can be precisely determined via sample-standard bracketing. As cold plasma conditions can amplify matrix effects, experiments were conducted to test the matrix tolerance of measurements; the use of clean, matrix-matched samples and standards is critical. Limitations of the cold-plasma high-resolution MC-ICP-MS methodology with respect to matrix tolerance are discussed and compared with the limitations of TIMS methodologies.

Morgan, Leah E.; Lloyd, Nicholas S.; Ellam, Robert M.; Simon, Justin I.

2012-01-01

304

Natural abundances of carbon isotopes in acetate from a coastal marine sediment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Measurements of the natural abundances of carbon isotopes were made in acetate samples isolated from the anoxic marine sediment of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina. The typical value of the total acetate carbon isotope ratio (delta 13C) was -16.1 +/- 0.2 per mil. The methyl and carboxyl groups were determined to be -26.4 +/- 0.3 and -6.0 +/- 0.3 per mil, respectively, for one sample. The isotopic composition of the acetate is thought to have resulted from isotopic discriminations that occurred during the cycling of that molecule. Measurements of this type, which have not been made previously in the natural environment, may provide information about the dominant microbial pathways in anoxic sediments as well as the processes that influence the carbon isotopic composition of biogenic methane from many sources.

Blair, N. E.; Martens, C. S.; Des Marais, D. J.

1987-01-01

305

Stable isotope stratigraphy across the K\\/T boundary, and isotopic investigations of an Ignored worm bed, Eastern Desert, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryOxygen and carbon stable isotope profiles of the Dakhla sequence at the Eastern Desert, Egypt, reveal that the negative isotopic\\u000a excursion commonly observed at the K\\/T boundary in sections showing continuous deposition around the world (e.g. El Kef section\\u000a at Tunisia,Perch-Nielsen et al.; 1982 and at Zumaya, Spain;Mount et al., 1986) is missing in this Egyptian study area. However, several

Mohamed N. A. Shaaban

1997-01-01

306

Stable-isotope geochronology of the Australian regolith  

SciTech Connect

Australian regolith profiles can be assigned to one of three post-Palaeozoic age groups on the basis of the oxygen-isotope composition of authigenic clay minerals developed in the profile. Systematic variations in the isotopic composition of meteoric waters, and therefore of the authigenic regolith minerals that formed in equilibrium with them, are a result of the continent's drift from high to low latitudes and changes in global climate. The hydrogen-isotope composition of the clays range from -115 to -50{per thousand}; however, it is inferred that the majority of clays have undergone some post-formational hydrogen-isotope exchange which renders their {delta}D composition unsuitable for dating purposes.

Bird, M.I.; Chivas, A.R. (Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia))

1989-12-01

307

Origin of petroporphyrins. 2. Evidence from stable carbon isotopes.  

PubMed

Compared with the carbon-13 isotopic composition of the ubiquitous C32DPEP (DPEP, deoxophylloerythroetioporphyrin) the heavy but equivalent carbon-13 isotopic composition for the porphyrin structures 15(2)-methyl-15,17-ethano-17-nor-H-C30DPEP and 15,17-butano-, 13,15-ethano-13(2),17-propano-, and 13(1)-methyl-13,15-ethano-13(2),17-propanoporphyrin suggests a common precursor, presumably chlorophyll c, for these petroporphyrins isolated from the marine Julia Creek oil shale and the lacustrine Condor oil shale. Similarly, the heavy but variable carbon-13 isotopic composition of 7-nor-H-C31DPEP compared with C32DPEP is consistent with an origin from both chlorophyll b and chlorophyll c3. The equivalent carbon-13 isotopic composition for 13(2)-methyl-C33DPEP compared with C32DPEP suggests a common origin resulting from a weighted average of chlorophyll inputs. PMID:11538479

Boreham, C J; Fookes, C J; Popp, B N; Hayes, J M

1990-01-01

308

Origin of petroporphyrins. 2. Evidence from stable carbon isotopes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Compared with the carbon-13 isotopic composition of the ubiquitous C32DPEP (DPEP, deoxophylloerythroetioporphyrin) the heavy but equivalent carbon-13 isotopic composition for the porphyrin structures 15(2)-methyl-15,17-ethano-17-nor-H-C30DPEP and 15,17-butano-, 13,15-ethano-13(2),17-propano-, and 13(1)-methyl-13,15-ethano-13(2),17-propanoporphyrin suggests a common precursor, presumably chlorophyll c, for these petroporphyrins isolated from the marine Julia Creek oil shale and the lacustrine Condor oil shale. Similarly, the heavy but variable carbon-13 isotopic composition of 7-nor-H-C31DPEP compared with C32DPEP is consistent with an origin from both chlorophyll b and chlorophyll c3. The equivalent carbon-13 isotopic composition for 13(2)-methyl-C33DPEP compared with C32DPEP suggests a common origin resulting from a weighted average of chlorophyll inputs.

Boreham, C. J.; Fookes, C. J.; Popp, B. N.; Hayes, J. M.

1990-01-01

309

De novoDe novo biosyntheses versus sequestration in leaf beetlesbiosyntheses versus sequestration in leaf beetles a mechanistic approach by stable isotopesa mechanistic approach by stable isotopes  

E-print Network

in leaf beetles ­­ a mechanistic approach by stable isotopesa mechanistic approach by stable isotopes biosynthesis OGlc OH #12;The picture is different in another leaf beetle larvae O O O O JA treatm ent H 2O

310

Current challenges in compound-specific stable isotope analysis of environmental organic contaminants.  

PubMed

Compound-specific stable-isotope analysis (CSIA) has greatly facilitated assessment of sources and transformation processes of organic pollutants. Multielement isotope analysis is one of the most promising applications of CSIA because it even enables distinction of different transformation pathways. This review introduces the essential features of continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and highlights current challenges in environmental analysis as exemplified for the isotopes of nitrogen, hydrogen, chlorine, and oxygen. Strategies and recent advances to enable isotopic measurements of polar contaminants, for example pesticides or pharmaceuticals, are discussed with special emphasis on possible solutions for analysis of low concentrations of contaminants in environmental matrices. Finally, we discuss different levels of calibration and referencing and point out the urgent need for compound-specific isotope standards for gas chromatography-isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) of organic pollutants. PMID:22302163

Elsner, Martin; Jochmann, Maik A; Hofstetter, Thomas B; Hunkeler, Daniel; Bernstein, Anat; Schmidt, Torsten C; Schimmelmann, Arndt

2012-07-01

311

Late Quaternary Environmental Changes Inferred from the stable Oxygen Isotope Composition of Aquatic Insects (Chironomidae: Diptera) and Stable Hydrogen Isotope Composition of bulk sediments from Idavain Lake, Southwest Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several techniques are available to examine the isotopic composition of historic lake waters, providing data that can subsequently be used to examine environmental changes. Recently-developed techniques are the stable oxygen isotope analysis of subfossil chironomid (Diptera: Chironomidae) head capsules (mostly chitin) preserved in lake sediments and stable hydrogen isotope analyses directly on bulk sediments. An advantage of using delta18O of

Y. Wang; B. Finney; M. J. Wooller

2007-01-01

312

Upper limits on argon isotope abundances in the Venus thermosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On December 9, 1978 the neutral gas mass spectrometer aboard the NASA Pioneer Venus multiprobe bus has measured density, composition, and temperature of the Venus dayside thermosphere. There was no positive identification of argon down to the lowest measuring altitude of 130 km. For the altitude level of 135 km the following upper limits for the number densities of argon isotopes were derived: n(Ar-36) less than 1.3 times 10 to the 6th power per cu cm and n(Ar-40) less than 2.8 times 10 to the 6th power per cu cm. From our upper atmosphere observations we infer for the troposphere of Venus the following upper limits for the mixing ratios: n(Ar-36)/total number density less than 9 times 10 to the minus 6th power and n(Ar-40)/total number density less than 20 times 10 to the minus 6th power.

Mauersberger, K.; Von Zahn, U.; Krankowsky, D.

1979-01-01

313

Stable Isotope Mixing Models as a Tool for Tracking Sources of Water and Water Pollutants  

EPA Science Inventory

One goal of monitoring pollutants is to be able to trace the pollutant to its source. Here we review how mixing models using stable isotope information on water and water pollutants can help accomplish this goal. A number of elements exist in multiple stable (non-radioactive) i...

314

IUPAC Project: Terminology and definition of quantities related to the isotope distribution in elements with more than two stable isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of IUPAC Project 2009-046-2-200 (http://www.iupac.org/web/ins/2009-046-2-200) is to define terminology and to identify the most suitable definitions of quantities that characterise the isotope distribution in elements with more than two stable isotopes, including so-called mass-independent fractionation, non-mass dependent fractionation, isotope anomaly, 17O excess, etc. Most atmospheric oxygen-bearing species show deviations in their triple oxygen isotope ratios from mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) relationships predicted by the theories of Urey, Bigeleisen and Mayer. Similar deviations have also been found in sulphur and other elements with more than two stables isotopes (e.g. Hg, Cd, Zn), often preserved in non-atmospheric reservoirs, including rocks, minerals, soils, ice and waters. Despite the ubiquity of this type of isotope anomaly, there has never been an attempt to clearly define the terminology and physical quantities used to measure these anomalies and the processes that lead to their formation. Terms like mass-independent fractionation, non-mass dependent fractionation, isotope anomaly, isotope excess etc. have been used in the historic and recent literature, but are often not carefully distinguished. The realisation that MDF comprises a range of possible relationships between the isotopes of one element led to further complications because it meant that apparent isotope anomalies could be created by a combination of different MDF processes. At the moment, at least four different definitions to quantify isotope anomalies are being used. Furthermore, coefficients used in these definitions vary, which makes the comparison of data from different sources very difficult, even for experts. A consistent set of recommendations on how to express and quantify the isotope distribution in elements with more than two stable isotopes is highly warranted. From our experience as academic teachers, we are woefully aware how impenetrable the field is for young researchers at the moment because of the lack of consistency and the lack of understanding between different groups. This project seeks to alleviate this.

Kaiser, J.; Angert, A.; Bergquist, B.; Brand, W.; Ono, S.; Rckmann, T.; Savarino, J.

2012-04-01

315

Stable isotope analysis of Pacific salmon: insight into trophic status and oceanographic conditions over the last 30 years  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Food web interactions and the response of Pacific salmon to physical processes in the North Pacific Ocean over interannual and interdecadal timescales are explored using naturally occurring stable isotope ratios of carbon ( 13C/ 12C) and nitrogen ( 15N/ 14N). Stable isotope analyses of five species of sexually mature North Pacific salmon from Alaska ( Oncorhynchus spp.) cluster into three groups: chinook salmon ( O. tshawytscha) have the highest values, followed by coho ( O. kisutch), with chum ( O. keta), sockeye ( O. nerka), and pink ( O. gorbuscha) together having the lowest values. Although detailed isotopic data on salmon prey are lacking, there are limited data on relevant prey items from areas in which they are found in high abundance. These data suggest that the characteristics of the sockeye, pink and chum we have analyzed are compatible with their diets including open ocean squid and zooplankton, which are in general agreement with stomach content analyses. Isotope relationships between muscle and scale show consistent relationships for both ?13C ( R2=0.98) and ? 15N ( R2=0.90). Thus, scales, which have been routinely archived for many systems, can be used for retrospective analyses. Archived sockeye salmon scales spanning 1966-1999 from Red Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska were analyzed for their stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen. The ?15N record displays a decreasing trend of ~3 from 1969-1982 and an increasing trend of ~3 from 1982-1992, while the variations in ?13C are relatively minor. These trends may result from factors such as shifts in trophic level of feeding and/or feeding location, or may originate at the base of the food web via changes in processes such as nutrient cycling or primary productivity. Detailed studies on prey isotopic variability and its controls are needed to distinguish between these factors, and thus to improve the use of stable isotope analysis as a tool to learn more about present and past ecosystem change in the North Pacific and its relation to climatic change.

Satterfield, Franklin R.; Finney, Bruce P.

316

Reconstruction of Middle Eocene - Late Oligocene Southern Ocean paleoclimate through calcareous nannofossils and stable isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The transition from the ice free early Paleogene world to the glaciated conditions of the early Oligocene has been matter of discussion in the last years. This transition has not been monotonic but punctuated by numerous transient cooling and warming events. Here we present a summary of recent studies based on Nannofossil response to climatic changes during the Eocene and Oligocene. Collected data issue from high latitudes ODP Sites 748, 738, 744, 689 and 690. Based on a detailed revision of the biostratigraphy carried out through quantitative analysis, we conducted paleoecological studies on calcareous nannofossils through the late middle Eocene to the - late Oligocene interval to identify abundance variations of selected taxa in response to changes in sea surface temperature (SST) and trophic conditions. The nannofossil-based interpretation has been compared with detailed oxygen and carbon stable isotope stratigraphy confirming the climate variability in the Southern Ocean for this time interval. We identify the Middle Eocene Climatic optimum (MECO) event, related with the regional exclusion of Paleogenic warm-water taxa from the Southern Ocean, followed by the progressive cooling trend particularly emphasized during the cooling events at about 39 Ma, 37 Ma and 35.5 Ma. In the earliest Oligocene, marked changes in calcareous nannofossil assemblages are strikingly associated with the Oi-1 event recorded in perfect accordance with the oxygen isotope records. For most of the Oligocene we recorded a cold phase, while a warming trend is detected in the late Oligocene. In addiction, a marked increase of taxa thriving in eutrophic conditions coupled with a decrease in oligotrophic taxa, suggests the presence of a time interval (from about 36 Ma to about 26 Ma) with prevailing eutrophic conditions that correspond to an increase of the carbon stable isotope curve. This interval well corresponds with the clay mineral concentration that shows at Site 738 a higher concentration in illite (Ehrmann and Mackensen, 1992). This result can be interpreted as a major influx of weathering in the basin, bringing more nutrients to the surface water. Our data confirm a strong climate variability in the Southern Ocean during the middle Eocene - late Oligocene and nannofossils demonstrate to be useful tools for paleoclimatic and paleoceanographic reconstructions.

Villa, Giuliana; Fioroni, Chiara; Persico, Davide; Pea, Laura; Bohaty, Steve

2010-05-01

317

Inherent variation in stable isotope values and discrimination factors in two life stages of green turtles.  

PubMed

We examine inherent variation in carbon and nitrogen stable isotope values of multiple soft tissues from a population of captive green turtles Chelonia mydas to determine the extent of isotopic variation due to individual differences in physiology. We compare the measured inherent variation in the captive population with the isotopic variation observed in a wild population of juvenile green turtles. Additionally, we measure diet-tissue discrimination factors to determine the offset that occurs between isotope values of the food source and four green turtle tissues. Tissue samples (epidermis, dermis, serum, and red blood cells) were collected from captive green turtles in two life stages (40 large juveniles and 30 adults) at the Cayman Turtle Farm, Grand Cayman, and analyzed for carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes. Multivariate normal models were fit to the isotope data, and the Bayesian Information Criterion was used for model selection. Inherent variation and discrimination factors differed among tissues and life stages. Inherent variation was found to make up a small portion of the isotopic variation measured in a wild population. Discrimination factors not only are tissue and life stage dependent but also appear to vary with diet and sea turtle species, thus highlighting the need for appropriate discrimination factors in dietary reconstructions and trophic-level estimations. Our measures of inherent variation will also be informative in field studies employing stable isotope analysis so that differences in diet or habitat are more accurately identified. PMID:22902371

Vander Zanden, Hannah B; Bjorndal, Karen A; Mustin, Walter; Ponciano, Jos Miguel; Bolten, Alan B

2012-01-01

318

Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Sodium and Potassium Cyanide as a Forensic Signature  

SciTech Connect

Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a future chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. A few of these samples displayed non-homogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of these, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples.

Kreuzer, Helen W.; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J.; Tomkins, Bruce; Janszen, Derek B.; Carman, April J.

2012-01-03

319

Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Sodium and Potassium Cyanide as a Forensic Signature  

SciTech Connect

Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a future chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. A few of these samples displayed non-homogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of these, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples.

Kruzer, Helen W [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Horita, Juske [ORNL; Moran, James J [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Tomkins, Bruce A [ORNL; Janszen, Derek B [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Carman, April [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2012-01-01

320

Simultaneous determination of stable carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen isotopes in cellulose.  

PubMed

A technological development is described through which the stable carbon-, oxygen-, and nonexchangeable hydrogen-isotopic ratios (?(13)C, ?(18)O, ?(2)H) are determined on a single carbohydrate (cellulose) sample with precision equivalent to conventional techniques (?(13)C 0.15, ?(18)O 0.30, ?(2)H 3.0). This triple-isotope approach offers significant new research opportunities, most notably in physiology and medicine, isotope biogeochemistry, forensic science, and palaeoclimatology, when isotopic analysis of a common sample is desirable or when sample material is limited. PMID:25495958

Loader, N J; Street-Perrott, F A; Daley, T J; Hughes, P D M; Kimak, A; Levani?, T; Mallon, G; Mauquoy, D; Robertson, I; Roland, T P; van Bellen, S; Ziehmer, M M; Leuenberger, M

2015-01-01

321

Stable isotopic signatures (delta13C,deltaD) of methane from European landfill sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stable isotopic signatures (delta13C,deltaD) of CH4 from four German and Dutch landfill sites have been characterized using different techniques for isotope analysis (tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry). Samples taken directly from the gas collection systems show fairly uniform, biogenic delta13C-deltaD isotopic signatures [delta13C=(-59.0+\\/-2.2)0\\/00 VPDB (n=104); deltaD=(-304+\\/-10)0\\/00 VSMOW (n=46)]. In contrast, emission samples taken with

P. Bergamaschi; C. Lubina; R. Knigstedt; H. Fischer; A. C. Veltkamp; O. Zwaagstra

1998-01-01

322

The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization  

SciTech Connect

Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in ?{sup 13}C between batches from ?29.7 to ?31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between ?31.3 to ?34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

Magdas, D. A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Cristea, G., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Bot, A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Mirel, V., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

2013-11-13

323

Stable carbon isotope fractionation by sulfate-reducing bacteria  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Biogeochemical transformations occurring in the anoxic zones of stratified sedimentary microbial communities can profoundly influence the isotopic and organic signatures preserved in the fossil record. Accordingly, we have determined carbon isotope discrimination that is associated with both heterotrophic and lithotrophic growth of pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). For heterotrophic-growth experiments, substrate consumption was monitored to completion. Sealed vessels containing SRB cultures were harvested at different time intervals, and delta(13)C values were determined for gaseous CO(2), organic substrates, and products such as biomass. For three of the four SRB, carbon isotope effects between the substrates, acetate or lactate and CO(2), and the cell biomass were small, ranging from 0 to 2 per thousand. However, for Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans, the carbon incorporated into biomass was isotopically heavier than the available substrates by 8 to 9 per thousand. SRB grown lithoautotrophically consumed less than 3% of the available CO(2) and exhibited substantial discrimination (calculated as isotope fractionation factors [alpha]), as follows: for Desulfobacterium autotrophicum, alpha values ranged from 1.0100 to 1.0123; for Desulfobacter hydrogenophilus, the alpha value was 0.0138, and for Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans, the alpha value was 1.0310. Mixotrophic growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans on acetate and CO(2) resulted in biomass with a delta(13)C composition intermediate to that of the substrates. The extent of fractionation depended on which enzymatic pathways were used, the direction in which the pathways operated, and the growth rate, but fractionation was not dependent on the growth phase. To the extent that environmental conditions affect the availability of organic substrates (e.g., acetate) and reducing power (e.g., H(2)), ecological forces can also influence carbon isotope discrimination by SRB.

Londry, Kathleen L.; Des Marais, David J.

2003-01-01

324

Stable carbon isotope values document how a Late Holocene expansion in grasslands impacted vertebrates in northwestern Madagascar  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Madagascar is home to some of the world's most distinctive plants and animals. Unfortunately, forest loss and habitat degradation has had a dramatic impact on both floral and faunal communities. Here we use carbon isotope values in radiocarbon-dated bones to examine how the vertebrate community at Anjohibe Cave, northwestern Madagascar, responded to a Late Holocene increase in C4 grass abundance. Our data demonstrate that major changes in the vegetation and animal community are recent phenomena at Anjohibe. Extinct lemurs and hippopotamuses were present until ca. 1500 years ago. These taxa relied exclusively on C3 resources. Locally extirpated fauna were present until 300 years ago. The majority of these species also relied on C3 resources. Their presence strongly suggests that the region surrounding the cave was more wooded than it is now, possibly as recently as 300 years ago. All introduced individuals are modern. Rats (Rattus sp.), shrews (Suncus murinus), and the giant frog Hoplobatrachus cf. tigrinus, have remarkably high carbon isotope values, implicating substantial ingestion of C4 foods. It is possible that grass abundance has increased dramatically in the past 100 years. Alternatively, opportunistically granivorous rats and shrews may selectively consume seeds from C4 grasses. In agreement with previous studies, stable isotope data reveal details of vegetation and faunal turnover in Northwestern Madagascar. Grasses have increased, forest dwelling species have vanished, and introduced taxa are exploiting a novel niche.

Crowley, B. E.; Samonds, K.

2012-12-01

325

Stable isotopes of authigenic minerals in variably-saturated fractured tuff  

SciTech Connect

Identifying stable isotope variation and mineralogical changes in fractured rock may help establish the history of climatic and geomorphological processes that might affect the isolation properties of a waste repository site. This study examines the use of the stable isotope ratios of oxygen ({sup 18}O/{sup 16}O) and carbon ({sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) in authigenic minerals as hydrogeochemical tools tracing low-temperature rock-water interaction in variably-saturated fractured stuff. Isotopic compositions of fracture-filling and rock matrix minerals in the Apache Leap tuff, near Superior, Arizona were concordant with geothermal temperatures and in equilibrium with water isotopically similar to present-day meteoric water and groundwater. Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of fracture-filling, in unsaturated fractured tuff, displayed an isotopic gradient believed to result from near-surface isotopic enrichment due to evaporation rather than the effects of rock-water interaction. Oxygen isotope ratios of rock matrix opal samples exhibited an isotopic gradient believed to result from, leaching and reprecipitation of silica at depth. Methods and results can be used to further define primary flowpaths and the movement of water in variably-saturated fractured rock. 71 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

Weber, D.S.; Evans, D.D.

1988-11-01

326

Metallicity-Dependent Isotopic Abundances and the Impact of Helium Rate Uncertainties in Massive Stars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

All stellar evolution models for nucleosynthesis require an initial isotopic abundance set to use as a starting point, because nuclear reactions occur between isotopes. Generally, our knowledge of isotopic abundances of stars is fairly incomplete except for the Solar System. We develop a first model for a complete average isotopic decomposition as a function of metallicity. Our model is based on the underlying nuclear astrophysics processes, and is fitted to observational data, rather than traditional forward galactic chemical evolution modeling which integrates stellar yields beginning from big bang nucleosynthesis. We first decompose the isotopic solar abundance pattern into contributions from astrophysical sources. Each contribution is then assumed to scale as a function of metallicity. The resulting total isotopic abundances are summed into elemental abundances and fitted to available halo and disk stellar data to constrain the model's free parameter values. This procedure allows us to use available elemental observational data to reconstruct and constrain both the much needed complete isotopic evolution that is not accessible to current observations, and the underlying astrophysical processes. Our model finds a best fit for Type Ia supernovae contributing 0.7 to the solar Fe abundance, and Type Ia onset occurring at [Fe/H]~1.2, in agreement with typical values. The completed model can be used in future nucleosynthesis studies. We also perform a preliminary analysis to assess the impact of our isotopic scaling model on the resulting nucleosynthesis of massive stars, compared to a linear interpolation method. Using these two input methods we compute a limited grid of stellar models, and compare the final nucleosynthesis to observations. The compactness parameter was first used to assess which models would likely explode as successful supernovae, and contribute explosive nucleosynthesis yields. We find a better agreement to solar observations using the scaling model compared to the linear interpolation method, for the six s--only isotopes along the weak s--process path. As a second project, we study the sensitivity of presupernova evolution and supernova nucleosynthesis yields of massive stars to variations of the helium-burning reaction rates within the range of their uncertainties. The current solar abundances from Lodders (2010) are used for the initial stellar composition. We compute a grid of 12 initial stellar masses and 176 models per stellar mass to explore the effects of independently varying the 12C(alpha,gamma)16O and 3alpha reaction rates, denoted Ralpha,12 and R3alpha, respectively. The production factors of both the intermediate-mass elements (A=16--40) and the s--only isotopes along the weak s--process path ( 70Ge, 76Se, 80Kr, 82Kr, 86Sr, and 87Sr) were found to be in reasonable agreement with predictions for variations of R3alpha and Ralpha,12 of +/-25%; the s--only isotopes, however, tend to favor higher values of R3alpha than the intermediate-mass isotopes. The experimental uncertainty (one standard deviation) in R3alpha(Ralpha,12 ) is approximately +/-10%(+/-25%). The results show that a more accurate measurement of one of these rates would decrease the uncertainty in the other as inferred from the present calculations. We also observe sharp changes in production factors and standard deviations for small changes in the reaction rates, due to differences in the convection structure of the star. The compactness parameter was used to assess which models would likely explode as successful supernovae, and hence contribute explosive nucleosynthesis yields. We also provide the approximate remnant masses for each model and the carbon mass fractions at the end of core-helium burning as a key parameter for later evolution stages.

West, Christopher

2013-03-01

327

Pre-Whaling Genetic Diversity and Population Ecology in Eastern Pacific Gray Whales: Insights from Ancient DNA and Stable Isotopes  

PubMed Central

Commercial whaling decimated many whale populations, including the eastern Pacific gray whale, but little is known about how population dynamics or ecology differed prior to these removals. Of particular interest is the possibility of a large population decline prior to whaling, as such a decline could explain the ?5-fold difference between genetic estimates of prior abundance and estimates based on historical records. We analyzed genetic (mitochondrial control region) and isotopic information from modern and prehistoric gray whales using serial coalescent simulations and Bayesian skyline analyses to test for a pre-whaling decline and to examine prehistoric genetic diversity, population dynamics and ecology. Simulations demonstrate that significant genetic differences observed between ancient and modern samples could be caused by a large, recent population bottleneck, roughly concurrent with commercial whaling. Stable isotopes show minimal differences between modern and ancient gray whale foraging ecology. Using rejection-based Approximate Bayesian Computation, we estimate the size of the population bottleneck at its minimum abundance and the pre-bottleneck abundance. Our results agree with previous genetic studies suggesting the historical size of the eastern gray whale population was roughly three to five times its current size. PMID:22590499

Alter, S. Elizabeth; Newsome, Seth D.; Palumbi, Stephen R.

2012-01-01

328

On the carbon and nitrogen isotope abundance ratios in Comet Halley  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emission lines attributable to (C-13)(N-14) have been resolved in ground-based spectra of Comet Halley. An analysis of the spectrum using six (C-13)(N-14) lines results in a carbon isotope abundance ratio, (C-12)(C-13) = 63 + 9/-7, and a lower limit N-14/N-15 greater than 200. The carbon isotope ratio is nearly 3-delta less than the bulk solar system ratio, 89. The limit on the nitrogen isotope ratio is consistent with the bulk solar system ratio, 250. The carbon isotope ratio in the comet may be explained by selective fractionation enhancement of C-13 in the parent of the CN molecule, or by a depletion of C-12 relative to C-13.

Wyckoff, S.; Lindholm, E.

329

Stable isotopic evidence for methane seeps in Neoproterozoic  

E-print Network

seeps in Neoproterozoic postglacial cap carbonates Ganqing Jiang1 , Martin J. Kennedy1 & Nicholas to be associated with methane seeps. Here we report carbon isotopic and petro- graphic data from a Neoproterozoic many cap carbonates, and are known collectively only in seep environments3,6 . Carbonate precipitated

Jiang, Ganqing

330

Relative g-factor measurements in the stable Te isotopes  

SciTech Connect

The g(2{sub 1}{sup +}) values in the even Te isotopes between {sup 122}Te and {sup 130}Te have been measured simultaneously, relative to each other, by the transient-field technique. In addition, g factors were also measured for the 3/2{sub 2}{sup +} and 5/2{sub 1}{sup +} levels in {sup 125}Te.

Stuchbery, Andrew E.; Nakamura, Akiumi; Davidson, Paul M.; Watanabe, Hiroshi [Department of Nuclear Physics, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Wilson, Anna N. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Physics, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Levon, Alexander I. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Prospekt Nauki 47, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine)

2007-09-15

331

Origins of etioporphyrins in sediments: Evidence from stable carbon isotopes  

SciTech Connect

In samples of the Julia Creek and Condor oil shales (Australia, Albian, and early Tertiary, respectively) etioporphyrin III is significantly depleted in {sup 13}C (4{per thousand}) relative to porphyrins derived from chlorophylls. This isotopic difference suggest a large contribution from some independent source. The haem group found in cytochromes derived from microbial sources is the most likely candidate.

Boreham, C.J. (BMR, Canberra (Australia)); Fookes, C.J.R. (CSIRO, Menai (Australia)); Popp, B.N.; Hayes, J.M. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (USA))

1989-09-01

332

Origins of etioporphyrins in sediments - Evidence from stable carbon isotopes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In samples of the Julia Creek and Condor oil shales (Australia, Albian, and early Tertiary, respectively) etioporphyrin III is significantly depleted in C-13 (4 per mil) relative to porphyrins derived from chlorophylls. This isotopic difference suggests a large contribution from some independent source. The haem group found in cytochromes derived from microbial sources is the most likely candidate.

Boreham, Christopher J.; Fookes, Christopher J. R.; Popp, Brian N.; Hayes, J. M.

1989-01-01

333

Mercury stable isotopes in sediments and largemouth bass from Florida lakes, USA.  

PubMed

Humans and wildlife can be exposed to mercury (Hg) through the consumption of fish with elevated concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg). Studies have shown that increased atmospheric deposition of Hg often leads to increased MeHg concentrations in aquatic organisms. However, depending on the ecosystem characteristics, reductions in Hg emissions may not always lead to immediate decreases in fish MeHg concentrations. Measurements of natural abundance Hg stable isotope ratios may enable a better understanding of these complex relationships. To gain insight into the sources of Hg to sport fish in central Florida, we measured the Hg isotopic compositions of surface sediments and largemouth bass from freshwater lakes. We found that fish collected from lakes located near the large Crystal River coal-fired power plant did not display evidence of anomalous negative ?(202)Hg values that were observed in nearby precipitation. This suggests that Hg recently deposited from the atmosphere is not preferentially methylated and bioaccumulated in these lakes relative to previously deposited Hg accumulated in the lake sediments. We also observed significant positive ?(199)Hg values in the fish that were correlated with light penetration depth in the lakes from which they were collected. This indicates that a significant amount of photochemical degradation of MeHg (up to ~40%) occurred prior to uptake of the remaining MeHg into the food webs. These results suggest that depending on physical lake characteristics and biogeochemical factors, decreased atmospheric Hg deposition may not lead to immediate short-term reductions in fish MeHg concentrations. Instead, recovery of some freshwater fish populations to baseline MeHg concentrations may take decades to centuries. PMID:23062970

Sherman, Laura S; Blum, Joel D

2013-03-15

334

Stable isotope record of coexisting apatite and dolomite in Early Cambrian phosphorites, Meishucun section, South China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Precambrian-Cambrian transition forms one of the most dramatic time periods in Earth's history, as global changes in tectonics, climate and chemistry in the atmosphere and oceans favoured the worldwide Cambrian Radiation and a concomitant ecosphere revolution. This time interval is paralleled by the first appearance of the widespread giant phosphorites. The well-known Meishucun section (South China), a former candidate section for the Pc-C boundary, documents phosphorite genesis amongst a rapid biodiversification, immediately following the end of the Precambrian in a low-latitude, shallow-water carbonate shelf. This contribution aims to elucidate the relation between simultaneous phosphorite deposition and global environmental conditions at the Pc-C boundary by using stable carbon and oxygen isotope analyses. Accurate determinations of d13C and d18O values may allow conclusions about ancient ocean circulation, paleo-productivity, paleo-temperatures, and most prominently diagenetic processes. The investigated samples from the Meishucun section basically consist of apatite, dolomite, and quartz that may be further devided into a lower and upper phosphorite as well as an overlying dolostone intervall. Additionally, calcite and siderite occur as minor compounds in some samples. Bulk d13C values of the carbonate fraction correlate with dolomite abundance throughout the section ranging from -4 to 1 per mil. Furthermore, several horizons suggest a relation between d13C values and apatite content, implying lower d13C values in apatites compared to coexisting dolomite. A slight negative d13C excursion at the top of the lower phosphorite coincides with the first appearance of small shelly fossils. Corresponding bulk d18O values generally show a stratigraphic-upward trend towards lower values throughout the record with slightly higher values in dolomite-rich sections. This may either indicate a warming trend during deposition, an isotopic shift in sea water composition, or an increasing contribution from carbonate apatite contents. Tentative calculations of temperatures in the fluids responsible for carbonate and phosphate mineral formation are based on experimental calibrations of the respective isotope systems by using d18O values of the carbonate fraction. They reveal mean temperatures ranging from 9C to 51C or 50C to 114C considering potential d18O values of -8 per mil and 0 per mil vs. SMOW in the mother fluids, respectively. Maximum temperatures of about 52C using -8 per mil vs. SMOW at the top of the lower phosphorite sequence possibly point towards a pronounced diagenetic influence. However, bulk isotope values are subject to mineralogical interferences. In particular, FTIR spectroscopic analyses show that the apatites also contain carbonate groups. Thus, bulk isotopic values of carbonates reflect a mixed signal of different phases of mineral genesis. This assumption is confirmed by petrographic observations that in most cases display apatite-coated dolomites suggesting an earlier onset of dolomite formation compared to apatite. Accordingly, d18O values of phosphate groups from the above mentioned phosphorite sequence indicate a mean temperature of only 31C (water: -8 per mil SMOW). Assuming the same isotopic composition of dolomite and apatite precipitating fluids, lower temperatures are calculated for apatite formation. In conclusion, a separation of the different carbonate groups is essential to obtain oxygen and carbon isotopic signals of the corresponding mineral phase, which is currently investigated by fractionation experiments. Acknowledgements: The presented research is supported by DFG research group 736 and Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research.

Wegwerth, Antje; Struck, Ulrich; Segl, Monika; Vennemann, Torsten W.; Gehlken, Peer-L.; Heubeck, Christoph; Bttcher, Michael E.

2010-05-01

335

Using Stable Water Isotopes to Evaluate Basin-Scale Simulations of Surface Water Budgets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two rare but naturally occurring isotopes of water, 1H2 18 O and 1H2H16O, are becoming of practical use in diagnosis of climate and earth system model performance. Their value as tracers and validation tools in hydro- logical subsystems derives from the systematic and different (from each other and from the most abundant water isotope: 1H1H16O) paths and residence times they

A. Henderson-Sellers; K. McGuffie; D. Noone; P. Irannejad

2004-01-01

336

Identification of functionally active aerobic methanotrophs in sediments from an arctic lake using stable isotope probing.  

PubMed

Arctic lakes are a significant source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH(4) ), but the role that methane oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) play in limiting the overall CH(4) flux is poorly understood. Here, we used stable isotope probing (SIP) techniques to identify the metabolically active aerobic methanotrophs in upper sediments (0-1?cm) from an arctic lake in northern Alaska sampled during ice-free summer conditions. The highest CH(4) oxidation potential was observed in the upper sediment (0-1?cm depth) with 1.59?mol?g wet weight(-1) day(-1) compared with the deeper sediment samples (1-3?cm, 3-5?cm and 5-10?cm), which exhibited CH(4) oxidation potentials below 0.4?mol?g wet weight(-1) day(-1) . Both type I and type II methanotrophs were directly detected in the upper sediment total communities using targeted primer sets based on 16S rRNA genes. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and functional genes (pmoA and mxaF) in the (13) C-DNA from the upper sediment indicated that type I methanotrophs, mainly Methylobacter, Methylosoma, Methylomonas and Methylovulum miyakonense, dominated the assimilation of CH(4) . Methylotrophs, including the genera Methylophilus and/or Methylotenera, were also abundant in the (13) C-DNA. Our results show that a diverse microbial consortium acquired carbon from CH(4) in the sediments of this arctic lake. PMID:22429394

He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J; Pohlman, John W; Catranis, Catharine; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M; Leigh, Mary Beth

2012-06-01

337

Lignocellulose-responsive bacteria in a southern California salt marsh identified by stable isotope probing  

PubMed Central

Carbon cycling by microbes has been recognized as the main mechanism of organic matter decomposition and export in coastal wetlands, yet very little is known about the functional diversity of specific groups of decomposers (e.g., bacteria) in salt marsh benthic trophic structure. Indeed, salt marsh sediment bacteria remain largely in a black box in terms of their diversity and functional roles within salt marsh benthic food web pathways. We used DNA stable isotope probing (SIP) utilizing 13C-labeled lignocellulose as a proxy to evaluate the fate of macrophyte-derived carbon in benthic salt marsh bacterial communities. Overall, 146 bacterial species were detected using SIP, of which only 12 lineages were shared between enriched and non-enriched communities. Abundant groups from the 13C-labeled community included Desulfosarcina, Spirochaeta, and Kangiella. This study is the first to use heavy-labeled lignocellulose to identify bacteria responsible for macrophyte carbon utilization in salt marsh sediments and will allow future studies to target specific lineages to elucidate their role in salt marsh carbon cycling and ultimately aid our understanding of the potential of salt marshes to store carbon. PMID:24917856

Darjany, Lindsay E.; Whitcraft, Christine R.; Dillon, Jesse G.

2014-01-01

338

Identification of functionally active aerobic methanotrophs in sediments from an arctic lake using stable isotope probing  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Arctic lakes are a significant source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4), but the role that methane oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) play in limiting the overall CH4 flux is poorly understood. Here, we used stable isotope probing (SIP) techniques to identify the metabolically active aerobic methanotrophs in upper sediments (01 cm) from an arctic lake in northern Alaska sampled during ice-free summer conditions. The highest CH4 oxidation potential was observed in the upper sediment (01 cm depth) with 1.59 ?mol g wet weight-1 day-1 compared with the deeper sediment samples (13 cm, 35 cm and 510 cm), which exhibited CH4 oxidation potentials below 0.4 ?mol g wet weight-1 day-1. Both type I and type II methanotrophs were directly detected in the upper sediment total communities using targeted primer sets based on 16S rRNA genes. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and functional genes (pmoA and mxaF) in the 13C-DNA from the upper sediment indicated that type I methanotrophs, mainly Methylobacter, Methylosoma, Methylomonas and Methylovulum miyakonense, dominated the assimilation of CH4. Methylotrophs, including the genera Methylophilus and/or Methylotenera, were also abundant in the 13CDNA. Our results show that a diverse microbial consortium acquired carbon from CH4 in the sediments of this arctic lake.

He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J.; Pohlman, John W.; Catranis, Catharine; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M.; Leigh, Mary Beth

2012-01-01

339

Estimation of soil water evaporative loss after tillage operation using the stable isotope technique  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Application of stable isotopes in soil studies has improved quantitative evaluation of evaporation and other hydrological processes in soil. This study was carried out to determine the effect of tillage on evaporative loss of water from the soil. Zero tillage and conventional tillage were compared. Suction tubes were installed for soil water collection at the depths 0.15, 0.50, and 1.0 m by pumping soil water with a peristaltic pump. Soil water evaporation was estimated using stable isotopes of water. The mean isotopic composition of the soil water at 0.15 m soil depth were -1.15 (?18O) and -0.75 (?D) and were highly enriched compared with the isotopic compositions of the site precipitation. Soil water stable isotopes (?18O and ?D) were more enriched near the surface under zero tillage while they were less negative down the profile under zero tillage. This suggests an occurrence of more evaporation and infiltration under conventional then zero tillage, respectively, because evaporative fractionation contributes to escape of lighter isotopes from liquid into the vapour phase leading to enrichment in heavy isotopes in the liquid phase. The annual evaporation estimated using the vapour diffusion equation ranges from 46-70 and 54-84 mm year-1 under zero and conventional tillage, respectively, indicating more evaporation under conventional tillage compared with zero tillage. Therefore, to reduce soil water loss, adoption of conservation tillage practices such as zero tillage is encouraged.

Busari, M. A.; Salako, F. K.; Tuniz, C.; Zuppi, G. M.; Stenni, B.; Adetunji, M. T.; Arowolo, T. A.

2013-09-01

340

Stable isotope reactive transport modeling in water-rock interactions during CO2 injection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stable isotopes can be of great usefulness in the characterization and monitoring of CO2 sequestration sites. Stable isotopes can be used to track the migration of the CO2 plume and identify leakage sources. Moreover, they provide unique information about the chemical reactions that take place on the CO2-water-rock system. However, there is a lack of appropriate tools that help modelers to incorporate stable isotope information into the flow and transport models used in CO2 sequestration problems. In this work, we present a numerical tool for modeling the transport of stable isotopes in groundwater reactive systems. The code is an extension of the groundwater single-phase flow and reactive transport code HYTEC [2]. HYTEC's transport module was modified to include element isotopes as separate species. This way, it is able to track isotope composition of the system by computing the mixing between the background water and the injected solution accounting for the dependency of diffusion on the isotope mass. The chemical module and database have been expanded to included isotopic exchange with minerals and the isotope fractionation associated with chemical reactions and mineral dissolution or precipitation. The performance of the code is illustrated through a series of column synthetic models. The code is also used to model the aqueous phase CO2 injection test carried out at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory site (Palisades, New York, USA) [1]. References [1] N. Assayag, J. Matter, M. Ader, D. Goldberg, and P. Agrinier. Water-rock interactions during a CO2 injection field-test: Implications on host rock dissolution and alteration effects. Chemical Geology, 265(1-2):227-235, July 2009. [2] Jan van der Lee, Laurent De Windt, Vincent Lagneau, and Patrick Goblet. Module-oriented modeling of reactive transport with HYTEC. Computers & Geosciences, 29(3):265-275, April 2003.

Hidalgo, Juan J.; Lagneau, Vincent; Agrinier, Pierre

2010-05-01

341

Isotopic Analysis of Fingernails as a USGS Open House Demonstration of the Use of Stable Isotopes in Foodweb Studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The USGS Isotope Tracers Project uses stable isotopes and tritium to add a unique dimension of chemical information to a wide range of environmental investigations. The use and application of isotopes is usually an unfamiliar and even esoteric topic to the general public. Therefore during three USGS open house events, as a public outreach effort, we demonstrated the use of stable isotopes by analyzing nitrogen and carbon isotopes from very small fragments of fingernail from willing participants. We titled the exhibit "You Are What You Eat". The results from all participants were plotted on a graph indicating the general influence of different food groups on the composition of body tissues as represented by fingernails. All participants were assigned a number and no personal-identification information was collected. A subset of participants provided us with an estimate of the number of days a week various foods were eaten and if they were vegetarians, vegans or non-vegetarians. Volunteers from our research group were on hand to explain and discuss fundamental concepts such as how foods attain their isotopic composition, the difference between C3 and C4 plants, the effects of assimilation, trophic enrichment, and the various uses of stable isotopes in environmental studies. The results of the fingernail analyses showed the variation of the range of isotopic compositions among about 400 people at each event, the distinct influence of C4 plants (mainly corn and cane sugar) on our carbon isotopic composition, and the isotopic differences between vegetarians and non vegetarians among other details (http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/projects/fingernails/). A poll of visitors attending the open house event in 2006 indicated that "You Are What You Eat" was among the most popular exhibits. Following the first two open house events we were contacted by a group of researchers from Brazil who had completed a very similar study. Our collaboration resulted in a publication in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology (Nardoto et al., 2006). This study found that despite global trends toward dietary homogenization, regional differences in food resources and dietary preferences were recorded in the carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of fingernails.

Silva, S. R.; Kendall, C.; Young, M. B.; Choy, D.

2011-12-01

342

Monitoring of the aerobe biodegradation of chlorinated organic solvents by stable isotope analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our chemical-biological basic research aims to eliminate chlorinated environmental contaminants from aquifers around industrial areas in the frame of research program supported by the European Social Fund (TMOP-4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV-2012-0043). The most careful and simplest way includes the in situ biodegradation with the help of cultured and compound specific strains. Numerous members of Pseudomonas bacteria are famous about function of bioremediation. They can metabolism the environmental hazardous chemicals like gas oils, dyes, and organic solvents. Our research based on the Pseudomonas putida F1 strain, because its ability to degrade halogenated hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene. Several methods were investigated to estimate the rate of biodegradation, such as the measurement of the concentration of the pollutant along the contamination pathway, the microcosm's studies or the compound specific stable isotope analysis. In this area in the Transcarpathian basin we are pioneers in the stable isotope monitoring of biodegradation. The main goal is to find stable isotope fractionation factors by stable isotope analysis, which can help us to estimate the rate and effectiveness of the biodegradation. The subsequent research period includes the investigation of the method, testing its feasibility and adaptation in the environment. Last but not least, the research gives an opportunity to identify the producer of the contaminant based on the stable isotope composition of the contaminant.

Horvth, Anik; Fut, Istvn; Palcsu, Lszl

2014-05-01

343

Quantitative analysis of prostate specific antigen isoforms using immunoprecipitation and stable isotope labeling mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is a widely used serum marker for prostate cancer (PCa), but has limited specificity for distinguishing early PCa from benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Recently, proPSAs, comprised of native proPSA, as well as truncated proPSA forms, [-2] proPSA, [-5] proPSA, and [-7] proPSA, have been shown to be better diagnostic targets than PSA for PCa. Stable isotope labeling-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (SIL/MRM-MS) has been frequently used to measure low-abundance biomarkers in tissues and biofluids, owing to its high sensitivity and specificity, simplicity, and multiplexing capability. In this study, we have developed and optimized a strategy using immunoprecipitation in conjunction with SIL/MRM-MS assay which is capable of sensitive and accurate quantification of proPSA in serum. Since serum and plasma are by far the most complex biological fluids, the immunoprecipitation workflow was optimized to achieve sufficient sensitivity, efficiencies of protein purification with immunoaffinity depletion were determined. The developed strategy can detect proPSA and PSA with a limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) at nanogram per milliliter levels, corresponding to a concentration 6 orders-of-magnitude lower than the most abundant serum proteins. Furthermore, the simultaneous measurement of multiple biomarkers, including the mature and precursor forms of PSA, can be achieved in a single multiplexed analysis using LC/MRM-MS. The strategy demonstrated here provides an attractive alternative to ELISAs or RIAs for the reliably measurement of proPSA to improve the specificity of PCa diagnosis. PMID:25427836

Chen, Yi-Ting; Tuan, Li-Ping; Chen, Hsiao-Wei; Wei, I-An; Chou, Min-Yuan; Chen, Han-Min; Tyan, Yu-Chang; Chen, Sung-Fang

2015-01-01

344

The Barium Isotopic Abundance in the Metal-Poor Star HD140283  

E-print Network

We derive the mixture of odd to even barium isotopes in the atmosphere of the metal-poor subgiant HD140283 from the analysis of the Ba II transition at 455.4 nm in a high-resolution high signal-to-noise spectrum of the star. The detailed shape of this spectral line depends on the relative contributions of odd and even isotopes via isotopic and hyperfine splitting. We measure the fractional abundance of odd Ba isotopes by modelling the formation of the Ba II 455.4 nm line profile with the use of both a classical 1D hydrostatic and a 3D hydrodynamical model atmosphere of HD140283. We interpret the results in terms of contributions by the slow (s-) and rapid (r-) neutron-capture processes to the isotopic mix. While the result of the 1D analysis of the Ba II feature indicates a (64 +/- 36)% contribution of the r-process to the isotopic mix, the 3D analysis points toward a mere (15 +/- 34)% contribution from this process, that is consistent with a solar-like mixture of barium isotopes.

R. Collet; M. Asplund; P. E. Nissen

2008-11-27

345

Stable isotope analysis of dissolved carbon species of Hot Lake, WA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hot Lake is a hypersaline, meromictic lake in north-central Washington. The lake is epsomitic, with seasonably-variable salinity (.2 to 2 M magnesium sulfate) and produces carbonates and salt precipitates. The maximum depth of the lake is around 2.5 m, and below a thermocline there is intense solar heat retention in the monolimnion, often exceeding 50C. Despite these extreme and variable conditions, a microbial mat of up to 1.5 cm thick thrives annually in Hot Lake. The mat is widespread throughout the lake at water depths (during our experiments) ranging from 60cm-140cm. It is comprised of a variety of cyanobacteria along with other autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria. These populations are visibly stratified with four consistent laminae displaying differences in bacterial pigmentation. Many of the layers contain carbonate species, but the full relationship between the mat and the carbonate crystallization is not known. We are studying the microbial interactions and carbon cycling of the mat communities, using stable isotope analysis of the mat and the lake water, both in situ and ex situ. We are exploring the incorporation and movement of carbon in the mat, spatially and temporally, to understand the fixation mechanisms and metabolic processes at play in this environment. This was done primarily using stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The focus of this work is on the study and measurement of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon using a GasBench and IRMS setup, following methods adapted from Lang et al. (2012). To account for the unique chemistry of Hot Lake, trials on the effects of oxidation conditions and salinity were done on lab-synthesized samples to compare to Hot Lake results. The majority of lake water analyses were done in conjunction with a stable isotope probing (SIP) experiment, completed during two 24-hour periods at Hot Lake in June and July of 2013. The SIP experiments included ex situ incubations (in separate glass containers on the shore of the lake immediately after removal from the lake) under various conditions (with labeled and unlabeled substrate, in the presence and absence of daylight, with and without undermat sediment) performed as both constant labeling and pulse-chase experiments. We incubated mat sections in lake water (from equivalent depth to the collected mat) spiked either with 13C-labeled or natural abundance organic (acetate or glucose) or inorganic (bicarbonate) substrates. For those conditions in which inorganic carbon was added, we measured the DOC of the water in each condition to measure conversion from DIC to DOC and vice versa for consumption/conversion of DOC to DIC. By comparing the GasBench DIC/DOC results of these various conditions over the course of the experiments, we assessed carbon flow into and out of the mat around a daily cycle. The assessments were made using the ?13C values and data of the lake water samples from the IRMS in conjunction with bulk mat isotope values. Our data show significant interactions between DIC and DOC pools and allow us to estimate the daily balance between carbon fixation and remineralization mediated by the microbial mat.

Courtney, S.; Moran, J.; Cory, A. B.; Lindemann, S. R.; Fredrickson, J.

2013-12-01

346

Preliminary mineralogic, fluid inclusion, and stable isotope study of the Mahd adh Dhahab gold mine, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Mahd adh Dhahab mine, located about 280 km northeast of Jiddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, has yielded more than 2 million ounces of gold from periodic production during the past 3,000 years. A new orebody on the southern side of the ancient workings, known as the South orebody, is being developed by Gold Fields-Mahd adh Dhahab Limited. A suite of samples was collected from the newly exposed orebody for preliminary mineralogic, stable isotope, fluid inclusion, and geochemical studies. The Mahd adh Dhahab deposit is in the carapace of a Proterozoic epizonal rhyolite stock that domed pyroclastic and metasedimentary rocks of the Proterozoic Halaban group. Ore of gold, silver, copper, zinc, tellurium, and lead is associated with north-trending, steeply dipping quartz veins in a zone 1,000 m long and 400 m wide. The veins include an assemblage of quartz-chlorite-pyrite-hematite-chalcopyrite-sphalerite-precious metals, which is similar to the mineral assemblage at the epithermal deposit at Creede, Colorado. The primary ore contains abundant chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and pyrite in addition to a complex precious metal assemblage. Gold and silver occur principally as minute grains of telluride minerals disseminated in quartz-chlorite-hematite and as inclusions in chalcopyrite and sphalerite. Telluride minerals include petzite, hessite, and sylvanite. Free gold is present but not abundant. All of the vein-quartz samples contained abundant, minute inclusions of both low-density, vapor-rich fluids and liquid-rich fluids. Primary fluid inclusions yielded homogenization temperatures of from 110? to 238? C. Preliminary light-stable isotope studies of the sulfide minerals and quartz showed that all of the d34S values are between 1.2 and 6.3 per mil, which is a typical range for hydrothermal sulfide minerals that derive their sulfur from an igneous source. The data-suggest that the sulfide sulfur isotope geochemistry was controlled by exchange with la large sulfur isotope reservoir at depth. The d18O values of all stages of vein quartz in the South orebody range between 8.5 and 11.1 per mil. This range is similar to that for quartz from the North orebody and indicates that the hydrothermal system consisted of dominantly exchanged meteoric water, which was uniform in temperature and d18O content throughout the area during the entire period of mineralization. Lead isotope analyses of two galena samples indicate that the lead in the South orebody is less radiogenic than that from the North orebody and confirm that the lead was derived from oceanic crust approximately 700 Ma ago.

Rye, Robert O.; Hall, W.E.; Cunningham, C.G.; Czamanske, G.K.; Afifi, A.M.; Stacey, J.S.

1983-01-01

347

Stable isotope monitoring of ionic trapping of CO2 in deep brines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CO2 injection into a depleted gas-reservoir is used as a combined method for Enhanced Gas Recovery (EGR) and CO2 storage. In order to safeguard this process, monitoring the degree of dissolution and potential further precipitation and mineral interactions are a necessity. Here a method is introduced, in which stable isotope and geochemical data can be used as a monitoring technique to quantify ionic trapping of injected CO2. Isotope and geochemical data of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) can be used to distinguish between already present and to be injected inorganic carbon. Injected CO2, for instance, is formed during combustion of former plant material and is expected to have a different isotope ratio (?13C value) than the baseline data of the aquifer. This is because combusted CO2 originates from organic material, such as coal and oil with a predominant C3 plant signature. Mixing the injected CO2 with groundwater is therefore expected to change the isotope, as well as the geochemical composition of the groundwater. Mass balance calculations with stable isotope ratios can serve to quantify ionic trapping of CO2 as DIC in groundwater. However, depending on the composition of the aquifer, weathering of carbonate or silicates may occur. Enhanced weathering processes due to CO2 injection can also further influence the isotopic composition. Such interactions between dissolved CO2 and minerals depend on the temperature and pressure regimes applied. Field data, as well as laboratory experiments are planned to quantify isotope ratios of dissolved inorganic carbon as well as oxygen isotope ratios of the water. These are indicative of geochemical processes before, during and after EGR. The isotope method should therefore provide a new tool to quantify the efficiency of ionic trapping under various temperatures and pressures. Keywords: Enhanced Gas Recovery, monitoring of CO2 dissolution, stable isotopes

Myrttinen, A.; Barth, J. A. C.; Becker, V.; Blum, P.; Grathwohl, P.

2009-04-01

348

Using chromium stable isotope ratios to quantify Cr(VI) reduction: Lack of sorption effects  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Chromium stable isotope values can be effectively used to monitor reduction of Cr(VI) in natural waters. We investigate effects of sorption during transport of Cr(VI) which may also shift Cr isotopes values, complicating efforts to quantify reduction. This study shows that Cr stable isotope fractionation caused by sorption is negligible. Equilibrium fractionation of Cr stable isotopes between dissolved Cr-(VI) and Cr(VI) adsorbed onto ??-Al2O3 and goethite is less than 0.04???. (53Cr/52Cr) under environmentally relevant pH conditions. Batch experiments at pH 4.0 and pH 6.0 were conducted in series to sequentially magnify small isotope fractionations. A simple transport model suggests that adsorption may cause amplification of a small isotope fractionation along extreme fringes of a plume, leading to shifts in 53Cr/52Cr values. We therefore suggest that isotope values at extreme fringes of Cr plumes be critically evaluated for sorption effects. A kinetic effect was observed in experiments with goethite at pH 4 where apparently lighter isotopes diffuse into goethite clumps at a faster rate before eventually reaching equilibrium. This observed kinetic effect may be important in a natural system that has not attained equilibrium and is in need of further study. Cr isotope fractionation caused by speciation of Cr(VI) between HCrO4- and CrO42- was also examined, and we conclude that it is not measurable. In the absence of isotope fractionation caused by equilibrium speciation and sorption, most of the variation in ??53 Cr values may be attributed to reduction, and reliable estimates of Cr reduction can be made.

Ellis, A.S.; Johnson, T.M.; Bullen, T.D.

2004-01-01

349

Turnover of Stable Isotopes Due to Growth and Metabolism in Zebrafish, Danio Rerio  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stable isotope ratios of carbon (13C/12C), nitrogen (15 N/14N) and sulfur (34S/32S) in animal tissues can be used as tracers of the nutrient sources of organisms' diets and determining trophic interactions in ecosystems. The isotopic turnover of these elements in a predator's tissues reflects the isotopic signature of the predator's diet (the prey). The rate at which an organism takes up the isotopic signature of its food is correlated with its growth rate and/or metabolism. Hence unless baseline isotopic turnover rates are known, the isotopic signature of a consumer may lead to misinterpretation of predator-prey relationships. Laboratory studies provide isotopic turnover rates of organisms under controlled conditions, which serve as models for understanding the rates at which organisms in the field isotopically incorporate new diets. This study examines the isotopic turnover rates of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in response to a dietary switch in young zebrafish, Danio rerio. Zebrafish, raised on commercial fish food (8.2 0.5%, d34S; were fed a new, isotopically distinct diet (2.9 0.5%, d34S) and the rate at which zebra fish muscle tissues changed towards the isotopic signature of their new food was monitored. Preliminary results show a change in the fish sulfur isotope composition of roughly 0.03% per day towards the sulfur isotope ratio of the new food. At the observed turnover rate, approximately 180 days would be required for the zebrafish muscle tissue to resemble a new food. The study is also investigating the importance of growth versus metabolism as a predictor of isotope turnover rate in zebra fish tissues.

Tarboush, R.; MacAvoy, S.; Macko, S.; Connaughton, V.

2002-05-01

350

Technical Note: Silica stable isotopes and silicification in a carnivorous sponge Asbestopluma sp.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The stable isotope composition of benthic sponge spicule silica is a potential source of palaeoceanographic information about past deep seawater chemistry. The silicon isotopic composition of spicules has been shown to relate to the silicic acid concentration of ambient water, although existing calibrations do exhibit a degree of scatter in the relationship. Less is known about how the oxygen isotope composition of sponge spicule silica relates to environmental conditions during growth. Here, we investigate the biological vital effects on silica silicon and oxygen isotope composition in a carnivorous sponge, Asbestopluma sp., from the Southern Ocean. We find significant variations in silicon and oxygen isotopic composition within the specimen that appear related to unusual spicule silicification. The largest variation in both isotope systems was associated to the differential distribution of an unconventional, hypersilicified spicule type (desma) along the sponge body. The absence of an internal canal in the desmas suggests an unconventional silicification pattern leading to an unusually heavy isotopic signature. Additional internal variability derives from a systematic offset between the peripheral skeleton of the body having systematically a higher isotopic composition than the internal skeleton. A simplified silicon isotope fractionation model, in which desmas were excluded, suggests that the lack of a system for seawater pumping in carnivorous sponges favours a low replenishment of dissolved silicon within the internal tissues, causing kinetic fractionation during silicification that impacts the isotopic signature of the internal skeleton. Analysis of multiple spicules should be carried out to "average out" any artefacts in order to produce more robust downcore measurements.

Hendry, K. R.; Swann, G. E. A.; Leng, M. J.; Sloane, H. J.; Goodwin, C.; Berman, J.; Maldonado, M.

2014-12-01

351

Neutrino scattering off the stable even-even Mo isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Inelastic neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections are studied focusing on the neutral current processes. Particularly, we investigate the angular and initial neutrino-energy dependence of the differential and integrated cross sections for low and intermediate energies of the incoming neutrino. The nuclear wave functions for the initial and final nuclear states are constructed in the context of the quasi-particle random phase approximation (QRPA) tested on the reproducibility of the low-lying energy spectrum. The results presented here refer to the isotopes Mo92, Mo94, Mo96, Mo98 and Mo100. These isotopes could play a significant role in supernova neutrino detection in addition to their use in double-beta and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments (e.g. MOON, NEMO III).

Balasi, K. G.; Kosmas, T. S.; Divari, P. C.

2009-11-01

352

Using Stable Isotopes to Trace Microbial Hydrogen Production Pathways  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biological H2 production by hydrogenase enzymes (H2ases) plays an important role in anaerobic microbial metabolism and community structure. Despite considerable progress in elucidating H2 metabolism, the regulation of and flux through key H2 production pathways remain largely undefined. Our goal is to improve understanding of biological H2 production by using H isotope ratios to dissect proton fluxes through different H2ase enzymes and from different substrates. We hypothesized that the isotope ratio of H2 produced by various hydrogenases (H2ase) would differ, and that the H isotope ratios would allow us to define the contribution of different enzymes when more than one is present in vivo. We chose Shewanella oneidensis (S.o.) MR-1, a facultative anaerobe capable of transferring electrons to a variety of terminal acceptors, including protons, as a model system for in vivo studies. S. o. encodes one [FeFe]- and one [NiFe]-H2ase. We purified three [FeFe]-H2ases (S.o., Clostridium pasteurianum, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) and two [NiFe]-H2ases (S. o. and Desulfovibrio fructosovorans) to test the isotope fractionation associated with activity by each enzyme in vitro. For in vivo analysis we used wild-type S.o. as well as electron transfer-deficient and H2ase-deficient strains. We employed batch cultures using lactate as an electron donor and O2 as an initial electron acceptor (with H2 production after O2 consumption). The five H2ases we tested all had a unique isotope fractionation. Measurements of H2 produced in vivo showed distinct periods of H2 production having isotope signatures consistent with in vitro results. Isotope data as well as studies of H2 production by mutants in the genes encoding either the [NiFe]-H2ase or the [FeFe]-H2ase, respectively, show that the [NiFe]- and [FeFe]- H2ases became active at different times. The [NiFe]-H2ase both produces and consumes H2 before the [FeFe]-H2ase becomes active. RNA analysis is consistent with up regulation of different hydrogenases at different points in the cultures growth, but presents a mystery. Transcription of the [NiFe]-H2ase is more coincident with detection of H2 production and uptake by the protein. The [FeFe]-H2ase gene, however, undergoes a burst of transcription long before H2 production by the protein is detected. A second burst of transcription of the gene coincides with H2 production. We are working towards identifying key conditions that direct hydrogenase activity (including redox conditions and availability of auxiliary electron acceptors). Taken together we show that different H2ases express different fractionation factors in vitro, and H isotope ratios can be exploited to dissect pathways of H2 production in vivo.

Moran, J.; Hill, E.; Bartholomew, R.; Yang, H.; Shi, L.; Ostrom, N. E.; Gandhi, H.; Hegg, E.; Kreuzer, H.

2010-12-01

353

Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) ?(2)H reproducibility (1? standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1 to 0.58 . This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN(2) is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen. PMID:20718408

Coplen, Tyler B; Qi, Haiping

2010-09-15

354

Determination of stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes of light hydrocarbons  

Microsoft Academic Search

A combined system for the measurement of ¹³C\\/¹²C and D\\/H ratios on light hydrocarbons (C-C) and CO is described. The system is designed for natural gas and sediment gas analyses. It comprises gas chromatographic separation with online combustion of hydrocarbons to CO and HO, reduction of HO to H on zinc in closed ampules, and mass spectrometric determination of isotope

Ingolf. Dumke; Eckhard. Faber; Juergen. Poggenburg

1989-01-01

355

Carbon cycle for Lake Washington - a stable isotope study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors investigate the carbon cycle in Lake Washington for the year 1980 using monthly measurements of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and its ¹³C:¹²C isotopic composition. Mass balances of DIC and its ¹³C:¹²C yield estimates of CO gas exchange rates and net organic carbon production rates. Between 24 June and 13 August, the calculated CO gas invasion rate of

P. D. Quay; S. R. Emerson; B. M. Quay; A. H. Devol

1986-01-01

356

Ar-39 Detection at the 10^-16 Isotopic Abundance Level with Atom Trap Trace Analysis  

E-print Network

Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA), a laser-based atom counting method, has been applied to analyze atmospheric Ar-39 (half-life = 269 yr), a cosmogenic isotope with an isotopic abundance of 8x10^-16. In addition to the superior selectivity demonstrated in this work, counting rate and efficiency of ATTA have been improved by two orders of magnitude over prior results. Significant applications of this new analytical capability lie in radioisotope dating of ice and water samples and in the development of dark matter detectors.

W. Jiang; W. D. Williams; K. Bailey; A. M. Davis; S. -M. Hu; Z. -T. Lu; T. P. O'Connor; R. Purtschert; N. C. Sturchio; Y. R. Sun; P. Mueller

2011-01-15

357

Environmental Reconstruction of the Arctic middle Eocene using Stable Isotope Analyses of Terrestrial Substrates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I report on reconstructions of key environmental attributes of the Arctic middle Eocene (circa 45 Ma) using stable isotope analyses of terrestrial substrates from Axel Heiberg Island. The field site, now located in the far north of Canada, was home to extensive forests of deciduous conifers living at approximately 83 degrees North latitude during the middle Eocene. Fossils of these trees and associated soils are known for their spectacular preservation. Here I describe my vision of the middle Eocene Arctic environment, including the lack of polar ice, the high relative humidity, high levels of soil methane production, site temperature, and patterns of seasonality. These estimates were generated from stable isotope studies of oxygen and hydrogen in fossil cellulose, carbon and oxygen in paleosol carbonate and hydrogen within lipid biomarkers. I also report on our recent advances in the understanding of the oxygen isotopic exchange specific to position within the cellulose molecule, and its implications for the interpretation of isotopic analyses of cellulose.

Jahren, A.

2006-05-01

358

Stable isotope-labeling studies in metabolomics: new insights into structure and dynamics of metabolic networks  

PubMed Central

The rapid emergence of metabolomics has enabled system-wide measurements of metabolites in various organisms. However, advances in the mechanistic understanding of metabolic networks remain limited, as most metabolomics studies cannot routinely provide accurate metabolite identification, absolute quantification and flux measurement. Stable isotope labeling offers opportunities to overcome these limitations. Here we describe some current approaches to stable isotope-labeled metabolomics and provide examples of the significant impact that these studies have had on our understanding of cellular metabolism. Furthermore, we discuss recently developed software solutions for the analysis of stable isotope-labeled metabolomics data and propose the bioinformatics solutions that will pave the way for the broader application and optimal interpretation of system-scale labeling studies in metabolomics. PMID:24568354

Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Barrett, Michael P; Breitling, Rainer; Creek, Darren J

2014-01-01

359

Steppe bison paleobiology through the scope of stable isotopes and zooarchaeology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bison are one of the most abundant and widely distributed species of large mammal during the Late Pleistocene. In the southern steppes of Eastern Europe, steppe bison (Bison priscus) is ubiquitous in zooarchaeological assemblages, particularly during the Upper Palaeolithic when a model of economic "specialization" is proposed. Specialization, in this context, implies the deliberate selection of a preferred species, which becomes the key food resource. The applicability of a specialised hunting model for the Upper Palaeolithic of Europe has recently been challenged, however (Grayson & Delpech 2002). In this research, therefore we re-examine bison acquisition strategies during the Upper Palaeolithic in the Ukrainian steppes in the light of biogeochemical and zooarchaeological data. The acquisition strategies used to procure a prey species are directly related to its social and spatial behaviour. A synthesis of ethological information for contemporary bison (Julien 2009) demonstrates the behavioural diversity of this taxa, linked mainly to local environmental variability, climatic conditions and population density. It is therefore necessary to propose a paleoethological model for the steppe bison before attempting to identify the acquisition strategies used by prehistoric hunters. In this research, we reconstruct the behaviour of the steppe bison using a combination of zooarchaeological tools, stable isotope analysis (intra-tooth isotope variation of carbon, oxygen and strontium ratios) and traditional paleobiological approaches. The advantages of using a combined approach are demonstrated through the examination of a case study: the site of Amvrosievka (Ukraine). Amvrosievka is a complex of Epigravettian sites composed of a camp and kill site, where more than 500 bison are represented (Krotova & Belan 1993). Twenty-five permanent lower teeth (M3) representing twenty-five individual bison were selected from the kill and camp site for isotopic analysis. Intra- and inter-individual variations of ?18O from the enamel carbonate were analysed in order to track seasonal temperatures changes; the 87Sr/86Sr ratio was examined to determine the spatial behaviour of the animals and ?13C was used to examine changes in diet. The relatively large number of individuals represented in this study allowed us to interpret the resulting data in terms of intra-populational variability. In addition to the isotopic analysis, zooarchaeological study of a recently excavated portion of the kill site enabled us to determine the age at death and sex-ratio of the kill-population as well as examine patterns of carcass treatment. We use the combined information from the isotopic and zooarchaeological analyses to reconstruct the social composition of the herds, their spatial behaviour, seasonality and the existence of different sub-herds through the identification of different isotopic groups. Ultimately, we are able to suggest that the site represents a palimpsest of different hunting episodes. Finally, the impact of steppe bison palaeoethology on the choice of hunting strategy and subsistence economy of the Epigravettian occupants of Amvrosievka is examined. The non migratory behaviour of steppe bison in the study region is shown to have affected the season of acquisition as well as the hunting and butchering strategies developed by the Epigravettians. The combined paleoethological and palethnographical reconstruction offered here has direct implications for understanding the relative contribution of hunting pressure vs climatic change in the demise of the "mammoth steppe" faunas at the end of the Late Pleistocene. Cited references: Grayson D. & F. Delpech, 2002. Specialized Early Upper Palaeolithic Hunters in Southwestern France ? Journal of Archaeological Science, 29, p. 1439-1449. Julien M. A., 2009. Chasseurs de bisons - Apports de l'archozoologie et de la biogochimie isotopique l'tude palethnographique et palothologique du gisement pigravettien d'Amvrosievka (Ukraine), PhD Thesis, Universit de Mont

Julien, Marie-Anne; Dorothe, Drucker; Herv, Bocherens; Ariane, Burke; Marylne, Patou-Mathis; Alexandra, Krotova

2010-05-01

360

Stable carbon isotope ratios of fatty acids in seagrass and redhead ducks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fatty acids were extracted from roots and rhizomes of the seagrass, Halodule wrightii, and from subcutaneous fat tissues of eight redhead ducks (Aythya americana) collected either in Texas or South Dakota. Stable carbon isotope ratios (?13C) of individual fatty acids were measured by gas chromatography\\/combustion\\/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC\\/C\\/IRMS). In cases where individual fatty acids were not completely resolved by

Beth Trust Hammer; Marilyn L. Fogel; Thomas C. Hoering

1998-01-01

361

Resource-Consumer Relationships and Baseline Stable Isotopic Signatures of Food Webs in Isolated Wetlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined isolated wetland food webs using stable C and N isotopes to understand resource-consumer relationships and controls\\u000a on baseline isotopic signatures. Marshes were usually more 13C-enriched than cypress savannas and cypress gum swamps. Analysis of coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM) fractions indicated\\u000a that C3 plants contributed the majority of organic matter to isolated wetlands. Individual wetlands of the same

Stephen P. Opsahl; Stephen W. Golladay; Lora L. Smith; Stephanie E. Allums

2010-01-01

362

Regional Modeling of Stable Carbon Isotope ratio of non Methane Hydrocarbons  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study of stable isotope ratio (delta 13C) can be useful to understand the history of an air parcel that include sources, mixing and photochemical processing. The 3D regional model (MC2AQ) was modified (with two different resolution, 21.2km and 5.3km) to include isotope information for Propene, Toluene, Propane, Benzene, Xylenes, and Isoprene. These compounds (both 12C and 13C) were included

F.-Dehghan

2004-01-01

363

Linking aboveground and belowground food webs through carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analyses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios (?13C and ?15N) have been used for more than two decades in analyses of food web structure. The utility of isotope ratio measurements is\\u000a based on the observation that consumer ?13C values are similar (15N values are about 3 higher than those of their diet. The technique has been applied most often to aquatic

Fujio Hyodo; Ayato Kohzu; Ichiro Tayasu

2010-01-01

364

Linking breeding and wintering grounds of neotropical migrant songbirds using stable hydrogen isotopic analysis of feathers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent studies have shown that stable hydrogen isotope ratios (?D) in the tissues of animals often correlate with ?D of local\\u000a precipitation. Here we examined the relationship between ?D in feathers and growing season precipitation for neotropical migrant\\u000a songbirds breeding over a continent-wide isotopic gradient. ?D values were determined on feathers of 140 individuals of 6\\u000a species of wild insectivorous

K. A. Hobson; Leonard I. Wassenaar

1996-01-01

365

Using ? 13 C stable isotopes to quantify individual-level diet variation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individual-level diet variation can be easily quantified by gut-content analysis. However, because gut contents are a snapshot\\u000a of individuals feeding habits, such cross-sectional data can be subject to sampling error and lead one to overestimate levels\\u000a of diet variation. In contrast, stable isotopes reflect an individuals long-term diet, so isotope variation among individuals\\u000a can be interpreted as diet variation. Nevertheless,

Mrcio S. Arajo; Daniel I. Bolnick; Glauco Machado; Ariovaldo A. Giaretta; Srgio F. dos Reis

2007-01-01

366

Fractionation of stable Sr isotopes during carbonate precipitation and surface sorption process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable strontium (Sr) isotope has been used as a new tool for constraining the Sr budget in seawater. To further understand the controlling factors of Sr marine mass balance, we study Sr isotope fractionation of new delta87\\/86Sr* (measured 87Sr\\/86Sr without normalization) and delta88\\/86Sr in carbonate precipitation and Sr sorption experiments. For such purpose, a high-precision analytical technique was developed using

H. Liu; C. You; K. Huang; Y. Tu; C. Chung

2010-01-01

367

Stable isotope discrimination during soil denitrification: Production and consumption of nitrous oxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measuring the stable isotope composition of nitrous oxide (N2O) evolved from soil could improve our understanding of the relative contributions of the main microbial processes (nitrification and denitrification) responsible for N2O formation in soil. However, interpretation of the isotopic data in N2O is complicated by the lack of knowledge of fractionation parameters by different microbial processes responsible for N2O production

Oleg V. Menyailo; Bruce A. Hungate

2006-01-01

368

Stream-water stable isotopes, moisture fluxes, complex topography and isotopic fractionation along the South Central Andes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stable-isotope data and modeling studies have focused on establishing a relationship between elevation and the ?18O and ?D of precipitation in order to interpret paleo-isotope data in terms of past moisture sources and changes in the distribution of rainfall. Far less is known about how local topographic features such as the height and relief of orographic barriers and/or valley geometry influence stable isotope fractionation by modulating moisture pathways. We establish regional characteristics of stable-isotopes in rainfall and stream water from NW Argentina, and quantify the impact of topography from different morphotectonic regions (e.g., broken foreland, fold and thrust belt, orogenic plateau) on the degree of isotopic fractionation. The Central Andes constitute a major orographic barrier to atmospheric circulation. Moisture-bearing air masses rise along their eastern flanks, leading to heavy convective rainfall during austral summer. We present results of the ?18O and ?D composition of water from 219 streams along three E-W transects between 22S and 28S, crossing several orographic barriers, intermontane basins and the Puna Plateau. Stream-water ?18O for the different segments ranges between - 3.6 to -6.7 (VSMOW) in the southern broken foreland, between -5.3 to -11.4 in the transition zone between the Subandes foreland-fold-and-thrust belt and the broken foreland, and between -6.1 to -11.6 in Subandes. In combination with TRMM-satellite derived rainfall and a thermodynamic model for the isotopic evolution of precipitation, our data reveal: (1) a strong N-S gradient in the effectiveness of isotopic fractionation in relation to different topographic configurations of the orographic front and plateau flank, resulting in a two- to three-fold difference in the efficiency of rainwater isotopic fractionation ; (2) a strong relationship between the isotopic signal and elevation along the wedge topography of the Subandes, contrasting with a weak relationship in the complex topography of the broken foreland system, due to the characteristics of moisture pathways through the intermontane basin zone; (3) a "critical" orographic barrier that forces an additional 50% rain-out of the remaining moisture behind the first orographic barrier to the east of the Puna and an orographic barrier threshold elevation between 2 to 2.5 km; and (4) an unequal distribution of catchment rainfall, resulting in a deviation from expected catchment isotopic values. Thus, in addition to different moisture sources, complex topography significantly modifies modern stable-isotope values. The influence of the topographic pathway is most pronounced in the broken-foreland province, which provides multiple pathways for moisture to penetrate into the orogen, resulting in poor correlations between isotopic fractionation and elevation. In contrast, the laterally-continuous orographic ramp of the Subandes yields strong correlations between isotopic fractionation and elevation. Therefore, isotopic records derived from soil-carbonates, plant-biomarkers, volcanic glass, and teeth in areas with similar complex topography may be problematic in reflecting elevation changes and tracking the tectonic build up of orography.

Rohrmann, A.; Strecker, M. R.; Clarke, B. A.; Bookhagen, B.; Mulch, A.; Sachse, D.

2012-12-01

369

Effect of accumulation rate on water stable isotopes of near-surface snow in inland Antarctica  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

changes in water stable isotopes in polar firn were investigated at three sites characterized by different accumulation rates along the East Antarctic ice divide near Dome Fuji. Water stable isotopes, major ion concentrations, and tritium contents of three 2-4 m deep pits were measured at high resolution (2 cm). Temporally, the snow pits cover the past 50 years with snow accumulation rates in the range of 29-41 kg m-2 a-1 around Dome Fuji. Oxygen isotopic profiles in the three pits do not show annual fluctuations, but instead exhibit multiyear cycles. These multiyear cycles are lower in frequency at Dome Fuji as compared with the other two sites. Peaks of water stable isotopes in the multiyear cycles correspond to some ion concentration minima in the pits, although such relationships are not observed in coastal regions. We propose that the extremely low accumulation environment keeps the snow layer at the near surface, which result in postdepositional modifications of isotopic signals by processes such as ventilation and vapor condensation-sublimation. We estimate that oxygen isotopic ratios could be modified by >10 and that the original seasonal cycle could be completely overprinted under the accumulation conditions at Dome Fuji. Moreover, stake measurements at Dome Fuji suggest that the large variability in snow accumulation rate is the cause of the multiyear cycles.

Hoshina, Yu; Fujita, Koji; Nakazawa, Fumio; Iizuka, Yoshinori; Miyake, Takayuki; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Kuramoto, Takayuki; Fujita, Shuji; Motoyama, Hideaki

2014-01-01

370

Evaluation of stable tungsten isotopes in the resolved resonance region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last decade benchmark experiments and simulations, together with newly obtained neutron cross section data, have pointed out deficiencies in evaluated data files of W isotopes. The role of W as a fundamental structural material in different nuclear applications fully justifies a new evaluation of 182, 183, 184, 186W neutron resonance parameters. In this regard transmission and capture cross section measurements on natural and enriched tungsten samples were performed at the GELINA facility of the EC-JRC-IRMM. A resonance parameter file used as input in the resonance shape analysis was prepared based on the available literature and adjusted in first instance to transmission data.

Emiliani, F.; Guber, K.; Kopecky, S.; Lampoudis, C.; Massimi, C.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Volev, K.

2013-03-01

371

Determination of Key Intermediates in Cholesterol and Bile Acid Biosynthesis by Stable Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry  

PubMed Central

For more than a decade, we have developed stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry methods to quantify key intermediates in cholesterol and bile acid biosynthesis, mevalonate and oxysterols, respectively. The methods are more sensitive and reproducible than conventional radioisotope (RI), gas-chromatography (GC) or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods, so that they are applicable not only to samples from experimental animals but also to small amounts of human specimens. In this paper, we review the development of stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry for quantifying mevalonate and oxysterols in biological materials, and demonstrate the usefulness of this technique. PMID:19609389

Yoshida, Tadashi; Honda, Akira; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Matsuzaki, Yasushi

2008-01-01

372

Stable Isotope Dynamics in Cownose Rays (Rhinoptera bonasus) within the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico  

E-print Network

sincerest gratitude to Dr. R. J. David Wells for agreeing to serve as my committee chair and Dr. Tasha L. Metz for her support throughout my tenure at Texas A&M University at Galveston and for her dedication to the sea turtle entanglement netting program... Corrected standard ellipse area SIA Stable isotope analysis SIBER Stable Isotope Bayesian Ellipses in R STFERL Sea Turtle and Fisheries Ecology Research Laboratory TA Total area VPDB Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite YOY Young-of-the-year ix TABLE OF CONTENTS...

St. Clair, Katherine I

2014-07-25

373

Use of stable isotopes to identify sources of methane in Appalachian Basin shallow groundwaters: a review.  

PubMed

Development of unconventional shale gas reservoirs in the Appalachian Basin has raised questions regarding the potential for these activities to affect shallow groundwater resources. Geochemical indicators, such as stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes of methane, stable carbon isotopes of ethane, and hydrocarbon ratios, have been used to evaluate methane sources however their utility is complicated by influences from multiple physical (e.g., mixing) and geochemical (e.g., redox) processes. Baseline sampling of shallow aquifers prior to development, and measurement of additional geochemical indicators within samples from across the Appalachian Basin, may aid in identifying natural causes for dissolved methane in shallow groundwater versus development-induced pathways. PMID:25033440

Hakala, J Alexandra

2014-09-20

374

Stable isotope analysis of precipitation samples obtained via crowdsourcing reveals the spatiotemporal evolution of Superstorm Sandy.  

PubMed

Extra-tropical cyclones, such as 2012 Superstorm Sandy, pose a significant climatic threat to the northeastern United Sates, yet prediction of hydrologic and thermodynamic processes within such systems is complicated by their interaction with mid-latitude water patterns as they move poleward. Fortunately, the evolution of these systems is also recorded in the stable isotope ratios of storm-associated precipitation and water vapor, and isotopic analysis provides constraints on difficult-to-observe cyclone dynamics. During Superstorm Sandy, a unique crowdsourced approach enabled 685 precipitation samples to be obtained for oxygen and hydrogen isotopic analysis, constituting the largest isotopic sampling of a synoptic-scale system to date. Isotopically, these waters span an enormous range of values (> 21 for ?(18)O, > 160 for ?(2)H) and exhibit strong spatiotemporal structure. Low isotope ratios occurred predominantly in the west and south quadrants of the storm, indicating robust isotopic distillation that tracked the intensity of the storm's warm core. Elevated values of deuterium-excess (> 25) were found primarily in the New England region after Sandy made landfall. Isotope mass balance calculations and Lagrangian back-trajectory analysis suggest that these samples reflect the moistening of dry continental air entrained from a mid-latitude trough. These results demonstrate the power of rapid-response isotope monitoring to elucidate the structure and dynamics of water cycling within synoptic-scale systems and improve our understanding of storm evolution, hydroclimatological impacts, and paleo-storm proxies. PMID:24618882

Good, Stephen P; Mallia, Derek V; Lin, John C; Bowen, Gabriel J

2014-01-01

375

Stable Isotope Analysis of Precipitation Samples Obtained via Crowdsourcing Reveals the Spatiotemporal Evolution of Superstorm Sandy  

PubMed Central

Extra-tropical cyclones, such as 2012 Superstorm Sandy, pose a significant climatic threat to the northeastern United Sates, yet prediction of hydrologic and thermodynamic processes within such systems is complicated by their interaction with mid-latitude water patterns as they move poleward. Fortunately, the evolution of these systems is also recorded in the stable isotope ratios of storm-associated precipitation and water vapor, and isotopic analysis provides constraints on difficult-to-observe cyclone dynamics. During Superstorm Sandy, a unique crowdsourced approach enabled 685 precipitation samples to be obtained for oxygen and hydrogen isotopic analysis, constituting the largest isotopic sampling of a synoptic-scale system to date. Isotopically, these waters span an enormous range of values (21 for O, 160 for H) and exhibit strong spatiotemporal structure. Low isotope ratios occurred predominantly in the west and south quadrants of the storm, indicating robust isotopic distillation that tracked the intensity of the storm's warm core. Elevated values of deuterium-excess (25) were found primarily in the New England region after Sandy made landfall. Isotope mass balance calculations and Lagrangian back-trajectory analysis suggest that these samples reflect the moistening of dry continental air entrained from a mid-latitude trough. These results demonstrate the power of rapid-response isotope monitoring to elucidate the structure and dynamics of water cycling within synoptic-scale systems and improve our understanding of storm evolution, hydroclimatological impacts, and paleo-storm proxies. PMID:24618882

Good, Stephen P.; Mallia, Derek V.; Lin, John C.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

2014-01-01

376

Analytical modelling of stable isotope fractionation of volatile organic compounds in the unsaturated zone  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Analytical models were developed that simulate stable isotope ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) near a point source contamination in the unsaturated zone. The models describe diffusive transport of VOCs, biodegradation and source ageing. The mass transport is governed by Fick's law for diffusion. The equation for reactive transport of VOCs in the soil gas phase was solved for different source geometries and for different boundary conditions. Model results were compared to experimental data from a one-dimensional laboratory column and a radial-symmetric field experiment. The comparison yielded a satisfying agreement. The model results clearly illustrate the significant isotope fractionation by gas phase diffusion under transient state conditions. This leads to an initial depletion of heavy isotopes with increasing distance from the source. The isotope evolution of the source is governed by the combined effects of isotope fractionation due to vaporisation, diffusion and biodegradation. The net effect can lead to an enrichment or depletion of the heavy isotope in the remaining organic phase, depending on the compound and element considered. Finally, the isotope evolution of molecules migrating away from the source and undergoing degradation is governed by a combined degradation and diffusion isotope effect. This suggests that, in the unsaturated zone, the interpretation of biodegradation of VOC based on isotopic data must always be based on a model combining gas phase diffusion and degradation.

Bouchard, Daniel; Cornaton, Fabien; Hhener, Patrick; Hunkeler, Daniel

2011-01-01

377

Stable isotope ratio as a tracer of mangrove carbon in Malaysian ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ratio of stable carbon isotopes (d13C) in plants and animals from Malaysian mangrove swamps, coastal inlets, and offshore waters was determined. Vascular plants of the swamps were isotopically distinct ( xs.d.=-27.11.2) from plankton (-21.00.3) and other algae (-18.72.2). Animals from the swamps (-20.94.1) and inlets (-19.82.5) had a wide range of isotope ratios (-28.6 to-15.4), indicating consumption of both

M. R. Rodelli; J. N. Gearing; P. J. Gearing; N. Marshall; A. Sasekumar

1984-01-01

378

Molecular and stable carbon isotopic compositions of hopanoids in seep carbonates from the South China Sea continental slope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The lipid biomarkers of hopanoids in cold seep carbonates from the South China Sea continental slope were investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) and gas chromatography-isotope ratio-mass spectrometer (GC-ir-MS). The distribution of hopanes/hopenes shows a preference for the biological 17?(H), 21?(H)-over the geological 17?(H), 21?(H)-configuration. This interpretation is in agreement with the strong odd-even preference of long-chain n-alkanes in those samples, suggesting that the ?? hopanes may be the early diagenetic products of biohopanoids and the ??, ?? configurations of hopanes were mainly derived from allochthonous sources contributing to the organic matter of the carbonates. In terms of hopanoid acids, the C30 to C33 17?(H), 21?(H)-hopanoid acids were detected with C32 17?(H), 21?(H)-hopanoid acid being the most abundant. However, there is a significant difference in stable carbon isotopic compostions of the C32 17?(H), 21?(H)-hopanoic acid among samples (-30.7 to -69.8). The ?13C values match well with the carbon isotopic compositions of SRB-derived iso-/anteiso-C15:0 fatty acids in the samples, which strongly depend on the carbon utilization types by microbe. The most abundant compound of hopanols detected in the samples, C30-17?(H), 21?(H)-hopanol, may be a good indicator of diagenetic product of type I methanotrophs. The molecular and carbon isotopic compositions of hopanoids demonstrate clearly that there is a combination contribution of both SRB and type I or type X methanotrophs to the source organism in the seep carbonates from the South China Sea continental slope.

Guan, Hongxiang; Sun, Yongge; Mao, Shengyi; Zhu, Xiaowei; Wu, Nengyou

2014-10-01

379

Multiple Group Analysis (MGA): A gamma-ray spectrum analysis code for determining plutonium isotopic abundances  

SciTech Connect

MGA calculates relative isotopic abundances of plutonium and other actinides in a sample. The code performs its analysis using data from a gamma-ray spectrum of the sample taken with a germanium detector. This volume describes the structure of the program and the procedures used for measuring samples and analyzing the spectra. It is assumed that the user is familiar with standard practices and equipment used in gamma-ray spectrometry.

Gunnink, R.; Ruhter, W.D.

1990-09-01

380

Relation of Phanerozoic stable isotope excursions to climate, bacterial metabolism, and major extinctions.  

PubMed

Conspicuous global stable carbon isotope excursions that are recorded in marine sedimentary rocks of Phanerozoic age and were associated with major extinctions have generally paralleled global stable oxygen isotope excursions. All of these phenomena are therefore likely to share a common origin through global climate change. Exceptional patterns for carbon isotope excursions resulted from massive carbon burial during warm intervals of widespread marine anoxic conditions. The many carbon isotope excursions that parallel those for oxygen isotopes can to a large degree be accounted for by the Q10 pattern of respiration for bacteria: As temperature changed along continental margins, where ?90% of marine carbon burial occurs today, rates of remineralization of isotopically light carbon must have changed exponentially. This would have reduced organic carbon burial during global warming and increased it during global cooling. Also contributing to the ?(13)C excursions have been release and uptake of methane by clathrates, the positive correlation between temperature and degree of fractionation of carbon isotopes by phytoplankton at temperatures below ?15, and increased phytoplankton productivity during "icehouse" conditions. The Q10 pattern for bacteria and climate-related changes in clathrate volume represent positive feedbacks for climate change. PMID:21041682

Stanley, Steven M

2010-11-01

381

National uses and needs for separated stable isotopes in physics, chemistry, and geoscience research  

SciTech Connect

Present uses of separated stable isotopes in the fields of physics, chemistry, and the geosciences have been surveyed to identify current supply problems and to determine future needs. Demand for separated isotopes remains strong, with 220 different nuclides having been used in the past three years. The largest needs, in terms of both quantity and variety of isotopes, are found in nuclear physics research. Current problems include a lack of availability of many nuclides, unsatisfactory enrichment of rare species, and prohibitively high costs for certain important isotopes. It is expected that demands for separated isotopes will remain roughly at present levels, although there will be a shift toward more requests for highly enriched rare isotopes. Significantly greater use will be made of neutron-rich nuclides below A = 100 for producing exotic ion beams at various accelerators. Use of transition metal nuclei for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy will expand. In addition, calibration standards will be required for the newer techniques of radiological dating, such as the Sm/Nd and Lu/Hf methods, but in relatively small quantities. Most members of the research community would be willing to pay considerably more than they do now to maintain adequate supplies of stable isotopes.

Zisman, M.S.

1982-01-01

382

Early diagenesis and organic matter preservation--A molecular stable isotope perspective  

SciTech Connect

Through new developments in stable isotope capability, gas chromatography coupled to a stable isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC/IRMS), the molecular pathways of the diagenetic reactions can be observed on the components themselves. The authors report the results of laboratory-controlled degradation experiments of fresh organic substrates. Isotopically resolvable materials were used. Seagrass showed slight enrichments in [delta]N-15 with little change in [delta]C-13 following four weeks of decomposition. During that period the identifiable amino acid content decreased by approx. 50% for each amino acid. Mixtures of marine sediment with the same seagrass showed enrichments in nitrogen with associated depletions in carbon isotopic compositions over the same time span. Control experiments on the sediments without added fresh seagrass showed no change in isotopic content. These changes are attributed to hydrolysis, deamination and decarboxylation reactions. Isotopic fractionations of similar size and direction have been observed in laboratory studies on peptide hydrolysis and natural samples of particulate organic materials. At the molecular level, using GC/IRMS, certain amino acids are seen to decrease in C-13 content while others become increasingly enriched in C-13. Similar reactions are seen in carbohydrates. The molecular isotope approach indicates that the process of diagenesis and preservation is significantly more complex than simple breakdown and loss. A large portion of the organic matter eventually preserved in organic-rich deposits can be attributed to new production in the deposit.

Macko, S.A. (Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. Environmental Sciences); Engel, M.H.; Qian, Y. (Univ. Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). School Geology and Geophysics)

1992-01-01

383

Use of Stable Isotopes to Investigate Keratin Deposition in the Claw Tips of Ducks  

PubMed Central

Stable isotopes derived from the claws of birds could be used to determine the migratory origins of birds if the time periods represented in excised sections of claws were known. We investigated new keratin growth in the claws of adult female Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis) by estimating the equilibration rates of stable isotopes (?13C, ?15N, and ?2H) from the breeding grounds into 1 mm claw tips. We sampled birds on their breeding ground through time and found that it took approximately 33.5 months for isotope values in most claw tips to equilibrate to isotope values that reflected those present in the environment on their breeding grounds. Results from this study suggest that isotopes equilibrate slowly into claw tips of Lesser Scaup, suggesting isotopes could potentially be used to determine the wintering grounds of birds. We suggest using controlled feeding experiments or longitudinal field investigations to understand claw growth and isotopic equilibration in claw tips. Such information would be valuable in ascertaining whether claw tips can be used in future studies to identify the migratory origins of birds. PMID:24282563

Hopkins, John B.; Cutting, Kyle A.; Warren, Jeffrey M.

2013-01-01

384

Determination of hexavalent chromium reduction using Cr stable isotopes: isotopic fractionation factors for permeable reactive barrier materials.  

PubMed

Cr stable isotope measurements can provide improved estimates of the extent of Cr(VI) reduction to less toxic Cr(III). The relationship between observed (53)Cr/(52)Cr ratio shifts and the extent of reduction can be calibrated by determining the isotopic fractionation factor for relevant reactions. Permeable reactive barriers (PRB) made of Fe(0) and in situ redox manipulation (ISRM) zones effectively remediate Cr-contaminated aquifers. Here, we determine the isotopic fractionations for dominant reductants in reactive barriers and reduced sediments obtained from an ISRM zone at the US DOE's Hanford site. In all cases, significant isotopic fractionation was observed; fractionation (expressed as ?) was -3.91 for Fe(II)-doped goethite, -2.11 for FeS, -2.65 for green rust, -2.67 for FeCO(3), and -3.18 for ISRM zone sediments. These results provide a better calibration of the relationship between Cr isotope ratios and the extent of Cr(VI) reduction and aid in interpretation of Cr isotope data from systems with reactive barriers. PMID:22424120

Basu, Anirban; Johnson, Thomas M

2012-05-15

385

Stable isotope evolution and paleolimnology of ancient Lake Creede  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The lacustrine carbonate and travertine (tufa) deposits of ancient Lake Creede preserve a remarkable record of the isotopic evolution of the lake. That record indicates that the ?18O of the lake water, and by analogy its salinity, evolved through evaporation. Limited ans less reliable data on hydrous minerals and fluid inclusions in early diagenetic carbonates indicate that the ?D of the lake waters also evolved through evaporation. The isotope data place restrictions on models of the physical limnology of the lake and its evolution. The closed-basin Lake Creede formed shortly after collapse of the 26.9 Ma Creede caldera. Throughout most of its history it occupied the northern three quarters of the moat between the resurgent dome and wall of the caldera. The Creede Formation was deposited in the basin, dominantly as lacustrine sediments. Travertine mounds interfinger with Creede Formation sediments along the inner and outer margins of the lake basin. An estimated one-half of the original thickness of the Creede Formation has been lost mainly to erosion although scattered remnants of the upper portion remain on the caldera walls. Two diamond core holes (CCM-1 and CCM-2) sampled the uneroded portion of the Creede Formation as part of the U.S. Continental Drilling Program. Volcaniclastic material, including tuff units deposited directly into the lake and ash washed in from the watershed, compose the main lithologies of the Creede Formation. These volcaniclastic strata were produced by episodic ring-fracture volcanism. Lacustrine carbonates make up about 15% of the section sampled by drill core. They occur as 1 mm to 2 cm low-Mg calcite laminar alternating with siliciclastic laminar in scattered intervals throughout the preserved section. The carbonate laminar are accumulations of 5-20 ?m crystallites (microparites) and brine shrimmp fecal pellets (peloids) composed mainly of microparasite particles. Low-Mg calcite also occurs as an early diagenetic replacement of gypsum or ikaite (CaCO3 6H2O) crystals grown displacively in the muds and silts neat the water-sediment interface (rice grains). Other studies indicate that aragonite was the original CaCO3 precipitate forming the microsparite and pelodial laminae and that it converted to calcite suring burual diagenesis. Samples from CCM-2 and nearby outcrop do not appear to have undergone significant isotope exchange during recrystallization. Samples from CCM-1 and nearby outcrop, however, appear to have undergone extensive oxygen isotope exchange with meteoric water-dominated fluids possibly during a local 17.6 Ma hydrothermal event. The ?18-?13C data set produced by microsampling of individual carbonate lamellae and rice grains is exceptional in several aspects and provides important clues concerning the evolution of limnologic structure of the lake and its chemical and isotopic composition. Travertine and ikaite pseudomorphs in travertine deposits extendthe record an additional 330m above the collar of CCM-2. The ?18O values on the CCM-2 samples range from 10.4% to 37.3% and ?13C values range from -10.8% to 9.6%. The data fall into two distinct groups, a covariant group and an invariant group. The covariant group shows a strong negative covariance and a large range of ?18O and ?13C values. The negative covariance is opposite that normally reported for lacustrine carbonates. The large range of ?18O and ?13C values requires that the carbonates precipitated from waters have a large range of temperature and carbon and oxygen isotopic composition. The invariant group has a narrow range of large ?18O values (35% to 2%) and a wide range of ?13C values (-10.8% to 9.6%), indicating precipitation from waters with a narrow range of temperature and ?18O but a wide range of in ?13C of aqueous carbon. The ranges of isotope values for microsparite and peloid samples are virtually identical; two-thirds are in the covariant group. By contrast, the values for almost all rice grain samples are in the in

Rye, Robert O.; Bethke, Philip M.; Finkelstein, David B.

2000-01-01

386

Stable isotope fractionation by thermal diffusion through partially molten wet and dry silicate rocks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water plays a fundamental role in affecting geochemical transport and physical properties of magmas. Here we show the previously undocumented behavior of water within partially molten silicate resting in a temperature gradient, producing O, Li and H isotope redistribution by thermal diffusion leading to enrichment of light isotopes at the hot end of the gradient. After weeks to months, fully molten as well as mostly crystalline portions of water-bearing experiments develop remarkably large isotope and chemical redistributions: up to 28 for ?18O, 144 for ?D, and 18 for ?7Li. In contrast, long-term dry experiments develop smaller (5 ?18O) isotopic fractionations only in the hotter end where it is molten or partially molten. Isotope fractionation of oxygen is linearly related to temperature, and the magnitude of isotopic separation per C is 2 larger for wet experiments than dry ones. We explain this by water de-polymerizing the silicate structure leading to a smaller size of diffusing SiOx fragments. The magnitude of isotope separation between the hot and cold ends for Li, Mg, Fe, O, and H isotopes increases linearly with ?Mheavy-light/Mlight. These relationships provide predictive tests for natural rocks and highlight the role of water in isotope and compositional redistribution during temperature gradient mediated processes. We discuss the implications to natural environments in which the lightest stable isotopes (H, Li, O) with the greatest ?Mheavy-light/Mlight and fastest diffusion coefficients are capable of achieving mass-dependent redistribution in a transient temperature gradient. These experiments underscore the importance of solution-reprecipitation in wet subsolidus systems and demonstrate that isotopic redistribution can be established 6 orders of magnitude quicker than by diffusion through a traditional silicate melt at higher temperature. This has important implications for timescales of natural isotope and chemical redistribution by thermal diffusion.

Bindeman, I. N.; Lundstrom, C. C.; Bopp, C.; Huang, F.

2013-03-01

387

Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios of Phenolic Compounds in Secondary Particulate Organic Matter Formed by Photooxidation of Toluene  

E-print Network

Compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios for phenolic compounds in secondary particulate organic matter (POM) formed by photooxidation of toluene were studied. Secondary POM generated by photooxidation of toluene using a continuous-flow reactor and an 8 cubic meter indoor smog chamber was collected, and then extracted with acetonitrile. Eight phenolic compounds were identified in the extracts by a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer, and their compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios were determined by a gas chromatograph coupled with a combustion furnace followed by an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The majority of the products, including methylnitrophenols and methylnitrocatechols, were isotopically depleted by 5 to 6 permil compared to the initial isotope ratio for toluene, whereas the isotope ratio for 4_nitrophenol remained the same as the initial isotope ratio for toluene. Based on the reaction mechanisms postulated in literature, stable carbon isotope ratios of these produc...

Irei, Satoshi; Huang, Lin; Auld, Janeen; Collin, Fabrice; Hastie, Donald

2014-01-01

388

Establishing pathways of energy flow for insect predators using stable isotope ratios: field and laboratory evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantifying pathways of energy transfer between plants, pests, and beneficial insects is a necessary step toward maintaining\\u000a pest stable agroecosystems in the absence of chemical subsidies. A diet switching experiment utilizing a predatory ladybird\\u000a beetle, Hippodamia variegata (Goeze), evaluated the use of naturally occurring stable C and N isotopes as an economically feasible and safe method for\\u000a quantifying pathways of

P. H. Ostrom; Manuel Colunga-Garcia; Stuart H. Gage

1996-01-01

389

Seasonal variation of stable isotopic compositions recorded in a laminated tufa, SW Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-resolution stable isotopic analyses of an annually laminated tufa from Shirokawa, SW Japan, show cyclic variations that correspond to mm-scale summer (dense) and winter (porous) laminae. Both ?18O and ?13C values are high in winter and low in summer, and correlate well with each other (r=0.88). Because the ?18O content of stream water has remained relatively stable over time, the

J. Matsuoka; A. Kano; T. Oba; T. Watanabe; S. Sakai; K. Seto

2001-01-01

390

Stable isotope fractionation analysis as a tool to monitor biodegradation in contaminated acquifers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The assessment of biodegradation in contaminated aquifers has become an issue of increasing importance in the recent years. To some extent, this can be related to the acceptance of intrinsic bioremediation or monitored natural attenuation as a means to manage contaminated sites. Among the few existing methods to detect biodegradation in the subsurface, stable isotope fractionation analysis (SIFA) is one of the most promising approaches which is pronounced by the drastically increasing number of applications. This review covers the recent laboratory and field studies assessing biodegradation of contaminants via stable isotope analysis. Stable isotope enrichment factors have been found that vary from no fractionation for dioxygenase reactions converting aromatic hydrocarbons over moderate fractionation by monooxygenase reactions ( ?=-3) and some anaerobic studies on microbial degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons ( ?=-1.7) to larger fractionations by anaerobic dehalogenation reactions of chlorinated solvents ( ?=between -5 and -30). The different isotope enrichment factors can be related to the respective biochemical reactions. Based on that knowledge, we discuss under what circumstances SIFA can be used for a qualitative or even a quantitative assessment of biodegradation in the environment. In a steadily increasing number of cases, it was possible to explain biodegradation processes in the field based on isotope enrichment factors obtained from laboratory experiments with pure cultures and measured isotope values from the field. The review will focus on the aerobic and anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents as the major contaminants of groundwater. Advances in the instrumental development for stable isotope analysis are only mentioned if it is important for the understanding of the application.

Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Morasch, Barbara; Griebler, Christian; Richnow, Hans H.

2004-12-01

391

Study of isotopic variations in black powder: reflections on the use of stable isotopes in forensic science for source inference.  

PubMed

Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has recently made its appearance in the forensic community. This high-precision technology has already been applied to a broad range of forensic fields such as illicit drugs, explosives and flammable liquids, where current, routinely used techniques have limited powers of discrimination. The conclusions drawn from the majority of these IRMS studies appear to be very promising. Used in a comparative process, as in food or drug authentication, the measurement of stable isotope ratios is a new and remarkable analytical tool for the discrimination or the identification of a substance with a definite source or origin. However, the research consists mostly of preliminary studies. The significance of this 'new' piece of information needs to be evaluated in light of a forensic framework to assess the actual potential and validity of IRMS, considering the characteristics of each field. Through the isotopic study of black powder, this paper aims at illustrating the potential of the method and the limitations of current knowledge in stable isotopes when facing forensic problems. PMID:19603456

Gentile, Natacha; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Delmont, Olivier

2009-08-30

392

High-Temperature Equilibrium Isotope Fractionation of Non-Traditional Stable Isotopes: Experiments, Theory, and Applications (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experiments are crucial for validating our understanding of stable isotope fractionation at high temperatures. The three-isotope method has been applied with success in the Si, Mg, Fe, and Ni isotope systems to date. The results of these experiments can be compared with expectations from theory and measurements of natural samples. Qualitative insights into the partitioning of heavy and light isotopes between mineral phases are gained by treating the force constant for relevant bonds, Kf j, as electrostatic in origin. The ionic model, based on the mean bond strength as defined by Pauling, has obvious limitations but is useful for rationalizing structures and site occupancies in silicates and oxide minerals and is equally useful in formulating expectations for isotope fractionation between phases. In some cases, as in Fe isotopes in spinels, the expectations are contrary to predictions based on modeling but similar to observations in natural samples. Experimental verification is required. The force constant for a bond between cation i (Mg, Fe, etc.) and anion j (e.g., O) can be written in terms of mean bond strengths si and sj (as defined by Pauling) as Kf,ij = sisj e2 (1-n)/(4 ? ?? r3ij ) where ?o is the electric constant (vacuum permittivity for simplicity), e is the charge of an electron, n is the exponent in the Born-Mayer formulation for ion repulsion (Born and Mayer 1932), and rij is the interatomic spacing. This equation shows explicitly that larger values for the force constant Kf correspond to smaller coordination numbers (via si and sj). We therefore expect an inverse relationship between isotope ratios (heavy/light) and coordination of its oxygen bond partners in silicate and oxides minerals and this is verified in mantle minerals. Our work with Fe isotope partitioning in mantle spinels suggests that coordination may be equally important as oxidation state, recognizing that these distinctions are not orthogonal. Recent work on the Mg isotopic compositions of mantle minerals underscores the utility and complexity of inter-mineral partitioning of 25Mg/24Mg and 26Mg/24Mg and tests our understanding of the crystal chemical controls on isotope partitioning of the major rock-forming elements. In our initial work on mantle minerals we pointed out that the largest inter-mineral fractionation in the Mg isotopic system in many mantle xenoliths is between spinel and olivine owing to the presence of tetrahedral Mg in the former. The observation that ?25Mg spinel > ?25Mg pyroxene > ?25Mg olivine is consistent with our understanding of the bonding environment of Mg in these minerals and our data matched expectations from theory. This expectation from theory and measurements of natural samples has now been verified experimentally using the three-isotope method. Complexity arises with substitution of Cr and Fe in the spinel structure, again warranting further experimental calibration. Stable isotope ratios of the rock-forming elements provide not only new ways of estimating temperatures of formation and resetting, but also provide an independent method for identifying mineral parageneses. For example, we have found consistent evidence for isotopic disequilibrium between pyroxene and other phases in mantle xenoliths. The full potential of these isotope systems will only be realized with exhaustive exploration of the crystal chemical influences on inter-mineral fractionations.

Young, E. D.; Lazar, G. C.; Macris, C. A.; Manning, C. E.; Schauble, E. A.; Shahar, A.

2013-12-01

393

Preparation of heteroelement-incorporated and stable isotope-labeled protein standards for quantitative proteomics.  

PubMed

A major obstacle for further development of quantitative proteomics is the lack of accurately quantified protein standards. The following protocol describes innovative methods for the production of stable isotope-labeled protein standards. Their production is achieved by cell-free protein synthesis, which enables simultaneous incorporation of selenomethionine and stable isotope-labeled amino acids. The selenium tag allows sensitive and accurate quantification by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The stable isotope label allows internal standardization in mass spectrometry-based proteomics by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Both label types can be placed within a single protein RISQ standard (recombinant isotope-labeled and selenium quantified) or can be distributed over two types of related RSQ and RIQ standards for the same target protein (recombinant selenium quantified and recombinant isotope-labeled and quantified). The combination of cell-free synthesis as production method with ICP-MS and ESI-MS/MS as detection methods results in protein standards, which are quantified at an outstanding level of accuracy. PMID:24792000

Konopka, Anna; Zinn, Nico; Wild, Christina; Lehmann, Wolf D

2014-01-01

394

The conflict between cheetahs and humans on Namibian farmland elucidated by stable isotope diet analysis.  

PubMed

Large areas of Namibia are covered by farmland, which is also used by game and predator species. Because it can cause conflicts with farmers when predators, such as cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), hunt livestock, we assessed whether livestock constitutes a significant part of the cheetah diet by analysing the stable isotope composition of blood and tissue samples of cheetahs and their potential prey species. According to isotopic similarities, we defined three isotopic categories of potential prey: members of a C4 food web with high ?15N values (gemsbok, cattle, springhare and guinea fowl) and those with low ?15N values (hartebeest, warthog), and members of a C3 food web, namely browsers (eland, kudu, springbok, steenbok and scrub hare). We quantified the trophic discrimination of heavy isotopes in cheetah muscle in 9 captive individuals and measured an enrichment for 15N (3.2) but not for 13C in relation to food. We captured 53 free-ranging cheetahs of which 23 were members of groups. Cheetahs of the same group were isotopically distinct from members of other groups, indicating that group members shared their prey. Solitary males (n?=?21) and males in a bachelor groups (n?=?11) fed mostly on hartebeest and warthogs, followed by browsers in case of solitary males, and by grazers with high ?15N values in case of bachelor groups. Female cheetahs (n?=?9) predominantly fed on browsers and used also hartebeest and warthogs. Mixing models suggested that the isotopic prey category that included cattle was only important, if at all, for males living in bachelor groups. Stable isotope analysis of fur, muscle, red blood cells and blood plasma in 9 free-ranging cheetahs identified most individuals as isotopic specialists, focussing on isotopically distinct prey categories as their food. PMID:25162403

Voigt, Christian C; Thalwitzer, Susanne; Melzheimer, Jrg; Blanc, Anne-Sophie; Jago, Mark; Wachter, Bettina

2014-01-01

395

Seasonal variation of Fatty acids and stable carbon isotopes in sponges as indicators for nutrition: biomarkers in sponges identified.  

PubMed

To get a better understanding of sponge feeding biology and efficiencies, the fatty acid (FA) composition and (13)C natural abundance of sponges and of suspended particulate matter (SPM) from surrounding seawater was studied in different seasons at three locations. Haliclona oculata and Haliclona xena from the Oosterschelde, the Netherlands, Halichondria panicea and H. xena from Lake Veere, the Netherlands, and Aplysina aerophoba and Dysidea avara from the Mediterranean, Spain, were studied. Several FA biomarkers for different algal groups, bacteria and sponge biomass were identified in all sponges. The FA concentration variation in sponges was related to changes in fatty acid concentration in SPM. Stable carbon isotopic ratios (?(13)C) in sponge specific FAs showed very limited seasonal variation at all sites. Algal FAs in sponges were mainly acquired from the SPM through active filtration in all seasons. At the two sites in the Netherlands only in May (spring), the sponge specific FAs had similar ?(13)C ratios as algal FAs, suggesting that sponges were mainly growing during spring and probably summer. During autumn and winter, they were still actively filtering, but the food collected during this period had little effect on sponge ?(13)C values suggesting limited incorporation of filtered material into the sponge body. The sponge A. aerophoba relied mostly on the symbiotic bacteria. In conclusion, fatty acid composition in combination with stable carbon isotope analysis can be used to analyze the food source of sponges. PMID:25107690

Koopmans, Marieke; van Rijswijk, Pieter; Boschker, Henricus T S; Marco, Houtekamer; Martens, Dirk; Wijffels, Rene H

2015-02-01

396

Abundant and stable char residues in soils: implications for soil fertility and carbon sequestration.  

PubMed

Large-scale soil application of biochar may enhance soil fertility, increasing crop production for the growing human population, while also sequestering atmospheric carbon. But reaching these beneficial outcomes requires an understanding of the relationships among biochar's structure, stability, and contribution to soil fertility. Using quantitative (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we show that Terra Preta soils (fertile anthropogenic dark earths in Amazonia that were enriched with char >800 years ago) consist predominantly of char residues composed of ~6 fused aromatic rings substituted by COO(-) groups that significantly increase the soils' cation-exchange capacity and thus the retention of plant nutrients. We also show that highly productive, grassland-derived soils in the U.S. (Mollisols) contain char (generated by presettlement fires) that is structurally comparable to char in the Terra Preta soils and much more abundant than previously thought (~40-50% of organic C). Our findings indicate that these oxidized char residues represent a particularly stable, abundant, and fertility-enhancing form of soil organic matter. PMID:22834642

Mao, J-D; Johnson, R L; Lehmann, J; Olk, D C; Neves, E G; Thompson, M L; Schmidt-Rohr, K

2012-09-01

397

Stable water isotope simulation by current land-surface schemes:Results of IPILPS phase 1  

SciTech Connect

Phase 1 of isotopes in the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (iPILPS) compares the simulation of two stable water isotopologues ({sup 1}H{sub 2} {sup 18}O and {sup 1}H{sup 2}H{sup 16}O) at the land-atmosphere interface. The simulations are off-line, with forcing from an isotopically enabled regional model for three locations selected to offer contrasting climates and ecotypes: an evergreen tropical forest, a sclerophyll eucalypt forest and a mixed deciduous wood. Here we report on the experimental framework, the quality control undertaken on the simulation results and the method of intercomparisons employed. The small number of available isotopically-enabled land-surface schemes (ILSSs) limits the drawing of strong conclusions but, despite this, there is shown to be benefit in undertaking this type of isotopic intercomparison. Although validation of isotopic simulations at the land surface must await more, and much more complete, observational campaigns, we find that the empirically-based Craig-Gordon parameterization (of isotopic fractionation during evaporation) gives adequately realistic isotopic simulations when incorporated in a wide range of land-surface codes. By introducing two new tools for understanding isotopic variability from the land surface, the Isotope Transfer Function and the iPILPS plot, we show that different hydrological parameterizations cause very different isotopic responses. We show that ILSS-simulated isotopic equilibrium is independent of the total water and energy budget (with respect to both equilibration time and state), but interestingly the partitioning of available energy and water is a function of the models' complexity.

Henderson-Sellers, A.; Fischer, M.; Aleinov, I.; McGuffie, K.; Riley, W.J.; Schmidt, G.A.; Sturm, K.; Yoshimura, K.; Irannejad, P.

2005-10-31

398

Dietary segregation between two cohabiting species of sparrows revealed with stable isotope analysis  

E-print Network

, 1786)) and Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia (A. Wilson, 1810)) cohabit on many islands along, Melospiza melodia, Passerella iliaca, Song Sparrow, stable isotopes. Résumé : Les bruants fauves (Passerella iliaca (Merrem, 1786)) et les bruants chanteurs (Melospiza melodia (A. Wilson, 1810)) cohabitent dans de

399

Modeling of the stable carbon isotope ratio: Results and analysis using a regional model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Non Methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) are oxidized by the OH radical in the atmosphere, leading to secondary pollutants such as ozone and aldehydes, which play an important role in the creation of photochemical smog and secondary organic aerosols. Therefore it is important to understand the detailed sources and behavior of NMHCs. The study of the stable carbon isotope ratio (delta 13C)

Farida Dehghan

2006-01-01

400

From the Cover: Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in fast food: Signatures of corn and confinement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Americans spend >100 billion dollars on restaurant fast food each year; fast food meals comprise a disproportionate amount of both meat and calories within the U.S. diet. We used carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes to infer the source of feed to meat animals, the source of fat within fries, and the extent of fertilization and confinement inherent to production. We

A. Hope Jahren; Rebecca A. Kraft

2008-01-01

401

Diet of spotted bats (Euderma maculatum) in Arizona as indicated by fecal analysis and stable isotopes  

EPA Science Inventory

We assessed diet of spotted bats (Euderma maculatum (J.A. Allen, 1891)) by visual analysis of bat feces and stable carbon (d13C) and nitrogen (d15N) isotope analysis of bat feces, wing, hair, and insect prey. We collected 33 fecal samples from spotted bats and trapped 3755 insect...