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Sample records for abundant plasma protein

  1. Impact of Protein Stability, Cellular Localization, and Abundance on Proteomic Detection of Tumor-Derived Proteins in Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Faca, Vitor M.; Zhang, Wenxuan; Zhang, Qing; Jain, Anjali; Hanash, Sam; Agus, David B.; McIntosh, Martin W.; Mallick, Parag

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-derived, circulating proteins are potentially useful as biomarkers for detection of cancer, for monitoring of disease progression, regression and recurrence, and for assessment of therapeutic response. Here we interrogated how a protein's stability, cellular localization, and abundance affect its observability in blood by mass-spectrometry-based proteomics techniques. We performed proteomic profiling on tumors and plasma from two different xenograft mouse models. A statistical analysis of this data revealed protein properties indicative of the detection level in plasma. Though 20% of the proteins identified in plasma were tumor-derived, only 5% of the proteins observed in the tumor tissue were found in plasma. Both intracellular and extracellular tumor proteins were observed in plasma; however, after normalizing for tumor abundance, extracellular proteins were seven times more likely to be detected. Although proteins that were more abundant in the tumor were also more likely to be observed in plasma, the relationship was nonlinear: Doubling the spectral count increased detection rate by only 50%. Many secreted proteins, even those with relatively low spectral count, were observed in plasma, but few low abundance intracellular proteins were observed. Proteins predicted to be stable by dipeptide composition were significantly more likely to be identified in plasma than less stable proteins. The number of tryptic peptides in a protein was not significantly related to the chance of a protein being observed in plasma. Quantitative comparison of large versus small tumors revealed that the abundance of proteins in plasma as measured by spectral count was associated with the tumor size, but the relationship was not one-to-one; a 3-fold decrease in tumor size resulted in a 16-fold decrease in protein abundance in plasma. This study provides quantitative support for a tumor-derived marker prioritization strategy that favors secreted and stable proteins over all but the

  2. Impact of protein stability, cellular localization, and abundance on proteomic detection of tumor-derived proteins in plasma.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qiaojun; Kani, Kian; Faca, Vitor M; Zhang, Wenxuan; Zhang, Qing; Jain, Anjali; Hanash, Sam; Agus, David B; McIntosh, Martin W; Mallick, Parag

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-derived, circulating proteins are potentially useful as biomarkers for detection of cancer, for monitoring of disease progression, regression and recurrence, and for assessment of therapeutic response. Here we interrogated how a protein's stability, cellular localization, and abundance affect its observability in blood by mass-spectrometry-based proteomics techniques. We performed proteomic profiling on tumors and plasma from two different xenograft mouse models. A statistical analysis of this data revealed protein properties indicative of the detection level in plasma. Though 20% of the proteins identified in plasma were tumor-derived, only 5% of the proteins observed in the tumor tissue were found in plasma. Both intracellular and extracellular tumor proteins were observed in plasma; however, after normalizing for tumor abundance, extracellular proteins were seven times more likely to be detected. Although proteins that were more abundant in the tumor were also more likely to be observed in plasma, the relationship was nonlinear: Doubling the spectral count increased detection rate by only 50%. Many secreted proteins, even those with relatively low spectral count, were observed in plasma, but few low abundance intracellular proteins were observed. Proteins predicted to be stable by dipeptide composition were significantly more likely to be identified in plasma than less stable proteins. The number of tryptic peptides in a protein was not significantly related to the chance of a protein being observed in plasma. Quantitative comparison of large versus small tumors revealed that the abundance of proteins in plasma as measured by spectral count was associated with the tumor size, but the relationship was not one-to-one; a 3-fold decrease in tumor size resulted in a 16-fold decrease in protein abundance in plasma. This study provides quantitative support for a tumor-derived marker prioritization strategy that favors secreted and stable proteins over all but the

  3. The effect of colostrum intake on blood plasma proteome profile in newborn lambs: low abundance proteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Colostrum intake by newborn lambs plays a fundamental role in the perinatal period, ensuring lamb survival. In this study, blood plasma samples from two groups of newborn lambs (Colostrum group and Delayed Colostrum group) at 2 and 14 h after birth were treated to reduce the content of high abundance proteins and analyzed using Two-Dimensional Differential in Gel Electrophoresis and MALDI MS/MS for protein identification in order to investigate low abundance proteins with immune function in newborn lambs. Results The results showed that four proteins were increased in the blood plasma of lambs due to colostrum intake. These proteins have not been previously described as increased in blood plasma of newborn ruminants by colostrum intake. Moreover, these proteins have been described as having an immune function in other species, some of which were previously identified in colostrum and milk. Conclusions In conclusion, colostrum intake modified the low abundance proteome profile of blood plasma from newborn lambs, increasing the concentration of apolipoprotein A-IV, plasminogen, serum amyloid A and fibrinogen, demonstrating that colostrum is essential, not only for the provision of immunoglobulins, but also because of increases in several low abundance proteins with immune function. PMID:24708841

  4. Mining the plasma proteome for disease applications across seven logs of protein abundance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Faca, V; Hanash, S

    2011-01-01

    The current state of proteomics technologies has sufficiently advanced to allow in-depth quantitative analysis of the plasma proteome and development of a related knowledge base. Here we review approaches that have been applied to increase depth of analysis by mass spectrometry given the substantial complexity of plasma and the vast dynamic range of protein abundance. Fractionation strategies resulting in reduced complexity of individual fractions followed by mass spectrometry analysis of digests from individual fractions has allowed well in excess of 1000 proteins to be identified and quantified with high confidence that span more than seven logs of protein abundance. Such depth of analysis has contributed to elucidation of plasma proteome variation in health and of protein changes associated with disease states. PMID:21062094

  5. Depletion of the highly abundant protein albumin from human plasma using the Gradiflow.

    PubMed

    Rothemund, Deborah L; Locke, Vicki L; Liew, Audrey; Thomas, Theresa M; Wasinger, Valerie; Rylatt, Dennis B

    2003-03-01

    Analysis of complex protein samples by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) is often more difficult in the presence of a few predominant proteins. In plasma, proteins such as albumin mask proteins of lower abundance, as well as significantly limiting the amount of protein that can be loaded onto the immobilized pH gradient strip. In this paper the Gradiflow, a preparative electrophoresis system, has been used to deplete human plasma of the highly abundant protein albumin under native and denatured conditions. A three step protocol incorporating a charge separation to collect proteins with an isoelectric point greater than albumin and two size separations to isolate proteins larger and smaller than albumin, was used. When the albumin depleted fractions were analysed on pH 3-10 2-DE gels, proteins that were masked by albumin were revealed and proteins not seen in the unfractionated plasma sample were visualised. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the identification of the protein that lies beneath albumin to be C4B-binding protein alpha chain. The liquid fractions from the Gradiflow separations were also analysed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to confirm the proteins were separated according to their size and charge mobility in an electric field. PMID:12627381

  6. LDL Receptor-related Protein 1 Regulates the Abundance of Diverse Cell-signaling Proteins in the Plasma Membrane Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Gaultier, Alban; Simon, Gabriel; Niessen, Sherry; Dix, Melissa; Takimoto, Shinako; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Gonias, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is an endocytic receptor, reported to regulate the abundance of other receptors in the plasma membrane, including uPAR and tissue factor. The goal of this study was to identify novel plasma membrane proteins, involved in cell-signaling, which are regulated by LRP1. Membrane protein ectodomains were prepared from RAW 264.7 cells in which LRP1 was silenced and control cells using protease K. Peptides were identified by LC-MS/MS. By analysis of spectral counts, 31 transmembrane and secreted proteins were regulated in abundance at least 2-fold when LRP1 was silenced. Validation studies confirmed that semaphorin4D (Sema4D), plexin domain-containing protein-1 (Plxdc1), and neuropilin-1 were more abundant in the membranes of LRP1 gene-silenced cells. Regulation of Plxdc1 by LRP1 was confirmed in CHO cells, as a second model system. Plxdc1 co-immunoprecipitated with LRP1 from extracts of RAW 264.7 cells and mouse liver. Although Sema4D did not co-immunoprecipitate with LRP1, the cell-surface level of Sema4D was increased by RAP, which binds to LRP1 and inhibits binding of other ligands. These studies identify Plxdc1, Sema4D, and neuropilin-1 as novel LRP1-regulated cell-signaling proteins. Overall, LRP1 emerges as a generalized regulator of the plasma membrane proteome. PMID:20919742

  7. Relative Abundance of Integral Plasma Membrane Proteins in Arabidopsis Leaf and Root Tissue Determined by Metabolic Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bernfur, Katja; Larsson, Olaf; Larsson, Christer; Gustavsson, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic labeling of proteins with a stable isotope (15N) in intact Arabidopsis plants was used for accurate determination by mass spectrometry of differences in protein abundance between plasma membranes isolated from leaves and roots. In total, 703 proteins were identified, of which 188 were predicted to be integral membrane proteins. Major classes were transporters, receptors, proteins involved in membrane trafficking and cell wall-related proteins. Forty-one of the integral proteins, including nine of the 13 isoforms of the PIP (plasma membrane intrinsic protein) aquaporin subfamily, could be identified by peptides unique to these proteins, which made it possible to determine their relative abundance in leaf and root tissue. In addition, peptides shared between isoforms gave information on the proportions of these isoforms. A comparison between our data for protein levels and corresponding data for mRNA levels in the widely used database Genevestigator showed an agreement for only about two thirds of the proteins. By contrast, localization data available in the literature for 21 of the 41 proteins show a much better agreement with our data, in particular data based on immunostaining of proteins and GUS-staining of promoter activity. Thus, although mRNA levels may provide a useful approximation for protein levels, detection and quantification of isoform-specific peptides by proteomics should generate the most reliable data for the proteome. PMID:23990937

  8. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  9. Hydrogel nanoparticle harvesting of plasma or urine for detecting low abundance proteins.

    PubMed

    Magni, Ruben; Espina, Benjamin H; Liotta, Lance A; Luchini, Alessandra; Espina, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Novel biomarker discovery plays a crucial role in providing more sensitive and specific disease detection. Unfortunately many low-abundance biomarkers that exist in biological fluids cannot be easily detected with mass spectrometry or immunoassays because they are present in very low concentration, are labile, and are often masked by high-abundance proteins such as albumin or immunoglobulin. Bait containing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (NIPAm) based nanoparticles are able to overcome these physiological barriers. In one step they are able to capture, concentrate and preserve biomarkers from body fluids. Low-molecular weight analytes enter the core of the nanoparticle and are captured by different organic chemical dyes, which act as high affinity protein baits. The nanoparticles are able to concentrate the proteins of interest by several orders of magnitude. This concentration factor is sufficient to increase the protein level such that the proteins are within the detection limit of current mass spectrometers, western blotting, and immunoassays. Nanoparticles can be incubated with a plethora of biological fluids and they are able to greatly enrich the concentration of low-molecular weight proteins and peptides while excluding albumin and other high-molecular weight proteins. Our data show that a 10,000 fold amplification in the concentration of a particular analyte can be achieved, enabling mass spectrometry and immunoassays to detect previously undetectable biomarkers. PMID:25145492

  10. Abundance of plasma antioxidant proteins confers tolerance to acute hypobaric hypoxia exposure.

    PubMed

    Padhy, Gayatri; Sethy, Niroj Kumar; Ganju, Lilly; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2013-09-01

    Systematic identification of molecular signatures for hypobaric hypoxia can aid in better understanding of human adaptation to high altitude. In an attempt to identify proteins promoting hypoxia tolerance during acute exposure to high altitude, we screened and identified hypoxia tolerant and susceptible rats based on hyperventilation time to a simulated altitude of 32,000 ft (9754 m). The hypoxia tolerance was further validated by estimating 8-isoprotane levels and protein carbonyls, which revealed that hypoxia tolerant rats possessed significant lower plasma levels as compared to susceptible rats. We used a comparative plasma proteome profiling approach using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) combined with MALDI TOF/TOF for both groups, along with an hypoxic control group. This resulted in the identification of 19 differentially expressed proteins. Seven proteins (TTR, GPx-3, PON1, Rab-3D, CLC11, CRP, and Hp) were upregulated in hypoxia tolerant rats, while apolipoprotein A-I (APOA1) was upregulated in hypoxia susceptible rats. We further confirmed the consistent higher expression levels of three antioxidant proteins (PON1, TTR, and GPx-3) in hypoxia-tolerant animals using ELISA and immunoblotting. Collectively, these proteomics-based results highlight the role of antioxidant enzymes in conferring hypoxia tolerance during acute hypobaric hypoxia. The expression of these antioxidant enzymes could be used as putative biomarkers for screening altitude adaptation as well as aiding in better management of altered oxygen pathophysiologies. PMID:24067188

  11. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Reyes, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate at the onset of seed desiccation and in response to water deficit in vegetative plant tissues. The typical LEA proteins are highly hydrophilic and intrinsically unstructured. They have been classified in different families, each one showing distinctive conserved motifs. In this manuscript we present and discuss some of the recent findings regarding their role in plant adaptation to water deficit, as well as those concerning to their possible function, and how it can be related to their intrinsic structural flexibility. PMID:21447997

  12. Selectivity of monolithic supports under overloading conditions and their use for separation of human plasma and isolation of low abundance proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brgles, Marija; Clifton, James; Walsh, Robert; Huang, Feilei; Rucevic, Marijana; Cao, Lulu; Hixson, Douglas; Müller, Egbert

    2011-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) represent over 75% of all proteins present in human plasma. These two proteins frequently interfere with detection, determination and purification of low abundance proteins that can be potential biomarkers and biomarker candidates for various diseases. Some low abundance plasma proteins such as clotting factors and inhibitors are also important therapeutic agents. In this paper, the characterization of ion-exchange monolithic supports under overloading conditions was performed by use of sample displacement chromatography (SDC). If these supports were used for separation of human plasma, the composition of bound and eluted proteins in both anion- and cation-exchange mode is dependent on column loading. Under overloading conditions, the weakly bound proteins such as HSA in anion-exchange and IgG in cation-exchange mode are displaced by stronger binding proteins, and this phenomenon was not dependent on column size. Consequently, small monolithic columns with a column volume of 100 and 200 μL are ideal supports for high-throughput screening in order to develop new methods for separation of complex mixtures, and for sample preparation in proteomic technology. PMID:21186030

  13. A combined blood based gene expression and plasma protein abundance signature for diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer - a study of the OVCAD consortium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The immune system is a key player in fighting cancer. Thus, we sought to identify a molecular ‘immune response signature’ indicating the presence of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and to combine this with a serum protein biomarker panel to increase the specificity and sensitivity for earlier detection of EOC. Methods Comparing the expression of 32,000 genes in a leukocytes fraction from 44 EOC patients and 19 controls, three uncorrelated shrunken centroid models were selected, comprised of 7, 14, and 6 genes. A second selection step using RT-qPCR data and significance analysis of microarrays yielded 13 genes (AP2A1, B4GALT1, C1orf63, CCR2, CFP, DIS3, NEAT1, NOXA1, OSM, PAPOLG, PRIC285, ZNF419, and BC037918) which were finally used in 343 samples (90 healthy, six cystadenoma, eight low malignant potential tumor, 19 FIGO I/II, and 220 FIGO III/IV EOC patients). Using new 65 controls and 224 EOC patients (thereof 14 FIGO I/II) the abundances of six plasma proteins (MIF, prolactin, CA125, leptin, osteopondin, and IGF2) was determined and used in combination with the expression values from the 13 genes for diagnosis of EOC. Results Combined diagnostic models using either each five gene expression and plasma protein abundance values or 13 gene expression and six plasma protein abundance values can discriminate controls from patients with EOC with Receiver Operator Characteristics Area Under the Curve values of 0.998 and bootstrap .632+ validated classification errors of 3.1% and 2.8%, respectively. The sensitivities were 97.8% and 95.6%, respectively, at a set specificity of 99.6%. Conclusions The combination of gene expression and plasma protein based blood derived biomarkers in one diagnostic model increases the sensitivity and the specificity significantly. Such a diagnostic test may allow earlier diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:23551967

  14. Microscale depletion of high abundance proteins in human biofluids using IgY14 immunoaffinity resin: Analysis of human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Hyung, Seok Won; Piehowski, Paul D.; Moore, Ronald J.; Orton, Daniel J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Clauss, Therese R.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Brewer, Heather M.; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-09-06

    Removal of highly abundant proteins in plasma is often carried out using immunoaffinity depletion to extend the dynamic range of measurements to lower abundance species. While commercial depletion columns are available for this purpose, they generally are not applicable to limited sample quantities (<20 µL) due to low yields stemming from losses caused by nonspecific binding to the column matrix. Additionally, the cost of the depletion media can be prohibitive for larger scale studies. Modern LC-MS instrumentation provides the sensitivity necessary to scale-down depletion methods with minimal sacrifice to proteome coverage, which makes smaller volume depletion columns desirable for maximizing sample recovery when samples are limited, as well as for reducing the expense of large scale studies. We characterized the performance of a 346 µL column volume micro-scale depletion system, using four different flow rates to determine the most effective depletion conditions for ~6 μL injections of human plasma proteins and then evaluated depletion reproducibility at the optimum flow rate condition. Depletion of plasma using a commercial 10 mL depletion column served as the control. Results showed depletion efficiency of the micro-scale column increased as flow rate decreased, and that our micro-depletion was reproducible. We found, in an initial application, a 600 µL sample of human cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) pooled from multiple sclerosis patients was depleted and then analyzed using reversed phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to demonstrate the utility of the system for this important biofluid where sample quantities are more commonly limited.

  15. Microscale depletion of high abundance proteins in human biofluids using IgY14 immunoaffinity resin: Analysis of human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hyung, Seok Won; Piehowski, Paul D.; Moore, Ronald J.; Orton, Daniel J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Clauss, Therese R.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Brewer, Heather M.; Liu, Tao; et al

    2014-09-06

    Removal of highly abundant proteins in plasma is often carried out using immunoaffinity depletion to extend the dynamic range of measurements to lower abundance species. While commercial depletion columns are available for this purpose, they generally are not applicable to limited sample quantities (<20 µL) due to low yields stemming from losses caused by nonspecific binding to the column matrix. Additionally, the cost of the depletion media can be prohibitive for larger scale studies. Modern LC-MS instrumentation provides the sensitivity necessary to scale-down depletion methods with minimal sacrifice to proteome coverage, which makes smaller volume depletion columns desirable for maximizingmore » sample recovery when samples are limited, as well as for reducing the expense of large scale studies. We characterized the performance of a 346 µL column volume micro-scale depletion system, using four different flow rates to determine the most effective depletion conditions for ~6 μL injections of human plasma proteins and then evaluated depletion reproducibility at the optimum flow rate condition. Depletion of plasma using a commercial 10 mL depletion column served as the control. Results showed depletion efficiency of the micro-scale column increased as flow rate decreased, and that our micro-depletion was reproducible. We found, in an initial application, a 600 µL sample of human cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) pooled from multiple sclerosis patients was depleted and then analyzed using reversed phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to demonstrate the utility of the system for this important biofluid where sample quantities are more commonly limited.« less

  16. Microscale Depletion of High Abundance Proteins in Human Biofluids using IgY14 Immunoaffinity Resin. Analysis of Human Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Hyung, Seok Won; Piehowski, Paul D.; Moore, Ronald J.; Orton, Daniel J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Chu, Rosalie K.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Brewer, Heather M.; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-09-06

    Removal of highly abundant proteins in plasma is often carried out using immunoaffinity depletion to extend the dynamic range of measurements to lower abundance species. While commercial depletion columns are available for this purpose, they generally are not applicable to limited sample quantities (<20 µL) due to low yields stemming from losses caused by nonspecific binding to the column matrix. Additionally, the cost of the depletion media can be prohibitive for larger scale studies. Modern LC-MS instrumentation provides the sensitivity necessary to scale-down depletion methods with minimal sacrifice to proteome coverage, which makes smaller volume depletion columns desirable for maximizing sample recovery when samples are limited, as well as for reducing the expense of large scale studies. We characterized the performance of a 346 µL column volume micro-scale depletion system, using four different flow rates to determine the most effective depletion conditions for ~6 μL injections of human plasma proteins and then evaluated depletion reproducibility at the optimum flow rate condition. Depletion of plasma using a commercial 10 mL depletion column served as the control. Results showed depletion efficiency of the micro-scale column increased as flow rate decreased, and that our micro-depletion was reproducible. In an initial application, a 600 µL sample of human cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) pooled from multiple sclerosis patients was depleted and then analyzed using reversed phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to demonstrate the utility of the system for this important biofluid where sample quantities are more commonly limited.

  17. Microscale depletion of high abundance proteins in human biofluids using IgY14 immunoaffinity resin: analysis of human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Hyung, Seok-Won; Piehowski, Paul D.; Moore, Ronald J.; Orton, Daniel J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Clauss, Therese R.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Brewer, Heather; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Removal of highly abundant proteins in plasma is often carried out using immunoaffinity depletion to extend the dynamic range of measurements to lower abundance species. While commercial depletion columns are available for this purpose, they generally are not applicable to limited sample quantities (<20 μL) due to low yields stemming from losses caused by nonspecific binding to the column matrix and concentration of large eluent volumes. Additionally, the cost of the depletion media can be prohibitive for larger-scale studies. Modern LC-MS instrumentation provides the sensitivity necessary to scale-down depletion methods with minimal sacrifice to proteome coverage, which makes smaller volume depletion columns desirable for maximizing sample recovery when samples are limited, as well as for reducing the expense of large-scale studies. We characterized the performance of a 346 μL column volume microscale depletion system, using four different flow rates to determine the most effective depletion conditions for ~6-μL injections of human plasma proteins and then evaluated depletion reproducibility at the optimum flow rate condition. Depletion of plasma using a commercial 10-mL depletion column served as the control. Results showed depletion efficiency of the microscale column increased as flow rate decreased, and that our microdepletion was reproducible. In an initial application, a 600-μL sample of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pooled from multiple sclerosis patients was depleted and then analyzed using reversed phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to demonstrate the utility of the system for this important biofluid where sample quantities are more commonly limited. PMID:25192788

  18. Predicting the dynamics of protein abundance.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Ahmed M; Patrick, Ralph; Bailey, Timothy L; Bodén, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    Protein synthesis is finely regulated across all organisms, from bacteria to humans, and its integrity underpins many important processes. Emerging evidence suggests that the dynamic range of protein abundance is greater than that observed at the transcript level. Technological breakthroughs now mean that sequencing-based measurement of mRNA levels is routine, but protocols for measuring protein abundance remain both complex and expensive. This paper introduces a Bayesian network that integrates transcriptomic and proteomic data to predict protein abundance and to model the effects of its determinants. We aim to use this model to follow a molecular response over time, from condition-specific data, in order to understand adaptation during processes such as the cell cycle. With microarray data now available for many conditions, the general utility of a protein abundance predictor is broad. Whereas most quantitative proteomics studies have focused on higher organisms, we developed a predictive model of protein abundance for both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe to explore the latitude at the protein level. Our predictor primarily relies on mRNA level, mRNA-protein interaction, mRNA folding energy and half-life, and tRNA adaptation. The combination of key features, allowing for the low certainty and uneven coverage of experimental observations, gives comparatively minor but robust prediction accuracy. The model substantially improved the analysis of protein regulation during the cell cycle: predicted protein abundance identified twice as many cell-cycle-associated proteins as experimental mRNA levels. Predicted protein abundance was more dynamic than observed mRNA expression, agreeing with experimental protein abundance from a human cell line. We illustrate how the same model can be used to predict the folding energy of mRNA when protein abundance is available, lending credence to the emerging view that mRNA folding affects translation efficiency

  19. Predicting the Dynamics of Protein Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Ahmed M.; Patrick, Ralph; Bailey, Timothy L.; Bodén, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Protein synthesis is finely regulated across all organisms, from bacteria to humans, and its integrity underpins many important processes. Emerging evidence suggests that the dynamic range of protein abundance is greater than that observed at the transcript level. Technological breakthroughs now mean that sequencing-based measurement of mRNA levels is routine, but protocols for measuring protein abundance remain both complex and expensive. This paper introduces a Bayesian network that integrates transcriptomic and proteomic data to predict protein abundance and to model the effects of its determinants. We aim to use this model to follow a molecular response over time, from condition-specific data, in order to understand adaptation during processes such as the cell cycle. With microarray data now available for many conditions, the general utility of a protein abundance predictor is broad. Whereas most quantitative proteomics studies have focused on higher organisms, we developed a predictive model of protein abundance for both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe to explore the latitude at the protein level. Our predictor primarily relies on mRNA level, mRNA–protein interaction, mRNA folding energy and half-life, and tRNA adaptation. The combination of key features, allowing for the low certainty and uneven coverage of experimental observations, gives comparatively minor but robust prediction accuracy. The model substantially improved the analysis of protein regulation during the cell cycle: predicted protein abundance identified twice as many cell-cycle-associated proteins as experimental mRNA levels. Predicted protein abundance was more dynamic than observed mRNA expression, agreeing with experimental protein abundance from a human cell line. We illustrate how the same model can be used to predict the folding energy of mRNA when protein abundance is available, lending credence to the emerging view that mRNA folding affects translation

  20. On protein abundance distributions in complex mixtures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry, an analytical technique that measures the mass-to-charge ratio of ionized atoms or molecules, dates back more than 100 years, and has both qualitative and quantitative uses for determining chemical and structural information. Quantitative proteomic mass spectrometry on biological samples focuses on identifying the proteins present in the samples, and establishing the relative abundances of those proteins. Such protein inventories create the opportunity to discover novel biomarkers and disease targets. We have previously introduced a normalized, label-free method for quantification of protein abundances under a shotgun proteomics platform (Griffin et al., 2010). The introduction of this method for quantifying and comparing protein levels leads naturally to the issue of modeling protein abundances in individual samples. We here report that protein abundance levels from two recent proteomics experiments conducted by the authors can be adequately represented by Sichel distributions. Mathematically, Sichel distributions are mixtures of Poisson distributions with a rather complex mixing distribution, and have been previously and successfully applied to linguistics and species abundance data. The Sichel model can provide a direct measure of the heterogeneity of protein abundances, and can reveal protein abundance differences that simpler models fail to show. PMID:23360617

  1. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in legumes

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Marina; Covarrubias, Alejandra A.

    2013-01-01

    Plants are exposed to different external conditions that affect growth, development, and productivity. Water deficit is one of these adverse conditions caused by drought, salinity, and extreme temperatures. Plants have developed different responses to prevent, ameliorate or repair the damage inflicted by these stressful environments. One of these responses is the activation of a set of genes encoding a group of hydrophilic proteins that typically accumulate to high levels during seed dehydration, at the last stage of embryogenesis, hence named Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins. LEA proteins also accumulate in response to water limitation in vegetative tissues, and have been classified in seven groups based on their amino acid sequence similarity and on the presence of distinctive conserved motifs. These proteins are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, from ferns to angiosperms, suggesting a relevant role in the plant response to this unfavorable environmental condition. In this review, we analyzed the LEA proteins from those legumes whose complete genomes have been sequenced such as Phaseolus vulgaris, Glycine max, Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan, and Cicer arietinum. Considering their distinctive motifs, LEA proteins from the different groups were identified, and their sequence analysis allowed the recognition of novel legume specific motifs. Moreover, we compile their transcript accumulation patterns based on publicly available data. In spite of the limited information on these proteins in legumes, the analysis and data compiled here confirm the high correlation between their accumulation and water deficit, reinforcing their functional relevance under this detrimental conditions. PMID:23805145

  2. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in legumes.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Marina; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2013-01-01

    Plants are exposed to different external conditions that affect growth, development, and productivity. Water deficit is one of these adverse conditions caused by drought, salinity, and extreme temperatures. Plants have developed different responses to prevent, ameliorate or repair the damage inflicted by these stressful environments. One of these responses is the activation of a set of genes encoding a group of hydrophilic proteins that typically accumulate to high levels during seed dehydration, at the last stage of embryogenesis, hence named Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins. LEA proteins also accumulate in response to water limitation in vegetative tissues, and have been classified in seven groups based on their amino acid sequence similarity and on the presence of distinctive conserved motifs. These proteins are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, from ferns to angiosperms, suggesting a relevant role in the plant response to this unfavorable environmental condition. In this review, we analyzed the LEA proteins from those legumes whose complete genomes have been sequenced such as Phaseolus vulgaris, Glycine max, Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan, and Cicer arietinum. Considering their distinctive motifs, LEA proteins from the different groups were identified, and their sequence analysis allowed the recognition of novel legume specific motifs. Moreover, we compile their transcript accumulation patterns based on publicly available data. In spite of the limited information on these proteins in legumes, the analysis and data compiled here confirm the high correlation between their accumulation and water deficit, reinforcing their functional relevance under this detrimental conditions. PMID:23805145

  3. Practical Immunoaffinity-Enrichment LC-MS for Measuring Protein Kinetics of Low-Abundance Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lassman, Michael E.; McAvoy, Thomas; Lee, Anita Y.H.; Chappell, Derek; Wong, Oitak; Zhou, Haihong; Reyes-Soffer, Gissette; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Millar, John S.; Rader, Daniel J.; Gutstein, David E.; Laterza, Omar

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND For a more complete understanding of pharmacodynamic, metabolic, and pathophysiologic effects, protein kinetics, such as production rate and fractional catabolic rate, can offer substantially more information than protein concentration alone. Kinetic experiments with stable isotope tracers typically require laborious sample preparation and are most often used for studying abundant proteins. Here we describe a practical methodology for measuring isotope enrichment into low-abundance proteins that uses an automated procedure and immunoaffinity enrichment (IA) with LC-MS. Low-abundance plasma proteins cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) were studied as examples. METHODS Human participants (n = 39) were infused with [2H3]leucine, and blood samples were collected at multiple time points. Sample preparation and analysis were automated and multiplexed to increase throughput. Proteins were concentrated from plasma by use of IA and digested with trypsin to yield proteotypic peptides that were analyzed by microflow chromatography-mass spectrometry to measure isotope enrichment. RESULTS The IA procedure was optimized to provide the greatest signal intensity. Use of a gel-free method increased throughput while increasing the signal. The intra- and interassay CVs were <15% at all isotope enrichment levels studied. More than 1400 samples were analyzed in <3 weeks without the need for instrument stoppages or user interventions. CONCLUSIONS The use of automated gel-free methods to multiplex the measurement of isotope enrichment was applied to the low-abundance proteins CETP and PCSK9. PMID:24751376

  4. Redox regulation of protein damage in plasma.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Helen R; Dias, Irundika H K; Willetts, Rachel S; Devitt, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The presence and concentrations of modified proteins circulating in plasma depend on rates of protein synthesis, modification and clearance. In early studies, the proteins most frequently analysed for damage were those which were more abundant in plasma (e.g. albumin and immunoglobulins) which exist at up to 10 orders of magnitude higher concentrations than other plasma proteins e.g. cytokines. However, advances in analytical techniques using mass spectrometry and immuno-affinity purification methods, have facilitated analysis of less abundant, modified proteins and the nature of modifications at specific sites is now being characterised. The damaging reactive species that cause protein modifications in plasma principally arise from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by NADPH oxidases (NOX), nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and oxygenase activities; reactive nitrogen species (RNS) from myeloperoxidase (MPO) and NOS activities; and hypochlorous acid from MPO. Secondary damage to proteins may be caused by oxidized lipids and glucose autooxidation. In this review, we focus on redox regulatory control of those enzymes and processes which control protein maturation during synthesis, produce reactive species, repair and remove damaged plasma proteins. We have highlighted the potential for alterations in the extracellular redox compartment to regulate intracellular redox state and, conversely, for intracellular oxidative stress to alter the cellular secretome and composition of extracellular vesicles. Through secreted, redox-active regulatory molecules, changes in redox state may be transmitted to distant sites. PMID:24624332

  5. Development of a Chip/Chip/SRM platform using digital chip isoelectric focusing and LC-Chip mass spectrometry for enrichment and quantitation of low abundance protein biomarkers in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Rafalko, Agnes; Dai, Shujia; Hancock, William S; Karger, Barry L; Hincapie, Marina

    2012-02-01

    Protein biomarkers are critical for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of disease. The transition from protein biomarker discovery to verification can be a rate limiting step in clinical development of new diagnostics. Liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-SRM MS) is becoming an important tool for biomarker verification studies in highly complex biological samples. Analyte enrichment or sample fractionation is often necessary to reduce sample complexity and improve sensitivity of SRM for quantitation of clinically relevant biomarker candidates present at the low ng/mL range in blood. In this paper, we describe an alternative method for sample preparation for LC-SRM MS, which does not rely on availability of antibodies. This new platform is based on selective enrichment of proteotypic peptides from complex biological peptide mixtures via isoelectric focusing (IEF) on a digital ProteomeChip (dPC) for SRM quantitation using a triple quadrupole (QQQ) instrument with an LC-Chip (Chip/Chip/SRM). To demonstrate the value of this approach, the optimization of the Chip/Chip/SRM platform was performed using prostate specific antigen (PSA) added to female plasma as a model system. The combination of immunodepletion of albumin and IgG with peptide fractionation on the dPC, followed by SRM analysis, resulted in a limit of quantitation of PSA added to female plasma at the level of ∼1-2.5 ng/mL with a CV of ∼13%. The optimized platform was applied to measure levels of PSA in plasma of a small cohort of male patients with prostate cancer (PCa) and healthy matched controls with concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 25 ng/mL. A good correlation (r(2) = 0.9459) was observed between standard clinical ELISA tests and the SRM-based assay. Our data demonstrate that the combination of IEF on the dPC and SRM (Chip/Chip/SRM) can be successfully applied for verification of low abundance protein biomarkers in complex samples. PMID:22098410

  6. Development of a Chip/Chip/SRM platform using digital chip isoelectric focusing and LC-Chip mass spectrometry for enrichment and quantitation of low abundance protein biomarkers in human plasma

    PubMed Central

    Rafalko, Agnes; Dai, Shujia; Hancock, William S.; Karger, Barry L.; Hincapie, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Protein biomarkers are critical for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of disease. The transition from protein biomarker discovery to verification can be a rate limiting step in clinical development of new diagnostics. Liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-SRM MS) is becoming an important tool for biomarker verification studies in highly complex biological samples. Analyte enrichment or sample fractionation is often necessary to reduce sample complexity and improve sensitivity of SRM for quantitation of clinically relevant biomarker candidates present at the low ng/mL range in blood. In this paper, we describe an alternative method for sample preparation for LC-SRM MS, which does not rely on availability of antibodies. This new platform is based on selective enrichment of proteotypic peptides from complex biological peptide mixtures via isoelectric focusing (IEF) on a digital ProteomeChip (dPC™) for SRM quantitation using a triple quadrupole (QQQ) instrument with an LC-Chip (Chip/Chip/SRM). To demonstrate the value of this approach, the optimization of the Chip/Chip/SRM platform was performed using prostate specific antigen (PSA) added to female plasma as a model system. The combination of immunodepletion of albumin and IgG with peptide fractionation on the dPC, followed by SRM analysis, resulted in a limit of quantitation of PSA added to female plasma at the level of ~1–2.5 ng/mL with a CV of ~13%. The optimized platform was applied to measure levels of PSA in plasma of a small cohort of male patients with prostate cancer (PCa) and healthy matched controls with concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 25 ng/mL. A good correlation (r2 = 0.9459) was observed between standard clinical ELISA tests and the SRM-based-assay. Our data demonstrate that the combination of IEF on the dPC and SRM (Chip/Chip/SRM) can be successfully applied for verification of low abundance protein biomarkers in complex samples. PMID:22098410

  7. Relative Quantification of Several Plasma Proteins during Liver Transplantation Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Parviainen, Ville; Joenväärä, Sakari; Tukiainen, Eija; Ilmakunnas, Minna; Isoniemi, Helena; Renkonen, Risto

    2011-01-01

    Plasma proteome is widely used in studying changes occurring in human body during disease or other disturbances. Immunological methods are commonly used in such studies. In recent years, mass spectrometry has gained popularity in high-throughput analysis of plasma proteins. In this study, we tested whether mass spectrometry and iTRAQ-based protein quantification might be used in proteomic analysis of human plasma during liver transplantation surgery to characterize changes in protein abundances occurring during early graft reperfusion. We sampled blood from systemic circulation as well as blood entering and exiting the liver. After immunodepletion of six high-abundant plasma proteins, trypsin digestion, iTRAQ labeling, and cation-exchange fractionation, the peptides were analyzed by reverse phase nano-LC-MS/MS. In total, 72 proteins were identified of which 31 could be quantified in all patient specimens collected. Of these 31 proteins, ten, mostly medium-to-high abundance plasma proteins with a concentration range of 50–2000 mg/L, displayed relative abundance change of more than 10%. The changes in protein abundance observed in this study allow further research on the role of several proteins in ischemia-reperfusion injury during liver transplantation and possibly in other surgery. PMID:22187521

  8. Elemental abundances of flaring solar plasma - Enhanced neon and sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmelz, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Elemental abundances of two flares observed with the SMM Flat Crystal Spectrometer are compared and contrasted. The first had a gradual rise and a slow decay, while the second was much more impulsive. Simultaneous spectra of seven bright soft X-ray resonance lines provide information over a broad temperature range and are available throughout both flares, making these events unique in the SMM data base. For the first flare, the plasma seemed to be characterized by coronal abundances but, for the second, the plasma composition could not be coronal, photospheric, or a linear combination of both. A good differential emission measure fit required enhanced neon such that Ne/O = 0.32 +/- 0.02, a value which is inconsistent with the current models of coronal abundances based on the elemental first-ionization potential. Similar values of enhanced neon are found for flaring plasma observed by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer, in (He-3)-rich solar energetic particle events, and in the decay phase of several long duration soft X-ray events. Sulfur is also enhanced in the impulsive flare, but not as dramatically as neon. These events are compared with two models which attempt to explain the enhanced values of neon and sulfur.

  9. Age-Related Differences in Plasma Proteins: How Plasma Proteins Change from Neonates to Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ignjatovic, Vera; Lai, Cera; Summerhayes, Robyn; Mathesius, Ulrike; Tawfilis, Sherif; Perugini, Matthew A.; Monagle, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of major diseases such as cardiovascular disease, thrombosis and cancer increases with age and is the major cause of mortality world-wide, with neonates and children somehow protected from such diseases of ageing. We hypothesized that there are major developmental differences in plasma proteins and that these contribute to age-related changes in the incidence of major diseases. We evaluated the human plasma proteome in healthy neonates, children and adults using the 2D-DIGE approach. We demonstrate significant changes in number and abundance of up to 100 protein spots that have marked differences in during the transition of the plasma proteome from neonate and child through to adult. These proteins are known to be involved in numerous physiological processes such as iron transport and homeostasis, immune response, haemostasis and apoptosis, amongst others. Importantly, we determined that the proteins that are differentially expressed with age are not the same proteins that are differentially expressed with gender and that the degree of phosphorylation of plasma proteins also changes with age. Given the multi-functionality of these proteins in human physiology, understanding the differences in the plasma proteome in neonates and children compared to adults will make a major contribution to our understanding of developmental biology in humans. PMID:21365000

  10. SoyProLow: A protein database enriched in low abundant soybean proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tavakolan, Mona; Alkharouf, Nadim W; Matthews, Benjamin F; Natarajan, Savithiry S

    2014-01-01

    Soybeans are an important legume crop that contain 2 major storage proteins, β-conglycinin and glycinin, which account about 70- 80% of total seed proteins. These abundant proteins hinder the isolation and characterization of several low abundant proteins in soybean seeds. Several protein extraction methodologies were developed in our laboratory to decrease these abundant storage proteins in seed extracts and to also decrease the amount of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), which is normally very abundant in leaf extracts. One of the extraction methodologies used 40% isopropanol and was more effective in depleting soybean storage proteins and enhancing low abundant seed proteins than similar methods using 10-80% isopropanol. Extractions performed with 40% isopropanol decreased the amount of storage proteins and revealed 107 low abundant proteins when using the combined approaches of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) and Mass Spectrometry (MS). The separation of proteins was achieved by iso-electric focusing (IEF) and 2D-PAGE. The proteins were analyzed with MS techniques to provide amino acid sequence. The proteins were identified by comparing their amino acid sequences with those in different databases including NCBI-non redundant, UniprotKB and MSDB databases. In this investigation, previously published results on low abundant soybean seed proteins were used to create an online database (SoyProLow) to provide a data repository that can be used as a reference to identify and characterize low abundance proteins. This database is freely accessible to individuals using similar techniques and can be for the subsequent genetic manipulation to produce value added soybean traits. An intuitive user interface based on dynamic HTML enables users to browse the network and the profiles of the low abundant proteins. Availability http://bioinformatics.towson.edu/Soybean_low_abundance_proteins_2D_Gel_DB/Gel1.aspx PMID:25352730

  11. Human plasma protein N-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Clerc, Florent; Reiding, Karli R; Jansen, Bas C; Kammeijer, Guinevere S M; Bondt, Albert; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    Glycosylation is the most abundant and complex protein modification, and can have a profound structural and functional effect on the conjugate. The oligosaccharide fraction is recognized to be involved in multiple biological processes, and to affect proteins physical properties, and has consequentially been labeled a critical quality attribute of biopharmaceuticals. Additionally, due to recent advances in analytical methods and analysis software, glycosylation is targeted in the search for disease biomarkers for early diagnosis and patient stratification. Biofluids such as saliva, serum or plasma are of great use in this regard, as they are easily accessible and can provide relevant glycosylation information. Thus, as the assessment of protein glycosylation is becoming a major element in clinical and biopharmaceutical research, this review aims to convey the current state of knowledge on the N-glycosylation of the major plasma glycoproteins alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, alpha-1-antitrypsin, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, alpha-2-macroglobulin, antithrombin-III, apolipoprotein B-100, apolipoprotein D, apolipoprotein F, beta-2-glycoprotein 1, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen, immunoglobulin (Ig) A, IgG, IgM, haptoglobin, hemopexin, histidine-rich glycoprotein, kininogen-1, serotransferrin, vitronectin, and zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein. In addition, the less abundant immunoglobulins D and E are included because of their major relevance in immunology and biopharmaceutical research. Where available, the glycosylation is described in a site-specific manner. In the discussion, we put the glycosylation of individual proteins into perspective and speculate how the individual proteins may contribute to a total plasma N-glycosylation profile determined at the released glycan level. PMID:26555091

  12. Clinical relevance of drug binding to plasma proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Fanali, Gabriella; Fasano, Mauro; Pallottini, Valentina; Trezza, Viviana

    2014-12-01

    Binding to plasma proteins highly influences drug efficacy, distribution, and disposition. Serum albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, is a monomeric multi-domain macromolecule that displays an extraordinary ligand binding capacity, providing a depot and carrier for many endogenous and exogenous compounds, such as fatty acids and most acidic drugs. α-1-Acid glycoprotein, the second main plasma protein, is a glycoprotein physiologically involved in the acute phase reaction and is the main carrier for basic and neutral drugs. High- and low-density lipoproteins play a limited role in drug binding and are natural drug delivery system only for few lipophilic drugs or lipid-based formulations. Several factors influence drug binding to plasma proteins, such as pathological conditions, concurrent administration of drugs, sex, and age. Any of these factors, in turn, influences drug efficacy and toxicity. Here, biochemical, biomedical, and biotechnological aspects of drug binding to plasma proteins are reviewed.

  13. Estimating relative abundances of proteins from shotgun proteomics data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Spectral counting methods provide an easy means of identifying proteins with differing abundances between complex mixtures using shotgun proteomics data. The crux spectral-counts command, implemented as part of the Crux software toolkit, implements four previously reported spectral counting methods, the spectral index (SIN), the exponentially modified protein abundance index (emPAI), the normalized spectral abundance factor (NSAF), and the distributed normalized spectral abundance factor (dNSAF). Results We compared the reproducibility and the linearity relative to each protein’s abundance of the four spectral counting metrics. Our analysis suggests that NSAF yields the most reproducible counts across technical and biological replicates, and both SIN and NSAF achieve the best linearity. Conclusions With the crux spectral-counts command, Crux provides open-source modular methods to analyze mass spectrometry data for identifying and now quantifying peptides and proteins. The C++ source code, compiled binaries, spectra and sequence databases are available at http://noble.gs.washington.edu/proj/crux-spectral-counts. PMID:23164367

  14. Total protein or high-abundance protein: Which offers the best loading control for Western blotting?

    PubMed

    Thacker, Jonathan S; Yeung, Derrick H; Staines, W Richard; Mielke, John G

    2016-03-01

    Western blotting routinely involves a control for variability in the amount of protein across immunoblot lanes. Normalizing a target signal to one found for an abundantly expressed protein is widely regarded as a reliable loading control; however, this approach is being increasingly questioned. As a result, we compared blotting for two high-abundance proteins (actin and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase [GAPDH]) and two total protein membrane staining methods (Ponceau and Coomassie Brilliant Blue) to determine the best control for loading variability. We found that Ponceau staining optimally balanced accuracy and precision, and we suggest that this approach be considered as an alternative to normalizing with a high-abundance protein. PMID:26706797

  15. Antibody arrays for determination of relative protein abundances.

    PubMed

    Chaga, Grigoriy S

    2008-01-01

    As a large number of genome-sequencing projects reached completion, the attention of the scientific community is turning toward understanding the structure-functions of gene translation products-the proteins as well as the complete complement of proteins-the proteome. One goal of proteomics is to correlate changes in protein abundance with biological processes and disease states. To help accelerate this avenue of proteomics, a significant effort has been devoted to the development of multiplexed methods for protein analyses. We have developed an Antibody Microarray, a chip-based technology for multiparallel determination of relative abundance of hundreds of proteins. The Antibody Microarray is composed of hundreds of distinct monoclonal antibodies printed at high density on a glass slide. It utilizes a novel experimental setup and data analysis algorithm, which enables scientists to assay hundreds of cytosolic, nuclear, and membrane-bound proteins with a single experiment. Examples of biological samples that are analyzed on the Antibody Microarray include tissue samples, cell cultures, and body fluids. PMID:18370316

  16. Plasma Membrane Abundance of Human Aquaporin 5 Is Dynamically Regulated by Multiple Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Philip; Öberg, Fredrik; Sjöhamn, Jennie; Hedfalk, Kristina; Bill, Roslyn M; Conner, Alex C; Conner, Matthew T; Törnroth-Horsefield, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin membrane protein channels mediate cellular water flow. Human aquaporin 5 (AQP5) is highly expressed in the respiratory system and secretory glands where it facilitates the osmotically-driven generation of pulmonary secretions, saliva, sweat and tears. Dysfunctional trafficking of AQP5 has been implicated in several human disease states, including Sjögren's syndrome, bronchitis and cystic fibrosis. In order to investigate how the plasma membrane expression levels of AQP5 are regulated, we studied real-time translocation of GFP-tagged AQP5 in HEK293 cells. We show that AQP5 plasma membrane abundance in transfected HEK293 cells is rapidly and reversibly regulated by at least three independent mechanisms involving phosphorylation at Ser156, protein kinase A activity and extracellular tonicity. The crystal structure of a Ser156 phosphomimetic mutant indicates that its involvement in regulating AQP5 membrane abundance is not mediated by a conformational change of the carboxy-terminus. We suggest that together these pathways regulate cellular water flow. PMID:26569106

  17. Plasma Membrane Abundance of Human Aquaporin 5 Is Dynamically Regulated by Multiple Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Philip; Öberg, Fredrik; Sjöhamn, Jennie; Hedfalk, Kristina; Bill, Roslyn M.; Conner, Alex C.; Conner, Matthew T.; Törnroth-Horsefield, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin membrane protein channels mediate cellular water flow. Human aquaporin 5 (AQP5) is highly expressed in the respiratory system and secretory glands where it facilitates the osmotically-driven generation of pulmonary secretions, saliva, sweat and tears. Dysfunctional trafficking of AQP5 has been implicated in several human disease states, including Sjögren’s syndrome, bronchitis and cystic fibrosis. In order to investigate how the plasma membrane expression levels of AQP5 are regulated, we studied real-time translocation of GFP-tagged AQP5 in HEK293 cells. We show that AQP5 plasma membrane abundance in transfected HEK293 cells is rapidly and reversibly regulated by at least three independent mechanisms involving phosphorylation at Ser156, protein kinase A activity and extracellular tonicity. The crystal structure of a Ser156 phosphomimetic mutant indicates that its involvement in regulating AQP5 membrane abundance is not mediated by a conformational change of the carboxy-terminus. We suggest that together these pathways regulate cellular water flow. PMID:26569106

  18. Abundant protein phosphorylation potentially regulates Arabidopsis anther development

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Juanying; Zhang, Zaibao; You, Chenjiang; Zhang, Xumin; Lu, Jianan; Ma, Hong

    2016-01-01

    As the male reproductive organ of flowering plants, the stamen consists of the anther and filament. Previous studies on stamen development mainly focused on single gene functions by genetic methods or gene expression changes using comparative transcriptomic approaches, especially in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana. However, studies on Arabidopsis anther protein expression and post-translational modifications are still lacking. Here we report proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies on developing Arabidopsis anthers at stages 4–7 and 8–12. We identified 3908 high-confidence phosphorylation sites corresponding to 1637 phosphoproteins. Among the 1637 phosphoproteins, 493 were newly identified, with 952 phosphorylation sites. Phosphopeptide enrichment prior to LC-MS analysis facilitated the identification of low-abundance proteins and regulatory proteins, thereby increasing the coverage of proteomic analysis, and facilitated the analysis of more regulatory proteins. Thirty-nine serine and six threonine phosphorylation motifs were uncovered from the anther phosphoproteome and further analysis supports that phosphorylation of casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and 14-3-3 proteins is a key regulatory mechanism in anther development. Phosphorylated residues were preferentially located in variable protein regions among family members, but they were they were conserved across angiosperms in general. Moreover, phosphorylation might reduce activity of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes and hamper brassinosteroid signaling in early anther development. Most of the novel phosphoproteins showed tissue-specific expression in the anther according to previous microarray data. This study provides a community resource with information on the abundance and phosphorylation status of thousands of proteins in developing anthers, contributing to understanding post-translational regulatory mechanisms during anther development. PMID:27531888

  19. Abundant protein phosphorylation potentially regulates Arabidopsis anther development.

    PubMed

    Ye, Juanying; Zhang, Zaibao; You, Chenjiang; Zhang, Xumin; Lu, Jianan; Ma, Hong

    2016-09-01

    As the male reproductive organ of flowering plants, the stamen consists of the anther and filament. Previous studies on stamen development mainly focused on single gene functions by genetic methods or gene expression changes using comparative transcriptomic approaches, especially in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana However, studies on Arabidopsis anther protein expression and post-translational modifications are still lacking. Here we report proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies on developing Arabidopsis anthers at stages 4-7 and 8-12. We identified 3908 high-confidence phosphorylation sites corresponding to 1637 phosphoproteins. Among the 1637 phosphoproteins, 493 were newly identified, with 952 phosphorylation sites. Phosphopeptide enrichment prior to LC-MS analysis facilitated the identification of low-abundance proteins and regulatory proteins, thereby increasing the coverage of proteomic analysis, and facilitated the analysis of more regulatory proteins. Thirty-nine serine and six threonine phosphorylation motifs were uncovered from the anther phosphoproteome and further analysis supports that phosphorylation of casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and 14-3-3 proteins is a key regulatory mechanism in anther development. Phosphorylated residues were preferentially located in variable protein regions among family members, but they were they were conserved across angiosperms in general. Moreover, phosphorylation might reduce activity of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes and hamper brassinosteroid signaling in early anther development. Most of the novel phosphoproteins showed tissue-specific expression in the anther according to previous microarray data. This study provides a community resource with information on the abundance and phosphorylation status of thousands of proteins in developing anthers, contributing to understanding post-translational regulatory mechanisms during anther development. PMID:27531888

  20. Topology of Protein Interaction Network Shapes Protein Abundances and Strengths of Their Functional and Nonspecific Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, S.; Heo, M.; Shakhnovich, E.

    2011-03-08

    How do living cells achieve sufficient abundances of functional protein complexes while minimizing promiscuous nonfunctional interactions? Here we study this problem using a first-principle model of the cell whose phenotypic traits are directly determined from its genome through biophysical properties of protein structures and binding interactions in a crowded cellular environment. The model cell includes three independent prototypical pathways, whose topologies of protein-protein interaction (PPI) subnetworks are different, but whose contributions to the cell fitness are equal. Model cells evolve through genotypic mutations and phenotypic protein copy number variations. We found a strong relationship between evolved physical-chemical properties of protein interactions and their abundances due to a 'frustration' effect: Strengthening of functional interactions brings about hydrophobic interfaces, which make proteins prone to promiscuous binding. The balancing act is achieved by lowering concentrations of hub proteins while raising solubilities and abundances of functional monomers. On the basis of these principles we generated and analyzed a possible realization of the proteome-wide PPI network in yeast. In this simulation we found that high-throughput affinity capture-mass spectroscopy experiments can detect functional interactions with high fidelity only for high-abundance proteins while missing most interactions for low-abundance proteins.

  1. Comparison of Depletion Strategies for the Enrichment of Low-Abundance Proteins in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Filip, Szymon; Vougas, Konstantinos; Zoidakis, Jerome; Latosinska, Agnieszka; Mullen, William; Spasovski, Goce; Mischak, Harald; Vlahou, Antonia; Jankowski, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Proteome analysis of complex biological samples for biomarker identification remains challenging, among others due to the extended range of protein concentrations. High-abundance proteins like albumin or IgG of plasma and urine, may interfere with the detection of potential disease biomarkers. Currently, several options are available for the depletion of abundant proteins in plasma. However, the applicability of these methods in urine has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we compared different, commercially available immunodepletion and ion-exchange based approaches on urine samples from both healthy subjects and CKD patients, for their reproducibility and efficiency in protein depletion. A starting urine volume of 500 μL was used to simulate conditions of a multi-institutional biomarker discovery study. All depletion approaches showed satisfactory reproducibility (n=5) in protein identification as well as protein abundance. Comparison of the depletion efficiency between the unfractionated and fractionated samples and the different depletion strategies, showed efficient depletion in all cases, with the exception of the ion-exchange kit. The depletion efficiency was found slightly higher in normal than in CKD samples and normal samples yielded more protein identifications than CKD samples when using both initial as well as corresponding depleted fractions. Along these lines, decrease in the amount of albumin and other targets as applicable, following depletion, was observed. Nevertheless, these depletion strategies did not yield a higher number of identifications in neither the urine from normal nor CKD patients. Collectively, when analyzing urine in the context of CKD biomarker identification, no added value of depletion strategies can be observed and analysis of unfractionated starting urine appears to be preferable. PMID:26208298

  2. Determination of optimal protein quantity required to identify abundant and less abundant soybean seed proteins by 2D-PAGE and MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimizing the amounts of proteins required to separate and characterize both abundant and less abundant proteins by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) is critical for conducting proteomic research. In this study, we tested five different levels of soybean seed proteins (7...

  3. Extravascular circulation of plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Szabó, G; Magyar, Z

    1982-01-01

    The escape of radioiodinated serum albumin (RISA) from the circulation and lymphatic albumin transport was investigated in anaesthetized rabbits. The fraction of RISA escaping each hour from the circulation was 0.0932 +/- 0.0075, lymphatic albumin transport in the thoracic duct was 0.0389 +/- 0.0026 in the hepatic lymph trunk 0.0115 +/- 0.016, in the intestinal trunk 0.0122 +/- 0.0037 and in the renal lymphatics 0.0185 +/- 0.0021. About 78% of the lymph and 91% of albumin transported by the thoracic duct originated from the abdominal and renal lymphatics. The ratio of albumin escape from the circulation versus lymphatic return was 2.36. From the first slopes of the lymphatic RISA activity curves the albumin escape rates were calculated and found to be 1.89 in the liver, 2.32 in the kidney, 0.69 in the intestine and 0.20 g h-1 kg-1 tissue weight in the leg (skin). The lymph vessels returned 17% of the escaped albumin, from the liver about 12% from the intestines and almost all from the kidneys. A very strong correlation (r = 0.996) was found between lymph to plasma albumin concentration ratios and the first slopes of the RISA equilibration curves, proving that protein concentration in the lymph is determined by the rate of protein escape from the capillaries and that the rates obtained from the first slopes of the RISA cpm/g albumin in lymph per RISA cpm/g albumin in plasma equilibration curves are a measure of capillary permeability to protein. PMID:7184306

  4. Label-Free Protein Quantification for Plant Golgi Protein Localization and Abundance1[W

    PubMed Central

    Nikolovski, Nino; Shliaha, Pavel V.; Gatto, Laurent; Dupree, Paul; Lilley, Kathryn S.

    2014-01-01

    The proteomic composition of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Golgi apparatus is currently reasonably well documented; however, little is known about the relative abundances between different proteins within this compartment. Accurate quantitative information of Golgi resident proteins is of great importance: it facilitates a better understanding of the biochemical processes that take place within this organelle, especially those of different polysaccharide synthesis pathways. Golgi resident proteins are challenging to quantify because the abundance of this organelle is relatively low within the cell. In this study, an organelle fractionation approach targeting the Golgi apparatus was combined with a label-free quantitative mass spectrometry (data-independent acquisition method using ion mobility separation known as LC-IMS-MSE [or HDMSE]) to simultaneously localize proteins to the Golgi apparatus and assess their relative quantity. In total, 102 Golgi-localized proteins were quantified. These data show that organelle fractionation in conjunction with label-free quantitative mass spectrometry is a powerful and relatively simple tool to access protein organelle localization and their relative abundances. The findings presented open a unique view on the organization of the plant Golgi apparatus, leading toward unique hypotheses centered on the biochemical processes of this organelle. PMID:25122472

  5. Abundant storage protein depletion from tuber proteins using ethanol precipitation method: Suitability to proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Min; Gupta, Ravi; Kim, Sun Hyung; Wang, Yiming; Rakwal, Randeep; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Kim, Sun Tae

    2015-05-01

    High-abundance proteins (HAPs) hamper in-depth proteome study necessitating development of a HAPs depletion method. Here, we report a novel ethanol precipitation method (EPM) for HAPs depletion from total tuber proteins. Ethanol showed a dose-dependent effect on depletion of sporamin from sweet potato and patatin from potato tubers, respectively. The 50% ethanol was an optimal concentration. 2DE analysis of EPM-prepared sweet potato proteins also revealed enrichment of storage proteins (SPs) in ethanol supernatant (ES) resulting in detection of new low-abundance proteins in ethanol pellet (EP), compared to total fraction. The ES fraction showed even higher trypsin inhibitor activity than total proteins, further showing the efficacy of EPM in enrichment of sporamin in ES fraction. Application of this method was demonstrated for comparative proteomics of two sweet potato cultivars (Hwang-geum and Ho-bac) and purification of SP (sporamin) in its native form, as examples. Comparative proteomics identified many cultivar specific protein spots and selected spots were confidently assigned for their protein identity using MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis. Overall, the EPM is simple, reproducible, and economical for depletion of SPs and is suitable for downstream proteomics study. This study opens a door for its potential application to other tuber crops or fruits rich in carbohydrates. PMID:25689267

  6. An efficient extraction method to enhance analysis of low abundant proteins from soybean seed.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Savithiry S; Krishnan, Hari B; Lakshman, Sukla; Garrett, Wesley M

    2009-11-15

    Large amounts of the major storage proteins, beta-conglycinin and glycinin, in soybean (Glycine max) seeds hinder the isolation and characterization of less abundant seed proteins. We investigated whether isopropanol extraction could facilitate resolution of the low abundant proteins, different from the main storage protein fractions, in one-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (1D-PAGE) and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). 1D-PAGE of proteins extracted by different concentrations (10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, 70% and 80%) of isopropanol showed that greater than 30% isopropanol was suitable for preferential enrichment of low abundant proteins. Analysis of 2D-PAGE showed that proteins which were less abundant or absent by the conventional extraction procedure were clearly seen in the 40% isopropanol extracts. Increasing isopropanol concentration above 40% resulted in a decrease in the number of less abundant protein spots. We have identified a total of 107 protein spots using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrophotometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Our results suggest that extraction of soybean seed powder with 40% isopropanol enriches lower abundance proteins and is a suitable method for 2D-PAGE separation and identification. This methodology could potentially allow the extraction and characterization of low abundant proteins of other legume seeds containing highly abundant storage proteins. PMID:19651100

  7. An efficient extraction method to enhance analysis of low abundant proteins from soybean seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large amounts of the major seed storage proteins, such as ß-conglycinin and glycinin, in soybean (Glycine max) seeds hinder the isolation and characterization of less abundant seed proteins. We investigated whether isopropanol extraction could facilitate resolution of the less abundant proteins fro...

  8. Glycan Moieties as Bait to Fish Plasma Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fei; Zhao, Qun; Sui, Zhigang; Liang, Yu; Jiang, Hao; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-05-17

    Plasma membrane proteome analysis is of significance for screening candidate biomarkers and drug targets. However, due to their low abundance and lack of specific groups that can enable their capture, the plasma membrane proteins (PMPs) are under-represented. On the basis of the fact that PMPs are embedded in or anchored to the phospholipid bilayer of the plasma membrane and the glycan moieties of proteins and lipids located on the plasma membrane are exposed outside of the cell surface, we proposed a strategy to capture PMPs, termed as glycan moieties-directed PMPs enrichment (GMDPE). With the glycan moieties exposed outside of the cells as bait to ensure the selectivity and the phospholipid bilayer as raft to provide the sensitivity, we applied this strategy into the plasma membrane proteome analysis of HeLa cells, and in total, 772 PMPs were identified, increased by 4.5 times compared to those identified by the reported cell surface biotinylation method. Notably, among them, 86 CD antigens and 16 ion channel proteins were confidently identified. All these results demonstrated that our proposed approach has great potential in the large scale plasma membrane proteome profiling. PMID:27088673

  9. Protein Homeostasis at the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The plasma membrane (PM) and endocytic protein quality control (QC) in conjunction with the endosomal sorting machinery either repairs or targets conformationally damaged membrane proteins for lysosomal/vacuolar degradation. Here, we provide an overview of emerging aspects of the underlying mechanisms of PM QC that fulfill a critical role in preserving cellular protein homeostasis in health and diseases. PMID:24985330

  10. Industrial-scale proteomics: from liters of plasma to chemically synthesized proteins.

    PubMed

    Rose, Keith; Bougueleret, Lydie; Baussant, Thierry; Böhm, Günter; Botti, Paolo; Colinge, Jacques; Cusin, Isabelle; Gaertner, Hubert; Gleizes, Anne; Heller, Manfred; Jimenez, Silvia; Johnson, Andrew; Kussmann, Martin; Menin, Laure; Menzel, Christoph; Ranno, Frederic; Rodriguez-Tomé, Patricia; Rogers, John; Saudrais, Cedric; Villain, Matteo; Wetmore, Diana; Bairoch, Amos; Hochstrasser, Denis

    2004-07-01

    Human blood plasma is a useful source of proteins associated with both health and disease. Analysis of human blood plasma is a challenge due to the large number of peptides and proteins present and the very wide range of concentrations. In order to identify as many proteins as possible for subsequent comparative studies, we developed an industrial-scale (2.5 liter) approach involving sample pooling for the analysis of smaller proteins (M(r) generally < ca. 40 000 and some fragments of very large proteins). Plasma from healthy males was depleted of abundant proteins (albumin and IgG), then smaller proteins and polypeptides were separated into 12 960 fractions by chromatographic techniques. Analysis of proteins and polypeptides was performed by mass spectrometry prior to and after enzymatic digestion. Thousands of peptide identifications were made, permitting the identification of 502 different proteins and polypeptides from a single pool, 405 of which are listed here. The numbers refer to chromatographically separable polypeptide entities present prior to digestion. Combining results from studies with other plasma pools we have identified over 700 different proteins and polypeptides in plasma. Relatively low abundance proteins such as leptin and ghrelin and peptides such as bradykinin, all invisible to two-dimensional gel technology, were clearly identified. Proteins of interest were synthesized by chemical methods for bioassays. We believe that this is the first time that the small proteins in human blood plasma have been separated and analyzed so extensively. PMID:15221774

  11. Regular Patterns for Proteome-Wide Distribution of Protein Abundance across Species

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ying; Ying, Wantao; Wu, Songfeng; Zhu, Yunping; Liu, Siqi; Yang, Pengyuan; Qian, Xiaohong; He, Fuchu

    2012-01-01

    A proteome of the bio-entity, including cell, tissue, organ, and organism, consists of proteins of diverse abundance. The principle that determines the abundance of different proteins in a proteome is of fundamental significance for an understanding of the building blocks of the bio-entity. Here, we report three regular patterns in the proteome-wide distribution of protein abundance across species such as human, mouse, fly, worm, yeast, and bacteria: in most cases, protein abundance is positively correlated with the protein's origination time or sequence conservation during evolution; it is negatively correlated with the protein's domain number and positively correlated with domain coverage in protein structure, and the correlations became stronger during the course of evolution; protein abundance can be further stratified by the function of the protein, whereby proteins that act on material conversion and transportation (mass category) are more abundant than those that act on information modulation (information category). Thus, protein abundance is intrinsically related to the protein's inherent characters of evolution, structure, and function. PMID:22427835

  12. Mass spectrometry in cancer biomarker research: a case for immunodepletion of abundant blood-derived proteins from clinical tissue specimens

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, DaRue A; Johann, Donald J; Wei, Bih-Rong; Ye, Xiaoying; Chan, King C; Nissley, Dwight V; Simpson, R Mark; Citrin, Deborah E; Mackall, Crystal L; Linehan, W Marston; Blonder, Josip

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of clinically relevant cancer biomarkers using mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has proven difficult, primarily because of the enormous dynamic range of blood-derived protein concentrations and the fact that the 22 most abundant blood-derived proteins constitute approximately 99% of the total plasma protein mass. Immunodepletion of clinical body fluid specimens (e.g., serum/plasma) for the removal of highly abundant proteins is a reasonable and reproducible solution. Often overlooked, clinical tissue specimens also contain a formidable amount of highly abundant blood-derived proteins present in tissue-embedded networks of blood/lymph capillaries and interstitial fluid. Hence, the dynamic range impediment to biomarker discovery remains a formidable obstacle, regardless of clinical sample type (solid tissue and/or body fluid). Thus, we optimized and applied simultaneous immunodepletion of blood-derived proteins from solid tissue and peripheral blood, using clear cell renal cell carcinoma as a model disease. Integrative analysis of data from this approach and genomic data obtained from the same type of tumor revealed concordant key pathways and protein targets germane to clear cell renal cell carcinoma. This includes the activation of the lipogenic pathway characterized by increased expression of adipophilin (PLIN2) along with 'cadherin switching', a phenomenon indicative of transcriptional reprogramming linked to renal epithelial dedifferentiation. We also applied immunodepletion of abundant blood-derived proteins to various tissue types (e.g., adipose tissue and breast tissue) showing unambiguously that the removal of abundant blood-derived proteins represents a powerful tool for the reproducible profiling of tissue proteomes. Herein, we show that the removal of abundant blood-derived proteins from solid tissue specimens is of equal importance to depletion of body fluids and recommend its routine use in the context of biological discovery and

  13. Proteomics-Based Identification of Differentially Abundant Proteins from Human Keratinocytes Exposed to Arsenic Trioxide

    PubMed Central

    Udensi, Udensi K; Tackett, Alan J; Byrum, Stephanie; Avaritt, Nathan L; Sengupta, Deepanwita; Moreland, Linley W; Tchounwou, Paul B; Isokpehi, Raphael D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Arsenic is a widely distributed environmental toxicant that can cause multi-tissue pathologies. Proteomic assays allow for the identification of biological processes modulated by arsenic in diverse tissue types. Method The altered abundance of proteins from HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line exposed to arsenic was quantified using a label-free LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry workflow. Selected proteomics results were validated using western blot and RT-PCR. A functional annotation analytics strategy that included visual analytical integration of heterogeneous data sets was developed to elucidate functional categories. The annotations integrated were mainly tissue localization, biological process and gene family. Result The abundance of 173 proteins was altered in keratinocytes exposed to arsenic; in which 96 proteins had increased abundance while 77 proteins had decreased abundance. These proteins were also classified into 69 Gene Ontology biological process terms. The increased abundance of transferrin receptor protein (TFRC) was validated and also annotated to participate in response to hypoxia. A total of 33 proteins (11 increased abundance and 22 decreased abundance) were associated with 18 metabolic process terms. The Glutamate--cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), the only protein annotated with the term sulfur amino acid metabolism process, had increased abundance while succinate dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] iron-sulfur subunit, mitochondrial precursor (SDHB), a tumor suppressor, had decreased abundance. Conclusion A list of 173 differentially abundant proteins in response to arsenic trioxide was grouped using three major functional annotations covering tissue localization, biological process and protein families. A possible explanation for hyperpigmentation pathologies observed in arsenic toxicity is that arsenic exposure leads to increased iron uptake in the normally hypoxic human skin. The proteins mapped to metabolic process terms and

  14. Sensing Small Changes in Protein Abundance: Stimulation of Caco-2 Cells by Human Whey Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cundiff, Judy K; McConnell, Elizabeth J; Lohe, Kimberly J; Maria, Sarah D; McMahon, Robert J; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approaches have largely facilitated our systemic understanding of cellular processes and biological functions. Cutoffs in protein expression fold changes (FCs) are often arbitrarily determined in MS-based quantification with no demonstrable determination of small magnitude changes in protein expression. Therefore, many biological insights may remain veiled due to high FC cutoffs. Herein, we employ the intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line Caco-2 as a model system to demonstrate the dynamicity of tandem-mass-tag (TMT) labeling over a range of 5-40% changes in protein abundance, with the variance controls of ± 5% FC for around 95% of TMT ratios when sampling 9-12 biological replicates. We further applied this procedure to examine the temporal proteome of Caco-2 cells upon exposure to human whey proteins (WP). Pathway assessments predict subtle effects due to WP in moderating xenobiotic metabolism, promoting proliferation and various other cellular functions in differentiating enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. This demonstration of a sensitive MS approach may open up new perspectives in the system-wide exploration of elusive or transient biological effects by facilitating scrutiny of narrow windows of proteome abundance changes. Furthermore, we anticipate this study will encourage more investigations of WP on infant gastrointestinal tract development. PMID:26586228

  15. Evaluation of Multi-Protein Immunoaffinity Subtraction for Plasma Proteomics and Candidate Biomarker Discovery Using Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun; Mottaz, Heather M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Moore, Ronald J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-11-01

    The detection of low-abundance protein disease biomarkers from human blood poses significant challenges due to the high dynamic range of protein concentrations that span more than 10 orders of magnitude, as well as the extreme complexity of the serum/plasma proteome. Therefore, experimental strategies that include the removal of high-abundance proteins have been increasingly utilized in proteomic studies of serum, plasma, and other body fluids to enhance detection of low-abundance proteins and achieve broader proteome coverage. However, both the specificity and reproducibility of the high-abundance protein depletion process represent common concerns. Here, we report a detailed evaluation of the performance of two commercially available immunoaffinity subtraction systems commonly used in human serum/plasma proteome characterization by high resolution LC-MS/MS. One system uses mammalian IgG antibodies to remove six of the most abundant plasma proteins, and the other uses chicken immunoglobulin yolk (IgY) antibodies to remove twelve of the most abundant plasma proteins. Plasma samples were repeatedly processed using these two systems, and the resulting flow-through fractions and bound fractions were individually analyzed for comparison. Removal of target proteins by both immunoaffinity subtraction systems proved reproducible and efficient. Nontarget proteins, including spiked protein standards, were also observed to bind to the columns, but in a fairly reproducible manner. The results suggest that these multi-protein immunoaffinity subtraction systems are both highly effective and reproducible for removing high-abundance proteins and therefore, can be readily integrated into quantitative strategies to enhance detection of low-abundance proteins in biomarker discovery studies.

  16. Chloroplast isolation and affinity chromatography for enrichment of low-abundant proteins in complex proteomes.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Roman G; Stael, Simon; Teige, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the proteome is crucial to advance the biological sciences. Low-abundant proteins are of particular interest to many biologists as they include, for example those proteins involved in signal transduction. Recent technological advances resulted in a tremendous increase in protein identification sensitivity by mass spectrometry (MS). However, the dynamic range in protein abundance still forms a fundamental problem that limits the detection of low-abundant proteins in complex proteomes. These proteins will typically escape detection in shotgun MS experiments due to the presence of other proteins at an abundance several-fold higher in order of magnitude. Therefore, specific enrichment strategies are required to overcome this technical limitation of MS-based protein discovery. We have searched for novel signal transduction proteins, more specifically kinases and calcium-binding proteins, and here we describe different approaches for enrichment of these low-abundant proteins from isolated chloroplasts from pea and Arabidopsis for subsequent proteomic analysis by MS. These approaches could be extended to include other signal transduction proteins and target different organelles. PMID:25820724

  17. Identification of Differentially Abundant Proteins of Edwardsiella ictaluri during Iron Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Dumpala, Pradeep R.; Peterson, Brian C.; Lawrence, Mark L.; Karsi, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe intracellular bacterium that causes enteric septicemia in channel catfish. Iron is an essential inorganic nutrient of bacteria and is crucial for bacterial invasion. Reduced availability of iron by the host may cause significant stress for bacterial pathogens and is considered a signal that leads to significant alteration in virulence gene expression. However, the precise effect of iron-restriction on E. ictaluri protein abundance is unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify differentially abundant proteins of E. ictaluri during in vitro iron-restricted conditions. We applied two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) for determining differentially abundant proteins and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/TOF MS) for protein identification. Gene ontology and pathway-based functional modeling of differentially abundant proteins was also conducted. A total of 50 unique differentially abundant proteins at a minimum of 2-fold (p ≤ 0.05) difference in abundance due to iron-restriction were detected. The numbers of up- and down-regulated proteins were 37 and 13, respectively. We noted several proteins, including EsrB, LamB, MalM, MalE, FdaA, and TonB-dependent heme/hemoglobin receptor family proteins responded to iron restriction in E. ictaluri. PMID:26168192

  18. Natural variability in abundance of prevalent soybean proteins.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Savithiry S

    2010-12-01

    Soybean is an inexpensive source of protein for humans and animals. Genetic modifications (GMO) to soybean have become inevitable on two fronts, both quality and yield will need to improve to meet increasing global demand. To ensure the safety of the crop for consumers it is important to determine the natural variation in seed protein constituents as well as any unintended changes that may occur in the GMO as a result of genetic modification. Understanding the natural variation of seed proteins in wild and cultivated soybeans that have been used in conventional soybean breeding programs is critical for determining unintended protein expression in GMO soybeans. In recent years, proteomic technologies have been used as an effective analytical tool for examining modifications of protein profiles. We have standardized and applied these technologies to determine and quantify the spectrum of proteins present in soybean seed. We used two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for the separation, quantification, and identification of different classes of soybean seed proteins. We have observed significant variations in different classes of proteins, including storage, allergen and anti-nutritional protein profiles, between non-GMO cultivated and wild soybean varieties. This information is useful for scientists and regulatory agencies to determine whether the unintended expression of proteins found in transgenic soybean is within the range of natural variation. PMID:20709130

  19. Factors regulating the abundance and localization of synaptobrevin in the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Dittman, Jeremy S.; Kaplan, Joshua M.

    2006-01-01

    After synaptic vesicle fusion, vesicle proteins must be segregated from plasma membrane proteins and recycled to maintain a functional vesicle pool. We monitored the distribution of synaptobrevin, a vesicle protein required for exocytosis, in Caenorhabditis elegans motor neurons by using a pH-sensitive synaptobrevin GFP fusion protein, synaptopHluorin. We estimated that 30% of synaptobrevin was present in the plasma membrane. By using a panel of endocytosis and exocytosis mutants, we found that the majority of surface synaptobrevin derives from fusion of synaptic vesicles and that, in steady state, synaptobrevin equilibrates throughout the axon. The surface synaptobrevin was enriched near active zones, and its spatial extent was regulated by the clathrin adaptin AP180. These results suggest that there is a plasma membrane reservoir of synaptobrevin that is supplied by the synaptic vesicle cycle and available for retrieval throughout the axon. The size of the reservoir is set by the relative rates of exo- and endocytosis. PMID:16844789

  20. Pharmacological zinc and phytase supplementation enhance metallothionein mRNA abundance and protein concentration in newly weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Michelle M; Hill, Gretchen M; Link, Jane E; Raney, Nancy E; Tempelman, Robert J; Ernst, Catherine W

    2004-03-01

    The swine industry feeds pharmacological zinc (Zn) to newly weaned pigs to improve health. Because most swine diets are plant-based with a high phytic acid content, we hypothesized that adding phytase to diets could reduce the amount of Zn required to obtain beneficial responses. The role of metallothionein (MT) in Zn homeostasis could be important in this positive response. Thus, the goal of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary Zn and phytase on relative MT mRNA abundance and protein concentration in newly weaned pigs. Diets containing adequate (150 mg Zn/kg) or pharmacological concentrations of Zn (1000 or 2000 mg Zn/kg), as zinc oxide, with or without phytase [0, 500 phytase units (FTU)/kg, Natuphos, BASF] were fed in a 3 x 2 factorial design. Plasma and tissue minerals were measured in pigs killed after 14 d of dietary intervention. Hepatic and renal relative MT mRNA abundance and protein were greater (P < 0.05) in pigs fed 1000 mg Zn/kg with phytase, or 2000 mg Zn/kg with or without phytase vs. the remaining treatments. Intestinal mucosa MT mRNA abundance and protein were greater (P < 0.05) in pigs fed 2000 mg Zn/kg with phytase than in pigs fed 2000 mg Zn/kg alone or 1000 mg Zn/kg with phytase. Pigs fed 1000 mg Zn/kg plus phytase or 2000 mg Zn/kg with or without phytase had higher plasma, hepatic, and renal Zn than those fed the adequate Zn diets or 1000 mg Zn/kg. We conclude that feeding 1000 mg Zn/kg with phytase enhances MT mRNA abundance and protein and Zn absorption to the same degree as 2000 mg Zn/kg with and without phytase. PMID:14988443

  1. Genomic analysis of membrane protein families: abundance and conserved motifs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Engelman, Donald M; Gerstein, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Background Polytopic membrane proteins can be related to each other on the basis of the number of transmembrane helices and sequence similarities. Building on the Pfam classification of protein domain families, and using transmembrane-helix prediction and sequence-similarity searching, we identified a total of 526 well-characterized membrane protein families in 26 recently sequenced genomes. To this we added a clustering of a number of predicted but unclassified membrane proteins, resulting in a total of 637 membrane protein families. Results Analysis of the occurrence and composition of these families revealed several interesting trends. The number of assigned membrane protein domains has an approximately linear relationship to the total number of open reading frames (ORFs) in 26 genomes studied. Caenorhabditis elegans is an apparent outlier, because of its high representation of seven-span transmembrane (7-TM) chemoreceptor families. In all genomes, including that of C. elegans, the number of distinct membrane protein families has a logarithmic relation to the number of ORFs. Glycine, proline, and tyrosine locations tend to be conserved in transmembrane regions within families, whereas isoleucine, valine, and methionine locations are relatively mutable. Analysis of motifs in putative transmembrane helices reveals that GxxxG and GxxxxxxG (which can be written GG4 and GG7, respectively; see Materials and methods) are among the most prevalent. This was noted in earlier studies; we now find these motifs are particularly well conserved in families, however, especially those corresponding to transporters, symporters, and channels. Conclusions We carried out a genome-wide analysis on patterns of the classified polytopic membrane protein families and analyzed the distribution of conserved amino acids and motifs in the transmembrane helix regions in these families. PMID:12372142

  2. Transcriptional abundance is not the single force driving the evolution of bacterial proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite rapid progress in understanding the mechanisms that shape the evolution of proteins, the relative importance of various factors remain to be elucidated. In this study, we have assessed the effects of 16 different biological features on the evolutionary rates (ERs) of protein-coding sequences in bacterial genomes. Results Our analysis of 18 bacterial species revealed new correlations between ERs and constraining factors. Previous studies have suggested that transcriptional abundance overwhelmingly constrains the evolution of yeast protein sequences. This transcriptional abundance leads to selection against misfolding or misinteractions. In this study we found that there was no single factor in determining the evolution of bacterial proteins. Not only transcriptional abundance (codon adaptation index and expression level), but also protein-protein associations (PPAs), essentiality (ESS), subcellular localization of cytoplasmic membrane (SLM), transmembrane helices (TMH) and hydropathicity score (HS) independently and significantly affected the ERs of bacterial proteins. In some species, PPA and ESS demonstrate higher correlations with ER than transcriptional abundance. Conclusions Different forces drive the evolution of protein sequences in yeast and bacteria. In bacteria, the constraints are involved in avoiding a build-up of toxic molecules caused by misfolding/misinteraction (transcriptional abundance), while retaining important functions (ESS, PPA) and maintaining the cell membrane (SLM, TMH and HS). Each of these independently contributes to the variation in protein evolution. PMID:23914835

  3. Contribution of protein fractionation to depth of analysis of the serum and plasma proteomes.

    PubMed

    Faca, Vitor; Pitteri, Sharon J; Newcomb, Lisa; Glukhova, Veronika; Phanstiel, Doug; Krasnoselsky, Alexei; Zhang, Qing; Struthers, Jason; Wang, Hong; Eng, Jimmy; Fitzgibbon, Matt; McIntosh, Martin; Hanash, Samir

    2007-09-01

    In-depth analysis of the serum and plasma proteomes by mass spectrometry is challenged by the vast dynamic range of protein abundance and substantial complexity. There is merit in reducing complexity through fractionation to facilitate mass spectrometry analysis of low-abundance proteins. However, fractionation reduces throughput and has the potential of diluting individual proteins or inducing their loss. Here, we have investigated the contribution of extensive fractionation of intact proteins to depth of analysis. Pooled serum depleted of abundant proteins was fractionated by an orthogonal two-dimensional system consisting of anion-exchange and reversed-phase chromatography. The resulting protein fractions were aliquotted; one aliquot was analyzed by shotgun LC-MS/MS, and another was further resolved into protein bands in a third dimension using SDS-PAGE. Individual gel bands were excised and subjected to in situ digestion and mass spectrometry. We demonstrate that increased fractionation results in increased depth of analysis based on total number of proteins identified in serum and based on representation in individual fractions of specific proteins identified in gel bands following a third-dimension SDS gel analysis. An intact protein analysis system (IPAS) based on a two-dimensional plasma fractionation schema was implemented that resulted in identification of 1662 proteins with high confidence with representation of protein isoforms that differed in their chromatographic mobility. Further increase in depth of analysis was accomplished by repeat analysis of aliquots from the same set of two-dimensional fractions resulting in overall identification of 2254 proteins. We conclude that substantial depth of analysis of proteins from milliliter quantities of serum or plasma and detection of isoforms are achieved with depletion of abundant proteins followed by two-dimensional protein fractionation and MS analysis of individual fractions. PMID:17696519

  4. Depletion of cells and abundant proteins from biological samples by enhanced dielectrophoresis✩

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, C.; Provine, J.; Davis, R.W.; Howe, R.T.

    2016-01-01

    Platforms that are sensitive and specific enough to assay low-abundance protein biomarkers, in a high throughput multiplex format, within a complex biological fluid specimen, are necessary to enable protein biomarker based diagnostics for diseases such as cancer. The signal from an assay for a low-abundance protein biomarker in a biological fluid sample like blood is typically buried in a background that arises from the presence of blood cells and from high-abundance proteins that make up 90% of the assayed protein mass. We present an automated on-chip platform for the depletion of cells and highly abundant serum proteins in blood. Our platform consists of two components, the first of which is a microfluidic mixer that mixes beads containing antibodies against the highly abundant proteins in the whole blood. This complex mixture (consisting of beads, cells, and serum proteins) is then injected into the second component of our microfluidic platform, which comprises a filter trench to capture all the cells and the beads. The size-based trapping of the cells and beads into the filter trench is significantly enhanced by leveraging additional negative dielectrophoretic forces to push the micron sized particles (cells and beads which have captured the highly abundant proteins) down into the trench, allowing the serum proteins of lower abundance to flow through. In general, dielectrophoresis using bare electrodes is incapable of producing forces beyond the low piconewton range that tend to be insufficient for separation applications. However, by using electrodes passivated with atomic layer deposition, we demonstrate the application of enhanced negative DEP electrodes together with size-based flltration induced by the filter trench, to deplete 100% of the micron sized particles in the mixture. PMID:26924893

  5. Plasma Biomarker Discovery Using 3D Protein Profiling Coupled with Label-Free Quantitation

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Lynn A.; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Barnhart, Kurt T.; Speicher, David W.

    2011-01-01

    In-depth quantitative profiling of human plasma samples for biomarker discovery remains quite challenging. One promising alternative to chemical derivatization with stable isotope labels for quantitative comparisons is direct, label-free, quantitative comparison of raw LC–MS data. But, in order to achieve high-sensitivity detection of low-abundance proteins, plasma proteins must be extensively pre-fractionated, and results from LC–MS runs of all fractions must be integrated efficiently in order to avoid misidentification of variations in fractionation from sample to sample as “apparent” biomarkers. This protocol describes a powerful 3D protein profiling method for comprehensive analysis of human serum or plasma proteomes, which combines abundant protein depletion and high-sensitivity GeLC–MS/MS with label-free quantitation of candidate biomarkers. PMID:21468938

  6. Two Novel Heat-Soluble Protein Families Abundantly Expressed in an Anhydrobiotic Tardigrade

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Ayami; Tanaka, Sae; Yamaguchi, Shiho; Kuwahara, Hirokazu; Takamura, Chizuko; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Horikawa, Daiki D.; Toyoda, Atsushi; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Fujiyama, Asao; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS) and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS) protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals. PMID:22937162

  7. Dietary zinc depletion and repletion affects plasma proteins: an analysis of the plasma proteome

    PubMed Central

    Wickwire, Kathie; Ho, Emily; Chung, Carolyn S.; King, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a problem worldwide. Current methods for assessing Zn status are limited to measuring plasma or serum Zn within populations suspected of deficiency. Despite the high prevalence of Zn deficiency in the human population there are no methods currently available for sensitively assessing Zn status among individuals. The purpose of this research was to utilize a proteomic approach using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) and mass spectrometry to identify protein biomarkers that were sensitive to changes in dietary Zn levels in humans. Proteomic analysis was performed in human plasma samples (n = 6) obtained from healthy adult male subjects that completed a dietary Zn depletion/repletion protocol, current dietary zinc intake has a greater effect on fractional zinc absorption than does longer term zinc consumption in healthy adult men. Chung et al. (Am J Clin Nutr 87 (5):1224–1229, 2008). After a 13 day Zn acclimatization period where subjects consumed a Zn-adequate diet, the male subjects consumed a marginal Zn-depleted diet for 42 days followed by consumption of a Zn-repleted diet for 28 days. The samples at baseline, end of depletion and end of repletion were pre-fractionated through immuno-affinity columns to remove 14 highly abundant proteins, and each fraction separated by 2DE. Following staining by colloidal Coomassie blue and densitometric analysis, three proteins were identified by mass spectrometry as affected by changes in dietary Zn. Fibrin β and chain E, fragment double D were observed in the plasma protein fraction that remained bound to the immuno-affinity column. An unnamed protein that was related to immunoglobulins was observed in the immunode-pleted plasma fraction. Fibrin β increased two-fold following the Zn depletion period and decreased to baseline values following the Zn repletion period; this protein may serve as a viable biomarker for Zn status in the future. PMID:23255060

  8. Protein abundance changes of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in different sugar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Niu, Chen; Liu, Bin; Wei, JianPing; Wang, HuXuan; Yuan, YaHong; Yue, TianLi

    2016-09-16

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is a yeast which can cause spoilage in the concentrated juice industries. It exhibits resistance to high sugar concentrations but genome- and proteome-wide studies on Z. rouxii in response to high sugar concentrations have been poorly investigated. Herein, by using a 2-D electrophoresis based workflow, the proteome of a wild strain of Z. rouxii under different sugar concentrations has been analyzed. Proteins were extracted, quantified, and subjected to 2-DE analysis in the pH range 4-7. Differences in growth (lag phase), protein content (13.97-19.23mg/g cell dry weight) and number of resolved spots (196-296) were found between sugar concentrations. ANOVA test showed that 168 spots were different, and 47 spots, corresponding to 40 unique gene products have been identified. These protein species are involved in carbohydrate and energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, response to stimulus, protein transport and vesicle organization, cell morphogenesis regulation, transcription and translation, nucleotide metabolism, amino-sugar nucleotide-sugar pathways, oxidoreductases balancing, and ribosome biogenesis. The present study provides important information about how Z. rouxii acts to cope with high sugar concentration at molecular levels, which might enhance our global understanding of Z. rouxii's high sugar-tolerance trait. PMID:27322723

  9. Fibroblastic synoviocytes secrete plasma proteins via α2 -macroglobulins serving as intracellular and extracellular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ke-Wei; Murray, Elsa J Brochmann; Murray, Samuel S

    2015-11-01

    Changes in plasma protein levels in synovial fluid (SF) have been implicated in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. It was previously thought that the presence of plasma proteins in SF reflected ultrafiltration or extravasation from the vasculature, possibly due to retraction of inflamed endothelial cells. Recent proteomic analyses have confirmed the abundant presence of plasma proteins in SF from control and arthritic patients. Systematic depletion of high-abundance plasma proteins from SF and conditioned media from synoviocytes cultured in serum, and protein analysis under denaturing/reducing conditions have limited our understanding of sources and the native structures of "plasma protein" complexes in SF. Using Western blotting, qPCR, and mass spectrometry, we found that Hig-82 lapine fibroblastic synovicytes cultured under serum-free conditions expressed and secreted plasma proteins, including the cytokine-binding protein secreted phosphoprotein 24 kDa (Spp24) and many of the proteases and protease inhibitors found in SF. Treating synoviocytes with TGF-β1 or BMP-2 for 24 h upregulated the expression of plasma proteins, including Spp24, α2 -HS-glycoprotein, α1 -antitrypsin, IGF-1, and C-reactive protein. Furthermore, many of the plasma proteins of mass <151 kDa were secreted as disulfide-bound complexes with members of the α2 -macroglobulin (A2M) family, which serve as intracellular and extracellular chaperones, not protease inhibitors. Using brefeldin A to block vesicular traffic and protease inhibitors to inhibit endogenous activation of naïve A2M, we demonstrated that the complexes were formed in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen and that Ca(2+) cysteine protease-dependent processes are involved. PMID:25900303

  10. Quantitative analysis of aberrant protein glycosylation in liver cancer plasma by AAL-enrichment and MRM mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Shin, Park Min; Kim, Yong-Sam; Oh, Na Ree; Ji, Eun Sun; Kim, Kwang Hoe; Lee, Yeon Jung; Kim, Sung Ho; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2013-11-01

    A lectin-coupled mass spectrometry (MS) approach was employed to quantitatively monitor aberrant protein glycosylation in liver cancer plasma. To do this, we compared the difference in the total protein abundance of a target glycoprotein between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) plasmas and hepatitis B virus (HBV) plasmas, as well as the difference in lectin-specific protein glycoform abundance of the target glycoprotein. Capturing the lectin-specific protein glycoforms from a plasma sample was accomplished by using a fucose-specific aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) immobilized onto magnetic beads via a biotin-streptavidin conjugate. Following tryptic digestion of both the total plasma and its AAL-captured fraction of each HCC and HBV sample, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry was conducted quantitatively by a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) technique. From the MRM-based analysis of the total plasmas and AAL-captured fractions, differences between HCC and HBV plasma groups in fucosylated glycoform levels of target glycoproteins were confirmed to arise from both the change in the total protein abundance of the target proteins and the change incurred by aberrant fucosylation on target glycoproteins in HCC plasma, even when no significant change occurs in the total protein abundance level. Combining the MRM-based analysis method with the lectin-capturing technique proved to be a successful means of quantitatively investigating aberrant protein glycosylation in cancer plasma samples. Additionally, it was elucidated that the differences between HCC and control groups in fucosylated biomarker candidates A1AT and FETUA mainly originated from an increase in fucosylation levels on these target glycoproteins, rather than an increase in the total protein abundance of the target glycoproteins. PMID:24027776

  11. Separation of proteins from human plasma by sample displacement chromatography in hydrophobic interaction mode

    PubMed Central

    Josic, Djuro; Breen, Lucas; Clifton, James; Gajdosik, Martina Srajer; Gaso-Sokac, Dajana; Rucevic, Marijana; Müller, Egbert

    2013-01-01

    Sample displacement chromatography (SDC) in reversed-phase and ion-exchange modes was introduced approximately twenty years ago. This method was first used for the preparative purification of peptides and proteins. Recently, SDC in ion-exchange mode was also successfully used for enrichment of low abundance proteins from human plasma. In this paper, the use of SDC for the separation of plasma proteins in hydrophobic interaction mode is demonstrated. By use of two or more columns coupled in series during sample application, and subsequent elution of detached columns in parallel, additional separation of bound proteins was achieved. Further low-abundance, physiologically active proteins could be highly enriched and detected by ESI-MS/MS. PMID:22740472

  12. Assessment of the natural variation of low abundant metabolic proteins in soybean seeds using proteomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, we investigated the distribution of the low abundant proteins that are involved in soybean seed development in four wild and twelve cultivated soybean genotypes. We found proteomic variation of these proteins within and...

  13. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section 640...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  14. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  15. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  16. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  17. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  18. Measurement of Cysteine Dioxygenase Activity and Protein Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Stipanuk, Martha H.; Dominy, John E.; Ueki, Iori; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.

    2009-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is an iron (Fe2+)-dependent thiol dioxygenase that uses molecular oxygen to oxidize the sulfhydryl group of cysteine to generate 3-sulfinoalanine (commonly called cysteinesulfinic acid). Cysteine dioxygenase activity is routinely assayed by measuring cysteinesulfinate formation from substrate L-cysteine at pH 6.1 in the presence of ferrous ions to saturate the enzyme with metal cofactor, a copper chelator to diminish substrate oxidation, and hydroxylamine to inhibit pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent degradation of product. The amount of cysteine dioxygenase may be measured by immunoblotting. Upon SDS-PAGE, cysteine dioxygenase can be separated into two major bands, with the upper band representing the 23-kDa protein and the lower band representing the mature enzyme that has undergone formation of an internal thioether cross link in the active site. Formation of this cross link is dependent upon the catalytic turnover of substrate and produces an enzyme with a higher catalytic efficiency and catalytic half-life. PMID:19885389

  19. Electroejaculation increases low molecular weight proteins in seminal plasma modifying sperm quality in Corriedale rams.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, A; Manes, J; Cesari, A; Alberio, R; Hozbor, F

    2014-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of seminal collection method (artificial vagina or electroejaculation) on the protein composition of seminal plasma and sperm quality parameters in Corriedale rams. To address this question, we assessed the effect of seminal collection method on motility, plasma membrane integrity and functionality, mitochondrial functionality and the decondensation state of nuclear chromatin in sperm cells. Volume, pH, osmolarity, protein concentration, total protein content and protein profile using sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and 2-D polyacrylamide electrophoresis of seminal plasma collected with artificial vagina and electroejaculation were also analysed. The main findings from this study were that ejaculates obtained with electroejaculation had (i) a higher number of spermatozoa with intact plasma membrane and functional mitochondria and (ii) a higher proportion of seminal plasma, total protein content and relative abundance of low molecular weight proteins than ejaculates obtained with artificial vagina. Five of these proteins were identified by mass spectrometry: binder of sperm 5 precursor; RSVP14; RSVP22; epididymal secretory protein E1 and clusterin. One protein spot with molecular weight of approximately 31 kDa and isoelectric point of 4.8 was only found in the seminal plasma from electroejaculation. PMID:24494601

  20. Choice of dietary protein of vegetarians and omnivores is reflected in their hair protein 13C and 15N abundance.

    PubMed

    Petzke, Klaus J; Boeing, Heiner; Metges, Cornelia C

    2005-01-01

    Stable isotopic (15N, 13C) composition of tissues depends on isotopic pattern of food sources. We investigated whether the isotopic compositions of human hair protein and amino acids reflect the habitual dietary protein intake. Hair samples were analyzed from 100 omnivores (selected randomly out of the 1987-1988 German nutrition survey VERA), and from 15 ovo-lacto-vegetarians (OLV), and from 6 vegans recruited separately. Hair bulk and amino acid specific isotopic compositions were analyzed by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS and GC/C/IRMS, respectively) and the results were correlated with data of the 7 day dietary records. Hair bulk 15N and 13C abundances clearly reflect the particular eating habits. Vegans can be distinguished from OLV and both are significantly distinct from omnivores in both 15N and 13C abundances. 15N and 13C abundances rose with a higher proportion of animal to total protein intake (PAPI). Individual proportions of animal protein consumption (IPAP) were calculated using isotopic abundances and a linear regression model using animal protein consumption data of vegans (PAPI = 0) and omnivores (mean PAPI = 0.639). IPAP values positively correlated with the intake of protein, meat, meat products, and animal protein. Distinct patterns for hair amino acid specific 15N and 13C abundances were measured but with lower resolution between food preference groups compared with bulk values. In conclusion, hair 13C and 15N values both reflected the extent of animal protein consumption. Bulk isotopic abundance of hair can be tested for future use in the validation of dietary assessment methods. PMID:15880664

  1. Identification of PDC-109-like protein(s) in buffalo seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Harshan, Hiron M; Sankar, Surya; Singh, L P; Singh, Manish Kumar; Sudharani, S; Ansari, M R; Singh, S K; Majumdar, A C; Joshi, P

    2009-10-01

    The FN-2 family of seminal plasma proteins represents the major protein fraction of bovine seminal plasma. These proteins also constitute the major seminal plasma proteins fraction in horse, goat and bison seminal plasma and are present in pig, rat, mouse, hamster and human seminal plasma. BSP-A1 and BSP-A2, the predominant proteins of the FN-2 family, are collectively termed as PDC-109. Fn-2 proteins play an important role in fertilization, including sperm capacitation and formation of oviductal sperm reservoirs. Significantly, BSP proteins were also shown to have negative effects in the context of sperm storage. No conclusive evidence for the presence of buffalo seminal plasma protein(s) similar to PDC-109 exists. Studies with buffalo seminal plasma indicated that isolation and identification of PDC-109-like protein(s) from buffalo seminal plasma by conventional methods might be difficult. Thus, antibodies raised against PDC-109 isolated, and purified from cattle seminal plasma, were used for investigating the presence of PDC-109-like protein(s) in buffalo seminal plasma. Buffalo seminal plasma proteins were resolved on SDS-PAGE, blotted to nitro cellulose membranes and probed for the presence of PDC-109-like protein(s) using the PDC-109 antisera raised in rabbits. A distinct immunoreactive band well below the 20-kDa regions indicated the presence of PDC-109-like protein(s) in buffalo seminal plasma. PMID:19117702

  2. DERIVING PLASMA DENSITIES AND ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES FROM SERTS DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Kimble, J. A.; Saba, J. L. R.

    2012-09-20

    We use high-resolution spectral emission line data obtained by the SERTS instrument during three rocket flights to demonstrate a new approach for constraining electron densities of solar active region plasma. We apply differential emission measure (DEM) forward-fitting techniques to characterize the multithermal solar plasma producing the observed EUV spectra, with constraints on the high-temperature plasma from the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope. In this iterative process, we compare line intensities predicted by an input source distribution to observed line intensities for multiple iron ion species, and search a broad range of densities to optimize {chi}{sup 2} simultaneously for the many available density-sensitive lines. This produces a density weighted by the DEM, which appears to be useful for characterizing the bulk of the emitting plasma over a significant range of temperature. This 'DEM-weighted density' technique is complementary to the use of density-sensitive line ratios and less affected by uncertainties in atomic data and ionization fraction for any specific line. Once the DEM shape and the DEM-weighted density have been established from the iron lines, the relative elemental abundances can be determined for other lines in the spectrum. We have also identified spectral lines in the SERTS wavelength range that may be problematic.

  3. Deriving Plasma Densities and Elemental Abundances from SERTS Differential Emission Measure Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Kimble, J. A.; Saba, J. L. R.

    2012-01-01

    We use high-resolution spectral emission line data obtained by the SERTS instrument during three rocket flights to demonstrate a new approach for constraining electron densities of solar active region plasma.We apply differential emission measure (DEM) forward-fitting techniques to characterize the multithermal solar plasma producing the observed EUV spectra, with constraints on the high-temperature plasma from the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope. In this iterative process, we compare line intensities predicted by an input source distribution to observed line intensities for multiple iron ion species, and search a broad range of densities to optimize chi-square simultaneously for the many available density-sensitive lines. This produces a density weighted by the DEM, which appears to be useful for characterizing the bulk of the emitting plasma over a significant range of temperature. This "DEM-weighted density" technique is complementary to the use of density-sensitive line ratios and less affected by uncertainties in atomic data and ionization fraction for any specific line. Once the DEM shape and the DEM-weighted density have been established from the iron lines, the relative elemental abundances can be determined for other lines in the spectrum. We have also identified spectral lines in the SERTS wavelength range that may be problematic

  4. Genetics of single-cell protein abundance variation in large yeast populations.

    PubMed

    Albert, Frank W; Treusch, Sebastian; Shockley, Arthur H; Bloom, Joshua S; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-02-27

    Variation among individuals arises in part from differences in DNA sequences, but the genetic basis for variation in most traits, including common diseases, remains only partly understood. Many DNA variants influence phenotypes by altering the expression level of one or several genes. The effects of such variants can be detected as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). Traditional eQTL mapping requires large-scale genotype and gene expression data for each individual in the study sample, which limits sample sizes to hundreds of individuals in both humans and model organisms and reduces statistical power. Consequently, many eQTL are probably missed, especially those with smaller effects. Furthermore, most studies use messenger RNA rather than protein abundance as the measure of gene expression. Studies that have used mass-spectrometry proteomics reported unexpected differences between eQTL and protein QTL (pQTL) for the same genes, but these studies have been even more limited in scope. Here we introduce a powerful method for identifying genetic loci that influence protein expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We measure single-cell protein abundance through the use of green fluorescent protein tags in very large populations of genetically variable cells, and use pooled sequencing to compare allele frequencies across the genome in thousands of individuals with high versus low protein abundance. We applied this method to 160 genes and detected many more loci per gene than previous studies. We also observed closer correspondence between loci that influence protein abundance and loci that influence mRNA abundance of a given gene. Most loci that we detected were clustered in 'hotspots' that influence multiple proteins, and some hotspots were found to influence more than half of the proteins that we examined. The variants that underlie these hotspots have profound effects on the gene regulatory network and provide insights into genetic variation in cell

  5. Genetics of single-cell protein abundance variation in large yeast populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Frank W.; Treusch, Sebastian; Shockley, Arthur H.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-02-01

    Variation among individuals arises in part from differences in DNA sequences, but the genetic basis for variation in most traits, including common diseases, remains only partly understood. Many DNA variants influence phenotypes by altering the expression level of one or several genes. The effects of such variants can be detected as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). Traditional eQTL mapping requires large-scale genotype and gene expression data for each individual in the study sample, which limits sample sizes to hundreds of individuals in both humans and model organisms and reduces statistical power. Consequently, many eQTL are probably missed, especially those with smaller effects. Furthermore, most studies use messenger RNA rather than protein abundance as the measure of gene expression. Studies that have used mass-spectrometry proteomics reported unexpected differences between eQTL and protein QTL (pQTL) for the same genes, but these studies have been even more limited in scope. Here we introduce a powerful method for identifying genetic loci that influence protein expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We measure single-cell protein abundance through the use of green fluorescent protein tags in very large populations of genetically variable cells, and use pooled sequencing to compare allele frequencies across the genome in thousands of individuals with high versus low protein abundance. We applied this method to 160 genes and detected many more loci per gene than previous studies. We also observed closer correspondence between loci that influence protein abundance and loci that influence mRNA abundance of a given gene. Most loci that we detected were clustered in `hotspots' that influence multiple proteins, and some hotspots were found to influence more than half of the proteins that we examined. The variants that underlie these hotspots have profound effects on the gene regulatory network and provide insights into genetic variation in cell

  6. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-05-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions.

  7. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution

    PubMed Central

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions. PMID:27220911

  8. Natural Genetic Variation Influences Protein Abundances in C. elegans Developmental Signalling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kapil Dev; Roschitzki, Bernd; Snoek, L. Basten; Grossmann, Jonas; Zheng, Xue; Elvin, Mark; Kamkina, Polina; Schrimpf, Sabine P.; Poulin, Gino B.; Kammenga, Jan E.; Hengartner, Michael O.

    2016-01-01

    Complex traits, including common disease-related traits, are affected by many different genes that function in multiple pathways and networks. The apoptosis, MAPK, Notch, and Wnt signalling pathways play important roles in development and disease progression. At the moment we have a poor understanding of how allelic variation affects gene expression in these pathways at the level of translation. Here we report the effect of natural genetic variation on transcript and protein abundance involved in developmental signalling pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans. We used selected reaction monitoring to analyse proteins from the abovementioned four pathways in a set of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) generated from the wild-type strains N2 (Bristol) and CB4856 (Hawaii) to enable quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. About half of the cases from the 44 genes tested showed a statistically significant change in protein abundance between various strains, most of these were however very weak (below 1.3-fold change). We detected a distant QTL on the left arm of chromosome II that affected protein abundance of the phosphatidylserine receptor protein PSR-1, and two separate QTLs that influenced embryonic and ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis on chromosome IV. Our results demonstrate that natural variation in C. elegans is sufficient to cause significant changes in signalling pathways both at the gene expression (transcript and protein abundance) and phenotypic levels. PMID:26985669

  9. Elevated nonspecific plasma proteins in allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Reich, M; Niess, J H; Bär, C; Zwacka, G; Markert, U R

    2003-01-01

    Several allergen-specific plasma proteins, such as IgE and IgG subclasses, are commonly used for the evaluation of grade of allergy. In the present investigation, we compared the concentration of various nonspecific plasma proteins, mostly known as inflammation markers, in an allergic and a healthy population. Plasma from 130 children with single inhalation allergies to grass pollen, birch pollen, or house dust mites as well as from 42 healthy children was obtained during the symptom-free period. Patients showed symptoms including allergic rhinitis, dermatitis, and asthma with one single radioallergosorbent test (RAST) class 3 or higher. Plasma concentrations of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1(sICAM-1), soluble interleukin-2 receptor(sIL-2R), sE-selectin, and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (1sVCAM-1) were analyzed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. Concentrations of sICAM-1 and sE-selectin were significantly increased in all patients compared to controls. In the single allergen groups, sICAM-1 elevation was significant in the grass and mite groups, but not in the birch group; while sE-selection increase was significant in the birch and mite groups, but not in the grass group. The elevation of sIL-2R in the allergic patients was obvious in each single allergen group, but not significant. No difference was observed in sVCAM-1 expression. In two groups of patients with mean age of 9.5 years versus 17.5 years, the analyzed parameters were not age dependent. The increased proteins may be useful as additional markers for efficacy and follow-up investigations of allergy therapies. PMID:12861853

  10. Differential abundances of four forms of Binder of SPerm 1 in the seminal plasma of Bos taurus indicus bulls with different patterns of semen freezability.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Marcos Jorge; Martins, Leonardo Franco; Senra, Renato Lima; Santos, Thaís Ferreira Dos; Okano, Denise Silva; Pereira, Paulo Roberto Gomes; Faria-Campos, Alessandra; Campos, Sérgio Vale Aguiar; Guimarães, José Domingos; Baracat-Pereira, Maria Cristina

    2016-08-01

    The Binder of SPerm 1 (BSP1) protein is involved in the fertilization and semen cryopreservation processes and is described to be both beneficial and detrimental to sperm. Previously, the relationship of BSP1 with freezability events has not been completely understood. The objective of this work was to determine the differential abundance of the forms of the BSP1 protein in cryopreserved seminal plasma of Bos taurus indicus bulls with different patterns of semen freezability using proteomics. A wide cohort of adult bulls with high genetic value from an artificial insemination center was used as donors of high quality, fresh semen. Nine bulls presenting different patterns of semen freezability were selected. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed differential abundance in a group of seven protein spots in the frozen/thawed seminal plasma from the bulls, ranging from 15 to 17 kDa, with pI values from 4.6 to 5.8. Four of these spots were confirmed to be BSP1 using mass spectrometry, proteomics, biochemical, and computational analysis (Tukey's test at P < 0.05). The protein spot weighing 15.52 ± 0.53 kDa with a pI value of 5.78 ± 0.12 is highlighted by its high abundance in bulls with low semen freezability and its absence in bulls presenting high semen freezability. This is the first report showing that more than two forms of BSP1 are found in the seminal plasma of Nelore adult bulls and not all animals have a similar abundance of each BSP1 form. Different BSP1 forms may be involved in different events of fertilization and the cryopreservation process. PMID:27118515

  11. Visualization and Dissemination of Multidimensional Proteomics Data Comparing Protein Abundance During Caenorhabditis elegans Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffle, Michael; Merrihew, Gennifer E.; Jaschob, Daniel; Sharma, Vagisha; Davis, Trisha N.; Noble, William S.; MacCoss, Michael J.

    2015-11-01

    Regulation of protein abundance is a critical aspect of cellular function, organism development, and aging. Alternative splicing may give rise to multiple possible proteoforms of gene products where the abundance of each proteoform is independently regulated. Understanding how the abundances of these distinct gene products change is essential to understanding the underlying mechanisms of many biological processes. Bottom-up proteomics mass spectrometry techniques may be used to estimate protein abundance indirectly by sequencing and quantifying peptides that are later mapped to proteins based on sequence. However, quantifying the abundance of distinct gene products is routinely confounded by peptides that map to multiple possible proteoforms. In this work, we describe a technique that may be used to help mitigate the effects of confounding ambiguous peptides and multiple proteoforms when quantifying proteins. We have applied this technique to visualize the distribution of distinct gene products for the whole proteome across 11 developmental stages of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. The result is a large multidimensional dataset for which web-based tools were developed for visualizing how translated gene products change during development and identifying possible proteoforms. The underlying instrument raw files and tandem mass spectra may also be downloaded. The data resource is freely available on the web at http://www.yeastrc.org/wormpes/.

  12. Visualization and dissemination of multidimensional proteomics data comparing protein abundance during Caenorhabditis elegans development.

    PubMed

    Riffle, Michael; Merrihew, Gennifer E; Jaschob, Daniel; Sharma, Vagisha; Davis, Trisha N; Noble, William S; MacCoss, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Regulation of protein abundance is a critical aspect of cellular function, organism development, and aging. Alternative splicing may give rise to multiple possible proteoforms of gene products where the abundance of each proteoform is independently regulated. Understanding how the abundances of these distinct gene products change is essential to understanding the underlying mechanisms of many biological processes. Bottom-up proteomics mass spectrometry techniques may be used to estimate protein abundance indirectly by sequencing and quantifying peptides that are later mapped to proteins based on sequence. However, quantifying the abundance of distinct gene products is routinely confounded by peptides that map to multiple possible proteoforms. In this work, we describe a technique that may be used to help mitigate the effects of confounding ambiguous peptides and multiple proteoforms when quantifying proteins. We have applied this technique to visualize the distribution of distinct gene products for the whole proteome across 11 developmental stages of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. The result is a large multidimensional dataset for which web-based tools were developed for visualizing how translated gene products change during development and identifying possible proteoforms. The underlying instrument raw files and tandem mass spectra may also be downloaded. The data resource is freely available on the web at http://www.yeastrc.org/wormpes/ . Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26133526

  13. Evaluation of two high-abundance protein depletion kits and optimization of downstream isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Fanghua; Hou, Tieying; Huang, Dehong; Xue, Zhifeng; Liang, Dongyan; Li, Qiuming; Lin, Weimiao

    2015-11-01

    Disease biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic purposes are most likely within an extremely low concentration range and are thus masked by the presence of high‑abundance proteins. Therefore, removing high‑abundance proteins is the main challenge for identifying disease biomarkers. In addition, the solution obtained from high‑abundance protein depletion kits contains a rich array of compounds, which interfere with isoelectric focusing (IEF). In the present study, the effect of two commercial kits was evaluated and the downstream IEF protocol was optimized. High‑resolution results could be obtained according to the following conditions: The ProteoPrep Blue Albumin and IgG Depletion kit depleted albumin and IgG; immobilized pH gradient strips (typically 18 cm) were rehydrated with sample buffer containing 250 µg serum proteins at 30 v for 6 h, 60 v for 6 h, 200 v for 2 h, 500 v for 2 h, 1,000 v for 2 h, 5,000 v for 2 h, 10,000 v for 2 h and then focusing at 10,000 v up to 110 k vhs. In addition, the protein spots identified by matrix‑assisted laser desorption ionization time‑of‑flight mass spectrometry demonstrated that all proteins had a low abundance. The present study not only provides a definite and effective method for removing high‑abundance proteins, but also provides a proper protocol (protocol C) for downstream IEF. The present study includes a comprehensive investigation of serum proteomics, which paves the way for serum protein research. PMID:26460178

  14. Determination of relative protein abundance by internally normalized ratio algorithm with antibody arrays.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Oskar; Kozlowski, Mark; Garachtchenko, Tatiana; Nikoloff, Corina; Lew, Nancy; Litman, David J; Chaga, Grigoriy

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we report an experimental setup and mathematical algorithm for determination of relative protein abundance from directly labeled native protein samples applied to an array of antibodies. The application of the proposed experimental system compensates internally at each array element for a number of deficiencies in array experiments such as differential labeling efficiency in dual color assay systems, differential solubility of protein molecules in dual color assay systems, and differential affinity of capture reagents toward proteins labeled with two different fluorescent dyes. This system offers full compensation for variable amounts of capture reagents on separate array structures, as well as limited compensation for nonspecific interactions between capture reagents and analytes. The proposed experimental strategy enables the use of a large number of capture reagents to develop a true multiplex analysis system that will yield complete relative protein abundance information in two biological systems. PMID:15952723

  15. Mapping protein abundance patterns in the brain using voxelation combined with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2010-02-01

    Voxelation creates expression atlases by high-throughput analysis of spatially registered cubes or voxels harvested from the brain. The modality independence of voxelation allows a variety of bioanalytical techniques to be used to map abundance. Protein expression patterns in the brain can be obtained using liquid chromatography (LC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS). Here we describe the methodology of voxelation as it pertains particularly to LC-MS proteomic analysis: sample preparation, instrumental set up and analysis, peptide identification and protein relative abundance quantitation. We also briefly describe some of the advantages, limitations and insights into the brain that can be obtained using combined proteomic and transcriptomic maps

  16. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D; Chrisler, William B; Markillie, Lye M; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Smith, Richard D; Rodland, Karin D; Sorger, Peter K; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H Steven

    2016-01-01

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components-16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators-of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and breast cancer cell lines as well as fibroblasts. We found that core pathway proteins were present at very similar concentrations across all cell types, with a variance similar to that of proteins previously shown to display conserved abundances across species. In contrast, EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were present at highly variable concentrations. The absolute abundance of most core proteins was between 50,000 and 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower amounts (2000 to 5000 copies per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3000 and 10,000 occupied EGFRs, consistent with the idea that adaptors limit signaling. Our results suggest that the relative stoichiometry of core MAPK pathway proteins is very similar across different cell types, with cell-specific differences mostly restricted to variable amounts of feedback regulators and receptors. The low abundance of adaptors relative to EGFR could be responsible for previous observations that only a fraction of total cell surface EGFR is capable of rapid endocytosis, high-affinity binding, and mitogenic signaling. PMID:27405981

  17. Improvements in proteomic metrics of low abundance proteins through proteome equalization using ProteoMiner prior to MudPIT

    PubMed Central

    Fonslow, Bryan R.; Carvalho, Paulo C.; Academia, Katrina; Freeby, Steve; Xu, Tao; Nakorchevsky, Aleksey; Paulus, Aran; Yates, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Ideally shotgun proteomics would facilitate the identification of an entire proteome with 100% protein sequence coverage. In reality, the large dynamic range and complexity of cellular proteomes results in oversampling of abundant proteins, while peptides from low abundance proteins are undersampled or remain undetected. We tested the proteome equalization technology, ProteoMiner, in conjunction with Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) to determine how the equalization of protein dynamic range could improve shotgun proteomics methods for the analysis of cellular proteomes. Our results suggest low abundance protein identifications were improved by two mechanisms: (1) depletion of high abundance proteins freed ion trap sampling space usually occupied by high abundance peptides and (2) enrichment of low abundance proteins increased the probability of sampling their corresponding more abundant peptides. Both mechanisms also contributed to dramatic increases in the quantity of peptides identified and the quality of MS/MS spectra acquired due to increases in precursor intensity of peptides from low abundance proteins. From our large data set of identified proteins, we categorized the dominant physicochemical factors which facilitate proteome equalization with a hexapeptide library. These results illustrate that equalization of the dynamic range of the cellular proteome is a promising methodology to improve low abundance protein identification confidence, reproducibility, and sequence coverage in shotgun proteomics experiments, opening a new avenue of research for improving proteome coverage. PMID:21702434

  18. With or without you - Proteomics with or without major plasma/serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Gianazza, Elisabetta; Miller, Ingrid; Palazzolo, Luca; Parravicini, Chiara; Eberini, Ivano

    2016-05-17

    The first sections of this review compile and discuss strategies and protocols for managing plasma/serum as a source of biomarkers relevant to human disease. In many such cases, depletion of abundant protein(s) is a crucial preliminary step to the procedure; specific conceptual and technical approaches, however, make it possible to effectively use to this purpose whole plasma/serum. The final sections focus instead on the complexity associated with each of the major serum/plasma proteins in terms of both, multiple molecular structures (existence of a number of protein species) and of multiple molecular functions (behavior as multifunctional/multitasking/moonlighting proteins). Reviewing evidence in these and some related fields (regulation of the synthetic pattern by proteins and non-protein compounds and its connection with health and disease) prompts the suggestion/recommendation that information on the abundant components of plasma/serum proteome is routinely obtained and processed/mined as a valuable contribution to the characterization of any non-physiological condition and to the understanding of its mechanisms and of its implications/sequels. PMID:27072114

  19. Comprehensive and quantitative proteomic analyses of zebrafish plasma reveals conserved protein profiles between genders and between zebrafish and human

    PubMed Central

    Li, Caixia; Tan, Xing Fei; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Omic approaches have been increasingly used in the zebrafish model for holistic understanding of molecular events and mechanisms of tissue functions. However, plasma is rarely used for omic profiling because of the technical challenges in collecting sufficient blood. In this study, we employed two mass spectrometric (MS) approaches for a comprehensive characterization of zebrafish plasma proteome, i.e. conventional shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for an overview study and quantitative SWATH (Sequential Window Acquisition of all THeoretical fragment-ion spectra) for comparison between genders. 959 proteins were identified in the shotgun profiling with estimated concentrations spanning almost five orders of magnitudes. Other than the presence of a few highly abundant female egg yolk precursor proteins (vitellogenins), the proteomic profiles of male and female plasmas were very similar in both number and abundance and there were basically no other highly gender-biased proteins. The types of plasma proteins based on IPA (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) classification and tissue sources of production were also very similar. Furthermore, the zebrafish plasma proteome shares significant similarities with human plasma proteome, in particular in top abundant proteins including apolipoproteins and complements. Thus, the current study provided a valuable dataset for future evaluation of plasma proteins in zebrafish. PMID:27071722

  20. Comprehensive and quantitative proteomic analyses of zebrafish plasma reveals conserved protein profiles between genders and between zebrafish and human.

    PubMed

    Li, Caixia; Tan, Xing Fei; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Omic approaches have been increasingly used in the zebrafish model for holistic understanding of molecular events and mechanisms of tissue functions. However, plasma is rarely used for omic profiling because of the technical challenges in collecting sufficient blood. In this study, we employed two mass spectrometric (MS) approaches for a comprehensive characterization of zebrafish plasma proteome, i.e. conventional shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for an overview study and quantitative SWATH (Sequential Window Acquisition of all THeoretical fragment-ion spectra) for comparison between genders. 959 proteins were identified in the shotgun profiling with estimated concentrations spanning almost five orders of magnitudes. Other than the presence of a few highly abundant female egg yolk precursor proteins (vitellogenins), the proteomic profiles of male and female plasmas were very similar in both number and abundance and there were basically no other highly gender-biased proteins. The types of plasma proteins based on IPA (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) classification and tissue sources of production were also very similar. Furthermore, the zebrafish plasma proteome shares significant similarities with human plasma proteome, in particular in top abundant proteins including apolipoproteins and complements. Thus, the current study provided a valuable dataset for future evaluation of plasma proteins in zebrafish. PMID:27071722

  1. What Are the Sources of Solar Energetic Particles? Element Abundances and Source Plasma Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2015-11-01

    We have spent 50 years in heated discussion over which populations of solar energetic particles (SEPs) are accelerated at flares and which by shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The association of the large "gradual" SEP events with shock acceleration is supported by the extensive spatial distribution of SEPs and by the delayed acceleration of the particles. Recent STEREO observations have begun to show that the particle onset times correspond to the observed time of arrival of the shock on the observer's magnetic flux tube and that the SEP intensities are related to the local shock speed. The relative abundances of the elements in these gradual events are a measure of those in the ambient solar corona, differing from those in the photosphere by a widely-observed function of the first ionization potential (FIP) of the elements. SEP events we call "impulsive", the traditional "3He-rich" events with enhanced heavy-element abundances, are associated with type III radio bursts, flares, and narrow CMEs; they selectively populate flux tubes that thread a localized source, and they are fit to new particle-in-cell models of magnetic reconnection on open field lines as found in solar jets. These models help explain the strong enhancements seen in heavy elements as a power (of 2-8) in the mass-to-charge ratio A/Q throughout the periodic table from He to Pb. A study of the temperature dependence of A/Q shows that the source plasma in impulsive SEP events must lie in the range of 2-4 MK to explain the pattern of abundances. This is much lower than the temperatures of >10 MK seen on closed loops in solar flares. Recent studies of A/Q-dependent enhancements or suppressions from scattering during transport show source plasma temperatures in gradual SEP events to be 0.8-1.6 MK in 69 % of the events, i.e. coronal plasma; 24 % of the events show reaccelerated impulsive-event material.

  2. Hsp90 is involved in the regulation of cytosolic precursor protein abundance in tomato.

    PubMed

    Tillmann, Bodo; Röth, Sascha; Bublak, Daniela; Sommer, Manuel; Stelzer, Ernst H K; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter; Schleiff, Enrico

    2015-02-01

    Cytosolic chaperones are involved in the regulation of cellular protein homeostasis in general. Members of the families of heat stress proteins 70 (Hsp70) and 90 (Hsp90) assist the transport of preproteins to organelles such as chloroplasts or mitochondria. In addition, Hsp70 was described to be involved in the degradation of chloroplast preproteins that accumulate in the cytosol. Because a similar function has not been established for Hsp90, we analyzed the influences of Hsp90 and Hsp70 on the protein abundance in the cellular context using an in vivo system based on mesophyll protoplasts. We observed a differential behavior of preproteins with respect to the cytosolic chaperone-dependent regulation. Some preproteins such as pOE33 show a high dependence on Hsp90, whereas the abundance of preproteins such as pSSU is more strongly dependent on Hsp70. The E3 ligase, C-terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (Chip), appears to have a more general role in the control of cytosolic protein abundance. We discuss why the different reaction modes are comparable with the cytosolic unfolded protein response. PMID:25619681

  3. Identification of Trypanosome Proteins in Plasma from African Sleeping Sickness Patients Infected with T. b. rhodesiense

    PubMed Central

    Enyaru, John C.; Carr, Steven A.; Pearson, Terry W.

    2013-01-01

    Control of human African sleeping sickness, caused by subspecies of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, is based on preventing transmission by elimination of the tsetse vector and by active diagnostic screening and treatment of infected patients. To identify trypanosome proteins that have potential as biomarkers for detection and monitoring of African sleeping sickness, we have used a ‘deep-mining” proteomics approach to identify trypanosome proteins in human plasma. Abundant human plasma proteins were removed by immunodepletion. Depleted plasma samples were then digested to peptides with trypsin, fractionated by basic reversed phase and each fraction analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This sample processing and analysis method enabled identification of low levels of trypanosome proteins in pooled plasma from late stage sleeping sickness patients infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense. A total of 254 trypanosome proteins were confidently identified. Many of the parasite proteins identified were of unknown function, although metabolic enzymes, chaperones, proteases and ubiquitin-related/acting proteins were found. This approach to the identification of conserved, soluble trypanosome proteins in human plasma offers a possible route to improved disease diagnosis and monitoring, since these molecules are potential biomarkers for the development of a new generation of antigen-detection assays. The combined immuno-depletion/mass spectrometric approach can be applied to a variety of infectious diseases for unbiased biomarker identification. PMID:23951171

  4. Selectivity analysis of single binder assays used in plasma protein profiling

    PubMed Central

    Neiman, Maja; Fredolini, Claudia; Johansson, Henrik; Lehtiö, Janne; Nygren, Per-Åke; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M

    2013-01-01

    The increasing availability of antibodies toward human proteins enables broad explorations of the proteomic landscape in cells, tissues, and body fluids. This includes assays with antibody suspension bead arrays that generate protein profiles of plasma samples by flow cytometer analysis. However, antibody selectivity is context dependent so it is necessary to corroborate on-target detection over off-target binding. To address this, we describe a concept to directly verify interactions from antibody-coupled beads by analysis of their eluates by Western blots and MS. We demonstrate selective antibody binding in complex samples with antibodies toward a set of chosen proteins with different abundance in plasma and serum, and illustrate the need to adjust sample and bead concentrations accordingly. The presented approach will serve as an important tool for resolving differential protein profiles from antibody arrays within plasma biomarker discoveries. PMID:24151238

  5. The 82-plex plasma protein signature that predicts increasing inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tepel, Martin; Beck, Hans C.; Tan, Qihua; Borst, Christoffer; Rasmussen, Lars M.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to define the specific plasma protein signature that predicts the increase of the inflammation marker C-reactive protein from index day to next-day using proteome analysis and novel bioinformatics tools. We performed a prospective study of 91 incident kidney transplant recipients and quantified 359 plasma proteins simultaneously using nano-Liquid-Chromatography-Tandem Mass-Spectrometry in individual samples and plasma C-reactive protein on the index day and the next day. Next-day C-reactive protein increased in 59 patients whereas it decreased in 32 patients. The prediction model selected and validated 82 plasma proteins which determined increased next-day C-reactive protein (area under receiver-operator-characteristics curve, 0.772; 95% confidence interval, 0.669 to 0.876; P < 0.0001). Multivariable logistic regression showed that 82-plex protein signature (P < 0.001) was associated with observed increased next-day C-reactive protein. The 82-plex protein signature outperformed routine clinical procedures. The category-free net reclassification index improved with 82-plex plasma protein signature (total net reclassification index, 88.3%). Using the 82-plex plasma protein signature increased net reclassification index with a clinical meaningful 10% increase of risk mainly by the improvement of reclassification of subjects in the event group. An 82-plex plasma protein signature predicts an increase of the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein. PMID:26445912

  6. Nonspecific plasma proteins during sublingual immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Reich, M; Zwacka, G; Markert, U R

    2003-01-01

    Usually, specific allergy-related plasma proteins such as immunoglobulin E (IgE) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) are used for estimating the grade of sensitization and follow-up of immunotherapy. In recent years, several nonspecific inflammatory markers, such as sICAM-1 and sIL-2R, have been shown as being suitable for therapy control in allergy. In our investigation of patients under sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), plasma from 42 healthy controls and 133 children with single inhalation allergies to grass pollen, birch pollen or house dust mites was obtained during the symptom-free period. Patients showed symptoms including allergic rhinitis, dermatitis and allergic asthma with one single RAST class 3 or higher. Plasma concentrations of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R), sE-selectin, interleukin-12 (IL-12) and specific IgG4 were analyzed with the ELISA technique. After 1 year of SLIT, concentrations of sICAM-1, sIL-2R and sE-selectin declined significantly when results from all patients were taken as one group. Regarding the single allergen groups, the sICAM-1 and sIL-2R decrease was significant in the grass and mite group, but not in the birch group, while the sE-selectin decline was only significant in the birch group after 1 year of SLIT, but not in the grass and the mite group. No difference was observed in IL-12 and IgG4 expression. In two groups of controls with a mean age of 9.5 versus 17.5 years, the analyzed parameters were not age-dependent. The increased proteins may be useful as additional markers for the evaluation of immunological effects and follow-up investigations of allergy therapies. PMID:12947996

  7. Hsp90 is involved in the regulation of cytosolic precursor protein abundance in tomato.

    PubMed

    Tillmann, Bodo; Röth, Sascha; Bublak, Daniela; Sommer, Manuel; Stelzer, Ernst H K; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter; Schleiff, Enrico

    2014-10-20

    Cytosolic chaperones are involved in the regulation of cellular protein homeostasis in general. Members of the heat stress protein 70 and 90 (Hsp70 or Hsp90) families assist the transport of preproteins to organelles such as chloroplasts or mitochondria. In addition, Hsp70 was described to be involved in the degradation of chloroplast preproteins that accumulate in the cytosol. Because a similar function has not been established for Hsp90, we analyzed the influences of Hsp90 and Hsp70 on the protein abundance in the cellular context using an in vivo system based on mesophyll protoplasts. We observed a differential behavior of preproteins in respect to the cytosolic chaperone dependent regulation. Some preproteins like pOE33 show a high dependence on Hsp90, whereas the abundance of preproteins like pSSU is more strongly dependent on Hsp70. The E3 ligase Chip appears to have a more general role in the control of cytosolic protein abundance. We discuss why the different reaction modes are comparable to the cytosolic unfolded protein response. PMID:25336566

  8. Using antibody arrays to measure protein abundance and glycosylation: considerations for optimal performance.

    PubMed

    Haab, Brian B; Partyka, Katie; Cao, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Antibody arrays provide a valuable method for obtaining multiple protein measurements from small volumes of biological samples. Antibody arrays can be designed to target not only core protein abundances (relative or absolute abundances, depending on the availability of standards for calibration), but also posttranslational modifications, provided antibodies or other affinity reagents are available to detect them. Glycosylation is a common modification that has important and diverse functions in both normal and disease biology. Significant progress has been made in developing methods for measuring glycan levels on multiple specific proteins using antibody arrays and glycan-binding reagents. This unit describes practical approaches for developing, optimizing, and using antibody array assays to determine both protein abundance and glycosylation state. Low-volume arrays can be used to reduce sample consumption, and a new way to improve the binding strength of particular glycan-binding reagents through multimerization is discussed. These methods can be useful for a wide range of biological studies in which glycosylation may change and/or affect protein function. PMID:24510592

  9. Identification of Proteins of Altered Abundance in Oil Palm Infected with Ganoderma boninense

    PubMed Central

    Al-Obaidi, Jameel R.; Mohd-Yusuf, Yusmin; Razali, Nurhanani; Jayapalan, Jaime Jacqueline; Tey, Chin-Chong; Md-Noh, Normahnani; Junit, Sarni Mat; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Hashim, Onn Haji

    2014-01-01

    Basal stem rot is a common disease that affects oil palm, causing loss of yield and finally killing the trees. The disease, caused by fungus Ganoderma boninense, devastates thousands of hectares of oil palm plantings in Southeast Asia every year. In the present study, root proteins of healthy oil palm seedlings, and those infected with G. boninense, were analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). When the 2-DE profiles were analyzed for proteins, which exhibit consistent significant change of abundance upon infection with G. boninense, 21 passed our screening criteria. Subsequent analyses by mass spectrometry and database search identified caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase, caffeic acid O-methyltransferase, enolase, fructokinase, cysteine synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and ATP synthase as among proteins of which abundances were markedly altered. PMID:24663087

  10. High levels of plasma protein C in nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pabinger-Fasching, I; Lechner, K; Niessner, H; Schmidt, P; Balzar, E; Mannhalter, C

    1985-02-18

    In patients with severe nephrotic syndrome determinations of plasma protein C: Ag levels (8 patients: 5 adults, 3 children) and protein C activity (3 out of 8 patients) revealed significantly elevated plasma protein C concentrations. Furthermore we observed a significant inverse correlation of protein C: Ag to AT III: Ag levels. No protein C: Ag could be detected in the urine of two patients studied. We conclude from our data, that changes of plasma protein C do not contribute to the high thrombotic tendency in nephrotic syndrome. PMID:3838827

  11. Accuracy and Reproducibility in Quantification of Plasma Protein Concentrations by Mass Spectrometry without the Use of Isotopic Standards

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Gertjan; Woolerton, Yvonne; van Straalen, Jan P.; Vissers, Johannes P. C.; Dekker, Nick; Langridge, James I.; Beynon, Robert J.; Speijer, Dave; Sturk, Auguste; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Quantitative proteomic analysis with mass spectrometry holds great promise for simultaneously quantifying proteins in various biosamples, such as human plasma. Thus far, studies addressing the reproducible measurement of endogenous protein concentrations in human plasma have focussed on targeted analyses employing isotopically labelled standards. Non-targeted proteomics, on the other hand, has been less employed to this end, even though it has been instrumental in discovery proteomics, generating large datasets in multiple fields of research. Results Using a non-targeted mass spectrometric assay (LCMSE), we quantified abundant plasma proteins (43 mg/mL—40 ug/mL range) in human blood plasma specimens from 30 healthy volunteers and one blood serum sample (ProteomeXchange: PXD000347). Quantitative results were obtained by label-free mass spectrometry using a single internal standard to estimate protein concentrations. This approach resulted in quantitative results for 59 proteins (cut off ≥11 samples quantified) of which 41 proteins were quantified in all 31 samples and 23 of these with an inter-assay variability of ≤ 20%. Results for 7 apolipoproteins were compared with those obtained using isotope-labelled standards, while 12 proteins were compared to routine immunoassays. Comparison of quantitative data obtained by LCMSE and immunoassays showed good to excellent correlations in relative protein abundance (r = 0.72–0.96) and comparable median concentrations for 8 out of 12 proteins tested. Plasma concentrations of 56 proteins determined by LCMSE were of similar accuracy as those reported by targeted studies and 7 apolipoproteins quantified by isotope-labelled standards, when compared to reference concentrations from literature. Conclusions This study shows that LCMSE offers good quantification of relative abundance as well as reasonable estimations of concentrations of abundant plasma proteins. PMID:26474480

  12. Nanoparticle size matters in the formation of plasma protein coronas on Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhengyan; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2014-09-01

    When nanoparticles (NPs) enter into biological systems, proteins would interact with NPs to form the protein corona that can critically impact the biological identity of the nanomaterial. Owing to their fundamental scientific interest and potential applications, Fe3O4 NPs of different sizes have been developed for applications in cell separation and protein separation and as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), etc. Here, we investigated whether nanoparticle size affects the formation of protein coronas around Fe3O4 NPs. Both the identification and quantification results demonstrated that particle size does play an important role in the formation of plasma protein coronas on Fe3O4 NPs; it not only influenced the protein composition of the formed plasma protein corona but also affected the abundances of the plasma proteins within the coronas. Understanding the different binding profiles of human plasma proteins on Fe3O4 NPs of different sizes would facilitate the exploration of the bio-distributions and biological fates of Fe3O4 NPs in biological systems. PMID:24974013

  13. Trans-splicing Into Highly Abundant Albumin Transcripts for Production of Therapeutic Proteins In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Mansfield, S Gary; Cote, Colette A; Jiang, Ping Du; Weng, Ke; Amar, Marcelo JA; Brewer, Bryan H; Remaley, Alan T; McGarrity, Gerard J; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A; Puttaraju, M

    2008-01-01

    Spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing has emerged as an exciting mode of RNA therapy. Here we describe a novel trans-splicing strategy, which targets highly abundant pre-mRNAs, to produce therapeutic proteins in vivo. First, we used a pre-trans-splicing molecule (PTM) that mediated trans-splicing of human apolipoprotein A-I (hapoA-I) into the highly abundant mouse albumin exon 1. Hydrodynamic tail vein injection of the hapoA-I PTM plasmid in mice followed by analysis of the chimeric transcripts and protein, confirmed accurate and efficient trans-splicing into albumin pre-mRNA and production of hapoA-I protein. The versatility of this approach was demonstrated by producing functional human papillomavirus type-16 E7 (HPV16-E7) single-chain antibody in C57BL/6 mice and functional factor VIII (FVIII) and phenotypic correction in hemophilia A mice. Altogether, these studies demonstrate that trans-splicing to highly abundant albumin transcripts can be used as a general platform to produce therapeutic proteins in vivo. PMID:19066600

  14. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease. PMID:27453073

  15. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease. PMID:27453073

  16. Influence of Acute High Glucose on Protein Abundance Changes in Murine Glomerular Mesangial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barati, Michelle T.; Gould, James C.; Salyer, Sarah A.; Isaacs, Susan; Wilkey, Daniel W.; Merchant, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of acute exposure to high glucose levels as experienced by glomerular mesangial cells in postprandial conditions and states such as in prediabetes were investigated using proteomic methods. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry methods were used to identify protein expression patterns in immortalized rat mesangial cells altered by 2 h high glucose (HG) growth conditions as compared to isoosmotic/normal glucose control (NG⁎) conditions. Unique protein expression changes at 2 h HG treatment were measured for 51 protein spots. These proteins could be broadly grouped into two categories: (1) proteins involved in cell survival/cell signaling and (2) proteins involved in stress response. Immunoblot experiments for a protein belonging to both categories, prohibitin (PHB), supported a trend for increased total expression as well as significant increases in an acidic PHB isoform. Additional studies confirmed the regulation of proteasomal subunit alpha-type 2 and the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone and oxidoreductase PDI (protein disulfide isomerase), suggesting altered ER protein folding capacity and proteasomal function in response to acute HG. We conclude that short term high glucose induces subtle changes in protein abundances suggesting posttranslational modifications and regulation of pathways involved in proteostasis. PMID:26839892

  17. Influence of Acute High Glucose on Protein Abundance Changes in Murine Glomerular Mesangial Cells.

    PubMed

    Barati, Michelle T; Gould, James C; Salyer, Sarah A; Isaacs, Susan; Wilkey, Daniel W; Merchant, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The effects of acute exposure to high glucose levels as experienced by glomerular mesangial cells in postprandial conditions and states such as in prediabetes were investigated using proteomic methods. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry methods were used to identify protein expression patterns in immortalized rat mesangial cells altered by 2 h high glucose (HG) growth conditions as compared to isoosmotic/normal glucose control (NG(⁎)) conditions. Unique protein expression changes at 2 h HG treatment were measured for 51 protein spots. These proteins could be broadly grouped into two categories: (1) proteins involved in cell survival/cell signaling and (2) proteins involved in stress response. Immunoblot experiments for a protein belonging to both categories, prohibitin (PHB), supported a trend for increased total expression as well as significant increases in an acidic PHB isoform. Additional studies confirmed the regulation of proteasomal subunit alpha-type 2 and the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone and oxidoreductase PDI (protein disulfide isomerase), suggesting altered ER protein folding capacity and proteasomal function in response to acute HG. We conclude that short term high glucose induces subtle changes in protein abundances suggesting posttranslational modifications and regulation of pathways involved in proteostasis. PMID:26839892

  18. Mature adipocyte proteome reveals differentially altered protein abundances between lean, overweight and morbidly obese human subjects.

    PubMed

    Benabdelkamel, Hicham; Masood, Afshan; Almidani, Ghaith M; Alsadhan, Abdulmajeed A; Bassas, Abdulelah F; Duncan, Mark W; Alfadda, Assim A

    2015-02-01

    Overweight (OW) and obese individuals are considered to be graded parts of the scale having increasing weight as a common feature. They may not, however, be part of the same continuum and may differ metabolically. In this study we applied an untargeted proteomic approach to compare protein abundances in mature adipocytes derived from the subcutaneous adipose tissue of overweight and morbidly obese female subjects to those of lean age matched controls. Mature adipocytes were isolated from liposuction samples of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue collected from both lean (L; n = 7, 23.3 ± 0.4 kg/m(2); mean BMI ± SD), overweight (OW; n = 8, 27.9 ± 0.6 kg/m(2); mean BMI ± SD) and morbidly obese (MOB; n = 7, 44.8 ± 3.8 kg/m(2); mean BMI ± SD) individuals. Total protein extracts were then compared by two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE). One hundred and ten differentially expressed protein spots (i.e., fitting the statistical criteria ANOVA test, p < 0.05; fold-change ≥1.5) were detected, and of these, 89 were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Of these, 66 protein spots were common to both groups whereas 23 were unique to the MOB group. Significant differences were evident in the abundances of key proteins involved in glucose and lipid metabolism, energy regulation, cytoskeletal structure and redox control signaling pathways. Differences in the abundance of some chaperones were also evident. The differentially abundant proteins were investigated using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to establish their associations with known biological functions. The network identified in the OW group with the highest score relates to-: cell-to-cell signaling and interaction; in contrast, in the MOB group the major interacting pathways are associated with lipid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry and cancer. The differences in abundance of the differentially regulated proteins were validated by

  19. Relationships between protein-encoding gene abundance and corresponding process are commonly assumed yet rarely observed.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Jennifer D; Hall, Edward K; Lennon, Jay T; Evans, Sarah E; Waldrop, Mark P; Cotner, James B; Nemergut, Diana R; Graham, Emily B; Wallenstein, Matthew D

    2015-08-01

    For any enzyme-catalyzed reaction to occur, the corresponding protein-encoding genes and transcripts are necessary prerequisites. Thus, a positive relationship between the abundance of gene or transcripts and corresponding process rates is often assumed. To test this assumption, we conducted a meta-analysis of the relationships between gene and/or transcript abundances and corresponding process rates. We identified 415 studies that quantified the abundance of genes or transcripts for enzymes involved in carbon or nitrogen cycling. However, in only 59 of these manuscripts did the authors report both gene or transcript abundance and rates of the appropriate process. We found that within studies there was a significant but weak positive relationship between gene abundance and the corresponding process. Correlations were not strengthened by accounting for habitat type, differences among genes or reaction products versus reactants, suggesting that other ecological and methodological factors may affect the strength of this relationship. Our findings highlight the need for fundamental research on the factors that control transcription, translation and enzyme function in natural systems to better link genomic and transcriptomic data to ecosystem processes. PMID:25535936

  20. Relationships between protein-encoding gene abundance and corresponding process are commonly assumed yet rarely observed

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Jennifer D; Hall, Edward K; Lennon, Jay T; Evans, Sarah E; Waldrop, Mark P; Cotner, James B; Nemergut, Diana R; Graham, Emily B; Wallenstein, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    For any enzyme-catalyzed reaction to occur, the corresponding protein-encoding genes and transcripts are necessary prerequisites. Thus, a positive relationship between the abundance of gene or transcripts and corresponding process rates is often assumed. To test this assumption, we conducted a meta-analysis of the relationships between gene and/or transcript abundances and corresponding process rates. We identified 415 studies that quantified the abundance of genes or transcripts for enzymes involved in carbon or nitrogen cycling. However, in only 59 of these manuscripts did the authors report both gene or transcript abundance and rates of the appropriate process. We found that within studies there was a significant but weak positive relationship between gene abundance and the corresponding process. Correlations were not strengthened by accounting for habitat type, differences among genes or reaction products versus reactants, suggesting that other ecological and methodological factors may affect the strength of this relationship. Our findings highlight the need for fundamental research on the factors that control transcription, translation and enzyme function in natural systems to better link genomic and transcriptomic data to ecosystem processes. PMID:25535936

  1. Depletion of abundant plant RuBisCO protein using the protamine sulfate precipitation method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Ji; Lee, Hye Min; Wang, Yiming; Wu, Jingni; Kim, Sang Gon; Kang, Kyu Young; Park, Ki Hun; Kim, Yong Chul; Choi, In Soo; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep; Kim, Sun Tae

    2013-07-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is the most abundant plant leaf protein, hampering deep analysis of the leaf proteome. Here, we describe a novel protamine sulfate precipitation (PSP) method for the depletion of RuBisCO. For this purpose, soybean leaf total proteins were extracted using Tris-Mg/NP-40 extraction buffer. Obtained clear supernatant was subjected to the PSP method, followed by 13% SDS-PAGE analysis of total, PS-supernatant and -precipitation derived protein samples. In a dose-dependent experiment, 0.1% w/v PS was found to be sufficient for precipitating RuBisCO large and small subunits (LSU and SSU). Western blot analysis confirmed no detection of RuBisCO LSU in the PS-supernatant proteins. Application of this method to Arabidopsis, rice, and maize leaf proteins revealed results similar to soybean. Furthermore, 2DE analyses of PS-treated soybean leaf displayed enriched protein profile for the protein sample derived from the PS-supernatant than total proteins. Some enriched 2D spots were subjected to MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis and were successfully assigned for their protein identity. Hence, the PSP method is: (i) simple, fast, economical, and reproducible for RuBisCO precipitation from the plant leaf sample; (ii) applicable to both dicot and monocot plants; and (iii) suitable for downstream proteomics analysis. PMID:23576416

  2. Oxidative damage to human plasma proteins by ozone.

    PubMed

    Cross, C E; Reznick, A Z; Packer, L; Davis, P A; Suzuki, Y J; Halliwell, B

    1992-01-01

    Exposure of human plasma to ozone produces oxidative protein damage, measured as protein carbonyl formation. Isolated human albumin or creatine phosphokinase are oxidized much faster than are total proteins. Consideration must be given to proteins as targets of oxidative injury by ozone in vivo. PMID:1568641

  3. Changes in protein abundance are observed in bacterial isolates from a natural host

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Megan A.; Stinear, Timothy P.; Goode, Robert J. A.; Coppel, Ross L.; Smith, Alexander I.; Kleifeld, Oded

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial proteomic studies frequently use strains cultured in synthetic liquid media over many generations. It is uncertain whether bacterial proteins expressed under these conditions will be the same as the repertoire found in natural environments, or when bacteria are infecting a host organism. Thus, genomic and proteomic characterization of bacteria derived from the host environment in comparison to reference strains grown in the lab, should aid understanding of pathogenesis. Isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis were obtained from the lymph nodes of three naturally infected sheep and compared to a laboratory reference strain using bottom-up proteomics, after whole genome sequencing of each of the field isolates. These comparisons were performed following growth in liquid media that allowed us to reach the required protein amount for proteomic analysis. Over 1350 proteins were identified in the isolated strains, from which unique proteome features were revealed. Several of the identified proteins demonstrated a significant abundance difference in the field isolates compared to the reference strain even though there were no obvious differences in the DNA sequence of the corresponding gene or in nearby non-coding DNA. Higher abundance in the field isolates was observed for proteins related to hypoxia and nutrient deficiency responses as well as to thiopeptide biosynthesis. PMID:26528441

  4. The natural 13C abundance of plasma glucose is a useful biomarker of recent dietary caloric sweetener intake.

    PubMed

    Cook, Chad M; Alvig, Amy L; Liu, Yu Qiu David; Schoeller, Dale A

    2010-02-01

    There is a need for objective biomarkers of dietary intake, because self-reporting is often subject to bias. We tested the validity of a biomarker for the fraction of dietary carbohydrate (CHO) from cane sugar and high fructose corn syrup (C(4) sugars) using natural (13)C abundance of plasma glucose. In a randomized, single-blinded, crossover design, 5 participants consumed 3 weight-maintaining diets for 7 d, with a 2-wk washout between diet periods. Diets differed in the fraction of total CHO energy from C(4) sugars (5, 16, or 32%). During each diet period, blood samples were drawn at hours 0800 and 1600 on d 1, 3, and 5 and at 0800, 1000, 1200, 1400, and 1600 on d 7. The delta(13)C abundance of plasma glucose was analyzed via GC- isotope ratio MS. Within each diet period, delta(13)C abundance of the 0800 fasting glucose did not change from baseline with increasing time during a diet period; however, there was a strong positive correlation (R(2) = 0.89) between delta(13)C abundance of the glucose concentration at 1000 on d 7 and the percent of breakfast CHO from C(4) sugars. Also, delta(13)C abundance of the combined plasma glucose samples on d 7 demonstrated a strong positive correlation (R(2) = 0.90) with the percent of total daily CHO from C(4) sugars. The natural delta(13)C abundance of postprandial plasma glucose relative to dietary C(4) CHO content was a valid biomarker for contributions of C(4) caloric sweeteners from the previous meal. PMID:20018804

  5. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Shi, Xuebin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish) or non-meat proteins (casein or soy) for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota. PMID:27042829

  6. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Shi, Xuebin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish) or non-meat proteins (casein or soy) for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota. PMID:27042829

  7. Plasma protein alterations in the refractory anemia with excess blasts subtype 1 subgroup of myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Refractory anemia with excess blasts subtype 1 (RAEB-1) is a subgroup of myelodysplastic syndrome. It represents a heterogeneous group of oncohematological bone marrow diseases, which occur particularly in elderly patients. The aim of this proteomic study was to search for plasma protein alterations in RAEB-1 patients. Results A total of 24 plasma samples were depleted of fourteen high-abundant plasma proteins, analyzed with 2D SDS-PAGE, compared, and statistically processed with Progenesis SameSpots software. Proteins were identified by nanoLC-MS/MS. Retinol-binding protein 4 and leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein were relatively quantified using mass spectrometry. 56 significantly differing spots were found; and in 52 spots 50 different proteins were successfully identified. Several plasma proteins that changed either in their level or modification have been described herein. The plasma level of retinol-binding protein 4 was decreased, while leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein was modified in RAEB-1 patients. Changes in the inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4, altered protein fragmentation, or fragments modifications were observed. Conclusions This study describes proteins, which change quantitatively or qualitatively in the plasma of RAEB-1 patients. It is the first report on qualitative changes in the leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein in the RAEB-1 subgroup of myelodysplastic syndrome. Described changes in the composition or modification of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 fragments in RAEB-1 are in agreement with those changes observed in previous study of refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia, and thus H4 fragments could be a marker specific for myelodysplastic syndrome. PMID:22568928

  8. Plasma and Plasma Protein Product Transfusion: A Canadian Blood Services Centre for Innovation Symposium.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Michelle P; Al-Habsi, Khalid S; Golder, Mia; Walsh, Geraldine M; Sheffield, William P

    2015-07-01

    Plasma obtained via whole blood donation processing or via apheresis technology can either be transfused directly to patients or pooled and fractionated into plasma protein products that are concentrates of 1 or more purified plasma protein. The evidence base supporting clinical efficacy in most of the indications for which plasma is transfused is weak, whereas high-quality evidence supports the efficacy of plasma protein products in at least some of the clinical settings in which they are used. Transfusable plasma utilization remains composed in part of applications that fall outside of clinical practice guidelines. Plasma contains all of the soluble coagulation factors and is frequently transfused in efforts to restore or reinforce patient hemostasis. The biochemical complexities of coagulation have in recent years been rationalized in newer cell-based models that supplement the cascade hypothesis. Efforts to normalize widely used clinical hemostasis screening test values by plasma transfusion are thought to be misplaced, but superior rapid tests have been slow to emerge. The advent of non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants has brought new challenges to clinical laboratories in plasma testing and to clinicians needing to reverse non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants urgently. Current plasma-related controversies include prophylactic plasma transfusion before invasive procedures, plasma vs prothrombin complex concentrates for urgent warfarin reversal, and the utility of increased ratios of plasma to red blood cell units transfused in massive transfusion protocols. The first recombinant plasma protein products to reach the clinic were recombinant hemophilia treatment products, and these donor-free equivalents to factors VIII and IX are now being supplemented with novel products whose circulatory half-lives have been increased by chemical modification or genetic fusion. Achieving optimal plasma utilization is an ongoing challenge in the interconnected

  9. A Systems Approach to Elucidate Heterosis of Protein Abundances in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Blein-Nicolas, Mélisande; Albertin, Warren; da Silva, Telma; Valot, Benoît; Balliau, Thierry; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Bely, Marina; Marullo, Philippe; Sicard, Delphine; Dillmann, Christine; de Vienne, Dominique; Zivy, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Heterosis is a universal phenomenon that has major implications in evolution and is of tremendous agro-economic value. To study the molecular manifestations of heterosis and to find factors that maximize its strength, we implemented a large-scale proteomic experiment in yeast. We analyzed the inheritance of 1,396 proteins in 55 inter- and intraspecific hybrids obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. uvarum that were grown in grape juice at two temperatures. We showed that the proportion of heterotic proteins was highly variable depending on the parental strain and on the temperature considered. For intraspecific hybrids, this proportion was higher at nonoptimal temperature. Unexpectedly, heterosis for protein abundance was strongly biased toward positive values in interspecific hybrids but not in intraspecific hybrids. Computer modeling showed that this observation could be accounted for by assuming concave relationships between protein abundances and their controlling factors, in line with the metabolic model of heterosis. These results point to nonlinear processes that could play a central role in heterosis. PMID:25971257

  10. A Systems Approach to Elucidate Heterosis of Protein Abundances in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Blein-Nicolas, Mélisande; Albertin, Warren; da Silva, Telma; Valot, Benoît; Balliau, Thierry; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Bely, Marina; Marullo, Philippe; Sicard, Delphine; Dillmann, Christine; de Vienne, Dominique; Zivy, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Heterosis is a universal phenomenon that has major implications in evolution and is of tremendous agro-economic value. To study the molecular manifestations of heterosis and to find factors that maximize its strength, we implemented a large-scale proteomic experiment in yeast. We analyzed the inheritance of 1,396 proteins in 55 inter- and intraspecific hybrids obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. uvarum that were grown in grape juice at two temperatures. We showed that the proportion of heterotic proteins was highly variable depending on the parental strain and on the temperature considered. For intraspecific hybrids, this proportion was higher at nonoptimal temperature. Unexpectedly, heterosis for protein abundance was strongly biased toward positive values in interspecific hybrids but not in intraspecific hybrids. Computer modeling showed that this observation could be accounted for by assuming concave relationships between protein abundances and their controlling factors, in line with the metabolic model of heterosis. These results point to nonlinear processes that could play a central role in heterosis. PMID:25971257

  11. Exoproteome analysis reveals higher abundance of proteins linked to alkaline stress in persistent Listeria monocytogenes strains.

    PubMed

    Rychli, Kathrin; Grunert, Tom; Ciolacu, Luminita; Zaiser, Andreas; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Wagner, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, responsible for listeriosis a rare but severe infection disease, can survive in the food processing environment for month or even years. So-called persistent L. monocytogenes strains greatly increase the risk of (re)contamination of food products, and are therefore a great challenge for food safety. However, our understanding of the mechanism underlying persistence is still fragmented. In this study we compared the exoproteome of three persistent strains with the reference strain EGDe under mild stress conditions using 2D differential gel electrophoresis. Principal component analysis including all differentially abundant protein spots showed that the exoproteome of strain EGDe (sequence type (ST) 35) is distinct from that of the persistent strain R479a (ST8) and the two closely related ST121 strains 4423 and 6179. Phylogenetic analyses based on multilocus ST genes showed similar grouping of the strains. Comparing the exoproteome of strain EGDe and the three persistent strains resulted in identification of 22 differentially expressed protein spots corresponding to 16 proteins. Six proteins were significantly increased in the persistent L. monocytogenes exoproteomes, among them proteins involved in alkaline stress response (e.g. the membrane anchored lipoprotein Lmo2637 and the NADPH dehydrogenase NamA). In parallel the persistent strains showed increased survival under alkaline stress, which is often provided during cleaning and disinfection in the food processing environments. In addition, gene expression of the proteins linked to stress response (Lmo2637, NamA, Fhs and QoxA) was higher in the persistent strain not only at 37 °C but also at 10 °C. Invasion efficiency of EGDe was higher in intestinal epithelial Caco2 and macrophage-like THP1 cells compared to the persistent strains. Concurrently we found higher expression of proteins involved in virulence in EGDe e.g. the actin-assembly-inducing protein ActA and the

  12. Structure and function of a mitochondrial late embryogenesis abundant protein are revealed by desiccation.

    PubMed

    Tolleter, Dimitri; Jaquinod, Michel; Mangavel, Cécile; Passirani, Catherine; Saulnier, Patrick; Manon, Stephen; Teyssier, Emeline; Payet, Nicole; Avelange-Macherel, Marie-Hélène; Macherel, David

    2007-05-01

    Few organisms are able to withstand desiccation stress; however, desiccation tolerance is widespread among plant seeds. Survival without water relies on an array of mechanisms, including the accumulation of stress proteins such as the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins. These hydrophilic proteins are prominent in plant seeds but also found in desiccation-tolerant organisms. In spite of many theories and observations, LEA protein function remains unclear. Here, we show that LEAM, a mitochondrial LEA protein expressed in seeds, is a natively unfolded protein, which reversibly folds into alpha-helices upon desiccation. Structural modeling revealed an analogy with class A amphipathic helices of apolipoproteins that coat low-density lipoprotein particles in mammals. LEAM appears spontaneously modified by deamidation and oxidation of several residues that contribute to its structural features. LEAM interacts with membranes in the dry state and protects liposomes subjected to drying. The overall results provide strong evidence that LEAM protects the inner mitochondrial membrane during desiccation. According to sequence analyses of several homologous proteins from various desiccation-tolerant organisms, a similar protection mechanism likely acts with other types of cellular membranes. PMID:17526751

  13. Mass Spectrometry and Next-Generation Sequencing Reveal an Abundant and Rapidly Evolving Abalone Sperm Protein

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Melody R.; McDowall, Margo H.; Stewart, Lia; Ouaddi, Aleena; MacCoss, Michael J.; Swanson, Willie J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Abalone, a broadcast spawning marine mollusk, is an important model for molecular interactions and positive selection in fertilization, but the focus has previously been on only two sperm proteins, lysin and sp18.We used genomic and proteomic techniques to bring new insights to this model by characterizing the testis transcriptome and sperm proteome of the Red abalone Haliotis rufescens. One pair of homologous, testis-specific proteins contains a secretion signal and is small, abundant, and associated with the acrosome. Comparative analysis revealed that homologs are extremely divergent between species, and show strong evidence for positive selection. The acrosomal localization and rapid evolution of these proteins indicates that they play an important role in fertilization, and could be involved in the species-specificity of sperm-egg interactions in abalone. Our genomic and proteomic characterization of abalone fertilization resulted in the identification of interesting, novel peptides that have eluded detection in this important model system for 20 years. PMID:23585193

  14. Changes in Relative Thylakoid Protein Abundance Induced by Fluctuating Light in the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Grouneva, Irina; Muth-Pawlak, Dorota; Battchikova, Natalia; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2016-05-01

    One of the hallmarks of marine diatom biology is their ability to cope with rapid changes in light availability due to mixing of the water column and the lens effect. We investigated how irradiance fluctuations influence the relative abundance of key photosynthetic proteins in the centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana by means of mass-spectrometry-based approaches for relative protein quantitation. Most notably, fluctuating-light conditions lead to a substantial overall up-regulation of light-harvesting complex proteins as well as several subunits of photosystems II and I. Despite an initial delay in growth under FL, there were no indications of FL-induced photosynthesis limitation, in contrast to other photosynthetic organisms. Our findings further strengthen the notion that diatoms use a qualitatively different mechanism of photosynthetic regulation in which chloroplast-mitochondria interaction has overtaken crucial regulatory processes of photosynthetic light reactions that are typical for the survival of land plants, green algae, and cyanobacteria. PMID:27025989

  15. Three abundant germ line-specific transcripts in Volvox carteri encode photosynthetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Choi, G; Przybylska, M; Straus, D

    1996-09-01

    Volvox carteri is a multicellular eukaryotic green alga composed of about 2000 cells of only two differentiated types: somatic and germ line. To understand how embryonic cells are assigned either to somatic or germ line fates, we are investigating the regulation of transcripts that are abundant in only one cell type. Here we report the identity of three transcripts that are coordinately expressed at high levels in germ line cells but not in somatic cells. Surprisingly, all three transcripts encode photosynthetic chloroplast proteins (light-harvesting complex protein, oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 3, and ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase) that are transcribed from nuclear genes. We discuss why these mRNAs might be required at high levels in germ line cells and present a hypothesis, suggested by our results, on the evolution of cell specialization in the Volvocales. PMID:8781179

  16. Protein composition of seminal plasma in fractionated stallion ejaculates.

    PubMed

    Kareskoski, A M; del Alamo, M M Rivera; Güvenc, K; Reilas, T; Calvete, J J; Rodriguez-Martinez, H; Andersson, M; Katila, T

    2011-02-01

    Seminal plasma (SP) contains several types of compounds derived from the epididymides and accessory glands. The aim of this study was to examine the protein composition of different ejaculate fractions. Trial I: fractionated ejaculates were collected from two normal and two subfertile stallions. Samples containing pre-sperm fluid and the first sperm-rich jets (HIGH-1), the main sperm-rich portion (HIGH-2), the jets with low sperm concentrations (LOW), and a combined whole-ejaculate (WE) sample was centrifuged, and the SP was filtered and frozen. A part of each SP sample was stored (5°C, 24 h) with spermatozoa from HIGH-2 and skim milk extender. Sperm motility was evaluated after storage in extender mixed with the stallion's own SP or SP from one of the other stallions (sperm from a normal stallion stored in SP from a subfertile stallion and vice versa). Protein composition was analysed using reverse-phase liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry. The area-under-the-curve (AUC) was used for quantitative comparison of proteins within fractions. Trial II: semen samples were collected from seven stallions. Fractions with the highest (HIGH) and lowest (LOW) sperm concentrations and WE samples were examined using SDS-PAGE and densitometry. No significant differences emerged between fractions in the AUC-values of the Horse Seminal Protein-1 (HSP-1) and HSP-2 peaks, or the peak containing HSP-3 and HSP-4 (HSP-3/4). Levels of HSP-1, HSP-2 and HSP-3/4 were not significantly correlated with total sperm motility, progressive sperm motility or average path velocity after storage. Significant differences between ejaculate fractions in the amount of different protein groups present in SP were not found in Trial I; but in Trial II, the proteins in the 60-70 kDa range were more abundant in LOW than in HIGH and WE, indicating that this band contained proteins derived mainly from the seminal vesicles, which produce most of the SP in LOW. PMID

  17. Protein Abundance Changes and Ubiquitylation Targets Identified after Inhibition of the Proteasome with Syringolin A*

    PubMed Central

    Svozil, Julia; Hirsch-Hoffmann, Matthias; Dudler, Robert; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Baerenfaller, Katja

    2014-01-01

    As proteins are the main effectors inside cells, their levels need to be tightly regulated. This is partly achieved by specific protein degradation via the Ubiquitin-26S proteasome system (UPS). In plants, an exceptionally high number of proteins are involved in Ubiquitin-26S proteasome system-mediated protein degradation and it is known to regulate most, if not all, important cellular processes. Here, we investigated the response to the inhibition of the proteasome at the protein level treating leaves with the specific inhibitor Syringolin A (SylA) in a daytime specific manner and found 109 accumulated and 140 decreased proteins. The patterns of protein level changes indicate that the accumulating proteins cause proteotoxic stress that triggers various responses. Comparing protein level changes in SylA treated with those in a transgenic line over-expressing a mutated ubiquitin unable to form polyubiquitylated proteins produced little overlap pointing to different response pathways. To distinguish between direct and indirect targets of the UPS we also enriched and identified ubiquitylated proteins after inhibition of the proteasome, revealing a total of 1791 ubiquitylated proteins in leaves and roots and 1209 that were uniquely identified in our study. The comparison of the ubiquitylated proteins with those changing in abundance after SylA-mediated inhibition of the proteasome confirmed the complexity of the response and revealed that some proteins are regulated both at transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. For the ubiquitylated proteins that accumulate in the cytoplasm but are targeted to the plastid or the mitochondrion, we often found peptides in their target sequences, demonstrating that the UPS is involved in controlling organellar protein levels. Attempts to identify the sites of ubiquitylation revealed that the specific properties of this post-translational modification can lead to incorrect peptide spectrum assignments in complex peptide mixtures

  18. Comparative changes in plasma protein concentration, hematocrit and plasma volume during exercise, bedrest and + Gz acceleration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Beaumont, W.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of experiments which indicate that under conditions of a constant red cell volume the proportional changes in hematocrit and plasma volume during exercise are never equal. On the basis of direct measurements and calculated changes of plasma volume it is concluded that during maximal exercise there is a small loss of protein from the plasma. It is clear that changes in content of blood constituents can only be evaluated correctly after determination of changes in plasma volume.

  19. Heterogeneity of Arabinogalactan-Proteins on the Plasma Membrane of Rose Cells.

    PubMed Central

    Serpe, M. D.; Nothnagel, E. A.

    1996-01-01

    Arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) have been purified from the plasma membrane of suspension-cultured Paul's Scarlet rose (Rosa sp.) cells. The two most abundant and homogeneous plasma membrane AGP fractions were named plasma membrane AGP1 (PM-AGP1) and plasma membrane AGP2 (PM-AGP2) and had apparent molecular masses of 140 and 217 kD, respectively. Both PM-AGP1 and PM-AGP2 had [beta]-(1-3)-, [beta]-(1,6)-, and [beta]-(1,3,6)-galactopyranosyl residues, predominantly terminal [alpha]-arabinofuranosyl residues, and (1,4)- and terminal glucuronopyranosyl residues. The protein moieties of PM-AGP1 and PM-AGP2 were both rich in hydroxyproline, alanine, and serine, but differed in the abundance of hydroxyproline, which was 1.6 times higher in PM-AGP2 than in PM-AGP1. Another difference was the overall protein content, which was 3.7% (w/w) in PM-AGP1 and 15% in PM-AGP2. As judged by their behavior on reverse-phase chromatography, PM-AGP1 and PM-AGP2 were not more hydrophobic than AGPs from the cell wall or culture medium. In contrast, a minor plasma membrane AGP fraction eluted later on reverse-phase chromatography and was more negatively charged at pH 5 than either PM-AGP1 or PM-AGP2. The more negatively charged fraction contained molecules with a glycosyl composition characteristic of AGPs and included at least two different macromolecules. The results of this investigation indicate that Rosa plasma membrane contains at least four distinct AGPs or AGP-like molecules. These molecules differed from each other in size, charge, hydrophobicity, amino-acyl composition, and/or protein content. PMID:12226444

  20. Isolation and characterization of haemoporin, an abundant haemolymph protein from Aplysia californica.

    PubMed Central

    Jaenicke, Elmar; Walsh, Patrick J; Decker, Heinz

    2003-01-01

    In the present study, we show the isolation and characterization of the protein haemoporin, which constitutes the second most abundant protein fraction in the haemolymph of the marine gastropod Aplysia californica. Although Aplysia is commonly used to investigate the molecular basis of learning, not much is known about the proteins in its haemolymph, which is in contact with the neurons owing to the open circulatory system of molluscs. In the native state, haemoporin is a macromolecular complex forming a cylinder with a central solvent-filled pore. The native complex most probably is a homopentamer made up from 70 kDa subunits with a molecular mass of 360 kDa and a sedimentation coefficient of 11.7 S. Prediction of the secondary structure by CD spectroscopy revealed that haemoporin contains 36% alpha-helices and 19% beta-strands. An absorption band in the 300-400 nm region indicates that haemoporin probably contains a bound substance. Haemoporin also contains a below average amount of tryptophan as evident from absorption and fluorescence spectra. The specific absorption coefficient at 280 nm (a (280 nm, 1 mg/ml)) varies between 0.42 and 0.59 l x g(-1) x cm(-1) depending on the method. The function of the protein is not yet known, but there are structural parallels between haemoporin and a pore protein reported previously in the haemolymph of another marine gastropod Megathura crenulata. The alanine-rich N-terminal sequence (AAVPEAAAEATAEAAPVSEF) is unique among protein sequences and indicates an alpha-helical structure. Whereas one side of the helix is hydrophobic and faces the interior of the protein, the other side contains a glutamic cluster, which may form the channel of the pore in the quaternary structure. Thus both proteins might belong to a new class of haemolymph proteins present in the haemolymph of marine gastropods. PMID:12889987

  1. Characterization of auxin-binding proteins from zucchini plasma membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, G. R.; Rice, M. S.; Lomax, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    We have previously identified two auxin-binding polypeptides in plasma membrane (PM) preparations from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) (Hicks et al. 1989, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86, 4948-4952). These polypeptides have molecular weights of 40 kDa and 42 kDa and label specifically with the photoaffinity auxin analog 5-N3-7-3H-IAA (azido-IAA). Azido-IAA permits both the covalent and radioactive tagging of auxin-binding proteins and has allowed us to characterize further the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides, including the nature of their attachment to the PM, their relationship to each other, and their potential function. The azido-IAA-labeled polypeptides remain in the pelleted membrane fraction following high-salt and detergent washes, which indicates a tight and possibly integral association with the PM. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of partially purified azido-IAA-labeled protein demonstrates that, in addition to the major isoforms of the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides, which possess isoelectric points (pIs) of 8.2 and 7.2, respectively, several less abundant isoforms that display unique pIs are apparent at both molecular masses. Tryptic and chymotryptic digestion of the auxin-binding proteins indicates that the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides are closely related or are modifications of the same polypeptide. Phase extraction with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 results in partitioning of the azido-IAA-labeled polypeptides into the aqueous (hydrophilic) phase. This apparently paradoxical behavior is also exhibited by certain integral membrane proteins that aggregate to form channels. The results of gel filtration indicate that the auxin-binding proteins do indeed aggregate strongly and that the polypeptides associate to form a dimer or multimeric complex in vivo. These characteristics are consistent with the hypothesis that the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides are subunits of a multimeric integral membrane protein which has an auxin-binding site, and which may

  2. The highly abundant protein Ag-lbp55 from Ascaridia galli represents a novel type of lipid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Jordanova, Rositsa; Radoslavov, Georgi; Fischer, Peter; Torda, Andrew; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Boteva, Raina; Walter, Rolf D; Bankov, Ilia; Liebau, Eva

    2005-12-16

    Lipid-binding proteins exhibit important functions in lipid transport, cellular signaling, gene transcription, and cytoprotection. Their functional analogues in nematodes are nematode polyprotein allergens/antigens and fatty acid and retinoid-binding proteins. This work describes a novel 55-kDa protein, Ag-lbp55, purified from the parasitic nematode Ascaridia galli. By direct N-terminal sequencing, a partial amino acid sequence was obtained that allowed the design of oligonucleotide primers to obtain the full-length cDNA sequence. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of an N-terminal signal peptide of 25 amino acid residues and a FAR domain at the C terminus. Data base searches showed almost no significant homologies to other described proteins. The secondary structure of Ag-lbp55 was predominantly alpha-helical (65%) as shown by CD spectroscopy. It was found to bind with high affinity fatty acids (caprylic, oleic, and palmitic acid) and their fluorescent analogue dansylaminoundecanic acid. Immunolocalization showed that Ag-lbp55 is a highly abundant protein, mainly distributed in the inner hypodermis and extracellularly in the pseudocoelomatic fluid. A similar staining pattern was observed in other pathogenic nematodes, indicating the existence of similar proteins in these species. PMID:16210327

  3. Extensive dataset of boar seminal plasma proteome displaying putative reproductive functions of identified proteins.

    PubMed

    Perez-Patiño, Cristina; Barranco, Isabel; Parrilla, Inmaculada; Martinez, Emilio A; Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto; Roca, Jordi

    2016-09-01

    A complete proteomic profile of seminal plasma (SP) remains challenging, particularly in porcine. The data reports on the analysis of boar SP-proteins by using a combination of SEC, 1-D SDS PAGE and NanoLC-ESI-MS/MS from 33 pooled SP-samples (11 boars, 3 ejaculates/boar). A complete dataset of the 536 SP-proteins identified and validated with confidence ≥95% (Unused Score >1.3) and a false discovery rate (FDR) ≤1%, is provided. In addition, the relative abundance of 432 of them is also shown. Gene ontology annotation of the complete SP-proteome complemented by an extensive description of the putative reproductive role of SP-proteins, providing a valuable source for a better understanding of SP role in the reproductive success. This data article refers to the article entitled "Characterization of the porcine seminal plasma proteome comparing ejaculate portions" (Perez-Patiño et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27583342

  4. Molecular interactions of graphene oxide with human blood plasma proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenry, Affa Affb Affc; Loh, Kian Ping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the molecular interactions between graphene oxide (GO) and human blood plasma proteins. To gain an insight into the bio-physico-chemical activity of GO in biological and biomedical applications, we performed a series of biophysical assays to quantify the molecular interactions between GO with different lateral size distributions and the three essential human blood plasma proteins. We elucidate the various aspects of the GO-protein interactions, particularly, the adsorption, binding kinetics and equilibrium, and conformational stability, through determination of quantitative parameters, such as GO-protein association constants, binding cooperativity, and the binding-driven protein structural changes. We demonstrate that the molecular interactions between GO and plasma proteins are significantly dependent on the lateral size distribution and mean lateral sizes of the GO nanosheets and their subtle variations may markedly influence the GO-protein interactions. Consequently, we propose the existence of size-dependent molecular interactions between GO nanosheets and plasma proteins, and importantly, the presence of specific critical mean lateral sizes of GO nanosheets in achieving very high association and fluorescence quenching efficiency of the plasma proteins. We anticipate that this work will provide a basis for the design of graphene-based and other related nanomaterials for a plethora of biological and biomedical applications.

  5. Plasma protein profiles of neonatal pigs before and after suckling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyun; Olson, Douglas J; Gordon, John R; Middleton, Dorothy M; Simko, Elemir

    2012-01-01

    Absorption of colostral proteins ingested by neonatal piglets within 24 to 36 h after birth is generally considered to be non-selective. Nevertheless, the transfer of colostral proteins, except immunoglubulins, from gut to bloodstream after natural suckling is still poorly characterized. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in 2-dimensional electrophoretic plasma protein profiles of neonatal piglets before and after suckling, in order to characterize the gastrointestinal absorption of colostral proteins into the neonatal bloodstream. As expected, the most significant change in plasma after suckling is the presence of a large amount of immunoglobulin. However, while the concentration of a few proteins was mildly increased in post-suckling plasma, the evidence of absorption of colostral non-immunoglobulin proteins by neonatal piglets was not detected in this study. PMID:22754088

  6. Plasma protein profiles of neonatal pigs before and after suckling

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanyun; Olson, Douglas J.; Gordon, John R.; Middleton, Dorothy M.; Simko, Elemir

    2012-01-01

    Absorption of colostral proteins ingested by neonatal piglets within 24 to 36 h after birth is generally considered to be non-selective. Nevertheless, the transfer of colostral proteins, except immunoglubulins, from gut to bloodstream after natural suckling is still poorly characterized. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in 2-dimensional electrophoretic plasma protein profiles of neonatal piglets before and after suckling, in order to characterize the gastrointestinal absorption of colostral proteins into the neonatal bloodstream. As expected, the most significant change in plasma after suckling is the presence of a large amount of immunoglobulin. However, while the concentration of a few proteins was mildly increased in post-suckling plasma, the evidence of absorption of colostral non-immunoglobulin proteins by neonatal piglets was not detected in this study. PMID:22754088

  7. Cold-regulated cereal chloroplast late embryogenesis abundant-like proteins. Molecular characterization and functional analyses.

    PubMed

    NDong, Christian; Danyluk, Jean; Wilson, Kenneth E; Pocock, Tessa; Huner, Norman P A; Sarhan, Fathey

    2002-07-01

    Cold acclimation and freezing tolerance are the result of complex interaction between low temperature, light, and photosystem II (PSII) excitation pressure. Previous results have shown that expression of the Wcs19 gene is correlated with PSII excitation pressure measured in vivo as the relative reduction state of PSII. Using cDNA library screening and data mining, we have identified three different groups of proteins, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) 3-L1, LEA3-L2, and LEA3-L3, sharing identities with WCS19. These groups represent a new class of proteins in cereals related to group 3 LEA proteins. They share important characteristics such as a sorting signal that is predicted to target them to either the chloroplast or mitochondria and a C-terminal sequence that may be involved in oligomerization. The results of subcellular fractionation, immunolocalization by electron microscopy and the analyses of target sequences within the Wcs19 gene are consistent with the localization of WCS19 within the chloroplast stroma of wheat (Triticum aestivum) and rye (Secale cereale). Western analysis showed that the accumulation of chloroplastic LEA3-L2 proteins is correlated with the capacity of different wheat and rye cultivars to develop freezing tolerance. Arabidopsis was transformed with the Wcs19 gene and the transgenic plants showed a significant increase in their freezing tolerance. This increase was only evident in cold-acclimated plants. The putative function of this protein in the enhancement of freezing tolerance is discussed. PMID:12114590

  8. Cold-Regulated Cereal Chloroplast Late Embryogenesis Abundant-Like Proteins. Molecular Characterization and Functional Analyses

    PubMed Central

    NDong, Christian; Danyluk, Jean; Wilson, Kenneth E.; Pocock, Tessa; Huner, Norman P.A.; Sarhan, Fathey

    2002-01-01

    Cold acclimation and freezing tolerance are the result of complex interaction between low temperature, light, and photosystem II (PSII) excitation pressure. Previous results have shown that expression of the Wcs19 gene is correlated with PSII excitation pressure measured in vivo as the relative reduction state of PSII. Using cDNA library screening and data mining, we have identified three different groups of proteins, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) 3-L1, LEA3-L2, and LEA3-L3, sharing identities with WCS19. These groups represent a new class of proteins in cereals related to group 3 LEA proteins. They share important characteristics such as a sorting signal that is predicted to target them to either the chloroplast or mitochondria and a C-terminal sequence that may be involved in oligomerization. The results of subcellular fractionation, immunolocalization by electron microscopy and the analyses of target sequences within the Wcs19 gene are consistent with the localization of WCS19 within the chloroplast stroma of wheat (Triticum aestivum) and rye (Secale cereale). Western analysis showed that the accumulation of chloroplastic LEA3-L2 proteins is correlated with the capacity of different wheat and rye cultivars to develop freezing tolerance. Arabidopsis was transformed with the Wcs19 gene and the transgenic plants showed a significant increase in their freezing tolerance. This increase was only evident in cold-acclimated plants. The putative function of this protein in the enhancement of freezing tolerance is discussed. PMID:12114590

  9. Ultrasensitive Detection of Low-Abundance Protein Biomarkers by Mass Spectrometry Signal Amplification Assay.

    PubMed

    Du, Ruijun; Zhu, Lina; Gan, Jinrui; Wang, Yuning; Qiao, Liang; Liu, Baohong

    2016-07-01

    A mass spectrometry signal amplification method is developed for the ultrasensitive and selective detection of low-abundance protein biomarkers by utilizing tag molecules on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). EpCAM and thrombin as model targets are captured by specific aptamers immobilized on the AuNPs. With laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-TOF MS), the mass tag molecules are detected to represent the protein biomarkers. Benefiting from the MS signal amplification, the assay can achieve a limit of detection of 100 aM. The method is further applied to detect thrombin in fetal bovine serum and EpCAM in cell lysates to demonstrate its selectivity and feasibility in complex biological samples. With the high sensitivity and specificity, the protocol shows great promise for providing a new route to single-cell analysis and early disease diagnosis. PMID:27253396

  10. Spatial Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by Voxelation Integrated with High-Throughput Liquid Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Petyuk, Vladislav A; Qian, Weijun; Chin, Mark H; Wang, Haixing H; Livesay, Eric A; Monroe, Matthew E; Adkins, Joshua N; Jaitly, Navdeep; Anderson, David J; Camp, David G; Smith, Desmond J; Smith, Richard D

    2007-01-25

    Temporally and spatially resolved mapping of protein abundance patterns within the mammalian brain is of significant interest for understanding brain function and molecular etiologies of neurodegenerative diseases; however, such imaging efforts have been greatly challenged by complexity of the proteome, throughput and sensitivity of applied analytical methodologies, and accurate quantitation of protein abundances across the brain. Here, we describe a methodology for comprehensive spatial proteome mapping that addresses these challenges by employing voxelation integrated with automated microscale sample processing, high-throughput LC system coupled with high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer and a “universal” stable isotope labeled reference sample approach for robust quantitation. We applied this methodology as a proof-of-concept trial for the analysis of protein distribution within a single coronal slice of a C57BL/6J mouse brain. For relative quantitation of the protein abundances across the slice, an 18O-isotopically labeled reference sample, derived from a whole control coronal slice from another mouse, was spiked into each voxel sample and stable isotopic intensity ratios were used to obtain measures of relative protein abundances. In total, we generated maps of protein abundance patterns for 1,028 proteins. The significant agreement of the protein distributions with previously reported data supports the validity of this methodology, which opens new opportunities for studying the spatial brain proteome and its dynamics during the course of disease progression and other important biological and associated health aspects in a discovery-driven fashion.

  11. [Development of online conventional array-based two-dimensional liquid chromatographic system for proteins separation in human plasma].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi; Hong, Guangfeng; Gao, Mingxia; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2014-04-01

    Human plasma is one of the proteins-containing samples most difficult to characterize on account of the wide dynamic concentration range of its intact proteins. Herein, we developed a high-throughput conventional array-based two-dimensional liquid chromatographic system for proteins separation in human plasma in online mode. In the system, a conventional strong-anion exchange chromatographic column was used as the first separation dimension and eight parallel conventional reversed-phase liquid chromatographic columns were integrated as the second separation dimension. The fractions from the first dimension were sequentially transferred into the corresponding reversed-phase liquid chromatographic precolumns for retention and enrichment using a 10-port electrically actuated multi-position valve. The second dimensional solvent flow was directly and identically split into 8 channels. The fractions were concurrently back-flushed from the precolumns into the 8 conventional RP columns and were separated simultaneously. An 8-channel fraction collector was refitted to collect the reversed-phase liquid chromatographic fractions for further investigation. Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) dyein solution was conveniently used for high-abundance protein location. Two separation dimensions were relatively independent parts, as well as each channel of the second dimensional array separation. Therefore, the new system could improve the separation throughput and total peak capacity. The system was successfully applied for the separation of human plasma intact proteins. The results indicated the established system is an effective method for removing high abundance proteins in plasma and in-depth research in plasma proteomics. PMID:25069321

  12. Plasma protein binding of nitroxynil in several species.

    PubMed

    Alvinerie, M; Floc'h, R; Galtier, P

    1991-06-01

    The binding of nitroxynil to total plasma proteins of cows, sheep and rabbits was characterized using equilibrium dialysis. The data indicate clearly that nitroxynil was highly (97-98%) bound to plasma protein of each animal. This linear binding would be due to the particular power exerted by serum albumin. The results are in good agreement with known pharmacokinetic properties of nitroxynil in domestic species. PMID:1920604

  13. Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, M.; Ng, E.-P.; Bakhtiari, K.; Vinciguerra, M.; Ahmad, H. Ali; Awala, H.; Mintova, S.; Daghighi, M.; Bakhshandeh Rostami, F.; de Vries, M.; Motazacker, M. M.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.; Mahmoudi, M.; Rezaee, F.

    2015-11-01

    The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8-12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and the type of zeolites than zeolite nanoparticles concentration. The number of proteins present in the corona of zeolite nanoparticles at 100% plasma (in vivo state) is less than with 10% plasma exposure. This could be due to a competition between the proteins to occupy the corona of the zeolite nanoparticles. Moreover, a high selective adsorption for apolipoprotein C-III (APOC-III) and fibrinogen on the zeolite nanoparticles at high plasma concentration (100%) was observed. While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins. The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment. The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy.

  14. Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, M.; Ng, E.-P.; Bakhtiari, K.; Vinciguerra, M.; Ahmad, H. Ali; Awala, H.; Mintova, S.; Daghighi, M.; Bakhshandeh Rostami, F.; de Vries, M.; Motazacker, M. M.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.; Mahmoudi, M.; Rezaee, F.

    2015-01-01

    The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8–12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and the type of zeolites than zeolite nanoparticles concentration. The number of proteins present in the corona of zeolite nanoparticles at 100% plasma (in vivo state) is less than with 10% plasma exposure. This could be due to a competition between the proteins to occupy the corona of the zeolite nanoparticles. Moreover, a high selective adsorption for apolipoprotein C-III (APOC-III) and fibrinogen on the zeolite nanoparticles at high plasma concentration (100%) was observed. While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins. The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment. The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy. PMID:26616161

  15. Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, M; Ng, E-P; Bakhtiari, K; Vinciguerra, M; Ali Ahmad, H; Awala, H; Mintova, S; Daghighi, M; Bakhshandeh Rostami, F; de Vries, M; Motazacker, M M; Peppelenbosch, M P; Mahmoudi, M; Rezaee, F

    2015-01-01

    The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8-12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and the type of zeolites than zeolite nanoparticles concentration. The number of proteins present in the corona of zeolite nanoparticles at 100% plasma (in vivo state) is less than with 10% plasma exposure. This could be due to a competition between the proteins to occupy the corona of the zeolite nanoparticles. Moreover, a high selective adsorption for apolipoprotein C-III (APOC-III) and fibrinogen on the zeolite nanoparticles at high plasma concentration (100%) was observed. While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins. The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment. The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy. PMID:26616161

  16. Identification and cDNA cloning of a protein abundantly expressed during apple fruit development.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Mori, H; Yamaki, S

    1999-02-01

    A 60 kDa protein (MF-60) abundantly appearing in matured apple fruit was detected by SDS-PAGE of the soluble protein. It was partially purified through Butyl-Toyopearl and DEAE-cellulose. Its partial amino acid sequences were determined to isolate a full-length cDNA. MF-60 cDNA (mf-60) consisting of 1,825 bp containing an open reading frame of 1,524 bp and encoding a 54.2 kDa polypeptide. The deduced polypeptide of mf-60 has 81.1% identity to turgor-responsive protein 26 g from wilted garden pea shoot. Northern blot and Western blot analyses showed that the levels of the protein and the transcript of MF-60 changed in parallel through the developmental season; they were very low in young fruit at 36 DAF and 60 DAF, started to increase at 85 DAF, and then remained at a higher level from 114 DAF to 176 DAF. These results suggested that MF-60 functions are connected with fruit development but not with the fruit ripening induced by ethylene. PMID:10202815

  17. Quantitative proteomics analysis of adsorbed plasma proteins classifies nanoparticles with different surface properties and size

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Burnum, Kristin E.; Luna, Maria L.; Petritis, Brianne O.; Kim, Jong Seo; Qian, Weijun; Moore, Ronald J.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Thrall, Brian D.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Pounds, Joel G.; Liu, Tao

    2011-12-01

    In biofluids (e.g., blood plasma) nanoparticles are readily embedded in layers of proteins that can affect their biological activity and biocompatibility. Herein, we report a study on the interactions between human plasma proteins and nanoparticles with a controlled systematic variation of properties using stable isotope labeling and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based quantitative proteomics. Novel protocol has been developed to simplify the isolation of nanoparticle bound proteins and improve the reproducibility. Plasma proteins associated with polystyrene nanoparticles with three different surface chemistries and two sizes as well as for four different exposure times (for a total of 24 different samples) were identified and quantified by LC-MS analysis. Quantitative comparison of relative protein abundances were achieved by spiking an 18 O-labeled 'universal reference' into each individually processed unlabeled sample as an internal standard, enabling simultaneous application of both label-free and isotopic labeling quantitation across the sample set. Clustering analysis of the quantitative proteomics data resulted in distinctive pattern that classifies the nanoparticles based on their surface properties and size. In addition, data on the temporal study indicated that the stable protein 'corona' that was isolated for the quantitative analysis appeared to be formed in less than 5 minutes. The comprehensive results obtained herein using quantitative proteomics have potential implications towards predicting nanoparticle biocompatibility.

  18. Combining Ultracentrifugation and Peptide Termini Group-specific Immunoprecipitation for Multiplex Plasma Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Sonja; Schreiber, Thomas D.; Eisen, David; Wiese, Calvin; Planatscher, Hannes; Pynn, Christopher J.; Stoll, Dieter; Templin, Markus F.; Joos, Thomas O.; Pötz, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Blood plasma is a valuable source of potential biomarkers. However, its complexity and the huge dynamic concentration range of its constituents complicate its analysis. To tackle this problem, an immunoprecipitation strategy was employed using antibodies directed against short terminal epitope tags (triple X proteomics antibodies), which allow the enrichment of groups of signature peptides derived from trypsin-digested plasma. Isolated signature peptides are subsequently detected using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Sensitivity of the immunoaffinity approach was, however, compromised by the presence of contaminant peaks derived from the peptides of nontargeted high abundant proteins. A closer analysis of the enrichment strategy revealed nonspecific peptide binding to the solid phase affinity matrix as the major source of the contaminating peptides. We therefore implemented a sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation separation step into the procedure. This yielded a 99% depletion of contaminating peptides from a sucrose fraction containing 70% of the peptide-antibody complexes and enabled the detection of the previously undetected low abundance protein filamin-A. Assessment of this novel approach using 15 different triple X proteomics antibodies demonstrated a more consistent detection of a greater number of targeted peptides and a significant reduction in the intensity of nonspecific peptides. Ultracentrifugation coupled with immunoaffinity MS approaches presents a powerful tool for multiplexed plasma protein analysis without the requirement for demanding liquid chromatography separation techniques. PMID:22527512

  19. Dietary fat, carbohydrate and protein: effects on plasma lipoprotein profiles fat, carbohydrate and protein and plasma lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In general, under isoweight conditions, different types of dietary protein or individual amino acids have little effect on lipoprotein patterns. Dietary carbohydrate tends to increase plasma triglyceride when it displaces fat, accompanied by a decrease in HDL cholesterol concentrations. Potential ...

  20. Comparative Plasma Protein Profiling of Hemoglobin H Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khungwanmaythawee, Kornpat; Paemanee, Atchara; Chaichana, Chartchai; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Fucharoen, Suthat; Svasti, Saovaros; Smith, Duncan R.

    2014-01-01

    HbH and HbH-constant spring (HbH-CS) are the most common forms of α-thalassemia detected in the Thai population. The accumulation of excess β globin chains in these diseases results in increased red cell hemolysis, and patients with HbH-CS normally have a more severe clinical presentation than patients with HbH disease. This study aimed to detect alterations in the expression of plasma proteins of HbH and HbH-CS patients as compared to normal plasma. Platelet poor plasma was separated from HbH and HbH-CS and normal subjects and differential plasma proteins were detected using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified using LC/MS/MS. A total of 14 differentially expressed proteins were detected of which 5 proteins were upregulated and 9 were downregulated. Most of the differentially expressed proteins are liver secreted proteins involved in hemolysis, oxidative stress response, and hemoglobin degradation. Seven proteins were found to be differentially expressed between HbH and HbH-CS. Levels of haptoglobin, a hemoglobin scavenging protein, were significantly increased in HbH patients as compared to HbH-CS patients. The identification of differentially expressed proteins may lead to a better understanding of the biological events underlying the clinical presentation of HbH and HbH-CS patients and can have application as hemolytic markers or severity predictors. PMID:25024506

  1. Transport proteins of the plant plasma membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assmann, S. M.; Haubrick, L. L.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed molecular and genetic approaches have enabled the identification and functional characterization of novel genes encoding ion channels, ion carriers, and water channels of the plant plasma membrane.

  2. Differential Gene Expression and Protein Abundance Evince Ontogenetic Bias toward Castes in a Primitively Eusocial Wasp

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, James H.; Wolschin, Florian; Henshaw, Michael T.; Newman, Thomas C.; Toth, Amy L.; Amdam, Gro V.

    2010-01-01

    Polistes paper wasps are models for understanding conditions that may have characterized the origin of worker and queen castes and, therefore, the origin of paper wasp sociality. Polistes is “primitively eusocial” by virtue of having context-dependent caste determination and no morphological differences between castes. Even so, Polistes colonies have a temporal pattern in which most female larvae reared by the foundress become workers, and most reared by workers become future-reproductive gynes. This pattern is hypothesized to reflect development onto two pathways, which may utilize mechanisms that regulate diapause in other insects. Using expressed sequence tags (ESTs) for Polistes metricus we selected candidate genes differentially expressed in other insects in three categories: 1) diapause vs. non-diapause phenotypes and/or worker vs. queen differentiation, 2) behavioral subcastes of worker honey bees, and 3) no a priori expectation of a role in worker/gyne development. We also used a non-targeted proteomics screen to test for peptide/protein abundance differences that could reflect larval developmental divergence. We found that foundress-reared larvae (putative worker-destined) and worker-reared larvae (putative gyne-destined) differed in quantitative expression of sixteen genes, twelve of which were associated with caste and/or diapause in other insects, and they also differed in abundance of nine peptides/proteins. Some differentially-expressed genes are involved in diapause regulation in other insects, and other differentially-expressed genes and proteins are involved in the insulin signaling pathway, nutrient metabolism, and caste determination in highly social bees. Differential expression of a gene and a peptide encoding hexameric storage proteins is especially noteworthy. Although not conclusive, our results support hypotheses of 1) larval developmental pathway divergence that can lead to caste bias in adults and 2) nutritional differences as the

  3. Proteome analysis of abundant proteins extracted from the leaf of Gynura procumbens (Lour.) Merr.

    PubMed

    Hew, Chaw-Sen; Gam, Lay-Harn

    2011-12-01

    Gynura procumbens (Lour.) Merr. is a traditionally used medicinal plant to decrease cholesterol level, reduce high blood pressure, control diabetics, and for treatment of cancer. In our present study, a proteomic approach was applied to study the proteome of the plant that had never analyzed before. We have identified 92 abundantly expressed proteins from the leaves of G. procumbens (Lour.) Merr. Amongst the identified proteins was miraculin, a taste-masking agent with high commercial value. Miraculin made up ∼0.1% of the total protein extracted; the finding of miraculin gave a great commercial value to G. procumbens (Lour.) Merr. as miraculin's natural source is limited while the production of recombinant miraculin faced challenges of not being able to exhibit the taste-masking effect as in the natural miraculin. We believe the discovery of miraculin in G. procumbens (Lour.) Merr., provides commercial feasibility of miraculin in view of the availability of G. procumbens (Lour.) Merr. that grow wildly and easily in tropical climate. PMID:21938418

  4. Increased abundance of proteins involved in phytosiderophore production in boron-tolerant barley.

    PubMed

    Patterson, John; Ford, Kris; Cassin, Andrew; Natera, Siria; Bacic, Antony

    2007-07-01

    Boron (B) phytotoxicity affects cereal-growing regions worldwide. Although B-tolerant barley (Hordeum vulgare) germplasm is available, molecules responsible for this tolerance mechanism have not been defined. We describe and use a new comparative proteomic technique, iTRAQ peptide tagging (iTRAQ), to compare the abundances of proteins from B-tolerant and -intolerant barley plants from a 'Clipper' x 'Sahara' doubled-haploid population selected on the basis of a presence or absence of two B-tolerance quantitative trait loci. iTRAQ was used to identify three enzymes involved in siderophore production (Iron Deficiency Sensitive2 [IDS2], IDS3, and a methylthio-ribose kinase) as being elevated in abundance in the B-tolerant plants. Following from this result, we report a potential link between iron, B, and the siderophore hydroxymugineic acid. We believe that this study highlights the potency of the iTRAQ approach to better understand mechanisms of abiotic stress tolerance in cereals, particularly when applied in conjunction with bulked segregant analysis. PMID:17478636

  5. A conserved abundant cytoplasmic long noncoding RNA modulates repression by Pumilio proteins in human cells.

    PubMed

    Tichon, Ailone; Gil, Noa; Lubelsky, Yoav; Havkin Solomon, Tal; Lemze, Doron; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Ulitsky, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) genes are encoded in the human genome, and hundreds of them are evolutionarily conserved, but their functions and modes of action remain largely obscure. Particularly enigmatic lncRNAs are those that are exported to the cytoplasm, including NORAD-an abundant and highly conserved cytoplasmic lncRNA. Here we show that most of the sequence of NORAD is comprised of repetitive units that together contain at least 17 functional binding sites for the two mammalian Pumilio homologues. Through binding to PUM1 and PUM2, NORAD modulates the mRNA levels of their targets, which are enriched for genes involved in chromosome segregation during cell division. Our results suggest that some cytoplasmic lncRNAs function by modulating the activities of RNA-binding proteins, an activity which positions them at key junctions of cellular signalling pathways. PMID:27406171

  6. A conserved abundant cytoplasmic long noncoding RNA modulates repression by Pumilio proteins in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Tichon, Ailone; Gil, Noa; Lubelsky, Yoav; Havkin Solomon, Tal; Lemze, Doron; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Ulitsky, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) genes are encoded in the human genome, and hundreds of them are evolutionarily conserved, but their functions and modes of action remain largely obscure. Particularly enigmatic lncRNAs are those that are exported to the cytoplasm, including NORAD—an abundant and highly conserved cytoplasmic lncRNA. Here we show that most of the sequence of NORAD is comprised of repetitive units that together contain at least 17 functional binding sites for the two mammalian Pumilio homologues. Through binding to PUM1 and PUM2, NORAD modulates the mRNA levels of their targets, which are enriched for genes involved in chromosome segregation during cell division. Our results suggest that some cytoplasmic lncRNAs function by modulating the activities of RNA-binding proteins, an activity which positions them at key junctions of cellular signalling pathways. PMID:27406171

  7. Screening Preeclamptic Cord Plasma for Proteins Associated with Decreased Breast Cancer Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Low, Hoi Pang; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Qiu, Li; Chang, Chien-I; Strohsnitter, William C.; Norwitz, Errol R.; Tam, Sun W.; Evans, James E.; Green, Karin M.; Paulo, Joao A.; Lambe, Mats; Hsieh, Chung-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Preeclampsia, a complication of pregnancy characterized by hypertension and proteinuria, has been found to reduce the subsequent risk for breast cancer in female offspring. As this protective effect could be due to exposure to preeclampsia-specific proteins during intrauterine life, the proteomic profiles of umbilical cord blood plasma between preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies were compared. Umbilical cord plasma samples, depleted of 14 abundant proteins, were subjected to proteomic analysis using the quantitative method of nanoACQUITY ultra performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry with elevated energy mode of acquisitionE (NanoUPLC-MSE). Sixty-nine differentially expressed proteins were identified, of which 15 and 6 proteins were only detected in preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies, respectively. Additionally, expression of 8 proteins (gelsolin, complement C5, keratin type I cytoskeletal 10, pigment epithelium-derived factor, complement factor B, complement component C7, hemoglobin subunit gamma-2 and alpha-fetoprotein) were up-regulated in preeclampsia with a fold change of ⩾2.0 when compared to normotensive pregnancies. The identification of alpha-fetoprotein in preeclamptic umbilical cord blood plasma supported the validity of this screen as alpha-fetoprotein has anti-estrogenic properties and has previously been linked to preeclampsia as well as a reduced breast cancer risk. The findings of this pilot study may provide new insights into the mechanistic link between preeclampsia and potentially reduced breast cancer susceptibility in adult life. PMID:24296084

  8. Screening preeclamptic cord plasma for proteins associated with decreased breast cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Low, Hoi Pang; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Qiu, Li; Chang, Chien-I; Strohsnitter, William C; Norwitz, Errol R; Tam, Sun W; Evans, James E; Green, Karin M; Paulo, Joao A; Lambe, Mats; Hsieh, Chung-Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Preeclampsia, a complication of pregnancy characterized by hypertension and proteinuria, has been found to reduce the subsequent risk for breast cancer in female offspring. As this protective effect could be due to exposure to preeclampsia-specific proteins during intrauterine life, the proteomic profiles of umbilical cord blood plasma between preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies were compared. Umbilical cord plasma samples, depleted of 14 abundant proteins, were subjected to proteomic analysis using the quantitative method of nanoACQUITY ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with elevated energy mode of acquisition(E) (NanoUPLC-MS(E)). Sixty-nine differentially expressed proteins were identified, of which 15 and 6 proteins were only detected in preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies, respectively. Additionally, expression of 8 proteins (gelsolin, complement C5, keratin type I cytoskeletal 10, pigment epithelium-derived factor, complement factor B, complement component C7, hemoglobin subunit gamma-2 and alpha-fetoprotein) were up-regulated in preeclampsia with a fold change of ≥2.0 when compared to normotensive pregnancies. The identification of alpha-fetoprotein in preeclamptic umbilical cord blood plasma supported the validity of this screen as alpha-fetoprotein has anti-estrogenic properties and has previously been linked to preeclampsia as well as a reduced breast cancer risk. The findings of this pilot study may provide new insights into the mechanistic link between preeclampsia and potentially reduced breast cancer susceptibility in adult life. PMID:24296084

  9. Neutrophils Turn Plasma Proteins into Weapons against HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Hagleitner, Magdalena; Rambach, Günter; Van Aken, Hugo; Dierich, Manfred; Kehrel, Beate E.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of innate immune activation granulocytes and macrophages produce hypochlorite/hypochlorous acid (HOCl) via secretion of myeloperoxidase (MPO) to the outside of the cells, where HOCl immediately reacts with proteins. Most proteins that become altered by this system do not belong to the invading microorganism but to the host. While there is no doubt that the myeloperoxidase system is capable of directly inactivating HIV-1, we hypothesized that it may have an additional indirect mode of action. We show in this article that HOCl is able to chemically alter proteins and thus turn them into Idea-Ps (Idea-P = immune defence-altered protein), potent amyloid-like and SH-groups capturing antiviral weapons against HIV-1. HOCl-altered plasma proteins (Idea-PP) have the capacity to bind efficiently and with high affinity to the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120, and to its receptor CD4 as well as to the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). Idea-PP was able to inhibit viral infection and replication in a cell culture system as shown by reduced number of infected cells and of syncytia, resulting in reduction of viral capsid protein p24 in the culture supernatant. The unmodified plasma protein fraction had no effect. HOCl-altered isolated proteins antithrombin III and human serum albumin, taken as representative examples of the whole pool of plasma proteins, were both able to exert the same activity of binding to gp120 and inhibition of viral proliferation. These data offer an opportunity to improve the understanding of the intricacies of host-pathogen interactions and allow the generation of the following hypothetical scheme: natural immune defense mechanisms generate by posttranslational modification of plasma proteins a potent virucidal weapon that immobilizes the virus as well as inhibits viral fusion and thus entry into the host cells. Furthermore simulation of this mechanism in vitro might provide an interesting new therapeutic approach against microorganisms

  10. In-Depth Analysis of a Plasma or Serum Proteome Using a 4D Protein Profiling Method

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hsin-Yao; Beer, Lynn A.; Speicher, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive proteomic analysis of human plasma or serum has been a major strategy used to identify biomarkers that serve as indicators of disease. However, such in-depth proteomic analyses are challenging due to the complexity and extremely large dynamic range of protein concentrations in plasma. Therefore, reduction in sample complexity through multidimensional pre-fractionation strategies is critical, particularly for the detection of low-abundance proteins that have the potential to be the most specific disease biomarkers. We describe here a 4D protein profiling method that we developed for comprehensive proteomic analyses of both plasma and serum. Our method consists of abundant protein depletion coupled with separation strategies – microscale solution isoelectrofocusing and 1D SDS-PAGE – followed by reversed-phase separation of tryptic peptides prior to LC–MS/MS. Using this profiling strategy, we routinely identify a large number of proteins over nine orders of magnitude, including a substantial number of proteins at the low ng/mL or lower levels from approximately 300 μL of plasma sample. PMID:21468940

  11. Plasma Protein Pentosidine and Carboxymethyllysine, Biomarkers for Age-related Macular Degeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jiaqian; Yuan, Xianglin; Gu, Jiayin; Yue, Xiuzhen; Gu, Xiaorong; Nagaraj, Ram H.; Crabb, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) causes severe vision loss in the elderly; early identification of AMD risk could help slow or prevent disease progression. Toward the discovery of AMD biomarkers, we quantified plasma protein Nε-carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pentosidine from 58 AMD and 32 control donors. CML and pentosidine are advanced glycation end products that are abundant in Bruch membrane, the extracellular matrix separating the retinal pigment epithelium from the blood-bearing choriocapillaris. We measured CML and pentosidine by LC-MS/MS and LC-fluorometry, respectively, and found higher mean levels of CML (∼54%) and pentosidine (∼64%) in AMD (p < 0.0001) relative to normal controls. Plasma protein fructosyl-lysine, a marker of early glycation, was found by amino acid analysis to be in equal amounts in control and non-diabetic AMD donors, supporting an association between AMD and increased levels of CML and pentosidine independent of other diseases like diabetes. Carboxyethylpyrrole (CEP), an oxidative modification from docosahexaenoate-containing lipids and also abundant in AMD Bruch membrane, was elevated ∼86% in the AMD cohort, but autoantibody titers to CEP, CML, and pentosidine were not significantly increased. Compellingly higher mean levels of CML and pentosidine were present in AMD plasma protein over a broad age range. Receiver operating curves indicate that CML, CEP adducts, and pentosidine alone discriminated between AMD and control subjects with 78, 79, and 88% accuracy, respectively, whereas CML in combination with pentosidine provided ∼89% accuracy, and CEP plus pentosidine provided ∼92% accuracy. Pentosidine levels appeared slightly altered in AMD patients with hypertension and cardiovascular disease, indicating further studies are warranted. Overall this study supports the potential utility of plasma protein CML and pentosidine as biomarkers for assessing AMD risk and susceptibility, particularly in combination with CEP

  12. Cardiovascular-related proteins identified in human plasma by the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project pilot phase.

    PubMed

    Berhane, Beniam T; Zong, Chenggong; Liem, David A; Huang, Aaron; Le, Steven; Edmondson, Ricky D; Jones, Richard C; Qiao, Xin; Whitelegge, Julian P; Ping, Peipei; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2005-08-01

    Proteomic profiling of accessible bodily fluids, such as plasma, has the potential to accelerate biomarker/biosignature development for human diseases. The HUPO Plasma Proteome Project pilot phase examined human plasma with distinct proteomic approaches across multiple laboratories worldwide. Through this effort, we confidently identified 3020 proteins, each requiring a minimum of two high-scoring MS/MS spectra. A critical step subsequent to protein identification is functional annotation, in particular with regard to organ systems and disease. Performing exhaustive literature searches, we have manually annotated a subset of these 3020 proteins that have cardiovascular-related functions on the basis of an existing body of published information. These cardiovascular-related proteins can be organized into eight groups: markers of inflammation and/or cardiovascular disease, vascular and coagulation, signaling, growth and differentiation, cytoskeletal, transcription factors, channels/receptors and heart failure and remodeling. In addition, analysis of the peptide per protein ratio for MS/MS identification reveals group-specific trends. These findings serve as a resource to interrogate the functions of plasma proteins, and moreover, the list of cardiovascular-related proteins in plasma constitutes a baseline proteomic blueprint for the future development of biosignatures for diseases such as myocardial ischemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:16052623

  13. Plasma proteins in children with trichuris dysentery syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, E S; Ramdath, D D; Whyte-Alleng, C; Howell, S; Serjeant, B E

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To determine whether in Trichuris trichiura dysentery there is (1) evidence of a systemic inflammatory response, (2) evidence that the plasma protein disturbance has special characteristics compared with uninfected children in the endemic environment. METHODS: Three groups of children (age 1.6 to 11.4 years) were studied: 53 cases of trichuris dysentery syndrome (TDS), 16 cases of chronic non-secretory diarrhoea not infected with the parasite ("disease controls", DC), and 20 asymptomatic, parasite-free primary schoolchildren (normal controls, NC). C reactive protein, alpha 1 antitrypsin, caeruloplasmin, albumin, total globulin, fibrinogen, fibronectin, ferritin, and transferrin were measured on a single occasion for each. The study was thus a cross sectional descriptive survey for group comparison. Plasma viscosity was measured on admission for TDS and DC and repeated after six weeks and six months for TDS. RESULTS: Plasma C reactive protein, alpha 1 antitrypsin, total globulin, fibronectin, and viscosity were significantly higher in TDS than in NC. DC children also had acute phase protein elevations (C reactive protein, caeruloplasmin, viscosity). However, the increase in caeruloplasmin was specific to the DC group while an increase in fibronectin was specific to the TDS group. Serial measurement of viscosity in TDS showed a modest but significant fall during the six months following treatment. CONCLUSIONS: There is an acute phase response in intense trichuriasis and a specific elevation of plasma fibronectin. Plasma viscosity remains abnormally high six months after treatment, although lower than at diagnosis. Images PMID:9155675

  14. Simplified and efficient quantification of low-abundance proteins at very high multiplex via targeted mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Michael W; Keshishian, Hasmik; Mani, D R; Gillette, Michael A; Carr, Steven A

    2014-04-01

    Liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-MRM-MS) of plasma that has been depleted of abundant proteins and fractionated at the peptide level into six to eight fractions is a proven method for quantifying proteins present at low nanogram-per-milliliter levels. A drawback of fraction-MRM is the increased analysis time due to the generation of multiple fractions per biological sample. We now report that the use of heated, long, fused silica columns (>30 cm) packed with 1.9 μm of packing material can reduce or eliminate the need for fractionation prior to LC-MRM-MS without a significant loss of sensitivity or precision relative to fraction-MRM. We empirically determined the optimal column length, temperature, gradient duration, and sample load for such assays and used these conditions to study detection sensitivity and assay precision. In addition to increased peak capacity, longer columns packed with smaller beads tolerated a 4- to 6-fold increase in analyte load without a loss of robustness or reproducibility. The longer columns also provided a 4-fold improvement in median limit-of-quantitation values with increased assay precision relative to the standard 12 cm columns packed with 3 μm material. Overall, the optimized chromatography provided an approximately 3-fold increase in analysis throughput with excellent robustness and less than a 2-fold reduction in quantitative sensitivity relative to fraction-MRM. The value of the system for increased multiplexing was demonstrated by the ability to configure an 800-plex MRM-MS assay, run in a single analysis, comprising 2400 transitions with retention time scheduling to monitor 400 unlabeled and heavy labeled peptide pairs. PMID:24522978

  15. Protein polymorphism of a human plasma apolipoprotein D antigenic epitope.

    PubMed

    Camato, R; Marcel, Y L; Milne, R W; Lussier-Cacan, S; Weech, P K

    1989-06-01

    Based on our previous observation that monoclonal antibody anti-apoD-4E11 reacted with several HDL proteins we studied them further with three questions in mind: i) is there common protein polymorphism in healthy individuals? ii) how many proteins are present and what are their characteristics? iii) are they all apolipoproteins and do they have the same lipoprotein distribution as apoD? Isolated, delipidated apoD was used as a standard for radioimmunometric assay of plasma with antibody 4E11. The antigen varied from 3 to 11 mumol-equivalents of apoD per liter of plasma (equivalent to 5-20 mg apoD/dl plasma) with means of 6.1 and 6.8 mumol/l in men and women, respectively. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of plasma found up to eight 4E11-antigenic-proteins of different Mr, each heterogeneous in pI. All plasmas tested contained apoD and an Mr 38,000 antigen, the latter being the most immunoreactive. Six proteins of Mr 70,000-94,000 were found, but the number varied between subjects. Eighty nine percent of the plasma antigen was associated with lipoproteins: 83% with HDL and VHDL, 5% with LDL and VLDL. Lipoproteins of all sizes, separated by polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis, contained the antigen. ApoD was almost the only 4E11-antigen in LDL, and was in two states: the one free, the other an apoD-apoB mixed disulfide complex. The apparent proportions of higher Mr antigens increased with increasing lipoprotein density, and the proportion of apoD decreased reciprocally. None of these 4E11-antigenic-proteins cross-reacted with antiserum to retinol-binding protein. PMID:2477480

  16. Effect of ultrasonic stimulation on mRNA abundance of uncoupling protein (UCP) 2 and UCP 3 in gastrocnemius muscle of rats.

    PubMed

    Kogure, Akinori; Yoshida, Toshihide; Takakura, Yasuto; Umekawa, Tsunekazu; Hioki, Chizuko; Yoshioka, Keiji; Yoshimoto, Kanji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2005-01-01

    1. The hypothesis that ultrasonic stimulation upregulates uncoupling protein (UCP) 2 and UCP3 in gastrocnemius muscle by a different mechanism of exercise was investigated in Wister rats. 2. The ultrasnonic-stimulated group was given ultrasonic stimulation to the leg (1 MHz frequency, 1 W/cm2 intensity, 10 min continuously). 3. The exercise group was given exercise training by swimming for 10 min in plastic barrels filled with warm water. 4. After 3 h, rats were killed and the gastrocnemius muscle was removed rapidly, weighed and frozen in liquid nitrogen for real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. 5. In gastrocnenius muscles of ultrasonic-stimulated rats, UCP3 mRNA abundance was significantly increased 3.6-fold and UCP2 mRNA abundance was significantly increased 2.2-fold compared with control rats. 6. In gastrocnenius muscles of exercised rats, UCP3 mRNA abundance was significantly increased 3.5-fold compared with control rats, but no change in UCP2 mRNA abundance was observed. 7. Plasma free fatty acid (FFA) levels were also significantly increased in the ultrasonic stimulation group, as well as the exercise group, compared with the control group. 8. These findings show that ultrasonic stimulation lipolyses subcutaneous fat into FFA and glycerol and upregulates UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA by a mechanism different to that of exercise. PMID:15730441

  17. Ubiquitous Autofragmentation of Fluorescent Proteins Creates Abundant Defective Ribosomal Products (DRiPs) for Immunosurveillance.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiajie; Gibbs, James S; Hickman, Heather D; Cush, Stephanie S; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W

    2015-06-26

    broadly, given the wide use of fluorescent proteins, their ubiquitous and abundant fragmentation must be considered when interpreting experiments using these extremely useful probes. PMID:25971973

  18. Ubiquitous Autofragmentation of Fluorescent Proteins Creates Abundant Defective Ribosomal Products (DRiPs) for Immunosurveillance*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jiajie; Gibbs, James S.; Hickman, Heather D.; Cush, Stephanie S.; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    broadly, given the wide use of fluorescent proteins, their ubiquitous and abundant fragmentation must be considered when interpreting experiments using these extremely useful probes. PMID:25971973

  19. Plasma protein profiling of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease across two independent cohorts.

    PubMed

    Muenchhoff, Julia; Poljak, Anne; Song, Fei; Raftery, Mark; Brodaty, Henry; Duncan, Mark; McEvoy, Mark; Attia, John; Schofield, Peter W; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2015-01-01

    To unlock the full potential of disease modifying treatments, it is essential to develop early biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD). For practical reasons, blood-based markers that could provide a signal at the stage of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or even earlier would be ideal. Using the proteomic approach of isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ), we compared the plasma protein profiles of MCI, AD, and cognitively normal control subjects from two independent cohorts: the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study (261 MCI subjects, 24 AD subjects, 411 controls) and the Hunter Community Study (180 MCI subjects, 153 controls). The objective was to identify any proteins that are differentially abundant in MCI and AD plasma in both cohorts, since they might be of interest as potential biomarkers, or could help direct future mechanistic studies. Proteins representative of biological processes relevant to AD pathology, such as the complement system, the coagulation cascade, lipid metabolism, and metal and vitamin D and E transport, were found to differ in abundance in MCI. In particular, levels of complement regulators C1 inhibitor and factor H, fibronectin, ceruloplasmin, and vitamin D-binding protein were significantly decreased in MCI participants from both cohorts. Several apolipoproteins, including apolipoprotein AIV, B-100, and H were also significantly decreased in MCI. Most of these proteins have previously been reported as potential biomarkers for AD; however, we show for the first time that a significant decrease in plasma levels of two potential biomarkers (fibronectin and C1 inhibitor) is evident at the MCI stage. PMID:25159666

  20. Modelling of NO destruction in a low-pressure reactor by an Ar plasma jet: species abundances in the reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutasi, Kinga

    2011-03-01

    The destruction of NO molecules by an Ar plasma jet in a low-pressure (0.2 Torr) reactor is investigated by means of a 3D hydrodynamic model. The density distribution of species created through molecular kinetics triggered by the collision of Ar+ with NO is calculated, showing that in the case of the most abundant species a quasi-homogeneous density distribution builds up in a large part of the reactor. The conversion of NO into stable O2 and N2 molecules is followed under different plasma jet conditions and NO gas flows, and the effect of N2 addition on NO destruction is studied. It is shown that in the present system the reproduction of NO molecules on the surface through surface-assisted recombination of N and O atoms becomes impossible due to the fast disappearance of N atoms in the jet's inlet vicinity.

  1. Instability of the biotin-protein bond in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Bogusiewicz, Anna; Mock, Nell I; Mock, Donald M

    2004-04-15

    Labeling proteins with biotin offers an alternative to labeling with radioisotopes for pharmacokinetic studies in humans. However, stability of the biotin-protein bond is a critical tacit assumption. Using release of biotin from immunoglobulin G as the outcome, we individually evaluated stability of the biotin label produced by six biotinylation agents: biotin PEO-amine, 5-(biotinamido)-pentylamine, iodoacetyl-LC-biotin, NHS-LC-biotin, sulfo-NHS-LC-biotin, and biotin-LC-hydrazide. Each of the six biotinylated proteins was incubated at room temperature for 4h in human plasma or in phosphate-buffered saline (control). Free biotin was separated from the biotinylated protein by ultrafiltration and quantitated by avidin-binding assay. For each biotinylation reagent, biotin release was significantly increased by plasma (p < 0.0001 vs control by unpaired t test). Moreover, the hydrazide bond was also unstable in buffer. Biotin remaining on the protein was quantitated directly using capture of europium-streptavidin by the immobilized biotinylated immunoglobulin G. Consistent with biotin release data, streptavidin capture was reduced by plasma to 8% of control. We conclude that all of the biotinylating agents produce biotin-protein bonds that are susceptible to hydrolysis by factors present in human plasma; five of six are stable in buffer. PMID:15051531

  2. Characterization of mercury-containing protein in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Yun, Zhaojun; Li, Lu; Liu, Lihong; He, Bin; Zhao, Xingchen; Jiang, Guibin

    2013-06-01

    Characterization of mercury binding protein in the human body is very important for understanding the metabolism and the mechanism of toxication of ingested mercuric compounds. In this study, mercury-containing protein in human plasma was separated by on-line heart-cutting two-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography (2D-HPLC). This 2D separation system used size exclusion liquid chromatography (SEC) followed by weak anion exchange liquid chromatography (WAX) and the two LC parts were coupled by a six-port valve equipped with a storage loop and controled by the computer. The WAX effluent was determined by both UV detection and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to locate the mercury-containing protein. A unique mercury-containing protein fraction was obtained by 2D-HPLC separation and subsequently identified by HPLC coupled with linear ion trap-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (HPLC-LTQ-FT). The database search confirmed that the mercury-containing protein in the human plasma is human serum albumin (HSA). The stoichiometry and thermodyamics interaction of inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) with HSA was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and two binding types were observed. Mercury-containing protein in human plasma was separated and identified in the present study and it is important for understanding the metabolism of mercury in the human body. PMID:23748885

  3. The freshwater Amazonian stingray, Potamotrygon motoro, up-regulates glutamine synthetase activity and protein abundance, and accumulates glutamine when exposed to brackish (15 per thousand) water.

    PubMed

    Ip, Y K; Loong, A M; Ching, B; Tham, G H Y; Wong, W P; Chew, S F

    2009-12-01

    This study aimed to examine whether the stenohaline freshwater stingray, Potamotrygon motoro, which lacks a functional ornithine-urea cycle, would up-regulate glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and protein abundance, and accumulate glutamine during a progressive transfer from freshwater to brackish (15 per thousand) water with daily feeding. Our results revealed that, similar to other freshwater teleosts, P. motoro performed hyperosmotic regulation, with very low urea concentrations in plasma and tissues, in freshwater. In 15 per thousand water, it was non-ureotelic and non-ureoosmotic, acting mainly as an osmoconformer with its plasma osmolality, [Na+] and [Cl-] comparable to those of the external medium. There were significant increases in the content of several free amino acids (FAAs), including glutamate, glutamine and glycine, in muscle and liver, but not in plasma, indicating that FAAs could contribute in part to cell volume regulation. Furthermore, exposure of P. motoro to 15 per thousand water led to up-regulation of GS activity and protein abundance in both liver and muscle. Thus, our results indicate for the first time that, despite the inability to synthesize urea and the lack of functional carbamoyl phosphate synthetase III (CPS III) which uses glutamine as a substrate, P. motoro retained the capacity to up-regulate the activity and protein expression of GS in response to salinity stress. Potamotrygon motoro was not nitrogen (N) limited when exposed to 15 per thousand water with feeding, and there were no significant changes in the amination and deamination activities of hepatic glutamate dehydrogenase. In contrast, P. motoro became N limited when exposed to 10 per thousand water with fasting and could not survive well in 15 per thousand water without food. PMID:19915125

  4. The nano-plasma interface: implications of the protein corona

    PubMed Central

    Wolfram, Joy; Yang, Yong; Shen, Jianliang; Moten, Asad; Chen, Chunying; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Zhao, Yuliang

    2014-01-01

    The interactions between nanoparticles and macromolecules in the blood plasma dictate the biocompatibility and efficacy of nanotherapeutics. Accordingly, the properties of nanoparticles and endogenous biomolecules change at the nano-plasma interface. Here, we review the implications of such changes including toxicity, immunological recognition, molecular targeting, biodistribution, intracellular uptake, and drug release. Although this interface poses several challenges for nanomedicine, it also presents opportunities for exploiting nanoparticle-protein interactions. PMID:24656615

  5. The nano-plasma interface: Implications of the protein corona.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Joy; Yang, Yong; Shen, Jianliang; Moten, Asad; Chen, Chunying; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Zhao, Yuliang

    2014-12-01

    The interactions between nanoparticles and macromolecules in the blood plasma dictate the biocompatibility and efficacy of nanotherapeutics. Accordingly, the properties of nanoparticles and endogenous biomolecules change at the nano-plasma interface. Here, we review the implications of such changes including toxicity, immunological recognition, molecular targeting, biodistribution, intracellular uptake, and drug release. Although this interface poses several challenges for nanomedicine, it also presents opportunities for exploiting nanoparticle-protein interactions. PMID:24656615

  6. Adsorption kinetics of plasma proteins on ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jansch, M; Stumpf, P; Graf, C; Rühl, E; Müller, R H

    2012-05-30

    In this study the kinetics of plasma protein adsorption onto ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles have been analyzed and compared to previously published kinetic studies on polystyrene particles (PS particles), oil-in-water nanoemulsions and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs). SPIO and USPIO nanoparticles are commonly used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhancers for tumor imaging as well as in drug delivery applications. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) has been used to determine the plasma protein adsorption onto the citrate/triethylene glycol-stabilized iron oxide surface. The results indicate that the existence of a Vroman effect, a displacement of previously adsorbed abundant proteins, such as albumin or fibrinogen, respectively, on USPIO particles has to be denied. Previously, identical findings have been reported for oil-in-water nanoemulsions. Furthermore, the protein adsorption kinetics differs dramatically from that of other solid drug delivery systems (PS, SLN). More relevant for the in vivo fate of long circulating particles is the protein corona after several minutes or even hours. Interestingly, the patterns received after an incubation time of 0.5 min to 240 min are found to be qualitatively and quantitatively similar. This leads to the assumption of a long-lived ("hard") protein corona around the iron oxide nanoparticles. PMID:22342465

  7. Drug-drug plasma protein binding interactions of ivacaftor.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Elena K; Huang, Johnny X; Carbone, Vincenzo; Baker, Mark; Azad, Mohammad A K; Cooper, Matthew A; Li, Jian; Velkov, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Ivacaftor is a novel cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiator that improves the pulmonary function for patients with CF bearing a G551D CFTR-protein mutation. Because ivacaftor is highly bound (>97%) to plasma proteins, there is the strong possibility that co-administered CF drugs may compete for the same plasma protein binding sites and impact the free drug concentration. This, in turn, could lead to drastic changes in the in vivo efficacy of ivacaftor and therapeutic outcomes. This biochemical study compares the binding affinity of ivacaftor and co-administered CF drugs for human serum albumin (HSA) and α1 -acid glycoprotein (AGP) using surface plasmon resonance and fluorimetric binding assays that measure the displacement of site-selective probes. Because of their ability to strongly compete for the ivacaftor binding sites on HSA and AGP, drug-drug interactions between ivacaftor are to be expected with ducosate, montelukast, ibuprofen, dicloxacillin, omeprazole, and loratadine. The significance of these plasma protein drug-drug interactions is also interpreted in terms of molecular docking simulations. This in vitro study provides valuable insights into the plasma protein drug-drug interactions of ivacaftor with co-administered CF drugs. The data may prove useful in future clinical trials for a staggered treatment that aims to maximize the effective free drug concentration and clinical efficacy of ivacaftor. PMID:25707701

  8. Supramolecular Structures with Blood Plasma Proteins, Sugars and Nanosilica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turov, V. V.; Gun'ko, V. M.; Galagan, N. P.; Rugal, A. A.; Barvinchenko, V. M.; Gorbyk, P. P.

    Supramolecular structures with blood plasma proteins (albumin, immunoglobulin and fibrinogen (HPF)), protein/water/silica and protein/water/ silica/sugar (glucose, fructose and saccharose) were studied by NMR, adsorption, IR and UV spectroscopy methods. Hydration parameters, amounts of weakly and strongly bound waters and interfacial energy (γ S) were determined over a wide range of component concentrations. The γ S(C protein,C silica) graphs were used to estimate the energy of protein-protein, protein-surface and particle-particle interactions. It was shown that interfacial energy of self-association (γ as) of protein molecules depends on a type of proteins. A large fraction of water bound to proteins can be displaced by sugars, and the effect of disaccharide (saccharose) was greater than that of monosugars. Changes in the structural parameters of cavities in HPF molecules and complexes with HPF/silica nanoparticles filled by bound water were analysed using NMR-cryoporometry showing that interaction of proteins with silica leads to a significant decrease in the amounts of water bound to both protein and silica surfaces. Bionanocomposites with BSA/nanosilica/sugar can be used to influence states of living cells and tissues after cryopreservation or other treatments. It was shown that interaction of proteins with silica leads to strong decrease in the volume of all types of internal cavities filled by water.

  9. Dextrose-mediated aggregation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in human plasma: Implication of isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are clinically administered through intravenous infusion after mixing with a diluent, e.g., saline, 5% dextrose. Such a clinical setting increases the likelihood of interactions among mAb molecules, diluent, and plasma components, which may adversely affect product safety and efficacy. Avastin® (bevacizumab) and Herceptin® (trastuzumab), but not Remicade® (infliximab), were shown to undergo rapid aggregation upon dilution into 5% dextrose when mixed with human plasma in vitro; however, the biochemical pathways leading to the aggregation were not clearly defined. Here, we show that dextrose-mediated aggregation of Avastin or Herceptin in plasma involves isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins. Using mass spectrometry, we found that dextrose-induced insoluble aggregates were composed of mAb itself and multiple abundant plasma proteins, namely complement proteins C3, C4, factor H, fibronectin, and apolipoprotein. These plasma proteins, which are characterized by an isoelectronic point of 5.5–6.7, lost solubility at the resulting pH in the mixture with formulated Avastin (pH 6.2) and Herceptin (pH 6.0). Notably, switching formulation buffers for Avastin (pH 6.2) and Remicade (pH 7.2) reversed their aggregation profiles. Avastin formed little, if any, insoluble aggregates in dextrose-plasma upon raising the buffer pH to 7.2 or above. Furthermore, dextrose induced pH-dependent precipitation of plasma proteins, with massive insoluble aggregates being detected at pH 6.5–6.8. These data show that isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins is a prerequisite of dextrose-induced aggregation of mAb in human plasma. This finding highlights the importance of assessing the compatibility of a therapeutic mAb with diluent and human plasma during product development. PMID:26338058

  10. Brugia malayi abundant larval transcript 2 protein treatment attenuates experimentally-induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Vishal; Amdare, Nitin; Yadav, Ravi Shankar; Tarnekar, Aaditya; Goswami, Kalyan; Reddy, Maryada Venkata Rami

    2015-11-01

    Helminths are known to modulate host's immunity by suppressing host protective pro-inflammatory responses. Such immunomodulatory effects have been experimentally shown to have therapeutic implications in immune mediated disorders. In the present study, we have explored a filarial protein i.e. Brugia malayi recombinant abundant larval transcript 2 (rBmALT2) for its therapeutic effect in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induced colitis in mouse model. The immunomodulatory activity of rBmALT-2 was initially confirmed by demonstrating that it suppressed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced nitric oxide synthesis and down-regulated the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro by peritoneal exudate cells of mice. Treatment with rBmALT2 reduced severity of colitis associated with significant reduction in weight loss, disease activity, colon damage, mucosal edema and histopathological score including myeloperoxidase activity in colon tissues. rBmALT2 was comparatively more effective in attenuation of colitis when used in the preventive mode than when used for curative purpose. The therapeutic effect of rBmALT2 was found to be associated with downregulation of IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-17 and upregulation of IL-10 cytokines. These results provide strong experimental evidence that BmALT2 could be a potential alternative therapeutic agent in colitis. PMID:26669016

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of microalgae based on highly abundant proteins using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Won; Roh, Seong Woon; Cho, Kichul; Kim, Kil-Nam; Cha, In-Tae; Yim, Kyung June; Song, Hye Seon; Nam, Young-Do; Oda, Tatsuya; Chung, Young-Ho; Kim, Soo Jung; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kim, Daekyung

    2015-01-01

    The blooms of toxic phototrophic microorganisms, such as microalgae and cyanobacteria, which are typically found in freshwater and marine environments, are becoming more frequent and problematic in aquatic systems. Due to accumulation of toxic algae, harmful algal blooms (HABs) exert negative effects on aquatic systems. Therefore, rapid detection of harmful microalgae is important for monitoring the occurrence of HABs. Mass spectrometry-based methods have become sensitive, specific techniques for the identification and characterization of microorganisms. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) allows us to measure a unique molecular fingerprint of highly abundant proteins in a microorganism and has been used for the rapid, accurate identification of bacteria and fungi in clinical microbiology. Here, we tested the specificity of MALDI-TOF MS using microalgal strains (Heterocapsa, Alexandrium, Nannochloropsis, Chaetoceros, Chlorella, and Dunaliella spp.). Our research suggested that this method was comparable in terms of the rapid identification of microalgea to conventional methods based on genetic information and morphology. Thus, this efficient mass spectrometry-based technique may have applications in the rapid identification of harmful microorganisms from aquatic environmental samples. PMID:25476355

  12. Increased microRNA-34c abundance in Alzheimer's disease circulating blood plasma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Shephali; Chertkow, Howard; Schipper, Hyman M.; Yuan, Zongfei; Shetty, Vikranth; Jenkins, Samantha; Jones, Timothy; Wang, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs, present either in the cellular component, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), or in cell-free plasma, have emerged as biomarkers for age-dependent systemic, disease-associated changes in many organs. Previously, we have shown that microRNA (miR)-34a is increased in circulating PBMC of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. In the present study, we show that this microRNA's sister, miR-34c, exhibits even greater increase in both cellular and plasma components of AD circulating blood samples, compared to normal age-matched controls. Statistical analysis shows the accuracy of levels of miR-34c assayed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis: the area under the curve is 0.99 (p < 0.0001) and the 95% confidence level extends from 0.97 to 1. Pearson correlation between miR-34c levels and mild and moderate AD, as defined by the mini-mental state examination (MMSE), shows an r-value of −0.7, suggesting a relatively strong inverse relationship between the two parameters. These data show that plasma levels of microRNA 34c are much more prominent in AD than those of its sister, miR-34a, or than its own level in PBMC. Transfection studies show that miR-34c, as does its sister miR-34a, represses the expression of several selected genes involved in cell survival and oxidative defense pathways, such as Bcl2, SIRT1, and others, in cultured cells. Taken together, our results indicate that increased levels of miR-34c in both PBMC and plasma may reflect changes in circulating blood samples in AD patients, compared to age-matched normal controls. PMID:24550773

  13. Experience With a Hepatitis-free Plasma Protein Solution

    PubMed Central

    Salsbury, A. J.; Brozovich, M.

    1968-01-01

    Clinical experience with a 4.3% solution of plasma protein treated to render it free of the agent of serum hepatitis is satisfactory. Sixty-seven transfusions of 400 ml. of the commercial preparation were given to 33 patients (25 with acute blood loss, 4 with severe burns, and 4 with hypoproteinaemia secondary to hepatic or renal disease). The solution was clinically as effective as reconstituted dried plasma in expanding plasma volume and in replacing serum protein lost in burns. Adverse effects were mild pyrexial reactions in one case and facial flushing in another. No cases of serum hepatitis occurred. The solution is available for immediate use, it can be kept at room temperature, and, as it does not cause rouleaux formation, it can be given before blood is taken for grouping and cross-matching. PMID:5662990

  14. Combining subproteome enrichment and Rubisco depletion enables identification of low abundance proteins differentially regulated during plant defense.

    PubMed

    Widjaja, Ivy; Naumann, Kai; Roth, Udo; Wolf, Noreen; Mackey, David; Dangl, Jeffery L; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Transgenic Arabidopsis conditionally expressing the bacterial avrRpm1 type III effector under the control of a dexamethasone-responsive promoter were used for proteomics studies. This model system permits study of an individual effector without interference from additional bacterial components. Coupling of different prefractionation approaches to high resolution 2-DE facilitated the discovery of low abundance proteins - enabling the identification of proteins that have escaped detection in similar experiments. A total of 34 differentially regulated protein spots were identified. Four of these (a remorin, a protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C), an RNA-binding protein, and a C2-domain-containing protein) are potentially early signaling components in the interaction between AvrRpm1 and the cognate disease resistance gene product, resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola 1 (RPM1). For the remorin and RNA-binding protein, involvement of PTM and post-transcriptional regulation are implicated, respectively. PMID:19053141

  15. CYCLoPs: A Comprehensive Database Constructed from Automated Analysis of Protein Abundance and Subcellular Localization Patterns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Judice L. Y.; Chong, Yolanda T.; Friesen, Helena; Moses, Alan; Boone, Charles; Andrews, Brenda J.; Moffat, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Changes in protein subcellular localization and abundance are central to biological regulation in eukaryotic cells. Quantitative measures of protein dynamics in vivo are therefore highly useful for elucidating specific regulatory pathways. Using a combinatorial approach of yeast synthetic genetic array technology, high-content screening, and machine learning classifiers, we developed an automated platform to characterize protein localization and abundance patterns from images of log phase cells from the open-reading frame−green fluorescent protein collection in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. For each protein, we produced quantitative profiles of localization scores for 16 subcellular compartments at single-cell resolution to trace proteome-wide relocalization in conditions over time. We generated a collection of ∼300,000 micrographs, comprising more than 20 million cells and ∼9 billion quantitative measurements. The images depict the localization and abundance dynamics of more than 4000 proteins under two chemical treatments and in a selected mutant background. Here, we describe CYCLoPs (Collection of Yeast Cells Localization Patterns), a web database resource that provides a central platform for housing and analyzing our yeast proteome dynamics datasets at the single cell level. CYCLoPs version 1.0 is available at http://cyclops.ccbr.utoronto.ca. CYCLoPs will provide a valuable resource for the yeast and eukaryotic cell biology communities and will be updated as new experiments become available. PMID:26048563

  16. A rapid method for depletion of Rubisco from soybean (Glycine max) leaf for proteomic analysis of lower abundance proteins.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Hari B; Natarajan, Savithiry S

    2009-12-01

    2-DE analysis of complex plant proteomes has limited dynamic resolution because only abundant proteins can be detected. Proteomic assessment of the low abundance proteins within leaf tissue is difficult when it is comprised of 30-50% of the CO(2) fixation enzyme Rubisco. Resolution can be improved through depletion of Rubisco using fractionation techniques based upon different physiological or biochemical principles. We have developed a fast and simple fractionation technique using 10 mM Ca(2+) and 10 mM phytate to precipitate Rubisco from soybean leaf soluble protein extract. This method is not only rapid, but also inexpensive, and capable of removing 85% of the extremely abundant Rubisco enzyme from soybean leaf soluble protein extract. This method allowed for roughly 230 previously inconspicuous protein spots in soybean leaf to be more easily detectable (3-fold increase in vol%) using fluorescent detection and allowed 28 phosphorylated proteins previously undetected, to be isolated and identified by MALDI-TOF-MS. PMID:19766275

  17. A major integral protein of the plant plasma membrane binds flavin.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Astrid; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Hertel, Rainer

    2003-05-01

    Abundant flavin binding sites have been found in membranes of plants and fungi. With flavin mononucleotide-agarose affinity columns, riboflavin-binding activity from microsomes of Cucurbita pepoL. hypocotyls was purified and identified as a specific PIP1-homologous protein of the aquaporin family. Sequences such as gi|2149955 in Phaseolus vulgaris, PIP1b of Arabidopsis thaliana, and NtAQP1 of tobacco are closely related. The identification as a riboflavin-binding protein was confirmed by binding tests with an extract of Escherichia coli cells expressing the tobacco NtAQP1 as well as leaves of transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress NtAQP1 or were inhibited in PIP1 expression by antisense constructs. When binding was assayed in the presence of dithionite, the reduced flavin formed a relatively stable association with the protein. Upon dilution under oxidizing conditions, the adduct was resolved, and free flavin reappeared with a half time of about 30 min. Such an association can also be induced photochemically, with oxidized flavin by blue light at 450 nm, in the presence of an electron donor. Several criteria, localization in the plasma membrane, high abundance, affinity to roseoflavin, and photochemistry, argue for a role of the riboflavin-binding protein PIP1 as a photoreceptor. PMID:12768338

  18. Overexpression of BAX INHIBITOR-1 Links Plasma Membrane Microdomain Proteins to Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toshiki; Aki, Toshihiko; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Uchimiya, Hirofumi; Kawai-Yamada, Maki

    2015-01-01

    BAX INHIBITOR-1 (BI-1) is a cell death suppressor widely conserved in plants and animals. Overexpression of BI-1 enhances tolerance to stress-induced cell death in plant cells, although the molecular mechanism behind this enhancement is unclear. We recently found that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BI-1 is involved in the metabolism of sphingolipids, such as the synthesis of 2-hydroxy fatty acids, suggesting the involvement of sphingolipids in the cell death regulatory mechanism downstream of BI-1. Here, we show that BI-1 affects cell death-associated components localized in sphingolipid-enriched microdomains of the plasma membrane in rice (Oryza sativa) cells. The amount of 2-hydroxy fatty acid-containing glucosylceramide increased in the detergent-resistant membrane (DRM; a biochemical counterpart of plasma membrane microdomains) fraction obtained from BI-1-overexpressing rice cells. Comparative proteomics analysis showed quantitative changes of DRM proteins in BI-1-overexpressing cells. In particular, the protein abundance of FLOTILLIN HOMOLOG (FLOT) and HYPERSENSITIVE-INDUCED REACTION PROTEIN3 (HIR3) markedly decreased in DRM of BI-1-overexpressing cells. Loss-of-function analysis demonstrated that FLOT and HIR3 are required for cell death by oxidative stress and salicylic acid, suggesting that the decreased levels of these proteins directly contribute to the stress-tolerant phenotypes in BI-1-overexpressing rice cells. These findings provide a novel biological implication of plant membrane microdomains in stress-induced cell death, which is negatively modulated by BI-1 overexpression via decreasing the abundance of a set of key proteins involved in cell death. PMID:26297139

  19. Prediction of colorectal cancer diagnosis based on circulating plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Surinova, Silvia; Choi, Meena; Tao, Sha; Schüffler, Peter J; Chang, Ching-Yun; Clough, Timothy; Vysloužil, Kamil; Khoylou, Marta; Srovnal, Josef; Liu, Yansheng; Matondo, Mariette; Hüttenhain, Ruth; Weisser, Hendrik; Buhmann, Joachim M; Hajdúch, Marián; Brenner, Hermann; Vitek, Olga; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-09-01

    Non-invasive detection of colorectal cancer with blood-based markers is a critical clinical need. Here we describe a phased mass spectrometry-based approach for the discovery, screening, and validation of circulating protein biomarkers with diagnostic value. Initially, we profiled human primary tumor tissue epithelia and characterized about 300 secreted and cell surface candidate glycoproteins. These candidates were then screened in patient systemic circulation to identify detectable candidates in blood plasma. An 88-plex targeting method was established to systematically monitor these proteins in two large and independent cohorts of plasma samples, which generated quantitative clinical datasets at an unprecedented scale. The data were deployed to develop and evaluate a five-protein biomarker signature for colorectal cancer detection. PMID:26253081

  20. Ion Energy Distributions and their Relative Abundance in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J. S.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cappelli, M. A.; Sharma, S. P.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Study of kinetics of ions and neutrals produced in high density inductively coupled plasma (ICP) discharges is of great importance for achieving a high degree of plasma assisted deposition and etching. In this paper, we present the ion energy distributions (IEDs) of various ions arriving at the grounded lower electrode. The ions were energy as well as mass analyzed by a combination of electrostatic analyzer-quadrupole mass spectrometer for pure Ar and CF4/Ar mixtures. The measurements have been made at gas pressures ranging from 30 to 100 mTorr. In addition, the IEDs were measured when the wafer-supporting electrode was also rf-powered and the effect of the self-bias was observed in the energy distributions of ions. The shapes of the IEDs are discussed an related to the sheath properties and measured electrical waveforms, as a function of pressure and applied power. Relative ion intensities were obtained by integration of each ion kinetic energy distribution function over its energy range.

  1. Disproportional changes in hematocrit, plasma volume, and proteins during exercise and bed rest.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Beaumont, W.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Juhos, L.

    1972-01-01

    The interrelationships between the changes in plasma volume, hematocrit, and plasma proteins during muscular exercise and bed rest were investigated. Proportionally, the changes in hematocrit are always smaller than the changes in plasma volume. For this reason changes in the concentration of blood constituents can only be quantitated on the basis of plasma volume changes. During short periods of intensive exercise, there was a small loss of plasma proteins. With prolonged submaximal exercise there was a net gain in plasma protein, which contributes to stabilization of the vascular volume. Prolonged bed rest induced hypoproteinemia; this loss of plasma protein probably plays an important role in recumbency hypovolemia.

  2. Alteration in abundance of specific membrane proteins of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is attributed to deletion of the inner membrane protein MorC

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kenneth P.; Fields, Julia G.; Voogt, Richard D.; Deng, Bin; Lam, Ying-Wai; Mintz, Keith P.

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an important pathogen in the etiology of human periodontal and systemic diseases. Inactivation of the gene coding for the inner membrane protein, morphogenesis protein C (MorC), results is pleotropic effects pertaining to the membrane structure and function of this bacterium. The role of this protein in membrane biogenesis is unknown. To begin to understand the role of this conserved protein, stable isotope dimethyl labeling in conjunction with mass spectrometry was used to quantitatively analyze differences in the membrane proteomes of the isogenic mutant and wild-type strain. A total of 613 proteins were quantified and 601 of these proteins were found to be equal in abundance between the two strains. The remaining 12 proteins were found in lesser (10) or greater (2) abundance in the membrane preparation of the mutant strain compared with the wild-type strain. The 12 proteins were ascribed functions associated with protein quality control systems, oxidative stress responses, and protein secretion. The potential relationship between these proteins and the phenotypes of the morC mutant strain is discussed. PMID:25684173

  3. Poly(A) binding protein abundance regulates eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F assembly in human cytomegalovirus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Caleb; Perez, Cesar; Mohr, Ian

    2012-04-10

    By commandeering cellular translation initiation factors, or destroying those dispensable for viral mRNA translation, viruses often suppress host protein synthesis. In contrast, cellular protein synthesis proceeds in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-infected cells, forcing viral and cellular mRNAs to compete for limiting translation initiation factors. Curiously, inactivating the host translational repressor 4E-BP1 in HCMV-infected cells stimulates synthesis of the cellular poly(A) binding protein (PABP), significantly increasing PABP abundance. Here, we establish that new PABP synthesis is translationally controlled by the HCMV-encoded UL38 mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1-activator. The 5' UTR within the mRNA encoding PABP contains a terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) element found in mRNAs, the translation of which is stimulated in response to mitogenic, growth, and nutritional stimuli, and proteins encoded by TOP-containing mRNAs accumulated in HCMV-infected cells. Furthermore, UL38 expression was necessary and sufficient to regulate expression of a PABP TOP-containing reporter. Remarkably, preventing the rise in PABP abundance by RNAi impaired eIF4E binding to eIF4G, thereby reducing assembly of the multisubunit initiation factor eIF4F, viral protein production, and replication. This finding demonstrates that viruses can increase host translation initiation factor concentration to foster their replication and defines a unique mechanism whereby control of PABP abundance regulates eIF4F assembly. PMID:22431630

  4. Assessment of 24-hours Aldosterone Administration on Protein Abundances in Fluorescence-Sorted Mouse Distal Renal Tubules by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Thomas B; Pisitkun, Trairak; Hoffert, Jason D; Jensen, Uffe B; Fenton, Robert A; Praetorius, Helle A; Knepper, Mark A; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Aldosterone exerts multiple long-term effects in the distal renal tubules. The aim of this study was to establish a method for identifying proteins in these tubules that change in abundance by only 24-hours aldosterone administration. Methods Mice endogenously expressing green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in the connecting tubule and cortical collecting ducts were treated with a subcutaneous injection of 2.0 mg/kg aldosterone or vehicle (n=5), and sacrificed 24 hours later. Suspensions of single cells were obtained enzymatically, and eGFP positive cells were isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Samples of 100 μg proteins were digested with trypsin and labeled with 8-plex iTRAQ reagents and processed for liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results FACS yielded 1.4 million cells per mouse. The LC-MS/MS spectra were matched to peptides by the SEQUEST search algorithm, which identified 3002 peptides corresponding to 506 unique proteins of which 20 significantly changed abundance 24-hours after aldosterone injection. Conclusion We find the method suitable and useful for studying hormonal effects on protein abundance in distal tubular segments. PMID:23428628

  5. Rapid formation of plasma protein corona critically affects nanoparticle pathophysiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenzer, Stefan; Docter, Dominic; Kuharev, Jörg; Musyanovych, Anna; Fetz, Verena; Hecht, Rouven; Schlenk, Florian; Fischer, Dagmar; Kiouptsi, Klytaimnistra; Reinhardt, Christoph; Landfester, Katharina; Schild, Hansjörg; Maskos, Michael; Knauer, Shirley K.; Stauber, Roland H.

    2013-10-01

    In biological fluids, proteins bind to the surface of nanoparticles to form a coating known as the protein corona, which can critically affect the interaction of the nanoparticles with living systems. As physiological systems are highly dynamic, it is important to obtain a time-resolved knowledge of protein-corona formation, development and biological relevancy. Here we show that label-free snapshot proteomics can be used to obtain quantitative time-resolved profiles of human plasma coronas formed on silica and polystyrene nanoparticles of various size and surface functionalization. Complex time- and nanoparticle-specific coronas, which comprise almost 300 different proteins, were found to form rapidly (<0.5 minutes) and, over time, to change significantly in terms of the amount of bound protein, but not in composition. Rapid corona formation is found to affect haemolysis, thrombocyte activation, nanoparticle uptake and endothelial cell death at an early exposure time.

  6. Radioimmunoassay for pregnancy-associated plasma protein A

    SciTech Connect

    Sinosich, M.J.; Teisner, B.; Folkerson, J.; Saunders, D.M.; Grudzinskas, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    A specific and highly sensitive radioimmunoassay for determination of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A in human serum is described. The minimum detection limit for this protein was 2.9 ..mu..g/L. The within- and between-assay coefficients of variation were 4.0 and 4.5%, respectively. The circulating protein was detected within 32 days of conception in eight normal pregnancies and within 21 days in a twin pregnancy. Circulating concentrations in the mother at term were consistently higher (10-fold) than in matched amniotic fluid; none was detected in the umbilical circulation. This protein was also detected in the circulation of patients with hydatidiform mole. This assay will permit investigations into the clinical evaluation of measurements of the protein during early pregnancy and trophoblastic disease.

  7. Glycotope Sharing between Snail Hemolymph and Larval Schistosomes: Larval Transformation Products Alter Shared Glycan Patterns of Plasma Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Timothy P.; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Hongdi; Gonzalez, Laura A.; Deelder, André M.; Hokke, Cornelis H.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence supports the involvement of inducible, highly diverse lectin-like recognition molecules in snail hemocyte-mediated responses to larval Schistosoma mansoni. Because host lectins likely are involved in initial parasite recognition, we sought to identify specific carbohydrate structures (glycans) shared between larval S. mansoni and its host Biomphalaria glabrata to address possible mechanisms of immune avoidance through mimicry of elements associated with the host immunoreactivity. A panel of monoclonal antibodies (mABs) to specific S. mansoni glycans was used to identify the distribution and abundance of shared glycan epitopes (glycotopes) on plasma glycoproteins from B. glabrata strains that differ in their susceptibilities to infection by S. mansoni. In addition, a major aim of this study was to determine if larval transformation products (LTPs) could bind to plasma proteins, and thereby alter the glycotopes exposed on plasma proteins in a snail strain-specific fashion. Plasma fractions (<100 kDa/>100 kDa) from susceptible (NMRI) and resistant (BS-90) snail strains were subjected to SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analyses using mAB to LacdiNAc (LDN), fucosylated LDN variants, Lewis X and trimannosyl core glycans. Results confirmed a high degree of glycan sharing, with NMRI plasma exhibiting a greater distribution/abundance of LDN, F-LDN and F-LDN-F than BS-90 plasma (<100 kDa fraction). Pretreatment of blotted proteins with LTPs significantly altered the reactivity of specific mABs to shared glycotopes on blots, mainly through the binding of LTPs to plasma proteins resulting in either glycotope blocking or increased glycotope attachment to plasma. Many LTP-mediated changes in shared glycans were snail-strain specific, especially those in the <100 kDa fraction for NMRI plasma proteins, and for BS-90, mainly those in the >100 kDa fraction. Our data suggest that differential binding of S. mansoni LTPs to plasma proteins of susceptible and resistant B

  8. Glycotope sharing between snail hemolymph and larval schistosomes: larval transformation products alter shared glycan patterns of plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Timothy P; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Hongdi; Gonzalez, Laura A; Deelder, André M; Hokke, Cornelis H

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence supports the involvement of inducible, highly diverse lectin-like recognition molecules in snail hemocyte-mediated responses to larval Schistosoma mansoni. Because host lectins likely are involved in initial parasite recognition, we sought to identify specific carbohydrate structures (glycans) shared between larval S. mansoni and its host Biomphalaria glabrata to address possible mechanisms of immune avoidance through mimicry of elements associated with the host immunoreactivity. A panel of monoclonal antibodies (mABs) to specific S. mansoni glycans was used to identify the distribution and abundance of shared glycan epitopes (glycotopes) on plasma glycoproteins from B. glabrata strains that differ in their susceptibilities to infection by S. mansoni. In addition, a major aim of this study was to determine if larval transformation products (LTPs) could bind to plasma proteins, and thereby alter the glycotopes exposed on plasma proteins in a snail strain-specific fashion. Plasma fractions (< 100 kDa/> 100 kDa) from susceptible (NMRI) and resistant (BS-90) snail strains were subjected to SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analyses using mAB to LacdiNAc (LDN), fucosylated LDN variants, Lewis X and trimannosyl core glycans. Results confirmed a high degree of glycan sharing, with NMRI plasma exhibiting a greater distribution/abundance of LDN, F-LDN and F-LDN-F than BS-90 plasma (< 100 kDa fraction). Pretreatment of blotted proteins with LTPs significantly altered the reactivity of specific mABs to shared glycotopes on blots, mainly through the binding of LTPs to plasma proteins resulting in either glycotope blocking or increased glycotope attachment to plasma. Many LTP-mediated changes in shared glycans were snail-strain specific, especially those in the < 100 kDa fraction for NMRI plasma proteins, and for BS-90, mainly those in the > 100 kDa fraction. Our data suggest that differential binding of S. mansoni LTPs to plasma proteins of susceptible and resistant B

  9. Application of electroimmunoassay to the study of plasma protein synthesis in cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Grieninger, G; Pindyck, J; Hertzberg, K M; Mosesson, M W

    1979-01-01

    Electroimmunoassay has been applied to the study of plasma protein synthesis and secretion in liver cell cultures. The assay is performed on unconcentrated samples of culture medium containing the secreted plasma proteins and yields results within 2 hours. The characteristics of plasma protein production by the cultured hepatocytes coupled with the sensitivity of this assay permit the study of plasma protein in synthesis and its regulation by hormones and other agents without the routine use of radioisotopes. PMID:518014

  10. The ubiquitous distribution of late embryogenesis abundant proteins across cell compartments in Arabidopsis offers tailored protection against abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Candat, Adrien; Paszkiewicz, Gaël; Neveu, Martine; Gautier, Romain; Logan, David C; Avelange-Macherel, Marie-Hélène; Macherel, David

    2014-07-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are hydrophilic, mostly intrinsically disordered proteins, which play major roles in desiccation tolerance. In Arabidopsis thaliana, 51 genes encoding LEA proteins clustered into nine families have been inventoried. To increase our understanding of the yet enigmatic functions of these gene families, we report the subcellular location of each protein. Experimental data highlight the limits of in silico predictions for analysis of subcellular localization. Thirty-six LEA proteins localized to the cytosol, with most being able to diffuse into the nucleus. Three proteins were exclusively localized in plastids or mitochondria, while two others were found dually targeted to these organelles. Targeting cleavage sites could be determined for five of these proteins. Three proteins were found to be endoplasmic reticulum (ER) residents, two were vacuolar, and two were secreted. A single protein was identified in pexophagosomes. While most LEA protein families have a unique subcellular localization, members of the LEA_4 family are widely distributed (cytosol, mitochondria, plastid, ER, and pexophagosome) but share the presence of the class A α-helix motif. They are thus expected to establish interactions with various cellular membranes under stress conditions. The broad subcellular distribution of LEA proteins highlights the requirement for each cellular compartment to be provided with protective mechanisms to cope with desiccation or cold stress. PMID:25005920

  11. Dexamethasone modulates rat renal brush border membrane phosphate transporter mRNA and protein abundance and glycosphingolipid composition.

    PubMed Central

    Levi, M; Shayman, J A; Abe, A; Gross, S K; McCluer, R H; Biber, J; Murer, H; Lötscher, M; Cronin, R E

    1995-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are important regulators of renal phosphate transport. This study investigates the role of alterations in renal brush border membrane (BBM) sodium gradient-dependent phosphate transport (Na-Pi cotransporter) mRNA and protein abundance in the dexamethasone induced inhibition of Na-Pi cotransport in the rat. Dexamethasone administration for 4 d caused a 1.5-fold increase in the Vmax of Na-Pi cotransport (1785 +/- 119 vs. 2759 +/- 375 pmol/5 s per mg BBM protein in control, P < 0.01), which was paralleled by a 2.5-fold decrease in the abundance of Na-Pi mRNA and Na-Pi protein. There was also a 1.7-fold increase in BBM glucosylceramide content (528 +/- 63 vs. 312 +/- 41 ng/mg BBM protein in control, P < 0.02). To determine whether the alteration in glucosylceramide content per se played a functional role in the decrease in Na-Pi cotransport, control rats were treated with the glucosylceramide synthase inhibitor, D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoyl-amino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP). The resultant 1.5-fold decrease in BBM glucosylceramide content (199 +/- 19 vs. 312 +/- 41 ng/mg BBM protein in control, P < 0.02) was associated with a 1.4-fold increase in Na-Pi cotransport activity (1422 +/- 73 vs. 1048 +/- 85 pmol/5 s per mg BBM protein in control, P < 0.01), and a 1.5-fold increase in BBM Na-Pi protein abundance. Thus, dexamethasone-induced inhibition of Na-Pi cotransport is associated with a decrease in BBM Na-Pi cotransporter abundance, and an increase in glucosylceramide. Since primary alteration in BBM glucosylceramide content per se directly and selectively modulates BBM Na-Pi cotransport activity and Na-Pi protein abundance, we propose that the increase in BBM glucosylceramide content plays an important role in mediating the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on Na-Pi cotransport activity. Images PMID:7615789

  12. Region-Specific Protein Abundance Changes in the Brain of MPTP-induced Parkinson’s Disease Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Jianying; Chin, Mark H; Schepmoes, Athena A; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Weitz, Karl K; Petritis, Brianne O; Monroe, Matthew E; Camp, David G; Wood, Stephen A; Melega, William P; Bigelow, Diana J; Smith, Desmond J; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D

    2010-02-15

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the nigrostriatal region of the brain; however, the neurodegeneration extends well beyond dopaminergic neurons. To gain a better understanding of the molecular changes relevant to PD, we applied two-dimensional LC-MS/MS to comparatively analyze the proteome changes in four brain regions (striatum, cerebellum, cortex, and the rest of brain) using a MPTP-induced PD mouse model with the objective to identify nigrostriatal-specific and other region-specific protein abundance changes. The combined analyses resulted in the identification of 4,895 non-redundant proteins with at least two unique peptides per protein. The relative abundance changes in each analyzed brain region were estimated based on the spectral count information. A total of 518 proteins were observed with significant MPTP-induced changes across different brain regions. 270 of these proteins were observed with specific changes occurring either only in the striatum and/or in the rest of the brain region that contains substantia nigra, suggesting that these proteins are associated with the underlying nigrostriatal pathways. Many of the proteins that exhibit significant abundance changes were associated with dopamine signaling, mitochondrial dysfunction, the ubiquitin system, calcium signaling, the oxidative stress response, and apoptosis. A set of proteins with either consistent change across all brain regions or with changes specific to the cortex and cerebellum regions were also detected. One of the interesting proteins is ubiquitin specific protease (USP9X), a deubiquination enzyme involved in the protection of proteins from degradation and promotion of the TGF-β pathway, which exhibited altered abundances in all brain regions. Western blot validation showed similar spatial changes, suggesting that USP9X is potentially associated with neurodegeneration. Together, this study for the first time presents an overall picture of

  13. Specific alterations in plasma proteins during depressed, manic, and euthymic states of bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Song, Y.R.; Wu, B.; Yang, Y.T.; Chen, J.; Zhang, L.J.; Zhang, Z.W.; Shi, H.Y.; Huang, C.L.; Pan, J.X.; Xie, P.

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common psychiatric mood disorder affecting more than 1-2% of the general population of different European countries. Unfortunately, there is no objective laboratory-based test to aid BD diagnosis or monitor its progression, and little is known about the molecular basis of BD. Here, we performed a comparative proteomic study to identify differentially expressed plasma proteins in various BD mood states (depressed BD, manic BD, and euthymic BD) relative to healthy controls. A total of 10 euthymic BD, 20 depressed BD, 15 manic BD, and 20 demographically matched healthy control subjects were recruited. Seven high-abundance proteins were immunodepleted in plasma samples from the 4 experimental groups, which were then subjected to proteome-wide expression profiling by two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. Proteomic results were validated by immunoblotting and bioinformatically analyzed using MetaCore. From a total of 32 proteins identified with 1.5-fold changes in expression compared with healthy controls, 16 proteins were perturbed in BD independent of mood state, while 16 proteins were specifically associated with particular BD mood states. Two mood-independent differential proteins, apolipoprotein (Apo) A1 and Apo L1, suggest that BD pathophysiology may be associated with early perturbations in lipid metabolism. Moreover, down-regulation of one mood-dependent protein, carbonic anhydrase 1 (CA-1), suggests it may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive episodes in BD. Thus, BD pathophysiology may be associated with early perturbations in lipid metabolism that are independent of mood state, while CA-1 may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive episodes. PMID:26375446

  14. Specific alterations in plasma proteins during depressed, manic, and euthymic states of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Song, Y R; Wu, B; Yang, Y T; Chen, J; Zhang, L J; Zhang, Z W; Shi, H Y; Huang, C L; Pan, J X; Xie, P

    2015-11-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common psychiatric mood disorder affecting more than 1-2% of the general population of different European countries. Unfortunately, there is no objective laboratory-based test to aid BD diagnosis or monitor its progression, and little is known about the molecular basis of BD. Here, we performed a comparative proteomic study to identify differentially expressed plasma proteins in various BD mood states (depressed BD, manic BD, and euthymic BD) relative to healthy controls. A total of 10 euthymic BD, 20 depressed BD, 15 manic BD, and 20 demographically matched healthy control subjects were recruited. Seven high-abundance proteins were immunodepleted in plasma samples from the 4 experimental groups, which were then subjected to proteome-wide expression profiling by two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. Proteomic results were validated by immunoblotting and bioinformatically analyzed using MetaCore. From a total of 32 proteins identified with 1.5-fold changes in expression compared with healthy controls, 16 proteins were perturbed in BD independent of mood state, while 16 proteins were specifically associated with particular BD mood states. Two mood-independent differential proteins, apolipoprotein (Apo) A1 and Apo L1, suggest that BD pathophysiology may be associated with early perturbations in lipid metabolism. Moreover, down-regulation of one mood-dependent protein, carbonic anhydrase 1 (CA-1), suggests it may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive episodes in BD. Thus, BD pathophysiology may be associated with early perturbations in lipid metabolism that are independent of mood state, while CA-1 may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive episodes. PMID:26375446

  15. Palmitoylation of POTE family proteins for plasma membrane targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sudipto; Ise, Tomoko; Nagata, Satoshi; Maeda, Hiroshi; Bera, Tapan K.; Pastan, Ira

    2007-11-23

    The POTE gene family is composed of 13 paralogs and likely evolved by duplications and remodeling of the human genome. One common property of POTE proteins is their localization on the inner aspect of the plasma membrane. To determine the structural elements required for membrane localization, we expressed mutants of different POTEs in 293T cells as EGFP fusion proteins. We also tested their palmitoylation by a biotin-switch assay. Our data indicate that the membrane localizations of different POTEs are mediated by similar 3-4 short cysteine rich repeats (CRRs) near the amino-terminuses and that palmitoylation on paired cysteine residues in each CRR motif is responsible for the localization. Multiple palmitoylation in the small CRRs can result in the strong association of whole POTEs with plasma membrane.

  16. Liver takes up retinol-binding protein from plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gjoen, T.; Bjerkelund, T.; Blomhoff, H.K.; Norum, K.R.; Berg, T.; Blomhoff, R.

    1987-08-15

    Retinol is transported in plasma bound to a specific transport protein, retinol-binding protein. We prepared /sup 125/I-tyramine cellobiose-labeled rat retinol-binding protein and studied its tissue uptake 1, 5, and 24 h after intravenous injection into rats. The liver was the organ containing most radioactivity at all time points studied. After 5 and 24 h, 30 and 22% of the injected dose were recovered in liver, respectively. After separating the liver into parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells in the 5-h group, we found that both cell fractions contained approximately the same amount of radioactivity (per gram of liver). Most of the retinol-binding protein radioactivity in the nonparenchymal cell fraction was in the stellate cells. The implication of these results for a possible transfer mechanism for retinol between parenchymal and stellate cells is discussed.

  17. Abundant class III acidic chitinase homologue in tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seed serves as the major storage protein.

    PubMed

    Rao, Devavratha H; Gowda, Lalitha R

    2008-03-26

    The phyla Leguminosae contains protease inhibitors, lectins, chitinases, and glycohydrolases as major defense proteins in their seeds. Electrophoretic analysis of the seed proteins of tamarind ( Tamarindus indica L.), an agri-waste material, indicated the unusual presence of two major proteins comparable to overexpression of recombinant proteins. These proteins were identified by amino-terminal analysis to be (1) Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor and (2) class III endochitinase (34000 Da). These two proteins were purified to apparent homogeneity by a single-step chitin bead affinity chromatography and characterized. The Kunitz inhibitor was specific toward inhibiting trypsin with a stoichiometry of 1:1. The 33000 +/- 1000 Da protein, accounting for >50% of the total seed protein, is an acidic glycoprotein exhibiting a very low endotype hydrolytic activity toward chitin derivatives. SDS-PAGE followed by densitometry of tamarind seed germination indicates the disappearance of the chitinase with the concomitant appearance of a cysteine endopeptidase. On the basis of its abundance, accumulation without any pathogenesis-related stimulus, temporal regulation, amino acid composition, and very low enzyme activity, this 34000 Da protein designated "tamarinin" physiologically serves as the major storage protein. PMID:18298067

  18. Lactate dehydrogenase A as a highly abundant eye lens protein in platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus): upsilon (upsilon)-crystallin.

    PubMed

    van Rheede, Teun; Amons, Reinout; Stewart, Niall; de Jong, Wilfried W

    2003-06-01

    Vertebrate eye lenses mostly contain two abundant types of proteins, the alpha-crystallins and the beta/gamma-crystallins. In addition, certain housekeeping enzymes are highly expressed as crystallins in various taxa. We now observed an unusual approximately 41-kd protein that makes up 16% to 18% of the total protein in the platypus eye lens. Its cDNA sequence was determined, which identified the protein as muscle-type lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A). It is the first observation of LDH-A as a crystallin, and we designate it upsilon (upsilon)-crystallin. Interestingly, the related heart-type LDH-B occurs as an abundant lens protein, known as epsilon-crystallin, in many birds and crocodiles. Thus, two members of the ldh gene family have independently been recruited as crystallins in different higher vertebrate lineages, suggesting that they are particularly suited for this purpose in terms of gene regulatory or protein structural properties. To establish whether platypus LDH-A/upsilon-crystallin has been under different selective constraints as compared with other vertebrate LDH-A sequences, we reconstructed the vertebrate ldh-a gene phylogeny. No conspicuous rate deviations or amino acid replacements were observed. PMID:12716980

  19. A Protein Extract from Chicken Reduces Plasma Homocysteine in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lysne, Vegard; Bjørndal, Bodil; Vik, Rita; Nordrehaug, Jan Erik; Skorve, Jon; Nygård, Ottar; Berge, Rolf K

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate effects of a water-soluble protein fraction of chicken (CP), with a low methionine/glycine ratio, on plasma homocysteine and metabolites related to homocysteine metabolism. Male Wistar rats were fed either a control diet with 20% w/w casein as the protein source, or an experimental diet where 6, 14 or 20% w/w of the casein was replaced with the same amount of CP for four weeks. Rats fed CP had reduced plasma total homocysteine level and markedly increased levels of the choline pathway metabolites betaine, dimethylglycine, sarcosine, glycine and serine, as well as the transsulfuration pathway metabolites cystathionine and cysteine. Hepatic mRNA level of enzymes involved in homocysteine remethylation, methionine synthase and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase, were unchanged, whereas cystathionine gamma-lyase of the transsulfuration pathway was increased in the CP treated rats. Plasma concentrations of vitamin B2, folate, cobalamin, and the B-6 catabolite pyridoxic acid were increased in the 20% CP-treated rats. In conclusion, the CP diet was associated with lower plasma homocysteine concentration and higher levels of serine, choline oxidation and transsulfuration metabolites compared to a casein diet. The status of related B-vitamins was also affected by CP. PMID:26053618

  20. A Protein Extract from Chicken Reduces Plasma Homocysteine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lysne, Vegard; Bjørndal, Bodil; Vik, Rita; Nordrehaug, Jan Erik; Skorve, Jon; Nygård, Ottar; Berge, Rolf K.

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate effects of a water-soluble protein fraction of chicken (CP), with a low methionine/glycine ratio, on plasma homocysteine and metabolites related to homocysteine metabolism. Male Wistar rats were fed either a control diet with 20% w/w casein as the protein source, or an experimental diet where 6, 14 or 20% w/w of the casein was replaced with the same amount of CP for four weeks. Rats fed CP had reduced plasma total homocysteine level and markedly increased levels of the choline pathway metabolites betaine, dimethylglycine, sarcosine, glycine and serine, as well as the transsulfuration pathway metabolites cystathionine and cysteine. Hepatic mRNA level of enzymes involved in homocysteine remethylation, methionine synthase and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase, were unchanged, whereas cystathionine gamma-lyase of the transsulfuration pathway was increased in the CP treated rats. Plasma concentrations of vitamin B2, folate, cobalamin, and the B-6 catabolite pyridoxic acid were increased in the 20% CP-treated rats. In conclusion, the CP diet was associated with lower plasma homocysteine concentration and higher levels of serine, choline oxidation and transsulfuration metabolites compared to a casein diet. The status of related B-vitamins was also affected by CP. PMID:26053618

  1. Thyroid hormone stimulation of plasma protein synthesis in cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hertzberg, K M; Pindyck, J; Mosesson, M W; Grieninger, G

    1981-01-25

    The direct effect of thyroid hormones on hepatocellular plasma protein synthesis has been studied in primary monolayer cultures derived from chick embryo liver. The chemically defined medium used for plating and maintaining the cultures contained no other hormones, protein, or serum supplement. Addition of physiological concentrations (10 nM) of triiodothyronine or thyroxine produced 3-fold or greater increases in the rates of synthesis of fibrinogen and three other major secreted proteins. By comparison albumin, transferrin, and total protein synthesis were not substantially increased. The enhanced synthesis of selected plasma proteins could be detected 6 h after initial addition of triiodothyronine. Exposure of the cells to the hormone for only 30 min was nearly as effective as continuous exposure in eliciting the ultimate response. Triiodothyronine exerted its half-maximal effect at a concentration of 1 nM. Diminished potency was associated with less iodination of the hormone; a marked reduction was noted with di-iodinated thyronine and no stimulatory activity at all with either mono- or non-iodinated thyronine. PMID:7451459

  2. Smoking, COPD and 3-Nitrotyrosine Levels of Plasma Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hongjun; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Peterson, Elena S.; Tan, Ruimin; Bigelow, Diana J.; Scholand, Mary Beth; Hoidal, John R.; Pounds, Joel G.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Nitric oxide is a physiologically regulator of endothelial function and hemodynamics. Oxidized products of nitric oxide can form nitrotyrosine, which is a marker of nitrative stress. Cigarette smoking decreases exhaled nitric oxide, and the underlying mechanism may be important in the cardiovascular toxicity of cigarette smoke, although it is not clear if this effect results from decreased nitric oxide production or oxidation of nitric oxide to reactive, nitrating, species. These processes would be expected to have opposite effects on nitrotyrosine levels, a marker of nitrative stress. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we determine the effects of smoking and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on circulating levels of nitrotyrosine, and thereby gain insight into the processes regulating nitrotyrosine formation. METHODS: A custom antibody microarray platform was used to analyze the levels of 3-nitrotyrosine modifications on 24 proteins in plasma. Plasma samples from 458 individuals were analyzed. RESULTS: Nitrotyrosine levels in circulating proteins were uniformly reduced in smokers but increased in COPD patients. We also observed a persistent suppression of nitrotyrosine in former smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking broadly suppresses the levels of 3-nitrotyrosine in plasma proteins, suggesting that cigarette smoke suppresses endothelial nitric oxide production. In contrast, the increase in nitrotyrosine levels in COPD patients most likely results from inflammatory processes. This study provides the first evidence that smoking has irreversible effects on endothelial production of nitric oxide, and provides insight into how smoking could induce a loss of elasticity in the vasculature and a long-term increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  3. Identification of cDNA clones encoding valosin-containing protein and other plant plasma membrane-associated proteins by a general immunoscreening strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, J; Dixon, R A; Gonzales, R A; Kjellbom, P; Bhattacharyya, M K

    1995-01-01

    An approach was developed for the isolation and characterization of soybean plasma membrane-associated proteins by immunoscreening of a cDNA expression library. An antiserum was raised against purified plasma membrane vesicles. In a differential screening of approximately 500,000 plaque-forming units with the anti-(plasma membrane) serum and DNA probes derived from highly abundant clones isolated in a preliminary screening, 261 clones were selected from approximately 1,200 antiserum-positive plaques. These clones were classified into 40 groups by hybridization analysis and 5'- and 3'-terminal sequencing. By searching nucleic acid and protein sequence data bases, 11 groups of cDNAs were identified, among which valosin-containing protein (VCP), clathrin heavy chain, phospholipase C, and S-adenosylmethionine:delta 24-sterol-C-methyltransferase have not to date been cloned from plants. The remaining 29 groups did not match any current data base entries and may, therefore, represent additional or yet uncharacterized genes. A full-length cDNA encoding the soybean VCP was sequenced. The high level of amino acid identity with vertebrate VCP and yeast CDC48 protein indicates that the soybean protein is a plant homolog of vertebrate VCP and yeast CDC48 protein. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7753826

  4. Proteomics reveals differences in protein abundance and highly similar antigenic profiles between Besnoitia besnoiti and Besnoitia tarandi.

    PubMed

    García-Lunar, P; Regidor-Cerrillo, J; Ortega-Mora, L M; Gutiérrez-Expósito, D; Alvarez-García, G

    2014-10-15

    Besnoitia besnoiti and Besnoitia tarandi are two cyst-forming apicomplexan parasites of the genus Besnoitia. B. besnoiti uses cattle as an intermediate host, in which it causes a disease that progresses in two sequential phases: the acute anasarca stage and the chronic scleroderma stage. Reindeer and caribou act as intermediate hosts for B. tarandi, which causes clinical signs similar to those caused by B. besnoiti. Previous studies demonstrated high molecular similarity, as determined by 18S and ITS-1 RNA sequences, between these Besnoitia spp., and strong serological cross-reactivity between these species has recently been demonstrated. Thus, a difference gel electrophoresis approach and mass spectrometry analysis were used to describe the proteomes and explore differences in protein abundance between B. besnoiti and B. tarandi in tachyzoite extracts. Immunoproteomes were also compared using 2-DE immunoblotting with polyclonal sera from experimentally infected rabbits. From approximately 1400 spots detected in DIGE-gels, 28 and 29 spots were differentially abundant in B. besnoiti and B. tarandi tachyzoites, respectively (± 1.5-fold, p<0.05). Four and 13 spots were exclusively detected in B. besnoiti and B. tarandi, respectively. Of the 32 differentially abundant spots analyzed by MALDI-TOF/MS, 6 up-regulated B. besnoiti proteins (LDH; HSP90; purine nucleoside phosphorylase and 3 hypothetical proteins) and 6 up-regulated B. tarandi proteins (G3PDH; LDH; PDI; mRNA decapping protein and 2 hypothetical proteins) were identified. Interestingly, no specific antigen spots were recognized by sera on any of the Besnoitia species studied and a similar antigen profile has been observed for B. tarandi and B. besnoiti sera when cross reactions were studied. This fact corroborates the difficulty in discerning Besnoitia infections using current serological assays. The present study underscores the importance of sequencing the B. besnoiti genome for species diversity studies of

  5. A cherry protein and its gene, abundantly expressed in ripening fruit, have been identified as thaumatin-like.

    PubMed Central

    Fils-Lycaon, B R; Wiersma, P A; Eastwell, K C; Sautiere, P

    1996-01-01

    A 29-kD polypeptide is the most abundant soluble protein in ripe cherry fruit (Prunus avium L); accumulation begins at the onset of ripening as the fruit turns from yellow to red. This protein was extracted from ripe cherries and purified by size-exclusion and ion-exchange chromatography. Antibodies to the purified protein were used to screen a cDNA library from ripe cherries. Numerous recombinant plaques reacted positively with the antibodies; the DNA sequence of representative clones encoded a polypeptide of 245 amino acid residues. A signal peptide was indicated, and the predicted mature protein corresponded to the purified protein in size (23.3 kD, by mass spectrometry) and isoelectric point (4.2). A search of known protein sequences revealed a strong similarity between this polypeptide and the thaumatin family of pathogenesis-related proteins. The cherry thaumatin-like protein does not have a sweet taste, and no antifungal activity was seen in preliminary assays. Expression of the protein appears to be regulated at the gene level, with mRNA levels at their highest in the ripe fruit. PMID:8685266

  6. Cellular expression of human centromere protein C demonstrates a cyclic behavior with highest abundance in the G1 phase.

    PubMed Central

    Knehr, M; Poppe, M; Schroeter, D; Eickelbaum, W; Finze, E M; Kiesewetter, U L; Enulescu, M; Arand, M; Paweletz, N

    1996-01-01

    Centromere proteins are localized within the centromere-kinetochore complex, which can be proven by means of immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy. In consequence, their putative functions seem to be related exclusively to mitosis, namely to the interaction of the chromosomal kinetochores with spindle microtubules. However, electron microscopy using immune sera enriched with specific antibodies against human centromere protein C (CENP-C) showed that it occurs not only in mitosis but during the whole cell cycle. Therefore, we investigated the cell cycle-specific expression of CENP-C systematically on protein and mRNA levels applying HeLa cells synchronized in all cell cycle phases. Immunoblotting confirmed protein expression during the whole cell cycle and revealed an increase of CENP-C from the S phase through the G2 phase and mitosis to highest abundance in the G1 phase. Since this was rather surprising, we verified it by quantifying phase-specific mRNA levels of CENP-C, paralleled by the amplification of suitable internal standards, using the polymerase chain reaction. The results were in excellent agreement with abundant protein amounts and confirmed the cyclic behavior of CENP-C during the cell cycle. In consequence, we postulate that in addition to its role in mitosis, CENP-C has a further role in the G1 phase that may be related to cell cycle control. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8816782

  7. Size-related variation in protein abundance in the brain and abdominal tissue of bumble bee workers.

    PubMed

    Wolschin, F; Shpigler, H; Amdam, G V; Bloch, G

    2012-06-01

    Female bumble bee workers of the same species often show a profound body size variation that is linked to a division of labour. Large individuals are more likely to forage whereas small individuals are more likely to perform in-nest activities. A higher sensory sensitivity, stronger circadian rhythms as well as better learning and memory performances appear to better equip large individuals for outdoor activities compared to their smaller siblings. The molecular mechanisms underlying worker functional polymorphism remain unclear. Proteins are major determinants of an individual's morphology and behaviour. We hypothesized that the abundance of proteins such as metabolic enzymes as well as proteins involved in neuronal functions would differ with body size and provide insights into the mechanisms underlying size-dependent physiological specialization in bumble bee workers. We conducted protein quantification measurements based on liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry on tissue samples derived from small and large Bombus impatiens and Bombus terrestris workers. Proteins found to differ significantly in abundance between small and large workers belong to the categories of structure, energy metabolism and stress response. These findings provide the first proteomic insight into mechanisms associated with size-based division of labour in social insects. PMID:22568679

  8. Comparative Analysis of Techniques to Purify Plasma Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, Michael P.; Antrobus, Robin; Lill, Jennie R.; Duncan, Lidia M.; Hör, Simon; Lehner, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this project was to identify the best method for the enrichment of plasma membrane (PM) proteins for proteomics experiments. Following tryptic digestion and extended liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry acquisitions, data were processed using MaxQuant and Gene Ontology (GO) terms used to determine protein subcellular localization. The following techniques were examined for the total number and percentage purity of PM proteins identified: (a) whole cell lysate (total number, 84–112; percentage purity, 9–13%); (b) crude membrane preparation (104–111; 17–20%); (c) biotinylation of surface proteins with N-hydroxysulfosuccinimydyl-S,S-biotin and streptavidin pulldown (78–115; 27–31%); (d) biotinylation of surface glycoproteins with biocytin hydrazide and streptavidin pulldown (41–54; 59–85%); or (e) biotinylation of surface glycoproteins with amino-oxy-biotin (which labels the sialylated fraction of PM glycoproteins) and streptavidin pulldown (120; 65%). A two- to threefold increase in the overall number of proteins identified was achieved by using stop and go extraction tip (StageTip)-based anion exchange (SAX) fractionation. Combining technique (e) with SAX fractionation increased the number of proteins identified to 281 (54%). Analysis of GO terms describing these proteins identified a large subset of proteins integral to the membrane with no subcellular assignment. These are likely to be of PM location and bring the total PM protein identifications to 364 (68%). This study suggests that selective biotinylation of the cell surface using amino-oxy-biotin in combination with SAX fractionation is a useful method for identification of sialylated PM proteins. PMID:20808639

  9. Partitioning lung and plasma proteins: circulating surfactant proteins as biomarkers of alveolocapillary permeability.

    PubMed

    Doyle, I R; Nicholas, T E; Bersten, A D

    1999-03-01

    1. The alveolocapillary membrane faces an extraordinary task in partitioning the plasma and lung hypophase proteins, with a surface area approximately 50-fold that of the body and only 0.1-0.2 micron thick. 2. Lung permeability is compromised under a variety of circumstances and the delineation between physiological and pathological changes in permeability is not always clear. Although the tight junctions of the epithelium, rather than the endothelium, are regarded as the major barrier to fluid and protein flux, it is becoming apparent that the permeability of both are dynamically regulated. 3. Whereas increased permeability and the flux of plasma proteins into the alveolar compartment has dire consequences, fortuitously the flux of surfactant proteins from the airspaces into the circulation may provide a sensitive means of non-invasively monitoring the lung, with important implications for treatment modalities. 4. Surfactant proteins are unique in that they are present in the alveolar hypophase in high concentrations. They diffuse down their vast concentration gradients (approximately 1:1500-7000) into the circulation in a manner that reflects lung function and injury score. Surfactant proteins vary markedly in size (approximately 20-650 kDa) and changes in the relative amounts appear particularly diagnostic with regard to disease severity. Alveolar levels of surfactant proteins remain remarkably constant despite respiratory disease and, unlike the flux of plasma proteins into the alveolus, which may reach equilibrium in acute lung injury, the flux of surfactant proteins is unidirectional because of the concentration gradient and because they are rapidly cleared from the circulation. 5. Ultimately, the diagnostic usefulness of surfactant proteins as markers of alveolocapillary permeability will demand a sound understanding of their kinetics through the vascular compartment. PMID:10081613

  10. In Situ Quantification of Protein Binding to the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elizabeth M.; Hennen, Jared; Chen, Yan; Mueller, Joachim D.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a fluorescence-based assay that allows for direct measurement of protein binding to the plasma membrane inside living cells. An axial scan through the cell generates a fluorescence intensity profile that is analyzed to determine the membrane-bound and cytoplasmic concentrations of a peripheral membrane protein labeled by the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The membrane binding curve is constructed by mapping those concentrations for a population of cells with a wide range of protein expression levels, and a fit of the binding curve determines the number of binding sites and the dissociation coefficient. We experimentally verified the technique, using myosin-1C-EGFP as a model system and fit its binding curve. Furthermore, we studied the protein-lipid interactions of the membrane binding domains from lactadherin and phospholipase C-δ1 to evaluate the feasibility of using competition binding experiments to identify specific lipid-protein interactions in living cells. Finally, we applied the technique to determine the lipid specificity, the number of binding sites, and the dissociation coefficient of membrane binding for the Gag matrix domain of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1, which provides insight into early assembly steps of the retrovirus. PMID:26039166

  11. An in vivo detection system for transient and low‐abundant protein interactions and their kinetics in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Brezovich, Andrea; Schuschnig, Martina; Ammerer, Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Methylation tracking (M‐Track) is a protein‐proximity assay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, allowing the detection of transient protein–protein interactions in living cells. The bait protein is fused to a histone lysine methyl transferase and the prey protein to a methylation acceptor peptide derived from histone 3. Upon interaction, the histone 3 fragment is stably methylated on lysine 9 and can be detected by methylation‐specific antibodies. Since methylation marking is irreversible in budding yeast and only takes place in living cells, the occurrence of artifacts during cell lysate preparation is greatly reduced, leading to a more accurate representation of native interactions. So far, this method has been limited to highly abundant or overexpressed proteins. However, many proteins of interest are low‐abundant, and overexpression of proteins may interfere with their function, leading to an artificial situation. Here we report the generation of a toolbox including a novel cleavage‐enrichment system for the analysis of very low‐abundant proteins at their native expression levels. In addition, we developed a system for the parallel analysis of two prey proteins in a single cell, as well as an inducible methylation system. The inducible system allows precise control over the time during which the interaction is detected and can be used to determine interaction kinetics. Furthermore, we generated a set of constructs facilitating the cloning‐free genomic tagging of proteins at their endogenous locus by homologous recombination, and their expression from centromeric plasmids. GenBank submissions: pCK900; KM407502, pCK901; KM407503, pCK902; KM407504, pCK903; KM407505, pCK904; KM407506, pCK905; KM407507, pCK906; KM407508, pCK907; KM407509, pCK908; KM407510, pCK909; KM407511, pCK910; KM407512, pCK911; KM407513. © 2015 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25582094

  12. The AP2 clathrin adaptor protein complex regulates the abundance of GLR-1 glutamate receptors in the ventral nerve cord of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Garafalo, Steven D.; Luth, Eric S.; Moss, Benjamin J.; Monteiro, Michael I.; Malkin, Emily; Juo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of glutamate receptor (GluR) abundance at synapses by clathrin-mediated endocytosis can control synaptic strength and plasticity. We take advantage of viable, null mutations in subunits of the clathrin adaptor protein 2 (AP2) complex in Caenorhabditis elegans to characterize the in vivo role of AP2 in GluR trafficking. In contrast to our predictions for an endocytic adaptor, we found that levels of the GluR GLR-1 are decreased at synapses in the ventral nerve cord (VNC) of animals with mutations in the AP2 subunits APM-2/μ2, APA-2/α, or APS-2/σ2. Rescue experiments indicate that APM-2/μ2 functions in glr-1–expressing interneurons and the mature nervous system to promote GLR-1 levels in the VNC. Genetic analyses suggest that APM-2/μ2 acts upstream of GLR-1 endocytosis in the VNC. Consistent with this, GLR-1 accumulates in cell bodies of apm-2 mutants. However, GLR-1 does not appear to accumulate at the plasma membrane of the cell body as expected, but instead accumulates in intracellular compartments including Syntaxin-13– and RAB-14–labeled endosomes. This study reveals a novel role for the AP2 clathrin adaptor in promoting the abundance of GluRs at synapses in vivo, and implicates AP2 in the regulation of GluR trafficking at an early step in the secretory pathway. PMID:25788288

  13. Plasma proteins as early biomarkers of exposure to carcinogenic aromatic amines.

    PubMed

    Miller, M J; Parmelee, D C; Benjamin, T; Sechi, S; Dooley, K L; Kadlubar, F F

    1994-12-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DG) has been used to study the changes induced in dog plasma polypeptides by the known urinary bladder carcinogens, 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) and 2-naphthylamine (2-NA). Treatment with 3-aminobiphenyl (3-ABP) and 1-naphthylamine (1-NA), both considered to be non-carcinogenic, were used as controls. The purpose of this study was: (1) to determine whether or not changes that occurred in the plasma protein patterns were specific to 4-ABP and/or other related carcinogenic arylamines; (2) to measure the time course in the changes of the major polypeptides during dosing and their resynthesis during a recovery period; and (3) to determine, by microsequencing, the biochemical identity of the affected proteins. The results indicate that only the most potent carcinogen, 4-ABP, had the effect of suppressing the expression of some proteins, while the other aromatic amines caused no discernible change in the 2DG patterns during a 12-week dosing period. The 4-ABP caused dramatic suppression of two sets of proteins. One set of three spots had an apparent molecular weight of 32.5 kDa, and a pI of 5.8-6.0. The major component in this group was identified as the beta-chain of haptoglobin. Expression of this protein decreased markedly during the first 2 weeks of treatment and recovered slowly after dosing stopped. Since haptoglobin functions to bind with free hemoglobin and facilitates its elimination from the blood stream, these results can be rationalized as a consequence of 4-ABP binding to hemoglobin in the erythrocyte, resulting in cell death and hemolysis. The 4-ABP modified hemoglobin then binds to haptoglobin and this tertiary complex is purged from the blood stream, resulting in the disappearance of free haptoglobin. A second set of spots (mol. wt., 65 kDa; pI, 6.5-6.6) disappeared much faster than the haptoglobin, and recovered more quickly. The major protein is about one-fifth the intensity of haptoglobin and appeared to be N

  14. Application of an improved proteomics method for abundant protein cleanup: molecular and genomic mechanisms study in plant defense.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yixiang; Gao, Peng; Xing, Zhuo; Jin, Shumei; Chen, Zhide; Liu, Lantao; Constantino, Nasie; Wang, Xinwang; Shi, Weibing; Yuan, Joshua S; Dai, Susie Y

    2013-11-01

    High abundance proteins like ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) impose a consistent challenge for the whole proteome characterization using shot-gun proteomics. To address this challenge, we developed and evaluated Polyethyleneimine Assisted Rubisco Cleanup (PARC) as a new method by combining both abundant protein removal and fractionation. The new approach was applied to a plant insect interaction study to validate the platform and investigate mechanisms for plant defense against herbivorous insects. Our results indicated that PARC can effectively remove Rubisco, improve the protein identification, and discover almost three times more differentially regulated proteins. The significantly enhanced shot-gun proteomics performance was translated into in-depth proteomic and molecular mechanisms for plant insect interaction, where carbon re-distribution was used to play an essential role. Moreover, the transcriptomic validation also confirmed the reliability of PARC analysis. Finally, functional studies were carried out for two differentially regulated genes as revealed by PARC analysis. Insect resistance was induced by over-expressing either jacalin-like or cupin-like genes in rice. The results further highlighted that PARC can serve as an effective strategy for proteomics analysis and gene discovery. PMID:23943779

  15. Application of an Improved Proteomics Method for Abundant Protein Cleanup: Molecular and Genomic Mechanisms Study in Plant Defense*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yixiang; Gao, Peng; Xing, Zhuo; Jin, Shumei; Chen, Zhide; Liu, Lantao; Constantino, Nasie; Wang, Xinwang; Shi, Weibing; Yuan, Joshua S.; Dai, Susie Y.

    2013-01-01

    High abundance proteins like ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) impose a consistent challenge for the whole proteome characterization using shot-gun proteomics. To address this challenge, we developed and evaluated Polyethyleneimine Assisted Rubisco Cleanup (PARC) as a new method by combining both abundant protein removal and fractionation. The new approach was applied to a plant insect interaction study to validate the platform and investigate mechanisms for plant defense against herbivorous insects. Our results indicated that PARC can effectively remove Rubisco, improve the protein identification, and discover almost three times more differentially regulated proteins. The significantly enhanced shot-gun proteomics performance was translated into in-depth proteomic and molecular mechanisms for plant insect interaction, where carbon re-distribution was used to play an essential role. Moreover, the transcriptomic validation also confirmed the reliability of PARC analysis. Finally, functional studies were carried out for two differentially regulated genes as revealed by PARC analysis. Insect resistance was induced by over-expressing either jacalin-like or cupin-like genes in rice. The results further highlighted that PARC can serve as an effective strategy for proteomics analysis and gene discovery. PMID:23943779

  16. A Surface Biotinylation Strategy for Reproducible Plasma Membrane Protein Purification and Tracking of Genetic and Drug-Induced Alterations.

    PubMed

    Hörmann, Katrin; Stukalov, Alexey; Müller, André C; Heinz, Leonhard X; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Colinge, Jacques; Bennett, Keiryn L

    2016-02-01

    Plasma membrane (PM) proteins contribute to the identity of a cell, mediate contact and communication, and account for more than two-thirds of known drug targets.1-8 In the past years, several protocols for the proteomic profiling of PM proteins have been described. Nevertheless, comparative analyses have mainly focused on different variations of one approach.9-11 We compared sulfo-NHS-SS-biotinylation, aminooxy-biotinylation, and surface coating with silica beads to isolate PM proteins for subsequent analysis by one-dimensional gel-free liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Absolute and relative numbers of PM proteins and reproducibility parameters on a qualitative and quantitative level were assessed. Sulfo-NHS-SS-biotinylation outperformed aminooxy-biotinylation and surface coating using silica beads for most of the monitored criteria. We further simplified this procedure by a competitive biotin elution strategy achieving an average PM annotated protein fraction of 54% (347 proteins). Computational analysis using additional databases and prediction tools revealed that in total over 90% of the purified proteins were associated with the PM, mostly as interactors. The modified sulfo-NHS-SS-biotinylation protocol was validated by tracking changes in the plasma membrane proteome composition induced by genetic alteration and drug treatment. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins were depleted in PM purifications from cells deficient in the GPI transamidase component PIGS, and treatment of cells with tunicamycin significantly reduced the abundance of N-glycoproteins in surface purifications. PMID:26699813

  17. [Immunodiffusion analysis of plasma proteins in the canine family].

    PubMed

    Baranov, O K; Iurishina, N A; Savina, M A

    1976-01-01

    Immunodiffusion studies have been made on the plasma of 9 species (Vulpes vulpes, V. corsak, Alopex lagopus, Canis aureus, C. lupus, C. familiaris, C. dingo, Nyctereutes procynoides, Fennecus zerde) from the family of Canidae using milk antisera. Unlike rabbit antisera used earlier, milk antisera make it possible to detect more significant antigenic divergency with respect to 5 alpha- and beta-globulins. These globulins seem to have a higher evolution rate of antigenic mosaics as compared to other plasma proteins in the family investigated. The family Canidae serologically may be divided into two main groups: 1) the genus Canis which includes the wolf, domestic dog, dingo, jackal and 2) species which significantly differ from the former (the fox, polar fox, dog fox, fennec). In relation to these two groups, the raccoon dog occupies special position. PMID:62473

  18. Comparison of Amino Acids Physico-Chemical Properties and Usage of Late Embryogenesis Abundant Proteins, Hydrophilins and WHy Domain

    PubMed Central

    Jaspard, Emmanuel; Hunault, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant proteins (LEAPs) comprise several diverse protein families and are mostly involved in stress tolerance. Most of LEAPs are intrinsically disordered and thus poorly functionally characterized. LEAPs have been classified and a large number of their physico-chemical properties have been statistically analyzed. LEAPs were previously proposed to be a subset of a very wide family of proteins called hydrophilins, while a domain called WHy (Water stress and Hypersensitive response) was found in LEAP class 8 (according to our previous classification). Since little is known about hydrophilins and WHy domain, the cross-analysis of their amino acids physico-chemical properties and amino acids usage together with those of LEAPs helps to describe some of their structural features and to make hypothesis about their function. Physico-chemical properties of hydrophilins and WHy domain strongly suggest their role in dehydration tolerance, probably by interacting with water and small polar molecules. The computational analysis reveals that LEAP class 8 and hydrophilins are distinct protein families and that not all LEAPs are a protein subset of hydrophilins family as proposed earlier. Hydrophilins seem related to LEAP class 2 (also called dehydrins) and to Heat Shock Proteins 12 (HSP12). Hydrophilins are likely unstructured proteins while WHy domain is structured. LEAP class 2, hydrophilins and WHy domain are thus proposed to share a common physiological role by interacting with water or other polar/charged small molecules, hence contributing to dehydration tolerance. PMID:25296175

  19. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR).

    PubMed

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest. PMID:25989346

  20. Comparison of amino acids physico-chemical properties and usage of late embryogenesis abundant proteins, hydrophilins and WHy domain.

    PubMed

    Jaspard, Emmanuel; Hunault, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant proteins (LEAPs) comprise several diverse protein families and are mostly involved in stress tolerance. Most of LEAPs are intrinsically disordered and thus poorly functionally characterized. LEAPs have been classified and a large number of their physico-chemical properties have been statistically analyzed. LEAPs were previously proposed to be a subset of a very wide family of proteins called hydrophilins, while a domain called WHy (Water stress and Hypersensitive response) was found in LEAP class 8 (according to our previous classification). Since little is known about hydrophilins and WHy domain, the cross-analysis of their amino acids physico-chemical properties and amino acids usage together with those of LEAPs helps to describe some of their structural features and to make hypothesis about their function. Physico-chemical properties of hydrophilins and WHy domain strongly suggest their role in dehydration tolerance, probably by interacting with water and small polar molecules. The computational analysis reveals that LEAP class 8 and hydrophilins are distinct protein families and that not all LEAPs are a protein subset of hydrophilins family as proposed earlier. Hydrophilins seem related to LEAP class 2 (also called dehydrins) and to Heat Shock Proteins 12 (HSP12). Hydrophilins are likely unstructured proteins while WHy domain is structured. LEAP class 2, hydrophilins and WHy domain are thus proposed to share a common physiological role by interacting with water or other polar/charged small molecules, hence contributing to dehydration tolerance. PMID:25296175

  1. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J.; Laclette, Juan P.; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest. PMID:25989346

  2. Changes in total plasma content of electrolytes and proteins with maximal exercise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Beaumont, W.; Strand, J. C.; Petrofsky, J. S.; Hipskind, S. G.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    To determine to what extent the increases in concentration of plasma proteins and electrolytes with short maximal work were a result of hemoconcentration, the changes in plasma volume and total content of the plasma constituents were simultaneously evaluated. The results obtained from six human subjects indicated that in comparison to preexercise values there was a net decrease in total content of plasma protein, sodium, and chloride in the first 2 min of the postexercise period, due primarily to a significant loss (13-15%) of plasma fluid. The total plasma potassium content was increased immediately after exercise but was significantly below the preexercise plasma content after 2 min of recovery.

  3. Bovine plasma proteins increase virulence of Haemophilus somnus in mice.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Roger S; Kimball, Richard A; Corbeil, Lynette B

    2007-01-01

    The role of bovine serum or plasma proteins in Haemophilus somnus virulence was investigated in a mouse model of septicemia. An increase in virulence was detected when the organism was pre-incubated for 5 min and inoculated with fetal calf serum. When purified bovine serum or plasma proteins were pre-incubated with H. somnus before inoculating into mice, transferrin was found to increase virulence. Bovine lactoferrin was also noted to increase virulence, but to a lesser extent and had a delayed time course when compared with transferrin. Using an ELISA assay, an increased amount of H. somnus whole cells and culture supernatant bound to bovine transferrin when the organism was grown in iron-restricted media. Lactoferrin also bound to H. somnus, but binding was not affected by growth in iron-restricted media and it was eliminated with 2M NaCl, which reversed charge mediated binding. Transferrin, but not lactoferrin, supported growth of H. somnus on iron-depleted agar based media using a disk assay. Therefore, lactoferrin increased virulence by an undetermined mechanism whereas transferrin increased virulence of H. somnus by binding to iron-regulated outer-membrane proteins (IROMPs) and providing iron to the pathogen. PMID:17125964

  4. Biochemical and structural characterization of an endoplasmic reticulum-localized late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein from the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Rie; Furuki, Takao; Shimizu, Tempei; Takezawa, Daisuke; Kikawada, Takahiro; Sakurai, Minoru; Sugawara, Yasutake

    2014-11-28

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, which accumulate to high levels in seeds during late maturation, are associated with desiccation tolerance. A member of the LEA protein family was found in cultured cells of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha; preculture treatment of these cells with 0.5M sucrose medium led to their acquisition of desiccation tolerance. We characterized this preculture-induced LEA protein, designated as MpLEA1. MpLEA1 is predominantly hydrophilic with a few hydrophobic residues that may represent its putative signal peptide. The protein also contains a putative endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention sequence, HEEL, at the C-terminus. Microscopic observations indicated that GFP-fused MpLEA1 was mainly localized in the ER. The recombinant protein MpLEA1 is intrinsically disordered in solution. On drying, MpLEA1 shifted predominantly toward α-helices from random coils. Such changes in conformation are a typical feature of the group 3 LEA proteins. Recombinant MpLEA1 prevented the aggregation of α-casein during desiccation-rehydration events, suggesting that MpLEA1 exerts anti-aggregation activity against desiccation-sensitive proteins by functioning as a "molecular shield". Moreover, the anti-aggregation activity of MpLEA1 was ten times greater than that of BSA or insect LEA proteins, which are known to prevent aggregation on drying. Here, we show that an ER-localized LEA protein, MpLEA1, possesses biochemical and structural features specific to group 3 LEA proteins. PMID:25450698

  5. Pro-inflammatory flagellin proteins of prevalent motile commensal bacteria are variably abundant in the intestinal microbiome of elderly humans.

    PubMed

    Neville, B Anne; Sheridan, Paul O; Harris, Hugh M B; Coughlan, Simone; Flint, Harry J; Duncan, Sylvia H; Jeffery, Ian B; Claesson, Marcus J; Ross, R Paul; Scott, Karen P; O'Toole, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    Some Eubacterium and Roseburia species are among the most prevalent motile bacteria present in the intestinal microbiota of healthy adults. These flagellate species contribute "cell motility" category genes to the intestinal microbiome and flagellin proteins to the intestinal proteome. We reviewed and revised the annotation of motility genes in the genomes of six Eubacterium and Roseburia species that occur in the human intestinal microbiota and examined their respective locus organization by comparative genomics. Motility gene order was generally conserved across these loci. Five of these species harbored multiple genes for predicted flagellins. Flagellin proteins were isolated from R. inulinivorans strain A2-194 and from E. rectale strains A1-86 and M104/1. The amino-termini sequences of the R. inulinivorans and E. rectale A1-86 proteins were almost identical. These protein preparations stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) from human intestinal epithelial cell lines, suggesting that these flagellins were pro-inflammatory. Flagellins from the other four species were predicted to be pro-inflammatory on the basis of alignment to the consensus sequence of pro-inflammatory flagellins from the β- and γ- proteobacteria. Many fliC genes were deduced to be under the control of σ(28). The relative abundance of the target Eubacterium and Roseburia species varied across shotgun metagenomes from 27 elderly individuals. Genes involved in the flagellum biogenesis pathways of these species were variably abundant in these metagenomes, suggesting that the current depth of coverage used for metagenomic sequencing (3.13-4.79 Gb total sequence in our study) insufficiently captures the functional diversity of genomes present at low (≤1%) relative abundance. E. rectale and R. inulinivorans thus appear to synthesize complex flagella composed of flagellin proteins that stimulate IL-8 production. A greater depth of sequencing, improved evenness of sequencing and improved

  6. Pro-Inflammatory Flagellin Proteins of Prevalent Motile Commensal Bacteria Are Variably Abundant in the Intestinal Microbiome of Elderly Humans

    PubMed Central

    Neville, B. Anne; Sheridan, Paul O.; Harris, Hugh M. B.; Coughlan, Simone; Flint, Harry J.; Duncan, Sylvia H.; Jeffery, Ian B.; Claesson, Marcus J.; Ross, R. Paul; Scott, Karen P.; O'Toole, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Some Eubacterium and Roseburia species are among the most prevalent motile bacteria present in the intestinal microbiota of healthy adults. These flagellate species contribute “cell motility” category genes to the intestinal microbiome and flagellin proteins to the intestinal proteome. We reviewed and revised the annotation of motility genes in the genomes of six Eubacterium and Roseburia species that occur in the human intestinal microbiota and examined their respective locus organization by comparative genomics. Motility gene order was generally conserved across these loci. Five of these species harbored multiple genes for predicted flagellins. Flagellin proteins were isolated from R. inulinivorans strain A2-194 and from E. rectale strains A1-86 and M104/1. The amino-termini sequences of the R. inulinivorans and E. rectale A1-86 proteins were almost identical. These protein preparations stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) from human intestinal epithelial cell lines, suggesting that these flagellins were pro-inflammatory. Flagellins from the other four species were predicted to be pro-inflammatory on the basis of alignment to the consensus sequence of pro-inflammatory flagellins from the β- and γ- proteobacteria. Many fliC genes were deduced to be under the control of σ28. The relative abundance of the target Eubacterium and Roseburia species varied across shotgun metagenomes from 27 elderly individuals. Genes involved in the flagellum biogenesis pathways of these species were variably abundant in these metagenomes, suggesting that the current depth of coverage used for metagenomic sequencing (3.13–4.79 Gb total sequence in our study) insufficiently captures the functional diversity of genomes present at low (≤1%) relative abundance. E. rectale and R. inulinivorans thus appear to synthesize complex flagella composed of flagellin proteins that stimulate IL-8 production. A greater depth of sequencing, improved evenness of sequencing and improved

  7. In vitro, in silico and integrated strategies for the estimation of plasma protein binding. A review.

    PubMed

    Lambrinidis, George; Vallianatou, Theodosia; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna

    2015-06-23

    Plasma protein binding (PPB) strongly affects drug distribution and pharmacokinetic behavior with consequences in overall pharmacological action. Extended plasma protein binding may be associated with drug safety issues and several adverse effects, like low clearance, low brain penetration, drug-drug interactions, loss of efficacy, while influencing the fate of enantiomers and diastereoisomers by stereoselective binding within the body. Therefore in holistic drug design approaches, where ADME(T) properties are considered in parallel with target affinity, considerable efforts are focused in early estimation of PPB mainly in regard to human serum albumin (HSA), which is the most abundant and most important plasma protein. The second critical serum protein α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), although often underscored, plays also an important and complicated role in clinical therapy and thus the last years it has been studied thoroughly too. In the present review, after an overview of the principles of HSA and AGP binding as well as the structure topology of the proteins, the current trends and perspectives in the field of PPB predictions are presented and discussed considering both HSA and AGP binding. Since however for the latter protein systematic studies have started only the last years, the review focuses mainly to HSA. One part of the review highlights the challenge to develop rapid techniques for HSA and AGP binding simulation and their performance in assessment of PPB. The second part focuses on in silico approaches to predict HSA and AGP binding, analyzing and evaluating structure-based and ligand-based methods, as well as combination of both methods in the aim to exploit the different information and overcome the limitations of each individual approach. Ligand-based methods use the Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) methodology to establish quantitate models for the prediction of binding constants from molecular descriptors, while they provide

  8. Loss of propranolol during ultrafiltration in plasma protein binding studies.

    PubMed

    Parsons, D L; Fan, H F

    1986-12-01

    A commercial ultrafiltration device was examined for propranolol plasma protein binding studies. A nonspecific loss of free drug resulted in a low recovery in the ultrafiltrate. Use of a rinse filtrate did not completely compensate for this loss. Use of different centrifugal forces indicated the loss was not due to significant membrane rejection of drug. Equilibrating the device with sample for four hours slightly improved the recovery while use of a higher ionic strength buffer had no effect. Propranolol was bound by the membrane, but there was a larger, continuous loss to the o-ring. Results with an alternate commercial device were also unsatisfactory. PMID:3797814

  9. Effect of animal plasma proteins on intestinal damage and recovery of neonatal pigs infected with rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Corl, Benjamin A; Harrell, Robert J; Moon, Hong Kil; Phillips, Oulayvahn; Weaver, Eric M; Campbell, Joy M; Arthington, John D; Odle, Jack

    2007-12-01

    Rotaviruses infect and elicit diarrhea in neonates of most mammalian species and cause 800,000 infant deaths a year. We used neonatal piglets to study the effects of dietary animal plasma proteins on intestinal health following rotavirus infection. Plasma protein contains a diverse mixture of functional components with biological activity and improves the health of animals challenged with other diarrhea-causing pathogens. In a 2 x 2 factorial design, we compared plasma protein- and soy protein-based diets in rotavirus-infected and noninfected piglets to determine if plasma protein reduced acute rotavirus intestinal damage or improved recovery. All infected animals shed rotavirus particles in their feces. Infected, plasma protein-fed piglets maintained growth rates similar to noninfected piglets in the first 3 days of infection; however, soy protein-fed piglets experienced reduced gains. Furthermore, infected, plasma protein-fed piglets showed no clinical signs of diarrhea. Infection reduced intestinal villus height and the villus height/crypt depth ratio by Day 3 of infection; however, reductions were not attenuated with dietary plasma protein. Infected, plasma protein-fed pigs maintained greater intestinal mucosa protein and estimated total lactase activity than infected, soy protein-fed piglets. Plasma proteins contain growth factors that may aid in rate of recovery as well as virus-binding proteins that may reduce infection pressure in the intestine. These data, combined with findings from other studies using plasma proteins in animal models of diarrhea, indicate the potential for using plasma proteins to improve the health of diarrheic neonates. PMID:17475463

  10. Effects of Tamarindus indica fruit pulp extract on abundance of HepG2 cell lysate proteins and their possible consequential impact on metabolism and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chong, Ursula R W; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri S; Abdul-Aziz, Azlina; Hashim, Onn H; Mat-Junit, Sarni

    2013-01-01

    The fruit pulp extract of Tamarindus indica has been reported for its antioxidant and hypolipidemic properties. In this study, the methanol extract of T. indica fruit pulp was investigated for its effects on the abundance of HepG2 cell lysate proteins. Cell lysate was extracted from HepG2 cells grown in the absence and presence of the methanol extract of T. indica fruit pulp. Approximately 2500 spots were resolved using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the abundance of 20 cellular proteins was found to be significantly reduced. Among the proteins of reduced abundance, fourteen, including six proteins involved in metabolism (including ethanolamine phosphate cytidylyltransferase), four mitochondrial proteins (including prohibitin and respiratory chain proteins), and four proteins involved in translation and splicing, were positively identified by mass spectrometry and database search. The identified HepG2 altered abundance proteins, when taken together and analyzed by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) software, are suggestive of the effects of T. indica fruit pulp extract on metabolism and inflammation, which are modulated by LXR/RXR. In conclusion, the methanol fruit pulp extract of T. indica was shown to cause reduced abundance of HepG2 mitochondrial, metabolic, and regulatory proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, protein synthesis, and cellular metabolism. PMID:24455694

  11. Effects of Tamarindus indica Fruit Pulp Extract on Abundance of HepG2 Cell Lysate Proteins and Their Possible Consequential Impact on Metabolism and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Ursula R. W.; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri S.; Abdul-Aziz, Azlina; Hashim, Onn H.; Mat-Junit, Sarni

    2013-01-01

    The fruit pulp extract of Tamarindus indica has been reported for its antioxidant and hypolipidemic properties. In this study, the methanol extract of T. indica fruit pulp was investigated for its effects on the abundance of HepG2 cell lysate proteins. Cell lysate was extracted from HepG2 cells grown in the absence and presence of the methanol extract of T. indica fruit pulp. Approximately 2500 spots were resolved using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the abundance of 20 cellular proteins was found to be significantly reduced. Among the proteins of reduced abundance, fourteen, including six proteins involved in metabolism (including ethanolamine phosphate cytidylyltransferase), four mitochondrial proteins (including prohibitin and respiratory chain proteins), and four proteins involved in translation and splicing, were positively identified by mass spectrometry and database search. The identified HepG2 altered abundance proteins, when taken together and analyzed by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) software, are suggestive of the effects of T. indica fruit pulp extract on metabolism and inflammation, which are modulated by LXR/RXR. In conclusion, the methanol fruit pulp extract of T. indica was shown to cause reduced abundance of HepG2 mitochondrial, metabolic, and regulatory proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, protein synthesis, and cellular metabolism. PMID:24455694

  12. Mastitomics, the integrated omics of bovine milk in an experimental model of Streptococcus uberis mastitis: 1. High abundance proteins, acute phase proteins and peptidomics.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Funmilola Clara; Mullen, William; Tassi, Riccardo; Ramírez-Torres, Adela; Mudaliar, Manikhandan; McNeilly, Tom N; Zadoks, Ruth N; Burchmore, Richard; David Eckersall, P

    2016-08-16

    A peptidomic investigation of milk from an experimental model of Streptococcus uberis mastitis in dairy cows has incorporated a study of milk high abundance and acute phase (APP) proteins as well as analysis of low molecular weight peptide biomarkers. Intramammary infection (IMI) with S. uberis caused a shift in abundance from caseins, β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin to albumin, lactoferrin and IgG with the increase in lactoferrin occurring last. The APP response of haptoglobin, mammary associated serum amyloid A3 and C-reactive protein occurred between 30-48 hours post challenge with peak concentrations of APPs at 72-96 hours post challenge and declined thereafter at a rate resembling the fall in bacterial count rather than the somatic cell count. A peptide biomarker panel for IMI based on capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry was developed. It comprised 77 identified peptides (IMI77) composed mainly of casein derived peptides but also including peptides of glycosylation dependent cell adhesion molecule and serum amyloid A. The panel had a biomarker classification score that increased from 36 hour to 81 hour post challenge, significantly differentiating infected from non-infected milk, thus suggesting potential as a peptide biomarker panel of bovine mastitis and specifically that of S. uberis origin. The use of omic technology has shown a multifactorial cross system reaction in high and low abundance proteins and their peptide derivatives with changes of over a thousand fold in analyte levels in response to S. uberis infection. PMID:27412456

  13. An odorant-binding protein is abundantly expressed in the nose and in the seminal fluid of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Mastrogiacomo, Rosa; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Niccolini, Alberto; Serra, Andrea; Gazzano, Angelo; Scaloni, Andrea; Pelosi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    We have purified an abundant lipocalin from the seminal fluid of the rabbit, which shows significant similarity with the sub-class of pheromone carriers "urinary" and "salivary" and presents an N-terminal sequence identical with that of an odorant-binding protein (rabOBP3) expressed in the nasal tissue of the same species. This protein is synthesised in the prostate and found in the seminal fluid, but not in sperm cells. The same protein is also expressed in the nasal epithelium of both sexes, but is completely absent in female reproductive organs. It presents four cysteines, among which two are arranged to form a disulphide bridge, and is glycosylated. This is the first report of an OBP identified at the protein level in the seminal fluid of a vertebrate species. The protein purified from seminal fluid is bound to some organic chemicals whose structure is currently under investigation. We reasonably speculate that, like urinary and salivary proteins reported in other species of mammals, this lipocalin performs a dual role, as carrier of semiochemicals in the seminal fluid and as detector of chemical signals in the nose. PMID:25391153

  14. An Odorant-Binding Protein Is Abundantly Expressed in the Nose and in the Seminal Fluid of the Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Niccolini, Alberto; Serra, Andrea; Gazzano, Angelo; Scaloni, Andrea; Pelosi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    We have purified an abundant lipocalin from the seminal fluid of the rabbit, which shows significant similarity with the sub-class of pheromone carriers “urinary” and “salivary” and presents an N-terminal sequence identical with that of an odorant-binding protein (rabOBP3) expressed in the nasal tissue of the same species. This protein is synthesised in the prostate and found in the seminal fluid, but not in sperm cells. The same protein is also expressed in the nasal epithelium of both sexes, but is completely absent in female reproductive organs. It presents four cysteines, among which two are arranged to form a disulphide bridge, and is glycosylated. This is the first report of an OBP identified at the protein level in the seminal fluid of a vertebrate species. The protein purified from seminal fluid is bound to some organic chemicals whose structure is currently under investigation. We reasonably speculate that, like urinary and salivary proteins reported in other species of mammals, this lipocalin performs a dual role, as carrier of semiochemicals in the seminal fluid and as detector of chemical signals in the nose. PMID:25391153

  15. Thousand and one ways to quantify and compare protein abundances in label-free bottom-up proteomics.

    PubMed

    Blein-Nicolas, Mélisande; Zivy, Michel

    2016-08-01

    How to process and analyze MS data to quantify and statistically compare protein abundances in bottom-up proteomics has been an open debate for nearly fifteen years. Two main approaches are generally used: the first is based on spectral data generated during the process of identification (e.g. peptide counting, spectral counting), while the second makes use of extracted ion currents to quantify chromatographic peaks and infer protein abundances based on peptide quantification. These two approaches actually refer to multiple methods which have been developed during the last decade, but were submitted to deep evaluations only recently. In this paper, we compiled these different methods as exhaustively as possible. We also summarized the way they address the different problems raised by bottom-up protein quantification such as normalization, the presence of shared peptides, unequal peptide measurability and missing data. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock. PMID:26947242

  16. Plasma Proteins Interaction with Curcumin Nanoparticles: Implications in Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Yallapu, Murali M.; Ebeling, Mara C.; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin, a natural bioactive polyphenol, has been widely investigated as a conventional medicine for centuries. Over the past two decades, major pre-clinical and clinical trials have demonstrated its safe therapeutic profile but clinical translation has been hampered due to rapid degradation, poor water solubility, bioavailability and pharmaco-kinetics. To overcome such translational issues, many laboratories have focused on developing curcumin nanoformulations for cancer therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the evolution of curcumin nanomedicine in cancer therapeutics, the possible interactions between the surface of curcumin nanoparticles and plasma proteins, the role of nanoparticle-protein complex architecture parameters, and the rational design of clinically useful curcumin nanoformulations. Considering all the biologically relevant phenomena, curcumin nanoformulations can be developed as a new neutraceutical or pharmaceutical agent. PMID:23566382

  17. Detecting protein association at the T cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Florian; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2015-04-01

    At the moment, many models on T cell signaling rely on results obtained via rather indirect methodologies, which makes direct comparison and conclusions to the in vivo situation difficult. Recently, a variety of new imaging methods were developed, which have the potential to directly shed light onto the mysteries of protein association at the T cell membrane. While the new modalities are extremely promising, for a broad readership it may be difficult to judge the results, since technological shortcomings are not always obvious. In this review article, we put key questions on the mechanism of protein interactions in the T cell plasma membrane into relation with techniques that allow to address such questions. We discuss applicability of the techniques, their strengths and weaknesses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nanoscale membrane organisation and signalling. PMID:25300585

  18. Cell Cycle-Regulated Protein Abundance Changes in Synchronously Proliferating HeLa Cells Include Regulation of Pre-mRNA Splicing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Karen R.; Yu, Yanbao; Lackey, Patrick E.; Chen, Xian; Marzluff, William F.; Cook, Jeanette Gowen

    2013-01-01

    Cell proliferation involves dramatic changes in DNA metabolism and cell division, and control of DNA replication, mitosis, and cytokinesis have received the greatest attention in the cell cycle field. To catalogue a wider range of cell cycle-regulated processes, we employed quantitative proteomics of synchronized HeLa cells. We quantified changes in protein abundance as cells actively progress from G1 to S phase and from S to G2 phase. We also describe a cohort of proteins whose abundance changes in response to pharmacological inhibition of the proteasome. Our analysis reveals not only the expected changes in proteins required for DNA replication and mitosis but also cell cycle-associated changes in proteins required for biological processes not known to be cell-cycle regulated. For example, many pre-mRNA alternative splicing proteins are down-regulated in S phase. Comparison of this dataset to several other proteomic datasets sheds light on global mechanisms of cell cycle phase transitions and underscores the importance of both phosphorylation and ubiquitination in cell cycle changes. PMID:23520512

  19. Sodium-pump gene-expression, protein abundance and enzyme activity in isolated nephron segments of the aging rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer, Pnina; Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Popovtzer, Mordecai M

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with alteration in renal tubular functions, including sodium handling and concentrating ability. Na-K-ATPase plays a key role in driving tubular transport, and we hypothesized that decreased concentrating ability of the aging kidney is due in part to downregulation of Na-K-ATPase. In this study, we evaluated Na and K balance, aldosterone levels, and Na-K-ATPase gene expression, protein abundance, and activity in aging rat kidney. Na-K-ATPase activity (assayed microfluorometrically), mRNA (RT-PCR), and protein abundance (immunoblotting) were quantitated in the following isolated nephron segments: PCT, PST, MTAL, DCT, and CCD from 2, 8, 15, and 24 month-old-rats. In the course of aging, creatinine clearance decreased from 0.48 ± 0.02 mL/min/100 g BW to 0.28 ± 0.06 (P < 0.001) and aldosterone decreased from 23.6 ± 0.8 ng/dL to 13.2 ± 0.6 (P < 0.001). Serum Na+ and K+ increased by 4.0% and 22.5%, respectively. Na-K-ATPase activity, mRNA, and protein abundance of the α1 subunit displayed similar trends in all assayed segments; increasing in PCT and PST; decreasing in MTAL and DCT; increasing in CCD: in PCT they increased by 40%, 75%, and 250%, respectively; while in PST they increased by 80%, 50%, and 100%, respectively (P < 0.001). In MTAL they declined by 36%, 24%, and 34%, respectively, and in DCT by 38%, 59%, and 60%, respectively (P < 0.001). They were higher in CCD by 110%, 115%, and 246%, respectively (P < 0.001). Rats maintained Na/K balance; however with a steady state elevated serum K+. These results reveal quantitative changes in axial distribution of Na-K-ATPase at the level of gene expression, protein abundance, and activity in the nephrons of aging animals and may explain, in part, the pathophysiology of the senescent kidney. PMID:26056060

  20. Uses of Phage Display in Agriculture: Sequence Analysis and Comparative Modeling of Late Embryogenesis Abundant Client Proteins Suggest Protein-Nucleic Acid Binding Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Downie, A. Bruce; Payne, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    A group of intrinsically disordered, hydrophilic proteins—Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins—has been linked to survival in plants and animals in periods of stress, putatively through safeguarding enzymatic function and prevention of aggregation in times of dehydration/heat. Yet despite decades of effort, the molecular-level mechanisms defining this protective function remain unknown. A recent effort to understand LEA functionality began with the unique application of phage display, wherein phage display and biopanning over recombinant Seed Maturation Protein homologs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Glycine max were used to retrieve client proteins at two different temperatures, with one intended to represent heat stress. From this previous study, we identified 21 client proteins for which clones were recovered, sometimes repeatedly. Here, we use sequence analysis and homology modeling of the client proteins to ascertain common sequence and structural properties that may contribute to binding affinity with the protective LEA protein. Our methods uncover what appears to be a predilection for protein-nucleic acid interactions among LEA client proteins, which is suggestive of subcellular residence. The results from this initial computational study will guide future efforts to uncover the protein protective mechanisms during heat stress, potentially leading to phage-display-directed evolution of synthetic LEA molecules. PMID:23956788

  1. A High-Content Imaging Screen for Cellular Regulators of β-Catenin Protein Abundance.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xin; Montoute, Monica; Bee, Tiger W; Lin, Hong; Kallal, Lorena A; Liu, Yan; Agarwal, Pankaj; Wang, Dayuan; Lu, Quinn; Morrow, Dwight; Pope, Andrew J; Wu, Zining

    2016-03-01

    Abnormal accumulation of β-catenin protein, a key transcriptional activator required for Wnt signaling, is the hallmark of many tumor types, including colon cancer. In normal cells, β-catenin protein level is tightly controlled by a multiprotein complex through the proteosome pathway. Mutations in the components of the β-catenin degradation complex, such as adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and Axin, lead to β-catenin stabilization and the constitutive activation of target genes. Since the signal transduction of Wnt/β-catenin is mainly mediated by protein-protein interactions, this pathway has been particularly refractory to conventional target-based small-molecule screening. Here we designed a cellular high-content imaging assay to detect β-catenin protein through immunofluorescent staining in the SW480 colon cancer cell line, which has elevated β-catenin endogenously. We demonstrate that the assay is robust and specific to screen a focused biologically diverse chemical library set against known targets that play diverse cellular functions. We identified a number of hits that reduce β-catenin levels without causing cell death. These hits may serve as tools to understand the dynamics of β-catenin degradation. This study demonstrates that detecting cell-based β-catenin protein stability is a viable approach to identifying novel mechanisms of β-catenin regulation as well as small molecules of therapeutic potential. PMID:26656867

  2. Functional characterization of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein gene family from Pinus tabuliformis (Pinaceae) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Lan, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a large and highly diverse gene family present in a wide range of plant species. LEAs are proposed to play a role in various stress tolerance responses. Our study represents the first-ever survey of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in a widely distributed pine (Pinus tabuliformis) in China. Twenty-three LEA genes were identified from the P. tabuliformis belonging to seven groups. Proteins with repeated motifs are an important feature specific to LEA groups. Ten of 23 pine LEA genes were selectively expressed in specific tissues, and showed expression divergence within each group. In addition, we selected 13 genes representing each group and introduced theses genes into Escherichia coli to assess the protective function of PtaLEA under heat and salt stresses. Compared with control cells, the E. coli cells expressing PtaLEA fusion protein exhibited enhanced salt and heat resistance and viability, indicating the protein may play a protective role in cells under stress conditions. Furthermore, among these enhanced tolerance genes, a certain extent of function divergence appeared within a gene group as well as between gene groups, suggesting potential functional diversity of this gene family in conifers. PMID:26781930

  3. Functional characterization of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein gene family from Pinus tabuliformis (Pinaceae) in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Lan, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a large and highly diverse gene family present in a wide range of plant species. LEAs are proposed to play a role in various stress tolerance responses. Our study represents the first-ever survey of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in a widely distributed pine (Pinus tabuliformis) in China. Twenty–three LEA genes were identified from the P. tabuliformis belonging to seven groups. Proteins with repeated motifs are an important feature specific to LEA groups. Ten of 23 pine LEA genes were selectively expressed in specific tissues, and showed expression divergence within each group. In addition, we selected 13 genes representing each group and introduced theses genes into Escherichia coli to assess the protective function of PtaLEA under heat and salt stresses. Compared with control cells, the E. coli cells expressing PtaLEA fusion protein exhibited enhanced salt and heat resistance and viability, indicating the protein may play a protective role in cells under stress conditions. Furthermore, among these enhanced tolerance genes, a certain extent of function divergence appeared within a gene group as well as between gene groups, suggesting potential functional diversity of this gene family in conifers. PMID:26781930

  4. Direct Correlation between Motile Behavior and Protein Abundance in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Yann S; Gillet, Sébastien; Frankel, Nicholas W; Weibel, Douglas B; Emonet, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Understanding how stochastic molecular fluctuations affect cell behavior requires the quantification of both behavior and protein numbers in the same cells. Here, we combine automated microscopy with in situ hydrogel polymerization to measure single-cell protein expression after tracking swimming behavior. We characterized the distribution of non-genetic phenotypic diversity in Escherichia coli motility, which affects single-cell exploration. By expressing fluorescently tagged chemotaxis proteins (CheR and CheB) at different levels, we quantitatively mapped motile phenotype (tumble bias) to protein numbers using thousands of single-cell measurements. Our results disagreed with established models until we incorporated the role of CheB in receptor deamidation and the slow fluctuations in receptor methylation. Beyond refining models, our central finding is that changes in numbers of CheR and CheB affect the population mean tumble bias and its variance independently. Therefore, it is possible to adjust the degree of phenotypic diversity of a population by adjusting the global level of expression of CheR and CheB while keeping their ratio constant, which, as shown in previous studies, confers functional robustness to the system. Since genetic control of protein expression is heritable, our results suggest that non-genetic diversity in motile behavior is selectable, supporting earlier hypotheses that such diversity confers a selective advantage. PMID:27599206

  5. Chernobyl seed project. Advances in the identification of differentially abundant proteins in a radio-contaminated environment

    PubMed Central

    Rashydov, Namik M.; Hajduch, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Plants have the ability to grow and successfully reproduce in radio-contaminated environments, which has been highlighted by nuclear accidents at Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011). The main aim of this article is to summarize the advances of the Chernobyl seed project which has the purpose to provide proteomic characterization of plants grown in the Chernobyl area. We present a summary of comparative proteomic studies on soybean and flax seeds harvested from radio-contaminated Chernobyl areas during two successive generations. Using experimental design developed for radio-contaminated areas, altered abundances of glycine betaine, seed storage proteins, and proteins associated with carbon assimilation into fatty acids were detected. Similar studies in Fukushima radio-contaminated areas might complement these data. The results from these Chernobyl experiments can be viewed in a user-friendly format at a dedicated web-based database freely available at http://www.chernobylproteomics.sav.sk. PMID:26217350

  6. Chernobyl seed project. Advances in the identification of differentially abundant proteins in a radio-contaminated environment.

    PubMed

    Rashydov, Namik M; Hajduch, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Plants have the ability to grow and successfully reproduce in radio-contaminated environments, which has been highlighted by nuclear accidents at Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011). The main aim of this article is to summarize the advances of the Chernobyl seed project which has the purpose to provide proteomic characterization of plants grown in the Chernobyl area. We present a summary of comparative proteomic studies on soybean and flax seeds harvested from radio-contaminated Chernobyl areas during two successive generations. Using experimental design developed for radio-contaminated areas, altered abundances of glycine betaine, seed storage proteins, and proteins associated with carbon assimilation into fatty acids were detected. Similar studies in Fukushima radio-contaminated areas might complement these data. The results from these Chernobyl experiments can be viewed in a user-friendly format at a dedicated web-based database freely available at http://www.chernobylproteomics.sav.sk. PMID:26217350

  7. New genetic regulators question relevance of abundant yolk protein production in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Rompay, Liesbeth Van; Borghgraef, Charline; Beets, Isabel; Caers, Jelle; Temmerman, Liesbet

    2015-01-01

    Vitellogenesis or maternal yolk formation is considered critical to the reproduction of egg-laying animals. In invertebrates, however, most of its regulatory genes are still unknown. Via a combined mapping and whole-genome sequencing strategy, we performed a forward genetic screen to isolate novel regulators of yolk production in the nematode model system Caenorhabditis elegans. In addition to isolating new alleles of rab-35, rab-10 and M04F3.2, we identified five mutant alleles corresponding to three novel regulatory genes potently suppressing the expression of a GFP-based yolk reporter. We confirmed that mutations in vrp-1, ceh-60 and lrp-2 disrupt endogenous yolk protein synthesis at the transcriptional and translational level. In contrast to current beliefs, our discovered set of mutants with strongly reduced yolk proteins did not show serious reproduction defects. This raises questions as to whether yolk proteins per se are needed for ultimate reproductive success. PMID:26553710

  8. Spatial mapping of protein abundances in the mouse brain by voxelation integrated with high-throughput liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Petyuk, Vladislav A; Qian, Wei-Jun; Chin, Mark H; Wang, Haixing; Livesay, Eric A; Monroe, Matthew E; Adkins, Joshua N; Jaitly, Navdeep; Anderson, David J; Camp, David G; Smith, Desmond J; Smith, Richard D

    2007-03-01

    Temporally and spatially resolved mapping of protein abundance patterns within the mammalian brain is of significant interest for understanding brain function and molecular etiologies of neurodegenerative diseases; however, such imaging efforts have been greatly challenged by complexity of the proteome, throughput and sensitivity of applied analytical methodologies, and accurate quantitation of protein abundances across the brain. Here, we describe a methodology for comprehensive spatial proteome mapping that addresses these challenges by employing voxelation integrated with automated microscale sample processing, high-throughput liquid chromatography (LC) system coupled with high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer, and a "universal" stable isotope labeled reference sample approach for robust quantitation. We applied this methodology as a proof-of-concept trial for the analysis of protein distribution within a single coronal slice of a C57BL/6J mouse brain. For relative quantitation of the protein abundances across the slice, an 18O-isotopically labeled reference sample, derived from a whole control coronal slice from another mouse, was spiked into each voxel sample, and stable isotopic intensity ratios were used to obtain measures of relative protein abundances. In total, we generated maps of protein abundance patterns for 1028 proteins. The significant agreement of the protein distributions with previously reported data supports the validity of this methodology, which opens new opportunities for studying the spatial brain proteome and its dynamics during the course of disease progression and other important biological and associated health aspects in a discovery-driven fashion. PMID:17255552

  9. Discovery and initial verification of differentially abundant proteins between multiple sclerosis patients and controls using iTRAQ and SID-SRM.

    PubMed

    Kroksveen, Ann C; Aasebø, Elise; Vethe, Heidrun; Van Pesch, Vincent; Franciotta, Diego; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Ulvik, Rune J; Vedeler, Christian; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Barsnes, Harald; Berven, Frode S

    2013-01-14

    In the present study, we aimed to discover cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteins with significant abundance difference between early multiple sclerosis patients and controls, and do an initial verification of these proteins using selected reaction monitoring (SRM). iTRAQ and Orbitrap MS were used to compare the CSF proteome of patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) (n=5), patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis that had CIS at the time of lumbar puncture (n=5), and controls with other inflammatory neurological disease (n=5). Of more than 1200 identified proteins, five proteins were identified with significant abundance difference between the patients and controls. In the initial verification using SRM we analyzed a larger patient and control cohort (n=132) and also included proteins reported as differentially abundant in multiple sclerosis in the literature. We found significant abundance difference for 11 proteins after verification, of which the five proteins alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, contactin-1, apolipoprotein D, clusterin, and kallikrein-6 were significantly differentially abundant in several of the group comparisons. This initial study form the basis for further biomarker verification studies in even larger sample cohorts, to determine if these proteins have relevance as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers for multiple sclerosis. PMID:23059536

  10. Study of model systems to test the potential function of Artemia group 1 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins.

    PubMed

    Warner, Alden H; Guo, Zhi-hao; Moshi, Sandra; Hudson, John W; Kozarova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Embryos of the brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana, are genetically programmed to develop either ovoviparously or oviparously depending on environmental conditions. Shortly upon their release from the female, oviparous embryos enter diapause during which time they undergo major metabolic rate depression while simultaneously synthesize proteins that permit them to tolerate a wide range of stressful environmental events including prolonged periods of desiccation, freezing, and anoxia. Among the known stress-related proteins that accumulate in embryos entering diapause are the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins. This large group of intrinsically disordered proteins has been proposed to act as molecular shields or chaperones of macromolecules which are otherwise intolerant to harsh conditions associated with diapause. In this research, we used two model systems to study the potential function of the group 1 LEA proteins from Artemia. Expression of the Artemia group 1 gene (AfrLEA-1) in Escherichia coli inhibited growth in proportion to the number of 20-mer amino acid motifs expressed. As well, clones of E. coli, transformed with the AfrLEA-1 gene, expressed multiple bands of LEA proteins, either intrinsically or upon induction with isopropyl-β-thiogalactoside (IPTG), in a vector-specific manner. Expression of AfrLEA-1 in E. coli did not overcome the inhibitory effects of high concentrations of NaCl and KCl but modulated growth inhibition resulting from high concentrations of sorbitol in the growth medium. In contrast, expression of the AfrLEA-1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae did not alter the growth kinetics or permit yeast to tolerate high concentrations of NaCl, KCl, or sorbitol. However, expression of AfrLEA-1 in yeast improved its tolerance to drying (desiccation) and freezing. Under our experimental conditions, both E. coli and S. cerevisiae appear to be potentially suitable hosts to study the function of Artemia group 1 LEA proteins under environmentally

  11. Disordered nucleiome: Abundance of intrinsic disorder in the DNA- and RNA-binding proteins in 1121 species from Eukaryota, Bacteria and Archaea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are abundant in various proteomes, where they play numerous important roles and complement biological activities of ordered proteins. Among functions assigned to IDPs are interactions with nucleic acids. However, often, such assignments are made based on the guilty-by-association principle. The validity of the extension of these correlations to all nucleic acid binding proteins has never been analyzed on a large scale across all domains of life. To fill this gap, we perform a comprehensive computational analysis of the abundance of intrinsic disorder and intrinsically disordered domains in nucleiomes (∼548 000 nucleic acid binding proteins) of 1121 species from Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota. Nucleiome is a whole complement of proteins involved in interactions with nucleic acids. We show that relative to other proteins in the corresponding proteomes, the DNA-binding proteins have significantly increased disorder content and are significantly enriched in disordered domains in Eukaryotes but not in Archaea and Bacteria. The RNA-binding proteins are significantly enriched in the disordered domains in Bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryota, while the overall abundance of disorder in these proteins is significantly increased in Bacteria, Archaea, animals and fungi. The high abundance of disorder in nucleiomes supports the notion that the nucleic acid binding proteins often require intrinsic disorder for their functions and regulation. PMID:27037624

  12. Properties of proteins binding plasma progesterone in pregnant Cape porcupines (Hystrix africaeaustralis).

    PubMed

    Louw, A I; van Wyk, V; van Aarde, R J

    1992-09-01

    The properties of progesterone-binding proteins in plasma of pregnant Cape porcupines were investigated using radiolabelled progesterone and either progesterone or cortisol as competing ligands as well as native plasma and heated (60 degrees C for 30 min) plasma. The results demonstrated that plasma from pregnant porcupines contains corticosteroid-binding globulin, but that it constitutes a significant portion of plasma progesterone-binding proteins only during the early stages of pregnancy. Corticosteroid-binding globulin of porcupines appears to be as heat labile as that of guinea-pigs. Concentrations of progesterone-binding proteins in plasma increased during pregnancy to reach concentrations at the eleventh week that were 25 times higher than those of progesterone; concentrations increased significantly (r2 = 0.88) with the increase in progesterone concentration. The results indicate that plasma progesterone-binding proteins in Cape porcupines (Old World hystricomorph) are similar in composition to those in guinea-pigs (New World hystricomorph). PMID:1432942

  13. Visualizing and Quantifying Intracellular Behavior and Abundance of the Core Circadian Clock Protein PERIOD2.

    PubMed

    Smyllie, Nicola J; Pilorz, Violetta; Boyd, James; Meng, Qing-Jun; Saer, Ben; Chesham, Johanna E; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Krogager, Toke P; Spiller, David G; Boot-Handford, Raymond; White, Michael R H; Hastings, Michael H; Loudon, Andrew S I

    2016-07-25

    Transcriptional-translational feedback loops (TTFLs) are a conserved molecular motif of circadian clocks. The principal clock in mammals is the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. In SCN neurons, auto-regulatory feedback on core clock genes Period (Per) and Cryptochrome (Cry) following nuclear entry of their protein products is the basis of circadian oscillation [1, 2]. In Drosophila clock neurons, the movement of dPer into the nucleus is subject to a circadian gate that generates a delay in the TTFL, and this delay is thought to be critical for oscillation [3, 4]. Analysis of the Drosophila clock has strongly influenced models of the mammalian clock, and such models typically infer complex spatiotemporal, intracellular behaviors of mammalian clock proteins. There are, however, no direct measures of the intracellular behavior of endogenous circadian proteins to support this: dynamic analyses have been limited and often have no circadian dimension [5-7]. We therefore generated a knockin mouse expressing a fluorescent fusion of native PER2 protein (PER2::VENUS) for live imaging. PER2::VENUS recapitulates the circadian functions of wild-type PER2 and, importantly, the behavior of PER2::VENUS runs counter to the Drosophila model: it does not exhibit circadian gating of nuclear entry. Using fluorescent imaging of PER2::VENUS, we acquired the first measures of mobility, molecular concentration, and localization of an endogenous circadian protein in individual mammalian cells, and we showed how the mobility and nuclear translocation of PER2 are regulated by casein kinase. These results provide new qualitative and quantitative insights into the cellular mechanism of the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:27374340

  14. Protein covalent immobilization via its scarce thiol versus abundant amine groups: Effect on orientation, cell binding domain exposure and conformational lability.

    PubMed

    Ba, O M; Hindie, M; Marmey, P; Gallet, O; Anselme, K; Ponche, A; Duncan, A C

    2015-10-01

    Quantity, orientation, conformation and covalent linkage of naturally cell adhesive proteins adsorbed or covalently linked to a surface, are known to influence the preservation of their subsequent long term cell adhesion properties and bioactivity. In the present work, we explore two different strategies for the covalent linking of plasma fibronectin (pFN) - used as a cell adhesive model protein, onto a polystyrene (PS) surface. One is aimed at tethering the protein to the surface in a semi-oriented fashion (via one of the 4 free thiol reactive groups on the protein) with a heterofunctional coupling agent (SSMPB method). The other aims to immobilize the protein in a more random fashion by reaction between the abundant pendant primary amine bearing amino acids of the pFN and activated carboxylic surface functions obtained after glutaric anhydride surface treatment (GA method). The overall goal will be to verify the hypothesis of a correlation between covalent immobilization of a model cell adhesive protein to a PS surface in a semi-oriented configuration (versus randomly oriented) with promotion of enhanced exposure of the protein's cell binding domain. This in turn would lead to enhanced cell adhesion. Ideally the goal is to elaborate substrates exhibiting a long term stable protein monolayer with preserved cell adhesive properties and bioactivity for biomaterial and/or cell adhesion commercial plate applications. However, the initial restrictive objective of this paper is to first quantitatively and qualitatively investigate the reversibly (merely adsorbed) versus covalently irreversibly bound protein to the surface after the immobilization procedure. Although immobilized surface amounts were similar (close to the monolayer range) for all immobilization approaches, covalent grafting showed improved retention and stronger "tethering" of the pFN protein to the surface (roughly 40%) after SDS rinsing compared to that for mere adsorption (0%) suggesting an added value

  15. Abundant and broad expression of transcription-induced chimeras and protein products in mammalian genomes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guanting; Wu, Jin; Zhao, Gangbin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Weihua; Mu, Shijie

    2016-02-12

    The expression of transcription-induced chimeras (TICs) was underestimated due to strategic and logical reasons. In order to thoroughly examine TICs, systematic survey of TIC events was conducted in mammalian genomes using ESTs, followed by experimental validation using RT-PCR and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The expression of ∼98% TIC events in at least one tissue or cell line from both mouse and human was verified. Besides, ∼40% TICs were broadly expressed, and ∼33% of TICs showed expression levels comparable to or higher than their upstream parental genes. We further identified putative chimeric proteins in public databases and validated two using Western blotting. GO analysis revealed that proteins resided in one multi-protein complex or functioning in metabolic or signaling pathway tended to produce fused products. Taken together, we have shown substantial evidence for the underestimated TIC events; and TICs could be a novel regulated way to further increases the proteome complexity in mammalian genomes. Possible regulation mechanisms and evolution of TICs were also discussed. PMID:26718406

  16. LEA polypeptide profiling of recalcitrant and orthodox legume seeds reveals ABI3-regulated LEA protein abundance linked to desiccation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hundertmark, Michaela; Buitink, Julia

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to orthodox seeds that acquire desiccation tolerance during maturation, recalcitrant seeds are unable to survive drying. These desiccation-sensitive seeds constitute an interesting model for comparative analysis with phylogenetically close species that are desiccation tolerant. Considering the importance of LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) proteins as protective molecules both in drought and in desiccation tolerance, the heat-stable proteome was characterized in cotyledons of the legume Castanospermum australe and it was compared with that of the orthodox model legume Medicago truncatula. RNA sequencing identified transcripts of 16 homologues out of 17 LEA genes for which polypeptides are detected in M. truncatula seeds. It is shown that for 12 LEA genes, polypeptides were either absent or strongly reduced in C. australe cotyledons compared with M. truncatula seeds. Instead, osmotically responsive, non-seed-specific dehydrins accumulated to high levels in the recalcitrant cotyledons compared with orthodox seeds. Next, M. truncatula mutants of the ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3) gene were characterized. Mature Mtabi3 seeds were found to be desiccation sensitive when dried below a critical water content of 0.4g H2O g DW–1. Characterization of the LEA proteome of the Mtabi3 seeds revealed a subset of LEA proteins with severely reduced abundance that were also found to be reduced or absent in C. australe cotyledons. Transcripts of these genes were indeed shown to be ABI3 responsive. The results highlight those LEA proteins that are critical to desiccation tolerance and suggest that comparable regulatory pathways responsible for their accumulation are missing in both desiccation-sensitive genotypes, revealing new insights into the mechanistic basis of the recalcitrant trait in seeds. PMID:24043848

  17. Subproteomics: identification of plasma membrane proteins from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Navarre, Catherine; Degand, Hervé; Bennett, Keiryn L; Crawford, Janne S; Mørtz, Ejvind; Boutry, Marc

    2002-12-01

    As a consequence of their poor solubility during isoelectric focusing, integral membrane proteins are generally absent from two-dimensional gel proteome maps. In order to analyze the yeast plasma membrane proteome, a plasma membrane purification protocol was optimized in order to reduce contaminating membranes and cytosolic proteins. Specifically, the new fractionation scheme largely depleted the plasma membrane fraction of cytosolic proteins by deoxycholate stripping and ribosomal proteins by sucrose gradient flotation. The plasma membrane complement was resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis using the cationic detergent cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide in the first, and sodium dodecyl sulfate in the second dimension, and fifty spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectometry. In spite of the presence of still contaminating ribosomal proteins, major proteins corresponded to known plasma membrane residents, the ABC transporters Pdr5p and Snq2p, the P-type H(+)-ATPase Pma1p, the glucose transporter Hxt7p, the seven transmembrane-span Mrh1p, the low affinity Fe(++) transporter Fet4p, the twelve-span Ptr2p, and the plasma membrane anchored casein kinase Yck2p. The four transmembrane-span proteins Sur7p and Nce102p were also present in the isolated plasma membranes, as well as the unknown protein Ygr266wp that probably contains a single transmembrane span. Thus, combining subcellular fractionation with adapted two-dimensional electrophoresis resulted in the identification of intrinsic plasma membrane proteins. PMID:12469340

  18. Norvaline and Norleucine May Have Been More Abundant Protein Components during Early Stages of Cell Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Carreño, Claudia; Becerra, Arturo; Lazcano, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    The absence of the hydrophobic norvaline and norleucine in the inventory of protein amino acids is readdressed. The well-documented intracellular accumulation of these two amino acids results from the low-substrate specificity of the branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic enzymes that act over a number of related α-ketoacids. The lack of absolute substrate specificity of leucyl-tRNA synthase leads to a mischarged norvalyl-tRNALeu that evades the translational proofreading activites and produces norvaline-containing proteins, (cf. Apostol et al. J Biol Chem 272:28980-28988, 1997). A similar situation explains the presence of minute but detectable amounts of norleucine in place of methionine. Since with few exceptions both leucine and methionine are rarely found in the catalytic sites of most enzymes, their substitution by norvaline and norleucine, respectively, would have not been strongly hindered in small structurally simple catalytic polypeptides during the early stages of biological evolution. The report that down-shifts of free oxygen lead to high levels of intracellular accumulation of pyruvate and the subsequent biosynthesis of norvaline (Soini et al. Microb Cell Factories 7:30, 2008) demonstrates the biochemical and metabolic consequences of the development of a highly oxidizing environment. The results discussed here also suggest that a broader definition of biomarkers in the search for extraterrestrial life may be required.

  19. A group 6 late embryogenesis abundant protein from common bean is a disordered protein with extended helical structure and oligomer-forming properties.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M; Reyes, José L; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2014-11-14

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association. PMID:25271167

  20. A Group 6 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein from Common Bean Is a Disordered Protein with Extended Helical Structure and Oligomer-forming Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y.; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O.; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M.; Reyes, José L.; Covarrubias, Alejandra A.

    2014-01-01

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association. PMID:25271167

  1. Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant proteins from embryos of Artemia franciscana: structural properties and protective abilities during desiccation.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Leaf C; Menze, Michael A; Hand, Steven C

    2014-01-01

    Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are highly hydrophilic, and their expression is associated with desiccation tolerance in both plants and animals. Here we show that two LEA proteins from embryos of Artemia franciscana, AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m, are intrinsically disordered in solution but upon desiccation gain secondary structure, as measured by circular dichroism. Trifluoroethanol and sodium dodecyl sulfate are both shown to induce α-helical structure in AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m. Bioinformatic predictions of secondary-structure content for both proteins correspond most closely to conformations measured in the dry state. Because some LEA proteins afford protection to desiccation-sensitive proteins during drying and subsequent rehydration, we tested for this capacity in AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m. The protective capacities vary, depending on the target enzyme. For the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, neither AfrLEA2 nor AfrLEA3m, with or without trehalose present, was able to afford protection better than that provided by bovine serum albumin (BSA) under the same conditions. However, for another cytoplasmic enzyme, phosphofructokinase, both AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m in the presence of trehalose were able to afford protection far greater than that provided by BSA with trehalose. Finally, for the mitochondrial enzyme citrate synthase, 400-μg/mL AfrLEA3m without trehalose provided significantly more protection than the same concentration of either AfrLEA2 or BSA. PMID:25244376

  2. Proteome profiling of the growth phases of Leishmania pifanoi promastigotes in axenic culture reveals differential abundance of immunostimulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Alcolea, Pedro J; Alonso, Ana; García-Tabares, Francisco; Mena, María del Carmen; Ciordia, Sergio; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is a term that encompasses a compendium of neglected tropical diseases caused by dimorphic and digenetic protozoan parasites from the genus Leishmania (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae). The clinical manifestations of neotropical cutaneous leishmaniasis (NCL) caused by Leishmania pifanoi and other species of the "Leishmania mexicana complex" mainly correspond to anergic diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (ADCL), which is the origin of considerable morbidity. Despite the outstanding advances in the characterization of the trypanosomatid genomes and proteomes, the biology of this species has been scarcely explored. However, the close relation of L. pifanoi to the sequenced species L. mexicana and others included in the "L. mexicana complex" allowed us to perform a two-dimension electrophoresis (2DE) approach to the promastigote proteome at the differential expression level. Protein identifications were performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). This insight has revealed similarities and differences between L. pifanoi and other species responsible for cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. Interestingly, certain proteins that were previously described as immunostimulatory (elongation factor 1β, trypanothione peroxidase, heat shock protein 70, enolase, GDP-forming succinyl-CoA and aldehyde dehydrogenase) are more abundant in the final growth stages of promastigotes (late-logarithmic and/or stationary phase) in the case of L. pifanoi. PMID:26992294

  3. Fumonisin mycotoxicosis in broilers: plasma proteins and coagulation modifications.

    PubMed

    Espada, Y; Ruiz de Gopegui, R; Cuadradas, C; Cabañes, F J

    1997-01-01

    The effects of fumonisin B1 (FB1) intoxication in chickens were evaluated in three experiments. Two-day-old broiler chicks were fed a diet containing 10 mg pure FB1/kg feed for 6 days; some chicks were necropsied at this time, and others were allowed to recover for 5 wk before necropsy. In two other experiments, 2-day-old chicks were fed a broiler starter ration prepared with Fusarium moniliforme culture material containing FB1; one group received 30 mg/kg for 2 wk, and another received 300 mg FB1/kg for 8 days. Compared with controls, intoxicated chicks exhibited decreased prothrombin time, increased plasma fibrinogen (not included for the group receiving 30 mg/kg of culture material), and increased antithrombin III activity. Simultaneously decreased serum albumin concentration and increased serum globulins could be observed in groups intoxicated with F. moniliforme culture material containing FB1. The group allowed to recover for 5 wk did not exhibit modifications in hemostasis or serum proteins compared with controls. The results indicate that low doses of pure FB1 (10 mg/kg) and FB1 from F. moniliforme culture material (30 mg/kg) may alter hemostasis and serum proteins in young chicks. PMID:9087322

  4. Engineering protein processing of the mammary gland to produce abundant hemophilia B therapy in milk

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianguo; Xu, Weijie; Ross, Jason W.; Walters, Eric M.; Butler, Stephen P.; Whyte, Jeff J.; Kelso, Lindsey; Fatemi, Mostafa; Vanderslice, Nicholas C.; Giroux, Keith; Spate, Lee D.; Samuel, Melissa S.; Murphy, Cliff N.; Wells, Kevin D.; Masiello, Nick C.; Prather, Randall S.; Velander, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Both the low animal cell density of bioreactors and their ability to post-translationally process recombinant factor IX (rFIX) limit hemophilia B therapy to <20% of the world’s population. We used transgenic pigs to make rFIX in milk at about 3,000-fold higher output than provided by industrial bioreactors. However, this resulted in incomplete γ-carboxylation and propeptide cleavage where both processes are transmembrane mediated. We then bioengineered the co-expression of truncated, soluble human furin (rFurin) with pro-rFIX at a favorable enzyme to substrate ratio. This resulted in the complete conversion of pro-rFIX to rFIX while yielding a normal lactation. Importantly, these high levels of propeptide processing by soluble rFurin did not preempt γ-carboxylation in the ER and therefore was compartmentalized to the Trans-Golgi Network (TGN) and also to milk. The Golgi specific engineering demonstrated here segues the ER targeted enhancement of γ-carboxylation needed to biomanufacture coagulation proteins like rFIX using transgenic livestock. PMID:26387706

  5. Engineering protein processing of the mammary gland to produce abundant hemophilia B therapy in milk.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianguo; Xu, Weijie; Ross, Jason W; Walters, Eric M; Butler, Stephen P; Whyte, Jeff J; Kelso, Lindsey; Fatemi, Mostafa; Vanderslice, Nicholas C; Giroux, Keith; Spate, Lee D; Samuel, Melissa S; Murphy, Cliff N; Wells, Kevin D; Masiello, Nick C; Prather, Randall S; Velander, William H

    2015-01-01

    Both the low animal cell density of bioreactors and their ability to post-translationally process recombinant factor IX (rFIX) limit hemophilia B therapy to <20% of the world's population. We used transgenic pigs to make rFIX in milk at about 3,000-fold higher output than provided by industrial bioreactors. However, this resulted in incomplete γ-carboxylation and propeptide cleavage where both processes are transmembrane mediated. We then bioengineered the co-expression of truncated, soluble human furin (rFurin) with pro-rFIX at a favorable enzyme to substrate ratio. This resulted in the complete conversion of pro-rFIX to rFIX while yielding a normal lactation. Importantly, these high levels of propeptide processing by soluble rFurin did not preempt γ-carboxylation in the ER and therefore was compartmentalized to the Trans-Golgi Network (TGN) and also to milk. The Golgi specific engineering demonstrated here segues the ER targeted enhancement of γ-carboxylation needed to biomanufacture coagulation proteins like rFIX using transgenic livestock. PMID:26387706

  6. Myosin Gene Expression and Protein Abundance in Different Castes of the Formosan Subterranean Termite (Coptotermes formosanus).

    PubMed

    Tarver, Matthew R; Florane, Christopher B; Mattison, Christopher P; Holloway, Beth A; Lax, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The Formosan subterranean termite (Coptotermes formosanus) is an important worldwide pest, each year causing millions of dollars in structural damage and control costs. Termite colonies are composed of several phenotypically distinct castes. Termites utilize these multiple castes to efficiently perform unique roles within the colony. During the molting/caste differentiation process, multiple genes are believed to be involved in the massive reorganization of the body plan. The objective of this research was to analyze the muscle gene, myosin, to further understand the role it plays in C. formosanus development. We find that comparing worker vs. solider caste myosin gene expression is up-regulated in the soldier and a myosin antibody-reactive protein suggests changes in splicing. Comparison of body regions of mature soldier and worker castes indicates a greater level of myosin transcript in the heads. The differential expression of this important muscle-related gene is anticipated considering the large amount of body plan reorganization and muscle found in the soldier caste. These results have a direct impact on our understanding of the downstream genes in the caste differentiation process and may lead to new targets for termite control. PMID:26466734

  7. Treatment Characteristics of Second Order Structure of Proteins Using Low-Pressure Oxygen RF Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nobuya; Nakahigashi, Akari; Kawaguchi, Ryutaro; Goto, Masaaki

    2010-10-01

    Removal of proteins from the surface of medical equipments is attempted using oxygen plasma produced by RF discharge. FTIR spectra indicate that the bonding of C-H and N-H in the casein protein is reduced after irradiation of oxygen plasma. Also, the second order structure of a protein such as α-helix and β-sheet are modified by the oxygen plasma. Complete removal of casein protein with the concentration of 0.016 mg/cm2 that is equivalent to remnants on the medical equipment requires two hours avoiding the damage to medical equipments.

  8. Treatment Characteristics of Second Order Structure of Proteins Using Low-Pressure Oxygen RF Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Nobuya; Nakahigashi, Akari; Kawaguchi, Ryutaro; Goto, Masaaki

    2010-10-13

    Removal of proteins from the surface of medical equipments is attempted using oxygen plasma produced by RF discharge. FTIR spectra indicate that the bonding of C-H and N-H in the casein protein is reduced after irradiation of oxygen plasma. Also, the second order structure of a protein such as {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet are modified by the oxygen plasma. Complete removal of casein protein with the concentration of 0.016 mg/cm{sup 2} that is equivalent to remnants on the medical equipment requires two hours avoiding the damage to medical equipments.

  9. Proteomics analysis of vesicles isolated from plasma and urine of prostate cancer patients using a multiplex, aptamer-based protein array

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Joanne Louise; Brennan, Paul; Gurney, Mark; Webber, Jason Paul; Spary, Lisa Kate; Carton, David Gil; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Walton, Sean Peter; Mason, Malcolm David; Tabi, Zsuzsanna; Clayton, Aled

    2016-01-01

    Proteomics analysis of biofluid-derived vesicles holds enormous potential for discovering non-invasive disease markers. Obtaining vesicles of sufficient quality and quantity for profiling studies has, however, been a major problem, as samples are often replete with co-isolated material that can interfere with the identification of genuine low abundance, vesicle components. Here, we used a combination of ultracentrifugation and size-exclusion chromatography to isolate and analyse vesicles of plasma or urine origin. We describe a sample-handling workflow that gives reproducible, quality vesicle isolations sufficient for subsequent protein profiling. Using a semi-quantitative aptamer-based protein array, we identified around 1,000 proteins, of which almost 400 were present at comparable quantities in plasma versus urine vesicles. Significant differences were, however, apparent with elements like HSP90, integrin αVβ5 and Contactin-1 more prevalent in urinary vesicles, while hepatocyte growth factor activator, prostate-specific antigen–antichymotrypsin complex and many others were more abundant in plasma vesicles. This was also applied to a small set of specimens collected from men with metastatic prostate cancer, highlighting several proteins with the potential to indicate treatment refractory disease. The study provides a practical platform for furthering protein profiling of vesicles in prostate cancer, and, hopefully, many other disease scenarios. PMID:27363484

  10. Proteomics analysis of vesicles isolated from plasma and urine of prostate cancer patients using a multiplex, aptamer-based protein array.

    PubMed

    Welton, Joanne Louise; Brennan, Paul; Gurney, Mark; Webber, Jason Paul; Spary, Lisa Kate; Carton, David Gil; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Walton, Sean Peter; Mason, Malcolm David; Tabi, Zsuzsanna; Clayton, Aled

    2016-01-01

    Proteomics analysis of biofluid-derived vesicles holds enormous potential for discovering non-invasive disease markers. Obtaining vesicles of sufficient quality and quantity for profiling studies has, however, been a major problem, as samples are often replete with co-isolated material that can interfere with the identification of genuine low abundance, vesicle components. Here, we used a combination of ultracentrifugation and size-exclusion chromatography to isolate and analyse vesicles of plasma or urine origin. We describe a sample-handling workflow that gives reproducible, quality vesicle isolations sufficient for subsequent protein profiling. Using a semi-quantitative aptamer-based protein array, we identified around 1,000 proteins, of which almost 400 were present at comparable quantities in plasma versus urine vesicles. Significant differences were, however, apparent with elements like HSP90, integrin αVβ5 and Contactin-1 more prevalent in urinary vesicles, while hepatocyte growth factor activator, prostate-specific antigen-antichymotrypsin complex and many others were more abundant in plasma vesicles. This was also applied to a small set of specimens collected from men with metastatic prostate cancer, highlighting several proteins with the potential to indicate treatment refractory disease. The study provides a practical platform for furthering protein profiling of vesicles in prostate cancer, and, hopefully, many other disease scenarios. PMID:27363484

  11. Protein diffusion in plant cell plasma membranes: the cell-wall corral

    PubMed Central

    Martinière, Alexandre; Runions, John

    2013-01-01

    Studying protein diffusion informs us about how proteins interact with their environment. Work on protein diffusion over the last several decades has illustrated the complex nature of biological lipid bilayers. The plasma membrane contains an array of membrane-spanning proteins or proteins with peripheral membrane associations. Maintenance of plasma membrane microstructure can be via physical features that provide intrinsic ordering such as lipid microdomains, or from membrane-associated structures such as the cytoskeleton. Recent evidence indicates, that in the case of plant cells, the cell wall seems to be a major player in maintaining plasma membrane microstructure. This interconnection / interaction between cell-wall and plasma membrane proteins most likely plays an important role in signal transduction, cell growth, and cell physiological responses to the environment. PMID:24381579

  12. Binding contribution between synaptic vesicle membrane and plasma membrane proteins in neurons: an AFM study.

    PubMed

    Sritharan, K C; Quinn, A S; Taatjes, D J; Jena, B P

    1998-01-01

    The final step in the exocytotic process is the docking and fusion of membrane-bound secretory vesicles at the cell plasma membrane. This docking and fusion is brought about by several participating vesicle membrane, plasma membrane and soluble cytosolic proteins. A clear understanding of the interactions between these participating proteins giving rise to vesicle docking and fusion is essential. In this study, the binding force profiles between synaptic vesicle membrane and plasma membrane proteins have been examined for the first time using the atomic force microscope. Binding force contributions of a synaptic vesicle membrane protein VAMP1, and the plasma membrane proteins SNAP-25 and syntaxin, are also implicated from these studies. Our study suggests that these three proteins are the major, if not the only contributors to the interactive binding force that exist between the two membranes. PMID:10452835

  13. Integrated analysis of transcriptomic and proteomic data of Desulfovibrio vulgaris: Zero-Inflated Poisson regression models to predict abundance of undetected proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Lei; Wu, Gang; Brockman, Fred J.; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-05-04

    Abstract Advances in DNA microarray and proteomics technologies have enabled high-throughput measurement of mRNA expression and protein abundance. Parallel profiling of mRNA and protein on a global scale and integrative analysis of these two data types could provide additional insight into the metabolic mechanisms underlying complex biological systems. However, because protein abundance and mRNA expression are affected by many cellular and physical processes, there have been conflicting results on the correlation of these two measurements. In addition, as current proteomic methods can detect only a small fraction of proteins present in cells, no correlation study of these two data types has been done thus far at the whole-genome level. In this study, we describe a novel data-driven statistical model to integrate whole-genome microarray and proteomic data collected from Desulfovibrio vulgaris grown under three different conditions. Based on the Poisson distribution pattern of proteomic data and the fact that a large number of proteins were undetected (excess zeros), Zero-inflated Poisson models were used to define the correlation pattern of mRNA and protein abundance. The models assumed that there is a probability mass at zero representing some of the undetected proteins because of technical limitations. The models thus use abundance measurements of transcripts and proteins experimentally detected as input to generate predictions of protein abundances as output for all genes in the genome. We demonstrated the statistical models by comparatively analyzing D. vulgaris grown on lactate-based versus formate-based media. The increased expressions of Ech hydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh)-periplasmic Fe-only hydrogenase (Hyd) pathway for ATP synthesis were predicted for D. vulgaris grown on formate.

  14. In vitro protein binding of liraglutide in human plasma determined by reiterated stepwise equilibrium dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Plum, Anne; Jensen, Lisbeth Bjerring; Kristensen, Jesper Bøggild

    2013-01-01

    Liraglutide is a human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It is based on human GLP-1 with the addition of a 16-carbon fatty acid, which facilitates binding to plasma proteins, thus prolonging the elimination half-life and allowing once-daily administration. It has not been possible to quantify liraglutide protein binding by ultrafiltration (the usual method of choice), as the lipophilic molecule becomes trapped in the filter membrane. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a methodology that could determine the extent of liraglutide binding to plasma proteins in vitro. We report here the details of a novel reiterated stepwise equilibrium dialysis assay that has successfully been used to quantify liraglutide plasma protein binding. The assay allowed quantification of liraglutide binding to proteins in purified plasma protein solutions and human plasma samples and was effective at plasma dilutions as low as 5%. At a clinically relevant liraglutide concentration (104 pM), greater than 98.9% of liraglutide was bound to protein. Specific binding to human serum albumin and α1-acid glycoprotein was 99.4% and 99.3%, respectively. The novel methodology described herein could have an application in the quantification of plasma protein binding of other highly lipophilic drug molecules. PMID:23853127

  15. Biofield-effect protein-sensor: Plasma functionalization of polyaniline, protein immobilization, and sensing mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chae-Ryong; Lee, Hyun-Uk; Ahn, Kyun; Jeong, Se-Young; Choi, Jun-Hee; Kim, Jinwoo; Cho, Jiung

    2014-06-01

    We report the fabrication of a biofield-effect protein-sensor (BioFEP) based on atmospheric-pressure plasma (AP) treatment of a conducting polyaniline (PANI) film. Successive H2 and O2 AP (OHAP) treatment generated dominant hydrophilic -OH and O=CO- functional groups on the PANI film surface, which served as strong binding sites to immobilize bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein molecules. The output current changes of the BioFEP as a function of BSA concentration were obtained. The resistance of the OHAP surface could be sensitively increased from 2.5 × 108 Ω to 2.0 × 1012 Ω with increasing BSA concentrations in the range of 0.025-4 μg/ml. The results suggest that the method is a simple and cost-effective tool to determine the concentration of BSA by measuring electrical resistance.

  16. Administration of Exogenous Growth Hormone Is Associated with Changes in Plasma and Intracellular Mammary Amino Acid Profiles and Abundance of the Mammary Gland Amino Acid Transporter SLC3A2 in Mid-Lactation Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Sciascia, Quentin L.; Pacheco, David; McCoard, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) identify changes in plasma and mammary intracellular amino acid (AA) profiles in dairy cows treated with growth hormone (GH), and (2) evaluate the expression of mammary gland genes involved in the transport of AA identified in (1). Eight non-pregnant (n = 4 per group) lactating dairy cows were treated with a single subcutaneous injection of either a slow-release formulation of commercially available GH (Lactotropin 500 mg) or physiological saline solution. Six days after treatment, cows were milked and blood collected from the jugular vein for the analysis of free AA in the plasma. Cows were euthanized and mammary tissue harvested. Treatment with GH increased milk, protein, fat and lactose yields, with no effect on dry matter intake. Plasma concentrations of lysine and group I AA decreased significantly, and arginine, methionine, tyrosine and arginine-family AA tended to decrease in GH-treated cows. Concentrations of intracellular glycine, serine and glutamate increased significantly, with a trend for decreased arginine observed in the mammary gland of GH-treated cows. A trend for increased concentrations of intracellular total AA, NEAA and arginine-family AA were observed in the mammary gland of GH-treated cows. Variance in the concentration of plasma methionine, tyrosine, valine, alanine, ornithine, BCAA, EAA was significantly different between treatments. Variance in the concentration of intracellular lysine, valine, glutamine, EAA and group II was significantly different between treatments. AA changes were associated with increased mRNA abundance of the mammary gland AA transporter SLC3A2. We propose that these changes occur to support increased milk protein and fatty acid production in the mammary gland of GH-treated cows via potential mTOR pathway signaling. PMID:26226162

  17. STIM Proteins and the Endoplasmic Reticulum-Plasma Membrane Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Silvia; Meyer, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic organelles can interact with each other through stable junctions where the two membranes are kept in close apposition. The junction that connects the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane (ER-PM junction) is unique in providing a direct communication link between the ER and the PM. In a recently discovered signaling process, STIM (stromal-interacting molecule) proteins sense a drop in ER Ca2+ levels and directly activate Orai PM Ca2+ channels across the junction space. In an inverse process, a voltage-gated PM Ca2+ channel can directly open ER ryanodine-receptor Ca2+ channels in striated-muscle cells. Although ER-PM junctions were first described 50 years ago, their broad importance in Ca2+ signaling, as well as in the regulation of cholesterol and phosphatidylinositol lipid transfer, has only recently been realized. Here, we discuss research from different fields to provide a broad perspective on the structures and unique roles of ER-PM junctions in controlling signaling and metabolic processes. PMID:21548779

  18. Phytochrome-imposed oscillations in PIF3 protein abundance regulate hypocotyl growth under diurnal light/dark conditions in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Soy, Judit; Leivar, Pablo; González-Schain, Nahuel; Sentandreu, Maria; Prat, Salomé; Quail, Peter H.; Monte, Elena

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Arabidopsis seedlings display rhythmic growth when grown under diurnal conditions, with maximal elongation rates occurring at the end of the night under short-day photoperiods. Current evidence indicates that this behavior involves the action of the growth-promoting bHLH factors PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) and PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 5 (PIF5) at the end of the night, through a coincidence mechanism that combines their transcriptional regulation by the circadian clock with control of protein accumulation by light. To assess the possible role of PIF3 in this process, we have analyzed hypocotyl responses and marker gene expression in pif single- and higher-order mutants. The data show that PIF3 plays a prominent role as a promoter of seedling growth under diurnal light/dark conditions, in conjunction with PIF4 and PIF5. In addition, we provide evidence that PIF3 functions in this process through its intrinsic transcriptional regulatory activity, at least in part by directly targeting growth-related genes, and independently of its ability to regulate phytochrome B (phyB) levels. Furthermore, in sharp contrast to PIF4 and PIF5, our data show that the PIF3 gene is not subject to transcriptional regulation by the clock, but that PIF3 protein abundance oscillates under diurnal conditions as a result of a progressive decline in PIF3 protein degradation mediated by photoactivated phyB, and consequent accumulation of the bHLH factor during the dark period. Collectively, the data suggest that phyB-mediated, post-translational regulation allows PIF3 accumulation to peak just before dawn, at which time it accelerates hypocotyl growth, together with PIF4 and PIF5, by directly regulating the induction of growth-related genes. PMID:22409654

  19. Competition between Heterochromatic Loci Allows the Abundance of the Silencing Protein, Sir4, to Regulate de novo Assembly of Heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Larin, Michelle L.; Harding, Katherine; Williams, Elizabeth C.; Lianga, Noel; Doré, Carole; Pilon, Sophie; Langis, Éric; Yanofsky, Corey; Rudner, Adam D.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the locations and boundaries of heterochromatin are critical during development, and de novo assembly of silent chromatin in budding yeast is a well-studied model for how new sites of heterochromatin assemble. De novo assembly cannot occur in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and one to two divisions are needed for complete silent chromatin assembly and transcriptional repression. Mutation of DOT1, the histone H3 lysine 79 (K79) methyltransferase, and SET1, the histone H3 lysine 4 (K4) methyltransferase, speed de novo assembly. These observations have led to the model that regulated demethylation of histones may be a mechanism for how cells control the establishment of heterochromatin. We find that the abundance of Sir4, a protein required for the assembly of silent chromatin, decreases dramatically during a G1 arrest and therefore tested if changing the levels of Sir4 would also alter the speed of de novo establishment. Halving the level of Sir4 slows heterochromatin establishment, while increasing Sir4 speeds establishment. yku70Δ and ubp10Δ cells also speed de novo assembly, and like dot1Δ cells have defects in subtelomeric silencing, suggesting that these mutants may indirectly speed de novo establishment by liberating Sir4 from telomeres. Deleting RIF1 and RIF2, which suppresses the subtelomeric silencing defects in these mutants, rescues the advanced de novo establishment in yku70Δ and ubp10Δ cells, but not in dot1Δ cells, suggesting that YKU70 and UBP10 regulate Sir4 availability by modulating subtelomeric silencing, while DOT1 functions directly to regulate establishment. Our data support a model whereby the demethylation of histone H3 K79 and changes in Sir4 abundance and availability define two rate-limiting steps that regulate de novo assembly of heterochromatin. PMID:26587833

  20. Integrated Proteomic and Glycoproteomic Analyses of Prostate Cancer Cells Reveal Glycoprotein Alteration in Protein Abundance and Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Punit; Wang, Xiangchun; Yang, Weiming; Toghi Eshghi, Shadi; Sun, Shisheng; Hoti, Naseruddin; Chen, Lijun; Yang, Shuang; Pasay, Jered; Rubin, Abby; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the U.S. and worldwide, and androgen-deprivation therapy remains the principal treatment for patients. Although a majority of patients initially respond to androgen-deprivation therapy, most will eventually develop castration resistance. An increased understanding of the mechanisms that underline the pathogenesis of castration resistance is therefore needed to develop novel therapeutics. LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines are models for androgen-dependence and androgen-independence, respectively. Herein, we report the comparative analysis of these two prostate cancer cell lines using integrated global proteomics and glycoproteomics. Global proteome profiling of the cell lines using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling and two- dimensional (2D) liquid chromatography-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) led to the quantification of 8063 proteins. To analyze the glycoproteins, glycosite-containing peptides were isolated from the same iTRAQ-labeled peptides from the cell lines using solid phase extraction followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. Among the 1810 unique N-linked glycosite-containing peptides from 653 identified N-glycoproteins, 176 glycoproteins were observed to be different between the two cell lines. A majority of the altered glycoproteins were also observed with changes in their global protein expression levels. However, alterations in 21 differentially expressed glycoproteins showed no change at the protein abundance level, indicating that the glycosylation site occupancy was different between the two cell lines. To determine the glycosylation heterogeneity at specific glycosylation sites, we further identified and quantified 1145 N-linked glycopeptides with attached glycans in the same iTRAQ-labeled samples. These intact glycopeptides contained 67 glycan compositions and showed increased fucosylation in PC3 cells in several of the examined glycosylation sites. The increase in

  1. Determination of Cremophor EL in plasma after sample preparation with solid phase extraction and plasma protein precipitation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, T H; Böhler, J; Frahm, A W

    2001-01-01

    The non-ionic emulsifier Cremophor EL can be quantified using a special potentiometric titration technique with barium chloride activation and precipitation with sodium tetraphenylborate. The end point of the titration is indicated by an ionsensitive coated wire electrode which responds to an excess of tetraphenylborate ions. Sample preparation is necessary to quantify the excipient in plasma of patients receiving ciclosporin formulations with Cremophor EL (Sandimmun), since plasma proteins cause disturbances of the titration. Solid phase extraction was tested with various sorbent materials. Although some of the sorbents yielded good extraction rates of Cremophor EL from aqueous solutions, the extraction rates from plasma were significantly lower. Therefore, plasma protein precipitation with acetonitrile has been examined as an alternative to SPE and has been proved the superior method. Using the precipitation technique, a recovery rate of above 90% was achieved. Furthermore, the limit of detection from plasma was found to be 30 microg, in analogy to the determination from aqueous solutions. The combination of the plasma protein precipitation with the potentiometric titration allows quantitation and thus pharmakokinetic investigations of Cremophor EL in patients treated with Sandimmun after kidney-transplantation. PMID:11199229

  2. Meal composition and plasma amino acid ratios: Effect of various proteins or carbohydrates, and of various protein concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokogoshi, Hidehiko; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of meals containing various proteins and carbohydrates, and of those containing various proportions of protein (0 percent to 20 percent of a meal, by weight) or of carbohydrate (0 percent to 75 percent), on plasma levels of certain large neutral amino acids (LNAA) in rats previously fasted for 19 hours were examined. Also the plasma tryptophan ratios (the ratio of the plasma trytophan concentration to the summed concentrations of the other large neutral amino acids) and other plasma amino acid ratios were calculated. (The plasma tryptophan ratio has been shown to determine brain tryptophan levels and, thereby, to affect the synthesis and release of the neurotransmitter serotonin). A meal containing 70 percent to 75 percent of an insulin-secreting carbohydrate (dextrose or dextrin) increased plasma insulin levels and the tryptophan ratio; those containing 0 percent or 25 percent carbohydrate failed to do so. Addition of as little as 5 percent casein to a 70 percent carbohydrate meal fully blocked the increase in the plasma tryptophan ratio without affecting the secretion of insulin - probably by contributing much larger quantities of the other LNAA than of tryptophan to the blood. Dietary proteins differed in their ability to suppress the carbohydrate-induced rise in the plasma tryptophan ratio. Addition of 10 percent casein, peanut meal, or gelatin fully blocked this increase, but lactalbumin failed to do so, and egg white did so only partially. (Consumption of the 10 percent gelatin meal also produced a major reduction in the plasma tyrosine ratio, and may thereby have affected brain tyrosine levels and catecholamine synthesis.) These observations suggest that serotonin-releasing neurons in brains of fasted rats are capable of distinguishing (by their metabolic effects) between meals poor in protein but rich in carbohydrates that elicit insulin secretion, and all other meals. The changes in brain serotonin caused by carbohydrate-rich, protein

  3. WHEY PROTEIN SUPPRESSES PLASMA GHRELIN CONCENTRATIONS IN OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE MEN AND WOMEN.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most satiating macronutrient appears to be dietary protein; however, it is unclear if different dietary protein sources have differing effects on satiety. Few studies that have investigated the effects of whey protein on satiety hormones, such as plasma ghrelin, in overweight and obese men and w...

  4. Soluble Proteins Form Film by the Treatment of Low Temperature Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikehara, Sanae; Sakakita, Hajime; Ishikawa, Kenji; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Nakanishi, Hayao; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Hori, Masaru; Ikehara, Yuzuru

    2015-09-01

    It has been pointed out that low temperature plasma in atmosphere was feasible to use for hemostasis without heat injury. Indeed, earlier studies demonstrated that low temperature plasma played an important role to stimulate platelets to aggregate and turned on the proteolytic activities of coagulation factors, resulting in the acceleration of the natural blood coagulation process. On the other hands, our developed equips could immediately form clots upon the contact with plasma flair, while the histological appearance was different from natural coagulation. Based on these findings in formed clots, we sought to determine if plasma flair supplied by our devices was capable of forming film using a series of soluble proteins Following plasma treatment, films were formed from bovine serum albumin, and the other plasma proteins at physiological concentration. Analysis of trans-electron microscope demonstrated that plasma treatment generated small protein particles and made them fuse to be larger aggregations The combined results demonstrated that plasma are capable of aggregating soluble proteins and that platelets and coagulation factors are not necessary for plasma induced blood coagulation. Supported in part by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Priority Area (21590454, 24590498, and 24108006 to Y. I.).

  5. Multi-protein assemblies underlie the mesoscale organization of the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Sinem K.; Honigmann, Alf; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; Lang, Thorsten; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2014-01-01

    Most proteins have uneven distributions in the plasma membrane. Broadly speaking, this may be caused by mechanisms specific to each protein, or may be a consequence of a general pattern that affects the distribution of all membrane proteins. The latter hypothesis has been difficult to test in the past. Here, we introduce several approaches based on click chemistry, through which we study the distribution of membrane proteins in living cells, as well as in membrane sheets. We found that the plasma membrane proteins form multi-protein assemblies that are long lived (minutes), and in which protein diffusion is restricted. The formation of the assemblies is dependent on cholesterol. They are separated and anchored by the actin cytoskeleton. Specific proteins are preferentially located in different regions of the assemblies, from their cores to their edges. We conclude that the assemblies constitute a basic mesoscale feature of the membrane, which affects the patterning of most membrane proteins, and possibly also their activity. PMID:25060237

  6. Multi-protein assemblies underlie the mesoscale organization of the plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saka, Sinem K.; Honigmann, Alf; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; Lang, Thorsten; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2014-07-01

    Most proteins have uneven distributions in the plasma membrane. Broadly speaking, this may be caused by mechanisms specific to each protein, or may be a consequence of a general pattern that affects the distribution of all membrane proteins. The latter hypothesis has been difficult to test in the past. Here, we introduce several approaches based on click chemistry, through which we study the distribution of membrane proteins in living cells, as well as in membrane sheets. We found that the plasma membrane proteins form multi-protein assemblies that are long lived (minutes), and in which protein diffusion is restricted. The formation of the assemblies is dependent on cholesterol. They are separated and anchored by the actin cytoskeleton. Specific proteins are preferentially located in different regions of the assemblies, from their cores to their edges. We conclude that the assemblies constitute a basic mesoscale feature of the membrane, which affects the patterning of most membrane proteins, and possibly also their activity.

  7. Increased levels of hyper-stable protein aggregates in plasma of older adults.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke; Trasatti, Hannah; Wymer, James P; Colón, Wilfredo

    2016-06-01

    Proteins that misfold into hyper-stable/degradation-resistant species during aging may accumulate and disrupt protein homeostasis (i.e., proteostasis), thereby posing a survival risk to any organism. Using the method diagonal two-dimensional (D2D) SDS-PAGE, which separates hyper-stable SDS-resistant proteins at a proteomics level, we analyzed the plasma of healthy young (<30 years) and older (60-80 years) adults. We discovered the presence of soluble SDS-resistant protein aggregates in the plasma of older adults, but found significantly lower levels in the plasma of young adults. We identified the inflammation-related chaperone protein haptoglobin as the main component of the hyper-stable aggregates. This observation is consistent with the growing link between accumulations of protein aggregates and aging across many organisms. It is plausible higher amounts of SDS-resistant protein aggregates in the plasma of older adults may reflect a compromise in proteostasis that may potentially indicate cellular aging and/or disease risk. The results of this study have implications for further understanding the link between aging and the accumulation of protein aggregates, as well as potential for the development of aging-related biomarkers. More broadly, this novel application of D2D SDS-PAGE may be used to identify, quantify, and characterize the degradation-resistant protein aggregates in human plasma or any biological system. PMID:27179971

  8. Progranulin protein levels are differently regulated in plasma and CSF

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Alexandra M.; Finch, NiCole A.; Thomas, Colleen S.; Wojtas, Aleksandra; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Roberts, Rosebud O.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Knopman, David S.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate the relationship between plasma and CSF progranulin (PGRN) levels. Methods: Plasma and CSF PGRN were measured in a cohort of 345 subjects from the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging by ELISA. Single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping was performed using TaqMan assays. Associations between PGRN and sex, age at sample collection, diagnosis, single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes (GRN, SORT1, and APOE), and Pittsburgh compound B score were explored separately in CSF and plasma using single variable linear regression models. Pearson partial correlation coefficient was used to estimate the correlation of PGRN in CSF and plasma. Results: Plasma (p = 0.0031) and CSF (p = 0.0044) PGRN significantly increased with age, whereas plasma PGRN levels were 7% lower (p = 0.0025) and CSF PGRN levels 5% higher (p = 0.0024) in male compared with female participants. Correcting for age and sex, higher plasma PGRN was associated with higher CSF PGRN (partial r = 0.17, p = 0.004). In plasma, both rs5848 (GRN; p = 0.002) and rs646776 (SORT1; p = 3.56E-7) were associated with PGRN, while only rs5848 showed highly significant association in CSF (p = 5.59E-14). Age, sex, rs5848 genotype, and plasma PGRN together accounted for only 18% of the variability observed in CSF PGRN. Conclusions: While some correlation exists between plasma and CSF PGRN, age, sex, and genetic factors differently affect PGRN levels. Therefore, caution should be taken when using plasma PGRN to predict PGRN changes in the brain. These findings further highlight that plasma PGRN levels may not accurately predict clinical features or response to future frontotemporal lobar degeneration therapies. PMID:24771538

  9. Expression profiles of 12 late embryogenesis abundant protein genes from Tamarix hispida in response to abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Gao, Caiqiu; Liu, Yali; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Kaimin; Wang, Yucheng

    2014-01-01

    Twelve embryogenesis abundant protein (LEA) genes (named ThLEA-1 to -12) were cloned from Tamarix hispida. The expression profiles of these genes in response to NaCl, PEG, and abscisic acid (ABA) in roots, stems, and leaves of T. hispida were assessed using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). These ThLEAs all showed tissue-specific expression patterns in roots, stems, and leaves under normal growth conditions. However, they shared a high similar expression patterns in the roots, stems, and leaves when exposed to NaCl and PEG stress. Furthermore, ThLEA-1, -2, -3, -4, and -11 were induced by NaCl and PEG, but ThLEA-5, -6, -8, -10, and -12 were downregulated by salt and drought stresses. Under ABA treatment, some ThLEA genes, such as ThLEA-1, -2, and -3, were only slightly differentially expressed in roots, stems, and leaves, indicating that they may be involved in the ABA-independent signaling pathway. These findings provide a basis for the elucidation of the function of LEA genes in future work. PMID:25133264

  10. Immunoprecipitation of Plasma Membrane Receptor-Like Kinases for Identification of Phosphorylation Sites and Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Yasuhiro; Macho, Alberto P; Zipfel, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are difficult to study for numerous reasons. The surface of membrane proteins is relatively hydrophobic and sometimes very unstable, additionally requiring detergents for their extraction from the membrane. This leads to challenges at all levels, including expression, solubilization, purification, identification of associated proteins, and the identification of post-translational modifications. However, recent advances in immunoprecipitation technology allow to isolate membrane proteins efficiently, facilitating the study of protein-protein interactions, the identification of novel associated proteins, and to identify post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation. Here, we describe an optimized immunoprecipitation protocol for plant plasma membrane receptor-like kinases. PMID:26577786

  11. Integration of multi-omics data of a genome-reduced bacterium: Prevalence of post-transcriptional regulation and its correlation with protein abundances

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Hua; van Noort, Vera; Lluch-Senar, Maria; Hennrich, Marco L.; H. Wodke, Judith A.; Yus, Eva; Alibés, Andreu; Roma, Guglielmo; Mende, Daniel R.; Pesavento, Christina; Typas, Athanasios; Gavin, Anne-Claude; Serrano, Luis; Bork, Peer

    2016-01-01

    We developed a comprehensive resource for the genome-reduced bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae comprising 1748 consistently generated ‘-omics’ data sets, and used it to quantify the power of antisense non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), lysine acetylation, and protein phosphorylation in predicting protein abundance (11%, 24% and 8%, respectively). These factors taken together are four times more predictive of the proteome abundance than of mRNA abundance. In bacteria, post-translational modifications (PTMs) and ncRNA transcription were both found to increase with decreasing genomic GC-content and genome size. Thus, the evolutionary forces constraining genome size and GC-content modify the relative contributions of the different regulatory layers to proteome homeostasis, and impact more genomic and genetic features than previously appreciated. Indeed, these scaling principles will enable us to develop more informed approaches when engineering minimal synthetic genomes. PMID:26773059

  12. Synthesis and secretion of plasma proteins by embryonic chick hepatocytes: changing patterns during the first three days of culture

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    A simple model system is described for studying synthesis of plasma proteins. The system is based on chick embryo hepatocytes in primary monolayer culture which synthesize a broad spectrum of plasma proteins and secrete them into the culture medium. The secreted proteins are stable and consist almost exclusively of plasma proteins. The cultured cells are nonproliferating hepatic parenchymal cells whose cell mass remains constant in culture. By a modification of Laurell's rocket immunoelectrophoresis, the secreted plasma proteins can be detected in nanogram amounts in 3 microliter of unconcentrated culture medium. Kinetics of secretion are obtained by sequential assay of proteins accumulating in the medium. In this system it is demonstrated that: (a) intracellular plasma protein levels are equivalent to less than 5% of the daily secretion; (b) synthesis and secretion are continuous; and (c) the overall half-time for plasma protein movement along the secretory pathway is less than 10 min. From these results, it follows that the rate at which the plasma proteins are secreted gives a valid estimate of their rate of synthesis. This feature of the culture and the sensitivity of the assay allow routine measurements of plasma protein synthesis without disruption of the cells and without the use of radioisotopes. It is shown, furthermore, that the overall rate of plasma protein synthesis in cultured hepatocytes is constant over a 3- day period and is similar to that of the intact liver. 3,000,000 cells, containing 1 mg cell protein, synthesize 0.2 mg of plasma proteins daily, amounting to one-fifth of hepatocellular protein synthesis. Under the conditions used, albumin synthesis steadily decreases with culture time whereas the synthesis of many other plasma proteins increases. The observed phenotypic changes and reorganization of plasma protein synthesis illustrate how the system may be exploited for studying the regulatory processes governing plasma protein synthesis. PMID

  13. Interleukin (IL)-1 in rat parturition: IL-1 receptors 1 and 2 and accessory proteins abundance in pregnant rat uterus at term - regulation by progesterone.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Tomohito; Takeda, Jun; Fang, Xin; Bronson, Heather; Olson, David M

    2016-07-01

    The role of interleukin-1 (IL-1), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, in parturition is typically noted by changes in its concentrations. Studying the expression of its receptor family, IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) 1, IL-1R2, IL-1R accessory protein (IL-1RAcP), and its predominantly brain isoform, IL-1RAcPb, during late gestation in the uterus in the Long-Evans rat is another. We assessed changes in their mRNA and protein relative abundance in the uterus and compared IL-1RAcP and IL-1RAcPb mRNA abundance in uterus, cervix, ovaries, placenta, and whole blood of Long-Evans rats during late gestation or in RU486 and progesterone-treated dams using quantitative real-time PCR and western immunoblotting. IL-1R1, IL-1RAcP, and IL-1RAcPb mRNA abundance significantly increased in the uterus at delivery whereas IL-1R2 mRNA abundance significantly decreased. IL-1R1 protein increased at term and IL-1R2 protein decreased at term compared to nonpregnant uteri. IL1-RAcPb mRNA abundance was less than IL-1RAcP, but in the lower uterine segment it was the highest of all tissues examined. RU486 stimulated preterm delivery and an increase in IL-1R1 mRNA abundance whereas progesterone administration extended pregnancy and suppressed the increase in IL-1R1. These data suggest that changes in uterine sensitivity to IL-1 occur during late gestation and suggest another level of regulation for the control of delivery. The roles for IL-1RAcP and IL-1RAcPb need to be determined, but may relate to different intracellular signaling pathways. PMID:27440742

  14. Stimulation of muscle protein synthesis by leucine is dependent on plasma amino acid availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have reported that a physiological increase in plasma leucine increased translation initiation factor activity during 60- and 120-min leucine infusion. Muscle protein synthesis was stimulated at 60 min but not at 120 min, perhaps due to the decrease (-50%) in plasma essential amino acids (AA). ...

  15. Prednisolone-induced predisposition to femoral head separation and the accompanying plasma protein changes in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head separation (FHS) is an idiopathic bone problem that causes lameness and production losses in commercial poultry. In a model of prednisolone induced susceptibility to FHS, the changes in plasma proteins and peptides were analyzed to find possible biomarkers. Plasma from control and FHS-s...

  16. Detection of boar sperm plasma membrane protein using Rhodamine 640; implications for cryobiology and physiology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhodamine 640 (R640) was used to detect changes in boar sperm plasma membrane protein (PMP) during cryopreservation; a poorly understood phenomenon. The protocol was adapted for boar sperm so that semen samples (n = 17) could be analyzed for PMP (R640 positive) and plasma membrane integrity (PMI; Y...

  17. Improved tolerance to salt and water stress in Drosophila melanogaster cells conferred by late embryogenesis abundant protein.

    PubMed

    Marunde, Matthew R; Samarajeewa, Dilini A; Anderson, John; Li, Shumin; Hand, Steven C; Menze, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    Mechanisms that govern anhydrobiosis involve the accumulation of highly hydrophilic macromolecules, such as late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins. Group 1 LEA proteins comprised of 181 (AfLEA1.1) and 197 (AfLEA1.3) amino acids were cloned from embryos of Artemia franciscana and expressed in Drosophila melanogaster cells (Kc167). Confocal microscopy revealed a construct composed of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and AfLEA1.3 accumulates in the mitochondria (AfLEA1.3-GFP), while AfLEA1.1-GFP was found in the cytoplasm. In the presence of mixed substrates, oxygen consumption was statistically identical for permeabilized Kc167 control and Kc167-AfLEA1.3 cells. Acute titrations of permeabilized cells with NaCl up to 500 mM led to successive drops in oxygen flux, which were significantly ameliorated by 18% in Kc167-AfLEA1.3 cells compared to Kc167 controls. Mitochondria were isolated from both cell types and resuspended in a sucrose-based buffer solution. The purified mitochondria from Kc167 control cells showed significantly larger reductions in respiratory capacities after one freeze-thaw cycle (-80°C) compared to mitochondria isolated from Kc167-AfLEA1.3 cells. When cultured in the presence of a non-permeant osmolyte (50-200 mM sucrose) cells expressing AfLEA1.3 showed significantly improved viability (10-15%) during this hyperosmotic challenge as compared to Kc167 controls. Furthermore, Kc167-AfLEA1.3 cells survived desiccation by convective air drying in presence of 200 mM extracellular trehalose to lower final moisture contents than did control Kc167 cells (0.36 g H2O/g DW vs.1.02 g H2O/g DW). Thus, AfLEA1.3 exerts a protective influence on mitochondrial function and increases viability of Kc167 cells during water stress. PMID:23376561

  18. Plasma Protein Oxidation and Its Correlation with Antioxidant Potential During Human Aging

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kanti Bhooshan; Mehdi, Mohd Murtaza; Maurya, Pawan Kumar; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the main molecular characteristic of aging is the progressive accumulation of oxidative damages in cellular macromolecules. Proteins are one of the main molecular targets of age-related oxidative stress, which have been observed during aging process in cellular systems. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can lead to oxidation of amino acid side chains, formation of protein-protein cross-linkages, and oxidation of the peptide backbones. In the present study, we report the age-dependent oxidative alterations in biomarkers of plasma protein oxidation: protein carbonyls (PCO), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) and plasma total thiol groups (T-SH) in the Indian population and also correlate these parameters with total plasma antioxidant potential. We show an age dependent decrease in T-SH levels and increase in PCO and AOPPs level. The alterations in the levels of these parameters correlated significantly with the total antioxidant capacity of the plasma. The levels of oxidized proteins in plasma provide an excellent biomarker of oxidative stress due to the relative long half-life of such oxidized proteins. PMID:20826915

  19. Identification of vitronectin as a major plasma protein adsorbed on polymer surfaces of different copolymer composition.

    PubMed

    Bale, M D; Wohlfahrt, L A; Mosher, D F; Tomasini, B; Sutton, R C

    1989-12-01

    The arrays of proteins adsorbed from plasma onto a series of polystyrene copolymeric latexes were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of washed beads and immunoblotting of proteins desorbed from the beads and separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Beads were prepared by continuous emulsion polymerization in the absence of surfactant. Coomassie brilliant blue staining of gel electropherograms of desorbed proteins indicated that the presence of small amounts of comonomers (1 to 10 mole %) significantly influenced the composition of the adsorbed protein layer. Immunoblotting revealed that fibrinogen, fibronectin, and vitronectin were adsorbed by all surfaces investigated. C3 and Clq adsorption varied significantly with copolymer composition. The ELISAs revealed that although the concentrations of vitronectin and fibronectin in plasma are similar, the extent of vitronectin adsorption from 70% to 85% plasma was greater by two orders of magnitude than fibronectin adsorption. Vitronectin adsorbed on carboxylic acid-containing copolymers reacted more strongly with a conformationally sensitive antivitronectin monoclonal antibody (MoAb) than vitronectin adsorbed to polystyrene and was more susceptible to cleavage by plasma proteases(s). The results show that vitronectin is a major protein adsorbed from concentrated plasma and that small changes in the chemical composition of a copolymer profoundly affects the extent and nature of protein adsorption from complex mixtures such as plasma. PMID:2479428

  20. Desialylation of plasma proteins in severe dengue infection: possible role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Rajendiran, Soundravally; Lakshamanappa, Hoti Sugeerappa; Zachariah, Bobby; Nambiar, Selvaraj

    2008-09-01

    Oxidative stress in dengue infection has been suggested. This study was carried out to explore the plasma protein oxidation and its sialic acid content in dengue infection. Thirty-two dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), 25 dengue shock syndrome (DSS), 29 dengue fever (DF), and 63 healthy controls were included in this study. The extent of carbonylation, sulphydryl content, and desialylation of plasma protein was estimated in acute phase sample. Significantly higher levels of protein carbonyls and lower levels of sialic acid and sulphydryl groups were found in DHF and DSS compared with DF using one-way analysis of variance. Regression analysis showed that desialylation is dependent on protein carbonyls in DHF/DSS. This study indicates that, in dengue infection, plasma proteins undergo increased levels of desialylation, which can be attributed to the oxidative stress. Future studies on sialylation status of endothelium and platelets can show light into the pathogenesis of the dengue infection. PMID:18784228

  1. Interaction between a plasma membrane-localized ankyrin-repeat protein ITN1 and a nuclear protein RTV1

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Hikaru; Sakata, Keiko; Kusumi, Kensuke; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Iba, Koh

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ITN1, a plasma membrane ankyrin protein, interacts with a nuclear DNA-binding protein RTV1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear transport of RTV1 is partially inhibited by interaction with ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RTV1 can promote the nuclear localization of ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both overexpression of RTV1 and the lack of ITN1 increase salicylic acids sensitivity in plants. -- Abstract: The increased tolerance to NaCl 1 (ITN1) protein is a plasma membrane (PM)-localized protein involved in responses to NaCl stress in Arabidopsis. The predicted structure of ITN1 is composed of multiple transmembrane regions and an ankyrin-repeat domain that is known to mediate protein-protein interactions. To elucidate the molecular functions of ITN1, we searched for interacting partners using a yeast two-hybrid assay, and a nuclear-localized DNA-binding protein, RTV1, was identified as a candidate. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis revealed that RTV1 interacted with ITN1 at the PM and nuclei in vivo. RTV1 tagged with red fluorescent protein localized to nuclei and ITN1 tagged with green fluorescent protein localized to PM; however, both proteins localized to both nuclei and the PM when co-expressed. These findings suggest that RTV1 and ITN1 regulate the subcellular localization of each other.

  2. Microscopic elucidation of abundant endophytic bacteria colonizing the cell wall–plasma membrane peri-space in the shoot-tip tissue of banana

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Pious; Reddy, Krishna M.

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed at generating microscopic evidence of intra-tissue colonization in banana in support of the previous findings on widespread association of endophytic bacteria with the shoot tips of field-grown plants and micropropagated cultures, and to understand the extent of tissue colonization. Leaf-sheath tissue sections (∼50–100 µm) from aseptically gathered shoot tips of cv. Grand Naine were treated with Live/Dead bacterial viability kit components SYTO 9 (S9) and propidium iodide (PI) followed by epifluorescence or confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The S9, which targets live bacteria, showed abundant green-fluorescing particles along the host cell periphery in CLSM, apparently in between the plasma membrane and the cell wall. These included non-motile and occasional actively motile single bacterial cells seen in different x–y planes and z-stacks over several cell layers, with the fluorescence signal similar to that of pure cultures of banana endophytes. Propidium iodide, which stains dead bacteria, did not detect any, but post-ethanol treatment, both PI and 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole detected abundant bacteria. Propidium iodide showed clear nuclear staining, as did S9 to some extent, and the fluorophores appeared to detect bacteria at the exclusion of DNA-containing plant organelles as gathered from bright-field and phase-contrast microscopy. The S9–PI staining did not work satisfactorily with formalin- or paraformaldehyde-fixed tissue. The extensive bacterial colonization in fresh tissue was further confirmed with the suckers of different cultivars, and was supported by transmission electron microscopy. This study thus provides clear microscopic evidence of the extensive endophytic bacterial inhabitation in the confined cell wall–plasma membrane peri-space in shoot tissue of banana with the organisms sharing an integral association with the host. The abundant tissue colonization suggests a possible involvement of endophytes in

  3. SOLiD-SAGE of Endophyte-Infected Red Fescue Reveals Numerous Effects on Host Transcriptome and an Abundance of Highly Expressed Fungal Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Karen V.; Belanger, Faith C.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important plant-fungal symbiotic relationships is that of cool season grasses with endophytic fungi of the genera Epichloë and Neotyphodium. These associations often confer benefits, such as resistance to herbivores and improved drought tolerance, to the hosts. One benefit that appears to be unique to fine fescue grasses is disease resistance. As a first step towards understanding the basis of the endophyte-mediated disease resistance in Festuca rubra we carried out a SOLiD-SAGE quantitative transcriptome comparison of endophyte-free and Epichloë festucae-infected F. rubra. Over 200 plant genes involved in a wide variety of physiological processes were statistically significantly differentially expressed between the two samples. Many of the endophyte expressed genes were surprisingly abundant, with the most abundant fungal tag representing over 10% of the fungal mapped tags. Many of the abundant fungal tags were for secreted proteins. The second most abundantly expressed fungal gene was for a secreted antifungal protein and is of particular interest regarding the endophyte-mediated disease resistance. Similar genes in Penicillium and Aspergillus spp. have been demonstrated to have antifungal activity. Of the 10 epichloae whole genome sequences available, only one isolate of E. festucae and Neotyphodium gansuense var inebrians have an antifungal protein gene. The uniqueness of this gene in E. festucae from F. rubra, its transcript abundance, and the secreted nature of the protein, all suggest it may be involved in the disease resistance conferred to the host, which is a unique feature of the fine fescue–endophyte symbiosis. PMID:23285269

  4. Site-specific analysis of advanced glycation end products in plasma proteins of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Greifenhagen, Uta; Frolov, Andrej; Blüher, Matthias; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are posttranslational modifications formed non-enzymatically from the reaction of carbohydrates and their degradation products with proteins. Accumulation of AGEs is associated with the progression of severe diabetic complications, for example, and elevated tissue levels of AGEs might even predict these pathologies. As AGE formation is often site-specific, mapping of these modification sites may reveal more sensitive and specific markers than the global tissue level. Here, 42 AGE modifications were identified in a bottom-up proteomic approach by tandem mass spectrometry, which corresponded to 36 sites in 22 high to medium abundant proteins in individual plasma samples obtained from type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with long disease duration (>10 years). Major modifications were glarg (11 modification sites) and carboxymethylation (5) of arginine and formylation (8), acetylation (7), and carboxymethylation (7) of lysine residues. Relative quantification of these sites in plasma samples obtained from normoglycemic individuals (n = 47) and patients with T2DM being newly diagnosed (n = 47) or of medium (2-5 years, n = 20) and long disease duration (>10 years, n = 20) did not reveal any significant differences. PMID:27236317

  5. Translocation of signalling proteins to the plasma membrane revealed by a new bioluminescent procedure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Activation by extracellular ligands of G protein-coupled (GPCRs) and tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs), results in the generation of second messengers that in turn control specific cell functions. Further, modulation/amplification or inhibition of the initial signalling events, depend on the recruitment onto the plasma membrane of soluble protein effectors. High throughput methodologies to monitor quantitatively second messenger production, have been developed over the last years and are largely used to screen chemical libraries for drug development. On the contrary, no such high throughput methods are yet available for the other aspect of GPCRs regulation, i.e. protein translocation to the plasma membrane, despite the enormous interest of this phenomenon for the modulation of receptor downstream functions. Indeed, to date, the experimental procedures available are either inadequate or complex and expensive. Results Here we describe the development of a novel conceptual approach to the study of cytosolic proteins translocation to the inner surface of the plasma membrane. The basis of the technique consists in: i) generating chimeras between the protein of interests and the calcium (Ca2+)-sensitive, luminescent photo-protein, aequorin and ii) taking advantage of the large Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+] difference between bulk cytosolic and the sub-plasma membrane rim. Conclusion This approach, that keeps unaffected the translocation properties of the signalling protein, can in principle be applied to any protein that, upon activation, moves from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Thus, not only the modulation of GPCRs and RTKs can be investigated in this way, but that of all other proteins that can be recruited to the plasma membrane also independently of receptor activation. Moreover, its automated version, which can provide information about the kinetics and concentration-dependence of the process, is also applicable to high throughput screening of drugs

  6. The relative abundance of a salivary protein, bSP30, is correlated with susceptibility to bloat in cattle herds selected for high or low bloat susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Rajan, G H; Morris, C A; Carruthers, V R; Wilkins, R J; Wheeler, T T

    1996-12-01

    Pasture bloat is a serious economic and animal welfare problem in cattle grazed on legumes in New Zealand. Analysis of salivary proteins from dairy cattle in herds bred for either low or high susceptibility to bloat has resulted in the identification of a 30 kilodalton protein, which we term bSP30, whose relative abundance is negatively correlated with bloat score (r = -0.40 +/- 0.12). From 74 animals sampled, relative abundance of bSP30 was 66 +/- 15% higher in the low-susceptibility herd than in the high-susceptibility herd. Relative abundance of bSP30 also varied significantly within individuals, according to feeding or time of day, and from day to day. A sequence homology search of 38 amino acids derived from three tryptic fragments of the protein suggests that the amino acid sequence of bSP30 has not been described previously. Amino acid analysis indicates that bSP30 is not a member of the proline-rich family of salivary proteins. The function of bSP30 is unknown but it is conceivable that it plays a role in the aetiology of bloat. PMID:9022155

  7. Differential protein expression in seminal plasma from fertile and infertile males

    PubMed Central

    Cadavid J, Angela P.; Alvarez, Angela; Markert, Udo R.; Maya, Walter Cardona

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to analyze human seminal plasma proteins in association with male fertility status using the proteomic mass spectrometry technology Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight (SELDI-TOF-MS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Semen analysis was performed using conventional methods. Protein profiles of the seminal plasma were obtained by SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry over a strong anion exchanger, ProteinChip® Q10 array. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: We found statistically significant differences in motility and sperm count between fertile and infertile men. In addition, we observed ten seminal proteins that are significantly up-regulated in the infertile group. In conclusion, comparison of seminal plasma proteome in fertile and infertile men provides new aspects in the physiology of male fertility and might help in identifying novel markers of male infertility. PMID:25395747

  8. Proteomic Profiling of Nonenzymatically Glycated Proteins in Human Plasma and Erythrocyte Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Tang, Ning; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Phillips, Lawrence S.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of peptides and proteins by D-glucose has important implications in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, particularly in the development of diabetic complications. In this report, a thorough proteomic profiling of glycated proteins was attempted by using phenylboronate affinity chromatography to enrich glycated proteins and glycated, tryptic peptides from human plasma and erythrocyte membranes. Enriched peptides were subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry, and 76 and 31 proteins were confidently identified as glycated from human plasma and erythrocyte membrane, respectively. It was observed that most of the glycated proteins can be identified in samples from individuals with normal glucose tolerance, although samples from individuals with impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus have slightly higher numbers of glycated proteins and more glycation sites identified.

  9. Proteomic Identification of Novel Differentiation Plasma Protein Markers in Hypobaric Hypoxia-Induced Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mohammad Faiz; Sharma, Manish; Garg, Iti; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypobaric hypoxia causes complex changes in the expression of genes, including stress related genes and corresponding proteins that are necessary to maintain homeostasis. Whereas most prior studies focused on single proteins, newer methods allowing the simultaneous study of many proteins could lead to a better understanding of complex and dynamic changes that occur during the hypobaric hypoxia. Methods In this study we investigated the temporal plasma protein alterations of rat induced by hypobaric hypoxia at a simulated altitude of 7620 m (25,000 ft, 282 mm Hg) in a hypobaric chamber. Total plasma proteins collected at different time points (0, 6, 12 and 24 h), separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and identified using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF). Biological processes that were enriched in the plasma proteins during hypobaric hypoxia were identified using Gene Ontology (GO) analysis. According to their properties and obvious alterations during hypobaric hypoxia, changes of plasma concentrations of Ttr, Prdx-2, Gpx -3, Apo A-I, Hp, Apo-E, Fetub and Nme were selected to be validated by Western blot analysis. Results Bioinformatics analysis of 25 differentially expressed proteins showed that 23 had corresponding candidates in the database. The expression patterns of the eight selected proteins observed by Western blot were in agreement with 2-DE results, thus confirming the reliability of the proteomic analysis. Most of the proteins identified are related to cellular defense mechanisms involving anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. Their presence reflects the consequence of serial cascades initiated by hypobaric hypoxia. Conclusion/Significance This study provides information about the plasma proteome changes induced in response to hypobaric hypoxia and thus identification of the candidate proteins which can act as novel biomarkers. PMID:24842778

  10. Investigation of the adsorption of blood plasma proteins by activated carbon fiber material

    SciTech Connect

    Eretskaya, E.V.; Nikolaev, V.G.; Sergeev, V.P.; Stefanov, A.V.; Vovyanko, S.I.

    1987-01-01

    The authors study the adsorption of fibrinogen, albumin, and gamma globulin by carbon fibrous materials by physical immobilization of protein ligands on their surface. The adsorption of proteins from model solutions under standard conditions was studied by an indirect method according to the decrease in the concentration of the adsorbate in solution, determining the protein content. The adsorption of the same proteins from the plasma and their desorption from activated carbon fibrous materials were estimated by a direct radiometric method using /sup 125/I-labeled proteins.

  11. Competitive Adsorption of Plasma Proteins Using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance.

    PubMed

    Felgueiras, Helena P; Murthy, N Sanjeeva; Sommerfeld, Sven D; Brás, M Manuela; Migonney, Véronique; Kohn, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Proteins that get adsorbed onto the surfaces of biomaterials immediately upon their implantation mediate the interactions between the material and the environment. This process, in which proteins in a complex mixture compete for adsorption sites on the surface, is determined by the physicochemical interactions at the interface. Competitive adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA), fibronectin (Fn), and collagen type I (Col I), sequentially and from mixtures, was investigated so as to understand the performances of different surfaces used in biomedical applications. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation was used to monitor the adsorption of these proteins onto two materials used in functional bone replacement, a titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) and Ti6Al4V physisorbed with poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) [poly(NaSS)], and three controls, gold, poly(desaminotyrosyltyrosine ethyl ester carbonate) [poly(DTEc)], and polystyrene (PS). In experiments with individual proteins, the adsorption was the highest with Fn and Col I and the least with BSA. Also, protein adsorption was the highest on poly(NaSS) and Ti6Al4V and the least on poly(DTEc). In sequential adsorption experiments, protein exchange was observed in BSA + Fn, Fn + Col I, and BSA + Col I sequences but not in Fn + BSA and Col I + BSA because of the lower affinity of BSA to surfaces relative to Fn and Col I. Protein adsorption was the highest with Col I + Fn on hydrophobic surfaces. In experiments with protein mixtures, with BSA & Fn, Fn appears to be preferentially adsorbed; with Fn & Col I, both proteins were adsorbed, probably as multilayers; and with Col I & BSA, the total amount of protein was the highest, greater than that in sequential and individual adsorption of the two proteins, probably because of the formation of BSA and Col I complexes. Protein conformational changes induced by the adsorbing surfaces, protein-protein interactions, and affinities of proteins appear to be the important factors that

  12. Age-related variations of protein carbonyls in human saliva and plasma: is saliva protein carbonyls an alternative biomarker of aging?

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Yanyi; Liu, Hongchen; Che, Yuwei; Xu, Yingying; E, Lingling

    2015-06-01

    Free radical hypothesis which is one of the most acknowledged aging theories was developed into oxidative stress hypothesis. Protein carbonylation is by far one of the most widely used markers of protein oxidation. We studied the role of age and gender in protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma among 273 Chinese healthy subjects (137 females and 136 males aged between 20 and 79) and discussed the correlation between protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma. Protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma were, respectively, 2.391 ± 0.639 and 0.838 ± 0.274 nmol/mg. Variations of saliva and plasma different age groups all reached significant differences in both male and female (all p < 0.05) while both saliva and plasma protein carbonyls were found to be significantly correlated with age (r = 0.6582 and r = 0.5176, all p < 0.001). Gender was discovered to be unrelated to saliva and plasma protein carbonyl levels (all p > 0.05). Saliva and plasma protein carbonyls were positively related (r = 0.4405, p < 0.001). Surprisingly, saliva and plasma protein carbonyls/ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) ratios were proved to be significantly correlated with age (r = 0.7796 and r = 0.6938, all p < 0.001) while saliva protein carbonyls/FRAP ratio and plasma protein carbonyls/FRAP ratio were also correlated (r = 0.5573, p < 0.001). We concluded that saliva protein carbonyls seem to be an alternative biomarker of aging while the mechanisms of protein carbonylation and oxidative stress and the relationship between saliva protein carbonyls and diseases need to be further investigated. PMID:25943699

  13. Lectin Receptor Kinases Participate in Protein-Protein Interactions to Mediate Plasma Membrane-Cell Wall Adhesions in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces. PMID:16361528

  14. Large-scale inference of protein tissue origin in gram-positive sepsis plasma using quantitative targeted proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Malmström, Erik; Kilsgård, Ola; Hauri, Simon; Smeds, Emanuel; Herwald, Heiko; Malmström, Lars; Malmström, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The plasma proteome is highly dynamic and variable, composed of proteins derived from surrounding tissues and cells. To investigate the complex processes that control the composition of the plasma proteome, we developed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy to infer the origin of proteins detected in murine plasma. The strategy relies on the construction of a comprehensive protein tissue atlas from cells and highly vascularized organs using shotgun mass spectrometry. The protein tissue atlas was transformed to a spectral library for highly reproducible quantification of tissue-specific proteins directly in plasma using SWATH-like data-independent mass spectrometry analysis. We show that the method can determine drastic changes of tissue-specific protein profiles in blood plasma from mouse animal models with sepsis. The strategy can be extended to several other species advancing our understanding of the complex processes that contribute to the plasma proteome dynamics. PMID:26732734

  15. Large-scale inference of protein tissue origin in gram-positive sepsis plasma using quantitative targeted proteomics.

    PubMed

    Malmström, Erik; Kilsgård, Ola; Hauri, Simon; Smeds, Emanuel; Herwald, Heiko; Malmström, Lars; Malmström, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The plasma proteome is highly dynamic and variable, composed of proteins derived from surrounding tissues and cells. To investigate the complex processes that control the composition of the plasma proteome, we developed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy to infer the origin of proteins detected in murine plasma. The strategy relies on the construction of a comprehensive protein tissue atlas from cells and highly vascularized organs using shotgun mass spectrometry. The protein tissue atlas was transformed to a spectral library for highly reproducible quantification of tissue-specific proteins directly in plasma using SWATH-like data-independent mass spectrometry analysis. We show that the method can determine drastic changes of tissue-specific protein profiles in blood plasma from mouse animal models with sepsis. The strategy can be extended to several other species advancing our understanding of the complex processes that contribute to the plasma proteome dynamics. PMID:26732734

  16. Characterization of Plasma Membrane Proteins from Ovarian Cancer Cells Using Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, David L.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Ahram, Mamoun; Adkins, Joshua N.; Feldhaus, Jane M.; Wahl, Jon H.; Wunsch, David M.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2003-01-01

    To determine how the repertoire of plasma membrane proteins change with disease state, specifically related to cancer, several methods for preparation of plasma membrane proteins were evaluated. Cultured cells derived from stage IV ovarian tumors were grown to 90% confluence and harvested in buffer containing CHAPS detergent. This preparation was centrifuged at low speed to remove insoluble cellular debris resulting in a crude homogenate. Glycosylated proteins in the crude homogenate were selectively enriched using lectin affinity chromatography. The crude homogenate and the lectin purified sample were prepared for mass spectrometric evaluation. The general procedure for protein identification began with trypsin digestion of protein fractions followed by separation by reversed phase liquid chromatography that was coupled directly to a conventional tandem mass spectrometer (i.e. LCQ ion trap). Mass and fragmentation data for the peptides were searched against a human proteome data base using the informatics program SEQUEST. Using this procedure 398 proteins were identified with high confidence, including receptors, membrane-associated ligands, proteases, phosphatases, as well as structural and adhesion proteins. Results indicate that lectin chromatography provides a select subset of proteins and that the number and quality of the identifications improve as does the confidence of the protein identifications for this subset. These results represent the first step in development of methods to separate and successfully identify plasma membrane proteins from advanced ovarian cancer cells. Further characterization of plasma membrane proteins will contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying progression of this deadly disease and may lead to new targeted interventions as well as new biomarkers for diagnosis.

  17. Characterization of Plasma Membrane Proteins from Ovarian Cancer Cells Using Mass Spectrometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Springer, David L.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Ahram, Mamoun; Adkins, Joshua N.; Feldhaus, Jane M.; Wahl, Jon H.; Wunschel, David S.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2004-01-01

    To determine how the repertoire of plasma membrane proteins change with disease state, specifically related to cancer, several methods for preparation of plasma membrane proteins were evaluated. Cultured cells derived from stage IV ovarian tumors were grown to 90% confluence and harvested in buffer containing CHAPS detergent. This preparation was centrifuged at low speed to remove insoluble cellular debris resulting in a crude homogenate. Glycosylated proteins in the crude homogenate were selectively enriched using lectin affinity chromatography. The crude homogenate and the lectin purified sample were prepared for mass spectrometric evaluation. The general procedure for protein identification began with trypsinmore » digestion of protein fractions followed by separation by reversed phase liquid chromatography that was coupled directly to a conventional tandem mass spectrometer (i.e. LCQ ion trap). Mass and fragmentation data for the peptides were searched against a human proteome data base using the informatics program SEQUEST. Using this procedure 398 proteins were identified with high confidence, including receptors, membrane-associated ligands, proteases, phosphatases, as well as structural and adhesion proteins. Results indicate that lectin chromatography provides a select subset of proteins and that the number and quality of the identifications improve as does the confidence of the protein identifications for this subset. These results represent the first step in development of methods to separate and successfully identify plasma membrane proteins from advanced ovarian cancer cells. Further characterization of plasma membrane proteins will contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying progression of this deadly disease and may lead to new targeted interventions as well as new biomarkers for diagnosis.« less

  18. Correlation of mRNA expression and protein abundance affected by multiple sequence features related to translational efficiency in Desulfovibrio vulgaris: A quantitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Lei; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-12-01

    The modest correlation between mRNA expression and protein abundance in large scale datasets is explained in part by experimental challenges, such as technological limitations, and in part by fundamental biological factors in the transcription and translation processes. Among various factors affecting the mRNA-protein correlation, the roles of biological factors related to translation are poorly understood. In this study, using experimental mRNA expression and protein abundance data collected from Desulfovibrio vulgaris by DNA microarray and LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis, we quantitatively examined the effects of several translational-efficiency-related sequence features on mRNA-protein correlation. Three classes of sequence features were investigated according to different translational stages: (1) initiation: Shine-Dalgarno sequences, start codon identity and start codon context; (2) elongation: codon usage and amino acid usage; and (3) termination: stop codon identity and stop codon context. Surprisingly, although it is widely accepted that translation initiation is a rate-limiting step for translation, our results showed that the mRNA-protein correlation was affected the most by the features at elongation stages, codon usage and amino acid composition (7.4-12.6% and 5.3-9.3% of the total variation of mRNA-protein correlation, respectively), followed by stop codon context and the Shine-Dalgarno sequence (2.5-4.2% and 2.3%, respectively). Taken together, all sequence features contributed to 18.4-21.8% of the total variation of mRNA-protein correlation. As the first comprehensive quantitative analysis of the mRNA-protein correlation in bacterial D. vulgaris, our results suggest that the traditional view of the relative importance of various sequence features in prokaryotic protein translation might be questionable.

  19. Proteomic analysis reveals differential accumulation of small heat shock proteins and late embryogenesis abundant proteins between ABA-deficient mutant vp5 seeds and wild-type Vp5 seeds in maize.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolin; Gong, Fangping; Yang, Le; Hu, Xiuli; Tai, Fuju; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    ABA is a major plant hormone that plays important roles during many phases of plant life cycle, including seed development, maturity and dormancy, and especially the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. Understanding of the molecular basis of ABA-mediated plant response to stress is of interest not only in basic research on plant adaptation but also in applied research on plant productivity. Maize mutant viviparous-5 (vp5), deficient in ABA biosynthesis in seeds, is a useful material for studying ABA-mediated response in maize. Due to carotenoid deficiency, vp5 endosperm is white, compared to yellow Vp5 endosperm. However, the background difference at proteome level between vp5 and Vp5 seeds is unclear. This study aimed to characterize proteome alterations of maize vp5 seeds and to identify ABA-dependent proteins during seed maturation. We compared the embryo and endosperm proteomes of vp5 and Vp5 seeds by gel-based proteomics. Up to 46 protein spots, most in embryos, were found to be differentially accumulated between vp5 and Vp5. The identified proteins included small heat shock proteins (sHSPs), late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, stress proteins, storage proteins and enzymes among others. However, EMB564, the most abundant LEA protein in maize embryo, accumulated in comparable levels between vp5 and Vp5 embryos, which contrasted to previously characterized, greatly lowered expression of emb564 mRNA in vp5 embryos. Moreover, LEA proteins and sHSPs displayed differential accumulations in vp5 embryos: six out of eight identified LEA proteins decreased while nine sHSPs increased in abundance. Finally, we discussed the possible causes of global proteome alterations, especially the observed differential accumulation of identified LEA proteins and sHSPs in vp5 embryos. The data derived from this study provides new insight into ABA-dependent proteins and ABA-mediated response during maize seed maturation. PMID:25653661

  20. RNAi-mediated downregulation of poplar plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) changes plasma membrane proteome composition and affects leaf physiology.

    PubMed

    Bi, Zhen; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Uehlein, Norbert; Zimmer, Ina; Mühlhans, Stefanie; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel Karl; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Palme, Klaus; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Block, Katja

    2015-10-14

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) are one subfamily of aquaporins that mediate the transmembrane transport of water. To reveal their function in poplar, we generated transgenic poplar plants in which the translation of PIP genes was downregulated by RNA interference investigated these plants with a comprehensive leaf plasma membrane proteome and physiome analysis. First, inhibition of PIP synthesis strongly altered the leaf plasma membrane protein composition. Strikingly, several signaling components and transporters involved in the regulation of stomatal movement were differentially regulated in transgenic poplars. Furthermore, hormonal crosstalk related to abscisic acid, auxin and brassinosteroids was altered, in addition to cell wall biosynthesis/cutinization, the organization of cellular structures and membrane trafficking. A physiological analysis confirmed the proteomic results. The leaves had wider opened stomata and higher net CO2 assimilation and transpiration rates as well as greater mesophyll conductance for CO2 (gm) and leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf). Based on these results, we conclude that PIP proteins not only play essential roles in whole leaf water and CO2 flux but have important roles in the regulation of stomatal movement. PMID:26248320

  1. Snythesis and differentiation of plasma proteins in cultured embryonic chicken liver cells: a system for study of regulation of protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Grieninger, G; Granick, S

    1975-01-01

    A new system is described for studying the control of protein synthesis. In a monolayer culture of chick embryo liver cells, plasma proteins are synthesized for three days at in vivo rates. The plasma proteins are secreted into the culture medium and without concentration are detected there simply and sensitively by a modified Laurell electronimmunoassay. Secretion of the newly synthesized plasma proteins occurs within 30 min of their synthesis. Thus, rates of synthesis of the plasma proteins can be followed readily from rates of their accumulation in the culture medium. This system has the following advantages for the study of protein synthesis: cells do not have to be disrupted for the assay; the cell population can be followed over several days; it is not necessary to label the proteins radioactively; and turnover of plasma proteins is negligible and need not be taken into account. The usefulness of the system is illustrated by a number of findings. The spectrum of plasma proteins synthesized in culture changed qualitatively and quantitatively. Albumin synthesis steadily decreased with culture time and stopped at the third day, whereas the synthesis of some new plasma proteins ("adult") was induced. These qualitative changes suggest differential gene expression in culture and a special control of albumin synthesis in vivo, different from the synthesis of the other plasma proteins. Quantitative changes in the rates of synthesis of specific plasma proteins suggest a competition among their messenger RNAs for components of the translational machinery. Insulin has a differential effect on the synthesis of specific plasma proteins at concentrations within the physiological range of the hormone. Images PMID:1061087

  2. First evidence for accumulation of protein-bound and protein-free pyrraline in human uremic plasma by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Odani, H; Shinzato, T; Matsumoto, Y; Takai, I; Nakai, S; Miwa, M; Iwayama, N; Amano, I; Maeda, K

    1996-07-01

    Glucose-derived advanced glycation end products (AGEs) cross-link proteins and cause various biological tissue damage. One of them, pyrraline [epsilon-2-(formyl-5-hydroxymethyl-pyrrol-1-yl) -L-norleucine], has been demonstrated by utilizing antibody to accumulate in plasma and sclerosed matrix of diabetic individuals, suggesting responsibility for diabetic complications. To elucidate the involvement of pyrraline in uremia, we examined the pyrraline levels in patients with chronic renal failure by a mass spectrometric approach. Here we show that protein-free pyrraline as well as pyrraline with binding protein are significantly increased in non-diabetic uremic plasma compared to healthy subjects. Our results suggest that circulating pyrraline could be a substance contributing to complications in uremia. PMID:8694819

  3. Protein retention on plasma-treated hierarchical nanoscale gold-silver platform

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jinghua; Levchenko, Igor; Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Keidar, Michael; Cvelbar, Uros; Filipic, Gregor; Han, Zhao Jun; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    2015-01-01

    Dense arrays of gold-supported silver nanowires of about 100 nm in diameter grown directly in the channels of nanoporous aluminium oxide membrane were fabricated and tested as a novel platform for the immobilization and retention of BSA proteins in the microbial-protective environments. Additional treatment of the silver nanowires using low-temperature plasmas in the inductively-coupled plasma reactor and an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet have demonstrated that the morphology of the nanowire array can be controlled and the amount of the retained protein may be increased due to the plasma effect. A combination of the neutral gold sublayer with the antimicrobial properties of silver nanowires could significantly enhance the efficiency of the platforms used in various biotechnological processes. PMID:26307515

  4. Protein retention on plasma-treated hierarchical nanoscale gold-silver platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jinghua; Levchenko, Igor; Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Keidar, Michael; Cvelbar, Uros; Filipic, Gregor; Han, Zhao Jun; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    2015-08-01

    Dense arrays of gold-supported silver nanowires of about 100 nm in diameter grown directly in the channels of nanoporous aluminium oxide membrane were fabricated and tested as a novel platform for the immobilization and retention of BSA proteins in the microbial-protective environments. Additional treatment of the silver nanowires using low-temperature plasmas in the inductively-coupled plasma reactor and an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet have demonstrated that the morphology of the nanowire array can be controlled and the amount of the retained protein may be increased due to the plasma effect. A combination of the neutral gold sublayer with the antimicrobial properties of silver nanowires could significantly enhance the efficiency of the platforms used in various biotechnological processes.

  5. Preovulatory Aging In Vivo and In Vitro Affects Maturation Rates, Abundance of Selected Proteins, Histone Methylation Pattern and Spindle Integrity in Murine Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Demond, Hannah; Trapphoff, Tom; Dankert, Deborah; Heiligentag, Martyna; Grümmer, Ruth; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Eichenlaub-Ritter, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Delayed ovulation and delayed fertilization can lead to reduced developmental competence of the oocyte. In contrast to the consequences of postovulatory aging of the oocyte, hardly anything is known about the molecular processes occurring during oocyte maturation if ovulation is delayed (preovulatory aging). We investigated several aspects of oocyte maturation in two models of preovulatory aging: an in vitro follicle culture and an in vivo mouse model in which ovulation was postponed using the GnRH antagonist cetrorelix. Both models showed significantly reduced oocyte maturation rates after aging. Furthermore, in vitro preovulatory aging deregulated the protein abundance of the maternal effect genes Smarca4 and Nlrp5, decreased the levels of histone H3K9 trimethylation and caused major deterioration of chromosome alignment and spindle conformation. Protein abundance of YBX2, an important regulator of mRNA stability, storage and recruitment in the oocyte, was not affected by in vitro aging. In contrast, in vivo preovulatory aging led to reduction in Ybx2 transcript and YBX2 protein abundance. Taken together, preovulatory aging seems to affect various processes in the oocyte, which could explain the low maturation rates and the previously described failures in fertilization and embryonic development. PMID:27611906

  6. Barriers to diffusion of plasma membrane proteins form early during guinea pig spermiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, A E; Nakhimovsky, L; Myles, D G; Koppel, D E

    1997-01-01

    The plasma membrane of the mature guinea pig sperm is segregated into at least four domains of different composition. Previous studies have shown that some proteins localized within these domains are free to diffuse laterally, suggesting that barriers to protein diffusion are responsible for maintaining the nonuniform distribution of at least some surface proteins in mature sperm. The different membrane domains appear sequentially during sperm morphogenesis in the testis and during later passage through the epididymis. To determine when diffusion barriers become functional during sperm development, we examined the diffusion of two proteins that are expressed on the cell surface of developing spermatids and become segregated to different plasma membrane domains during the course of spermiogenesis. Both proteins exhibited rapid lateral diffusion throughout spermiogenesis, even after they become localized to specific regions of the surface membrane. These results suggest that barriers to membrane diffusion form concomitantly with membrane domains during spermiogenesis. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:9199813

  7. Protein profiles of CCL5, HPGDS, and NPSR1 in plasma reveal association with childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Hamsten, C; Häggmark, A; Grundström, J; Mikus, M; Lindskog, C; Konradsen, J R; Eklund, A; Pershagen, G; Wickman, M; Grunewald, J; Melén, E; Hedlin, G; Nilsson, P; van Hage, M

    2016-09-01

    Asthma is a common chronic childhood disease with many different phenotypes that need to be identified. We analyzed a broad range of plasma proteins in children with well-characterized asthma phenotypes to identify potential markers of childhood asthma. Using an affinity proteomics approach, plasma levels of 362 proteins covered by antibodies from the Human Protein Atlas were investigated in a total of 154 children with persistent or intermittent asthma and controls. After screening, chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5) hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase (HPGDS) and neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) were selected for further investigation. Significantly lower levels of both CCL5 and HPGDS were found in children with persistent asthma, while NPSR1 was found at higher levels in children with mild intermittent asthma compared to healthy controls. In addition, the protein levels were investigated in another respiratory disease, sarcoidosis, showing significantly higher NPSR1 levels in sera from sarcoidosis patients compared to healthy controls. Immunohistochemical staining of healthy tissues revealed high cytoplasmic expression of HPGDS in mast cells, present in stroma of both airway epithelia, lung as well as in other organs. High expression of NPSR1 was observed in neuroendocrine tissues, while no expression was observed in airway epithelia or lung. In conclusion, we have utilized a broad-scaled affinity proteomics approach to identify three proteins with altered plasma levels in asthmatic children, representing one of the first evaluations of HPGDS and NPSR1 protein levels in plasma. PMID:27145233

  8. Identification of DNA-binding proteins on human umbilical vein endothelial cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, T M; Frampton, G; Cameron, J S

    1993-01-01

    The binding of anti-DNA antibodies to the endothelial cell is mediated through DNA, which forms a bridge between the immunoglobulin and the plasma membrane. We have shown that 32P-labelled DNA bound to the plasma membrane of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) by a saturable process, which could be competitively inhibited by non-radiolabelled DNA. In addition, DNA-binding was enhanced in HUVEC that had been treated with IL-1 alpha or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). DNA-binding proteins of mol. wt 46,000, 92,000, and 84,000 were identified by the binding of 32P-labelled DNA to plasma membrane proteins separated on SDS-PAGE. DNA-binding proteins of mol. wt 46,000 and 84,000 were also present in the cytosol and nucleus. Murine anti-DNA MoAb410 bound to a single band, at mol. wt 46,000, of plasma membrane protein, in the presence of DNA. Our results showed that DNA-binding proteins are present in different cellular fractions of endothelial cells. DNA-binding proteins on the cell membrane could participate in the in situ formation of immune deposits; and their presence in the cell nucleus suggests a potential role in the modulation of cell function. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8419070

  9. Isolation and partial characterization of a fatty acid binding protein in rat liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Stremmel, W; Strohmeyer, G; Borchard, F; Kochwa, S; Berk, P D

    1985-01-01

    When [14C]oleate-bovine serum albumin complexes were incubated in vitro with rat liver plasma membranes (LPM), specific, saturable binding of oleate to the membranes was observed. Maximal heat-sensitive (i.e., specific) binding was 3.2 nmol/mg of membrane protein. Oleate-agarose affinity chromatography of Triton X-100-solubilized LPM was used to isolate a single 40-kDa protein with high affinity for oleate. On gel filtration, the protein comigrated with various fatty acids but not with [14C]bilirubin, [35S]sulfobromophthalein, [14C]taurocholate, [14C]phosphatidylcholine, or [14C]cholesteryloleate. A rabbit antibody to this membrane fatty acid-binding protein gave a single precipitin line with the antigen but no reactivity with concentrated cytosolic proteins, LPM bilirubin/sulfobromophthalein-binding protein, or rat albumin or other rat plasma proteins. The antibody selectively inhibited heat-sensitive binding of [14C]oleate to LPM. Immunofluorescence studies localized the antigen in liver-cell plasma membranes as well as in other major sites of fatty acid transport. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that this protein may act as a receptor in a hepatocellular uptake mechanism for fatty acids. Images PMID:3881757

  10. Plasma-induced surface modification of polydimethylsiloxane aimed at reducing salt and protein deposition.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Nele; Rymarczyk-Machal, Monika; Schacht, Etienne

    2011-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is an elastomer that is widely used in construction and for biological and biomedical applications. The biocompatibility of PDMS was improved by different surface treatment methods, i.e., plasma treatment or a combination of plasma treatment with UV-irradiation or redox initiator, to minimize the effects of deposition of salts and proteins. In this work we used the vinyl monomers sulfobetaine and AMPS which have good biocompatible properties. PMID:21176391

  11. [The virological safety and bacterial sterility of a method for fractionating blood plasma proteins with rivanol].

    PubMed

    Zhurina, N A; Shatskaia, T L; Katushkina, N V

    1993-01-01

    The bacterial and virological safety of the method of rivanol fractionation of blood plasma proteins has been evaluated in experiments with samples of donor blood plasma mixed with the suspension of viruses and Escherichia coli used as models. The bacteriostatic action of rivanol and the elimination of bacteriophage and influenza virus from the end product at the stages of rivanol precipitation and adsorption on carbon have been established. PMID:8067072

  12. Characterization of plasma protein binding dissociation with online SPE-HPLC

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Fan, Yiran; Wang, Yunlong; Lu, Yaxin; Yin, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    A novel parameter of relative recovery (Rre) was defined and determined by online SPE-HPLC to characterize plasma protein binding (PPB) kinetics of highly plasma binding drugs. The proportional relationship of Rre with koff of PPB has been established with a new SPE model. A rapid, easy to use method could potentially be used to categorize PK properties of the drug candidates in the decision process of drug discovery and development. PMID:26460813

  13. Heterologous Expression of MeLEA3: A 10 kDa Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein of Cassava, Confers Tolerance to Abiotic Stress in Escherichia coli with Recombinant Protein Showing In Vitro Chaperone Activity.

    PubMed

    Barros, Nicolle L F; da Silva, Diehgo T; Marques, Deyvid N; de Brito, Fabiano M; dos Reis, Savio P; de Souza, Claudia R B

    2015-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are small molecular weight proteins involved in acquisition of tolerance to drought, salinity, high temperature, cold, and freezing stress in many plants. Previous studies revealed a cDNA sequence coding for a 10 kDa atypical LEA protein, named MeLEA3, predicted to be located into mitochondria with potential role in salt stress response of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz). Here we aimed to produce the recombinant MeLEA3 protein by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and evaluate the tolerance of bacteria expressing this protein under abiotic stress. Our result revealed that the recombinant MeLEA3 protein conferred a protective function against heat and salt stress in bacterial cells. Also, the recombinant MeLEA3 protein showed in vitro chaperone activity by protection of NdeI restriction enzyme activity under heat stress. PMID:25990084

  14. Optimization of hydrolysis conditions for bovine plasma protein using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Eun-Young; Go, Gwang-Woong; Kim, Gap-Don; Joo, Seon-Tea; Yang, Han-Sul

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to establish optimal conditions for the hydrolysis of bovine plasma protein. Response surface methodology was used to model and optimize responses [degree of hydrolysis (DH), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity and Fe(2+)-chelating activity]. Hydrolysis conditions, such as hydrolysis temperature (46.6-63.4 °C), hydrolysis time (98-502 min), and hydrolysis pH (6.32-9.68) were selected as the main processing conditions in the hydrolysis of bovine plasma protein. Optimal conditions for maximum DH (%), DPPH radical-scavenging activity (%) and Fe(2+)-chelating activity (%) of the hydrolyzed bovine plasma protein, were respectively established. We discovered the following three conditions for optimal hydrolysis of bovine plasma: pH of 7.82-8.32, temperature of 54.1 °C, and time of 338.4-398.4 min. We consequently succeeded in hydrolyzing bovine plasma protein under these conditions and confirmed the various desirable properties of optimal hydrolysis. PMID:25952847

  15. Serum stimulation of plasma protein synthesis in culture is selective and rapidly reversible.

    PubMed

    Plant, P W; Liang, T J; Pindyck, J; Grieninger, G

    1981-10-27

    Primary hepatocyte monolayers, derived from chick embryos, can be cultured from the onset in a completely chemically defined medium, free of added hormones. The liver cells synthesize and secrete a wide spectrum of plasma proteins for several days in this serum-free environment. Addition of fetal bovine serum elicits a 3-5-fold increase in the production of certain plasma proteins: fibrinogen, albumin, and the alpha1-globulin M. This effect of serum is selective; transferrin and plasminogen syntheses are enhanced less than 1.5-fold. Significant stimulation is observed with 0.1% fetal bovine serum, and half-maximal values for individual plasma proteins are obtained with concentrations ranging between 0.4 and 1%. The stimulatory activity of serum shows no developmental or species specificity. Plasma is active as serum derived from the same blood sample. The hepatocytes respond rapidly to serum, significant changes in albumin synthesis occurring less than 1 h after serum addition or removal. The effect of short exposure is fully reversible. These results establish the capacity of low concentrations of serum to stimulate plasma protein synthesis and underscore the importance of studying the effects of hormones and other factors under serum-free conditions. The findings suggest that, in addition to the classical hormones, ubiquitous but as yet uncharacterized serum components play a role in controlling this major hepatic function. PMID:7284395

  16. Reticulomics: Protein-Protein Interaction Studies with Two Plasmodesmata-Localized Reticulon Family Proteins Identify Binding Partners Enriched at Plasmodesmata, Endoplasmic Reticulum, and the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Botchway, Stanley W; Slade, Susan E; Knox, Kirsten; Frigerio, Lorenzo; Oparka, Karl; Hawes, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a ubiquitous organelle that plays roles in secretory protein production, folding, quality control, and lipid biosynthesis. The cortical ER in plants is pleomorphic and structured as a tubular network capable of morphing into flat cisternae, mainly at three-way junctions, and back to tubules. Plant reticulon family proteins (RTNLB) tubulate the ER by dimerization and oligomerization, creating localized ER membrane tensions that result in membrane curvature. Some RTNLB ER-shaping proteins are present in the plasmodesmata (PD) proteome and may contribute to the formation of the desmotubule, the axial ER-derived structure that traverses primary PD. Here, we investigate the binding partners of two PD-resident reticulon proteins, RTNLB3 and RTNLB6, that are located in primary PD at cytokinesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Coimmunoprecipitation of green fluorescent protein-tagged RTNLB3 and RTNLB6 followed by mass spectrometry detected a high percentage of known PD-localized proteins as well as plasma membrane proteins with putative membrane-anchoring roles. Förster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy assays revealed a highly significant interaction of the detected PD proteins with the bait RTNLB proteins. Our data suggest that RTNLB proteins, in addition to a role in ER modeling, may play important roles in linking the cortical ER to the plasma membrane. PMID:26353761

  17. The Unstructured N-terminal Region of Arabidopsis Group 4 Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) Proteins Is Required for Folding and for Chaperone-like Activity under Water Deficit.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Velazquez, Cesar L; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Reyes, José Luis; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2016-05-13

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a conserved group of proteins widely distributed in the plant kingdom that participate in the tolerance to water deficit of different plant species. In silico analyses indicate that most LEA proteins are structurally disordered. The structural plasticity of these proteins opens the question of whether water deficit modulates their conformation and whether these possible changes are related to their function. In this work, we characterized the secondary structure of Arabidopsis group 4 LEA proteins. We found that they are disordered in aqueous solution, with high intrinsic potential to fold into α-helix. We demonstrate that complete dehydration is not required for these proteins to sample ordered structures because milder water deficit and macromolecular crowding induce high α-helix levels in vitro, suggesting that prevalent conditions under water deficit modulate their conformation. We also show that the N-terminal region, conserved across all group 4 LEA proteins, is necessary and sufficient for conformational transitions and that their protective function is confined to this region, suggesting that folding into α-helix is required for chaperone-like activity under water limitation. We propose that these proteins can exist as different conformers, favoring functional diversity, a moonlighting property arising from their structural dynamics. PMID:27006402

  18. Tumour regression after extracorporeal affinity chromatography of blood plasma across agarose beads containing staphylococcal protein A.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, L; Jonsson, S; Söderberg, M; Eneström, S; Liedén, G; Lindgren, S

    1984-11-01

    The therapeutic effect of absorbing plasma from tumour patients with immobilized staphylococcal protein A was tested. Plasma prepared by centrifugation was passed over protein A-Sepharose and then reinfused into the patient. Five patients were thus treated. One with malignant melanoma and one with renal adenocarcinoma showed measurable regression of metastatic lesions. In another with malignant melanoma a subcutaneous metastasis showed histopathological changes compatible with a therapeutic effect. In two patients, one with malignant melanoma and one with renal adenocarcinoma, no signs of regression were found. No severe adverse effects of the treatment were observed. PMID:6542007

  19. Molecular Weight Determinations of Proteins by Californium Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundqvist, B.; Roepstorff, Peter; Fohlman, J.; Hedin, A.; Hakansson, P.; Kamensky, I.; Lindberg, M.; Salehpour, M.; Sawe, G.

    1984-11-01

    The plasma desorption mass spectrometry method is used to determine the molecular weights of larger molecules than before, to determine the molecular weights of proteins and peptides in mixtures, and to monitor protein modification reactions. Proteins up to molecular weight 25,000 can now be studied with a mass spectrometric technique. Protein-peptide mixtures that could not be resolved with conventional techniques were successfully analyzed by this technique. The precision of the method is good enough to permit one to follow the different steps in the conversion of porcine insulin to human insulin.

  20. Isolation and characterization of a new zinc-binding protein from albacore tuna plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dyke, B.; Hegenauer, J.; Saltman, P.; Laurs, R.M.

    1987-06-02

    The protein responsible for sequestering high levels of zinc in the plasma of the albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) has been isolated by sequential chromatography. The glycoprotein has a molecular weight of 66,000. Approximately 8.2% of its amino acid residues are histidines. Equilibrium dialysis experiments show it to bind 3 mol of zinc/mol of protein. The stoichiometric constant for the association of zinc with a binding site containing three histidines was determined to be 10/sup 9.4/. This protein is different from albumin and represents a previously uncharacterized zinc transport protein.

  1. Isolation and characterization of a new zinc-binding protein from albacore tuna plasma.

    PubMed

    Dyke, B; Hegenauer, J; Saltman, P; Laurs, R M

    1987-06-01

    The protein responsible for sequestering high levels of zinc in the plasma of the albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) has been isolated by sequential chromatography. The glycoprotein has a molecular weight of 66,000. Approximately 8.2% of its amino acid residues are histidines. Equilibrium dialysis experiments show it to bind 3 mol of zinc/mol of protein. The stoichiometric constant for the association of zinc with a binding site containing three histidines was determined to be 10(9.4). This protein is different from albumin and represents a previously uncharacterized zinc transport protein. PMID:3607021

  2. Maternal Low Quality Protein Diet Alters Plasma Amino Acid Concentrations of Weaning Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kabasakal Cetin, Arzu; Dasgin, Halil; Gülec, Atila; Onbasilar, İlyas; Akyol, Asli

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated the influence of a maternal low protein diet on the fetus. However, the effect of a maternal low quality protein diet on fetal growth and development is largely unknown. Wistar rats (11 weeks old) were mated and maintained on either a chow diet with 20% casein (n = 6) as the control group (C), or a low quality protein diet with 20% wheat gluten (n = 7) as the experimental group (WG) through gestation and lactation. Maternal body weights were similar in both groups throughout the study. Birth weights were not influenced by maternal diet and offspring body weights during lactation were similar between the groups. Offspring’s plasma amino acid profiles showed that plasma methionine, glutamine and lysine were significantly lower and aspartic acid, ornithine and glycine-proline were significantly higher in the WG. Plant based protein comprises an important part of protein intake in developing countries. It is well-known that these diets can be inadequate in terms of essential amino acids. The current study shows differential effects of a maternal low quality protein diet on the offspring’s plasma amino acids. Future studies will examine further aspects of the influence of maternal low quality protein diets on fetal growth and development. PMID:26633475

  3. Possible detection of pancreatic cancer by plasma protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Honda, Kazufumi; Hayashida, Yasuharu; Umaki, Tomoko; Okusaka, Takuji; Kosuge, Tomoo; Kikuchi, Satoru; Endo, Mitsufumi; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Aoki, Tatsuya; Itoi, Takao; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Hirohashi, Setsuo; Yamada, Tesshi

    2005-11-15

    The survival rate of pancreatic cancer patients is the lowest among those with common solid tumors, and early detection is one of the most feasible means of improving outcomes. We compared plasma proteomes between pancreatic cancer patients and sex- and age-matched healthy controls using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization coupled with hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Proteomic spectra were generated from a total of 245 plasma samples obtained from two institutes. A discriminating proteomic pattern was extracted from a training cohort (71 pancreatic cancer patients and 71 healthy controls) using a support vector machine learning algorithm and was applied to two validation cohorts. We recognized a set of four mass peaks at 8,766, 17,272, 28,080, and 14,779 m/z, whose mean intensities differed significantly (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.01), as most accurately discriminating cancer patients from healthy controls in the training cohort [sensitivity of 97.2% (69 of 71), specificity of 94.4% (67 of 71), and area under the curve value of 0.978]. This set discriminated cancer patients in the first validation cohort with a sensitivity of 90.9% (30 of 33) and a specificity of 91.1% (41 of 45), and its discriminating capacity was further validated in an independent cohort at a second institution. When combined with CA19-9, 100% (29 of 29 patients) of pancreatic cancers, including early-stage (stages I and II) tumors, were detected. Although a multi-institutional large-scale study will be necessary to confirm clinical significance, the biomarker set identified in this study may be applicable to using plasma samples to diagnose pancreatic cancer. PMID:16288055

  4. Interaction of Globular Plasma Proteins with Water-Soluble CdSe Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Jyotsana; Rawat, Kamla; Sanwlani, Shilpa; Bohidar, H B

    2015-06-01

    The interactions between water-soluble semiconductor quantum dots [hydrophilic 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-coated CdSe] and three globular plasma proteins, namely, bovine serum albumin (BSA), β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) and human serum albumin (HSA), are investigated. Acidic residues of protein molecules form electrostatic interactions with these quantum dots (QDs). To determine the stoichiometry of proteins bound to QDs, we used dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential techniques. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments revealed energy transfer from tryptophan residues in the proteins to the QD particles. Quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of protein molecules was noticed during this binding process (hierarchy HSA<β-Lg protein molecules). Upon binding with QD particles, the protein molecules underwent substantial conformational changes at the secondary-structure level (50 % helicity lost), due to loss in hydration. PMID:25767054

  5. Annexin A5 is the Most Abundant Membrane-Associated Protein in Stereocilia but is Dispensable for Hair-Bundle Development and Function.

    PubMed

    Krey, Jocelyn F; Drummond, Meghan; Foster, Sarah; Porsov, Edward; Vijayakumar, Sarath; Choi, Dongseok; Friderici, Karen; Jones, Sherri M; Nuttall, Alfred L; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    The phospholipid- and Ca(2+)-binding protein annexin A5 (ANXA5) is the most abundant membrane-associated protein of ~P23 mouse vestibular hair bundles, the inner ear's sensory organelle. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we estimated that ANXA5 accounts for ~15,000 copies per stereocilium, or ~2% of the total protein there. Although seven other annexin genes are expressed in mouse utricles, mass spectrometry showed that none were present at levels near ANXA5 in bundles and none were upregulated in stereocilia of Anxa5(-/-) mice. Annexins have been proposed to mediate Ca(2+)-dependent repair of membrane lesions, which could be part of the repair mechanism in hair cells after noise damage. Nevertheless, mature Anxa5(-/-) mice not only have normal hearing and balance function, but following noise exposure, they are identical to wild-type mice in their temporary or permanent changes in hearing sensitivity. We suggest that despite the unusually high levels of ANXA5 in bundles, it does not play a role in the bundle's key function, mechanotransduction, at least until after two months of age in the cochlea and six months of age in the vestibular system. These results reinforce the lack of correlation between abundance of a protein in a specific compartment or cellular structure and its functional significance. PMID:27251877

  6. Correlated Changes in the Activity, Amount of Protein, and Abundance of Transcript of NADPH:Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase and Chlorophyll Accumulation during Greening of Cucumber Cotyledons.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, K.; Chen, R. M.; Tanaka, A.; Teramoto, H.; Tanaka, R.; Timko, M. P.; Tsuji, H.

    1995-01-01

    Changes in the activity and abundance of NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (NPR) and the abundance of mRNA encoding it were examined during the greening of 5-d-old etiolated cucumber cotyledons under continuous illumination. To measure NPR activity in the extracts from fully greened tissues, we have developed an improved method of assay. Upon exposure of etiolated cotyledons to light, NPR activity decreased rapidly within the first 2 h of exposure. Thereafter, enzymatic activity increased transiently, reaching a submaximum level at 12 h, and decreased slowly. The level of immunodetectable NPR protein followed the same pattern of changes during 96 h of greening as observed for NPR activity. The NPR mRNA in etiolated cotyledons disappeared quickly in the 1st h of irradiation. However, the level of mRNA increased thereafter to reach 3-fold or more of the dark level at 12 h and then decreased. The changes in the activity, protein level, and mRNA level after the first rapid decreases corresponded chronologically and nearly paralleled the increase in the rate of chlorophyll accumulation. These findings suggest that the greening of cucumber cotyledons is regulated basically by the level of NPR protein without activation or repression of enzymatic activity and that NPR mRNA increased by light maintains the level of enzyme protein necessary for greening. PMID:12228591

  7. Annexin A5 is the Most Abundant Membrane-Associated Protein in Stereocilia but is Dispensable for Hair-Bundle Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Krey, Jocelyn F.; Drummond, Meghan; Foster, Sarah; Porsov, Edward; Vijayakumar, Sarath; Choi, Dongseok; Friderici, Karen; Jones, Sherri M.; Nuttall, Alfred L.; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    The phospholipid- and Ca2+-binding protein annexin A5 (ANXA5) is the most abundant membrane-associated protein of ~P23 mouse vestibular hair bundles, the inner ear’s sensory organelle. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we estimated that ANXA5 accounts for ~15,000 copies per stereocilium, or ~2% of the total protein there. Although seven other annexin genes are expressed in mouse utricles, mass spectrometry showed that none were present at levels near ANXA5 in bundles and none were upregulated in stereocilia of Anxa5−/− mice. Annexins have been proposed to mediate Ca2+-dependent repair of membrane lesions, which could be part of the repair mechanism in hair cells after noise damage. Nevertheless, mature Anxa5−/− mice not only have normal hearing and balance function, but following noise exposure, they are identical to wild-type mice in their temporary or permanent changes in hearing sensitivity. We suggest that despite the unusually high levels of ANXA5 in bundles, it does not play a role in the bundle’s key function, mechanotransduction, at least until after two months of age in the cochlea and six months of age in the vestibular system. These results reinforce the lack of correlation between abundance of a protein in a specific compartment or cellular structure and its functional significance. PMID:27251877

  8. The role of plasma proteins in formation of obstructive protamine complexes

    SciTech Connect

    De Paulis, R.; Mohammad, S.F.; Chiariello, L.; Morea, M.; Olsen, D.B. )

    1991-06-01

    Formation of complexes between heparin and protamine (in saline), or heparin, plasma proteins, and protamine (in plasma) was assessed by measurements of light transmission through different test solutions. To examine the formation of these complexes, 125I-labeled protamine was used. Addition of 125I-protamine to plasma or blood resulted in the sedimentation of 125I-protamine in the form of insoluble complexes. This complex formation was not affected by the presence of heparin, suggesting that protamine-plasma protein interaction may be primarily responsible for precipitation of 125I-protamine. To assess the capability of these complexes to obstruct the pulmonary circulation, an in vitro experimental model was developed. Citrated serum, plasma, blood, or saline were allowed to flow through a glass bead column with the help of a peristaltic pump. A pressure transducer positioned before the column allowed pressure measurements at a constant flow rate during the experiment. Mixing of protamine with plasma or blood prior to their passage through the glass bead column resulted in a significant increase in pressure suggesting that the column was being clogged with insoluble complexes. The increase in pressure occurred both in the presence and absence of heparin in plasma or blood. Under identical experimental conditions, the increase in pressure was insignificant when protamine was added to saline or serum regardless of whether heparin was present or absent. This was further confirmed by the use of 125I-protamine. These observations suggest that protamine forms insoluble complexes with certain plasma proteins. Based on these observations, it is hypothesized that following intravenous administration, protamine immediately forms complexes in circulating blood.

  9. Cell wall constrains lateral diffusion of plant plasma-membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Martinière, Alexandre; Lavagi, Irene; Nageswaran, Gayathri; Rolfe, Daniel J.; Maneta-Peyret, Lilly; Luu, Doan-Trung; Botchway, Stanley W.; Webb, Stephen E. D.; Mongrand, Sebastien; Maurel, Christophe; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa L.; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen; Friml, Jirí; Moreau, Patrick; Runions, John

    2012-01-01

    A cell membrane can be considered a liquid-phase plane in which lipids and proteins theoretically are free to diffuse. Numerous reports, however, describe retarded diffusion of membrane proteins in animal cells. This anomalous diffusion results from a combination of structuring factors including protein–protein interactions, cytoskeleton corralling, and lipid organization into microdomains. In plant cells, plasma-membrane (PM) proteins have been described as relatively immobile, but the control mechanisms that structure the PM have not been studied. Here, we use fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to estimate mobility of a set of minimal PM proteins. These proteins consist only of a PM-anchoring domain fused to a fluorescent protein, but their mobilities remained limited, as is the case for many full-length proteins. Neither the cytoskeleton nor membrane microdomain structure was involved in constraining the diffusion of these proteins. The cell wall, however, was shown to have a crucial role in immobilizing PM proteins. In addition, by single-molecule fluorescence imaging we confirmed that the pattern of cellulose deposition in the cell wall affects the trajectory and speed of PM protein diffusion. Regulation of PM protein dynamics by the plant cell wall can be interpreted as a mechanism for regulating protein interactions in processes such as trafficking and signal transduction. PMID:22689944

  10. Pharmacokinetics and plasma protein binding of rutin deca (H-) sulfate sodium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang-jun; Lu, Si-jie; Yao, Tong-wei; Zeng, Su

    2009-11-01

    Rutin deca (H-) sulfate sodium (RDS) possesses very good activity as an inhibitor of the complement system of warm-blooded animals and HIV. An ion-pair coupled with solid-phase extraction technique (IP-SPE) was developed to extract RDS from rat plasma, urine, bile and protein solution samples. The assay was applied to pharmacokinetics of RDS, including plasma pharmacokinetics, excretion and protein binding studies. After i.v. 5, 20 and 100 mg x kg(-1) RDS via tail vein in rats, the plasma concentration-time profiles were fitted using 3P97 software. The average terminal half-life (t(1/2)) was 3.432 +/- 0.185 2 h. The relationship of dose and AUC of RDS was linear within the dosage range. This suggested that the disposition of RDS in rats belong to linear kinetics and the pharmacokinetic parameters of RDS were dose independent. After iv RDS 20 mg x kg(-1) in rats, the biliary excretion amount of parent drug amount was only 0.3181% +/- 0.2087% of given dosage, and the urinary excretion was 86.0% +/- 6.1% in 36 h. Ultrafiltration techniques were applied to determine the protein binding of RDS in plasma (from SD rat, Beagle dog and human), human serum albumin (HSA) and human alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP). The mean protein binding rate in plasma of SD rat, Beagle dog and human plasma of RDS were 80%-90%, in which the range of concentration of RDS was 5 to 100 microg x mL(-1). The protein binding to HSA was 85.7% +/- 1.3% and 14.0% +/- 3.2% to AGP. PMID:21351726

  11. The pro-oxidant buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) reduces tumor growth of implanted Lewis lung carcinoma in mice associated with increased protein carbonyl, tubulin abundance, and aminopeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gómez, Isabel; Carmona-Cortés, Javier; Wangensteen, Rosemary; Vargas-Tendero, Pablo; Banegas, Inmaculada; Quesada, Andrés; García-Lora, Angel M; Vargas, Félix

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the pro-oxidant buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and of the interaction between BSO and TETRAC, an antagonist of αvß3 integrin, on tumor development and aminopeptidase (AP) activity in a murine model of implanted Lewis's carcinoma. Male CBA-C57 mice were untreated (controls) or treated with BSO (222 mg/100 mL in drinking water), TETRAC (10 mg/kg/day, i.p.), or BSO + TETRAC. BSO for 28 days and TETRAC were given for the last 20 days. Mice were subcutaneously inoculated with 1 × 10(6) Lewis carcinoma 3LL cells into the dorsum. Study variables were tumor weight (TW); Hb, as index of tumor-mediated angiogenesis; vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein abundance; protein carbonyl content; α-tubulin abundance; and GluAp, AlaAp, and AspAp activities. BSO produced a major decrease in TW (203 ± 18 mg) with respect to controls (365 ± 26) and a reduction in Hb content. The TETRAC group also showed marked reductions in TW (129 ± 15) and Hb concentration associated with a reduced VEGF content. The BSO + TETRAC group showed a major TW reduction (125 ± 13); although, the difference with the TETRAC group was not significant. BSO treatment increased protein carbonyl and tubulin abundance in comparison to controls. The activity of all APs was increased in the three experimental groups and was strongly and negatively correlated with TW. In conclusion, administration of BSO reduced the TW, which inversely correlated with protein carbonyl content, suggesting a loss of microtubule polymerization. The finding of a negative correlation between TW and AP activity opens up new perspectives for the study of APs as tumor growth modulators. PMID:24816945

  12. Low plasma protein nitrotyrosine levels distinguish primary Raynaud's phenomenon from scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Kingdon, E J; Mani, A R; Frost, M T; Denton, C P; Powis, S H; Black, C M; Moore, K P

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the hypothesis that increased formation of reactive nitrogen species may contribute to the vascular pathology that develops in patients with connective tissue disease such as scleroderma. Patients and methods The level of protein‐bound nitrotyrosine in plasma was measured by stable isotope dilution gas chromatography/negative ion chemical ionisation mass spectrometry in 11 patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon, 37 with scleroderma, 13 with chronic renal impairment, and in 23 healthy controls. Results Plasma protein‐bound nitrotyrosine was markedly decreased in patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon (mean (SEM) 0.60 (0.06) ng/mg dry protein) compared with patients with scleroderma (1.78 (0.21) ng/mg protein), chronic renal impairment (1.42 (0.17) ng/mg protein) or healthy controls (1.63±0.15 ng/mg protein, ANOVA p<0.001). Conclusion These data suggest that there is decreased nitration of plasma proteins, or increased degradation of nitrated proteins from the circulation of patients with primary but not secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. PMID:16308344

  13. Adsorbed plasma proteins modulate the effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on neutrophils in blood.

    PubMed

    Vlasova, Irina I; Mikhalchik, Elena V; Barinov, Nikolay A; Kostevich, Valeria A; Smolina, Natalia V; Klinov, Dmitry V; Sokolov, Alexey V

    2016-08-01

    Proteins adsorbed on a surface may affect the interaction of this surface with cells. Here, we studied the binding of human serum albumin (HSA), fibrinogen (FBG) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) to PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (PEG-SWCNTs) and evaluated the impact of PEG-SWCNT treated by these proteins on neutrophils in whole blood samples. Measurements of adsorption parameters revealed tight binding of proteins to PEG-SWCNTs. AFM was employed to directly observe protein binding to sidewalls of PEG-SWCNTs. Fluorescein-labeled IgG was used to ascertain the stability of PEG-SWCNT-IgG complexes in plasma. In blood samples, all plasma proteins mitigated damage of neutrophils observed just after blood exposure to PEG-SWCNTs, while only treatment of PEG-SWCNTs with IgG resulted in dose- and time-dependent enhancement of CNT-induced neutrophil activation and in potentiation of oxidative stress. Our study demonstrates the ability of adsorbed plasma proteins to influence neutrophil response caused by PEG-SWCNTs in whole blood. PMID:27015767

  14. Adsorption of protein streptavidin to the plasma treated surface of polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesel, Alenka; Elersic, Kristina

    2012-05-01

    Immobilization of protein streptavidin to the surface of polystyrene (PS) polymer was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Two different protocols were used to attach streptavidin to the PS surface: physical adsorption and chemical coupling. In both cases the surface properties of PS samples were modified by exposure to cold oxygen plasma for 10 s. Plasma was created in oxygen at 75 Pa by en electrode-less RF discharge. The RF generator operated at 27.12 MHz and the nominal power was about 120 W. The electron temperature was about 3 eV, the plasma density was about 3 × 1015 m-3 and the neutral oxygen atom density was about 3 × 1021 m-3. Oxygen plasma treatment caused formation of O-rich functional groups on the surface of PS. The concentration of oxygen was determined by XPS and was about 28 at.%. A thin film of streptavidin was deposited by physical adsorption and chemical bonding. The appearance of streptavidin on the surface was determined from XPS spectra measuring the ratio between N and C peaks. The plasma treatment caused poor adsorption and but strong chemisorption of streptavidin. The results were explained by specific interaction of protein with polar functional groups on the surface of PS after plasma treatment.

  15. Stimulus-dependent secretion of plasma proteins from human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Borregaard, N; Kjeldsen, L; Rygaard, K; Bastholm, L; Nielsen, M H; Sengeløv, H; Bjerrum, O W; Johnsen, A H

    1992-01-01

    In search for matrix proteins released from secretory vesicles of human neutrophils, a prominent 67-kD protein was identified in the extracellular medium of neutrophils stimulated by the chemotactic peptide, FMLP. The protein was purified to apparent homogeneity and partially sequenced. The sequence of the first 32 NH2-terminal amino acids was identical to the sequence of albumin. mRNA for human albumin could not be detected in bone marrow cells, nor could biosynthetic labeling of albumin be demonstrated in bone marrow cells during incubation with [14C]leucine. Immunofluorescence studies on single cells demonstrated the presence of intracellular albumin in fixed permeabilized neutrophils. Light microscopy of immunogold-silver-stained cryosections visualized albumin in cytoplasmic "granules." The morphology of these was determined by immunoelectron microscopy as vesicles of varying form and size. Subcellular fractionation studies on unstimulated neutrophils demonstrated the presence of albumin in the low density pre-gamma and gamma-regions that contain secretory vesicles, but are devoid of specific granules and azurophil granules. Albumin was readily released from these structures during activation of neutrophils with inflammatory mediators. Immunoblotting demonstrated the presence of immunoglobulin and transferrin along with albumin in exocytosed material from stimulated neutrophils. This indicates that secretory vesicles are unique endocytic vesicles that can be triggered to exocytose by inflammatory stimuli. Images PMID:1378856

  16. Quantitative immunological determination of 12 plasma proteins excreted in human urine collected before and after exercise

    PubMed Central

    Poortmans, Jacques; Jeanloz, Roger W.

    1968-01-01

    Urine was collected from 6 healthy male adults at rest and from 20 male adults after a marathon race (25 miles). The concentrated urines were quantitatively analyzed, by single radial immunodiffusion, for their content in 12 different plasma proteins: tryptophan-rich prealbumin, albumin, α1-acid glycoprotein, α1-antitrypsin, ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin, Gc-globulin, transferrin, hemopexin, β2-glycoprotein I, γA-globulin, and γG-globulin. Albumin, γA-globulin, and γG-globulin represent the major part of the plasma proteins detected in normal urine excreted by humans at rest (12, 0.5, and 2.5 mg respectively, out of a total excretion of 17.5 mg of plasma proteins per 24 hr). The other plasma proteins were excreted at a lower rate (< 0.4 mg/24 hr). The relative content of tryptophan-rich prealbumin, α1-antitrypsin, Gc-globulin, transferrin, and γG-globulin was lower in normal urine than in normal serum, whereas that of α1-acid glycoprotein, β2-glycoprotein I, and γA-globulin was higher. The ratio of γG-globulin to γA-globulin was 4.9:1. When plotted on a logarithmic scale, no direct relationship between the molecular weight of a protein and the value of its renal clearance could be observed. Strenuous exercise increased (up to 50-fold) the excretion of plasma proteins which represent 82% of the total proteins found in urine, instead of 57% in urine collected from humans at rest. There was particularly a significant rise of tryptophan-rich albumin, albumin, α1-acid glycoprotein, transferrin, γA-globulin, and γG-globulin (0.26, 127, 11.8, 3.3, 1.2, and 2.0 μg respectively, out of a total excretion of 167 μg of plasma proteins per min). The ratio of γG-globulin to γA-globulin was 16:1. After exercise, the renal clearance of proteins increased from 2 to 40 times, but, as for the urine of normal subjects at rest, no direct relationship between molecular weight and renal clearance could be observed. Images PMID:4170390

  17. Bee bread increases honeybee haemolymph protein and promote better survival despite of causing higher Nosema ceranae abundance in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Basualdo, Marina; Barragán, Sergio; Antúnez, Karina

    2014-08-01

    Adequate protein nutrition supports healthy honeybees and reduces the susceptibility to disease. However little is known concerning the effect of the diet on Nosema ceranae development, an obligate intracellular parasite that disturbs the protein metabolism of honeybees (Apis mellifera). Here we tested the effect of natural (bee bread) and non-natural protein diets (substitute) on haemolymph proteins titers of honeybee and N. ceranae spore production. The natural diet induced higher levels of protein and parasite development, but the survival of bees was also higher than with non-natural diets. The data showed that the administration of an artificially high nutritious diet in terms of crude protein content is not sufficient to promote healthy bees; rather the protein ingested should be efficiently assimilated. The overall results support the idea that the physiological condition of the bees is linked to protein levels in the haemolymph, which affects the tolerance to parasite; consequently the negative impact of the parasite on host fitness is not associated only with the level of infection. PMID:24992539

  18. Proteomic profiling of human plasma exosomes identifies PPAR{gamma} as an exosome-associated protein

    SciTech Connect

    Looze, Christopher; Yui, David; Leung, Lester; Ingham, Matthew; Kaler, Maryann; Yao, Xianglan; Wu, Wells W.; Shen Rongfong; Daniels, Mathew P.; Levine, Stewart J.

    2009-01-16

    Exosomes are nanovesicles that are released from cells as a mechanism of cell-free intercellular communication. Only a limited number of proteins have been identified from the plasma exosome proteome. Here, we developed a multi-step fractionation scheme incorporating gel exclusion chromatography, rate zonal centrifugation through continuous sucrose gradients, and high-speed centrifugation to purify exosomes from human plasma. Exosome-associated proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and 66 proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS, which included both cellular and extracellular proteins. Furthermore, we identified and characterized peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), a nuclear receptor that regulates adipocyte differentiation and proliferation, as well as immune and inflammatory cell functions, as a novel component of plasma-derived exosomes. Given the important role of exosomes as intercellular messengers, the discovery of PPAR{gamma} as a component of human plasma exosomes identifies a potential new pathway for the paracrine transfer of nuclear receptors.

  19. PLASMA PROTEIN PROFILING AS A HIGH THROUGHPUT TOOL FOR CHEMICAL SCREENING USING A SMALL FISH MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hudson, R. Tod, Michael J. Hemmer, Kimberly A. Salinas, Sherry S. Wilkinson, James Watts, James T. Winstead, Peggy S. Harris, Amy Kirkpatrick and Calvin C. Walker. In press. Plasma Protein Profiling as a High Throughput Tool for Chemical Screening Using a Small Fish Model (Abstra...

  20. Circulating plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity and blood pressure tracking in the community

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clinical trials using cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors to raise high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations reported an 'off-target' blood pressure (BP) raising effect. We evaluated the relations of baseline plasma CETP activity and longitudinal BP change. One tho...

  1. Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Proteins from Maize Cluster in Two Sequence Subgroups with Differential Aquaporin Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Chaumont, François; Barrieu, François; Jung, Rudolf; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    2000-01-01

    The transport of water through membranes is regulated in part by aquaporins or water channel proteins. These proteins are members of the larger family of major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). Plant aquaporins are categorized as either tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) or plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs). Sequence analysis shows that PIPs form several subclasses. We report on the characterization of three maize (Zea mays) PIPs belonging to the PIP1 and PIP2 subfamilies (ZmPIP1a, ZmPIP1b, and ZmPIP2a). The ZmPIP2a clone has normal aquaporin activity in Xenopus laevis oocytes. ZmPIP1a and ZmPIP1b have no activity, and a review of the literature shows that most PIP1 proteins identified in other plants have no or very low activity in oocytes. Arabidopsis PIP1 proteins are the only exception. Control experiments show that this lack of activity of maize PIP1 proteins is not caused by their failure to arrive at the plasma membrane of the oocytes. ZmPIP1b also does not appear to facilitate the transport of any of the small solutes tried (glycerol, choline, ethanol, urea, and amino acids). These results are discussed in relationship to the function and regulation of the PIP family of aquaporins. PMID:10759498

  2. Coarse-grained model of adsorption of blood plasma proteins onto nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Hender; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2015-12-01

    We present a coarse-grained model for evaluation of interactions of globular proteins with nanoparticles (NPs). The protein molecules are represented by one bead per aminoacid and the nanoparticle by a homogeneous sphere that interacts with the aminoacids via a central force that depends on the nanoparticle size. The proposed methodology is used to predict the adsorption energies for six common human blood plasma proteins on hydrophobic charged or neutral nanoparticles of different sizes as well as the preferred orientation of the molecules upon adsorption. Our approach allows one to rank the proteins by their binding affinity to the nanoparticle, which can be used for predicting the composition of the NP-protein corona. The predicted ranking is in good agreement with known experimental data for protein adsorption on surfaces.

  3. [The oxidative modification of blood plasma proteins in patients in critical states].

    PubMed

    Riabov, G A; Azizov, Iu M; Dorokhov, S I; Kulabukhov, V V; Titova, I A; Pasechnik, I N; Brazhnik, T B; Rybintsev, V Iu

    2000-01-01

    Current concepts on the formation and biological activity of activated oxygen forms (AOF) in humans are discussed. The main AOF types are produced as a result of consecutive single-electron recovery of molecular oxygen (O2) and are more reactive than O2. AOF are initially normal components of cellular metabolism with certain biological functions. Their reactive aggressiveness is regulated by a potent antioxidant system which is present in any live organism. In disease this balance is distorted towards uncontrolled AOF generation and formation of oxidative stress, when AOF impair all biological structures, including proteins. Unregulated modification of proteins by AOF results in loss of protein biological activities (enzymatic, receptor, transporting function, etc.). Moreover, oxidative modification of proteins generates new antigens and provokes immune response. The authors present experimental data which confirm significant modification of plasma proteins in critical patients. The role of the detrimental effect of AOF on proteins in the formation of critical states deserves special studies. PMID:10833843

  4. Plasma reciprocal pool specific activity predicts that of intracellular free leucine for protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Horber, F.F.; Horber-Feyder, C.M.; Krayer, S.; Schwenk, W.F.; Haymond, M.W. )

    1989-09-01

    We previously proposed that, during the infusion of either labeled leucine or its alpha-ketoacid, alpha-ketoisocaproate (KIC), the plasma specific activity (SA) of the transaminated product of the infused tracer (reciprocal pool SA) may better reflect the intracellular leucine SA than the plasma SA of either infused tracer (primary pool SA). To test this hypothesis, 14 dogs were simultaneously infused intravenously with (3H)leucine and (14C)KIC, and blood and tissue compartments were sampled. The ratios of (3H)-leucine to (14C)leucine (3H)/(14C)leucine in mixed tissue proteins and in the intracellular space of striated muscle were the same as the ratio of the isotope infusion rates and similar, although slightly lower (P less than 0.01), than (3H)KIC/(14C)leucine SA (ratio of reciprocal pool SA) in plasma. Plasma (3H)KIC/(14C)leucine SA were essentially identical to the (3H)/(14C) of leucine in (1) mixed liver proteins, (2) intrahepatic free leucine, and (3) fibrin. The (3H)/(14C)leucine in mixed renal proteins and in the intracellular space of kidney and erythrocytes were similar to those of the venous plasma (3H)/(14C)leucine SA. The plasma (3H)KIC and (14C)leucine SA (the reciprocal pool SA) were similar to the SA of (3H)- and (14C)leucine in the intracellular space of all organs investigated with the exception of kidney. Therefore, in postabsorptive dogs, the plasma SA of the transaminated product of the infused labeled KIC or leucine is an excellent predictor of the intracellular leucine SA in all tissues investigated with the exception of kidney.

  5. KvLEA, a New Isolated Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein Gene from Kosteletzkya virginica Responding to Multiabiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoli; Wang, Hongyan; Chu, Liye; Shao, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    The LEA proteins are a kind of hydrophilic proteins, playing main functions in desiccation tolerance. However, their importance as a kind of stress proteins in abiotic stress is being clarified little by little. In this study we isolated, cloned, and identified the first KvLEA gene in Kosteletzkya virginica. Bioinformatic analysis showed that the protein encoded by this gene had common properties of LEA proteins and the multiple sequences alignment and phylogenetic analysis further showed that this protein had high homology with two Arabidopsis LEA proteins. Gene expression analysis revealed that this gene had a higher expression in root and it was induced obviously by salt stress. Moreover, the transcripts of KvLEA were also induced by other abiotic stresses including drought, high temperature, chilling, and ABA treatment. Among these abiotic stresses, ABA treatment brought about the biggest changes to this gene. Collectively, our research discovered a novel LEA gene and uncovered its involvement in multiabiotic stresses in K. virginica. This research not only enriched studies on LEA gene in plant but also would accelerate more studies on K. virginica in the future. PMID:27123459

  6. KvLEA, a New Isolated Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein Gene from Kosteletzkya virginica Responding to Multiabiotic Stresses.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoli; Wang, Hongyan; Chu, Liye; Shao, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    The LEA proteins are a kind of hydrophilic proteins, playing main functions in desiccation tolerance. However, their importance as a kind of stress proteins in abiotic stress is being clarified little by little. In this study we isolated, cloned, and identified the first KvLEA gene in Kosteletzkya virginica. Bioinformatic analysis showed that the protein encoded by this gene had common properties of LEA proteins and the multiple sequences alignment and phylogenetic analysis further showed that this protein had high homology with two Arabidopsis LEA proteins. Gene expression analysis revealed that this gene had a higher expression in root and it was induced obviously by salt stress. Moreover, the transcripts of KvLEA were also induced by other abiotic stresses including drought, high temperature, chilling, and ABA treatment. Among these abiotic stresses, ABA treatment brought about the biggest changes to this gene. Collectively, our research discovered a novel LEA gene and uncovered its involvement in multiabiotic stresses in K. virginica. This research not only enriched studies on LEA gene in plant but also would accelerate more studies on K. virginica in the future. PMID:27123459

  7. Determination of protein carbonyls in plasma, cell extracts, tissue homogenates, isolated proteins: Focus on sample preparation and derivatization conditions

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Daniela; Davies, Michael J.; Grune, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    Protein oxidation is involved in regulatory physiological events as well as in damage to tissues and is thought to play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases and in the aging process. Protein-bound carbonyls represent a marker of global protein oxidation, as they are generated by multiple different reactive oxygen species in blood, tissues and cells. Sample preparation and stabilization are key steps in the accurate quantification of oxidation-related products and examination of physiological/pathological processes. This review therefore focuses on the sample preparation processes used in the most relevant methods to detect protein carbonyls after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine with an emphasis on measurement in plasma, cells, organ homogenates, isolated proteins and organelles. Sample preparation, derivatization conditions and protein handling are presented for the spectrophotometric and HPLC method as well as for immunoblotting and ELISA. An extensive overview covering these methods in previously published articles is given for researchers who plan to measure protein carbonyls in different samples. PMID:26141921

  8. GPI-anchored proteins do not reside in ordered domains in the live cell plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sevcsik, Eva; Brameshuber, Mario; Fölser, Martin; Weghuber, Julian; Honigmann, Alf; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2015-01-01

    The organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane has been subject of a long-lasting debate. Membrane rafts of higher lipid chain order were proposed to mediate protein interactions, but have thus far not been directly observed. Here, we use protein micropatterning combined with single-molecule tracking to put current models to the test: we rearranged lipid-anchored raft proteins (glycosylphosphatidylinositol(GPI)-anchored mGFP) directly in the live cell plasma membrane and measured the effect on the local membrane environment. Intriguingly, this treatment does neither nucleate the formation of an ordered membrane phase, nor result in any enrichment of nanoscopic ordered domains within the micropatterned regions. In contrast, we find that immobilized mGFP-GPIs behave as inert obstacles to the diffusion of other membrane constituents without influencing their membrane environment over distances beyond their physical size. Our results indicate that phase partitioning is not a fundamental element of protein organization in the plasma membrane. PMID:25897971

  9. [Prognostic value of S-100B protein plasma measurement after cardiac arrest].

    PubMed

    Ziani, S; Bertho, N; Atlan, G; Fievet, M-L; Ecollan, P; Beaudeux, J-L

    2010-01-01

    S-100B protein is selectively synthesized by glial cells, and is released in biological fluids after acute brain damage. We analyzed initial levels and evolution of plasma S-100B protein concentrations after resuscitated cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA). S-100B levels were determined in 27 subjects at the time of CPA (H0) then 12, 24 and 48 h after resuscitation. Initial levels of S-100B and kinetics revealed that: 1) 95% the of subjects with a concentration of protein S-100B greater than 0.80 microg/L at H0 did not survive; 2) 62% of subjects with a concentration of protein S-100B lower than 0.80 microg/L at H0 survived; 3) 100% of subjects with a protein S-100B level lower than 0.80 microg/L at H0 and whose evolution kinetics of S-100B levels showed a decrease survived; 4) 100% of the subjects whose S-100B levels increased from H12 died. In summary, this study suggests that the threshold of 0.80 microg/L for S-100B plasma levels at H0 could be predictive for the outcome of the CPA, when associated with the kinetic study of S-100B plasma concentration. PMID:20146976

  10. GPI-anchored proteins do not reside in ordered domains in the live cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Sevcsik, Eva; Brameshuber, Mario; Fölser, Martin; Weghuber, Julian; Honigmann, Alf; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2015-01-01

    The organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane has been the subject of a long-lasting debate. Membrane rafts of higher lipid chain order were proposed to mediate protein interactions, but have thus far not been directly observed. Here we use protein micropatterning combined with single-molecule tracking to put current models to the test: we rearranged lipid-anchored raft proteins (glycosylphosphatidylinositol(GPI)-anchored-mGFP) directly in the live cell plasma membrane and measured the effect on the local membrane environment. Intriguingly, this treatment does neither nucleate the formation of an ordered membrane phase nor result in any enrichment of nanoscopic-ordered domains within the micropatterned regions. In contrast, we find that immobilized mGFP-GPIs behave as inert obstacles to the diffusion of other membrane constituents without influencing their membrane environment over distances beyond their physical size. Our results indicate that phase partitioning is not a fundamental element of protein organization in the plasma membrane. PMID:25897971

  11. Moesin, ezrin, and p205 are actin-binding proteins associated with neutrophil plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Pestonjamasp, K; Amieva, M R; Strassel, C P; Nauseef, W M; Furthmayr, H; Luna, E J

    1995-01-01

    Actin-binding proteins in bovine neutrophil plasma membranes were identified using blot overlays with 125I-labeled F-actin. Along with surface-biotinylated proteins, membranes were enriched in major actin-binding polypeptides of 78, 81, and 205 kDa. Binding was specific for F-actin because G-actin did not bind. Further, unlabeled F-actin blocked the binding of 125I-labeled F-actin whereas other acidic biopolymers were relatively ineffective. Binding also was specifically inhibited by myosin subfragment 1, but not by CapZ or plasma gelsolin, suggesting that the membrane proteins, like myosin, bind along the sides of the actin filaments. The 78- and 81-kDa polypeptides were identified as moesin and ezrin, respectively, by co-migration on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation with antibodies specific for moesin and ezrin. Although not present in detectable amounts in bovine neutrophils, radixin (a third and closely related member of this gene family) also bound 125I-labeled F-actin on blot overlays. Experiments with full-length and truncated bacterial fusion proteins localized the actin-binding site in moesin to the extreme carboxy terminus, a highly conserved sequence. Immunofluorescence micrographs of permeabilized cells and cell "footprints" showed moesin co-localization with actin at the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane, consistent with a role as a membrane-actin-linking protein. Images PMID:7612961

  12. Effect of parasitism on plasma sex-specific proteins in Cyphocarax gilbert (Teleost, Curimatidae).

    PubMed

    Da Silva, L Gomes; Azevedo, J S; Silva-Neto, M A; Lima, N R Wille; Dansa-Petretski, M

    2005-06-01

    Cyphocarax gilbert (Szidat, L., 1948) is a fish commonly found in coastal drainage of eastern Brazil. This fish is sometimes caught with signs of infection by the crustacean Riggia paranensis, a haematophagous parasite. A remarkable feature of infected fish is that they lack gonads. In this paper we have analysed the frequency of parasitism, the gonadal development of non-infected fish and the profile of plasma proteins in both infected and non-infected specimens. Two reproductive periods/year were observed, beginning in February and August. On average, 40% of fish were infected, in the Itabapoana River (Brazil). Sex-specific proteins were identified by electrophoresis. SDS-PAGE analysis demonstrated that a 143 kDa female-specific glycolipoprotein (FSP) is a calcium-binding phosphoprotein. FSP was isolated through ultracentrifugation and SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the native protein is composed of three polypeptides of 143, 100 and 70 kDa. Both FSP and a 33 kDa male-specific protein (MSP) are absent from infected fish plasma. FSP levels in female plasma changes with the developmental stage of gonads. Altogether these data suggest that the FSP corresponds to fish vitellogenin. Furthermore, the absence of the above-mentioned proteins in infected fish suggests that R. paranensis might interfere with the regular hormonal process of fish vitellogenesis. PMID:15977902

  13. PHYSCOMITRELLA PATENS ARABINOGALACTAN PROTEINS CONTAIN ABUNDANT TERMINAL 3-O-METHYL-L-RHAMMOSYL RESIDUES NOT FOUND IN ANGIOSPERMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A biochemical investigation of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) in Physcomitrella patens was undertaken with particular emphasis on the glycan chains. Following homogenization and differential centrifugation of moss gametophytes, AGPs were obtained by Arrive phenylglycoside-induced precipitation from...

  14. Correlation between mRNA and protein abundance in Desulfovibrio vulgaris: A multiple regression to identify sources of variations

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Lei; Wu, G; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-01-13

    Using whole-genome microarray and LC-MC/MS proteomic data collected from Desulfovibrio vulgaris grown under three different conditions, we systematically investigate the relationship between mRNA and protein abundunce by a multiple regression approach.

  15. Protein and cholesterol electrophoresis of plasma samples from captive cownose ray (Rhinoptera bonasus).

    PubMed

    Cray, Carolyn; Rodriguez, Marilyn; Field, Cara; McDermott, Alexa; Leppert, Lynda; Clauss, Tonya; Bossart, Gregory D

    2015-11-01

    Our study was undertaken to assess the application of semiautomated methods available at the reference laboratory level for the evaluation of plasma protein and cholesterol via electrophoresis in samples from cownose rays (Rhinoptera bonasus). Three groups of animals were assessed: clinically normal, clinically abnormal, and parasitized with leeches. As reported previously, the albumin band was negligible; the protein electrophoretograms were dominated by a large beta-globulin fraction. While the group of samples from the leech-parasitized rays did not show any large differences, the abnormal group exhibited significantly elevated total solids and cholesterol levels. The latter was related to a significant increase in very low density lipoprotein levels. The results demonstrate the potential application of these laboratory methods in quantitation of plasma proteins and cholesterol fractions in subclass Elasmobranchii. PMID:26450839

  16. Plasma protein(s) yields met-enkephalin-related peptides in near-micromolar concentrations when treated with pepsin.

    PubMed

    Singer, E A; Mitra, S P; Carraway, R E

    1986-10-01

    Treatment of animal and human plasmas with pepsin yielded large quantities of immunoreactive methionine5-enkephalin (i-met-ENK). The concentrations measured after pepsin treatment were 0.1-0.5 microM, about 1000 times the normal circulating level of i-met-ENK (0.03-0.3 nM). The reaction was shown to be time and pH dependent and to involve the action of pepsin on a protein(s) of about 65,000 mol wt. Pepsin-generated i-met-ENK from rat plasma gave three major peaks during reverse phase HPLC, one of which (approximately 25% of the total) coeluted with methionine5-enkephalin sulfoxide and also completed in a radioreceptor assay for opiate-related substances. In addition, this material produced met-ENK-like effects on vascular permeability in rat skin and inhibited electrically induced contractions of the isolated guinea pig ileum in a naloxone-sensitive manner. The plasma substrate(s) that yielded i-met-ENK was distinguished from adrenal proenkephalins, since partially purified plasma substrate(s) did not liberate i-met-ENK upon digestion with trypsin and carboxypeptidase B. Although it is possible that these peptides differ from met-ENK in amino acid sequence, the results presented here suggest that met-ENK-related substances might be formed physiologically by the action of a pepsin-related processing enzyme(s) on plasma substrate(s). Such a mechanism would be analogous to that used in the renin-angiotensin system. PMID:3093194

  17. Two major proteins from locust plasma are involved in coagulation and are specifically precipitated by laminarin, a beta-1,3-glucan.

    PubMed

    Duvic, B; Brehélin, M

    1998-12-01

    Incubation of plasma of the locust Locusta migratoria, with laminarin induced the precipitation of two major proteins with molecular masses of about 260,000 (P260) and 85,000 Da (P85). This precipitation was not observed when other polysaccharides, such as curdlan, dextran, chitin, cellulose or mannan were used. P260 and P85 were purified to homogeneity by a single step on heparin-sepharose chromatography. Since all attempts to separate P260 from P85, other than the use of sodium dodecyl sulfate, were unsuccessful, it is likely that these two molecules form a complex non-covalently associated. Treatment of P260-P85 complex with N-glycosidase F showed that P260 did not appear to be glycosylated whereas 6% of P85 molecular mass was due to N-linked carbohydrates. On the other hand, no change in molecular masses of P260 or P85 was observed once the complex had been treated with lipase. SDS-PAGE and Western blots of plasma and serum stained with blue Coomassie for proteins or with highly specific polysera to P260 or P85, respectively, showed that P260 was only present in plasma and P85 remained in both samples. This indicates that P260 is likely to be one of the most abundant plasma proteins directly involved in the coagulation process in Locusta migratoria. The addition of plasma or P260-P85 complex to a hemocyte lysate supernatant prior to its activation by laminarin induced a lower protease as well as phenoloxidase activity compared with the control. This reduction of activities was not observed in the presence of serum or when P260-P85 complex was added to a fully activated proPO system. PMID:9887512

  18. Characterization of Differential Protein Tethering at the Plasma Membrane in Response to Epidermal Growth Factor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Looyenga, Brendan D.; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P.

    2013-01-01

    Physical tethering of membrane proteins to the cortical actin cytoskeleton provides functional organization to the plasma membrane and contributes to diverse cellular processes including cell signaling, vesicular trafficking, endocytosis, and migration. For these processes to occur, membrane protein tethering must be dynamically regulated in response to environmental cues. In this study, we describe a novel biochemical scheme for isolating the complement of plasma membrane proteins that are physically tethered to the actin cytoskeleton. We utilized this method in combination with tandem liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) to demonstrate that cytoskeletal tethering of membrane proteins is acutely regulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) in normal human kidney (HK2) cells. Our results indicate that several proteins known to be involved in EGF signaling, as well as other proteins not traditionally associated with this pathway, are tethered to the cytoskeleton in dynamic fashion. Further analysis of one hit from our proteomic survey, the receptor phosphotyrosine phosphatase PTPRS, revealed a correlation between cytoskeletal tethering and endosomal trafficking in response to EGF. This finding parallels previous indications that PTPRS is involved in the desensitization of EGFR and provides a potential mechanism to coordinate localization of these two membrane proteins in the same compartment upon EGFR activation. PMID:22559174

  19. Dietary protein and plasma total homocysteine, cysteine concentrations in coronary angiographic subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dietary patterns are associated with plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations in healthy populations, but the associations between dietary protein and tHcy, total cysteine (tCys) in high risk populations are unclear. We therefore examined the association between dietary protein and tHcy and tCys concentrations in coronary angiographic subjects. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1015 Chinese patients who underwent coronary angiography (40–85 y old). With the use of food-frequency questionnaires, we divided the total protein intakes into high animal-protein and high plant-protein diets. Circulating concentrations of tHcy and tCys were simultaneously measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Results We found that high animal-protein diet was positively associated with hyperhomocysteinemia after adjustment for potential confounders, with the subjects in the highest quartile of intake having the greatest increase in risk (OR: 4.14, 95% CI: 2.67-6.43), whereas high plant-protein diet was inversely related to hyperhomocysteinemia, with a higher intake being protective. Compared with the first quartile of intake, the adjusted OR was 0.59 (95% CI: 0.38-0.91) for the fourth quartile. The total protein intake was positively associated with the risk of hypercysteinemia and the participants in highest quartile had significant OR of 1.69 (95% CI: 1.02-2.87) compared with those in lowest quartile. In multivariate linear regression analyses, high animal-protein and total-protein intakes were positively associated with plasma tHcy and tCys concentrations. The plant-protein intake was a negative determinant of plasma tHcy concentrations. Conclusions High animal-protein diet was positively associated with high tHcy concentrations, whereas high plant-protein diet was inversely associated with tHcy concentrations. Furthermore the total protein intake was strongly related to tCys concentrations. PMID:24195518

  20. Core-shell molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles with assistant recognition polymer chains for effective recognition and enrichment of natural low-abundance protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dejing; Yang, Qian; Jin, Susu; Song, Yingying; Gao, Junfei; Wang, Ying; Mi, Huaifeng

    2014-02-01

    Core-shell molecular imprinting of nanomaterials overcomes difficulties with template transfer and achieves higher binding capacities for macromolecular imprinting, which are more important to the imprinting of natural low-abundance proteins from cell extracts. In the present study, a novel strategy of preparing core-shell nanostructured molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was developed that combined the core-shell approach with assistant recognition polymer chains (ARPCs). Vinyl-modified silica nanoparticles were used as support and ARPCs were used as additional functional monomers. Immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was chosen as the model protein. The cloned template protein BiP was selectively assembled with ARPCs from their library, which contained numerous limited-length polymer chains with randomly distributed recognition and immobilization sites. The resulting complex was copolymerized onto the surface of vinyl-modified silica nanoparticles under low concentrations of the monomers. After template removal, core-shell-structured nanoparticles with a thin imprinted polymer layer were produced. The particles demonstrated considerably high adsorption capacity, fast adsorption kinetics and selective binding affinities toward the template BiP. Furthermore, the synthesized MIP nanoparticles successfully isolated cloned protein BiP from protein mixtures and highly enriched BiP from an ER extract containing thousands of kinds of proteins. The enrichment reached 115-fold and the binding capacity was 5.4 μg g(-1), which were higher than those achieved by using traditional MIP microspheres. The advantageous properties of MIP nanoparticles hold promise for further practical applications in biology, such as protein analysis and purification. PMID:24140608

  1. Plasma volume and intravascular protein masses in trained boys and fit young men.

    PubMed

    Koch, G; Röcker, L

    1977-12-01

    Plasma volumes and intravascular protein masses were measured in eight well-trained boys (VO2 max = 59.6 +/- 6.5 ml/kg body wt) aged 13-15 yr and compared with two groups of adult athletes aged 17-20 yr (VO2 max = 61.8 +/- 3.4 ml/kg body wt) and 24-30 yr (VO2 max = 63.3 +/- 4.1 ml/kg body wt), respectively. The trained boys had larger plasma volumes and increased intravascular masses of albumin and hepatogenic globulins as compared with values available for children with normal physical activity. There was no significant difference between the boys and the adults concerning maximal oxygen uptake, plasma volume, albumin, immunoglobins, and haptoglobin, when allowance was made for differences in body dimensions; probably due to the young age, however, the boys had considerably higher relative alpha2-macroglobulin and transferrin masses. Endurance training apparently elicits the same response of the plasma protein system regardless of age, at least after pubertal age has been attained. The overall effect of these changes implies an increase of the water binding capacity of the plasma PMID:75204

  2. Stimulated synthesis of plasma protein species in Q fever and endotoxemia

    SciTech Connect

    Picking, W.D.; Ershadi, M.; Hackstadt, T.; Paretsky, D.

    1987-05-01

    Q fever stimulates hepatic transcription and translation. Products of stimulated transcription have been identified, but not of translation. Protein (Pr) synthesis and rPr S6 phosphorylation correlated. The authors now report stimulated synthesis of plasma Pr species in early febrile responses to Q fever and Coxiella burnetii lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Guinea pigs received 400 g LPS intraperitoneally and 7 hr later 250 Ci L-(TVS)met, then sacrificed 3 hr later. Plasma Pr sp act (cpm/mg Pr) increased 2.3X over controls (N). Exptl plasma Pr PAGE autorads showed intensified Pr bands at M/sub r/ 55K. Guinea pigs infected with C. burnetii (Inf) received 400 Ci (TVS)met 84 hr p.i. and were sacrificed 3 hr later. Inf plasma Pr 1D-PAGE showed bands at 55K similar to that found with LPS, with lower albumin concn. Coomassie stain and autorads of 2-D PAGEs showed intensified or new acidic peptide species in Inf plasma. PAGE autorads in vitro translations using liver mRNA and ribosomes showed major species in Inf systems at 49K (4+) and 62K (2+) compared to N. The data indicate acute phase protein induction by LPS or rickettsial infection.

  3. The highly abundant chlorophyll-protein complex of iron-deficient Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 (CP43') is encoded by the isiA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Burnap, R L; Troyan, T; Sherman, L A

    1993-01-01

    A chlorophyll (Chl)-protein complex designated CPVI-4 becomes the major pigment-protein complex in Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 cells grown under conditions of iron limitation. Work by Laudenbach et al. (J Bacteriol [1988] 170: 5018-5026) has identified an iron-repressible operon, designated isiAB, containing the flavodoxin gene and a gene predicted to encode a Chl-binding protein resembling CP43 of photosystem II. To test the hypothesis that the CP43-like protein is a component of the CPVI-4 complex, we have inactivated the isiAB operon in Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 using directed insertional mutagenesis. Mutant cells grown under conditions of iron limitation exhibit pronounced changes in their spectroscopic and photosynthetic properties relative to similarly grown wild-type cells. Notably, the strong 77 K fluorescence emission at 685 nm, which dominates the spectrum of iron-deficient wild-type cells, is dramatically reduced in the mutant. The loss of this emission appears to unmask the otherwise obscured photosystem II emissions at 685 and 695 nm. Most importantly, mildly denaturing gel electrophoresis shows that mutant cells no longer express the CPVI-4 complex, indicating that the isiA gene encodes a component of this abundant Chl-protein complex. PMID:8022940

  4. Identification of Putative Genes Involved in Bisphenol A Degradation Using Differential Protein Abundance Analysis of Sphingobium sp. BiD32.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nicolette A; Kjeldal, Henrik; Gough, Heidi L; Nielsen, Jeppe L

    2015-10-20

    Discharge of the endocrine disrupting compound bisphenol A (BPA) with wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents into surface waters results in deleterious effects on aquatic life. Sphingobium sp. BiD32 was previously isolated from activated sludge based on its ability to degrade BPA. This study investigated BPA metabolism by Sphingobium sp. BiD32 using label-free quantitative proteomics. The genome of Sphingobium sp. BiD32 was sequenced to provide a species-specific platform for optimal protein identification. The bacterial proteomes of Sphingobium sp. BiD32 in the presence and absence of BPA were identified and quantified. A total of 2155 proteins were identified; 1174 of these proteins were quantified, and 184 of these proteins had a statistically significant change in abundance in response to the presence/absence of BPA (p ≤ 0.05). Proteins encoded by genes previously identified to be responsible for protocatechuate degradation were upregulated in the presence of BPA. The analysis of the metabolites from BPA degradation by Sphingobium sp. BiD32 detected a hydroxylated metabolite. A novel p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase enzyme detected by proteomics was implicated in the metabolic pathway associated with the detected metabolite. This enzyme is hypothesized to be involved in BPA degradation by Sphingobium sp. BiD32, and may serve as a future genetic marker for BPA degradation. PMID:26390302

  5. Studies of individual carbon sites of proteins in solution by natural abundance carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Strategies for assignments.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, E; Norton, R S; Allerhand, A

    1975-08-25

    Natural abundance 13C Fourier transform NMR spectra (at 15.18 MHz, in 20-mm sample tubes) of aqueous native proteins yield numerous narrow single carbon resonances of nonprotonated aromatic carbons. Techniques for the assignment of these resonances are presented. Each technique is applied to one or more of the following proteins: ferricytochrome c from horse heart and Candida krusei, ferrocytochrome c and cyanoferricytochrome c from horse heart, lysozyme from hen egg white, cyanoferrimyoglobins from horse and sperm whale skeletal muscle, and carbon monoxide myoglobin from horse. In all of the protein spectra we have examined, methine aromatic carbons give rise to broad bands. Studies of the narrow resonances of nonprotonated aromatic carbons of proteins are facilitated by removal of these broad bands by means of the convolution-difference method, preferably from spectra recorded under conditions of noise-modulated off-resonance proton decoupling. We present a summary of the chemical shift ranges for the various types of nonprotonated aromatic carbons of amino acid residues and hemes of diamagnetic proteins, based on our results for hen egg white lysozyme, horse heart ferrocytochrome c, horse carbon monoxide myoglobin, and carbon monoxide hemoglobins from various species... PMID:169240

  6. Triton X-114 cloud point extraction to subfractionate blood plasma proteins for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Jessen, Flemming; Wulff, Tune

    2015-09-15

    A simple and reproducible procedure for enrichment of a plasma protein subfraction suitable for two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2DE) was developed, using a Triton X-114-based cloud point extraction (CPE). Appropriate conditions for such a CPE procedure were found by SDS-PAGE to be a plasma protein concentration of about 10mg/ml in 3% (w/v) Triton X-114. 2DE of proteins obtained by CPE of 400 μl of human plasma revealed about 200 spots constituting a spot pattern very different from the pattern of total plasma. The CPE procedure only had a limited contribution to the technical variation. Identification of about 60 spots, representing only 22 proteins, revealed that several proteins in the obtained subfraction were present in more isoforms or modifications. Among these were apolipoproteins (A-1, D, E, L1, and M), haptoglobin-related protein, phosphatidylcholine-sterol acyltransferase, serum amyloid A, and serum paraoxonase/arylesterase 1, which are proteins of a hydrophobic nature, as in plasma they relate to lipoprotein particles. Thus, Triton X-114-based CPE is a simple plasma prefractionation tool, attractive for detailed 2DE studies of hydrophobic plasma proteins and their isoforms or modifications. PMID:26080275

  7. Treatment of Second-Order Structures of Proteins Using Oxygen Radio Frequency Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nobuya; Nakahigashi, Akari; Liu, Hao; Goto, Masaaki

    2010-08-01

    Decomposition characteristics of second-order structures of proteins are determined using an oxygen radio frequency (RF) plasma sterilizer in order to prevent infectious proteins from contaminating medical equipment in hospitals. The removal of casein protein as a test protein with a concentration of 50 mg/cm2 on the plane substrate requires approximately 8 h when singlet atomic oxygen is irradiated. The peak intensity of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra of the β-sheet structures decreases at approximately the same rate as those of the α-helix and first-order structures of proteins. Active oxygen has a sufficient oxidation energy to dissociate hydrogen bonds within the β-sheet structure.

  8. Plasma membrane protein trafficking in plant–microbe interactions: a plant cell point of view

    PubMed Central

    Nathalie Leborgne-Castel; Bouhidel, Karim

    2014-01-01

    In order to ensure their physiological and cellular functions, plasma membrane (PM) proteins must be properly conveyed from their site of synthesis, i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum, to their final destination, the PM, through the secretory pathway. PM protein homeostasis also relies on recycling and/or degradation, two processes that are initiated by endocytosis. Vesicular membrane trafficking events to and from the PM have been shown to be altered when plant cells are exposed to mutualistic or pathogenic microbes. In this review, we will describe the fine-tune regulation of such alterations, and their consequence in PM protein activity. We will consider the formation of intracellular perimicrobial compartments, the PM protein trafficking machinery of the host, and the delivery or retrieval of signaling and transport proteins such as pattern-recognition receptors, producers of reactive oxygen species, and sugar transporters. PMID:25566303

  9. Modification of expansin protein abundance in tomato fruit alters softening and cell wall polymer metabolism during ripening

    PubMed Central

    Brummell, DA; Harpster, MH; Civello, PM; Palys, JM; Bennett, AB; Dunsmuir, P

    1999-01-01

    The role of the ripening-specific expansin Exp1 protein in fruit softening and cell wall metabolism was investigated by suppression and overexpression of Exp1 in transgenic tomato plants. Fruit in which Exp1 protein accumulation was suppressed to 3% that of wild-type levels were firmer than controls throughout ripening. Suppression of Exp1 protein also substantially inhibited polyuronide depolymerization late in ripening but did not prevent the breakdown of structurally important hemicelluloses, a major contributor to softening. In contrast, fruit overexpressing high levels of recombinant Exp1 protein were much softer than controls, even in mature green fruit before ripening commenced. This softening was correlated with the precocious and extensive depolymerization of structural hemicelluloses, whereas polyuronide depolymerization was not altered. These data are consistent with there being at least three components to fruit softening and textural changes. One component is a relaxation of the wall directly mediated by Exp1, which indirectly limits part of a second component due to polyuronide depolymerization late in ripening, perhaps by controlling access of a pectinase to its substrate. The third component is caused by depolymerization of hemicelluloses, which occurs independently of or requires only very small amounts of Exp1 protein. PMID:10559444

  10. Dataset of liver proteins of eu- and hypothyroid rats affected in abundance by any of three factors: in vivo exposure to hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), thyroid status, gender differences.

    PubMed

    Miller, I; Renaut, J; Cambier, S; Murk, A J; Gutleb, A C; Serchi, T

    2016-09-01

    Male Wistar rats with different thyroid status (eu-, hypothyroid) were exposed to 0, 3 or 30 mg/kg body weight of the flame retardant HBCD for 7 days and obtained data compared with a previous study in females, "Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) induced changes in the liver proteome of eu- and hypothyroid female rats" (Miller et al., 2016) [1]. Specifically, proteomic investigation of liver protein patterns obtained by 2D-DIGE was performed and differences between animals groups recorded, based on the factors exposure, thyroid status and gender. All proteins with significantly changed abundance in any of these comparisons were identified by mass spectrometry. General, hormone and proteomic data of both the present and the previous studies are discussed in Miller et al. (2016) [1] and in "Gender specific differences in the liver proteome of rats exposed to hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD)" Miller et al. (2016) [2]. PMID:27579339

  11. Novel platelet-agglutinating protein from a thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, F A; Lian, E C

    1985-01-01

    A novel platelet-agglutinating protein (PAP) was purified approximately 2,000-fold from the plasma of a patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) by ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sephacel and concanavalin A-Sepharose chromatographies. On sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with and without reduction, this preparation revealed a major protein band with a molecular weight of 37,000, and a minor band with a molecular weight of 32,000-34,000. After elution from the gel, only the 37,000-mol wt protein corresponding to the major band induced the platelet agglutination. When four normal plasmas and the recovery plasma from the same TTP patient were subjected to the similar purification steps, the 37,000-mol wt major band was absent. The 125I-PAP bound to the platelets in a concentration-dependent manner. The platelet agglutination induced by PAP was not inhibited by hirudin, heparin in the presence of antithrombin III, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, apyrase, aspirin, or prostaglandin I2. However, it was inhibited by IgG from normal adults and from the same TTP patient after recovery. The anti-37,000-mol wt PAP antiserum prepared in the rabbit formed a single precipitin line against the highly purified PAP. Using this antiserum in the Western immunoblotting, the 37,000-mol wt protein band was found in the three TTP plasmas, of which the platelet-agglutinating activity was inhibited by the anti-37,000-mol wt PAP IgG. The 37,000-mol wt immunoprecipitin band was absent in the plasmas obtained from another two TTP patients, two normal subjects, two patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and two patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation. These results suggest that the 37,000-mol wt PAP is present only in certain cases of TTP, and is likely to be responsible for the formation of platelet thrombi in the microcirculation. Images PMID:3932464

  12. Proteomic analysis of plasma membrane proteins in wheat roots exposed to phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu; Du, Jiangxue; Yue, Le; Zhan, Xinhua

    2016-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are potentially carcinogenic and toxic to humans through ingestion of contaminated food crops. PAHs can enter crop roots through proton/PAH symporters; however, to date, the symporter remains unclear. Here we reveal, for the first time, the plasma membrane proteome of Triticum aestivum seedling roots in response to phenanthrene (a model PAH) exposure. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and protein database search engines were employed to analyze and identify phenanthrene-responsive proteins. Over 192 protein spots are reproducibly detected in each gel, while 8 spots are differentially expressed under phenanthrene treatment. Phenanthrene induces five up-regulated proteins distinguished as 5-methyltetrahydropteroyltriglutamate-homocysteine methyltransferase 2, enolase, heat shock protein 80-2, probable mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription subunit 37e (heat shock 70-kDa protein 1), and lactoylglutathione lyase. Three proteins identified as adenosine kinase 2, 4-hydroxy-7-methoxy-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-2-yl glucoside beta-D-glucosidase 1c, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 3 are down-regulated under exposure to phenanthrene. The up-regulated proteins are related to plant defense response, antioxidant system, and glycolysis. The down-regulated proteins involve the metabolism of high-energy compounds and plant growth. Magnesium, which is able to bind to enolase, can enhance the transport of phenanthrene into wheat roots. Therefore, it is concluded that phenanthrene can induce differential expression of proteins in relation to carbohydrate metabolism, self-defense, and plant growth on wheat root plasma membrane. This study not only provides novel insights into PAH uptake by plant roots and PAH stress responses, but is also a good starting point for further determination and analyses of their functions using genetic and other approaches. PMID:26897580

  13. The abundant class III chitinase homolog in young developing banana fruits behaves as a transient vegetative storage protein and most probably serves as an important supply of amino acids for the synthesis of ripening-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Peumans, Willy J; Proost, Paul; Swennen, Rony L; Van Damme, Els J M

    2002-10-01

    Analyses of the protein content and composition revealed dramatic changes in gene expression during in situ banana (Musa spp.) fruit formation/ripening. The total banana protein content rapidly increases during the first 60 to 70 d, but remains constant for the rest of fruit formation/ripening. During the phase of rapid protein accumulation, an inactive homolog of class III chitinases accounts for up to 40% (w/v) of the total protein. Concomitant with the arrest of net protein accumulation, the chitinase-related protein (CRP) progressively decreases and several novel proteins appear in the electropherograms. Hence, CRP behaves as a fruit-specific vegetative storage protein that accumulates during early fruit formation and serves as a source of amino acids for the synthesis of ripening-associated proteins. Analyses of individual proteins revealed that a thaumatin-like protein, a beta-1,3-glucanase, a class I chitinase, and a mannose-binding lectin are the most abundant ripening-associated proteins. Because during the ripening of prematurely harvested bananas, similar changes take place as in the in situ ripening bananas, CRP present in immature fruits is a sufficient source of amino acids for a quasi-normal synthesis of ripening-associated proteins. However, it is evident that the conversion of CRP in ripening-associated proteins takes place at an accelerated rate, especially when climacteric ripening is induced by ethylene. The present report also includes a discussion of the accumulation of the major banana allergens and the identification of suitable promoters for the production of vaccines in transgenic bananas. PMID:12376669

  14. Seminal plasma protein profiles of ejaculates obtained by internal artificial vagina and electroejaculation in Brahman bulls.

    PubMed

    Rego, J P A; Moura, A A; Nouwens, A S; McGowan, M R; Boe-Hansen, G B

    2015-09-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate if differences exist in the seminal plasma protein profile from mature Brahman bulls using two methods of semen collection: internal artificial vagina (IAV) and electroejaculation (EEJ). Semen was collected four times from three bulls on the same day and parameters were assessed immediately post-collection. Seminal plasma proteins were evaluated by 2-D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. Semen volume was greater (P < 0.05) for EEJ (4.6 ± 0.35 mL) than for IAV (1.86 ± 0.24 mL) but sperm concentration was greater in IAV (1505 ± 189 × 10(6) sperm/mL) than in EEJ samples (344 ± 87 × 10(6) sperm/mL). Sperm motility and the percentage of normal sperm were not different between treatments. Total concentration of seminal plasma proteins was greater for samples collected by IAV as compared to EEJ (19.3 ± 0.9 compared with 13.0 ± 1.8 mg/mL, P < 0.05; respectively). Based on 2-D gels, 22 spots had a greater volume (P < 0.05) in gels derived from IAV samples, corresponding to 21 proteins identified as transferrin, albumin, epididymal secretory glutathione peroxidase, among others. Thirty-three spots, corresponding to 26 proteins, had a greater volume (P < 0.05) in gels derived from EEJ samples. These proteins were identified as spermadhesin-1, Bovine Sperm Protin 1, 3 and 5 isoforms, angiogenin-1, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, clusterin, nucleobindin-1, cathepsins, spermadhesin Z13, annexins, among others. Thus, proteins in greater amounts in samples obtained by IAV and EEJ were mainly of epididymal origin and accessory sex glands, respectively. PMID:26282524

  15. Increased Depth and Breadth of Plasma Protein Quantitation via Two-Dimensional Liquid Chromatography/Multiple Reaction Monitoring-Mass Spectrometry with Labeled Peptide Standards.

    PubMed

    Percy, Andrew J; Yang, Juncong; Chambers, Andrew G; Borchers, Christoph H

    2016-01-01

    Absolute quantitative strategies are emerging as a powerful and preferable means of deriving concentrations in biological samples for systems biology applications. Method development is driven by the need to establish new-and validate current-protein biomarkers of high-to-low abundance for clinical utility. In this chapter, we describe a methodology involving two-dimensional (2D) reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), operated under alkaline and acidic pH conditions, combined with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-mass spectrometry (MS) (also called selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-MS) and a complex mixture of stable isotope-labeled standard (SIS) peptides, to quantify a broad and diverse panel of 253 proteins in human blood plasma. The quantitation range spans 8 orders of magnitude-from 15 mg/mL (for vitamin D-binding protein) to 450 pg/mL (for protein S100-B)-and includes 31 low-abundance proteins (defined as being <10 ng/mL) of potential disease relevance. The method is designed to assess candidates at the discovery and/or verification phases of the biomarker pipeline and can be adapted to examine smaller or alternate panels of proteins for higher sample throughput. Also detailed here is the application of our recently developed software tool-Qualis-SIS-for protein quantitation (via regression analysis of standard curves) and quality assessment of the resulting data. Overall, this chapter provides the blueprint for the replication of this quantitative proteomic method by proteomic scientists of all skill levels. PMID:26867735

  16. Protein adsorption to polyethylene glycol modified liposomes from fibrinogen solution and from plasma.

    PubMed

    Price, M E; Cornelius, R M; Brash, J L

    2001-06-01

    Unmodified and polyethylene glycol (PEG) modified neutral and negatively charged liposomes were prepared by freeze-thaw and extrusion followed by chromatographic purification. The effects of PEG molecular weight (PEG 550, 2000, 5000), PEG loading (0-15 mol%), and liposome surface charge on fibrinogen adsorption were quantified using radiolabeling techniques. All adsorption isotherms increased monotonically over the concentration range 0-3 mg/ml and adsorption levels were low. Negatively charged liposomes adsorbed significantly more fibrinogen than neutral liposomes. PEG modification had no effect on fibrinogen adsorption to neutral liposomes. An inverse relationship was found between PEG loading of negatively charged liposomes and fibrinogen adsorption. PEGs of all three molecular weights at a loading of 5 mol% reduced fibrinogen adsorption to negatively charged liposomes. Protein adsorption from diluted plasma (10% normal strength) to four different liposome types (neutral, PEG-neutral, negatively charged, and PEG-negatively charged) was investigated using gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. The profiles of adsorbed proteins were similar on all four liposome types, but distinctly different from the profile of plasma itself, indicating a partitioning effect of the lipid surfaces. alpha2-macroglobulin and fibronectin were significantly enriched on the liposomes whereas albumin, transferrin, and fibrinogen were depleted compared to plasma. Apolipoprotein AI was a major component of the adsorbed protein layers. The blot of complement protein C3 adsorbed on the liposomes suggested that the complement system was activated. PMID:11406096

  17. Interstitial fluid, plasma protein, colloid, and leukocyte uptake into initial lymphatics.

    PubMed

    Ikomi, F; Hunt, J; Hanna, G; Schmid-Schönbein, G W

    1996-11-01

    Lymphatics serve to remove from the interstitium a range of materials, including plasma proteins, colloid materials, and cells. Lymph flow rates can be enhanced by periodic tissue compression or venous pressure elevation, but little is known to what degree enhancement of lymph flow affects material transport. The objective was to examine the uptake of plasma proteins, a colloidal perflubron emulsion (LA-11063, mean particle diameter = 0.34 micron), and leukocytes into lymphatics. Prenodal collecting lymphatics in the lower hindlimb of rabbits were cannulated with and without foot massage and after elevation of venous pressure (40 mmHg). The average lymph flow rates were elevated approximately 22-fold by the skin massage but only about threefold by venous pressure elevation. Lymph-to-plasma protein concentration ratio remained unchanged by the massage but decreased significantly after venous pressure elevation. Lymph colloid concentration and leukocyte counts were elevated on average 47 and 8.5 times, respectively, by foot massage, but both decreased after venous pressure elevation. These results suggest that skin movement by massage and elevation of the venous pressure lead to opposite lymph transport kinetics of protein, colloids, and cells. Massage is more effective to enhance material transport out of the interstitium into the initial lymphatics. PMID:8941530

  18. HIV-1 RNA genome dimerizes on the plasma membrane in the presence of Gag protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbo; Rahman, Sheikh Abdul; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Grunwald, David; Sardo, Luca; Burdick, Ryan C; Plisov, Sergey; Liang, Edward; Tai, Sheldon; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2016-01-12

    Retroviruses package a dimeric genome comprising two copies of the viral RNA. Each RNA contains all of the genetic information for viral replication. Packaging a dimeric genome allows the recovery of genetic information from damaged RNA genomes during DNA synthesis and promotes frequent recombination to increase diversity in the viral population. Therefore, the strategy of packaging dimeric RNA affects viral replication and viral evolution. Although its biological importance is appreciated, very little is known about the genome dimerization process. HIV-1 RNA genomes dimerize before packaging into virions, and RNA interacts with the viral structural protein Gag in the cytoplasm. Thus, it is often hypothesized that RNAs dimerize in the cytoplasm and the RNA-Gag complex is transported to the plasma membrane for virus assembly. In this report, we tagged HIV-1 RNAs with fluorescent proteins, via interactions of RNA-binding proteins and motifs in the RNA genomes, and studied their behavior at the plasma membrane by using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We showed that HIV-1 RNAs dimerize not in the cytoplasm but on the plasma membrane. Dynamic interactions occur among HIV-1 RNAs, and stabilization of the RNA dimer requires Gag protein. Dimerization often occurs at an early stage of the virus assembly process. Furthermore, the dimerization process is probably mediated by the interactions of two RNA-Gag complexes, rather than two RNAs. These findings advance the current understanding of HIV-1 assembly and reveal important insights into viral replication mechanisms. PMID:26712001

  19. New protein kinase from plasma membrane of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells activated by natural polypeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Racker, E; Abdel-Ghany, M; Sherrill, K; Riegler, C; Blair, E A

    1984-01-01

    A polypeptide-dependent protein kinase was purified about 80-fold from an extract of plasma membranes of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. The membranes were extracted with Nonidet P-40, and the extract was purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation and hydroxylapatite and affinity chromatography. The activity was stimulated 10-fold or more by polypeptide preparations from a variety of tissues, including placenta and hypothalamus. Polypeptide-dependent protein kinase had a pH optimum of about 7.5 and required Mg2+ for activity. Mn2+ at low concentrations (200 microM) stimulated enzyme activity somewhat but inhibited activity strongly at higher concentrations. The best available substrate for polypeptide-dependent protein kinase was beta-casein, and little or no phosphorylation was observed with alpha-casein, kappa-casein, phosvitin, alpha-lactalbumin, alpha-lactoglobulin, and histone. However, several endogenous substrates from plasma membranes of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells were phosphorylated. Polypeptide-dependent protein kinase activity was not inhibited by 10 mM N-ethylmaleimide, and this resistance was useful in differentiating this protein kinase from other protein kinases that were present in crude fractions and sensitive to the inhibitor. Images PMID:6589591

  20. Influence of relative abundance of isotopes on depth resolution for depth profiling of metal coatings by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fariñas, Juan C; Coedo, Aurora G; Dorado, Teresa

    2010-04-15

    A systematic study on the influence of relative abundance of isotopes of elements in the coating (A(c)) and in the substrate (A(s)) on both shape of time-resolved signals and depth resolution (Delta z) was performed for depth profile analysis of metal coatings on metal substrates by ultraviolet (266 nm) nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry. Five coated samples with coating thicknesses of the same order of magnitude (20-30 microm) were tested: nickel coating on aluminium, chromium and copper, and steel coated with copper and zinc. A laser repetition rate of 1 Hz and a laser fluence of 21 J cm(-2) were used. Five different depth profile types were established, which showed a clear dependence on A(c)/A(s) ratio. In general, depth profiles obtained for ratios above 1-10 could not be used to determine Delta z. We found that Delta z increased non-linearly with A(c)/A(s) ratio. The best depth profile types, leading to highest depth resolution and reproducibility, were attained in all cases by using the isotopes with low/medium A(c) values and with the highest A(s) values. In these conditions, an improvement of up to 4 times in Delta z values was achieved. The average ablation rates were in the range from 0.55 microm pulse(-1) for copper coating on steel to 0.83 microm pulse(-1) for zinc coating on steel, and the Delta z values were between 2.74 microm for nickel coating on chromium and 5.91 microm for nickel coating on copper, with RSD values about 5-8%. PMID:20188923

  1. Overexpression of Drosophila juvenile hormone esterase binding protein results in anti-JH effects and reduced pheromone abundance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The titer of juvenile hormone (JH), which has wide ranging physiological effects in insects, is regulated in part by JH esterase (JHE). We show that overexpression in Drosophila melanogaster of the JHE binding protein, DmP29 results in a series of apparent anti-JH effects. We hypothesize that DmP29 ...

  2. Identification of an abundant 56 kDa protein implicated in food allergy as granule-bound starch synthase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice, the staple food of South and East Asian counties, is considered to be hypoallergenic. However, several clinical studies have documented rice-induced allergy in sensitive patients. Rice proteins with molecular weights of 14-16 kDa, 26 kDa, 33 kDa and 56 kDa have been identified as allergens. Re...

  3. Analysis of crude protein and allergen abundance in peanuts (Arachis hypogaea cv. Walter) from three growing regions in Australia.

    PubMed

    Walczyk, Nicole E; Smith, Penelope M C; Tovey, Euan; Wright, Graeme C; Fleischfresser, Dayle B; Roberts, Thomas H

    2013-04-17

    The effects of plant growth conditions on concentrations of proteins, including allergens, in peanut ( Arachis hypogaea L.) kernels are largely unknown. Peanuts (cv. Walter) were grown at five sites (Taabinga, Redvale, Childers, Bundaberg, and Kairi) covering three commercial growing regions in Queensland, Australia. Differences in temperature, rainfall, and solar radiation during the growing season were evaluated. Kernel yield varied from 2.3 t/ha (Kairi) to 3.9 t/ha (Childers), probably due to differences in solar radiation. Crude protein appeared to vary only between Kairi and Childers, whereas Ara h 1 and 2 concentrations were similar in all locations. 2D-DIGE revealed significant differences in spot volumes for only two minor protein spots from peanuts grown in the five locations. Western blotting using peanut-allergic serum revealed no qualitative differences in recognition of antigens. It was concluded that peanuts grown in different growing regions in Queensland, Australia, had similar protein compositions and therefore were unlikely to show differences in allergenicity. PMID:23495786

  4. Vitamin D plasma binding protein. Turnover and fate in the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, J G; Fraser, D R; Lawson, D E

    1981-01-01

    The metabolic disposition of the plasma binding protein (DBP) for vitamin D and its metabolites was studied in adult rabbits. Apo-DBP was purified from rabbit plasma and enzymatically labeled with radioiodine. The radioiodine-labeled protein retained its ability to bind vitamin D sterols and its physicochemical properties. When 125I-labeled DBP and 131I-labeled rabbit albumin were simultaneously injected intravenously, the 125I was cleared from plasma at a faster rate (t 1/2 = 1.7 d) than 131I (t 1/2 = 5 d) and 125I was present in excess of 131I in kidney, liver, skeletal muscle, heart, lung, intestine, testis, and bone 1 h after injection. In contrast to DBP, 25(OH)D3 was cleared more slowly (t 1/2 = 10.7 d). Compared to albumin, DBP radioactivity appeared earlier and in greater quantity in the urine of catheterized rabbits. Gel filtration analyses of plasma revealed most of the 125I to elute in the position of DBP, with only small amounts in the less than 1,000-dalton region. In contrast, almost all of the urine 125I eluted in this small molecular weight fraction. The molar ratio of DBP to 25(OH)D3 in normal rabbit plasma was 138/1. The extravascular pool of DBP was calculated to be 1.5-2.4 times larger than the intravascular DBP pool, and the molar replacement rate of DBP was 1,350-fold higher than that of 25(OH)D3. The plasma disappearance curves of holo-DBP, prepared either by saturating with 25(OH)D3 or by covalently linking 3 beta-bromoacetoxy-25(OH)D3, were very similar to that of apo-DBP. Neuraminidase treatment of DBP did not alter its plasma survival. These studies indicate that DBP or DBP-25(OH)D3 complex is removed from plasma by a variety of tissues, that the DBP moiety is degraded during this process, and that a significant recirculation of 25(OH)D3 probably occurs. The molar excess of DBP to 25(OH)D3 in plasma, and the relatively rapid turnover of DBP indicate that a high capacity, high affinity, and dynamic transport mechanism for vitamin D sterols

  5. Sequestration of bovine seminal plasma proteins by different assemblies of phosphatidylcholine: A new technical approach.

    PubMed

    Le Guillou, J; Ropers, M-H; Gaillard, C; David-Briand, E; van Leeuwen-Ibarrola, J; Desherces, S; Schmitt, E; Bencharif, D; Amirat-Briand, L; Anton, M; Tainturier, D

    2016-04-01

    Binder of SPerm (BSP) proteins, the main proteins from bovine seminal plasma, are known to partially intercalate into the outer leaflet of the spermatozoa membrane and bind to choline-containing lipids being present therein. This insertion generates a negative effect on semen quality after cryopreservation by inducing an early-stage capacitation of spermatozoa. The assumption of surface properties exhibited by BSP proteins was checked by tensiometry measurements: BSP proteins are highly surface active. This suggests that BSP proteins can reach the interface covered by phospholipids not only by interactions between one and each other but also due to their own surface activity. The insertion of BSP proteins into the lipid domains outer leaflet of spermatozoa was reproduced on a biomimetic system such as Langmuir monolayers. The insertion of BSP proteins can be performed in the compressible fluid domains which contain choline-bearing lipids. Monolayer films were used as well to study the complexation of BSP proteins by two phospholipid assemblies: low density lipoprotein (LDLs) from egg yolk or liposomes produced from egg phospholipids. Irrespective of the phospholipid structure (lipoprotein or liposome), BSP was hindered to alter the structure of the membrane. Only the overall ratio BSP proteins:phosphatidylcholine was important. The difference between the two sequestering agents lies on their surface properties: LDL have a strong tendency to merge with the outer layer whereas liposomes mainly remain in the bulk on the same time scale. PMID:26628332

  6. Interactions of normal and mutant vesicular stomatitis virus matrix proteins with the plasma membrane and nucleocapsids.

    PubMed Central

    Chong, L D; Rose, J K

    1994-01-01

    We demonstrated recently that a fraction of the matrix (M) protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) binds tightly to cellular membranes in vivo when expressed in the absence of other VSV proteins. This membrane-associated M protein was functional in binding purified VSV nucleocapsids in vitro. Here we show that the membrane-associated M protein is largely associated with a membrane fraction having the density of plasma membranes, indicating membrane specificity in the binding. In addition, we analyzed truncated forms of M protein to identify regions responsible for membrane association and nucleocapsid binding. Truncated M protein lacking the amino-terminal basic domain still associated with cellular membranes, although not as tightly as wild-type M protein, and could not bind nucleocapsids. In contrast, deletion of the carboxy-terminal 14 amino acids did not disrupt stable membrane association or nucleocapsid interaction. These results suggest that the amino terminus of M protein either interacts directly with membranes and nucleocapsids or stabilizes a conformation that is required for M protein to mediate both of these interactions. Images PMID:8254754

  7. Identification of differentially expressed plasma proteins in atherosclerotic patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lepedda, Antonio Junior; Lobina, Omar; Rocchiccioli, Silvia; Nieddu, Gabriele; Ucciferri, Nadia; De Muro, Pierina; Idini, Michela; Nguyen, Hai Quy Tram; Guarino, Anna; Spirito, Rita; Formato, Marilena

    2016-07-01

    Besides hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance, several factors are associated with a higher cardiovascular risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), many of them being closely related to each other owing to common origins or pathways. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying vascular dysfunctions in diabetes include reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide, increased ROS and prothrombotic factors production, as well as activation of receptors for advanced glycation end-products. These alterations contribute to create a pro-inflammatory/thrombotic state that ultimately leads to plaque formation and complication. This study aimed at identifying differentially expressed plasma proteins between T2DM and non-diabetic patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy, by means of two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with LC-MS/MS. Before analysis, plasma samples were enriched in low-expression proteins through combinatorial hexapeptide ligand libraries. Both mono- and two-dimensional western blotting were performed for data validation. Differentially expressed proteins were mapped onto STRING v10 to build a protein-protein interaction network. Sixteen differentially expressed spots were identified with a high score. Among them, there were fibrinogen beta and gamma chains, complement C1r, C3 and C4-B subcomponents, alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), vitronectin and CD5 antigen-like. Protein-Protein interaction analysis evidenced a network among differentially expressed proteins in which vitronectin seems to represent a potentially pivotal node among fibrinolysis, complement dependent immune responses and inflammation in accordance with a number of in vitro and in vivo evidences for a contributory role of these proteins to the development of diabetic atherosclerosis. PMID:27037039

  8. Cellulose synthase interacting protein

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on earth. The great abundance of cellulose places it at the forefront as a primary source of biomass for renewable biofuels. However, the knowledge of how plant cells make cellulose remains very rudimentary. Cellulose microfibrils are synthesized at the plasma membrane by hexameric protein complexes, also known as cellulose synthase complexes. The only known components of cellulose synthase complexes are cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins until the recent identification of a novel component. CSI1, which encodes CESA interacting protein 1 (CSI1) in Arabidopsis. CSI1, as the first non-CESA proteins associated with cellulose synthase complexes, opens up many opportunities. PMID:21150290

  9. The COG and COPI Complexes Interact to Control the Abundance of GEARs, a Subset of Golgi Integral Membrane ProteinsD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Toshihiko; Ungar, Daniel; Hughson, Frederick M.; Krieger, Monty

    2004-01-01

    The conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex is a soluble hetero-octamer associated with the cytoplasmic surface of the Golgi. Mammalian somatic cell mutants lacking the Cog1 (ldlB) or Cog2 (ldlC) subunits exhibit pleiotropic defects in Golgi-associated glycoprotein and glycolipid processing that suggest COG is involved in the localization, transport, and/or function of multiple Golgi processing proteins. We have identified a set of COG-sensitive, integral membrane Golgi proteins called GEARs (mannosidase II, GOS-28, GS15, GPP130, CASP, giantin, and golgin-84) whose abundances were reduced in the mutant cells and, in some cases, increased in COG-overexpressing cells. In the mutants, some GEARs were abnormally localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and were degraded by proteasomes. The distributions of the GEARs were altered by small interfering RNA depletion of ε-COP in wild-type cells under conditions in which COG-insensitive proteins were unaffected. Furthermore, synthetic phenotypes arose in mutants deficient in both ε-COP and either Cog1 or Cog2. COG and COPI may work in concert to ensure the proper retention or retrieval of a subset of proteins in the Golgi, and COG helps prevent the endoplasmic reticulum accumulation and degradation of some GEARs. PMID:15004235

  10. RcLEA, a late embryogenesis abundant protein gene isolated from Rosa chinensis, confers tolerance to Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis thaliana and stabilizes enzyme activity under diverse stresses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Lu, Songchong; Jiang, Changhua; Wang, Yaofeng; Lv, Bo; Shen, Jiabin; Ming, Feng

    2014-07-01

    The late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family is a large protein family that is closely associated with resistance to abiotic stresses in many organisms, such as plants, bacteria and animals. In this study, we isolated a LEA gene, RcLEA, which was cytoplasm-localized, from Rosa chinensis. RcLEA was found to be induced by high temperature through RT-PCR. Overexpression of RcLEA in Escherichia coli improved its growth performance compared with the control under high temperature, low temperature, NaCl and oxidative stress conditions. RcLEA was also overexpressed in Arabidopsis thaliana. The transgenic Arabidopsis showed better growth after high and low temperature treatment and exhibited less peroxide according to 3, 3-diaminobenzidine staining. However, RcLEA did not improve the tolerance to NaCl or osmotic stress in Arabidopsis. In vitro analysis showed that RcLEA was able to prevent the freeze-thaw-induced inactivation or heat-induced aggregation of various substrates, such as lactate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase. It also protected the proteome of E. coli from denaturation when the proteins were heat-shocked or subjected to acidic conditions. Furthermore, bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays suggested that RcLEA proteins function in a complex manner by making the form of homodimers. PMID:24760474

  11. Simulated gastrointestinal digestion, intestinal permeation and plasma protein interaction of white, green, and black tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Tenore, Gian Carlo; Campiglia, Pietro; Giannetti, Daniela; Novellino, Ettore

    2015-02-15

    The gastrointestinal digestion, intestinal permeation, and plasma protein interaction of polyphenols from a single tea cultivar at different stages of processing (white, green, and black teas) were simulated. The salivary phase contained 74.8-99.5% of native polyphenols, suggesting potential bioavailability of significant amounts of antioxidants through the oral mucosal epithelium that might be gastric sensitive and/or poorly absorbed in the intestine. White tea had the highest content and provided the best intestinal bioaccessibility and bioavailability for catechins. Since most of native catechins were not absorbed, they were expected to accumulate in the intestinal lumen where a potential inhibition capacity of cellular glucose and cholesterol uptake was assumed. The permeated catechins (approximately, 2-15% of intestinal levels) significantly bound (about 37%) to plasma HDLs, suggesting a major role in cholesterol metabolism. White tea and its potential nutraceuticals could be effective in the regulation of plasma glucose and cholesterol levels. PMID:25236233

  12. Study of plasma modified-PTFE for biological applications: relationship between protein resistant properties, plasma treatment, surface composition and surface roughness

    PubMed Central

    Vandencasteele, Nicolas; Nisol, Bernard; Viville, Pascal; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Castner, David G.; Reniers, François

    2013-01-01

    PTFE samples were treated by low-pressure, O2 RF plasmas. The adsorption of BSA was used as a probe for the protein resistant properties. The exposure of PTFE to an O2 plasma leads to an increase in the chamber pressure. OES reveals the presence of CO, CO2 and F in the gas phase, indicating a strong etching of the PTFE surface by the O2 plasma. Furthermore, the high resolution C1s spectrum shows the appearance of CF3, CF and C-CF components in addition to the CF2 component, which is consistent with etching of the PTFE surface. WCA as high as 160° were observed, indicating a superhydrophobic behaviour. AFM Images of surfaces treated at high plasma power showed a increase in roughness. Lower amounts of BSA adsorption were detected on high power, O2 plasma-modified PTFE samples compared to low power, oxygen plasma-modified ones. PMID:24795545

  13. Application of epifluorescence scanning for monitoring the efficacy of protein removal by RF gas-plasma decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Helen C.; Richardson, Patricia R.; Campbell, Gaynor A.; Kovalev, Valeri I.; Maier, Robert; Barton, James S.; Jones, Anita C.; De Large, Greg; Casey, Mark; Baxter, Robert L.

    2009-11-01

    The development of methods for measuring the efficiency of gas-plasma decontamination has lagged far behind application. An approach to measuring the efficiency of protein removal from solid surfaces using fluorescein-labelled bovine serum albumin and epifluorescence scanning (EFSCAN) is described. A method for fluorescently labelling proteins, which are adsorbed and denatured on metal surfaces, has been developed. Both approaches have been used to evaluate the efficiency of radio frequency (RF) gas-plasma decontamination protocols. Examples with 'real' surgical instruments demonstrate that an argon-oxygen RF gas-plasma treatment can routinely reduce the protein load by about three orders of magnitude beyond that achieved by current decontamination methods.

  14. Detection of cellular prion protein in exosomes derived from ovine plasma.

    PubMed

    Berrone, Elena; Corona, Cristiano; Mazza, Maria; Vallino Costassa, Elena; Faro, Monica Lo; Properzi, Francesca; Guglielmetti, Chiara; Maurella, Cristiana; Caramelli, Maria; Deregibus, Maria Chiara; Camussi, Giovanni; Casalone, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    Prion protein (PrP) is present at extremely low levels in the blood of animals and its detection is complicated by the poor sensitivity of current standard methodologies. Interesting results have been obtained with recent advanced technologies that are able to detect minute amounts of the pathological PrP (PrPSc), but their efficiency is reduced by various factors present in blood. In this study, we were able to extract cellular PrP (PrPC) from plasma-derived exosomes by a simple, fast method without the use of differential ultracentrifugation and to visualize it by Western blotting, reducing the presence of most plasma proteins. This result confirms that blood is capable of releasing PrP in association with exosomes and could be useful to better study its role in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. PMID:26399471

  15. Synthesis of Photoactivatable Analogues of Lysophosphatidic Acid and Covalent Labeling of Plasma Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zaiguo; Baker, Daniel L.; Tigyi, Gabor; Bittman, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid bearing a benzophenone group in either the sn-1 or sn-2 chain of an oleoyl-type ester or oleyl-type ether chain and 32P in the phosphate group were synthesized. The benzophenone moiety was introduced by selective hydroboration of the double bond of enyne 11 at low temperature, followed by Suzuki reaction with 4-bromobenzophenone. The key intermediates for the preparation of ester-linked LPA 1 and 3 were obtained in one pot by a modified DIBAL-H reduction of orthoformate intermediate 22. These probes were shown to covalently modify a single protein target in rat plasma containing albumin and several protein targets in rat plasma containing a low level of albumin. PMID:16408973

  16. Blood volume and plasma protein responses to heat acclimatization in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, M.H.; Edwards, R.J.; Graveney, M.J.; Cochrane, L.A.; Davies, J.A.

    1981-03-01

    The effects of heat acclimatization on intravascular volume and protein responses to acute heat stress and exercise were studied in six male subjects. Absolute values for hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration were lower after acclimatization, indicating hemodilution. Also, after acclimatization, the magnitude of the hemoconcentration response to exercise in the heat was significantly increased. There was no change in the concentration of plasma protein during or after acclimatization compared with before acclimatization, but there was a net increase in the total intravascular protein content. It is suggested that the hemodilution associated with heat acclimatization may be explained in terms of an increase in the intravascular oncotic pressure following an exercise-induced augmentation of protein, occurring at the expense of the interstitial compartment. It is concluded that this hemodilution is unlikely to be primarily responsible for the cardiovascular adjustment accompanying heat acclimatization and that it should be regarded as a secondary feature of adaptation to heat.

  17. The importance of selecting a proper biological milieu for protein corona analysis in vitro: Human plasma versus human serum.

    PubMed

    Mirshafiee, Vahid; Kim, Raehyun; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Kraft, Mary L

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) exposure to biological fluids in the body results in protein binding to the NP surface, which forms a protein coating that is called the "protein corona". To simplify studies of protein-NP interactions and protein corona formation, NPs are incubated with biological solutions, such as human serum or human plasma, and the effects of this exposure are characterized in vitro. Yet, how NP exposure to these two different biological milieus affects protein corona composition and cell response has not been investigated. Here, we explore the differences between the protein coronas that form when NPs are incubated in human serum versus human plasma. NP characterization indicated that NPs that were exposed to human plasma had higher amounts of proteins bound to their surfaces, and were slightly larger in size than those exposed to human serum. In addition, significant differences in corona composition were also detected with gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, where a higher fraction of coagulation proteins and complement factors were found on the plasma-exposed NPs. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that the uptake of plasma-exposed NPs was higher than that of serum-exposed NPs by RAW 264.7 macrophage immune cells, but not by NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells. This difference is likely due to the elevated amounts of opsonins, such as fibrinogen, on the surfaces of the NPs exposed to plasma, but not serum, because these components trigger NP internalization by immune cells. As the human plasma better mimics the composition of the in vivo environment, namely blood, in vitro protein corona studies should employ human plasma, and not human serum, so the biological phenomena that is observed is more similar to that occurring in vivo. PMID:26643610

  18. Retinoic acid-induced differentiation of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells is associated with changes in the abundance of G proteins.

    PubMed

    Ammer, H; Schulz, R

    1994-04-01

    Western blot analysis, using subtype-specific anti-G protein antibodies, revealed the presence of the following G protein subunits in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells: Gs alpha, Gi alpha 1, Gi alpha 2, Go alpha, Gz alpha, and G beta. Differentiation of the cells by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) treatment (10 mumol/L; 6 days) caused substantial alterations in the abundance of distinct G protein subunits. Concomitant with an enhanced expression of mu-opioid binding sites, the levels of the inhibitory G proteins Gi alpha 1 and Gi alpha 2 were found to be significantly increased. This coordinate up-regulation is accompanied by functional changes in mu-opioid receptor-stimulated low-Km GTPase, mu-receptor-mediated adenylate cyclase inhibition, and receptor-independent guanosine 5'-(beta gamma-imido)triphosphate [Gpp(NH)p; 10 nmol/L]-mediated attenuation of adenylate cyclase activity. In contrast, increased levels of inhibitory G proteins had no effect on muscarinic cholinergic receptor-mediated adenylate cyclase inhibition. With respect to stimulatory receptor systems, a reciprocal regulation was observed for prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) receptors and Gs alpha, the G protein subunit activating adenylate cyclase. RA treatment of SH-SY5Y cells increases both the number of PGE1 binding sites and PGE1-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity, but significantly reduced amounts of Gs alpha were found. This down-regulation is paralleled by a decrease in the stimulatory activity of Gs alpha as assessed in S49 cyc- reconstitution assays.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8133263

  19. Abundant Type III Lipid Transfer Proteins in Arabidopsis Tapetum Are Secreted to the Locule and Become a Constituent of the Pollen Exine1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming-Der; Chen, Tung-Ling L.; Huang, Anthony H.C.

    2013-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are small secretory proteins in plants with defined lipid-binding structures for possible lipid exocytosis. Special groups of LTPs unique to the anther tapetum are abundant, but their functions are unclear. We studied a special group of LTPs, type III LTPs, in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Their transcripts were restricted to the anther tapetum, with levels peaking at the developmental stage of maximal pollen-wall exine synthesis. We constructed an LTP-Green Fluorescent Protein (LTP-GFP) plasmid, transformed it into wild-type plants, and monitored LTP-GFP in developing anthers with confocal laser scanning microscopy. LTP-GFP appeared in the tapetum and was secreted via the endoplasmic reticulum-trans-Golgi network machinery into the locule. It then moved to the microspore surface and remained as a component of exine. Immuno-transmission electron microscopy of native LTP in anthers confirmed the LTP-GFP observations. The in vivo association of LTP-GFP and exine in anthers was not observed with non-type III or structurally modified type III LTPs or in transformed exine-defective mutant plants. RNA interference knockdown of individual type III LTPs produced no observable mutant phenotypes. RNA interference knockdown of two type III LTPs produced microscopy-observable morphologic changes in the intine underneath the exine (presumably as a consequence of changes in the exine not observed by transmission electron microscopy) and pollen susceptible to dehydration damage. Overall, we reveal a novel transfer pathway of LTPs in which LTPs bound or nonbound to exine precursors are secreted from the tapetum to become microspore exine constituents; this pathway explains the need for plentiful LTPs to incorporate into the abundant exine. PMID:24096413

  20. DNA polymorphisms and transcript abundance of PRKAG2 and phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase in the rumen are associated with gain and feed intake in beef steers.

    PubMed

    Lindholm-Perry, A K; Kuehn, L A; Oliver, W T; Kern, R J; Cushman, R A; Miles, J R; McNeel, A K; Freetly, H C

    2014-08-01

    Beef steers with variation in feed efficiency phenotypes were evaluated previously on a high-density SNP panel. Ten markers from rs110125325-rs41652818 on bovine chromosome 4 were associated with average daily gain (ADG). To identify the gene(s) in this 1.2-Mb region responsible for variation in ADG, genotyping with 157 additional markers was performed. Several markers (n = 41) were nominally associated with ADG, and three of these, including the only marker to withstand Bonferroni correction, were located within the protein kinase, AMP-activated, gamma 2 non-catalytic subunit (PRKAG2) gene. An additional population of cross-bred steers (n = 406) was genotyped for validation. One marker located within the PRKAG2 loci approached a significant association with gain. To evaluate PRKAG2 for differences in transcript abundance, we measured expression in the liver, muscle, rumen and intestine from steers (n = 32) with extreme feed efficiency phenotypes collected over two seasons. No differences in PRKAG2 transcript abundance were detected in small intestine, liver or muscle. Correlation between gene expression level of PRKAG2 in rumen and average daily feed intake (ADFI) was detected in both seasons (P < 0.05); however, the direction differed by season. Lastly, we evaluated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), of which PRKAG2 is a subunit, for differences among ADG and ADFI and found that the phosphorylated form of AMPK was associated with ADFI in the rumen. These data suggest that PRKAG2 and its mature protein, AMPK, are involved in feed efficiency traits in beef steers. This is the first evidence to suggest that rumen AMPK may be contributing to ADFI in cattle. PMID:24730749

  1. Abundant type III lipid transfer proteins in Arabidopsis tapetum are secreted to the locule and become a constituent of the pollen exine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Der; Chen, Tung-Ling L; Huang, Anthony H C

    2013-11-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are small secretory proteins in plants with defined lipid-binding structures for possible lipid exocytosis. Special groups of LTPs unique to the anther tapetum are abundant, but their functions are unclear. We studied a special group of LTPs, type III LTPs, in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Their transcripts were restricted to the anther tapetum, with levels peaking at the developmental stage of maximal pollen-wall exine synthesis. We constructed an LTP-Green Fluorescent Protein (LTP-GFP) plasmid, transformed it into wild-type plants, and monitored LTP-GFP in developing anthers with confocal laser scanning microscopy. LTP-GFP appeared in the tapetum and was secreted via the endoplasmic reticulum-trans-Golgi network machinery into the locule. It then moved to the microspore surface and remained as a component of exine. Immuno-transmission electron microscopy of native LTP in anthers confirmed the LTP-GFP observations. The in vivo association of LTP-GFP and exine in anthers was not observed with non-type III or structurally modified type III LTPs or in transformed exine-defective mutant plants. RNA interference knockdown of individual type III LTPs produced no observable mutant phenotypes. RNA interference knockdown of two type III LTPs produced microscopy-observable morphologic changes in the intine underneath the exine (presumably as a consequence of changes in the exine not observed by transmission electron microscopy) and pollen susceptible to dehydration damage. Overall, we reveal a novel transfer pathway of LTPs in which LTPs bound or nonbound to exine precursors are secreted from the tapetum to become microspore exine constituents; this pathway explains the need for plentiful LTPs to incorporate into the abundant exine. PMID:24096413

  2. Nanostructure protein repellant amphiphilic copolymer coatings with optimized surface energy by Inductively Excited Low Pressure Plasma.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Sudhir; Pulpytel, Jérome; Ceccone, Giacomo; Lisboa, Patricia; Rossi, François; Kumar, Virendra; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh

    2011-12-01

    Statistically designed amphiphilic copolymer coatings were deposited onto Thermanox, Si wafer, and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) substrates via Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate and diethylene glycol vinyl ether in an Inductively Excited Low Pressure Plasma reactor. Plasma deposited amphiphilic coatings were characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Water Contact Angle techniques. The surface energy of the coatings can be adjusted between 12 and 70 mJ/m(2). The roughness of the coatings can be tailored depending on the plasma mode used. A very smooth coating was deposited with a CW (continuous wave) power, whereas a rougher surface with R(a) in the range of 2 to 12 nm was deposited with the PW (pulsed wave) mode. The nanometer scale roughness of amphiphilic PFDA-co-DEGVE coatings was found to be in the range of the size of the two proteins namely BSA and lysozyme used to examine for the antifouling properties of the surfaces. The results show that the statistically designed surfaces, presenting a surface energy around 25 mJ/m(2), present no adhesion with respect to both proteins measured by QCM. PMID:22029599

  3. Plasma steroid-binding proteins: primary gatekeepers of steroid hormone action.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Geoffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Biologically active steroids are transported in the blood by albumin, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG). These plasma proteins also regulate the non-protein-bound or 'free' fractions of circulating steroid hormones that are considered to be biologically active; as such, they can be viewed as the 'primary gatekeepers of steroid action'. Albumin binds steroids with limited specificity and low affinity, but its high concentration in blood buffers major fluctuations in steroid concentrations and their free fractions. By contrast, SHBG and CBG play much more dynamic roles in controlling steroid access to target tissues and cells. They bind steroids with high (~nM) affinity and specificity, with SHBG binding androgens and estrogens and CBG binding glucocorticoids and progesterone. Both are glycoproteins that are structurally unrelated, and they function in different ways that extend beyond their transportation or buffering functions in the blood. Plasma SHBG and CBG production by the liver varies during development and different physiological or pathophysiological conditions, and abnormalities in the plasma levels of SHBG and CBG or their abilities to bind steroids are associated with a variety of pathologies. Understanding how the unique structures of SHBG and CBG determine their specialized functions, how changes in their plasma levels are controlled, and how they function outside the blood circulation provides insight into how they control the freedom of steroids to act in health and disease. PMID:27113851

  4. Targeting NEU Protein in Melanoma Cells with Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma and Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byul Bora; Kim, Myung Soo; Kim, Uk Kyu; Hong, Jin Woo; Lee, Hae June; Kim, Gyoo Cheon

    2015-05-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma effectively kills cancer cells, but it cannot selectively kill cancer cells. The authors targeted NEU (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) protein, which is frequently over-expressed in the cell membrane of melanoma cells, using anti-NEU antibody-labeled gold nanoparticles. The labeled nanoparticles preferentially targeted melanoma cells rather than normal keratinocytes. After the addition of labeled gold nanoparticles to melanoma and normal keratinocyte cells, both cells were exposed to non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma. The death rate of melanoma cells was significantly higher than that of normal keratinocyte cells; many vacuoles, indicative of cell death, were observed in melanoma cells treated with anti-NEU antibody labeled gold nanoparticles and plasma. This selective cancer cell death was attributed to the selective destruction of NEU protein and a downstream effector of NEU. Our study findings show that treatment with a combination of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma and anti-NEU antibody-labeled gold nanoparticles effectively and selectively kills melanoma cells. PMID:26349401

  5. Exploring the stochastic dynamics of correlated movement of receptor proteins in plasma membranes in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jung Y.; Lin, Chien Y.

    2015-12-01

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization plays a crucial role in the signaling process of living cells. In this study, we developed a theoretical model and performed single-molecule tracking to explore the correlated diffusion processes of liganded epidermal growth factor receptors prior to dimer formation. We disclosed that both an attractive potential between liganded receptor proteins in proximity and correlated fluctuations in the local environments of the proteins play an important role to produce the observed correlated movement of the receptors. This result can serve as the foundation to shed light on the way in which receptor functions are regulated in plasma membranes in vivo.

  6. Bloodstream form Trypanosome plasma membrane proteins: antigenic variation and invariant antigens.

    PubMed

    Schwede, Angela; Carrington, Mark

    2010-12-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is exposed to the adaptive immune system and complement in the blood of its mammalian hosts. The aim of this review is to analyse the role and regulation of the proteins present on the external face of the plasma membrane in the long-term persistence of an infection and transmission. In particular, the following are addressed: (1) antigenic variation of the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG), (2) the formation of an effective VSG barrier shielding invariant surface proteins, and (3) the rapid uptake of VSG antibody complexes combined with degradation of the immunoglobulin and recycling of the VSG. PMID:20109254

  7. Exploring the stochastic dynamics of correlated movement of receptor proteins in plasma membranes in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jung Y.; Lin, Chien Y.

    2015-12-14

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization plays a crucial role in the signaling process of living cells. In this study, we developed a theoretical model and performed single-molecule tracking to explore the correlated diffusion processes of liganded epidermal growth factor receptors prior to dimer formation. We disclosed that both an attractive potential between liganded receptor proteins in proximity and correlated fluctuations in the local environments of the proteins play an important role to produce the observed correlated movement of the receptors. This result can serve as the foundation to shed light on the way in which receptor functions are regulated in plasma membranes in vivo.

  8. Optical tweezers study of red blood cell aggregation and disaggregation in plasma and protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kisung; Kinnunen, Matti; Khokhlova, Maria D.; Lyubin, Evgeny V.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Meglinski, Igor; Fedyanin, Andrey A.

    2016-03-01

    Kinetics of optical tweezers (OT)-induced spontaneous aggregation and disaggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied at the level of cell doublets to assess RBC interaction mechanics. Measurements were performed under in vitro conditions in plasma and fibrinogen and fibrinogen + albumin solutions. The RBC spontaneous aggregation kinetics was found to exhibit different behavior depending on the cell environment. In contrast, the RBC disaggregation kinetics was similar in all solutions qualitatively and quantitatively, demonstrating a significant contribution of the studied proteins to the process. The impact of the study on assessing RBC interaction mechanics and the protein contribution to the reversible RBC aggregation process is discussed.

  9. Multifunctional Transmembrane Protein Ligands for Cell-Specific Targeting of Plasma Membrane-Derived Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Zha