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Sample records for ac microsized gliding

  1. AC electric field for rapid assembly of nanostructured polyaniline onto microsized gap for sensor devices.

    PubMed

    La Ferrara, Vera; Rametta, Gabriella; De Maria, Antonella

    2015-07-01

    Interconnected network of nanostructured polyaniline (PANI) is giving strong potential for enhancing device performances than bulk PANI counterparts. For nanostructured device processing, the main challenge is to get prototypes on large area by requiring precision, low cost and high rate assembly. Among processes meeting these requests, the alternate current electric fields are often used for nanostructure assembling. For the first time, we show the assembly of nanostructured PANI onto large electrode gaps (30-60 μm width) by applying alternate current electric fields, at low frequencies, to PANI particles dispersed in acetonitrile (ACN). An important advantage is the short assembly time, limited to 5-10 s, although electrode gaps are microsized. That encouraging result is due to a combination of forces, such as dielectrophoresis (DEP), induced-charge electrokinetic (ICEK) flow and alternate current electroosmotic (ACEO) flow, which speed up the assembly process when low frequencies and large electrode gaps are used. The main achievement of the present study is the development of ammonia sensors created by direct assembling of nanostructured PANI onto electrodes. Sensors exhibit high sensitivity to low gas concentrations as well as excellent reversibility at room temperature, even after storage in air. PMID:26009866

  2. Teleseismic S wave microseisms.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota

    2016-08-26

    Although observations of microseisms excited by ocean swells were firmly established in the 1940s, the source locations remain difficult to track. Delineation of the source locations and energy partition of the seismic wave components are key to understanding the excitation mechanisms. Using a seismic array in Japan, we observed both P and S wave microseisms excited by a severe distant storm in the Atlantic Ocean. Although nonlinear forcing of an ocean swell with a one-dimensional Earth model can explain P waves and vertically polarized S waves (SV waves), it cannot explain horizontally polarized S waves (SH waves). The precise source locations may provide a new catalog for exploring Earth's interior. PMID:27563094

  3. Earthquake Prognosis With Applied Microseism.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmedov, N.; Nagiyev, A.

    Earthquakes are the most dangerous natural catastrophy in terms of numerous casualties, amount of damages, areal coverage and difficulties associated with a need to provide secure measures. Inability to forecast these events makes the situation worse due to the following circumstances:-their buried focuses are invisible in the subsurface, they occur suddenly as a thunder, and some tens of the seconds later they leave devastated areas and casualties of tens of thousands of people. Currently earthquake forecausting is actually absolutely inefficient. Microseism application is one of the possible ways to forecast earthquakes. These small oscillation of up-going low-ampitude, irregular wawes observed on seismograms are refered to as microseism. Having been different from earhquakes itself, they are continuous, that is, have no origin coordinate on time axis. Their occurence is associated with breakers observed along shorelines, strong wind and hurricane patterns and so on. J.J.Linch has discovered a new tool to monitor hurricane motion trend over the seas with applied microseism recorded at ad hocstations. Similar to these observations it became possible to monitor the formation of the earthquake focuses based on correlation between low-frequency horizontal ahannels'N-S and E-W components. Microseism field and preceding abnormal variations monitoring data derived from "Cherepaha" 3M and 6/12 device enable to draw out some systematic trend in amplitude/frecuency domain. This relationship observed in a certain frequency range made it possible to define the generation of earthquake focuses with regard to the monitoring station. This variation trend was observed while Turkish and Iranian events happened during 1990,1992, and 1997. It is suggested to be useful to verify these effects in other regions to further correlate available data and work out common forecausting criteria.

  4. The bacterial gliding machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Abhishek

    Cells of Flavobacterium johnsoniae, a rod-shaped bacterium, glide over surfaces with speeds reaching up to 2 micrometer's. Gliding is powered by a protonmotive force. The adhesin SprB forms filaments about 160 nm long that move on the cell-surface along a looped track. Interaction of SprB filaments with a surface produces gliding. We tethered F. johnsoniae cells to glass by adding anti-SprB antibody. Tethered cells spun about fixed points, rotating at speeds of about 1 Hz. The torques required to sustain such speeds were large, comparable to those generated by the flagellar rotary motor. Using a flow cell apparatus, we changed load on the gliding motor by adding the viscous agent Ficoll to tethered cells. We found that a gliding motor runs at constant speed rather than constant torque. We attached gold nanoparticles to the SprB filament and tracked its motion. We fluorescently tagged a bacterial Type IX secretion system (T9SS) protein and imaged its dynamics. Fluorescently tagged T9SS protein localized near the point of tether, indicating that T9SS localizes with the gliding motor. Based on our results, we propose a model to explain bacterial gliding.

  5. Array Analysis of North Atlantic Microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, David; Bean, Chris; Möllhoff, Martin; Donne, Sarah; Lokmer, Ivan; Le Pape, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Oceans generate persistent low frequency background seismic signals known as microseisms through a mechanical coupling with the Earth's crust. Microseism energy originates as regions of low barometric pressure (depressions) over the oceans where it is transmitted to the sea-floor and propagates as elastic energy in the Earths crust. Consequently microseisms carry important meteorological information relating to both the atmosphere and the hydrosphere. The significance of microseisms as climate indicators has previously been investigated in several studies (Essen et al., 1999; Aster et al., 2010) and to estimate ocean wave parameters using onshore seismometer data (Bromirski et al., 1999). Also many modern seismological methods make use of microseism signals, for example "noise tomography" (Shapiro et al., 2005); spectral ratio techniques ; and cross-correlation techniques (Wapenaar et al., 2011; Brenguier et al., 2014). The continental shelf near Ireland is a known generation are for microseisms and an important region for European weather forecasting and climate studies. There has also been seismometers in the region since the 1960s. There is a single station in Valentia observatory in south-west Ireland and a small scale seismic array in Scotland which offer potential climate records for the region. To make use of this information it is first necessary to understand how microseisms recorded in Ireland relate to the local ocean wavefield. The WAVEOBS project was set established with three primary goals; to get a better fundamental understanding of microseism sources; to investigate the use of ocean generated microseisms as real time ocean wave height data; and to investigate their use as a climate proxy. Using spectral analysis and array methods the microseism wavefield in the North-East Atlantic near Ireland is described with reference to the ocean wavefield.

  6. Optical diagnostics of a gliding arc.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z W; Zhu, J J; Li, Z S; Aldén, M; Leipold, F; Salewski, M; Kusano, Y

    2013-03-11

    Dynamic processes in a gliding arc plasma generated between two diverging electrodes in ambient air driven by 31.25 kHz AC voltage were investigated using spatially and temporally resolved optical techniques. The life cycles of the gliding arc were tracked in fast movies using a high-speed camera with framing rates of tens to hundreds of kHz, showing details of ignition, motion, pulsation, short-cutting, and extinction of the plasma column. The ignition of a new discharge occurs before the extinction of the previous discharge. The developed, moving plasma column often short-cuts its current path triggered by Townsend breakdown between the two legs of the gliding arc. The emission from the plasma column is shown to pulsate at a frequency of 62.5 kHz, i.e., twice the frequency of the AC power supply. Optical emission spectra of the plasma radiation show the presence of excited N2, NO and OH radicals generated in the plasma and the dependence of their relative intensities on both the distance relative to the electrodes and the phase of the driving AC power. Planar laser-induced fluorescence of the ground-state OH radicals shows high intensity outside the plasma column rather than in the center suggesting that ground-state OH is not formed in the plasma column but in its vicinity. PMID:23482171

  7. Gliding Direction of Mycoplasma mobile

    PubMed Central

    Morio, Hanako; Kasai, Taishi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycoplasma mobile glides in the direction of its cell pole by a unique mechanism in which hundreds of legs, each protruding from its own gliding unit, catch, pull, and release sialylated oligosaccharides fixed on a solid surface. In this study, we found that 77% of cells glided to the left with a change in direction of 8.4° ± 17.6° μm−1 displacement. The cell body did not roll around the cell axis, and elongated, thinner cells also glided while tracing a curved trajectory to the left. Under viscous conditions, the range of deviation of the gliding direction decreased. In the presence of 250 μM free sialyllactose, in which the binding of the legs (i.e., the catching of sialylated oligosaccharides) was reduced, 70% and 30% of cells glided to the left and the right, respectively, with changes in direction of ∼30° μm−1. The gliding ghosts, in which a cell was permeabilized by Triton X-100 and reactivated by ATP, glided more straightly. These results can be explained by the following assumptions based on the suggested gliding machinery and mechanism: (i) the units of gliding machinery may be aligned helically around the cell, (ii) the legs extend via the process of thermal fluctuation and catch the sialylated oligosaccharides, and (iii) the legs generate a propulsion force that is tilted from the cell axis to the left in 70% and to the right in 30% of cells. IMPORTANCE Mycoplasmas are bacteria that are generally parasitic to animals and plants. Some Mycoplasma species form a protrusion at a pole, bind to solid surfaces, and glide. Although these species appear to consistently glide in the direction of the protrusion, their exact gliding direction has not been examined. This study analyzed the gliding direction in detail under various conditions and, based on the results, suggested features of the machinery and the mechanism of gliding. PMID:26503848

  8. Multidecadal climate-induced variability in microseisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aster, R.C.; McNamara, D.E.; Bromirski, P.D.

    2008-01-01

    Microseisms are the most ubiquitous continuous seismic signals on Earth at periods between approximately 5 and 25 s (Peterson 1993; Kedar and Webb 2005). They arise from atmospheric energy converted to (primarily) Rayleigh waves via the intermediary of wind-driven oceanic swell and occupy a period band that is uninfluenced by common anthropogenic and wind-coupled noise processes on land (Wilson et al. 2002; de la Torre et al. 2005). "Primary" microseisms (near 8-s period) are generated in shallow water by breaking waves near the shore and/or the nonlinear interaction of the ocean wave pressure signal with the sloping sea floor (Hasselmann 1963). Secondary microseisms occur at half of the primary period and are especially strongly radiated in source regions where opposing wave components interfere (Longuett-Higgins 1950; Tanimoto 2007), which principally occurs due to the interaction of incident swell and reflected/scattered wave energy from coasts (Bromirski and Duennebier 2002; Bromirski, Duennebier, and Stephen 2005). Coastal regions having a narrow shelf with irregular and rocky coastlines are known to be especially efficient at radiating secondary microseisms (Bromirski, Duennebier, and Stephen 2005; Shulte-Pelkum et al. 2004). The secondary microseism is globally dominant, and its amplitudes proportional to the square of the standing wave height (Longuett-Higgins 1950), which amplifies its sensitivity to large swell events (Astiz and Creager 1994; Webb 2006).

  9. Microseism and infrasound generation by cyclones.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Samuel P; Richard, Jacques C; Mancini, Jay D; Fessatidis, Vassilios; Crooker, Benjamin

    2003-05-01

    A two-dimensional cylindrical shear-flow wave theory for the generation of microseisms and infrasound by hurricanes and cyclones is developed as a linearized theory paralleling the seminal work by Longuet-Higgins which was limited to one-dimensional plane waves. Both theories are based on Bernoulli's principle. A little appreciated consequence of the Bernoulli principle is that surface gravity waves induce a time dependent pressure on the sea floor through a vertical column of water. A significant difference exists between microseisms detected at the bottom of each column and seismic signals radiated into the crust through coherence over a region of the sea floor. The dominant measured frequency of radiated microseisms is matched by this new theory for seismic data gathered at the Fordham Seismic Station both for a hurricane and a mid-latitude cyclone in 1998. Implications for Bernoulli's principle and this cylindrical stress flow theory on observations in the literature are also discussed. PMID:12765375

  10. Electrolytic plating apparatus for discrete microsized particles

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Anton

    1976-11-30

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for electrolytically producing very uniform coatings of a desired material on discrete microsized particles. Agglomeration or bridging of the particles during the deposition process is prevented by imparting a sufficiently random motion to the particles that they are not in contact with a powered cathode for a time sufficient for such to occur.

  11. Electroless plating apparatus for discrete microsized particles

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Anton

    1978-01-01

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for producing very uniform coatings of a desired material on discrete microsized particles by electroless techniques. Agglomeration or bridging of the particles during the deposition process is prevented by imparting a sufficiently random motion to the particles that they are not in contact with each other for a time sufficient for such to occur.

  12. Hydrodynamic glide efficiency in swimming.

    PubMed

    Naemi, Roozbeh; Easson, William J; Sanders, Ross H

    2010-07-01

    The glide is a major part of starts, turns and the stroke cycle in breaststroke. Glide performance, indicated by the average velocity, can be improved by increasing the glide efficiency, that is, the ability of the body to minimise deceleration. This paper reviews the factors that affect glide efficiency. In the first part of the review the sources of resistive force are reviewed including surface friction (skin drag), pressure (form) drag and resistance due to making waves (wave drag). The effect of body surface characteristics on the skin drag, the effect of the depth of the swimmer on wave drag, and the effects of posture and alignment, body size and shape on the form drag are reviewed. The effects of these variables on the added mass, that is, the mass of water entrained with the body are explained. The 'glide factor' as a measure of glide efficiency that takes into account the combined effect of the resistive force and the added mass is described. In the second part methods of quantifying the resistive force are reviewed. Finally, the 'hydro-kinematic method' of measuring glide efficiency is evaluated. PMID:19540161

  13. Locating Microseism Sources in Offshore Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, X.; Clayton, R. W.

    2007-12-01

    We use the broadband stations from the S. California network to locate the apparent origin of secondary microseisms energy (5-8 Hz band). The procedure is to grid the offshore region and using each grid point as the source point, predict the response of a Rayleigh wave at each station. These predicted waveforms are then correlated with the data over a time window that is typically a 1/2 hour in length and composited at the grid point. The length of the time window controls a tradeoff between the spatial-temporal resolution of the sources and the robustness on the image. The procedure is valid for multiple sources. This results show that during periods of high microseism activity the sources are distinct at several locations in a region approximately 50-100 km offshore. For an 11/09/2002 Southern Ocean storm, for example, two zones parallel to each other and perpendicular to the coast are imaged.

  14. Similarities and differences between gliding glow and gliding arc discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, St.; Bogaerts, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we have analyzed the properties of a gliding dc discharge in argon at atmospheric pressure. Despite the usual designation of these discharges as ‘gliding arc discharges’, it was found previously that they operate in two different regimes—glow and arc. Here we analyze the differences in both regimes by means of two dimensional fluid modeling. In order to address different aspects of the discharge operation, we use two models—Cartesian and axisymmetric in a cylindrical coordinate system. The obtained results show that the two types of discharges produce a similar plasma column for a similar discharge current. However, the different mechanisms of plasma channel attachment to the cathode could produce certain differences in the plasma parameters (i.e. arc elongation), and this can affect gas treatments applications.

  15. Characteristics of body wave microseism observed at northern continental Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, D. H.; Jung, S.

    2014-12-01

    It has been understood that most of microseism observed at land is generated at coastal region by the ocean wave activity and propagates into the continent as the Rayleigh wave. However, it has also been reported that microseism could be generated at mid ocean and propagate as the body waves, such as P, PP and PKP phases. In this study, we analyzed microseisms with seismic records from seismic stations that are located at northern continental Asia. These included seismic arrays and a local dense network at South Korea, Kazakhstan, and China. First, we computed seismic noise spectra in the frequency band between 0.01 and 0.4 Hz. Second, the back-azimuth and the phase velocity of the microseism were measured from the frequency-wavenumber (FK) analysis. Although each data set was recorded at different time periods, the results show similar patterns. Non-transient microseism peak around the 0.2 Hz frequency was observed coherently at all data of winter season. The FK analysis shows that this microseism propagated with the phase velocities of around 12, 11, and 21 km/s at South Korea, China, and Kazakhstan, respectively. The back-projection of the FK result shows that these body wave microseisms were mostly generated at the northern part of the Pacific.

  16. [Mechanism of bacterial gliding motility].

    PubMed

    Nakane, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria have various way to move over solid surfaces, such as glass, agar, and host cell. These movements involve surface appendages including flagella, type IV pili and other "mysterious" nano-machineries. Gliding motility was a term used various surface movements by several mechanisms that have not been well understood in past few decades. However, development of visualization techniques allowed us to make much progress on their dynamics of machineries. It also provided us better understanding how bacteria move over surfaces and why bacteria move in natural environments. In this review, I will introduce recent studies on the gliding motility of Flavobacteium and Mycoplasma based on the detail observation of single cell and its motility machinery with micro-nano scales. PMID:26632217

  17. Bacteria that glide with helical tracks

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Beiyan; McBride, Mark J.; Chen, Jing; Zusman, David R.; Oster, George

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria glide smoothly on surfaces, but with no discernable propulsive organelles on their surface. Recent experiments with Myxococcus xanthus and Flavobacterium johnsoniae show that both distantly related bacterial species glide utilizing proteins that move in helical tracks, albeit with significantly different motility mechanisms. Both species utilize proton motive force for movement. However, the motors that power gliding in M. xanthus have been identified, while the F. johnsoniae motors remain to be discovered. PMID:24556443

  18. Micro-size polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinson, W. G.; Pipkin, J. L.; Anson, J. F.; Casciano, D. A.; Burns, E. R.

    1987-09-01

    The development and characterization of a micro-size two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis system is described. Some of the techniques which have evolved with use of the system are also discussed. This apparatus has unique features which provide advantages over other small scale units. Up to ten first- and second-dimension gels can be processed simultaneously with excellent resolution of protein regions. Consistent reproducibility is possible from protein samples as small as 400 ng and individual protein regions as small as 1 pg can be visualized by silver staining of the two-dimensional gels. Similar sensitivities are achieved in autoradiographs of 3H-labeled proteins extracted from the nuclei of cultured cells. The application of this system in conjunction with flow cytometric examination of nuclear DNA and electrostatic cell sorting of specific cell nuclei to provide homogeneous sample populations, allows subtle variations in isotope incorporation in proteins to be detected; whereas many times in generalized tissue samples these changes are masked. Also, these techniques elucidate the effects of external stimuli (chemicals, drugs, or environment) on protein synthesis and phosphorylation for analyses and comparison. Fabrication drawings are available upon request.

  19. Radial gravitational gliding on passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobbold, P. R.; Szatmari, P.

    1991-03-01

    Gravitational gliding of uppermost sediments down a passive margin is possible if there is a basal layer of evaporite or other soft material to allow detachment. In examples from the Gulf of Mexico and the Brazilian margin, gliding has produced three main structural domains: an uppermost domain of downdip extension; an intermediate domain of rigid gliding; and a lowermost domain of downdip contraction. Domain boundaries are established by changes in slope. In this paper, we examine three kinds of gravitational gliding, depending on the paths followed by material particles. In ideal parallel gliding, particle paths are parallel straight lines, trending downslope. This should occur where the margin is perfectly straight. In ideal radial gliding, particle paths are radii of a circle and the margin is shaped like a circular cone. Natural margins will not have ideal shapes; but divergent gliding will tend to occur off coastal salients; convergent gliding, off coastal re-entrants. A simple kinematic model based on ductile behaviour illustrates some essential features of radial gliding. Changes in radius during divergent gliding produce strike-parallel extension; during convergent gliding, they produce strike-parallel contraction. Vertical strains also differ. Divergent gliding produces an uppermost domain of strong vertical thinning, balanced by extensions in all horizontal directions. Similarly, convergent gliding produces a lowermost domain of strong vertical thickening, balanced by contractions in all horizontal directions. These deformed states cannot be restored by simple techniques based on section balancing. We have done three experiments using analogue materials: sand, to model the brittle behaviour of sediments; silicone putty, to model the ductile behaviour of basal layers of evaporite. The experiments were properly scaled to account for gravitational forces. Experiment I reproduced convergent gliding above a basement with a conical upper surface. Strike

  20. Glides and Phonological Change in Mombasan Swahili.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, John

    1991-01-01

    A study of the pronunciation of an adult male Swahili speaker, a native and long-term resident of Mombasa Old Town, supplemented with notes on other adult speakers, suggests a new account of glides and phonological change in this variation of the language. The asymmetrical distribution of the two glide types (palatal and labiovelar) is analyzed…

  1. New model of flap-gliding flight.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2015-07-21

    A new modelling approach is presented for describing flap-gliding flight in birds and the associated mechanical energy cost of travelling. The new approach is based on the difference in the drag characteristics between flapping and non-flapping due to the drag increase caused by flapping. Thus, the possibility of a gliding flight phase, as it exists in flap-gliding flight, yields a performance advantage resulting from the decrease in the drag when compared with continuous flapping flight. Introducing an appropriate non-dimensionalization for the mathematical relations describing flap-gliding flight, results and findings of generally valid nature are derived. It is shown that there is an energy saving of flap-gliding flight in the entire speed range compared to continuous flapping flight. The energy saving reaches the highest level in the lower speed region. The travelling speed of flap-gliding flight is composed of the weighted average of the differing speeds in the flapping and gliding phases. Furthermore, the maximum range performance achievable with flap-gliding flight and the associated optimal travelling speed are determined. PMID:25841702

  2. Glide performance and aerodynamics of non-equilibrium glides in northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus).

    PubMed

    Bahlman, Joseph W; Swartz, Sharon M; Riskin, Daniel K; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2013-03-01

    Gliding is an efficient form of travel found in every major group of terrestrial vertebrates. Gliding is often modelled in equilibrium, where aerodynamic forces exactly balance body weight resulting in constant velocity. Although the equilibrium model is relevant for long-distance gliding, such as soaring by birds, it may not be realistic for shorter distances between trees. To understand the aerodynamics of inter-tree gliding, we used direct observation and mathematical modelling. We used videography (60-125 fps) to track and reconstruct the three-dimensional trajectories of northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus) in nature. From their trajectories, we calculated velocities, aerodynamic forces and force coefficients. We determined that flying squirrels do not glide at equilibrium, and instead demonstrate continuously changing velocities, forces and force coefficients, and generate more lift than needed to balance body weight. We compared observed glide performance with mathematical simulations that use constant force coefficients, a characteristic of equilibrium glides. Simulations with varying force coefficients, such as those of live squirrels, demonstrated better whole-glide performance compared with the theoretical equilibrium state. Using results from both the observed glides and the simulation, we describe the mechanics and execution of inter-tree glides, and then discuss how gliding behaviour may relate to the evolution of flapping flight. PMID:23256188

  3. Glide performance and aerodynamics of non-equilibrium glides in northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus)

    PubMed Central

    Bahlman, Joseph W.; Swartz, Sharon M.; Riskin, Daniel K.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2013-01-01

    Gliding is an efficient form of travel found in every major group of terrestrial vertebrates. Gliding is often modelled in equilibrium, where aerodynamic forces exactly balance body weight resulting in constant velocity. Although the equilibrium model is relevant for long-distance gliding, such as soaring by birds, it may not be realistic for shorter distances between trees. To understand the aerodynamics of inter-tree gliding, we used direct observation and mathematical modelling. We used videography (60–125 fps) to track and reconstruct the three-dimensional trajectories of northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus) in nature. From their trajectories, we calculated velocities, aerodynamic forces and force coefficients. We determined that flying squirrels do not glide at equilibrium, and instead demonstrate continuously changing velocities, forces and force coefficients, and generate more lift than needed to balance body weight. We compared observed glide performance with mathematical simulations that use constant force coefficients, a characteristic of equilibrium glides. Simulations with varying force coefficients, such as those of live squirrels, demonstrated better whole-glide performance compared with the theoretical equilibrium state. Using results from both the observed glides and the simulation, we describe the mechanics and execution of inter-tree glides, and then discuss how gliding behaviour may relate to the evolution of flapping flight. PMID:23256188

  4. Microseisms from the Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, K. J.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, V.

    2014-12-01

    Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA We performed frequency-dependent polarization and power analysis on continuous ambient seismic energy recorded by broadband seismic stations that were part of the Utah Regional Seismic Network (UU) for the years of 2001-2013. The number of broadband seismometers increased from 10 to 28 in this time period. As expected, at all 28 stations the single and double frequency peaks caused by microseisms were observed in the range of 3-20 s. At four of the stations located around the Great Salt Lake (BGU, HVU, NOQ, and SPU) an additional noise peak was intermittently observed in the period range of 0.8-1.2 s. This noise peak was strongest at SPU, a station located on the tip of a peninsula jutting into the lake from the north, and weakest at NOQ, a station located a few kilometers south of the lake in the Oquirrh Mountains. The noise peaks occur in both daytime and nighttime, and have durations lasting from a couple of hours to multiple days. They occur more frequently in the spring, summer, and fall, and less commonly in the winter. The occurrences of noise peaks in the summer show a day night pattern and seem to reach a peak during the night. The time dependence of this 1-s seismic noise was compared to records of wind speed measured at 1-hr intervals from nearby meteorological stations run by the NWS, and to lake level gage height measurements made by the USGS. Correlations with wind speed and lake level were done for every month of the year in 2013. Results showed that the correlations with wind varied throughout the year from a high of 0.49 in November to a low of 0.20 in the month of January. The correlation with lake level also varied throughout the year and the strongest correlation was found in the month of December with a correlation of 0.43. While these correlation values are statistically significant, neither wind nor lake level can completely explain the seismic observations

  5. 14 CFR 171.267 - Glide path automatic monitor system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Glide path automatic monitor system. 171... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.267 Glide path automatic monitor system. (a) The ISMLS glide path equipment... control points when any of the following occurs: (1) A shift of the mean ISMLS glide path angle...

  6. 14 CFR 171.267 - Glide path automatic monitor system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Glide path automatic monitor system. 171... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.267 Glide path automatic monitor system. (a) The ISMLS glide path equipment... control points when any of the following occurs: (1) A shift of the mean ISMLS glide path angle...

  7. 14 CFR 171.267 - Glide path automatic monitor system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Glide path automatic monitor system. 171... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.267 Glide path automatic monitor system. (a) The ISMLS glide path equipment... control points when any of the following occurs: (1) A shift of the mean ISMLS glide path angle...

  8. 14 CFR 171.267 - Glide path automatic monitor system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Glide path automatic monitor system. 171... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.267 Glide path automatic monitor system. (a) The ISMLS glide path equipment... control points when any of the following occurs: (1) A shift of the mean ISMLS glide path angle...

  9. 14 CFR 171.267 - Glide path automatic monitor system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Glide path automatic monitor system. 171... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.267 Glide path automatic monitor system. (a) The ISMLS glide path equipment... control points when any of the following occurs: (1) A shift of the mean ISMLS glide path angle...

  10. A Mesozoic gliding mammal from northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jin; Hu, Yaoming; Wang, Yuanqing; Wang, Xiaolin; Li, Chuankui

    2006-12-14

    Gliding flight has independently evolved many times in vertebrates. Direct evidence of gliding is rare in fossil records and is unknown in mammals from the Mesozoic era. Here we report a new Mesozoic mammal from Inner Mongolia, China, that represents a previously unknown group characterized by a highly specialized insectivorous dentition and a sizable patagium (flying membrane) for gliding flight. The patagium is covered with dense hair and supported by an elongated tail and limbs; the latter also bear many features adapted for arboreal life. This discovery extends the earliest record of gliding flight for mammals to at least 70 million years earlier in geological history, and demonstrates that early mammals were diverse in their locomotor strategies and lifestyles; they had experimented with an aerial habit at about the same time as, if not earlier than, when birds endeavoured to exploit the sky. PMID:17167478

  11. Antibacterial activity of aquatic gliding bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sangnoi, Yutthapong; Anantapong, Theerasak; Kanjana-Opas, Akkharawit

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to screen and isolate strains of freshwater aquatic gliding bacteria, and to investigate their antibacterial activity against seven common pathogenic bacteria. Submerged specimens were collected and isolated for aquatic gliding bacteria using four different isolation media (DW, MA, SAP2, and Vy/2). Gliding bacteria identification was performed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Crude extracts were obtained by methanol extraction. Antibacterial activity against seven pathogenic bacteria was examined by agar-well diffusion assay. Five strains of aquatic gliding bacteria including RPD001, RPD008, RPD018, RPD027 and RPD049 were isolated. Each submerged biofilm and plastic specimen provided two isolates of gliding bacteria, whereas plant debris gave only one isolate. Two strains of gliding bacteria were obtained from each DW and Vy/2 isolation medium, while one strain was obtained from the SAP2 medium. Gliding bacteria strains RPD001, RPD008 and RPD018 were identified as Flavobacterium anhuiense with 96, 82 and 96 % similarity, respectively. Strains RPD049 and RPD027 were identified as F. johnsoniae and Lysobacter brunescens, respectively, with similarity equal to 96 %. Only crude extract obtained from RPD001 inhibited growth of Listeria monocytogenes (MIC 150 µg/ml), Staphylococcus aureus (MIC 75 µg/ml) and Vibrio cholerae (MIC 300 µg/ml), but showed weak inhibitory effect on Salmonella typhimurium (MIC > 300 µg/ml). Gliding bacterium strain RPD008 should be considered to a novel genus separate from Flavobacterium due to its low similarity value. Crude extract produced by RPD001 showed potential for development as a broad antibiotic agent. PMID:26885469

  12. Micro-Sized Enterprises, Innovation and Universities: A Welsh Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Paul; Patz, Ralf; Thomas, Brychan; McCarthy, Simon

    2014-01-01

    This study considers the linkage between micro-sized enterprises and other organizations, especially universities, in relation to the innovation process. The focus of the research is on non-start-up enterprises in Wales and how they develop their products. The research methodology adopted is a thematic literature review and the case study…

  13. Approaches for the Detection of Microseism Generating Regions from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Kedar, S.

    2004-12-01

    Ocean microseisms have been suggested as a potential source for tomographic imaging of the Earth. An optimal tomographic approach requires that the source regions for ocean microseism generation be known. Longuet-Higgins (Philos. trans. R. Soc. London, 1950) has suggested that standing waves in the ocean are responsible for the generation of microseisms, so that a potential way of determining the regions responsible for microseism generation is the determination of which regions of the ocean exhibit standing wave activity. Although ocean standing waves have been observed and modeled in a laboratory setting, there is currently no remote sensing instrument capable of providing direct observations. In this paper, we consider remote sensing or modeling measurements which might provide observations indicative of potential standing wave activity. The first option, radar altimetry, provides a measurement of the significant wave height and, at lower resolutions, sea surface skewness. It is expected that non-linear interactions will result in a spatial modulation of the wave field and an increase of surface skewness. We review the accuracy of current ocean altimeters and conclude that, while these type of observations might be possible in the future, current altimeters do not have sufficient accuracy to retrieve the expected signals. An alternate approach is to use wave directional spectra to estimate the standing wave energy which might be observed. There are two potential sources for the estimation of directional wave spectra: wave action models (WAM's) or synthetic aperture radar (SAR). We review the capabilities of each of these measurements and conclude that they present a useful potential source for estimating regions of microseism generation. To test this conclusion, we present results of comparisons between SAR data collected off the California and WAM data with seismic data.

  14. Quantifying the influence of sea ice on ocean microseism using observations from the Bering Sea, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsai, Victor C.; McNamara, Daniel E.

    2011-01-01

    Microseism is potentially affected by all processes that alter ocean wave heights. Because strong sea ice prevents large ocean waves from forming, sea ice can therefore significantly affect microseism amplitudes. Here we show that this link between sea ice and microseism is not only a robust one but can be quantified. In particular, we show that 75–90% of the variability in microseism power in the Bering Sea can be predicted using a fairly crude model of microseism damping by sea ice. The success of this simple parameterization suggests that an even stronger link can be established between the mechanical strength of sea ice and microseism power, and that microseism can eventually be used to monitor the strength of sea ice, a quantity that is not as easily observed through other means.

  15. Identifying apparent velocity changes in cross correlated microseism noise data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friderike Volk, Meike; Bean, Christopher; Lokmer, Ivan; Pérez, Nemesio; Ibáñez, Jesús

    2015-04-01

    Currently there is a strong interest of using cross correlation of ambient noise to retrieve Green's functions. These are usually used to calculate the seismic wave velocity of the subsurface and therefore can be used for subsurface imaging or monitoring of various geological settings where we expect rapid velocity changes (e.g. reservoirs or volcanoes). The assumption of this method is that the wavefields which are correlated must be diffuse. This criterion is fulfilled if the ambient noise sources are uniformly distributed or the scattering in the medium is high enough to mitigate any source directivity. The location of the sources is usually unknown and it can change in time. These temporal and spatial variations of the microseism noise sources may lead to changes in the retrieved Green's functions, and so, to the apparent changes in seismic wave velocities. To further investigate the apparent changes in Green's functions we undertook an active seismic experiment in Tenerife lasting three months. A small airgun was used as an active source and was shooting repeatedly every 15 minutes. The shots and the microseism noise were recorded at several seismic stations at the same time. That data set gives us the opportunity to compare the changes in seismic wave velocity recovered through cross correlation of ambient noise and changes we measure through active shots from the airgun. The aim is to distinguish between apparent seismic velocity changes and seismic velocity changes caused by changes in the medium. We also use the data set to track the direction of the microseism noise sources to see if changes which are only recovered through cross correlation can be related to temporal and spatial variations of the microseism noise sources.

  16. Synthesis of micro-sized interconnected Si-C composites

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Donghai; Yi, Ran; Dai, Fang

    2016-02-23

    Embodiments provide a method of producing micro-sized Si--C composites or doped Si--C and Si alloy-C with interconnected nanoscle Si and C building blocks through converting commercially available SiO.sub.x (0

  17. Ray-theoretical modeling of secondary microseism P-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farra, V.; Stutzmann, E.; Gualtieri, L.; Schimmel, M.; Ardhuin, F.

    2016-06-01

    Secondary microseism sources are pressure fluctuations close to the ocean surface. They generate acoustic P-waves that propagate in water down to the ocean bottom where they are partly reflected, and partly transmitted into the crust to continue their propagation through the Earth. We present the theory for computing the displacement power spectral density of secondary microseism P-waves recorded by receivers in the far field. In the frequency domain, the P-wave displacement can be modeled as the product of (1) the pressure source, (2) the source site effect that accounts for the constructive interference of multiply reflected P-waves in the ocean, (3) the propagation from the ocean bottom to the stations, (4) the receiver site effect. Secondary microseism P-waves have weak amplitudes, but they can be investigated by beamforming analysis. We validate our approach by analyzing the seismic signals generated by Typhoon Ioke (2006) and recorded by the Southern California Seismic Network. Back projecting the beam onto the ocean surface enables to follow the source motion. The observed beam centroid is in the vicinity of the pressure source derived from the ocean wave model WAVEWATCH IIIR. The pressure source is then used for modeling the beam and a good agreement is obtained between measured and modeled beam amplitude variation over time. This modeling approach can be used to invert P-wave noise data and retrieve the source intensity and lateral extent.

  18. Ray-theoretical modeling of secondary microseism P waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farra, V.; Stutzmann, E.; Gualtieri, L.; Schimmel, M.; Ardhuin, F.

    2016-09-01

    Secondary microseism sources are pressure fluctuations close to the ocean surface. They generate acoustic P waves that propagate in water down to the ocean bottom where they are partly reflected and partly transmitted into the crust to continue their propagation through the Earth. We present the theory for computing the displacement power spectral density of secondary microseism P waves recorded by receivers in the far field. In the frequency domain, the P-wave displacement can be modeled as the product of (1) the pressure source, (2) the source site effect that accounts for the constructive interference of multiply reflected P waves in the ocean, (3) the propagation from the ocean bottom to the stations and (4) the receiver site effect. Secondary microseism P waves have weak amplitudes, but they can be investigated by beamforming analysis. We validate our approach by analysing the seismic signals generated by typhoon Ioke (2006) and recorded by the Southern California Seismic Network. Backprojecting the beam onto the ocean surface enables to follow the source motion. The observed beam centroid is in the vicinity of the pressure source derived from the ocean wave model WAVEWATCH IIIR. The pressure source is then used for modeling the beam and a good agreement is obtained between measured and modeled beam amplitude variation over time. This modeling approach can be used to invert P-wave noise data and retrieve the source intensity and lateral extent.

  19. Characteristics of microseisms recorded by the Earthscope Transportable Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sufri, Oner

    I analyzed the characteristics of microseisms recorded in the United States by Earthscope Transportable Array (TA) broadband stations during the calendar year of 2009 and a 19-day period of October-November 2012. I used eigen-decomposition of spectral covariance matrices to extract power and polarization information for each hour of data recorded at each seismometer. For the continuous data from 2009, I generated array-averaged spectrograms and geographical animations to locate individual microseisms. Then, I grouped and cataloged those microseisms according to their initiation time, duration, peak power, average power, dominant period, variation in their period content, degree of polarization, and their azimuths obtained from polarization ellipsoids. Over 78 distinct microseismic events were identified and grouped into four different types. The longest duration microseismic signal occurred in the month of December, 2009, for more than 280 hours and was associated with the propagation of two storms: one from the Gulf of Alaska region and another from the Newfoundland region. The most powerful signal was also recorded in the same month with an average peak period near 6-sec on December 28-31, 2009, and resulted from wave action associated with two different unnamed storms in the East-Central Pacific and North Atlantic oceans. The seismic observations were compared to excitation predictions computed with the power spectral density of the equivalent pressure generated by ocean gravity waves using the WAVEWATCH-III ocean wave model from the French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea (Ifremer). Microseismic excitation predictions were calculated both with and without coastline reflections. I also processed continuous TA seismic data from 17 October-4 November, 2012, coinciding with the passage of Hurricane Sandy. I determined and tracked locations of microseisms as the hurricane propagated from South to North along the U.S. Atlantic coast. I found that the

  20. Performance analysis of jump-gliding locomotion for miniature robotics.

    PubMed

    Vidyasagar, A; Zufferey, Jean-Christohphe; Floreano, Dario; Kovač, M

    2015-04-01

    Recent work suggests that jumping locomotion in combination with a gliding phase can be used as an effective mobility principle in robotics. Compared to pure jumping without a gliding phase, the potential benefits of hybrid jump-gliding locomotion includes the ability to extend the distance travelled and reduce the potentially damaging impact forces upon landing. This publication evaluates the performance of jump-gliding locomotion and provides models for the analysis of the relevant dynamics of flight. It also defines a jump-gliding envelope that encompasses the range that can be achieved with jump-gliding robots and that can be used to evaluate the performance and improvement potential of jump-gliding robots. We present first a planar dynamic model and then a simplified closed form model, which allow for quantification of the distance travelled and the impact energy on landing. In order to validate the prediction of these models, we validate the model with experiments using a novel jump-gliding robot, named the 'EPFL jump-glider'. It has a mass of 16.5 g and is able to perform jumps from elevated positions, perform steered gliding flight, land safely and traverse on the ground by repetitive jumping. The experiments indicate that the developed jump-gliding model fits very well with the measured flight data using the EPFL jump-glider, confirming the benefits of jump-gliding locomotion to mobile robotics. The jump-glide envelope considerations indicate that the EPFL jump-glider, when traversing from a 2 m height, reaches 74.3% of optimal jump-gliding distance compared to pure jumping without a gliding phase which only reaches 33.4% of the optimal jump-gliding distance. Methods of further improving flight performance based on the models and inspiration from biological systems are presented providing mechanical design pathways to future jump-gliding robot designs. PMID:25811417

  1. Temporal evolution characteristics of an annular-mode gliding arc discharge in a vortex flow

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Tian-Liang; Liu, Jing-Lin; Li, Xiao-Song; Liu, Jin-Bao; Song, Yuan-Hong; Xu, Yong; Zhu, Ai-Min

    2014-05-15

    An annular-mode gliding arc discharge powered by a 50 Hz alternating current (ac) supply was studied in a vortex flow of dry and humid air. Its temporal evolution characteristics were investigated by electrical measurement, temporally resolved imaging, and temporally resolved optical emission spectroscopic measurements. Three discharge stages of arc-ignition, arc-gliding, and arc-extinction were clearly observed in each half-cycle of the discharge. During the arc-gliding stage, the intensity of light emission from the arc root at the cathode was remarkably higher than that at other areas. The spectral intensity of N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}Π{sub u}−B{sup 3}Π{sub g}) during the arc-ignition stage was much higher than that during the arc-gliding stage, which was contrary to the temporal evolutions of spectral intensities for N{sub 2}{sup +}(B{sup 2}Σ{sub u}{sup +}−X{sup 2}Σ{sub g}{sup +}) and OH(A{sup 2}Σ{sup +}−X{sup 2}Π{sub i}). Temporally resolved vibrational and rotational temperatures of N{sub 2} were also presented and decreased with increasing the water vapor content.

  2. 14 CFR 171.265 - Glide path performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Glide path performance requirements. 171... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.265 Glide path performance requirements. This section prescribes the performance requirements for glide path equipment components of the ISMLS. These requirements are based on...

  3. Aerodynamic Characteristics and Glide-Back Performance of Langley Glide-Back Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Covell, Peter F.; Tartabini, Paul V.; Murphy, Kelly J.

    2004-01-01

    NASA-Langley Research Center is conducting system level studies on an-house concept of a small launch vehicle to address NASA's needs for rapid deployment of small payloads to Low Earth Orbit. The vehicle concept is a three-stage system with a reusable first stage and expendable upper stages. The reusable first stage booster, which glides back to launch site after staging around Mach 3 is named the Langley Glide-Back Booster (LGBB). This paper discusses the aerodynamic characteristics of the LGBB from subsonic to supersonic speeds, development of the aerodynamic database and application of this database to evaluate the glide back performance of the LGBB. The aerodynamic database was assembled using a combination of wind tunnel test data and engineering level analysis. The glide back performance of the LGBB was evaluated using a trajectory optimization code and subject to constraints on angle of attack, dynamic pressure and normal acceleration.

  4. Novel mechanisms power bacterial gliding motility.

    PubMed

    Nan, Beiyan; Zusman, David R

    2016-07-01

    For many bacteria, motility is essential for survival, growth, virulence, biofilm formation and intra/interspecies interactions. Since natural environments differ, bacteria have evolved remarkable motility systems to adapt, including swimming in aqueous media, and swarming, twitching and gliding on solid and semi-solid surfaces. Although tremendous advances have been achieved in understanding swimming and swarming motilities powered by flagella, and twitching motility powered by Type IV pili, little is known about gliding motility. Bacterial gliders are a heterogeneous group containing diverse bacteria that utilize surface motilities that do not depend on traditional flagella or pili, but are powered by mechanisms that are less well understood. Recently, advances in our understanding of the molecular machineries for several gliding bacteria revealed the roles of modified ion channels, secretion systems and unique machinery for surface movements. These novel mechanisms provide rich source materials for studying the function and evolution of complex microbial nanomachines. In this review, we summarize recent findings made on the gliding mechanisms of the myxobacteria, flavobacteria and mycoplasmas. PMID:27028358

  5. Investigation of gliding flight by flying fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyungmin; Jeon, Woo-Pyung; Choi, Haecheon

    2006-11-01

    The most successful flight capability of fish is observed in the flying fish. Furthermore, despite the difference between two medium (air and water), the flying fish is well evolved to have an excellent gliding performance as well as fast swimming capability. In this study, flying fish's morphological adaptation to gliding flight is experimentally investigated using dry-mounted darkedged-wing flying fish, Cypselurus Hiraii. Specifically, we examine the effects of the pectoral and pelvic fins on the aerodynamic performance considering (i) both pectoral and pelvic fins, (ii) pectoral fins only, and (iii) body only with both fins folded. Varying the attack angle, we measure the lift, drag and pitching moment at the free-stream velocity of 12m/s for each case. Case (i) has higher lift-to-drag ratio (i.e. longer gliding distance) and more enhanced longitudinal static stability than case (ii). However, the lift coefficient is smaller for case (i) than for case (ii), indicating that the pelvic fins are not so beneficial for wing loading. The gliding performance of flying fish is compared with those of other fliers and is found to be similar to those of insects such as the butterfly and fruitfly.

  6. Remote, real-time monitoring of cyclones with microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, B. G.; Lee, W. D.; Schwab, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Giving proper care to selecting microseisms from well isolated cyclones, these great oceanic storms can be monitored in real time by seismic recordings at stations 1200-4100 km distant from the cyclone's center. We treat ocean depths of 3.4-5.5 km. For the theoretically-computed microseism, which our procedure compares with the experimental data, we use a Green's-function approach in the frequency domain. Relating recorded displacement F and theoretical Green's function G, We have F(ω,r)=S(ω)G(ω,r) in which our only unknown is the generalized source function S(ω) and r is the distance to the center at any specific time. The basic result of this report is that the form of this function is A SN(ω), where A is a real constant increasing with the strength of the cyclone and SN(ω), is a positive real function of frequency, independent of cyclone-receiver separation and of cyclone strength. That is, for a given ocean basin, and a given receiver-region geology, at our current level of accuracy SN(ω) is the same for all cyclone strengths and cyclone-receiver separations. Using the multimode approach, we've developed the numerical method for computing the Green's function for multilayered oceanic structures. For each of the 4 selected cyclones, the source functions for all locations along the path show a consistency which demonstrates that the recorded microseisms are radiated from the cyclone. The extracted source function exhibits spectra that are characteristic of ocean waves generated by cyclonic winds. With knowledge of distance between the source and receiver, cyclone A is therefore trivial to monitor in real time from remote recordings. At the current time, the cyclone's strength—generalized source function—must be related empirically to the cyclone's maximum wind speed, areal extent, and lateral velocity.

  7. Uncovering the Mystery of Gliding Motility in the Myxobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Beiyan; Zusman, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial gliding motility is the smooth movement of cells on solid surfaces unaided by flagella or pili. Many diverse groups of bacteria exhibit gliding, but the mechanism of gliding motility has remained a mystery since it was first observed more than a century ago. Recent studies on the motility of Myxococcus xanthus, a soil myxobacterium, suggest a likely mechanism for gliding in this organism. About forty M. xanthus genes were shown to be involved in gliding motility, and some of their protein products were labeled and localized within cells. These studies suggest that gliding motility in M. xanthus involves large multiprotein structural complexes, regulatory proteins, and cytoskeletal filaments. In this review, we summarize recent experiments that provide the basis for this emerging view of M. xanthus motility. We also discuss alternative models for gliding. PMID:21910630

  8. Mapping the source distribution of microseisms using noise covariogram envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghisorkhani, Hamzeh; Gudmundsson, Ólafur; Roberts, Roland; Tryggvason, Ari

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a method for mapping the noise-source distribution of microseisms which uses information from the full length of covariograms (cross-correlations). We derive a forward calculation based on the plane-wave assumption in 2-D, to formulate an iterative, linearized inversion of covariogram envelopes in the time domain. The forward calculation involves bandpass filtering of the covariograms. The inversion exploits the well-known feature of noise cross-correlation, that is, an anomaly in the noise field that is oblique to the interstation direction appears as cross-correlation amplitude at a smaller time lag than the in-line, surface wave arrival. Therefore, the inversion extracts more information from the covariograms than that contained at the expected surface wave arrival, and this allows us to work with few stations to find the propagation directions of incoming energy. The inversion is naturally applied to data that retain physical units that are not amplitude normalized in any way. By dividing a network into groups of stations, we can constrain the source location by triangulation. We demonstrate results of the method with synthetic data and one year (2012) of data from the Swedish National Seismic Network and also look at the seasonal variation of source distribution around Scandinavia. After preprocessing and cross-correlation, the stations are divided into five groups of 9-12 stations. We invert the envelopes of each group in eight period ranges between 2 and 25 s. Results show that the noise sources at short periods (less than 12 s) lie predominantly in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Barents Sea, and at longer periods the energy appears to have a broader distribution. The strongly anisotropic source distribution in this area is estimated to cause significant biases of velocity measurements compared to the level of heterogeneity in the region. The amplitude of the primary microseisms varies little over the year, but secondary microseisms are much

  9. Mapping the source distribution of microseisms using noise covariogram envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghisorkhani, Hamzeh; Gudmundsson, Ólafur; Roberts, Roland; Tryggvason, Ari

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a method for mapping the noise-source distribution of microseisms which uses information from the full length of covariograms (cross-correlations). We derive a forward calculation based on the plane-wave assumption in 2D, to formulate an iterative, linearized inversion of covariogram envelopes in the time domain. The forward calculation involves bandpass filtering of the covariograms. The inversion exploits the well-known feature of noise cross-correlation, i.e., that an anomaly in the noise field that is oblique to the inter-station direction appears as cross-correlation amplitude at a smaller time lag than the in-line, surface-wave arrival. Therefore, the inversion extracts more information from the covariograms than that contained at the expected surface-wave arrival, and this allows us to work with few stations to find the propagation directions of incoming energy. The inversion is naturally applied to data that retain physical units, i.e., that are not amplitude normalized in any way. By dividing a network into groups of stations, we can constrain the source location by triangulation. We demonstrate results of the method with synthetic data and one year (2012) of data from the Swedish National Seismic Network (SNSN) and also look at the seasonal variation of source distribution around Scandinavia. After preprocessing and cross-correlation, the stations are divided into 5 groups of 9 to 12 stations. We invert the envelopes of each group in 8 period ranges between 2 to 25 sec. Results show that the noise sources at short periods (less than 12 sec) lie predominantly in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Barents Sea, and at longer periods the energy appears to have a broader distribution. The strongly anisotropic source distribution in this area is estimated to cause significant biases of velocity measurements compared to the level of heterogeneity in the region. The amplitude of the primary microseisms varies little over the year, but secondary

  10. Insights Into the Origin of Earth's hum and Microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, B. A.; Rhie, J.; Colas, B.

    2005-12-01

    We have recently documented that the sources of Earth's background free oscillations in the 2-7 mHz frequency range, are primarily in the oceans. We used array data from two regional networks of VBB seismometers, in California (Berkeley Digital Seismic Network) and in Japan (F-NET). We proposed a mechanism for their generation, involving the coupling of infragravity waves with the ocean floor, where the infragravity waves would be produced through non-linear interactions between storm generated ocean waves. The precise mechanism of this atmosphere-ocean-seafloor coupling is however not yet well understood, as well as their relation to microseisms, another type of seismic noise originating from ocean waves, which dominates seismic records in the period range 0.1-1 Hz. In order to gain further insight into these intriguing phenomena, we have focused on the North Pacific region, where the dominant sources of hum appear to be located in the northern hemisphere winter. We have assembled a dataset of significant wave height recordings at buoys deployed by the National Oceanographic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) for a five day period in 2000, during which two large storms develop and propagate across the Pacific, there are no significant earthquakes, and the background "hum" is maximum. From the temporal correlations between the signature of the storms on the buoy data and the seismic low frequency Rayleigh wave background noise, we infer that the coupling with the seafloor most likely occurs near the coast, around the rim of the north Pacific ocean. We also show that we can track the generated Rayleigh waves as they propagate from West to East across the continental United States. We have also assembled and processed 3 years of microseism data at stations of the BDSN, F-NET arrays, and show a strong correlation of amplitude fluctations in the microseismic band with that in the "hum" band during the northern hemispheric winter

  11. Typhoon-induced Microseisms Recorded Offshore and Onland Western Pacific Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Chi, W.; Dolenc, D.; Kuo, B.; Lin, C.; Collins, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    Microseisms usually are generated by continuous forcing of winds and ocean waves in shallow water, with the frequency controlled by the fetch area. Here we study microseisms during extreme weather conditions. In 2006 we deployed the first broadband ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) offshore Taiwan. The OBSs at 1749 meters and 4726 meters water depths recorded strong microseisms signals (0.02 to 1 Hz passband) when Shan-Shan typhoon passed over the OBSs. This provides a unique opportunity to study how the microseisms wavefield evolves with a moving source. We studied the displacement waveforms recorded by OBSs, F-net and GSN onland stations. The spectrograms show primary peak energy between 0.05 to 0.1 Hz, and the stronger secondary peak appeared between 0.1 and 0.2 Hz. The primary peak has longer duration than the secondary peak. The arrival time of the peak typhoon-induced displacement for each station is consistently earlier than the time when the eye of typhoon gets closest to the station. We also see the microseisms ground motion energy migrating from south to north, and its primary energy frequency does not correlate with fetch areas. In sum, we have recorded strong microseisms motions in deep water, and the frequency band of the strong microseisms may not change with different fetch areas. Besides, the moving typhoon lits up the seismic stations along the track, showing clear evidence of a moving microseism source region.

  12. On complex, curved trajectories in microtubule gliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosselin, Pierre; Mohrbach, Hervé; Kulić, Igor M.; Ziebert, Falko

    2016-04-01

    We study the dynamics of microtubules in gliding assays. These biofilaments are typically considered as purely semiflexible, hence their trajectories under the action of motors covering the substrate have been regarded so far as straight, modulo fluctuations. However, this is not always the case experimentally, where microtubules are known to move on large scale circles or spirals, or even display quite regular wavy trajectories and more complex dynamics. Incorporating recent experimental evidence for a (small) preferred curvature as well as the microtubules' well established lattice twist into a dynamic model for microtubule gliding, we could reproduce both types of trajectories. Interestingly, as a function of the microtubules' length we found length intervals of stable rings alternating with regions where wavy and more complex dynamics prevails. Finally, both types of dynamics (rings and waves) can be rationalized by considering simple limits of the full model.

  13. Origin of deep ocean microseisms by using teleseismic body waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LandèS, Matthieu; Hubans, Fabien; Shapiro, Nikolai M.; Paul, Anne; Campillo, Michel

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies of oceanic microseisms have concentrated on fundamental mode surface waves. Extraction of fundamental mode Rayleigh and Love wave Green functions from station-station correlations of ambient seismic noise has recently been demonstrated to be a very powerful tool for imaging of the Earth's crust and uppermost mantle. In this study we concentrate on energetic arrivals in two frequency bands around the primary (14 s) and the secondary (7 s) microseismic peaks that appear at near-zero times in noise cross correlations. Thanks to a polarization analysis of data from the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment network, we identify this "near-zero time" signal as an upcoming P wave in the secondary microseismic frequency band (5-10 s). In a second step, analyzing noise cross correlations from three different arrays (in Yellowstone, in Turkey, and in Kyrgyzstan), we determine the origin of these signals by means of beam-forming analysis and its projection on the Earth. Our results show that in the 0.1-0.3 Hz frequency band, the energetic "near-zero" time arrivals in seismic noise cross correlations are mainly formed by teleseismic P, PP, and PKP waves. Generation of this ambient body waves in the secondary microseismic band presents a marked seasonal behavior with sources located in southern and northern oceans during summer and winter, respectively. Moreover, body wave array analysis is accurate enough to confirm that significant amount of the microseism energy is generated far from the coast in deep oceans.

  14. Assessing the importance of terrain parameters on glide avalanche release

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peitzsch, Erich H.; Hendrikx, Jordy; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    Glide snow avalanches are dangerous and difficult to predict. Despite recent research there is still a lack of understanding regarding the controls of glide avalanche release. Glide avalanches often occur in similar terrain or the same locations annually and observations suggest that topography may be critical. Thus, to gain an understanding of the terrain component of these types of avalanches we examined terrain parameters associated with glide avalanche release as well as areas of consistent glide crack formation but no subsequent avalanches. Glide avalanche occurrences visible from the Going-to-the-Sun Road corridor in Glacier National Park, Montana from 2003-2013 were investigated using an avalanche database derived of daily observations each year from April 1 to June 15. This yielded 192 glide avalanches in 53 distinct avalanche paths. Each avalanche occurrence was digitized in a GIS using satellite, oblique, and aerial imagery as reference. Topographical parameters such as area, slope, aspect, elevation and elevation were then derived for the entire dataset utilizing GIS tools and a 10m DEM. Land surface substrate and surface geology were derived from National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring maps and U.S. Geological Survey surface geology maps, respectively. Surface roughness and glide factor were calculated using a four level classification index. . Then, each avalanche occurrence was aggregated to general avalanche release zones and the frequencies were compared. For this study, glide avalanches released in elevations ranging from 1300 to 2700 m with a mean aspect of 98 degrees (east) and a mean slope angle of 38 degrees. The mean profile curvature for all glide avalanches was 0.15 and a plan curvature of -0.01, suggesting a fairly linear surface (i.e. neither convex nor concave). The glide avalanches occurred in mostly bedrock made up of dolomite and limestone slabs and talus deposits with very few occurring in alpine meadows. However, not all glide

  15. LEDS theory of workhardening stages and planar versus distributed glide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann-Wilsdorf, D.; Wilsdorf, H. G. F.; Wert, J. A.

    1994-09-01

    From a widespread convention, glide in crystalline materials is classified as 'planar' versus 'distributed'. At elevated temperatures, 'distributed glide' is favored and is almost usually found at medium to high strains in pure metals, in low-concentration homogeneous alloys, and in a preponderance of multiphase alloys, provided temperatures are not too low. While at low temperatures, 'planar glide' is widely observed and favored in solid solution alloys. In this paper, a general explanation is presented over the proposed additional causes for planar versus distributed glide, based on the LEDS theory.

  16. A source representation of microseisms constrained by HV spectral ratio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreger, D.; Rhie, J.

    2006-12-01

    The microseisms are generated by pressure variation on the sea floor caused by incident and reflected ocean waves, and dominant background noises at short periods. The observations of microseism wave fields in deep sedimentary basins (e.g., Santa Clara Valley) show that the maximum period of the horizontal to vertical (H/V) spectral ratio correlates with basin thickness. A similar correlation has been found in teleseismic arrival times and P-wave amplitude as well as local-earthquake S-wave relative amplification [Dolenc et al., 2005]. This observation infers that a study of microseism wave field, combined with other seismic data sets, can probably be used to invert for the velocity structures of the deep basins. To make this inversion possible, it is necessary to understand the excitation and propagation characteristics of microseisms. We will perform forward computations of microseism wave fields for source representations such as CLVDs and single-forces with the USGS 3D velocity model. Various spatial extensions as well as the frequency content of the source will be tested to match observed shifts in dominant H/V spectral ratio. The optimal source representation of the microseisms will be the first step to accomplish inversions for 3D seismic velocity structure in sedimentary basins using microseisms.

  17. Micro-size optical fibre strain interrogation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrad, Nezih; Xiao, Gaozhi; Guo, Honglei

    2008-03-01

    Within several countries, the military is undergoing significant economic pressure to extend the use of its air fleet beyond its established design life. The availability of low weight, small size, reliable and cost-effective technologies to detect and monitor incipient damage and to alert prior to catastrophic failures is critical to sustain operational effectiveness. To enable the implementation of distributed and highly multiplexed optical fiber sensors networks to aerospace platforms, the data acquisition (interrogation) system has to meet small size and low weight requirements. This paper reports on our current development of micro-sized Echelle Diffractive Gratings (EDG) based interrogation system for strain monitoring of serially multiplexed fibre Bragg grating sensors. The operation principle of the interrogator and its suitability for strain measurements is demonstrated. Static load measurements obtained using this system are compared to those acquired using a optical multi-wavelength meter and are found to have strong correlation.

  18. A numerical investigation on the properties of the modal Green's functions of microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, B. G.; Lee, W.; Fred, S.; Kim, J.; Jung, S.

    2011-12-01

    Theoretical spectrum of microseisms was introduced in our previous study, which indicates that the main peaks of the theoretical microseisms retained roughly at the same frequency as those of observed microseisms, and consist of almost full range of higher modes. In this study, we carried out a systematic investigation to find the fundamental properties that affect the features of microseisms by (1) presenting the associated sampling behavior of seismic modes comprising microseisms, and (2) showing the effect of earth structure and propagation on the microseisms. The sampling behavior of the seismic modes, being a function of frequency and mode number, were investigated with rigorous computations of the energy-density function from mode 1 to mode 70, for the period range of 2~20 sec., which is the typical frequency range of microseisms. All the mode parameters are calculated for the oceanic model with vertical point source at the top of the liquid layer. In the energy density function of each modes commonly shows that the depth of maximum energy of each mode migrates to the shallower structure as the frequency increases. However, the sampling depths are found to jump up to the uppermost liquid layer abruptly at around 0.08 Hz (about T= 12.6 sec) for all the modes, except mode 1, as a result, a steep amplitude depression is developed in the computed displacement spectra at around the frequency. Thus, the amplitude spectra of the computed microseisms, the sum of amplitude spectra of all modes, are devided into two parts, known as the primary and secondary microseism, with a boundary at around 0.08 Hz, which corresponds very well to the observed microseisms' amplitude spectra. Together with these overall features, three distinct classes of amplitude spectra are recognized, such as modes mainly contributing to the primary peaks, modes contributing mostly to the secondary peaks, and modes with substantial energies at both primary and secondary peaks. In general, the

  19. 14 CFR 171.265 - Glide path performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Glide path performance requirements. 171.265 Section 171.265 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Interim Standard Microwave Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.265 Glide...

  20. 14 CFR 23.71 - Glide: Single-engine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Glide: Single-engine airplanes. 23.71... Glide: Single-engine airplanes. The maximum horizontal distance traveled in still air, in nautical miles... with the engine inoperative, its propeller in the minimum drag position, and landing gear and...

  1. 14 CFR 23.71 - Glide: Single-engine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Glide: Single-engine airplanes. 23.71... Glide: Single-engine airplanes. The maximum horizontal distance traveled in still air, in nautical miles... with the engine inoperative, its propeller in the minimum drag position, and landing gear and...

  2. 14 CFR 23.71 - Glide: Single-engine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Glide: Single-engine airplanes. 23.71... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 23.71 Glide: Single-engine airplanes. The maximum horizontal distance traveled in still air, in nautical...

  3. 14 CFR 23.71 - Glide: Single-engine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Glide: Single-engine airplanes. 23.71... Glide: Single-engine airplanes. The maximum horizontal distance traveled in still air, in nautical miles... with the engine inoperative, its propeller in the minimum drag position, and landing gear and...

  4. 14 CFR 23.71 - Glide: Single-engine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Glide: Single-engine airplanes. 23.71... Glide: Single-engine airplanes. The maximum horizontal distance traveled in still air, in nautical miles... with the engine inoperative, its propeller in the minimum drag position, and landing gear and...

  5. Gliding Motility of Mycoplasma mobile on Uniform Oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Taishi; Hamaguchi, Tasuku

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The binding and gliding of Mycoplasma mobile on a plastic plate covered by 53 uniform oligosaccharides were analyzed. Mycoplasmas bound to and glided on only 21 of the fixed sialylated oligosaccharides (SOs), showing that sialic acid is essential as the binding target. The affinities were mostly consistent with our previous results on the inhibitory effects of free SOs and suggested that M. mobile recognizes SOs from the nonreducing end with four continuous sites as follows. (i and ii) A sialic acid at the nonreducing end is tightly recognized by tandemly connected two sites. (iii) The third site is recognized by a loose groove that may be affected by branches. (iv) The fourth site is recognized by a large groove that may be enhanced by branches, especially those with a negative charge. The cells glided on uniform SOs in manners apparently similar to those of the gliding on mixed SOs. The gliding speed was related inversely to the mycoplasma's affinity for SO, suggesting that the detaching step may be one of the speed determinants. The cells glided faster and with smaller fluctuations on the uniform SOs than on the mixtures, suggesting that the drag caused by the variation in SOs influences gliding behaviors. IMPORTANCE Mycoplasma is a group of bacteria generally parasitic to animals and plants. Some Mycoplasma species form a protrusion at a pole, bind to solid surfaces, and glide in the direction of the protrusion. These procedures are essential for parasitism. Usually, mycoplasmas glide on mixed sialylated oligosaccharides (SOs) derived from glycoprotein and glycolipid. Since gliding motility on uniform oligosaccharides has never been observed, this study gives critical information about recognition and interaction between receptors and SOs. PMID:26148712

  6. Uncertainty estimates in broadband seismometer sensitivities using microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringler, A. T.; Storm, T.; Gee, L. S.; Hutt, C. R.; Wilson, D.

    2015-04-01

    The midband sensitivity of a seismic instrument is one of the fundamental parameters used in published station metadata. Any errors in this value can compromise amplitude estimates in otherwise high-quality data. To estimate an upper bound in the uncertainty of the midband sensitivity for modern broadband instruments, we compare daily microseism (4- to 8-s period) amplitude ratios between the vertical components of colocated broadband sensors across the IRIS/USGS (network code IU) seismic network. We find that the mean of the 145,972 daily ratios used between 2002 and 2013 is 0.9895 with a standard deviation of 0.0231. This suggests that the ratio between instruments shows a small bias and considerable scatter. We also find that these ratios follow a standard normal distribution ( R 2 = 0.95442), which suggests that the midband sensitivity of an instrument has an error of no greater than ±6 % with a 99 % confidence interval. This gives an upper bound on the precision to which we know the sensitivity of a fielded instrument.

  7. Uncertainty estimates in broadband seismometer sensitivities using microseisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, Adam T.; Storm, Tyler L.; Gee, Lind S.; Hutt, Charles R.; Wilson, David C.

    2015-01-01

    The midband sensitivity of a seismic instrument is one of the fundamental parameters used in published station metadata. Any errors in this value can compromise amplitude estimates in otherwise high-quality data. To estimate an upper bound in the uncertainty of the midband sensitivity for modern broadband instruments, we compare daily microseism (4- to 8-s period) amplitude ratios between the vertical components of colocated broadband sensors across the IRIS/USGS (network code IU) seismic network. We find that the mean of the 145,972 daily ratios used between 2002 and 2013 is 0.9895 with a standard deviation of 0.0231. This suggests that the ratio between instruments shows a small bias and considerable scatter. We also find that these ratios follow a standard normal distribution (R 2 = 0.95442), which suggests that the midband sensitivity of an instrument has an error of no greater than ±6 % with a 99 % confidence interval. This gives an upper bound on the precision to which we know the sensitivity of a fielded instrument.

  8. An Efficient Implementation of the Gliding Box Lacunarity Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Charles R. Tolle,; Timothy R. McJunkin; David J. Gorsich

    2008-03-01

    Lacunarity is a measure of how data fills space. It complements fractal dimension, which measures how much space is filled. Currently, many researchers use the gliding box algorithm for calculating lacunarity. This paper introduces a fast algorithm for making this calculation. The algorithm presented is akin to fast box counting algorithms used by some researchers in estimating fractal dimension. A simplified gliding box measure equation along with key pseudo code implementations for the algorithm are presented. Applications for the gliding box lacunarity measure have included subjects that range from biological community modeling to target detection.

  9. Degradation of Verapamil hydrochloride in water by gliding arc discharge.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Syam; Maslani, Alan; Izdebski, Tomasz; Horakova, Marta; Klementova, Sarka; Spatenka, Petr

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the influence of gliding arc plasma discharge on the degradation of Verapamil hydrochloride in water. The plasma discharge was characterized by means of optical emission spectroscopy. Spectra of various atomic and molecular species were observed. Aqueous solution of Verapamil hydrochloride was exposed to gliding arc discharge operated in continuous discharge at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The identification of Verapamil, the degradation mechanisms of Verapamil and its transformation products were performed using liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Experimental results indicate that the atmospheric pressure gliding arc plasma treatment has noticeable effects on Verapamil with satisfactory degradation efficiency. Plausible mechanisms of the degradation were discussed. PMID:26953731

  10. Substrate-induced gliding in a nematic liquid crystal layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mema, E.; Kondic, L.; Cummings, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    We consider the interaction between nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) and polymer substrates. Such substrates can interact with NLCs, exhibiting a phenomenon known as director gliding: the preferred orientation of the NLC molecules at the interface changes on time scales that are slow relative to the elastic relaxation time scale of the NLC. We present two models for gliding, inspired by experiments that investigate the interaction between the NLC and a polymer substrate. These models, though simple, lead to nontrivial results, including loss of bistability under gliding. Perhaps surprisingly, we find that externally imposed switching between the steady states of a bistable system may reverse the effect of gliding, preventing loss of bistability if switching is sufficiently frequent. Our findings may be of relevance to a variety of technological applications involving liquid crystal devices, and particularly to a new generation of flexible liquid crystal displays that implement polymeric substrates.

  11. Unitary step of gliding machinery in Mycoplasma mobile

    PubMed Central

    Kinosita, Yoshiaki; Nakane, Daisuke; Sugawa, Mitsuhiro; Masaike, Tomoko; Mizutani, Kana; Miyata, Makoto; Nishizaka, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Among the bacteria that glide on substrate surfaces, Mycoplasma mobile is one of the fastest, exhibiting smooth movement with a speed of 2.0–4.5 μm⋅s−1 with a cycle of attachment to and detachment from sialylated oligosaccharides. To study the gliding mechanism at the molecular level, we applied an assay with a fluorescently labeled and membrane-permeabilized ghost model, and investigated the motility by high precision colocalization microscopy. Under conditions designed to reduce the number of motor interactions on a randomly oriented substrate, ghosts took unitary 70-nm steps in the direction of gliding. Although it remains possible that the stepping behavior is produced by multiple interactions, our data suggest that these steps are produced by a unitary gliding machine that need not move between sites arranged on a cytoskeletal lattice. PMID:24912194

  12. Substrate-induced gliding in a nematic liquid crystal layer.

    PubMed

    Mema, E; Kondic, L; Cummings, L J

    2015-12-01

    We consider the interaction between nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) and polymer substrates. Such substrates can interact with NLCs, exhibiting a phenomenon known as director gliding: the preferred orientation of the NLC molecules at the interface changes on time scales that are slow relative to the elastic relaxation time scale of the NLC. We present two models for gliding, inspired by experiments that investigate the interaction between the NLC and a polymer substrate. These models, though simple, lead to nontrivial results, including loss of bistability under gliding. Perhaps surprisingly, we find that externally imposed switching between the steady states of a bistable system may reverse the effect of gliding, preventing loss of bistability if switching is sufficiently frequent. Our findings may be of relevance to a variety of technological applications involving liquid crystal devices, and particularly to a new generation of flexible liquid crystal displays that implement polymeric substrates. PMID:26764717

  13. Soaring energetics and glide performance in a moving atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Graham K; Reynolds, Kate V; Thomas, Adrian L R

    2016-09-26

    Here, we analyse the energetics, performance and optimization of flight in a moving atmosphere. We begin by deriving a succinct expression describing all of the mechanical energy flows associated with gliding, dynamic soaring and thermal soaring, which we use to explore the optimization of gliding in an arbitrary wind. We use this optimization to revisit the classical theory of the glide polar, which we expand upon in two significant ways. First, we compare the predictions of the glide polar for different species under the various published models. Second, we derive a glide optimization chart that maps every combination of headwind and updraft speed to the unique combination of airspeed and inertial sink rate at which the aerodynamic cost of transport is expected to be minimized. With these theoretical tools in hand, we test their predictions using empirical data collected from a captive steppe eagle (Aquila nipalensis) carrying an inertial measurement unit, global positioning system, barometer and pitot tube. We show that the bird adjusts airspeed in relation to headwind speed as expected if it were seeking to minimize its aerodynamic cost of transport, but find only weak evidence to suggest that it adjusts airspeed similarly in response to updrafts during straight and interthermal glides.This article is part of the themed issue 'Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight'. PMID:27528788

  14. Electrical charging of skis gliding on snow.

    PubMed

    Colbeck, S C

    1995-01-01

    Ski charging was measured using giant-slalom style skis as gliding capacitors. The voltage measured across the plates was proportional to the charge on the base. While resting on dry snow or suspended in the air, the voltage was slowly reduced by the data logger itself. On wet snow the decay was much faster. While stationary on powder snow the ski developed a slightly negative voltage, showed a small, transient positive peak when motion began, rapidly dropped to negative values, and then assumed a quasi-steady climb to positive voltages. A great deal of noise was superimposed on the general features of the signal when skiing on hard or bumpy surfaces. Thus, the accumulation of charge to high levels was only possible with long runs in deep powder. The rate of charging increased with speed but was not affected by use of one "antistatic" wax, and another such wax actually increased the measured voltage over that of an unwaxed base. PMID:7898330

  15. Identification and Characterization of Several Large Hurricanes using Microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, C. W.; Stein, S. A.; Moore, C.

    2010-12-01

    An ongoing debate within the climatological community centers on whether rising North Atlantic sea-surface temperatures due to anthropogenic global warming are changing the frequency or energy of hurricanes. A short and incomplete observational record makes it difficult to answer this question. Since North Atlantic hurricane records were based entirely on ship logs and land observations before aircraft reconnaissance began in 1944, it is possible that hurricanes may have gone unobserved before then. Even after the initiation of regular aircraft observation, not all areas were monitored. Hence the potential for sampling problems exists up until the advent of satellite-based observation in the mid-1960’s, implying that an undercount in the historical record is likely. To address this issue, we continue to develop methodology to improve the record of the number of North Atlantic hurricanes through the analysis of their signals recorded on decades of historical seismograms. Ambient seismic noise—signals derived from natural sources not related to earthquakes—is generated by atmospheric energy and so has been used as a proxy for oceanic wave climate and an indication of decadal-scale climate variability. Hence ambient seismic noise should be usable to detect hurricanes that may have gone unobserved. Our methodology towards a general hurricane discriminant uses digital data from the HRV (Harvard, Massachusetts) and SJG (San Juan, Puerto Rico) seismic stations to calibrate seismic noise signals correlated with maximum wind speeds of several well-characterized North Atlantic hurricanes. We find that filtering of HRV data recorded during hurricane Andrew (August 1992) in the 200-143 mHz passband retrieves a signal correlatable with Andrew’s maximum wind speed. Spectral amplitudes show that the energy in the secondary microseism band contains increasing low-frequency content as Andrew matures. Results based on this methodology for several additional large hurricanes

  16. Gliding Motility in Bacteria: Insights from Studies of Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Spormann, Alfred M.

    1999-01-01

    Gliding motility is observed in a large variety of phylogenetically unrelated bacteria. Gliding provides a means for microbes to travel in environments with a low water content, such as might be found in biofilms, microbial mats, and soil. Gliding is defined as the movement of a cell on a surface in the direction of the long axis of the cell. Because this definition is operational and not mechanistic, the underlying molecular motor(s) may be quite different in diverse microbes. In fact, studies on the gliding bacterium Myxococcus xanthus suggest that two independent gliding machineries, encoded by two multigene systems, operate in this microorganism. One machinery, which allows individual cells to glide on a surface, independent of whether the cells are moving alone or in groups, requires the function of the genes of the A-motility system. More than 37 A-motility genes are known to be required for this form of movement. Depending on an additional phenotype, these genes are divided into two subclasses, the agl and cgl genes. Videomicroscopic studies on gliding movement, as well as ultrastructural observations of two myxobacteria, suggest that the A-system motor may consist of multiple single motor elements that are arrayed along the entire cell body. Each motor element is proposed to be localized to the periplasmic space and to be anchored to the peptidoglycan layer. The force to glide which may be generated here is coupled to adhesion sites that move freely in the outer membrane. These adhesion sites provide a specific contact with the substratum. Based on single-cell observations, similar models have been proposed to operate in the unrelated gliding bacteria Flavobacterium johnsoniae (formerly Cytophaga johnsonae), Cytophaga strain U67, and Flexibacter polymorphus (a filamentous glider). Although this model has not been verified experimentally, M. xanthus seems to be the ideal organism with which to test it, given the genetic tools available. The second gliding

  17. Microsized structures assisted nanostructure formation on ZnSe wafer by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shutong; Feng, Guoying E-mail: zhoush@scu.edu.cn

    2014-12-22

    Micro/nano patterning of ZnSe wafer is demonstrated by femtosecond laser irradiation through a diffracting pinhole. The irradiation results obtained at fluences above the ablation threshold are characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The microsized structure with low spatial frequency has a good agreement with Fresnel diffraction theory. Laser induced periodic surface structures and laser-induced periodic curvelet surface structures with high spatial frequency have been found on the surfaces of microsized structures, such as spikes and valleys. We interpret its formation in terms of the interference between the reflected laser field on the surface of the valley and the incident laser pulse.

  18. GLobal Integrated Design Environment (GLIDE): A Concurrent Engineering Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Melissa L.; Kunkel, Matthew R.; Smith, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The GLobal Integrated Design Environment (GLIDE) is a client-server software application purpose-built to mitigate issues associated with real time data sharing in concurrent engineering environments and to facilitate discipline-to-discipline interaction between multiple engineers and researchers. GLIDE is implemented in multiple programming languages utilizing standardized web protocols to enable secure parameter data sharing between engineers and researchers across the Internet in closed and/or widely distributed working environments. A well defined, HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP) based Application Programming Interface (API) to the GLIDE client/server environment enables users to interact with GLIDE, and each other, within common and familiar tools. One such common tool, Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation), paired with its add-in API for GLIDE, is discussed in this paper. The top-level examples given demonstrate how this interface improves the efficiency of the design process of a concurrent engineering study while reducing potential errors associated with manually sharing information between study participants.

  19. Prospects for the gliding mechanism of Mycoplasma mobile.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Makoto; Hamaguchi, Tasuku

    2016-02-01

    Mycoplasma mobile forms gliding machinery at a cell pole and glides continuously in the direction of the cell pole at up to 4.5μm per second on solid surfaces such as animal cells. This motility system is not related to those of any other bacteria or eukaryotes. M. mobile uses ATP energy to repeatedly catch, pull, and release sialylated oligosaccharides on host cells with its approximately 50-nm long legs. The gliding machinery is a large structure composed of huge surface proteins and internal jellyfish-like structure. This system may have developed from an accidental combination between an adhesin and a rotary ATPase, both of which are essential for the adhesive parasitic life of Mycoplasmas. PMID:26500189

  20. Glide-Shuffle Competition in Silicon: An Atomistic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ju; Cai, Wei; Chang, Jinpeng; Yip, Sidney

    2001-06-01

    Glide-Shuffle Competition in Silicon: An Atomistic Study Ju Li, Wei Cai, Jinpeng Chang, Sidney Yip, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Cambridge, MA 02139 Recent experiments by Suzuki et al and Rabier et al suggest that low-T and high-T plasticity in Si and III-IV compounds may be governed by different mechanisms. We perform direct atomistic calculations to obtain the core energies, Peierls-Nabarro stresses, and kink formation and migration energies of full shuffle- and glide-set dislocations and glide-set partial dislocations in Si using the Stillinger-Weber potential. These results are compared with previous calculations, and their implications will be discussed. Dynamical simulations of some of the full dislocations in motion show qualitatively different behavior with their counterparts in bcc metals.

  1. Global oceanic microseism sources as seen by seismic arrays and predicted by wave action models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillers, G.; Graham, N.; Landes, M.; Hubans, F.; Campillo, M.; Shapiro, N. M.; Paul, A.; Kedar, S.; Clayton, R. W.

    2010-12-01

    Estimated locations of P-wave microseism generation obtained from seismic arrays analyses are combined with ocean wave-wave interaction models to improve the understanding of microseism generation. Source regions of likely microseism generation are found by combining data from three different networks located in the northern hemisphere. For each array, teleseismic P-wave arrivals are extracted from station-station correlations of ambient noise associated with the secondary microseism peak. Estimates of the slowness and azimuth of the teleseismic body waves are obtained and source location probabilities are constructed by projecting these beamforming results to patches on the Earth's surface that represent likely source regions. The application of Longuet-Higgins' (LH) microseism excitation theory to hindcast ocean wave-wave interaction spectra combined with bathymetry has shown that microseism can be excited very locally in the deep oceans as a consequence of nonlinear atmosphere-ocean-seafloor interactions. We utilize this approach to identify the source mechanism and location associated with the body wave arrivals, and compare projection results from seismic array processing to predictions from globally distributed ocean wave-wave interaction intensities. Based on this technique we observe a number of previously undocumented potential source regions, such as the oceans south of Madagascar, or the southern tip of Australia. We find that spatial patterns of strong excitation generally agrees with the inferred source projections based on 12-day averaging noise correlations. Details of the distributions depend, however, on averaging choices applied to the 3-hourly sampled oceanic excitation functions. We therefore focus on the sensitivity and stability of the resulting spatio temporal correlations to choices of averaging, considering the mapping of temporally variable excitations into results of the array beamforming analysis. More specifically, we investigate to

  2. Improved Detection and Location of Ocean Microseism Signals using Array Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reading, A. M.; Gal, M.; Koper, K. D.; Tkalcic, H.

    2015-12-01

    We present and evaluate a range of approaches that may be used to investigate ocean microseisms using seismic array data. At amplitudes below the dominant incoming signal, the ambient seismic energy (background noise) associated with microseisms arrives from multiple directions at any one time. Thus we address the challenge of detecting weaker signals from unpredictable directions in the presence of other strong signals. Our aim is to extract the most accurate information possible from such weaker signals in order to expand the capability of ocean storm studies, using seismology, including the ability to extract storm patterns from archive seismic array records. Detection of weaker microseism signals may be improved using algorithms widely used in astronomy. One example is the CLEAN algorithm which has wide usage in radio astronomy. This algorithm operates by finding the position and strength of point sources and iteratively deconvolving their contribution to the image. It may be combined to optimum effect with the previously published (Incoherently Averaged Signal) IAS Capon implementation for an accurate detection of weaker sources. Having detected weaker sources, they may be backprojected using a suitable Earth model, taking into account a correction for the mislocation due to slowness-azimuth station corrections. The microseism generation locations inferred in this manner are strongly frequency dependent, even within relatively restricted frequency ranges (0.325-0.725 Hz) for some arrays. Our advances in seismic array processing, with a focus on methods appropriate to weaker ambient noise signals, have led to insights, for example, regarding the generation of seismic noise. We find that secondary microseisms in the lower frequency band are generated mainly by ocean swell whereas higher frequency bands are generated by local wind conditions. These arrivals are investigated over a two-decade time frame for the Southern Ocean and west Pacific Ocean.

  3. A methodology for boost-glide transport technology planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repic, E. M.; Olson, G. A.; Milliken, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A systematic procedure is presented by which the relative economic value of technology factors affecting design, configuration, and operation of boost-glide transport can be evaluated. Use of the methodology results in identification of first-order economic gains potentially achievable by projected advances in each of the definable, hypersonic technologies. Starting with a baseline vehicle, the formulas, procedures and forms which are integral parts of this methodology are developed. A demonstration of the methodology is presented for one specific boost-glide system.

  4. Directionality of ambient noise on the Juan de Fuca plate: implications for source locations of the primary and secondary microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Ritzwoller, Michael H.

    2015-04-01

    Based on cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise computed using 61 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) within the Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate from the Cascadia Initiative experiment and 42 continental stations near the coast of the western United States, we investigate the locations of generation of the primary (11-20 s period) and secondary (5-10 s period) microseisms in the northern Pacific Ocean by analysing the directionality and seasonality of the microseism (Rayleigh wave) signals received in this region. We conclude that (1) the ambient noise observed across the array is much different in the primary and secondary microseism bands, both in its azimuthal content and seasonal variation. (2) The principal secondary microseism signals propagate towards the east, consistent with their generation in deep waters of the North Pacific, perhaps coincident both with the region of observed body wave excitation and the predicted wave-wave interaction region from recent studies. (3) The primary microseism, as indicated by observations of the azimuthal dependence of the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave as well as observations of precursory arrivals, derives significantly from the shallow waters of the eastern Pacific near to the JdF plate but also has a component generated at greater distance of unknown origin. (4) These observations suggest different physical mechanisms for generating the two microseisms: the secondary microseisms are likely to be generated by non-linear wave-wave interaction over the deep Pacific Ocean, while the primary microseism may couple directly into the solid earth locally in shallow waters from ocean gravity waves. (5) Above 5 s period, high quality empirical Green's functions are observed from cross-correlations between deep water OBSs and continental stations, which illustrates that microseisms propagate efficiently from either deep or shallow water source regions onto the continent and are well recorded by continental seismic stations.

  5. The descent of ant: field-measured performance of gliding ants.

    PubMed

    Munk, Yonatan; Yanoviak, Stephen P; Koehl, M A R; Dudley, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Gliding ants avoid predatory attacks and potentially mortal consequences of dislodgement from rainforest canopy substrates by directing their aerial descent towards nearby tree trunks. The ecologically relevant measure of performance for gliding ants is the ratio of net horizontal to vertical distance traveled over the course of a gliding trajectory, or glide index. To study variation in glide index, we measured three-dimensional trajectories of Cephalotes atratus ants gliding in natural rainforest habitats. We determined that righting phase duration, glide angle, and path directness all significantly influence variation in glide index. Unsuccessful landing attempts result in the ant bouncing off its target and being forced to make a second landing attempt. Our results indicate that ants are not passive gliders and that they exert active control over the aerodynamic forces they experience during their descent, despite their apparent lack of specialized control surfaces. PMID:25788722

  6. Illusory Continuity without Sufficient Sound Energy to Fill a Temporal Gap: Examples of Crossing Glide Tones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuroda, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Eguchi, Shuntarou

    2012-01-01

    The gap transfer illusion is an auditory illusion where a temporal gap inserted in a longer glide tone is perceived as if it were in a crossing shorter glide tone. Psychophysical and phenomenological experiments were conducted to examine the effects of sound-pressure-level (SPL) differences between crossing glides on the occurrence of the gap…

  7. Dynamics of discrete screw dislocations on glide directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicandro, R.; De Luca, L.; Garroni, A.; Ponsiglione, M.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a simple discrete model for screw dislocations in crystals. Using a variational discrete scheme we study the motion of a configuration of dislocations toward low energy configurations. We deduce an effective fully overdamped dynamics that follows the maximal dissipation criterion introduced in Cermelli and Gurtin (1999) and predicts motion along the glide directions of the crystal.

  8. 14 CFR 171.265 - Glide path performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Glide path performance requirements. 171.265 Section 171.265 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Amplitude (DDM) (95 pct. probability) Outer limit of coverage to ISMLS point “C.” 0.035. The...

  9. 14 CFR 171.265 - Glide path performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Glide path performance requirements. 171.265 Section 171.265 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Amplitude (DDM) (95 pct. probability) Outer limit of coverage to ISMLS point “C.” 0.035. The...

  10. 14 CFR 171.265 - Glide path performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Glide path performance requirements. 171.265 Section 171.265 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Amplitude (DDM) (95 pct. probability) Outer limit of coverage to ISMLS point “C.” 0.035. The...

  11. Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun (Part II)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duoos, Bridget A.

    2012-01-01

    Part I of Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun, which was published in last issue, discussed how to select cross-country ski equipment, dress for the activity and the biomechanics of the diagonal stride. Part II focuses on teaching the diagonal stride technique and begins with a progression of indoor activities. Incorporating this fun,…

  12. Gliding swifts attain laminar flow over rough wings.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; de Kat, Roeland

    2014-01-01

    Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined gliding birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1-2% of chord length on the upper surface--10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended glides. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n = 3; std 13%) of their total area during glides that maximize flight distance and duration--similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation) before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of glide performance. PMID:24964089

  13. Gliding Swifts Attain Laminar Flow over Rough Wings

    PubMed Central

    Lentink, David; de Kat, Roeland

    2014-01-01

    Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined gliding birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1–2% of chord length on the upper surface—10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended glides. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n = 3; std 13%) of their total area during glides that maximize flight distance and duration—similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation) before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of glide performance. PMID:24964089

  14. Evaluation of snow-glide risk by modelling and on-site assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitinger, Georg; Meusburger, Katrin; Rüdisser, Johannes; Tasser, Erich; Höller, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Abandonment of agricultural practices on alpine grasslands lead to increasing snow-glide intensities due to lower surface roughness of the vegetation. Beneath the danger of snow-glide avalanches snow gliding leads to soil erosion and damaging of young trees at afforested sites. Especially in high altitudes afforestation is important to protect settlements and infrastructure against snow-gliding and glide avalanches. Snow-glide damages are therefore of particular danger for these afforestation sites. In the light of future climate change and warmer winter periods, studies already state increasing snow-glide risk and the occurrence of glide avalanches. This study presents an approach to evaluate snow-glide risk by combining the refined Spatial Snow Glide Model (SSGM) first published by Leitinger et al. (2008) and the Guidelines to Identify Snow-Glide Areas (GISGA) proposed by Höller (2012), an on-site risk analyses approach. First, GISGA was validated on the basis of corresponding snow-glide measurements. Second, a potential snow-glide map for an area in the Eastern Alps covering 20000 km² was modelled. The results revealed considerable areas of high snow-glide risk. Using the average amount of winter precipitation between 1990 and 2010 in the SSGM shows higher vulnerability for the northern part of the study area (Tyrol, Austria) than in the southern part (South Tyrol, Italy) because of lower winter precipitation. However, running the SSGM based on the highest winter precipitation registered in the study area between 1801 and 2003 exhibits the possibility of very high snow-glide risk for most parts of the study area with significant increasing risk in the southern part. Given the very probable future climate during winter periods with increasing temperatures but uncertain development of precipitation patterns, snow-glide activity and linked glide avalanches might further increase at least in areas and altitudes with solid precipitation. In combination with the

  15. Properies of the microseism wave field in Australia from three component array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Martin; Reading, Anya; Ellingsen, Simon; Koper, Keith; Burlacu, Relu; Tkalčić, Hrvoje

    2016-04-01

    In the last two decades, ambient noise studies in the range of 1-20 seconds have predominantly focused on the analysis of source regions for Rayleigh and P waves. The theoretical excitation of these phases is well understood for primary microseisms (direct coupling of gravity waves in sloping shallow bathymetry) and secondary microseisms (wave-wave interaction) and correlates well with observations. For Love waves, the excitation mechanism in the secondary microseism band is to date unknown. It has been shown, that LQ waves can exhibit larger amplitudes than Rg waves for certain frequencies. Therefore detailed analysis of the wave field are necessary to find indications on the generation mechanism. We analyse data from two spiral-shaped arrays located in Australia, the Pilbara Array (PSAR) in the North-West and an array in South Queensland (SQspa) in the East. The two arrays are different in aperture and allow for the study of primary and secondary microseisms with SQspa and higher secondary microseisms with PSAR. We use a deconvolution enhanced beamforming approach, which is based on the CLEAN algorithm. It allows the accurate detection of weaker sources and the estimation of power levels on each component or wave type. For PSAR we evaluate 1 year of data in the frequency range of 0.35-1 Hz and find fundamental and higher mode Rg and LQ waves. For the low end of the frequency range, we find the strongest fundamental mode Rg waves to originate from multiple direction, but confined to coastline reflectors, i.e. coastlines that are perpendicular to the main swell direction, while higher mode Rg waves are mainly generated in the Great Australian Bight. For higher frequencies, the source locations of Rg waves move toward the north coast, which is closest to the array and we see an increase in the Lg phase. The majority of fundamental LQ waves are generated at the west coast of Australia and we find some agreement between low frequency Rg and LQ source locations, which

  16. Adaptive glide slope control for parafoil and payload aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Michael

    Airdrop systems provide a unique capability of delivering large payloads to undeveloped and inaccessible locations. Traditionally, these systems have been unguided, requiring large landing zones and drops from low altitude. The invention of the steerable, gliding, ram-air parafoil enabled the possibility of precision aerial payload delivery. In practice, the gliding ability of the ram-air parafoil can actually create major problems for airdrop systems by making them more susceptible to winds and allowing them to achieve far greater miss distances than were previously possible. Research and development work on guided airdrop systems has focused primarily on evolutionary improvements to the guidance algorithm, while the navigation and control algorithms have changed little since the initial autnomous systems were developed. Furthermore, the control mechanisms have not changed since the invention of the ram-air canopy in the 1960’s. The primary contributions of this dissertation are: (1) the development of a reliable and robust method to identify a flight dynamic model for a parafoil and payload aircraft using minimal sensor data; (2) the first demonstration in flight test of the ability to achieve large changes in glide slope over ground using coupled incidence angle variation and trailing edge brake deflection; (3) the first development of a control law to implement glide slope control on an autonomous system; (4) the first flight tests of autonomous landing with a glide slope control mechanism demonstrating an improvement in landing accuracy by a factor of 2 or more in especially windy conditions, and (5) the first demonstrations in both simulation and flight test of the ability to perform in-flight system identification to adapt the internal control mappings to flight data and provide dramatic improvements in landing accuracy when there is a significant discrepancy between the assumed and actual flight characteristics.

  17. The enigma of eugregarine epicytic folds: where gliding motility originates?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the past decades, many studies focused on the cell motility of apicomplexan invasive stages as they represent a potential target for chemotherapeutic intervention. Gregarines (Conoidasida, Gregarinasina) are a heterogeneous group that parasitize invertebrates and urochordates, and are thought to be an early branching lineage of Apicomplexa. As characteristic of apicomplexan zoites, gregarines are covered by a complicated pellicle, consisting of the plasma membrane and the closely apposed inner membrane complex, which is associated with a number of cytoskeletal elements. The cell cortex of eugregarines, the epicyte, is more complicated than that of other apicomplexans, as it forms various superficial structures. Results The epicyte of the eugregarines, Gregarina cuneata, G. polymorpha and G. steini, analysed in the present study is organised in longitudinal folds covering the entire cell. In mature trophozoites and gamonts, each epicytic fold exhibits similar ectoplasmic structures and is built up from the plasma membrane, inner membrane complex, 12-nm filaments, rippled dense structures and basal lamina. In addition, rib-like myonemes and an ectoplasmic network are frequently observed. Under experimental conditions, eugregarines showed varied speeds and paths of simple linear gliding. In all three species, actin and myosin were associated with the pellicle, and this actomyosin complex appeared to be restricted to the lateral parts of the epicytic folds. Treatment of living gamonts with jasplakinolide and cytochalasin D confirmed that actin actively participates in gregarine gliding. Contributions to gliding of specific subcellular components are discussed. Conclusions Cell motility in gregarines and other apicomplexans share features in common, i.e. a three-layered pellicle, an actomyosin complex, and the polymerisation of actin during gliding. Although the general architecture and supramolecular organisation of the pellicle is not correlated with

  18. Microsized BiOCl Square Nanosheets as Ultraviolet Photodetectors and Photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zhang, Junying; Gao, Hong; Li, Feng; Lindquist, Sten-Eric; Wu, Nianqiang; Wang, Rongming

    2016-03-16

    BiOCl microstructures that include microspheres stacked by nanosheet and microsized square nanosheets, with a large lateral size of 3-5 μm and a thickness of 35 nm (the side length/thickness ratio is ∼100), are synthesized by a solvothermal method with the assistance of polyvinylpyrrolidone. The exposed face of the large square nanosheet is {001} facet. The BiOCl microstructures show good photocatalytic activity toward decomposition of Rhodamine B under ultraviolet-visible light irradiation. Moreover, individual microsized BiOCl square nanosheets are employed as the building block for construction of an ultraviolet photodetector. Because of its large size, thin thickness, and high surface-to-volume ratio, a BiOCl nanosheet shows high sensitivity and fast transient response to ultraviolet light in the spectral range 200-380 nm. PMID:26913647

  19. Osteointegration of PLGA implants with nanostructured or microsized β-TCP particles in a minipig model.

    PubMed

    Kulkova, Julia; Moritz, Niko; Suokas, Esa O; Strandberg, Niko; Leino, Kari A; Laitio, Timo T; Aro, Hannu T

    2014-12-01

    Bioresorbable suture anchors and interference screws have certain benefits over equivalent titanium-alloy implants. However, there is a need for compositional improvement of currently used bioresorbable implants. We hypothesized that implants made of poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) compounded with nanostructured particles of beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) would induce stronger osteointegration than implants made of PLGA compounded with microsized β-TCP particles. The experimental nanostructured self-reinforced PLGA (85L:15G)/β-TCP composite was made by high-energy ball-milling. Self-reinforced microsized PLGA (95L:5G)/β-TCP composite was prepared by melt-compounding. The composites were characterized by gas chromatography, Ubbelohde viscometry, scanning electron microscopy, laser diffractometry, and standard mechanical tests. Four groups of implants were prepared for the controlled laboratory study employing a minipig animal model. Implants in the first two groups were prepared from nanostructured and microsized PLGA/β-TCP composites respectively. Microroughened titanium-alloy (Ti6Al4V) implants served as positive intra-animal control, and pure PLGA implants as negative control. Cone-shaped implants were inserted in a random order unilaterally in the anterior cortex of the femoral shaft. Eight weeks after surgery, the mechanical strength of osteointegration of the implants was measured by a push-out test. The quality of new bone surrounding the implant was assessed by microcomputed tomography and histology. Implants made of nanostructured PLGA/β-TCP composite did not show improved mechanical osteointegration compared with the implants made of microsized PLGA/β-TCP composite. In the intra-animal comparison, the push-out force of two PLGA/β-TCP composites was 35-60% of that obtained with Ti6Al4V implants. The implant materials did not result in distinct differences in quality of new bone surrounding the implant. PMID:25241283

  20. Are deep-ocean-generated surface-wave microseisms observed on land?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromirski, Peter D.; Stephen, Ralph A.; Gerstoft, Peter

    2013-07-01

    studies attribute land double-frequency (DF) microseism observations to deep water generation. Here we show that near-coastal generation is generally the dominant source region. This determination is based on observations at land and ocean seismic stations, buoys, gravity-wave hindcasts, and on beamforming results from continental seismic arrays. Interactions between opposing ocean wave components generate a pressure excitation pulse at twice the ocean wave frequency that excites pseudo-Rayleigh (pRg) wave DF microseisms. pRg generated in shallow coastal waters have most of their energy in the solid Earth ("elastic" pRg) and are observed by land-based and seafloor seismometers as DF microseisms. pRg generated in the deep ocean have most of their energy in the ocean ("acoustic" pRg) and are continuously observed on the ocean bottom, but acoustic pRg does not efficiently transition onto continents. High-amplitude DF signals over the [0.2, 0.3] Hz band observed on the deep seafloor are uncorrelated with continental observations and are not clearly detectable at individual continental stations or by land seismic-array beamforming. Below 0.2 Hz, modeling and some observations suggest that some deep water-generated elastic pRg energy can reach continental stations, providing that losses from scattering and transition across the continental-shelf boundary to the shore are not substantial. However, most observations indicate that generally little deep-ocean-generated DF microseism energy reaches continental stations. Effectively, DF land observations are dominated by near-coastal wave activity.

  1. A comparison of glide force characteristics between 2 prefilled insulin lispro pens.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tina M; Lennartz, Amanda H; Ignaut, Debra A

    2015-03-01

    Glide force, average glide force, and glide force variability of the insulin lispro 200 units/mL pen (Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA) were compared to the Humalog KwikPen 100 units/mL pen (hereafter, KwikPen; Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA). Data were collected on 2 doses, 2 injection speeds, and 2 needle types. Insulin lispro 200 units/mL pen showed significantly lower maximum glide force, average glide force, and glide force variability than the KwikPen across all combinations of dose size, dose speed, and needle type. The lower glide force observed with the insulin lispro 200 units/mL pen offers another treatment option for patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who require greater than 20 units of mealtime insulin daily. PMID:25591858

  2. The gliding speed of migrating birds: slow and safe or fast and risky?

    PubMed

    Horvitz, Nir; Sapir, Nir; Liechti, Felix; Avissar, Roni; Mahrer, Isaac; Nathan, Ran

    2014-06-01

    Aerodynamic theory postulates that gliding airspeed, a major flight performance component for soaring avian migrants, scales with bird size and wing morphology. We tested this prediction, and the role of gliding altitude and soaring conditions, using atmospheric simulations and radar tracks of 1346 birds from 12 species. Gliding airspeed did not scale with bird size and wing morphology, and unexpectedly converged to a narrow range. To explain this discrepancy, we propose that soaring-gliding birds adjust their gliding airspeed according to the risk of grounding or switching to costly flapping flight. Introducing the Risk Aversion Flight Index (RAFI, the ratio of actual to theoretical risk-averse gliding airspeed), we found that inter- and intraspecific variation in RAFI positively correlated with wing loading, and negatively correlated with convective thermal conditions and gliding altitude, respectively. We propose that risk-sensitive behaviour modulates the evolution (morphology) and ecology (response to environmental conditions) of bird soaring flight. PMID:24641086

  3. Observation of deep water microseisms in the North Atlantic Ocean using tide modulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beucler, Éric; Mocquet, Antoine; Schimmel, Martin; Chevrot, Sébastien; Quillard, Olivier; Vergne, Jérôme; Sylvander, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Ocean activity produces continuous and ubiquitous seismic energy mostly in the 2-20 s period band, known as microseismic noise. Between 2 and 10 s period, secondary microseisms (SM) are generated by swell reflections close to the shores and/or by opposing swells in the deep ocean. However, unique conditions are required in order for surface waves generated by deep-ocean microseisms to be observed on land. By comparing short-duration power spectral densities at both Atlantic shoreline and inland seismic stations, we show that ocean tides strongly modulate the seismic energy in a wide period band except between 2.5 and 5 s. This tidal proxy reveals the existence of an ex situ short-period contribution of the SM peak. Comparison with swell spectra at surrounding buoys suggests that the largest part of this extra energy comes from deep ocean-generated microseisms. The energy modulation might be also used in numerical models of microseismic generation to constrain coastal reflection coefficients.

  4. The relationship between 3-D kinematics and gliding performance in the southern flying squirrel, Glaucomys volans.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Kristin L

    2006-02-01

    Gliding is the simplest form of flight, yet relatively little is known about its mechanics in animals. The goal of this study was to describe the body position and performance of a gliding mammal and to identify correlates between kinematics and aerodynamic performance. To do this, I used a pair of high-speed digital cameras to record a portion of the middle of glides by southern flying squirrels, Glaucomys volans. The squirrels launched from a height of 4 m and landed on a vertical pole. Reflective markers were applied to anatomical landmarks and the 3-D coordinates of these points were computed to describe the kinematics of the glides. From these data I estimated the lift and drag generated during the glide, and correlated these variables with gliding performance as measured by glide angle, glide speed and stability. In the majority of the glide sequences the squirrels accelerated in the downward direction and accelerated horizontally forward as they moved through the calibrated volume in the middle of the glide trajectory, rather than exhibiting a steady glide in which the body weight is balanced by the resultant aerodynamic force. Compared to human engineered airfoils, the angles of attack used by the squirrels were unexpectedly high, ranging from 35.4 degrees to 53.5 degrees , far above the angle of attack at which an aircraft wing would typically stall. As expected based on aerodynamic theory, there was a negative correlation between angle of attack and lift coefficient, indicating that the wings are stalled, and a positive correlation between angle of attack and drag coefficient. Also as expected, there was a negative correlation between lift-to-drag ratio and angle of attack, as increasing angle of attack produced both less lift and more drag. Within glides, there was a strong correlation between nose-down pitching rotations and limb movements that tended to increase the angle of attack of the wing membrane, suggesting that the animals actively control

  5. Analysis on typhoon-induced microseisms from ocean bottom seismometer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tzu-Chuan; Lin, Jing-Yi

    2013-04-01

    Ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) is usually used for active sources and passive listening experiments, such as air guns, explosives, earthquakes and other signals. In fact, the seismometer records not only the seismic waveforms but also noises generated by winds, waves, tides and other external forces. From the end of August to early September 2011, 15 OBSs were deployed offshore northeastern Taiwan for a recording period of about 20 days. At the end of August, the typhoon NANMADOL formed in the western Pacific and moved northwestward from the East Philippines and finally landed on the island of Taiwan. Due to storms or pressure changes caused by the typhoon, elastic waves would be directly or indirectly produced and recorded by the seismometers. In this study, by analyzing the seismic signals collected by the OBSs and the BATS stations, we investigate the influence induced by the changes of typhoon path and intensity on the submarine seismic noises. Preliminary results indicate that the seismic energy change related to the typhoon occurred mainly at 0.2-0.5 Hz, which is a relatively low frequency compared to that of earthquakes. The amplitude of this low-frequency noise increased when the distance between the typhoon and seismometer decreased. By comparing the seismic waves with the data collected from the marine weather buoy, we observed a positive correlation between the power of the low frequency microseisms and the wave height. This clearly indicates that the typhoon was the main source of microseisms during their passing. Owing to the ocean waves generated by the typhoon, the pressure altered by the water column change and recorded by the seismometers as seismic waves before being transmitted to the sea?oor. The spectrum analysis shows the presence of a high energy signals at 0.2-1 Hz with a period of about 12 hours which could be related to the tidal movements. In addition, the amplitude of the recorded microseisms is also affected by the depth of seismometers

  6. Substrate induced gliding for a nematic liquid crystal layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mema, Ensela; Cummings, Linda; Kondic, Lou

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between nematic liquid crystals (NLC) and polymer substrates is of current industrial interest, due to a desire to manufacture a new generation of flexible Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs) for use in portable electronic devices. Polymer substrates present challenges because they can interact with the NLC, exhibiting a phenomenon known as gliding: the preferred orientation of the NLC molecules at the interface changes over timescales of minutes to hours. We present two models for gliding, inspired by the physics and chemistry of the interaction between the NLC and polymer substrate. These models, though simple, lead to non-trivial results, including loss of bistability, a finding that may have implications for display devices. Supported by NSF Grant No. DMS-1211713.

  7. Investigation of Aerodynamic Capabilities of Flying Fish in Gliding Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, H.; Choi, H.

    In the present study, we experimentally investigate the aerodynamic capabilities of flying fish. We consider four different flying fish models, which are darkedged-wing flying fishes stuffed in actual gliding posture. Some morphological parameters of flying fish such as lateral dihedral angle of pectoral fins, incidence angles of pectoral and pelvic fins are considered to examine their effect on the aerodynamic performance. We directly measure the aerodynamic properties (lift, drag, and pitching moment) for different morphological parameters of flying fish models. For the present flying fish models, the maximum lift coefficient and lift-to-drag ratio are similar to those of medium-sized birds such as the vulture, nighthawk and petrel. The pectoral fins are found to enhance the lift-to-drag ratio and the longitudinal static stability of gliding flight. On the other hand, the lift coefficient and lift-to-drag ratio decrease with increasing lateral dihedral angle of pectoral fins.

  8. [Hofmannsthal and the gliding out of this world].

    PubMed

    Tellenbach, H

    1988-01-01

    In the sphere of language, Hugo von Hofmannsthal was already in his childhood talented by nature. His first poems and essays he wrote when he was 17 years old, his first drama ("The Death of Tizian") in his 18th year. From the beginning he followed the great tradition of the theatre of Vienna. His lyrical creations end already before he turned 30 years. At this time the dramatist begins with the reception of the medieval mystery plays, Calderon and the greek-oriental myths. The phenomena of gliding-out-of-the-world are found before this time, in the period of his very own spiritual conceiving. They show a remarkable inclination to abandon the world of reality (Wirklichkeit, koinos kosmos): gliding into the world of dream and trance, of phantastic tales, of magic and demonia, of depersonalization and dilusion, of dying and of death (idios kosmos). These tendencies vanish when Hofmannsthal turns to more conventional topics. PMID:3073605

  9. Crystal geometry of screw dislocation glide in tungsten nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadanov, E. V.

    2015-02-01

    A zigzag pattern of low-temperature dislocation glide occurring in tungsten nanocrystals in the intersecting planes {110} and {211}, which belong to the <111> crystallographic zone, has been revealed using field ion microscopy. It has been shown that cores of 1/2[111] screw dislocations are undissociated within the limits of the resolution of the field ion microscope. It has been found experimentally that surface atoms are displaced into metastable positions in the region of the trace of screw dislocation motion.

  10. Soil erosion by snow gliding - a first quantification attempt in a subalpine area in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusburger, K.; Leitinger, G.; Mabit, L.; Mueller, M. H.; Walter, A.; Alewell, C.

    2014-09-01

    Snow processes might be one important driver of soil erosion in Alpine grasslands and thus the unknown variable when erosion modelling is attempted. The aim of this study is to assess the importance of snow gliding as a soil erosion agent for four different land use/land cover types in a subalpine area in Switzerland. We used three different approaches to estimate soil erosion rates: sediment yield measurements in snow glide depositions, the fallout radionuclide 137Cs and modelling with the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE). RUSLE permits the evaluation of soil loss by water erosion, the 137Cs method integrates soil loss due to all erosion agents involved, and the measurement of snow glide deposition sediment yield can be directly related to snow-glide-induced erosion. Further, cumulative snow glide distance was measured for the sites in the winter of 2009/2010 and modelled for the surrounding area and long-term average winter precipitation (1959-2010) with the spatial snow glide model (SSGM). Measured snow glide distance confirmed the presence of snow gliding and ranged from 2 to 189 cm, with lower values on the north-facing slopes. We observed a reduction of snow glide distance with increasing surface roughness of the vegetation, which is an important information with respect to conservation planning and expected and ongoing land use changes in the Alps. Snow glide erosion estimated from the snow glide depositions was highly variable with values ranging from 0.03 to 22.9 t ha-1 yr-1 in the winter of 2012/2013. For sites affected by snow glide deposition, a mean erosion rate of 8.4 t ha-1 yr-1 was found. The difference in long-term erosion rates determined with RUSLE and 137Cs confirms the constant influence of snow-glide-induced erosion, since a large difference (lower proportion of water erosion compared to total net erosion) was observed for sites with high snow glide rates and vice versa. Moreover, the difference between RUSLE and 137Cs erosion

  11. Abdominal breathing manoeuvre reduces passive drag acting on gliding swimmers.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yusuke; Yanai, Toshimasa

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the passive drag acting on a gliding swimmer is reduced if the swimmer adopts an abdominal breathing manoeuvre (expanding the abdominal wall) rather than chest breathing manoeuvre (expanding the rib cage). Eleven male participants participated in this study. A specialised towing machine was used to tow each participant with tension set at various magnitudes and to record time series data of towing velocity. Participants were asked to inhale air by expanding the abdominal wall or the rib cage and to maintain the same body configuration throughout gliding. The steady-state velocity was measured and the coefficient of drag was calculated for each towing trial to compare between the breathing manoeuvres. The results showed that the towing velocity was increased by 0.02 m/s with a towing force of 34.3 N and by 0.06 m/s with a towing force of 98.1 N. The coefficient of drag was reduced by 5% with the abdominal breathing manoeuvre, which was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.05). These results indicate that adopting the abdominal breathing manoeuvre during gliding reduces the passive drag and the hypothesis was supported. PMID:26715235

  12. Characteristics of Atmospheric Pressure Rotating Gliding Arc Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Fengsen; Tu, Xin; Bo, Zheng; Cen, Kefa; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a novel direct current (DC) atmospheric pressure rotating gliding arc (RGA) plasma reactor has been developed for plasma-assisted chemical reactions. The influence of the gas composition and the gas flow rate on the arc dynamic behaviour and the formation of reactive species in the N2 and air gliding arc plasmas has been investigated by means of electrical signals, high speed photography, and optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics. Compared to conventional gliding arc reactors with knife-shaped electrodes which generally require a high flow rate (e.g., 10–20 L/min) to maintain a long arc length and reasonable plasma discharge zone, in this RGA system, a lower gas flow rate (e.g., 2 L/min) can also generate a larger effective plasma reaction zone with a longer arc length for chemical reactions. Two different motion patterns can be clearly observed in the N2 and air RGA plasmas. The time-resolved arc voltage signals show that three different arc dynamic modes, the arc restrike mode, takeover mode, and combined modes, can be clearly identified in the RGA plasmas. The occurrence of different motion and arc dynamic modes is strongly dependent on the composition of the working gas and gas flow rate. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51576174), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120101110099) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. 2015FZA4011)

  13. Functional anatomy of gliding membrane muscles in the sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps).

    PubMed

    Endo, H; Yokokawa, K; Kurohmaru, M; Hayashi, Y

    1998-02-01

    In order to clarify the morphological adaptation for gliding behavior in the marsupial mammals, the gliding membrane muscles in the sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps) were observed. Unlike the styliform cartilage in flying squirrels, the sugar glider has a well-developed tibiocarpalis muscle in the most lateral area of the gliding membrane. The gliding membrane substantially consists of the humerodorsalis and tibioabdominalis muscle complex. We believe that the thick tibiocarpalis bundle and the humerodorsalis and tibioabdominalis muscle complex may serve as a membrane controller in the gliding behavior. A characteristic thin membranous structure between the cutaneous and deeper muscles was observed. In addition to the direct powerful control exerted by trunk and limb movement, we suggest that indirect power conduction by this thin membranous structure may contribute to gliding membrane control. PMID:9488912

  14. Origin of microseisms in equatorial and southern Africa from analysis of broadband arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euler, G. G.; Wiens, D. A.; Nyblade, A.

    2010-12-01

    Using broadband array noise correlation and frequency-wavenumber analysis, we find evidence for 4 distinct origins of microseisms in the 10-200mHz band: an unusual source of Rayleigh waves at 35-40mHz located in the Bight of Bonny, several abyssal locations with enhanced P-wave production at 100-200mHz, and both coastal and abyssal Rayleigh wave sources that vary in bandwidth. We find no evidence of persistent seismic noise generation on land. Data analyzed were 1Hz vertical component recordings from the Cameroon, Southern Africa, Tanzania, and Ethiopia PASSCAL experiments. The Bonny microseism is characterized by 2 well-defined peaks at 36 & 38mHz and is found to have a location on the continental shelf in the northern portion of the Bight of Bonny. Our preliminary analysis finds that the microseism is well represented as a point source with a frequency-dependent location and horizontal slowness. Additional peaks near 61mHz and 69mHz are associated with increased Rayleigh waves sourced from the Bight of Bonny but are below the frequency range expected for a doubled frequency microseism (70-80mHz). Strong P-wave energy is found to originate from abyssal regions west of Retkjanes Ridge near Greenland, South of the Kerguelen Islands, and in the vicinity of the triple-junction formed by the African, South American & Antarctic plates. We propose that the locations represent optimal sea floor bathymetry for efficient conversion of nonlinearly interfering ocean swell to seismic P waves. Maputo bay and Sofala bay in Mozambique, the Western Cape coast in South Africa, and the North Atlantic are the dominant sources of microseismic Rayleigh waves outside of 35-40mHz. All noise sources identified in our study have a seasonal signature with peak noise generation in the winter months of each location implying their energy is derived from ocean swell of extratropical cyclones.

  15. Detection of micro-sized air bubble defects in optical glass based on Mie theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sai; Bai, Jian; Wang, Kaiwei; He, Fan; Zhou, Bin

    2015-10-01

    Mie scattering theory was shown in this paper to be suitable for analyzing the forward scattered light intensity distribution of micro-sized air bubble defects in glass, shining by a monochrome laser with a wavelength of 532um. The scattered light was measured by a high definition CCD camera. The scattering process can be classified as uncorrelated single scattering according to the properties of optical media. After calculating and smoothing the gray value of split rings of picture, Chahine algorithm was applied to reverse the size of defects. This technique was accurate to within 5% for defects with radii of <50um.

  16. Radiation enhanced basal plane dislocation glide in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimov, Eugene B.; Vergeles, Pavel S.; Polyakov, Alexander Y.; Lee, In-Hwan; Pearton, Stephen J.

    2016-05-01

    A movement of basal plane segments of dislocations in GaN films grown by epitaxial lateral overgrowth under low energy electron beam irradiation (LEEBI) was studied by the electron beam induced current (EBIC) method. Only a small fraction of the basal plane dislocation segments were susceptible to irradiation and the movement was limited to relatively short distances. The effect is explained by the radiation enhanced dislocation glide (REDG) in the structure with strong pinning. A dislocation velocity under LEEBI with a beam current lower than 1 nA was estimated as about 10 nm/s. The results assuming the REDG for prismatic plane dislocations were presented.

  17. Aerodynamic characteristics of flying fish in gliding flight.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyungmin; Choi, Haecheon

    2010-10-01

    The flying fish (family Exocoetidae) is an exceptional marine flying vertebrate, utilizing the advantages of moving in two different media, i.e. swimming in water and flying in air. Despite some physical limitations by moving in both water and air, the flying fish has evolved to have good aerodynamic designs (such as the hypertrophied fins and cylindrical body with a ventrally flattened surface) for proficient gliding flight. Hence, the morphological and behavioral adaptations of flying fish to aerial locomotion have attracted great interest from various fields including biology and aerodynamics. Several aspects of the flight of flying fish have been determined or conjectured from previous field observations and measurements of morphometric parameters. However, the detailed measurement of wing performance associated with its morphometry for identifying the characteristics of flight in flying fish has not been performed yet. Therefore, in the present study, we directly measure the aerodynamic forces and moment on darkedged-wing flying fish (Cypselurus hiraii) models and correlated them with morphological characteristics of wing (fin). The model configurations considered are: (1) both the pectoral and pelvic fins spread out, (2) only the pectoral fins spread with the pelvic fins folded, and (3) both fins folded. The role of the pelvic fins was found to increase the lift force and lift-to-drag ratio, which is confirmed by the jet-like flow structure existing between the pectoral and pelvic fins. With both the pectoral and pelvic fins spread, the longitudinal static stability is also more enhanced than that with the pelvic fins folded. For cases 1 and 2, the lift-to-drag ratio was maximum at attack angles of around 0 deg, where the attack angle is the angle between the longitudinal body axis and the flying direction. The lift coefficient is largest at attack angles around 30∼35 deg, at which the flying fish is observed to emerge from the sea surface. From glide polar

  18. Coupled factors influencing detachment of nano- and micro-sized particles from primary minima.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chongyang; Lazouskaya, Volha; Jin, Yan; Li, Baoguo; Ma, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Wenjuan; Huang, Yuanfang

    2012-06-01

    This study examined the detachments of nano- and micro-sized colloids from primary minima in the presence of cation exchange by laboratory column experiments. Colloids were initially deposited in columns packed with glass beads at 0.2 M CaCl(2) in the primary minima of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energies. Then, the columns were flushed with NaCl solutions with different ionic strengths (i.e., 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 0.2 M). Detachments were observed at all ionic strengths and were particularly significant for the nanoparticle. The detachments increased with increasing electrolyte concentration for the nanoparticle whereas increased from 0.001 M to 0.01 M and decreased with further increasing electrolyte concentration for the micro-sized colloid. The observations were attributed to coupled influence of cation exchange, short-range repulsion, surface roughness, surface charge heterogeneity, and deposition in the secondary minima. The detachments of colloids from primary minima challenge the common belief that colloid interaction in primary minimum is irreversible and resistant to disturbance in solution ionic strength and composition. Although the significance of surface roughness, surface charge heterogeneity, and secondary minima on colloid deposition has been widely recognized, our study implies that they also play important roles in colloid detachment. Whereas colloid detachment is frequently associated with decrease of ionic strength, our results show that increase of ionic strength can also cause detachment due to influence of cation exchange. PMID:22575872

  19. Single potassium niobate nano/microsized particles as local mechano-optical Brownian probes.

    PubMed

    Mor, Flavio M; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Magrez, Arnaud; Forró, László; Jeney, Sylvia

    2016-03-28

    Perovskite alkaline niobates, due to their strong nonlinear optical properties, including birefringence and the capability to produce second-harmonic generation (SHG) signals, attract a lot of attention as potential candidates for applications as local nano/microsized mechano-optical probes. Here, we report on an implementation of photonic force microscopy (PFM) to explore the Brownian motion and optical trappability of monocrystalline potassium niobate (KNbO3) nano/microsized particles having sizes within the range of 50 to 750 nm. In particular, we exploit the anisotropic translational diffusive regime of the Brownian motion to quantify thermal fluctuations and optical forces of singly-trapped KNbO3 particles within the optical trapping volume of a PFM microscope. We also show that, under near-infrared (NIR) excitation of the highly focused laser beam of the PFM microscope, a single optically-trapped KNbO3 particle reveals a strong SHG signal manifested by a narrow peak (λ(em) = 532 nm) at half the excitation wavelength (λ(ex) = 1064 nm). Moreover, we demonstrate that the thus induced SHG emission can be used as a local light source that is capable of optically exciting molecules of an organic dye, Rose Bengal (RB), which adhere to the particle surface, through the mechanism of luminescence energy transfer (LET). PMID:26956197

  20. Body wave microseisms from a distant storm revealed by Hi-net data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, K.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of microseisms were firmly established in 1940's. Their excitation sources are ocean swell activities. Microseisms from 0.1 to 0.5 Hz, which double the frequency, indicating the generation of the former through nonlinear wave-wave interaction of the latter. Because the swell activities are their sources, surface wave excitation is dominant.Recently body wave microseisms from a distant storm, however, have been focussed [e.g. Gerstoft et al. 2006]. They show clear teleseismic P waves excited by distant storms. A back-projection method could constrain the source distribution, which gives clues to their excitation mechanisms. Most studies focused, however, only vertical components.In this study, in order to constrain excitation mechanisms of microseisms, we conducted a 3-component array analysis using Hi-net operated by NIED, when a strong weather bomb hit the Atlantic ocean on Dec. 9th, 2014. We analyzed 3-component velocity-meters with a natural frequency of 1 Hz at 775 stations. The instrumental response was deconvolved by using the inverse filtering technique after reduction of common logger noise Their frequency-wavenumber spectra were calculated at 0.15 Hz. The spectra of a vertical component and a radial component show that clear teleseismic P-wave. The slowness of about 0.05 [s/km] and the back azimuth of -5 degrees are consistent with that of the P wave traveled from the weather bomb in the Atlantic ocean. The radial component shows SV wave with about 20% of P wave amplitudes. These observations could be explained by a single force source at the sea surface in the 1-D medium in the first order approximation. The transverse component also shows SH waves with about 10% of the P wave amplitude. The excitation source of P, SV and SH wave were located in the same small area by a backprojection analysis. These observations suggest that the steep topography and the thick sediment beneath the source area also affected the excitations.Observations of

  1. Single potassium niobate nano/microsized particles as local mechano-optical Brownian probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, Flavio M.; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Magrez, Arnaud; Forró, László; Jeney, Sylvia

    2016-03-01

    Perovskite alkaline niobates, due to their strong nonlinear optical properties, including birefringence and the capability to produce second-harmonic generation (SHG) signals, attract a lot of attention as potential candidates for applications as local nano/microsized mechano-optical probes. Here, we report on an implementation of photonic force microscopy (PFM) to explore the Brownian motion and optical trappability of monocrystalline potassium niobate (KNbO3) nano/microsized particles having sizes within the range of 50 to 750 nm. In particular, we exploit the anisotropic translational diffusive regime of the Brownian motion to quantify thermal fluctuations and optical forces of singly-trapped KNbO3 particles within the optical trapping volume of a PFM microscope. We also show that, under near-infrared (NIR) excitation of the highly focused laser beam of the PFM microscope, a single optically-trapped KNbO3 particle reveals a strong SHG signal manifested by a narrow peak (λem = 532 nm) at half the excitation wavelength (λex = 1064 nm). Moreover, we demonstrate that the thus induced SHG emission can be used as a local light source that is capable of optically exciting molecules of an organic dye, Rose Bengal (RB), which adhere to the particle surface, through the mechanism of luminescence energy transfer (LET).Perovskite alkaline niobates, due to their strong nonlinear optical properties, including birefringence and the capability to produce second-harmonic generation (SHG) signals, attract a lot of attention as potential candidates for applications as local nano/microsized mechano-optical probes. Here, we report on an implementation of photonic force microscopy (PFM) to explore the Brownian motion and optical trappability of monocrystalline potassium niobate (KNbO3) nano/microsized particles having sizes within the range of 50 to 750 nm. In particular, we exploit the anisotropic translational diffusive regime of the Brownian motion to quantify thermal

  2. Gliding arc in tornado using a reverse vortex flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kalra, Chiranjeev S.; Cho, Young I.; Gutsol, Alexander; Fridman, Alexander; Rufael, Tecle S.

    2005-02-01

    The present article reports a new gliding arc (GA) system using a reverse vortex flow ('tornado') in a cylindrical reactor (gliding arc in tornado, or GAT), as used to preserve the main advantages of traditional GA systems and overcome their main drawbacks. The primary advantages of traditional GA systems retained in the present GAT are the possibility to generate transitional plasma and to avoid considerable electrode erosion. In contrast to a traditional GA, the new GAT system ensures much more uniform gas treatment and has a significantly larger gas residence time in the reactor. The present article also describes the design of the new reactor and its stable operation regime when the variation of GAT current is very small. These features are understood to be very important for most viable applications. Additionally the GAT provides near-perfect thermal insulation from the reactor wall, indicating that the present GAT does not require the reactor wall to be constructed of high-temperature materials. The new GAT system, with its unique properties such as a high level of nonequilibrium and a large residence time, looks very promising for many industrial applications including fuel conversion, carbon dioxide conversion to carbon monoxide and oxygen, surface treatment, waste treatment, flame stabilization, hydrogen sulfide treatment, etc.

  3. Block glides offshore Newport Beach, Southern California continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, H.G.; Clarke, S.H. Jr.; Kennedy, M.P.

    1988-01-01

    The continental slope offshore Newport Beach, California, is characterized by a relatively gentle (approximately 1/sup 0/) grade and is dissected by numerous channels and canyons, of which the most conspicuous is Newport Canyon. An unusual series of block-glide landslides have developed on this lope adjacent to many of these channels. Locally, secondary channels that develop along pull-apart fractures between the slide blocks may service as conduits for downslope sediment movement. A detailed seismic-reflection survey of the area shows that the slope is underlain by soft water-saturated unstable sediment of Quaternary age. The block-glides lie wholly within this sediment; displaced blocks appear to have moved only a short distance downslope and are preserved as intact masses that exhibit downward increasing internal deformation. This deformation reaches a maximum near the front of the displaced mass and in basal beds nearest the slip surface. The morphology of the blocks and their intervening channellike erosional scarps is similar to that of glacial blocks and their associated bergschrunds. The formation of new scarps and the widening of channels formed as pull-aparts by the ongoing process of block movement may contribute to headward erosion and widening of Newport Canyon and its tributaries. Slope failure might be greatly enhanced by strong ground motion associated with nearby earthquakes. The authors suspect that renewed movement occurs on these blocks during major seismic events on the nearby Newport-Inglewood fault (e.g., 1933 M/sub L/ 6.3 event).

  4. 14 CFR 29.71 - Helicopter angle of glide: Category B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Helicopter angle of glide: Category B. 29... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.71 Helicopter angle of glide: Category B. For each category B helicopter, except multiengine helicopters meeting...

  5. 14 CFR 29.71 - Helicopter angle of glide: Category B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Helicopter angle of glide: Category B. 29... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.71 Helicopter angle of glide: Category B. For each category B helicopter, except multiengine helicopters meeting...

  6. Effortful Pitch Glide: A Potential New Exercise Evaluated by Dynamic MRI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miloro, Keri Vasquez; Pearson, William G., Jr.; Langmore, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanics of the effortful pitch glide (EPG) with swallowing using dynamic MRI. The EPG is a combination of a pitch glide and a pharyngeal squeeze maneuver for targeting laryngeal and pharyngeal muscles. The authors hypothesized that the EPG would elicit significantly greater structural…

  7. High Order Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of Gliding Snake Aerodynamics: Effect of 3D Flow on Gliding Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, Yann; Hassan, Syed Harris; Socha, Jake; Vlachos, Pavlos; Frankel, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Chrysopelea paradisi are snakes that are able to glide over long distances by morphing the cross section of their bodies from circular to a triangular airfoil, and undulating through the air. Snake glide is characterized by relatively low Reynolds number and high angle of attack as well as three dimensional and unsteady flow. Here we study the 3D dynamics of the flow using an in-house high-order large eddy simulation code. The code features a novel multi block immersed boundary method to accurately and efficiently represent the complex snake geometry. We investigate the steady state 3-dimensionality of the flow, especially the wake flow induced by the presence of the snake's body, as well as the vortex-body interaction thought to be responsible for part of the lift enhancement. Numerical predictions of global lift and drag will be compared to experimental measurements, as well as the lift distribution along the body of the snake due to cross sectional variations. Comparisons with previously published 2D results are made to highlight the importance of 3-dimensional effects. Additional efforts are made to quantify properties of the vortex shedding and Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) is used to analyse the main modes responsible for the lift and drag forces.

  8. Natural glide slab avalanches, Glacier National Park, USA: A unique hazard and forecasting challenge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reardon, Blase; Fagre, Daniel B.; Dundas, Mark; Lundy, Chris

    2006-01-01

    In a museum of avalanche phenomena, glide cracks and glide avalanches might be housed in the “strange but true” section. These oddities are uncommon in most snow climates and tend to be isolated to specific terrain features such as bedrock slabs. Many glide cracks never result in avalanches, and when they do, the wide range of time between crack formation and slab failure makes them highly unpredictable. Despite their relative rarity, glide cracks and glide avalanches pose a regular threat and complex forecasting challenge during the annual spring opening of the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park, U.S.A. During the 2006 season, a series of unusual glide cracks delayed snow removal operations by over a week and provided a unique opportunity to record detailed observations of glide avalanches and characterize their occurrence and associated weather conditions. Field observations were from snowpits, crown profiles and where possible, measurements of slab thickness, bed surface slope angle, substrate and other physical characteristics. Weather data were recorded at one SNOTEL site and two automated stations located from 0.6-10 km of observed glide slab avalanches. Nearly half (43%) of the 35 glide slab avalanches recorded were Class D2-2.5, with 15% Class D3-D3.5. The time between glide crack opening and failure ranged from 2 days to over six weeks, and the avalanches occurred in cycles associated with loss of snow water equivalent and spikes in temperature and radiation. We conclude with suggest ions for further study.

  9. Gliding Motility and Por Secretion System Genes Are Widespread among Members of the Phylum Bacteroidetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yongtao

    2013-01-01

    The phylum Bacteroidetes is large and diverse, with rapid gliding motility and the ability to digest macromolecules associated with many genera and species. Recently, a novel protein secretion system, the Por secretion system (PorSS), was identified in two members of the phylum, the gliding bacterium Flavobacterium johnsoniae and the nonmotile oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. The components of the PorSS are not similar in sequence to those of other well-studied bacterial secretion systems. The F. johnsoniae PorSS genes are a subset of the gliding motility genes, suggesting a role for the secretion system in motility. The F. johnsoniae PorSS is needed for assembly of the gliding motility apparatus and for secretion of a chitinase, and the P. gingivalis PorSS is involved in secretion of gingipain protease virulence factors. Comparative analysis of 37 genomes of members of the phylum Bacteroidetes revealed the widespread occurrence of gliding motility genes and PorSS genes. Genes associated with other bacterial protein secretion systems were less common. The results suggest that gliding motility is more common than previously reported. Microscopic observations confirmed that organisms previously described as nonmotile, including Croceibacter atlanticus, “Gramella forsetii,” Paludibacter propionicigenes, Riemerella anatipestifer, and Robiginitalea biformata, exhibit gliding motility. Three genes (gldA, gldF, and gldG) that encode an apparent ATP-binding cassette transporter required for F. johnsoniae gliding were absent from two related gliding bacteria, suggesting that the transporter may not be central to gliding motility. PMID:23123910

  10. Soil erosion by snow gliding - a first quantification attempt in a sub-alpine area, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusburger, K.; Leitinger, G.; Mabit, L.; Mueller, M. H.; Walter, A.; Alewell, C.

    2014-03-01

    Snow processes might be one important driver of soil erosion in Alpine grasslands and thus the unknown variable when erosion modelling is attempted. The aim of this study is to assess the importance of snow gliding as soil erosion agent for four different land use/land cover types in a sub-alpine area in Switzerland. We used three different approaches to estimate soil erosion rates: sediment yield measurements in snow glide deposits, the fallout radionuclide 137Cs, and modelling with the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE). The RUSLE model is suitable to estimate soil loss by water erosion, while the 137Cs method integrates soil loss due to all erosion agents involved. Thus, we hypothesise that the soil erosion rates determined with the 137Cs method are higher and that the observed discrepancy between the soil erosion rate of RUSLE and the 137Cs method is related to snow gliding and sediment concentrations in the snow glide deposits. Cumulative snow glide distance was measured for the sites in the winter 2009/10 and modelled for the surrounding area with the Spatial Snow Glide Model (SSGM). Measured snow glide distance ranged from 2 to 189 cm, with lower values at the north facing slopes. We observed a reduction of snow glide distance with increasing surface roughness of the vegetation, which is important information with respect to conservation planning and expected land use changes in the Alps. Our hypothesis was confirmed: the difference of RUSLE and 137Cs erosion rates was related to the measured snow glide distance (R2= 0.64; p < 0.005) and snow sediment yields (R2 = 0.39; p = 0.13). A high difference (lower proportion of water erosion compared to total net erosion) was observed for high snow glide rates and vice versa. The SSGM reproduced the relative difference of the measured snow glide values under different land uses and land cover types. The resulting map highlighted the relevance of snow gliding for large parts of the investigated area. Based

  11. Long-range correlations of microseism-band pressure fluctuations in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Justin S.; Godin, Oleg A.; Evers, Läslo G.; Lv, Cheng

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the spatial coherence of underwater ambient noise using a yearlong time series measured off Ascension Island. Qualitative agreement with observed cross-correlations is achieved using a simple range-dependent model, constrained by earlier, active tomographic studies in the area. In particular, the model correctly predicts the existence of two weakly dispersive normal modes in the microseism frequency range, with the group speed of one of the normal modes being smaller than the sound speed in water. The agreement justifies our interpretation of the peaks of the measured cross-correlation function of ambient noise as modal arrivals, with dispersion that is sensitive to crustal velocity structure. Our observations are consistent with Scholte to Moho head wave coupled propagation, with double mode conversion occurring due to the bathymetric variations between receivers. We thus demonstrate the feasibility of interrogating crustal properties using noise interferometry of moored hydrophone data at ranges in excess of 120 km.

  12. Calculation and experimental validation of spectral properties of microsize grains surrounded by nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haitong; Liu, Dong; Duan, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xiaodong

    2014-04-01

    Opacified aerogels are particulate thermal insulating materials in which micrometric opacifier mineral grains are surrounded by silica aerogel nanoparticles. A geometric model was developed to characterize the spectral properties of such microsize grains surrounded by much smaller particles. The model represents the material's microstructure with the spherical opacifier's spectral properties calculated using the multi-sphere T-matrix (MSTM) algorithm. The results are validated by comparing the measured reflectance of an opacified aerogel slab against the value predicted using the discrete ordinate method (DOM) based on calculated optical properties. The results suggest that the large particles embedded in the nanoparticle matrices show different scattering and absorption properties from the single scattering condition and that the MSTM and DOM algorithms are both useful for calculating the spectral and radiative properties of this particulate system. PMID:24718167

  13. Long-range correlations of microseism-band pressure fluctuations in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Justin S.; Godin, Oleg A.; Evers, Läslo G.; Lv, Cheng

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the spatial coherence of underwater ambient noise using a yearlong time-series measured off Ascension Island. Qualitative agreement with observed cross-correlations is achieved using a simple range-dependent model, constrained by earlier, active tomographic studies in the area. In particular, the model correctly predicts the existence of two weakly dispersive normal modes in the microseism frequency range, with the group speed of one of the normal modes being smaller than the sound speed in water. The agreement justifies our interpretation of the peaks of the measured cross-correlation function of ambient noise as modal arrivals, with dispersion that is sensitive to crustal velocity structure. Our observations are consistent with Scholte to Moho head wave coupled propagation, with double mode conversion occurring due to the bathymetric variations between receivers. We thus demonstrate the feasibility of interrogating crustal properties using noise interferometry of moored hydrophone data at ranges in excess of 120 km.

  14. GlideScope and Frova Introducer for Difficult Airway Management

    PubMed Central

    Ciccozzi, Alessandra; Guetti, Cristiana; Papola, Roberta; Paladini, Antonella; Varrassi, Giustino; Marinangeli, Franco

    2013-01-01

    The introduction into clinical practice of new tools for intubation as videolaringoscopia has dramatically improved the success rate of intubation and the work of anesthesiologists in what is considered the most delicate maneuver. Nevertheless intubation difficulties may also be encountered with good anatomical visualization of glottic structures in videolaringoscopia. To overcome the obstacles that may occur both in a difficult provided intubation such as those unexpected, associated endotracheal introducer able to facilitate the passage of the endotracheal tube through the vocal cords into the trachea may be useful. We report 4 cases of difficult intubation planned and unplanned and completed successfully using the GlideScope videolaryngoscope associated with endotracheal Frova introducer. PMID:23991339

  15. Degradation of tetrafluoroethane using three-phase gliding arc plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, J.; García, M.; Pacheco, M.; Valdivia, R.; Rivera, C.; Garduño, M.

    2012-06-01

    The use of many chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) has negatively impacted the ozone layer. The Montreal Protocol was implemented, as a temporary solution for this problem by replacing CFC's by hydrofluorocarbons (HFC's). These kinds of gases have the propriety to be free of chlorine. However, in a next future, the Montreal Protocol also considers the replacement of HFC's because they have a high global warming potential when they enter in contact with the atmosphere. One of the methods to remove those compounds is the gliding arc plasma because it presents some advantages. The inlet system works near the atmospheric pressure and has a transition region from plasma at thermodynamic local partial equilibrium to non-thermal plasma; allowing high gas and electronic temperatures. Results present a promissory possibility to be scaled and to give an industrial service.

  16. Leaping shampoo glides on a lubricating air layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Li, E. Q.; Marston, J. O.; Bonito, A.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2013-06-01

    When a stream of shampoo is fed onto a pool in one's hand, a jet can leap sideways or rebound from the liquid surface in an intriguing phenomenon known as the Kaye effect. Earlier studies have debated whether non-Newtonian effects are the underlying cause of this phenomenon, making the jet glide on top of a shear-thinning liquid layer, or whether an entrained air layer is responsible. Herein we show unambiguously that the jet slides on a lubricating air layer. We identify this layer by looking through the pool liquid and observing its rupture into fine bubbles. The resulting microbubble sizes suggest this air layer is of submicron thickness. This thickness estimate is also supported by the tangential deceleration of the jet during the rebounding.

  17. Employment of hypersonic glide vehicles: Proposed criteria for use

    SciTech Connect

    Olguin, Abel

    2014-07-01

    Hypersonic Glide Vehicles (HGVs) are a type of reentry vehicle that couples the high speed of ballistic missiles with the maneuverability of aircraft. The HGV has been in development since the 1970s, and its technology falls under the category of Conventional Prompt Global Strike (CPGS) weapons. As noted by James M. Acton, a senior associate in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment, CPGS is a “missile in search of a mission.” With the introduction of any significant new military capability, a doctrine for use—including specifics regarding how, when and where it would be used, as well as tactics, training and procedures—must be clearly defined and understood by policy makers, military commanders, and planners. In this paper, benefits and limitations of the HGV are presented. Proposed criteria and four scenarios illustrate a possible method for assessing when to use an HGV.

  18. Glide planes symmetry in the organization of some sulfide structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, S. V.; Magarill, S. A.; Pervukhina, N. V.

    2016-03-01

    The role of glide planes in the organization of structures is shown based on a crystallographic analysis of the monoclinic structures of TlAs3S5 and Tl2(As,Sb)3S13 sulfides. In the first structure, cations and anions form systems (with identical geometries) of two face-centered sublattices, linked by the c plane, with the effect of unified "two-dimensional" (2D) ordering. The second structure, exhibiting signs of order-disorder (OD) type, is interpreted as a superposition of two noncentrosymmetric components with independent cation and anion sublattices, which, however, also form a regular 2D order due to the n plane. The stabilizing role of Tl cations in the geometry of cation matrices is indicated.

  19. Flavobacterium tistrianum sp. nov., a gliding bacterium isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Suwannachart, Chatrudee; Rueangyotchanthana, Kanjana; Srichuay, Suksan; Pheng, Sophea; Fungsin, Bundit; Phoonsiri, Chantara; Kim, Song-Gun

    2016-06-01

    A novel gliding bacterial strain, GB 56.1T, was obtained from soil at the Sakaerat Biosphere Reserve, in Nakhon Ratchasima province, Thailand; the strain was characterized using a polyphasic approach. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, yellow, rod shaped and devoid of flagella, but showed gliding motility. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences found that GB 56.1T was a member of the genus Flavobacterium and that the strain shared the highest sequence similarities with Flavobacterium nitrogenifigens (98.4 %), Flavobacterium anhuiense(98.3 %) and Flavobacterium ginsenosidimutans (97.9 %). The similarities of the sequences of all other species of the genus Flavobacterium were below 97.4 %. The major respiratory quinone of strain GB 56.1T was MK-6; fatty acids were iso-C15:0, C16:1ω6c/C16:1ω7c, C16:0 and C16:0 3-OH. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, an unidentified amino lipid and four polar lipids. The DNA G+C content of this strain was 34.2 mol%. The DNA-DNA relatedness of GB 56.1T was highest against F.anhuiense, with a value of 37.6 %. On the basis of morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics, DNA-DNA hybridization relatedness and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, we conclude that strain GB 56.1T represents a novel species, for which the name Flavobacterium tistrianum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GB 56.1T (=TISTR 1612T =KCTC 42679T). PMID:26970735

  20. An investigation into a micro-sized droplet impinging on a surface with sharp wettability contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, C. Y.; Lam, Y. C.

    2014-10-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted into a micro-sized droplet jetted onto a surface with sharp wettability contrast. The dynamics of micro-sized droplet impingement on a sharp wettability contrast surface, which is critical in inkjet printing technology, has not been investigated in the literature. Hydrophilic lines with line widths ranging from 27 to 53 µm, and contact angle ranging from 17° to 77°, were patterned on a hydrophobic surface with a contact angle of 107°. Water droplets with a diameter of 81 µm were impinged at various offset distances from the centre of the hydrophilic line. The evolution of the droplet upon impingement can be divided into three distinct phases, namely the kinematic phase, the translating phase where the droplet moves towards the centre of the hydrophilic line, and the conforming phase where the droplet spreads along the line. The key parameters affecting the conformability of the droplet to the hydrophilic line pattern are the ratio of the line width to the initial droplet diameter and the contact angle of the hydrophilic line. The droplet will only conform completely to the hydrophilic pattern if the line width is not overly small relative to the droplet and the contact angle of the hydrophilic line is sufficiently low. The impact offset distance does not affect the final shape and final location of the droplet, as long as part of the droplet touches the hydrophilic line upon impingement. This process has a significant impact on inkjet printing technology as high accuracy of inkjet droplet deposition and shape control can be achieved through wettability patterning.

  1. STS-41 Discovery, OV-103, glides over concrete runway 22 at EAFB, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-41 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, with nose landing gear (NLG) and main landing gear (MLG) deployed, glides over concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, prior to touchdown.

  2. Impact of snow gliding on soil redistribution for a sub-alpine area in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusburger, K.; Leitinger, G.; Mabit, L.; Mueller, M. H.; Alewell, C.

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the importance of snow gliding as soil erosion agent for four different land use/land cover types in a sub-alpine area in Switzerland. The 14 investigated sites are located close to the valley bottom at approximately 1500 m a.s.l., while the elevation of the surrounding mountain ranges is about 2500 m a.s.l. We used two different approaches to estimate soil erosion rates: the fallout radionuclide 137Cs and the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE). The RUSLE model is suitable to estimate soil loss by water erosion, while the 137Cs method integrates soil loss due to all erosion agents involved. Thus, we hypothesise that the soil erosion rates determined with the 137Cs method are higher and that the observed discrepancy between the erosion rate of RUSLE and the 137Cs method is related to snow gliding. Cumulative snow glide distance was measured for the sites in the winter 2009/2010 and modelled for the surrounding area with the Spatial Snow Glide Model (SSGM). Measured snow glide distance range from 0 to 189 cm with lower values for the north exposed slopes. We observed a reduction of snow glide distance with increasing surface roughness of the vegetation, which is an important information with respect to conservation planning and expected land use changes in the Alps. Our hypothesis was confirmed, the difference of RUSLE and 137Cs erosion rates was correlated to the measured snow glide distance (R2 = 0.73; p < 0.005). A high difference (lower proportion of water erosion compared to total net erosion) was observed for high snow glide rates and vice versa. The SSGM reproduced the relative difference of the measured snow glide values between different land use/land cover types. The resulting map highlights the relevance of snow gliding for large parts of the investigated area. Based on these results, we conclude that snow gliding is a key process impacting soil erosion pattern and magnitude in sub-alpine areas with similar

  3. Efficiency of lift production in flapping and gliding flight of swifts.

    PubMed

    Henningsson, Per; Hedenström, Anders; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Many flying animals use both flapping and gliding flight as part of their routine behaviour. These two kinematic patterns impose conflicting requirements on wing design for aerodynamic efficiency and, in the absence of extreme morphing, wings cannot be optimised for both flight modes. In gliding flight, the wing experiences uniform incident flow and the optimal shape is a high aspect ratio wing with an elliptical planform. In flapping flight, on the other hand, the wing tip travels faster than the root, creating a spanwise velocity gradient. To compensate, the optimal wing shape should taper towards the tip (reducing the local chord) and/or twist from root to tip (reducing local angle of attack). We hypothesised that, if a bird is limited in its ability to morph its wings and adapt its wing shape to suit both flight modes, then a preference towards flapping flight optimization will be expected since this is the most energetically demanding flight mode. We tested this by studying a well-known flap-gliding species, the common swift, by measuring the wakes generated by two birds, one in gliding and one in flapping flight in a wind tunnel. We calculated span efficiency, the efficiency of lift production, and found that the flapping swift had consistently higher span efficiency than the gliding swift. This supports our hypothesis and suggests that even though swifts have been shown previously to increase their lift-to-drag ratio substantially when gliding, the wing morphology is tuned to be more aerodynamically efficient in generating lift during flapping. Since body drag can be assumed to be similar for both flapping and gliding, it follows that the higher total drag in flapping flight compared with gliding flight is primarily a consequence of an increase in wing profile drag due to the flapping motion, exceeding the reduction in induced drag. PMID:24587260

  4. Model tests of gliding with different hindwing configurations in the four-winged dromaeosaurid Microraptor gui

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, David E.; Gong, Enpu; Martin, Larry D.; Burnham, David A.; Falk, Amanda R.

    2010-01-01

    Fossils of the remarkable dromaeosaurid Microraptor gui and relatives clearly show well-developed flight feathers on the hind limbs as well as the front limbs. No modern vertebrate has hind limbs functioning as independent, fully developed wings; so, lacking a living example, little agreement exists on the functional morphology or likely flight configuration of the hindwing. Using a detailed reconstruction based on the actual skeleton of one individual, cast in the round, we developed light-weight, three-dimensional physical models and performed glide tests with anatomically reasonable hindwing configurations. Models were tested with hindwings abducted and extended laterally, as well as with a previously described biplane configuration. Although the hip joint requires the hindwing to have at least 20° of negative dihedral (anhedral), all configurations were quite stable gliders. Glide angles ranged from 3° to 21° with a mean estimated equilibrium angle of 13.7°, giving a lift to drag ratio of 4.1:1 and a lift coefficient of 0.64. The abducted hindwing model’s equilibrium glide speed corresponds to a glide speed in the living animal of 10.6 m·s−1. Although the biplane model glided almost as well as the other models, it was structurally deficient and required an unlikely weight distribution (very heavy head) for stable gliding. Our model with laterally abducted hindwings represents a biologically and aerodynamically reasonable configuration for this four-winged gliding animal. M. gui’s feathered hindwings, although effective for gliding, would have seriously hampered terrestrial locomotion. PMID:20133792

  5. Seasonal variations in the Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio in the secondary microseism from colocated ring laser and seismograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro; Hadziioannou, Céline; Igel, Heiner; Wassermann, Joachim; Schreiber, Ulrich; Gebauer, André; Chow, Bryant

    2016-04-01

    Monthly variations in the ratio of Rayleigh-to-Love waves in the secondary microseism are obtained from a colocated ring laser and an STS-2 seismograph at Wettzell, Germany. Two main conclusions are derived for the Rayleigh-to-Love wave kinetic energy ratios in the secondary microseism; first, the energy ratio is in the range 0.8-0.9 (<1.0) throughout a year except for June and July. It means that Love wave energy is larger than Rayleigh wave energy most of the year by about 10-20%. Second, this ratio suddenly increases to 1.0-1.2 in June and July, indicating a larger fraction of Rayleigh wave energy. This change suggests that the locations and behaviors of excitation sources are different in these months.

  6. Seasonal variation in Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio in the secondary microseism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, T.; Hadziioannou, C.; Igel, H.; Wassermann, J. M.; Schreiber, U.; Gebauer, A.; Chow, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Ring Laser (the G-ring) at Wettzell (WET), Germany, is a rotation-measurement instrument that can monitor tiny variations in seismic noise. It essentially records only SH-type signals. Combined with a co-located seismograph (three-component seismograph STS-2), we can monitor the amount of Love waves from this instrument and that of Rayleigh waves from the STS seismograph. We report on seasonal variation of Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio in the secondary microseism. The first step in our analysis is to obtain stacked Fourier spectra that were least affected by earthquakes. We used two earthquake catalogues to do this; the GCMT (Global Centroid Moment Tensor, Earthquakes M > 5.5) catalogue and the EMSC (European-Mediterranean Seismic Centre) catalogue for regional earthquakes (distance < 1000 km) with M > 4.5. We then created monthly averages of noise Fourier spectra for the frequency range 0.13-0.30 Hz using both the G-ring and STS data from 2009 to 2015. Monthly spectra show clear seasonal variations for the secondary microseism. We obtained surface vertical acceleration from STS and surface transverse acceleration from G-ring from which we can directly measure the Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio. The procedure is the same with an account in our recent GRL paper (Tanimoto et al., 2015). Comparison between vertical acceleration and transverse acceleration shows that Rayleigh-wave surface amplitudes are about 20 percent larger than Love waves but in terms of kinetic energy this ratio will be different. We converted these ratios of surface amplitude to those of kinetic energy using an available earth model (Fichtner et al., 2013). The averaged ratio over the frequency band 0.13-0.30 Hz shows is in the range 0.6-0.8 in spring, autumn and winter but it increases to about 1.2 in summer. Except for the summer, the amount of Love waves are higher but the amount of Rayleigh waves increases in summer and appears to exceed that of Love waves.

  7. Sustainable design of high-performance microsized microbial fuel cell with carbon nanotube anode and air cathode.

    PubMed

    Mink, Justine E; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2013-08-27

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising alternative energy source that both generates electricity and cleans water. Fueled by liquid wastes such as wastewater or industrial wastes, the microbial fuel cell converts waste into energy. Microsized MFCs are essentially miniature energy harvesters that can be used to power on-chip electronics, lab-on-a-chip devices, and/or sensors. As MFCs are a relatively new technology, microsized MFCs are also an important rapid testing platform for the comparison and introduction of new conditions or materials into macroscale MFCs, especially nanoscale materials that have high potential for enhanced power production. Here we report a 75 μL microsized MFC on silicon using CMOS-compatible processes and employ a novel nanomaterial with exceptional electrochemical properties, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), as the on-chip anode. We used this device to compare the usage of the more commonly used but highly expensive anode material gold, as well as a more inexpensive substitute, nickel. This is the first anode material study done using the most sustainably designed microsized MFC to date, which utilizes ambient oxygen as the electron acceptor with an air cathode instead of the chemical ferricyanide and without a membrane. Ferricyanide is unsustainable, as the chemical must be continuously refilled, while using oxygen, naturally found in air, makes the device mobile and is a key step in commercializing this for portable technology such as lab-on-a-chip for point-of-care diagnostics. At 880 mA/m(2) and 19 mW/m(2) the MWCNT anode outperformed the others in both current and power densities with between 6 and 20 times better performance. All devices were run for over 15 days, indicating a stable and high-endurance energy harvester already capable of producing enough power for ultra-low-power electronics and able to consistently power them over time. PMID:23899322

  8. Strongly gliding harmonic tremor during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hotovec, Alicia J.; Prejean, Stephanie G.; Vidale, John E.; Gomberg, Joan S.

    2013-01-01

    During the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, gliding harmonic tremor occurred prominently before six nearly consecutive explosions during the second half of the eruptive sequence. The fundamental frequency repeatedly glided upward from < 1 Hz to as high as 30 Hz in less than 10 min, followed by a relative seismic quiescence of 10 to 60 s immediately prior to explosion. High frequency (5 to 20 Hz) gliding returned during the extrusive phase, and lasted for 20 min to 3 h at a time. Although harmonic tremor is not uncommon at volcanoes, tremor at such high frequencies is a rare observation. These frequencies approach or exceed the plausible upper limits of many models that have been suggested for volcanic tremor. We also analyzed the behavior of a swarm of repeating earthquakes that immediately preceded the first instance of pre-explosion gliding harmonic tremor. We find that these earthquakes share several traits with upward gliding harmonic tremor, and favor the explanation that the gliding harmonic tremor at Redoubt Volcano is created by the superposition of increasingly frequent and regular, repeating stick–slip earthquakes through the Dirac comb effect.

  9. Harmonic Tremor and Gliding: Acoustic Chug Swarms at Tungurahua, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. M.; Ruiz, M. C.

    2010-12-01

    On May 28, 2010, a new eruptive episode started at Tungurahua volcano with a mid-size volcanic explosion, followed by a sustained ash emission with high ash column (10 km high), pyroclastic flows running down western and southern flanks and seismic and infrasonic tremor. After a quiescence period of 5 hours, Tungurahua Volcano in Ecuador experienced a major swarm of volcanic explosions including hundreds of events recorded up to June 18, 2010 on seismic and acoustic instrumentation in the vicinity of the active vent. Explosions exhibited extremely high excess pressures in the infrasonic band as well as in the audio band. Thirteen events produced pressures larger than 160 dB at 1 km distance from the vent. Among the diverse signals recorded during the week long episode of explosive activity, numerous sequences of harmonic tremor show significant patterns of modulation, or frequency gliding. Some harmonic tremor extended for as long as 30 minutes, often with as many as 10 different regimes of distinct behavior in one sequence of explosions. We applied automated search ridge identification using Gabor and Wavelet transforms in conjunction with time-domain analyses to derive high precision estimates of time varying periodicities. One pattern observed was a rise in dominant frequency as the tremor amplitude diminished prior to the onset of a second sequence of nearly monotonic pulsations. We speculate that these relate to conduit piston effects when the loss of gas pressure below a debris plug vibrates at shorter periods as the amplitude of the plug motion weakens.

  10. Loop formation of microtubules during gliding at high density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lynn; Tüzel, Erkan; Ross, Jennifer L.

    2011-09-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton, including the associated proteins, forms a complex network essential to multiple cellular processes. Microtubule-associated motor proteins, such as kinesin-1, travel on microtubules to transport membrane bound vesicles across the crowded cell. Other motors, such as cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin-5, are used to organize the cytoskeleton during mitosis. In order to understand the self-organization processes of motors on microtubules, we performed filament-gliding assays with kinesin-1 motors bound to the cover glass with a high density of microtubules on the surface. To observe microtubule organization, 3% of the microtubules were fluorescently labeled to serve as tracers. We find that microtubules in these assays are not confined to two dimensions and can cross one other. This causes microtubules to align locally with a relatively short correlation length. At high density, this local alignment is enough to create 'intersections' of perpendicularly oriented groups of microtubules. These intersections create vortices that cause microtubules to form loops. We characterize the radius of curvature and time duration of the loops. These different behaviors give insight into how crowded conditions, such as those in the cell, might affect motor behavior and cytoskeleton organization.

  11. Take-off and landing kinetics of a free-ranging gliding mammal, the Malayan colugo (Galeopterus variegatus)

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Greg; Lim, Norman T.-L; Spence, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    Arboreal animals negotiate a highly three-dimensional world that is discontinuous on many spatial scales. As the scale of substrate discontinuity increases, many arboreal animals rely on leaping or gliding locomotion between distant supports. In order to successfully move through their habitat, gliding animals must actively modulate both propulsive and aerodynamic forces. Here we examined the take-off and landing kinetics of a free-ranging gliding mammal, the Malayan colugo (Galeopterus variegatus) using a custom-designed three-dimensional accelerometry system. We found that colugos increase the propulsive impulse to affect longer glides. However, we also found that landing forces are negatively associated with glide distance. Landing forces decrease rapidly as glide distance increases from the shortest glides, then level off, suggesting that the ability to reorient the aerodynamic forces prior to landing is an important mechanism to reduce velocity and thus landing forces. This ability to substantially alter the aerodynamic forces acting on the patagial wing in order to reorient the body is a key to the transition between leaping and gliding and allows gliding mammals to travel long distances between trees with reduced risk of injury. Longer glides may increase the access to distributed resources and reduce the exposure to predators in the canopy or on the forest floor. PMID:18252673

  12. Flight Modes in Migrating European Bee-Eaters: Heart Rate May Indicate Low Metabolic Rate during Soaring and Gliding

    PubMed Central

    Sapir, Nir; Wikelski, Martin; McCue, Marshall D.; Pinshow, Berry; Nathan, Ran

    2010-01-01

    Background Many avian species soar and glide over land. Evidence from large birds (mb>0.9 kg) suggests that soaring-gliding is considerably cheaper in terms of energy than flapping flight, and costs about two to three times the basal metabolic rate (BMR). Yet, soaring-gliding is considered unfavorable for small birds because migration speed in small birds during soaring-gliding is believed to be lower than that of flapping flight. Nevertheless, several small bird species routinely soar and glide. Methodology/Principal Findings To estimate the energetic cost of soaring-gliding flight in small birds, we measured heart beat frequencies of free-ranging migrating European bee-eaters (Merops apiaster, mb∼55 g) using radio telemetry, and established the relationship between heart beat frequency and metabolic rate (by indirect calorimetry) in the laboratory. Heart beat frequency during sustained soaring-gliding was 2.2 to 2.5 times lower than during flapping flight, but similar to, and not significantly different from, that measured in resting birds. We estimated that soaring-gliding metabolic rate of European bee-eaters is about twice their basal metabolic rate (BMR), which is similar to the value estimated in the black-browed albatross Thalassarche (previously Diomedea) melanophrys, mb∼4 kg). We found that soaring-gliding migration speed is not significantly different from flapping migration speed. Conclusions/Significance We found no evidence that soaring-gliding speed is slower than flapping flight in bee-eaters, contradicting earlier estimates that implied a migration speed penalty for using soaring-gliding rather than flapping flight. Moreover, we suggest that small birds soar and glide during migration, breeding, dispersal, and other stages in their annual cycle because it may entail a low energy cost of transport. We propose that the energy cost of soaring-gliding may be proportional to BMR regardless of bird size, as theoretically deduced by earlier studies

  13. Deconvolution enhanced direction of arrival estimation using 1- and 3-component seismic arrays applied to ocean induced microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, M.; Reading, A. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, R.; Gibbons, S. J.

    2016-04-01

    Microseisms in the period of 2 - 10 seconds are generated in deep oceans and near coastal regions. It is common for microseisms from multiple sources to arrive at the same time at a given seismometer. It is therefore desirable to be able to measure multiple slowness vectors accurately. Popular ways to estimate the direction of arrival of ocean induced microseisms are the conventional (fk) or adaptive (Capon) beamformer. These techniques give robust estimates, but are limited in their resolution capabilities and hence do not always detect all arrivals. One of the limiting factors in determining direction of arrival with seismic arrays is the array response, which can strongly influence the estimation of weaker sources. In this work, we aim to improve the resolution for weaker sources and evaluate the performance of two deconvolution algorithms, Richardson-Lucy deconvolution and a new implementation of CLEAN-PSF. The algorithms are tested with 3 arrays of different aperture (ASAR, WRA and NORSAR) using 1 month of real data each and compared with the conventional approaches. We find an improvement over conventional methods from both algorithms and the best performance with CLEAN-PSF. We then extend the CLEAN-PSF framework to 3 components and evaluate 1 year of data from the Pilbara Seismic Array (PSAR) in north-west Australia. The 3 component CLEAN-PSF analysis is capable in resolving a previously undetected Sn phase.

  14. Applicability of an empirical law to predict significant sea-wave heights from microseisms along the Western Ligurian Coast (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, Gabriele; Scafidi, Davide; Cutroneo, Laura; Gallino, Stefano; Capello, Marco

    2016-07-01

    The use of microseisms with appropriate predictive laws is a reliable method for estimating such sea-wave parameters as period and significant height. Through the use of opportune predictive laws calibrated with measurements obtained from wave buoys, it is possible to determine the significant height of the wave as a function of the spectral energy-content of the microseism. In this paper we will present a procedure that utilises microseisms recorded by a micro network of five seismic stations to predict the significant height of waves, and its uncertainty, along the western Ligurian coast (Italy). The calibration and validation of the procedure was performed using wave measurements obtained from a wave buoy off Capo Mele (Imperia, Italy) over a two and a half year period. The differences between the significant heights measured by the wave buoy and the empirical predictions were less than 10 cm (corresponding to 10% of the mean measured value) for 47% of the data and less than 20 cm (corresponding to 20% of the mean measured value) for 72%.

  15. Estimate of Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio in the secondary microseism by colocated ring laser and seismograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro; Hadziioannou, Céline; Igel, Heiner; Wasserman, Joachim; Schreiber, Ulrich; Gebauer, André

    2015-04-01

    Using a colocated ring laser and an STS-2 seismograph, we estimate the ratio of Rayleigh-to-Love waves in the secondary microseism at Wettzell, Germany, for frequencies between 0.13 and 0.30 Hz. Rayleigh wave surface acceleration was derived from the vertical component of STS-2, and Love wave surface acceleration was derived from the ring laser. Surface wave amplitudes are comparable; near the spectral peak about 0.22 Hz, Rayleigh wave amplitudes are about 20% higher than Love wave amplitudes, but outside this range, Love wave amplitudes become higher. In terms of the kinetic energy, Rayleigh wave energy is about 20-35% smaller on average than Love wave energy. The observed secondary microseism at Wettzell thus consists of comparable Rayleigh and Love waves but contributions from Love waves are larger. This is surprising as the only known excitation mechanism for the secondary microseism, described by Longuet-Higgins (1950), is equivalent to a vertical force and should mostly excite Rayleigh waves.

  16. Deconvolution enhanced direction of arrival estimation using one- and three-component seismic arrays applied to ocean induced microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, M.; Reading, A. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, R.; Gibbons, S. J.

    2016-07-01

    Microseisms in the period of 2-10 s are generated in deep oceans and near coastal regions. It is common for microseisms from multiple sources to arrive at the same time at a given seismometer. It is therefore desirable to be able to measure multiple slowness vectors accurately. Popular ways to estimate the direction of arrival of ocean induced microseisms are the conventional (fk) or adaptive (Capon) beamformer. These techniques give robust estimates, but are limited in their resolution capabilities and hence do not always detect all arrivals. One of the limiting factors in determining direction of arrival with seismic arrays is the array response, which can strongly influence the estimation of weaker sources. In this work, we aim to improve the resolution for weaker sources and evaluate the performance of two deconvolution algorithms, Richardson-Lucy deconvolution and a new implementation of CLEAN-PSF. The algorithms are tested with three arrays of different aperture (ASAR, WRA and NORSAR) using 1 month of real data each and compared with the conventional approaches. We find an improvement over conventional methods from both algorithms and the best performance with CLEAN-PSF. We then extend the CLEAN-PSF framework to three components (3C) and evaluate 1 yr of data from the Pilbara Seismic Array in northwest Australia. The 3C CLEAN-PSF analysis is capable in resolving a previously undetected Sn phase.

  17. Numerical study of nanosecond laser interactions with micro-sized single droplets and sprays of xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Auguste, T.; Gaufridy de Dortan, F. de; Ceccotti, T.; Hergott, J. F.; Sublemontier, O.; Descamps, D.; Schmidt, M.

    2007-02-15

    We present a thorough numerical study on interactions of a nanosecond laser with micro-sized xenon droplets. We developed a code which allows simulation of laser interactions with a single droplet as well as a spray. We give a detailed description of the code, and we present results on the dynamics of a microplasma produced by irradiation of a single xenon droplet with a laser focused at peak vacuum intensity in the 5x10{sup 10}-5x10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} range. We find that the heating of the plasma depends dramatically on the laser parameters (duration, pulse shape, and intensity) on one hand, and on the droplet diameter on the other. We also present results obtained with a spray which show that the dynamics of the microplasmas is very sensitive to the position of the droplets in the interaction volume. The predictions of our model agree well with recent experimental observations performed on laser-produced plasma sources for extreme ultraviolet lithography. In particular, the postprocessing of our data with a sophisticated atomic physics code has allowed us to reproduce quite well the spectrum emitted in the extreme ultraviolet range by a xenon plasma generated by laser irradiation of a spray of droplets.

  18. Epoxy matrix composites filled with micro-sized LD sludge: wear characterization and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, Abhilash; Satapathy, Alok

    2016-02-01

    Owing to the very high cost of conventional filler materials in polymer composites, exploring the possibility of using low cost minerals and industrial wastes for this purpose has become the need of the hour. In view of this, the present work includes the development and the wear performance evaluation of a new class of composites consisting of epoxy and microsized LD sludge. LD sludge or the Linz-Donawitz Sludge (LDS) are the fine solid particles recovered after wet cleaning of the gas emerging from LD convertors during steel making. Epoxy composites filled with different proportions (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt %) of LDS are fabricated by conventional hand lay-up technique. Dry sliding wear trials are performed on the composite specimens under different test conditions as per ASTM G 99 following a design of experiment approach based on Taguchi's orthogonal arrays. The Taguchi approach leads to the recognition of most powerful variables that predominantly control the wear rate. This parametric analysis reveals that LDS content and sliding velocity affects the specific wear rate more significantly than normal load and sliding distance. Furthermore with increase in LDS content specific wear rate of the composite decreases for a constant sliding velocity. The sliding wear behavior of these composites under an extended range of test conditions is predicted by a model based on the artificial neural network (ANN).

  19. A micro-sized bio-solar cell for self-sustaining power generation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hankeun; Choi, Seokheun

    2015-01-21

    Self-sustainable energy sources are essential for a wide array of wireless applications deployed in remote field locations. Due to their self-assembling and self-repairing properties, "biological solar (bio-solar) cells" are recently gaining attention for those applications. The bio-solar cell can continuously generate electricity from microbial photosynthetic and respiratory activities under day-night cycles. Despite the vast potential and promise of bio-solar cells, they, however, have not yet successfully been translated into commercial applications, as they possess persistent performance limitations and scale-up bottlenecks. Here, we report an entirely self-sustainable and scalable microliter-sized bio-solar cell with significant power enhancement by maximizing solar energy capture, bacterial attachment, and air bubble volume in well-controlled microchambers. The bio-solar cell has a ~300 μL single chamber defined by laser-machined poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrates and it uses an air cathode to allow freely available oxygen to act as an electron acceptor. We generated a maximum power density of 0.9 mW m(-2) through photosynthetic reactions of cyanobacteria, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which is the highest power density among all micro-sized bio-solar cells. PMID:25367739

  20. Estimates of Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio in microseisms by co-located Ring Laser and STS-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro; Hadziioannou, Céline; Igel, Heiner; Wassermann, Joachim; Schreiber, Ulrich; Gebauer, André

    2015-04-01

    In older studies of microseisms (seismic noise), it was often assumed that microseisms, especially the secondary microseisms (0.1-0.3 Hz), mainly consist of Rayleigh waves. However, it has become clear that there exists a large amount of Love-wave energy mixed in it (e.g., Nishida et al., 2008). However, its confirmation is not necessarily straightforward and often required an array of seismographs. In this study, we take advantage of two co-located instruments, a Ring Laser and an STS-2 type seismograph, at Wettzell (WET), Germany (Schreiber et al., 2009). The Ring Laser records rotation (its vertical component) and is thus only sensitive to Love waves. The vertical component of STS-2 seismograph is only sensitive to Rayleigh waves. Therefore, a combination of the two instruments provides a unique opportunity to separate Rayleigh waves and Love waves in microseisms. The question we address in this paper is the ratio of Rayleigh waves to Love waves in microseisms. For both instruments, we analyze data from 2009 to 2014. Our basic approach is to create stacked vertical acceleration spectra for Rayleigh waves from STS-2 and stacked transverse acceleration spectra for Love waves from Ring Laser. The two spectra at Earth's surface can then be compared directly by their amplitudes. The first step in our analysis is a selection of time portions (each six-hour long) that are least affected by earthquakes. We do this by examining the GCMT (Global Centroid Moment Tensor) catalogue and also checking the PSDs for various frequency ranges. The second step is to create stacked (averaged) Fourier spectra from those selected time portions. The key is to use the same time portions for the STS-2 and the Ring Laser data so that the two can be directly compared. The vertical spectra from STS-2 are converted to acceleration spectra. The Ring Laser rotation spectra are first obtained in the unit of radians/sec (rotation rate). But as the Ring Laser spectra are dominated by fundamental

  1. Effects of Glide Path on the Centering Ability and Preparation Time of Two Reciprocating Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Marcelo Santos; Fontana, Carlos Eduardo; Kato, Augusto Shoji; de Martin, Alexandre Sigrist; da Silveira Bueno, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of establishing glide path on the centering ability and preparation time of two single-file reciprocating systems in mesial root canals of mandibular molars. Methods and Materials: Sixty extracted mandibular molars with curvatures of 25-39 degrees and separate foramina for the mesiobuccal and mesiolingual canals, were divided into four groups (n=15); WaveOne+glide path; WaveOne; Reciproc+glide path and Reciproc. Non-patent canals were excluded and only one canal in each tooth was instrumented. A manual glide path was established in first and third groups with #10, 15 and 20 hand K-files. Preparation was performed with reciprocating in-and-out motion, with a 3-4 mm amplitude and slight apical pressure. Initial and final radiographs were taken to analyze the amount of dentin removed in the instrumented canals. The radiographs were superimposed with an image editing software and examined to assess discrepancies at 3-, 6- and 9-mm distances from the apex. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Preparation in groups without glide paths was swifter than the other groups (P=0.001). However, no difference was observed regarding centering ability. Conclusion: Establishing a glide path increased the total instrumentation time for preparing curved canals with WaveOne and Reciproc instruments. Glide path had no influence on the centering ability of these systems. PMID:26843875

  2. Identifying seismic noise sources and their amplitude from P wave microseisms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neale, Jennifer; Harmon, Nicholas; Srokosz, Meric

    2016-04-01

    Understanding sources of seismic noise is important for a range of applications including seismic imagery, time-lapse, and climate studies. For locating sources from seismic data, body waves offer an advantage over surface waves because they can reveal the distance to the source as well as direction. Studies have found that body waves do originate from regions predicted by models (Obrebski et al., 2013), where wave interaction intensity and site effect combine to produce the source (Ardhuin & Herbers, 2013). Here, we undertake a quantitative comparison between observed body wave microseisms and modelled sources- in terms of location, amplitude, and spectral shape- with the aim of understanding how well sources are observed and potentially what they reveal about the underlying ocean wavefield. We used seismic stations from the Southern California Seismic Network, and computed beamformer output as a function of time, frequency, slowness and azimuth. During winter months (October - mid March) the dominant arrivals at frequencies 0.18-0.22 Hz were P waves that originated from the North Pacific, whilst arrivals from the North Atlantic dominated at slightly lower frequencies of 0.16-0.18 Hz. Based on this, we chose to focus on P waves during winter, and back-projected the beamformer energy onto a global grid using P wave travel timetables (following Gerstoft et al., 2008). We modelled the seismic sources using Wavewatch III and site effect coefficients calculated following Ardhuin and Herbers (2013). We output the beamformer and the modelled sources on a 2° global grid averaged over 6 hour periods from September 2012 to September 2014, at seismic frequencies of 0.06 to 0.3 Hz. We then integrated the spectra over the full frequency range. Here we focus on results from the first winter in the North Pacific. Preliminary results indicate that the logarithm of the modelled source and the logarithm of the beamformer output are well described by a two-term exponential model

  3. Influence of a glide path on the dentinal crack formation of ProTaper Next system

    PubMed Central

    Uzunoğlu, Emel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to evaluate dentinal crack formation after root canal preparation with ProTaper Next system (PTN) with and without a glide path. Materials and Methods Forty-five mesial roots of mandibular first molars were selected. Fifteen teeth were left unprepared and served as controls. The experimental groups consist of mesiobuccal and mesiolingual root canals of remaining 30 teeth, which were divided into 2 groups (n = 15): Group PG/PTN, glide path was created with ProGlider (PG) and then canals were shaped with PTN system; Group PTN, glide path was not prepared and canals were shaped with PTN system only. All roots were sectioned perpendicular to the long axis at 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 mm from the apex, and the sections were observed under a stereomicroscope. The presence/absence of cracks was recorded. Data were analyzed with chi-square tests with Yates correction. Results There were no significant differences in crack formation between the PTN with and without glide path preparation. The incidence of cracks observed in PG/PTN and PTN groups was 17.8% and 28.9%, respectively. Conclusions The creation of a glide path with ProGlider before ProTaper Next rotary system did not influence dentinal crack formation in root canals. PMID:26587414

  4. Dislocation dynamics simulations of interactions between gliding dislocations and radiation induced prismatic loops in zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouet, Julie; Dupuy, Laurent; Onimus, Fabien; Mompiou, Frédéric; Perusin, Simon; Ambard, Antoine

    2014-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of Pressurized Water Reactor fuel cladding tubes made of zirconium alloys is strongly affected by neutron irradiation due to the high density of radiation induced dislocation loops. In order to investigate the interaction mechanisms between gliding dislocations and loops in zirconium, a new nodal dislocation dynamics code, adapted to Hexagonal Close Packed metals, has been used. Various configurations have been systematically computed considering different glide planes, basal or prismatic, and different characters, edge or screw, for gliding dislocations with -type Burgers vectors. Simulations show various interaction mechanisms such as (i) absorption of a loop on an edge dislocation leading to the formation of a double super-jog, (ii) creation of a helical turn, on a screw dislocation, that acts as a strong pinning point or (iii) sweeping of a loop by a gliding dislocation. It is shown that the clearing of loops is more favorable when the dislocation glides in the basal plane than in the prismatic plane explaining the easy dislocation channeling in the basal plane observed after neutron irradiation by transmission electron microscopy.

  5. Polycomb Controls Gliogenesis by Regulating the Transient Expression of the Gcm/Glide Fate Determinant

    PubMed Central

    Diebold, Celine; Van de Bor, Véronique; Schuettengruber, Bernd; González, Inma; Busturia, Ana; Cavalli, Giacomo; Giangrande, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The Gcm/Glide transcription factor is transiently expressed and required in the Drosophila nervous system. Threshold Gcm/Glide levels control the glial versus neuronal fate choice, and its perdurance triggers excessive gliogenesis, showing that its tight and dynamic regulation ensures the proper balance between neurons and glia. Here, we present a genetic screen for potential gcm/glide interactors and identify genes encoding chromatin factors of the Trithorax and of the Polycomb groups. These proteins maintain the heritable epigenetic state, among others, of HOX genes throughout development, but their regulatory role on transiently expressed genes remains elusive. Here we show that Polycomb negatively affects Gcm/Glide autoregulation, a positive feedback loop that allows timely accumulation of Gcm/Glide threshold levels. Such temporal fine-tuning of gene expression tightly controls gliogenesis. This work performed at the levels of individual cells reveals an undescribed mode of Polycomb action in the modulation of transiently expressed fate determinants and hence in the acquisition of specific cell identity in the nervous system. PMID:23300465

  6. Integrated Information and Prospects for Gliding Mechanism of the Pathogenic Bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Makoto; Hamaguchi, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae forms a membrane protrusion at a cell pole and is known to adhere to solid surfaces, including animal cells, and can glide on these surfaces with a speed up to 1 μm per second. Notably, gliding appears to be involved in the infectious process in addition to providing the bacteria with a means of escaping the host's immune systems. However, the genome of M. pneumoniae does not encode any of the known genes found in other bacterial motility systems or any conventional motor proteins that are responsible for eukaryotic motility. Thus, further analysis of the mechanism underlying M. pneumoniae gliding is warranted. The gliding machinery formed as the membrane protrusion can be divided into the surface and internal structures. On the surface, P1 adhesin, a 170 kDa transmembrane protein forms an adhesin complex with other two proteins. The internal structure features a terminal button, paired plates, and a bowl (wheel) complex. In total, the organelle is composed of more than 15 proteins. By integrating the currently available information by genetics, microscopy, and structural analyses, we have suggested a working model for the architecture of the organelle. Furthermore, in this article, we suggest and discuss a possible mechanism of gliding based on the structural model, in which the force generated around the bowl complex transmits through the paired plates, reaching the adhesin complex, resulting in the repeated catch of sialylated oligosaccharides on the host surface by the adhesin complex. PMID:27446003

  7. Waste generation and utilisation in micro-sized furniture-manufacturing enterprises in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Top, Y

    2015-01-01

    The number of small-scale businesses within most national economies is generally high, especially in developing countries. Often these businesses have a weak economic status and limited environmental awareness. The type and amount of waste produced, and the recycling methods adopted by these businesses during their operation can have negative effects on the environment. This study investigated the types of waste generated and the recycling methods adopted in micro-sized enterprises engaged in the manufacture of furniture. An assessment was also made of whether the characteristics of the enterprise had any effect on the waste recycling methods that were practised. A survey was conducted of 31 enterprises in the furniture industry in Gumushane province, Turkey, which is considered a developing economy. Surveys were undertaken via face-to-face interviews. It was found that medium-density fibreboard (MDF), and to a lesser extent, chipboard, were used in the manufacture of furniture, and two major types of waste in the form of fine dust and small fragments of board are generated during the cutting of these boards. Of the resulting composite board waste, 96.9% was used for heating homes and workplaces, where it was burnt under conditions of incomplete combustion. Enterprises were found to have adopted other methods to utilise their wastes in addition to using them as fuel. Such enterprises include those operating from a basement or first floor of a building in the cities, those continuing production throughout the year, those in need for capital and those enterprises not operating a dust-collection system. PMID:25453314

  8. The statistics of the time segments of low-frequency microseisms: Trends and synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubushin, A. A.

    2010-06-01

    The problem of identifying the effects of synchronization in the parameters of low-frequency microseismic noise from the data of 77 stations belonging to the F-net broadband seismograph network in Japan for the period from the beginning of 1997 through August, 2009 is considered. The vertical components measured initially with a sampling rate of one second and subsequently converted into the signals sampled at 1 minute intervals by means of averaging and decimation are used in the analysis. Six statistics are taken as the parameters: the support width of the multifractal singularity spectrum; the generalized Hurst exponent; the asymmetry coefficient of the spectrum of singularity; the logarithmic variance; the spectral exponent; and the linear predictability index. These parameters are calculated from the realizations contained within consecutive daily time intervals. When using the moving time window with a width of one year for evaluating the multiple correlation, the daily variations in the median values of the statistics of the noise measured at five spatial clusters of stations exhibit a stable increase in the synchronization not long before the Hokkaido earthquake (September 25, 2003; M = 8.3), subsequently passing to the new level of high synchronization. Based on the analysis of the trends in the index of linear predictability it turned out possible to estimate the beginning of the enhancement in the synchronization with rather high accuracy as the middle of 2002. The effect revealed for the variations in the different parameters of microseisms is an independent argument for the earlier conclusion about the synchronization in the field of the microseismic noise on the Japan Islands.

  9. Investigations of Lateral Stability of a Glide Bomb Using Automatic Control Having No Time Lag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sponder, E. W.

    1950-01-01

    The investigation of the lateral stability of an automatically controlled glide bomb led also to the attempt of clarifying the influence of a phugoid oscillation or of any general longitudinal oscillation on the lateral stability of a glide bomb. Under the assumption that its period of oscillation considerably exceeds the rolling and yawing oscillation and that c(sub a) is, at least in sections, practically constant, the result of this test is quite simple. It becomes clear that the influence of the phugoid oscillation may be replaced by suitable variation of the rolling-yawing moment on a rectilinear flight path instead of the phugoid oscillation. If the flying weight of the glide bomb of unchanged dimensions is increased, an increase of the flight velocity will be more favorable than an increase of the lift coefficient. The arrangement of the control permits lateral stability to be achieved in every case; a minimum rolling moment due to sideslip proves of great help.

  10. Reprint of “Prospects for the gliding mechanism of Mycoplasma mobile”.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Makoto; Hamaguchi, Tasuku

    2015-12-01

    Mycoplasma mobile forms gliding machinery at a cell pole and glides continuously in the direction of the cell pole at up to 4.5 μm per second on solid surfaces such as animal cells. This motility system is not related to those of any other bacteria or eukaryotes. M. mobile uses ATP energy to repeatedly catch, pull, and release sialylated oligosaccharides on host cells with its approximately 50-nm long legs. The gliding machinery is a large structure composed of huge surface proteins and internal jellyfish-like structure. This system may have developed from an accidental combination between an adhesin and a rotary ATPase, both of which are essential for the adhesive parasitic life of Mycoplasmas. PMID:26711226

  11. The collapse of stacking fault tetrahedra by interactions with gliding dislocations.

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukawa, Yoshitaka; Osetskiy, Yury N; Stocks, George Malcolm; Zinkle, Steven J

    2005-01-01

    The collapse of stacking-fault tetrahedra (SFT) by gliding dislocations was observed in in situ straining experiments in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). A stacking-fault tetrahedron was collapsed by intersection with a gliding perfect dislocation: only the base portion divided by the gliding plane of the dislocation annihilated, while the apex portion remained intact. As a result of analysis on evolution of atom configuration induced by intersection with perfect dislocation in SFT, it was found that an unusual atom configuration inevitably appeared in one of the ledges formed on stacking-fault planes, which is traditionally called I-ledge: the atoms on adjacent (111) planes were overlapping each other. The overlapping configuration provides a strong repulsive force, being a conceivable driving force to induce a chain reaction of atom displacements that collapses the SFT base portion.

  12. A quantitative evaluation of the dynamic cathodoluminescence contrast of gliding dislocations in semiconductor crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasnyov, S.; Schreiber, J.; Hoering, L.

    2004-01-01

    Dark cathodoluminescence (CL) defect contrasts observed in CL video movies taken on GaAs and ZnO samples disclose the intrinsic recombination properties of glide dislocations during their slip motion. This way, the kinematical SEM CL microscopy provides, for the first time, direct information on the possible relationship between the dynamics and electronic activity of glide dislocations as expected from structural alterations or kink processes related to defect movement. The dark CL defect contrasts observed for various dislocation types in both materials indicate defect-bound non-radiative excess carrier recombination. Quantitative CL contrast analysis is performed to discover differences in the recombination strength of distinct dislocation structures resulting from the type and dynamic state of the glide dislocations studied.

  13. Do physicochemical sediment variables and their soft sediment macrofauna differ among microsize coastal lagoons with forested and urbanised catchments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikac, K. M.; Maher, W. A.; Jones, A. R.

    2007-03-01

    Microsize intermittently open and closed coastal lagoons are a common feature of the coast of southern New South Wales, in southeast Australia. Many of these lagoons are undergoing development and urbanisation of their catchments, leading to concern about their ecological health. Consequently, it was hypothesised that lagoons with urbanised catchments should hav e finer, more contaminated sediments and fewer macrofaunal taxa (represented by opportunistic taxa) than lagoons that have undeveloped, forested catchments. To test these hypotheses, five lagoons with catchments dominated by either native forest or urban development were compared with respect to their sediment composition (i.e. sediment grain size, trace metal concentrations, organic carbon and nutrients) and soft sediment macrofaunal assemblages in the Batemans Bay region of southeast Australia. Using a nested design without temporal replication, replicate core samples were taken from sampling stations nested within lagoons that were nested within catchment type. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were used to test for significant differences and dissimilarities between catchment types and among lagoons. Of all the abiotic and biotic variables measured, only total nitrogen showed a difference between the two catchment types. Thus providing support to refute the explanatory model that urbanisation had negatively affected the sedimentary environment and macrofaunal composition of these microsize coastal lagoons. In contrast, differences among lagoons were usually significant with differences between the two forested lagoons, North Head and Acheron lagoon, being particularly large for assemblage composition and the abundance of some taxa; this variation may, potentially, obscure any effects of urbanisation. In addition, the information collected in this study provides a basic understanding of the physicochemical and biological aspects of microsize coastal lagoons in southeast Australia. Such

  14. Cruising the rain forest floor: butterfly wing shape evolution and gliding in ground effect.

    PubMed

    Cespedes, Ann; Penz, Carla M; DeVries, Philip J

    2015-05-01

    Flight is a key innovation in the evolutionary success of insects and essential to dispersal, territoriality, courtship and oviposition. Wing shape influences flight performance and selection likely acts to maximize performance for conducting essential behaviours that in turn results in the evolution of wing shape. As wing shape also contributes to fitness, optimal shapes for particular flight behaviours can be assessed with aerodynamic predictions and placed in an ecomorphological context. Butterflies in the tribe Haeterini (Nymphalidae) are conspicuous members of understorey faunas in lowland Neotropical forests. Field observations indicate that the five genera in this clade differ in flight height and behaviour: four use gliding flight at the forest floor level, and one utilizes flapping flight above the forest floor. Nonetheless, the association of ground level gliding flight behaviour and wing shape has never been investigated in this or any other butterfly group. We used landmark-based geometric morphometrics to test whether wing shapes in Haeterini and their close relatives reflected observed flight behaviours. Four genera of Haeterini and some distantly related Satyrinae showed significant correspondence between wing shape and theoretical expectations in performance trade-offs that we attribute to selection for gliding in ground effect. Forewing shape differed between sexes for all taxa, and male wing shapes were aerodynamically more efficient for gliding flight than corresponding females. This suggests selection acts differentially on male and female wing shapes, reinforcing the idea that sex-specific flight behaviours contribute to the evolution of sexual dimorphism. Our study indicates that wing shapes in Haeterini butterflies evolved in response to habitat-specific flight behaviours, namely gliding in ground effect along the forest floor, resulting in ecomorphological partitions of taxa in morphospace. The convergent flight behaviour and wing morphology

  15. Tensile response of passivated films with climb-assisted dislocation glide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayas, C.; Deshpande, V. S.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2012-09-01

    The tensile response of single crystal films passivated on two sides is analysed using climb enabled discrete dislocation plasticity. Plastic deformation is modelled through the motion of edge dislocations in an elastic solid with a lattice resistance to dislocation motion, dislocation nucleation, dislocation interaction with obstacles and dislocation annihilation incorporated through a set of constitutive rules. The dislocation motion in the films is by glide-only or by climb-assisted glide whereas in the surface passivation layers dislocation motion occurs by glide-only and penalized by a friction stress. For realistic values of the friction stress, the size dependence of the flow strength of the oxidised films was mainly a geometrical effect resulting from the fact that the ratio of the oxide layer thickness to film thickness increases with decreasing film thickness. However, if the passivation layer was modelled as impenetrable, i.e. an infinite friction stress, the plastic hardening rate of the films increases with decreasing film thickness even for geometrically self-similar specimens. This size dependence is an intrinsic material size effect that occurs because the dislocation pile-up lengths become on the order of the film thickness. Counter-intuitively, the films have a higher flow strength when dislocation motion is driven by climb-assisted glide compared to the case when dislocation motion is glide-only. This occurs because dislocation climb breaks up the dislocation pile-ups that aid dislocations to penetrate the passivation layers. The results also show that the Bauschinger effect in passivated thin films is stronger when dislocation motion is climb-assisted compared to films wherein dislocation motion is by glide-only.

  16. Aerodynamic performance due to forewing and hindwing interaction in gliding dragonfly flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Lu, Xi-Yun

    2009-07-01

    Aerodynamic performance due to forewing and hindwing interaction in gliding dragonfly flight has been studied using a multiblock lattice Boltzmann method. We find that the interactions between forewing and hindwing effectively enhance the total lift force and reduce the drag force on the wings compared to two independent wings. The interaction mechanism may be associated with the triangular camber effect by modulating the relative arrangement of the forewing and hindwing. The results obtained in this Brief Report provide physical insight into the understanding of aerodynamic behaviors for gliding dragonfly flight.

  17. The Role of Incision and Sedimentation in Continental Gravity Gliding - Insight from Numerical Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riad, H.; Messager, G.; Nivihre, B.

    2010-12-01

    Large scale gravity gliding are usually observed in deltas and passive margins. They imply the rigid translation of a body down a slope, with coeval upslope extension and downslope contraction. Displacement vectors are parallel to a buried detachment plane gently dipping basinward (1-5°). Field examples suggest that gravity gliding could be found in continental domains but contrary to oceanic environments, upslope sedimentation and pore fluid overpressure do not play a major role. These lacks must be compensated. This study investigates mechanisms generating gravity gliding in a continental domains through the use of a two-dimensional (2D) finite-element model and a 2D analytical failure analysis. We focus on the role of tectonic uplifts and the subsequent fluvial incision and sedimentation at the toes of the slopes. The geometries of the numerical models are based on a field example in the Andean foothills of Argentina. Gravity gliding occurs along the long limb of an asymmetric crustal-scale anticline, above a 1000 m depth salt layers. The numerical models simulate the deformations and estimate quantitatively the circumstances under which failure at the head and toe of the frictional-plastic sedimentary cover initiates. Analytical solutions give simplified approximation of the numerical results taking into account many configurations with various values of the incision, sedimentation, internal friction angle and thickness of the décollement layer. The principal effect of the incision and sedimentation is to reduce and strengthen the downslope resistance to the contractional failure. Consequently, the magnitude of the critical slope for which the gravity gliding initiates, is reduced by the incision and is increased by the sedimentation. Results show that large-scale gravity gliding can be found in continental domains as a consequence of tectonic uplifts and where overburden thickness is lower than 2000 m. Incision facilitates and localizes the gliding

  18. Gliding Text: A New Aid to Improve the Reading Performance of Poor Readers by Subconscious Gaze Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krischer, C. C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    People with reading difficulties experience automatic gaze guidance when using gliding text (subtitles). Reading exercises with gliding text eliminated reading difficulties for 21 second graders in 24 15-minute sessions. Mean reading speed increased from 10 to 24 words per minute. (SK)

  19. Toxicity of nano- and micro-sized silver particles in human hepatocyte cell line L02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengpeng; Guan, Rongfa; Ye, Xingqian; Jiang, Jiaxin; Liu, Mingqi; Huang, Guangrong; Chen, Xiaoting

    2011-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) previously classified as antimicrobial agents have been widely used in consumers and industrial products, especially food storage material. Ag NPs used as antimicrobial agents may be found in liver. Thus, examination of the ability of Ag NPs to penetrate the liver is warranted. The aim of the study was to determine the optimal viability assay for using with Ag NPs in order to assess their toxicity to liver cells. For toxicity evaluations, cellular morphology, mitochondrial function (3-(4, 5-dimethylazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide, MTT assay), membrane leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH release assay), Oxidative stress markers (malonaldehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)), DNA damage (single cell gel eletrophoresis, SCGE assay), and protein damage were assessed under control and exposed conditions (24 h of exposure). The results showed that mitochondrial function decreased significantly in cells exposed to Ag NPs at 25 μg·mL-1. LDH leakage significantly increased in cells exposed to Ag NPs (>= 25 μg mL-1) while micro-sized silver particles tested displayed LDH leakage only at higher doses (100 μg·mL-1). The microscopic studies demonstrated that nanoparticle-exposed cells at higher doses became abnormal in size, displaying cellular shrinkage, and an acquisition of an irregular shape. Due to toxicity of silver, further study conducted with reference to its oxidative stress. The results exhibited significant depletion of GSH level, increase in SOD levels and lead to lipid peroxidation, which suggested that cytotoxicity of Ag NPs in liver cells might be mediated through oxidative stress. The results demonstrates that Ag NPs lead to cellular morphological modifications, LDH leakage, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cause increased generation of ROS, depletion of GSH, lipid peroxidation, oxidative DNA damage and protein damage. Though the exact mechanism behind Ag NPs

  20. An In Vitro Comparison of Root Canal Transportation by Reciproc File With and Without Glide Path

    PubMed Central

    Nazarimoghadam, Kiumars; Daryaeian, Mohammad; Ramazani, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of ideal canal preparation is to prevent iatrogenic aberrations such as transportation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the root canal transportation by Reciproc file with and without glide path. Materials and Methods: Thirty acrylic-resin blocks with a curvature of 60° and size#10 (2% taper) were assigned into two groups (n= 15). In group 1, the glide path was performed using stainless steel k-files size#10 and 15 at working length In group 2, canals were prepared with Reciproc file system at working length. By using digital imaging software (AutoCAD 2008), the pre-instrumentation and post-instrumentation digital images were superimposed over, taking the landmarks as reference points. Then the radius of the internal and external curve of the specimens was calculated at three α, β and γ points (1mm to apex as α, 3mm to apex as β, and 5mm to apex as γ). The data were statically analyzed using the independent T-test and Mann-Whitney U test by SPSS version 16. Results: Glide path was found significant for only external curve in the apical third of the canal; that is, 5mm to apex (P=0.005). But in the other third, canal modification was not significant (P> 0.008). Conclusion: Canal transportation in the apical third of the canal seems to be significantly reduced when glide path is performed using reciprocating files. PMID:25628682

  1. Evaluation of the GlideScope Direct: A New Video Laryngoscope for Teaching Direct Laryngoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Viernes, Darwin; Goldman, Allan J.; Galgon, Richard E.; Joffe, Aaron M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Teaching direct laryngoscopy is limited by the inability of the instructor to simultaneously view the airway with the laryngoscopist. Our primary aim is to report our initial use of the GlideScope Direct, a video-enabled, Macintosh laryngoscope intended primarily as a training tool in direct laryngoscopy. Methods. The GlideScope Direct was made available to anyone who planned on performing direct laryngoscopy as the primary technique for intubation. Novices were those who had performed <30 intubations. Results. The GlideScope Direct was used 123 times as primarily a direct laryngoscope while the instructor viewed the intubation on the monitor. It was highly successful as a direct laryngoscope (93% success). Salvage by indirect laryngoscopy occurred in 7/9 remaining patients without changing equipment. Novices performed 28 intubations (overall success rate of 79%). In 6 patients, the instructor took over and successfully intubated the patient. Instructors used the video images to guide the operator in 16 (57%) of those patients. Seven different instructors supervised the 28 novices, all of who subjectively felt advantaged by having the laryngoscopic view available. Conclusions. The GlideScope Direct functions similarly to a Macintosh laryngoscope and provides the instructor subjective reassurance, while providing the ability to guide the trainee laryngoscopist. PMID:22778728

  2. Use of glide-ins in CMS for production and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hahn, K.; Holzman, B.; Padhi, S.; Pi, H.; Spiga, D.; Sfiligoi, I.; Vaandering, E.; Würthwein, F.; CMS Offline Computing Projects

    2010-04-01

    With the evolution of various grid federations, the Condor glide-ins represent a key feature in providing a homogeneous pool of resources using late-binding technology. The CMS collaboration uses the glide-in based Workload Management System, glideinWMS, for production (ProdAgent) and distributed analysis (CRAB) of the data. The Condor glide-in daemons traverse to the worker nodes, submitted via Condor-G. Once activated, they preserve the Master-Worker relationships, with the worker first validating the execution environment on the worker node before pulling the jobs sequentially until the expiry of their lifetimes. The combination of late-binding and validation significantly reduces the overall failure rate visible to CMS physicists. We discuss the extensive use of the glideinWMS since the computing challenge, CCRC-08, in order to prepare for the forthcoming LHC data-taking period. The key features essential to the success of large-scale production and analysis on CMS resources across major grid federations, including EGEE, OSG and NorduGrid are outlined. Use of glide-ins via the CRAB server mechanism and ProdAgent, as well as first hand experience of using the next generation CREAM computing element within the CMS framework is discussed.

  3. Flavobacterium columnare type IX secretion system mutations result in defects in gliding motility and virulence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The gliding bacterium Flavobacterium columnare causes columnaris disease in wild and aquaculture-reared freshwater fish. The mechanisms responsible for columnaris disease are not known. The related bacterium Flavobacterium johnsoniae uses a type IX secretion system (T9SS) to secrete enzy...

  4. Use of glide-ins in CMS for production and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hahn, K.; Holzman, B.; Padhi, S.; Pi, H.; Spiga, D.; Sfiligoi, I.; Vaandering, E.; Wurthwein, F.; /UC, San Diego

    2010-01-01

    With the evolution of various grid federations, the Condor glide-ins represent a key feature in providing a homogeneous pool of resources using late-binding technology. The CMS collaboration uses the glide-in based Workload Management System, glideinWMS, for production (ProdAgent) and distributed analysis (CRAB) of the data. The Condor glide-in daemons traverse to the worker nodes, submitted via Condor-G. Once activated, they preserve the Master-Worker relationships, with the worker first validating the execution environment on the worker node before pulling the jobs sequentially until the expiry of their lifetimes. The combination of late-binding and validation significantly reduces the overall failure rate visible to CMS physicists. We discuss the extensive use of the glideinWMS since the computing challenge, CCRC-08, in order to prepare for the forthcoming LHC data-taking period. The key features essential to the success of large-scale production and analysis on CMS resources across major grid federations, including EGEE, OSG and NorduGrid are outlined. Use of glide-ins via the CRAB server mechanism and ProdAgent, as well as first hand experience of using the next generation CREAM computing element within the CMS framework is discussed.

  5. Directed Binding of Gliding Bacterium, Mycoplasma mobile, Shown by Detachment Force and Bond Lifetime

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Akihiro; Nakane, Daisuke; Mizutani, Masaki; Nishizaka, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycoplasma mobile, a fish-pathogenic bacterium, features a protrusion that enables it to glide smoothly on solid surfaces at a velocity of up to 4.5 µm s−1 in the direction of the protrusion. M. mobile glides by a repeated catch-pull-release of sialylated oligosaccharides fixed on a solid surface by hundreds of 50-nm flexible “legs” sticking out from the protrusion. This gliding mechanism may be explained by a possible directed binding of each leg with sialylated oligosaccharides, by which the leg can be detached more easily forward than backward. In the present study, we used a polystyrene bead held by optical tweezers to detach a starved cell at rest from a glass surface coated with sialylated oligosaccharides and concluded that the detachment force forward is 1.6- to 1.8-fold less than that backward, which may be linked to a catch bond-like behavior of the cell. These results suggest that this directed binding has a critical role in the gliding mechanism. PMID:27353751

  6. Differences in torsional performance of single- and multiple-instrument rotary systems for glide path preparation.

    PubMed

    Arias, Ana; Singh, Rupinderpal; Peters, Ove A

    2016-05-01

    A new rotary instrument has been developed to simplify the glide path preparation in root canals before shaping procedures. The purpose of this study was to compare the peak torque and force induced by nickel-titanium PathFile multiple-instrument system and the recently developed M-Wire ProGlider single instrument during glide path preparation of mesial root canals in extracted mandibular molars. Each independent canal of eight mesial roots of mandibular molars was randomly assigned to achieve a reproducible glide path with a new set of either PathFile #1 and #2 or ProGlider after negotiation with a 10 K-file. Tests were run in a standardized fashion using a torque-testing platform. Peak torque (N cm) and force (N) were registered and analysis of variance and Tukey post-hoc tests were applied. Preliminary data for stationary torque at failure were also obtained and compared with peak torque for each instrument. PathFile #1 and #2 instruments showed statistically lower peak torque (p = 0.001) and peak force (p = 0.008) than ProGlider. Torque at failure according to ADA No. 28/ISO 36030-1 was not significantly different from peak torque during glide path preparation for ProGlider instruments while it was significantly higher for PathFile #1 and #2 (p < 0.001). Under the conditions of this study, PathFile instruments developed significant lower peak torque and force during glide path preparation compared to ProGlider, which is possibly subjected to a greater contact with the canal walls due to the increase in its flute diameter at middle and coronal levels. PMID:25701538

  7. The Effect of Depth on Drag During the Streamlined Glide: A Three-Dimensional CFD Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Novais, Maria L.; Silva, António J.; Mantha, Vishveshwar R.; Ramos, Rui J.; Rouboa, Abel I.; Vilas-Boas, J. Paulo; Luís, Sérgio R.; Marinho, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of depth on drag during the streamlined glide in swimming using Computational Fluid Dynamics. The Computation Fluid Dynamic analysis consisted of using a three-dimensional mesh of cells that simulates the flow around the considered domain. We used the K-epsilon turbulent model implemented in the commercial code Fluent® and applied it to the flow around a three-dimensional model of an Olympic swimmer. The swimmer was modeled as if he were gliding underwater in a streamlined prone position, with hands overlapping, head between the extended arms, feet together and plantar flexed. Steady-state computational fluid dynamics analyses were performed using the Fluent® code and the drag coefficient and the drag force was calculated for velocities ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 m/s, in increments of 0.50m/s, which represents the velocity range used by club to elite level swimmers during the push-off and glide following a turn. The swimmer model middle line was placed at different water depths between 0 and 1.0 m underwater, in 0.25m increments. Hydrodynamic drag decreased with depth, although after 0.75m values remained almost constant. Water depth seems to have a positive effect on reducing hydrodynamic drag during the gliding. Although increasing depth position could contribute to decrease hydrodynamic drag, this reduction seems to be lower with depth, especially after 0.75 m depth, thus suggesting that possibly performing the underwater gliding more than 0.75 m depth could not be to the benefit of the swimmer. PMID:23487502

  8. Gliding characteristics of flexor tendon and tenosynovium in carpal tunnel syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ettema, Anke M; Zhao, Chunfeng; Amadio, Peter C; O'Byrne, Megan M; An, Kai-Nan

    2007-04-01

    The characteristic pathological finding in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is noninflammatory fibrosis of the synovium. How this fibrosis might affect tendon function, if at all, is unknown. The subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) lies between the flexor tendons and the visceral synovium (VS) of the ulnar tenosynovial bursa. Fibrosis of the SSCT may well affect its gliding characteristics. To investigate this possibility, the relative motion of the flexor tendon and VS was observed during finger flexion in patients undergoing carpal tunnel surgery, and for comparison in hands without CTS, in an in vitro cadaver model. We used a camera to document the gliding motion of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS III) tendon and SSCT in three patients with CTS during carpal tunnel release and compared this with simulated active flexion in three cadavers with no antemortem history of CTS. The data were digitized with the use of Analyze Software (Biomedical Imaging Resource, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN). In the CTS patients, the SSCT moved en bloc with the tendon, whereas, in the controls the SSCT moved smoothly and separately from the tendon. The ratio of VS to tendon motion was higher for the patients than in the cadaver controls. These findings suggest that in patients with CTS the synovial fibrosis has altered the gliding characteristics of the SSCT. The alterations in the gliding characteristics of the SSCT may affect the ability of the tendons in the carpal tunnel to glide independently from each other, or from the nearby median nerve. These abnormal tendon mechanics may play a role in the etiology of CTS. PMID:16944527

  9. Ancient phylogenetic divergence of the enigmatic African rodent Zenkerella and the origin of anomalurid gliding

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, David; Sallam, Hesham M.; Cronin, Drew T.; Esara Echube, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The “scaly-tailed squirrels” of the rodent family Anomaluridae have a long evolutionary history in Africa, and are now represented by two gliding genera (Anomalurus and Idiurus) and a rare and obscure genus (Zenkerella) that has never been observed alive by mammalogists. Zenkerella shows no anatomical adaptations for gliding, but has traditionally been grouped with the glider Idiurus on the basis of craniodental similarities, implying that either the Zenkerella lineage lost its gliding adaptations, or that Anomalurus and Idiurus evolved theirs independently. Here we present the first nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences of Zenkerella, based on recently recovered whole-body specimens from Bioko Island (Equatorial Guinea), which show unambiguously that Zenkerella is the sister taxon of Anomalurus and Idiurus. These data indicate that gliding likely evolved only once within Anomaluridae, and that there were no subsequent evolutionary reversals. We combine this new molecular evidence with morphological data from living and extinct anomaluromorph rodents and estimate that the lineage leading to Zenkerella has been evolving independently in Africa since the early Eocene, approximately 49 million years ago. Recently discovered fossils further attest to the antiquity of the lineage leading to Zenkerella, which can now be recognized as a classic example of a “living fossil,” about which we know remarkably little. The osteological markers of gliding are estimated to have evolved along the stem lineage of the Anomalurus–Idiurus clade by the early Oligocene, potentially indicating that this adaptation evolved in response to climatic perturbations at the Eocene–Oligocene boundary (∼34 million years ago). PMID:27602286

  10. The Effect of Depth on Drag During the Streamlined Glide: A Three-Dimensional CFD Analysis.

    PubMed

    Novais, Maria L; Silva, António J; Mantha, Vishveshwar R; Ramos, Rui J; Rouboa, Abel I; Vilas-Boas, J Paulo; Luís, Sérgio R; Marinho, Daniel A

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of depth on drag during the streamlined glide in swimming using Computational Fluid Dynamics. The Computation Fluid Dynamic analysis consisted of using a three-dimensional mesh of cells that simulates the flow around the considered domain. We used the K-epsilon turbulent model implemented in the commercial code Fluent(®) and applied it to the flow around a three-dimensional model of an Olympic swimmer. The swimmer was modeled as if he were gliding underwater in a streamlined prone position, with hands overlapping, head between the extended arms, feet together and plantar flexed. Steady-state computational fluid dynamics analyses were performed using the Fluent(®) code and the drag coefficient and the drag force was calculated for velocities ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 m/s, in increments of 0.50m/s, which represents the velocity range used by club to elite level swimmers during the push-off and glide following a turn. The swimmer model middle line was placed at different water depths between 0 and 1.0 m underwater, in 0.25m increments. Hydrodynamic drag decreased with depth, although after 0.75m values remained almost constant. Water depth seems to have a positive effect on reducing hydrodynamic drag during the gliding. Although increasing depth position could contribute to decrease hydrodynamic drag, this reduction seems to be lower with depth, especially after 0.75 m depth, thus suggesting that possibly performing the underwater gliding more than 0.75 m depth could not be to the benefit of the swimmer. PMID:23487502

  11. Ancient phylogenetic divergence of the enigmatic African rodent Zenkerella and the origin of anomalurid gliding.

    PubMed

    Heritage, Steven; Fernández, David; Sallam, Hesham M; Cronin, Drew T; Esara Echube, José Manuel; Seiffert, Erik R

    2016-01-01

    The "scaly-tailed squirrels" of the rodent family Anomaluridae have a long evolutionary history in Africa, and are now represented by two gliding genera (Anomalurus and Idiurus) and a rare and obscure genus (Zenkerella) that has never been observed alive by mammalogists. Zenkerella shows no anatomical adaptations for gliding, but has traditionally been grouped with the glider Idiurus on the basis of craniodental similarities, implying that either the Zenkerella lineage lost its gliding adaptations, or that Anomalurus and Idiurus evolved theirs independently. Here we present the first nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences of Zenkerella, based on recently recovered whole-body specimens from Bioko Island (Equatorial Guinea), which show unambiguously that Zenkerella is the sister taxon of Anomalurus and Idiurus. These data indicate that gliding likely evolved only once within Anomaluridae, and that there were no subsequent evolutionary reversals. We combine this new molecular evidence with morphological data from living and extinct anomaluromorph rodents and estimate that the lineage leading to Zenkerella has been evolving independently in Africa since the early Eocene, approximately 49 million years ago. Recently discovered fossils further attest to the antiquity of the lineage leading to Zenkerella, which can now be recognized as a classic example of a "living fossil," about which we know remarkably little. The osteological markers of gliding are estimated to have evolved along the stem lineage of the Anomalurus-Idiurus clade by the early Oligocene, potentially indicating that this adaptation evolved in response to climatic perturbations at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary (∼34 million years ago). PMID:27602286

  12. Involvement of the Type IX Secretion System in Capnocytophaga ochracea Gliding Motility and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Daichi; Shibata, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Yuichiro; Kokubu, Eitoyo; Nakayama, Koji; Saito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Capnocytophaga ochracea is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that demonstrates gliding motility when cultured on solid agar surfaces. C. ochracea possesses the ability to form biofilms; however, factors involved in biofilm formation by this bacterium are unclear. A type IX secretion system (T9SS) in Flavobacterium johnsoniae was shown to be involved in the transport of proteins (e.g., several adhesins) to the cell surface. Genes orthologous to those encoding T9SS proteins in F. johnsoniae have been identified in the genome of C. ochracea; therefore, the T9SS may be involved in biofilm formation by C. ochracea. Here we constructed three ortholog-deficient C. ochracea mutants lacking sprB (which encodes a gliding motility adhesin) or gldK or sprT (which encode T9SS proteins in F. johnsoniae). Gliding motility was lost in each mutant, suggesting that, in C. ochracea, the proteins encoded by sprB, gldK, and sprT are necessary for gliding motility, and SprB is transported to the cell surface by the T9SS. For the ΔgldK, ΔsprT, and ΔsprB strains, the amounts of crystal violet-associated biofilm, relative to wild-type values, were 49%, 34%, and 65%, respectively, at 48 h. Confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopy revealed that the biofilms formed by wild-type C. ochracea were denser and bacterial cells were closer together than in those formed by the mutant strains. Together, these results indicate that proteins exported by the T9SS are key elements of the gliding motility and biofilm formation of C. ochracea. PMID:26729712

  13. [Structure and solidity of new bone in a cortical gliding hole by implanted leg screw (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hutzschenreuter, P; Claes, L

    1976-07-23

    Leg screws were implanted in 30 tibia diaphysis. 112 days later in the gliding hole there was new lamellar bone round of the screw head, neck of screw and into the both first screw threads. After screw explantation we measured in 8 cases the solidity of the new bone. Under conditions of tension measurement, we use 341 N per millimeter cortical thread surfaces to put out all new bone from the gliding hole. The results of these tension measurements were cylindric fragments. The remodelling into the gliding hole seems to be the results of static stress and dynamic compensation for reaching a defect in living cortical bone. PMID:962685

  14. Aerodynamic force generation, performance and control of body orientation during gliding in sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps).

    PubMed

    Bishop, Kristin L

    2007-08-01

    Gliding has often been discussed in the literature as a possible precursor to powered flight in vertebrates, but few studies exist on the mechanics of gliding in living animals. In this study I analyzed the 3D kinematics of sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps) during short glides in an enclosed space. Short segments of the glide were captured on video, and the positions of marked anatomical landmarks were used to compute linear distances and angles, as well as whole body velocities and accelerations. From the whole body accelerations I estimated the aerodynamic forces generated by the animals. I computed the correlations between movements of the limbs and body rotations to examine the control of orientation during flight. Finally, I compared these results to those of my earlier study on the similarly sized and distantly related southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans). The sugar gliders in this study accelerated downward slightly (1.0+/-0.5 m s(-2)), and also accelerated forward (2.1+/-0.6 m s(-2)) in all but one trial, indicating that the body weight was not fully supported by aerodynamic forces and that some of the lift produced forward acceleration rather than just balancing body weight. The gliders used high angles of attack (44.15+/-3.12 degrees ), far higher than the angles at which airplane wings would stall, yet generated higher lift coefficients (1.48+/-0.18) than would be expected for a stalled wing. Movements of the limbs were strongly correlated with body rotations, suggesting that sugar gliders make extensive use of limb movements to control their orientation during gliding flight. In addition, among individuals, different limb movements were associated with a given body rotation, suggesting that individual variation exists in the control of body rotations. Under similar conditions, flying squirrels generated higher lift coefficients and lower drag coefficients than sugar gliders, yet had only marginally shallower glides. Flying squirrels have a

  15. ACS Quicklook PDF products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchkov, Anatoly

    1999-12-01

    This report details the features of the ACS quicklook PDF products produced by the HST data pipeline. The requirements closely follow the design of paper products recommended by the Data Quality Committee, with appropriate changes required to fully support ACS.

  16. Location of Body Wave Microseism Sources Using Three-Component Data From a Large Aperture Seismic Array in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, R.; Ni, S.; Wang, F.

    2015-12-01

    From September 2013 through October 2014 up to 100 Guralp CMG-3 broadband seismometers were deployed in the WT-Array (WTA) in northwest China. The aperture of WTA is about 700 km, with an average station spacing of approximately 50 km. Here, we process continuous, three-component WTA data to detect and locate body wave microseism sources in four distinct period bands: 1.0-2.5 s, 2.5-5 s, 5-10 s, and 10-20 s. We back-project vertical component data through a 1D reference Earth model (AK135) to a global grid of hypothetical source locations, assuming P-wave (30o-90o), PP-wave (60o-180o), and S-wave (30o-75o) propagation. At the same time, we rotate the horizontals and back-project the radial and transverse components of the wavefield. For each frequency band, grid point, and assumed origin time, the array power is calculated from the amplitude of a windowed, filtered, and tapered time domain beam constructed with fourth-root stacking. We find strong P-wave and S-wave noise sources in the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans. Shorter period sources (2.5-5 s) are mainly observed in the North Pacific Ocean, while both short and long period (2.5-20 s) sources are observed in the North Atlantic Ocean. Median power plots for each month during September 2013 through October 2014 show distinct seasonal variations. The energy peaks in the North Atlantic are visible from November to March and strong energy is also observed in the North Pacific from October to April. We also observe PP-waves in the Southern Ocean, especially for May-August 2014. Using classical f-k analysis and plane-wave propagation, we are able to confirm the back-projection results. To improve our understanding of body wave microseism generation, we compare the observed P, S, and PP wave microseism locations with the predictions of significant wave height and wave-wave interactions derived from the WAVEWATCH III ocean model.From September 2013 through October 2014 up to 100 Guralp CMG-3 broadband

  17. 3D microfluidic chips with integrated functional microelements fabricated by a femtosecond laser for studying the gliding mechanism of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Yasutaka; Sugioka, Koji; Shihira-Ishikawa, Ikuko; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2011-06-21

    Phormidium, a genus of filamentous cyanobacteria, forms endosymbiotic associations with seedling roots that accelerate the growth of the vegetable seedlings. Understanding the gliding mechanism of Phormidium will facilitate improved formation of this association and increased vegetable production. To observe the gliding movements, we fabricated various microfluidic chips termed nanoaquariums using a femtosecond (fs) laser. Direct fs laser writing, followed by annealing and successive wet etching in dilute hydrofluoric acid solution, can easily produce three-dimensional (3D) microfluidics with different structures embedded in a photostructurable glass. Using the fs laser, optical waveguides and filters were integrated with the microfluidic structures in the microchips, allowing the gliding mechanism to be more easily clarified. Using this apparatus, we found that CO(2) secreted from the seedling root attracts Phormidium in the presence of light, and determined the light intensity and specific wavelength necessary for gliding. PMID:21562650

  18. Interlayer-glide-driven isosymmetric phase transition in compressed In2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Feng; Liu, Cailong; Gao, Yang; Zhang, Junkai; Tan, Dayong; Han, Yonghao; Ma, Yanzhang; Shu, Jinfu; Yang, Wenge; Chen, Bin; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Gao, Chunxiao

    2014-05-01

    We report an anomalous phase transition in compressed In2Se3. The high-pressure studies indicate that In2Se3 transforms to a new isosymmetric R-3m structure at 0.8 GPa whilst the volume collapses by ˜7%. This phase transition involves a pressure-induced interlayer shear glide with respect to one another. Consequently, the outer Se atoms of one sheet locate into the interstitial sites of three Se atoms in the neighboring sheets that are weakly connected by van der Waals interaction. Interestingly, this interlayer shear glide changes the stacking sequence significantly but leaves crystal symmetry unaffected. This study provides an insight to the mechanisms of the intriguing isosymmetric phase transition.

  19. Phase field modeling of a glide dislocation transmission across a coherent sliding interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Songlin; Ni, Yong; He, Linghui

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional phase field microelasticity modeling and simulation capable of representing core structure and elastic interactions of dislocations are used to study a glide dislocation transmission across a coherent sliding interface in face-centered cubic metals. We investigate the role of the interface sliding process, which is described as the reversible motion of interface dislocation on the interfacial barrier strength to transmission. Numerical results show that a wider transient interface sliding zone develops on the interface with a lower interfacial unstable stacking fault energy to trap the glide dislocation leading to a stronger barrier to transmission. The interface sliding zone shrinks in the case of high applied stress and low mobility for the interfacial dislocation. This indicates that such interfacial barrier strength might be rate dependent. We discuss the calculated interfacial barrier strength for the Cu/Ni interface from the contribution of interface sliding comparable to previous atomistic simulations.

  20. An innovative way to reinsert dislodged Arndt blocker using urological glide wire

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Rahul; Ancheri, Sneha Ann; Dharmalingam, Sathish Kumar; Sahajanandan, Raj

    2016-01-01

    The Arndt blocker is positioned in the desired bronchus using a wire loop which couples the blocker with a fiberoptic bronchoscope (FOB). The wire loop once removed cannot be reinserted in 5F and 7F blockers making repositioning of the blocker difficult. A 34-year-old female was to undergo left thoracotomy followed by laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The left lung was isolated with a 7F Arndt bronchial blocker. During one-lung ventilation, the wire loop was removed for oxygen insufflation. There was loss of lung isolation during the procedure and dislodgement of the blocker was confirmed by FOB. The initial attempts to reintroduce the blocker into the left main bronchus failed. An alternative technique using a glide wire was attempted which resulted in successful reintroduction of the Arndt blocker. The 0.032 inch zebra glide wire may be effectively used to reposition a dislodged Arndt blocker if the wire loop has been removed. PMID:27052085

  1. Feather roughness reduces flow separation during low Reynolds number glides of swifts.

    PubMed

    van Bokhorst, Evelien; de Kat, Roeland; Elsinga, Gerrit E; Lentink, David

    2015-10-01

    Swifts are aerodynamically sophisticated birds with a small arm and large hand wing that provides them with exquisite control over their glide performance. However, their hand wings have a seemingly unsophisticated surface roughness that is poised to disturb flow. This roughness of about 2% chord length is formed by the valleys and ridges of overlapping primary feathers with thick protruding rachides, which make the wing stiffer. An earlier flow study of laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition over prepared swift wings suggested that swifts can attain laminar flow at a low angle of attack. In contrast, aerodynamic design theory suggests that airfoils must be extremely smooth to attain such laminar flow. In hummingbirds, which have similarly rough wings, flow measurements on a 3D printed model suggest that the flow separates at the leading edge and becomes turbulent well above the rachis bumps in a detached shear layer. The aerodynamic function of wing roughness in small birds is, therefore, not fully understood. Here, we performed particle image velocimetry and force measurements to compare smooth versus rough 3D-printed models of the swift hand wing. The high-resolution boundary layer measurements show that the flow over rough wings is indeed laminar at a low angle of attack and a low Reynolds number, but becomes turbulent at higher values. In contrast, the boundary layer over the smooth wing forms open laminar separation bubbles that extend beyond the trailing edge. The boundary layer dynamics of the smooth surface varies non-linearly as a function of angle of attack and Reynolds number, whereas the rough surface boasts more consistent turbulent boundary layer dynamics. Comparison of the corresponding drag values, lift values and glide ratios suggests, however, that glide performance is equivalent. The increased structural performance, boundary layer robustness and equivalent aerodynamic performance of rough wings might have provided small (proto) birds with

  2. Quadrupedal locomotor performance in two species of arboreal squirrels: predicting energy savings of gliding.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Elizabeth A; Ben-David, Merav; Smith, Winston P

    2010-10-01

    Gliding allows mammals to exploit canopy habitats of old-growth forests possibly as a means to save energy. To assess costs of quadrupedal locomotion for a gliding arboreal mammal, we used open-flow respirometry and a variable-speed treadmill to measure oxygen consumption and to calculate cost of transport, excess exercise oxygen consumption, and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption for nine northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus) and four fox squirrels (Sciurus niger). Our results indicate that oxygen consumption during exercise by flying squirrels was 1.26-1.65 times higher than predicted based on body mass, and exponentially increased with velocity (from 0.84 ± 0.03 ml O(2) kg(-1) s(-1) at 0.40 m s(-1) to 1.55 ± 0.03 ml O(2) kg(-1) s(-1) at 0.67 m s(-1)). Also, cost of transport in flying squirrels increased with velocity, although excess exercise oxygen consumption and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption did not. In contrast, oxygen consumption during exercise for fox squirrels was similar to predicted, varying from 0.51 (±0.02) ml O(2) kg(-1) s(-1) at 0.63 m s(-1) to 0.54 (±0.03) ml O(2) kg(-1) s(-1) at 1.25 m s(-1). In addition, the cost of transport for fox squirrels decreased with velocity, while excess exercise oxygen consumption and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption did not. Collectively, these observations suggest that unlike fox squirrels, flying squirrels are poorly adapted to prolonged bouts of quadrupedal locomotion. The evolution of skeletal adaptations to climbing, leaping, and landing and the development of a gliding membrane likely has increased the cost of quadrupedal locomotion by >50% while resulting in energy savings during gliding and reduction in travel time between foraging patches. PMID:20361193

  3. On the irradiation creep by climb-enabled glide of dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barashev, A. V.; Golubov, S. I.; Stoller, R. E.

    2016-08-01

    In the climb-enabled glide model of irradiation creep, the plastic deformation is defined by the elastic deflections of pinned dislocations, which is an inconsistency. We argue that this relation is incorrect; instead, as in other pinning-unpinning-type models, the dislocations move from one set of obstacles to another, so that the inter-obstacle spacing determines creep rate, whereas the dependence on the applied stress is only implicit in the unpinning time.

  4. Sandbox experiments on gravitational spreading and gliding in the presence of fluid overpressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourgues, R.; Cobbold, P. R.

    2006-05-01

    Whereas in previous analogue experiments on gravitational spreading and gliding, detachment occurred on a ductile layer, we have used a relatively new technique of injecting compressed air into sand packs so as to simulate the effects of fluid overpressures in sedimentary strata and to trigger slope instabilities. In our experiments, the governing equations yield scales for dimensions, stresses and fluid pressure. However, the more transitory phenomena of production and decrease of overpressure cannot be suitably scaled. By using layers of differing permeability, we are able to produce sharp detachments in models made of sand alone. The experiments involve gravity spreading or gravity gliding. In gravity spreading, propagation of the detachment and of extensional deformation depends on the fluid pressure. For medium values of fluid overpressure, normal faults are closely spaced, numerous and bound rotated blocks. They propagate progressively toward the back of the model. For the highest pressures, the deformation propagates very fast and faults bound non-rotated blocks, which slide on an efficient basal detachment. Fault dips are also controlled by fluid pressure and by frictional resistance at the base. To model gravitational gliding required an apparatus with a more complex system of air injection. We did a series of experiments using injection windows of various lengths and compared the results with predictions from a quasi-3D analytical model of sliding. In contrast with predictions for an infinite slope, sliding depends on (1) the fluid overpressure on the detachment, (2) the fluid overpressure in the body of the sliding sheet, and (3) the shape of the detachment surface. In particular, we show that frictional resistance at the lower edge is a primary control on the dynamics of gliding.

  5. GLIDE: a grid-based light-weight infrastructure for data-intensive environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattmann, Chris A.; Malek, Sam; Beckman, Nels; Mikic-Rakic, Marija; Medvidovic, Nenad; Chrichton, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    The promise of the grid is that it will enable public access and sharing of immense amounts of computational and data resources among dynamic coalitions of individuals and institutions. However, the current grid solutions make several limiting assumptions that curtail their widespread adoption. To address these limitations, we present GLIDE, a prototype light-weight, data-intensive middleware infrastructure that enables access to the robust data and computational power of the grid on DREAM platforms.

  6. Prosodic effects on glide-vowel sequences in three Romance languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitoran, Ioana

    2001-05-01

    Glide-vowel sequences occur in many Romance languages. In some they can vary in production, ranging from diphthongal pronunciation [ja,je] to hiatus [ia,ie]. According to native speakers' impressionistic perceptions, Spanish and Romanian both exhibit this variation, but to different degrees. Spanish favors glide-vowel sequences, while Romanian favors hiatus, occasionally resulting in different pronunciations of the same items: Spanish (b[j]ela, ind[j]ana), Romanian (b[i]ela, ind[i]ana). The third language, French, has glide-vowel sequences consistently (b[j]elle). This study tests the effect of position in the word on the acoustic duration of the sequences. Shorter duration indicates diphthong production [jV], while longer duration, hiatus [iV]. Eleven speakers (4 Spanish, 4 Romanian, 3 French), were recorded. Spanish and Romanian showed a word position effect. Word-initial sequences were significantly longer than word-medial ones (p<0.001), consistent with native speakers more frequent description of hiatus word-initially than medially. The effect was not found in French (p>0.05). In the Spanish and Romanian sentences, V in the sequence bears pitch accent, but not in French. It is therefore possible that duration is sensitive not to the presence/absence of the word boundary, but to its position relative to pitch accent. The results suggest that the word position effect is crucially enhanced by pitch accent on V.

  7. A theoretical analysis of pitch stability during gliding in flying snakes.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Farid; Ross, Shane D; Vlachos, Pavlos P; Socha, John J

    2014-06-01

    Flying snakes use their entire body as a continuously morphing 'wing' to produce lift and shallow their glide trajectory. Their dominant behavior during gliding is aerial undulation, in which lateral waves are sent posteriorly down the body. This highly dynamic behavior, which is unique among animal gliders, should have substantial effects on the flight dynamics and stability of the snakes, resulting from the continuous redistribution of mass and aerodynamic forces. In this study, we develop two-dimensional theoretical models to assess the stability characteristics of snakes in the pitch direction. Previously measured force coefficients are used to simulate aerodynamic forces acting on the models, and undulation is simulated by varying mass. Model 1 is a simple three-airfoil representation of the snake's body that possesses a passively stable equilibrium solution, whose basin of stability contains initial conditions observed in experimental gliding trajectories. Model 2 is more sophisticated, with more degrees of freedom allowing for postural changes to better represent the snake's real kinematics; in addition, a restoring moment is added to simulate potential active control. The application of static and dynamic stability criteria show that Model 2 is passively unstable, but can be stabilized with a restoring moment. Overall, these models suggest that undulation does not contribute to stability in pitch, and that flying snakes require a closed-loop control system formed around a passively stable dynamical framework. PMID:24852642

  8. Wake analysis of aerodynamic components for the glide envelope of a jackdaw (Corvus monedula).

    PubMed

    KleinHeerenbrink, Marco; Warfvinge, Kajsa; Hedenström, Anders

    2016-05-15

    Gliding flight is a relatively inexpensive mode of flight used by many larger bird species, where potential energy is used to cover the cost of aerodynamic drag. Birds have great flexibility in their flight configuration, allowing them to control their flight speed and glide angle. However, relatively little is known about how this flexibility affects aerodynamic drag. We measured the wake of a jackdaw (Corvus monedula) gliding in a wind tunnel, and computed the components of aerodynamic drag from the wake. We found that induced drag was mainly affected by wingspan, but also that the use of the tail has a negative influence on span efficiency. Contrary to previous work, we found no support for the separated primaries being used in controlling the induced drag. Profile drag was of similar magnitude to that reported in other studies, and our results suggest that profile drag is affected by variation in wing shape. For a folded tail, the body drag coefficient had a value of 0.2, rising to above 0.4 with the tail fully spread, which we conclude is due to tail profile drag. PMID:26994178

  9. Methods to Improve Success With the GlideScope Video Laryngoscope.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Darrell; Austin, Paul N; Silvestro, Loraine S

    2015-12-01

    Occasionally intubation of patients is difficult using a video laryngoscope (GlideScope, Verathon Medical) because of an inability to guide the endotracheal tube to the glottis or pass the tube into the trachea despite an adequate view of the glottis. We examined methods to improve success when this difficulty occurs. A literature search revealed 253 potential sources, with 25 meeting search criteria: 7 randomized controlled trials, 4 descriptive studies, 8 case series, and 6 case reports. Findings from the randomized controlled trials suggested that using a flexible-tipped endotracheal tube with a rigid stylet (GlideRite, Verathon Medical) improved intubation success, whereas other methods did not, such as using a forceps-guided endotracheal tube exchanger. If a malleable stylet was used, a 90 degrees bend above the endotracheal tube cuff was preferable to a 60 degrees bend. Evidence from lower-level sources suggested that several interventions were helpful, including using a controllable stylet, a fiberoptic bronchoscope in conjunction with the GlideScope, or an intubation guide, and twisting the endotracheal tube to facilitate passage into the trachea. Providers must consider the risks and benefits of any technique, particularly if the device manufacturer does not recommend the technique. Further rigorous investigations should be conducted examining methods to increase success. PMID:26742332

  10. Effects of cervical sustained natural apophyseal glide on forward head posture and respiratory function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se-Yoon; Kim, Nan-Soo; Kim, Laurentius Jongsoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To determine the effects of cervical sustained natural apophyseal glide on forward head posture and respiratory function. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty male and female adults in their 20s with forward head posture were included in the study. The subjects were divided randomly into experimental and control groups (n=15 each). Subjects in the experimental group performed cervical sustained natural apophyseal glide three times/week for four weeks while subjects in the control group did not perform the intervention. The craniovertebral angle, forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second, as well as the % predicted value of each measurement were assessed to determine the changes in respiration functions before and after the exercise. [Results] The craniovertebral angle four weeks after the experiment was increased in the experimental group, whereas the control group showed no significant difference compared to baseline. The forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and the % predicted values thereof were significantly increased in the experimental group four weeks after the experiment, but not in the control group. [Conclusion] Cervical sustained natural apophyseal glide was determined to be effective in improving neck posture and respiratory functions for patients with forward head posture. PMID:26180334

  11. Postoperative Sore Throat After Laryngoscopy With Macintosh or Glide Scope Video Laryngoscope Blade in Normal Airway Patients

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Atabak; Imani, Farsad; Makarem, Jalil; Khajavi, Mohammad Reza; Etezadi, Farhad; Habibi, Shirin; Shariat Moharari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Glide Scope videolaryngoscope provides a suitable view for intubation, with less force required. Objectives: The present study was conducted, to compare postoperative sore throat and hoarseness after laryngoscopy and intubation, by Macintosh blade or Glide Scope video laryngoscope in normal airway patients. Patients and Methods: Three hundred patients were randomly allocated into two groups of 150: Macintosh blade laryngoscope or Glide Scope video laryngoscope. The patients were evaluated for 48 hours for sore throat and hoarseness by an interview. Results: The incidence and severity of sore throat in the Glide Scope group, at 6, 24 and 48 hours after the operation, were significantly lower than in the Macintosh laryngoscope group. In addition, the incidence of hoarseness in the Glide Scope group, at 6 and 24 hours after the operation, were significantly lower than in the Macintosh laryngoscope group. The incidence and severity of sore throat in men, at 6 and 24 hours after the operation, were significantly lower than in the women. Conclusions: The incidence and severity of sore throat and hoarseness after tracheal intubation by Glide Scope were lower than in the Macintosh laryngoscope. The incidence and severity of sore throat were increased by intubation and longer operation times. PMID:24660157

  12. The driving force for glide of a threading dislocation in a strained epitaxial layer on a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, L. B.

    T HE PROCESS of epitaxial growth of a very thin layer onto a substrate crystal is considered for the particular situation in which the layer and substrate materials have the same crystal structure and orientation but different lattice parameters. Under these conditions, the layer grows with an intrinsic elastic strain determined by the mismatch in lattice parameters. The associated stress in the crystalline layer provides a driving force for the nucleation and motion of defects, primarily dislocations. The focus here is on the glide of a dislocation extending from the free surface of the layer to the layer-substrate interface, the so-called threading dislocation. A general definition of driving force for glide of a threading dislocation is introduced on the basis of work arguments. The definition is then applied to calculate the driving force for steady motion of an isolated threading dislocation in a strained layer, and the result includes Matthews' critical thickness concept as one of its features. Next, a kinetic equation for glide of a dislocation in semiconductor materials is proposed to estimate the glide rate of a threading dislocation in these low mobility materials. Finally, for the case of cubic materials, the general definition of driving force is applied to estimate the additional driving force on a threading dislocation due to an encounter with a dislocation on an intersecting glide plane. The results indicate that this effect is significant in blocking the glide of a threading dislocation for large mismatch strains and for layer thicknesses near the critical thickness.

  13. Perception of visual apparent motion is modulated by a gap within concurrent auditory glides, even when it is illusory

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingcui; Guo, Lu; Bao, Ming; Chen, Lihan

    2015-01-01

    Auditory and visual events often happen concurrently, and how they group together can have a strong effect on what is perceived. We investigated whether/how intra- or cross-modal temporal grouping influenced the perceptual decision of otherwise ambiguous visual apparent motion. To achieve this, we juxtaposed auditory gap transfer illusion with visual Ternus display. The Ternus display involves a multi-element stimulus that can induce either of two different percepts of apparent motion: ‘element motion’ (EM) or ‘group motion’ (GM). In “EM,” the endmost disk is seen as moving back and forth while the middle disk at the central position remains stationary; while in “GM,” both disks appear to move laterally as a whole. The gap transfer illusion refers to the illusory subjective transfer of a short gap (around 100 ms) from the long glide to the short continuous glide when the two glides intercede at the temporal middle point. In our experiments, observers were required to make a perceptual discrimination of Ternus motion in the presence of concurrent auditory glides (with or without a gap inside). Results showed that a gap within a short glide imposed a remarkable effect on separating visual events, and led to a dominant perception of GM as well. The auditory configuration with gap transfer illusion triggered the same auditory capture effect. Further investigations showed that visual interval which coincided with the gap interval (50–230 ms) in the long glide was perceived to be shorter than that within both the short glide and the ‘gap-transfer’ auditory configurations in the same physical intervals (gaps). The results indicated that auditory temporal perceptual grouping takes priority over the cross-modal interaction in determining the final readout of the visual perception, and the mechanism of selective attention on auditory events also plays a role. PMID:26042055

  14. Support for the initial attachment, growth and differentiation of MG-63 cells: a comparison between nano-size hydroxyapatite and micro-size hydroxyapatite in composites

    PubMed Central

    Filová, Elena; Suchý, Tomáš; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Šupová, Monika; Žaloudková, Margit; Balík, Karel; Lisá, Věra; Šlouf, Miroslav; Bačáková, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is considered to be a bioactive material that favorably influences the adhesion, growth, and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts. To optimize the cell response on the hydroxyapatite composite, it is desirable to assess the optimum concentration and also the optimum particle size. The aim of our study was to prepare composite materials made of polydimethylsiloxane, polyamide, and nano-sized (N) or micro-sized (M) HA, with an HA content of 0%, 2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25% (v/v) (referred to as N0–N25 or M0–M25), and to evaluate them in vitro in cultures with human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells. For clinical applications, fast osseointegration of the implant into the bone is essential. We observed the greatest initial cell adhesion on composites M10 and N5. Nano-sized HA supported cell growth, especially during the first 3 days of culture. On composites with micro-size HA (2%–15%), MG-63 cells reached the highest densities on day 7. Samples M20 and M25, however, were toxic for MG-63 cells, although these composites supported the production of osteocalcin in these cells. On N2, a higher concentration of osteopontin was found in MG-63 cells. For biomedical applications, the concentration range of 5%–15% (v/v) nano-size or micro-size HA seems to be optimum. PMID:25125978

  15. Support for the initial attachment, growth and differentiation of MG-63 cells: a comparison between nano-size hydroxyapatite and micro-size hydroxyapatite in composites.

    PubMed

    Filová, Elena; Suchý, Tomáš; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Supová, Monika; Zaloudková, Margit; Balík, Karel; Lisá, Věra; Slouf, Miroslav; Bačáková, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is considered to be a bioactive material that favorably influences the adhesion, growth, and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts. To optimize the cell response on the hydroxyapatite composite, it is desirable to assess the optimum concentration and also the optimum particle size. The aim of our study was to prepare composite materials made of polydimethylsiloxane, polyamide, and nano-sized (N) or micro-sized (M) HA, with an HA content of 0%, 2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25% (v/v) (referred to as N0-N25 or M0-M25), and to evaluate them in vitro in cultures with human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells. For clinical applications, fast osseointegration of the implant into the bone is essential. We observed the greatest initial cell adhesion on composites M10 and N5. Nano-sized HA supported cell growth, especially during the first 3 days of culture. On composites with micro-size HA (2%-15%), MG-63 cells reached the highest densities on day 7. Samples M20 and M25, however, were toxic for MG-63 cells, although these composites supported the production of osteocalcin in these cells. On N2, a higher concentration of osteopontin was found in MG-63 cells. For biomedical applications, the concentration range of 5%-15% (v/v) nano-size or micro-size HA seems to be optimum. PMID:25125978

  16. Contact- and Protein Transfer-Dependent Stimulation of Assembly of the Gliding Motility Machinery in Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Jakobczak, Beata; Keilberg, Daniela; Wuichet, Kristin; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria engage in contact-dependent activities to coordinate cellular activities that aid their survival. Cells of Myxococcus xanthus move over surfaces by means of type IV pili and gliding motility. Upon direct contact, cells physically exchange outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins, and this transfer can rescue motility in mutants lacking lipoproteins required for motility. The mechanism of gliding motility and its stimulation by transferred OM lipoproteins remain poorly characterized. We investigated the function of CglC, GltB, GltA and GltC, all of which are required for gliding. We demonstrate that CglC is an OM lipoprotein, GltB and GltA are integral OM β-barrel proteins, and GltC is a soluble periplasmic protein. GltB and GltA are mutually stabilizing, and both are required to stabilize GltC, whereas CglC accumulate independently of GltB, GltA and GltC. Consistently, purified GltB, GltA and GltC proteins interact in all pair-wise combinations. Using active fluorescently-tagged fusion proteins, we demonstrate that GltB, GltA and GltC are integral components of the gliding motility complex. Incorporation of GltB and GltA into this complex depends on CglC and GltC as well as on the cytoplasmic AglZ protein and the inner membrane protein AglQ, both of which are components of the gliding motility complex. Conversely, incorporation of AglZ and AglQ into the gliding motility complex depends on CglC, GltB, GltA and GltC. Remarkably, physical transfer of the OM lipoprotein CglC to a ΔcglC recipient stimulates assembly of the gliding motility complex in the recipient likely by facilitating the OM integration of GltB and GltA. These data provide evidence that the gliding motility complex in M. xanthus includes OM proteins and suggest that this complex extends from the cytoplasm across the cell envelope to the OM. These data add assembly of gliding motility complexes in M. xanthus to the growing list of contact-dependent activities in bacteria. PMID:26132848

  17. Characteristics of short period secondary microseisms (SPSM) in Taiwan: The influence of shallow ocean strait on SPSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying-Nien; Gung, Yuancheng; You, Shuei-Huei; Hung, Shu-Huei; Chiao, Ling-Yun; Huang, Tzu-Ying; Chen, Yen-Ling; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Jan, Sen

    2011-02-01

    Taking advantage of a unique opportunity provided by a dense array of coastal short-period seismic stations and the diverse bathymetry around Taiwan, we examine how the long-range coherent ambient noises are influenced by surrounding ocean settings using the cross-correlation functions (CCFs) between pairs of stations. The effective energy of the CCFs derived from three components of short-period seismometer data falls within the frequency range of the short period secondary microseism (SPSM). The spatial variations mapped from the amplitude asymmetry of CCFs and source migration images evidently demonstrate that the SPSM strengths are closely linked to the drastic changes in offshore ocean characteristics and result in much stronger SPSM in the shallow and narrow Taiwan Strait than in deep open seas of eastern Taiwan. The temporal variations of the CCF strengths exhibit very good correlations with the wind speeds and wave heights, explicitly indicating the observed SPSM is dominated by local sources generated from wind-driven ocean waves around offshore Taiwan.

  18. Bacterial gliding fluid dynamics on a layer of non-Newtonian slime: Perturbation and numerical study.

    PubMed

    Ali, N; Asghar, Z; Anwar Bég, O; Sajid, M

    2016-05-21

    Gliding bacteria are an assorted group of rod-shaped prokaryotes that adhere to and glide on certain layers of ooze slime attached to a substratum. Due to the absence of organelles of motility, such as flagella, the gliding motion is caused by the waves moving down the outer surface of these rod-shaped cells. In the present study we employ an undulating surface model to investigate the motility of bacteria on a layer of non-Newtonian slime. The rheological behavior of the slime is characterized by an appropriate constitutive equation, namely the Carreau model. Employing the balances of mass and momentum conservation, the hydrodynamic undulating surface model is transformed into a fourth-order nonlinear differential equation in terms of a stream function under the long wavelength assumption. A perturbation approach is adopted to obtain closed form expressions for stream function, pressure rise per wavelength, forces generated by the organism and power required for propulsion. A numerical technique based on an implicit finite difference scheme is also employed to investigate various features of the model for large values of the rheological parameters of the slime. Verification of the numerical solutions is achieved with a variational finite element method (FEM). The computations demonstrate that the speed of the glider decreases as the rheology of the slime changes from shear-thinning (pseudo-plastic) to shear-thickening (dilatant). Moreover, the viscoelastic nature of the slime tends to increase the swimming speed for the shear-thinning case. The fluid flow in the pumping (generated where the organism is not free to move but instead generates a net fluid flow beneath it) is also investigated in detail. The study is relevant to marine anti-bacterial fouling and medical hygiene biophysics. PMID:26903204

  19. Nanoscale Visualization of a Fibrillar Array in the Cell Wall of Filamentous Cyanobacteria and Its Implications for Gliding Motility▿

    PubMed Central

    Read, Nicholas; Connell, Simon; Adams, David G.

    2007-01-01

    Many filamentous cyanobacteria are motile by gliding, which requires attachment to a surface. There are two main theories to explain the mechanism of gliding. According to the first, the filament is pushed forward by small waves that pass along the cell surface. In the second, gliding is powered by the extrusion of slime through pores surrounding each cell septum. We have previously shown that the cell walls of several motile cyanobacteria possess an array of parallel fibrils between the peptidoglycan and the outer membrane and have speculated that the function of this array may be to generate surface waves to power gliding. Here, we report on a study of the cell surface topography of two morphologically different filamentous cyanobacteria, using field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). FEGSEM and AFM images of Oscillatoria sp. strain A2 confirmed the presence of an array of fibrils, visible as parallel corrugations on the cell surface. These corrugations were also visualized by AFM scanning of fully hydrated filaments under liquid; this has not been achieved before for filamentous bacteria. FEGSEM images of Nostoc punctiforme revealed a highly convoluted, not parallel, fibrillar array. We conclude that an array of parallel fibrils, beneath the outer membrane of Oscillatoria, may function in the generation of thrust in gliding motility. The array of convoluted fibrils in N. punctiforme may have an alternative function, perhaps connected with the increase in outer membrane surface area resulting from the presence of the fibrils. PMID:17693519

  20. Effect of curing time and concentration for a chemical treatment that improves surface gliding for extrasynovial tendon grafts in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Toshikazu; Sun, Yu-Long; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zobitz, Mark E.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether treatment time and concentration of these reagents have an effect on the resulting gliding resistance. Forty peroneus longus (PL) tendons were used, from 20 adult mongrel dogs, along with the A2 pulley obtained from the ipsilateral hind paw. After the baseline gliding resistance was measured, the PL tendons were treated with one of three concentrations of hyaluronic acid (HA) and 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) or N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) mixed with 10% gelatin for various times (5, 30, and 60 min). Tendon friction was measured over 1000 cycles of simulated flexion/extension motion. Gliding resistance of the untreated PL tendons had no significant difference among the groups. After surface treatment with low concentration of HA and EDC/NHS for 5-min cure, the gliding resistance was similar to that of the untreated PL tendon and significantly higher than its 30- and 60-min treatment. For the rest of high concentration of HA and EDC/NHS groups, the gliding resistance was lower than that of untreated PL tendon. However, there was no significant difference among the timing points. It is possible to optimize the effect of surface treatment on friction and durability by regulating cure time and concentration of reagents in a canine extrasynovial tendon in vitro. PMID:16752399

  1. Decomposition of CCl4 and CHCl3 on gliding are plasma.

    PubMed

    Indarto, Antonius; Choi, Jae-Wook; Lee, Hwaung; Song, Hyung-Keun

    2006-01-01

    Decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons, CCl4 and CHCl3, in gliding plasma was examined. The effects of initial concentrations, total gas flow rates, and power consumption have been investigated. The conversion result was relatively high. It reached 80% for CCl4 and 97% for CHCl3. Using atmospheric air as the carrier gas, the plasma reaction occurred at exothermic reaction and the main products were CO2, CO, and Cl2. Transformation into CCl4 was also detected for CHCl3 decomposition reaction. The conversion of CCl4 and CHCl3 were increased with the increasing applied frequency and decreasing total gas flow rate. PMID:20050553

  2. Research on motion model for the hypersonic boost-glide aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shenda; Wu, Jing; Wang, Xueying

    2015-11-01

    A motion model for the hypersonic boost-glide aircraft(HBG) was proposed in this paper, which also analyzed the precision of model through simulation. Firstly the trajectory of HBG was analyzed, and a scheme which divide the trajectory into two parts then build the motion model on each part. Secondly a restrained model of boosting stage and a restrained model of J2 perturbation were established, and set up the observe model. Finally the analysis of simulation results show the feasible and high-accuracy of the model, and raise a expectation for intensive research.

  3. A 3D model of a reverse vortex flow gliding arc reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenchev, G.; Kolev, St.; Bogaerts, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this computational study, a gliding arc plasma reactor with a reverse-vortex flow stabilization is modelled for the first time by a fluid plasma description. The plasma reactor operates with argon gas at atmospheric pressure. The gas flow is simulated using the k-ε Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes turbulent model. A quasi-neutral fluid plasma model is used for computing the plasma properties. The plasma arc movement in the reactor is observed, and the results for the gas flow, electrical characteristics, plasma density, electron temperature, and gas temperature are analyzed.

  4. Emergent spinless Weyl semimetals between the topological crystalline insulator and normal insulator phases with glide symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heejae; Murakami, Shuichi

    2016-05-01

    We construct a theory describing phase transitions between the spinless topological crystalline insulator phase with glide symmetry and a normal insulator phase. We show that a spinless Weyl semimetal phase should intervene between these two phases. Here, because all the bands are free from degeneracy in general, a gap closing between a single conduction band and a single valence band at phase transition generally gives rise to a pair creation of Weyl nodes; hence the Weyl semimetal phase naturally appears. We show the relationship between the change of the Z2 topological number when the system goes through the Weyl semimetal phase, and the trajectory of the Weyl nodes.

  5. Use-Dependent Curvature Changes in the GlideRite® Reusable Intubation Stylet.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cameron R; Urdaneta, Felipe; Gravenstein, Nikolaus

    2016-05-15

    The Glidescope® is one of the most widely used video laryngoscopes in the market. It is often used with a purpose-built, reusable, "nonmalleable" stainless steel stylet, the GlideRite®. In this study, we investigated whether this stylet retains its original curvature with repeated use and sterilization. To evaluate the shape and curvature of the stylets, high-resolution digital photographs were made of 55 GlideRite stylets (5 new and 50 randomly selected from operating room stock) laid on a grid background and analyzed using Adobe Photoshop®. In a similar fashion, 1 new stylet was inserted into and removed 100 times from an endotracheal tube and photographed every 20 cycles to determine the impact of use on stylet shape. For the 5 new stylets, the handle-to-tip angle was very consistent (23.44° ± 1.04°). The stylets in clinical use varied widely in their configuration. For analysis, they were divided into 3 groups based on the handle-to-tip angle: ±1 SD of the new stylets, those with a shallower angle (straighter), and those with a steeper angle (more curved). The handle-to-tip angles were as follows: 23.07° ± 0.80° (±1 SD), 18.39° ± 2.59° (straighter), and 27.65° ± 2.73° (more curved). Analysis of variance showed that the new and ±1 SD groups were not significantly different, but both the straighter (P = 0.0002) and more curved (P = 0.0048) groups were significantly different from new. The repeated insertion and removal of a new stylet resulted in gradual straightening of the curve of the stylet from 22° at baseline to 19.2° after 100 insertion/removal cycles. Used GlideRite reusable stylets are not reliably equivalent to new ones in terms of their shape or curvature. Given that the repeated insertion and removal of a new stylet from an endotracheal tube resulted in their straightening, it is likely that clinical use has the same effect. Because many used stylets were actually more curved than the new ones, we hypothesize that practitioners

  6. Rapid diffusion of magic-size islands by combined glide and vacancy mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, D; Voter, A F; Uche, O U; Hamilton, J C

    2009-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics, nudged elastic band, and embedded atom methods, we show that certain 2D Ag islands undergo extremely rapid one-dimensional diffusion on Cu(001) surfaces. Indeed, below 300K, hopping rates for 'magic-size' islands are orders of magnitude faster than hopping rates for single Ag adatoms. This rapid diffusion requires both the c(10 x 2) hexagonally-packed superstructure typical of Ag on Cu(001) and appropriate 'magic-sizes' for the islands. The novel highly-cooperative diffusion mechanism presented here couples vacancy diffusion with simultaneous core glide.

  7. Characterization of atmospheric pressure H2O/O2 gliding arc plasma for the production of OH and O radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, N. C.; Hafez, M. G.; Talukder, M. R.

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure H 2 O / O 2 gliding arc plasma is generated by a 88 Hz , 6 kV AC power supply. The properties of the produced plasma are investigated by optical emission spectroscopy. The relative intensity, rotational, vibrational, excitation temperatures and electron density are studied as a function of applied voltage, electrode spacing, and oxygen flow rate. The rotational and vibrational temperatures are determined simulating the OH ( A 2 Σ + ( v ″ = 0 ) → X 2 Π ( v ' = 0 ) ) bands with the aid of LIFBASE simulation software. The excitation temperature is obtained from the CuI transition taking non-thermal equilibrium condition into account employing intensity ratio method. The electron density is approximated from the H α Stark broadening using the Voigt profile fitting method. It is observed that the rotational and vibrational temperatures decrease with increasing electrode spacing and O 2 flow rate, but increase with the applied voltage. The excitation temperature is found to increase with increasing applied voltage and O 2 flow rate, but decrease with electrode spacing. The electron density increases with increasing applied voltage while it seems to be in a downward trend with increasing electrode spacing and O 2 flow rate.

  8. The mysterious nature of bacterial surface (gliding) motility: A focal adhesion-based mechanism in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Islam, Salim T; Mignot, Tâm

    2015-10-01

    Motility of bacterial cells promotes a range of important physiological phenomena such as nutrient detection, harm avoidance, biofilm formation, and pathogenesis. While much research has been devoted to the mechanism of bacterial swimming in liquid via rotation of flagellar filaments, the mechanisms of bacterial translocation across solid surfaces are poorly understood, particularly when cells lack external appendages such as rotary flagella and/or retractile type IV pili. Under such limitations, diverse bacteria at the single-cell level are still able to "glide" across solid surfaces, exhibiting smooth translocation of the cell along its long axis. Though multiple gliding mechanisms have evolved in different bacterial classes, most remain poorly characterized. One exception is the gliding motility mechanism used by the Gram-negative social predatory bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. The available body of research suggests that M. xanthus gliding motility is mediated by trafficked multi-protein (Glt) cell envelope complexes, powered by proton-driven flagellar stator homologues (Agl). Through coupling to the substratum via polysaccharide slime, Agl-Glt assemblies can become fixed relative to the substratum, forming a focal adhesion site. Continued directional transport of slime-associated substratum-fixed Agl-Glt complexes would result in smooth forward movement of the cell. In this review, we have provided a comprehensive synthesis of the latest mechanistic and structural data for focal adhesion-mediated gliding motility in M. xanthus, with emphasis on the role of each Agl and Glt protein. Finally, we have also highlighted the possible connection between the motility complex and a new type of spore coat assembly system, suggesting that gliding and cell envelope synthetic complexes are evolutionarily linked. PMID:26520023

  9. Heart rate and estimated energy expenditure of flapping and gliding in black-browed albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kentaro Q; Takahashi, Akinori; Iwata, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yamamoto, Maki; Trathan, Philip N

    2013-08-15

    Albatrosses are known to expend only a small amount of energy during flight. The low energy cost of albatross flight has been attributed to energy-efficient gliding (soaring) with sporadic flapping, although little is known about how much time and energy albatrosses expend in flapping versus gliding during cruising flight. Here, we examined the heart rates (used as an instantaneous index of energy expenditure) and flapping activities of free-ranging black-browed albatrosses (Thalassarche melanophrys) to estimate the energy cost of flapping as well as time spent in flapping activities. The heart rate of albatrosses during flight (144 beats min(-1)) was similar to that while sitting on the water (150 beats min(-1)). In contrast, heart rate was much higher during takeoff and landing (ca. 200 beats min(-1)). Heart rate during cruising flight was linearly correlated with the number of wing flaps per minute, suggesting an extra energy burden of flapping. Albatrosses spend only 4.6±1.4% of their time flapping during cruising flight, which was significantly lower than during and shortly after takeoff (9.8±3.5%). Flapping activity, which amounted to just 4.6% of the time in flight, accounted for 13.3% of the total energy expenditure during cruising flight. These results support the idea that albatrosses achieve energy-efficient flight by reducing the time spent in flapping activity, which is associated with high energy expenditure. PMID:23661772

  10. CO2 Dissociation by Low Current Gliding Discharge in the Reverse Vortex Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutsol, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    If performed with high energy efficiency, plasma-chemical dissociation of carbon dioxide can be a way of converting and storing energy when there is an excess of electric energy, for example generated by solar elements of wind turbines. CO2 dissociation with efficiency of up to 90% was reported earlier for low pressure microwave discharge in supersonic flow. A new plasma-chemical system uses a low current gliding discharge in the reverse vortex flow of plasma gas. The system is a development of the Gliding Arc in Tornado reactor. The system was used to study dissociation of CO2 in wide ranges of the following experimental parameters: reactor pressure (15-150 kPa), discharge current (50-500 mA), gas flow rate (3-30 liters per minute), and electrode gap length (1-10 cm). Additionally, the effect of thermal energy recuperation on CO2 dissociation efficiency was tested. Plasma chemical efficiency of CO2 dissociation is very low (about 3%) in a short discharge at low pressures (about 15 kPa) when it is defined by electronic excitation. The highest efficiency (above 40%) was reached at pressures 50-70 kPa in a long discharge with thermal energy recuperation. It means that the process is controlled by thermal dissociation with subsequent effective quenching. Plasma chemical efficiency was determined from the data of chromatographic analysis and oscilloscope electric power integration, and also was checked calorimetrically by the thermal balance of the system.

  11. The novel marine gliding zooflagellate genus Mantamonas (Mantamonadida ord. n.: Apusozoa).

    PubMed

    Glücksman, Edvard; Snell, Elizabeth A; Berney, Cédric; Chao, Ema E; Bass, David; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Mantamonasis a novel genus of marine gliding zooflagellates probably related to apusomonad and planomonad Apusozoa. Using phase and differential interference contrast microscopy we describe the type species Mantamonas plasticasp. n. from coastal sediment in Cumbria, England. Cells are ∼5μm long, ∼5μm wide, asymmetric, flattened, biciliate, and somewhat plastic. The posterior cilium, on which they glide smoothly over the substratum, is long and highly acronematic. The much thinner, shorter, and almost immobile anterior cilium points forward to the cell's left. These morphological and behavioural traits suggest thatMantamonasis a member of the protozoan phylum Apusozoa. Analyses of 18S and 28S rRNA gene sequences of Mantamonas plasticaand a second genetically very different marine species from coastal sediment in Tanzania show Mantamonasas a robustly monophyletic clade, that is very divergent from all other eukaryotes. 18S rRNA trees mostly placeMantamonaswithin unikonts (opisthokonts, Apusozoa, and Amoebozoa) but its precise position varies with phylogenetic algorithm and/or taxon and nucleotide position sampling; it may group equally weakly as sister to Planomonadida, Apusomonadida or Breviata. On 28S rRNA and joint 18/28S rRNA phylogenies (including 11 other newly obtained apusozoan/amoebozoan 28S rRNA sequences) it consistently strongly groups with Apusomonadida (Apusozoa). PMID:20884290

  12. Development of a gliding arc plasma reactor for CO₂destruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Cheon; Chun, Young Nam

    2014-01-01

    A gliding arc plasma reactor was designed to destruct carbon dioxide (CO₂), which is a major greenhouse gas. To increase the CO₂destruction rate with a high processing gas volume, an orifice baffle for gathering the gas flow at the centre of the electrodes was installed in the gliding arc plasma reactor. The CO₂inflows with methane (CH₄) and steam (H₂O) improve the CO₂destruction. The parametric studies have been made of the change of CH4 addition, gas injection velocity of the centre nozzle, change of CO₂gas flow rate, and orifice baffle configuration. The produced gases were measured, and the data analysis has been achieved in determining the CO₂destruction rate, CH₄conversion rate, destruction energy efficiency, and selectivity for CO₂and H₂. The highest CO₂ destruction rate for each parameter has been shown as follows: the CH₄/CO₂ratio is 1 as 40%, and the injection gas velocity is 69.5 m/s as 35.7%, the CO₂flow rate is 5 L/min as 42.6%, and the orifice baffle is Type 1, which had the smallest internal area, as 35.7%. PMID:25189841

  13. Atomistic study on the generation and gliding properties of pyramidal dislocations in magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaburaki, Hideo; Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Masatake

    Plastic deformation of magnesium and its alloys is attracting great interest as one of the candidate materials for energy-conserving lightweight structural metals. The generation of non-basal pyramidal dislocations near the c-axis direction is the key to enhancing plasticity in these highly anisotropic hcp magnesium materials. However, the fundamental understanding of the generation and gliding properties of pyramidal dislocations is still not clear because of the large Burgers vector. Using the molecular dynamics method, we have successfully generated < c + a > type I and II screw dislocations from the crack set in the perfect magnesium crystal by applying the shear stress. Visualization of these dislocations is important because the core structures are complex and largely extended. Comparing the results by first-principles calculations, we have found that the core of the type I screw dislocation is smoothly extended while that of the type II screw dislocation has a corrugated structure. We also found that both dislocations can easily cross-slip to other slip planes. In particular, it is observed that the core of the gliding pyramidal type I screw dislocation cross-slips to other slip planes. The detailed processes of cross-slip are elucidated in the presentation.

  14. A protein secretion system linked to bacteroidete gliding motility and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Keiko; Naito, Mariko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Hirakawa, Hideki; Shoji, Mikio; McBride, Mark J; Rhodes, Ryan G; Nakayama, Koji

    2010-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis secretes strong proteases called gingipains that are implicated in periodontal pathogenesis. Protein secretion systems common to other Gram-negative bacteria are lacking in P. gingivalis, but several proteins, including PorT, have been linked to gingipain secretion. Comparative genome analysis and genetic experiments revealed 11 additional proteins involved in gingipain secretion. Six of these (PorK, PorL, PorM, PorN, PorW, and Sov) were similar in sequence to Flavobacterium johnsoniae gliding motility proteins, and two others (PorX and PorY) were putative two-component system regulatory proteins. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that porK, porL, porM, porN, porP, porT, and sov were down-regulated in P. gingivalis porX and porY mutants. Disruption of the F. johnsoniae porT ortholog resulted in defects in motility, chitinase secretion, and translocation of a gliding motility protein, SprB adhesin, to the cell surface, providing a link between a unique protein translocation system and a motility apparatus in members of the Bacteroidetes phylum. PMID:19966289

  15. The Effects of One-Dimensional Glide On the Reaction Kinetics of Interstitial Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, Howard L.; Singh, B. N.; Golubov, S. I.

    2000-09-01

    Collision cascades in metals produce small interstitial clusters and perfect dislocation loops that glide in thermally activated, one-dimensional (1D) random walks. These gliding defects can change their Burgers vectors by thermal activation or by interactions with other defects. Their migration is therefore ?mixed 1D/3D migration? along a 3D path consisting of 1D segments. The defect reaction kinetics under mixed 1D/3D diffusion are different from both pure 1D diffusion and pure 3D diffusion, both of which can be formulated within analytical rate theory models of microstructure evolution under irradiation. Atomic-scale Kinetic Monte Carlo defect migration simulations are used to investigate the effects of mixed 1D/3D migration on defect reaction kinetics as a guide for implementing mixed 1D/3D migration into the theory. The dependence of sink strength on the size and concentration of sinks under mixed 1D/3D migration lies between those for pure 1D and pure 3D migration and varies with the average distance between direction changes, L. The sink strength for sinks of size R under mixed 1D/3D migration can be approximated by an expression that varies directly as R2 for values of L greater than the sink size. The transition from mixed 1D/3D to pure 3D diffusion as L decreases is demonstrated in the simulations.

  16. Glass micro-wire tracks for guiding kinesin-powered gliding motion of microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Liao, A. L.; Sikora, A.; Oliveira, D.; Umetsu, M.; Kumagai, I.; Adschiri, T.; Hwang, W.; Teizer, W.

    2013-03-01

    Kinesin, an enzyme molecule found in eukaryotic cells, walks on specific paths, namely microtubules. These microtubules, self-assembled in-vitro, cooperate with kinesin molecules by playing the role of either a track for the molecular motors or a lengthy cargo lorry driven by the motor molecules. One of major challenges in utilization of the latter case, which is particularly advantageous for practical applications because of the longer cruising range and the higher carrying capacity of the bio-transporter, is herding the gliding microtubules. A general approach to achieve this goal is aligning motor molecules along a track. In previous attempts such tracks were physically and/or chemically patterned on a glass surface. We use a kinesin-coated glass wire to demonstrate kinesin-powered gliding movement of microtubules confined by the wire-like structure. This new approach distinguishes itself in that the glass wire track is an independent entity, being separable from a two-dimensional surface in principle. We will also discuss quantitative analysis of the guided motility and potential applications.

  17. A protein secretion system linked to bacteroidete gliding motility and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Keiko; Naito, Mariko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Hirakawa, Hideki; Shoji, Mikio; McBride, Mark J.; Rhodes, Ryan G.; Nakayama, Koji

    2009-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis secretes strong proteases called gingipains that are implicated in periodontal pathogenesis. Protein secretion systems common to other Gram-negative bacteria are lacking in P. gingivalis, but several proteins, including PorT, have been linked to gingipain secretion. Comparative genome analysis and genetic experiments revealed 11 additional proteins involved in gingipain secretion. Six of these (PorK, PorL, PorM, PorN, PorW, and Sov) were similar in sequence to Flavobacterium johnsoniae gliding motility proteins, and two others (PorX and PorY) were putative two-component system regulatory proteins. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that porK, porL, porM, porN, porP, porT, and sov were down-regulated in P. gingivalis porX and porY mutants. Disruption of the F. johnsoniae porT ortholog resulted in defects in motility, chitinase secretion, and translocation of a gliding motility protein, SprB adhesin, to the cell surface, providing a link between a unique protein translocation system and a motility apparatus in members of the Bacteroidetes phylum. PMID:19966289

  18. Two Essential Light Chains Regulate the MyoA Lever Arm To Promote Toxoplasma Gliding Motility

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Melanie J.; Alonso, Hernan; Enciso, Marta; Egarter, Saskia; Sheiner, Lilach; Meissner, Markus; Striepen, Boris; Smith, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Key to the virulence of apicomplexan parasites is their ability to move through tissue and to invade and egress from host cells. Apicomplexan motility requires the activity of the glideosome, a multicomponent molecular motor composed of a type XIV myosin, MyoA. Here we identify a novel glideosome component, essential light chain 2 (ELC2), and functionally characterize the two essential light chains (ELC1 and ELC2) of MyoA in Toxoplasma. We show that these proteins are functionally redundant but are important for invasion, egress, and motility. Molecular simulations of the MyoA lever arm identify a role for Ca2+ in promoting intermolecular contacts between the ELCs and the adjacent MLC1 light chain to stabilize this domain. Using point mutations predicted to ablate either the interaction with Ca2+ or the interface between the two light chains, we demonstrate their contribution to the quality, displacement, and speed of gliding Toxoplasma parasites. Our work therefore delineates the importance of the MyoA lever arm and highlights a mechanism by which this domain could be stabilized in order to promote invasion, egress, and gliding motility in apicomplexan parasites. PMID:26374117

  19. Concerted Action of Two Formins in Gliding Motility and Host Cell Invasion by Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Wassim; Plattner, Fabienne; Carlier, Marie-France; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    The invasive forms of apicomplexan parasites share a conserved form of gliding motility that powers parasite migration across biological barriers, host cell invasion and egress from infected cells. Previous studies have established that the duration and direction of gliding motility are determined by actin polymerization; however, regulators of actin dynamics in apicomplexans remain poorly characterized. In the absence of a complete ARP2/3 complex, the formin homology 2 domain containing proteins and the accessory protein profilin are presumed to orchestrate actin polymerization during host cell invasion. Here, we have undertaken the biochemical and functional characterization of two Toxoplasma gondii formins and established that they act in concert as actin nucleators during invasion. The importance of TgFRM1 for parasite motility has been assessed by conditional gene disruption. The contribution of each formin individually and jointly was revealed by an approach based upon the expression of dominant mutants with modified FH2 domains impaired in actin binding but still able to dimerize with their respective endogenous formin. These mutated FH2 domains were fused to the ligand-controlled destabilization domain (DD-FKBP) to achieve conditional expression. This strategy proved unique in identifying the non-redundant and critical roles of both formins in invasion. These findings provide new insights into how controlled actin polymerization drives the directional movement required for productive penetration of parasites into host cells. PMID:20949068

  20. Latest Sea-Operations in the Macaronesian region with Unmanned Autonomous Marine Gliding Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera, Carlos; Lorenzo, Alvaro; Viera, Josue; Morales, Tania; Vega, Daura; Rueda, Maria Jose; Llinas, Octavio

    2013-04-01

    Current advances on key marine technology fields provide nowadays a broad range of autonomous unmanned platforms addressed for an efficient and cost-effective ocean observation, with a suitable level of success in terms of endurance, reliability and useful gathered information. In this context, a multidisciplinary family of unmanned autonomous vehicles addressed to monitor both coastal and open-ocean areas plays a relevant role. During the last month, some of the newest unmanned gliding vehicle technologies have been tested within the context of the Oceanic Platform of the Canary Islands (PLOCAN) in varied operational scenarios aiming different technical and scientific purposes, all of them joined in direct partnership with the company provider and other R&D institutions in some cases. Among others, representative examples in this way are the missions under the name Challenger One, Vulcano and SB02 through surface and underwater gliding vehicles, performed mostly in the surrounding subtropical waters of the ESTOC site observatory in the Canary Islands archipelago. The main gathered operational and scientific results from these missions are presented in this work as a sign of new ocean observing technologies within the framework of the Macaronesian Marine and Maritime Observation Strategy (R3M) and linked with the current European rules programs and projects in this field. Keywords: autonomous vehicle, gliders, R3M, ocean observatory, monitoring, marine robotics, ESTOC,

  1. Energy Management of Manned Boost-Glide Vehicles: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    As flight progressed from propellers to jets to rockets, the propulsive energy grew exponentially. With the development of rocket-only boosted vehicles, energy management of these boost-gliders became a distinct requirement for the unpowered return to base, alternate landing site, or water-parachute landing, starting with the X-series rocket aircraft and terminating with the present-day Shuttle. The problem presented here consists of: speed (kinetic energy) - altitude (potential energy) - steep glide angles created by low lift-to-drag ratios (L/D) - distance to landing site - and the bothersome effects of the atmospheric characteristics varying with altitude. The primary discussion regards post-boost, stabilized glides; however, the effects of centrifugal and geopotential acceleration are discussed as well. The aircraft and spacecraft discussed here are the X-1, X-2, X-15, and the Shuttle; and to a lesser, comparative extent, Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and lifting bodies. The footprints, landfalls, and methods developed for energy management are also described. The essential tools required for energy management - simulator planning, instrumentation, radar, telemetry, extended land or water range, Mission Control Center (with specialist controllers), and emergency alternate landing sites - were first established through development of early concepts and were then validated by research flight tests.

  2. Pitch glide effect induced by a nonlinear string-barrier interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartofelev, Dmitri; Stulov, Anatoli; Välimäki, Vesa

    2015-10-01

    Interactions of a vibrating string with its supports and other spatially distributed barriers play a significant role in the physics of many stringed musical instruments. It is well known that the tone of the string vibrations is determined by the string supports, and that the boundary conditions of the string termination may cause a short-lasting initial fundamental frequency shifting. Generally, this phenomenon is associated with the nonlinear modulation of the stiff string tension. The aim of this paper is to study the initial frequency glide phenomenon that is induced only by the string-barrier interaction, apart from other possible physical causes, and without the interfering effects of dissipation and dispersion. From a numerical simulation perspective, this highly nonlinear problem may present various difficulties, not the least of which is the risk of numerical instability. We propose a numerically stable and a purely kinematic model of the string-barrier interaction, which is based on the travelling wave solution of the ideal string vibration. The model is capable of reproducing the motion of the vibrating string exhibiting the initial fundamental frequency glide, which is caused solely by the complex nonlinear interaction of the string with its termination. The results presented in this paper can expand our knowledge and understanding of the timbre evolution and the physical principles of sound generation of numerous stringed instruments, such as lutes called the tambura, sitar and biwa.

  3. Effect of cellular filamentation on adventurous and social gliding motility of Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Yang, Zhaomin; Shi, Wenyuan

    1999-01-01

    Filamentous bacterial cells often provide biological information that is not readily evident in normal-size cells. In this study, the effect of cellular filamentation on gliding motility of Myxococcus xanthus, a Gram-negative social bacterium, was investigated. Elongation of the cell body had different effects on adventurous and social motility of M. xanthus. The rate of A-motility was insensitive to cell-body elongation whereas the rate of S-motility was reduced dramatically as the cell body got longer, indicating that these two motility systems work in different ways. The study also showed that filamentous wild-type cells glide smoothly with relatively straight, long cell bodies. However, filamentous cells of certain social motility mutants showed zigzag, tangled cell bodies on a solid surface, apparently a result of a lack of coordination between different fragments within the filaments. Further genetic and biochemical analyses indicated that the uncoordinated movements of these mutant filaments were correlated with the absence of cell surface fibril materials, indicating a possible new function for fibrils. PMID:10611358

  4. Velocity Fluctuations in Kinesin-1 Gliding Motility Assays Originate in Motor Attachment Geometry Variations.

    PubMed

    Palacci, Henri; Idan, Ofer; Armstrong, Megan J; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Nitta, Takahiro; Hess, Henry

    2016-08-01

    Motor proteins such as myosin and kinesin play a major role in cellular cargo transport, muscle contraction, cell division, and engineered nanodevices. Quantifying the collective behavior of coupled motors is critical to our understanding of these systems. An excellent model system is the gliding motility assay, where hundreds of surface-adhered motors propel one cytoskeletal filament such as an actin filament or a microtubule. The filament motion can be observed using fluorescence microscopy, revealing fluctuations in gliding velocity. These velocity fluctuations have been previously quantified by a motional diffusion coefficient, which Sekimoto and Tawada explained as arising from the addition and removal of motors from the linear array of motors propelling the filament as it advances, assuming that different motors are not equally efficient in their force generation. A computational model of kinesin head diffusion and binding to the microtubule allowed us to quantify the heterogeneity of motor efficiency arising from the combination of anharmonic tail stiffness and varying attachment geometries assuming random motor locations on the surface and an absence of coordination between motors. Knowledge of the heterogeneity allows the calculation of the proportionality constant between the motional diffusion coefficient and the motor density. The calculated value (0.3) is within a standard error of our measurements of the motional diffusion coefficient on surfaces with varying motor densities calibrated by landing rate experiments. This allowed us to quantify the loss in efficiency of coupled molecular motors arising from heterogeneity in the attachment geometry. PMID:27414063

  5. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  6. Examining spring wet slab and glide avalanche occurrence along the Going-to-the-Sun Road corridor, Glacier National Park, Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peitzsch, Erich H.; Jordy Hendrikx; Fagre, Daniel B.; Blase Reardon

    2012-01-01

    The results suggest that the role of air temperature and snowpack settlement appear to be the most important variables in wet slab and glide avalanche occurrence. When applied to the 2011 season, the results of the CART model are encouraging and they enhance our understanding of some of the required meteorological and snowpack conditions for wet slab and glide avalanche occurrence.

  7. A bond graph model for the sample extraction/injection system of a microsized gas chromatographic instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jie; Wang, Wanjun; Murphy, Michael C.; Overton, Edward

    1996-09-01

    A bond graph model of the sample extraction/injection system of a prototype portable gas chromatographic instrument has been developed. In addition to performing the same functions as current portable gas chromatographs (GCs), the new generation of GC instruments is designed to perform extraction of analytes from liquid and solid samples. The prototype instrument achieves these improvements by taking of advantage of microfabrication technologies and microprocessor control in the design. A novel sample extraction/injection module is essential to the improved performance of the portable instrument, which will include microfabricated components such as inlets, interface chips, fluid channels, control valves, optimal heater/sensor combinations, and multiport connectors. In order to achieve the desired analytical performance, all of the major components are heated to 250 °C during different stages of a sample analysis. Predicting the performance of the system in this operating regime requires the modeling and analysis of system behavior in two interacting energy domains, fluid and thermal. This article represents the first effort to understand the dynamic behavior of the thermofluid aspect of micro-GC instruments and one of the first attempts to apply the widely-used bond graph technique to modeling and analysis of microsized thermofluid systems. Simulation results using the bond graph model closely match available experimental data, with differences typically less than 10%. This demonstrates that fluid dynamic theory for macroscale systems, and the bond graph method based on it, can be readily applied to microscale systems with these dimensions. The bond graph method can be a useful computer-aided design tool for the development of a new generation of truly integrated micro-GC instruments and sensors fabricated with micromachining technology.

  8. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  9. ACS Symposium Support

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth D. Jordan

    2010-02-20

    The funds from this DOE grant were used to help cover the travel costs of five students and postdoctoral fellows who attended a symposium on 'Hydration: From Clusters to Aqueous Solutions' held at the Fall 2007 American Chemical Society Meeting in Boston, MA, August 19-23. The Symposium was sponsored by the Physical Chemistry Division, ACS. The technical program for the meeting is available at http://phys-acs.org/fall2007.html.

  10. Gliding Box method applied to trace element distribution of a geochemical data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz González, Antonio; Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Rosario García Moreno, M.; Paz Ferreiro, Jorge; Saa Requejo, Antonio; María Tarquis, Ana

    2010-05-01

    The application of fractal theory to process geochemical prospecting data can provide useful information for evaluating mineralization potential. A geochemical survey was carried out in the west area of Coruña province (NW Spain). Major elements and trace elements were determined by standard analytical techniques. It is well known that there are specific elements or arrays of elements, which are associated with specific types of mineralization. Arsenic has been used to evaluate the metallogenetic importance of the studied zone. Moreover, as can be considered as a pathfinder of Au, as these two elements are genetically associated. The main objective of this study was to use multifractal analysis to characterize the distribution of three trace elements, namely Au, As, and Sb. Concerning the local geology, the study area comprises predominantly acid rocks, mainly alkaline and calcalkaline granites, gneiss and migmatites. The most significant structural feature of this zone is the presence of a mylonitic band, with an approximate NE-SW orientation. The data set used in this study comprises 323 samples collected, with standard geochemical criteria, preferentially in the B horizon of the soil. Occasionally where this horizon was not present, samples were collected from the C horizon. Samples were taken in a rectilinear grid. The sampling lines were perpendicular to the NE-SW tectonic structures. Frequency distributions of the studied elements departed from normal. Coefficients of variation ranked as follows: Sb < As < Au. Significant correlation coefficients between Au, Sb, and As were found, even if these were low. The so-called ‘gliding box' algorithm (GB) proposed originally for lacunarity analysis has been extended to multifractal modelling and provides an alternative to the ‘box-counting' method for implementing multifractal analysis. The partitioning method applied in GB algorithm constructs samples by gliding a box of certain size (a) over the grid map in all

  11. The effect of vegetation cover on the formation of glide-snow avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistl, Thomas; Bebi, Peter; Bartelt, Perry

    2014-05-01

    Glide snow avalanches release on steep, smooth slopes and can be prevented either by protection forests or by artificial defense structures. To minimize the risk for people and infrastructure, guidelines have been formulated concerning structure, height and distance between avalanche prevention bridges. These guidelines assure the major functions of the defense structures: first to prevent the release of avalanches and second to withstand the static and dynamic forces of the moving snow cover. The major functions of protection forests are generally similar and therefore guidelines on the maximum tolerable size of forest gaps exist in Switzerland. These guidelines are based on a static relationship between the pressure of the snow cover and the resistance of the defense structure and on empirical observations (forest). Whereas ground friction is only qualitatively taken into account, we assume it to play a crucial role in glide snow avalanche formation. To prove this assumption we collected data on the predominant vegetation cover of 67 release areas in the region of Davos, Switzerland. Our observations reveal a strong relationship between vegetation cover type, slope angle and slab length. We were able to quantify the Coulomb friction parameter μ by applying a physical model that accounts for the dynamic forces of the moving snow on the stauchwall, the fixed snow cover below the release area. The stauchwall resists the dynamic forces of the snow cover, until a critical strain rate is reached and then fails in brittle compression. This failure strongly depends on the friction between snow cover and soil. A typical value of μ for grassy slopes is 0.2. Snow characteristics like density are implemented in the model as constants. We compared the model results with the guidelines for defense structures and forest gap sizes and found accordance for certain friction parameter values. Forest gaps of 40 meter length and a 35° slope angle require friction values of 0

  12. Differential Recognition of Pitch Patterns in Discrete and Gliding Stimuli in Congenital Amusia: Evidence from Mandarin Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Fang; Xu, Yi; Patel, Aniruddh D.; Francart, Tom; Jiang, Cunmei

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether "melodic contour deafness" (insensitivity to the direction of pitch movement) in congenital amusia is associated with specific types of pitch patterns (discrete versus gliding pitches) or stimulus types (speech syllables versus complex tones). Thresholds for identification of pitch direction were obtained using discrete…

  13. Flavobacterium columnare type IX secretion system mutations result in defects in gliding motility and loss of virulence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gliding bacterium Flavobacterium columnare causes columnaris disease in wild and aquaculture-reared freshwater fish. The mechanisms responsible for columnaris disease are not known. The related bacterium Flavobacterium johnsoniae uses a type IX secretion system (T9SS) to secrete enzymes, adhesin...

  14. Magnetic deflagration in the molecular magnet manganese-12-ac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, Sean

    In 1995, Paulsen and Park [1, 2] observed abrupt spontaneous reversals of the magnetization in crystals of the molecular magnet Mn12-ac, which they dubbed "magnetic avalanches". They suggested that the magnetic avalanches were a thermal runaway process where the reversing spins release heat stimulating further relaxation. Various exotic phenomena were proposed as an alternative explanations [3]. In 2005, Suzuki et al. [4] established that this spontaneous magnetic relaxation occurs as a "front" separating regions of opposing magnetization that propagates at a constant speed through the crystal. They suggested that this propagating front is analogous to a flame in chemical deflagration and introduced the thermal relaxation process, magnetic deflagration. The analysis presented there was limited by lack of data. A more thorough comparison with the theory would require the ability to trigger avalanches in a more controlled way rather than wait for their spontaneous occurrence. The work presented in this thesis is a continuation of the program initiated by Suzuki [4, 5]. Significant progress experimental progress has been made allowing us to trigger avalanches over a wide range of conditions. The magnetization dynamics and the ignition temperatures are studied in detail using an array of micro-sized Hall sensors and Germanium thermometers. In addition, we report the existence of a new species of avalanches consisting only of the fast-relaxing isomers of Mn12-ac, the so-called "minor species". We explore avalanches of both species, as well as the interaction between them. Finally, a detailed analysis is performed to compare the experiment with the theory of magnetic deflagration [6]. We find the theory of magnetic deflagration to be consistent with the data and extract values for the key physical quantities: the thermal diffusivity and avalanche front temperatures. Agreement between our predicted values and an independent measurement of these quantities would provide

  15. Characteristic of copper matrix simultaneously reinforced with nano- and micro-sized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rajkovic, Viseslava Bozic, Dusan; Devecerski, Aleksandar; Jovanovic, Milan T.

    2012-05-15

    The effect of the simultaneous presence of nano- and micro-sized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles on the microstructure and properties of copper matrix was the object of this study. The mixture of inert gas-atomized prealloyed copper powder (with 1 wt.% Al) and 0.6 wt.% commercial Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder (serving as micro-sized particles) was used as the starting materials. Strengthening of the copper matrix was performed by treating the powders in the air for up to 20 h in the planetary ball mill. During milling of the prealloyed powder, finely dispersed nano-sized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles were formed in situ by internal oxidation. The approximate size of these particles was between 30 and 60 nm. The highest values of microhardness were reached in compacts processed from 10 h-milled powders. The microhardness of compact obtained from 10 h-milled powder was 3 times higher than the microhardness of compact processed from as-received and non-milled prealloyed powder. At the maximum microhardness the grain size reaches the smallest value as a result of the synergetic effect of nano- and micro-sized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. Recrystallization, which occurred during prolonged milling, was the main factor influencing the decrease in microhardness. The increase in electrical conductivity of compacts after 15 h of milling is the result of the decrease in microhardness and activated recrystallization processes. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Copper matrix was reinforced with nano- and micro-sized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The twofold role of coarse Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in matrix strengthening exists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer During shorter milling time these particles contribute to increase of microhardness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At longer milling time decrease in microhardness is related to recrystallization.

  16. Crawling and Gliding: A Computational Model for Shape-Driven Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Niculescu, Ioana; Textor, Johannes; de Boer, Rob J.

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is a complex process involving many intracellular and extracellular factors, with different cell types adopting sometimes strikingly different morphologies. Modeling realistically behaving cells in tissues is computationally challenging because it implies dealing with multiple levels of complexity. We extend the Cellular Potts Model with an actin-inspired feedback mechanism that allows small stochastic cell rufflings to expand to cell protrusions. This simple phenomenological model produces realistically crawling and deforming amoeboid cells, and gliding half-moon shaped keratocyte-like cells. Both cell types can migrate randomly or follow directional cues. They can squeeze in between other cells in densely populated environments or migrate collectively. The model is computationally light, which allows the study of large, dense and heterogeneous tissues containing cells with realistic shapes and migratory properties. PMID:26488304

  17. Glide-plane symmetry and superconducting gap structure of iron-based superconductors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Berlijn, T; Hirschfeld, P J; Scalapino, D J; Maier, T A

    2015-03-13

    We consider the effect of glide-plane symmetry of the Fe-pnictogen/chalcogen layer in Fe-based superconductors on pairing in spin fluctuation models. Recent theories have proposed that so-called η-pairing states with nonzero total momentum can be realized and possess exotic properties such as odd parity spin singlet symmetry and time-reversal symmetry breaking. Here we show that η pairing is inevitable when there is orbital weight at the Fermi level from orbitals with even and odd mirror reflection symmetry in z; however, by explicit calculation, we conclude that the gap function that appears in observable quantities is identical to that found in earlier, 1 Fe per unit cell pseudocrystal momentum calculations. PMID:25815960

  18. Kinetic Monte Carlo and density functional study of hydrogen enhanced dislocation glide in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarle, S.; Ewels, C. P.

    2006-05-01

    We investigate Hydrogen Enhanced Dislocation Glide [HEDG], using n-fold way Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of the interaction between hydrogen and 90° partial dislocations in silicon, and a range of new density functional calculations. We examine two different hydrogen arrival species, as well as hydrogen recombination at the dislocation. The Monte Carlo simulations use a line-wise description of the dislocation line parameterized using density functional calculations of migration and formation energies of various dislocation line defects and their complexes with hydrogen. From this we suggest that the rate of H2 expulsion from the dislocation core increases as we approach HEDG, but that if the concentration of the hydrogen species goes beyond that required for HEDG it then slows dislocation motion by choking the line with defects comprised of two hydrogen atoms in a reconstruction bond. A `dislocation engine' model is proposed whereby hydrogen enters the dislocation line, catalyses motion, and is expelled along the core as H2.

  19. Automated CFD Database Generation for a 2nd Generation Glide-Back-Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaderjian, Neal M.; Rogers, Stuart E.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Pandya, Shishir A.; Ahmad, Jasim U.; Tejmil, Edward

    2003-01-01

    A new software tool, AeroDB, is used to compute thousands of Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions for a 2nd generation glide-back booster in one week. The solution process exploits a common job-submission grid environment using 13 computers located at 4 different geographical sites. Process automation and web-based access to the database greatly reduces the user workload, removing much of the tedium and tendency for user input errors. The database consists of forces, moments, and solution files obtained by varying the Mach number, angle of attack, and sideslip angle. The forces and moments compare well with experimental data. Stability derivatives are also computed using a monotone cubic spline procedure. Flow visualization and three-dimensional surface plots are used to interpret and characterize the nature of computed flow fields.

  20. Crawling and Gliding: A Computational Model for Shape-Driven Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Niculescu, Ioana; Textor, Johannes; de Boer, Rob J

    2015-10-01

    Cell migration is a complex process involving many intracellular and extracellular factors, with different cell types adopting sometimes strikingly different morphologies. Modeling realistically behaving cells in tissues is computationally challenging because it implies dealing with multiple levels of complexity. We extend the Cellular Potts Model with an actin-inspired feedback mechanism that allows small stochastic cell rufflings to expand to cell protrusions. This simple phenomenological model produces realistically crawling and deforming amoeboid cells, and gliding half-moon shaped keratocyte-like cells. Both cell types can migrate randomly or follow directional cues. They can squeeze in between other cells in densely populated environments or migrate collectively. The model is computationally light, which allows the study of large, dense and heterogeneous tissues containing cells with realistic shapes and migratory properties. PMID:26488304

  1. Glide-plane symmetry and superconducting gap structure of iron-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yan; Berlijn, Tom; Hirschfeld, Peter J.; Scalapino, Douglas J.; Maier, Thomas A.

    2015-03-10

    We consider the effect of glide-plane symmetry of the Fe-pnictogen/chalcogen layer in Fe-based superconductors on pairing in spin fluctuation models. Recent theories propose that so-called η-pairing states with nonzero total momentum can be realized and possess such exotic properties as odd parity spin singlet symmetry and time-reversal symmetry breaking. Here we show that when there is orbital weight at the Fermi level from orbitals with even and odd mirror reflection symmetry in z, η pairing is inevitable; however, we conclude from explicit calculation that the gap function appearing in observable quantities is identical to that found in earlier pseudocrystal momentum calculations with 1 Fe per unit cell.

  2. Evidence for the transport of impurity hydrogen with gliding dislocations in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Goroh; Kanno, Motohiro; Koyama, Katsumi

    1996-09-15

    Environmental embrittlement in most metallic materials is known to be caused by hydrogen penetration from the atmosphere into the material under tensile stress. The authors have shown the location of internal hydrogen atoms in the microstructure of some aluminum base alloys by means of tritium autoradiography in which the location of a hydrogen atom can be visualized as a silver particle produced through the photographic reaction by the {beta}-ray emitted from tritium: radio isotope of hydrogen. They also developed a unique testing machine which, being equipped with an ultra high vacuum chamber and a quadrupole mass spectrometer, can detect a trace amount of hydrogen gas evolved from the specimen on fracture. This paper describes a direct evidence of the correlation between hydrogen atom transport and dislocation glide in aluminum, which has been obtained by means of tritium autoradiography on a deformed sample.

  3. Glide-plane symmetry and superconducting gap structure of iron-based superconductors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Yan; Berlijn, Tom; Hirschfeld, Peter J.; Scalapino, Douglas J.; Maier, Thomas A.

    2015-03-10

    We consider the effect of glide-plane symmetry of the Fe-pnictogen/chalcogen layer in Fe-based superconductors on pairing in spin fluctuation models. Recent theories propose that so-called η-pairing states with nonzero total momentum can be realized and possess such exotic properties as odd parity spin singlet symmetry and time-reversal symmetry breaking. Here we show that when there is orbital weight at the Fermi level from orbitals with even and odd mirror reflection symmetry in z, η pairing is inevitable; however, we conclude from explicit calculation that the gap function appearing in observable quantities is identical to that found in earlier pseudocrystal momentummore » calculations with 1 Fe per unit cell.« less

  4. Acetylcholinesterase-Inhibiting Activity of Pyrrole Derivatives from a Novel Marine Gliding Bacterium, Rapidithrix thailandica

    PubMed Central

    Sangnoi, Yutthapong; Sakulkeo, Oraphan; Yuenyongsawad, Supreeya; Kanjana-opas, Akkharawit; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok; Plubrukarn, Anuchit; Suwanborirux, Khanit

    2008-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase-inhibiting activity of marinoquinoline A (1), a new pyrroloquinoline from a novel species of a marine gliding bacterium Rapidithrix thailandica, was assessed (IC50 4.9 μM). Two related pyrrole derivatives, 3-(2′-aminophenyl)-pyrrole (3) and 2,2-dimethyl-pyrrolo-1,2-dihydroquinoline (4), were also isolated from two other strains of R. thailandica. The isolation of 3 from a natural source is reported here for the first time. Compound 4 was proposed to be an isolation artifact derived from 3. The two isolated compounds were virtually inactive in the acetylcholinesterase-inhibitory assay (enzyme inhibition < 30% at 0.1 g L−1). PMID:19172195

  5. Gravity effects on a gliding arc in four noble gases: from normal to hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potočňáková, L.; Šperka, J.; Zikán, P.; van Loon, J. J. W. A.; Beckers, J.; Kudrle, V.

    2015-04-01

    A gliding arc in four noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr) has been studied under previously unexplored conditions of varying artificial gravity, from normal 1 g gravity up to 18 g hypergravity. Significant differences, mainly the visual thickness of the plasma channel, its maximum elongation and general sensitivity to hypergravity conditions, were observed between the discharges in individual gases, resulting from their different atomic weights and related quantities, such as heat conductivity or ionisation potential. Generally, an increase of the artificial gravity level leads to a faster plasma channel movement thanks to stronger buoyant force and a decrease of maximum height reached by the channel due to more intense losses of heat and reactive species. In relation to this, an increase in current and a decrease in absorbed power was observed.

  6. Measurements of 3D slip velocities and plasma column lengths of a gliding arc discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas; Aldén, Marcus; Li, Zhongshan E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de; Moseev, Dmitry; Kusano, Yukihiro; Salewski, Mirko; Alpers, Andreas E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de; Gritzmann, Peter; Schwenk, Martin

    2015-01-26

    A non-thermal gliding arc discharge was generated at atmospheric pressure in an air flow. The dynamics of the plasma column and tracer particles were recorded using two synchronized high-speed cameras. Whereas the data analysis for such systems has previously been performed in 2D (analyzing the single camera image), we provide here a 3D data analysis that includes 3D reconstructions of the plasma column and 3D particle tracking velocimetry based on discrete tomography methods. The 3D analysis, in particular, the determination of the 3D slip velocity between the plasma column and the gas flow, gives more realistic insight into the convection cooling process. Additionally, with the determination of the 3D slip velocity and the 3D length of the plasma column, we give more accurate estimates for the drag force, the electric field strength, the power per unit length, and the radius of the conducting zone of the plasma column.

  7. Investigation of hydrocarbon oil transformation by gliding arc discharge: comparison of batch and recirculated configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, J. Christopher; Prantsidou, Maria

    2016-04-01

    The degradation of liquid dodecane was studied in a gliding arc discharge (GAD) of humid argon or nitrogen. A batch or recirculating configuration was used. The products in the gaseous and liquid phase were analysed by infrared and chromatography and optical emission spectroscopy was used to identify the excited species in the discharge. The best degradation performance comes from the use of humid N2 but a GAD of humid argon produces fewer gas-phase products but more liquid-phase end-products. A wide range of products such as heavier saturated or unsaturated hydrocarbons both aliphatic and aromatic, and oxidation products mainly alcohols, but also aldehydes, ketones and esters are produced in the liquid-phase. The recirculating treatment mode is more effective than the batch mode increasing the reactivity and changing the product selectivities. Overall, the study shows promising results for the organic liquid waste treatment, especially in the recirculating mode.

  8. Optimal heading change with minimum energy loss for a hypersonic gliding vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, Anthony J.; Bae, Gyoung H.

    1987-01-01

    A three state model is presented for analyzing the problem of optimal changes in heading with minimum energy loss for a hypersonic gliding vehicle. A further model order reduction to a single state model is examined using singular perturbation theory. The optimal solution for the reduced problem defines an optimal altitude profile dependent on the current energy of the vehicle, and the corresponding optimal lift and bank angle. A separate boundary layer analysis, based on an expansion of the necessary conditions about the reduced solution, is used to account for altitude and flight path angle dynamics and to derive a guidance law in feedback form. The guidance law is evaluated for a hypothetical vehicle.

  9. Complete genome sequence of the gliding, heparinolytic Pedobacter saltans type strain (113T)

    SciTech Connect

    Liolios, Konstantinos; Sikorski, Johannes; Lu, Megan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Kotsyurbenko, Oleg; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Abt, Birte; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-01-01

    Pedobacter saltans Steyn et al. 1998 is one of currently 32 species in the genus Pedobacter within the family Sphingobacteriaceae. The species is of interest for its isolated location in the tree of life. Like other members of the genus P. saltans is heparinolytic. Cells of P. saltans show a peculiar gliding, dancing motility and can be distinguished from other Pedobacter strains by their ability to utilize glycerol and the inability to assimilate D-cellobiose. The ge- nome presented here is only the second completed genome sequence of a type strain from a member of the family Sphingobacteriaceae to be published. The 4,635,236 bp long genome with its 3,854 protein-coding and 67 RNA genes consists of one chromosome, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  10. Tevatron AC dipole system

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is an oscillating dipole magnet which can induce large amplitude oscillations without the emittance growth and decoherence. These properties make it a good tool to measure optics of a hadron synchrotron. The vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is powered by an inexpensive high power audio amplifier since its operating frequency is approximately 20 kHz. The magnet is incorporated into a parallel resonant system to maximize the current. The use of a vertical pinger magnet which has been installed in the Tevatron made the cost relatively inexpensive. Recently, the initial system was upgraded with a more powerful amplifier and oscillation amplitudes up to 2-3{sigma} were achieved with the 980 GeV proton beam. This paper discusses details of the Tevatron AC dipole system and also shows its test results.

  11. ac bidirectional motor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, K.

    1988-01-01

    Test data are presented and the design of a high-efficiency motor/generator controller at NASA-Lewis for use with the Space Station power system testbed is described. The bidirectional motor driver is a 20 kHz to variable frequency three-phase ac converter that operates from the high-frequency ac bus being designed for the Space Station. A zero-voltage-switching pulse-density-modulation technique is used in the converter to shape the low-frequency output waveform.

  12. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  13. AC solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Schutten, H.P.; Benjamin, J.A.; Lade, R.W.

    1986-03-18

    An AC solar cell is described comprising: a pair of PN junction type solar cells connected in antiparallel between a pair of main terminals; and means for electrically directing light alternatingly without mechanical movement on the PN junctions to generate an alternating potential across the main terminals.

  14. AC 67 Launch Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Live footage of the Unmanned Atlas Centaur (AC) 67 launch is presented on March 26, 1987 at the WESH television station in Florida. Lightning is shown after 49 seconds into the flight. The vehicle is totally destroyed due to a cloud-to-ground lightning flash.

  15. The Effect of Lift-Drag Ratio and Speed on the Ability to Position a Gliding Aircraft for a Landing on a 5,000-Foot Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, John P.

    1959-01-01

    Flight tests were made to determine the capability of positioning a gliding airplane for a landing on a 5,000-foot runway with special reference to the gliding flight of a satellite vehicle of fixed configuration upon reentry into the earth's atmosphere. The lift-drag ratio and speed of the airplane in the glides were varied through as large a range as possible. The results showed a marked tendency to undershoot the runway when the lift-drag ratios were below certain values, depending upon the speed in the glide. A straight line dividing the successful approaches from the undershoots could be drawn through a lift-drag ratio of about 3 at 100 knots and through a lift-drag ratio of about 7 at 185 knots. Provision of a drag device would be very beneficial, particularly in reducing the tendency toward undershooting at the higher speeds.

  16. Efficacy and safety of BrushPicks, a new cleaning aid, compared to the use of Glide floss.

    PubMed

    Yankell, Samuel L; Shi, Xiuren; Emling, Robert C

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this double-blind, four-week clinical study was to evaluate the efficacy of BrushPicks, a new cleaning aid, and Glide floss on the reduction of plaque area, gingivitis and bleeding on probing, and to monitor safety when these products were used in addition to toothbrushing with an ADA-Accepted toothbrush (Oral-B P35) and an ADA-Accepted fluoride-containing dentifrice (Crest Regular). No special instructions on or supervision of product use was conducted, other than requesting twice-a-day (morning and evening) use of the assigned products. Following a baseline examination, 63 qualifying adult male and female subjects from the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania area were randomized into two groups. Subjects were also told to use their assigned dental aid after each toothbrushing. Examinations for efficacy and safety were repeated after two and four weeks' use of the products. Sixty-two subjects completed all aspects of the study. There were no untoward side effects attributed to product use, reported or observed, at the two- or four-week examination times. At baseline, there were no significant differences in plaque, gingivitis or bleeding on probing mean scores between the BrushPicks and Glide floss groups. At the two- and four-week evaluation times, both the BrushPicks and Glide floss had numerically lower plaque scores compared to baseline levels. The only statistically significant reduction (p < 0.01) was in the BrushPicks group, comparing the week two mean with the baseline value. Gingivitis (GI) at four weeks was statistically (p < 0.05) lower in the BrushPicks group as compared to the Glide floss mean value. When the changes in scores from baseline to two weeks and to four weeks were assessed, the mean GI score for the Glide floss group was significantly lower at two weeks (p < 0.01) compared to baseline, and also from two weeks to four weeks (p < 0.001). The change in mean GI score for the Glide floss group from baseline to four weeks was also

  17. Orbiter entry trajectory corridors: 32000 pound payload, 67.5 percent center of gravity. [glide path data compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treybig, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Thermal and equilibrium glide boundaries were used to analyze and/or design shuttle orbiter entry trajectories. Plots are presented of orbiter thermal and equilibrium glide boundaries in the drag/mass-relative velocity dynamic pressure-relative velocity, and altitude-relative velocity planes for an orbiter having a 32,000 pound payload and a 67.5% center of gravity location. These boundaries were defined for control points 1 through 4 of the shuttle orbiter for 40 deg-30 deg and 38 deg-28 deg ramped angle of attack entry profiles and 40 deg, 38 deg, 35 deg, 30 deg, 28 deg, and 25 deg constant angle of attack entry profiles each at 20 deg, 15 deg, and 10 deg constant body flap settings.

  18. [Successful tracheal intubation using the GlideScope AVL in a pediatric patient with Pierre Robin syndrome].

    PubMed

    Iwai, Hidetaka; Mouri, Hideyuki; Hirabayashi, Yoshihiro; Takeuchi, Mamoru

    2014-06-01

    We report a successful use of GlideScope AVL in a pediatric patient with Pierre Robin syndrome. A 36-day-old boy weighing 2.8 kg with Pierre Robin syndrome presented for tracheostomy after several weeks of trial airway management in prone position, who had failed to relieve his obstructive apnea. The Pentax-AWS videolaryngoscope equipped with the neonate Introck could not visualize his glottic opening. The GlideScope AVL single-use video laryngoscope equipping the #1 stat captured the view of the vocal cords. A tracheal tube (2.5 mm ID) with 90 degrees angled stylet, however, did not advance into the glottic opening, colliding with the anterior wall of the larynx and/or the laryngeal ventricle. Bending the tip of the stylet in a direction opposite to the inherent memory of the tube facilitated the placement of the tube into the trachea PMID:24979857

  19. The Screw-Like Movement of a Gliding Bacterium Is Powered by Spiral Motion of Cell-Surface Adhesins.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Abhishek; Roland, Thibault; Berg, Howard C

    2016-09-01

    Flavobacterium johnsoniae, a rod-shaped bacterium, glides over surfaces at speeds of ∼2 μm/s. The propulsion of a cell-surface adhesin, SprB, is known to enable gliding. We used cephalexin to generate elongated cells with irregular shapes and followed their displacement in three dimensions. These cells rolled about their long axes as they moved forward, following a right-handed trajectory. We coated gold nanoparticles with an SprB antibody and tracked them in three dimensions in an evanescent field where the nanoparticles appeared brighter when they were closer to the glass. The nanoparticles followed a right-handed spiral trajectory on the surface of the cell. Thus, if SprB were to adhere to the glass rather than to a nanoparticle, the cell would move forward along a right-handed trajectory, as observed, but in a direction opposite to that of the nanoparticle. PMID:27602728

  20. Novel Features of the Polysaccharide-Digesting Gliding Bacterium Flavobacterium johnsoniae as Revealed by Genome Sequence Analysis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Mark J.; Xie, Gary; Martens, Eric C.; Lapidus, Alla; Henrissat, Bernard; Rhodes, Ryan G.; Goltsman, Eugene; Wang, Wei; Xu, Jian; Hunnicutt, David W.; Staroscik, Andrew M.; Hoover, Timothy R.; Cheng, Yi-Qiang; Stein, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    The 6.10-Mb genome sequence of the aerobic chitin-digesting gliding bacterium Flavobacterium johnsoniae (phylum Bacteroidetes) is presented. F. johnsoniae is a model organism for studies of bacteroidete gliding motility, gene regulation, and biochemistry. The mechanism of F. johnsoniae gliding is novel, and genome analysis confirms that it does not involve well-studied motility organelles, such as flagella or type IV pili. The motility machinery is composed of Gld proteins in the cell envelope that are thought to comprise the “motor” and SprB, which is thought to function as a cell surface adhesin that is propelled by the motor. Analysis of the genome identified genes related to sprB that may encode alternative adhesins used for movement over different surfaces. Comparative genome analysis revealed that some of the gld and spr genes are found in nongliding bacteroidetes and may encode components of a novel protein secretion system. F. johnsoniae digests proteins, and 125 predicted peptidases were identified. F. johnsoniae also digests numerous polysaccharides, and 138 glycoside hydrolases, 9 polysaccharide lyases, and 17 carbohydrate esterases were predicted. The unexpected ability of F. johnsoniae to digest hemicelluloses, such as xylans, mannans, and xyloglucans, was predicted based on the genome analysis and confirmed experimentally. Numerous predicted cell surface proteins related to Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron SusC and SusD, which are likely involved in binding of oligosaccharides and transport across the outer membrane, were also identified. Genes required for synthesis of the novel outer membrane flexirubin pigments were identified by a combination of genome analysis and genetic experiments. Genes predicted to encode components of a multienzyme nonribosomal peptide synthetase were identified, as were novel aspects of gene regulation. The availability of techniques for genetic manipulation allows rapid exploration of the features identified for the

  1. Take-off and landing forces and the evolution of controlled gliding in northern flying squirrels Glaucomys sabrinus.

    PubMed

    Paskins, Keith E; Bowyer, Adrian; Megill, William M; Scheibe, John S

    2007-04-01

    Flying squirrels are well known for their ability to glide between trees at the top of a forest canopy. We present experimental performance and behavioural evidence that flight in flying squirrels may have evolved out of a need to control landing forces. Northern flying squirrels were filmed jumping from a horizontal branch to a much larger vertical pole. These were both slightly compliant (less than 1.9 mm N(-1)), and instrumented using strain gauges so that forces could be measured. Take-off and landing forces were both positively correlated with horizontal range between 0.5 and 2.5 m (r=0.355 and r=0.811, respectively, P<0.05), but not significantly different to each other at each range tested. Take-off forces ranged from 1 to 10 bodyweights, and landing forces were between 3 and 10 bodyweights. Glide angles increased rapidly with horizontal range, approaching 45 degrees at 3 m, above which they gradually decreased, suggesting that northern flying squirrels are optimised for long distance travel. We show that northern flying squirrels initiate full gliding posture at ranges of less than 1 m, without landing any higher than an equivalent ballistic projectile. However, this gliding posture enables them to pitch upwards, potentially stalling the wing, and spreads the landing reaction force over all four extended limbs. At steeper approach angles of close to 45 degrees , flying squirrels were unable to pitch up sufficiently and landed forelimbs first, consequently sustaining higher impact forces. We investigate four hypotheses to explain the origin of flight in these animals and conclude that the need to reduce landing impact forces was most likely to have stimulated the development of aerial control in flying squirrels. PMID:17401124

  2. Problems Involved in an Emergency Method of Guiding a Gliding Vehicle from High Altitudes to a High Key Position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewel, Joseph W., Jr.; Whitten, James B.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine the problems involved in an emergency method of guiding a gliding vehicle from high altitudes to a high key position (initial position) above a landing field. A jet airplane in a simulated flameout condition, conventional ground-tracking radar, and a scaled wire for guidance programming on the radar plotting board were used in the tests. Starting test altitudes varied from 30,000 feet to 46,500 feet, and starting positions ranged 8.4 to 67 nautical miles from the high key. Specified altitudes of the high key were 12,000, 10,000 or 4,000 feet. Lift-drag ratios of the aircraft of either 17, 16, or 6 were held constant during any given flight; however, for a few flights the lift-drag ratio was varied from 11 to 6. Indicated airspeeds were held constant at either 160 or 250 knots. Results from these tests indicate that a gliding vehicle having a lift-drag ratio of 16 and an indicated approach speed of 160 knots can be guided to within 800 feet vertically and 2,400 feet laterally of a high key position. When the lift-drag ratio of the vehicle is reduced to 6 and the indicated approach speed is raised to 250 knots, the radar controller was able to guide the vehicle to within 2,400 feet vertically and au feet laterally of the high key. It was also found that radar stations which give only azimuth-distance information could control the glide path of a gliding vehicle as well as stations that receive azimuth-distance-altitude information, provided that altitude information is supplied by the pilot.

  3. A Middle Triassic thoracopterid from China highlights the evolutionary origin of overwater gliding in early ray-finned fishes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guang-Hui; Zhao, Li-Jun; Shen, Chen-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Gliding adaptations in thoracopterid flying fishes represent a remarkable case of convergent evolution of overwater gliding strategy with modern exocoetid flying fishes, but the evolutionary origin of this strategy was poorly known in the thoracopterids because of lack of transitional forms. Until recently, all thoracopterids, from the Late Triassic of Austria and Italy and the Middle Triassic of South China, were highly specialized ‘four-winged’ gliders in having wing-like paired fins and an asymmetrical caudal fin with the lower caudal lobe notably larger than the upper lobe. Here, we show that the new genus Wushaichthys and the previously alleged ‘peltopleurid’ Peripeltopleurus, from the Middle Triassic (Ladinian, 235–242 Ma) of South China and near the Ladinian/Anisian boundary of southern Switzerland and northern Italy, respectively, represent the most primitive and oldest known thoracopterids. Wushaichthys, the most basal thoracopterid, shows certain derived features of this group in the skull. Peripeltopleurus shows a condition intermediate between Wushaichthys and Thoracopterus in having a slightly asymmetrical caudal fin but still lacking wing-like paired fins. Phylogenetic studies suggest that the evolution of overwater gliding of thoracopterids was gradual in nature; a four-stage adaption following the ‘cranial specialization–asymmetrical caudal fin–enlarged paired fins–scale reduction’ sequence has been recognized in thoracopterid evolution. Moreover, Wushaichthys and Peripeltopleurus bear hooklets on the anal fin of supposed males, resembling those of modern viviparious teleosts. Early thoracopterids probably had evolved a live-bearing reproductive strategy. PMID:25568155

  4. Parker Flex-It stylet is as effective as GlideRite Rigid stylet for orotracheal intubation by Glidescope

    PubMed Central

    Sheta, Saad A.; Abdelhalim, Ashraf A.; ElZoughari, Ismail A.; AlZahrani, Tariq A.; Al-Saeed, Abdulhamid H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate Parker Flex-It stylet as an alternative to GlideRite Rigid stylet to aid tracheal intubation with the Glidescope. Methods: This prospective randomized trial was conducted at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between May and December 2014. Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II patients were randomly assigned to one of 2 equal groups receiving intubation by Glidescope using either GlideRite Rigid stylet (Group GS) or Parker Flex-It stylet (Group PS). The total intubation time, ease of intubation, incidences of successful intubation at first attempt, number of intubation attempts, use of optimization maneuvers, and possible complications were recorded. Results: No significant differences between both groups regarding the total intubation time (p=0.08) was observed. Intubation was significantly easier in group PS compared with group GS as measured by visual analogue scale (p=0.001) with no significant differences between the groups regarding the rate of successful tracheal intubation from first attempt (p=0.524). However, the number of attempts at intubation and usage of external laryngeal manipulation were similar in both groups (p>0.05). The incidence of sore throat, dysphagia, hoarseness, and trauma were significantly higher in group GS (p<0.05). Conclusion: Parker Flex-It stylet is as effective as GlideRite Rigid stylet when used by experienced operators in patients with normal airways using Glidescope; however, it is easier and less traumatic. PMID:26620987

  5. CR TKA UHMWPE wear tested after artificial aging of the vitamin E treated gliding component by simulating daily patient activities.

    PubMed

    Schwiesau, Jens; Fritz, Bernhard; Kutzner, Ines; Bergmann, Georg; Grupp, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    The wear behaviour of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is dominated by two wear mechanisms: the abrasive wear and the delamination of the gliding components, where the second is strongly linked to aging processes and stress concentration in the material. The addition of vitamin E to the bulk material is a potential way to reduce the aging processes. This study evaluates the wear behaviour and delamination susceptibility of the gliding components of a vitamin E blended, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) cruciate retaining (CR) total knee arthroplasty. Daily activities such as level walking, ascending and descending stairs, bending of the knee, and sitting and rising from a chair were simulated with a data set received from an instrumented knee prosthesis. After 5 million test cycles no structural failure of the gliding components was observed. The wear rate was with 5.62 ± 0.53 mg/million cycles falling within the limit of previous reports for established wear test methods. PMID:25506594

  6. CR TKA UHMWPE Wear Tested after Artificial Aging of the Vitamin E Treated Gliding Component by Simulating Daily Patient Activities

    PubMed Central

    Schwiesau, Jens; Fritz, Bernhard; Kutzner, Ines; Bergmann, Georg; Grupp, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The wear behaviour of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is dominated by two wear mechanisms: the abrasive wear and the delamination of the gliding components, where the second is strongly linked to aging processes and stress concentration in the material. The addition of vitamin E to the bulk material is a potential way to reduce the aging processes. This study evaluates the wear behaviour and delamination susceptibility of the gliding components of a vitamin E blended, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) cruciate retaining (CR) total knee arthroplasty. Daily activities such as level walking, ascending and descending stairs, bending of the knee, and sitting and rising from a chair were simulated with a data set received from an instrumented knee prosthesis. After 5 million test cycles no structural failure of the gliding components was observed. The wear rate was with 5.62 ± 0.53 mg/million cycles falling within the limit of previous reports for established wear test methods. PMID:25506594

  7. Periodicity in Attachment Organelle Revealed by Electron Cryotomography Suggests Conformational Changes in Gliding Mechanism of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Akihiro; Matsuo, Lisa; Kato, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a pathogenic bacterium, glides on host surfaces using a unique mechanism. It forms an attachment organelle at a cell pole as a protrusion comprised of knoblike surface structures and an internal core. Here, we analyzed the three-dimensional structure of the organelle in detail by electron cryotomography. On the surface, knoblike particles formed a two-dimensional array, albeit with limited regularity. Analyses using a nonbinding mutant and an antibody showed that the knoblike particles correspond to a naplike structure that has been observed by negative-staining electron microscopy and is likely to be formed as a complex of P1 adhesin, the key protein for binding and gliding. The paired thin and thick plates feature a rigid hexagonal lattice and striations with highly variable repeat distances, respectively. The combination of variable and invariant structures in the internal core and the P1 adhesin array on the surface suggest a model in which axial extension and compression of the thick plate along a rigid thin plate is coupled with attachment to and detachment from the substrate during gliding. PMID:27073090

  8. A Middle Triassic thoracopterid from China highlights the evolutionary origin of overwater gliding in early ray-finned fishes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Hui; Zhao, Li-Jun; Shen, Chen-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Gliding adaptations in thoracopterid flying fishes represent a remarkable case of convergent evolution of overwater gliding strategy with modern exocoetid flying fishes, but the evolutionary origin of this strategy was poorly known in the thoracopterids because of lack of transitional forms. Until recently, all thoracopterids, from the Late Triassic of Austria and Italy and the Middle Triassic of South China, were highly specialized 'four-winged' gliders in having wing-like paired fins and an asymmetrical caudal fin with the lower caudal lobe notably larger than the upper lobe. Here, we show that the new genus Wushaichthys and the previously alleged 'peltopleurid' Peripeltopleurus, from the Middle Triassic (Ladinian, 235-242 Ma) of South China and near the Ladinian/Anisian boundary of southern Switzerland and northern Italy, respectively, represent the most primitive and oldest known thoracopterids. Wushaichthys, the most basal thoracopterid, shows certain derived features of this group in the skull. Peripeltopleurus shows a condition intermediate between Wushaichthys and Thoracopterus in having a slightly asymmetrical caudal fin but still lacking wing-like paired fins. Phylogenetic studies suggest that the evolution of overwater gliding of thoracopterids was gradual in nature; a four-stage adaption following the 'cranial specialization-asymmetrical caudal fin-enlarged paired fins-scale reduction' sequence has been recognized in thoracopterid evolution. Moreover, Wushaichthys and Peripeltopleurus bear hooklets on the anal fin of supposed males, resembling those of modern viviparious teleosts. Early thoracopterids probably had evolved a live-bearing reproductive strategy. PMID:25568155

  9. Physical characteristics of gliding arc discharge plasma generated in a laval nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S. Y.; Sun, X. M.; Li, X. D.; Yan, J. H.; Du, C. M.

    2012-07-15

    The dynamic behavior of gliding arc discharge generated in a Laval nozzle has been investigated by electrical diagnostics and a high-speed camera. The results show that the voltage waveform keeps the initial shape as the gas flow rate is small, while it becomes less stable with increasing flow rate. During the first half of a cycle, the voltage rises and after that it decreases. In nitrogen and oxygen, the break down voltage for the arc is between 3.3 and 5.5 kV, while it is between 3.3-7.5 kV in air. The waveform of current I remains almost stable; and for nitrogen and oxygen, the maximum value of current I is between 0.28 and 0.46 A. With increasing flow rate, the power consumption in air first increases and then decreases; it remains in the range of 110-217 W, and gradually increases in nitrogen and oxygen. The power consumption in oxygen is lower than that in nitrogen; the input of the energy density decreases with increasing flow rate for all the three gases. The development of the arc is tracked and recorded by a high-speed camera. The cycle is stable at 10 ms for flow rates up to 1 m{sup 3} h{sup -1}. At a higher flow rate, the cycle becomes unstable.

  10. The mercury resistance (mer) operon in a marine gliding flavobacterium, Tenacibaculum discolor 9A5.

    PubMed

    Allen, Rachel C; Tu, Yen-Kuei; Nevarez, Michael J; Bobbs, Alexander S; Friesen, Joseph W; Lorsch, Jon R; McCauley, John A; Voet, Judith G; Hamlett, Nancy V

    2013-01-01

    Genes conferring mercury resistance have been investigated in a variety of bacteria and archaea but not in bacteria of the phylum Bacteroidetes, despite their importance in many environments. We found, however, that a marine gliding Bacteroidetes species, Tenacibaculum discolor, was the predominant mercury-resistant bacterial taxon cultured from a salt marsh fertilized with mercury-contaminated sewage sludge. Here we report characterization of the mercuric reductase and the narrow-spectrum mercury resistance (mer) operon from one of these strains - T. discolor 9A5. This mer operon, which confers mercury resistance when cloned into Flavobacterium johnsoniae, encodes a novel mercury-responsive ArsR/SmtB family transcriptional regulator that appears to have evolved independently from other mercury-responsive regulators, a novel putative transport protein consisting of a fusion between the integral membrane Hg(II) transporter MerT and the periplasmic Hg(II)-binding protein MerP, an additional MerP protein, and a mercuric reductase that is phylogenetically distinct from other known mercuric reductases. PMID:22816663

  11. A computational study of the aerodynamic performance of a dragonfly wing section in gliding flight.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Abel; Mittal, Rajat; Dong, Haibo

    2008-06-01

    A comprehensive computational fluid-dynamics-based study of a pleated wing section based on the wing of Aeshna cyanea has been performed at ultra-low Reynolds numbers corresponding to the gliding flight of these dragonflies. In addition to the pleated wing, simulations have also been carried out for its smoothed counterpart (called the 'profiled' airfoil) and a flat plate in order to better understand the aerodynamic performance of the pleated wing. The simulations employ a sharp interface Cartesian-grid-based immersed boundary method, and a detailed critical assessment of the computed results was performed giving a high measure of confidence in the fidelity of the current simulations. The simulations demonstrate that the pleated airfoil produces comparable and at times higher lift than the profiled airfoil, with a drag comparable to that of its profiled counterpart. The higher lift and moderate drag associated with the pleated airfoil lead to an aerodynamic performance that is at least equivalent to and sometimes better than the profiled airfoil. The primary cause for the reduction in the overall drag of the pleated airfoil is the negative shear drag produced by the recirculation zones which form within the pleats. The current numerical simulations therefore clearly demonstrate that the pleated wing is an ingenious design of nature, which at times surpasses the aerodynamic performance of a more conventional smooth airfoil as well as that of a flat plate. For this reason, the pleated airfoil is an excellent candidate for a fixed wing micro-aerial vehicle design. PMID:18503106

  12. Nitrogen dioxide formation in the gliding arc discharge-assisted decomposition of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Bo, Zheng; Yan, Jianhua; Li, Xiaodong; Chi, Yong; Cen, Kefa

    2009-07-30

    To apply gliding arc discharge (GAD) plasma processing to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emission control, the formation of NO(2) as an undesired byproduct needs to be addressed. Comparative results of effluent temperature and product concentrations between experiment and thermodynamic equilibrium calculation show that the NO(2) formation in dry air GAD is totally out of thermodynamic equilibrium. Meanwhile, obvious NO (A(2)Sigma+)) and N(2)(+) (B(2)Sigma(u)(+)) are detected as the major reactive species in the dry air GAD plasma region. These results suggest that the thermal (or Zeldovich) NO(x) formation mechanism is not significant in GAD system, while the energy level and the density of electrons in the plasma region will severely influence the NO(2) formation. The presence of 500 ppm VOCs in the feed gases shows a limiting influence on the NO(2) formation, which is in the order of aromatic hydrocarbon (C(6)H(6) and C(7)H(8))>straight-chain hydrocarbon (C(4)H(10) and C(6)H(14))>halogenated hydrocarbon (CCl(4)). The influences of VOCs chemical structure, supply voltage, feed gas humidity, and reactor geometry on NO(2) formation are investigated, and the results correspond to above mechanism analysis. Based on the above, the possible pathways of the inhibition of NO(2) formation in GAD-assisted VOCs decomposition process are discussed. PMID:19153003

  13. Removal of gaseous HxCBz by gliding arc plasma in combination with a catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yong; Li, Xiaodong; Ji, Shasha; Lu, Shengyong; Buekens, Alfons; Yan, Jianhua

    2014-12-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HxCBz) owns the chemical structure of one benzene ring and six H atoms substituted by Cl atoms and it is a persistent organic pollutant present in flue gas from municipal solid waste incineration as an important precursor of dioxins. Its removal was studied using gliding arc plasma treatment, coupled downstream with a V2O5–WO3–TiO2 catalyst. Several parameters (input voltage, O2 concentration, catalytic temperature and catalyst position) all influenced its removal efficiency (RE). Optimal parameter settings were tentatively determined, i.e., an input voltage of 15 kV, the temperature of the catalyst (250 °C), and the O2 concentration (30 vol% O2) tested at a single, fixed concentration of gaseous HxCBz (71.6 ng Nm−3). A maximum RE of 76 ± 3% HxCBz was attained, with the plasma and coupled catalyst combined. Two destruction pathways, incorporating dechlorination and oxidation reactions, were recognised, both based on the detection of end- and intermediate products as well as of active species produced by the plasma. These end- and intermediate products included: low chlorinated polychlorobenzenes (mainly 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene) as well as hydrocarbons (mainly C2H6), HCOOH, CH4, CO, CO2, etc. PMID:25461941

  14. Dislocation gliding and cross-hatch morphology formation in AIII-BV epitaxial heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalskiy, V. A. Vergeles, P. S.; Eremenko, V. G.; Fokin, D. A.

    2014-12-08

    An approach for understanding the origin of cross-hatch pattern (CHP) on the surface of lattice mismatched GaMnAs/InGaAs samples grown on GaAs (001) substrates is developed. It is argued that the motion of threading dislocations in the (111) slip planes during the relaxation of InGaAs buffer layer is more complicated process and its features are similar to the ones of dislocation half-loops gliding in plastically deformed crystals. The heterostructures were characterized by atomic force microscopy and electron beam induced current (EBIC). Detailed EBIC experiments revealed contrast features, which cannot be accounted for by the electrical activity of misfit dislocations at the buffer/substrate interface. We attribute these features to specific extended defects (EDs) generated by moving threading dislocations in the partially relaxed InGaAs layers. We believe that the core topology, surface reconstruction, and elastic strains from these EDs accommodated in slip planes play an important role in the CHP formation. The study of such electrically active EDs will allow further understanding of degradation and changes in characteristics of quantum devices based on strained heterostructures.

  15. On-chip microtubule gliding assay for parallel measurement of tau protein species.

    PubMed

    Subramaniyan Parimalam, Subhathirai; Tarhan, Mehmet C; Karsten, Stanislav L; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Shintaku, Hirofumi; Kotera, Hidetoshi; Yokokawa, Ryuji

    2016-04-26

    Tau protein is a well-established biomarker for a group of neurodegenerative diseases collectively called tauopathies. So far, clinically relevant detection of tau species in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cannot be achieved without immunological methods. Recently, it was shown that different tau isoforms including the ones carrying various types of mutations affect microtubule (MT)-kinesin binding and velocity in an isoform specific manner. Here, based on these observations, we developed a microfluidic device to analyze tau mutations, isoforms and their ratios. The assay device consists of three regions: a MT reservoir which captures MTs from a solution to a kinesin-coated surface, a microchannel which guides gliding MTs, and an arrowhead-shaped collector which concentrates MTs. Tau-bound fluorescently labeled MTs (tau-MTs) were assayed, and the increase in fluorescence intensity (FI) corresponding to the total number of MTs accumulated was measured at the collector. We show that our device is capable of differentiating 3R and 4R tau isoform ratios and effects of point mutations within 5 minutes. Furthermore, radially oriented collector regions enable simultaneous FI measurements for six independent assays. Performing parallel assays in the proposed device with minimal image processing provides a cost-efficient, easy-to-use and fast tau detection platform. PMID:27056640

  16. Leaping shampoo glides on a 500-nm-thick lubricating air layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Erqiang; Lee, Sanghyun; Marston, Jeremy; Bonito, Andrea; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2013-11-01

    When a stream of shampoo is fed onto a pool in one's hand, a jet can leap sideways or rebound from the liquid surface in an intriguing phenomenon known as the Kaye effect. Earlier studies have debated whether non-Newtonian effects are the underlying cause of this phenomenon, making the jet glide on top of a shear-thinning liquid layer, or whether an entrained air layer is responsible. Herein we show unambiguously that the jet slides on a lubricating air layer [Lee et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 061001 (2013)]. We identify this layer by looking through the pool liquid and observing its rupture into fine micro-bubbles. The resulting micro-bubble sizes suggest that the thickness of this air layer is around 500 nm. This thickness estimate is also supported by the tangential deceleration of the jet during the rebounding, with the shear stress within the thin air layer sufficient for the observed deceleration. Particle tracking within the jet shows uniform velocity, with no pronounced shear, which would be required for shear-thinning effects. The role of the surfactant may primarily be to stabilize the air film.

  17. Collective behavior of minus-ended motors in mitotic microtubule asters gliding toward DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athale, Chaitanya A.; Dinarina, Ana; Nedelec, Francois; Karsenti, Eric

    2014-02-01

    Microtubules (MTs) nucleated by centrosomes form star-shaped structures referred to as asters. Aster motility and dynamics is vital for genome stability, cell division, polarization and differentiation. Asters move either toward the cell center or away from it. Here, we focus on the centering mechanism in a membrane independent system of Xenopus cytoplasmic egg extracts. Using live microscopy and single particle tracking, we find that asters move toward chromatinized DNA structures. The velocity and directionality profiles suggest a random-walk with drift directed toward DNA. We have developed a theoretical model that can explain this movement as a result of a gradient of MT length dynamics and MT gliding on immobilized dynein motors. In simulations, the antagonistic action of the motor species on the radial array of MTs leads to a tug-of-war purely due to geometric considerations and aster motility resembles a directed random-walk. Additionally, our model predicts that aster velocities do not change greatly with varying initial distance from DNA. The movement of asymmetric asters becomes increasingly super-diffusive with increasing motor density, but for symmetric asters it becomes less super-diffusive. The transition of symmetric asters from superdiffusive to diffusive mobility is the result of number fluctuations in bound motors in the tug-of-war. Overall, our model is in good agreement with experimental data in Xenopus cytoplasmic extracts and predicts novel features of the collective effects of motor-MT interactions.

  18. Collective behavior of minus-ended motors in mitotic microtubule asters gliding toward DNA.

    PubMed

    Athale, Chaitanya A; Dinarina, Ana; Nedelec, Francois; Karsenti, Eric

    2014-02-01

    Microtubules (MTs) nucleated by centrosomes form star-shaped structures referred to as asters. Aster motility and dynamics is vital for genome stability, cell division, polarization and differentiation. Asters move either toward the cell center or away from it. Here, we focus on the centering mechanism in a membrane independent system of Xenopus cytoplasmic egg extracts. Using live microscopy and single particle tracking, we find that asters move toward chromatinized DNA structures. The velocity and directionality profiles suggest a random-walk with drift directed toward DNA. We have developed a theoretical model that can explain this movement as a result of a gradient of MT length dynamics and MT gliding on immobilized dynein motors. In simulations, the antagonistic action of the motor species on the radial array of MTs leads to a tug-of-war purely due to geometric considerations and aster motility resembles a directed random-walk. Additionally, our model predicts that aster velocities do not change greatly with varying initial distance from DNA. The movement of asymmetric asters becomes increasingly super-diffusive with increasing motor density, but for symmetric asters it becomes less super-diffusive. The transition of symmetric asters from superdiffusive to diffusive mobility is the result of number fluctuations in bound motors in the tug-of-war. Overall, our model is in good agreement with experimental data in Xenopus cytoplasmic extracts and predicts novel features of the collective effects of motor-MT interactions. PMID:24476749

  19. Genome sequence of the filamentous, gliding Thiothrix nivea neotype strain (JP2T)

    PubMed Central

    Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Abt, Birte; Verbarg, Susanne; Göker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Thiothrix nivea (Rabenhorst 1865) Winogradsky 1888 (Approved Lists 1980) emend. Larkin and Shinabarger 1983 is the type species of the genus Thiothrix in the family Thiotrichaceae. The species is of interest not only because of its isolated location in the yet to be genomically characterized region of the tree of life, but also because of its life-style with gliding gonidia, the multilayer sheath, rosettes, and the embedded sulfur granules. Strain JP2T is the neotype strain of the species which was first observed by Rabenhorst in 1865 and later reclassified by Winogradsky in 1888 into the then novel genus Thiothrix. This is the first completed (improved-high-quality-draft) genome sequence to be published of a member of the family Thiotrichaceae. The genome in its current assembly consists of 15 contigs in four scaffolds with a total of 4,691,711 bp bearing 4,542 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:22675589

  20. Dislocation gliding and cross-hatch morphology formation in AIII-BV epitaxial heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalskiy, V. A.; Vergeles, P. S.; Eremenko, V. G.; Fokin, D. A.; Dorokhin, M. V.; Danilov, Yu. A.; Zvonkov, B. N.

    2014-12-01

    An approach for understanding the origin of cross-hatch pattern (CHP) on the surface of lattice mismatched GaMnAs/InGaAs samples grown on GaAs (001) substrates is developed. It is argued that the motion of threading dislocations in the {111} slip planes during the relaxation of InGaAs buffer layer is more complicated process and its features are similar to the ones of dislocation half-loops gliding in plastically deformed crystals. The heterostructures were characterized by atomic force microscopy and electron beam induced current (EBIC). Detailed EBIC experiments revealed contrast features, which cannot be accounted for by the electrical activity of misfit dislocations at the buffer/substrate interface. We attribute these features to specific extended defects (EDs) generated by moving threading dislocations in the partially relaxed InGaAs layers. We believe that the core topology, surface reconstruction, and elastic strains from these EDs accommodated in slip planes play an important role in the CHP formation. The study of such electrically active EDs will allow further understanding of degradation and changes in characteristics of quantum devices based on strained heterostructures.

  1. Kinesin force generation measured using a centrifuge microscope sperm-gliding motility assay.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, K; Cole, D; Yeh, Y; Baskin, R J

    1996-01-01

    To measure force generation and characterize the relationship between force and velocity in kinesin-driven motility we have developed a centrifuge microscope sperm-gliding motility assay. The average (extrapolated) value of maximum isometric force at low kinesin density was 0.90 +/- 0.14 pN. Furthermore, in the experiments at low kinesin density, sperm pulled off before stall at forces between 0.40 and 0.75 pN. To further characterize our kinesin-demembranated sperm assay we estimated maximum isometric force using a laser trap-based assay. At low kinesin density, 4.34 +/- 1.5 pN was the maximum force. Using values of axoneme stiffness available from other studies, we concluded that, in our centrifuge microscope-based assay, a sperm axoneme functions as a lever arm, magnifying the centrifugal force and leading to pull-off before stall. In addition, drag of the distal portion of the axoneme is increased by the centrifugal force (because the axoneme is rotated into closer proximity to the glass surface) and represents an additional force that the kinesin motor must overcome. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 PMID:8968616

  2. Impulse Three Phase Power Supply Used for a Gliding Plasma Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Torres, J. A.; Pacheco-Sotelo, J.; Valdivia-Barrientos, R.; Pacheco-Pacheco, M.; Ramos-Flores, F.; Soria-Arguello, G.; Ibañez-Olvera, M.

    2015-03-01

    Power sources used for generating plasma have different configurations depending on the particular application; the aim here comprises the maximum energy transfer to the plasma discharge reaching. This work shows the performance and versatility of a simple impulse phase power source, applied to gliding arc plasma discharge. It is capable of changing the operating frequency from 5 kHz up to 150 kHz and the duty cycle from 1% to 33% in all three phases, each one connected to three divergent tungsten electrodes. This allows a soft start plasma ignition until the full load is reached. This converter uses a sequential logic circuits composed by flip-flops, gates drivers, IGBT's and high voltage ferrite transformers. These features facilitate the maximum energy transfer to the plasma without using more complex electronic structures. The effect of frequency, duty cycle, voltage and current wave form signals is here described. This power supply has the adaptability to work whit different type of gas such as Argon, Helium, Air and Nitrogen. A Matlab Simulink simulation validates the experimental results. The main features and advantages of this configuration are also defined.

  3. Physical characteristics of gliding arc discharge plasma generated in a laval nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, S. Y.; Sun, X. M.; Li, X. D.; Yan, J. H.; Du, C. M.

    2012-07-01

    The dynamic behavior of gliding arc discharge generated in a Laval nozzle has been investigated by electrical diagnostics and a high-speed camera. The results show that the voltage waveform keeps the initial shape as the gas flow rate is small, while it becomes less stable with increasing flow rate. During the first half of a cycle, the voltage rises and after that it decreases. In nitrogen and oxygen, the break down voltage for the arc is between 3.3 and 5.5 kV, while it is between 3.3-7.5 kV in air. The waveform of current I remains almost stable; and for nitrogen and oxygen, the maximum value of current I is between 0.28 and 0.46 A. With increasing flow rate, the power consumption in air first increases and then decreases; it remains in the range of 110-217 W, and gradually increases in nitrogen and oxygen. The power consumption in oxygen is lower than that in nitrogen; the input of the energy density decreases with increasing flow rate for all the three gases. The development of the arc is tracked and recorded by a high-speed camera. The cycle is stable at 10 ms for flow rates up to 1 m3 h-1. At a higher flow rate, the cycle becomes unstable.

  4. Genome sequence of the filamentous, gliding Thiothrix nivea neotype strain (JP2T)

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Abt, Birte; Verbarg, Susanne; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Thiothrix nivea (Rabenhorst 1865) Winogradsky 1888 (Approved Lists 1980) emend. Larkin and Shinabarger 1983 is the type species of the genus Thiothrix in the family Thiotrichaceae. The species is of interest not only because of its isolated location in the yet to be genomically characterized region of the tree of life, but also because of its life-style with gliding gonidia, the multilayer sheath, rosettes, and the embedded sulfur granules. Strain JP2T is the neotype strain of the species which was first observed by Rabenhorst in 1865 and later reclassified by Winogradsky in 1888 into the then novel genus Thiothrix. This is the first completed (im- proved-high-quality-draft) genome sequence to be published of a member of the family Thio- trichaceae. The genome in its current assembly consists of 15 contigs in four scaffolds with a total of 4,691,711 bp bearing 4,542 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  5. AC power systems handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, J.

    1991-01-01

    Transient disturbances are what headaches are made of. Whatever you call them-spikes, surges, are power bumps-they can take your equipment down and leave you with a complicated and expensive repair job. Protection against transient disturbances is a science that demands attention to detail. This book explains how the power distribution system works, what can go wrong with it, and how to protect a facility against abnormalities. system grounding and shielding are covered in detail. Each major method of transient protection is analyzed and its relative merits discussed. The book provides a complete look at the critical elements of the ac power system. Provides a complete look at the ac power system from generation to consumption. Discusses the mechanisms that produce transient disturbances and how to protect against them. Presents diagrams to facilitate system design. Covers new areas, such as the extent of the transient disturbance problem, transient protection options, and stand-by power systems.

  6. Aerodynamics of the flying snake Chrysopelea paradisi: how a bluff body cross-sectional shape contributes to gliding performance.

    PubMed

    Holden, Daniel; Socha, John J; Cardwell, Nicholas D; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2014-02-01

    A prominent feature of gliding flight in snakes of the genus Chrysopelea is the unique cross-sectional shape of the body, which acts as the lifting surface in the absence of wings. When gliding, the flying snake Chrysopelea paradisi morphs its circular cross-section into a triangular shape by splaying its ribs and flattening its body in the dorsoventral axis, forming a geometry with fore-aft symmetry and a thick profile. Here, we aimed to understand the aerodynamic properties of the snake's cross-sectional shape to determine its contribution to gliding at low Reynolds numbers. We used a straight physical model in a water tunnel to isolate the effects of 2D shape, analogously to studying the profile of an airfoil of a more typical flyer. Force measurements and time-resolved (TR) digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) were used to determine lift and drag coefficients, wake dynamics and vortex-shedding characteristics of the shape across a behaviorally relevant range of Reynolds numbers and angles of attack. The snake's cross-sectional shape produced a maximum lift coefficient of 1.9 and maximum lift-to-drag ratio of 2.7, maintained increases in lift up to 35 deg, and exhibited two distinctly different vortex-shedding modes. Within the measured Reynolds number regime (Re=3000-15,000), this geometry generated significantly larger maximum lift coefficients than many other shapes including bluff bodies, thick airfoils, symmetric airfoils and circular arc airfoils. In addition, the snake's shape exhibited a gentle stall region that maintained relatively high lift production even up to the highest angle of attack tested (60 deg). Overall, the cross-sectional geometry of the flying snake demonstrated robust aerodynamic behavior by maintaining significant lift production and near-maximum lift-to-drag ratios over a wide range of parameters. These aerodynamic characteristics help to explain how the snake can glide at steep angles and over a wide range of angles of attack

  7. Graphene Oxide-Assisted Synthesis of Microsized Ultrathin Single-Crystalline Anatase TiO2 Nanosheets and Their Application in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Biao; Sha, Junwei; Li, Wei; He, Fang; Liu, Enzuo; Shi, Chunsheng; He, Chunnian; Li, Jiajun; Zhao, Naiqin

    2016-02-01

    High-quality microsized ultrathin single-crystalline anatase TiO2 nanosheets (MS-TiO2) with exposed {001} facets were synthesized by a facile and low-cost two-step process that combines a graphene oxide (GO)-assisted hydrothermal method with calcination. Both GO and HF play an important role in the formation of well dispersed MS-TiO2. As a novel microsized (1-4 μm) ultrathin two-dimensional (2D) material, MS-TiO2 possesses much higher lateral size and aspect ratio compared to common 2D nanosized (30-60 nm) ultrathin TiO2 nanosheets (NS-TiO2), resulting in excellent electronic conductivity and superior electron transfer and diffusion properties. Here, we fabricated MS-TiO2 and NS-TiO2, both of which were incorporated with the TiO2 nanoparticles (P25) to constitute the hybrid photoanode of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), and explored the effect of the lateral size (nano- and micro-) of ultrathin TiO2 nanosheets on their electron transfer and diffusion properties. Benefiting from the faster electron transfer rate and short diffusion path of the MS-TiO2, the MS-TiO2/P25 gains the more superior performance compared to pure P25 and NS-TiO2/P25 in the application of DSSCs. Moreover, it is expected that the novel high aspect ratio MS-TiO2 may be applied in diverse fields including photocatalysis, photodetectors, lithium-ion batteries and others concerning the environment and energy. PMID:26745514

  8. Source locations of teleseismic P, SV, and SH waves observed in microseisms recorded by a large aperture seismic array in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiaoxia; Koper, Keith D.; Burlacu, Relu; Ni, Sidao; Wang, Fuyun; Zou, Changqiao; Wei, Yunhao; Gal, Martin; Reading, Anya M.

    2016-09-01

    Transversely polarized seismic waves are routinely observed in ambient seismic energy across a wide range of periods, however their origin is poorly understood because the corresponding source regions are either undefined or weakly constrained, and nearly all models of microseism generation incorporate a vertically oriented single force as the excitation mechanism. To better understand the origin of transversely polarized energy in the ambient seismic wavefield we make the first systematic attempt to locate the source regions of teleseismic SH waves observed in microseismic (2.5-20 s) noise. We focus on body waves instead of surface waves because the source regions can be constrained in both azimuth and distance using conventional array techniques. To locate microseismic sources of SH waves (as well as SV and P waves) we continuously backproject the vertical, radial, and transverse components of the ambient seismic wavefield recorded by a large-aperture array deployed in China during 2013-2014. As expected, persistent P wave sources are observed in the North Atlantic, North Pacific, and Indian Oceans, mainly at periods of 2.5-10 s, in regions with the strong ocean wave interactions needed to produce secondary microseisms. SV waves are commonly observed to originate from locations indistinguishable from the P wave sources, but with smaller signal-to-noise ratios. We also observe SH waves with about half or less the signal-to-noise ratio of SV waves. SH source regions are definitively located in deep water portions of the Pacific, away from the sloping continental shelves that are thought to be important for the generation of microseismic Love waves, but nearby regions that routinely generate teleseismic P waves. The excitation mechanism for the observed SH waves may therefore be related to the interaction of P waves with small-wavelength bathymetric features, such as seamounts and basins, through some sort of scattering process.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics vs. inverse dynamics methods to determine passive drag in two breaststroke glide positions.

    PubMed

    Costa, L; Mantha, V R; Silva, A J; Fernandes, R J; Marinho, D A; Vilas-Boas, J P; Machado, L; Rouboa, A

    2015-07-16

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) plays an important role to quantify, understand and "observe" the water movements around the human body and its effects on drag (D). We aimed to investigate the flow effects around the swimmer and to compare the drag and drag coefficient (CD) values obtained from experiments (using cable velocimetry in a swimming pool) with those of CFD simulations for the two ventral gliding positions assumed during the breaststroke underwater cycle (with shoulders flexed and upper limbs extended above the head-GP1; with shoulders in neutral position and upper limbs extended along the trunk-GP2). Six well-trained breaststroke male swimmers (with reasonable homogeneity of body characteristics) participated in the experimental tests; afterwards a 3D swimmer model was created to fit within the limits of the sample body size profile. The standard k-ε turbulent model was used to simulate the fluid flow around the swimmer model. Velocity ranged from 1.30 to 1.70 m/s for GP1 and 1.10 to 1.50 m/s for GP2. Values found for GP1 and GP2 were lower for CFD than experimental ones. Nevertheless, both CFD and experimental drag/drag coefficient values displayed a tendency to jointly increase/decrease with velocity, except for GP2 CD where CFD and experimental values display opposite tendencies. Results suggest that CFD values obtained by single model approaches should be considered with caution due to small body shape and dimension differences to real swimmers. For better accuracy of CFD studies, realistic individual 3D models of swimmers are required, and specific kinematics respected. PMID:26087879

  10. An aeroelastic instability provides a possible basis for the transition from gliding to flapping flight

    PubMed Central

    Curet, Oscar M.; Swartz, Sharon M.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2013-01-01

    The morphology, kinematics and stiffness properties of lifting surfaces play a key role in the aerodynamic performance of vertebrate flight. These surfaces, as a result of their flexible nature, may move both actively, owing to muscle contraction, and passively, in reaction to fluid forces. However, the nature and implications of this fluid–structure interaction are not well understood. Here, we study passive flight (flight with no active wing actuation) and explore a physical mechanism that leads to the emergence of a natural flapping motion. We model a vertebrate wing with a compliant shoulder and the ability to camber with an idealized physical model consisting of a cantilevered flat plate with a hinged trailing flap. We find that at low wind speed the wing is stationary, but at a critical speed the wing spontaneously flaps. The lift coefficient is significantly enhanced once the wing starts to oscillate, although this increase in lift generation is accompanied by an increase in drag. Flow visualization suggests that a strong leading edge vortex attached to the wing during downstroke is the primary mechanism responsible for the enhanced lift. The flapping instability we observe suggests a possible scenario for an evolutionary transition from gliding to powered flapping flight in animals that possess compliant wings capable of passive camber. Although the flapping state is accompanied by a lower lift-to-drag ratio, the increased lifting capability it confers might have enabled increased body mass, improved foraging performance and/or flight at lower speeds, any of which might have been selectively advantageous. PMID:23303221

  11. Measuring the number and spacing of molecular motors propelling a gliding microtubule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallesen, Todd L.; Macosko, Jed C.; Holzwarth, G.

    2011-01-01

    The molecular motor gliding assay, in which a microtubule or other filament moves across a surface coated with motors, has provided much insight into how molecular motors work. The kinesin-microtubule system is also a strong candidate for the job of nanoparticle transporter in nanotechnology devices. In most cases, several motors transport each filament. Each motor serves both to bind the microtubule to a stationary surface and to propel the microtubule along the surface. By applying a uniform transverse force of 4-19 pN to a superparamagnetic bead attached to the trailing end of the microtubule, we have measured the distance d between binding points (motors). The average value of d was determined as a function of motor surface density σ. The measurements agree well with the scaling model of Duke, Holy, and Liebler, which predicts that ~σ-2/5 if 0.05⩽σ⩽20μm-2 [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.74.330 74, 330 (1995)]. The distribution of d fits an extension of the model. The radius of curvature of a microtubule bent at a binding point by the force of the magnetic bead was ≈1 μm, 5000-fold smaller than the radius of curvature of microtubules subjected only to thermal forces. This is evidence that at these points of high bending stress, generated by the force on the magnetic bead, the microtubule is in the more flexible state of a two-state model of microtubule bending proposed by Heussinger, Schüller, and Frey [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.81.021904 81, 021904 (2010)].

  12. Identification of /sup 233/Ac

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y.Y.; Zhou, M.L.

    1983-09-01

    We report in this paper identification of the new isotope /sup 233/Ac. Uranium targets were irradiated with 28 GeV protons; after rapid retrieval of the target and separation of actinium from thorium, /sup 233/Ac was allowed to decay into the known /sup 233/Th daughter. Exhaustive chemical purification was employed to permit the identification of /sup 233/Th via its characteristic ..gamma.. radiations. The half-life derived for /sup 233/Ac from several experiments is 2.3 +- 0.3 min. The production cross section for /sup 233/Ac is 100 ..mu..b.

  13. AC resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, P.J.

    1983-10-04

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument. 8 figs.

  14. AC Resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument.

  15. Functional Conservation of the Glide/Gcm Regulatory Network Controlling Glia, Hemocyte, and Tendon Cell Differentiation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Cattenoz, Pierre B.; Popkova, Anna; Southall, Tony D.; Aiello, Giuseppe; Brand, Andrea H.; Giangrande, Angela

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens allow us to understand how transcription factors trigger developmental processes, including cell specification. A major challenge is identification of their binding sites because feedback loops and homeostatic interactions may mask the direct impact of those factors in transcriptome analyses. Moreover, this approach dissects the downstream signaling cascades and facilitates identification of conserved transcriptional programs. Here we show the results and the validation of a DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID) genome-wide screen that identifies the direct targets of Glide/Gcm, a potent transcription factor that controls glia, hemocyte, and tendon cell differentiation in Drosophila. The screen identifies many genes that had not been previously associated with Glide/Gcm and highlights three major signaling pathways interacting with Glide/Gcm: Notch, Hedgehog, and JAK/STAT, which all involve feedback loops. Furthermore, the screen identifies effector molecules that are necessary for cell-cell interactions during late developmental processes and/or in ontogeny. Typically, immunoglobulin (Ig) domain–containing proteins control cell adhesion and axonal navigation. This shows that early and transiently expressed fate determinants not only control other transcription factors that, in turn, implement a specific developmental program but also directly affect late developmental events and cell function. Finally, while the mammalian genome contains two orthologous Gcm genes, their function has been demonstrated in vertebrate-specific tissues, placenta, and parathyroid glands, begging questions on the evolutionary conservation of the Gcm cascade in higher organisms. Here we provide the first evidence for the conservation of Gcm direct targets in humans. In sum, this work uncovers novel aspects of cell specification and sets the basis for further understanding of the role of conserved Gcm gene regulatory cascades. PMID:26567182

  16. Plasma-catalytic hybrid system using spouted bed with a gliding arc discharge: CH4 reforming as a model reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Sekiguchi, H.

    2011-07-01

    A combination of a gliding arc discharge and a spouted catalytic bed was used to investigate a plasma-catalytic hybrid system using CH4 reforming as a model reaction. Alumina-supported catalysts that contained 0.5 wt% of Pt, Pd, Rh, and Ru (denoted as Pt/Al2O3, Pd/Al2O3, Rh/Al2O3 and Ru/Al2O3, respectively) were used. For comparison, active Al2O3 particles were also examined. The conversion of CH4 and the selectivity of the product were investigated by changing the feed flow rate and reaction time. The production of C2H2, H2 and soot was observed in the gliding arc discharge without a catalyst. Using Pt/Al2O3 and Pd/Al2O3with the gliding arc discharge, C2H4, C2H6 and C2H2 were produced. It is considered that C2H4 and C2H6 were formed by the hydrogenation of C2H2 on the active site of Pt/Al2O3 and Pd/Al2O3. A stronger resistance to deactivation was shown in the presence of Pd/Al2O3 than in the presence of Pt/Al2O3, whereas the selectivity of hydrocarbon using Rh/Al2O3 and Ru/Al2O3 showed a tendency similar to that in active Al2O3 and non-catalytic experiments. The proposed reactor has a potential to improve the selectivity of the plasma process.

  17. Functional Conservation of the Glide/Gcm Regulatory Network Controlling Glia, Hemocyte, and Tendon Cell Differentiation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Cattenoz, Pierre B; Popkova, Anna; Southall, Tony D; Aiello, Giuseppe; Brand, Andrea H; Giangrande, Angela

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens allow us to understand how transcription factors trigger developmental processes, including cell specification. A major challenge is identification of their binding sites because feedback loops and homeostatic interactions may mask the direct impact of those factors in transcriptome analyses. Moreover, this approach dissects the downstream signaling cascades and facilitates identification of conserved transcriptional programs. Here we show the results and the validation of a DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID) genome-wide screen that identifies the direct targets of Glide/Gcm, a potent transcription factor that controls glia, hemocyte, and tendon cell differentiation in Drosophila. The screen identifies many genes that had not been previously associated with Glide/Gcm and highlights three major signaling pathways interacting with Glide/Gcm: Notch, Hedgehog, and JAK/STAT, which all involve feedback loops. Furthermore, the screen identifies effector molecules that are necessary for cell-cell interactions during late developmental processes and/or in ontogeny. Typically, immunoglobulin (Ig) domain-containing proteins control cell adhesion and axonal navigation. This shows that early and transiently expressed fate determinants not only control other transcription factors that, in turn, implement a specific developmental program but also directly affect late developmental events and cell function. Finally, while the mammalian genome contains two orthologous Gcm genes, their function has been demonstrated in vertebrate-specific tissues, placenta, and parathyroid glands, begging questions on the evolutionary conservation of the Gcm cascade in higher organisms. Here we provide the first evidence for the conservation of Gcm direct targets in humans. In sum, this work uncovers novel aspects of cell specification and sets the basis for further understanding of the role of conserved Gcm gene regulatory cascades. PMID:26567182

  18. Cooling Floor AC Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Lu; Hao, Ding; Hong, Zhang; Ce, Gao Dian

    The present HVAC equipments for the residential buildings in the Hot-summer-and-Cold-winter climate region are still at a high energy consuming level. So that the high efficiency HVAC system is an urgently need for achieving the preset government energy saving goal. With its advantage of highly sanitary, highly comfortable and uniform of temperature field, the hot-water resource floor radiation heating system has been widely accepted. This paper has put forward a new way in air-conditioning, which combines the fresh-air supply unit and such floor radiation system for the dehumidification and cooling in summer or heating in winter. By analyze its advantages and limitations, we found that this so called Cooling/ Heating Floor AC System can improve the IAQ of residential building while keep high efficiency quality. We also recommend a methodology for the HVAC system designing, which will ensure the reduction of energy cost of users.

  19. Digital ac monitor

    DOEpatents

    Hart, George W.; Kern, Jr., Edward C.

    1987-06-09

    An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog ac circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer.

  20. Thermionic triode generates ac power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniazzeh, A. G. F.; Scharz, F. C.

    1970-01-01

    Electrostatic grid controls conduction cycle of thermionic diode to convert low dc output voltages to high ac power without undesirable power loss. An ac voltage applied to the grid of this new thermionic triode enables it to convert heat directly into high voltage electrical power.

  1. Automated ac galvanomagnetic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szofran, F. R.; Espy, P. N.

    1985-01-01

    An automated, ac galvanomagnetic measurement system is described. Hall or van der Pauw measurements in the temperature range 10-300 K can be made at a preselected magnetic field without operator attendance. Procedures to validate sample installation and correct operation of other system functions, such as magnetic field and thermometry, are included. Advantages of ac measurements are discussed.

  2. Sailplane Glide Performance and Control Using Fixed and Articulating Winglets. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colling, James David

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effects of controllable articulating winglets on glide performance and yawing moments of high performance sailplanes. Testing was conducted in the Texas A&M University 7 x 10 foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel using a full-scale model of the outboard 5.6 feet of a 15 meter class high performance sailplane wing. Different wing tip configurations could be easily mounted to the wing model. A winglet was designed in which the cant and toe angles as well as a rudder on the winglet could be adjusted to a range of positions. Cant angles used in the investigation consisted of 5, 25, and 40 degrees measured from the vertical axis. Toe-out angles ranged from 0 to 22.5 degrees. A rudder on the winglet was used to study the effects of changing the camber of the winglet airfoil on wing performance and wing yawing moments. Rudder deflections consisted of-10, 0, and 10 degrees. Test results for a fixed geometry winglet and a standard wing tip are presented to show the general behavior of winglets on sailplane wings, and the effects of boundary-layer turbulators on the winglets are also presented. By tripping the laminar boundary-layer to turbulent before laminar separation occurs, the wing performance was increased at low Reynolds numbers. The effects on the lift and drag, yawing moment, pitching moment, and wing root bending moment of the model are presented. Oil flows were used on the wing model with the fixed geometry winglet and the standard wing tip to visualize flow directions and areas of boundary layer transition. A cant angle of 25 degrees and a toe-out angle of 2.5 degrees provided an optimal increase in wing performance for the cant and toe angles tested. Maximum performance was obtained when the winglet rudder remained in the neutral position of zero degrees. By varying the cant, toe, and rudder angles from their optimized positions, wing performance decreases. Although the winglet rudder proved to be more effective in

  3. Automated Euler and Navier-Stokes Database Generation for a Glide-Back Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaderjian, Neal M.; Rogers, Stuart E.; Aftosmis, Mike J.; Pandya, Shishir A.; Ahmad, Jasim U.; Tejnil, Edward

    2004-01-01

    The past two decades have seen a sustained increase in the use of high fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in basic research, aircraft design, and the analysis of post-design issues. As the fidelity of a CFD method increases, the number of cases that can be readily and affordably computed greatly diminishes. However, computer speeds now exceed 2 GHz, hundreds of processors are currently available and more affordable, and advances in parallel CFD algorithms scale more readily with large numbers of processors. All of these factors make it feasible to compute thousands of high fidelity cases. However, there still remains the overwhelming task of monitoring the solution process. This paper presents an approach to automate the CFD solution process. A new software tool, AeroDB, is used to compute thousands of Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions for a 2nd generation glide-back booster in one week. The solution process exploits a common job-submission grid environment, the NASA Information Power Grid (IPG), using 13 computers located at 4 different geographical sites. Process automation and web-based access to a MySql database greatly reduces the user workload, removing much of the tedium and tendency for user input errors. The AeroDB framework is shown. The user submits/deletes jobs, monitors AeroDB's progress, and retrieves data and plots via a web portal. Once a job is in the database, a job launcher uses an IPG resource broker to decide which computers are best suited to run the job. Job/code requirements, the number of CPUs free on a remote system, and queue lengths are some of the parameters the broker takes into account. The Globus software provides secure services for user authentication, remote shell execution, and secure file transfers over an open network. AeroDB automatically decides when a job is completed. Currently, the Cart3D unstructured flow solver is used for the Euler equations, and the Overflow structured overset flow solver is used for the

  4. McKenzie treatment versus mulligan sustained natural apophyseal glides for chronic mechanical low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Waqqar, Saira; Shakil-ur-Rehman, Syed; Ahmad, Shakeel

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Chronic mechanical low back pain is common among different age groups and genders. Different manual therapy techniques combined with exercise therapy and electrotherapy modalities play an important role in its management. Our objective was to compare the effects of McKenzie extension exercisesprogram (EEP) versus Mulligan Sustained Natural Apophyseal Glides (SNAGs) for chronic mechanical low back pain (CMLBP). Methods: This randomized control trial (RCT) was conducted at Riphah Physical Rehabilitation Centre, Pakistan Railways General Hospital Rawalpindi, from 1st July to 31st December 2014. The inclusion criteria was patients of both gender and age range 30-70 years with minimum 4 weeks history of CMLBP. A total of 37 patients were screened out as per inclusion criteria and randomly placed into two groups. Twenty patients in group A were treated with Mulligan SNAGs and 17 patients in group B with McKenzie EEP for four weeks at two session per week and single session per day. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Scale (ODI) and lumber Range of Motion (ROM) were used as an assessment tools and were measured at baseline and at the completion 4 weeks intervention. The data was analyzed with SPSS to draw the statistical and clinical significance of both interventions. Results: At the completion of 4 weeks intervention the pre and post statistical analysis revealed that clinically the McKenzie EEP improved pain (mean 9.12 to 1.46) and disability (73.82 to 6.24) slightly more than Mulligan SNAGs (pain: from 8.85 to 2.55, disability 73.75 to 7.05), while the Mulligan SNAGs improved lumbar ROM more effectively than McKenzie EEP in all directions including flexion, extension, side bending and rotation. Statistically there was no significant difference between the effects of two interventions in managing pain and disability, and improving Lumber ROM. Conclusion: McKenzie EEP is clinically slightly more effective in the management of pain

  5. TiO2-assisted degradation of a perfluorinated surfactant in aqueous solutions treated by gliding arc discharge.

    PubMed

    Marouf-Khelifa, Kheira; Abdelmalek, Fatiha; Khelifa, Amine; Addou, Ahmed

    2008-02-01

    The plasma-chemical degradation of Forafac 1110, a perfluorinated non-ionic surfactant, in aqueous solutions was investigated using TiO2 catalysts. The considered plasma was the gliding arc in humid air, which results from an electric discharge at atmospheric pressure and quasi-ambient temperature. Two titanium dioxide powders were used and their synergistic effects on the Forafac degradation were compared. The results were discussed through the evolution of the pH, the conductivity, the fluoride ions concentration released in solutions, the surfactant concentration remaining after treatment and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurement. The combination of the plasma-chemical treatment with heterogeneous catalysis through the use of TiO2 accelerated the Forafac degradation, since only 60 min was sufficient to remove 96% instead of 360 min needed in the absence of TiO2. The use of anatase and rutile under the trade-name of Rhodia TiO2 and Merck TiO2, respectively, led to different results, because Rhodia TiO2 has proven to be more efficient. It would seem that the crystalline phase as well as the crystallite size, explain the efficiency of anatase. The advantage of the plasma-catalysis is due to the fact that there is a significant production of the OH* radicals not only generated by the gliding arc discharge but also by TiO2. PMID:17980903

  6. Effects of Temperature on the Interactions of Helium-Vacancy Clusters with Gliding Edge Dislocations in α-Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Zhu, Zi Qiang; Peng, SM; Long, XG; Zhou, X. S.; Zu, Xiaotao; Heinisch, Howard L.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Gao, Fei

    2013-10-15

    The interaction of helium-vacancy (He-V) clusters with a gliding a/2<111>{110} edge dislocation in a-Fe is investigated by molecular dynamics methods under a constant strain rate at temperatures of 100 to 600 K. A number of small HenVm (n/m = 0~4) clusters initially placed at different positions relative to the slip plane are comparatively studied. The results show that the interaction of He-V clusters with gliding edge dislocations depends on the helium-to-vacancy (He/V) ratio, the position of the clusters relative to the slip plane, the cluster size, and also temperature. The obstacle strength of the He-V clusters relevant to the dislocation motion generally increases with increasing He/V ratio at the same temperature, but decreases slightly with increasing temperature for the same He-V cluster. One of the interesting results is that He-V clusters do not move along with the dislocation, even at 600 K.

  7. Distance of the contact glide in the closing masticatory stroke during mastication of three types of food.

    PubMed

    Rilo, B; Fernández-Formoso, N; Mora, M J; Cadarso-Suárez, C; Santana, U

    2009-08-01

    This study was designed to characterize the distance of the contact glide in the closing masticatory stroke in healthy adult subjects, during chewing of three types of food (crustless bread, chewing gum and peanuts). Mandibular movements (masticatory movements and laterality movements with dental contact) were registered using a gnathograph (MK-6I Diagnostic System) on the right and left side during unilateral chewing of the three food types. Length of dental contact was measured in masticatory cycle, which is defined as where the terminal part of the chewing cycles could be superimposed on the pathways taken by the mandible during lateral excursions with occlusal contacts. The length of dental contact during mastication of chewing gum is 1.46 +/- 1 mm, during chewing of soft bread is 1.38 +/- 0.7 mm and during chewing of peanuts is 1.45 +/- 0.9 mm. There is no significant difference in the lengths of dental contact during mastication of three types of foods that enable direct tooth gliding. PMID:19453848

  8. Shedding of TRAP by a Rhomboid Protease from the Malaria Sporozoite Surface Is Essential for Gliding Motility and Sporozoite Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ejigiri, Ijeoma; Ragheb, Daniel R. T.; Pino, Paco; Coppi, Alida; Bennett, Brandy Lee; Soldati-Favre, Dominique; Sinnis, Photini

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium sporozoites, the infective stage of the malaria parasite, move by gliding motility, a unique form of locomotion required for tissue migration and host cell invasion. TRAP, a transmembrane protein with extracellular adhesive domains and a cytoplasmic tail linked to the actomyosin motor, is central to this process. Forward movement is achieved when TRAP, bound to matrix or host cell receptors, is translocated posteriorly. It has been hypothesized that these adhesive interactions must ultimately be disengaged for continuous forward movement to occur. TRAP has a canonical rhomboid-cleavage site within its transmembrane domain and mutations were introduced into this sequence to elucidate the function of TRAP cleavage and determine the nature of the responsible protease. Rhomboid cleavage site mutants were defective in TRAP shedding and displayed slow, staccato motility and reduced infectivity. Moreover, they had a more dramatic reduction in infectivity after intradermal inoculation compared to intravenous inoculation, suggesting that robust gliding is critical for dermal exit. The intermediate phenotype of the rhomboid cleavage site mutants suggested residual, albeit inefficient cleavage by another protease. We therefore generated a mutant in which both the rhomboid-cleavage site and the alternate cleavage site were altered. This mutant was non-motile and non-infectious, demonstrating that TRAP removal from the sporozoite surface functions to break adhesive connections between the parasite and extracellular matrix or host cell receptors, which in turn is essential for motility and invasion. PMID:22911675

  9. Operation Method for AC Motor Control during Power Interruption in Direct AC/AC Converter System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizu, Keiichiro; Azuma, Satoshi

    Direct AC/AC converters have been studied due to their potential use in power converters with no DC-link capacitor, which can contribute to the miniaturization of power converters. However, the absence of a DC-link capacitor makes it difficult to control the AC motor during power interruption. First, this paper proposes a system that realizes AC motor control during power interruption by utilizing a clamp capacitor. In general, direct AC/AC converters have a clamp circuit consisting of a rectifier diode(s) and a clamp capacitor in order to avoid over-voltages. In the proposed system, there is an additional semiconductor switch reverse-parallel to the rectifier diode(s), and the clamp capacitor voltage can be utilized for AC motor control by turning on the additional switch. Second, this paper discusses an operation method for AC motor control and clamp capacitor voltage control during power interruption. In the proposed method “DC-link voltage control”, the kinetic energy in the AC motor is transformed into electrical energy and stored in the clamp capacitor; the clamp capacitor is therefore charged and the capacitor voltage is controlled to remain constant at an instruction value. Third, this paper discusses a switching operation during power interruption. A dead-time is introduced between the operation of turning off all switches on the rectifier side and the operation of turning on the additional switch, which prevents the occurrence of a short circuit between the interrupted power source and the clamp capacitor. Finally, experimental results are presented. During power interruptions, an output current was continuously obtained and the clamp capacitor voltage was maintained to be equal to the instruction value of the capacitor voltage. These results indicate that both AC motor control and capacitor voltage control were successfully achieved by using the proposed system.

  10. Uniformly microsized luminescent materials obtained through a solid state reaction of WO{sub 3} with Ln{sup 3+}-exchanged zeolite L at 700 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yige; Fang, Yi; Zhang, Wenjun; Zhang, Li; Chen, Yuhuan; Yu, Xiaoyan

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: We have reported the modification of Ln3+/ZL microcrystals by the tungstate-oxygen species via a solid state reaction of WO{sub 3} and Ln{sup 3+}-exchanged zeolite L at 700 °C. Highlights: ► Luminescent materials were obtained from zeolite L crystals. ► The materials show characteristic luminescence of Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions. ► The framework of zeolite L crystals has been kept during the annealing process. ► Energy transfer from tungstate-oxygen species to lanthanide was confirmed. - Abstract: In this work, we report the uniformly microsized luminescent materials prepared by a solid state reaction of WO{sub 3} and Ln{sup 3+}-exchanged zeolite L at 700 °C. The obtained materials were investigated by SEM, XRD and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The influence of tungstate-oxygen species on the morphology and luminescence of the materials were discussed in detail. Energy transfer from the tungstate-oxygen species to Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions have been demonstrated by the photoluminescence spectra, implying the loading of tungstate-oxygen species into the nanochannels of the crystals and the close proximity of which to Eu{sup 3+} ions.

  11. Performance tests of Mn-added aluminum heat pipe with micro-sized inner fins and thermal fluid for cooling electronic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M. R.; Choi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Aluminum-5 wt % manganese alloy heat pipe with a nano-fluid of n-butanol and 0.2 wt % carbon nano-tubes was prepared by deep-drawing, and its mechanical and corrosion properties were determined to improve thermal conductivity performance. The heat pipe was designed to have micro-sized inner fins working at temperature higher than 200°C and simultaneously retaining a similar thermal conductivity to that of pure aluminum. The heat pipe formed by aluminum-5 wt % manganese alloys had improved mechanical properties such as 38% micro-hardness, 45.8% yield strength, and 53.5 wt % ultimate tensile strength due to grain size refinement and work hardening effects. The corrosion rate of the aluminum alloy in artificial sea water at room temperature decreased from 0.110 mpy to 0.102 mpy. The nano-fluid of n-butanol and 0.2 wt % carbon nano-tubes improved the thermal conductivity of the heat-pipe by about 250%.

  12. Template-assisted formation of microsized nanocrystalline CeO2 tubes and their catalytic performance in the carboxylation of methanol

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Meike; Schäfer, Christian; Brandner, Armin; Hofmann, Heiko J; Claus, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Summary Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)/ceria composite fibres were synthesized by using a sequential combination of polymer electrospinning, spray-coating with a sol, and a final calcination step to yield microstructured ceria tubes, which are composed of nanocrystalline ceria particles. The PMMA template is removed from the organic/inorganic hybrid material by radio frequency (rf) plasma etching followed by calcination of the ceramic green-body fibres. Microsized ceria (CeO2) tubes, with a diameter of ca. 0.75 µm, composed of nanocrystalline agglomerated ceria particles were thus obtained. The 1-D ceramic ceria material was characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), UV–vis and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL), as well as thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Its catalytic performance was studied in the direct carboxylation of methanol with carbon dioxide leading to dimethyl carbonate [(CH3O)2CO, DMC], which is widely employed as a phosgene and dimethyl sulfate substitute, and as well as a fuel additive. PMID:22259761

  13. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  14. Ac traction gets on track

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, L.

    1995-09-01

    This article describes inverter-based ac traction systems which give freight locomotives greater adhesion, pulling power, and braking capacity. In the 1940s, dc traction replaced the steam engine as a source of train propulsion, and it has ruled the freight transportation industry ever since. But now, high-performance ac-traction systems, with their unprecedented levels of pulling power and adhesion, are becoming increasingly common on America`s freight railroads. In thousands of miles of demonstration tests, today`s ac-traction systems have outperformed traditional dc-motor driven systems. Major railroad companies are convinced enough of the benefits of ac traction to have integrated it into their freight locomotives.

  15. Flavobacterium johnsoniae gldN and gldO are partially redundant genes required for gliding motility and surface localization of SprB.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Ryan G; Samarasam, Mudiarasan Napoleon; Shrivastava, Abhishek; van Baaren, Jessica M; Pochiraju, Soumya; Bollampalli, Sreelekha; McBride, Mark J

    2010-03-01

    Cells of the gliding bacterium Flavobacterium johnsoniae move rapidly over surfaces. Mutations in gldN cause a partial defect in gliding. A novel bacteriophage selection strategy was used to aid construction of a strain with a deletion spanning gldN and the closely related gene gldO in an otherwise wild-type F. johnsoniae UW101 background. Bacteriophage transduction was used to move a gldN mutation into F. johnsoniae UW101 to allow phenotypic comparison with the gldNO deletion mutant. Cells of the gldN mutant formed nonspreading colonies on agar but retained some ability to glide in wet mounts. In contrast, cells of the gldNO deletion mutant were completely nonmotile, indicating that cells require GldN, or the GldN-like protein GldO, to glide. Recent results suggest that Porphyromonas gingivalis PorN, which is similar in sequence to GldN, has a role in protein secretion across the outer membrane. Cells of the F. johnsoniae gldNO deletion mutant were defective in localization of the motility protein SprB to the cell surface, suggesting that GldN may be involved in secretion of components of the motility machinery. Cells of the gldNO deletion mutant were also deficient in chitin utilization and were resistant to infection by bacteriophages, phenotypes that may also be related to defects in protein secretion. PMID:20038590

  16. Flavobacterium johnsoniae gldN and gldO Are Partially Redundant Genes Required for Gliding Motility and Surface Localization of SprB▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Ryan G.; Samarasam, Mudiarasan Napoleon; Shrivastava, Abhishek; van Baaren, Jessica M.; Pochiraju, Soumya; Bollampalli, Sreelekha; McBride, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Cells of the gliding bacterium Flavobacterium johnsoniae move rapidly over surfaces. Mutations in gldN cause a partial defect in gliding. A novel bacteriophage selection strategy was used to aid construction of a strain with a deletion spanning gldN and the closely related gene gldO in an otherwise wild-type F. johnsoniae UW101 background. Bacteriophage transduction was used to move a gldN mutation into F. johnsoniae UW101 to allow phenotypic comparison with the gldNO deletion mutant. Cells of the gldN mutant formed nonspreading colonies on agar but retained some ability to glide in wet mounts. In contrast, cells of the gldNO deletion mutant were completely nonmotile, indicating that cells require GldN, or the GldN-like protein GldO, to glide. Recent results suggest that Porphyromonas gingivalis PorN, which is similar in sequence to GldN, has a role in protein secretion across the outer membrane. Cells of the F. johnsoniae gldNO deletion mutant were defective in localization of the motility protein SprB to the cell surface, suggesting that GldN may be involved in secretion of components of the motility machinery. Cells of the gldNO deletion mutant were also deficient in chitin utilization and were resistant to infection by bacteriophages, phenotypes that may also be related to defects in protein secretion. PMID:20038590

  17. Gliding Associated Proteins Play Essential Roles during the Formation of the Inner Membrane Complex of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Gow, Matthew; Jiménez-Ruiz, Elena; Ferguson, David J. P.; Meissner, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The inner membrane complex (IMC) of apicomplexan parasites is a specialised structure localised beneath the parasite’s plasma membrane, and is important for parasite stability and intracellular replication. Furthermore, it serves as an anchor for the myosin A motor complex, termed the glideosome. While the role of this protein complex in parasite motility and host cell invasion has been well described, additional roles during the asexual life cycle are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that core elements of the glideosome, the gliding associated proteins GAP40 and GAP50 as well as members of the GAPM family, have critical roles in the biogenesis of the IMC during intracellular replication. Deletion or disruption of these genes resulted in the rapid collapse of developing parasites after initiation of the cell cycle and led to redistribution of other glideosome components. PMID:26845335

  18. Gliding Associated Proteins Play Essential Roles during the Formation of the Inner Membrane Complex of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Harding, Clare R; Egarter, Saskia; Gow, Matthew; Jiménez-Ruiz, Elena; Ferguson, David J P; Meissner, Markus

    2016-02-01

    The inner membrane complex (IMC) of apicomplexan parasites is a specialised structure localised beneath the parasite's plasma membrane, and is important for parasite stability and intracellular replication. Furthermore, it serves as an anchor for the myosin A motor complex, termed the glideosome. While the role of this protein complex in parasite motility and host cell invasion has been well described, additional roles during the asexual life cycle are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that core elements of the glideosome, the gliding associated proteins GAP40 and GAP50 as well as members of the GAPM family, have critical roles in the biogenesis of the IMC during intracellular replication. Deletion or disruption of these genes resulted in the rapid collapse of developing parasites after initiation of the cell cycle and led to redistribution of other glideosome components. PMID:26845335

  19. Drag or negative traction of geared-down supporting propellers in the downward vertical glide of a helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toussaint, A

    1920-01-01

    Discussed here are computations of drag or negative traction of geared down supporting propellers in the downward vertical glide of a helicopter. By means of Frounde's Theory, the maximum value of the drag of a windmill is calculated. For wooden propellers, the author finds that the difference between the drag and the weight is proportional to the number of blades and is larger for propellers of small diameter; thus it is 25 kg. for a six blade propeller with a diameter of 2 m. 50. The author notes that if we are to adopt large propellers, we must have recourse to a different method of construction, resulting in large dimension propellers much lighter than those made of wood. In discussing insufficient drag, the author notes that the question of the drag of geared down supporting propellers can only be decided by experiment.

  20. Impact of the subtle differences in MMP-12 structure on Glide-based molecular docking for pose prediction of inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huan; Wang, Yajing; Xu, Feng

    2014-11-01

    Human MMP-12 is involved in many aspects of disease pathology. Substantial efforts have been made to develop MMP-12 inhibitors. However, the mechanism of some MMP-12 inhibitors is still unclear. Recently, the method of molecular modeling was used to explore the mechanism, but selecting the best candidate among the wealth of MMP-12 structures poses a challenge. In this study, we attempted to identify several criteria to predict the most appropriate MMP-12 PDB ID for enzyme-ligand interaction studies based on cross-docking by Glide. Furthermore, the parameters from PDB files such as R-free, resolution, B factor, and the molecular volume of the ligand in the complex can provide useful clues for choosing a suitable approximate initial model for pose prediction for MMP-12 inhibitors. This work might also provide a useful reference for other drug targets.

  1. Iso-branched 2- and 3-hydroxy fatty acids as characteristic lipid constituents of some gliding bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Fautz, E; Rosenfelder, G; Grotjahn, L

    1979-01-01

    The fatty acids present in the total hydrolysates of several gliding bacteria (Myxococcus fulvus, Stigmatella aurantiaca, Cytophaga johnsonae, Cytophaga sp. strain samoa and Flexibacter elegans) were analyzed by combined gas-liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. In addition to 13-methyl-tetradecanoic acid, 15-methyl-hexadecanoic acid, hexadecanoic acid, and hexadecenoic acid, 2- and 3-hydroxy fatty acids comprised up to 50% of the total fatty acids. The majority was odd-numbered and iso-branched. Small amounts of even-numbered and unbranched fatty acids were also present. Whereas 2-hydroxy-15-methyl hexadecanoic acid was characteristic for myxobacteria, 2-hydroxy-13-methyl-tetradecanoic acid, 3-hydroxy-13-methyl-tetradecanoic acid, and 3-hydroxy-15-methyl-hexadecanoic acid were dominant in the Cytophaga-Flexibacter group. PMID:118159

  2. Association of a new type of gliding, filamentous, purple phototrophic bacterium inside bundles of Microcoleus chthonoplastes in hypersaline cyanobacterial mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amelio, E. D.; Cohen, Y.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    An unidentified filamentous purple bacterium, probably belonging to a new genus or even a new family, is found in close association with the filamentous, mat-forming cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes in a hypersaline pond at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico, and in Solar Lake, Sinai, Egypt. This organism is a gliding, segmented trichome, 0.8-0.9 micrometer wide. It contains intracytoplasmic stacked lamellae which are perpendicular and obliquely oriented to the cell wall, similar to those described for the purple sulfur bacteria Ectothiorhodospira. These bacteria are found inside the cyanobacterial bundle, enclosed by the cyanobacterial sheath. Detailed transmission electron microscopical analyses carried out in horizontal sections of the upper 1.5 mm of the cyanobacterial mat show this cyanobacterial-purple bacterial association at depths of 300-1200 micrometers, corresponding to the zone below that of maximal oxygenic photosynthesis. Sharp gradients of oxygen and sulfide are established during the day at this microzone in the two cyanobacterial mats studied. The close association, the distribution pattern of this association and preliminary physiological experiments suggest a co-metabolism of sulfur by the two-membered community. This probable new genus of purple bacteria may also grow photoheterotrophically using organic carbon excreted by the cyanobacterium. Since the chemical gradients in the entire photic zone fluctuate widely in a diurnal cycle, both types of metabolism probably take place. During the morning and afternoon, sulfide migrates up to the photic zone allowing photoautotrophic metabolism with sulfide as the electron donor. During the day the photic zone is highly oxygenated and the purple bacteria may either use oxidized species of sulfur such as elemental sulfur and thiosulfate in the photoautotrophic mode or grow photoheterotrophically using organic carbon excreted by M. chthonoplastes. The new type of filamentous purple sulfur

  3. On the motion of two point vortex pairs with glide-reflective symmetry in a periodic strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Saikat; Stremler, Mark A.

    2015-10-01

    The motion of four point vortices with zero net circulation in a potential flow contained within a two-dimensional, singly periodic domain (i.e., a periodic strip) is determined under the assumption of a spatial symmetry that is preserved by the dynamics. This symmetry is inspired by the patterns observed in two-pair (2P) vortex wakes, in which four neighboring vortices appear as two pairs with a glide-reflective symmetry: the arrangement of each pair is related to the other by a reflection about the wake centerline and a half-period translation along the wake centerline. Under the assumed constraints, the problem can be reduced to an integrable Hamiltonian system. Vortex motions are classified using a bifurcation analysis of the phase space topology as determined by level curves of the Hamiltonian. Unlike the well-known von Kármán point vortex model, in which a singly periodic system of two point vortices with glide-reflective symmetry is always in relative equilibrium, this four-point-vortex system exhibits a rich variety of relative motions for almost all possible initial conditions. Five distinct classes of relative vortex motion are identified, encompassing a total of 12 different types of motion, suggesting that experimental wakes with four vortices formed per shedding cycle may exhibit behaviors not yet explored in the literature. A finite number of initial conditions do correspond to relative equilibria, in which case the vortex configuration propagates downstream with invariant size and shape. Some of these relative equilibria are neutrally stable to perturbations that preserve the system constraints, while others are unstable, leading to large deviations from the equilibrium configuration.

  4. In-Situ Determination of the Mechanical Properties of Gliding or Non-Motile Bacteria by Atomic Force Microscopy under Physiological Conditions without Immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Dhahri, Samia; Ramonda, Michel; Marlière, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We present a study about AFM imaging of living, moving or self-immobilized bacteria in their genuine physiological liquid medium. No external immobilization protocol, neither chemical nor mechanical, was needed. For the first time, the native gliding movements of Gram-negative Nostoc cyanobacteria upon the surface, at speeds up to 900 µm/h, were studied by AFM. This was possible thanks to an improved combination of a gentle sample preparation process and an AFM procedure based on fast and complete force-distance curves made at every pixel, drastically reducing lateral forces. No limitation in spatial resolution or imaging rate was detected. Gram-positive and non-motile Rhodococcus wratislaviensis bacteria were studied as well. From the approach curves, Young modulus and turgor pressure were measured for both strains at different gliding speeds and are ranging from 20±3 to 105±5 MPa and 40±5 to 310±30 kPa depending on the bacterium and the gliding speed. For Nostoc, spatially limited zones with higher values of stiffness were observed. The related spatial period is much higher than the mean length of Nostoc nodules. This was explained by an inhomogeneous mechanical activation of nodules in the cyanobacterium. We also observed the presence of a soft extra cellular matrix (ECM) around the Nostoc bacterium. Both strains left a track of polymeric slime with variable thicknesses. For Rhodococcus, it is equal to few hundreds of nanometers, likely to promote its adhesion to the sample. While gliding, the Nostoc secretes a slime layer the thickness of which is in the nanometer range and increases with the gliding speed. This result reinforces the hypothesis of a propulsion mechanism based, for Nostoc cyanobacteria, on ejection of slime. These results open a large window on new studies of both dynamical phenomena of practical and fundamental interests such as the formation of biofilms and dynamic properties of bacteria in real physiological conditions. PMID:23593493

  5. X-38 Drop Model: Glides to Earth After Being Dropped from a Cessna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A 4-foot-long model of NASA's X-38, an experimental crew return vehicle, glides to earth after being dropped from a Cessna aircraft in late 1995. The model was used to test the ram-air parafoil landing system, which could allow for accurate and controlled landings of an emergency Crew Return Vehicle spacecraft returning to Earth. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to

  6. Biocompatible micro-sized cell culture chamber for the detection of nanoparticle-induced IL8 promoter activity on a small cell population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Yvonne; Oostingh, Gertie J.; Sossalla, Adam; Duschl, Albert; von Briesen, Hagen; Thielecke, Hagen

    2011-08-01

    In most conventional in vitro toxicological assays, the response of a complete cell population is averaged, and therefore, single-cell responses are not detectable. Such averaging might result in misinterpretations when only individual cells within a population respond to a certain stimulus. Therefore, there is a need for non-invasive in vitro systems to verify the toxicity of nanoscale materials. In the present study, a micro-sized cell culture chamber with a silicon nitride membrane (0.16 mm2) was produced for cell cultivation and the detection of specific cell responses. The biocompatibility of the microcavity chip (MCC) was verified by studying adipogenic and neuronal differentiation. Thereafter, the suitability of the MCC to study the effects of nanoparticles on a small cell population was determined by using a green fluorescence protein-based reporter cell line. Interleukin-8 promoter (pIL8) induction, a marker of an inflammatory response, was used to monitor immune activation. The validation of the MCC-based method was performed using well-characterized gold and silver nanoparticles. The sensitivity of the new method was verified comparing the quantified pIL8 activation via MCC-based and standard techniques. The results proved the biocompatibility and the sensitivity of the microculture chamber, as well as a high optical quality due to the properties of Si3N4. The MCC-based method is suited for threshold- and time-dependent analysis of nanoparticle-induced IL8 promoter activity. This novel system can give dynamic information at the level of adherent single cells of a small cell population and presents a new non-invasive in vitro test method to assess the toxicity of nanomaterials and other compounds. PACS: 85.35.Be, 81.16.Nd, 87.18.Mp

  7. Optimizing use of the structural chemical analyser (variable pressure FESEM-EDX Raman spectroscopy) on micro-size complex historical paintings characterization.

    PubMed

    Guerra, I; Cardell, C

    2015-10-01

    The novel Structural Chemical Analyser (hyphenated Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy equipped with an X-ray detector) is gaining popularity since it allows 3-D morphological studies and elemental, molecular, structural and electronic analyses of a single complex micro-sized sample without transfer between instruments. However, its full potential remains unexploited in painting heritage where simultaneous identification of inorganic and organic materials in paintings is critically yet unresolved. Despite benefits and drawbacks shown in literature, new challenges have to be faced analysing multifaceted paint specimens. SEM-Structural Chemical Analyser systems differ since they are fabricated ad hoc by request. As configuration influences the procedure to optimize analyses, likewise analytical protocols have to be designed ad hoc. This paper deals with the optimization of the analytical procedure of a Variable Pressure Field Emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with an X-ray detector Raman spectroscopy system to analyse historical paint samples. We address essential parameters, technical challenges and limitations raised from analysing paint stratigraphies, archaeological samples and loose pigments. We show that accurate data interpretation requires comprehensive knowledge of factors affecting Raman spectra. We tackled: (i) the in-FESEM-Raman spectroscopy analytical sequence, (ii) correlations between FESEM and Structural Chemical Analyser/laser analytical position, (iii) Raman signal intensity under different VP-FESEM vacuum modes, (iv) carbon deposition on samples under FESEM low-vacuum mode, (v) crystal nature and morphology, (vi) depth of focus and (vii) surface-enhanced Raman scattering effect. We recommend careful planning of analysis strategies prior to research which, although time consuming, guarantees reliable results. The ultimate goal of this paper is to help to guide future users of a FESEM-Structural Chemical Analyser system

  8. The ac53, ac78, ac101, and ac103 Genes Are Newly Discovered Core Genes in the Family Baculoviridae

    PubMed Central

    Garavaglia, Matías Javier; Miele, Solange Ana Belén; Iserte, Javier Alonso; Belaich, Mariano Nicolás

    2012-01-01

    The family Baculoviridae is a large group of insect viruses containing circular double-stranded DNA genomes of 80 to 180 kbp, which have broad biotechnological applications. A key feature to understand and manipulate them is the recognition of orthology. However, the differences in gene contents and evolutionary distances among the known members of this family make it difficult to assign sequence orthology. In this study, the genome sequences of 58 baculoviruses were analyzed, with the aim to detect previously undescribed core genes because of their remote homology. A routine based on Multi PSI-Blast/tBlastN and Multi HaMStR allowed us to detect 31 of 33 accepted core genes and 4 orthologous sequences in the Baculoviridae which were not described previously. Our results show that the ac53, ac78, ac101 (p40), and ac103 (p48) genes have orthologs in all genomes and should be considered core genes. Accordingly, there are 37 orthologous genes in the family Baculoviridae. PMID:22933288

  9. Simple Equipment for Imaging AC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamata, Masahiro; Anayama, Takayuki

    2003-01-01

    Presents an effective way to demonstrate the difference between direct current and alternating current using red and green LEDs. Describes how to make a tool that shows how an AC voltage changes with time using the afterimage effect of the LEDs. (Author/NB)

  10. Semiconductor ac static power switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrancik, J.

    1968-01-01

    Semiconductor ac static power switch has long life and high reliability, contains no moving parts, and operates satisfactorily in severe environments, including high vibration and shock conditions. Due to their resistance to shock and vibration, static switches are used where accidental switching caused by mechanical vibration or shock cannot be tolerated.

  11. Energy saving in ac generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Circuit cuts no-load losses, without sacrificing full-load power. Phase-contro circuit includes gate-controlled semiconductor switch that cuts off applied voltage for most of ac cycle if generator idling. Switch "on" time increases when generator is in operation.

  12. The GlideScope for videolaryngoscopy-assisted nasotracheal-to-orotracheal tube exchange in the intensive care unit in a patient with a known difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Galgon, Richard E; Ketzler, Jonathan T

    2012-08-01

    A 77 year old, nasally intubated man with a history of repeated episodes of airway obstruction requiring intubation due to recurrent laryngitis and a hypopharyngeal mass, needed nasotracheal-to-orotracheal tube exchange. The GlideScope videolaryngoscope was inserted, achieving a full view of the glottic inlet with the nasotracheal tube in situ. An endotracheal tube (ETT) loaded on a GlideRite Rigid Stylet was advanced through the oropharynx into view. Advancement of this ETT to the glottic opening was tested and achieved. With both tracheal tubes in view, the nasotracheal tube cuff was deflated and withdrawn from the glottic opening. While maintaining videoscopic visualization, the orotracheal tube was advanced through the vocal cords into the trachea. The benefits of this technique versus existing alternatives are discussed. PMID:22658369

  13. Investigation of spoiler ailerons for use as speed brakes or glide-path controls on two NACA 65-series wings equipped with full-span slotted flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischel, Jack; Watson, James M

    1951-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was made to determine the characteristics of spoiler ailerons used as speed brakes or glide-path controls on an NACA 65-210 wing and an NACA 65-215 wing equipped with full-span slotted flaps. Several plug aileron and retractable-aileron configurations were investigated on two wing models with the full-span flaps retracted and deflected. Tests were made at various Mach numbers between 0.13 and 0.71. The results of this investigation have indicated that the use of plug or retractable ailerons, either alone or in conjunction with wing flaps, as speed brakes or glide-path controls is feasible and very effective.

  14. Voltage controller/current limiter for ac

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, T. T.

    1980-01-01

    Circuit protects ac power systems for overload failures, limits power surge and short-circuit currents to 150 percent of steady state level, regulates ac output voltage, and soft starts loads. Limiter generates dc error signal in response to line fluctuations and dumps power when overload is reached. Device is inserted between ac source and load.

  15. Quantitative analysis of Plasmodium ookinete motion in three dimensions suggests a critical role for cell shape in the biomechanics of malaria parasite gliding motility.

    PubMed

    Kan, Andrey; Tan, Yan-Hong; Angrisano, Fiona; Hanssen, Eric; Rogers, Kelly L; Whitehead, Lachlan; Mollard, Vanessa P; Cozijnsen, Anton; Delves, Michael J; Crawford, Simon; Sinden, Robert E; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Leckie, Christopher; Bailey, James; Baum, Jake

    2014-05-01

    Motility is a fundamental part of cellular life and survival, including for Plasmodium parasites--single-celled protozoan pathogens responsible for human malaria. The motile life cycle forms achieve motility, called gliding, via the activity of an internal actomyosin motor. Although gliding is based on the well-studied system of actin and myosin, its core biomechanics are not completely understood. Currently accepted models suggest it results from a specifically organized cellular motor that produces a rearward directional force. When linked to surface-bound adhesins, this force is passaged to the cell posterior, propelling the parasite forwards. Gliding motility is observed in all three life cycle stages of Plasmodium: sporozoites, merozoites and ookinetes. However, it is only the ookinetes--formed inside the midgut of infected mosquitoes--that display continuous gliding without the necessity of host cell entry. This makes them ideal candidates for invasion-free biomechanical analysis. Here we apply a plate-based imaging approach to study ookinete motion in three-dimensional (3D) space to understand Plasmodium cell motility and how movement facilitates midgut colonization. Using single-cell tracking and numerical analysis of parasite motion in 3D, our analysis demonstrates that ookinetes move with a conserved left-handed helical trajectory. Investigation of cell morphology suggests this trajectory may be based on the ookinete subpellicular cytoskeleton, with complementary whole and subcellular electron microscopy showing that, like their motion paths, ookinetes share a conserved left-handed corkscrew shape and underlying twisted microtubular architecture. Through comparisons of 3D movement between wild-type ookinetes and a cytoskeleton-knockout mutant we demonstrate that perturbation of cell shape changes motion from helical to broadly linear. Therefore, while the precise linkages between cellular architecture and actomyosin motor organization remain unknown, our

  16. Flight-test of the glide-slope track and flare-control laws for an automatic landing system for a powered-lift STOL airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, D. M.; Hardy, G. H.; Warner, D. N., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An automatic landing system was developed for the Augmentor Wing Jet STOL Research Airplane to establish the feasibility and examine the operating characteristics of a powered-lift STOL transport flying a steep, microwave landing system (MLS) glide slope to automatically land on a STOL port. The flight test results address the longitudinal aspects of automatic powered lift STOL airplane operation including glide slope tracking on the backside of the power curve, flare, and touchdown. Three different autoland control laws were evaluated to demonstrate the tradeoff between control complexity and the resulting performance. The flight test and simulation methodology used in developing conventional jet transport systems was applied to the powered-lift STOL airplane. The results obtained suggest that an automatic landing system for a powered-lift STOL airplane operating into an MLS-equipped STOL port is feasible. However, the airplane must be provided with a means of rapidly regulation lift to satisfactorily provide the glide slope tracking and control of touchdown sink rate needed for automatic landings.

  17. Anisotropic surface phonon dispersion of the hydrogen-terminated Si(110)-(1×1) surface: One-dimensional phonons propagating along the glide planes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Stephane Yu; Matsui, Kazuki; Kato, Hiroki; Suto, Shozo; Yamada, Taro

    2014-03-14

    We have measured the surface phonon dispersion curves on the hydrogen-terminated Si(110)-(1×1) surface with the two-dimensional space group of p2mg along the two highly symmetric and rectangular directions of ΓX{sup ¯} and ΓX{sup ′¯} using high-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy. All the essential energy-loss peaks on H:Si(110) were assigned to the vibrational phonon modes by using the selection rules of inelastic electron scattering including the glide-plane symmetry. Actually, the surface phonon modes of even-symmetry to the glide plane (along ΓX{sup ¯}) were observed in the first Brillouin zone, and those of odd-symmetry to the glide plane were in the second Brillouin zone. The detailed assignment was made by referring to theoretical phonon dispersion curves of Gräschus et al. [Phys. Rev. B 56, 6482 (1997)]. We found that the H–Si stretching and bending modes, which exhibit highly anisotropic dispersion, propagate along ΓX{sup ¯} direction as a one-dimensional phonon. Judging from the surface structure as well as our classical and quantum mechanical estimations, the H–Si stretching phonon propagates by a direct repulsive interaction between the nearest neighbor H atoms facing each other along ΓX{sup ¯}, whereas the H–Si bending phonon propagates by indirect interaction through the substrate Si atomic linkage.

  18. Self-interstitial atom clusters as obstacles to glide of 1/3?11 0?{1 00} edge dislocations in a-zirconium.

    SciTech Connect

    Voskoboinikov, Roman E; Osetskiy, Yury N; Bacon, David J

    2005-01-01

    Atomic-scale details of interaction of a 1/3 {l_angle}11{bar 2}0{r_angle} {l_brace}1{bar 1}00{r_brace} edge dislocation with clusters of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) in a-zirconium has been studied by computer simulation. Four typical clusters are considered. A triangular cluster of five SIAs lying within a basal plane bisected by the dislocation glide plane is not absorbed by the dislocation but acts as a moderately strong obstacle. A 3-D SIA cluster lying across the glide plane is completely absorbed by the dislocation by creation of super-jogs, and is a weak obstacle. Interaction of the dislocation with glissile SIA loops with perfect Burgers vector inclined at 60 degrees to the dislocation glide plane shows that the process depends on the vector orientation. Defects of the two orientations are strong obstacles, and one, which initially forms a sessile segment on the dislocation line, is particularly so.

  19. Comparison of the GlideScope and the McGrath method using vascular forceps and a tube exchanger in cases of simulated difficult airway intubation

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jae-Hang; Jeon, Woo Jae; Choe, Gyu Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background A "difficult airway" can be simulated with an extrication collar, which restricts cervical motion and mouth opening. The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of the GlideScope and the McGrath in difficult airway simulation. Methods Patients were randomized using computer-generated numbers and were placed into the GlideScope group or the McGrath group. The total intubation time was defined as the time measured from when the anesthesiologist picks up the device to the time at which three successive end-tidal CO2 values are acquired after intubation. Results There was no significant difference in total intubation time between the two groups (73.0 ± 25.3 sec vs. 72.3 ± 20.9 sec, P = 0.92). The success rates of the first intubation attempt did not differ between the two groups (82.8% vs. 83.3%, P = 0.95). Conclusions Our results suggest that there are no significant differences in the intubations with GlideScope and McGrath using vascular forceps and tube exchangers in difficult intubation scenarios. PMID:27066203

  20. A new stem-neopterygian fish from the Middle Triassic of China shows the earliest over-water gliding strategy of the vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guang-Hui; Zhao, Li-Jun; Gao, Ke-Qin; Wu, Fei-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Flying fishes are extraordinary aquatic vertebrates capable of gliding great distances over water by exploiting their enlarged pectoral fins and asymmetrical caudal fin. Some 50 species of extant flying fishes are classified in the Exocoetidae (Neopterygii: Teleostei), which have a fossil record no older than the Eocene. The Thoracopteridae is the only pre-Cenozoic group of non-teleosts that shows an array of features associated with the capability of over-water gliding. Until recently, however, the fossil record of the Thoracopteridae has been limited to the Upper Triassic of Austria and Italy. Here, we report the discovery of exceptionally well-preserved fossils of a new thoracopterid flying fish from the Middle Triassic of China, which represents the earliest evidence of an over-water gliding strategy in vertebrates. The results of a phylogenetic analysis resolve the Thoracopteridae as a stem-group of the Neopterygii that is more crown-ward than the Peltopleuriformes, yet more basal than the Luganoiiformes. As the first record of the Thoracopteride in Asia, this new discovery extends the geographical distribution of this group from the western to eastern rim of the Palaeotethys Ocean, providing new evidence to support the Triassic biological exchanges between Europe and southern China. Additionally, the Middle Triassic date of the new thoracopterid supports the hypothesis that the re-establishment of marine ecosystems after end-Permian mass extinction is more rapid than previously thought. PMID:23118437

  1. A new stem-neopterygian fish from the Middle Triassic of China shows the earliest over-water gliding strategy of the vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Hui; Zhao, Li-Jun; Gao, Ke-Qin; Wu, Fei-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Flying fishes are extraordinary aquatic vertebrates capable of gliding great distances over water by exploiting their enlarged pectoral fins and asymmetrical caudal fin. Some 50 species of extant flying fishes are classified in the Exocoetidae (Neopterygii: Teleostei), which have a fossil record no older than the Eocene. The Thoracopteridae is the only pre-Cenozoic group of non-teleosts that shows an array of features associated with the capability of over-water gliding. Until recently, however, the fossil record of the Thoracopteridae has been limited to the Upper Triassic of Austria and Italy. Here, we report the discovery of exceptionally well-preserved fossils of a new thoracopterid flying fish from the Middle Triassic of China, which represents the earliest evidence of an over-water gliding strategy in vertebrates. The results of a phylogenetic analysis resolve the Thoracopteridae as a stem-group of the Neopterygii that is more crown-ward than the Peltopleuriformes, yet more basal than the Luganoiiformes. As the first record of the Thoracopteride in Asia, this new discovery extends the geographical distribution of this group from the western to eastern rim of the Palaeotethys Ocean, providing new evidence to support the Triassic biological exchanges between Europe and southern China. Additionally, the Middle Triassic date of the new thoracopterid supports the hypothesis that the re-establishment of marine ecosystems after end-Permian mass extinction is more rapid than previously thought. PMID:23118437

  2. Localization of P42 and F1-ATPase α-Subunit Homolog of the Gliding Machinery in Mycoplasma mobile Revealed by Newly Developed Gene Manipulation and Fluorescent Protein Tagging

    PubMed Central

    Tulum, Isil; Yabe, Masaru; Uenoyama, Atsuko

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma mobile has a unique mechanism that enables it to glide on solid surfaces faster than any other gliding mycoplasma. To elucidate the gliding mechanism, we developed a transformation system for M. mobile based on a transposon derived from Tn4001. Modification of the electroporation conditions, outgrowth time, and colony formation from the standard method for Mycoplasma species enabled successful transformation. A fluorescent-protein tagging technique was developed using the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) and applied to two proteins that have been suggested to be involved in the gliding mechanism: P42 (MMOB1050), which is transcribed as continuous mRNA with other proteins essential for gliding, and a homolog of the F1-ATPase α-subunit (MMOB1660). Analysis of the amino acid sequence of P42 by PSI-BLAST suggested that P42 evolved from a common ancestor with FtsZ, the bacterial tubulin homologue. The roles of P42 and the F1-ATPase subunit homolog are discussed as part of our proposed gliding mechanism. PMID:24509320

  3. Modeling dislocation glide in Mg2SiO4 ringwoodite: Towards rheology under transition zone conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritterbex, S.; Carrez, Ph.; Gouriet, K.; Cordier, P.

    2015-11-01

    Deformation resulting from thermally activated plastic slip is modeled in Mg2SiO4 ringwoodite at 20 GPa for a wide range of temperatures. The model relies on the structures of the rate controlling 1 / 2 < 1 1 0 > screw dislocations which have been modeled using the Peierls-Nabarro-Galerkin method. These calculations are parametrized by density functional theory calculations of γ -surfaces of the { 0 0 1 }, { 1 1 0 } and { 1 1 1 } planes. At finite temperatures, dislocation mobility is controlled by kink-pair nucleation on the thermally activated 1 / 4 < 1 1 0 > partial screw dislocations as they occur in ringwoodite. Single slip critical resolved shear stresses (CRSS) corresponding to this mechanism are deduced from Orowan's equation. The results are found to be in reasonably good agreement with experimental data at 20 GPa which show high effective flow stresses under laboratory conditions. Finally, the CRSS's are calculated for typical mantle strain rates of ɛ ˙ =10-16 s-1 at appropriate temperatures expected in the lower transition zone. Results show that dislocation glide remains difficult and that lattice friction is not yet negligible in ringwoodite under natural conditions.

  4. Porphyromonas gingivalis and related bacteria: from colonial pigmentation to the type IX secretion system and gliding motility

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, K

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram-negative, non-motile, anaerobic bacterium implicated as a major pathogen in periodontal disease. P. gingivalis grows as black-pigmented colonies on blood agar, and many bacteriologists have shown interest in this property. Studies of colonial pigmentation have revealed a number of important findings, including an association with the highly active extracellular and surface proteinases called gingipains that are found in P. gingivalis. The Por secretion system, a novel type IX secretion system (T9SS), has been implicated in gingipain secretion in studies using non-pigmented mutants. In addition, many potent virulence proteins, including the metallocarboxypeptidase CPG70, 35 kDa hemin-binding protein HBP35, peptidylarginine deiminase PAD and Lys-specific serine endopeptidase PepK, are secreted through the T9SS. These findings have not been limited to P. gingivalis but have been extended to other bacteria belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. Many Bacteroidetes species possess the T9SS, which is associated with gliding motility for some of these bacteria. PMID:25546073

  5. Helkesimastix marina n. sp. (Cercozoa: Sainouroidea superfam. n.) a gliding zooflagellate of novel ultrastructure and unusual ciliary behaviour.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Lewis, Rhodri; Chao, Ema E; Oates, Brian; Bass, David

    2009-08-01

    Unlike Helkesimastix faecicola and H. major, Helkesimastix marina is marine, ingests bacteria, is probably also a cannibal, and differs in cell cycle ciliary behaviour. Daughter kinetids have mirror symmetry; pre-division cilia beat asymmetrically. We sequenced its 18S rDNA and studied its ultrastructure to clarify its taxonomy. Helkesimastix (Helkesimastigidae fam. n.) differs unexpectedly radically from cercomonads, lacking their complex microtubular ciliary roots, grouping not with them but with Sainouridae within Pansomonadida. Longitudinal cortical microtubules emanate from a dense apical centrosomal plate, where a striated rhizoplast attaches the nucleus, and two very short subparallel centrioles attach by dense fibres. The marginally more posterior centriole, attached to the centrosomal plate by a dense forked fibre, bears the long 9+2 gliding posterior cilium and a microtubular root; the left-side, nucleus-attached, left centriole bears an immotile ciliary stump with abnormal axoneme of nine disorganized mainly singlet microtubules, unlike the sainourid anterior papilla. Both transitional regions have a proximal lattice, the posterior centriole with slender hub. Sainouroidea superfam. n. (Sainouridae; Helkesimastigidae) have homologous cytoskeletal geometry. Dorsal Golgi dictyosome and posterior microbody are attached to the nuclear envelope, which has slender micro-invaginations and probably a cortical lattice. Bacteria are digested posteriorly in association with numerous mitochondria with flat cristae. PMID:19523874

  6. Organization in audition by similarity in rate of change: evidence from tracking individual frequency glides in mixtures.

    PubMed

    McPherson, L M; Ciocca, V; Bregman, A S

    1994-03-01

    In audition, sound energy is assigned to separate auditory "streams" following principles of organization that closely parallel the visual gestalt principles that guide the perception of distinct forms or objects. Metzger (1934) provided evidence for organization in vision based on similarity in the velocity of moving forms. If two dots approach one another along one spatial dimension, they may appear to cross and continue beyond their meeting point if their velocities differ; otherwise, they usually appear to change direction abruptly and retrace their movements. If an analogous auditory principle exists, with rate of change in frequency substituted for velocity of movement, two frequency glides that sweep through the same frequency range in opposite directions should be able to perceptually cross if their rates of change differ; otherwise, they should usually appear to change direction and retrace the same frequency region. Four experiments provided data in support of this hypothesis, and the results were consistent across experiments with varying stimuli and methods of presentation. When properties of the stimuli favored organization according to a principle of frequency proximity, the effect of a principle of rate similarity was attenuated but still evident. PMID:8036108

  7. Influence of misfit stresses on dislocation glide in single crystal superalloys: A three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Siwen; Fivel, Marc; Ma, Anxin; Hartmaier, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    In the characteristic γ / γ ‧ microstructure of single crystal superalloys, misfit stresses occur due to a significant lattice mismatch of those two phases. The magnitude of this lattice mismatch depends on the chemical composition of both phases as well as on temperature. Furthermore, the lattice mismatch of γ and γ ‧ phases can be either positive or negative in sign. The internal stresses caused by such lattice mismatch play a decisive role for the micromechanical processes that lead to the observed macroscopic athermal deformation behavior of these high-temperature alloys. Three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD) simulations are applied to investigate dislocation glide in γ matrix channels and shearing of γ ‧ precipitates by superdislocations under externally applied uniaxial stresses, by fully taking into account internal misfit stresses. Misfit stress fields are calculated by the fast Fourier transformation (FFT) method and hybridized with DDD simulations. For external loading along the crystallographic [001] direction of the single crystal, it was found that the different internal stress states for negative and positive lattice mismatch result in non-uniform dislocation movement and different dislocation patterns in horizontal and vertical γ matrix channels. Furthermore, positive lattice mismatch produces a lower deformation rate than negative lattice mismatch under the same tensile loading, but for an increasing magnitude of lattice mismatch, the deformation resistance always diminishes. Hence, the best deformation performance is expected to result from alloys with either small positive, or even better, vanishing lattice mismatch between γ and γ ‧ phase.

  8. Complete genome sequence of the filamentous gliding predatory bacterium Herpetosiphon aurantiacus type strain (114-95T)

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, Hajnalka; Nett, Markus; Domin, Nicole; Martin, Karin; Maresca, Julia A.; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Berry, Kerrie W.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Richardson, P M; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Schmutz, Jeremy; Brettin, Thomas S; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Bryant, Donald A.

    2011-01-01

    Herpetosiphon aurantiacus Holt and Lewin 1968 is the type species of the genus Herpetosiphon, which in turn is the type genus of the family Herpetosiphonaceae, type family of the order Herpe- tosiphonales in the phylum Chloroflexi. H. aurantiacus cells are organized in filaments which can rapidly glide. The species is of interest not only because of its rather isolated position in the tree of life, but also because Herpetosiphon ssp. were identified as predators capable of facultative pre- dation by a wolf pack strategy and of degrading the prey organisms by excreted hydrolytic en- zymes. The genome of H. aurantiacus strain 114-95T is the first completely sequenced genome of a member of the family Herpetosiphonaceae. The 6,346,587 bp long chromosome and the two 339,639 bp and 99,204 bp long plasmids with a total of 5,577 protein-coding and 77 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program DOEM 2005.

  9. Simultaneous distribution of AC and DC power

    DOEpatents

    Polese, Luigi Gentile

    2015-09-15

    A system and method for the transport and distribution of both AC (alternating current) power and DC (direct current) power over wiring infrastructure normally used for distributing AC power only, for example, residential and/or commercial buildings' electrical wires is disclosed and taught. The system and method permits the combining of AC and DC power sources and the simultaneous distribution of the resulting power over the same wiring. At the utilization site a complementary device permits the separation of the DC power from the AC power and their reconstruction, for use in conventional AC-only and DC-only devices.

  10. ac-resistance-measuring instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Hof, P.J.

    1981-04-22

    An auto-ranging ac resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an ac excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance.

  11. A Comparison of the GlideScope Video Laryngoscope to the C-MAC Video Laryngoscope for Intubation in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Jarrod; Chiu, Stephen; Patanwala, Asad E.; Sakles, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Study objective There is growing use of video laryngoscopy in US emergency departments (EDs). This study seeks to compare intubation success between the GlideScope video laryngoscope and the C-MAC video laryngoscope (C-MAC) in ED intubations. Methods This was an analysis of quality improvement data collected during a 3-year period in an academic ED. After each intubation, the operator completed a standardized data form reporting patient demographics, indication for intubation, device(s) used, reason for device selection, difficult airway characteristics, number of attempts, and outcome of each attempt. An attempt was defined as insertion of the device into the mouth regardless of attempt at tube placement. The primary outcomes were first pass and overall intubation success. The study compared success rates between the GlideScope video laryngoscope and the C-MAC groups, using multivariable logistic regression and adjusting for potential confounders. Results During the 3-year study period, there were 463 intubations, including 230 with the GlideScope video laryngoscope as the initial device and 233 with the C-MAC as the initial device. The GlideScope video laryngoscope resulted in first-pass success in 189 of 230 intubations (82.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 76.6% to 86.9%) and overall success in 221 of 230 intubations (96.1%; 95% CI 92.7% to 98.2%). The C-MAC resulted in first-pass success in 196 of 233 intubations (84.1%; 95% CI 78.8% to 88.6%) and overall success in 225 of 233 intubations (96.6%; 95% CI 93.4% to 98.5%). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, the type of video laryngoscopic device was not associated with first-pass (odds ratio 1.1; 95% CI 0.6 to 2.1) or overall success (odds ratio 1.2; 95% CI 0.5 to 3.1). Conclusion In this study of video laryngoscopy in the ED, the GlideScope video laryngoscope and the C-MAC were associated with similar rates of intubation success. PMID:23374414

  12. Analysis of the gliding pattern of the canine flexor digitorum profundus tendon through the A2 pulley.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Amadio, Peter C; Berglund, Lawrence J; An, Kai-Nan

    2008-01-01

    Friction between a tendon and its pulley was first quantified using the concept of the arc of contact. Studies of human tendons conformed closely to a theoretical nylon cable/nylon rod model. However, we observed differences in measured friction that depended on the direction of motion in the canine model. We hypothesized that fibrocartilaginous nodules in the tendon affected the measurements and attempted to develop a theoretical model to explain the observations we made. Two force transducers were connected to each end of the canine flexor digitorum profundus tendon and the forces were recorded when it was moved through the A2 pulley toward a direction of flexion by an actuator and then reversed a direction toward extension. The changes of a force as a function of tendon excursion were evaluated in 20 canine paws. A bead cable/rod model was developed to simulate the canine tendon-pulley complex. To interpret the results, a free-body diagram was developed. The two prominent fibrocartilaginous nodules in the tendon were found to be responsible for deviation from a theoretical nylon cable gliding around the rod model, in a fashion analogous to the effect of the patella on the quadriceps mechanism. A bead cable/rod model qualitatively reproduced the findings observed in the canine tendon-pulley complex. Frictional coefficient of the canine flexor tendon-pulley was 0.016+/-0.005. After accounting for the effect created by the geometry of two fibrocartilaginous nodules within the tendon, calculation of frictional force in the canine tendon was possible. PMID:18328488

  13. Buckling resistance, bending stiffness, and torsional resistance of various instruments for canal exploration and glide path preparation

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Sang-Won; Ha, Jung-Hong; Lee, WooCheol; Kim, Sung-Kyo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study compared the mechanical properties of various instruments for canal exploration and glide-path preparations. Materials and Methods The buckling resistance, bending stiffness, ultimate torsional strength, and fracture angle under torsional load were compared for C+ file (CP, Dentsply Maillefer), M access K-file (MA, Dentsply Maillefer), Mani K-file (MN, Mani), and NiTiFlex K-file (NT, Dentsply Maillefer). The files of ISO size #15 and a shaft length of 25 mm were selected. For measuring buckling resistance (n = 10), the files were loaded in the axial direction of the shaft, and the maximum load was measured during the files' deflection. The files (n = 10) were fixed at 3-mm from the tip and then bent 45° with respect to their long axis, while the bending force was recorded by a load cell. For measuring the torsional properties, the files (n = 10) were also fixed at 3-mm, and clockwise rotations (2-rpm) were applied to the files in a straight state. The torsional load and the distortion angle were recorded until the files succumbed to the torque. Results The CP was shown to require the highest load to buckle and bend the files, and the NT showed the least. While MA and MN showed similar buckling resistances, MN showed higher bending stiffness than MA. The NT had the lowest bending stiffness and ultimate torsional strength (p < 0.05). Conclusions The tested instruments showed different mechanical properties depending on the evaluated parameters. CP and NT files were revealed to be the stiffest and the most flexible instruments, respectively. PMID:25383345

  14. Comparison of GlideScope video laryngoscope with Macintosh laryngoscope in adult patients undergoing elective surgical procedures

    PubMed Central

    Parasa, Mrunalini; Yallapragada, Srivishnu Vardhan; Vemuri, Nagendra Nath; Shaik, Mastan Saheb

    2016-01-01

    Background: GlideScope (GS) is a video laryngoscope that allows a real-time view of the glottis and endotracheal intubation. It provides a better view of the larynx without the need for alignment of the airway axes. Aim: This prospective randomized comparative study is designed to compare the intubation time, hemodynamic response, and complications associated with intubation using a GS or Macintosh laryngoscope (ML) in adult subjects undergoing elective surgical procedures. Materials and Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1–2 patients were included in this prospective randomized comparative study. Patients were randomized to be intubated using either a GS or an ML. The primary outcome measure was the intubation time. The secondary outcome measures were the hemodynamic response to intubation and the incidence of mucosal injury. Statistical Analysis: Mean and standard deviation were calculated for different parameters under the study. The observed results were analyzed using Student's t-test for quantitative data and Z-test of proportions. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Intubation time was longer in GS group (45.7033 ± 11.649 s) as compared to ML (27.773 ± 5.122 s) P< 0.0001 with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) −13.2794 to −22.5806. GS provided better Cormack and Lehane laryngoscopic view (P = 0.0016 for grade 1 view) with 95% CI −0.1389 to −0.5951. GS group exhibited more laryngoscopic response than ML group with more increase in blood pressure and heart rate, but the difference was not statistically significant. More cases of mucosal trauma were documented in GS group. Conclusion: Use of GS to facilitate intubation led to better glottic view but took a longer time to achieve endotracheal intubation. GS was associated with more hemodynamic response to intubation and mucosal injury in comparison with an ML. PMID:27212755

  15. GlideScope Video Laryngoscope for Difficult Intubation in Emergency Patients: a Quasi-Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Koorosh; Ebrahimi, Mohsen; Hashemian, Amir Masoud; Sarshar, Saeed; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2015-12-01

    Macintosh direct laryngoscope has been the most widely used device for tracheal intubation. GlideScope video laryngoscope (GVL) has been recently introduced as an alternative device for performing intubation; however, its validity in emergency settings has not been thoroughly evaluated. The aim of this study was to compare Macintosh direct laryngoscope versus GVL for emergency endotracheal intubation. This quasi-randomized clinical trial was performed on 97 patients referred to Imam Reza Hospital whom all needed emergency intubation in 2011. Patients were divided into two groups of the easy airway and difficult airway; intubation was performed for patients with direct laryngoscopy or GVL. Then, the patients were evaluated in terms of demographic characteristics, successful intubation rate and intubation time. Data was analyzed by SPSS software 16. There was no significant difference in demographic characteristics of the patients in both easy airway and difficult airway groups who intubated with direct laryngoscopy and GVL methods (P>0.05). In difficult airway group, a significant difference was found in successful intubation at the first attempt (60.9% vs. 87.5%; P=0.036), overall intubation time (32.7 ± 14.58 vs. 22.5±7.88; P<0.001) and first attempt intubation time (28.43 ± 12.51 vs. 21.48±7.8; P=0.001) between direct laryngoscopy and GVL. These variables were not significantly different between two methods in easy airway group. According to the results, GVL can be a useful alternative to direct laryngoscopy in emergency situations and especially in cases with a difficult airway. PMID:26749229

  16. GPCR Ligand Dendrimer (GLiDe) Conjugates: Adenosine Receptor Interactions of a Series of Multivalent Xanthine Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Kecskés, Angela; Tosh, Dilip K.; Wei, Qiang; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists were tethered from polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers to provide high receptor affinity and selectivity. Here we prepared GPCR Ligand Dendrimer (GLiDe) conjugates from a potent adenosine receptor (AR) antagonist; such agents are of interest for treating Parkinson’s disease, asthma, and other conditions. Xanthine amine congener (XAC) was appended with an alkyne group on an extended C8 substituent for coupling by Cu(I)-catalyzed click chemistry to azide-derivatized G4 (fourth-generation) PAMAM dendrimers to form triazoles. These conjugates also contained triazole-linked PEG groups (8 or 22 moieties per 64 terminal positions) for increasing water-solubility and optionally prosthetic groups for spectroscopic characterization and affinity labeling. Human AR binding affinity increased progressively with the degree of xanthine substitution to reach Ki values in the nM range. The order of affinity of each conjugate was hA2AAR > hA3AR > hA1AR, while the corresponding monomer was ranked hA2AAR > hA1AR ≥ hA3AR. The antagonist activity of the most potent conjugate 14 (34 xanthines per dendrimer) was examined at the Gi-coupled A1AR. Conjugate 14 at 100 nM right-shifted the AR agonist concentration-response curve in a cyclic AMP functional assay in a parallel manner, but at 10 nM (lower than its Ki value) it significantly suppressed the maximal agonist effect in calcium mobilization. This is the first systematic probing of a potent AR antagonist tethered on a dendrimer and its activity as a function of variable loading. PMID:21539392

  17. Ac electrode diagnostics in ac-operated metal halide lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luijks, G. M. J. F.; van Esveld, H. A.; Nijdam, S.; Weerdesteijn, P. A. M.

    2008-07-01

    A diagnostic technique is presented to determine the electrode work function in ac-operated metal halide lamps. The heart of the experimental set-up is a high-speed photodiode array detector, which is able to follow real-time variations of electrode tip temperature and near-electrode plasma emissions in ac-operated experimental YAG lamps, enabling discrimination between the anode and cathode effects. Electrode tip temperature ripples have been measured for 100 Hz square wave operation and simulated with an existing electrode model. By using the electrode work function as main fit parameter for the simulations it is found that the measured cooling effect of the electrode tip in a NaTlDy-iodide lamp is caused by a gas-phase emitter effect of Dy. It is concluded that Dy coverage of the electrode tip causes an effective work function reduction of 0.3 eV at 100 Hz square wave operation, considerably less than the 1.0 eV reduction measured earlier for dc operation.

  18. The AC photovoltaic module is here!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, Steven J.; Wohlgemuth, John H.; Wills, Robert H.

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes the design, development, and performance results of a large-area photovoltaic module whose electrical output is ac power suitable for direct connection to the utility grid. The large-area ac PV module features a dedicated, integrally mounted, high-efficiency dc-to-ac power inverter with a nominal output of 250 watts (STC) at 120 Vac, 60 H, that is fully compatible with utility power. The module's output is connected directly to the building's conventional ac distribution system without need for any dc wiring, string combiners, dc ground-fault protection or additional power-conditioning equipment. With its advantages, the ac photovoltaic module promises to become a universal building block for use in all utility-interactive PV systems. This paper discusses AC Module design aspects and utility interface issues (including islanding).

  19. RHIC spin flipper AC dipole controller

    SciTech Connect

    Oddo, P.; Bai, M.; Dawson, C.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Roser, T.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.

    2011-03-28

    The RHIC Spin Flipper's five high-Q AC dipoles which are driven by a swept frequency waveform require precise control of phase and amplitude during the sweep. This control is achieved using FPGA based feedback controllers. Multiple feedback loops are used to and dynamically tune the magnets. The current implementation and results will be presented. Work on a new spin flipper for RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) incorporating multiple dynamically tuned high-Q AC-dipoles has been developed for RHIC spin-physics experiments. A spin flipper is needed to cancel systematic errors by reversing the spin direction of the two colliding beams multiple times during a store. The spin flipper system consists of four DC-dipole magnets (spin rotators) and five AC-dipole magnets. Multiple AC-dipoles are needed to localize the driven coherent betatron oscillation inside the spin flipper. Operationally the AC-dipoles form two swept frequency bumps that minimize the effect of the AC-dipole dipoles outside of the spin flipper. Both AC bumps operate at the same frequency, but are phase shifted from each other. The AC-dipoles therefore require precise control over amplitude and phase making the implementation of the AC-dipole controller the central challenge.

  20. ac electroosmosis in rectangular microchannels.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Michele; Accoto, Dino; Dario, Paolo

    2005-11-22

    Motivated by the growing interest in ac electroosmosis as a reliable no moving parts strategy to control fluid motion in microfluidic devices for biomedical applications, such as lab-on-a-chip, we study transient and steady-state electrokinetic phenomena (electroosmosis and streaming currents) in infinitely extended rectangular charged microchannels. With the aid of Fourier series and Laplace transforms we provide a general formal solution of the problem, which is used to study the time-dependent response to sudden ac applied voltage differences in case of finite electric double layer. The Debye-Huckel approximation has been adopted to allow for an algebraic solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann problem in Fourier space. We obtain the expressions of flow velocity profiles, flow rates, streaming currents, as well as expressions of the complex hydraulic and electrokinetic conductances. We analyze in detail the dependence of the electrokinetic conductance on the extension of linear dimensions relative to the Debye length, with an eye on finite electric double layer effects. PMID:16351310

  1. Single event AC - DC electrospraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachewicz, U.; Dijksman, J. F.; Marijnissen, J. C. M.

    2008-12-01

    Electrospraying is an innovative method to deposit very small amounts of, for example, biofluids (far less than 1 p1) that include DNA or protein molecules. An electric potential is applied between a nozzle filled with liquid and a counter electrode placed at 1-2 millimeter distance from the nozzle. In our set-up we use an AC field superposed on a DC field to control the droplet generation process. Our approach is to create single events of electrospraying triggered by one single AC pulse. During this pulse, the equilibrium meniscus (determined by surface tension, static pressure and the DC field) of the liquid changes rapidly into a cone and subsequently into a jet formed at the cone apex. Next, the jet breaks-up into fine droplets and the spraying stops. The meniscus returns to its equilibrium shape again. So far we obtained a stable and reproducible single event process for ethanol and ethylene glycol with water using glass pipettes. The results will be used to generate droplets on demand in a controlled way and deposit them on a pre-defined place on the substrate.

  2. Origin of shallow submarine mass movements and their glide planes—Sedimentological and geotechnical analyses from the continental slope off northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeten, Nicole J.; Laberg, Jan Sverre; Vanneste, Maarten; Forsberg, Carl Fredrik; Kvalstad, Tore J.; Forwick, Matthias; Vorren, Tore O.; Haflidason, Haflidi

    2014-11-01

    Submarine landslides are often characterized by a basal surface of rupture parallel to the stratigraphy, in which downslope movement is initiated. However, little is known about the sedimentology and physical properties of the sediments within these surfaces. In this study, we present a multiproxy analysis of the sediments collected from a giant piston core penetrating a shallow submarine mass transport deposit, in combination with high-resolution seismoacoustic data to identify and characterize the basal glide plane and the weaker sediments in which movement was initiated. The initial phase of instability consists of a single fracture that formed due to the downslope movement of a mostly intact slab of sediments. The 16 m long core, comprising mostly undisturbed massive and laminated ice-rafted debris-rich clay penetrated this slab. The base of the slab is characterized by a high-amplitude semicontinuous reflection visible on the subbottom profiler data at about 12.5 m depth, interpreted to originate from the glide plane on top of a plumite deposit. This plumite has dilative behavior with pore pressure decrease with increasing shear strain and high undrained shear strength. Movement probably started within contouritic sediments immediately above the glide plane, characterized by higher sensitivities and higher water contents. The occurrence of the mass movements documented in this study are likely affected by the presence of a submarine landslide complex directly downslope. The slide scar of this landslide complex promoted retrogressive movement farther upslope and progressive spreading of strain softening along the slide base and in the slide mass. Numerical models (infinite slope, BING, and retrogressive slope models) illustrate that the present-day continental slope is essentially stable and allow reconstruction of the failure processes when initiated by an external trigger.

  3. Observations of Glide and Decomposition of a<101> Dislocations at High Temperatures in Ni-Al Single Crystals Deformed along the Hard Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Daw, M. S.; Noebe, R. D.; Mills, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    Ni-44at.% Al and Ni-50at.% single crystals were tested in compression in the hard (001) orientations. The dislocation processes and deformation behavior were studied as a function of temperature, strain and strain rate. A slip transition in NiAl occurs from alpha(111) slip to non-alphaaaaaaaaaaa9111) slip at intermediate temperatures. In Ni-50at.% Al single crystal, only alpha(010) dislocations are observed above the slip transition temperature. In contrast, alpha(101)(101) glide has been observed to control deformation beyond the slip transition temperature in Ni-44at.%Al. alpha(101) dislocations are observed primarily along both (111) directions in the glide plane. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations show that the core of the alpha(101) dislocations along these directions is decomposed into two alpha(010) dislocations, separated by a distance of approximately 2nm. The temperature window of stability for these alpha(101) dislocations depends upon the strain rate. At a strain rate of 1.4 x 10(exp -4)/s, lpha(101) dislocations are observed between 800 and 1000K. Complete decomposition of a alpha(101) dislocations into alpha(010) dislocations occurs beyond 1000K, leading to alpha(010) climb as the deformation mode at higher temperature. At lower strain rates, decomposition of a alpha(101) dislocations has been observed to occur along the edge orientation at temperatures below 1000K. Embedded-atom method calculations and experimental results indicate that alpha(101) dislocation have a large Peieris stress at low temperature. Based on the present microstructural observations and a survey of the literature with respect to vacancy content and diffusion in NiAl, a model is proposed for alpha(101)(101) glide in Ni-44at.%Al, and for the observed yield strength versus temperature behavior of Ni-Al alloys at intermediate and high temperatures.

  4. Orotracheal intubation of morbidly obese patients, comparison of GlideScope® video laryngoscope and the LMA CTrach™ with direct laryngoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yousef, Gamal T.; Abdalgalil, Dief A.; Ibrahim, Tamer H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Morbidly obese patients are at increased risk of difficult mask ventilation and intubation as well as increased risk of hypoxemia during tracheal intubation. Recently, new video-assisted intubation devices have been developed. The GlideScope® videolaryngoscope and LMA CTrach™ (CT) allows continuous video-endoscopy of the tracheal intubation procedure. Objective: this study is to determine whether the GlideScope® videolaryngoscope (GVL) and the LMA CTrach™ (CT) provide the best airway management, measured primarily in intubation difficulty scale (IDS) scores, time and numbers of intubation attempts, and improvement in the intubation success rate of morbidly obese patients when compared with the direct Macintosh laryngoscope (DL). Materials and Methods: After Ethics’ Committee approval, 90 morbidly obese patients (BMI > 35 kg/m2) scheduled for general, gynecological, and bariatric surgery were included in this prospective study. Patients were randomly assigned in three groups: tracheal intubation using direct laryngoscopy (DL), GlideScope® videolaryngoscope (GVL) or the LMA CTrach™ (CT). Characteristics and consequences of airway management were evaluated. The primary outcome was the intubation difficulty scale score (IDS), Secondary outcomes were theintubation time, overall success rate, number of attempts, Cormack–Lehane grade, subjective difficulty of intubation, desaturation and upper airway morbidity. Results: Difficulty in facemask ventilation was similar in the three groups. IDS scores were significantly lower with GVL and CT than with DL. The mean TTI was 14 s faster in patients intubated with the GVL (86 s, IQR: 68-115) compared with DL (100 s, IQR; 80-150), and was 34 s faster when compared with CT (120 s, IQR; 95-180). The success rate of tracheal intubation was lower with the DL (80%) compared with the GVL (100%) or the CT (100%). Six cases of failed intubation occurred in group DL, four patients from the six patients were

  5. Clinical benefits of visualization of airway anatomy and manipulation of the endotracheal tube cuff with the GlideScope in the morbidly obese patient during tracheotomy.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Michael T; Lang, John

    2009-12-01

    Inadvertent deflation of the endotracheal tube cuff during a tracheotomy can complicate the surgical procedure, especially in a morbidly obese patient. Also, the anesthesia provider may lose control of the airway, with the inability to reintubate in case of airway edema, airway secretions, or airway fire. The use of the GlideScope video laryngoscope (Verathon Inc, Bothell, Washington) in the morbidly obese patient undergoing a tracheotomy has clinical benefits. This device allowed the visualization of the airway anatomy in 2 patients and the manipulation of the punctured endotracheal tube cuff in one case. PMID:20108730

  6. The multiphoton AC Stark effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, T. G.; Ficek, Z.; Freedhoff, H. S.

    1998-02-01

    We study the interaction of a two-level atom with two intense lasers: a strong laser of Rabi frequency 2Ω on resonance with the atomic transition, and a weaker laser detuned by 2Ω/n, i.e. by a subharmonic of the Rabi frequency of the first. The second laser "dresses" the dressed states created by the first in an n-photon process. We calculate the energy levels and eigenstates of this "doubly-dressed" atom, and find a new phenomenon: the splitting of the energy levels due to an n-photon coupling between them, resulting in a multiphoton AC Stark effect. We illustrate this effect in the fluorescence spectrum, and show that the spectrum contains triplets at the subharmonic as well as harmonic resonance frequencies with a clear dependence on the order n of the resonance and the ratio α of the Rabi frequencies of the lasers

  7. Protection of superconducting AC windings

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaege, T.; Agnoux, C.; Tavergnier, J.P. ); Lacaze, A. ); Collet, M. )

    1992-01-01

    Recent progresses on multifilamentary wires open new prospects of 50-60 Hz applications for superconductivity. The problem of AC windings protection is more critical than that of DC windings, because of high current densities, and of high matrix resistivity: one should not allow the quenched wire to carry it nominal current for longer than a few milliseconds, otherwise permanent damage could occur. After a quench initiation, the protection system therefore has to switch off or drastically reduce the current very rapidly. In this paper, the authors propose various schemes, applicable when the conductor is made of several wires: active protection involves an ultra-rapid quench detection. It is based on the measurement of the current passing through the central resistive wire, and/or of unbalanced currents in the different superconducting wires. About 20 milliseconds after detection, a fast circuit-breaker switched off the current. A complementary passive protection is provided by the resistance developing during normal phase propagation.

  8. Gliding into Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    A rich science learning experience not only captures students' attention but also motivates them to investigate and solve problems and investigate how scientists carry out their work. This article describes how secondary science coordinator Patrick Brown's found success teaching students the nature of science by engaging them in…

  9. First-principles study of atomic and electronic structures of 60° perfect and 30°/90° partial glide dislocations in CdTe

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kweon, Kyoung E.; Aberg, Daniel; Lordi, Vincenzo

    2016-05-16

    The atomic and electronic structures of 60° glide perfect and 30°/90° glide partial dislocations in CdTe are studied using combined semi-empirical and density functional theory calculations. The calculations predict that the dislocation cores tend to undergo significant reconstructions along the dislocation lines from the singly-periodic (SP) structures, yielding either doubly-periodic (DP) ordering by forming a dimer or quadruply-periodic (QP) ordering by alternating a dimer and a missing dimer. Charge modulation along the dislocation line, accompanied by the QP reconstruction for the Cd-/Te-core 60° perfect and 30° partials or the DP reconstruction for the Cd-core 90° partial, results in semiconducting character,more » as opposed to the metallic character of the SP dislocation cores. Dislocation-induced defect states for the 60° Cd-/Te-core are located relatively close to the band edges, whereas the defect states lie in the middle of the band gap for the 30° Cd-/Te-core partial dislocations. In addition to the intracore charge modulation within each QP core, the possibility of intercore charge transfer between two different dislocation cores when they are paired together in the same system is discussed. As a result, the analysis of the electronic structures reveals the potential role of the dislocations on charge transport in CdTe, particularly in terms of charge trapping and recombination.« less

  10. First-principles study of atomic and electronic structures of 60∘ perfect and 30∘/90∘ partial glide dislocations in CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweon, Kyoung E.; Åberg, Daniel; Lordi, Vincenzo

    2016-05-01

    The atomic and electronic structures of 60∘ glide perfect and 30∘/90∘ glide partial dislocations in CdTe are studied using combined semi-empirical and density functional theory calculations. The calculations predict that the dislocation cores tend to undergo significant reconstructions along the dislocation lines from the singly-periodic (SP) structures, yielding either doubly-periodic (DP) ordering by forming a dimer or quadruply-periodic (QP) ordering by alternating a dimer and a missing dimer. Charge modulation along the dislocation line, accompanied by the QP reconstruction for the Cd-/Te-core 60∘ perfect and 30∘ partials or the DP reconstruction for the Cd-core 90∘ partial, results in semiconducting character, as opposed to the metallic character of the SP dislocation cores. Dislocation-induced defect states for the 60∘ Cd-/Te-core are located relatively close to the band edges, whereas the defect states lie in the middle of the band gap for the 30∘ Cd-/Te-core partial dislocations. In addition to the intracore charge modulation within each QP core, the possibility of intercore charge transfer between two different dislocation cores when they are paired together in the same system is discussed. The analysis of the electronic structures reveals the potential role of the dislocations on charge transport in CdTe, particularly in terms of charge trapping and recombination.

  11. Learning Curves for Direct Laryngoscopy and GlideScope® Video Laryngoscopy in an Emergency Medicine Residency

    PubMed Central

    Sakles, John C; Mosier, Jarrod; Patanwala, Asad E.; Dicken, John

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Our objective is to evaluate the resident learning curves for direct laryngoscopy (DL) and GlideScope® video laryngoscopy (GVL) over the course of an emergency medicine (EM) residency training program. Methods This was an analysis of intubations performed in the emergency department (ED) by EM residents over a seven-year period from July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2014 at an academic ED with 70,000 annual visits. After EM residents perform an intubation in the ED they complete a continuous quality improvement (CQI) form. Data collected includes patient demographics, operator post- graduate year (PGY), difficult airway characteristics (DACs), method of intubation, device used for intubation and outcome of each attempt. We included in this analysis only adult intubations performed by EM residents using a DL or a standard reusable GVL. The primary outcome was first pass success, defined as a successful intubation with a single laryngoscope insertion. First pass success was evaluated for each PGY of training for DL and GVL. Logistic mixed-effects models were constructed for each device to determine the effect of PGY level on first pass success, after adjusting for important confounders. Results Over the seven-year period, the DL was used as the initial device on 1,035 patients and the GVL was used as the initial device on 578 patients by EM residents. When using the DL the first past success of PGY-1 residents was 69.9% (160/229; 95% CI 63.5%–75.7%), of PGY-2 residents was 71.7% (274/382; 95% CI 66.9%–76.2%), and of PGY-3 residents was 72.9% (309/424; 95% CI 68.4%–77.1%). When using the GVL the first pass success of PGY-1 residents was 74.4% (87/117; 95% CI 65.5%–82.0%), of PGY-2 residents was 83.6% (194/232; 95% CI 76.7%–87.7%), and of PGY-3 residents was 90.0% (206/229; 95% CI 85.3%–93.5%). In the mixed-effects model for DL, first pass success for PGY-2 and PGY-3 residents did not improve compared to PGY-1 residents (PGY-2 aOR 1.3, 95% CI 0.9–1

  12. Superconductor coil geometry and ac losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, T. V., Jr.; Zapata, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    An empirical relation is presented which allows simple computation of volume-averaged winding fields from central fields for coils of small rectangular cross sections. This relation suggests that, in certain applications, ac-loss minimization can be accomplished by use of low winding densities, provided that hysteresis losses are independent of winding density. The ac-loss measurements on coils wound of twisted multifilamentary composite superconductors show no significant dependence on ac losses on winding density, thus permitting the use of winding density as an independent design parameter in loss minimization.

  13. Three phase AC motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Vuckovich, Michael; Wright, Maynard K.; Burkett, John P.

    1984-03-20

    A motor controller for a three phase AC motor (10) which is adapted to operate bidirectionally from signals received either from a computer (30) or a manual control (32). The controller is comprised of digital logic circuit means which implement a forward and reverse command signal channel (27, 29) for the application of power through the forward and reverse power switching relays (16, 18, 20, 22). The digital logic elements are cross coupled to prevent activation of both channels simultaneously and each includes a plugging circuit (65, 67) for stopping the motor upon the removal of control signal applied to one of the two channels (27, 29) for a direction of rotation desired. Each plugging circuit (65, 67) includes a one-shot pulse signal generator (88, 102) which outputs a single pulse signal of predetermined pulsewidth which is adapted to inhibit further operation of the application of power in the channel which is being activated and to apply a reversal command signal to the other channel which provides a reversed phase application of power to the motor for a period defined by the pulse-width output of the one-shot signal generator to plug the motor (10) which will then be inoperative until another rotational command signal is applied to either of the two channels.

  14. Flavobacterium johnsoniae sprB Is Part of an Operon Spanning the Additional Gliding Motility Genes sprC, sprD, and sprF ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Ryan G.; Nelson, Shawn S.; Pochiraju, Soumya; McBride, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Cells of Flavobacterium johnsoniae move rapidly over surfaces by a process known as gliding motility. Gld proteins are thought to comprise the gliding motor that propels cell surface adhesins, such as the 669-kDa SprB. A novel protein secretion apparatus called the Por secretion system (PorSS) is required for assembly of SprB on the cell surface. Genetic and molecular analyses revealed that sprB is part of a seven-gene operon spanning 29.3 kbp of DNA. In addition to sprB, three other genes of this operon (sprC, sprD, and sprF) are involved in gliding. Mutations in sprB, sprC, sprD, and sprF resulted in cells that failed to form spreading colonies on agar but that exhibited some motility on glass in wet mounts. SprF exhibits some similarity to Porphyromonas gingivalis PorP, which is required for secretion of gingipain protease virulence factors via the P. gingivalis PorSS. F. johnsoniae sprF mutants produced SprB protein but were defective in localization of SprB to the cell surface, suggesting a role for SprF in secretion of SprB. The F. johnsoniae PorSS is involved in secretion of extracellular chitinase in addition to its role in secretion of SprB. SprF was not needed for chitinase secretion and may be specifically required for SprB secretion by the PorSS. Cells with nonpolar mutations in sprC or sprD produced and secreted SprB and propelled it rapidly along the cell surface. Multiple paralogs of sprB, sprC, sprD, and sprF are present in the genome, which may explain why mutations in sprB, sprC, sprD, and sprF do not result in complete loss of motility and suggests the possibility that semiredundant SprB-like adhesins may allow movement of cells over different surfaces. PMID:21131497

  15. Tevatron optics measurements using an AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is a device to study beam optics of hadron synchrotrons. It can produce sustained large amplitude oscillations with virtually no emittance growth. A vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is recently implemented and a maximum oscillation amplitude of 2{sigma} (4{sigma}) at 980 GeV (150 GeV) is achieved [1]. When such large oscillations are measured with the BPM system of the Tevatron (20 {micro}m resolution), not only linear but even nonlinear optics can be directly measured. This paper shows how to measure {beta} function using an AC dipole and the result is compared to the other measurement. The paper also shows a test to detect optics changes when small changes are made in the Tevatron. Since an AC dipole is nondestructive, it allows frequent measurements of the optics which is necessary for such an test.

  16. The AC-120: The advanced commercial transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duran, David; Griffin, Ernest; Mendoza, Saul; Nguyen, Son; Pickett, Tim; Noernberg, Clemm

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of this design was to fulfill a need for a new airplane to replace the aging 100 to 150 passenger, 1500 nautical mile range aircraft such as the Douglas DC9 and Boeing 737-100 airplanes. After researching the future aircraft market, conducting extensive trade studies, and analysis on different configurations, the AC-120 Advanced Commercial Transport final design was achieved. The AC-120's main design features include the incorporation of a three lifting surface configuration which is powered by two turboprop engines. The AC-120 is an economically sensitive aircraft which meets the new FM Stage Three noise requirements, and has lower NO(x) emissions than current turbofan powered airplanes. The AC-120 also improves on its contemporaries in passenger comfort, manufacturing, and operating cost.

  17. New ACS Guidelines Approved by CPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polik, William F.; Larive, Cynthia K.

    2008-04-01

    The American Chemical Society (ACS) Guidelines for Bachelor's Degree Programs have been revised in 2008 by the Committee on Professional Training (CPT) to reflect changes that are occurring in the chemistry profession and chemistry education. The goals of these changes are to promote modern and innovative chemistry curricula, encourage pedagogical innovation that enhances student learning and success, define faculty and infrastructure attributes of excellent chemistry programs, and streamline the procedures for program approval and review by ACS. The curriculum guidelines for an ACS-certified bachelor's degree are described in terms of foundation coursework, in-depth coursework, and laboratory requirements. Chemistry departments are encouraged to develop degree tracks to target emerging areas of interest within chemistry. The importance of developing student skills and regular program self-evaluation is emphasized. Finally, the procedures for approving and reviewing chemistry programs by ACS are summarized.

  18. The influence of various resistance loads on the ratio of activity of the external rotator muscles of the shoulder and the anterior gliding of the humeral head during external rotation exercise.

    PubMed

    Jo, Marg-Eun; Lee, Seung-Min; Jang, Jun-Hyeok; Lee, Sang-Yeol

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] To quantify the ratio of activation of the infraspinatus and posterior deltoid muscles and the anterior gliding motion of the humeral head during external rotation (ER) motions of the shoulder performed in prone position against different external resistance loads. [Subjects] Twenty healthy women between the ages of 20 and 30 years. [Methods] Activity ratio was quantified as the difference in the root mean square of the smoothed electromyography signal (EMG) of the posterior deltoid to the infraspinatus muscle, and anterior gliding pressure of the humeral head using a pressure biofeedback unit (PBU), for three resistance loads: 0, 1 and 2 kg. [Results] There was a significant correlation among all three variables (load, ratio, and pressure). Anterior gliding pressure correlated with the activity ratio, with activity of the posterior deltoid increasing with the magnitude of the resistance load. [Conclusion] There was a positive association between the magnitude of resistance load, activity of the posterior deltoid and anterior gliding pressure of the humeral head. The PBU could be used to facilitate the recruitment of the infraspinatus muscle at higher loads to improve glenohumeral joint stability during ER exercise against higher resistance. PMID:26644683

  19. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  20. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  1. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  2. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  3. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  4. The effect of sustained natural apophyseal glide (SNAG) combined with neurodynamics in the management of a patient with cervical radiculopathy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Anandkumar, Sudarshan

    2015-02-01

    This case report describes a 47-year-old female who presented with complaints of pain in the right elbow radiating down to the thumb. Physical examination revealed symptom reproduction with Spurling A test, upper limb neurodynamic testing-1 and right cervical rotation along with reduced symptoms with neck distraction. Clinical diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy (CR) was made based on a clinical prediction rule. This case report speculates a potentially first-time description of successful conservative management of CR in a patient utilizing simultaneous combination of sustained natural apophyseal glide and neurodynamic mobilization. Immediate improvements were seen in pain, cervical range of motion and functional abilities. The patient was discharged from physical therapy by the second week after four treatment sessions with complete pain resolution maintained at a four-month follow-up period. PMID:25329587

  5. Experimental AC (Asphalt Concrete) overlays of PCC pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. D.

    1983-11-01

    A series of experimental asphalt concrete (AC) overlays was constructed over an existing distressed portland cement concrete pavement on Interstate 80 near Boca, California. The experimental overlays included rubberized dense-graded AC, rubberized open-graded AC, a rubber flush coat interlayer, dense-graded AC with short polyester fibers and Bituthene interlayer strips. The report presents a description and discussion of AC mix batching, construction observations, laboratory testing, overlay covering, and initial performance evaluation.

  6. Cyclotron and linac production of Ac-225.

    PubMed

    Melville, Graeme; Allen, Barry J

    2009-04-01

    Radium needles that were once implanted into tumours as a cancer treatment are now obsolete and constitute a radioactive waste problem, as their half-life is 1600 years. The reduction of radium by photonuclear transmutation by bombarding Ra-226 with high-energy photons from a medical linear accelerator (linac) has been investigated. A linac dose of 2800 Gy produced about 2.4 MBq (64 microCi) of Ra-225, which decays to Ac-225 and can then be used for 'Targeted Alpha Therapy' (TAT) of cancer. This result, while consistent with theoretical calculations, is far too low to be of practical use unless much larger quantities of radium are irradiated. The increasing application of Ac-225 for cancer therapy indicates the potential need for its increased production and availability. This paper investigates the possibility of producing of Ac-225 in commercial quantities, which could potentially reduce obsolete radioactive material and displace the need for expensive importation of Ac-225 from the USA and Russia in the years ahead. Scaled up production of Ac-225 could theoretically be achieved by the use of a high current cyclotron or linac. Production specifications are determined for a linac in terms of current, pulse length and frequency, as well as an examination of other factors such as radiation issues and radionuclei separation. Yields are compared with those calculated for the Australian National Cyclotron in Sydney. PMID:19135381

  7. ac propulsion system for an electric vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geppert, S.

    1980-01-01

    It is pointed out that dc drives will be the logical choice for current production electric vehicles (EV). However, by the mid-80's, there is a good chance that the price and reliability of suitable high-power semiconductors will allow for a competitive ac system. The driving force behind the ac approach is the induction motor, which has specific advantages relative to a dc shunt or series traction motor. These advantages would be an important factor in the case of a vehicle for which low maintenance characteristics are of primary importance. A description of an EV ac propulsion system is provided, taking into account the logic controller, the inverter, the motor, and a two-speed transmission-differential-axle assembly. The main barrier to the employment of the considered propulsion system in EV is not any technical problem, but inverter transistor cost.

  8. ACS Data Handbook v.6.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzaga, S.; et al.

    2011-03-01

    ACS was designed to provide a deep, wide-field survey capability from the visible to near-IR using the Wide Field Camera (WFC), high resolution imaging from the near-UV to near-IR with the now-defunct High Resolution Camera (HRC), and solar-blind far-UV imaging using the Solar Blind Camera (SBC). The discovery efficiency of ACS's Wide Field Channel (i.e., the product of WFC's field of view and throughput) is 10 times greater than that of WFPC2. The failure of ACS's CCD electronics in January 2007 brought a temporary halt to CCD imaging until Servicing Mission 4 in May 2009, when WFC functionality was restored. Unfortunately, the high-resolution optical imaging capability of HRC was not recovered.

  9. AC loss in superconducting tapes and cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oomen, Marijn Pieter

    High-temperature superconductors are developed for use in power-transmission cables, transformers and motors. The alternating magnetic field in these devices causes AC loss, which is a critical factor in the design. The study focuses on multi-filament Bi-2223/Ag tapes exposed to a 50-Hz magnetic field at 77 K. The AC loss is measured with magnetic, electric and calorimetric methods. The results are compared to theoretical predictions based mainly on the Critical-State Model. The loss in high- temperature superconductors is affected by their characteristic properties: increased flux creep, high aspect ratio and inhomogeneties. Filament intergrowths and a low matrix resistivity cause a high coupling-current loss especially when the filaments are fully coupled. When the wide side of the tape is parallel to the external magnetic field, the filaments are decoupled by twisting. In a perpendicular field the filaments can be decoupled only by combining a short twist pitch with a transverse resistivity much higher than that of silver. The arrangement of the inner filaments determines the transverse resistivity. Ceramic barriers around the filaments cause partial decoupling in perpendicular magnetic fields at power frequencies. The resultant decrease in AC loss is greater than the accompanying decrease in critical current. With direct transport current in alternating magnetic field, the transport-current loss is well described with a new model for the dynamic resistance. The Critical- State Model describes well the magnetisation and total AC loss in parallel magnetic fields, at transport currents up to 0.7 times the critical current. When tapes are stacked face-to-face in a winding, the AC-loss density in perpendicular fields is greatly decreased due to the mutual shielding of the tapes. Coupling currents between the tapes in a cable cause an extra AC loss, which is reduced by a careful cable design. The total AC loss in complex devices with many tapes is generally well

  10. Brazilian Angiostrongylus cantonensis haplotypes, ac8 and ac9, have two different biological and morphological profiles

    PubMed Central

    Monte, Tainá CC; Gentile, Rosana; Garcia, Juberlan; Mota, Ester; Santos, Jeannie N; Maldonado, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the etiologic agent of eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in humans. Cases have been recorded in many parts of the world, including Brazil. The aim of this study was to compare the differences in the biology and morphology of two different Brazilian haplotypes of A. : ac8 and ac9. A significantly larger number of L1 larvae eliminated in the faeces of rodents at the beginning of the patent period was observed for ac9 haplotype and compared to the total of L1 larvae eliminated, there was a significant difference between the two haplotypes. The ac9 haplotype showed a significant difference in the proportion of female and male specimens (0.6:1), but the same was not observed for ac8 (1.2:1). The morphometric analysis showed that male and female specimens isolated from ac8 haplotype were significantly larger with respect to body length, oesophagus length, spicule length (male) and distance from the anus to the rear end (female) compared to specimens from ac9. The morphological analysis by light microscopy showed little variation in the level of bifurcations at the lateral rays in the right lobe of the copulatory bursa between the two haplotypes. The biological, morphological and morphometric variations observed between the two haplotypes agree with the observed variation at the molecular level using the cytochrome oxidase subunit I marker and reinforce the possible influence of geographical isolation on the development of these haplotypes. PMID:25591110

  11. AcsA-AcsB: The core of the cellulose synthase complex from Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769.

    PubMed

    McManus, John B; Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Kao, Teh-hui; Tien, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium, Gluconacetobacter hansenii, produces cellulose of exceptionally high crystallinity in comparison to the cellulose of higher plants. This bacterial cellulose is synthesized and extruded into the extracellular medium by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC). The catalytic component of this complex is encoded by the gene AcsAB. However, several other genes are known to encode proteins critical to cellulose synthesis and are likely components of the bacterial CSC. We have purified an active heterodimer AcsA-AcsB from G. hansenii ATCC23769 to homogeneity by two different methods. With the purified protein, we have determined how it is post-translationally processed, forming the active heterodimer AcsA-AcsB. Additionally, we have performed steady-state kinetic studies on the AcsA-AcsB complex. Finally through mutagenesis studies, we have explored the roles of the postulated CSC proteins AcsC, AcsD, and CcpAx. PMID:26672449

  12. Manipulating Flames with AC Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Kyle

    2013-11-01

    Time-oscillating electric fields applied to plasmas present in flames create steady flows of gas capable of shaping, directing, enhancing, or even extinguishing flames. Interestingly, electric winds induced by AC electric fields can be stronger that those due to static fields of comparable magnitude. Furthermore, unlike static fields, the electric force due to AC fields is localized near the surface of the flame. Consequently, the AC response depends only on the local field at the surface of the flame - not on the position of the electrodes used to generate the field. These results suggest that oscillating electric fields can be used to manipulate and control combustion processes at a distance. To characterize and explain these effects, we investigate a simple experimental system comprising a laminar methane-air flame positioned between two parallel-plate electrodes. We quantify both the electric and hydrodynamic response of the flame as a function of frequency and magnitude of the applied field. A theoretical model shows how steady gas flows emerge from the time-averaged electrical force due to the field-induced motion of ions generated within the flame and by their disappearance by recombination. These results provide useful insights into the application of AC fields to direct combustion processes.

  13. AC electric trapping of neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marian, Adela; Schlunk, Sophie; Schoellkopf, Wieland; Meijer, Gerard

    2008-05-01

    We have demonstrated trapping of ultracold ground-state ^87Rb atoms in a macroscopic ac electric trap [1]. Trapping by ac electric fields has been previously achieved for polar molecules [2], as well as Sr atoms on a chip [3], and recently for Rb atoms in a three-phase electric trap [4]. Similar to trapping of ions in a Paul trap, three-dimensional confinement in an ac electric trap is obtained by switching between two saddle-point configurations of the electric field. For the first time, this dynamic confinement is directly visualized with absorption images taken at different phases of the ac switching cycle. Stable electric trapping is observed in a narrow range of switching frequencies around 60 Hz, in agreement with trajectory calculations. In a typical experiment, about 3 x 10^5 Rb atoms are trapped with lifetimes on the order of 9 s and trap depths of about 10 μK. Additionally, we show that the atoms can be used to sensitively probe the electric fields in the trap by imaging the cloud while the fields are still on. References: 1. S. Schlunk et al., PRL 98, 223002 (2007) 2. H. L. Bethlem et al., PRA 74, 063403 (2006) 3. T. Kishimoto et al., PRL 96, 123001 (2006) 4. T. Rieger et al., PRL 99, 063001 (2007)

  14. Ac-dc converter firing error detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, O.L.

    1996-07-15

    Each of the twelve Booster Main Magnet Power Supply modules consist of two three-phase, full-wave rectifier bridges in series to provide a 560 VDC maximum output. The harmonic contents of the twelve-pulse ac-dc converter output are multiples of the 60 Hz ac power input, with a predominant 720 Hz signal greater than 14 dB in magnitude above the closest harmonic components at maximum output. The 720 Hz harmonic is typically greater than 20 dB below the 500 VDC output signal under normal operation. Extracting specific harmonics from the rectifier output signal of a 6, 12, or 24 pulse ac-dc converter allows the detection of SCR firing angle errors or complete misfires. A bandpass filter provides the input signal to a frequency-to-voltage converter. Comparing the output of the frequency-to-voltage converter to a reference voltage level provides an indication of the magnitude of the harmonics in the ac-dc converter output signal.

  15. AC power generation from microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Fernanda Leite; Wang, Heming; Forrestal, Casey; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2015-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) directly convert biodegradable substrates to electricity and carry good potential for energy-positive wastewater treatment. However, the low and direct current (DC) output from MFC is not usable for general electronics except small sensors, yet commercial DC-AC converters or inverters used in solar systems cannot be directly applied to MFCs. This study presents a new DC-AC converter system for MFCs that can generate alternating voltage in any desired frequency. Results show that AC power can be easily achieved in three different frequencies tested (1, 10, 60 Hz), and no energy storage layer such as capacitors was needed. The DC-AC converter efficiency was higher than 95% when powered by either individual MFCs or simple MFC stacks. Total harmonic distortion (THD) was used to investigate the quality of the energy, and it showed that the energy could be directly usable for linear electronic loads. This study shows that through electrical conversion MFCs can be potentially used in household electronics for decentralized off-grid communities.

  16. AC magnetic susceptibility of Bi2223-system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimishima, Y.; Inagaki, K.; Tanabe, K.; Nagata, N.; Ichiyanagi, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The AC magnetic susceptibilities χ AC of a Bi2223 sintered sample were measured by the Hartshorn bridge method. The linear AC χ' 0 showed the two-steps behavior at T C1 and T C2, where T C1 > T C2. The χ'0-data between T C1 and T C2 has no H AC-dependence and agreed well with those of powder specimen, and they can be regarded as the intragrain magnetic susceptibility. Below the inter-grain transition temperature T C2 the χ″ 0 showed a positive peak. The temperature dependence of χ' 0 and χ″ 0 were analyzed by the Bean's critical-state model. As a result, the temperature dependence of critical current density J C ∝ (1 - T/T C2) β was obtained with β = 2.3-2.6. The non-linear χ' 2 and χ″ 2 below T C2 resemble the behaviors derived from the Bean model, but the negative divergence of χ' 2 may show the evidence of d-wave paring in the present Bi2223-system.

  17. 76 FR 65633 - RIN 1904-AC43

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... FR 56678 (September 14, 2011) to make available and invite comments on the framework document for... Part 430 RIN 1904-AC43 Energy Conservation Program: Framework Document for General Service Fluorescent... general service fluorescent lamps and incandescent reflector lamps energy conservation standards in...

  18. ACS Task Force Frames Recommendations on Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Discusses findings and recommendations of an American Chemical Society (ACS) task force study on the status of chemical education in the United States. Recommendations relate to national concerns; all educational levels; elementary, secondary, university, college, and two-year college chemistry and science; chemistry careers; and industry and…

  19. High voltage AC/AC electrochemical capacitor operating at low temperature in salt aqueous electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Qamar; Béguin, François

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate that an activated carbon (AC)-based electrochemical capacitor implementing aqueous lithium sulfate electrolyte in 7:3 vol:vol water/methanol mixture can operate down to -40 °C with good electrochemical performance. Three-electrode cell investigations show that the faradaic contributions related with hydrogen chemisorption in the negative AC electrode are thermodynamically unfavored at -40 °C, enabling the system to work as a typical electrical double-layer (EDL) capacitor. After prolonged floating of the AC/AC capacitor at 1.6 V and -40°C, the capacitance, equivalent series resistance and efficiency remain constant, demonstrating the absence of ageing related with side redox reactions at this temperature. Interestingly, when temperature is increased back to 24 °C, the redox behavior due to hydrogen storage reappears and the system behaves as a freshly prepared one.

  20. 48 CFR Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false A Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7...

  1. 48 CFR Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false A Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7...

  2. Flavobacterium johnsoniae GldK, GldL, GldM, and SprA Are Required for Secretion of the Cell Surface Gliding Motility Adhesins SprB and RemA

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Abhishek; Johnston, Joseph J.; van Baaren, Jessica M.

    2013-01-01

    Flavobacterium johnsoniae cells move rapidly over surfaces by gliding motility. Gliding results from the movement of adhesins such as SprB and RemA along the cell surface. These adhesins are delivered to the cell surface by a Bacteroidetes-specific secretion system referred to as the type IX secretion system (T9SS). GldN, SprE, SprF, and SprT are involved in secretion by this system. Here we demonstrate that GldK, GldL, GldM, and SprA are each also involved in secretion. Nonpolar deletions of gldK, gldL, or gldM resulted in the absence of gliding motility and in T9SS defects. The mutant cells produced SprB and RemA proteins but failed to secrete them to the cell surface. The mutants were resistant to phages that use SprB or RemA as a receptor, and they failed to attach to glass, presumably because of the absence of cell surface adhesins. Deletion of sprA resulted in similar but slightly less dramatic phenotypes. sprA mutant cells failed to secrete SprB and RemA, but cells remained susceptible to some phages and retained some limited ability to glide. The phenotype of the sprA mutant was similar to those previously described for sprE and sprT mutants. SprA, SprE, and SprT are needed for secretion of SprB and RemA but may not be needed for secretion of other proteins targeted to the T9SS. Genetic and molecular experiments demonstrate that gldK, gldL, gldM, and gldN form an operon and suggest that the proteins encoded by these genes may interact to form part of the F. johnsoniae T9SS. PMID:23667240

  3. 7 CFR 1737.31 - Area Coverage Survey (ACS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Area Coverage Survey (ACS). 1737.31 Section 1737.31... Studies-Area Coverage Survey and Loan Design § 1737.31 Area Coverage Survey (ACS). (a) The Area Coverage Survey (ACS) is a market forecast of service requirements of subscribers in a proposed service area....

  4. 7 CFR 1737.31 - Area Coverage Survey (ACS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Area Coverage Survey (ACS). 1737.31 Section 1737.31... Studies-Area Coverage Survey and Loan Design § 1737.31 Area Coverage Survey (ACS). (a) The Area Coverage Survey (ACS) is a market forecast of service requirements of subscribers in a proposed service area....

  5. 7 CFR 1737.31 - Area Coverage Survey (ACS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Area Coverage Survey (ACS). 1737.31 Section 1737.31... Studies-Area Coverage Survey and Loan Design § 1737.31 Area Coverage Survey (ACS). (a) The Area Coverage Survey (ACS) is a market forecast of service requirements of subscribers in a proposed service area....

  6. 7 CFR 1737.31 - Area Coverage Survey (ACS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Area Coverage Survey (ACS). 1737.31 Section 1737.31... Studies-Area Coverage Survey and Loan Design § 1737.31 Area Coverage Survey (ACS). (a) The Area Coverage Survey (ACS) is a market forecast of service requirements of subscribers in a proposed service area....

  7. 7 CFR 1737.31 - Area Coverage Survey (ACS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Studies-Area Coverage Survey and Loan Design § 1737.31 Area Coverage Survey (ACS). (a) The Area Coverage Survey (ACS) is a market forecast of service requirements of subscribers in a proposed service area. (b... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Area Coverage Survey (ACS). 1737.31 Section...

  8. 21 CFR 886.1630 - AC-powered photostimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false AC-powered photostimulator. 886.1630 Section 886.1630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...) Identification. An AC-powered photostimulator is an AC-powered device intended to provide light stimulus...

  9. Methods for Addressing Missing Data with Applications from ACS Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandriet, Alexandra; Holme, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    As part of the ACS Examinations Institute (ACS-EI) national norming process, student performance data sets are collected from professors at colleges and universities from around the United States. Because the data sets are collected on a volunteer basis, the ACS-EI often receives data sets with only students' total scores and without the students'…

  10. 21 CFR 886.1630 - AC-powered photostimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false AC-powered photostimulator. 886.1630 Section 886.1630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...) Identification. An AC-powered photostimulator is an AC-powered device intended to provide light stimulus...

  11. Learning and performance of endotracheal intubation by paramedical students: Comparison of GlideScope® and intubating laryngeal mask airway with direct laryngoscopy in manikins

    PubMed Central

    Bahathiq, Adil Omar; Abdelmontaleb, Tharwat Helmy; Newigy, Mohammed Khairt

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: GlideScope video laryngoscope (GVL) and intubating laryngeal mask airway (I-LMA) may be used to facilitate intubation and secure the airway in patients with normal and abnormal airways. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether (GVL) and (I-LMA) facilitate and improve the tracheal intubation success rate and could be learned and performed easily by paramedic students when compared with Macintosh direct laryngoscopy (DL). Methods: This study was a prospective, randomised crossover trial that included 100 paramedic students. Macintosh DL, I-LMA and GVL were tested in both normal and difficult airway scenarios. Each participant was allowed up to three intubation attempts with each device, in each scenario. The time required to perform tracheal intubation, the success rate, number of intubation attempts and of optimisation manoeuvres and the severity of dental trauma were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-square, one-way ANOVA, or Kruskal-Wallis test as appropriate, followed by post hoc test. Results: GVL and I-LMA required less time to successfully perform tracheal intubation, showed a greater success rate of intubation, reduced the number of intubation attempts and optimization manoeuvres required and reduced the severity of dental trauma compared to Macintosh DL in both normal and difficult airway scenarios. Conclusion: GVL and I-LMA provide better airway management than Macintosh DL in both normal and difficult airway scenarios. PMID:27212721

  12. Gliding Arc Discharge in the Potato Pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica: Mechanism of Lethal Action and Effect on Membrane-Associated Molecules▿

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, M.; Feuilloley, M. G. J.; Veron, W.; Meylheuc, T.; Chevalier, S.; Brisset, J.-L.; Orange, N.

    2007-01-01

    Gliding arc (glidarc) discharge is a physicochemical technique for decontamination at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. It leads to the destruction of bacterial phytopathogens responsible for important losses in industrial agriculture, namely, Erwinia spp., without the formation of resistant forms. We investigated the effect of a novel optimized prototype allowing bacterial killing without lag time. This prototype also decreases the required duration of treatment by 50%. The study of the time course effect of the process on bacterial morphology suggests that glidarc induces major alterations of the bacterial membrane. We showed that glidarc causes the release of bacterial genomic DNA. By contrast, an apparent decrease in the level of extractible lipopolysaccharide was observed; however, no changes in the electrophoretic pattern and cytotoxic activity of the macromolecule were noted. Analysis of extractible proteins from the outer membrane of the bacteria revealed that glidarc discharge induces the release of these proteins from the lipid environment, but may also be responsible for protein dimerization and/or aggregation. This effect was not observed in secreted enzymatic proteins, such as pectate lyase. Analysis of the data supports the hypothesis that the plasma generated by glidarc discharge is acting essentially through oxidative mechanisms. Furthermore, these results indicate that, in addition to effectively destroying bacteria, glidarc discharge should be used to improve the extraction of bacterial molecules. PMID:17644644

  13. Free-Flight Investigation of Aerodynamic Heat Transfer to a Simulated Glide-Rocket Shape at Mach Numbers up to 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, A. G.

    1958-01-01

    Heat-transfer measurements were made on a simulated glide-rocket shape in free flight at Mach numbers up to 10 and free-stream Reynolds numbers of 2 x 10 based on distance along surface from apex and 3 x 10 based on nominal leading-edge diameter. The model simulated the bottom of a 75 deg delta wing at 8O deg angle of attack. The data indicated that for the test conditions a modified three-dimensional stagnation-point theory will predict to reasonable engineering accuracy the heating on a highly swept wing leading edge, the heating being reduced by sweep by the 3/2 power of the cosine of the sweep angle. The data also indicate that laminar heating rates over the windward surface of a highly swept flat glider wing at moderate angles of attack can be predicted with reasonable engineering accuracy by flat-plate theory using wedge local flow conditions and basing Reynolds numbers on lengths from the wing leading edge parallel to the surface center line.

  14. Attempts at validating a recombinant Flavobacterium psychrophilum gliding motility protein N as a vaccine candidate in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum) against bacterial cold-water disease.

    PubMed

    Plant, Karen P; LaPatra, Scott E; Call, Douglas R; Cain, Kenneth D

    2014-09-01

    The Flavobacterium psychrophilum gliding motility N (GldN) protein was investigated to determine its ability to elicit antibody responses and provide protective immunity in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum). GldN was PCR-amplified, cloned into pET102/D-TOPO, and expressed in Escherichia coli. Bacteria expressing recombinant GldN (rGldN) were formalin-inactivated and injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) into rainbow trout with Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) in four separate studies that used two different immunization protocols followed by challenge evaluations. Fish injected with E. coli only in FCA served as the control. Antibody responses to F. psychrophilum whole-cell lysates measured by ELISA were low in all four studies. Protection against F. psychrophilum challenge was observed in the first study, but not in the three following studies. The discrepancies in results obtained in the later studies are unclear but may relate to formalin treatment of the antigen preparations. Overall, it appeared that rGldN delivered i.p. as a crude formalin-killed preparation is not a consistent vaccine candidate, and more work is required. Additionally, this study illustrates the importance of conducting multiple in vivo evaluations on potential vaccine(s) before any conclusions are drawn. PMID:25053267

  15. Level structure and reflection asymmetric shape in sup 223 Ac

    SciTech Connect

    Sheline, R.K.; Liang, C.F.; Paris, P. )

    1990-07-20

    Mass separated sources of {sup 227}Pa (separated as PaF{sub 4}{sup +} ions) were used to study the level structure of {sup 223}Ac following alpha decay. The levels in {sup 223}Ac are interpreted as K = 5/2{sup {plus minus}} parity doublet bands which occur naturally in reflection asymmetric models and the multiphonon octupole model. The anomalous structure of the K = 3/2{sup {minus}} band is explained in terms of Coriolis coupling. The low lying parity doublet bands in {sup 223}Ac, {sup 225}Ac, and {sup 227}Ac are compared and contrasted.

  16. RHIC AC DIPOLE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; METH,M.; PAI,C.; PARKER,B.; PEGGS,S.; ROSER,T.; SANDERS,R.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; ZALTSMAN,A.

    2001-06-18

    Two ac dipoles with vertical and horizontal magnetic field have been proposed at RHIC for applications in linear and non-linear beam dynamics and spin manipulations. A magnetic field amplitude of 380 Gm is required to produce a coherent oscillation of 5 times the rms beam size at the top energy. We take the ac dipole frequency to be 1.0% of the revolution frequency away from the betatron frequency. To achieve the strong magnetic field with minimum power loss, an air-core magnet with two seven turn winding of low loss Litz wire resonating at 64 kHz is designed. The system is also designed to allow one to connect the two magnet winding in series to resonate at 37 kHz for the spin manipulation. Measurements of a half length prototype magnet are also presented.

  17. Initial Implementation Strategy for Drizzle with ACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, W. B.; Hack, W.; Hook, R. N.

    2001-04-01

    In order to provide geometric correction for single pointing ACS images, and to provide geometric correction together with simple image combination for associations of ACS images, we describe plans to implement the "drizzle" code by means of a python wrapper, and to use this wrapper in calacs. The initial strategy will endeavour to be robust and scientifically accurate, although not necessarily optimal. An upgrade path is outlined which could lead to significantly improved processing, involving an iterative pass through the data. The tools will be available stand-alone, offering a greater degree of flexibility than in pipeline implementation. The output product will be a multiple extension fits file containing the data (units counts per second), a weight image and a context image. The latter are provided by the drizzle program and are related to the variance and data quality arrays respectively.

  18. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY

    SciTech Connect

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Rosema, Keith; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Christensen, Charlotte; Gilbert, Karoline; Hodge, Paul; Seth, Anil C.; Dolphin, Andrew; Holtzman, Jon; Skillman, Evan D.; Weisz, Daniel; Cole, Andrew; Girardi, Leo; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Olsen, Knut; Freeman, Ken; Gallart, Carme; De Jong, Roelof S. E-mail: ben@astro.washington.edu E-mail: stephanie@astro.washington.edu E-mail: fabio@astro.washington.edu E-mail: aseth@cfa.harvard.edu

    2009-07-15

    The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) is a systematic survey to establish a legacy of uniform multi-color photometry of resolved stars for a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies (D < 4 Mpc). The survey volume encompasses 69 galaxies in diverse environments, including close pairs, small and large groups, filaments, and truly isolated regions. The galaxies include a nearly complete range of morphological types spanning a factor of {approx}10{sup 4} in luminosity and star formation rate. The survey data consist of images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), supplemented with archival data and new Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) imaging taken after the failure of ACS. Survey images include wide field tilings covering the full radial extent of each galaxy, and single deep pointings in uncrowded regions of the most massive galaxies in the volume. The new wide field imaging in ANGST reaches median 50% completenesses of m {sub F475W} = 28.0 mag, m {sub F606W} = 27.3 mag, and m {sub F814W} = 27.3 mag, several magnitudes below the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). The deep fields reach magnitudes sufficient to fully resolve the structure in the red clump. The resulting photometric catalogs are publicly accessible and contain over 34 million photometric measurements of >14 million stars. In this paper we present the details of the sample selection, imaging, data reduction, and the resulting photometric catalogs, along with an analysis of the photometric uncertainties (systematic and random), for both ACS and WFPC2 imaging. We also present uniformly derived relative distances measured from the apparent magnitude of the TRGB.

  19. Large aperture ac interferometer for optical testing.

    PubMed

    Moore, D T; Murray, R; Neves, F B

    1978-12-15

    A 20-cm clear aperture modified Twyman-Green interferometer is described. The system measures phase with an AC technique called phase-lock interferometry while scanning the aperture with a dual galvanometer scanning system. Position information and phase are stored in a minicomputer with disk storage. This information is manipulated with associated software, and the wavefront deformation due to a test component is graphically displayed in perspective and contour on a CRT terminal. PMID:20208642

  20. Highlights of the Dallas ACS Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildeman, Thomas R.; Freilich, Mark; Kelter, Paul B.

    1998-06-01

    Without a doubt, a primary feature of the 1998 Spring National Meeting in Dallas was the High School Program, which was organized by George Hague, and the impact that the Texas teachers had on other participants. Over 150 teachers registered for the meeting and participated in the program. Their organizational skills were used to reinstitute the High School/College Interface Luncheon. (The High School/College Interface Luncheon will also be held at the Fall ACS Meeting in Boston.)

  1. Graphs for Isotopes of 89-Ac (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides a graphic representation of nucleon separation energies and residual interaction parameters for isotopes of the chemical element 89-Ac (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89).

  2. [A novel Fe/AC desulphurizer at low temperature].

    PubMed

    Ma, J; Liu, S; Liu, Z; Zhu, Z; An, M; Yan, B

    2001-11-01

    Activated coke was used to support Fe2O3(Fe/AC) for flue gas SO2 removal. Reaction conditions on DeSOx activity were investigated. The results show that Fe/AC had higher activity than AC or Fe2O3 at temperature of 120 degrees C-250 degrees C. H2SO4 and Fe2(SO4)3 were formed after Fe/AC sorbed SO2, H2O and O2 increased the amount of SO2 adsorption. Fe/AC derived from AC of higher BET surface area had higher DeSOx activity. Fe/AC was suitable to be used at GHSV below 800 L/(kg.h). PMID:11855176

  3. Development of a hardware-based AC microgrid for AC stability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Robert R.

    As more power electronic-based devices enable the development of high-bandwidth AC microgrids, the topic of microgrid power distribution stability has become of increased interest. Recently, researchers have proposed a relatively straightforward method to assess the stability of AC systems based upon the time-constants of sources, the net bus capacitance, and the rate limits of sources. In this research, a focus has been to develop a hardware test system to evaluate AC system stability. As a first step, a time domain model of a two converter microgrid was established in which a three phase inverter acts as a power source and an active rectifier serves as an adjustable constant power AC load. The constant power load can be utilized to create rapid power flow transients to the generating system. As a second step, the inverter and active rectifier were designed using a Smart Power Module IGBT for switching and an embedded microcontroller as a processor for algorithm implementation. The inverter and active rectifier were designed to operate simultaneously using a synchronization signal to ensure each respective local controller operates in a common reference frame. Finally, the physical system was created and initial testing performed to validate the hardware functionality as a variable amplitude and variable frequency AC system.

  4. The Hubble Legacy Archive ACS grism data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kümmel, M.; Rosati, P.; Fosbury, R.; Haase, J.; Hook, R. N.; Kuntschner, H.; Lombardi, M.; Micol, A.; Nilsson, K. K.; Stoehr, F.; Walsh, J. R.

    2011-06-01

    A public release of slitless spectra, obtained with ACS/WFC and the G800L grism, is presented. Spectra were automatically extracted in a uniform way from 153 archival fields (or "associations") distributed across the two Galactic caps, covering all observations to 2008. The ACS G800L grism provides a wavelength range of 0.55-1.00 μm, with a dispersion of 40 Å/pixel and a resolution of ~80 Å for point-like sources. The ACS G800L images and matched direct images were reduced with an automatic pipeline that handles all steps from archive retrieval, alignment and astrometric calibration, direct image combination, catalogue generation, spectral extraction and collection of metadata. The large number of extracted spectra (73,581) demanded automatic methods for quality control and an automated classification algorithm was trained on the visual inspection of several thousand spectra. The final sample of quality controlled spectra includes 47 919 datasets (65% of the total number of extracted spectra) for 32 149 unique objects, with a median iAB-band magnitude of 23.7, reaching 26.5 AB for the faintest objects. Each released dataset contains science-ready 1D and 2D spectra, as well as multi-band image cutouts of corresponding sources and a useful preview page summarising the direct and slitless data, astrometric and photometric parameters. This release is part of the continuing effort to enhance the content of the Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA) with highly processed data products which significantly facilitate the scientific exploitation of the Hubble data. In order to characterize the slitless spectra, emission-line flux and equivalent width sensitivity of the ACS data were compared with public ground-based spectra in the GOODS-South field. An example list of emission line galaxies with two or more identified lines is also included, covering the redshift range 0.2 - 4.6. Almost all redshift determinations outside of the GOODS fields are new. The scope of science projects

  5. Deletion of the AcMNPV core gene ac109 results in budded virions that are non-infectious

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Minggang; Nie, Yingchao; Theilmann, David A.

    2009-06-20

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac109 is a core gene and its function in the virus life cycle is unknown. To determine its role in the baculovirus life cycle, we used the AcMNPV bacmid system to generate an ac109 deletion virus (vAc{sup 109KO}). Fluorescence and light microscopy showed that transfection of vAc{sup 109KO} results in a single-cell infection phenotype. Viral DNA replication is unaffected and the development of occlusion bodies in vAc{sup 109KO}-transfected cells evidenced progression to the very late phases of viral infection. Western blot and confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed that AC109 is expressed in the cytoplasm and nucleus throughout infection. In addition, AC109 is a structural protein as it was detected in both budded virus (BV) and occlusion derived virus in both the envelope and nucleocapsid fractions. Titration assays by qPCR and TCID{sub 50} showed that vAc{sup 109KO} produced BV but the virions are non-infectious. The vAc{sup 109KO} BV were indistinguishable from the BV of repaired and wild type control viruses as determined by negative staining and electron microscopy.

  6. Lumbar vertebral morphology of flying, gliding, and suspensory mammals: implications for the locomotor behavior of the subfossil lemurs Palaeopropithecus and Babakotia.

    PubMed

    Granatosky, Michael C; Miller, Charlotte E; Boyer, Doug M; Schmitt, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Lumbar vertebral morphology has been used as an indicator of locomotor behavior in living and fossil mammals. Rigidity within the lumbar region is thought to be important for increasing overall axial rigidity during various forms of locomotion, including bridging between supports, inverted quadrupedalism, gliding, and flying. However, distinguishing between those behaviors using bony features has been challenging. This study used osteological characters of the lumbar vertebrae to attempt to develop fine-grade functional distinctions among different mammalian species in order to make more complete inferences about how the axial skeleton affects locomotor behavior in extant mammals. These same lumbar characters were measured in two extinct species for which locomotor behaviors are well known, the sloth lemurs (Palaeopropithecus and Babakotia radofilai), in order to further evaluate their locomotor behaviors. Results from a principal components analysis of seven measurements, determined to be functionally significant from previous studies, demonstrate that inverted quadrupeds in the sample are characterized by dorsoventrally short and cranio-caudally expanded spinous processes, dorsally oriented transverse processes, and mediolaterally short and dorsoventrally high vertebral bodies compared with mammals that are relatively pronograde, vertical clingers, or gliders. Antipronograde mammals, dermopterans, and chiropterans also exhibit these traits, but not to the same extent as the inverted quadrupeds. In accordance with previous studies, our data show that the sloth lemur B. radofilai groups closely with antipronograde mammals like lorises, while Palaeopropithecus groups with extant sloths. These findings suggest that Palaeopropithecus was engaged in inverted quadrupedalism at a high frequency, while B. radofilai may have engaged in a more diverse array of locomotor and positional behaviors. The osteological features used here reflect differences in lumbar mobility

  7. High-frequency ac power distribution in Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Fu-Sheng; Lee, Fred C. Y.

    1990-01-01

    A utility-type 20-kHz ac power distribution system for the Space Station, employing resonant power-conversion techniques, is presented. The system converts raw dc voltage from photovoltaic cells or three-phase LF ac voltage from a solar dynamic generator into a regulated 20-kHz ac voltage for distribution among various loads. The results of EASY5 computer simulations of the local and global performance show that the system has fast response and good transient behavior. The ac bus voltage is effectively regulated using the phase-control scheme, which is demonstrated with both line and load variations. The feasibility of paralleling the driver-module outputs is illustrated with the driver modules synchronized and sharing a common feedback loop. An HF sinusoidal ac voltage is generated in the three-phase ac input case, when the driver modules are phased 120 deg away from one another and their outputs are connected in series.

  8. Study of AC electrical conduction mechanisms in an epoxy polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilani, Wissal; Mzabi, Nissaf; Gallot-Lavallée, Olivier; Fourati, Najla; Zerrouki, Chouki; Zerrouki, Rachida; Guermazi, Hajer

    2015-11-01

    The AC conductivity of an epoxy resin was investigated in the frequency range 10^{-1} - 106 Hz at temperatures ranging from -100 to 120 °C. The frequency dependence of σ_{ac} was described by the law: σ_{ac}=ω \\varepsilon0\\varepsilon^''_{HN}+Aωs. The study of temperature variation of the exponent (s) reveals two conduction models: the AC conduction dependence upon temperature is governed by the small polaron tunneling mechanism (SPTM) at low temperature (-100 -60 °C) and the correlated barrier hopping (CHB) model at high temperature (80-120 °C).

  9. AC Electroosmotic Pumping in Nanofluidic Funnels.

    PubMed

    Kneller, Andrew R; Haywood, Daniel G; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2016-06-21

    We report efficient pumping of fluids through nanofluidic funnels when a symmetric AC waveform is applied. The asymmetric geometry of the nanofluidic funnel induces not only ion current rectification but also electroosmotic flow rectification. In the base-to-tip direction, the funnel exhibits a lower ion conductance and a higher electroosmotic flow velocity, whereas, in the tip-to-base direction, the funnel has a higher ion conductance and a lower electroosmotic flow velocity. Consequently, symmetric AC waveforms easily pump fluid through the nanofunnels over a range of frequencies, e.g., 5 Hz to 5 kHz. In our experiments, the nanofunnels were milled into glass substrates with a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument, and the funnel design had a constant 5° taper with aspect ratios (funnel tip width to funnel depth) of 0.1 to 1.0. We tracked ion current rectification by current-voltage (I-V) response and electroosmotic flow rectification by transport of a zwitterionic fluorescent probe. Rectification of ion current and electroosmotic flow increased with increasing electric field applied to the nanofunnel. Our results support three-dimensional simulations of ion transport and electroosmotic transport through nanofunnels, which suggest the asymmetric electroosmotic transport stems from an induced pressure at the junction of the nanochannel and nanofunnel tip. PMID:27230495

  10. Ac45 silencing mediated by AAV-sh-Ac45-RNAi prevents both bone loss and inflammation caused by periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zheng; Chen, Wei; Hao, Liang; Zhu, Guochun; Lu, Yun; Li, Sheng; Wang, Lin; Li, Yi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Aim Periodontitis induced by oral pathogens leads to severe periodontal tissue damage and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption caused by inflammation. Based on the importance of Ac45 in osteoclast formation and function, we performed this study to evaluate the therapeutic potential of periodontitis by local adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated Ac45 gene knockdown. Material and Methods We used AAV-mediated short hairpin RNAi knockdown of Ac45 gene expression (AAV-sh-Ac45) to inhibit bone erosion and gingival inflammation simultaneously in a well-established periodontitis mouse model induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis W50. Histological studies were performed to evaluate the bone protection of AAV-sh-Ac45. Immunochemistry, ELISA and qRT-PCR were performed to reveal the role of Ac45 knockdown on inflammation, immune response and expression of cytokine. Results We found that Ac45 knockdown impaired osteoclast-mediated extracellular acidification and bone resorption in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, local administration of AAV-sh-Ac45 protected mice from bone erosion by >85% and attenuated inflammation and decreased infiltration of T-cells, dendritic cells and macrophages in the periodontal lesion. Notably, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was also reduced. Conclusions Local AAV-sh-Ac45 gene therapy efficiently protects against periodontal tissue damage and bone erosion through both inhibition of osteoclast function and attenuating inflammation, and may represent a powerful new treatment strategy for periodontitis. PMID:25952706

  11. Gliding flight: drag and torque of a hawk and a falcon with straight and turned heads, and a lower value for the parasite drag coefficient.

    PubMed

    Tucker, V A

    2000-12-01

    used for calculating the gliding performance of a peregrine. The accuracy with which drag coefficients measured on wingless bird bodies in a wind tunnel represent the C(D,par) of a living bird is unknown. Another method for determining C(D,par) selects values that improve the fit between speeds predicted by mathematical models and those observed in living birds. This method yields lower values for C(D,par) (0.05-0.07) than wind tunnel measurements, and the present study suggests a value of 0.1 for raptors as a compromise. PMID:11076737

  12. Using genetics to test the causal relationship of total adiposity and periodontitis: Mendelian randomization analyses in the Gene-Lifestyle Interactions and Dental Endpoints (GLIDE) Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Shungin, Dmitry; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Divaris, Kimon; Holtfreter, Birte; Shaffer, John R; Yu, Yau-Hua; Barros, Silvana P; Beck, James D; Biffar, Reiner; Boerwinkle, Eric A; Crout, Richard J.; Ganna, Andrea; Hallmans, Goran; Hindy, George; Hu, Frank B; Kraft, Peter; McNeil, Daniel W; Melander, Olle; Moss, Kevin L; North, Kari E; Orho-Melander, Marju; Pedersen, Nancy L; Ridker, Paul M; Rimm, Eric B; Rose, Lynda M; Rukh, Gull; Teumer, Alexander; Weyant, Robert J; Chasman, Daniel I; Joshipura, Kaumudi; Kocher, Thomas; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Marazita, Mary L; Nilsson, Peter; Offenbacher, Steve; Davey Smith, George; Lundberg, Pernilla; Palmer, Tom M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Johansson, Ingegerd; Franks, Paul W

    2015-01-01

    Background: The observational relationship between obesity and periodontitis is widely known, yet causal evidence is lacking. Our objective was to investigate causal associations between periodontitis and body mass index (BMI). Methods: We performed Mendelian randomization analyses with BMI-associated loci combined in a genetic risk score (GRS) as the instrument for BMI. All analyses were conducted within the Gene-Lifestyle Interactions and Dental Endpoints (GLIDE) Consortium in 13 studies from Europe and the USA, including 49 066 participants with clinically assessed (seven studies, 42.1% of participants) and self-reported (six studies, 57.9% of participants) periodontitis and genotype data (17 672/31 394 with/without periodontitis); 68 761 participants with BMI and genotype data; and 57 871 participants (18 881/38 990 with/without periodontitis) with data on BMI and periodontitis. Results: In the observational meta-analysis of all participants, the pooled crude observational odds ratio (OR) for periodontitis was 1.13 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.24] per standard deviation increase of BMI. Controlling for potential confounders attenuated this estimate (OR = 1.08; 95% CI:1.03, 1.12). For clinically assessed periodontitis, corresponding ORs were 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.42) and 1.13 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.17), respectively. In the genetic association meta-analysis, the OR for periodontitis was 1.01 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.03) per GRS unit (per one effect allele) in all participants and 1.00 (95% CI: 0.97, 1.03) in participants with clinically assessed periodontitis. The instrumental variable meta-analysis of all participants yielded an OR of 1.05 (95% CI: 0.80, 1.38) per BMI standard deviation, and 0.90 (95% CI: 0.56, 1.46) in participants with clinical data. Conclusions: Our study does not support total adiposity as a causal risk factor for periodontitis, as the point estimate is very close to the null in the causal inference analysis, with wide

  13. Public Understanding of Chemistry, ACS National Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettys, Nancy S.

    2000-06-01

    Three public events for area school-aged children were held on Saturday, March 25, 2000, prior to the opening of the 219th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society. All took place at the Moscone Convention Center in downtown San Francisco. The photographs tell the story: the programs were successful and a good time was had by all. Readers may be encouraged to try these ideas in their own area. If so, the local organizers of Carver Kidvention have additional information at www.scvacs.org/Carver/index.html or contact Howard Peters (Santa Clara Valley Section, ACS), peters4pa@aol.com. Additional photos of the Kidvention event may also be seen as supplemental material.

  14. An ac bridge readout for bolometric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, F. M.; Lange, A. E.; Beeman, J. W.; Haller, E. E.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have developed a bolometer readout circuit which greatly improves the low-frequency stability of bolometric detectors. The circuit uses an ac bias voltage and two matched bolometers and allows stable dc bolometer operation for integration times greater than 10 s. In astronomical applications the readout allows for qualitatively different observation modes (e.g. staring or slow-drift scanning) which are particularly well suited for space observations and for the use of arrays. In many applications the readout can increase sensitivity. The authors present noise spectra for 4He temperature bolometers with no excess noise at frequencies greater than 0.1 Hz. The measured optical responsivity of a bolometer operated with the present readout is the same as that of a bolometer operated with a conventional readout.

  15. Advanced ac powertrain for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Slicker, J.M.; Kalns, L.

    1985-01-01

    The design of an ac propulsion system for an electric vehicle includes a three-phase induction motor, transistorized PWM inverter/battery charger, microprocessor-based controller, and two-speed automatic transaxle. This system was built and installed in a Mercury Lynx test bed vehicle as part of a Department of Energy propulsion system development program. An integral part of the inverter is a 4-kw battery charger which utilizes one of the bridge transistors. The overall inverter strategy for this configuration is discussed. The function of the microprocessor-based controller is described. Typical test results of the total vehicle and each of its major components are given, including system efficiencies and test track performance results.

  16. Fuzzy efficiency optimization of AC induction motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jani, Yashvant; Sousa, Gilberto; Turner, Wayne; Spiegel, Ron; Chappell, Jeff

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the early states of work to implement a fuzzy logic controller to optimize the efficiency of AC induction motor/adjustable speed drive (ASD) systems running at less than optimal speed and torque conditions. In this paper, the process by which the membership functions of the controller were tuned is discussed and a controller which operates on frequency as well as voltage is proposed. The membership functions for this dual-variable controller are sketched. Additional topics include an approach for fuzzy logic to motor current control which can be used with vector-controlled drives. Incorporation of a fuzzy controller as an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) microchip is planned.

  17. Modeling of ac dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, J. S.; Huang, P. G.

    2010-06-15

    The qualitative electrodynamic field of the dielectric barrier discharge in air is studied by a three-component, drift-diffusion plasma model including the Poisson equation of plasmadynamics. The critical media interface boundary conditions independent of the detailed mechanisms of surface absorption, diffusion, recombination, and charge accumulation on electrode or dielectrics are developed from the theory of electromagnetics. The computational simulation duplicates the self-limiting feature of dielectric barrier discharge for preventing corona-to-spark transition, and the numerical results of the breakdown voltage are compared very well with data. According to the present modeling, the periodic electrodynamic force due to charge separation over the electrodes also exerts on alternative directions from the exposed to encapsulated electrodes over a complete ac cycle as experimental observations.

  18. Undergraduate Chemistry Education: Report of an ACS Presidential Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polik, William F.

    2006-01-01

    The American Chemical Society (ACS) Presidential Symposium, Envisioning Undergraduate Chemistry Education in 2015 was organized by the ACS Committee on Professional Training (CPT), in response to the challenge to envision the chemistry enterprise in 2015. The need for more diverse role models at all levels is emphasized, including high school…

  19. 24 CFR Appendices A-C to Subtitle A - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false A Appendices A-C to Subtitle A Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development Appendices A-C to Subtitle A...

  20. 24 CFR Appendices A-C to Subtitle A - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false A Appendices A-C to Subtitle A Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development Appendices A-C to Subtitle A...

  1. 24 CFR Appendices A-C to Subtitle A - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false A Appendices A-C to Subtitle A Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development Appendices A-C to Subtitle A...

  2. 24 CFR Appendices A-C to Subtitle A - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false A Appendices A-C to Subtitle A Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development Appendices A-C to Subtitle A...

  3. 24 CFR Appendixes A-C to Subtitle A - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false A Appendixes A-C to Subtitle A Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development Appendixes A-C to Subtitle A...

  4. Equivalent circuit models for ac impedance data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    A least-squares fitting routine has been developed for the analysis of ac impedance data. It has been determined that the checking of the derived equations for a particular circuit with a commercially available electronics circuit program is essential. As a result of the investigation described, three equivalent circuit models were selected for use in the analysis of ac impedance data.

  5. Electrostatic coalescence system with independent AC and DC hydrophilic electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Hovarongkura, A. David; Henry, Jr., Joseph D.

    1981-01-01

    An improved electrostatic coalescence system is provided in which independent AC and DC hydrophilic electrodes are employed to provide more complete dehydration of an oil emulsion. The AC field is produced between an AC electrode array and the water-oil interface wherein the AC electrode array is positioned parallel to the interface which acts as a grounded electrode. The emulsion is introduced into the AC field in an evenly distributed manner at the interface. The AC field promotes drop-drop and drop-interface coalescence of the water phase in the entering emulsion. The continuous oil phase passes upward through the perforated AC electrode array and enters a strong DC field produced between closely spaced DC electrodes in which small dispersed droplets of water entrained in the continuous phase are removed primarily by collection at hydrophilic DC electrodes. Large droplets of water collected by the electrodes migrate downward through the AC electrode array to the interface. All phase separation mechanisms are utilized to accomplish more complete phase separation.

  6. A Hyperactive Transposase of the Maize Transposable Element Activator (Ac)

    PubMed Central

    Lazarow, Katina; Du, My-Linh; Weimer, Ruth; Kunze, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable elements from maize are widely used as insertional mutagenesis and gene isolation tools in plants and more recently also in medaka and zebrafish. They are particularly valuable for plant species that are transformation-recalcitrant and have long generation cycles or large genomes with low gene densities. Ac/Ds transposition frequencies vary widely, however, and in some species they are too low for large-scale mutagenesis. We discovered a hyperactive Ac transposase derivative, AcTPase4x, that catalyzes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 100-fold more frequent Ds excisions than the wild-type transposase, whereas the reintegration frequency of excised Ds elements is unchanged (57%). Comparable to the wild-type transposase in plants, AcTPase4x catalyzes Ds insertion preferentially into coding regions and to genetically linked sites, but the mutant protein apparently has lost the weak bias of the wild-type protein for insertion sites with elevated guanine–cytosine content and nonrandom protein-DNA twist. AcTPase4x exhibits hyperactivity also in Arabidopsis thaliana where it effects a more than sixfold increase in Ds excision relative to wild-type AcTPase and thus may be useful to facilitate Ac/Ds-based insertion mutagenesis approaches. PMID:22562933

  7. Operation of AC Adapters Visualized Using Light-Emitting Diodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regester, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    A bridge rectifier is a diamond-shaped configuration of diodes that serves to convert alternating current(AC) into direct current (DC). In our world of AC outlets and DC electronics, they are ubiquitous. Of course, most bridge rectifiers are built with regular diodes, not the light-emitting variety, because LEDs have a number of disadvantages. For…

  8. 40 CFR Appendixes A-C to Part 403 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true A Appendixes A-C to Part 403 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PRE-TREAT-MENT REGULATIONS FOR EXIST-ING AND NEW SOURCES OF POLLUTION Appendixes A-C to Part 403...

  9. 40 CFR Appendixes A-C to Part 403 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true A Appendixes A-C to Part 403 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PRE-TREAT-MENT REGULATIONS FOR EXIST-ING AND NEW SOURCES OF POLLUTION Appendixes A-C to Part 403...

  10. Measurement of coupling resonance driving terms with the AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.

    2010-10-01

    Resonance driving terms for linear coupled betatron motion in a synchrotron ring can be determined from corresponding spectral lines of an excited coherent beam motion. An AC dipole is one of instruments to excite such a motion. When a coherent motion is excited with an AC dipole, measured Courant-Snyder parameters and betatron phase advance have apparent modulations, as if there is an additional quadrupole field at the location of the AC dipole. Hence, measurements of these parameters using the AC dipole require a proper interpretation of observed quantities. The situation is similar in measurements of resonance driving terms using the AC dipole. In this note, we derive an expression of coupled betatron motion excited with two AC dipoles in presence of skew quadrupole fields, discuss an impact of this quadrupole like effect of the AC dipole on a measurement of coupling resonance driving terms, and present an analytical method to determine the coupling resonance driving terms from quantities observed using the AC dipole.

  11. ACS Internal CTE Monitor and Short Darks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaz, Sara

    2012-10-01

    This is a continuation of Program 12386 and is to be executed once a cycle for internal CTE and short darks, respectively.INTERNAL CTE MONITOR:The charge transfer efficiency {CTE} of the ACS CCD detectors will decline as damage due to on-orbit radiation exposure accumulates. This degradation will be monitored once a cycle to determine the useful lifetime of the CCDs. All the data for this program is acquired using internal targets {lamps} only, so all of the exposures should be taken during Earth occultation time {but not during SAA passages}. This program emulates the ACS pre-flight ground calibration and post-launch SMOV testing {program 8948}, so that results from each epoch can be directly compared. Extended Pixel Edge Response {EPER} data will be obtained over a range of signal levels for the Wide Field Channel {WFC}. The signal levels are 125, 500, 1620, 5000, 10000, and 60000 electrons at gain 2.Since Cycle 18, this monitoring program was reduced {compared to 11881} considering that there is also an external CTE monitoring program.SHORT DARKS:To improve the pixel-based CTE model at signals below 10 DN, short dark frames are needed to obtain a statistically useful sample of clean, warm pixel trails. This program obtains a set of dark frames for each of the following exposure times: 66 s {60 s for some subarrays} and 339 s. These short darks and the 1040 s darks obtained from the CCD Daily Monitor will sample warm and hot pixels over logarithmically increasing brightness. Subarray short darks were newly added in Cycle 19 to study CTE tails in different subarray readout modes.

  12. ACS Internal CTE Monitor and Short Darks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaz, Sara

    2013-10-01

    This is a continuation of Program 13156 and is to be executed once a cycle for internal CTE and short darks, respectively.INTERNAL CTE MONITOR:The charge transfer efficiency {CTE} of the ACS CCD detectors will decline as damage due to on-orbit radiation exposure accumulates. This degradation will be monitored once a cycle to determine the useful lifetime of the CCDs. All the data for this program is acquired using internal targets {lamps} only, so all of the exposures should be taken during Earth occultation time {but not during SAA passages}. This program emulates the ACS pre-flight ground calibration and post-launch SMOV testing {program 8948}, so that results from each epoch can be directly compared. Extended Pixel Edge Response {EPER} data will be obtained over a range of signal levels for the Wide Field Channel {WFC}. The signal levels are 125, 500, 1620, 5000, 10000, and 60000 electrons at gain 2.Since Cycle 18, this monitoring program was reduced {compared to 11881} considering that there is also an external CTE monitoring program.SHORT DARKS:To improve the pixel-based CTE model at signals below 10 DN, short dark frames are needed to obtain a statistically useful sample of clean, warm pixel trails. This program obtains a set of dark frames for each of the following exposure times: 66 s {60 s for some subarrays} and 339 s. These short darks and the 1040 s darks obtained from the CCD Daily Monitor will sample warm and hot pixels over logarithmically increasing brightness. Subarray short darks were added in Cycle 19 to study CTE tails in different subarray readout modes.

  13. Wind-powered asynchronous AC/DC/AC converter system. [for electric power supply regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitan, D. K.

    1973-01-01

    Two asynchronous ac/dc/ac systems are modelled that utilize wind power to drive a variable or constant hertz alternator. The first system employs a high power 60-hertz inverter tie to the large backup supply of the power company to either supplement them from wind energy, storage, or from a combination of both at a preset desired current; rectifier and inverter are identical and operate in either mode depending on the silicon control rectifier firing angle. The second system employs the same rectification but from a 60-hertz alternator arrangement; it provides mainly dc output, some sinusoidal 60-hertz from the wind bus and some high harmonic content 60-hertz from an 800-watt inverter.

  14. Preliminary Geologic Mapping of the Ac-S-1 Hemisphere of Ceres from NASA's Dawn Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mest, S. C.; Williams, D. A.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Scully, J. E. C.; Crown, D. A.; Yingst, R. A.; Jaumann, R.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2015-10-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft [1], launched in September 2007, spent ~1 year (2011-2012) investigating Vesta and recently (March 6, 2015) arrived at dwarf planet Ceres. The first images of Ceres' surface were acquired by Dawn's Framing Camera (FC) [2] as it made optical navigation and rotation characterization observations during the Approach phase. The Dawn Science Team will conduct a geological mapping campaign at Ceres during the Nominal Mission, which will include iterative mapping using data obtained during each orbital phase. Iterative geologic mapping was previously successfully conducted during Dawn's mission to Vesta [3,4]. This abstract describes the preliminary geologic mapping results for quadrangle Ac-S-1 (55-90°N, 0-360°E), the northern hemisphere of Ceres.

  15. Tribological behavior of electron beam D6ac weldment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shyh-Chi; Tseng, Kuang-Hung; Wen, Hua-Chiang; Wu, Ming-Jhang; Chou, Chang-Pin

    2013-01-01

    A flow formed D6ac steel tubing was joined using electron beam (EB) welding. Thereafter, the EB weldments were treated by tempering at temperatures of 450 °C and 550 °C. After tempering, the microstructural features, mechanical properties, and tribological characteristics of the EB D6ac weldment were studied. This study used a scratch test to evaluate the sliding wear resistance of the tempered weldment. Results indicate that the tempering softens the microstructure by reducing the dislocation density of the flow formed D6ac steel. For the 450 °C/2 h/air cooling tempering treated D6ac steel, the fracture toughness of the EB weldment can be significantly improved. The tribological behavior of the tempered D6ac weldment depended on the tempered microstructures.

  16. Sustainable AC/AC hybrid electrochemical capacitors in aqueous electrolyte approaching the performance of organic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Qamar; Babuchowska, Paulina; Frąckowiak, Elżbieta; Béguin, François

    2016-09-01

    A high energy hybrid AC/AC electrochemical capacitor has been realized in aqueous Li2SO4+KI electrolyte mixture. Owing to the redox processes associated with the 2I-/I2 system, the positive electrode operates in narrow potential range and displays high capacity. During prolonged potentiostatic floating at 1.6 V, the hybrid cell demonstrates remarkably stable capacitance and resistance. Analyses by temperature programmed desorption after floating at 1.6 V proved that oxidation of the positive AC electrode is prevented by the use of Li2SO4+KI, which enables the maximum potential of this electrode to be shifted below the water oxidation potential. When charged at 0.2 A g-1 up to U = 1.6 V, the hybrid cell displays a high capacitance of 75 F g-1 (300 F g-1 per mass of one electrode) compared to 47 F g-1 (188 F g-1 per mass of one electrode) for a symmetric cell in Li2SO4. At 0.2 A g-1 up to 1.6 V, the hybrid capacitor in Li2SO4+KI displays an energy density of 26 Wh kg-1 which approaches the energy density of 30.9 Wh kg-1 measured when the same carbon is implemented in a capacitor using TEABF4/ACN electrolyte and charged up to 2.5 V.

  17. HVDC-AC system interaction from AC harmonics. Volume 1. Harmonic impedance calculations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, G D; Chow, J H; Lindh, C B; Miller, N W; Numrich, F H; Price, W W; Turner, A E; Whitney, R R

    1982-09-01

    Improved methods are needed to characterize ac system harmonic behavior for ac filter design for HVDC systems. The purpose of this General Electric Company RP1138 research is to evaluate the present filter design practice and to investigate methods for calculating system harmonic impedances. An overview of ac filter design for HVDC systems and a survey of literature related to filter design have been performed. Two methods for calculating system harmonic impedances have been investigated. In the measurement method, an instrumentation system for measuring system voltage and current has been assembled. Different schemes of using the measurements to calculate system harmonic impedances have been studied. In the analytical method, a procedure to include various operating conditions has been proposed. Computer programs for both methods have been prepared, and the results of the measurement and analytical methods analyzed. A conclusion of the project is that the measurement and analytical methods both provided reasonable results. There are correlations between the measured and analytical results for most harmonics, although there are discrepancies between the assumptions used in the two methods. A sensitivity approach has been proposed to further correlate the results. From the results of the analysis, it is recommended that both methods should be tested further. For the measurement method, more testing should be done to cover different system operating conditions. In the analytical method, more detailed models for representing system components should be studied. In addition, alternative statistical and sensitivity approaches should be attempted.

  18. Ac-Induced Instability at the Xanthophyllic Locus of Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, P. W.; Yoder, J. I.

    1993-01-01

    To detect genomic instability caused by Ac elements in transgenic tomatoes, we used the incompletely dominant mutation Xanthophyllic-1 (Xa-1) as a whole plant marker gene. Xa-1 is located on chromosome 10 and in the heterozygote state causes leaves to be yellow. Transgenic Ac-containing tomato plants which differed in the location and number of their Ac elements were crossed to Xa-1 tester lines and F(1) progeny were scored for aberrant somatic sectoring. Of 800 test and control F(1) progeny screened, only four plants had aberrantly high levels of somatic sectors. Three of the plants had twin sectors consisting of green tissue adjacent to white tissue, and the other had twin sectors comprised of green tissue adjacent to tissue more yellow than the heterozygote background. Sectoring was inherited and the two sectoring phenotypes mapped to opposite homologs of chromosome 10; the green/yellow sectoring phenotype mapped in coupling to Xa-1 while the green/white sectoring phenotype mapped in repulsion. The two sectoring phenotypes cosegregated with different single, non-rearranged Acs, and loss of these Acs from the genome corresponded to the loss of sectoring. Sectoring was still observed after transposition of the Ac to a new site which indicated that sectoring was not limited to a single locus. In both sectored lines, meiotic recombination of the sectoring Ac to the opposite homolog caused the phenotype to switch between the green/yellow and the green/white phenotypes. Thus the two different sectoring phenotypes arose from the same Ac-induced mechanism; the phenotype depended on which chromosome 10 homolog the Ac was on. We believe that the twin sectors resulted from chromosome breakage mediated by a single intact, transposition-competent Ac element. PMID:8394266

  19. 78 FR 49318 - Availability of Draft Advisory Circular (AC) 90-106A and AC 20-167A

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at http://DocketsInfo... Systems (78 FR 34935-34958) (Docket No.: FAA-2013-0485; Notice No. 1209). AC 90-106A, Enhanced Flight...), Synthetic Vision System (SVS), and Combined Vision System (CVS) equipment installation. AC 90-106A is...

  20. Operation of AC Adapters Visualized Using Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regester, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    A bridge rectifier is a diamond-shaped configuration of diodes that serves to convert alternating current (AC) into direct current (DC). In our world of AC outlets and DC electronics, they are ubiquitous. Of course, most bridge rectifiers are built with regular diodes, not the light-emitting variety, because LEDs have a number of disadvantages. For educational purposes, however, an LED-based rectifier is ideal because it allows students to literally see the rectifier operating. Here I'll discuss the practical aspects of building a full AC adapter incorporating an LED-based rectifier and ideas on how to use it in class.

  1. Dielectrophoretic particle-particle interaction under AC electrohydrodynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doh-Hyoung; Yu, Chengjie; Papazoglou, Elisabeth; Farouk, Bakhtier; Noh, Hongseok M

    2011-09-01

    We used the Maxwell stress tensor method to understand dielectrophoretic particle-particle interactions and applied the results to the interpretation of particle behaviors under alternating current (AC) electrohydrodynamic conditions such as AC electroosmosis (ACEO) and electrothermal flow (ETF). Distinct particle behaviors were observed under ACEO and ETF. Diverse particle-particle interactions observed in experiments such as particle clustering, particles keeping a certain distance from each other, chain and disc formation and their rotation, are explained based on the numerical simulation data. The improved understanding of particle behaviors in AC electrohydrodynamic flows presented here will enable researchers to design better particle manipulation strategies for lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:21823132

  2. Stochastic Dynamics of DC and AC Driven Dislocation Kinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, A.; Kteyan, A.

    2013-02-01

    Dynamics of a pinned dislocation kink controlled by the acting DC and AC forces is studied analytically. The motion of the kink, described by sine-Gordon (sG) equation, is explored within the framework of McLaughlin-Scott perturbation theory. Assuming weakness of the acting AC force, the equation of motion of the dislocation kink in the pinning potential is linearized. Based on the equations derived, we study stochastic behavior of the kink, and determine the probability of its depinning. The dependencies of the depinning probability on DC and AC forces are analyzed in detail.

  3. The application of Halbach cylinders to brushless ac servo motors

    SciTech Connect

    Atallah, K.; Howe, D.

    1998-07-01

    Halbach cylinders are applied to brushless ac servo motors. It is shown that a sinusoidal back-emf waveform and a low cogging torque can be achieved without recourse to conventional design features such as distributed windings and/or stator/rotor skew. A technique for imparting a multipole Halbach magnetization distribution on an isotropic permanent magnet cylinder is described, and it is shown that the torque capability of a Halbach ac servo motor can be up to 33% higher than conventional brushless permanent magnet ac motors.

  4. Critical field measurements in superconductors using ac inductive techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, S. A.; Ketterson, J. B.; Crabtree, G. W.

    1983-09-01

    The ac in-phase and out-of-phase response of type II superconductors is discussed in terms of dc magnetization curves. Hysteresis in the dc magnetization is shown to lead to a dependence of the ac response on the rate at which an external field is swept. This effect allows both Hc1 and Hc2 to be measured by ac techniques. A relatively simple mutual inductance bridge for making such measurements is described in the text, and factors affecting bridge sensitivity are discussed in the Appendix. Data for the magnetic superconductor ErRh4B4 obtained using this bridge are reported.

  5. Cyclotron production of Ac-225 for targeted alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Apostolidis, C; Molinet, R; McGinley, J; Abbas, K; Möllenbeck, J; Morgenstern, A

    2005-03-01

    The feasibility of producing Ac-225 by proton irradiation of Ra-226 in a cyclotron through the reaction Ra-226(p,2n)Ac-225 has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Proton energies were varied from 8.8 to 24.8 MeV and cross-sections were determined by radiochemical analysis of reaction yields. Maximum yields were reached at incident proton energies of 16.8 MeV. Radiochemical separation of Ac-225 from the irradiated target yielded a product suitable for targeted alpha therapy of cancer. PMID:15607913

  6. ACS (Alma Common Software) operating a set of robotic telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westhues, C.; Ramolla, M.; Lemke, R.; Haas, M.; Drass, H.; Chini, R.

    2014-07-01

    We use the ALMA Common Software (ACS) to establish a unified middleware for robotic observations with the 40cm Optical, 80cm Infrared and 1.5m Hexapod telescopes located at OCA (Observatorio Cerro Armazones) and the ESO 1-m located at La Silla. ACS permits to hide from the observer the technical specifications, like mount-type or camera-model. Furthermore ACS provides a uniform interface to the different telescopes, allowing us to run the same planning program for each telescope. Observations are carried out for long-term monitoring campaigns to study the variability of stars and AGN. We present here the specific implementation to the different telescopes.

  7. An electrohydrodynamic flow in ac electrowetting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Horim; Yun, Sungchan; Ko, Sung Hee; Kang, Kwan Hyoung

    2009-01-01

    In ac electrowetting, hydrodynamic flows occur within a droplet. Two distinct flow patterns were observed, depending on the frequency of the applied electrical signal. The flow at low-frequency range was explained in terms of shape oscillation and a steady streaming process in conjunction with contact line oscillation. The origin of the flow at high-frequency range has not yet been explained. We suggest that the high-frequency flow originated mainly from the electrothermal effect, in which electrical charge is generated due to the gradient of electrical conductivity and permittivity, which is induced by the Joule heating of fluid medium. To support our argument, we analyzed the flow field numerically while considering the electrical body force generated by the electrothermal effect. We visualized the flow pattern and measured the flow velocity inside the droplet. The numerical results show qualitative agreement with experimental results with respect to electric field and frequency dependence of flow velocity. The effects of induced-charge electro-osmosis, natural convection, and the Marangoni flow are discussed. PMID:20216975

  8. An electrohydrodynamic flow in ac electrowetting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Horim; Yun, Sungchan; Ko, Sung Hee; Kang, Kwan Hyoung

    2009-01-01

    In ac electrowetting, hydrodynamic flows occur within a droplet. Two distinct flow patterns were observed, depending on the frequency of the applied electrical signal. The flow at low-frequency range was explained in terms of shape oscillation and a steady streaming process in conjunction with contact line oscillation. The origin of the flow at high-frequency range has not yet been explained. We suggest that the high-frequency flow originated mainly from the electrothermal effect, in which electrical charge is generated due to the gradient of electrical conductivity and permittivity, which is induced by the Joule heating of fluid medium. To support our argument, we analyzed the flow field numerically while considering the electrical body force generated by the electrothermal effect. We visualized the flow pattern and measured the flow velocity inside the droplet. The numerical results show qualitative agreement with experimental results with respect to electric field and frequency dependence of flow velocity. The effects of induced-charge electro-osmosis, natural convection, and the Marangoni flow are discussed. PMID:20216975

  9. Regulation of the activities of African cassava mosaic virus promoters by the AC1, AC2, and AC3 gene products.

    PubMed

    Haley, A; Zhan, X; Richardson, K; Head, K; Morris, B

    1992-06-01

    DNA fragments comprising each of the promoter regions from the geminivirus African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) were cloned into the pUC18-based vector, pG1, producing transcriptional fusions with the beta-glucuronidase gene (GUS) and nopaline synthase terminator sequence. The relative activity of each promoter construct was analyzed by a GUS expression assay of extracts from Nicotiana clevelandii protoplasts coelectroporated with the GUS reporter constructs and constructs in which individual ACMV open reading frames (ORFs) were placed under control of a cauliflower mosaic virus 35 S promoter. Results suggest repression of the AC1 gene by its gene product, which is required for ACMV DNA synthesis. The promoter activity observed for the single promoter for the DNA A genes encoding functions of spread and the regulation of replication (AC2 and AC3 ORFs) was unaffected by coelectroporation with any of the ACMV ORF constructs. Promoters for the AV1 (coat protein) gene and the two DNA B genes (BV1 and BC1) were activated by electroporation of the AC2 ORF construct. To a lesser extent promoters for the AV1 and BV1 genes were activated with the AC3 ORF construct. The same pattern of promoter repression and activation was observed when transgenic N. benthamiana plants expressing the GUS reporter constructions were inoculated with ACMV DNA A. PMID:1585657

  10. Absorption and Attenuation Coefficients Using the WET Labs ac-s in the Mid-Atlantic Bight: Field Measurements and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohi, Nobuaki; Makinen, Carla P.; Mitchell, Richard; Moisan, Tiffany A.

    2008-01-01

    Ocean color algorithms are based on the parameterization of apparent optical properties as a function of inherent optical properties. WET Labs underwater absorption and attenuation meters (ac-9 and ac-s) measure both the spectral beam attenuation [c (lambda)] and absorption coefficient [a (lambda)]. The ac-s reports in a continuous range of 390-750 nm with a band pass of 4 nm, totaling approximately 83 distinct wavelengths, while the ac-9 reports at 9 wavelengths. We performed the ac-s field measurements at nine stations in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from water calibrations to data analysis. Onboard the ship, the ac-s was calibrated daily using Milli Q-water. Corrections for the in situ temperature and salinity effects on optical properties of water were applied. Corrections for incomplete recovery of the scattered light in the ac-s absorption tube were performed. The fine scale of spectral and vertical distributions of c (lambda) and a (lambda) were described from the ac-s. The significant relationships between a (674) and that of spectrophotometric analysis and chlorophyll a concentration of discrete water samples were observed.

  11. 7. VIEW OF THREE BOATHOUSES FROM 'PENN AC ROWING ASSN' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF THREE BOATHOUSES FROM 'PENN AC ROWING ASSN' TO NORTH END OF 'VESPER,' LOOKING EAST FROM WEST BANK OF SCHUYLKILL RIVER - Boathouse Row, East River Drive, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  12. Dc to ac converter operates efficiently at low input voltages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Self-oscillating dc to ac converter with transistor switching to produce a square wave output is used for low and high voltage power sources. The converter has a high efficiency throughout a wide range of loads.

  13. Initial tests of an AC dipole for the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Jansson, A.; Kopp, S.; Syphers, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    The AC dipole is a device to diagnose transverse motions of a beam. It can achieve large-amplitude oscillations without two inevitable problems of conventional kicker/pinger magnets: decoherence and emittance growth. While not the first synchrotron to operate with an AC dipole, the Tevatron can now make use of its recently upgraded BPM system, providing unprecedented resolution for use with an AC dipole, to measure both linear and nonlinear properties of the accelerator. Plans are to provide AC dipole systems for both transverse degrees of freedom. Preliminary tests have been done using an audio power amplifier with an existing vertical pinger magnet, producing oscillation amplitudes up to 2{sigma} at 150 GeV. In this paper, we will present the configuration of this system. We also show the analysis of a first few data sets, including the direct measurement of beta functions at BPM locations.

  14. ACS Algorithm in Discrete Ordinates for Pressure Vessel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, William; Haghighat, Alireza

    2016-02-01

    The Adaptive Collision Source (ACS) method can solve the Linear Boltzmann Equation (LBE) more efficiently by adaptation of the angular quadrature order. This is similar to, and essentially an extension of, the first collision source method. Previously, the ACS methodology has been implemented into the TITAN discrete ordinates code, and has shown speedups of 2-4 on a simple test problem, with very little loss of accuracy (within a provided adaptive tolerance). This work examines the use of the ACS method for a more realistic problem: pressure vessel dosimetry with the VENUS-2 MOX-fuelled reactor dosimetry benchmark. The ACS method proved to be able to obtain accurate results while being approximately twice as efficient as using a constant quadrature in a standard source iteration scheme.

  15. Reentrant ac Magnetic Susceptibility in Josephson-Junction Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo-Moreira, F.M.; Barbara, P.; Cawthorne, A.B.; Lobb, C.J.

    1997-06-01

    We have measured the complex ac magnetic susceptibility of unshunted Josephson-junction arrays as a function of temperature T , amplitude of the excitation field h{sub ac} , and external magnetic field H{sub dc} . For small h{sub ac} Meissner screening occurs. For larger h{sub ac} , however, the screening is reentrant in T . This reentrance is not thermodynamic but dynamic and arises from the paramagnetic contribution of multijunction loops. This result gives an alternative explanation of the paramagnetic Meissner effect observed in granular superconductors. Experimental results are in agreement with a simplified model based on a single loop containing four junctions. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) in a severely burned patient.

    PubMed

    Kollias, S; Stampolidis, N; Kourakos, P; Mantzari, E; Koupidis, S; Tsaousi, S; Dimitrouli, A; Atiyeh, B; Castana, O

    2015-03-31

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) occurs when increasing intra abdominal-pressure (IAP) reduces blood flow to abdominal organs. This results in impairment of pulmonary, cardiovascular, renal, hepatic, central nervous system and gastro-intestinal (gi) function, causing multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and death. The significant prognostic value of elevated intra-abdominal pressure has prompted many intensive care units to adopt measurement of this physiologic parameter as a routine vital sign in patients at risk. ACS generally occurs in patients who are critically ill due to any of a wide variety of medical and surgical conditions. it has been recently described as a rare complication of burn injury. it is fundamental to: 1) recognize IAP and ACS; 2) resuscitate effectively; and 3) prevent the development IAP-induced end-organ dysfunction and failure. We present our recent experience with one patient suffering from ACS secondary to burn injury and the physiologic results of abdominal wall escharotomy. PMID:26668555

  17. Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) in a severely burned patient

    PubMed Central

    kollias, S.; Stampolidis, N.; kourakos, P.; Mantzari, E.; Koupidis, S.; Tsaousi, S.; Dimitrouli, A.; Atiyeh, B.; Castana, O.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) occurs when increasing intra abdominal-pressure (IAP) reduces blood flow to abdominal organs. This results in impairment of pulmonary, cardiovascular, renal, hepatic, central nervous system and gastro-intestinal (gi) function, causing multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and death. The significant prognostic value of elevated intra-abdominal pressure has prompted many intensive care units to adopt measurement of this physiologic parameter as a routine vital sign in patients at risk. ACS generally occurs in patients who are critically ill due to any of a wide variety of medical and surgical conditions. it has been recently described as a rare complication of burn injury. it is fundamental to: 1) recognize IAP and ACS; 2) resuscitate effectively; and 3) prevent the development IAP-induced end-organ dysfunction and failure. We present our recent experience with one patient suffering from ACS secondary to burn injury and the physiologic results of abdominal wall escharotomy. PMID:26668555

  18. Methanolysis of polycarbonate catalysed by ionic liquid [Bmim][Ac].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fusheng; Li, Lei; Yu, Shitao; Lv, Zhiguo; Ge, Xiaoping

    2011-05-15

    The methanolysis of polycarbonate (PC) was studied using ionic liquid [Bmim][Ac] as a catalyst. The effects of temperature, time, methanol dosage and [Bmim][Ac] dosage on the methanolysis reaction were examined. It was shown that the conversion of PC was nearly 100%, and the yield of bisphenol A (BPA) was over 95% under the following conditions: m([Bmim][Ac]):m(PC) = 0.75:1;m(methanol):m(PC) = 0.75:1; a reaction temperature of 90 °C and a total time of 2.5h. The ionic liquid could be reused up to 6 times with no apparent decrease in the conversion of PC and yield of BPA. The kinetics of the reaction was also investigated. The results indicated that the methanolysis of PC in [Bmim][Ac] was a first-order kinetic reaction with an activation energy of 167 kJ/mol. PMID:21402441

  19. Hydrolysis of polycarbonate catalyzed by ionic liquid [Bmim][Ac].

    PubMed

    Song, Xiuyan; Liu, Fusheng; Li, Lei; Yang, Xuequn; Yu, Shitao; Ge, Xiaoping

    2013-01-15

    Hydrolysis of polycarbonate (PC) was studied using ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([Bmim][Ac]) as a catalyst. The influences of temperature, time, water dosage and [Bmim][Ac] dosage on the hydrolysis reaction were examined. Under the conditions of temperature 140°C, reaction time 3.0 h, m([Bmim][Ac]):m(PC)=1.5:1 and m(H(2)O):m(PC)=0.35:1, the conversion of PC was nearly 100% and the yield of bisphenol A (BPA) was over 96%. The ionic liquid could be reused up to 6 times without apparent decrease in the conversion of PC and yield of BPA. The kinetics of the reaction was also investigated. The results showed that the hydrolysis of PC in [Bmim][Ac] was a first-order kinetic reaction with an activation energy of 228 kJ/mol. PMID:23246956

  20. Fast electric dipole transitions in Ra-Ac nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.

    1985-01-01

    Lifetime of levels in /sup 225/Ra, /sup 225/Ac, and /sup 227/Ac have been measured by delayed coincidence techniques and these have been used to determine the E1 gamma-ray transition probabilities. The reduced E1 transition probabilities. The reduced E1 transition probabilities in /sup 225/Ra and /sup 225/Ac are about two orders of magnitude larger than the values in mid-actinide nuclei. On the other hand, the E1 rate in /sup 227/Ac is similar to those measured in heavier actinides. Previous studies suggest the presence of octupole deformation in all the three nuclei. The present investigation indicates that fast E1 transitions occur for nuclei with octupole deformation. However, the studies also show that there is no one-to-one correspondence between E1 rate and octupole deformation. 13 refs., 4 figs.