Science.gov

Sample records for academic industrial interface

  1. SNE Industrial Fieldbus Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucena, Angel; Raines, Matthew; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Mata, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) have very limited diagnostic and no prognostic capabilities, while current smart sensor designs do not have the capability to communicate over Fieldbus networks. The aim is to interface smart sensors with PLCs so that health and status information, such as failure mode identification and measurement tolerance, can be communicated via an industrial Fieldbus such as ControlNet. The SNE Industrial Fieldbus Interface (SIFI) is an embedded device that acts as a communication module in a networked smart sensor. The purpose is to enable a smart sensor to communicate health and status information to other devices, such as PLCs, via an industrial Fieldbus networking protocol. The SNE (Smart Network Element) is attached to a commercial off-the-shelf Any bus-S interface module through the SIFI. Numerous Anybus-S modules are available, each one designed to interface with a specific Fieldbus. Development of the SIFI focused on communications using the ControlNet protocol, but any of the Anybus-S modules can be used. The SIFI communicates with the Any-bus module via a data buffer and mailbox system on the Anybus module, and supplies power to the module. The Anybus module transmits and receives data on the Fieldbus using the proper protocol. The SIFI is intended to be connected to other existing SNE modules in order to monitor the health and status of a transducer. The SIFI can also monitor aspects of its own health using an onboard watchdog timer and voltage monitors. The SIFI also has the hardware to drive a touchscreen LCD (liquid crystal display) unit for manual configuration and status monitoring.

  2. The academic surgeon and industry.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, L R

    2000-04-01

    Academic surgeons should be aware of the tremendous potential that exists to partner with private companies on projects relating either to basic or clinical research. This is particularly timely now because many of these companies are experiencing unprecedented growth and market valuation. The development of these relationships requires knowing who to deal with as well as how to negotiate. Most academic medical centers have individuals who have expertise in developing sponsored research agreements, and young investigators should take advantage of this expertise. PMID:10727959

  3. Industry Support of Academic Research Growing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    National Science Board's fourteenth annual report to Congress indicates that university/industry relationships remained vigorous and varied during the 1960s/1970s, that corporate support of academic research is significantly higher than generally believed and that employee recruitment is an impetus for such alliances. These and other findings from…

  4. Interface design in the process industries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaverstock, M. C.; Stassen, H. G.; Williamson, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Every operator runs his plant in accord with his own mental model of the process. In this sense, one characteristic of an ideal man-machine interface is that it be in harmony with that model. With this theme in mind, the paper first reviews the functions of the process operator and compares them with human operators involved in control situations previously studied outside the industrial environment (pilots, air traffic controllers, helmsmen, etc.). A brief history of the operator interface in the process industry and the traditional methodology employed in its design is then presented. Finally, a much more fundamental approach utilizing a model definition of the human operator's behavior is presented.

  5. The Interaction of Academic and Industrial Supervisors in Graduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salminen-Karlsson, Minna; Wallgren, Lillemor

    2008-01-01

    In this study we explore the work and the cooperation of academic and industrial supervisors concerning single graduate students in so called industrial research schools, which are financially supported by a national research foundation and involve universities and industrial enterprises. Academic and industrial supervisors of totally eleven…

  6. Participation of Academic Scientists in Relationships with Industry

    PubMed Central

    Zinner, Darren E.; Bolcic-Jankovic, Dragana; Clarridge, Brian; Blumenthal, David; Campbell, Eric G.

    2013-01-01

    Relationships between academic researchers and industry have received considerable attention in the last 20 years, but current data on the prevalence, magnitude, and trends in such relationships are rare. In a mailed survey of 3080 academic life science researchers conducted in 2007, we found the majority (52.8%) of academic life scientists have some form of relationship with industry. Compared to our previous studies in 1995 and 1985, we found a significant decrease in industry support of university research, which could have major consequences for the academic life science research sector. PMID:19887423

  7. Academic psychiatry and the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Ban, Thomas A

    2006-05-01

    In the second half of the 19th century new drugs introduced by the pharmaceutical industry helped lead to the establishment of academic departments in psychiatry. Causal treatment of cerebral pellagra by nicotinic acid and cerebral syphilis by penicillin in the first half of the 20th century led to major changes in the diagnostic distribution of psychiatric patients. In the second half of the 20th century with the introduction of a rapidly growing number of psychotropic drugs, pharmacotherapy became the primary form of treatment in mental illness. Psychiatrists today perceive neuropharmacology as one of the basic sciences of psychiatry and psychopharmacology as the bridge between the mode of action and the clinical indications of psychotropic drugs. Pharmacotherapy with psychotropic drugs focused attention on the differential responsiveness to the same drug within the same diagnostic category. Yet, instead of re-evaluating psychiatric nosology and conducting research in psychopathology, a statistical methodology was adopted for the demonstration of therapeutic effectiveness in pharmacologically heterogeneous populations. Employment of consensus-based classifications and psychiatric rating scales in the clinical development of psychotropic drugs led to semi-finished products, which are prescribed indiscriminately. Replacement of single-center clinical trials by multi-center centrally coordinated clinical investigations led to the control of education in pharmacotherapy by the pharmaceutical industry. To separate education from marketing, the identification of the treatment-responsive forms of illness and the delineation of the therapeutic profile of psychotropic drugs are proposed with the employment of a new methodology, the "Composite Diagnostic Evaluation System." It is postulated that development of a pharmacologically valid psychiatric nosology with the employment of a "nosologic matrix" would provide the pharmaceutical industry with the necessary feedback to

  8. Strengths and limitations of industry vs. academic randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Laterre, P-F; François, B

    2015-10-01

    Clinical research has evolved substantially over the last two decades, but industry-sponsored research is still substantially superior to academic research in preparing, organizing and monitoring studies. Academics have to realize that conducting clinical research has become a real job with professionalism requirements. The primary objectives of research and development clearly differ between industry and academics. In the first case, new drug development is expected to generate profit, whereas in the latter case, research is aimed at understanding mechanisms of disease, promoting evidence-based medicine, and improving public health and care. However, a large number of clinical studies do not achieve their goals, and the reasons for failure may also differ between sponsored and academic studies. Industry and academics should develop better constructive partnerships and learn from each other. Academics should guide industry in study design and in investigator site selection, and academics should benefit from industry's expertise in improving monitoring and reporting processes. Finally, the existing database from former studies should be opened and shared with academics, to enable the exploration of additional scientific questions and the generation of new hypotheses. The two types of research should not be opposed, but should take the form of a constructive collaboration, increasing the chances of reaching each individual goal. PMID:26183298

  9. Value of Academe-Industry Programs Studied.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Highlights survey in which chemistry chairman and industry counterparts rated 20 examples of university-industry programs as to current participation and estimated value, indicating that participation is consistent with high value for certain programs (such as faculty seminars at industry sites). Other findings suggesting possibilities for new…

  10. Leveraging Industry Relationships in the Academic Enterprise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackney, Kenneth S.; Papadakis, Constantine N.

    2004-01-01

    Drexel University has maintained a leadership role in academic technology by choosing technology initiatives wisely, timing them effectively and ensuring that they have the greatest value to the community at large while being affordable. Drexel has leveraged vendor relationships to help accomplish these initiatives, and has shared its expertise…

  11. Science: Industry/Academic Cooperation: A Step Forward.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heylin, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Outlined is a concept for bringing the chemical industry and the universities together in chemical research. Objectives listed are to promote mutual understanding and cooperation between academe and the chemical industry, to work toward improving the national climate for creativity and innovation, and to promote education and funding in chemical…

  12. Academic-industry Collaborations in Translational Stroke Research.

    PubMed

    Boltze, Johannes; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph; Barthel, Henryk; Gounis, Matthew J

    2016-08-01

    Academic-industry collaborations are an emerging format of translational stroke research. Next to classic contract research models, a multitude of collaboration models has been developed, some of which even allowing for multinational or intercontinental research programs. This development has recently been paralleled by first successful attempts to overcome the translational stroke research road block, such as the unprecedented success of novel endovascular approaches or the advent of the multicenter preclinical trial concept. While the first underlines the role of the industry as a major innovation driver in stroke research, the latter will require enrollment of industrial partners for optimal output. Moreover, academic-industry partnerships are invaluable to bridge the translational "valley of death" as well as funding gaps in times of dwindling public funding and declining high risk capital investments. However, these collaborations are also subject to relevant challenges because interests, values, and aims often significantly differ between cademia and industry. Here, we describe common academic-industry collaboration models as well as associated benefits and challenges in the stroke research arena. We also suggest strategies for improved planning, implementation, guidance, and utilization of academic-industry collaborations to the maximum mutual benefit. PMID:27301976

  13. Comparing Career Options: Academic, Science Centers, and Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, A. E.

    2004-12-01

    The Employment Committee did a survey at the Atlanta AAS meeting, asking for input regarding topics for future employment sessions. The survey results indicated strong interest in more information about career paths. Thus, the Employment Committee is sponsoring a panel to present, discuss and contrast the three most common career directions that early-career astronomers consider: academic, science centers and industry. There also will be time for Q&A from the audience. The panelists: Academic - Vicky Kalogera, Northwestern; Science center - Deborah Levine, Spitzer Science Center; and Industry - John Miles, Lockheed-Martin.

  14. Commercial Funding in Academe: Examining the Correlates of Faculty's Use of Industrial and Business Funding for Academic Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szelenyi, Katalin; Goldberg, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the demographic, academic, attitudinal, and institutional correlates of receiving industry or business funding for academic work in a national sample of faculty in the United States. The findings depict a complicated picture of externally funded academic work, with implications for the practical and theoretical understanding of…

  15. At issue: A model for academic/industry collaboration.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, William T; Koenig, James I; Bilbe, Graeme; Bischoff, Serge

    2004-01-01

    Relationships between academia and industry are increasingly intimate and commercial. While opportunities are created for each partner, there are also important conflict of interest issues. Particularly challenging is ensuring that universities maintain their traditional role in public science while partnering with a commercial entity with a tradition of proprietary science. We describe a collaboration where the interests and values of each partner were articulated in advance and conflict of interest issues were resolved before legal and business arrangements were established in a contract. We discuss the principles involved and the resolutions achieved in the hope that it may provide a useful model for addressing academic/industry scientific collaborations. PMID:15954203

  16. Data Base Of Industrial Human-Robot Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, H. Mcllvaine

    1987-03-01

    A survey of ten robot manufacturers has produced a task taxonomy of factory-floor programming and a compilation of hardware and software interface designs, the first undertaken in industrial robotics. This data base suggests the need for increased application of human factors engineering.

  17. The North Carolina State University Libraries Search Experience: Usability Testing Tabbed Search Interfaces for Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teague-Rector, Susan; Ballard, Angela; Pauley, Susan K.

    2011-01-01

    Creating a learnable, effective, and user-friendly library Web site hinges on providing easy access to search. Designing a search interface for academic libraries can be particularly challenging given the complexity and range of searchable library collections, such as bibliographic databases, electronic journals, and article search silos. Library…

  18. The Role of Context in Academic Capitalism: The Industry-Friendly Department Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    This study shows a case of a department heavily involved in industry-academia collaborations and patenting activities while exhibiting high levels of academic norms such as teaching, basic research, academic freedom and free dissemination of knowledge. Based on the findings, the author argues that academic capitalism is a highly contextual…

  19. CAD Services: an Industry Standard Interface for Mechanical CAD Interoperability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, Russell; Weitzer, Ilan

    2002-01-01

    Most organizations seek to design and develop new products in increasingly shorter time periods. At the same time, increased performance demands require a team-based multidisciplinary design process that may span several organizations. One approach to meet these demands is to use 'Geometry Centric' design. In this approach, design engineers team their efforts through one united representation of the design that is usually captured in a CAD system. Standards-based interfaces are critical to provide uniform, simple, distributed services that enable the 'Geometry Centric' design approach. This paper describes an industry-wide effort, under the Object Management Group's (OMG) Manufacturing Domain Task Force, to define interfaces that enable the interoperability of CAD, Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM), and Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) tools. This critical link to enable 'Geometry Centric' design is called: Cad Services V1.0. This paper discusses the features of this standard and proposed application.

  20. Constituting the Significance and Value of Research: Views from Information Technology Academics and Industry Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Christine; Pham, Binh; Stoodley, Ian

    2004-01-01

    The information technology research community, comprising both academic and industry stakeholders, is responding to national and international imperatives that challenge disparate groups to work together. In this article it is shown how, within both academic and industrial contexts, researchers interpret, or constitute, the significance and value…

  1. The Effects of University-Industry Relationships and Academic Research on Scientific Performance: Synergy or Substitution?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manjarres-Henriquez, Liney; Gutierrez-Gracia, Antonio; Carrion-Garcia, Andres; Vega-Jurado, Jaider

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates whether university-industry relationships (UIR) and academic research activities have complementary effects on the scientific production of university lecturers. The analysis is based on a case study of two Spanish universities. We find that the effects of R&D contracts with industry, and academic research activity on…

  2. "I'm Not a Real Academic": A Career from Industry to Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santoro, Ninetta; Snead, Suzanne L.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past thirty years universities have increasingly extended their offerings of vocationally oriented degrees and have recruited into academe, practitioners from the professions. This paper reports on a qualitative study that investigated the experiences of 20 professionals-turned-academics in Australia; their expectations of academe and how…

  3. Beamline Control and Instrumentation System using Industrial Interface Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enz, F.

    2010-06-01

    How should a beamline be designed, which satisfies the needs and requirements of scientists and is easy to build and operate? Today, most control and instrumentation systems for beamlines are based on scientific requirements. Scientific details of the beamline, e.g. vacuum and beam physics details; are usually extensively described. However, control system specifications are often reduced to few requirements, e.g. which beam-related device to use. Lots of these systems work perfectly from the physicist's point of view, but are hard to bring into service and operate and difficult to extend with additional equipment. To overcome this, the engineering company ENZ has developed components using industrial standard interfaces to guarantee high flexibility for equipment extension. Using special interface boards and galvanic isolation offers increased stability of motion control axes. This saves resources during commissioning and service. A control system was developed and installed at a Soft-X-ray beamline at ASP Melbourne. It is operated under EPICs on distributed embedded IOC's based on PC-hardware. Motion and vacuum systems, measurement devices, e.g. a Low-Current Monitor (LoCuM) for beam position monitoring, and parts of the equipment protection system were developed and most of them tested in cooperation with DELTA at the Technical University of Dortmund.

  4. Beamline Control and Instrumentation System using Industrial Interface Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Enz, F.

    2010-06-23

    How should a beamline be designed, which satisfies the needs and requirements of scientists and is easy to build and operate? Today, most control and instrumentation systems for beamlines are based on scientific requirements. Scientific details of the beamline, e.g. vacuum and beam physics details; are usually extensively described. However, control system specifications are often reduced to few requirements, e.g. which beam-related device to use. Lots of these systems work perfectly from the physicist's point of view, but are hard to bring into service and operate and difficult to extend with additional equipment. To overcome this, the engineering company ENZ has developed components using industrial standard interfaces to guarantee high flexibility for equipment extension. Using special interface boards and galvanic isolation offers increased stability of motion control axes. This saves resources during commissioning and service. A control system was developed and installed at a Soft-X-ray beamline at ASP Melbourne. It is operated under EPICs on distributed embedded IOC's based on PC-hardware. Motion and vacuum systems, measurement devices, e.g. a Low-Current Monitor (LoCuM) for beam position monitoring, and parts of the equipment protection system were developed and most of them tested in cooperation with DELTA at the Technical University of Dortmund.

  5. Personality Types and Motivational Characteristics of Academics versus Professionals in Industry in the Same Occupational Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erez, Miriam; Shneorson, Zehava

    1980-01-01

    Academics scored higher on the artistic type and significantly lower on the enterprising type. Academics are motivated by the opportunity for scientific contribution, for autonomy, and for the high status attained in their jobs. Professionals in industry are highly motivated by the opportunity for exercising power. (Author)

  6. The Academic English Language Needs of Industrial Design Students in UiTM Kedah, Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adzmi, Nor Aslah; Bidin, Samsiah; Ibrahim, Syazliyati; Jusoff, Kamaruzaman

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the academic English language lacks and needs of Industrial Design students in Universiti Teknologi MARA Kedah (UiTM). It highlights the lacks and needs for English for Academic Purposes in helping the students to succeed in the program through the usage of English language. The research tools used were in…

  7. Academic-Industry Partnerships in Alcohol and Gambling: a Continuum of Benefits and Harms.

    PubMed

    Stein, Dan J

    2015-01-01

    There are many reasons why collaboration between academic institutions and private industry should be encouraged. At the same time, such collaborations raise the potential for profound conflicts of interest. Furthermore, there may be different kinds of issues in different kinds of industry, as is reflected in the metaphors we employ to think about them. The pharmaceutical industry is at times viewed as a "good" industry that can go wrong, while the tobacco industry is analogously viewed as a "bad" industry that can do little right. The alcohol and gambling industries may be particularly useful to think through insofar as they arguably require a continuum of benefits and harms to be acknowledged. I consider a number of initiatives by the alcohol and gambling industry in South Africa, and argue that there are real opportunities for delineating and developing more robust models of academic-industry collaboration, which ensure that public health is maximized in that country and elsewhere. PMID:26431410

  8. Optical fabrication apprenticeships: an academic/industrial partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Robert F.

    1995-09-01

    An overview of successful optical apprenticeship programs in the Rochester area where both academia and industry have created partnerships to develop and deliver industrial training material together.

  9. Drug discovery: new models for industry-academic partnerships.

    PubMed

    Tralau-Stewart, Cathy J; Wyatt, Colin A; Kleyn, Dominique E; Ayad, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The re-focusing of pharmaceutical industry research away from early discovery activities is stimulating the development of novel models of drug discovery, notably involving academia as a 'front end'. In this article the authors explore the drivers of change, the role of new entrants (universities with specialised core facilities) and novel partnership models. If they are to be sustainable and deliver, these new models must be flexible and properly funded by industry or public funding, rewarding all partners for contributions. The introduction of an industry-like process and experienced management teams signals a revolution in discovery that benefits society by improving the value gained from publicly funded research. PMID:18992364

  10. Public health, academic medicine, and the alcohol industry's corporate social responsibility activities.

    PubMed

    Babor, Thomas F; Robaina, Katherine

    2013-02-01

    We explored the emerging relationships among the alcohol industry, academic medicine, and the public health community in the context of public health theory dealing with corporate social responsibility. We reviewed sponsorship of scientific research, efforts to influence public perceptions of research, dissemination of scientific information, and industry-funded policy initiatives. To the extent that the scientific evidence supports the reduction of alcohol consumption through regulatory and legal measures, the academic community has come into increasing conflict with the views of the alcohol industry. We concluded that the alcohol industry has intensified its scientific and policy-related activities under the general framework of corporate social responsibility initiatives, most of which can be described as instrumental to the industry's economic interests. PMID:23237151

  11. Computer Scientists Flee Academe for Industry's Greener Pastures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robin

    1999-01-01

    Reports on a decline in computer-science faculty despite rising student enrollments of computer-science majors. The faculty decline is ascribed to increasing jobs competition from industry and a decline in the number of doctorates being awarded in computer science and computer engineering. (DB)

  12. Twins or Strangers? Differences and Similarities between Industrial and Academic Science. NBER Working Paper No. 16113

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauermann, Henry; Stephan, Paula E.

    2010-01-01

    Some scholars view academic and industrial science as qualitatively different knowledge production regimes. Others claim that the two sectors are increasingly similar. Large-scale empirical evidence regarding similarities and differences, however, has been missing. Drawing on prior work on the organization of science, we first develop a framework…

  13. Influences on Academic Achievement: A Comparison of Results from Uganda and More Industrialized Societies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyneman, Stephen P.

    Findings in industrialized countries, such as those of Jencks and Coleman, indicate that socioeconomic status has a strong influence on academic achievement and that school effects are of lesser importance. This study of socioeconomic influences and school influences on the performance of 23,615 Ugandan children taking the Primary Leaving…

  14. Academic-Industry Collaboration under Federal Grants and Cooperative Agreements: Financial, Administrative, and Regulatory Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, William F.

    2011-01-01

    Federal sponsorship of collaboration between academic institutions and industry is on the rise. Many government programs emphasize cooperation between universities and the commercial sector as a means to merge basic and applied research, promote economic development, and enhance knowledge dissemination. The intersection between academia and…

  15. External Confirmation of Adherence to Standards: As Applicable to Academic Programmes as to Business and Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughey, Aaron W.; Burke, Monica G.

    2010-01-01

    The development of, and adherence to, performance standards is imperative for success in today's competitive global market. This is as true for academic programmes in higher education as it is for the manufacturing and service sectors. Just like their counterparts in business and industry, it is important that graduate career preparation…

  16. Industrial and Academic Collaboration: Hybrid Models for Research and Innovation Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Freitas, Sara; Mayer, Igor; Arnab, Sylvester; Marshall, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores how, in the light of global economic downturn and rising student populations, new academic-industrial models for research collaboration based upon specific technological expertise and knowledge can be developed as potential mechanisms for preserving and extending central university research infrastructure. The paper explores…

  17. Universities in the Business of Repression: The Academic-Military-Industrial Complex and Central America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Jonathan

    This book presents the thesis that U.S. universities have become part of an academic-military-industrial complex that support repression and murder in Central America. Part 1 explains how U.S. policies have been based on murder in Central America and examines the responsibility of transnational corporations and U.S. war planners in this…

  18. Criteria for successful government-industry-academic partnerships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, David P.

    1996-03-01

    The mission of the Commercial Remote Sensing Program (CRSP) Office at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center is to maximize U.S. industry's commercial use of remote sensing and related space-based technologies and to develop advanced technical responses to spatial information requirements. The CRSP Office carries out this mission by offering several commercial partnership programs that help companies to apply remote sensing technologies in business applications and to buy down the risk of bringing new or improved products and services to market. Through its commercial partnerships, the CRSP seeks to increase the market demand for remote sensing products and related advanced technologies, thus increasing the use and reducing the cost of spatial information.

  19. Academic-industrial collaboration: the good, the bad, and the ugly.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joseph B.

    2002-01-01

    Academic-industrial collaborations and technology transfer have over the past 50 years played an increasingly prominent role in the biomedical sciences. University partnerships with industry can expedite the availability of innovative drugs and other medical technologies, bringing both important public health benefits and a source of income for universities and their faculty through a variety of financial arrangements. However, these relationships raise ethical concerns, particularly when research involves human subjects in clinical trials. Lapses in oversight of industry-sponsored clinical trials at universities, and especially patient deaths in a number of trials, have brought these issues into the public spotlight and have led the federal government to intensify its oversight of clinical research. The leadership of Harvard Medical School convened a group of leaders in academic medicine to formulate guidelines on individual financial conflicts of interest. They and other groups are working to formulate a national consensus on this issue. PMID:12053712

  20. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). Phase 1: Industrial/academic experimenters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maisel, James E.; Nowlin, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the work done at Arizona State University under the ACTS Experimenters Program. The main thrust of the Program was to develop experiments to test, evaluate, and prove the commercial worthiness of the ACTS satellite which is scheduled for launch in 1993. To accomplish this goal, meetings were held with various governmental, industrial, and academic units to discuss the ACTS satellite and its technology and possible experiments that would generate industrial interest and support for ASU's efforts. Several local industries generated several experiments of their own. The investigators submitted several experiments of educational, medical, commercial, and technical value and interest. The disposition of these experimental proposals is discussed in this report.

  1. Selected Aspects of Assessment/Improvement of Academic Research Quality, Also of Industrial Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemala, Marek

    2016-06-01

    In terms of publishing and commercialisation of academic research results, there may be more preferred qualitative research in the long term. But, not every research can be focused only on the quality of its outputs, but each output of the research, however, should have an adequate quality and added value. The main research question of this article may be determined as follows - How can the quality of academic research be better evaluated and thus improved, also in the area of Industrial management? It is not the intention of this article to perform statistical research in the field yet, but this study is based on empirical data and results.

  2. Problems for biomedical research at the academia-industrial interface.

    PubMed

    Weatherall, David

    2003-01-01

    Throughout much of the world, universities have driven towards industrial partnerships. This collaboration, which, in the biochemical field at least, has to continue if potential benefits for patients are to be realised, has brought with it a number of problems. These include the neglect of long-term research in favour of short-term projects, the curtailing of free dissemination of research information within university departments and the biasing of results of clinical trials by the financial interests of the investigators. It is very important that governments, universities, and industry itself address these problems. Universities should monitor the amount of basic, curiosity-driven research that is being carried on, compared with that which is more short-term goal orientated. PhD students and post-doctoral fellows should be exposed to the principles of bioethics early on in their careers. Further work is necessary on the terms of research contracts to protect, on the one hand, the rights of individual scientists and, on the other, industry from rogue scientists. Where problems arise, procedures should be in place for independent reviews to be conducted by bodies such as the Medical Research Council in the UK or the National Institutes of Health in the USA. The conflict-of-interest rules recently introduced for publication in medical journals should be extended to all branches of science. PMID:12645228

  3. Iowa Lakes Community College: Partnerships for Academic and Economic Success in a Rapidly Evolving Wind-Energy Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohni, Mary; Rogers, Jolene; Zeitz, Al

    2007-01-01

    Iowa Lakes Community College responded to a national need for wind-energy technicians. The Wind-Energy and Turbine Program aligned industry and academic competencies with experiential learning components to foster exploration of additional renewable energy applications. Completers understand both the physical and academic rigor a career in wind…

  4. VAPOR SAMPLING DEVICE FOR INTERFACE WITH MICROTOX ASSAY FOR SCREENING TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A time-integrated sampling system interfaced with a toxicity-based assay is reported for monitoring volatile toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the fill solvent accumulated each of 17 TICs from the vapor...

  5. Local/Global Cognitive Interfaces within Industrial Districts: An Italian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandinetti, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: With the advance of globalization the competitive chances of industrial districts depends increasingly on their ability to connect to the cognitive circuits of the global economy. This challenge demands the presence of local actors capable of acting as cognitive interfaces between the district context and the global environment. The paper…

  6. Interaction For Academics In The Industrial World: The U.S. And Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Duncan T.

    1989-04-01

    Interaction of the industrial and academic world is of course a very old problem. The relative roles of each organization and the education of the next generation of scientists has long been debated. However, in the last ten years, there has been a substantial change in the interaction and the expectations of each group. The principal reason for these changes have to do with pure economics. As the cost of "big science" has increased. The need for more resources at universities to train students has increased and the need for highly trained students, who work as teams rather than as individual scientists, has become more important. No longer is corporate research done exclusively by the single scientist or engineer working in their laboratory for long periods of time to come up with the "Eureka" solution. At universities, the tenure system tends to require an individual to develop his or her own research topic. The cost of developing new topics has increased enormously. In this paper, the interaction of industry and the academic world are reviewed from the viewpoint of the academic individual. While I have had industrial experience, it was not as great as others who have written on the subject. The main topics are, 1) what drives the need for so much money in the university community, 2) assuming there is a need, what are the sources of those funds, 3) what role should American and foreign companies play in educating and sponsoring research at universities, 4) what should be the expectations of the university community and the industrial world, 5) what are possible formats for such an interaction, and finally, 6) what are the dangers to the universities and to the United States economy in the long run by such interactions.

  7. Academic, Industry and Student Perspectives on the Inclusion of "Vocational Knowledge" in a "Learning and Teaching Academic Standards Statement" for Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acuña, Tina Botwright; Kelder, Jo-Anne; Able, Amanda J.; Guisard, Yann; Bellotti, William D.; McDonald, Glenn; Doyle, Richard; Wormell, Paul; Meinke, Holger

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the perspective of industry stakeholders in a national project to develop a Learning and Teaching Academic Standards (LTAS) Statement for the Agriculture discipline. The AgLTAS Statement will be aligned with the Science LTAS Statement published in 2011 and comprise a discourse on the nature and extent of the Agriculture…

  8. A PDP-15 to industrial-14 interface at the Lewis Research Center's cyclotron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kebberly, F. R.; Leonard, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    An interface (hardware and software) was built which permits the loading, monitoring, and control of a digital equipment industrial-14/30 programmable controller by a PDP-15 computer. The interface utilizes the serial mode for data transfer to and from the controller, so that the required hardware is essentially that of a teletype unit except for the speed of transmission. Software described here permits the user to load binary paper tape, read or load individual controller memory locations, and if desired turn controller outputs on and off directly from the computer.

  9. Meeting Technology and Manpower Needs through the Industry/University Interface. An Aerospace Industry Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aerospace Industries Association of America, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The Aerospace Industries Association (AIA) examined its member companies and their existing university relationships as an initial step in the process of strengthening these ties. Information drawn from background research, interviews (with company representatives and university, government, and private sector spokesmen), and a formal survey of…

  10. The Family-Study Interface and Academic Outcomes: Testing a Structural Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeuwisse, Marieke; Born, Marise Ph.; Severiens, Sabine E.

    2011-01-01

    Expanding on family-work and work-study models, this article investigated a model for family-study conflict and family-study facilitation. The focus of the study was the relationship of family-study conflict and family-study facilitation with students' effortful behaviors and academic performance among a sample of university students (N = 1,656).…

  11. Selected highlights of a half-century of academic and industry studies of turbidite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, C. H.

    2012-04-01

    From more than 50 years of research on modern turbidite systems and considering this bias (e.g. experimental and modeling research not included in this summary), the following are my suggested landmarks for interplay between academic and industry research on turbidite systems: 1.In the 1960´s, the outcrop research of the Bouma sequence showed immediate relevance for the characterization of proximal to distal depositional environments of modern Astoria Fan (e.g. a&b structures in proximal channels, c-e in levees, a-e in lobes, d&e in basin plains), and for identification of turbidites in industry boreholes. 2.In the 1970´s, Mutti and Ricchi Lucchís facies assemblages from outcrops correlated well with Nelson and Nilseńs comparison of modern and ancient turbidite systems. The emerging models from this and other outcrop and modern system studies of Walker and Normark provided early guidelines for industry exploration. 3.In the 1980´s, the new high-resolution sidescan sonar studies on modern systems revealed the complex morphology of channel and lobe systems. These new details interplayed with the major contribution of seismic sequence stratigraphy from industry, which had important implications for outcrop studies, modern system research, and an emerging variety of improved fan models that considered the depositional elements defined by Mutti and Normark. The maturity of studies at this point outlined the key tectonic, sediment supply and climate/sea level factors controlling the development of a wide variety of turbidite system depositional patterns. 4.In the 1990´s, the 3D seismic studies of industry and high-resolution seismic and coring studies on modern systems provided detailed new insight into a complex variety of turbidite systems, particularly for slope environments. The close comparison of these data confirmed the relevance of present-day turbidite systems as a key to past outcrop and subsurface systems. 5.In the new millennium, seismic geomorphology

  12. Academic-industrial relations before the blockbuster drugs: lessons from the Harvard Committee on Pharmacotherapy, 1939-1943.

    PubMed

    Podolsky, Scott H; Greene, Jeremy A

    2011-04-01

    Increasing discussion has developed in recent years over the nature of the relationship between academic medicine and the pharmaceutical industry. This article narrates the history of a little-known attempt at Harvard Medical School between 1939 and 1943 to establish an interdisciplinary, academic-industrial Committee on Pharmacotherapy to enhance and rationalize the relationship between the field of academic research in pharmacotherapeutics and the pharmaceutical industry. Using original archival materials, the authors depict the functioning of the committee, which was headed by Soma Weiss and included such members as Fuller Albright, Henry Beecher, and Walter Cannon. The committee would be collectively funded by seven pharmaceutical companies and was to be predicated on collaboration, both across the entire university and between academia and industry. It was expected to transform the bench-to-bedside study and testing of therapeutic compounds, to redefine the teaching of pharmacotherapy, and to create a unified forum through which to discuss the overall academic-industrial relationship and more specific issues such as patents. Unfortunately, the program proved to be short-lived, the victim of such contingent factors as the untimely death of Soma Weiss and America's entry into World War II, as well as such more fundamental factors as the inadequate and temporary nature of the funding stream and unresolved tensions regarding the goals of the committee on the part of both the medical school and its industry supporters. Nevertheless, these early forays into collaborative bench-to-bedside translational research and the rationalization of academic-industrial relations remain instructive today. PMID:21346508

  13. Effects of academic-industry relations on the professional socialization graduate science students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holleman, Margaret Ann Phillippi

    This study asks if there has been a change in graduate student socialization in the biological sciences given the increased commercialism of life sciences. Drawing on the work of Steven Brint (1994) and Sheila Slaughter and Larry Leslie (1997) and Sheila Slaughter and Gary Rhoades (2004), this study asks if graduate student socialization has shifted emphasis from the social and moral dimensions of work (social trustee professionalism) to the practical, technical, and commercial dimensions (expert professionalism). Building on the survey results of the Acadia Project (Swazey, Louis, & Anderson, 1994; Louis, Anderson & Rosenberg, 1995), this qualitative study uses interviews with 25 graduate science students at two A.A.U. research universities that have been heavily involved in academic-industry relations to see how the students were professionally socialized throughout their educational careers. The student configuration compares males and females, U.S. and international students, and those funded by the government versus those receiving at least partial support from industry. It uses critical professionalization theory as a framework. The study found that students' career goals and values were usually set before graduate school primarily by females in non-elite institutions, such as community colleges, women's and liberal arts colleges, and non-flagship state universities. Also, university science faculty tend to continue to socialize students---even those planning to go into industry---for the professoriate, as their prestige is based on placing proteges into other elite schools. U.S. females and most students going into academics or government labs had the values of social trustee professionals while those going into industry held those of expert professionals. The former were more likely to recognize situations involving conflicts of interest or commitment. Almost all the students were disillusioned by the grants and promotion and tenure systems. They feel both

  14. Necessity for Industry-Academic Economic Geology Collaborations for Energy Critical Minerals Research and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitzman, M.

    2012-12-01

    Economic geology is a highly interdisciplinary field utilizing a diverse set of petrologic, geochemical, geophysical, and tectonic data for improved scientific understanding of element migration and concentration in the crust (ore formation). A number of elements that were once laboratory curiosities now figure prominently in new energy technologies (e.g. wind turbines, solar energy collectors). If widely deployed, such technologies have the capacity to transform the way we produce, transmit, store, and conserve energy. To meet domestic and worldwide renewable energy needs these systems must be scaled from laboratory, to demonstration, to widespread deployment. Such technologies are materials intensive. If widely deployed, the elements required by these technologies will be needed in significant quantities and shortage of these "energy critical elements" could significantly inhibit the adoption of otherwise game changing energy technologies. It is imperative to better understand the geology, metallurgy, and mining engineering of critical mineral deposits if we are to sustainably develop these new technologies. There is currently no consensus among federal and state agencies, the national and international mining industry, the public, and the U.S. academic community regarding the importance of economic geology to secure sufficient energy critical elements to undertake large-scale renewable energy development. Available federal funding for critical elements focuses on downstream areas such as metallurgy, substitutions, and recycling rather than primary deposits. Undertaking the required research to discover and mine critical element deposits in an environmentally friendly manner will require significant partnering with industry due to the current lack of federal research support.

  15. Ethical principles for project collaboration between academic professionals or institutions and the biomedical industry.

    PubMed

    Riis, Povl

    2012-01-01

    Ethics in biomedical research cannot be defined by etymology, and need a semantic definition based on national and contemporary values. In a Nordic cultural and historic context, key values are solidarity with one's fellow man, equality, truth, justice, responsibility, freedom, and professionalism. In contemporary medical research, such ethics are further subgrouped into research ethics, researcher ethics, societal ethics, and distributive ethics. Lately, public and academic debates have addressed the necessary strengthening of the ethical concerns and interests of patients and society. Despite considerable progress, common ethical definitions and control systems still lack uniformity or indeed do not exist. Among the cooperative partners involved, the pharmaceutical industry have preserved an important role. The same is true for the overall judgments reflected by the European Forum for Good Clinical Practice, leading peer-reviewed journals, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics for developing nations, and the latest global initiative, the Singapore Statement on Research Integrity. To help both institutions and countries, it will be valuable to include the following information in academia-industry protocols before starting a project: international authorship names; fixed agendas and time schedules for project meetings; chairperson shifts, meeting reports, and project plan changes; future author memberships; equal blinding and data distribution from disciplinary groups; an equal plan for exchange of project manuscripts at the proofing stage; contractual descriptions of all procedures, disagreements, publishing rights, prevention, and controls for suspected dishonesty; and a detailed description of who is doing what in the working process. PMID:22570569

  16. Ethical principles for project collaboration between academic professionals or institutions and the biomedical industry

    PubMed Central

    Riis, Povl

    2012-01-01

    Ethics in biomedical research cannot be defined by etymology, and need a semantic definition based on national and contemporary values. In a Nordic cultural and historic context, key values are solidarity with one’s fellow man, equality, truth, justice, responsibility, freedom, and professionalism. In contemporary medical research, such ethics are further subgrouped into research ethics, researcher ethics, societal ethics, and distributive ethics. Lately, public and academic debates have addressed the necessary strengthening of the ethical concerns and interests of patients and society. Despite considerable progress, common ethical definitions and control systems still lack uniformity or indeed do not exist. Among the cooperative partners involved, the pharmaceutical industry have preserved an important role. The same is true for the overall judgments reflected by the European Forum for Good Clinical Practice, leading peer-reviewed journals, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics for developing nations, and the latest global initiative, the Singapore Statement on Research Integrity. To help both institutions and countries, it will be valuable to include the following information in academia–industry protocols before starting a project: international authorship names; fixed agendas and time schedules for project meetings; chairperson shifts, meeting reports, and project plan changes; future author memberships; equal blinding and data distribution from disciplinary groups; an equal plan for exchange of project manuscripts at the proofing stage; contractual descriptions of all procedures, disagreements, publishing rights, prevention, and controls for suspected dishonesty; and a detailed description of who is doing what in the working process. PMID:22570569

  17. Industrial & Engineering Systems Career Cluster ITAC for Career-Focused Education: Manufacturing Sub-Cluster. Integrated Technical & Academic Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Designed for Ohio educators responsible for planning programs to prepare high school students for careers in the manufacturing industry, this document presents an overview of Ohio's Integrated Technical and Academic Competencies (ITAC) system of career-focused education and specific information about the manufacturing subcluster of the industrial…

  18. Industrial Funding of Academic R&D Continues to Decline in FY 2004. Info Brief. NSF 06-315

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britt, Ronda

    2006-01-01

    Industrial funding for research and development in academic science and engineering (S&E) dropped by 2.6 percent in FY 2004, the third consecutive year of declining support from this sector, according to data from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Survey of Research and Development Expenditures at Universities and Colleges (table 1). The…

  19. Not So Different After All: Academic and Industrial Leadership in the 1990s. AGB Occasional Paper No. 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Henry E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the similarities of issues faced by academic and corporate leaders. Both types of institutions must adapt to the same societal, economic, and political pressures. These include rapidly changing markets, heightened competition, new technologies, and demands for accountability by multiple constituencies. Both industrial and…

  20. Ethical issues at the university-industry interface: a way forward?

    PubMed

    Evans, G R; Packham, D E

    2003-01-01

    This paper forms an introduction to this issue, the contents of which arose directly or indirectly from a conference in May 2001 on Corruption of scientific integrity?--The commercialisation of academic science. The introduction, in recent decades, of business culture and values into universities and research institutions is incompatible with the openness which scientific and all academic pursuit traditionally require. It has given rise to a web of problems over intellectual property and conflict of interest which has even led to corporate sponsors' suppressing unfavourable results of clinical trials, to the detriment of patients' health. Although there are those who see the norms of science developing to recognise the importance of instrumental science aiming at specific goals and of knowledge judged by its value in a context of application, none justifies the covert manipulation of results by vested interest. Public awareness of these problems is growing and creating a climate of opinion where they may be addressed. We suggest a way forward by the introduction of nationally and internationally-accepted guidelines for industrial collaboration which contain proper protections of the core purposes of universities and of the independence of their research. Some codes suggested for this purpose are discussed. We note that some universities are moving to adopt such codes of conduct, but argue the need for strong support from the government through its funding bodies. PMID:12645225

  1. Beyond knowledge transfer: The social construction of autonomous academic science in university-industry agricultural biotechnology research collaborations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biscotti, Dina Louise

    Autonomy is a social product. Although some might view autonomy as the absence of social interference in individual action, it is in fact produced through social institutions. It enables social actors to act; it is the justification for the allocation of enormous public resources into institutions classified as "public" or "nonprofit;" it can lead to innovation; and, significantly, it is key to the public acceptance of new technologies. In this dissertation, I analyze the social construction of autonomy for academic science in U.S. university-industry agricultural biotechnology research collaborations. University-industry relationships (UIRs) are a site of concern about the influence of commercial interests on academic science. Agricultural biotechnology is a contentious technology that has prompted questions about the ecological and public health implications of genetically-modified plants and animals. It has also spurred awareness of the industrialization of agriculture and accelerating corporate control of the global food system. Through analysis of in-depth interviews with over 200 scientists and administrators from nine U.S. research universities and thirty agricultural biotechnology companies, I find that both the academy and industry have a vested interest in the social construction of the academy as an autonomous space from which claims to objective, disinterested scientific knowledge can be made. These claims influence government regulation, as well as grower and public acceptance of agricultural biotechnology products. I argue that the social production of autonomy for academic science can be observed in narratives and practices related to: (1) the framing of when, how and why academic scientists collaborate with industry, (2) the meanings ascribed to and the uses deemed appropriate for industry monies in academic research, and (3) the dissemination of research results into the public domain through publications and patents. These narratives and practices

  2. Enrichment and Strengthening of Indian Biotechnology Industry along with Academic Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Shalini

    2014-01-01

    For many years, humankind has been incorporating biosciences in different places--from agriculture to food and medicine. Today, the nomenclature of biology has been recoined as Biotechnology, a technological science with a perfect blend of sophisticated techniques, manuals and application of fast delivery equipment and vehicles. It encompasses…

  3. Crustal structure of mountain belts and basins: Industry and academic collaboration at Cornell

    SciTech Connect

    Allmendinger, R.; Barazangi, M.; Brown, L.

    1995-08-01

    Interdisciplinary investigations of the large-scale structure and evolution of key basins and orogenic belts around the world are the focal point of academic-industry interaction at Cornell. Ongoing and new initiatives with significant industry involvement include: Project INDEPTH (Interdisciplinary Deep Profiling of Tibet and the Himalayas), a multinational effort to delineate deep structure across the type example of active continent-continent collision. 300 km of deep reflection profiling was collected across the Himalaya: and southern Tibet Plateau in 1992 and 1994. CAP (Cornell Andes Project), a long-standing interdisciplinary effort to understand the structure and evolution of the Andes, with a focus on Argentina, Chile and Bolivia. A deep reflection profile is tentatively planned for 1997. Intra-plate Orogeny in the Middle East and North Africa is the focus of multidisciplinary regional syntheses of existing seismic reflection and other databases in Syria (Palmyrides)and Morocco (Atlas), with an emphasis on reactivation and inversion tectonics. Project URSEIS (Urals Reflection Seismic Experiment and Integrated Studies) is a collaboration with EUROPROBE to collect 500 km of vibroseis and dynamite deep reflection profiling across the southern Urals in 1995. Project CRATON, an element in COCORP`s systematic exploration of the continental US, is a nascent multi-disciplinary effort to understand the buried craton of the central US and the basins built upon it. Global Basins Research Network (GBRN) is a diversified observational and computational effort to image and model the movement of pore fluids in detail and on a regional scale for a producing oil structure in the Gulf of Mexico.

  4. European Network of Gynaecological Oncological Trial Groups' Requirements for Trials Between Academic Groups and Industry Partners--First Update 2015.

    PubMed

    du Bois, Andreas; Reuss, Alexander; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric; Pignata, Sandro; Ledermann, Jonathan; Casado, Antonio; Sehouli, Jalid; Mirza, Mansoor; Colombo, Nicoletta; Marth, Christian; Witteveen, Els; Del Campo, Jose; Calvert, Paula; Aravantinos, Gerassimos; Vardar, Mehmet Ali; van der Zee, Ate G J; Korach, Jacob; Taskiran, Cagatay; Fehr, Mathias; Glasspool, Ros; Pfisterer, Jacobus; Cibula, David; Vergote, Ignace

    2015-09-01

    The first version of ENGOT's Requirements for Trials Between Academic Groups and Industry Partners in Europe was published 2010. This first update integrates the experiences made by the ENGOT network and the cooperative group studies while performing, analyzing, and publishing -among others - three large phase III trials. Furthermore, progress in European legislation and its impact on clinical studies in Europe have been considered in this update process. PMID:26067859

  5. Technology and the Post-Industrial Society: The Academic Library in the 1980s and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turock, Betty J.

    1984-01-01

    Summarizes status of academic libraries at beginning of 1980s in relationship to changes in broader society and technologies powering new communication networks (computers, video, teletext and videotex); outlines strategies for educating future library professionals; and forecasts how technologies might impact academic library beyond present…

  6. User-Interface Design Characteristics of Fortune 500 B2C E-Commerce Sites and Industry Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Jensen J.; Truell, Allen D.; Alexander, Melody W.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the user-interface design characteristics of 107 Fortune 500 B2C e-commerce Web sites and industry differences. Data were collected from corporate homepages, B2C product/service pages, B2C interactive shopping pages, as well as customer satisfaction of 321 online shoppers. The findings indicate that (a) to attract online…

  7. Improving academic leadership and oversight in large industry-sponsored clinical trials: the ARO-CRO model

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Neil A.; Spyropoulos, Alex C.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Kessler, Craig M.; Schulman, Sam; Turpie, Alexander G. G.; Skene, Allan M.; Cutler, Neal R.

    2011-01-01

    Standards for clinical trial design, execution, and publication have increased in recent years. However, the current structure for interaction among the pharmaceutical sponsor funding a drug or device development program, the contract research organization (CRO) that typically assists in executing the trial, regulatory agencies, and academicians, provides inadequate leadership and oversight of the development process. Conventional academic steering committees are not provided with the independent infrastructure by which to verify statistical analyses and conclusions regarding safety and efficacy. We propose an alternative approach centered on partnerships between CROs and university-based academic research organizations (AROs). In this model, the ARO takes responsibility for processes that address journal requirements and regulatory expectations for independent academic oversight (including oversight of Steering Committee and Data and Safety Monitoring Board activities), whereas the CRO provides infrastructure for efficient trial execution, site monitoring, and data management. The ARO engages academic experts throughout the trial process and minimizes conflicts of interest in individual industry relationships via diversification of sponsors, agents, and therapeutic areas. Although numerous models can be entertained, the ARO-CRO model is uniquely structured to meet the demand for greater assurance of integrity in clinical trials and the needs of each stakeholder in the process. PMID:21068436

  8. Improving academic leadership and oversight in large industry-sponsored clinical trials: the ARO-CRO model.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Neil A; Spyropoulos, Alex C; Halperin, Jonathan L; Kessler, Craig M; Schulman, Sam; Turpie, Alexander G G; Skene, Allan M; Cutler, Neal R; Hiatt, William R

    2011-02-17

    Standards for clinical trial design, execution, and publication have increased in recent years. However, the current structure for interaction among the pharmaceutical sponsor funding a drug or device development program, the contract research organization (CRO) that typically assists in executing the trial, regulatory agencies, and academicians, provides inadequate leadership and oversight of the development process. Conventional academic steering committees are not provided with the independent infrastructure by which to verify statistical analyses and conclusions regarding safety and efficacy. We propose an alternative approach centered on partnerships between CROs and university-based academic research organizations (AROs). In this model, the ARO takes responsibility for processes that address journal requirements and regulatory expectations for independent academic oversight (including oversight of Steering Committee and Data and Safety Monitoring Board activities), whereas the CRO provides infrastructure for efficient trial execution, site monitoring, and data management. The ARO engages academic experts throughout the trial process and minimizes conflicts of interest in individual industry relationships via diversification of sponsors, agents, and therapeutic areas. Although numerous models can be entertained, the ARO-CRO model is uniquely structured to meet the demand for greater assurance of integrity in clinical trials and the needs of each stakeholder in the process. PMID:21068436

  9. Power at the Interfaces: The Contested Orderings of Academic Presents and Futures in a Social Science Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stöckelová, Tereza

    2014-01-01

    The changes in and transformations of academic institutions and practices we are currently witnessing are complex. I argue that there are no clear-cut historical transitions between different regimes of science, such as from the "public knowledge regime" to "academic capitalism". Drawing upon John Law's analysis of…

  10. Of Sophists and Spin-Doctors: Industry-Sponsored Ghostwriting and the Crisis of Academic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    McHenry, Leemon

    2010-01-01

    Ghostwriting for medical journals has become a major, but largely invisible, factor contributing to the problem of credibility in academic medicine. In this paper I argue that the pharmaceutical marketing objectives and use of medical communication firms in the production of ghostwritten articles constitute a new form of sophistry. After identifying three distinct types of medical ghostwriting, I survey the known cases of ghostwriting in the literature and explain the harm done to academic medicine and to patients. Finally, I outline steps to address the problem and restore the integrity of the medical literature. PMID:21327175

  11. The "Traffic" in Graduate Students: Graduate Students as Tokens of Exchange between Academe and Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaughter, Sheila; Campbell, Teresa; Holleman, Margaret; Morgan, Edward

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes interview data from n=37 science and engineering faculty involved in university-industry relations. Explores the ways faculty define and redefine what makes industrial or corporate projects and examines the difficulties and tensions faculty face when they work with students on industrial or corporate projects. (Contains 52 references.)…

  12. Bridging the Gap between Industry and Higher Education: Training Academics To Promote Student Teamwork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Elisabeth; Rawlins, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the need for college graduates who are prepared for employment and skilled in teamwork, outlines a rationale for the development of groupwork in higher education, and describes a program sponsored by British Petroleum in 10 institutions in England and Scotland to provide academics with professional development in teaching groupwork…

  13. Making Connections: A Curriculum Ideabook for Teachers of Applied Academics and Industrial & Engineering Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Lois G.

    This document is designed to help vocational/tech prep and applied academics teachers plan and present their subject matter in a more integrated manner. The introduction presents the rationale for the ideabook. It is designed to help teachers modify their instructional program to more closely match the demands and realities of the real world. The…

  14. Shadow Scholars and the Rise of the Dissertation Service Industry: Can We Maintain Academic Integrity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Jeffry L.

    2016-01-01

    Notable interest was generated when Dave Tomar's book, "The Shadow Scholar: How I Made a Living Helping College Kids Cheat," was first published. While ghostwriters and paper mills have long been part of the academic landscape, a far more ominous enterprise has appeared that targets master's and doctoral students seeking assistance with…

  15. A Curriculum Model: Engineering Design Graphics Course Updates Based on Industrial and Academic Institution Requirements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meznarich, R. A.; Shava, R. C.; Lightner, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    Engineering design graphics courses taught in colleges or universities should provide and equip students preparing for employment with the basic occupational graphics skill competences required by engineering and technology disciplines. Academic institutions should introduce and include topics that cover the newer and more efficient graphics…

  16. Self- Versus Parent-Ratings of Industriousness, Affect, and Life Satisfaction in Relation to Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogarty, Gerard J.; Davies, Janet E.; MacCann, Carolyn; Roberts, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Parents consult with schools on how to help their children succeed, but schools rarely consult with parents, even though most parents have considerable expertise concerning their children's thoughts, feelings, and abilities. Aims: This study compares the prediction of academic achievement from self- and parent-ratings of feelings…

  17. Academic Institutions and One Health: Building Capacity for Transdisciplinary Research Approaches to Address Complex Health Issues at the Animal–Human–Ecosystem Interface

    PubMed Central

    Allen-Scott, Lisa K.; Buntain, Bonnie; Hatfield, Jennifer M.; Meisser, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    To improve health at the human, animal, and ecosystem interface, defined as One Health, training of researchers must transcend individual disciplines to develop a new process of collaboration. The transdisciplinary research approach integrates frameworks and methodologies beyond academic disciplines and includes involvement of and input from policy makers and members of the community. The authors argue that there should be a significant shift in academic institutions’ research capacity to achieve the added value of a transdisciplinary approach for addressing One Health problems. This Perspective is a call to action for academic institutions to provide the foundations for this salient shift. The authors begin by describing the transdisciplinary approach, propose methods for building transdisciplinary research capacity, and highlight three value propositions that support the case. Examples are provided to illustrate how the transdisciplinary approach to research adds value through improved sustainability of impact, increased cost-effectiveness, and enhanced abilities to mitigate potentially harmful unintended consequences. The authors conclude with three key recommendations for academic institutions: (1) a focus on creating enabling environments for One Health and transdisciplinary research, (2) the development of novel funding structures for transdisciplinary research, and (3) training of “transmitters” using real-world-oriented educational programs that break down research silos through collaboration across disciplines. PMID:25650827

  18. Academe-Industry Collaboration through the Experience of a Construction IT Membership-Based Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Jason; Khosrowshahi, Farzad

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally, the construction industry has been renowned for its deep fragmentation, with various stakeholders and disciplines brought together as virtual teams, in many instances for one-off projects. In addition, the industry is extremely information-intensive and document-driven. Such traits have been major contributors to the poor…

  19. The Role of Patenting in Academic-Industry Links in the UK. Fool's Gold?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packer, Kathryn

    1995-01-01

    Responses from 63 of 137 university directors of industrial liaison in the United Kingdom revealed a need to reappraise the role of patenting in higher education-industry interaction. Government policy regarding the issues of intellectual property, licensing, and income generation needs revision. (SK)

  20. Students' Experiences of Supervision in Academic and Industry Settings: Results of an Australian Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Suzanne; Pitt, Rachael; Manathunga, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    The joint supervision of Research Higher Degree (RHD) students by an industry and university supervisor is likely to increase in forthcoming years with a rise in the number of university-industry collaborations. Research students may become involved in these collaborative arrangements for a variety of reasons and may launch into their RHD without…

  1. Systems and Strategies at the University of Technology, Jamaica to Strengthen the Education/Industry Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Zubaidy, Sarim; George, Nancy A.

    Since 1995, when the College of Arts, Science, and Technology (CAST) became the University of Technology, Jamaica (UTech), it has been working to integrate the best features of CAST's polytechnic tradition with the academic and research culture necessary in a university. Central to CAST's success has been its partnerships with business and…

  2. Unifi nootropics from the lab to the web: a story of academic (and industrial) shortcomings.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a review of the work of my former academic group of research in the past 15 years, in the field of cognition enhancers (also called nootropics) that identified two very potent molecules: Unifiram and Sunifiram that for a variety of reasons were not protected by a patent. Some 12 years after their disclosure (2000) I casually found that on the web, there were dozens of sites offering Unifiram and Sunifiram as drugs that improve cognition in healthy individuals even if only few preclinical studies were done and their long-term toxicity was unknown. PMID:25831025

  3. An academic, clinical and industrial update on electrospun, additive manufactured and imprinted medical devices.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Christina N M; Fuller, Kieran P; Larrañaga, Aitor; Biggs, Manus; Bayon, Yves; Sarasua, Jose R; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning, additive manufacturing and imprint lithography scaffold fabrication technologies have attracted great attention in biomedicine, as they allow production of two- and three- dimensional constructs with tuneable topographical and geometrical features. In vitro data demonstrate that electrospun and imprinted substrates offer control over permanently differentiated and stem cell function. Advancements in functionalisation strategies have further enhanced the bioactivity and reparative capacity of electrospun and additive manufactured devices, as has been evidenced in several preclinical models. Despite this overwhelming success in academic setting, only a few technologies have reached the clinic and only a fraction of them have become commercially available products. PMID:26111642

  4. Smart and green interfaces: from single bubbles/drops to industrial environmental and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Dutschk, V; Karapantsios, T; Liggieri, L; McMillan, N; Miller, R; Starov, V M

    2014-07-01

    Interfaces can be called Smart and Green (S&G) when tailored such that the required technologies can be implemented with high efficiency, adaptability and selectivity. At the same time they also have to be eco-friendly, i.e. products must be biodegradable, reusable or simply more durable. Bubble and drop interfaces are in many of these smart technologies the fundamental entities and help develop smart products of the everyday life. Significant improvements of these processes and products can be achieved by implementing and manipulating specific properties of these interfaces in a simple and smart way, in order to accomplish specific tasks. The severe environmental issues require in addition attributing eco-friendly features to these interfaces, by incorporating innovative, or, sometimes, recycle materials and conceiving new production processes which minimize the use of natural resources and energy. Such concept can be extended to include important societal challenges related to support a sustainable development and a healthy population. The achievement of such ambitious targets requires the technology research to be supported by a robust development of theoretical and experimental tools, needed to understand in more details the behavior of complex interfaces. A wide but not exhaustive review of recent work concerned with green and smart interfaces is presented, addressing different scientific and technological fields. The presented approaches reveal a huge potential in relation to various technological fields, such as nanotechnologies, biotechnologies, medical diagnostics, and new or improved materials. PMID:24679903

  5. Transfer of control system interface solutions from other domains to the thermal power industry.

    PubMed

    Bligård, L-O; Andersson, J; Osvalder, A-L

    2012-01-01

    In a thermal power plant the operators' roles are to control and monitor the process to achieve efficient and safe production. To achieve this, the human-machine interfaces have a central part. The interfaces need to be updated and upgraded together with the technical functionality to maintain optimal operation. One way of achieving relevant updates is to study other domains and see how they have solved similar issues in their design solutions. The purpose of this paper is to present how interface design solution ideas can be transferred from domains with operator control to thermal power plants. In the study 15 domains were compared using a model for categorisation of human-machine systems. The result from the domain comparison showed that nuclear power, refinery and ship engine control were most similar to thermal power control. From the findings a basic interface structure and three specific display solutions were proposed for thermal power control: process parameter overview, plant overview, and feed water view. The systematic comparison of the properties of a human-machine system allowed interface designers to find suitable objects, structures and navigation logics in a range of domains that could be transferred to the thermal power domain. PMID:22317152

  6. Considering the Work of Martin Nakata's "Cultural Interface": A Reflection on Theory and Practice by a Non-Indigenous Academic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGloin, Colleen

    2009-01-01

    This is a reflective paper that explores Martin Nakata's work as a basis for understanding the possibilities and restrictions of non-Indigenous academics working in Indigenous studies. The paper engages with Nakata's work at the level of praxis. It contends that Nakata's work provides non-Indigenous teachers of Indigenous studies a framework for…

  7. Practical English Education for Natural Science and Technology through the Academic-Industrial Cooperation in Gunma University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozuka, Kazuo

    English education for specific purpose (ESP) , particularly for the field of natural sciences and technologies, has been attracting great interests in Japan because of the growing demands of the ability to use English in working place to the graduates in the filed. In Gunma University, we have launched a new style of ESP program tilted as “Collaboration between Academic and Industrial Sectors for Practical English Education” as a part of Good Practice Program supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology, Japan (MEXT) since 2006. The program aims to steam up the ability of students to use English through a variety of activities including the presentation of scientific topics in English in a regular class work and the pseudo-conversation (role-playing) style training in a non-regular class work.

  8. Commercial applications of speech interface technology: an industry at the threshold.

    PubMed

    Oberteuffer, J A

    1995-10-24

    Speech interface technology, which includes automatic speech recognition, synthetic speech, and natural language processing, is beginning to have a significant impact on business and personal computer use. Today, powerful and inexpensive microprocessors and improved algorithms are driving commercial applications in computer command, consumer, data entry, speech-to-text, telephone, and voice verification. Robust speaker-independent recognition systems for command and navigation in personal computers are now available; telephone-based transaction and database inquiry systems using both speech synthesis and recognition are coming into use. Large-vocabulary speech interface systems for document creation and read-aloud proofing are expanding beyond niche markets. Today's applications represent a small preview of a rich future for speech interface technology that will eventually replace keyboards with microphones and loud-speakers to give easy accessibility to increasingly intelligent machines. PMID:7479717

  9. Getting Technical: The Vicissitudes of Academic Industrial Chemistry in Nineteenth-Century Britain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, J. F.

    1997-01-01

    Recounts the history of chemistry instruction in English higher education, particularly the development of technical, or industrial, chemistry. Describes attempts to develop independent courses and departments of technical chemistry in the second half of the 19th century and the difficulties experienced. Extends the discussion to applied science…

  10. Working Partnerships: The Challenge of Creating Mutual Benefit for Academics and Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruss, Glenda

    2006-01-01

    Networks and partnerships between higher education institutions and industry have been identified as a primary means of addressing higher education's role in economic development, globally and in South Africa. This article draws on one component of a Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) study to provide an empirically based overview of the…

  11. Scalable Technology for the Extraction of Pharmaceutics (STEP): the transition from academic knowhow to industrial reality.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Ian; Ignatova, Svetlana; Hewitson, Peter; Janaway, Lee; Wood, Philip; Edwards, Neil; Harris, Guy; Guzlek, Hacer; Keay, David; Freebairn, Keith; Johns, David; Douillet, Nathalie; Thickitt, Chris; Vilminot, Elsa; Mathews, Ben

    2011-09-01

    This paper addresses the technological readiness of counter-current chromatography (CCC) instruments to become platform technology for the pharmaceutical industry. It charts the development of the prototype technology since its inception in 1966, through conceptual improvements in the 1980s that led to higher speed separations in hours as opposed to days. It then describes the engineering improvements that have led to the development of high performance counter-current chromatography with the potential for scale-up to process scale for manufacturing products in industry with separation times in minutes rather than hours. A new UK Technology Strategy Board high value manufacturing £1.5 m research programme to take CCC through to technology readiness level 8 (i.e. as platform technology for continuous 24 × 7 operation by industry) is introduced. Four case studies are given as examples of successes from its expanding applications portfolio, which is mainly confidential. Finally, the hurdles for the uptake of new technology by industry are highlighted and the following potential solutions given: rapid method development, automation, continuous processing and instrument reliability and robustness. The future challenge for the CCC community will be to address these development needs urgently if CCC is to become the platform technology it deserves to be. PMID:21296355

  12. Intensification of University-Industry Relationships and Its Impact on Academic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crespo, Manuel; Dridi, Houssine

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses the intensification of university-industry relationships and its impact on university research. The paper consists of recent follow-up research to an international comparative research project conducted in the 1990s. It deals specifically with the Quebec (Canada) situation. Twenty-eight in-depth interviews were conducted in the…

  13. Scholars, Inc.: Harvard Academics in Service of Industry and Government. [A Harvard Watch Report].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissman, Robert

    The interaction of Harvard University scholars with outside institutions is examined, as is the need for the university to monitor and regulate these outside activities. Harvard scholars were found to maintain 38 directorships with Fortune 500 companies, 60 ties to the biotechnology industry, over 500 contacts between faculty at the Business…

  14. The Politics of Knowledge and the Revitalization of American Democracy: A Response to Henry Giroux's "The University in Chains: Confronting the Military-Industrial-Academic Complex"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Cary

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Henry Giroux's "The University in Chains: Confronting the Military-Industrial-Academic Complex." Henry Giroux has written a provocative assessment of the contemporary challenges facing the United States as a society, which over the course of the 20th century had assumed the role of leader and exemplar…

  15. A Successful Model for an Academic-Industrial Partnership for Elementary Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Kevin C.; Sandler, Stanley R.

    2000-10-01

    ATOFINA Chemicals' Science Teacher Program for elementary science teachers is a mobilization of financial and technical resources to make an immediate impact in local school districts. This program, established in 1995, targets the professional development of grade 3-6 science teachers using commercially available teacher-tested kits. A description of this ongoing program at the Technical Center and its impact to date is presented as a model for both industrial and collegiate sponsorship of elementary science education. Success of the program has resulted in its expansion to 13 additional sites at ATOFINA manufacturing facilities.

  16. The interface between publicly funded and industry-funded research in pediatric psychopharmacology: opportunities for integration and collaboration.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Benedetto; Heiligenstein, John H; Riddle, Mark A; Greenhill, Laurence L; Fegert, Jörg M

    2004-07-01

    Pediatric psychopharmacology research is undergoing a major expansion consequent to increasing use of psychotropic medications in children and recent legislative incentives to industry. In this rapidly changing context, the interface between publicly and privately funded research needs to be reconsidered to integrate activities and avoid unnecessary duplication of efforts. Once, by default, the almost exclusive domain of public research, child research is now increasingly funded by industry. There are, however, important issues unlikely to be addressed through private funding for which public support is needed, such as direct comparisons between active medications, between pharmacological and psychosocial interventions, or between combined and single treatment modalities; development of effective treatment strategies for patients unresponsive to first-line treatments; development of better research methods to assess efficacy and safety; identification of moderators and mechanisms of treatment response; and impact of treatment on illness course and prognosis. Industry-sponsored research is limited by the restricted access to proprietary databases, which impedes independent analyses and meta-analyses. Translation of basic neuroscience discoveries into treatment applications for children with mental illness is a critical area of inquiry that can benefit from integration of efforts and collaborations among academia, government, and industry. PMID:15219466

  17. An Industry/Academe Consortium for Achieving 20% wind by 2030 through Cutting-Edge Research and Workforce Training

    SciTech Connect

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Marr, Jeffrey D.G.; Milliren, Christopher; Kaveh, Mos; Mohan, Ned; Stolarski, Henryk; Glauser, Mark; Arndt, Roger

    2013-12-01

    In January 2010, the University of Minnesota, along with academic and industry project partners, began work on a four year project to establish new facilities and research in strategic areas of wind energy necessary to move the nation towards a goal of 20% wind energy by 2030. The project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy with funds made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. $7.9M of funds were provided by DOE and $3.1M was provided through matching funds. The project was organized into three Project Areas. Project Area 1 focused on design and development of a utility scale wind energy research facility to support research and innovation. The project commissioned the Eolos Wind Research Field Station in November of 2011. The site, located 20 miles from St. Paul, MN operates a 2.5MW Clipper Liberty C-96 wind turbine, a 130-ft tall sensored meteorological tower and a robust sensor and data acquisition network. The site is operational and will continue to serve as a site for innovation in wind energy for the next 15 years. Project Areas 2 involved research on six distinct research projects critical to the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 goals. The research collaborations involved faculty from two universities, over nine industry partners and two national laboratories. Research outcomes include new knowledge, patents, journal articles, technology advancements, new computational models and establishment of new collaborative relationships between university and industry. Project Area 3 focused on developing educational opportunities in wind energy for engineering and science students. The primary outcome is establishment of a new graduate level course at the University of Minnesota called Wind Engineering Essentials. The seminar style course provides a comprehensive analysis of wind energy technology, economics, and operation. The course is highly successful and will continue to be offered at the University. The vision of U.S. DOE to

  18. Simulation of Hypersonic CO2 Flows in a Range of Academic and Industrial Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, J. C.; Smith, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies in high enthalpy carbon dioxide flows have provided the opportunity to validate computational tools against a wide range of data from experiments in a wide range of facilities, from a classical shock tube to the industrial facility in which the ExoMars heatshield will be qualified. Computations of both nozzle flows and stagnation tests have been performed using the thermochemical non-equilibrium Navier-Stokes code TINA, and the shock tube has been simulated using the SHOCK2 code. In general, good agreement with the experimental data has been achieved. Thus, this work provides increased confidence in the thermochemical modelling of carbon dioxide flows and the applicability of tools used in the design of entry vehicles for Mars.

  19. NASA as a Convener: Government, Academic and Industry Collaborations Through the NASA Human Health and Performance Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Elizabeth E.

    2011-01-01

    On October 18, 2010, the NASA Human Health and Performance center (NHHPC) was opened to enable collaboration among government, academic and industry members. Membership rapidly grew to 60 members (http://nhhpc.nasa.gov ) and members began identifying collaborative projects as detailed below. In addition, a first workshop in open collaboration and innovation was conducted on January 19, 2011 by the NHHPC resulting in additional challenges and projects for further development. This first workshop was a result of the SLSD successes in running open innovation challenges over the past two years. In 2008, the NASA Johnson Space Center, Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) began pilot projects in open innovation (crowd sourcing) to determine if these new internet-based platforms could indeed find solutions to difficult technical problems. From 2008 to 2010, the SLSD issued 34 challenges, 14 externally and 20 internally. The 14 external challenges were conducted through three different vendors: InnoCentive, Yet2.com and TopCoder. The 20 internal challenges were conducted using the InnoCentive platform, customized to NASA use, and promoted as NASA@Work. The results from the 34 challenges involved not only technical solutions that were reported previously at the 61st IAC, but also the formation of new collaborative relationships. For example, the TopCoder pilot was expanded by the NASA Space Operations Mission Directorate to the NASA Tournament Lab in collaboration with Harvard Business School and TopCoder. Building on these initial successes, the NHHPC workshop in January of 2011, and ongoing NHHPC member discussions, several important collaborations are in development: Space Act Agreement between NASA and GE for collaborative projects, NASA and academia for a Visual Impairment / Intracranial Hypertension summit (February 2011), NASA and the DoD through the Defense Venture Catalyst Initiative (DeVenCI) for a technical needs workshop (June 2011), NASA and the San Diego Zoo

  20. Managing the interface with marketing to improve delivery of pharmacovigilance within the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brian

    2004-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is under pressure to improve the scientific quality of its decisions concerning the benefit and risks of its products while ensuring compliance with acceptable standards of marketing. All those in a pharmaceutical company who currently work within pharmacovigilance should be encouraged to lead from the front to examine ongoing marketing activities to see how they can be adapted more towards pharmacovigilance and risk management. The current irony is that the personnel who have the greatest influence on benefit-risk decisions of a product are not necessarily those who acknowledge that they are performing pharmacovigilance. Indeed, for all concerned, whether their orientation is scientific and commercial, effective communication with prescribers and consumers usually underpins product success. Also, a substantial 'marketing' budget is culturally acceptable for the pharmaceutical industry so it is logical to assume that resource for postmarketing activity is often made available. Given these realities, I suggest we should strive for an integrated marketing and risk-management plan based on the best available evidence and that being fully aware and in control of the safety issues for your products is the best way to commercialise them successfully. This approach can still be consistent with other corporate responsibilities such as trying to reduce the financial burden of product development. If this article stimulates further debate about how the pharmaceutical industry can more effectively organise resources and operations to support pharmacovigilance, risk management, and marketing, then it will have achieved its purpose. PMID:15154832

  1. Service robotics: an emergent technology field at the interface between industry and services.

    PubMed

    Ott, Ingrid

    2012-12-01

    The paper at hand analyzes the economic implications of service robots as expected important future technology. The considerations are embedded into global trends, focusing on the interdependencies between services and industry not only in the context of the provision of services but already starting at the level of the innovation process. It is argued that due to the various interdependencies combined with heterogenous application fields, the resulting implications need to be contextualized. Concerning the net labor market effects, it is reasonable to assume that the field of service robotics will generate overall job creation that goes along with increasing skill requirements demanded from involved employees. It is analyzed which challenges arise in evaluating and further developing the new technology field and some policy recommendations are given. PMID:23226996

  2. A review and evaluation of the Langley Research Center's Scientific and Technical Information Program. Results of phase 4: Knowledge and attitudes survey, academic and industrial personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, T. E.; Glassman, M.; Glassman, N. A.

    1981-01-01

    Feedback from engineers and scientists in the academic and industrial community provided an assessment of the usage and perceived quality of NASA Langley generated STI and the familiarity and usage of selected NASA publications and services and identified ways to increase the accessibility of Langley STI. The questionnaire utilized both open and closed ended questions and was pretested for finalization. The questions were organized around the seven objectives for Phase IV. From a contact list of nearly 1,200 active industrial and academic researchers, approximately 600 addresses were verified. The 497 persons who agreed to participate were mailed questionnaires. The 381 completed questionnaires received by the cutoff date were analyzed. Based on the survey findings, recommendations were made for increasing the familiarity with and use of NASA and Langley STI and selected NASA publications and services. In addition, recommendations were made for increasing the accessibility of Langley STI.

  3. The symbiotic relationship of sediment and biofilm dynamics at the sediment water interface of oil sands industrial tailings ponds.

    PubMed

    Reid, T; VanMensel, D; Droppo, I G; Weisener, C G

    2016-09-01

    Within the oil sands industry, tailings ponds are used as a means of retaining tailings until a reclamation technology such as end pit lakes (EPLs) can be developed and optimized to remediate such tailings with a water cap (although dry-land strategies for tailing reclamation are also being developed). EPLs have proven successful for other mining ventures (e.g. metal rock mines) in eventually mitigating contaminant loads to receiving waters once biochemical remediation has taken place (although the duration for this to occur may be decades). While the biological interactions at the sediment water interface of tailings ponds or EPLs have been shown to control biogeochemical processes (i.e. chemical fluxes and redox profiles), these have often been limited to static microcosm conditions. Results from such experiments may not tell the whole story given that the sediment water interface often represents a dynamic environment where erosion and deposition may be occurring in association with microbial growth and decay. Mobilization of sediments and associated contaminants may therefore have a profound effect on remediation rates and, as such, may decrease the effectiveness of EPLs as viable reclamation strategies for mining industries. Using a novel core erosion system (U-GEMS), this paper examines how the microbial community can influence sediment water interface stability and how the biofilm community may change with tailings age and after disturbance (biofilm reestablishment). Shear strength, eroded mass measurements, density gradients, high-resolution microscopy, and microbial community analyses were made on 2 different aged tailings (fresh and ∼38 years) under biotic and abiotic conditions. The same experiments were repeated as duplicates with both sets of experiments having consolidation/biostabilization periods of 21 days. Results suggest that the stability of the tailings varies between types and conditions with the fresh biotic tailings experiencing up to 75

  4. Academic Politics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, William R.

    The internal politics of colleges and the influence of a current emphasis on efficiency on the traditional independence of the academician are analyzed. It is suggested that the academician does not work in the same differentiated, and therefore interdependent, way as someone in industry or a bureaucracy. Academic activity is segmented, which…

  5. Physician attitudes toward dissemination of optical spectroscopy devices for cervical cancer control: An Industrial-Academic collaborative study

    PubMed Central

    Shinn, Eileen; Qazi, Usman; Gera, Shalini; Brodovsky, Joan; Simpson, Jessica; Follen, Michele; Basen-Engquist, Karen; MacAulay, Calum

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Optical Spectroscopy has been studied for biologic plausisbility, technical efficacy, clinical effectiveness, patient satisfaction and cost-effectiveness. We sought to identify healthcare provider attitudes or practices that might act as barriers or to the dissemination of this new technology. Methods Through an academic-industrial partnership, we conducted a series of focus groups to examine physician barriers to optical diagnosis. The study was conducted in two stages. First, a pilot group of ten physicians (8 obstetrician gynecologists and two family practitioners) was randomly selected from 8 regions of the US and interviewed individually. They were presented with the results of a large trial (N=980) testing the accuracy of a spectroscopy based device in the detection of cervical neoplasia. They were also shown a prototype of the device and were given a period of time to ask questions and receive answers regarding the device. They were also asked to provide feedback of a questionnaire (provided in Appendix A) which was then revised and presented to three larger focus groups (n=13, 15, 17 for a total n=45). The larger focus groups were conducted during national scientific meetings with 20 obstetrician gynecologists and 25 primary care physicians (family practitioners and internists). Results When asked about the dissemination potential of the new cervical screening technology, all study groups tended to rely on established clinical guidelines from their respective professional societies with regard to the screening and diagnosis of cervical cancer. In addition, study participants consistently agreed that real-time spectroscopy would be viewed positively by their patients. Participants were positive about the new technology's potential as an adjunct to colposcopy and agreed that the improved accuracy would result in reduced healthcare costs (due to decreased biopsies and decreased visits). However, while all saw the potential of real-time diagnosis

  6. Academic Capitalism and Academic Culture: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Pilar; Berger, Joseph B.

    2008-01-01

    This case study investigated the impact of academic capitalism on academic culture by examining the perspectives of faculty members in an American academic department with significant industrial funding. The results of this study indicate that faculty members believe that the broad integrity of the academic culture remains unaffected in this…

  7. An Appraisal of the Industrial Cooperative Education Program Based on Selected Characteristics of the Students and Their Academic Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Nancy S.

    As a part of a series describing participants in the cooperative education option of the technical program at Macomb County Community College, this report compares the academic achievements, demographics, and employment characteristics of a random sample of 63 co-op respondents and 69 non co-op respondents from the original study population. Co-op…

  8. Helping Taiwanese Graduate Students Help Themselves: Applying Corpora to Industrial Management English as a Foreign Language Academic Reading and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Barry Lee

    2015-01-01

    Lack of knowledge in the conventional use of vocabulary and multiword patterns in one's respective field of expertise causes Taiwanese students to produce academic writing that is markedly "non-nativelike." This is because Taiwanese students are first and foremost second language readers and often have difficulty "picking up…

  9. Interdisciplinary studies on the development of nuclear-fueled circulatory support systems: Collaboration of industry and academe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to acquaint the Houston community with specific areas of available technology, both public and private, to demonstrate to industry how this technology may be acquired and put to use to provide new and useful services for man. Much of the technology utilized in the development of nuclear-fueled circulatory support systems in our laboratories has evolved from industry, NASA, and AEC; our projects involve radiation biology, thermodynamics, energy transfers, hemodynamics, hematology, pathology, and surgery.

  10. Arbitration in Academe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Joel, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Questions and issues critical to an understanding of arbitration in higher education are discussed. Aspects of the academic arbitration model are defined. The following four topics are examined: (1) the procedural similarities and differences between academic arbitration and the industrial model; (2) the possible inherent conflict between academic…

  11. Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  12. Redefining University Roles in Regional Economies: A Case Study of University-Industry Relations and Academic Organization in Nanotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sa, Creso M.

    2011-01-01

    The emerging field of nanotechnology has created a new frontier for the convergence of university and industrial research. In the United States, major federal investments provided a massive boom for this field over the decade. This paper reports on a case study of how the University at Albany came to establish the first college of nanotechnology…

  13. Technical Writing in Academe and in Industry: A Study Undertaken Preliminary to the Proposal of a Bachelor of Science Degree Program in Technical Communications to be Offered by the Humanities Department, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Scott Patrick

    The results of a survey of technical writing and editing, as they are taught in academe and practiced in industry, are presented in this report. The introduction explains that the survey was conducted by the humanities department of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, as the principal research preliminary to the proposal of a…

  14. A Review and Evaluation of the Langley Research Center's Scientific and Technical Information Program. Results of Phase IV--Knowledge and Attitudes Survey, Academic and Industrial Personnel. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; And Others

    As Phase IV of a comprehensive evaluation of the NASA-affiliated Langley Research Center's (LaRC) scientific and technical information (STI) program, a study was conducted to assess the usage, importance, and perceived quality of Langley-generated STI among academic and industrial research personnel, and to determine ways in which that information…

  15. Microwave tumor ablation: cooperative academic-industry development of a high-power gas-cooled system with early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brace, Christopher L.; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J.; Schefelker, Rick; Hinshaw, J. L.; Lubner, Meghan G.; Lee, Fred T.

    2013-02-01

    Microwave tumor ablation continues to evolve into a viable treatment option for many cancers. Current systems are poised to supplant radiofrequency ablation as the dominant percutaneous thermal therapy. Here is provided an overview of technical details and early clinical results with a high-powered, gas-cooled microwave ablation system. The system was developed with academic-industry collaboration using federal and private funding. The generator comprises three synchronous channels that each produce up to 140W at 2.45GHz. A mountable power distribution module facilitates CT imaging guidance and monitoring and reduces clutter in the sterile field. Cryogenic carbon-dioxide cools the coaxial applicator, permitting a thin applicator profile (~1.5 mm diameter) and high power delivery. A total of 106 liver tumors were treated (96 malignant, 10 benign) from December 2010 to June 2012 at a single academic institution. Mean tumor size +/- standard deviation was 2.5+/-1.3cm (range 0.5-13.9cm). Treatment time was 5.4+/-3.3min (range 1-20min). Median follow-up was 6 months (range 1-16 months). Technical success was reported in 100% of cases. Local tumor progression was noted in 4/96 (4.3%) of malignancies. The only major complication was a pleural effusion that was treated with thoracentesis. Microwave ablation with this system is an effective treatment for liver cancer. Compared to previous data from the same institution, these results suggest an increased efficacy and equivalent safety to RF ablation. Additional data from the lung and kidney support this conclusion.

  16. Effect of Bonder at Skin/Core Interface on the Mechanical Performances of Sandwich Structures Used in Marine Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsellino, C.; Calabrese, L.; di Bella, G.

    2007-11-01

    The present work is aimed to extend the knowledge of mechanical properties of sandwich structures used for marine applications focusing on the possibility to increase the performances of such structures by adding a bonder at the skin/core interface. Therefore, three sandwich structures that are utilised in different structural components of a yacht were realised by manual lay-up. The mechanical characterisation was performed by flatwise compressive, edgewise compressive and three point flexural tests. The tests execution has allowed both to determine the mechanical performances and to understand the fracture mechanisms that take place when the bonder is added in the stacking sequence of the samples.

  17. The animal-human interface and infectious disease in industrial food animal production: rethinking biosecurity and biocontainment.

    PubMed

    Graham, Jay P; Leibler, Jessica H; Price, Lance B; Otte, Joachim M; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Tiensin, T; Silbergeld, Ellen K

    2008-01-01

    Understanding interactions between animals and humans is critical in preventing outbreaks of zoonotic disease. This is particularly important for avian influenza. Food animal production has been transformed since the 1918 influenza pandemic. Poultry and swine production have changed from small-scale methods to industrial-scale operations. There is substantial evidence of pathogen movement between and among these industrial facilities, release to the external environment, and exposure to farm workers, which challenges the assumption that modern poultry production is more biosecure and biocontained as compared with backyard or small holder operations in preventing introduction and release of pathogens. An analysis of data from the Thai government investigation in 2004 indicates that the odds of H5N1 outbreaks and infections were significantly higher in large-scale commercial poultry operations as compared with backyard flocks. These data suggest that successful strategies to prevent or mitigate the emergence of pandemic avian influenza must consider risk factors specific to modern industrialized food animal production. PMID:19006971

  18. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  19. Astronomers Working in Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bless, Robert C.; King, Ivan R.

    1981-01-01

    Four scientists, trained as astronomers, describe their astronomical training and present careers in non-astronomy, industrial jobs. They recount some of the differences, positive and negative, between industrial and academic employment, and comment on some of the attitudes they perceive academic and industrial scientists hold toward each other.…

  20. Media independent interface. Interface control document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A Media Independent Interface (MII) is specified, using current standards in the industry. The MII is described in hierarchical fashion. At the base are IEEE/International Standards Organization (ISO) documents (standards) which describe the functionality of the software modules or layers and their interconnection. These documents describe primitives which are to transcent the MII. The intent of the MII is to provide a universal interface to one or more Media Access Contols (MACs) for the Logical Link Controller and Station Manager. This interface includes both a standardized electrical and mechanical interface and a standardized functional specification which defines the services expected from the MAC.

  1. Academic detailing.

    PubMed

    Shankar, P R; Jha, N; Piryani, R M; Bajracharya, O; Shrestha, R; Thapa, H S

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of sources available to prescribers to stay up to date about medicines. Prescribers in rural areas in developing countries however, may not able to access some of them. Interventions to improve prescribing can be educational, managerial, and regulatory or use a mix of strategies. Detailing by the pharmaceutical industry is widespread. Academic detailing (AD) has been classically seen as a form of continuing medical education in which a trained health professional such as a physician or pharmacist visits physicians in their offices to provide evidence-based information. Face-to-face sessions, preferably on an individual basis, clear educational and behavioural objectives, establishing credibility with respect to objectivity, stimulating physician interaction, use of concise graphic educational materials, highlighting key messages, and when possible, providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits can increase success of AD initiatives. AD is common in developed countries and certain examples have been cited in this review. In developing countries the authors have come across reports of AD in Pakistan, Sudan, Argentina and Uruguay, Bihar state in India, Zambia, Cuba, Indonesia and Mexico. AD had a consistent, small but potentially significant impact on prescribing practices. AD has much less resources at its command compared to the efforts by the industry. Steps have to be taken to formally start AD in Nepal and there may be specific hindering factors similar to those in other developing nations. PMID:21209521

  2. How Academic Is Academic Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    University provision for academic development is well established in the USA, UK and many other countries. However, arrangements for its provision and staffing vary. In Australia, there has been a trend towards professional rather than academic staff appointments. Is this appropriate? In this paper, the domains of academic development work are…

  3. Academic Restructuring: Organizational Change and Institutional Imperatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gumport, Patricia J.

    2000-01-01

    Argues that there has been a macro-trend whereby the dominant concept of public higher education has changed from higher education as a social institution to higher education as an industry. Identifies three interrelated mechanisms advancing this process: academic management, academic consumerism, and academic stratification. Argues that wholesale…

  4. Reviewing Academic Books: Are There Ethical Issues?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Edmund F.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses bias in academic book reviewing due to the hierarchy of perceived excellence promoted by the academic and publishing industries and that favors authors from the most prestigious universities. Focuses on pre-publication reviewing of philosophical work and considers anonymity in journal peer reviewing and transparency in academic book…

  5. Not for industry only: medical students and office-based academic detailing the PIVOT (Pregnant women Influenza Vaccine Optimization Team) initiative.

    PubMed

    Blitz, Daina A; Mallen, Jonathan R; Kwiatkowski, Thomas G; Rabin, Jill M; Dlugacz, Yosef D; Silverman, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Academic detailing is a method of educational outreach that utilizes individualized encounters with physicians to broach specific medical issues in an evidence-based and quality-driven manner. Medical students utilized the matter of influenza vaccination during pregnancy as a lens through which to explore the methods of academic detailing in a community setting. Structured and customized dialogues between North Shore-LIJ affiliated obstetricians and Hofstra North Shore-LIJ medical students were conducted regarding the disparity between the proportion of providers that recommend the vaccine and the percentage of pregnant women being vaccinated annually. Ultimately the project aimed to increase vaccine-carrying rates throughout office based practices in the community, while establishing a viable method for up-to-date information exchange between practicing physicians and academic medicine. While the extent of affected change is currently being quantified, the project proved successful insofar as academic detailing allowed the students to gain access to physicians, and engage in compelling and educational conversations. Both the physicians and students felt these interactions were valuable and well worth continuing. The goal for the future is to expand these practices to other pressing public health issues while continuing to refine the technique. PMID:25926764

  6. Academic Duty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Donald

    This book by a former university president examines the state of the research university faculty, focusing on teaching and how success at teaching can be evaluated; ethical problems in reviewing the work of others, research and how it is supported; outside commitments; and research misconduct. Chapters include: "Academic Freedom, Academic Duty,"…

  7. Academic Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago City Colleges, IL.

    This statement outlines the academic policies of the City Colleges of Chicago. Part I outlines the Institution's academic standards, covering: (1) student class attendance; (2) the grading system; (3) mid-term grades; (4) the use of non-grade designations; i.e., administrative initiated withdrawal, auditor, no-show withdrawal, incomplete, and…

  8. Academic Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swift, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The academy is defined by a fundamentally uncertain pursuit of certainty. The question of whether academic work is a sufficient form of engagement on its own is inseparable from the contradiction inherent to this pursuit. Like any properly academic question, it lends itself to a forum: a response is nearly obligatory for any professor in the…

  9. Academic Bullies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2008-01-01

    Many professors have been traumatized by academic bullies. Unlike bullies at school, the academic bully plays a more subtle game. Bullies may spread rumors to undermine a colleague's credibility or shut their target out of social conversations. The more aggressive of the species cuss out co-workers, even threatening to get physical. There is…

  10. Academic Freedom and Academic Tenure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De George, Richard T.

    2001-01-01

    Asserts that Martin Michaelson's proposal in "Should Untenured as Well as Tenured Faculty Be Guaranteed Academic Freedom? A Few Observations," despite its good intentions, is seriously flawed and if adopted in preference to existing standards will weaken rather than strengthen academic freedom. (EV)

  11. Academic Village.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    Presents design features of the Renner Middle School (Plano, Texas) where the sprawling suburbs have been kept at bay while creating the atmosphere of an academic village. Photos and a floor plan are provided. (GR)

  12. Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 1970

    1970-01-01

    Building data is given for the following academic libraries: (1) Rosary College, River Forest, Illinois; (2) Abilene Christian College, Abilene, Texas; (3) University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California. (MF)

  13. Vocational Training for Economic Development: A Report on Business/Industry Relationships with Kansas Community Colleges and Area Vocational-Technical Schools, 1990-91 Academic Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Board of Education, Topeka. Lifelong Learning Div.

    In order to provide educational opportunities for entry into and advancement within the work force, Kansas' 19 public community colleges and 14 area vocational technical schools (AVTSs) have expanded their offerings to include customized training for businesses and industries within Kansas. Vocational training is also supported by the Kansas…

  14. Videodisc-Computer Interfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zollman, Dean

    1984-01-01

    Lists microcomputer-videodisc interfaces currently available from 26 sources, including home use systems connected through remote control jack and industrial/educational systems utilizing computer ports and new laser reflective and stylus technology. Information provided includes computer and videodisc type, language, authoring system, educational…

  15. User interface concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redhed, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    Three possible goals for the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF) are: (1) a computational fluid dynamics (as opposed to aerodynamics) algorithm development tool; (2) a specialized research laboratory facility for nearly intractable aerodynamics problems that industry encounters; and (3) a facility for industry to use in its normal aerodynamics design work that requires high computing rates. The central system issue for industry use of such a computer is the quality of the user interface as implemented in some kind of a front end to the vector processor.

  16. Academic Prophecies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Robert M.; Polishook, Irwin H.

    1985-01-01

    Academic prophecies are characterized by their innocence, detachment from the realities of politics and economics, and deference to a limited cohort of administrative representatives. Careless forecasting of the untested future contributes to public misunderstanding of higher education's role in society. (MLW)

  17. Academic Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Burton R.

    With fragmentation the dominant trend in academic settings around the world, the larger wholes of profession, enterprise, and system are less held together by integrative ideology. Strong ideological bonding is characteristic of the parts, primarily the disciplines. The larger aggregations are made whole mainly by formal superstructure, many…

  18. Academic Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally negative practice.…

  19. Academic Freedom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Brian G.

    The strength of academic freedom has always depended upon historical circumstances. In the United States, higher education began with institutions founded and controlled by religious sects. The notion of who gets educated and to what ends expanded as American democracy expanded. By the 1980's, legitimate calls for equality became a general…

  20. Academic Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durant, Linda

    2013-01-01

    As colleges and universities become even more complex organizations, advancement professionals need to have the skills, experience, and academic credentials to succeed in this ever-changing environment. Advancement leaders need competencies that extend beyond fundraising, alumni relations, and communications and marketing. The author encourages…

  1. Graphic Novel Collections in Academic ARL Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Cassie

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the extent to which ARL academic libraries collect graphic novels. Using a core list of 176 titles developed from winners of major comics industry awards and a library-focused "best of" list, the holdings of 111 ARL academic libraries were searched using the libraries' online catalogs. Results suggest that most of the…

  2. Academic Capitalism in the Pasteur's Quadrant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Pilar

    2009-01-01

    Based on previous empirical studies, in this work the author presents an analysis of the role of context in academic capitalism. In particular, she argues that the literature on academic capitalism fails to properly acknowledge disciplinary and institutional differences, which results in an oversimplification of the effects of industry-academia…

  3. Academic Research: Corporate Support Has Its Benefits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1984

    1984-01-01

    A Twentieth Century Fund task force indicates that industry funding of academic research is not harmful to academic values if guidelines are followed. Some of the recommendations made by the task force are listed. One recommendation is that title to patents resulting from joint projects should be held by the university. (JN)

  4. Individual Values, Learning Routines and Academic Procrastination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, Franziska; Hofer, Manfred; Fries, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Background: Academic procrastination, the tendency to postpone learning activities, is regarded as a consequence of postmodern values that are prominent in post-industrialized societies. When students strive for leisure goals and have no structured routines for academic tasks, delaying strenuous learning activities becomes probable. Aims: The…

  5. Higher Education Academic Salaries in the UK. CEE DP 75

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Mark; Vignoles, Anna; Walker, James

    2007-01-01

    The recent industrial action taken by the Association of University Teachers (AUT) has given the issue of academic pay high prominence in the UK press. There appears to be a remarkable consensus that higher education academic salaries are too low, relative to other groups of workers in the UK, and that this is leading to an academic "brain drain".…

  6. Rebuilding America's Industrial Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community College Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    It's no secret within the academic or manufacturing communities that community colleges are the nation's training ground for industrial-skilled trade careers. But outside community college classrooms and industrial plants, many people are in the dark about the growing numbers of these often-well-paid and in-demand jobs. This article introduces the…

  7. Industrial Psychology in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Montmollin, Maurice

    1977-01-01

    The current status of French industrial psychology is evaluated. Within the social and economic context of contemporary France, varying ideologies and scarce resources have created a gap between applied and academic industrial psychology. Personnel practices and systems and organizational research are noted. (Editor)

  8. Industrial Technology Programs: The Influence of Industry on Program Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozak, Michael R.; Richards, John V.

    1981-01-01

    Presents data collected concerning concepts and skills which should be emphasized in the general academic curriculum and in the industrial technology curriculum, recommended minor fields of study for industrial technology majors, characteristics of successful employees, and present and future professional industrial employment needs in the…

  9. Academic Productivity as Perceived by Malaysian Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Aminuddin; Tymms, Peter; Ismail, Habsah

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to explore the perspectives of Malaysian academics in relation to academic productivity and some factors affecting it. A large scale online questionnaire was used to gather information from six public universities. The most productive role in the eyes of the academics was found to be teaching, with research and…

  10. Hyperbolic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Giomi, Luca

    2012-09-28

    Fluid interfaces, such as soap films, liquid droplets, or lipid membranes, are known to give rise to several special geometries, whose complexity and beauty continue to fascinate us, as observers of the natural world, and challenge us as scientists. Here I show that a special class of surfaces of constant negative Gaussian curvature can be obtained in fluid interfaces equipped with an orientational ordered phase. These arise in various soft and biological materials, such as nematic liquid crystals, cytoskeletal assemblies, or hexatic colloidal suspensions. The purely hyperbolic morphology originates from the competition between surface tension, that reduces the area of the interface at the expense of increasing its Gaussian curvature, and the orientational elasticity of the ordered phase, that in turn suffers for the distortion induced by the underlying curvature. PMID:23030106

  11. Hyperbolic Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giomi, Luca

    2012-09-01

    Fluid interfaces, such as soap films, liquid droplets, or lipid membranes, are known to give rise to several special geometries, whose complexity and beauty continue to fascinate us, as observers of the natural world, and challenge us as scientists. Here I show that a special class of surfaces of constant negative Gaussian curvature can be obtained in fluid interfaces equipped with an orientational ordered phase. These arise in various soft and biological materials, such as nematic liquid crystals, cytoskeletal assemblies, or hexatic colloidal suspensions. The purely hyperbolic morphology originates from the competition between surface tension, that reduces the area of the interface at the expense of increasing its Gaussian curvature, and the orientational elasticity of the ordered phase, that in turn suffers for the distortion induced by the underlying curvature.

  12. Nanomedicine: Industry-wise research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Mike

    2007-04-01

    Academic participation in nanomedicine research is welcomed by European industries. The recipe for success may or may not include creativity, but it will certainly require awareness of drug development and approval processes.

  13. Mitigating risk in academic preclinical drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Inglese, James; Walters, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    The number of academic drug discovery centres has grown considerably in recent years, providing new opportunities to couple the curiosity-driven research culture in academia with rigorous preclinical drug discovery practices used in industry. To fully realize the potential of these opportunities, it is important that academic researchers understand the risks inherent in preclinical drug discovery, and that translational research programmes are effectively organized and supported at an institutional level. In this article, we discuss strategies to mitigate risks in several key aspects of preclinical drug discovery at academic drug discovery centres, including organization, target selection, assay design, medicinal chemistry and preclinical pharmacology. PMID:25829283

  14. Popeye Project: ROV interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Scates, C.R.; Hickok, D.D.; Hernandez, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    The Popeye Project in the Gulf of Mexico helped advance the technology and standardization of ROV interfaces for deepwater subsea production systems. Some of the many successful ROV operations during installation and completion were {open_quotes}first-of-it`s-kind{close_quotes} activities-enabled by many technical advances. The use and reliance upon ROV systems for support of deepwater drilling and installation operations significantly increased in the past 10 years. Shell Offshore Inc.`s (SOI) confidence in this increased capability was an important factor in many of the design decisions which characterized the innovative system. Technology advancements, which depended on effective ROV intervention, were implemented with no significant difficulties. These advancements, in particular the flying leads and seabed position methods, are available to the industry for other deepwater subsea systems. In addition, several Popeye ROV interfaces have helped advance the subsea standardization initiative; e.g., hot stabs, torque-tool end effectors, and paint color.

  15. Soft Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilles de Gennes, Pierre; Edwards, Introduction By Sam

    1997-04-01

    Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac, one of the greatest physicists of the twentieth century, died in 1984. Dirac's college, St. John's of Cambridge, generously endowed annual lectures to be held at Cambridge University in his memory. This volume contains a much expanded version of the 1994 Dirac Lecture by Nobel Laureate Pierre Gilles de Gennes. The book presents an impressionistic tour of the physics of soft interfaces. Full of insight and interesting asides, it not only provides an accessible introduction to this topic, but also lays down many markers and signposts that will be of interest to researchers in physics or chemistry. Features discussions of wetting and dewetting, the dynamics of different types of interface and adhesion and polymer/polymer welding.

  16. Immunotechnology and industry.

    PubMed

    Inglis, J R

    1983-05-01

    In 1980, the year Immunology Today began, around 80 advertisements in Science offered jobs to postdoctoral scientists with experience of different aspects of immunology. 80 % of them were in academic institutions - universities, medical schools, research units and the like - while the remaining 20% were in industry. In 1982 the corresponding number of job offers was around 120 and industry supplied fully half of them - an indication of a three-fold increase in total recruitment. PMID:25291662

  17. Government, Higher Education and the Industrial Ethic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasker, Mary; Packham, David

    This paper argues that the values of industry and higher education are incompatible and that imposition of industrial values on universities must necessarily destroy traditional academic values. Any dialogue between industry and higher education must grapple with this value conflict. The industrial ethic is based on unlimited growth, exploitation…

  18. Are Bibliographic Management Software Search Interfaces Reliable?: A Comparison between Search Results Obtained Using Database Interfaces and the EndNote Online Search Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgibbons, Megan; Meert, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    The use of bibliographic management software and its internal search interfaces is now pervasive among researchers. This study compares the results between searches conducted in academic databases' search interfaces versus the EndNote search interface. The results show mixed search reliability, depending on the database and type of search…

  19. Academic Delay of Gratification and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bembenutty, Hefer

    2011-01-01

    The ability to delay gratification is the cornerstone of all academic achievement and education. It is by delaying gratification that learners can pursue long-term academic and career goals. In general, "delay of gratification" refers to an individual's ability to forgo immediate rewards for the sake of more valuable ones later (Mischel, 1996).…

  20. Enhancing the Industrial PhD Programme as a Policy Tool for University-Industry Cooperation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roolaht, Tõnu

    2015-01-01

    The changing role of universities in society includes the increasing expectation that academic institutions should engage in collaboration with companies. Industrial PhD programmes are educational tools for building bridges between the academic sector and industry. In these programmes, the PhD student studies and carries out research while being…

  1. University-Industry Relationships in Dentistry: Past, Present, Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Michael L.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an overview of the evolution of academic-industry partnerships in dentistry and their value to each of the partners; discusses details to be considered by investigators seeking to work with industry; and reviews some of the issues and dilemmas that can arise from academic-industry interactions. (EV)

  2. Howard Bowen Revisited: What's Happened to Academic Compensation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kacmarczyk, Ronald H.; Coughlin, Donna M.

    1984-01-01

    Trends in the monetary and non-monetary compensation of academic personnel were compared to data on compensation in government, business, and industry, and the non-academic not-for-profit sector. Findings from 1981-82 were compared to Howard R. Bowen's findings for 1976-77. (MLW)

  3. Value Conflicts Embedded in Service-Oriented Academic Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reino, Anne; Jaakson, Krista

    2014-01-01

    The academic profession traditionally consists of three roles: teaching, research and service. The service role includes not only university-industry and university-society relationships, but also academic professionals' obligations to their internal stakeholders, such as administrators and colleagues. This paper argues that the paradigm…

  4. The Role of Academic Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1996-02-01

    Increasingly, new science and technology are expected to solve the nation's current economic malaise. Unfortunately, virtually no industrial laboratories are devoted to anything close to basic research, which, historically, has been the source of many of the innovations on which industry has flourished in the past. For example, a number of industrial laboratories contributed significantly to our basic understanding of polymer science and, in the course of doing so, made better and more useful plastics. The strength of the American system of higher education has always been basic research, which is also the cornerstone of the process of graduate education. Before World War II, academic research was the vehicle by which advanced students learned advanced skills--both cognitive and manipulative. It was the structure devised to produce exemplary scientists who could then apply their skills in a number of different kinds of environments; the research results produced were generally of only secondary interest. Now, the academic research establishment has evolved into the source of the "strategic," "relevant," or "targeted" research that will solve the nation's economic problems. As expectations in this regard grow higher, guidelines are bound to become even more specific. Excessive over-direction of basic research activities can have the effect of throttling down the very industry-building discoveries that are so eagerly sought. From one point of view, targeted academic research often goes in the wrong direction. While it is true that most academic research starts off in some direction, it often does not finish going in that direction. The work that stands behind theses and dissertations often bears little resemblance to the problem that was defined when the student began his/her research. Almost every paper that is written as the result of a piece of academic research is either unsophisticatedin itsdetails or irrelevant, in spite of the initial hopes and promises. That

  5. Academic Inbreeding in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael H.

    1977-01-01

    Academic inbreeding, the employment for faculty positions of persons who receive their graduate training at the same academic institution, is considered detrimental to an institution's academic environment. Results of a study conducted at 54 universities revealed that almost half the faculty (48 percent) in collegiate nursing programs are drawn…

  6. What Is Academic Vocabulary?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, James F.; Graves, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors address the construct of "academic vocabulary." First, they attempt to bring some clarity to a constellation of terms surrounding academic vocabulary. Second, they compare and contrast definitions of academic vocabulary. Third, they review typologies that researchers and writers have proposed to organize academic…

  7. The Academic Adviser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I explore the idea that "academic" advisers are "academics" who play a major role in connecting the general education curriculum to the students' experience as well as connecting the faculty to the students' holistic experience of the curriculum. The National Academic Advising Association Concept of Academic…

  8. Industry Invests in Research Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploch, Margie

    1983-01-01

    Universities and industry are forging new relationships to support academic research and industrial research and development, including the establishment of university/cooperative research centers. Discusses various cooperative projects at these research centers. Includes a list of representative R&D centers in biotechnology, building…

  9. The McDonaldization of Academic Libraries?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Brian

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the McDonaldization thesis that suggests that many aspects of the fast food industry are making their way into other areas of society. Explores whether this thesis is applicable to academic libraries, focusing on efficiency, calculability, predictability, control, user expectations, pros and cons of teams, and creativity and information…

  10. Applications in the Academic and Scientific Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perspectives in Computing, 1983

    1983-01-01

    The six articles in this journal reflect the role of computers in the academic and scientific communities, discussing the relationship between universities and industry, communication networks, light-scattering, data processing during seismic exploration, and computer applications in publishing and archaeological site management. It is available…

  11. Academic Self-Concept, Autonomous Academic Motivation, and Academic Achievement: Mediating and Additive Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guay, Frederic; Ratelle, Catherine F.; Roy, Amelie; Litalien, David

    2010-01-01

    Three conceptual models were tested to examine the relationships among academic self-concept, autonomous academic motivation, and academic achievement. This allowed us to determine whether 1) autonomous academic motivation mediates the relation between academic self-concept and achievement, 2) academic self-concept mediates the relation between…

  12. Fluxes across a thermohaline interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, M.; Lueck, R. G.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements of velocity and temperature microstructure and hydrography were made with a towed vehicle moving in and around a single interface in a double-diffusive staircase. The interface was traversed 222 times in a saw-tooth pattern over a track 35 km long. The salinity and potential temperature and density in the mixed layers adjacent to the interface were spatially uniform except for one 8 km long anomaly. The rate of dissipation of kinetic energy was uniformly low in the interface and in the mixed layers, except for one section 600 m long where a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability generated turbulence. For the non-turbulent section of the interface, the mean rate of dissipation was 30.2 × 10 -10 W kg -1 in the mixed layers and 9.5 × 10 -10 W kg -1 in the interface. The non-dimensional dissipation rate, ɛ/vN 2, was almost always less than 16 in the interface and therfore, there was no turblent buoyancy flux according to ROHRet al. (1988, Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 195, 77-111). The average double-diffusive flux of buoyancy by heat was 3.6 × 10 -10 W kg -1. Under certain assumptions the ratio of the flux of buoyancy by heat and salt can be estimated to be 0.53 ± 0.10, in good agreement with laboratory and theoretical estimates for salt fingers. The average Cox number was about 8 in the interface, consistent with the theories of STERN (1975, Ocean circulation physics, Academic Press) and KUNZE (1987, Journal of Marine Research, 45 533-556), but displayed an inverse dependence on the vertical temperature gradient which was not predicted. As a result, the flux of buoyancy, as well as the individual contributions by heat and salt, were independent of the local mean vertical temperature gradient and the buoyancy frequency. The length of the turbulent section of the interface was only 1.7% of the total length observed. However, the turbulence was intense—the mean rate of dissipation was 2.5 × 10 -8 W kg -1—and may have sufficiently enhanced the flux of heat to

  13. The Academic Structure in Japan: Institutional Hierarchy and Academic Mobility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arimoto, Akira

    The characteristics of the Japanese academic structure are examined with attention to the evolution of institutional hierarchy, the closed academic structure, and the effects of the academic structure upon academic research. The evolution of Japan's institutional hierarchy in academics has been tightly related to factors of nationalism,…

  14. Is structural interface standardization beneficial?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombert, W. E.

    1983-11-01

    Factors applicable to fixed angle, large field and fixed angle, large building flat plate photovoltaic (PV) generator arrays are discussed in the context of standardization. It is concluded that structural interface standardization may be highly desirable in any one major project, but not at this time in the overall PV industry. Attempts to mandate such standardization will act as a deterrent to long-range improvements. In specific projects, structural standardization should be defined at the largest practical interface, leaving the maximum possible freedom to the module and array manufacturer. There is a corollary area, however, where detailed standards would benefit the industry; the matter of Standard Practices. Work being done towards definition of acceptable/desirable practices in materials, finishes, fastening and locking methods, grounding techniques, lightning protection, etc., and in handling the environmental ranges, should be continued.

  15. Conflicts of interest among academic dermatologists: freedom or constraint?

    PubMed

    Naldi, L

    2016-04-01

    Intangible and institutional conflicts of interest can particularly affect academia. Academic scientists have peculiar social responsibilities with respect to education and research. These responsibilities may conflict with the increased presence of industry in academia and commercialization of academic research through patents and royalties. Drug approval is almost entirely dependent worldwide on data produced in studies led by pharmaceutical industries. A reflection of the increasing role of the market in academic research is given by exaggerated claims in press releases by academic institutions. In consideration of the extensive presence of industry in academia, there is a need for a move from individual to institutional conflicts of interest disclosure, defining institutional policies for regulating conflicts of interest and developing an 'ethically credible partnership'. PMID:27115590

  16. Library Searching: An Industrial User's Viewpoint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses library searching of chemical literature from an industrial user's viewpoint, focusing on differences between academic and industrial researcher's searching techniques of the same problem area. Indicates that industry users need more exposure to patents, work with abstracting services and continued improvement in computer searching…

  17. Industry-Supported Team Students' Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glozman, Vladimir

    The industry-supported team students' project enhances professional, intellectual, and personal development of students while addressing the needs of local industry. In addition to achieving academic excellence, the students are exposed to industry requirements, and excel in effective oral communication and cooperative teamwork. The teamwork…

  18. Ethics and academic integrity.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2015-01-01

    Academics from across the globe must navigate ever-increasing demands for research, practice, and educational productivity. With the increased demands, nurse faculty must choose value priorities and actions that reflect academic integrity. What does it mean to choose actions that reflect personal integrity in the academic arena? This article begins an important nursing philosophical and theoretical discussion that members and future members of the discipline of nursing must reflect upon and grapple with as they consider what it potentially means to act with straight thinking and integrity in academics. PMID:25520458

  19. Partnerships with Academic Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes how professional and continuing higher education units can develop and sustain successful partnerships with academic departments in order to deliver educational programs effectively to students.

  20. The Legal Ins and Outs of University-Industry Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatel, David S.; Guthrie, Claire R.

    1983-01-01

    Innovative arrangements for collaboration between universities and industrial firms are discussed, and benefits for each sector are identified. Problems inherent in these relationships because academe's and industry's values and expectations differ significantly are described. (MLW)

  1. Today's Business Simulation Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Gary J.

    2004-01-01

    New technologies are transforming the business simulation industry. The technologies come from research in computational fields of science, and they endow simulations with new capabilities and qualities. These capabilities and qualities include computerized behavioral simulations, online feedback and coaching, advanced interfaces, learning on…

  2. Academic Researchers Speak

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergom, Inger; Waltman, Jean; August, Louise; Hollenshead, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Non-tenure-track (NTT) research faculty are perhaps the most under-recognized group of academic professionals on the campuses today, despite their increasingly important role within the expanding academic research enterprise. The American Association for the Advancement of Science reports that the amount of federal spending on R&D has more than…

  3. Academic Freedom and Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Ian

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a personal history of the author's own relationships with the concept of academic freedom. The article is subdivided into 3 prehistories, 7 incidents, 3 disjunctions, and 3 myths. The author discusses the complications of politics, culture, and academic freedom in one career.

  4. The Academic Generation Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dronzek, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The current generation gap in academia is different--fundamentally shaped by the structural problems of academic employment. The job market has especially exacerbated tensions between senior and junior faculty by ratcheting up expectations and requirements at every stage of the academic career. The disparities have been mentioned often enough to…

  5. Academic Libraries in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deale, H. Vail

    1973-01-01

    Iranian librarianship is in the embryonic stages of development, especially with respect to modern and functional academic libraries. In three major areas--personnel, resources, and physical facilities--the academic libraries are deficient compared with Western standards. (16 references) (Author)

  6. Understanding Academic Misconduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Julia M. Christensen; McCabe, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    Research suggests that the majority of U.S. undergraduate students have engaged in some form of misconduct while completing their academic work, despite knowing that such behaviour is ethically or morally wrong. U.S.-based studies have also identified myriad personal and institutional factors associated with academic misconduct. Implicit in some…

  7. Academic Freedom Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the author's enduring concerns about the concept of academic freedom is with semantics. It has seemed to him that one of the biggest difficulties with discussions of academic freedom (as with many conversations about "value-laden" terms such as "democracy," "equity," and "justice") is that people begin from different positions and with…

  8. Reconceptualizing Academic Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vantine, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, more and more independent schools have established academic support programs and learning centers to address their students' individual learning needs. Perhaps not surprisingly, as the number of students being evaluated has increased, even more families have requested academic accommodations and services for their children.…

  9. California Redefines Academic Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trow, Martin A.

    2003-01-01

    In the spring of 2003, University of California President Richard Atkinson forwarded to the U.C. Academic Senate a proposed revision of the existing regulation bearing on how university teachers should treat contentious and disputed issues, both political and academic, in their classrooms. The existing regulation on this matter, APM-010, had been…

  10. Understanding Academic Confidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Paul; Sanders, Lalage

    2006-01-01

    This paper draws on the psychological theories of self-efficacy and the self-concept to understand students' self-confidence in academic study in higher education as measured by the Academic Behavioural Confidence scale (ABC). In doing this, expectancy-value theory and self-efficacy theory are considered and contrasted with self-concept and…

  11. The Academic Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chickering, Arthur W.

    This report shows the results of a questionnaire on academic experiences, administered to students at four different colleges. Included in the term "academic experiences" are such factors as mental activities in class and in studying for class, the role of the teacher, motivation for studying, feelings about courses, and patterns of work. Two main…

  12. Marketing Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallon, Melissa, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Ask any academic librarian if marketing their library and its services is an important task, and the answer will most likely be a resounding "yes!" Particularly in economically troubled times, librarians are increasingly called upon to promote their services and defend their library's worth. Since few academic libraries have in-house marketing…

  13. Patterns of Academic Procrastination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Victor; Mensink, David; O'Sullivan, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Uses the Academic Procrastination Questionnaire to measure procrastination and six possible patterns underlying it among undergraduate students. Finds that the most common patterns for clients involved Evaluation Anxiety or being Discouraged/Depressed, or Dependent. Supports individualized assessment and solutions for academic procrastination. (SC)

  14. The Academic Dean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowker, Lee H.

    1981-01-01

    The role of the academic dean, role conflicts, and the occupational experiences and performance of deans are considered. Role conflict for academic deans is related to clashing constituencies, role ambiguity, lack of correspondence between organization requirements and the personalities of incumbent deans, changing organizational needs over time,…

  15. Gender and Academic Integrity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendershott, Anne; Drinan, Patrick F.; Cross, Megan

    1999-01-01

    Investigates the academic integrity climate of a mid-sized, comprehensive, private university. Seeks to assess gender differences in motivations surrounding cheating behaviors among 532 undergraduate students. Findings indicate that while both males and females are reluctant to report instances of academic dishonesty that they witness, there…

  16. Academic and Vocational Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villeneuve, Phyllis, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This manual describes pilot projects designed to explore and support academic vocational integration. In conjunction with the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, FACTC (Faculty Association of Community and Technical Colleges) sponsored an array of pilot projects during the fall of 1995. Vocational and academic faculty from…

  17. Thinking Academic Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Lis

    2016-01-01

    This lecture argues that the politicisation and instrumentalisation of the university caused by neoliberal frames has as a result the depoliticisation of knowledge and of the academic as individual. This depoliticisation has turned academic freedom into a right to disengage not only from the political fight around these issues but also from the…

  18. Recalibrating Academic Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yancey, George

    2012-01-01

    Whether political and/or religious academic bias exists is a question with important ramifications for the educational institutions. Those arguing for the presence of such bias contend that political conservatives and the highly religious in academia are marginalized and face discrimination. The question of academic bias tends to be cast in a…

  19. When the Academic World and the Real World Meet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svetlik, David

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author relates the need for a complimentary relationship between the academic and real outside world. This is not to compare a college degree with outside work experience--the two are complementary. It is the world of business and industry that often cause changes. Students and practitioners of industrial automation are an…

  20. Directory of Academic Programs in Occupational Safety and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weis, William J., III; And Others

    This booklet describes academic program offerings in American colleges and universities in the area of occupational safety and health. Programs are divided into five major categories, corresponding to each of the core disciplines: (1) occupational safety and health/industrial hygiene, (2) occupational safety, (3) industrial hygiene, (4)…

  1. Staying True to the Core: Designing the Future Academic Library Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2014, the practice of user experience design in academic libraries continues to evolve. It is typically applied in the context of interactions with digital interfaces. Some academic librarians are applying user experience approaches more broadly to design both environments and services with human-centered strategies. As the competition for the…

  2. The Ethical Academic: Academics as Public Intellectuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, American sociologist Robert Neelly Bellah (Bellah, et al., 1986: 303) critiqued the growing isolation of intellectuals within universities and called for a return to "social science as public philosophy." Little seems to have changed. My thirty-seven year experience at the University of Alberta suggests that academics see…

  3. Reengineering Academic Medical Centers: Reengineering Academic Values?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korn, David

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of academic medical centers (AMCs) looks at: change due to heavy federal funding in recent decades; adverse consequences, including deemphasis on education in favor of research and clinical service delivery, and discrepancies between AMC internal and external labor markets; and challenges to medical education in research, education, and…

  4. Does Academic Work Make Australian Academics Happy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Roderick; Tilbrook, Kerry; Krivokapic-Skoko, Branka

    2015-01-01

    Happiness research is a rapidly-growing area in social psychology and has emphasised the link between happiness and workplace productivity and creativity for knowledge workers. Recent articles in this journal have raised concerns about the level of happiness and engagement of Australian academics with their work, however there is little research…

  5. Alliance Building in the Information and Online Database Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Johanna Olson

    2001-01-01

    Presents an analysis of information industry alliance formation using environmental scanning methods. Highlights include why libraries and academic institutions should be interested; a literature review; historical context; industry and market structures; commercial and academic models; trends; and implications for information providers,…

  6. Cigarette makers pioneered many of our black arts of disinformation, including the funding of research to distract from the hazards of smoking. Ten Nobel prizes were the result. By funding distraction research, the cigarette industry became an important source of academic corruption, helping also to forge other forms of denialism on a global scale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, R. N.

    2014-12-01

    Cigarette Disinformation: Origins and Global Impact Robert N. Proctor The cigarette is the deadliest artifact in the history of human civilization. And whereas "only" a hundred million people died in the 20th century from smoking, we are presently on a pace to have several times that toll in the present century. Much of that catastrophe would not be possible without a massive campaign of disinformation. The cigarette industry pioneered many of the black arts of disinformation, cleverly exploiting the inherent skepticism of science to claim that "more research" was needed to resolve a purported "cigarette controversy." Cigarette makers funded hundreds of millions of dollars worth of "distraction research," most of which was solid empirical science but off topic, focusing on basic biology and biochemistry, viral and genetic causes of disease, and other "cigarette friendly" topics. At least ten Nobel prizes were the result. Cigarette skepticism was thus more complex than we normally imagine: the tobacco industry corrupted science by funding "alternative causation," meaning anything that could be used to draw attention away from cigarettes as a source of disease. The cigarette industry by this means became the most important source of academic corruption since the Nazi era. That corruption has also helped forge other forms of denialism and corruption on a global scale.

  7. Business as Usual: Amazon.com and the Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ullen, Mary K.; Germain, Carol Anne

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Steve Coffman proposed that libraries form a single interlibrary loan based entity patterned after Amazon.com. This study examined the suitability of Amazon.com's Web interface and record enhancements for academic libraries. Amazon.com could not deliver circulating monographs in the University at Albany Libraries' collection quickly…

  8. Content Management and the Future of Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yuhfen Diana; Liu, Mengxiong

    2001-01-01

    Discusses Internet-based electronic content management in digital libraries and considers the future of academic libraries. Topics include digital technologies; content management systems; standards; bandwidth; security and privacy concerns; legal matters, including copyrights and ownership; lifecycle; and multilingual access and interface. (LRW)

  9. An Academic Curriculum Will Close the Academic Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palumbo, Anthony; Kramer-Vida, Louisa

    2012-01-01

    America's unyielding academic achievement gap has been a national priority for a long time; yet, some schools have succeeded with academically disadvantaged youth. Usually, these institutions embrace a culture of success and follow an academic curriculum that is grounded in core knowledge and scholastic vocabulary. Academically disadvantaged…

  10. Resources for Academic Advising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Virginia N.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of resources available to assist college faculty in academic advising tasks are listed, including books, professional journals, annotated bibliographies, reports, monographs, conferences, and organizations. Some items are annotated. Addresses are provided for organizations. (MSE)

  11. Academics explore humidity's benefits.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Dave

    2008-11-01

    The effects of humidification on hospital superbugs are being explored by some of the UK's top academics, in what Dave Mortimer, national sales manager for Vapac Humidity Control, explains are the UK's first such studies. PMID:19044148

  12. Women in Academic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Thibault, George E

    2016-08-01

    More than a decade ago, women achieved parity with men in the number of matriculants to medical school, nearly one-third of the faculty of medical schools were women, and there were some women deans and department chairs. These trends were promising, but today there are still significant differences in pay, academic rank, and leadership positions for women compared with men in academic medicine. Though there has been progress in many areas, the progress is too slow to achieve previously recommended goals, such as 50% women department chairs by 2025 and 50% women deans by 2030.The author points to the findings presented in the articles from the Research Partnership on Women in Biomedical Careers in this issue, as well as research being published elsewhere, as an evidence base for the ongoing discussion of gender equity in academic medicine. More attention to culture and the working environment will be needed to achieve true parity for women in academic medical careers. PMID:27306968

  13. Academic Bankruptcy by Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Arthur D.

    1986-01-01

    The advantages and requirements for offering a second chance to students who have failed, by forgiving a poor academic record, are discussed and supported by findings from a survey of institutions and the results of several experimental programs. (MSE)

  14. Perspectives on academic dishonesty.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, M J; Lowenstein, A J

    1990-01-01

    Academic dishonest behaviors, such as lying, cheating, and plagiarism, are destructive and must be recognized and addressed early in the development of professional nurses. Faculty must be concerned with the relationship between student integrity in the classroom and clinical or professional behaviors. The authors discuss student motivation and attitudes toward unethical practices, faculty responses, and responsibilities when these incidents arise, and strategies for preventing academic dishonesty. PMID:2216065

  15. The Scholarship of Academic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggins, Heather, Ed.; Macdonald, Ranald, Ed.

    The selections in this book address the concept and nature of academic development and examine research into and within the field. Following an introduction, "Developing a Scholarship of Academic Development: Setting the Context," by Ranald Macdonald, the chapters of part 1, "Conceptualizing Academic Development," are: (2) "Academic Development: A…

  16. Academic Writing and Tacit Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elton, Lewis

    2010-01-01

    The genre of academic writing is discipline dependent, so that neither specialists in academic writing nor practising academics in a discipline can, independently of each other, provide students with the necessary help to develop the ability to write in their academic disciplines. Furthermore, the rules are largely tacit, i.e. they are not…

  17. The Rewards of Academic Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Christina

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies of academic leadership confirm what many academic leaders know from personal experience: academic leadership is a complex and demanding role with significant stress and high burnout and turnover rates (Brown, 2002; Brown and Moshavi, 2002). In the light of these issues, an exploration of the nature of academic leadership and its…

  18. Academic Freedom and Organisational Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, William G.

    2001-01-01

    Summarizes prominent current arguments on academic freedom's endangerment by managerialism and discusses their limitations. Defines a new vision of academic freedom informed by thinking on globalization. Presents findings from interviews with Australian faculty about academic freedom and discusses ways to ensure that academic freedom endures in…

  19. Bibliography for the Hospitality Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Elizabeth A.

    This annotated bibliography is a sample collection of reference materials in the hospitality industry suitable for a small academic library. It is assumed that the library has a general reference collection. Publication dates range from 1992-96, with two publication dates in the 1980s. No periodicals are included. The 41 reference materials are…

  20. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the industrial diamond industry is provided. More than 90 percent of the industrial diamond consumed in the U.S. and the rest of the world is manufactured diamond. Ireland, Japan, Russia, and the U.S. produce 75 percent of the global industrial diamond output. In 2000, the U.S. was the largest market for industrial diamond. Industrial diamond applications, prices for industrial diamonds, imports and exports of industrial diamonds, the National Defense Stockpile of industrial diamonds, and the outlook for the industrial diamond market are discussed.

  1. Students' perceptions of academic dishonesty in the chemistry classroom laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Carlo, Dawn I.; Bodner, George M.

    2004-01-01

    Although the literature on both academic dishonesty and scientific misconduct is extensive, research on academic dishonesty has focused on quizzes, exams, and papers, with the virtual exclusion of the classroom laboratory. This study examined the distinctions undergraduate chemistry majors made between academic dishonesty in the classroom laboratory and scientific misconduct in the research laboratory. Across the spectrum of undergraduate chemistry courses, from the introductory course for first-semester chemistry majors to the capstone course in instrumental analysis, we noted that students believe the classroom lab is fundamentally different from a research or industrial lab. This difference is so significant that it carries over into students' perceptions of dishonesty in these two environments.

  2. Video-Games Do Not Negatively Impact Adolescent Academic Performance in Science, Mathematics or Reading

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Aaron; Sauer, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Video-gaming is a common pastime among adolescents, particularly adolescent males in industrialized nations. Despite widespread suggestions that video-gaming negatively affects academic achievement, the evidence is inconclusive. We reanalyzed data from over 192,000 students in 22 countries involved in the 2009 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) to estimate the true effect size of frequency of videogame use on adolescent academic achievement in science, mathematics and reading. Contrary to claims that increased video-gaming can impair academic performance, differences in academic performance were negligible across the relative frequencies of videogame use. Videogame use had little impact on adolescent academic achievement. PMID:24699536

  3. Video-games do not negatively impact adolescent academic performance in science, mathematics or reading.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Aaron; Sauer, James D

    2014-01-01

    Video-gaming is a common pastime among adolescents, particularly adolescent males in industrialized nations. Despite widespread suggestions that video-gaming negatively affects academic achievement, the evidence is inconclusive. We reanalyzed data from over 192,000 students in 22 countries involved in the 2009 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) to estimate the true effect size of frequency of videogame use on adolescent academic achievement in science, mathematics and reading. Contrary to claims that increased video-gaming can impair academic performance, differences in academic performance were negligible across the relative frequencies of videogame use. Videogame use had little impact on adolescent academic achievement. PMID:24699536

  4. Media independent interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The work done on the Media Independent Interface (MII) Interface Control Document (ICD) program is described and recommendations based on it were made. Explanations and rationale for the content of the ICD itself are presented.

  5. Review of up-to date digital cameras interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkemann, Joachim

    2013-04-01

    Over the past 15 years, various interfaces on digital industrial cameras have been available on the market. This tutorial will give an overview of interfaces such as LVDS (RS644), Channel Link and Camera Link. In addition, other interfaces such as FireWire, Gigabit Ethernet, and now USB 3.0 have become more popular. Owing to their ease of use, these interfaces cover most of the market. Nevertheless, for certain applications and especially for higher bandwidths, Camera Link and CoaXPress are very useful. This tutorial will give a description of the advantages and disadvantages, comment on bandwidths, and provide recommendations on when to use which interface.

  6. Microbial Cellulases and Their Industrial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kuhad, Ramesh Chander; Gupta, Rishi; Singh, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    Microbial cellulases have shown their potential application in various industries including pulp and paper, textile, laundry, biofuel production, food and feed industry, brewing, and agriculture. Due to the complexity of enzyme system and immense industrial potential, cellulases have been a potential candidate for research by both the academic and industrial research groups. Nowadays, significant attentions have been devoted to the current knowledge of cellulase production and the challenges in cellulase research especially in the direction of improving the process economics of various industries. Scientific and technological developments and the future prospects for application of cellulases in different industries are discussed in this paper. PMID:21912738

  7. Industrial garnet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    A general overview of the industrial garnet industry is provided. About 20 percent of global industrial garnet production takes place in the U.S. During 2000, an estimated 300 kt of industrial garnets were produced worldwide. The U.S. is the world's largest consumer of industrial garnet, consuming 56.9 kt in 2000.

  8. Continuing Engineering Education- An Industrial Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgwardt, F. C.

    1971-01-01

    The author discusses the characteristics and role of a continuing engineering education director. It is necessary that the director of such a program must be able to communicate with the industrial complex and effectively screen and relate academic resources to industrial needs. (MS)

  9. Students' Perception of Industrial Internship Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renganathan, Sumathi; Karim, Zainal Ambri Bin Abdul; Li, Chong Su

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: An important aspect of an academic curriculum in higher learning institutions for technical disciplines is the industrial internship programme for students. The purpose of this paper is to investigate students' perception of the effectiveness of an industrial internship programme offered by a private technological university in Malaysia.…

  10. DOE/Industry Matching Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Lee

    2003-09-30

    For the academic year 2001-2002, the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences received $50,000 of industrial contributions, matched by a DOE grant of $35,000. We used the combined DOE/Industry Matching Grant of $85,000 toward (a) undergraduate merit scholarships and research support, (b) graduate student support, and (c) partial support of a research scientist.

  11. Academic Culture and Campus Culture of Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Xi; Tian, Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Academic culture of universities mainly consists of academic outlooks, academic spirits, academic ethics and academic environments. Campus culture in a university is characterized by individuality, academic feature, opening, leading, variety and creativity. The academic culture enhances the construction of campus culture. The campus culture…

  12. Water at Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Björneholm, Olle; Hansen, Martin H; Hodgson, Andrew; Liu, Li-Min; Limmer, David T; Michaelides, Angelos; Pedevilla, Philipp; Rossmeisl, Jan; Shen, Huaze; Tocci, Gabriele; Tyrode, Eric; Walz, Marie-Madeleine; Werner, Josephina; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2016-07-13

    The interfaces of neat water and aqueous solutions play a prominent role in many technological processes and in the environment. Examples of aqueous interfaces are ultrathin water films that cover most hydrophilic surfaces under ambient relative humidities, the liquid/solid interface which drives many electrochemical reactions, and the liquid/vapor interface, which governs the uptake and release of trace gases by the oceans and cloud droplets. In this article we review some of the recent experimental and theoretical advances in our knowledge of the properties of aqueous interfaces and discuss open questions and gaps in our understanding. PMID:27232062

  13. Measurement of academic entitlement.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian K

    2013-10-01

    Members of Generation Y, or Millennials, have been accused of being lazy, whiny, pampered, and entitled, particularly in the college classroom. Using an equity theory framework, eight items from a measure of work entitlement were adapted to measure academic entitlement in a university setting in three independent samples. In Study 1 (n = 229), confirmatory factor analyses indicated good model fit to a unidimensional structure for the data. In Study 2 (n = 200), the questionnaire predicted unique variance in university satisfaction beyond two more general measures of dispositional entitlement. In Study 3 (n = 161), the measure predicted unique variance in perceptions of grade fairness beyond that which was predicted by another measure of academic entitlement. This analysis provides evidence of discriminant, convergent, incremental, concurrent criterion-related, and construct validity for the Academic Equity Preference Questionnaire. PMID:24597456

  14. Soft particles at a fluid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabian, Hadi; Harting, Jens; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2015-11-01

    Particles added to a fluid interface can be used as a surface stabilizer in the food, oil and cosmetic industries. As an alternative to rigid particles, it is promising to consider highly deformable particles that can adapt their conformation at the interface. In this study, we compute the shapes of soft elastic particles using molecular dynamics simulations of a cross-linked polymer gel, complemented by continuum calculations based on the linear elasticity. It is shown that the particle shape is not only affected by the Young's modulus of the particle, but also strongly depends on whether the gel is partially or completely wetting the fluid interface. We find that the molecular simulations for the partially wetting case are very accurately described by the continuum theory. By contrast, when the gel is completely wetting the fluid interface the linear theory breaks down and we reveal that molecular details have a strong influence on the equilibrium shape.

  15. Academic medicine in Russia.

    PubMed

    Burger, Edward J; Ziganshina, Lilia; Ziganshin, Airat U

    2004-12-01

    Academic medicine, along with professionalism of the medical community in Russia underwent a remarkable evolution from the Revolution through the decline of the Soviet Union. The Soviet period brought about an enormous expansion of numbers of admissions to medical schools and a corresponding increase in the number of new physicians. Academic medical institutions were separated from institutions of higher learning in general and medical science was separated from the mainstream of science. Many of these features have been reversed in the past 14 years and re-professionalization of medicine has resumed. PMID:15578798

  16. Pharmaceutical speakers' bureaus, academic freedom, and the management of promotional speaking at academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Boumil, Marcia M; Cutrell, Emily S; Lowney, Kathleen E; Berman, Harris A

    2012-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies routinely engage physicians, particularly those with prestigious academic credentials, to deliver "educational" talks to groups of physicians in the community to help market the company's brand-name drugs. Although presented as educational, and even though they provide educational content, these events are intended to influence decisions about drug selection in ways that are not based on the suitability and effectiveness of the product, but on the prestige and persuasiveness of the speaker. A number of state legislatures and most academic medical centers have attempted to restrict physician participation in pharmaceutical marketing activities, though most restrictions are not absolute and have proven difficult to enforce. This article reviews the literature on why Speakers' Bureaus have become a lightning rod for academic/industry conflicts of interest and examines the arguments of those who defend physician participation. It considers whether the restrictions on Speakers' Bureaus are consistent with principles of academic freedom and concludes with the legal and institutional efforts to manage industry speaking. PMID:22789048

  17. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Statistics on the production, consumption, cost, trade, and government stockpile of natural and synthetic industrial diamond are provided. The outlook for the industrial diamond market is also considered.

  18. Academic medicine amenities unit: developing a model to integrate academic medical care with luxury hotel services.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David W; Kagan, Sarah H; Abramson, Kelly Brennen; Boberick, Cheryl; Kaiser, Larry R

    2009-02-01

    The interface between established values of academic medicine and the trend toward inpatient amenities units requires close examination. Opinions of such units can be polarized, reflecting traditional reservations about the ethical dilemma of offering exclusive services only to an elite patient group. An amenities unit was developed at the University of Pennsylvania Health System in 2007, using an approach that integrated academic medicine values with the benefits of philanthropy and service excellence to make amenities unit services available to all patients. Given inherent internal political concerns, a broadly based steering committee of academic and hospital leadership was developed. An academically appropriate model was conceived, anchored by four principles: (1) integration of academic values, (2) interdisciplinary senior leadership, (3) service excellence, and (4) recalibrated occupancy expectations based on multiple revenue streams. Foremost is ensuring the same health care is afforded all patients throughout the hospital, thereby overcoming ethical challenges and optimizing teaching experiences. Service excellence frames the service ethic for all staff, and this, in addition to luxury hotel-style amenities, differentiates the style and feel of the unit from others in the hospital. Recalibrated occupancy creates program viability given revenue streams redefined to encompass gifts and patient revenue, including both reimbursement and self-pay. The medical-surgical amenities patient-care unit has enjoyed a successful first year and a growing stream of returning patients and admitting physicians. Implications for other academic medical centers include opportunities to extrapolate service excellence throughout the hospital and to cultivate philanthropy to benefit services throughout the medical center. PMID:19174661

  19. Cognitive Awareness Prototype Development on User Interface Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosli, D'oria Islamiah

    2015-01-01

    Human error is a crucial problem in manufacturing industries. Due to the misinterpretation of information on interface system design, accidents or death may occur at workplace. Lack of human cognition criteria in interface system design is also one of the contributions to the failure in using the system effectively. Therefore, this paper describes…

  20. Project management - challenges in dealing with academic and non-academic partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, Daniela; Eisenhauer, Anton; Drossou-Berendes, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    Modern research projects on national, European and international level are challenged by an increasing requirement of inter and trans-disciplinarily, societal relevance and educational outreach as well as market oriented applications. In particular, to be successful in European research in the frame of HORIZON 2020, the EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation, it is crucial that relatively large international research consortia involve academic and non-academic partners, NGOs, private and non-private institutions as well as industrial companies. For the management and organisation of such consortia coordinators have to deal with significant differences between multi-national and multi-sectorial administrations and research environments, in order to secure a successful implementation of the project. This often costs research and non-academic partners tremendous efforts, not to say excessive demands. Based on the experiences made in the frame of an Innovative Training Network (ITN) project within the HORIZON 2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions, this presentation identifies organisational pitfalls and major challenges of the project management for European funded research involving multi-national academic and non-academic research partners. Possible strategies are discussed to circumvent and avoid conflicts already at the beginning of the project.

  1. Academic Faculty in University Research Centers: Neither Capitalism's Slaves nor Teaching Fugitives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozeman, Barry; Boardman, Craig

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses university-industry interactions for both educational and industrial outcomes. The results suggest that while academic faculty who are affiliated with centers are more involved with industry than non-affiliated faculty, affiliates are also more involved with and supportive of students at the undergraduate, graduate, and…

  2. Is Your Academic Library Pinning? Academic Libraries and Pinterest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Academic libraries are flocking to online social networking sites in an effort to meet users where they are. Pinterest is the latest of these rapidly growing online social networking tools. The author of this article reports results from a survey on academic libraries' presence on Pinterest. The survey found most academic library pinboards are in…

  3. Academic Buoyancy: Towards an Understanding of Students' Everyday Academic Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.; Marsh, Herbert W.

    2008-01-01

    Academic buoyancy is developed as a construct reflecting everyday academic resilience within a positive psychology context and is defined as students' ability to successfully deal with academic setbacks and challenges that are typical of the ordinary course of school life (e.g., poor grades, competing deadlines, exam pressure, difficult…

  4. Academic Practice in Transition: Hidden Stories of Academic Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchman, Deborah; King, Sharron

    2009-01-01

    Academic work is becoming increasingly restrictive and controlled as tertiary institutions move towards a more corporate managerialistic mode of operating. This paper uses a narrative lens to explore the ways in which academic staff make sense of this new environment. In particular, it compares academic staff's stories of their worklife with the…

  5. Academic buoyancy: Towards an understanding of students' everyday academic resilience.

    PubMed

    Martin, Andrew J; Marsh, Herbert W

    2008-02-01

    Academic buoyancy is developed as a construct reflecting everyday academic resilience within a positive psychology context and is defined as students' ability to successfully deal with academic setbacks and challenges that are typical of the ordinary course of school life (e.g., poor grades, competing deadlines, exam pressure, difficult schoolwork). Data were collected from 598 students in Years 8 and 10 at five Australian high schools. Half-way through the school year and then again at the end of the year, students were asked to rate their academic buoyancy as well as a set of hypothesized predictors (self-efficacy, control, academic engagement, anxiety, teacher-student relationship) in the area of mathematics. Multilevel modeling found that the bulk of variance in academic buoyancy was explained at the student level. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling showed that (a) Time 1 anxiety (negatively), self-efficacy, and academic engagement significantly predict Time 1 academic buoyancy; (b) Time 2 anxiety (negatively), self-efficacy, academic engagement, and teacher-student relationships explain variance in Time 2 academic buoyancy over and above that explained by academic buoyancy at Time 1; and (c) of the significant predictors, anxiety explains the bulk of variance in academic buoyancy. PMID:19083351

  6. Microconical interface fitting and interface grasping tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, Michael L. (Inventor); Wightman, William D. (Inventor); Johnston, Alistair P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A small and light weight microconical interface fitting may be attached to the surface of a space vehicle or equipment to provide an attachment device for an astronaut or robot to capture the space vehicle or equipment. The microconical interface fitting of the present invention has an axisymmetrical conical body having a base portion with a torque reaction surface for preventing rotation of the interface grasping tool; a cavitated, sunken or hollowed out intermediate locking portion which has a cavity shaped for receiving the latches of the grasping tool and an upper guiding portion for guiding the grasping tool into axial alignment with the microconical interface fitting. The capture is accomplished with an interface grasping tool. The grasping tool comprises an outer sleeve with a handle attached, an inner sleeve which may be raised and lowered within the outer sleeve with a plurality of latches supported at the lower end and a cam to raise and lower the inner sleeve. When the inner sleeve is at its lowest position, the latches form the largest diameter opening for surrounding the microconical fitting and the latches form the smallest diameter or a locking, grasping position when raised to the highest position within the outer sleeve. The inner sleeve may be at an intermediate, capture position which permits the latches to be biased outwardly when contacting the microconical fitting under very low forces to grasp the fitting and permits capture (soft docking) without exact alignment of the fitting and the tool.

  7. Evolving from academic to academic entrepreneur: overcoming barriers to scientific progress and finance.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew D

    2016-07-01

    The overall goal of my career as an academic chemist has always been the design and creation of advanced therapeutics and diagnostics that address unmet medical need in the management of chronic diseases. Realising this goal has been an immensely difficult process involving multidisciplinary problem-driven research at the chemistry-biology-medicine interfaces. With success in the laboratory, I started seriously to question the value of remaining an academic whose career is spent in the pursuit of knowledge and understanding alone without making any significant effort to translate knowledge and understanding gained into products of genuine utility for public benefit. Therefore, I elected by choice to become an academic entrepreneur, seeking opportunities wherever possible for the translation of the best of my personal and collaborative academic research work into potentially valuable and useful products. This choice has brought with it many unexpected difficulties and challenges. Nevertheless, progress bas been made and sufficient learnt to suggest that this would be an appropriate moment to take stock and provide some personal reflections on what it takes to design and create advanced therapeutics and diagnostics in the laboratory then seek to develop, innovate and translate the best towards market. PMID:27476702

  8. Theme: Teaching Academically Disadvantaged Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iverson, Maynard J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Will We Serve the Academically Disadvantaged?" (Iverson); "Using Centers of Learning to Reach Academically Disadvantaged Students" (Gentry); "Georgia's Special Lamb Project Adoption Program" (Farmer); "Teacher Expectations" (Powers); "Providing Instruction for Special Populations" (Jewell); and "The Educational Reform Movement and…

  9. Changing the Academic Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, Erica

    2004-01-01

    The article examines the ways in which rationalities of risk currently work to produce the academic as a self-managing worker within the 'post-welfare' university as a risk-conscious organization. It explores how risk minimization as audit (individual, departmental, organizational), engages all individuals within the university in doing particular…

  10. Unique Academic Skillsets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerome, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    For the past eighty-two years, Monroe College has been committed to being a national leader in urban and international education. Established in the fall of 2004, the honors program has been transformative for the college, bringing together a wide range of professionals from across disciplines to provide innovative academic offerings. The program…