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1

Spread of Academic Success in a High School Social Network  

PubMed Central

Application of social network analysis to education has revealed how social network positions of K-12 students correlate with their behavior and academic achievements. However, no study has been conducted on how their social network influences their academic progress over time. Here we investigated correlations between high school students’ academic progress over one year and the social environment that surrounds them in their friendship network. We found that students whose friends’ average GPA (Grade Point Average) was greater (or less) than their own had a higher tendency toward increasing (or decreasing) their academic ranking over time, indicating social contagion of academic success taking place in their social network. PMID:23418483

Blansky, Deanna; Kavanaugh, Christina; Boothroyd, Cara; Benson, Brianna; Gallagher, Julie; Endress, John; Sayama, Hiroki

2013-01-01

2

Students' Peer Relationships, Social and Academic Goals, and Academic Achievement: A Social Network Analysis Approach.  

E-print Network

??A multiwave study examined how high school students’ peer relationships impact with their academic motivation, social motivation, and academic achievement. Students’ motivation was framed in… (more)

Makara, Kara A.

2013-01-01

3

The Relationship between Online Social Networking and Academic and Social Integration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the relationship between online social networking (OSN) and perceptions of academic and social integration for first-year residential students at a rural regional comprehensive university. Students spent an average of 2.5 hours on OSN websites per day, primarily interacting with campus peers, friends and family. There was…

Kord, JoLanna; Wolf-Wendel, Lisa

2009-01-01

4

Inferring Social Ties in Academic Networks Using Short-Range Wireless Communications  

E-print Network

Inferring Social Ties in Academic Networks Using Short-Range Wireless Communications Igor ties of users from their location and co-location traces but they lack one important component publicly. Users' social ties are no exception either, as several stud- ies on ubiquitous computing have

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

5

Frameworks for Understanding the Nature of Interactions, Networking, and Community in a Social Networking Site for Academic Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a new social networking site, Cloudworks, which has been developed to enable discussion and sharing of learning and teaching ideas/designs and to promote reflective academic practice. The site aims to foster new forms of social and participatory practices (peer critiquing, sharing, user-generated content, aggregation, and…

Conole, Grainne; Galley, Rebecca; Culver, Juliette

2011-01-01

6

Exploring the Impacts of Social Networking Sites on Academic Relations in the University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social networking sites (SNS) affordances for persistent interaction, collective generation of knowledge, and formation of peer-based clusters for knowledge sharing render them useful for developing constructivist knowledge environments. However, notwithstanding their academic value, these environments are not necessarily insulated from the…

Rambe, Patient

2011-01-01

7

You Never Walk Alone: Recommending Academic Events Based on Social Network Analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Combining Social Network Analysis and recommender systems is a challenging research field. In scientific communities, recommender systems have been applied to provide useful tools for papers, books as well as expert finding. However, academic events (conferences, workshops, international symposiums etc.) are an important driven forces to move forwards cooperation among research communities. We realize a SNA based approach for academic events recommendation problem. Scientific communities analysis and visualization are performed to provide an insight into the communities of event series. A prototype is implemented based on the data from DBLP and EventSeer.net, and the result is observed in order to prove the approach.

Klamma, Ralf; Cuong, Pham Manh; Cao, Yiwei

8

Department-level change: Using social network analysis to map the hidden structure of academic departments  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Efforts to improve teaching in higher education have often focused on individual faculty. However, there is a growing consensus that the academic department is a more productive focus of change initiatives. Yet, academic departments are not all the same. Understanding the structure of relationships within a department is important for identifying who should be involved in the change effort and in what roles. It is also likely that a successful change effort will modify the structure of relationships within a department. This paper presents the preliminary results from a study of two academic departments at a research university. A social network for each department was constructed based on a web survey that asked faculty to identify colleagues with whom they had teaching-related conversations. We identify characteristics of the individuals and departments and describe how learning about this hidden structure can be beneficial to change agents.

Henderson, Charles R.; Quardokus, Kathleen

2013-07-16

9

Department-level change: Using social network analysis to map the hidden structure of academic departments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Efforts to improve teaching in higher education have often focused on individual faculty. However, there is a growing consensus that the academic department is a more productive focus of change initiatives. Yet, academic departments are not all the same. Understanding the structure of relationships within a department is important for identifying who should be involved in the change effort and in what roles. It is also likely that a successful change effort will modify the structure of relationships within a department. This paper presents the preliminary results from a study of two academic departments at a research university. A social network for each department was constructed based on a web survey that asked faculty to identify colleagues with whom they had teaching-related conversations. We identify characteristics of the individuals and departments and describe how learning about this hidden structure can be beneficial to change agents.

Henderson, Charles; Quardokus, Kathleen

2013-01-01

10

The SNAP Platform: Social Networking for Academic Purposes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This paper aims to introduce an enterprise-wide Web 2.0 learning support platform--SNAP, developed at Victoria University in Melbourne, Australia. Design/methodology/approach: Pointing to the evolution of the social web, the paper discusses the potential for the development of e-learning platforms that employ constructivist, connectivist,…

Kirkwood, Keith

2010-01-01

11

Why Are Some More Peer Than Others? Evidence from a Longitudinal Study of Social Networks and Individual Academic Performance  

PubMed Central

Studies of peer effects in educational settings confront two main problems. The first is the presence of endogenous sorting which confounds the effects of social influence and social selection on individual attainment. The second is how to account for the local network dependencies through which peer effects influence individual behavior. We empirically address these problems using longitudinal data on academic performance, friendship, and advice seeking relations among students in a full-time graduate academic program. We specify stochastic agent-based models that permit estimation of the interdependent contribution of social selection and social influence to individual performance. We report evidence of peer effects. Students tend to assimilate the average performance of their friends and of their advisors. At the same time, students attaining similar levels of academic performance are more likely to develop friendship and advice ties. Together, these results imply that processes of social influence and social selection are sub-components of a more general a co-evolutionary process linking network structure and individual behavior. We discuss possible points of contact between our findings and current research in the economics and sociology of education.

Lomi, Alessandro; Snijders, Tom A.B.; Steglich, Christian E.G.; Torlo, Vanina Jasmine

2014-01-01

12

Social support networks, stress, sense of coherence and academic success of university students with learning disabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study evaluated the extent to which 191 university students with learning disabilities (LD) differed from 190\\u000a students without disabilities in terms of their perceived social support, stress and sense of coherence. The study also investigated\\u000a students’ perceptions of their academic success at university as compared with their rating of their struggles and failures.\\u000a Findings indicated that students with

Tali Heiman

2006-01-01

13

Re-Imagining Internet Scholarship: Academic Uses and Abuses of the Influential Internet Social Network, Facebook  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since its inception at Harvard in 2004, the social network, Facebook, has grown dramatically and spread across the globe. It will soon have 1 billion users and is now operative in over 75 languages. A large percentage of undergraduates are now active on Facebook. Much of the recent literature on Facebook focuses on business applications and how it…

Nam, Kyoung-Ah; Fry, Gerald W.

2012-01-01

14

Content Generation and Social Network Interaction within Academic Library Facebook Pages  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of Facebook to share resources and engage patrons continues to gain acceptance within academic libraries. While many studies have analyzed the types of content academic libraries share on Facebook, there has not yet been a full examination of how this content is generated. This article examined the posting methods, the user responses, and…

Witte, Ginna Gauntner

2014-01-01

15

"Only Connect": Mixed Methods Study of How First-Year Students Create Residential Academic and Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A key component in the success of students' first-year experience is their successful academic and social integration into the college environment (Tinto, 1993). Researchers have specified integration in terms of student behaviors and perceptions (Berger & Milem, 1999; Hurtado & Carter, 1997) and also studied it in terms of engagement (Kuh, 2009)…

Smith, Rachel Anne

2010-01-01

16

Social Bookmarking in Academic Libraries: Trends and Applications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents an exploration of the potential utilization of social bookmarking web sites by academic libraries. These web sites, which allow users and organizations to create accounts for bookmarking online content, provide academic libraries tools to collaborate and network, organize and share electronic resources and teach information…

Redden, Carla S.

2010-01-01

17

Visitors and Residents: Mapping Student Attitudes to Academic Use of Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Visitors and Residents model of internet use suggests a continuum of modes of engagement with the online world, ranging from tool use to social spaces. In this paper, we examine evidence derived from a large cohort of students to assess whether this idea can be validated by experimental evidence. We find statistically significant differences…

Wright, Fiona; White, David; Hirst, Tony; Cann, Alan

2014-01-01

18

Semantic Networks and Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To illustrate the need for social network metadata within semantic metadata. Design/methodology/approach: Surveys properties of social networks and the semantic web, suggests that social network analysis applies to semantic content, argues that semantic content is more searchable if social network metadata is merged with semantic web…

Downes, Stephen

2005-01-01

19

Connectibles : tangible social networking  

E-print Network

This thesis presents "Connectibles," an instantiation of a tangible social network, a new type of social network application rooted in physical objects and real world social behavior. This research is inspired by social ...

Kalanithi, Jeevan James

2007-01-01

20

Social Learning in Social Networks  

E-print Network

This paper analyzes a model of social learning in a social network. Agents decide whether or not to adopt a new technology with unknown payoffs based on their prior beliefs and the experiences of their neighbors in the ...

Lamberson, PJ

21

Wayfinding in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the recent explosion of popularity of commercial social-networking sites like Facebook and MySpace, the size of social networks that can be studied scientifically has passed from the scale traditionally studied by sociologists and anthropologists to the scale of networks more typically studied by computer scientists. In this chapter, I will highlight a recent line of computational research into the modeling and analysis of the small-world phenomenon - the observation that typical pairs of people in a social network are connected by very short chains of intermediate friends - and the ability of members of a large social network to collectively find efficient routes to reach individuals in the network. I will survey several recent mathematical models of social networks that account for these phenomena, with an emphasis on both the provable properties of these social-network models and the empirical validation of the models against real large-scale social-network data.

Liben-Nowell, David

22

Social Insect Networks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Social insect colonies have many of the properties of adaptive networks. The simple rules governing how local interactions among individuals translate into group behaviors are found across social groups, giving social insects the potential to have a profound impact on our understanding of the interplay between network dynamics and social evolution.

Jennifer Fewell (Arizona State University; School of Life Sciences)

2003-09-26

23

Interests Diffusion in Social Networks  

E-print Network

Understanding cultural phenomena on Social Networks (SNs) and exploiting the implicit knowledge about their members is attracting the interest of different research communities both from the academic and the business side. The community of complexity science is devoting significant efforts to define laws, models, and theories, which, based on acquired knowledge, are able to predict future observations (e.g. success of a product). In the mean time, the semantic web community aims at engineering a new generation of advanced services by defining constructs, models and methods, adding a semantic layer to SNs. In this context, a leapfrog is expected to come from a hybrid approach merging the disciplines above. Along this line, this work focuses on the propagation of individual interests in social networks. The proposed framework consists of the following main components: a method to gather information about the members of the social networks; methods to perform some semantic analysis of the Domain of Interest; a p...

D'Agostino, Gregorio; De Nicola, Antonio; Tucci, Salvatore

2015-01-01

24

Social networking sites.  

PubMed

In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use the Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools, social networking and social bookmarking sites, virtual worlds, and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes social networking Web sites and techniques to increase their safe use. PMID:20173583

Wink, Diane M

2010-01-01

25

Tangible Social Network System.  

E-print Network

?? Tangible social network system is a home-based communication solution specifically designed for elders. Former researches indicate that insufficient communication among elders cause several challenges… (more)

Mannapperuma, Chanaka

2010-01-01

26

Academe's New Girl Network  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A "networking" processing pioneered by the Committee for the Concerns of Women in New England Colleges and Universities, which is establishing a New Girl network to compete with and eventually mesh with the Old Boy system, is described. Lobbying and conference efforts of HERS (Higher Education Resource Services) are reported. (LBH)

Stent, Angela

1978-01-01

27

Indiana Academic Standards for Social Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication presents Indiana's Academic Standards for K-8 social studies grade-by-grade and organized into five content areas: (1) history; (2) civics and government; (3) geography; (4) economics; and (5) individuals, society, and culture (psychology, sociology, and anthropology). For instructional purposes, the content knowledge should be…

Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis.

28

Social Networks and Entrepreneurship  

Microsoft Academic Search

A central tenet in sociology holds that positions in social structure influence the attitudes, behaviors, and outcomes of the actors occupying those positions. Though this proposition underlies much sociological thinking, perhaps the clearest instantiation of it appears in the literature collectively referred to as 'social network theory'. Research in this area investigates both the structure of the relations between social

Arent Greve; Janet W. Salaff

2003-01-01

29

Computer Mediated Communication for Social and Academic Purposes: Profiles of Use and University Students' Gratifications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study approaches the Internet as a social space, where university students make use of computer mediated communication (CMC) applications, i.e. e-mail, instant messaging and social network sites, in order to satisfy social and academic needs. We focus on university students, because they represent one of the most avid groups of CMC…

Vrocharidou, Anatoli; Efthymiou, Ilias

2012-01-01

30

Using Social Networking in the Library  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With celebrities discussing Twitter on television talk shows, Facebook being used by people to share pictures of their grandchildren, and academic seminars being delivered in Second Life, it is hard to get through a day without being faced with some sort of social networking tool. Librarians often talk about the importance of outreach and of…

Lindsay, Elizabeth Blakesley

2009-01-01

31

Trust Maximization in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Trust is a human-related phenomenon in social networks. Trust research on social networks has gained much attention on its usefulness, and on modeling propagations. There is little focus on finding maximum trust in social networks which is particularly important when a social network is oriented by certain tasks. In this paper, we propose a trust maximization algorithm based on the task-oriented social networks.

Zhan, Justin; Fang, Xing

32

Database Submission - The Evolving Social Network of Marketing Scholars  

Microsoft Academic Search

The interest in social networks among marketing scholars and practitioners has sharply increased in the last decade. One social network of which network scholars increasingly recognize the unique value is the academic collaboration (coauthor) network. We offer a comprehensive database of the collaboration network among marketing scholars over the last 40 years (available at http:\\/\\/mktsci.pubs.informs.org. Based on the ProQuest database,

Jacob Goldenberg; Barak Libai; Eitan Muller; Stefan Stremersch

2010-01-01

33

Affinity driven social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work we present a model for evolving networks, where the driven force is related to the social affinity between individuals of a population. In the model, a set of individuals initially arranged on a regular ordered network and thus linked with their closest neighbors are allowed to rearrange their connections according to a dynamics closely related to that of the stable marriage problem. We show that the behavior of some topological properties of the resulting networks follows a non trivial pattern.

Ruyú, B.; Kuperman, M. N.

2007-04-01

34

The Impact of Children's Social Adjustment on Academic Outcomes  

PubMed Central

This study tested whether social adjustment added to the prediction of academic outcomes above and beyond prior academic functioning. School records and peer-, teacher-, and self-report measures were collected for 1,255 third grade children in the fall and spring of the school year. Social acceptance by and aggression with peers were included as measures of social adjustment. Academic outcomes included math and reading GPA, classroom behavior, academic self-esteem, and absenteeism. As expected, support for the causal model was found where both forms of social adjustment contributed independently to the prediction of each area of academic adjustment. Gender differences in the patterns of results were present, particularly for the impact of aggression on academic adjustment. Discussion focuses on the implications for social-emotional literacy programs to prevent negative academic outcomes. PMID:21603062

DeRosier, Melissa E.; Lloyd, Stacey W.

2011-01-01

35

Neurocognitive and Temperamental Systems of Self-Regulation and Early Adolescents' Social and Academic Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the current study was to examine the role of individual differences in neurocognitive and temperamental systems of self-regulation in early adolescents' social and academic competence. Measures used in the study included the Attention Network Test, the Early Adolescence Temperament Questionnaire, a peer-reported Social Status…

Checa, Purificacion; Rodriguez-Bailon, Rosa; Rueda, M. Rosario

2008-01-01

36

The Social Network Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Online social networking is an important part in the everyday life of college students. Despite the increasing popularity of online social networking among students and faculty members, its educational benefits are largely untested. This paper presents our experience in using social networking applications and video content distribution websites as a complement of traditional classroom education. In particular, the solution has been based on effective adaptation, extension and integration of Facebook, Twitter, Blogger YouTube and iTunes services for delivering educational material to students on mobile platforms like iPods and 3 rd generation mobile phones. The goals of the proposed educational platform, described in this paper, are to make the learning experience more engaging, to encourage collaborative work and knowledge sharing among students, and to provide an interactive platform for the educators to reach students and deliver lecture material in a totally new way.

Bunus, Peter

37

Social networking and adolescents.  

PubMed

Online social networking is a 21st century innovation increasingly embraced by today's young people. It provides new opportunities for communication that expand an adolescent's world. Yet adults, often suspicious of new trends and technologies initially embraced by youth, often see these new environments as perilous places to visit. These fears have been accentuated by media hype, especially about sexual predators. How dangerous are they? Because the rush to go on these sites is a new phenomenon, research is as yet scant. This review explores current beliefs and knowledge about the dangers of social networking sites. PMID:19492691

Fuld, Gilbert L

2009-04-01

38

Social Network Infiltration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social networks are websites (or software that distributes media online) where users can distribute content to either a list of friends on that site or to anyone who surfs onto their page, and where those friends can interact and discuss the content. By linking to friends online, the users’ personal content (pictures, songs, favorite movies, diaries, websites, and so on) is dynamically distributed, and can "become viral", that is, get spread rapidly as more people see it and spread it themselves. Social networks are immensely popular around the planet, especially with younger users. The biggest social networks are Facebook and MySpace; an IYA2009 user already exists on Facebook, and one will be created for MySpace (in fact, several NASA satellites such as GLAST and Swift already have successful MySpace pages). Twitter is another network where data distribution is more limited; it is more like a mini-blog, but is very popular. IYA2009 already has a Twitter page, and will be updated more often with relevant information. In this talk I will review the existing social networks, show people how and why they are useful, and give them the tools they need to contribute meaningfully to IYA's online reach.

Plait, Philip

2008-05-01

39

Promoting Social Network Awareness: A Social Network Monitoring System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To increase communication and collaboration opportunities, members of a community must be aware of the social networks that exist within that community. This paper describes a social network monitoring system--the KIWI system--that enables users to register their interactions and visualize their social networks. The system was implemented in a…

Cadima, Rita; Ferreira, Carlos; Monguet, Josep; Ojeda, Jordi; Fernandez, Joaquin

2010-01-01

40

Social Networks and Political Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Social networks have been an important area of study in sociology dating back to the classic works of Simmel. The study of\\u000a social networks entails a unique perspective focused on social relations. It also carries a powerful methodological repertoire\\u000a geared toward mapping and analyzing social ties. Political research has greatly benefited from the application of social networks.\\u000a In particular, numerous

Clayton D. Peoples

41

Assessing Student Learning in Academic Advising Using Social Cognitive Theory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We investigated whether the social cognitive theory constructs of self-efficacy and self-regulated learning apply to academic advising for measuring student learning outcomes. Community college students (N = 120) participated in an individual academic-advising session. We assessed students' post-intervention self-efficacy in academic planning…

Erlich, Richard J.; Russ-Eft, Darlene F.

2013-01-01

42

Establishing academic and social support groups for teacher education students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following their research into cooperative learning, Johnson and Johnson (1994) have suggested that teachers establish base groups in their classes to provide academic and social support to students. Base groups are small groups of students that meet regularly to discuss matters associated with the students' social and academic goals and progress. One of the features of base groups is that

Anna M. Sullivan

1999-01-01

43

Academic Identification as a Mediator of the Relationship between Parental Socialization and Academic Achievement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines whether academic identification, or one's psychological and emotional investment in academics, mediates the association between child-reported parental educational socialization and standardized achievement test scores among a predominantly ethnic minority sample of 367 urban middle school students. We predicted that academic

Strambler, Michael J.; Linke, Lance H.; Ward, Nadia L.

2013-01-01

44

Effects of Social Capital on Academic Success: A Narrative Synthesis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many researchers link social capital theory to education and commonly use examples from the field of education to examine social capital theory. Accordingly, they accept that reflections and contributions of social capital can be observed in the field of education. This paper examines social capital's effects on academic success in education. In…

Acar, Erkan

2011-01-01

45

Academic Libraries: "Social" or "Communal?" The Nature and Future of Academic Libraries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The apparent death of academic libraries, as measured by declining circulation of print materials, reduced use of reference services, and falling gate counts, has led to calls for a more "social" approach to academic libraries: installing cafes, expanding group study spaces, and developing "information commons." This study compares these social

Gayton, Jeffrey T.

2008-01-01

46

From Photo Networks to Social Networks, Creation and Use of a Social Network Derived with Photos  

E-print Network

From Photo Networks to Social Networks, Creation and Use of a Social Network Derived with Photos and photos have received plenty of attention in the digital age. In this paper, we show how social photos that reveals social attributes. From this photo network, a social network is extracted that can help to build

Boyer, Edmond

47

Social Network Sites: Definition History and Scholarship  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Social network,sites,(SNSs) are increasingly attracting the attention of academic,and,industry researchers intrigued by their affordances and reach.,This special theme section of the,Journal,of Computer-Mediated,Communicationbrings ,together scholarship on these emergent phenomena.,In this introductory article, we describe features of SNSs and propose a comprehensive definition. We then present one perspective on the history of such sites, discussing key changes and developments. After briefly

Danah Boyd; Nicole B. Ellison

2007-01-01

48

Social Competence, Social Support, and Academic Achievement in Minority, Low-Income, Urban Elementary School Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite living in disadvantaged urban communities experiencing social and economic hardships, many children emerge with positive outcomes. Social-emotional competence and social support were hypothesized to have strong influences on academic trajectories during the critical period of academic skill acquisition. Participants were 282 third-grade students from six elementary schools in a Northwestern urban community. Beyond the importance of prior levels of

Maurice J. Elias; Norris M. Haynes

2008-01-01

49

Social Competence, Social Support, and Academic Achievement in Minority, Low-Income, Urban Elementary School Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite living in disadvantaged urban communities experiencing social and economic hardships, many children emerge with positive outcomes. Social-emotional competence and social support were hypothesized to have strong influences on academic trajectories during the critical period of academic skill acquisition. Participants were 282 third-grade…

Elias, Maurice J.; Haynes, Norris M.

2008-01-01

50

The malignant social network  

PubMed Central

Tumors contain a vastly complicated cellular network that relies on local communication to execute malignant programs. The molecular cues that are involved in cell-cell adhesion orchestrate large-scale tumor behaviors such as proliferation and invasion. We have recently begun to appreciate that many tumors contain a high degree of cellular heterogeneity and are organized in a cellular hierarchy, with a cancer stem cell (CSC) population identified at the apex in multiple cancer types. CSCs reside in unique microenvironments or niches that are responsible for directing their behavior through cellular interactions between CSCs and stromal cells, generating a malignant social network. Identifying cell-cell adhesion mechanisms in this network has implications for the basic understanding of tumorigenesis and the development of more effective therapies. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of cell-cell adhesion mechanisms used by CSCs and how these local interactions have global consequences for tumor biology. PMID:22796941

Hale, James S.; Li, Meizhang; Lathia, Justin D.

2012-01-01

51

Social Work Contract I agree to the following academic contract  

E-print Network

Social Work Contract I agree to the following academic contract: Social workers serve a wide diversity. Social work services should be provided without prejudice and/or imposition of the worker Work Performance Standards for Admission, Matriculation and Graduation (next page), and agree to adhere

Suzuki, Masatsugu

52

Social Network Visualization in Epidemiology  

PubMed Central

Epidemiological investigations and interventions are increasingly focusing on social networks. Two aspects of social networks are relevant in this regard: the structure of networks and the function of networks. A better understanding of the processes that determine how networks form and how they operate with respect to the spread of behavior holds promise for improving public health. Visualizing social networks is a key to both research and interventions. Network images supplement statistical analyses and allow the identification of groups of people for targeting, the identification of central and peripheral individuals, and the clarification of the macro-structure of the network in a way that should affect public health interventions. People are inter-connected and so their health is inter-connected. Inter-personal health effects in social networks provide a new foundation for public health. PMID:22544996

Christakis, Nicholas A.; Fowler, James H.

2010-01-01

53

Enhancing Academic Achievement through Direct Instruction of Social Skills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the impact of the explicit teaching of social skills to enhance academic achievement. The targeted population comprised kindergarten and second grade students in a middle-class community located in central Illinois. The problem of inappropriate behaviors and difficulties interacting with peers and how this may affect academic

Bendt, Lori; Nunan, Jan

54

Severity of Academic Achievement and Social Skills Deficits  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the differences in the rated social skills of elementary-aged students at-risk for emotional/behavioural disorders (E/BD) based on severity of academic difficulties. Teachers nominated students at-risk for E/BD who were classified into four groups of academic difficulty based on the Wide Range Achievement Test-3. Students,…

Bloom, Elana L.; Karagiannakis, Anastasia; Toste, Jessica R.; Heath, Nancy L.; Konstantinopoulos, Effie

2007-01-01

55

Children's Effortful Control and Academic Achievement: Mediation through Social Functioning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to test the premise that children's effortful control (EC) is prospectively related to their academic achievement and to specify mechanisms through which EC is related to academic success. We used data from 214 children (M age at Time 1 [T1] = 73 months) to test whether social functioning (e.g.,…

Valiente, Carlos; Eisenberg, Nancy; Haugen, Rg; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Hofer, Claire; Liew, Jeffrey; Kupfer, Anne

2011-01-01

56

Children's Effortful Control and Academic Achievement: Mediation Through Social Functioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to test the premise that children's effortful control (EC) is prospectively related to their academic achievement and to specify mechanisms through which EC is related to academic success. We used data from 214 children (M age at Time 1 [T1] = 73 months) to test whether social functioning (e.g., social competence and externalizing problems)

Carlos Valiente; Nancy Eisenberg; Rg Haugen; Tracy L. Spinrad; Claire Hofer; Jeffrey Liew; Anne Kupfer

2011-01-01

57

Linking Academic Social Environments, Ego-Identity Formation, Ego Virtues, and Academic Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study used Structural Equation Modeling to test an Eriksonian conceptual model linking academic social environments (relationships with faculty and fellow students), ego-identity formation, ego virtues, and academic success. Participants included 765 first-year students at a university in southern Ontario, Canada. Results indicated that…

Good, Marie; Adams, Gerald R.

2008-01-01

58

Social Psychology Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With over 11,000 links contained within its pages, the Social Psychology Network site is arguably the largest social psychology database on the Internet. Maintained by Professor Scout Plous of Wesleyan University, the site has been generously supported by the National Science Foundation. Visitors will appreciate the very clean layout of the siteâ??s homepage, as they are presented with a search engine, along with a number of electronic forums, and a listing of related topics. To delve into the siteâ??s contents, visitors may wish to select from any one of the areas on the left-hand side of the homepage, which include listings of doctoral programs in social psychology and teaching resources. There are numerous other options for interested parties, and they lead to such offerings as rankings of doctoral programs in the field and distance learning options in the field. Finally, visitors can also view many of the siteâ??s documents in a number of languages, including Spanish, French, Italian, and German.

Plous, Scott

59

Empathetic Social Choice on Social Networks Amirali Salehi-Abari  

E-print Network

matching on social networks [7, 4]. The influence of social networks on voting behavior has received aggregation (e.g., social welfare maximiza- tion or voting), and develop scalable optimization algorithms Algorithms, Economics, Human Factors, Theory Keywords Social Choice, Social and Economic Networks, Voting

Toronto, University of

60

Signed Networks in Social Media  

E-print Network

Relations between users on social media sites often reflect a mixture of positive (friendly) and negative (antagonistic) interactions. In contrast to the bulk of research on social networks that has focused almost exclusively on positive interpretations of links between people, we study how the interplay between positive and negative relationships affects the structure of on-line social networks. We connect our analyses to theories of signed networks from social psychology. We find that the classical theory of structural balance tends to capture certain common patterns of interaction, but that it is also at odds with some of the fundamental phenomena we observe --- particularly related to the evolving, directed nature of these on-line networks. We then develop an alternate theory of status that better explains the observed edge signs and provides insights into the underlying social mechanisms. Our work provides one of the first large-scale evaluations of theories of signed networks using on-line datasets, as ...

Leskovec, Jure; Kleinberg, Jon

2010-01-01

61

SNIF: social networking in fur  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present SNIF: Social Networking in Fur, a system that allows pet owners to interact through their pets' social networks. SNIF comprises inexpensive hardware that can be unobtrusively and transparently affixed to pet collars and paraphernalia in order to augment pet-to-pet, pet-to-owner, and owner-to-owner interactions. SNIF devices aggregate pertinent environmental, social, and individual information that can be broadcast or addressed

Jonathan Gips; Noah Fields; Philip Liang; Arnaud Pilpré

2005-01-01

62

Different Aspects of Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A social network is a set of people (or organizations or other social entities) connected by a set of social relation- ships, such as friendship, co-working or information exchange. Social network analysis focuses on the analysis of patterns of relationships among people, organizations, states and such social entities. Social network analysis provides both a visual and a mathematical analysis of

Mohsen Jamali; Hassan Abolhassani

2006-01-01

63

Microscopic evolution of social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a detailed study of network evolution by analyzing four large online social networks with full temporal information about node and edge arrivals. For the first time at such a large scale, we study individual node arrival and edge creation processes that collectively lead to macroscopic properties of networks. Using a methodology based on the maximum-likelihood principle, we in-

Jure Leskovec; Lars Backstrom; Ravi Kumar; Andrew Tomkins

2008-01-01

64

Social Science Research Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by Social Science Electronic Publishing (SSEP), this site allows users to freely access thousands of abstracts and full-text research papers. The core of the site is the SSRN Electronic Library, which contains an Abstract Database with over 15,600 entries and an Electronic Paper Collection, which currently contains over 4,200 full-text papers. Users can search title, abstract, and author fields, or browse the journals, which are grouped under the five respective Research Networks that form the SSRN: Accounting, Economics, Latin American, Financial, and Legal Scholarship. Within each journal entry, users may select from several display options to narrow their results and available full-text documents are indicated by a special symbol. Information on each of the five networks, including conference and job announcements, as well as information on subscribing and a list of site licenses, is accessible via a menu panel on the left side of the main page. According to SSEP, access to the abstracts and full-text papers will remain free of charge to all users until \\"the next revision to the web site this winter.\\"

2005-11-02

65

Social Science Research Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by Social Science Electronic Publishing (SSEP), this site allows users to freely access thousands of abstracts and full-text research papers. The core of the site is the SSRN Electronic Library, which contains an Abstract Database with over 15,600 entries and an Electronic Paper Collection, which currently contains over 4,200 full-text papers. Users can search title, abstract, and author fields, or browse the journals, which are grouped under the five respective Research Networks that form the SSRN: Accounting, Economics, Latin American, Financial, and Legal Scholarship. Within each journal entry, users may select from several display options to narrow their results and available full-text documents are indicated by a special symbol. Information on each of the five networks, including conference and job announcements, as well as information on subscribing and a list of site licenses, is accessible via a menu panel on the left side of the main page. According to SSEP, access to the abstracts and full-text papers will remain free of charge to all users until "the next revision to the web site this winter."

66

Sensor networks for social networks  

E-print Network

This thesis outlines the development of software that makes use of Bayesian belief networks and signal processing techniques to make meaningful inferences about real-world phenomena using data obtained from sensor networks. ...

Farry, Michael P. (Michael Patrick)

2006-01-01

67

Introduction to Social Network Analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social Network analysis focuses on patterns of relations between and among people, organizations, states, etc. It aims to describe networks of relations as fully as possible, identify prominent patterns in such networks, trace the flow of information through them, and discover what effects these relations and networks have on people and organizations. Social network analysis offers a very promising potential for analyzing human-human interactions in online communities (discussion boards, newsgroups, virtual organizations). This Tutorial provides an overview of this analytic technique and demonstrates how it can be used in Human Computer Interaction (HCI) research and practice, focusing especially on Computer Mediated Communication (CMC). This topic acquires particular importance these days, with the increasing popularity of social networking websites (e.g., youtube, myspace, MMORPGs etc.) and the research interest in studying them.

Zaphiris, Panayiotis; Ang, Chee Siang

68

Line graphs as social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It was demonstrated recently that the line graphs are clustered and assortative. These topological features are known to characterize some social networks [M.E.J. Newman, Y. Park, Why social networks are different from other types of networks, Phys. Rev. E 68 (2003) 036122]; it was argued that this similarity reveals their cliquey character. In the model proposed here, a social network is the line graph of an initial network of families, communities, interest groups, school classes and small companies. These groups play the role of nodes, and individuals are represented by links between these nodes. The picture is supported by the data on the LiveJournal network of about 8×10 6 people.

Krawczyk, M. J.; Muchnik, L.; Ma?ka-Kraso?, A.; Ku?akowski, K.

2011-07-01

69

The Influence of Protégé-Mentor Relationships and Social Networks on Women Doctoral Students' Academic Career Aspirations in Physical Sciences and Engineering  

E-print Network

research funding proposals for their postdoctoral positions.postdoctoral positions, (4) academic, industry and national laboratory comparisons and rationales, and (5) finance and funding.postdoctoral positions, (4) academic, industry and national laboratory comparisons, (5) work-life balance, and (6) finance and funding.

Gu, Yu

2012-01-01

70

Centrality measures in social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Complex networks represent an extensive variety of systems in nature and human interactions. Networks are graphs that describe the structures of interacting systems and give substantial information about the patterns of connections between the nodes in a particular system. In turn, knowing about the structure of networks and their arrangements enables one to make certain types of predictions about their behavior. With that larger motivation, this thesis research emphasizes different measurement metrics such as degree distribution, assortativity and clustering coefficients, transitivity, modularity, network diameter, and the average path length to associate the configurations of the different networks to determine certain types of behavior. The main focus of this thesis is on social networks, where the assortative patterns of social networks were identified. The various parameters used in the study of the networks were calculated and defined using the software packages Networkx and Gephi. The different types of networks are from the Stanford Network Analysis Project (SNAP) website. In particular, the focus is on using the numerical values of the coefficients to infer differences in the forms of contact in different social networks. The ability to do so has implications for detecting preferences when it comes to the relations between groups of people in social networks. As a result of social networks displaying assortative behaviors, the data indicates that these networks could also project some traits of 'narrow-mindedness' due to the formation of different clusters. Another significant repercussion of this research is the ability of a community to thrive successfully based on the interactions of the people with one another.

Moreau, Michele

71

Some Facts of Social Networks and Crowdsourcing  

E-print Network

penetration N Europe = Min 43 ­ Max 4968 / F = If member of social network Big social networks will get bigger on Online Social Networks · Crowdsourcing #12;Crowdsourcing #12;Crowdsourcing + Internet: Data createdSome Facts of Social Networks and Crowdsourcing Zheng Yang & Wei Xi Tsinghua University & Xi

Yang, Zheng

72

Academic Social Cohesion within Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the theoretical foundations of "social cohesion" as it relates to higher education institutions. In so doing it seeks (a) to understand the core elements of social cohesion--social capital, human capital and ethical behavioral norms that serve a common good--and (b) to establish a flexible framework for understanding the…

Heuser, Brian L.

2007-01-01

73

SocialCDN: Caching Techniques for Distributed Social Networks  

E-print Network

fusions of social and vehicular networks. I. INTRODUCTION Popular Online Social Networks (OSN. This revolution in human interaction through social media has brought to the forefront the issues of ownership. Critical among them is the need for a scalable social update dissemination service. A Social Update

Iftode, Liviu

74

Online Identities and Social Networking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Online identities play a critical role in the social web that is taking shape on the Internet. Despite many technical proposals for creating and managing online identities, none has received widespread acceptance. Design and implementation of online identities that are socially acceptable on the Internet remains an open problem. This chapter discusses the interplay between online identities and social networking. Online social networks (OSNs) are growing at a rapid pace and has millions of members in them. While the recent trend is to create explicit OSNs such as Facebook and MySpace, we also have implicit OSNs such as interaction graphs created by email and instant messaging services. Explicit OSNs allow users to create profiles and use them to project their identities on the web. There are many interesting identity related issues in the context of social networking including how OSNs help and hinder the definition of online identities.

Maheswaran, Muthucumaru; Ali, Bader; Ozguven, Hatice; Lord, Julien

75

An algorithmic approach to social networks  

E-print Network

Social networks consist of a set of individuals and some form of social relationship that ties the individuals together. In this thesis, we use algorithmic techniques to study three aspects of social networks: (1) we analyze ...

Liben-Nowell, David

2005-01-01

76

Social Group Dynamics in Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rich set of interactions between individuals in the society results in complex community structure, capturing highly connected\\u000a circles of friends, families, or professional cliques in a social network. Due to the frequent changes in the activity and\\u000a communication patterns of individuals, the associated social and communication network is subject to constant evolution. The\\u000a cohesive groups of people in such

Gergely Palla; Péter Pollner; Albert-László Barabási; Tamás Vicsek

77

Extracting Regular Behaviors from Social Media Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social media network analysis has become very popular in recent years. How do real networks evolve over time? What are the normal evolving behaviors in a social media network? In order to extract behaviors occurring regularly to reveal the microscopic evolving properties in social networks, the evolving process of networks is modeled as stochastic states transition, and the evolving behaviors

Leiming Yan; Jinwei Wang

2011-01-01

78

The Role of Social Cognitive Career Theory in The Role of Social Cognitive Career Theory in Information Technology based Academic Information Technology based Academic Performance Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Positive academic efficacy beliefs elevate educational expectations that lead to academic success (Bandura, 1997; Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994). The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of the variables: past performance, computer self-efficacy, outcome expectations, academic grade goal, and academic performance within social cognitive career theory's model of performance (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994). The study focused

Sheila M. Smith

79

The Social Costs of Academic Success across Ethnic Groups  

PubMed Central

This study explores the longitudinal association between academic achievement and social acceptance across ethnic groups in a nationally representative sample of adolescents (N = 13,570; Mage = 15.5 years). The effects of school context are also considered. Results show that African American and Native American adolescents experience greater social costs with academic success than Whites. Pertaining to school context, findings suggest that the differential social consequences of achievement experienced by African Americans are greatest in more highly achieving schools, but only when these schools have a smaller percentage of Black students. Students from Mexican decent also showed differential social costs with achievement in particular contexts. The implications of these findings to theory, policy, and future research are discussed. PMID:21077858

Fuller-Rowell, Thomas E.; Doan, Stacey N.

2010-01-01

80

Use of Social Emotional Learning Skills to Predict Future Academic Success and Progress toward Graduation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluated the degree to which a range of social emotional learning skills--academic self-efficacy, academic motivation, social connections, importance of school, and managing psychological and emotional distress and academic stress--could be used as an indicator of future academic outcomes. Using a sample of 4,797 from a large urban…

Davis, Alan; Solberg, V. Scott; de Baca, Christine; Gore, Taryn Hargrove

2014-01-01

81

Online Social Networking Issues Within Academia and Pharmacy Education  

PubMed Central

Online social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace are extremely popular as indicated by the numbers of members and visits to the sites. They allow students to connect with users with similar interests, build and maintain relationships with friends, and feel more connected with their campus. The foremost criticisms of online social networking are that students may open themselves to public scrutiny of their online personas and risk physical safety by revealing excessive personal information. This review outlines issues of online social networking in higher education by drawing upon articles in both the lay press and academic publications. New points for pharmacy educators to consider include the possible emergence of an “e-professionalism” concept; legal and ethical implications of using online postings in admission, discipline, and student safety decisions; how online personas may blend into professional life; and the responsibility for educating students about the risks of online social networking. PMID:18322572

2008-01-01

82

Early Home Experience, Classroom Social Competence and Academic Achievement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of a larger, on-going study conducted through the Center for Child Development and Education at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, this paper explores the influence of the home environment on children's psychological functioning in school and on their academic achievement. Data were obtained on home experience, classroom social

Tedesco, Lisa; Bradley, Robert H.

83

The Science of Infancy: Academic, Social, and Political Agendas  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effectiveness of researchers in infancy is conditioned by their participation in 3 agendas. The academic agenda is devoted to the question of understanding infants, the social agenda is devoted to the question of how to improve the life of infants, and the political agenda is devoted to finding the resources for both understanding and…

Sameroff, Arnold J.

2005-01-01

84

Students’ use of asynchronous discussions for academic discourse socialization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our universities are becoming increasingly diverse at the same time as online asynchronous discussions (OADs) are emerging as the most important forum for computer mediated communication (CMC) in distance education. But there is shortage of studies that explore how graduate students from different ethnic, linguistic and cultural backgrounds use OADs for academic discourse socialization. This article discusses a qualitative study

Gulbahar H. Beckett; Kelvin S. Beckett

2010-01-01

85

Social, Mental, Academic and Physical Development in Groups Doing Sports  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study is to show whether sport has an effect on education/academic success and social, mental and physical development or not. The search involves 160 students studying at Physical Education and Sports High School at Karamanoglu Mehmetbey University. Graded quintet likert type questionnaire was used as a measuring means. The first…

Nas, Kazim; Temel, Veysel; Akpinar, Selahattin; Akpinar, Oznur

2012-01-01

86

Transfer Student Engagement: Blurring of Social and Academic Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Transfer students are a distinct population. Their characteristics lead to a qualitatively different student experience. Drawing on interviews with a cross-sectional sample of transfer students at George Mason University (GMU), this study focused on the ways transfer students perceived their social and academic engagement, on the ways they engaged…

Lester, Jaime; Leonard, Jeannie Brown; Mathias, David

2013-01-01

87

Reward Allocation and Academic versus Social Orientation toward School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Correlates 138 elementary school children's views about the purposes of school to their styles of reward allocation: academically motivated students allocated rewards equally to two hypothetical performers who had unequally helped a teacher perform a manual chore, while socially motivated children allocated rewards in an equity (performance-based)…

Peterson, Candida C.; Peterson, James L.

1978-01-01

88

Page 1 | Bachelors of Social Work (BSW) | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 30, 2014 Bachelors of Social Work (BSW)  

E-print Network

Page 1 | Bachelors of Social Work (BSW) | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 30, 2014 Bachelors of Social Work (BSW) Academic Plan of Study College of Health and Human Services Department of Social Work the BSW graduate for generalist social work practice. Students will need to complete SOWK 1101, 2182, 2183

Raja, Anita

89

Social networks and the Semantic Web  

E-print Network

Social networks and the Semantic Web Peter Mika Business Informatics group Dept. of Computer technology for the social sciences Social network mining from the Web Semantics-based data management Browsing and visualization Case study Network Analysis of Semantic Web research 2. Network Analysis

Baeza-Yates, Ricardo

90

Mining Social Network for Semantic Advertisement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Networked computers are expanding more and more around the world, and digital social networks becoming of great importance for many people's work and leisure. Emails, Weblogs and Instant Messengers are popular instances of social networks. In this paper, the main target is having an advertisement according to user favorites and interests by mining his\\/her interactions in digital social networks. Briefly,

Pooya Moradian Zadeh; Mohsen Sadighi Moshkenani

2008-01-01

91

The Influence of Protege-Mentor Relationships and Social Networks on Women Doctoral Students' Academic Career Aspirations in Physical Sciences and Engineering  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Physical sciences and engineering doctoral programs serve as the most important conduit through which future academics are trained and prepared in these disciplines. This study examined women doctoral students' protege-mentor relationships in Physical sciences and engineering programs. Particularly, the study examined the influence of such…

Gu, Yu

2012-01-01

92

Social skill as determinant of social networks and perceived social support in schizophrenia.  

PubMed

Factors influencing supportive social networks of people with schizophrenia are little understood. Data from 46 outpatients with schizophrenia were analysed using structural equation modelling to test plausible sets of inter-relationships between social skill, social networks, and social support. The data supported a tentative model about the causal relationships between variables. Paths showed that people with greater social skill had larger social networks, but did not necessarily perceive greater support from these networks. Negative symptoms accounted for some of the effect of social skill on social networks. Whereas groups of single-admission and multiple-admission participants did not differ in terms of social skill, social networks, or support, the age of the participants influenced their social skill and the size of their social networks. Younger participants had greater social skill and larger social networks. The results appear to suggest the importance of early intervention for young people with first-episode psychosis. PMID:9516669

Macdonald, E M; Jackson, H J; Hayes, R L; Baglioni, A J; Madden, C

1998-02-01

93

Understanding Academic Performance of International Students: The Role of Ethnicity, Academic and Social Integration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More than 3 million students study outside their home country, primarily at a Western university. A common belief among educators is that international students are insufficiently adjusted to higher education in their host country, both academically and socially. Furthermore, several groups of international students experience considerable amounts…

Rienties, Bart; Beausaert, Simon; Grohnert, Therese; Niemantsverdriet, Susan; Kommers, Piet

2012-01-01

94

Assortative model for social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this Brief Report we present a version of a network growth model, generalized in order to describe the behavior of social networks. The case of study considered is the preprint archive at cul.arxiv.org. Each node corresponds to a scientist, and a link is present whenever two authors wrote a paper together. This graph is a nice example of degree-assortative network, that is, to say a network where sites with similar degree are connected to each other. The model presented is one of the few able to reproduce such behavior, giving some insight on the microscopic dynamics at the basis of the graph structure.

Catanzaro, Michele; Caldarelli, Guido; Pietronero, Luciano

2004-09-01

95

Enhancing Mentoring and Networking of Junior Academic Women: What, Why, and How?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses advantages and disadvantages of various types of career-supportive relationships that make up academic women's webs of intellectual, social, personal, and political ties, including formal mentoring, networking, and peer-support programs. Several strategies rooted in each of these models are presented, based on a review of current…

Quinlan, Kathleen M.

1999-01-01

96

So What Are the Impacts of Networking on Academic Institutions?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that much work needs to be done to assess the impacts of global networking on academic institutional performance. How the academic networked environment can be defined, possible assessment criteria, the need for a user perspective, and specific research needs are discussed. (Contains 11 references.) (KRN)

McClure, Charles R.

1994-01-01

97

Networks in Social Policy Problems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

1. Introduction M. Scotti and B. Vedres; Part I. Information, Collaboration, Innovation: The Creative Power of Networks: 2. Dissemination of health information within social networks C. Dhanjal, S. Blanchemanche, S. Clemençon, A. Rona-Tas and F. Rossi; 3. Scientific teams and networks change the face of knowledge creation S. Wuchty, J. Spiro, B. F. Jones and B. Uzzi; 4. Structural folds: the innovative potential of overlapping groups B. Vedres and D. Stark; 5. Team formation and performance on nanoHub: a network selection challenge in scientific communities D. Margolin, K. Ognyanova, M. Huang, Y. Huang and N. Contractor; Part II. Influence, Capture, Corruption: Networks Perspectives on Policy Institutions: 6. Modes of coordination of collective action: what actors in policy making? M. Diani; 7. Why skewed distributions of pay for executives is the cause of much grief: puzzles and few answers so far B. Kogut and J.-S. Yang; 8. Networks of institutional capture: a case of business in the State apparatus E. Lazega and L. Mounier; 9. The social and institutional structure of corruption: some typical network configurations of corruption transactions in Hungary Z. Szántó, I. J. Tóth and S. Varga; Part III. Crisis, Extinction, World System Change: Network Dynamics on a Large Scale: 10. How creative elements help the recovery of networks after crisis: lessons from biology A. Mihalik, A. S. Kaposi, I. A. Kovács, T. Nánási, R. Palotai, Á. Rák, M. S. Szalay-Beko and P. Csermely; 11. Networks and globalization policies D. R. White; 12. Network science in ecology: the structure of ecological communities and the biodiversity question A. Bodini, S. Allesina and C. Bondavalli; 13. Supply security in the European natural gas pipeline network M. Scotti and B. Vedres; 14. Conclusions and outlook A.-L. Barabási; Index.

Vedres, Balázs; Scotti, Marco

2012-08-01

98

Enhancing business networks using social network based virtual communities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – To enhance an entrepreneur's business network through the integration of the social network concepts and design principles of virtual communities. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This study documents the design and initial deployment of a virtual community case, Innovation Information Infrastructure, based on social network concepts. Findings – Basic design principles, deployment strategy, and future directions for social network-based virtual communities

Bih-ru Lea; Wen-bin Yu; Nisha Maguluru; Michael Nichols

2006-01-01

99

Relation Between Academic Achievement and Social Adjustment: Evidence From Chinese Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

A sample of children in Shanghai, P. R. China, initially aged 10 and 12 years, participated in this 2-year longitudinal project. Information on academic achievement and indexes of social adjustment, including social competence, aggression, social inhibition, leadership, and peer acceptance, was collected from multiple sources. It was found that academic achievement predicted children’s social competence and peer acceptance. In turn,

Xinyin Chen; Kenneth H. Rubin; Dan Li

1997-01-01

100

INTERACTING WITH SOCIAL NETWORKS TO IMPROVE HEALTHCARE BODY SENSOR NETWORKS  

E-print Network

INTERACTING WITH SOCIAL NETWORKS TO IMPROVE HEALTHCARE BODY SENSOR NETWORKS by DAVID BAUSCHLICHER.........................................................................................3 2.1 Wireless Sensor Networks.............................................................3 2.2 Body Sensor Networks..................................................................5 2.2.1 Energy

Miles, Will

101

Agent collaboration and social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we report on preliminary results for evaluating preferences for collaboration among a group of agents who located in a social network. We have implemented a game of boxes that are pushed into holes in a two dimensional world. We vary rations of boxes and holes as well as individuals awareness and information sharing. Our results corroborate intuitive

R. Sean Bowman; Henry Hexmoor

2005-01-01

102

Semirings for social networks analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the paper four semirings for solving social networks problems are constructed.The closure of relational matrix over geodetic semirings contains for every pair of vertices u and v the length and the number of u ? v geodesics; and for geosetic semiring the length and the set of vertices on u — v geodesics. The algorithms for computing the geodetic

Vladimir Batagelj

1994-01-01

103

Social Networking: Keeping It Clean  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The need to maintain an unpolluted learning environment is no easy task for schools and districts that have incorporated social networking sites into their educational life. The staff and teachers at Blaine High School in Minnesota's Anoka-Hennepin District 11 had been considering the pros and cons of establishing a school Facebook page when the…

Waters, John K.

2011-01-01

104

ONLINE SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYTICS Course Syllabus  

E-print Network

(asymptotic learning) or herding may occur in online social networks. TOPICS Basic social network conceptsONLINE SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYTICS Course Syllabus ECTS: 10 Period: Summer 2013 (17 July - 14 Aug) Level: Master Language of teaching: English Course type: Summer University STADS UVA code: 460122U056

105

Early Adolescent Social Networks and Substance Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relationships between social network position and the use of tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, and inhalants in a sample of 1,119 sixth-grade youth. Social network analyses of peer nominations were used to categorize youth as "members" of social groups, "liaisons" between groups, or social "isolates." The results revealed that…

Henry, David B.; Kobus, Kimberly

2007-01-01

106

Who Uses Social Networks? An aggregate study  

E-print Network

between users of social networks What cs492 students say? Social change from industrialisation #12;USA?: The intersection of users' personality and social media use." Computers in Human Behavior 26.2 (2010): 247-253. #12Who Uses Social Networks? An aggregate study Marta Kryven, CGL Talk, July 2014 #12;Generalities

Waterloo, University of

107

Social structure of Facebook networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the social structure of Facebook “friendship” networks at one hundred American colleges and universities at a single point in time, and we examine the roles of user attributes-gender, class year, major, high school, and residence-at these institutions. We investigate the influence of common attributes at the dyad level in terms of assortativity coefficients and regression models. We then examine larger-scale groupings by detecting communities algorithmically and comparing them to network partitions based on user characteristics. We thereby examine the relative importance of different characteristics at different institutions, finding for example that common high school is more important to the social organization of large institutions and that the importance of common major varies significantly between institutions. Our calculations illustrate how microscopic and macroscopic perspectives give complementary insights on the social organization at universities and suggest future studies to investigate such phenomena further.

Traud, Amanda L.; Mucha, Peter J.; Porter, Mason A.

2012-08-01

108

Children’s Social Behaviors as Predictors of Academic Achievement: A Longitudinal Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was an investigation of the relationships among a diverse sample of elementary students’ social skills, problem behaviors, academic competence, and academic achievement. The primary research question addressed the relationship between social behaviors and academic achievement. All data were collected and examined at two timepoints within a school year, which allowed for a replication of the relationships among the

Christine Kerres Malecki; Stephen N. Elliott

2002-01-01

109

Academic freedom and academic duty to teach social justice: a perspective and pedagogy for public health nursing faculty.  

PubMed

Public health nursing practice is rooted in the core value of social justice. Nursing faculty whose expertise is in public health are often the content experts responsible for teaching this essential, yet potentially controversial, value. Contemporary threats to academic freedom remind us that the disciplinary autonomy and academic duty to teach social justice may be construed as politically ideological. These threats are of particular concern when faculty members guide students through a scientific exploration of sociopolitical factors that lead to health-related social injustices and encourage students to improve and transform injustices in their professional careers. This article (a) reviews recent challenges to academic freedom that influence social justice education, (b) explores academic freedom and duty to teach social justice within the discipline of nursing, and (c) proposes a praxis-based approach to social justice education, which is grounded in transformative pedagogy. PMID:17319892

Fahrenwald, Nancy L; Taylor, Janette Y; Kneipp, Shawn M; Canales, Mary K

2007-01-01

110

Reconfiguration and search of social networks.  

PubMed

Social networks tend to exhibit some topological characteristics different from regular networks and random networks, such as shorter average path length and higher clustering coefficient, and the node degree of the majority of social networks obeys exponential distribution. Based on the topological characteristics of the real social networks, a new network model which suits to portray the structure of social networks was proposed, and the characteristic parameters of the model were calculated. To find out the relationship between two people in the social network, and using the local information of the social network and the parallel mechanism, a hybrid search strategy based on k-walker random and a high degree was proposed. Simulation results show that the strategy can significantly reduce the average number of search steps, so as to effectively improve the search speed and efficiency. PMID:24574861

Zhang, Lianming; Peng, Aoyuan; Yu, Jianping

2013-01-01

111

Understanding academic performance of international students: the role of ethnicity, academic and social integration  

Microsoft Academic Search

More than 3 million students study outside their home country, primarily at a Western university. A common belief among educators\\u000a is that international students are insufficiently adjusted to higher education in their host country, both academically and\\u000a socially. Furthermore, several groups of international students experience considerable amounts of stress while adapting to\\u000a the culture of the host-institute. Several researchers argue

Bart Rienties; Simon Beausaert; Therese Grohnert; Susan Niemantsverdriet; Piet Kommers

112

Academic and Social Self-Efficacy Scale: Development and Initial Validation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Academic and Social Self-Efficacy Scale (ASSESS) was developed to assess the self-efficacy judgments of students and to predict academic achievement and sociometric status. Self-reported judgments of academic self-efficacy best predicted academic achievement, whereas self-reported social self-efficacy best predicted sociometric status. Teacher- and parent-reported self-efficacy ratings were minimal predictors of achievement and sociometric status. A multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) analysis failed to

Frank M. Gresham; Sally Evans; Stephen N. Elliott

1988-01-01

113

"Hidden" social networks in behavior change interventions.  

PubMed

We investigated whether "hidden" (or unobserved) social networks were evident in a 2011 physical activity behavior change intervention in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Results showed evidence of unobserved social networks in the intervention and illustrated how the network evolved over short periods and affected behavior. Behavior change interventions should account for the interaction among participants (i.e., social networks) and how such interactions affect intervention outcome. PMID:25602895

Hunter, Ruth F; McAneney, Helen; Davis, Michael; Tully, Mark A; Valente, Thomas W; Kee, Frank

2015-03-01

114

Longitudinal Test of a Social Cognitive Model of Academic and Life Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors tested a social cognitive model of academic and overall life satisfaction in a sample of 769 university students. The predictors, drawn from Lent's unifying perspective on well-being and psychosocial adjustment, included social cognitive (academic self-efficacy, goal progress, social support) and personality (trait positive affect)…

Singley, Daniel B.; Lent, Robert W.; Sheu, Hung-Bin

2010-01-01

115

Data in Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social Network research relies on a variety of data-sources, depending on the problem-scenario and the questions which the research is trying to answer or inform. In this paper, we analyze some of the data- sources indexed by the sizes of these data-sets and relating them back to the research question, which the data-set is used for. In carrying out such

Anu Vaidyanathan; Malcolm Shore; Mark Billinghurst

2008-01-01

116

Measuring the academic, social, and psychological effects of academic service learning on middle school students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an academic service learning project on ninth-grade students' science achievement and attitudes. A quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design was used with four classes of one teacher in a rural school. The treatment was an Energy Fair service project. Two treatment classes that were chosen by random assignment (n = 58) were compared to two control classes (n = 64), who performed an alternative assignment. The Energy Fair was conducted for the elementary school students and on a limited basis for fellow students (peers). The academic effect was measured by a teacher-designed end-of-unit ecology test, with a subset of the questions on energy use. Psychological effects were measured by a self-esteem questionnaire, which measured both self-esteem and the satisfaction felt about one's self-esteem. Social effects were measured by three semantic differentials, one each for "adults," "peers," and "elementary students." The teacher was interviewed regarding her observations about the project. Written reflections from both the treatment and control groups were coded and analyzed. Pretest results were divided into thirds of high, medium, and low for all variables to search for the possibility of an attribute-treatment interaction. Analysis of covariance was used to reduce the possibility of pretest bias, to test for significant effects, and to test for a level by treatment interaction. Although the posttest means favored the experimental group, no statistically significant difference was found for academic results. No significant effect was found for either of the psychological measures. No change was found for the social results regarding "adults." A statistically significant effect was found for social results in the categories of "elementary students" and "peers." No statistically significant level by treatment interaction was found. Further research on the effects of academic service learning projects is needed at the middle school level, in all disciplines, and containing service of a longer duration and intensity.

Giacalone, Valarie A.

117

Profit Maximization over Social Networks  

E-print Network

Influence maximization is the problem of finding a set of influential users in a social network such that the expected spread of influence under a certain propagation model is maximized. Much of the previous work has neglected the important distinction between social influence and actual product adoption. However, as recognized in the management science literature, an individual who gets influenced by social acquaintances may not necessarily adopt a product (or technology), due, e.g., to monetary concerns. In this work, we distinguish between influence and adoption by explicitly modeling the states of being influenced and of adopting a product. We extend the classical Linear Threshold (LT) model to incorporate prices and valuations, and factor them into users' decision-making process of adopting a product. We show that the expected profit function under our proposed model maintains submodularity under certain conditions, but no longer exhibits monotonicity, unlike the expected influence spread function. To ma...

Lu, Wei

2012-01-01

118

Achievement and Social Goals of Younger and Older Elementary Students: Response to Academic and Social Failure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children with mild disabilities experience sufficient failure to produce negative future expectations (goals), which may compound early academic and social deficits. This research compared the teacher- and student-rated goals of 57 children at two age levels, who were average learners, had a reading problem/disability (RP), and were hyperactive or…

Zentall, Sydney S.; Beike, Suzanne M.

2012-01-01

119

Social Supports from Teachers and Peers as Predictors of Academic and Social Motivation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Young adolescents' perceptions of teachers' and peers' multiple classroom supports were examined in relation to motivational outcomes (interest and social goal pursuit). Responses from sixth (n = 120), seventh (n = 115), and eighth (n = 123) grade students concerning four dimensions of support (expectations for specific behavioral and academic

Wentzel, Kathryn R.; Battle, Ann; Russell, Shannon L.; Looney, Lisa B.

2010-01-01

120

Effect of peer nominations of teacher-student support at individual and classroom levels on social and academic outcomes.  

PubMed

This longitudinal study examined the prospective relations between 713 elementary students' individual peer teacher support reputation (PTSR) and a measure of the classroom-wide dispersion of peer nominations of teacher support (Centralization of Teacher Support) on students' peer relatedness (i.e., peer acceptance and peer academic reputation) and academic motivation (i.e., academic self-efficacy and teacher-rated behavioral engagement). PTSR was measured as the proportion of classmates who nominated a given student on a descriptor of teacher-student support. Centralization of Teacher Support was assessed using social network analysis to identify the degree to which peer nominations of teacher support in a classroom centered on a few students. PTSR predicted changes in all student outcomes, above academic achievement and relevant covariates. Centralization of Teacher Support predicted changes in students' peer academic reputation, net the effect of PTSR and covariates. Students' academic achievement moderated effects of PTSR and Centralization of Teacher Support on some outcomes. Findings highlight the importance of peers' perceptions of teacher support and of the structure of those perceptions for children's social and academic outcomes. Implications for practice are discussed. PMID:24930822

Hughes, Jan N; Im, Myung Hee; Wehrly, Sarah E

2014-06-01

121

Social Networking Sites and Cognitive Abilities: Do They Make You Smarter?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of social networking sites (SNS) on cognitive abilities and reported levels of social connectedness in adolescents. In order to provide a reliable measure of cognitive skills, standardized tests of verbal ability, working memory, and academic attainment were administered. Students also…

Alloway, Tracy Packiam; Horton, John; Alloway, Ross G.; Dawson, Clare

2013-01-01

122

Service-Learning Project in a First-Year Seminar: A Social Network Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Understanding the effects of a service-learning component on the classroom culture, socially and academically, brings a novel perspective to designing, executing, and assessing these types of active-learning projects. This paper evaluates the success of a service-learning project from a perspective of social networks by investigating the question:…

Teymuroglu, Zeynep

2013-01-01

123

Network Models for Social Influence Processes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Generalizes the p* class of models for social network data to predict individual-level attributes from network ties. The p* family is a class of models for social networks with parameters reflecting a wide variety of possible structural features. Illustrates the models with an empirical example involving a training course, with trainees' reactions…

Robins, Garry; Pattison, Philippa; Elliott, Peter

2001-01-01

124

Age and Gender Differences in Global, Academic, Social, and Athletic Self-Concepts in Academically Talented Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined age and gender differences in global, academic, athletic, and social self concepts in a group of 311 middle and high school students (ages 12-18) attending science, mathematics, or computer science classes at a summer program for the academically talented. The self-concept scores were obtained from the Rosenberg Self-Esteem…

Gabelko, Nina Hersch; And Others

125

Knowledge and Social Networks in Yahoo! Answers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study defines and explores relations between knowledge-seeking and social relationship networks, using data from a popular Q&A social network site. Our theoretical framework draws on Motivation, Common-goods, and Social capital theories to generate an understanding of the interrelationship of the two types of networks. A dataset consisting of 19 months of activity on Q&A Yahoo! Answers provides the basis

Amit Rechavi; Sheizaf Rafaeli

2012-01-01

126

The ART of Social Networking: How SART member clinics are connecting with patients online  

PubMed Central

Objective To study and describe the use of social networking websites among SART member clinics Design Cross-sectional study Setting University Based Practice Patients Not Applicable Interventions Not Applicable Main Outcome Measure Prevalence of social networking websites among SART member clinics and evaluation of content, volume and location (i.e mandated state, region) using multivariate regression analysis Results 384 SART registered clinics and 1,382 social networking posts were evaluated. Of the clinics, 96% have a website and 30% link to a social networking website. The majority of clinics (89%) with social networking websites were affiliated with non-academic centers. Social networking posts mostly provide information (31%) and/or advertise (28%), while the remaining offer support (19%) or are irrelevant (17%) to the target audience. Only 5% of posts involved patients requesting information. Clinic volume correlates with the presence of a clinic website and a social networking website (p<0.001). Conclusion Almost all SART member clinics have a website. Nearly one-third of these clinics host a social networking website like Facebook, Twitter and/or a Web-log (“blog”). Larger volume clinics commonly host social networking websites. These sites provide new ways to communicate with patients, but clinics should maintain policies on the incorporation of social networks into practice. PMID:22088209

OMURTAG, Kenan; JIMENEZ, Patricia T.; RATTS, Valerie; ODEM, Randall; COOPER, Amber R.

2013-01-01

127

Social Representations of American History and Academic Engagement and Performance of African American Students  

E-print Network

Previous research has shown that social representations of one’s social groups can influence academic outcomes for racial and ethnic minority students in the United States. Other research has found that representations of American history have...

Thai, Luyen T.

2014-04-29

128

Social Networks in Health Care: Communication, collaboration and insights  

E-print Network

-to-one media, 2007. #12;Issue Brief: Social Networks in Health Care: Communication, collaboration and insights 2 Business use of social networks Social networks transmit media such as video, web logs (blogs of Online Social Networks: A look at the change in demographics of social network users over time. The Pe

Klein, Ophir

129

Bayesian Networks for Social Modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes a body of work developed over the past five years. The work addresses the use of Bayesian network (BN) models for representing and predicting social/organizational behaviors. The topics covered include model construction, validation, and use. These topics show the bulk of the lifetime of such model, beginning with construction, moving to validation and other aspects of model "critiquing", and finally demonstrating how the modeling approach might be used to inform policy analysis. The primary benefits of using a well-developed computational, mathematical, and statistical modeling structure, such as BN, are 1) there are significant computational, theoretical and capability bases on which to build 2) the ability to empirically critique the model, and potentially evaluate competing models for a social/behavioral phenomenon.

Whitney, Paul; White, Amanda; Walsh, Stephen; Dalton, Angela; Brothers, Alan

130

Essays on social networks in development economics  

E-print Network

This thesis examines the role that social networks play in developing economies. The first two chapters analyze econometric issues that arise when researchers work with sampled network data. The final two chapters study ...

Chandrasekhar, Arun Gautham

2012-01-01

131

Adolescents' Fear of Social Consequences of Academic Success as a Function of Age and Sex.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Fear of Success Consequence Scale was used to assess early and mid-adolescents' fears of potential social consequences of academic success. Results indicated that fear of academic success decreased through adolescence and girls generally had a greater fear of academic success. (DWH)

Ishiyama, F. Ishu; Chabassol, David J.

1985-01-01

132

Assessing Academic Advising Outcomes Using Social Cognitive Theory: A Validity and Reliability Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The validity and reliability of three instruments, the "Counselor Rubric for Gauging Student Understanding of Academic Planning," micro-analytic questions, and the "Student Survey for Understanding Academic Planning," all based on social cognitive theory, were tested as means to assess self-efficacy and self-regulated learning in college academic

Erlich, Richard J.; Russ-Eft, Darlene F.

2012-01-01

133

Meerkat: Community Mining with Dynamic Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Meerkat is a tool for visualization and community mining of social networks. It is being developed to offer novel algorithms and functionality that other tools do not possess. Meerkat's features include navigation through graphical representations of networks, network querying and filtering, a multitude of graphical layout algorithms, community mining using recently developed algorithms, and dynamic network event analysis using recently

Jiyang Chen; Justin Fagnan; Randy Goebel; Reihaneh Rabbany; Farzad Sangi; Mansoureh Takaffoli; Eric Verbeek; Osmar R. Zaïane

2010-01-01

134

Huge Computer Network Quickens Pace of Academic Exchange and Collaboration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Internet, a network of computer networks, offers scholars an unprecedented array of information resources and professional communication options. At the same time, the complexity of some system features has frustrated many, and it has not been in high demand among academics. Efforts are being made to orient users better. (MSE)

Wilson, David L.

1992-01-01

135

Academic Literacy Socialization of First Year Doctoral Students in US: A Micro-Ethnographic Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study reports findings from a micro-ethnographic analysis of the academic literacy socialization of six multilingual students in the field of education as they progressed through their first-year of doctoral education. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the academic socialization processes that these multilingual students…

Seloni, Lisya

2012-01-01

136

Classroom Victimization: Consequences for Social and Academic Adjustment in Elementary School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Peer victimization is a well-established risk factor for children's adjustment, but it has rarely been studied as a feature of classroom climate. This study examines the consequences of classroom victimization for children's social and academic adjustment. Classroom victimization, social functioning, and academic adjustment were assessed…

Reuland, Meg M.; Mikami, Amori Yee

2014-01-01

137

Academic and Social Impairments of Elementary School Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined academic and social impairments of 6- to 11-year-old children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; n = 101) versus other referred children without ADHD (n = 53) and controls (n = 24). Parent and teacher ratings showed significantly lower academic performance and lower social functioning for children with ADHD…

McConaughy, Stephanie H.; Volpe, Robert J.; Antshel, Kevin M.; Gordon, Michael; Eiraldi, Ricardo B.

2011-01-01

138

Peer-perceived social competence and academic achievement of low-level educated young adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study focuses on the relationship between peer-rated social competence and academic\\u000asuccess among teenagers of the lowest level of Dutch general secondary education. At this\\u000aeducational level, an uninterested or even a mildly depreciative attitude toward academic\\u000aachievements is anticipated. As a result, it is expected that the relationship between academic\\u000aperformance and peer-perceived social competence should be void

G. H. Maassen; J. A. Landsheer

2002-01-01

139

The relation between extracurricular activities with academic and social competencies in school age children: a meta-analysis  

E-print Network

There has been a growing discussion in the fields of education and psychology about the relationship between social skill proficiency and academic excellence. However, the presence of extracurricular involvement as promoting both academic and social...

Lewis, Charla P.

2005-11-01

140

Motivations for social networking at work  

Microsoft Academic Search

The introduction of a social networking site inside of a large enterprise enables a new method of communication between colleagues, encouraging both personal and professional sharing inside the protected walls of a company intranet. Our analysis of user behavior and interviews presents the case that professionals use internal social networking to build stronger bonds with their weak ties and to

Joan Morris Dimicco; David R. Millen; Werner Geyer; Casey Dugan; Beth Brownholtz; Michael J. Muller

2008-01-01

141

Happiness is assortative in online social networks.  

PubMed

Online social networking communities may exhibit highly complex and adaptive collective behaviors. Since emotions play such an important role in human decision making, how online networks modulate human collective mood states has become a matter of considerable interest. In spite of the increasing societal importance of online social networks, it is unknown whether assortative mixing of psychological states takes place in situations where social ties are mediated solely by online networking services in the absence of physical contact. Here, we show that the general happiness, or subjective well-being (SWB), of Twitter users, as measured from a 6-month record of their individual tweets, is indeed assortative across the Twitter social network. Our results imply that online social networks may be equally subject to the social mechanisms that cause assortative mixing in real social networks and that such assortative mixing takes place at the level of SWB. Given the increasing prevalence of online social networks, their propensity to connect users with similar levels of SWB may be an important factor in how positive and negative sentiments are maintained and spread through human society. Future research may focus on how event-specific mood states can propagate and influence user behavior in "real life." PMID:21554117

Bollen, Johan; Gonçalves, Bruno; Ruan, Guangchen; Mao, Huina

2011-01-01

142

Competitive Influence Maximization in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks often serve as a medium for the diffusion of ideas or innovations. An individual's decision whether to adopt a prod- uct or innovation will be highly dependent on the choices made by the individual's peers or neighbors in the social network. In this work, we study the game of innovation diffusion with multiple competing innova- tions such as

Shishir Bharathi; David Kempe; Mahyar Salek

2007-01-01

143

Finding Experts Using Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Searching an organization's document repositories for experts is a frequently occurred problem in intranet information management. A common method for finding experts in an organization is to use social networks - people are not isolated but connected by various kinds of associations. In organizations, people explicitly send email to one another thus social networks are likely to be contained in

Yupeng Fu; Rongjing Xiang; Yiqun Liu; Min Zhang; Shaoping Ma

2007-01-01

144

Vizster: Visualizing Online Social Networks Jeffrey Heer  

E-print Network

, and online dating services. In 2003, another form of online community acquired stunning popularity: onlineVizster: Visualizing Online Social Networks Jeffrey Heer Computer Science Division University, Berkeley ABSTRACT Recent years have witnessed the dramatic popularity of online social networking services

Hearst, Marti

145

Social Networking on the Semantic Web  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Aims to investigate the way that the semantic web is being used to represent and process social network information. Design/methodology/approach: The Swoogle semantic web search engine was used to construct several large data sets of Resource Description Framework (RDF) documents with social network information that were encoded using the…

Finin, Tim; Ding, Li; Zhou, Lina; Joshi, Anupam

2005-01-01

146

Online Games, Virtual Worlds, and Social Networks  

E-print Network

JOUR 447: Online Games, Virtual Worlds, and Social Networks Virtual Island Making #12;One element how to use the game engine, Unity3D. Following the same instructions, each student creatively designed in the look and design of the virtual islands. JOUR 447: Online Games, Virtual Worlds, and Social Networks

Hemmers, Oliver

147

Skills for Social and Academic Success: A School-Based Intervention for Social Anxiety Disorder in Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes Skills for Academic and Social Success (SASS), a cognitive-behavioral, school-based intervention for adolescents with social anxiety disorder. Clinic-based treatment studies for socially anxious youth are reviewed, and a strong rationale for transporting empirically-based interventions into schools, such as SASS, is provided.…

Fisher, Paige H.; Masia-Warner, Carrie; Klein, Rachel G.

2004-01-01

148

Network analysis in the social sciences.  

PubMed

Over the past decade, there has been an explosion of interest in network research across the physical and social sciences. For social scientists, the theory of networks has been a gold mine, yielding explanations for social phenomena in a wide variety of disciplines from psychology to economics. Here, we review the kinds of things that social scientists have tried to explain using social network analysis and provide a nutshell description of the basic assumptions, goals, and explanatory mechanisms prevalent in the field. We hope to contribute to a dialogue among researchers from across the physical and social sciences who share a common interest in understanding the antecedents and consequences of network phenomena. PMID:19213908

Borgatti, Stephen P; Mehra, Ajay; Brass, Daniel J; Labianca, Giuseppe

2009-02-13

149

Information Filtering on Coupled Social Networks  

PubMed Central

In this paper, based on the coupled social networks (CSN), we propose a hybrid algorithm to nonlinearly integrate both social and behavior information of online users. Filtering algorithm, based on the coupled social networks, considers the effects of both social similarity and personalized preference. Experimental results based on two real datasets, Epinions and Friendfeed, show that the hybrid pattern can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also enlarge the recommendation coverage while adopting global metric. Further empirical analyses demonstrate that the mutual reinforcement and rich-club phenomenon can also be found in coupled social networks where the identical individuals occupy the core position of the online system. This work may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of the structure and function of coupled social networks. PMID:25003525

Nie, Da-Cheng; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Zhou, Jun-Lin; Fu, Yan; Zhang, Kui

2014-01-01

150

Unifying Social Networks for Smart Phones  

E-print Network

are operated from an Android device application which provides the user interface for the whole Social Unifier and LinkedIn. The tool developed is a system that has been called Social Unifier, which contains three main networking functionalities. First of all, Social Unifier is built over a NoSQL database system called Borges

151

Learning influence probabilities in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, there has been tremendous interest in the phe- nomenon of influence propagation in social networks. The studies in this area assume they have as input to their prob- lems a social graph with edges labeled with probabilities of influence between users. However, the question of where these probabilities come from or how they can be computed from real social

Amit Goyal; Francesco Bonchi; Laks V. S. Lakshmanan

2010-01-01

152

ENGAGE: A Blueprint for Incorporating Social Skills Training Into Daily Academic Instruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Student success in school depends, in part, on adequate social-interpersonal skills. Yet, in a time when all students are expected to reach specified academic goals, school personnel are hard-pressed to find ways to address the social-interpersonal behavior needs of their students. In this article, the authors discuss practical ways for teachers to infuse social skills into academic instruction. The authors

Naomi A. Schoenfeld; Robert B. Rutherford; Robert A. Gable; Marcia L. Rock

2008-01-01

153

Davis Social Links: Leveraging Social Networks for Future Internet Communication  

E-print Network

to revoke access to itself (or its identity) if it is being abused. An email address, which al- lows anyDavis Social Links: Leveraging Social Networks for Future Internet Communication Lerone Banks communication ar- chitecture for future Internet designs. We begin with a con- ceptual discussion of how future

California at Davis, University of

154

Social-Tie-Based Information Dissemination in Mobile Opportunistic Social Networks  

E-print Network

Social-Tie-Based Information Dissemination in Mobile Opportunistic Social Networks Yunsheng Wang Opportunistic Social Networks Motivation Social-Tie-based Information Dissemination Tie Strength Calculation the properties of social networks and opportunistic networks #12;Motivation "The Strength of Weak Ties": Mark

Wu, Jie

155

An Introduction to Social Network Data Analytics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The advent of online social networks has been one of the most exciting events in this decade. Many popular online social networks such as Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook have become increasingly popular. In addition, a number of multimedia networks such as Flickr have also seen an increasing level of popularity in recent years. Many such social networks are extremely rich in content, and they typically contain a tremendous amount of content and linkage data which can be leveraged for analysis. The linkage data is essentially the graph structure of the social network and the communications between entities; whereas the content data contains the text, images and other multimedia data in the network. The richness of this network provides unprecedented opportunities for data analytics in the context of social networks. This book provides a data-centric view of online social networks; a topic which has been missing from much of the literature. This chapter provides an overview of the key topics in this field, and their coverage in this book.

Aggarwal, Charu C.

156

Evolutionary Information Diffusion over Social Networks  

E-print Network

Social networks have become ubiquitous in our daily life, as such it has attracted great research interests recently. A key challenge is that it is of extremely large-scale with tremendous information flow, creating the phenomenon of "Big Data". Under such a circumstance, understanding information diffusion over social networks has become an important research issue. Most of the existing works on information diffusion analysis are based on either network structure modeling or empirical approach with dataset mining. However, the information diffusion is also heavily influenced by network users' decisions, actions and their socio-economic connections, which is generally ignored in existing works. In this paper, we propose an evolutionary game theoretic framework to model the dynamic information diffusion process in social networks. Specifically, we analyze the framework in uniform degree and non-uniform degree networks and derive the closed-form expressions of the evolutionary stable network states. Moreover, t...

Jiang, Chunxiao; Liu, K J Ray

2013-01-01

157

Mobilizing Ideas in Knowledge Networks: A Social Network Analysis of the Human Resource Management Community 1990-2005  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to show the role of social networks in mobilizing how actors both impact and are impacted on by their colleagues. It seeks to compare the human resource management (HRM) academic community with two other comparable communities, and to identify those groups that are seen to work closely together.…

Henneberg, Stephan C.; Swart, Juani; Naude, Peter; Jiang, Zhizhong; Mouzas, Stefanos

2009-01-01

158

Convening a Network within the European Conference on Educational Research: A History of the Social Justice and Intercultural Education Network  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The experience of initiating and sustaining a research-based dialogue on social justice and intercultural education in Europe requires both flexibility and focus. This article highlights the challenges facing convenors of one network, who wish to include researchers from diverse backgrounds, while at the same time enhancing the academic quality of…

Bhatti, Ghazala; Leeman, Yvonne

2011-01-01

159

Social Networks and Political Participation: How Do Networks Matter?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite great interest in the role of social networks as channels of political mobilization, few studies have examined which types of social networks work more effectively in recruiting political activists. Using the Citizen Participation Study data, this study shows that contrary to the conventional wisdom in the literature, there is little…

Lim, Chaeyoon

2008-01-01

160

Skills for Social and Academic Success: A School-Based Intervention for Social Anxiety Disorder in Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes Skills for Academic and Social Success (SASS), a cognitive–behavioral, school-based intervention for adolescents with social anxiety disorder. Clinic-based treatment studies for socially anxious youth are reviewed, and a strong rationale for transporting empirically-based interventions into schools, such as SASS, is provided. The SASS program consists of 12, 40-min group sessions that emphasize social skills and in-vivo exposure.

Paige H. Fisher; Carrie Masia-Warner; Rachel G. Klein

2004-01-01

161

Data Leak Aware Crowdsourcing in Social Network  

E-print Network

Harnessing human computation for solving complex problems call spawns the issue of finding the unknown competitive group of solvers. In this paper, we propose an approach called Friendlysourcing to build up teams from social network answering a business call, all the while avoiding partial solution disclosure to competitive groups. The contributions of this paper include (i) a clustering based approach for discovering collaborative and competitive team in social network (ii) a Markov-chain based algorithm for discovering implicit interactions in the social network.

Amor, Iheb Ben; Ouziri, Mourad; Benbernou, Salima; Nadif, Mohamed

2013-01-01

162

Can Socially Adept Friends Protect Peer-Victimized Early Adolescents against Lower Academic Competence?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examined indices of friends' social adjustment (prosocial skills and social anxiety) that may protect against or exacerbate vulnerability to lower academic competence in the context of peer victimization during middle school (N=320). Peer victimization was assessed with peer nominations, social anxiety was measured with self…

Tu, Kelly M.; Erath, Stephen A.; Flanagan, Kelly S.

2012-01-01

163

How women organize social networks different from men  

E-print Network

Superpositions of social networks, such as communication, friendship, or trade networks, are called multiplex networks, forming the structural backbone of human societies. Novel datasets now allow quantification and ...

Szell, Michael

164

Disease dynamics in a dynamic social network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We develop a framework for simulating a realistic, evolving social network (a city) into which a disease is introduced. We compare our results to prevaccine era measles data for England and Wales, and find that they capture the quantitative and qualitative features of epidemics in populations spanning two orders of magnitude. Our results provide unique insight into how and why the social topology of the contact network influences the propagation of the disease through the population. We argue that network simulation is suitable for concurrently probing contact network dynamics and disease dynamics in ways that prior modeling approaches cannot and it can be extended to the study of less well-documented diseases.

Christensen, Claire; Albert, István; Grenfell, Bryan; Albert, Réka

2010-07-01

165

Social Networks are Encoded in Language  

E-print Network

Knowledge regarding social information is thought to be derived from many different sources, such as interviews and formal relationships. Social networks can likewise be generated from such external information. Recent work has demonstrated that statistical linguistic data can explain findings thought to be explained by external factors alone, such as perceptual relations. The current study explored whether language implicitly comprises information that allows for extracting social networks, by testing the hypothesis that individuals who are socially related together are linguistically talked about together, as well as the hypothesis that individuals who are socially related more are talked about more. In the first analysis using first-order cooccurrences of names of characters in the Harry Potter novels we found that an MDS solution correlated with the actual social network of characters as rated by humans. In a second study using higher-order co-occurrences, a latent semantic analysis (LSA) space was trained on all seven Harry Potter novels. LSA cosine values for all character pairs were obtained, marking their semantic similarity. Again, an MDS analysis comparing the LSA data with the actual social relationships yielded a significant bidimensional regression. These results demonstrate that linguistic information indeed encodes social relationship information and show that implicit information within language can generate social networks.

Sterling Hutchinson; Vivek Datla; Max M. Louwerse

166

An agent model of social network and travel behavior interdependence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Travel is a prerequisite for activities which maintain social and business connections, building the vital social networks which conduct the flow of values, services, and opportunity. This paper presents a multi-agent simulation to study linked geographical and social spaces. The model simultaneously generates a social network and travel behavior by defining social-networking visits as travel activities. Information about space and

Jeremy Hackney; Kay W. Axhausen

167

Small "p" Publishing: A Networked Blogging Approach to Academic Discourse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article highlights a middle ground for academic publishing between formal peer-reviewed journals and informal blogging that we call "Small "p" Publishing." Having implemented and tested a publishing network that illustrates this middle ground, we describe its unique contributions to scholars and learning communities. Three features that…

Martin, Julia W.; Hughes, Brian

2012-01-01

168

Cyber threats in social networking websites  

E-print Network

A social network is a social structure made up of individuals or organizations called nodes, which are connected by one or more specific types of interdependency, such as friendship, common interest, and exchange of finance, relationships of beliefs, knowledge or prestige. A cyber threat can be both unintentional and intentional, targeted or non targeted, and it can come from a variety of sources, including foreign nations engaged in espionage and information warfare, criminals, hackers, virus writers, disgruntled employees and contractors working within an organization. Social networking sites are not only to communicate or interact with other people globally, but also one effective way for business promotion. In this paper, we investigate and study the cyber threats in social networking websites. We go through the amassing history of online social websites, classify their types and also discuss the cyber threats, suggest the anti-threats strategies and visualize the future trends of such hoppy popular websi...

Gharibi, Wajeb

2012-01-01

169

Sociapedia : online collaboration over a social network  

E-print Network

This paper introduces Sociapedia, a collaborative social network application that encourages friends to contribute content about each other. Sociapedia is designed upon the same principles that allowed ordinary web users ...

Kedia, Mihir

2009-01-01

170

Diffusion of innovations in social networks  

E-print Network

While social networks do affect diffusion of innovations, the exact nature of these effects are far from clear, and, in many cases, there exist conflicting hypotheses among researchers. In this paper, we focus on the linear ...

Acemoglu, Daron

171

Delivery properties of human social networks  

E-print Network

The recently proposed packet switched network paradigm takes advantage of human social contacts to opportunistically create data paths over time. Our goal is to examine the effect of the human contact process on data ...

Sollins, Karen R.

172

Social Networks in Improvement of Health Care  

PubMed Central

Social network is a social structure made of individuals or organizations associated with one or more types of interdependence (friendship, common interests, work, knowledge, prestige, etc.) which are the “nodes” of the network. Networks can be organized to exchange information, knowledge or financial assistance under the various interest groups in universities, workplaces and associations of citizens. Today the most popular and widely used networks are based on application of the Internet as the main ICT. Depending on the method of connection, their field of activity and expertise of those who participate in certain networks, the network can be classified into the following groups: a) Social Networks with personal physical connectivity (the citizens’ associations, transplant networks, etc.), b) Global social internet network (Facebook, Twitter, Skype), c) specific health internet social network (forums, Health Care Forums, Healthcare Industry Forum), d) The health community internet network of non professionals (DailyStrength, CaringBridge, CarePages, MyFamilyHealth), e) Scientific social internet network (BiomedExperts, ResearchGate, iMedExchange), f) Social internet network which supported professionals (HealthBoards, Spas and Hope Association of Disabled and diabetic Enurgi), g) Scientific medical internet network databases in the system of scientific and technical information (CC, Pubmed/Medline, Excerpta Medica/EMBASE, ISI Web Knowledge, EBSCO, Index Copernicus, Social Science Index, etc.). The information in the network are exchanged in real time and in a way that has until recently been impossible in real life of people in the community. Networks allow tens of thousands of specific groups of people performing a series of social, professional and educational activities in the place of living and housing, place of work or other locations where individuals are. Network provides access to information related to education, health, nutrition, drugs, procedures, etc., which gives a special emphasis on public health aspects of information, especially in the field of medicine and health care. The authors of this paper discuss the role and practical importance of social networks in improving the health and solving of health problems without the physical entrance into the health care system. Social networks have their advantages and disadvantages, benefits and costs, especially when it comes to information which within the network set unprofessional people from unreliable sources, without an adequate selection. The ethical aspect of the norms in this segment is still not adequately regulated, so any sanctions for the unauthorized and malicious use of social networks in private and other purposes in order to obtain personal gain at the expense of individuals or groups (sick or healthy, owners of certain businesses and companies, health organizations and pharmaceutical manufacturers, etc.), for which there is still no global or European codes and standards of conduct. Cyber crime is now one of the mostly present types of crime in modern times, as evidenced by numerous scandals that are happening both globally and locally. PMID:23922516

Masic, Izet; Sivic, Suad; Toromanovic, Selim; Borojevic, Tea; Pandza, Haris

2012-01-01

173

Social networks in improvement of health care.  

PubMed

Social network is a social structure made of individuals or organizations associated with one or more types of interdependence (friendship, common interests, work, knowledge, prestige, etc.) which are the "nodes" of the network. Networks can be organized to exchange information, knowledge or financial assistance under the various interest groups in universities, workplaces and associations of citizens. Today the most popular and widely used networks are based on application of the Internet as the main ICT. Depending on the method of connection, their field of activity and expertise of those who participate in certain networks, the network can be classified into the following groups: a) Social Networks with personal physical connectivity (the citizens' associations, transplant networks, etc.), b) Global social internet network (Facebook, Twitter, Skype), c) specific health internet social network (forums, Health Care Forums, Healthcare Industry Forum), d) The health community internet network of non professionals (DailyStrength, CaringBridge, CarePages, MyFamilyHealth), e) Scientific social internet network (BiomedExperts, ResearchGate, iMedExchange), f) Social internet network which supported professionals (HealthBoards, Spas and Hope Association of Disabled and diabetic Enurgi), g) Scientific medical internet network databases in the system of scientific and technical information (CC, Pubmed/Medline, Excerpta Medica/EMBASE, ISI Web Knowledge, EBSCO, Index Copernicus, Social Science Index, etc.). The information in the network are exchanged in real time and in a way that has until recently been impossible in real life of people in the community. Networks allow tens of thousands of specific groups of people performing a series of social, professional and educational activities in the place of living and housing, place of work or other locations where individuals are. Network provides access to information related to education, health, nutrition, drugs, procedures, etc., which gives a special emphasis on public health aspects of information, especially in the field of medicine and health care. The authors of this paper discuss the role and practical importance of social networks in improving the health and solving of health problems without the physical entrance into the health care system. Social networks have their advantages and disadvantages, benefits and costs, especially when it comes to information which within the network set unprofessional people from unreliable sources, without an adequate selection. The ethical aspect of the norms in this segment is still not adequately regulated, so any sanctions for the unauthorized and malicious use of social networks in private and other purposes in order to obtain personal gain at the expense of individuals or groups (sick or healthy, owners of certain businesses and companies, health organizations and pharmaceutical manufacturers, etc.), for which there is still no global or European codes and standards of conduct. Cyber crime is now one of the mostly present types of crime in modern times, as evidenced by numerous scandals that are happening both globally and locally. PMID:23922516

Masic, Izet; Sivic, Suad; Toromanovic, Selim; Borojevic, Tea; Pandza, Haris

2012-01-01

174

A Collaborative Cloud-Based Multimedia Sharing Platform for Social Networking Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The amount of multimedia content on the internet has been growing at a remarkable rate, and users are increasingly looking to share online media with colleagues and friends on social networks. Several commercial and academic solutions have attempted to make it easier to share this large variety of online content with others, but they are generally limited to sending links.

Cristian Gadea; Bogdan Solomon; Bogdan Ionescu; Dan Ionescu

2011-01-01

175

Digital gaming and social networking: English teachers' perceptions, attitudes and experiences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elements of popular culture, in particular the film and song genres, have already been integrated into the senior curriculum in Hong Kong. While academic researchers advocate the inclusion of online social networking and video gaming as curricular alternatives to connect learners to digital literacy practices, its reception by teachers has yet to be fully explored. This paper reports on an

Alice Chik

2011-01-01

176

Features of Digital African American Language in a Social Network Site  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines a social network site (SNS) where specific interlocutors communicate by combining aspects of academic American English (AE), digital language (DL), and African American Language (AAL)--creating a digital form of AAL or digital AAL (DAAL). This article describes the features of DAAL in the discursive, online context of MySpace,…

Cunningham, Jennifer M.

2014-01-01

177

Impact of Online Social Network on American College Students' Reading Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate social networking sites (SNS) and ways college students spend their time on both conventional academic and recreational reading. A total of 1,265 (466 male and 799 female) college students voluntarily participated in the study by completing a self-report survey. Descriptive analysis indicated that the…

Huang, SuHua; Capps, Matthew

2013-01-01

178

SuperNova: Super-peers based architecture for decentralized online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent years have seen several earnest initiatives from both academic researchers as well as open source communities to implement and deploy decentralized online social networks (DOSNs). The primary motivations for DOSNs are privacy and autonomy from big brotherly service providers. However decentralization introduces many challenges. One of the principal problems is to guarantee availability of data even when the data

Rajesh Sharma; Anwitaman Datta

2012-01-01

179

SuperNova: Super-peers Based Architecture for Decentralized Online Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent years have seen several earnest initiatives from both academic researchers as well as open source communities to implement and deploy decentralized online social networks (DOSNs). The primary motivations for DOSNs are privacy and autonomy from big brotherly service providers. The promise of decentralization is complete freedom for end-users from any service providers both in terms of keeping privacy about

Rajesh Sharma; Anwitaman Datta

2011-01-01

180

Enterprise social networks : engaging employees and sustaining participation  

E-print Network

Social relationships pervade every aspect of human life and development of social networks at work is inevitable. Enterprise social networking solutions provide a platform for employees to formally foster these professional ...

Sharma, Payal

2014-01-01

181

The social brain network and autism.  

PubMed

Available research data in Autism suggests the role of a network of brain areas, often known as the 'social brain'. Recent studies highlight the role of genetic mutations as underlying patho-mechanism in Autism. This mini review, discusses the basic concepts behind social brain networks, theory of mind and genetic factors associated with Autism. It critically evaluates and explores the relationship between the behavioral outcomes and genetic factors providing a conceptual framework for understanding of autism. PMID:25206065

Misra, Vivek

2014-04-01

182

Social network analysis and dual rover communications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social network analysis (SNA) refers to the collection of techniques, tools, and methods used in sociometry aiming at the analysis of social networks to investigate decision making, group communication, and the distribution of information. Human factors engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted a social network analysis on communication data collected during a 14-day field study operating a dual rover exploration mission to better understand the relationships between certain network groups such as ground control, flight teams, and planetary science. The analysis identified two communication network structures for the continuous communication and Twice-a-Day Communication scenarios as a split network and negotiated network respectfully. The major nodes or groups for the networks' architecture, transmittal status, and information were identified using graphical network mapping, quantitative analysis of subjective impressions, and quantified statistical analysis using Sociometric Statue and Centrality. Post-questionnaire analysis along with interviews revealed advantages and disadvantages of each network structure with team members identifying the need for a more stable continuous communication network, improved robustness of voice loops, and better systems training/capabilities for scientific imagery data and operational data during Twice-a-Day Communications.

Litaker, Harry L.; Howard, Robert L.

2013-10-01

183

Academic performance and social competence of adolescents: predictions based on effortful control and empathy.  

PubMed

This study explored the predictive power of effortful control (EC) on empathy, academic performance, and social competence in adolescents. We obtained self-report measures of EC and dispositional empathy in 359 students (197 girls and 162 boys) aged between 12 and 14 years. Each student provided information about the prosocial behavior of the rest of his/her classmates and completed a sociogram. At the end of the school year, we calculated the mean grade of each student and the teacher responsible for each class completed a questionnaire on the academic skills of his/her students. The study confirmed the existence of a structural equation model (SEM) in which EC directly predicted academic performance and social competence. Additionally, empathic concern partially mediated the effect of EC on social competence. Finally, social competence significantly predicted academic performance. The article discusses the practical applications of the model proposed. PMID:24230950

Zorza, Juan P; Marino, Julián; de Lemus, Soledad; Acosta Mesas, Alberto

2013-01-01

184

Perceived Social Support and Academic Achievement: Cross-Lagged Panel and Bivariate Growth Curve Analyses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As students transition to post-secondary education, they experience considerable stress and declines in academic performance. Perceived social support is thought to improve academic achievement by reducing stress. Longitudinal designs with three or more waves are needed in this area because they permit stronger causal inferences and help…

Mackinnon, Sean P.

2012-01-01

185

Personal and Social Support Factors Involved in Students' Decision to Participate in Formal Academic Mentoring  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, we examined the role of personal and social support factors involved in students' decision to participate in formal academic mentoring. Three hundred and eighteen students completing Grade 11 and planning to study sciences in college filled out a questionnaire and were then asked to participate in an academic mentoring program…

Larose, Simon; Cyrenne, Diane; Garceau, Odette; Harvey, Marylou; Guay, Frederic; Deschenes, Claire

2009-01-01

186

Taming the River: Negotiating the Academic, Financial, and Social Currents in Selective Colleges and Universities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Building on their important findings in "The Source of the River," the authors now probe even more deeply into minority underachievement at the college level. "Taming the River" examines the academic and social dynamics of different ethnic groups during the first two years of college. Focusing on racial differences in academic performance, the…

Charles, Camille Z.; Fischer, Mary J.; Mooney, Margarita A.; Massey, Douglas S.

2009-01-01

187

Academic Dismissal, Readmission Conditions, and Retention: A Study of Social Science Majors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study assessed the effectiveness of an institution's academic readmission conditions on the subsequent success of about 500 social science majors. Results show specific ethnic, age, and academic experience subgroups to be at highest risk. However, success among those readmitted was most related to gender, quality point deficit, and readmission…

Kinloch, Graham C.; And Others

1993-01-01

188

Legal Employment at Midcareer: The Influence of Social and Academic Origins.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study analyzed the relative influence of individual social origins and academic achievement in organizational recruitment and practice outcomes for legal careers. It investigated the effects of background characteristics and academic performance measures for a national sample of college seniors on types of legal practices 25 years after…

Lena, Hugh F.; And Others

189

Psychological Parameters of Students' Social and Academic Goals: A Qualitative Investigation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students' goals (motives) for their schooling have been the focus of much recent research and have been shown to significantly influence important aspects of their cognitive engagement and academic achievement. This paper presents the results of a qualitative investigation into the nature and characteristics of students' social and academic goals,…

Dowson, Martin; McInerney, Dennis M.

190

Social Cognitive Predictors of Mexican American College Students' Academic and Life Satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we used Lent's (2004) social cognitive model of well being to examine the academic and life satisfaction of 457 Mexican American college students attending a Hispanic-Serving Institution. Using structural equation modeling, results indicated that the model provided a good fit to the data. Specifically, we found positive relations from positive affect to enculturation, acculturation, college self-efficacy, academic

Lizette Ojeda; Lisa Y. Flores; Rachel L. Navarro

2011-01-01

191

The Mechanics of Social Capital and Academic Performance in an Indian College  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we examine how social capital affects the creation of human capital. Specifically, we study how college students' peers affect academic performance. Building on existing research, we consider the different types of peers in the academic context and the various mechanisms through which peers affect performance. We test our…

Hasan, Sharique; Bagde, Surendrakumar

2013-01-01

192

Social networking has completely transformed social life in the online world. It has become  

E-print Network

. This article discusses malware infection strategies used by attackers to infect social networking web sites and cons in its own sphere, though, and social networking web sites are no different. Online social networks, being a part of the Web 2.0 world, are prone to attacks and malware infections. Social networks

Enbody, Richard

193

A Model of Academic Self-Concept: Perceived Difficulty and Social Comparison among Academically Accelerated Secondary School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Academic self-concept predicts students' future goals and is affected by a student's relative success compared with his or her peer group. This exploratory study used structural equation modeling to examine the contributions of the perceived level of difficulty of the curriculum, in addition to the contributions of social comparison and…

Wilson, Hope E.; Siegle, Del; McCoach, D. Betsy; Little, Catherine A.; Reis, Sally M.

2014-01-01

194

A SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS APPROACH TO UNDERSTAND CHANGES IN A CANCER DISPARITIES COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP NETWORK  

PubMed Central

The Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TBCCN) is one of the Community Network Program sites funded (2005–10) by the National Cancer Institute’s Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities. TBCCN was tasked to form a sustainable, community-based partnership network focused on the goal of reducing cancer health disparities among racial–ethnic minority and medically underserved populations. This article reports evaluation outcome results from a social network analysis and discusses the varying TBCCN partner roles—in education, training, and research—over a span of three years (2007–09). The network analysis included 20 local community partner organizations covering a tricounty area in Southwest Florida. In addition, multiple externally funded, community-based participatory research pilot projects with community–academic partners have either been completed or are currently in progress, covering research topics including culturally targeted colorectal and prostate cancer screening education, patient navigation focused on preventing cervical cancer in rural Latinas, and community perceptions of biobanking. The social network analysis identified a trend toward increased network decentralization based on betweenness centrality and overall increase in number of linkages, suggesting network sustainability. Degree centrality, trust, and multiplexity exhibited stability over the three-year time period. These results suggest increased interaction and interdependence among partner organizations and less dependence on the cancer center. Social network analysis enabled us to quantitatively evaluate partnership network functioning of TBCCN in terms of network structure and information and resources flows, which are integral to understanding effective coalition practice based on Community Coalition Action Theory ( Butterfoss and Kegler 2009). Sharing the results of the social network analysis with the partnership network is an important component of our coalition building efforts. A comprehensive baseline needs assessment for the next five-year funding phase (2010–15) of TBCCN Community Networks Program Centers (CNP Center) is under way to further evaluate the growth and sustainability of the partnership network, with an emphasis on community-based intervention research that takes into account culture and literacy. [social network, health care disparities, cancer screening] PMID:24363957

Luque, John S.; Tyson, Dinorah Martinez; Bynum, Shalanda A.; Noel-Thomas, Shalewa; Wells, Kristen J.; Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Gwede, Clement K.; Meade, Cathy D.

2013-01-01

195

Dynamic Social Networks Logic Zoe Christoff  

E-print Network

- ship/links such as family ties, being colleagues, or "following" on social media sites ­ in other words of the population is in either of two states: infected with the disease or susceptible to it. This type of models be contracted by being in contact with an infected agent. Consider the social network consisting of agents

Amsterdam, University of

196

Creating Socially Networked Knowledge through Interdisciplinary Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We report on the experience of creating a socially networked system, the Research-oriented Social Environment (RoSE), for representing knowledge in the form of relationships between people, documents, and groups. Developed as an intercampus, interdisciplinary project of the University of California, this work reflects on a collaboration between…

Chuk, Eric; Hoetzlein, Rama; Kim, David; Panko, Julia

2012-01-01

197

SNIF: Social Networking In Fur Jonathan Gips  

E-print Network

: Networking through dogs Not content with being man's best friend, dogs also serve as a very strong social Pets function as natural social devices. Walking a dog in the park can lead to conversations that one. There are more than 65 million owned dogs in the United States, with nearly 40% of US households owning at least

198

Motivating contributors in social media networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite recent advancements in user-driven social media platforms, tools for studying user behavior patterns and motivations remain primitive. We highlight the voluntary nature of user contributions and that users can choose when (and when not) to contribute to the common media pool. We use a Game theoretic framework to study the dynamics of a social media network wherein contribution costs

Vivek K. Singh; Ramesh Jain; Mohan S. Kankanhalli

2009-01-01

199

Social networks and the development of social skills in cowbirds.  

PubMed

The complex interrelationships among individuals within social environments can exert selection pressures on social skills: those behaviours and cognitive processes that allow animals to manipulate and out-reproduce others. Social complexity can also have a developmental effect on social skills by providing individuals with opportunities to hone their skills by dealing with the challenges posed in within-group interactions. We examined how social skills develop in captive, adult male brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) that were exposed to differing levels of 'social complexity' across a 2-year experiment. After each year, subjects housed in groups with dynamic social structure (where many individuals entered and exited the groups during the year) outcompeted birds who had been housed in static groups. Exposure to dynamic structure subsequently led to substantial changes to the social networks of the home conditions during the breeding season. Static groups were characterized by a predictable relationship between singing and reproductive success that was stable across years. In dynamic conditions, however, males showed significant variability in their dominance status, their courting and even in their mating success. Reproductive success of males varied dramatically across years and was responsive to social learning in adulthood, and socially dynamic environments 'trained' individuals to be better competitors, even at an age when the development of many traits important for breeding (like song quality) had ended. PMID:22641827

White, David J; Gersick, Andrew S; Snyder-Mackler, Noah

2012-07-01

200

A Culturally Informed Model of Academic Well-Being for Latino Youth: The Importance of Discriminatory Experiences and Social Support  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study tested a culturally informed model of academic well-being for 278 Latino youth. We examined detrimental effects of discriminatory experiences and protective effects of social support on self-reported academic outcomes. Models specified main and buffering effects of social support and compared contributions of support provided by parents, school, and peers. Data indicated that discrimination was associated with lower academic

David S. DeGarmo; Charles R. Martinez Jr

2006-01-01

201

Behavioral and emotional adjustment, family functioning, academic performance, and social relationships in children with selective mutism.  

PubMed

This study addressed four questions which parents of children with selective mutism (SM) frequently ask: (1) Is SM associated with anxiety or oppositional behavior? (2) Is SM associated with parenting and family dysfunction? (3) Will my child fail at school? and (4) Will my child make friends or be teased and bullied? In comparison to a sample of 52 community controls, 52 children with SM were more anxious, obsessive, and prone to somatic complaints. In contrast, children with SM were less oppositional and evidenced fewer attentional difficulties at school. We found no group differences in family structure, economic resources, family functioning, maternal mood difficulties, recreational activities, or social networks. While parents reported no differences in parenting strategies, children with SM were described as less cooperative in disciplinary situations. The academic (e.g., reading and math) and classroom cooperative skills of children with SM did not differ from controls. Parents and teachers reported that children with SM had significant deficits in social skills. Though teachers and parents rated children with SM as less socially assertive, neither teachers nor parents reported that children with SM were victimized more frequently by peers. PMID:15482497

Cunningham, Charles E; McHolm, Angela; Boyle, Michael H; Patel, Sejal

2004-11-01

202

Socialized Gaussian Process Model for Human Behavior Prediction in a Health Social Network  

E-print Network

Socialized Gaussian Process Model for Human Behavior Prediction in a Health Social Network Yelong behavior in a social network. In this work, we propose a Socialized Gaussian Process (SGP) for socialized behavior factor and social correlation factor into a unified model, where basic Gaussian Process model

Dou, Dejing

203

How Do Online Social Networks Grow?  

PubMed Central

Online social networks such as Facebook, Twitter and Gowalla allow people to communicate and interact across borders. In past years online social networks have become increasingly important for studying the behavior of individuals, group formation, and the emergence of online societies. Here we focus on the characterization of the average growth of online social networks and try to understand which are possible processes behind seemingly long-range temporal correlated collective behavior. In agreement with recent findings, but in contrast to Gibrat's law of proportionate growth, we find scaling in the average growth rate and its standard deviation. In contrast, Renren and Twitter deviate, however, in certain important aspects significantly from those found in many social and economic systems. Whereas independent methods suggest no significance for temporally long-range correlated behavior for Renren and Twitter, a scaling analysis of the standard deviation does suggest long-range temporal correlated growth in Gowalla. However, we demonstrate that seemingly long-range temporal correlations in the growth of online social networks, such as in Gowalla, can be explained by a decomposition into temporally and spatially independent growth processes with a large variety of entry rates. Our analysis thus suggests that temporally or spatially correlated behavior does not play a major role in the growth of online social networks. PMID:24940744

Zhu, Konglin; Li, Wenzhong; Fu, Xiaoming; Nagler, Jan

2014-01-01

204

Developmental stress predicts social network position.  

PubMed

The quantity and quality of social relationships, as captured by social network analysis, can have major fitness consequences. Various studies have shown that individual differences in social behaviour can be due to variation in exposure to developmental stress. However, whether these developmental differences translate to consistent differences in social network position is not known. We experimentally increased levels of the avian stress hormone corticosterone (CORT) in nestling zebra finches in a fully balanced design. Upon reaching nutritional independence, we released chicks and their families into two free-flying rooms, where we measured daily social networks over five weeks using passive integrated transponder tags. Developmental stress had a significant effect on social behaviour: despite having similar foraging patterns, CORT chicks had weaker associations to their parents than control chicks. Instead, CORT chicks foraged with a greater number of flock mates and were less choosy with whom they foraged, resulting in more central network positions. These findings highlight the importance of taking developmental history into account to understand the drivers of social organization in gregarious species. PMID:25354917

Boogert, Neeltje J; Farine, Damien R; Spencer, Karen A

2014-10-01

205

Developmental stress predicts social network position  

PubMed Central

The quantity and quality of social relationships, as captured by social network analysis, can have major fitness consequences. Various studies have shown that individual differences in social behaviour can be due to variation in exposure to developmental stress. However, whether these developmental differences translate to consistent differences in social network position is not known. We experimentally increased levels of the avian stress hormone corticosterone (CORT) in nestling zebra finches in a fully balanced design. Upon reaching nutritional independence, we released chicks and their families into two free-flying rooms, where we measured daily social networks over five weeks using passive integrated transponder tags. Developmental stress had a significant effect on social behaviour: despite having similar foraging patterns, CORT chicks had weaker associations to their parents than control chicks. Instead, CORT chicks foraged with a greater number of flock mates and were less choosy with whom they foraged, resulting in more central network positions. These findings highlight the importance of taking developmental history into account to understand the drivers of social organization in gregarious species. PMID:25354917

Boogert, Neeltje J.; Farine, Damien R.; Spencer, Karen A.

2014-01-01

206

Social Scholarship: Applying Social Networking Technologies to Research Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Participatory web-based technologies have the potential to change the way scholars engage in scholarship. One reason Web 2.0 technologies, such as online social networking, are not widely integrated in PreK-12 and postsecondary education is the lack of modeling by educators. Their lack of research-based best practices limits the ability to…

Greenhow, Christine

2009-01-01

207

Googling Social Interactions: Web Search Engine Based Social Network Construction  

E-print Network

July 21, 2010 Copyright: Ã? 2010 Lee et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms Abstract Social network analysis has long been an untiring topic of sociology. However, until the era years, might provide torrents of data sources for such study in this (now and forthcoming) digital era

Ahn, Yong-Yeol

208

65% of online adults use social networking sites  

E-print Network

than social networking tools. Looking at usage on a typical day, 43% of online adults use social-2011 The percentage of all adult internet users who use social networking sites since 2005 Source: Pew Research Center65% of online adults use social networking sites Women maintain their foothold on SNS use and older

Klein, Ophir

209

A Developmental Analysis of Children's Social Support Networks.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although much investigation of adult social support networks has been done, little attention has been paid to children's social support networks. Childhood patterns of social support probably influence adult patterns. A study was conducted to describe the social networks of third through sixth grade children. It also tests the validity of a new…

Kriegler, Julie A.; Bogat, G. Anne

210

Health and the Structure of Adolescent Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Much research has explored the role of social networks in promoting health through the provision of social support. However, little work has examined how social networks themselves may be structured by health. This article investigates the link between individuals' health and the characteristics of their social network positions.We first develop…

Haas, Steven A.; Schaefer, David R.; Kornienko, Olga

2010-01-01

211

CPSC 534L:Topics in Data Management Social Networks  

E-print Network

; Big Data and Network Science -- social/ information networks and recommender systems; Data CleaningCPSC 534L:Topics in Data Management ­ Social Networks LaksV.S. Lakshmanan Department of Computer and challenging problems involving social networks (SN) and recommender systems (RS). Modeling Search

Lakshmanan, Laks V.S.

212

Community Structure in Online Collegiate Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Online social networking sites have become increasingly popular with college students. The networks we studied are defined through ``friendships'' indicated by Facebook users from UNC, Oklahoma, Caltech, Georgetown, and Princeton. We apply the tools of network science to study the Facebook networks from these five different universities at a single point in time. We investigate each single-institution network's community structure, which we obtain through partitioning the graph using an eigenvector method. We use both graphical and quantitative tools, including pair-counting methods, which we interpret through statistical analysis and permutation tests to measure the correlations between the network communities and a set of characteristics given by each user (residence, class year, major, and high school). We also analyze the single gender subsets of these networks, and the impact of missing demographical data. Our study allows us to compare the online social networks for the five schools as well as infer differences in offline social interactions. At the schools studied, we were able to define which characteristics of the Facebook users correlate best with friendships.

Traud, Amanda; Kelsic, Eric; Mucha, Peter; Porter, Mason

2009-03-01

213

Social Experiences in Kindergarten and Academic Achievement in Grade 1: A Monozygotic Twin Difference Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of this study was to examine how different types of social experiences in kindergarten relate to Grade 1 academic achievement, while controlling for possible genetic and shared environmental influences through the use of the monozygotic (MZ) twin difference method. Social experiences in kindergarten included relationship quality with the…

Vitaro, Frank; Boivin, Michel; Brendgen, Mara; Girard, Alain; Dionne, Ginette

2012-01-01

214

Social-Demographic, School, Neighborhood, and Parenting Influences on the Academic Achievement of Latino Young Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using data from a national sample of 388 Latino young adolescents, this study identified the social-demographic characteristics, influences in the broader social environment, and parenting practices that predict youth academic achievement. Youths who were Mexican American, older, and had an English language problem had lower levels of reading and mathematics achievement. Youths of mothers who began childbearing at older ages,

Mary Keegan Eamon

2005-01-01

215

Popularity, Social Acceptance, and Aggression in Adolescent Peer Groups: Links with Academic Performance and School Attendance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports a short-term longitudinal study focusing on popularity and social acceptance as predictors of academic engagement for a sample of 342 adolescents (approximate average age of 14). These youths were followed for 4 consecutive semesters. Popularity, social acceptance, and aggression were assessed with a peer nomination …

Schwartz, David; Gorman, Andrea Hopmeyer; Nakamoto, Jonathan; McKay, Tara

2006-01-01

216

Developmental Antecedents and Social and Academic Consequences of Stereotype-Consciousness in Middle Childhood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study, which included 124 children ages 5-11, examined developmental antecedents and social and academic consequences of stereotype-consciousness, defined as awareness of others' stereotypes. Greater age and more frequent parent-reported racial socialization practices were associated with greater likelihood of stereotype-consciousness.…

McKown, Clark; Strambler, Michael J.

2009-01-01

217

Socially Oriented Student Entrepreneurship: A Study of Student Change Agency in the Academic Capitalism Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents two clarifying cases of socially oriented student entrepreneurship. The findings illuminate an overlooked organizational space located at the intersection of the public good and academic capitalist knowledge/learning regimes (Slaughter & Rhoades, 2004) that provides students with the entrepreneurial agency to create social

Mars, Matthew M.; Rhoades, Gary

2012-01-01

218

A Brief Social-Belonging Intervention Improves Academic and Health Outcomes of Minority Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

A brief intervention aimed at buttressing college freshmen's sense of social belonging in school was tested in a randomized controlled trial (N = 92), and its academic and health-related consequences over 3 years are reported. The intervention aimed to lessen psychological perceptions of threat on campus by framing social adversity as common and transient. It used subtle attitude-change strategies to

Gregory M. Walton; Geoffrey L. Cohen

2011-01-01

219

Academic Affiliations of Social Work Journal Article Authors, 2004-2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The researchers tabulated the academic affiliations of the authors of all articles published between 2004 and 2008 in 6 major social work journals to produce a ranking of the colleges and universities whose faculty made the most substantive contributions to the social work literature. The results of this analysis are compared with findings of 5…

Ligon, Jan; Cobb, Alicia; Thyer, Bruce

2012-01-01

220

ENGAGE: A Blueprint for Incorporating Social Skills Training into Daily Academic Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student success in school depends, in part, on adequate social-interpersonal skills. Yet, in a time when all students are expected to reach specified academic goals, school personnel are hard-pressed to find ways to address the social-interpersonal behavior needs of their students. In this article, the authors discuss practical ways for teachers…

Schoenfeld, Naomi A.; Rutherford, Robert B.; Gable, Robert A.; Rock, Marcia L.

2008-01-01

221

Studying for the Sake of Others: The Role of Social Goals on Academic Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Much of the research on achievement goal theory has focused on the roles of mastery and performance goals in academic engagement, thus the role of other goals such as social goals has mostly been neglected. The aim of this research was to investigate the effects of different kinds of social goals (affiliation, approval, concern, responsibility and…

King, Ronnel Bornasal; McInerney, Dennis M.; Watkins, David A.

2012-01-01

222

Socially Oriented Motivational Goals and Academic Achievement: Similarities between Native and Anglo Americans  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examined the relations between two socially oriented dimensions of student motivation and academic achievement of Native (Navajo) American and Anglo American students. Using confirmatory factor analysis, a multidimensional and hierarchical model was found to explain the relations between performance and social goals. Four first-order…

Ali, Jinnat; McInerney, Dennis M.; Craven, Rhonda G.; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; King, Ronnel B.

2014-01-01

223

Social network predictors of latrine ownership.  

PubMed

Poor sanitation, including the lack of clean functioning toilets, is a major factor contributing to morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases in the developing world. We examine correlates of latrine ownership in rural India with a focus on social network predictors. Participants from 75 villages provided the names of their social contacts as well as their own relevant demographic and household characteristics. Using these measures, we test whether the latrine ownership of an individual's social contacts is a significant predictor of individual latrine ownership. We also investigate whether network centrality significantly predicts latrine ownership, and if so, whether it moderates the relationship between the latrine ownership of the individual and that of her social contacts. Our results show that, controlling for the standard predictors of latrine ownership such as caste, education, and income, individuals are more likely to own latrines if their social contacts own latrines. Interaction models suggest that this relationship is stronger among those of the same caste, the same education, and those with stronger social ties. We also find that more central individuals are more likely to own latrines, but the correlation in latrine ownership between social contacts is strongest among individuals on the periphery of the network. Although more data is needed to determine how much the clustering of latrine ownership may be caused by social influence, the results here suggest that interventions designed to promote latrine ownership should consider focusing on those at the periphery of the network. The reason is that they are 1) less likely to own latrines and 2) more likely to exhibit the same behavior as their social contacts, possibly as a result of the spread of latrine adoption from one person to another. PMID:24726688

Shakya, Holly B; Christakis, Nicholas A; Fowler, James H

2015-01-01

224

Persistent ISR: the social network analysis connection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Persistent surveillance provides decision makers with unprecedented access to multisource data collected from humans and sensor assets around the globe, yet these data exist in the physical world and provide few overt clues to meaning behind actions. In this paper we explore the recent growth in online social networking and ask the questions: 1) can these sites provide value-added information to compliment physical sensing and 2) what are the mechanisms by which these data could inform situational awareness and decision making? In seeking these answers we consider the range of options provided by Social Network Analysis (SNA), and focus especially on the dynamic nature of these networks. In our discussion we focus on the wave of reform experienced by the North African nations in early 2011 known as the Arab Spring. Demonstrators made widespread use of social networking applications to coordinate, document, and publish material to aid their cause. Unlike members of covert social networks who hide their activity and associations, these demonstrators openly posted multimedia information to coordinate activity and stimulate global support. In this paper we provide a review of SNA approaches and consider how one might track network adaptations by capturing temporal and conceptual trends. We identify opportunities and challenges for merging SNA with physical sensor output, and conclude by addressing future challenges in the persistent ISR domain with respect to SNA.

Bowman, Elizabeth K.

2012-06-01

225

Discovering Social Circles in Ego Networks  

E-print Network

People's personal social networks are big and cluttered, and currently there is no good way to automatically organize them. Social networking sites allow users to manually categorize their friends into social circles (e.g. 'circles' on Google+, and 'lists' on Facebook and Twitter), however they are laborious to construct and must be updated whenever a user's network grows. In this paper, we study the novel task of automatically identifying users' social circles. We pose this task as a multi-membership node clustering problem on a user's ego-network, a network of connections between her friends. We develop a model for detecting circles that combines network structure as well as user profile information. For each circle we learn its members and the circle-specific user profile similarity metric. Modeling node membership to multiple circles allows us to detect overlapping as well as hierarchically nested circles. Experiments show that our model accurately identifies circles on a diverse set of data from Facebook...

McAuley, Julian

2012-01-01

226

Cooperation on Social Networks and Its Robustness  

E-print Network

In this work we have used computer models of social-like networks to show by extensive numerical simulations that cooperation in evolutionary games can emerge and be stable on this class of networks. The amounts of cooperation reached are at least as much as in scale-free networks but here the population model is more realistic. Cooperation is robust with respect to different strategy update rules, population dynamics, and payoff computation. Only when straight average payoff is used or there is high strategy or network noise does cooperation decrease in all games and disappear in the Prisoner's Dilemma.

Antonioni, Alberto

2012-01-01

227

Integrating social networks and human social motives to achieve social influence at scale  

PubMed Central

The innovations of science often point to ideas and behaviors that must spread and take root in communities to have impact. Ideas, practices, and behaviors need to go from accepted truths on the part of a few scientists to commonplace beliefs and norms in the minds of the many. Moving from scientific discoveries to public good requires social influence. We introduce a structured influence process (SIP) framework to explain how social networks (i.e., the structure of social influence) and human social motives (i.e., the process of social influence wherein one person’s attitudes and behaviors affect another’s) are used collectively to enact social influence within a community. The SIP framework advances the science of scientific communication by positing social influence events that consider both the “who” and the “how” of social influence. This framework synthesizes core ideas from two bodies of research on social influence. The first is network research on social influence structures, which identifies who are the opinion leaders and who among their network of peers shapes their attitudes and behaviors. The second is research on social influence processes in psychology, which explores how human social motives such as the need for accuracy or the need for affiliation stimulate behavior change. We illustrate the practical implications of the SIP framework by applying it to the case of reducing neonatal mortality in India. PMID:25225373

Contractor, Noshir S.; DeChurch, Leslie A.

2014-01-01

228

Integrating social networks and human social motives to achieve social influence at scale.  

PubMed

The innovations of science often point to ideas and behaviors that must spread and take root in communities to have impact. Ideas, practices, and behaviors need to go from accepted truths on the part of a few scientists to commonplace beliefs and norms in the minds of the many. Moving from scientific discoveries to public good requires social influence. We introduce a structured influence process (SIP) framework to explain how social networks (i.e., the structure of social influence) and human social motives (i.e., the process of social influence wherein one person's attitudes and behaviors affect another's) are used collectively to enact social influence within a community. The SIP framework advances the science of scientific communication by positing social influence events that consider both the "who" and the "how" of social influence. This framework synthesizes core ideas from two bodies of research on social influence. The first is network research on social influence structures, which identifies who are the opinion leaders and who among their network of peers shapes their attitudes and behaviors. The second is research on social influence processes in psychology, which explores how human social motives such as the need for accuracy or the need for affiliation stimulate behavior change. We illustrate the practical implications of the SIP framework by applying it to the case of reducing neonatal mortality in India. PMID:25225373

Contractor, Noshir S; DeChurch, Leslie A

2014-09-16

229

Probing next Generation Portuguese Academic Network  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide several viewpoints about monitoring aspects related to recent deployments of a new technology (IPv6). Design/methodology/approach: Several views and domains were used, with a common point: the Portuguese research and education network (RCTS). Findings: A significant amount of work is yet to be…

Friacas, Carlos; Massano, Emanuel; Domingues, Monica; Veiga, Pedro

2008-01-01

230

Online and Offline Social Networks: Use of Social Networking Sites by Emerging Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social networking sites (e.g., MySpace and Facebook) are popular online communication forms among adolescents and emerging adults. Yet little is known about young people's activities on these sites and how their networks of "friends" relate to their other online (e.g., instant messaging) and offline networks. In this study, college students…

Subrahmanyam, Kaveri; Reich, Stephanie M.; Waechter, Natalia; Espinoza, Guadalupe

2008-01-01

231

Group colocation behavior in technological social networks  

E-print Network

We analyze two large datasets from technological networks with location and social data: user location records from an online location-based social networking service, and anonymized telecommunications data from a European cellphone operator, in order to investigate the differences between individual and group behavior with respect to physical location. We discover agreements between the two datasets: firstly, that individuals are more likely to meet with one friend at a place they have not visited before, but tend to meet at familiar locations when with a larger group. We also find that groups of individuals are more likely to meet at places that their other friends have visited, and that the type of a place strongly affects the propensity for groups to meet there. These differences between group and solo mobility has potential technological applications, for example, in venue recommendation in location-based social networks.

Brown, Chloë; Noulas, Anastasios; Mascolo, Cecilia; Blondel, Vincent

2014-01-01

232

Group Colocation Behavior in Technological Social Networks  

PubMed Central

We analyze two large datasets from technological networks with location and social data: user location records from an online location-based social networking service, and anonymized telecommunications data from a European cellphone operator, in order to investigate the differences between individual and group behavior with respect to physical location. We discover agreements between the two datasets: firstly, that individuals are more likely to meet with one friend at a place they have not visited before, but tend to meet at familiar locations when with a larger group. We also find that groups of individuals are more likely to meet at places that their other friends have visited, and that the type of a place strongly affects the propensity for groups to meet there. These differences between group and solo mobility has potential technological applications, for example, in venue recommendation in location-based social networks. PMID:25148037

Brown, Chloë; Lathia, Neal; Mascolo, Cecilia; Noulas, Anastasios; Blondel, Vincent

2014-01-01

233

Social contagion theory: examining dynamic social networks and human behavior  

PubMed Central

Here, we review the research we have conducted on social contagion. We describe the methods we have employed (and the assumptions they have entailed) to examine several datasets with complementary strengths and weaknesses, including the Framingham Heart Study, the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, and other observational and experimental datasets that we and others have collected. We describe the regularities that led us to propose that human social networks may exhibit a ‘three degrees of influence’ property, and we review statistical approaches we have used to characterize interpersonal influence with respect to phenomena as diverse as obesity, smoking, cooperation, and happiness. We do not claim that this work is the final word, but we do believe that it provides some novel, informative, and stimulating evidence regarding social contagion in longitudinally followed networks. Along with other scholars, we are working to develop new methods for identifying causal effects using social network data, and we believe that this area is ripe for statistical development as current methods have known and often unavoidable limitations. PMID:22711416

Christakis, Nicholas A.; Fowler, James H.

2013-01-01

234

Origin of Peer Influence in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social networks pervade our everyday lives: we interact, influence, and are influenced by our friends and acquaintances. With the advent of the World Wide Web, large amounts of data on social networks have become available, allowing the quantitative analysis of the distribution of information on them, including behavioral traits and fads. Recent studies of correlations among members of a social network, who exhibit the same trait, have shown that individuals influence not only their direct contacts but also friends' friends, up to a network distance extending beyond their closest peers. Here, we show how such patterns of correlations between peers emerge in networked populations. We use standard models (yet reflecting intrinsically different mechanisms) of information spreading to argue that empirically observed patterns of correlation among peers emerge naturally from a wide range of dynamics, being essentially independent of the type of information, on how it spreads, and even on the class of underlying network that interconnects individuals. Finally, we show that the sparser and clustered the network, the more far reaching the influence of each individual will be.

Pinheiro, Flávio L.; Santos, Marta D.; Santos, Francisco C.; Pacheco, Jorge M.

2014-03-01

235

Origin of peer influence in social networks.  

PubMed

Social networks pervade our everyday lives: we interact, influence, and are influenced by our friends and acquaintances. With the advent of the World Wide Web, large amounts of data on social networks have become available, allowing the quantitative analysis of the distribution of information on them, including behavioral traits and fads. Recent studies of correlations among members of a social network, who exhibit the same trait, have shown that individuals influence not only their direct contacts but also friends' friends, up to a network distance extending beyond their closest peers. Here, we show how such patterns of correlations between peers emerge in networked populations. We use standard models (yet reflecting intrinsically different mechanisms) of information spreading to argue that empirically observed patterns of correlation among peers emerge naturally from a wide range of dynamics, being essentially independent of the type of information, on how it spreads, and even on the class of underlying network that interconnects individuals. Finally, we show that the sparser and clustered the network, the more far reaching the influence of each individual will be. PMID:24655286

Pinheiro, Flávio L; Santos, Marta D; Santos, Francisco C; Pacheco, Jorge M

2014-03-01

236

Effects of Deception in Social Networks  

E-print Network

Honesty plays a crucial role in any situation where organisms exchange information or resources. Dishonesty can thus be expected to have damaging effects on social coherence if agents cannot trust the information or goods they receive. However, a distinction is often drawn between prosocial lies ('white' lies) and antisocial lying (i.e. deception for personal gain), with the former being considered much less destructive than the latter. We use an agent-based model to show that antisocial lying causes social networks to become increasingly fragmented. Antisocial dishonesty thus places strong constraints on the size and cohesion of social communities, providing a major hurdle that organisms have to overcome (e.g. by evolving counter-deception strategies) in order to evolve large, socially cohesive communities. In contrast, 'white' lies can prove to be beneficial in smoothing the flow of interactions and facilitating a larger, more integrated network. Our results demonstrate that these group-level effects can ar...

Iñiguez, Gerardo; Dunbar, Robin; Kaski, Kimmo; Barrio, Rafael A

2014-01-01

237

Social Trust Prediction Using Heterogeneous Networks  

PubMed Central

Along with increasing popularity of social websites, online users rely more on the trustworthiness information to make decisions, extract and filter information, and tag and build connections with other users. However, such social network data often suffer from severe data sparsity and are not able to provide users with enough information. Therefore, trust prediction has emerged as an important topic in social network research. Traditional approaches are primarily based on exploring trust graph topology itself. However, research in sociology and our life experience suggest that people who are in the same social circle often exhibit similar behaviors and tastes. To take advantage of the ancillary information for trust prediction, the challenge then becomes what to transfer and how to transfer. In this article, we address this problem by aggregating heterogeneous social networks and propose a novel joint social networks mining (JSNM) method. Our new joint learning model explores the user-group-level similarity between correlated graphs and simultaneously learns the individual graph structure; therefore, the shared structures and patterns from multiple social networks can be utilized to enhance the prediction tasks. As a result, we not only improve the trust prediction in the target graph but also facilitate other information retrieval tasks in the auxiliary graphs. To optimize the proposed objective function, we use the alternative technique to break down the objective function into several manageable subproblems. We further introduce the auxiliary function to solve the optimization problems with rigorously proved convergence. The extensive experiments have been conducted on both synthetic and real- world data. All empirical results demonstrate the effectiveness of our method. PMID:24729776

HUANG, JIN; NIE, FEIPING; HUANG, HENG; TU, YI-CHENG; LEI, YU

2014-01-01

238

Sentiment analysis on smoking in social networks.  

PubMed

Online social networks play a vital role in daily life to share the opinions or behaviors on different topics. The data of social networks can be used to understand health-related behaviors. In this work, we used Twitter status updates to survey of smoking behaviors among the users. We introduce approach to classify the sentiment of smoke-related tweets into positive and negative tweets. The classifier is based on the Support Vector Machines (SVMs) and can achieve high accuracy up to 86%. PMID:23920892

Sofean, Mustafa; Smith, Matthew

2013-01-01

239

Detecting Emotional Contagion in Massive Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Happiness and other emotions spread between people in direct contact, but it is unclear whether massive online social networks also contribute to this spread. Here, we elaborate a novel method for measuring the contagion of emotional expression. With data from millions of Facebook users, we show that rainfall directly influences the emotional content of their status messages, and it also affects the status messages of friends in other cities who are not experiencing rainfall. For every one person affected directly, rainfall alters the emotional expression of about one to two other people, suggesting that online social networks may magnify the intensity of global emotional synchrony. PMID:24621792

Coviello, Lorenzo; Sohn, Yunkyu; Kramer, Adam D. I.; Marlow, Cameron; Franceschetti, Massimo; Christakis, Nicholas A.; Fowler, James H.

2014-01-01

240

Burstiness and aging in social temporal networks  

E-print Network

The presence of burstiness in temporal social networks, revealed by a power law form of the waiting time distribution of consecutive interactions, is expected to produce aging effects in the corresponding time-integrated network. Here we propose an analytically tractable model, in which interactions among the agents are ruled by a renewal process, and that is able to reproduce this aging behavior. We develop an analytic solution for the topological properties of the integrated network produced by the model, finding that the time translation invariance of the degree distribution is broken. We validate our predictions against numerical simulations, and we check for the presence of aging effects in a empirical temporal network, ruled by bursty social interactions.

Moinet, Antoine; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

2014-01-01

241

MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD ESTIMATION FOR SOCIAL NETWORK DYNAMICS  

PubMed Central

A model for network panel data is discussed, based on the assumption that the observed data are discrete observations of a continuous-time Markov process on the space of all directed graphs on a given node set, in which changes in tie variables are independent conditional on the current graph. The model for tie changes is parametric and designed for applications to social network analysis, where the network dynamics can be interpreted as being generated by choices made by the social actors represented by the nodes of the graph. An algorithm for calculating the Maximum Likelihood estimator is presented, based on data augmentation and stochastic approximation. An application to an evolving friendship network is given and a small simulation study is presented which suggests that for small data sets the Maximum Likelihood estimator is more efficient than the earlier proposed Method of Moments estimator. PMID:25419259

Snijders, Tom A.B.; Koskinen, Johan; Schweinberger, Michael

2014-01-01

242

EventWeb: towards social life networks.  

PubMed

The Web has changed the way we live, work and socialize. The nodes in the current Web are documents and hence the current World Wide Web is a Document Web. Advances in technology and requirements of emerging applications require formation of a parallel and closely connected Web of events, the EventWeb, in which each node is an event. In this paper, we explore growth of EventWeb as a natural next step in the evolution of the Web with rich multimodal sensory information. Social networks use events extensively and have revolutionized communication among people. Mobile phones, equipped with myriads of sensors and being used by more than 75% of living humans, are bringing the next generation of social networks, not only to connect people with other people, but also to connect people with other people and essential life resources. We call these networks social life networks, and believe that this is the right time to focus efforts to discover and develop technology and infrastructure to design and build these networks and to apply them for solving some essential human problems. PMID:23419853

Jain, Ramesh

2013-03-28

243

Multiagent task allocation in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes a new variant of the task allocation problem, where the agents are connected in a social network and tasks\\u000a arrive at the agents distributed over the network. We show that the complexity of this problem remains NP-complete. Moreover, it is not approximable within some factor. In contrast to this, we develop an efficient greedy algorithm\\u000a for this

Mathijs M. de Weerdt; Yingqian Zhang; Tomas Klos

2011-01-01

244

Access, engagement, networks, and norms: Dimensions of social capital at work in a first grade classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social capital refers to access and use of resources available through one's networks to solve problems, and the norms that reflect inclusive or exclusive access to those networks and resources. Research has found positive relationships between social capital, academic achievement, and attainment. Studies, however, have generally examined social capital through factors that occur outside the classroom; students who have social capital, acquired through their family and community relationships, seem to be more successful academically. Limited research has explored what if any factors within the classroom might impact the production, and nature of social capital, or its workings in a classroom. The purpose of this study was to explore the workings and nature of classroom social capital, including its possible relationships to engagement and cognition among 5 student participants. Using methods of qualitative data collection, mixed methods were used to analyze information resources, participants' networking, student work, and classroom discourse. Eight interdependent networking factors and 3 overarching patterns of norms were discovered. The networking factors reflected the structure, content, processes, purposes, and acceptability of participants' networking. The norms, also working interdependently, appeared to promote or inhibit among other things, engagement in networking, help seeking, access, sharing, and intertextual use of diverse, often complex sources of information. Through interaction of the 8 factors and 3 overarching norms, ongoing outcomes of networking appeared to include the creation of bridging (inclusive) and bonding (exclusive) forms of social capital, and depth of scientific conceptual understanding, in this case, about birds. Bridging social capital appeared related to willingness to engage in strong and weak tie networking, help seeking, intertextuality, and possibly to mastery goal orientation for all participants, regardless of reading level. Expository sources more so than narrative texts generated intertextually dense, social and cognitive networks, often between members with weak ties. Together the networking factors and norms shed light on the way discourse, resources, and practice might impact social capital, suggesting that forms of social capital may be produced, accumulated, and depleted by factors and norms that are open to variation and occur within the classroom.

Wexler-Robock, Stephanie

245

Spreading paths in partially observed social networks  

PubMed Central

Understanding how and how far information, behaviors, or pathogens spread in social networks is an important problem, having implications for both predicting the size of epidemics, as well as for planning effective interventions. There are, however, two main challenges for inferring spreading paths in real-world networks. One is the practical difficulty of observing a dynamic process on a network, and the other is the typical constraint of only partially observing a network. Using a static, structurally realistic social network as a platform for simulations, we juxtapose three distinct paths: (1) the stochastic path taken by a simulated spreading process from source to target; (2) the topologically shortest path in the fully observed network, and hence the single most likely stochastic path, between the two nodes; and (3) the topologically shortest path in a partially observed network. In a sampled network, how closely does the partially observed shortest path (3) emulate the unobserved spreading path (1)? Although partial observation inflates the length of the shortest path, the stochastic nature of the spreading process also frequently derails the dynamic path from the shortest path. We find that the partially observed shortest path does not necessarily give an inflated estimate of the length of the process path; in fact, partial observation may, counterintuitively, make the path seem shorter than it actually is. PMID:22587148

Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Christakis, Nicholas A.

2012-01-01

246

Self-Organizing Flows in Social Networks Nidhi Hegde  

E-print Network

-like microblogging social networks. In such networks the functions of filtering, editing and disseminating news are totally dis- tributed, in contrast to traditional news channels. The efficiency of social filtering

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

247

Social networks for lonely objects  

E-print Network

Visions of ubiquitous computing describe a network of devices that quietly supports human goals, but this may also add complexity to an already frustrating relationship between humans and their electronic objects. As we ...

Kestner, John Anthony

2010-01-01

248

Perceived Social Support and Academic Achievement: Cross-Lagged Panel and Bivariate Growth Curve Analyses  

Microsoft Academic Search

As students transition to post-secondary education, they experience considerable stress and declines in academic performance.\\u000a Perceived social support is thought to improve academic achievement by reducing stress. Longitudinal designs with three or\\u000a more waves are needed in this area because they permit stronger causal inferences and help disentangle the direction of relationships.\\u000a This study uses a cross-lagged panel and a

Sean P. Mackinnon

249

Social Networks of Professionals in Health Care Organizations: A Review.  

PubMed

In this article, we provide an overview of social network research in health care, with a focus on social interactions between professionals in organizations. We begin by introducing key concepts defining the social network approach, including network density, centrality, and brokerage. We then review past and current research on the antecedents of health care professionals' social networks-including demographic attributes, professional groups, and organizational arrangements-and their consequences-including satisfaction at work, leadership, behaviors, knowledge transfer, diffusion of innovation, and performance. Finally, we examine future directions for social network research in health care, focusing on micro-macro linkages and network dynamics. PMID:25380607

Tasselli, Stefano

2014-12-01

250

Social Media and the New Academic Environment: Pedagogical Challenges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As web applications play a vital role in our society, social media has emerged as an important tool in the creation and exchange of user-generated content and social interaction. The benefits of these services have entered in the educational areas to become new means by which scholars communicate, collaborate and teach. Social Media and the New…

Patrut, Bogdan; Patrut, Monica; Cmeciu, Camelia

2013-01-01

251

Social selection and peer influence in an online social network.  

PubMed

Disentangling the effects of selection and influence is one of social science's greatest unsolved puzzles: Do people befriend others who are similar to them, or do they become more similar to their friends over time? Recent advances in stochastic actor-based modeling, combined with self-reported data on a popular online social network site, allow us to address this question with a greater degree of precision than has heretofore been possible. Using data on the Facebook activity of a cohort of college students over 4 years, we find that students who share certain tastes in music and in movies, but not in books, are significantly likely to befriend one another. Meanwhile, we find little evidence for the diffusion of tastes among Facebook friends-except for tastes in classical/jazz music. These findings shed light on the mechanisms responsible for observed network homogeneity; provide a statistically rigorous assessment of the coevolution of cultural tastes and social relationships; and suggest important qualifications to our understanding of both homophily and contagion as generic social processes. PMID:22184242

Lewis, Kevin; Gonzalez, Marco; Kaufman, Jason

2012-01-01

252

Social selection and peer influence in an online social network  

PubMed Central

Disentangling the effects of selection and influence is one of social science's greatest unsolved puzzles: Do people befriend others who are similar to them, or do they become more similar to their friends over time? Recent advances in stochastic actor-based modeling, combined with self-reported data on a popular online social network site, allow us to address this question with a greater degree of precision than has heretofore been possible. Using data on the Facebook activity of a cohort of college students over 4 years, we find that students who share certain tastes in music and in movies, but not in books, are significantly likely to befriend one another. Meanwhile, we find little evidence for the diffusion of tastes among Facebook friends—except for tastes in classical/jazz music. These findings shed light on the mechanisms responsible for observed network homogeneity; provide a statistically rigorous assessment of the coevolution of cultural tastes and social relationships; and suggest important qualifications to our understanding of both homophily and contagion as generic social processes. PMID:22184242

Lewis, Kevin; Gonzalez, Marco; Kaufman, Jason

2012-01-01

253

Chapter 7 Social network analysis 7.1 Introduction  

E-print Network

wide ranging social and political phenomena on the Islands. Interview participants reported.3). "The social network perspective encompasses theories, models, and applications research questions and quantify political, economic, or social structural environments. #12;Chapter 7

254

Some Social Considerations of Networking.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

New technologies of information handling are going to produce fundamental changes in the social structure. If we accept the statement that the book "upset the educational monopoly of the Church," we inevitably wonder what monopolies may tumble in the electronic wake of the computer. We are not dealing with a simple difference of degree but, rather…

Heinich, Robert

255

Behavioural Ecology: Social Networking for Dullards  

E-print Network

house finches can improve their mating success by moving to a different social network, where, and the background, such as strong shadows on a wall. Although I might balk at comparing dull male house finches to the beauty of `The Kitchen Maid', a recent paper [1] suggests that female house finches may think differently

Badyaev, Alex

256

Exploring Social Networking: Developing Critical Literacies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While schools have been using computers within their classrooms for years now, there has been a purposeful ignoring of the growing power of social networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Many schools ban students from accessing and using sites such as Facebook at school and many English and literacy teachers ignore or deny their value as a teaching…

Watson, Pauline

2012-01-01

257

Ethical Considerations of Social Networking for Counsellors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of online social networking websites has increased among Canadians in recent years. There are many professional and ethical implications for counsellors who use these sites (Boyd, 2007). Although they offer advantages to counsellors, their use can also raise issues around ethical conduct. Because the counselling literature has not yet…

Bratt, William Edgar Vernon

2010-01-01

258

Analysis of tag within online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, tagging systems have been paid increasing attentions from both research communities and system designers. Most popular online social networking sites harness tag for managing and locating contents, for organizing and connecting users, and for recommending and sharing resources. We believe that tag acts like bridge between people and resources. Research on tag and tagging behavior will provide

Chao Wu; Bo Zhou

2009-01-01

259

The Social Network Classroom Peter Bunus  

E-print Network

messages, playing online games, create blogs or download videos. Table 1. Generational differences in using social networking applications and video content distribution websites as a complement likely than other age categories to send and receive email messages, play online games, create blogs

Burns, Peter

260

Social Network Structures among Groundnut Farmers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Groundnut farmers in East Africa have experienced declines in production despite research and extension efforts to increase productivity. This study examined how social network structures related to acquisition of information about new seed varieties and productivity among groundnut farmers in Uganda and Kenya.…

Thuo, Mary; Bell, Alexandra A.; Bravo-Ureta, Boris E.; Okello, David K.; Okoko, Evelyn Nasambu; Kidula, Nelson L.; Deom, C. Michael; Puppala, Naveen

2013-01-01

261

The Diffusion of Innovations in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We consider processes in which new technologies and forms of behavior are transmitted through social and geographic networks Agents adopt behaviors based on a combination of their inherent payoff and their local popularity (the number of neighbors who have adopted them) subject to some random error We characterize the long-run dynamics of such processes in terms of the geometry of

H. PEYTON YOUNG

2000-01-01

262

Book recommendation based on web social network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recommender systems play an important role in dealing with web information overload such as book e-commerce. Current recommender systems often generate recommendation on users' opinions on items, and have several fatal weaknesses. With the growth of web social networks, a new kind of information is available: trust rating expressed by an user on another user. The web-based nature of this

Mingjuan Zhou

2010-01-01

263

Differentiating Specialists and Generalists Within College Students' Social Support Networks.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An alternative scoring method for the Social Support Questionnaire was used to examine relationships among social network structure, support types and satisfaction determinants. College students' social networks consisted of nuclear, and other, family; friends; and others. Proportion of support network occupied by nuclear family was positively…

Bogat, G. Anne; And Others

1985-01-01

264

Segmentation and Automated Social Hierarchy Detection through Email Network Analysis ?  

E-print Network

Segmentation and Automated Social Hierarchy Detection through Email Network Analysis ? German. Social Network, Enron, Behavior Pro#12;le, Link Mining, Data Mining, Corporate Householding. 1]. ? This work is based on an earlier work: Automated Social Hierarchy Detection through Email Network Analysis

Yang, Junfeng

265

Chic or Social: Visual Popularity Analysis in Online Fashion Networks  

E-print Network

Chic or Social: Visual Popularity Analysis in Online Fashion Networks Kota Yamaguchi Tohoku in social networks. But, how important is this visual content and how does it influ- ence behavior in the network? In this paper we study the effects of visual, textual, and social factors on popularity

Berg, Tamara L.

266

On Sampling Type Distribution from Heterogeneous Social Networks  

E-print Network

and more attention of the data mining com- munity in recent years. By modeling the social networkOn Sampling Type Distribution from Heterogeneous Social Networks Jhao-Yin Li and Mi-Yen Yeh {louisjyli,miyen}@iis.sinica.edu.tw Abstract. Social network analysis has drawn the attention of many

Lin, Jason Yi-Bing

267

Seed and Grow: An Attack Against Anonymized Social Networks  

E-print Network

telecommunication service providers or intelligence agencies a decade ago. Data from social networks, once published is a major concern in dealing with social network data in contexts such as storage, process- ingSeed and Grow: An Attack Against Anonymized Social Networks Wei Peng, Feng Li, Xukai Zou and Jie Wu

Wu, Jie

268

Methods for Coalition Formation in Adaptation-Based Social Networks  

E-print Network

formation in social networks consisting of a graph of interdependent agents allows many choices of which task to select and with whom to partner in the social network. Nodes represent agents and arcsMethods for Coalition Formation in Adaptation-Based Social Networks Levi Barton, Vicki H. Allan

Allan, Vicki H.

269

VIRTUAL SOCIAL NETWORKS AND THEIR UTILIZATION FOR PROMOTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article deals with current knowledge of social media with the focus on social networks. Social media offer great opportunities for businesses. However, in order to use these new business channels in the most effective way, businesses need relevant information. The main purpose of this article is to evaluate the state of utilization of social networks by businesses as well

Robert Stefko; Peter Dorcak; Frantisek Pollak

2011-01-01

270

Representing Excuses in Social Dependence Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we propose a representation of excuses in the context of multiagent systems. We distinguish five classes of excuses, taking as starting point both jurisprudential and philosophical studies about this topic, and we discuss their acceptance criteria. We highlight the following classes of excuses: epistemic excuses, power-based excuses, norm-based excuses, counts as-based excuses and social-based excuses and we represent them using social dependence networks. The acceptance criteria individuate those excuses which success in maintaining the trust of the other agents, e.g. in the context of social networks, excuses based on norms seem better than counts as-based ones in achieving this aim.

Boella, Guido; Broersen, Jan; van der Torre, Leendert; Villata, Serena

271

Computational Statistical Methods for Social Network Models  

PubMed Central

We review the broad range of recent statistical work in social network models, with emphasis on computational aspects of these methods. Particular focus is applied to exponential-family random graph models (ERGM) and latent variable models for data on complete networks observed at a single time point, though we also briefly review many methods for incompletely observed networks and networks observed at multiple time points. Although we mention far more modeling techniques than we can possibly cover in depth, we provide numerous citations to current literature. We illustrate several of the methods on a small, well-known network dataset, Sampson’s monks, providing code where possible so that these analyses may be duplicated. PMID:23828720

Hunter, David R.; Krivitsky, Pavel N.; Schweinberger, Michael

2013-01-01

272

Diffusion of Innovations over Multiplex Social Networks  

E-print Network

The ways in which an innovation (e.g., new behaviour, idea, technology, product) diffuses among people can determine its success or failure. In this paper, we address the problem of diffusion of innovations over multiplex social networks where the neighbours of a person belong to one or multiple networks (or layers) such as friends, families, or colleagues. To this end, we generalise one of the basic game-theoretic diffusion models, called networked coordination game, for multiplex networks. We present analytical results for this extended model and validate them through a simulation study, finding among other properties a lower bound for the success of an innovation.While simple and leading to intuitively understandable results, to the best of our knowledge this is the first extension of a game-theoretic innovation diffusion model for multiplex networks and as such it provides a basic framework to study more sophisticated innovation dynamics.

Ramezanian, Rasoul; Magnani, Matteo; Montesi, Danilo

2014-01-01

273

Social networking profile correlates of schizotypy.  

PubMed

Social networking sites, such as Facebook, are extremely popular and have become a primary method for socialization and communication. Despite a report of increased use among those on the schizophrenia-spectrum, few details are known about their actual practices. In the current research, undergraduate participants completed measures of schizotypy and personality, and provided access to their Facebook profiles. Information from the profiles were then systematically coded and compared to the questionnaire data. As predicted, social anhedonia (SocAnh) was associated with a decrease in social participation variables, including a decrease in number of friends and number of photos, and an increase in length of time since communication with a friend, but SocAnh was also associated with an increase in profile length. Also, SocAnh was highly correlated with extraversion. Relatedly, extraversion uniquely predicted the number of friends and photos and length of time since communication with a friend. In addition, perceptual aberration/magical ideation (PerMag) was associated with an increased number of "black outs" on Facebook profile print-outs, a measure of paranoia. Overall, results from this naturalistic-like study show that SocAnh and extraversion are associated with decreased social participation and PerMag with increased paranoia related to information on social networking sites. PMID:22796101

Martin, Elizabeth A; Bailey, Drew H; Cicero, David C; Kerns, John G

2012-12-30

274

Social encounter networks: characterizing Great Britain  

PubMed Central

A major goal of infectious disease epidemiology is to understand and predict the spread of infections within human populations, with the intention of better informing decisions regarding control and intervention. However, the development of fully mechanistic models of transmission requires a quantitative understanding of social interactions and collective properties of social networks. We performed a cross-sectional study of the social contacts on given days for more than 5000 respondents in England, Scotland and Wales, through postal and online survey methods. The survey was designed to elicit detailed and previously unreported measures of the immediate social network of participants relevant to infection spread. Here, we describe individual-level contact patterns, focusing on the range of heterogeneity observed and discuss the correlations between contact patterns and other socio-demographic factors. We find that the distribution of the number of contacts approximates a power-law distribution, but postulate that total contact time (which has a shorter-tailed distribution) is more epidemiologically relevant. We observe that children, public-sector and healthcare workers have the highest number of total contact hours and are therefore most likely to catch and transmit infectious disease. Our study also quantifies the transitive connections made between an individual's contacts (or clustering); this is a key structural characteristic of social networks with important implications for disease transmission and control efficacy. Respondents' networks exhibit high levels of clustering, which varies across social settings and increases with duration, frequency of contact and distance from home. Finally, we discuss the implications of these findings for the transmission and control of pathogens spread through close contact. PMID:23804621

Danon, Leon; Read, Jonathan M.; House, Thomas A.; Vernon, Matthew C.; Keeling, Matt J.

2013-01-01

275

Social networks among Indigenous peoples in Mexico.  

PubMed

We examine the extent to which social networks among indigenous peoples in Mexico have a significant effect on a variety of human capital investment and economic activities, such as school attendance and work among teenage boys and girls, and migration, welfare participation, employment status, occupation, and sector of employment among adult males and females. Using data from the 10 percent population sample of the 2000 Population and Housing Census of Mexico and the empirical strategy that Bertrand, Luttmer, and Mullainathan (2000) propose, which allows us to take into account the role of municipality and language group fixed effects, we confirm empirically that social network effects play an important role in the economic decisions of indigenous people, especially in rural areas. Our analysis also provides evidence that better access to basic services such as water and electricity increases the size and strength of network effects in rural areas. PMID:21188887

Skoufias, Emmanuel; Lunde, Trine; Patrinos, Harry Anthony

2010-01-01

276

Social Networks among Residents in Recovery Homes  

PubMed Central

Although evidence exists that substance abuse abstinence is enhanced when individuals in recovery are embedded in social networks that are cohesive, few studies examined the network structures underlying recovery home support systems. In two studies, we investigated the mechanisms through which social environments affect health outcomes among two samples of adult residents of recovery homes. Findings from Study 1 (n = 150) indicated that network size and the presence of relationships with other Oxford House (OH) residents both predicted future abstinence. Study 2 (n = 490) included individuals who lived in an OH residence for up to 6 months, and their personal relationship with other house residents predicted future abstinence. Implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:23956954

Jason, Leonard; Stevens, Ed; Ferrari, Joseph R.; Thompson, Erin; Legler, Ray

2013-01-01

277

Managing Trust in Online Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years, there is a dramatic growth in number and popularity of online social networks. There are many networks available with more than 100 million registered users such as Facebook, MySpace, QZone, Windows Live Spaces etc. People may connect, discover and share by using these online social networks. The exponential growth of online communities in the area of social networks attracts the attention of the researchers about the importance of managing trust in online environment. Users of the online social networks may share their experiences and opinions within the networks about an item which may be a product or service. The user faces the problem of evaluating trust in a service or service provider before making a choice. Recommendations may be received through a chain of friends network, so the problem for the user is to be able to evaluate various types of trust opinions and recommendations. This opinion or recommendation has a great influence to choose to use or enjoy the item by the other user of the community. Collaborative filtering system is the most popular method in recommender system. The task in collaborative filtering is to predict the utility of items to a particular user based on a database of user rates from a sample or population of other users. Because of the different taste of different people, they rate differently according to their subjective taste. If two people rate a set of items similarly, they share similar tastes. In the recommender system, this information is used to recommend items that one participant likes, to other persons in the same cluster. But the collaborative filtering system performs poor when there is insufficient previous common rating available between users; commonly known as cost start problem. To overcome the cold start problem and with the dramatic growth of online social networks, trust based approach to recommendation has emerged. This approach assumes a trust network among users and makes recommendations based on the ratings of the users that are directly or indirectly trusted by the target user.

Bhuiyan, Touhid; Josang, Audun; Xu, Yue

278

Informal Learning in Social Networks: A Study of the Orkut Social Network  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes an analytical study which characterises the virtual communities of the Orkut social network, focusing in particular on education, training and technology, in order to understand whether this and other social websites allow the development of informal learning. This empirical study, which is descriptive and exploratory, began…

Lisboa, Eliana Santana; Coutinho, Clara Pereira

2011-01-01

279

Promoting Social and Academic Competence in the Classroom: An Intervention Study Examining the Contribution of the "Responsive Classroom" Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This exploratory study examined the contribution of the "RC" Approach over a two-year period. The "RC" Approach integrates social and academic learning in order to produce classroom environments that are conducive to learning by integrating social and academic learning. Two questions are addressed. First, how does teachers' use of "RC" practices…

Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Chiu, Yu-Jen I.

2007-01-01

280

Examining the Link between Preschool Social-Emotional Competence and First Grade Academic Achievement: The Role of Attention Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recently, research has begun to identify cognitive and social-emotional predictors of early academic success. Yet few studies have examined the mechanisms by which children's social-emotional skills are associated with later academic success. The present study examines the associations between preschool emotion knowledge, kindergarten attention…

Rhoades, Brittany L.; Warren, Heather K.; Domitrovich, Celene E.; Greenberg, Mark T.

2011-01-01

281

Promoting Social and Academic Integration into Higher Education by First-Year Student Nurses: The APPL Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Academic, Personal and Professional Learning (APPL) model of support for student nurses was developed and implemented as a pilot project in the Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences of a university in response to a number of internal and external drivers. The common theme across these drivers was the enhancement of the social, academic

Fergy, Sue; Marks-Maran, Di; Ooms, Ann; Shapcott, Jean; Burke, Linda

2011-01-01

282

Effects of Teacher Efficacy on Student Academic and Social Emotional Achievements as Reported on Georgia Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students in kindergarten are not meeting state standards on standardized academic and social/emotional scores in the southeastern United States. The focus of this study was to determine if a teacher's perceptions of self-efficacy affects student success in academic and social/emotional standards as reported on the Georgia Kindergarten of…

Brown, Tisha J.

2012-01-01

283

A Culturally Informed Model of Academic Well-Being for Latino Youth: The Importance of Discriminatory Experiences and Social Support  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tested a culturally informed model of academic well-being for 278 Latino youth. We examined detrimental effects of discriminatory experiences and protective effects of social support on self-reported academic outcomes. Models specified main and buffering effects of social support and compared contributions of support provided by…

DeGarmo, David S.; Martinez, Charles R., Jr.

2006-01-01

284

Second Language Students' Discourse Socialization in Academic Online Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports an investigation of second language (L2) students' class participation in English-language university courses in two different modes: face-to-face off-line and asynchronous online. The study addressed (1) what characteristics of academic online discourse were created in graduate courses; (2) how students reported their…

Yim, Yoon-kyung Kecia

2011-01-01

285

Neighborhood Social Processes and Academic Achievement in Elementary School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To examine how neighborhood characteristics influence academic achievement, data were drawn from a community survey of low-income neighborhoods and linked with data on performance on standardized testing for third-grade students attending elementary schools in those communities. Results of multilevel logistic regressions indicated that probability…

Emory, Ronya; Caughy, Margaret; Harris, T. Robert; Franzini, Luisa

2008-01-01

286

Nevada Academic Standards in the Social Studies: History.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that knowledge of history is the precondition of political intelligence, Nevada's academic standards for history are intended to provide the framework for a comprehensive K-12 history education to prepare students for the responsibilities and challenges of life in the 21st century. It is imperative in today's global economy for Nevada…

Nevada State Dept. of Education, Carson City.

287

Social Capital and Academic Motivation among First-Generation Community College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social capital, the value of a relationship that provides support and assistance in a given social situation (Stanton-Salazar, 2001), is a useful theory for understanding the experiences of low-income adolescents who are the first in their families to attend college. According to social capital theory, networks of relationships can help students…

Moschetti, Roxanne Venus; Hudley, Cynthia

2015-01-01

288

The moderating role of attachment anxiety on social network site use intensity and social capital.  

PubMed

This study examined the moderating role of attachment anxiety on the relationship between intensity of social network site use and bridging, bonding, and maintained social capital. Data from 322 undergraduate Chinese students were collected. Hierarchical regression analyses showed positive relationships between online intensity of social network site use and the three types of social capital. Moreover, attachment anxiety moderated the effect of intensity of social network site use on social capital. Specifically, for students with lower attachment anxiety, the relationships between intensity of social network site use and bonding and bridging social capital were stronger than those with higher attachment anxiety. The result suggested that social network sites cannot improve highly anxiously attached individuals' social capital effectively; they may need more face-to-face communications. PMID:23654041

Liu, Haihua; Shi, Junqi; Liu, Yihao; Sheng, Zitong

2013-02-01

289

Cooperative behavior cascades in human social networks  

PubMed Central

Theoretical models suggest that social networks influence the evolution of cooperation, but to date there have been few experimental studies. Observational data suggest that a wide variety of behaviors may spread in human social networks, but subjects in such studies can choose to befriend people with similar behaviors, posing difficulty for causal inference. Here, we exploit a seminal set of laboratory experiments that originally showed that voluntary costly punishment can help sustain cooperation. In these experiments, subjects were randomly assigned to a sequence of different groups to play a series of single-shot public goods games with strangers; this feature allowed us to draw networks of interactions to explore how cooperative and uncooperative behaviors spread from person to person to person. We show that, in both an ordinary public goods game and in a public goods game with punishment, focal individuals are influenced by fellow group members’ contribution behavior in future interactions with other individuals who were not a party to the initial interaction. Furthermore, this influence persists for multiple periods and spreads up to three degrees of separation (from person to person to person to person). The results suggest that each additional contribution a subject makes to the public good in the first period is tripled over the course of the experiment by other subjects who are directly or indirectly influenced to contribute more as a consequence. These results show experimentally that cooperative behavior cascades in human social networks. PMID:20212120

Fowler, James H.; Christakis, Nicholas A.

2010-01-01

290

Parental Racial Socialization and the Academic Achievement of African American Children: A Cultural-Ecological Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a cultural-ecological approach, this study examined: (a) associations between parental racial socialization and child\\u000a academic achievement and (b) variations in these associations across child gender and family socio-economic status. Participants\\u000a were 134 fifth grade African American children and their mothers. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to examine\\u000a associations between two components of parental racial socialization (preparation for bias,

Christian A. Friend; Andrea G. Hunter; Anne C. Fletcher

2011-01-01

291

Resource Sharing and Coordinated Collection Development in the Network of Alabama Academic Libraries  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1982 the Council of Librarians of the Alabama Commission on Higher Education (ACHE) recommended the establishment of a cooperative network of the state's academic libraries. The creation of the Network of Alabama Academic Libraries (NAAL) arose out of the need to correct historical deficiencies in the library collections supporting graduate education as well as to establish a mechanism for

Linda McNair Cohen

1988-01-01

292

Rapid innovation diffusion in social networks  

PubMed Central

Social and technological innovations often spread through social networks as people respond to what their neighbors are doing. Previous research has identified specific network structures, such as local clustering, that promote rapid diffusion. Here we derive bounds that are independent of network structure and size, such that diffusion is fast whenever the payoff gain from the innovation is sufficiently high and the agents’ responses are sufficiently noisy. We also provide a simple method for computing an upper bound on the expected time it takes for the innovation to become established in any finite network. For example, if agents choose log-linear responses to what their neighbors are doing, it takes on average less than 80 revision periods for the innovation to diffuse widely in any network, provided that the error rate is at least 5% and the payoff gain (relative to the status quo) is at least 150%. Qualitatively similar results hold for other smoothed best-response functions and populations that experience heterogeneous payoff shocks. PMID:25024191

Kreindler, Gabriel E.; Young, H. Peyton

2014-01-01

293

Rapid innovation diffusion in social networks.  

PubMed

Social and technological innovations often spread through social networks as people respond to what their neighbors are doing. Previous research has identified specific network structures, such as local clustering, that promote rapid diffusion. Here we derive bounds that are independent of network structure and size, such that diffusion is fast whenever the payoff gain from the innovation is sufficiently high and the agents' responses are sufficiently noisy. We also provide a simple method for computing an upper bound on the expected time it takes for the innovation to become established in any finite network. For example, if agents choose log-linear responses to what their neighbors are doing, it takes on average less than 80 revision periods for the innovation to diffuse widely in any network, provided that the error rate is at least 5% and the payoff gain (relative to the status quo) is at least 150%. Qualitatively similar results hold for other smoothed best-response functions and populations that experience heterogeneous payoff shocks. PMID:25024191

Kreindler, Gabriel E; Young, H Peyton

2014-07-22

294

Traumatic Brain Injury in School-Age Children Academic and Social Outcome  

Microsoft Academic Search

School-aged children with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) require extraordinary effort and energy from individuals in their school, home, and community. The purpose of this study was to examine the academic, behavioral, and social outcomes of a cohort of children and adolescents following TBI. A comprehensive assessment of cognitive functioning, achievement, and adaptive behavior was administered to 43 school-aged children

Elsa Arroyos-Jurado; Jane S Paulsen; Kenneth W Merrell; Scott D Lindgren; Jeffrey E Max

2000-01-01

295

Traumatic Brain Injury in School-Age Children: Academic and Social Outcome.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the academic, behavioral, and social outcomes of a cohort of children and adolescents (N=43) following a traumatic brain injury. Findings reveal that premorbid functions were significant predictors of reading and spelling achievement and adaptive functioning. Discusses implications of results including program development, reintegration…

Arroyos-Jurado, Elsa; Paulsen, Jane S.; Merrell, Kenneth W.; Lindgren, Scott D.; Max, Jeffrey E.

2000-01-01

296

Talking about Writing: Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Adolescents' Socialization into Academic Literacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This dissertation describes and analyzes the academic language socialization of culturally and linguistically diverse adolescents through a multi-case ethnographic study of high school writing instruction in California. I argue that there is a significant gap between the norms for writing in English language development classes and those in the…

Gilliland, Elizabeth A.

2012-01-01

297

Asperger Syndrome and the Elementary School Experience: Practical Solutions for Academic & Social Difficulties.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book provides educators with an understanding of Asperger syndrome (AS) and how it affects a student academically and socially, and provides specific strategies for helping elementary school students with AS function successfully. Following an introductory chapter, chapter 2 presents the major areas of difficulty for individuals with AS with…

Moore, Susan Thompson.

298

Parent-School Relationships and Children's Academic and Social Outcomes in Public School Pre-Kindergarten  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two dimensions of parent-school relationships, parental school involvement and parents' perceptions of teacher responsiveness to child/parent, were examined in state-funded pre-kindergarten classrooms in a large urban school district. Children's social and academic outcomes were individually assessed in the fall and spring. Hierarchical Linear…

Powell, Douglas R.; Son, Seung-Hee; File, Nancy; San Juan, Robert R.

2010-01-01

299

Social Positioning, Participation, and Second Language Learning: Talkative Students in an Academic ESL Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Guided by positioning theory and poststructural views of second language learning, the two descriptive case studies presented in this article explored the links between social positioning and the language learning experiences of two talkative students in an academic ESL classroom. Focusing on the macro- and micro-level contexts of communication,…

Kayi-Aydar, Hayriye

2014-01-01

300

Integrating a Social Behavior Intervention during Small Group Academic Instruction Using a Total Group Criterion Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Total group contingencies, a variation of interdependent group contingencies, provide educators with an efficient and effective mechanism to improve social behavior and increase academic skills. Their utility has not been examined in small educational groups. This is unfortunate as supplemental instruction frequently is delivered in small group…

Rodriguez, Billie Jo; Anderson, Cynthia M.

2014-01-01

301

The Differential Effects of General Mental Ability and Emotional Intelligence on Academic Performance and Social Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study considers the debate about whether emotional intelligence (EI) has incremental validity over and above traditional intelligence dimensions. We propose that EI and general mental abilities (GMA) differ in predicting academic performance and the quality of social interactions among college students. Using two college student samples, we…

Song, Lynda Jiwen; Huang, Guo-hua; Peng, Kelly Z.; Law, Kenneth S.; Wong, Chi-Sum; Chen, Zhijun

2010-01-01

302

Communication Disorders in the School: Perspectives on Academic and Social Success an Introduction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The critical role of communication in schools cannot be understated. Communication skills are a necessity both in the academic and social atmosphere of the school environment. Unfortunately, there are a large number of children in the schools today identified with speech and language disorders. This special edition of "Psychology in the Schools"…

Thatcher, Karen L.; Fletcher, Kathryn; Decker, Blair

2008-01-01

303

Addressing the Academic and Social Needs of Young Male Students through School-Based Mentoring  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study addressed the problem within the U.S. public school system to sustainably meet the academic and social needs of its African American male students. The administrative team of the elementary school in this study desired an evaluation of a school-based male mentoring program that was designed to address these needs. The program, Gentlemen…

Alston, Curtis E.

2013-01-01

304

Personal Self and Collective Self: When Academic Choices Depend on the Context of Social Comparison  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research examines the impact of same-sex versus opposite-sex social comparisons on the perception of one's own abilities at school and subsequent reported marks and academic choices. During their final year, male and female high school students were asked to describe themselves either in comparison with boys in their class, in comparison with…

Chazal, Sebastien; Guimond, Serge; Darnon, Celine

2012-01-01

305

Commentary: Implementing Social-Emotional and Academic Innovations--Reflections, Reactions, and Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article "Implementation, Sustainability, and Scaling Up of Social-Emotional and Academic Innovations in Public Schools" by Elias, Zins, Graczyk, and Weissberg (2003) is a thought-provoking contribution, and one that begs for more application. Some of the points the authors raise have been articulated in the school and clinical evidence-based…

Elliott, Stephen N.; Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Roach, Andrew T.

2003-01-01

306

Peer Modeling of Academic and Social Behaviors during Small-Group Direct Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors describe an intervention for 3 preschoolers with disabilities who had low peer-related social competence. The intervention taught academic skills tailored to the need of each target student in small groups (triads) with two typically developing peers, using a progressive time delay procedure. Prior to instruction and separate from the…

Ledford, Jennifer R.; Wolery, Mark

2013-01-01

307

Personality, Freshmen Proactive Social Behavior, and College Transition: Predictors beyond Academic Strategies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When transitioning to college freshmen must behave proactively in order to strive for success in their collegiate careers and their future life. Past research has mainly focused on the academic strategies of freshmen when investigating the predictors of successful college transition and has paid little attention to students' social strategies. The…

Wang, Yi; Cullen, Kristin L.; Yao, Xiang; Li, Yixuan

2013-01-01

308

Students' Coping with Academic and Social Stress in an Inner-City Middle School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents the findings of several studies designed to examine students' coping processes in relation to stressful academic and social situations in the school environment. The setting for these studies was an inner-city intermediate school with approximately 423 students in the 1984-85 school year. Over 95 percent of the students were…

Fahs, Mary Ellen

309

Teacher: Students' Interpersonal Relationships and Students' Academic Achievements in Social Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The classroom is a social system in which the teacher and the students interact as organizational members. The quality of classroom relations is dependent on the activities of both the instructor and the students. Several environmental conditions and circumstances often tend to either improve or depress the academic performances of…

Fan, F. A.

2012-01-01

310

The Association between Preschool Children's Social Functioning and Their Emergent Academic Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relationship between social functioning and emergent academic development in a sample of 467 preschool children (M=55.9 months old, SD=3.8). Teachers reported on children's aggression, attention problems, and prosocial skills. Preliteracy, language, and early mathematics skills were assessed with standardized tests. Better…

Arnold, David H.; Kupersmidt, Janis B.; Voegler-Lee, Mary Ellen; Marshall, Nastassja A.

2012-01-01

311

Critical Links: Learning in the Arts and Student Academic and Social Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two purposes of this compendium are: (1) to recommend to researchers and funders of research promising lines of inquiry and study suggested by recent, strong studies of the academic and social effects of learning in the arts; and (2) to provide designers of arts education curriculum and instruction with insights found in the research that suggest…

Deasy, Richard J., Ed.

312

Department Name: Office of Academic Services Org. #: 2016 Position Title: Social Media/Videographer Asst  

E-print Network

Department Name: Office of Academic Services Org. #: 2016 Position Title: Social Media work is characterized by highly structured tasks or outcomes, relatively low level or number of skills. WLS 3 ­ Skilled Level ­ The work is typically skilled, requires little direct supervision, requires

Baltisberger, Jay H.

313

Department Name: Office of Academic Services Org. #: 2016 Position Title: Advanced Social Media/Video  

E-print Network

Department Name: Office of Academic Services Org. #: 2016 Position Title: Advanced Social Media is characterized by highly structured tasks or outcomes, relatively low level or number of skills required. WLS 3 ­ Skilled Level ­ The work is typically skilled, requires little direct supervision, requires

Baltisberger, Jay H.

314

Computer Science Majors: Sex Role Orientation, Academic Achievement, and Social Cognitive Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the sex role orientations endorsed by 188 male and female students majoring in computer science, a male-dominated college degree program. The relations among sex role orientation and academic achievement and social cognitive factors influential in career decision-making self-efficacy were explored. Findings revealed that…

Brown, Chris; Garavalia, Linda S.; Fritts, Mary Lou Hines; Olson, Elizabeth A.

2006-01-01

315

Commercial Social Media and the Erosion of the Commons: Implications for Academic Libraries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent scholarship challenges the celebratory discourse surrounding Web 2.0. This paper engages with this scholarship to examine critically the implications of academic libraries' presence within commercially owned social media spaces. It considers the apparent contradiction between work to promote the principles of open access and the idea of the…

Lilburn, Jeff

2012-01-01

316

Cambodian Early Adolescents' Academic Achievement: The Role of Social Capital  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the associations of parents' cultural beliefs and attitudes with respect to fate, traditional gender roles, aspirations, and involvement in children's academic achievement in Cambodia. Based on Coleman's social capital theory, a good parent-child relationship enables children's school success because…

Eng, Sothy

2013-01-01

317

Communication, Academic, and Social Skills of Young Adults with Hearing Loss  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manuscript reports on data collected as part of a larger research study designed to investigate factors that facilitate the integration of children with hearing loss into mainstream environments. Aspects of communicative, academic, and social functioning for 43 adolescents and young adults were examined using questionnaires. In addition,…

Eriks-Brophy, Alice; Durieux-Smith, Andree; Olds, Janet; Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth M.; Duquette, Cheryll; Whittingham, JoAnne

2012-01-01

318

Social Cognitive Predictors of Mexican American College Students' Academic and Life Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, we used Lent's (2004) social cognitive model of well being to examine the academic and life satisfaction of 457 Mexican American college students attending a Hispanic-Serving Institution. Using structural equation modeling, results indicated that the model provided a good fit to the data. Specifically, we found positive relations…

Ojeda, Lizette; Flores, Lisa Y.; Navarro, Rachel L.

2011-01-01

319

Academic Achievement and Social Functioning of Children With and Without Learning Difficulties  

Microsoft Academic Search

The academic achievement and social functioning of children with learning difficulties (LD) and children without LD (7–12 years old) was examined. Attainment scores in mathematics and English were obtained for each child, and a sample of children without LD was further classified as low achieving (LA) or high achieving (HA) on the basis of these scores. Sociometric and peer behavioural

Ann Walker; Dabie Nabuzoka

2007-01-01

320

Peer Relationships, Social Behaviours, Academic Performance and Loneliness in Korean Primary School Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate how different forms of peer relationships offer children unique support for loneliness and to examine the direct as well as indirect effects of social behaviours and academic performance through the mediation of peer relationships on the prediction of loneliness in Korean children. Four hundred and…

Shin, Yoolim

2007-01-01

321

Parenting, Child Behavior, and Academic and Social Functioning: Does Ethnicity Make a Difference?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Most research on the relation between parenting behaviors and child outcomes has not focused on cross-ethnic variation in these relations. Objective: This study examined if ethnicity moderates associations between parenting, child agency/persistence, and child academic achievement and social competence. Design: Participants included…

Bae, Hyo; Hopkins, Joyce; Gouze, Karen R.; Lavigne, John V.

2014-01-01

322

The relationship between the social management of emotional intelligence and academic performance among medical students.  

PubMed

Positive social interaction with peers was said to facilitate cognitive and intellectual development leading to good academic performance. There was paucity of published data on the effect of social management (SM) emotional intelligence (EI) on academic performance. We conducted this study to examine their relationship in the undergraduate medical students in a public medical school in Malaysia. This was a cross-sectional study using the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) to measure the SM. The first and final year medical students were invited to participate. Students answered a paper-based demography questionnaire and completed the online MSCEIT in privacy. Independent predictors were identified using multivariate analyses. A total of 163 (84?first year and 79?final year) medical students completed the study (at a response rate of 66.0%). SM score (B?=?-.10 95% CI -.175 to -.015, p?=?.021) was significantly related to the continuous assessment (CA) marks (adjusted R(2)?=?.45, F13,137?=?10.26, p?social intelligence and academic success in undergraduate medical students. A different collection of social skills and SM EI could be constructive towards academic achievement in medical schools. PMID:24773524

Chew, Boon-How; Md Zain, Azhar; Hassan, Faezah

2015-03-01

323

Indirect Socialization of Children: The Effects of Mothers' Jobs on Academic Behaviors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigates indirect socialization effects of parents' occupational conditions on children's school behavior. Subjects were 60 women of lower socioeconomic status and their adolescent and preadolescent children. As predicted, mothers' job autonomy and skill utilization were significantly associated with their children's academic behaviors.…

Piotrkowski, Chaya S.; Katz, Mitchell H.

1982-01-01

324

Virginia Tech Request for Update in Social Security Number for Academic Purposes  

E-print Network

3/31/2014 Virginia Tech Request for Update in Social Security Number for Academic Purposes Office of the University Registrar (MC 0134) Student Services Building Suite 250, Virginia Tech 800 Washington Street SW: ______________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________ E-mail Address (Virginia Tech email preferred

Buehrer, R. Michael

325

Patterns of Early Reading and Social Skills Associated with Academic Success in Elementary School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Researchers and policymakers emphasize that early childhood is a critical developmental stage with the potential to impact academic and social-emotional outcomes (G. Conti & J. J. Heckman, 2012; J. J. Heckman, 2012; R. Murnane, I. Sawhill, & C. Snow, 2012). Although there is substantial evidence that children's…

Cooper, Brittany Rhoades; Moore, Julia E.; Powers, C. J.; Cleveland, Michael; Greenberg, Mark T.

2014-01-01

326

Perceived Academic Control: Mediating the Effects of Optimism and Social Support on College Students' Psychological Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The first year of college presents numerous challenges experienced as overwhelming by some freshmen who may become overly stressed and depressed. This longitudinal study examined perceived academic control (PAC) as a mediator of optimism and social support's buffering effects on freshman students' psychological health. Multiple regressions…

Ruthig, Joelle C.; Haynes, Tara L.; Stupnisky, Robert H.; Perry, Raymond P.

2009-01-01

327

A Database Evaluation Based on Information Needs of Academic Social Scientists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluates two databases, "Historical Abstracts" and REESWeb, to determine their effectiveness in supporting academic social science research. While many performance evaluations gather quantitative data from isolated query and response transactions, this study is a qualitative evaluation of the databases in the context of actual…

Buterbaugh, Nancy Toth

328

Academic and social dimensions of student experience: The high school science classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study I asked how classroom participants defined and acted on academic and social dimensions of classroom life. Because little is known about how students think and feel about classroom experience (Erickson & Schultz, 1992), I focused on their perspectives. In attempting to sort out and report student perspectives, I used a case of one high school science classroom,

Ellen O'neil Longo

1997-01-01

329

Effects of Full-Day Kindergarten on Academic Achievement and Social Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A meta-analysis found that attending full-day (or all-day) kindergarten had a positive association with academic achievement (compared to half-day kindergarten) equal to about one quarter standard deviation at the end of the kindergarten year. But the association disappeared by third grade. Reasons for this fade-out are discussed. Social

Cooper, Harris; Batts Allen, Ashley; Patall, Erika A.; Dent, Amy L.

2010-01-01

330

Profiles of School Adaptation: Social, Behavioral and Academic Functioning in Sexually Abused Girls  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: The short-term outcomes of child sexual abuse (CSA) on academic, behavioral and social adaptation at school were examined in order to: (1) document the proportion of sexually abused (SA) girls struggling in school and define the nature of their difficulties, (2) explore whether different profiles of school adaptation could be…

Daignault, Isabelle V.; Hebert, Martine

2009-01-01

331

Self-Representations of Social and Academic Competence: Contextual Correlates in Middle Childhood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Self-representations of 1st-, 3rd-, and 5th-graders' social and academic competence were examined in relation to children's personal (grade/age); family (attachment to parents, marital conflict, anxiety related to conflict); and school (teacher appraisals) contexts. Children who reported higher levels of security of attachment to parents and lower…

Isabella, Russell A.; Diener, Marissa L.

2010-01-01

332

Young, Gifted, and Female: A Look at Academic and Social Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article illuminates the current status of our understanding regarding the academic and social-emotional needs of gifted, early adolescent females in the United States. A synthesis of both theoretical and empirical studies addresses two foundational questions. First, how do we describe the unique population of gifted, female, adolescent…

Meredith, Corine Cadle

2009-01-01

333

Rumor diffusion in an interests-based dynamic social network.  

PubMed

To research rumor diffusion in social friend network, based on interests, a dynamic friend network is proposed, which has the characteristics of clustering and community, and a diffusion model is also proposed. With this friend network and rumor diffusion model, based on the zombie-city model, some simulation experiments to analyze the characteristics of rumor diffusion in social friend networks have been conducted. The results show some interesting observations: (1) positive information may evolve to become a rumor through the diffusion process that people may modify the information by word of mouth; (2) with the same average degree, a random social network has a smaller clustering coefficient and is more beneficial for rumor diffusion than the dynamic friend network; (3) a rumor is spread more widely in a social network with a smaller global clustering coefficient than in a social network with a larger global clustering coefficient; and (4) a network with a smaller clustering coefficient has a larger efficiency. PMID:24453911

Tang, Mingsheng; Mao, Xinjun; Guessoum, Zahia; Zhou, Huiping

2013-01-01

334

Rumor Diffusion in an Interests-Based Dynamic Social Network  

PubMed Central

To research rumor diffusion in social friend network, based on interests, a dynamic friend network is proposed, which has the characteristics of clustering and community, and a diffusion model is also proposed. With this friend network and rumor diffusion model, based on the zombie-city model, some simulation experiments to analyze the characteristics of rumor diffusion in social friend networks have been conducted. The results show some interesting observations: (1) positive information may evolve to become a rumor through the diffusion process that people may modify the information by word of mouth; (2) with the same average degree, a random social network has a smaller clustering coefficient and is more beneficial for rumor diffusion than the dynamic friend network; (3) a rumor is spread more widely in a social network with a smaller global clustering coefficient than in a social network with a larger global clustering coefficient; and (4) a network with a smaller clustering coefficient has a larger efficiency. PMID:24453911

Mao, Xinjun; Guessoum, Zahia; Zhou, Huiping

2013-01-01

335

Cooperative networks overcoming defectors by social influence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We address the cooperation problem in structured populations by considering the prisoner’s dilemma game as a metaphor of the social interactions between individuals with imitation capacity. We present a new strategy update rule called democratic weighted update where the individual’s behavior is socially influenced by each one of their neighbors. In particular, the capacity of an individual to socially influence other ones is proportional to its accumulated payoff. When in a neighborhood there are cooperators and defectors, the focal player is contradictorily influenced by them and, therefore, the effective social influence is given by the difference of the accumulated payoff of each strategy in its neighborhood. First, by considering the growing process of the network and neglecting mutations, we show the evolution of highly cooperative systems. Then, we broadly show that the social influence allows to overcome the emergence of defectors into highly cooperative systems. In this way, we conclude that in a structured system formed by a growing process, the cooperation evolves if the individuals have an imitation capacity socially influenced by each one of their neighbors. Therefore, here we present a theoretical solution of the cooperation problem among genetically unrelated individuals.

Gomez Portillo, Ignacio

2014-01-01

336

Privacy policies for health social networking sites  

PubMed Central

Health social networking sites (HSNS), virtual communities where users connect with each other around common problems and share relevant health data, have been increasingly adopted by medical professionals and patients. The growing use of HSNS like Sermo and PatientsLikeMe has prompted public concerns about the risks that such online data-sharing platforms pose to the privacy and security of personal health data. This paper articulates a set of privacy risks introduced by social networking in health care and presents a practical example that demonstrates how the risks might be intrinsic to some HSNS. The aim of this study is to identify and sketch the policy implications of using HSNS and how policy makers and stakeholders should elaborate upon them to protect the privacy of online health data. PMID:23599228

Li, Jingquan

2013-01-01

337

Sensing Handshakes for Social Network Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Increasing ones social network and contacts currently is a manual process. Collections of business cards are exchanged or\\u000a notepads are brought around to write down contact details at events such as conferences. These details are not only difficult\\u000a to keep track of but the context in which the details were taken will be forgotten in time. Unfortunately business card exchange

David Haddock; Aaron J. Quigley; Benoit Gaudin

2009-01-01

338

Predicting Group Stability in Online Social Networks Akshay Patil  

E-print Network

the level of member diversity and social activities are critical in maintaining the stability of groups. We Social Networks, Group Stability, Online Communities 1. INTRODUCTION Understanding community structuresPredicting Group Stability in Online Social Networks Akshay Patil Stony Brook University Stony

Gao, Jie

339

Transfer of Training: Adding Insight through Social Network Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews studies which apply a social network perspective to examine transfer of training. The theory behind social networks focuses on the interpersonal mechanisms and social structures that exist among interacting units such as people within an organization. A premise of this perspective is that individual's behaviors and outcomes…

Van den Bossche, Piet; Segers, Mien

2013-01-01

340

Social Networking Technologies: A "Poke" for Campus Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Handwritten notes, meeting for coffee, eye contact, a handshake, a smile--are these social practices of yesteryear, soon to be replaced by the "wall posts" and "pokes" of today's social networking technologies? Although advances in social networking technologies allow for new and perhaps more efficient means of learning and communicating, they…

Berg, Joanne; Berquam, Lori; Christoph, Kathy

2007-01-01

341

Do Social Network Characteristics Predict Mammography Screening Practices?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Many breast cancer outreach programs assume that dissemination of information through social networks and provision of social support will promote screening. The authors prospectively examined the relationship between social network characteristics and adherence to screening guidelines. Method: Employed women age 40 years and older…

Allen, Jennifer D.; Stoddard, Anne M.; Sorensen, Glorian

2008-01-01

342

From Sensor Network To Social Network A Study On The Energy Impact In Buildings  

E-print Network

bayesian belief networks and signal processing techniques to make meaningful inferences about real world that constructs social networks that estimates human so- cial activities from sensor network data and analyzesFrom Sensor Network To Social Network­ A Study On The Energy Impact In Buildings Xiaoqian Jiang1

Pratt, Vaughan

343

Communication Dynamics in Finite Capacity Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In communication networks, structure and dynamics are tightly coupled. The structure controls the flow of information and is itself shaped by the dynamical process of information exchanged between nodes. In order to reconcile structure and dynamics, a generic model, based on the local interaction between nodes, is considered for the communication in large social networks. In agreement with data from a large human organization, we show that the flow is non-Markovian and controlled by the temporal limitations of individuals. We confirm the versatility of our model by predicting simultaneously the degree-dependent node activity, the balance between information input and output of nodes, and the degree distribution. Finally, we quantify the limitations to network analysis when it is based on data sampled over a finite period of time.

Haerter, Jan O.; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Mathiesen, Joachim

2012-10-01

344

Dynamical and bursty interactions in social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a modeling framework for dynamical and bursty contact networks made of agents in social interaction. We consider agents’ behavior at short time scales in which the contact network is formed by disconnected cliques of different sizes. At each time a random agent can make a transition from being isolated to being part of a group or vice versa. Different distributions of contact times and intercontact times between individuals are obtained by considering transition probabilities with memory effects, i.e., the transition probabilities for each agent depend both on its state (isolated or interacting) and on the time elapsed since the last change in state. The model lends itself to analytical and numerical investigations. The modeling framework can be easily extended and paves the way for systematic investigations of dynamical processes occurring on rapidly evolving dynamical networks, such as the propagation of an information or spreading of diseases.

Stehlé, Juliette; Barrat, Alain; Bianconi, Ginestra

2010-03-01

345

Recruitment dynamics in adaptive social networks  

PubMed Central

We model recruitment in adaptive social networks in the presence of birth and death processes. Recruitment is characterized by nodes changing their status to that of the recruiting class as a result of contact with recruiting nodes. Only a susceptible subset of nodes can be recruited. The recruiting individuals may adapt their connections in order to improve recruitment capabilities, thus changing the network structure adaptively. We derive a mean field theory to predict the dependence of the growth threshold of the recruiting class on the adaptation parameter. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of adaptation on the recruitment level, as well as on network topology. The theoretical predictions are compared with direct simulations of the full system. We identify two parameter regimes with qualitatively different bifurcation diagrams depending on whether nodes become susceptible frequently (multiple times in their lifetime) or rarely (much less than once per lifetime). PMID:25395989

Shkarayev, Maxim S.; Schwartz, Ira B.; Shaw, Leah B.

2013-01-01

346

Communication dynamics in finite capacity social networks.  

PubMed

In communication networks, structure and dynamics are tightly coupled. The structure controls the flow of information and is itself shaped by the dynamical process of information exchanged between nodes. In order to reconcile structure and dynamics, a generic model, based on the local interaction between nodes, is considered for the communication in large social networks. In agreement with data from a large human organization, we show that the flow is non-Markovian and controlled by the temporal limitations of individuals. We confirm the versatility of our model by predicting simultaneously the degree-dependent node activity, the balance between information input and output of nodes, and the degree distribution. Finally, we quantify the limitations to network analysis when it is based on data sampled over a finite period of time. PMID:23215144

Haerter, Jan O; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Mathiesen, Joachim

2012-10-19

347

Recruitment dynamics in adaptive social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We model recruitment in adaptive social networks in the presence of birth and death processes. Recruitment is characterized by nodes changing their status to that of the recruiting class as a result of contact with recruiting nodes. Only a susceptible subset of nodes can be recruited. The recruiting individuals may adapt their connections in order to improve recruitment capabilities, thus changing the network structure adaptively. We derive a mean-field theory to predict the dependence of the growth threshold of the recruiting class on the adaptation parameter. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of adaptation on the recruitment level, as well as on network topology. The theoretical predictions are compared with direct simulations of the full system. We identify two parameter regimes with qualitatively different bifurcation diagrams depending on whether nodes become susceptible frequently (multiple times in their lifetime) or rarely (much less than once per lifetime).

Shkarayev, Maxim S.; Schwartz, Ira B.; Shaw, Leah B.

2013-06-01

348

Removing Roadblocks to Rigor: Linking Academic and Social Supports to Ensure College Readiness and Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Concerned about the lack of focus on students' needs for support in order to meet rigorous academic standards at the secondary and postsecondary levels, the Pathways to College Network--a partnership of national organizations and funders working to improve postsecondary opportunities for underserved populations--is undertaking a national…

Savitz-Romer, Mandy; Jager-Hyman, Joie; Coles, Ann

2009-01-01

349

Psychological distress and academic self-perception among international medical students: the role of peer social support.  

PubMed

BackgroundPsychological distress among medical students is commonly observed during medical education and is generally related to poor academic self-perception. We evaluated the role of peer social support at medical schools in the association between psychological distress and academic self-perception.MethodsAn online survey was conducted in a medical degree program for 138 international students educated in English in the Czech Republic. The Medical Student Well-Being Index was used to define the students¿ psychological distress. Perceived peer social support was investigated with the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Poor academic self-perception was defined as the lowest 30% of a subscale score of the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure. Analyses evaluated the presence of additive interactions between psychological distress and peer social support on poor academic self-perception, adjusted for possible confounders.ResultsBoth psychological distress and low peer social support were negatively associated with poor academic self-perception, adjusted for local language proficiency and social support from family. Students with psychological distress and low peer social support had an odds ratio of 11.0 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.1¿56.6) for poor academic self-perception as compared with those without distress who had high peer social support. The presence of an additive interaction was confirmed in that the joint association was four times as large as what would have been expected to be on summing the individual risks of psychological distress and low peer social support (synergy index =4.5, 95% CI: 1.3¿14.9).ConclusionsPsychological distress and low peer social support may synergistically increase the probability of poor academic self-perception among international medical students. Promoting peer social relationships at medical school may interrupt the vicious cycle of psychological distress and poor academic performance. PMID:25430069

Yamada, Yukari; Klugar, Miloslav; Ivanova, Katerina; Oborna, Ivana

2014-11-28

350

The Changing Nature of Suicide Attacks: A Social Network Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To comprehend the developments underlying the suicide attacks of recent years, we suggest that the organizational approach, which until recently was used to explain this phenomenon, should be complemented with a social network perspective. By employing a social network analysis of Palestinian suicide networks, the authors found that, in contrast…

Pedahzur, Ami; Perliger, Arie

2006-01-01

351

Effects of new ventures' social network on knowledge transfer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effective knowledge transfer in new ventures' social network has been one of many factors crucial to new ventures' survival and growth. This paper explores the effects of new ventures' social network on knowledge transfer. The results show that network structure has significant effects on transferring knowledge to new ventures. High density, greater centrality, heterogeneity and lager size in new ventures'

Yahao Mei; Hongli Liu

2011-01-01

352

Threshold Learning Dynamics in Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Social learning is defined as the ability of a population to aggregate information, a process which must crucially depend on the mechanisms of social interaction. Consumers choosing which product to buy, or voters deciding which option to take with respect to an important issue, typically confront external signals to the information gathered from their contacts. Economic models typically predict that correct social learning occurs in large populations unless some individuals display unbounded influence. We challenge this conclusion by showing that an intuitive threshold process of individual adjustment does not always lead to such social learning. We find, specifically, that three generic regimes exist separated by sharp discontinuous transitions. And only in one of them, where the threshold is within a suitable intermediate range, the population learns the correct information. In the other two, where the threshold is either too high or too low, the system either freezes or enters into persistent flux, respectively. These regimes are generally observed in different social networks (both complex or regular), but limited interaction is found to promote correct learning by enlarging the parameter region where it occurs. PMID:21637714

González-Avella, Juan Carlos; Eguíluz, Victor M.; Marsili, Matteo; Vega-Redondo, Fernado; San Miguel, Maxi

2011-01-01

353

A generational comparison of social networking site use: the influence of age and social identity.  

PubMed

An online survey (N=256) compared social networking site (SNS) use among younger (millennial: 18-29) and older (baby-boomer: 41-64) subscribers focusing on the influence of collective self-esteem and group identity on motives for SNS use. Younger participants reported higher positive collective self-esteem, social networking site use for peer communication, and social compensation. Regardless of age, participants reporting high collective self-esteem and group identity were more likely to use social networking sites for peer communication and social identity gratifications, while those reporting negative collective self-esteem were more likely to use social networking sites for social compensation. The theoretical implications of the strong relationship between social identity gratifications and social compensation are discussed. PMID:22808625

Barker, Valerie

2012-01-01

354

Academic Language Socialization in High School Writing Conferences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines multilingual high school writers' individual talk with their teachers in two advanced English language development classes to observe how such talk shapes linguistically diverse adolescents' writing. Addressing adolescent writers' language socialization through microethnographic discourse analysis, the author…

Gilliland, Betsy

2014-01-01

355

Pivotal Response Treatments for Autism: Communication, Social, and Academic Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recognized as one of the top state-of-the-art treatments for autism in the United States, the innovative Pivotal Response Treatment uses natural learning opportunities to target and modify key behaviors in children with autism, leading to widespread positive effects on communication, behavior, and social skills. The product of 20 years of…

Koegel, Robert L.; Kern Koegel, Lynn

2006-01-01

356

Application of Academic Design Principles to Social Skills Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Public schools are replete with children and adolescents like Billy, Reid, and Rowdy whom teachers describe as rude, disruptive, and obnoxious, and not all of them are in special education. Asher (1990) estimated that 10% of school-age children have social skills deficits severe enough to be rejected by their peers and up to 75% of children with…

Snider, Vicki E.; Battalio, Rosemary

2011-01-01

357

Minnesota Academic Standards in History and Social Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Public education in Minnesota must help students gain the knowledge and skills that are necessary to, in Thomas Jefferson's view, protect and maintain freedom. The Social Studies Standards in this document attempt to do just this by specifying the particular knowledge and skills that Minnesota students will be required to learn in the disciplines…

Minnesota Department of Education, 2004

2004-01-01

358

Threshold of SIS Epidemics in Alternate Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We introduce the alternate social networks (ASN) model to study the epidemic threshold of SIS epidemic. The alternate social networks consist of a family network and a public network, mimicking the human contacts during some time (nighttime) and other time (daytime) respectively. Both the family network and the public network are constructed by a set of sub networks which can exhibit small-world properties, scale-free degree distribution or the household structure, representing various types of local interactions among social groups in modern society. Simulations show that the ASN has the essential characteristics of social networks, and the local fully connected structures (households) as well as the existence of local structures (publics) in the public network are two dominating ingredients for the epidemic threshold. Moreover, results show that the epidemic threshold in ASN is independent of the initial condition and the system size.

Ni, Shunjiang; Weng, Wenguo; Fan, Weicheng

2008-03-01

359

The Educational Effects of Rural Adolescents' Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the social networks and sources of social support for rural high-school adolescents and how these are related to educational and psychological outcomes. We examined quality, frequency. and nature of social relationships of high school students to understand how size, density, heterogeneity, compositional quality of social

Singh, Kusum; Dika, Sandra

2003-01-01

360

From Social Ties to Social Capital: Class Differences in the Relations between Schools and Parent Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focusing on parental networks--a central dimension of social capital--this article uses ethnographic data to examine social-class differences in the relations between families and schools. We detail the characteristics of networks across different classes and then explore the ways that networks come into play when parents are confronted by…

Horvat, Erin McNamara; Weininger, Elliot B.; Lareau, Annette

2003-01-01

361

The Social Fabric of Elementary Schools: A Network Typology of Social Interaction among Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While researchers are currently studying various forms of social network interaction among teachers for their impact on educational policy implementation and practice, knowledge on how various types of networks are interrelated is limited. The goal of this study is to understand the dimensionality that may underlie various types of social networks

Moolenaar, Nienke M.; Sleegers, Peter J. C.; Karsten, Sjoerd; Daly, Alan J.

2012-01-01

362

Open-source social Network Assessment Survey System (NASS)  

E-print Network

The selection of targeted survey questions and the design of survey questionnaires are instrumental in the social networks research. With the accelerating growth of theory and experimental knowledge in the area of social ...

Du, Aaron (Aaron Yinan)

2005-01-01

363

Tie strength in question answer on social network sites  

E-print Network

Asking friends, colleagues, or other trusted people to help answer a question or find information is a familiar and tried-and-true concept. Widespread use of online social networks has made social information seeking easier, ...

Panovich, Katrina Marie

364

Survey on Social Networking Site for Engineering Management Program  

E-print Network

Social Networking Sites (SNSs) such as Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter have gained much popularity as Web 2.0 technologies and have been widely adopted by different age groups from teenagers to students to working professionals. Consequently, social...

Mokkarala, Rajyalakshmi Sirisha

2012-07-27

365

Infectious Disease Modeling of Social Contagion in Networks  

E-print Network

Many behavioral phenomena have been found to spread interpersonally through social networks, in a manner similar to infectious diseases. An important difference between social contagion and traditional infectious diseases, ...

Hill, Alison Lynn

366

Structural and Cognitive Bottlenecks to Information Access in Social Networks  

E-print Network

Information in networks is non-uniformly distributed, enabling individuals in certain network positions to get preferential access to information. Social scientists have developed influential theories about the role of network structure in information access. These theories were validated through numerous studies, which examined how individuals leverage their social networks for competitive advantage, such as a new job or higher compensation. It is not clear how these theories generalize to online networks, which differ from real-world social networks in important respects, including asymmetry of social links. We address this problem by analyzing how users of the social news aggregator Digg adopt stories recommended by friends, i.e., users they follow. We measure the impact different factors, such as network position and activity rate; have on access to novel information, which in Digg's case means set of distinct news stories. We show that a user can improve his information access by linking to active users,...

Kang, Jeon-Hyung

2013-01-01

367

A social network analysis of customer-level revenue distribution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network analysis has been a topic of regular interest in the marketing discipline. Previous studies have largely focused\\u000a on similarities in product\\/brand choice decisions within the same social network, often in the context of product innovation\\u000a adoption. Not much is known, however, about the importance of social network effects once customers have been acquired. Using\\u000a the customer base of

Michael Haenlein

2011-01-01

368

Social Butterfly: Social Caches for Distributed Social Networks Lu Han, Badri Nath, Liviu Iftode, S. Muthukrishnan  

E-print Network

. Muthukrishnan Department of Computer Science Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey {luhan, badri, iftode) can overcome several disadvantages of the now popular centralized online social networks personal contents at the place of their choosing such as cloud storage, enterprise servers or personal

Iftode, Liviu

369

A Sensemaking Approach to Visual Analytics of Attribute-Rich Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social networks have become more complex, in particular considering the fact that elements in social networks are not only abstract topological nodes and links, but contain rich social attributes and reflecting diverse social relationships. For example, in a co-authorship social network in a scientific community, nodes in the social network, which…

Gou, Liang

2012-01-01

370

Violating Social Norms when Choosing Friends: How Rule-Breakers Affect Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Social networks rely on basic rules of conduct to yield functioning societies in both human and animal populations. As individuals follow established rules, their behavioral decisions shape the social network and give it structure. Using dynamic, self-organizing social network models we demonstrate that defying conventions in a social system can affect multiple levels of social and organizational success independently. Such actions primarily affect actors' own positions within the network, but individuals can also affect the overall structure of a network even without immediately affecting themselves or others. These results indicate that defying the established social norms can help individuals to change the properties of a social system via seemingly neutral behaviors, highlighting the power of rule-breaking behavior to transform convention-based societies, even before direct impacts on individuals can be measured. PMID:22039524

Hock, Karlo; Fefferman, Nina H.

2011-01-01

371

Optimizing Online Social Networks for Information Propagation  

PubMed Central

Online users nowadays are facing serious information overload problem. In recent years, recommender systems have been widely studied to help people find relevant information. Adaptive social recommendation is one of these systems in which the connections in the online social networks are optimized for the information propagation so that users can receive interesting news or stories from their leaders. Validation of such adaptive social recommendation methods in the literature assumes uniform distribution of users' activity frequency. In this paper, our empirical analysis shows that the distribution of online users' activity is actually heterogenous. Accordingly, we propose a more realistic multi-agent model in which users' activity frequency are drawn from a power-law distribution. We find that previous social recommendation methods lead to serious delay of information propagation since many users are connected to inactive leaders. To solve this problem, we design a new similarity measure which takes into account users' activity frequencies. With this similarity measure, the average delay is significantly shortened and the recommendation accuracy is largely improved. PMID:24816894

Chen, Duan-Bing; Wang, Guan-Nan; Zeng, An; Fu, Yan; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

2014-01-01

372

Social Networking—Another Breach In The Wall  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the increasing popularity of social networks like Facebook and MySpace, such sites have lately become the favourite destinations for spammers and attackers. Social networks have experienced complex social engineering attacks, massive spam and aggressive malware distribution in the recent past. This paper presents a practical case study of social engineering, malware distribution and phishing attacks against social networking sites that are identified over last few months. It is explained how private data of the users are exposed to attackers and how easily their privacy is compromised as a result of these attacks and their own careless behaviour.

Bamnote, Gajendra; Patil, Gajendra; Shejole, Amol

2010-11-01

373

Analyzing covert social network foundation behind terrorism disaster  

E-print Network

This paper addresses a method to analyze the covert social network foundation hidden behind the terrorism disaster. It is to solve a node discovery problem, which means to discover a node, which functions relevantly in a social network, but escaped from monitoring on the presence and mutual relationship of nodes. The method aims at integrating the expert investigator's prior understanding, insight on the terrorists' social network nature derived from the complex graph theory, and computational data processing. The social network responsible for the 9/11 attack in 2001 is used to execute simulation experiment to evaluate the performance of the method.

Maeno, Yoshiharu

2007-01-01

374

SocialCloud: Using Social Networks for Building Distributed Computing Services  

E-print Network

SocialCloud: Using Social Networks for Building Distributed Computing Services Abedelaziz Mohaisen investigate a new computing paradigm, called SocialCloud, in which computing nodes are governed by social ties existing computing paradigms, such as grid computing and the conventional cloud computing paradigms. We

Kim, Dae-Shik

375

Empathetic Social Choice on Social Networks Amirali Salehi-Abari and Craig Boutilier  

E-print Network

. The influence of social networks on voting behavior has received considerable attention in the social sciences form of classical preference aggregation (e.g., social welfare maximization or certain forms of voting. In fact, arguably most group decision problems, whether social, corporate, or policy-oriented, involve

Toronto, University of

376

Addressing therapeutic boundaries in social networking.  

PubMed

Facebook is the leading social networking website, with over 500 million users. Prior studies have shown an increasing number of housestaff accessing the site. While Facebook can be used to foster camaraderie, it can also create difficulties in the doctor-patient relationship, especially when boundaries are crossed. This study explored the prevalence of such boundary crossings and offers recommendations for training. An anonymous voluntary survey regarding Facebook use was distributed to current psychiatry residents through the American Psychiatric Association (APA) listserv. Of the 182 respondents, 95.7% had current Facebook profiles, and 9.7% had received friend requests from patients. In addition, 18.7% admitted to viewing patient profiles on Facebook. There is a substantial utilization of Facebook among psychiatric residents as compared with prior studies. Specific guidance regarding social media websites and the potential for ethical difficulties should be offered to trainees. PMID:22397540

Ginory, Almari; Sabatier, Laura Mayol; Eth, Spencer

2012-01-01

377

How we enhanced medical academics skills and reduced social inequities using an academic teaching program.  

PubMed

Abstract The training of future physicians should be concurrent with the development of different skills and attitudes. This warrants the need to regularly provide students with opportunities for self-development throughout their academic career. This approach was exemplified in a medical school in the Brazilian Amazon, where students were allowed to play the role of high school teachers. As part of this exercise, they conducted reinforcement classes for high school students to increase the number of university admissions. The medical students were solely responsible for organizing and implementing this project, giving them the opportunity to develop teaching and leadership skills, enhance their understanding of communication and administration and contribute toward the society. PMID:25301145

Martins, Antonio Camargo; Oliveira, Felipe Renê Alves; Delfino, Breno Matos; Pereira, Thasciany Moraes; de Moraes, Fabio Henrique Pinto; Barbosa, Guilherme Viana; de Macedo, Lucas Felipe; Domingos, Tayna Da Silva; Da Silva, Dyemisson Pinheiro; Menezes, Charlene Cristine Rodrigues; Oliveira Filho, Edmar Santana; Pereira, Thales Augusto Da Silva; Piccirilli, Elizabeth Souza; Pinto, Wagner De Jesus

2014-10-10

378

A social network caught in the Web  

E-print Network

We present an analysis of Club Nexus, an online community at Stanford University. Through the Nexus site we were able to study a reflection of the real world community structure within the student body. We observed and measured social network phenomena such as the small world effect, clustering, and the strength of weak ties. Using the rich profile data provided by the users we were able to deduce the attributes contributing to the formation of friendships, and to determine how the similarity of users decays as the distance between them in the network increases. In addition, we found correlations between a user's personality and their other attributes, as well as interesting correspondences between how users perceive themselves and how they are perceived by others.

Lada A. Adamic; Orkut Buyukkokten; Eytan Adar

2003-01-01

379

Public Health, Academic Medicine, and the Alcohol Industry’s Corporate Social Responsibility Activities  

PubMed Central

We explored the emerging relationships among the alcohol industry, academic medicine, and the public health community in the context of public health theory dealing with corporate social responsibility. We reviewed sponsorship of scientific research, efforts to influence public perceptions of research, dissemination of scientific information, and industry-funded policy initiatives. To the extent that the scientific evidence supports the reduction of alcohol consumption through regulatory and legal measures, the academic community has come into increasing conflict with the views of the alcohol industry. We concluded that the alcohol industry has intensified its scientific and policy-related activities under the general framework of corporate social responsibility initiatives, most of which can be described as instrumental to the industry’s economic interests. PMID:23237151

Robaina, Katherine

2013-01-01

380

Aligning Research and Policy on Social-Emotional and Academic Competence for Young Children  

PubMed Central

Research Findings The purpose of this article is to describe current education policies as they relate to the promotion of social, emotional, and academic (SEA) development and competence for young children. Academic and social–emotional competencies are described and conceptualized as developmentally linked, reciprocal processes that should be supported by education in an integrated, holistic manner. Practice or Policy The article reviews major public policies and national initiatives that have implications for the education of young children (e.g., Head Start, No Child Left Behind, IDEA) and highlights opportunities within these policies to promote programs that can support SEA competencies, as well as the limitations of these policies. The article also includes a review of the limitations of existing resources available to educators to identify evidence-based programs that support SEA competencies and concludes with recommendations for better alignment between research and policy to support SEA competencies.

Nadeem, Erum; Maslak, Kristi; Chacko, Anil; Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton

2014-01-01

381

Dimensionality of Social Networks Using Motifs and Eigenvalues  

PubMed Central

We consider the dimensionality of social networks, and develop experiments aimed at predicting that dimension. We find that a social network model with nodes and links sampled from an m-dimensional metric space with power-law distributed influence regions best fits samples from real-world networks when m scales logarithmically with the number of nodes of the network. This supports a logarithmic dimension hypothesis, and we provide evidence with two different social networks, Facebook and LinkedIn. Further, we employ two different methods for confirming the hypothesis: the first uses the distribution of motif counts, and the second exploits the eigenvalue distribution. PMID:25188391

Bonato, Anthony; Gleich, David F.; Kim, Myunghwan; Mitsche, Dieter; Pra?at, Pawe?; Tian, Yanhua; Young, Stephen J.

2014-01-01

382

Dimensionality of social networks using motifs and eigenvalues  

E-print Network

We consider the dimensionality of social networks, and develop experiments aimed at predicting that dimension. We find that a social network model with nodes and links sampled from an $m$-dimensional metric space with power-law distributed influence regions best fits samples from real-world networks when $m$ scales logarithmically with the number of nodes of the network. This supports a logarithmic dimension hypothesis, and we provide evidence with two different social networks, Facebook and LinkedIn. Further, we employ two different methods for confirming the hypothesis: the first uses the distribution of motif counts, and the second exploits the eigenvalue distribution.

Bonato, Anthony; Kim, Myunghwan; Mitsche, Dieter; Pra?at, Pawe?; Tian, Amanda; Young, Stephen J

2014-01-01

383

Predictors of Academic-Related Stress in College Students: An Examination of Coping, Social Support, Parenting, and Anxiety  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined potential predictors of the academic-related stress experienced by college students. In particular, the relationships among the coping strategies used by college students, social support, the parenting style used by college students' mothers and fathers, college students' experience of anxiety, and academic-related stress were…

Smith, Tara; Renk, Kimberly

2007-01-01

384

The Effects of GIS on Students' Academic Achievement and Motivation in Seventh-Grade Social Studies Lessons in Turkey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study sought to determine the effect of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) on the academic achievement and motivation of seventh-grade students. The study used a quasi-experimental design and a set of social studies lessons. The study was conducted over the 2006-2007 academic year on the students of a primary school at Ankara, Turkey's…

Aladag, Elif

2010-01-01

385

The End of Institutional Repositories and the Beginning of Social Academic Research Service: An Enhanced Role for Libraries  

Microsoft Academic Search

As more and more universities establish Institutional Repositories (IR), awareness is developing about the limitations of IRs in enhancing the academic research service. The concept of an IR needs to be expanded to include the integration of the processes that transform intellectual endeavor into a broadening array of academic and research support services which are fundamentally social. These include, but

Stuart M Basefsky

2009-01-01

386

MATH 100 Topic Analyzing Your Social Network Data  

E-print Network

MATH 100 Topic Analyzing Your Social Network Data Lulu Kang E1-105B, lkang2@math, Facebook is big business. It is straightforward to download your own Facebook network data and see which on the collection and analysis of network data. Network data is data on the interactions between things (whether

Fasshauer, Greg

387

The role of parenting self-efficacy in children? social and academic behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

A latent variable structural model was constructed to test the relations among mothers’ and fathers’ parenting self-efficacy\\u000a (PSE), their loneliness, and their child’s peer-evaluated social competence, self-evaluated loneliness, teacher-evaluated\\u000a motivational orientation, and academic skills. In order to do this, first the Self-Efficacy for Parenting Tasks Index (Coleman\\u000a & Karraker, 2000) was applied to a sample of mothers (n=876) and fathers

Niina Junttila; Marija Vauras; Eero Laakkonen

2007-01-01

388

Children at risk for early academic problems: the role of learning-related social skills  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasing evidence suggests that aspects of children’s learning-related social skills (including interpersonal skills and work-related skills) contribute to early school performance. The present investigation examined the association of work-related skills to academic outcomes at the beginning of kindergarten and at the end of second grade as well as characteristics of children with low work-related skills. Children were selected from a

Megan M McClelland; Frederick J Morrison; Deborah L Holmes

2000-01-01

389

Engagement in After-School Programs as a Predictor of Social Competence and Academic Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the experience sampling method, this study examined two questions related to outcomes associated with after-school programming.\\u000a First, does the quality of experience in after-school programs mediate the effect of program participation on social competence\\u000a and academic performance? Second, among program participants, is the difference in quality of experience when in programs\\u000a versus other settings after school related to higher

David J. Shernoff

2010-01-01

390

Social Goals, Academic Goals, and Avoiding Seeking Help in the Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

Why do some students avoid seeking help with their class work when it is needed? Investigated in this study were the relations between early adolescents' academic and social goals and reports of avoiding help-seeking and perceiving that help-seeking is a threat to self-worth. Surveys were administered to 443 fifth graders in 12 elementary schools. Being oriented to demonstrating ability (relative

Allison M. Ryan; Lynley Hicks; Carol Midgley

1997-01-01

391

Academic Achievement and Social Identity Among Bilingual Students in the U.S  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter discusses academic achievement and social identity development among bilingual students with respect to changing\\u000a demographics of increased linguistic diversity and poverty for school-aged children in the United States. Institutional policies\\u000a and practices are described that lead to blaming the victims of institutional inequity for low test scores and high dropout\\u000a rates. Contrasting paradigms in literacy research are also

Shelley Wong; Rachel Grant

392

Fashioning a web2.0-based academic writing course to enhance situated social learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper integrates discursive and non-discursive knowledge and practice into the web2.0-based multidimensional course of Academic Writing in English. By resorting to the rationale of collaborative writing as embodied in critical linguistics and social constructionism, the space of teaching and learning can be effectively broadened like promoting beneficiary instructor\\/expert-student as well as student-student interactions and most importantly, enhancing the awareness

Dawang Huang; Wenbin Wang; Tingjun Yang

2011-01-01

393

The Importance of Networking in the Academic and Professional Experiences of Racial Minority Students in the USA  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Through examination of the experiences of minority undergraduate doctoral aspirants in the United States, this study points to the importance of academic and professional influences of networking, as well as its role in the academic attainment and professional experiences of underrepresented groups in academe. The findings suggest that networking

Davis, Dannielle Joy; Warfield, Markeba

2011-01-01

394

The Development and Validation of the Academic and Social SOC Scale  

E-print Network

/Pacific Islander, 74% Caucasian, 6% Hispanic, 3% Other). Participants had a mean age of 19.84 years (SD = 2.00 years). 19 Measures. Study 1 included all measures discussed above, with items administered on a seven-point Likert-type scale (unless otherwise...) = 164.65, p =.09; Social: ??2 (134) = 172.73, p =.01). Table 5 contains factor loadings from the equated models and Table 6 contains latent correlations from an equivalent model that simultaneously examined academic and social SOC. Criterion...

Geldhof, Gordon John

2011-05-16

395

Physical fitness and academic performance in primary school children with and without a social disadvantage.  

PubMed

This study examined the differences between children with a low socioeconomic status [socially disadvantaged children (SDC)] and children without this disadvantage (non-SDC) on physical fitness and academic performance. In addition, this study determined the association between physical fitness and academic performance, and investigated the possible moderator effect of SDC. Data on 544 children were collected and analysed (130 SDC, 414 non-SDC, mean age = 8.0 ± 0.7). Physical fitness was measured with tests for cardiovascular and muscular fitness. Academic performance was evaluated using scores on mathematics, spelling and reading. SDC did not differ on physical fitness, compared with non-SDC, but scored significantly lower on academic performance. In the total group, multilevel analysis showed positive associations between cardiovascular fitness and mathematics (? = 0.23), and between cardiovascular fitness and spelling (? = 0.16), but not with reading. No associations were found between muscular fitness and academic performance. A significant interaction effect between SDC and cardiovascular fitness was found for spelling. To conclude, results showed a specific link between cardiovascular fitness and mathematics, regardless of socioeconomic status. SDC did moderate the relationship between cardiovascular fitness and spelling. PMID:25092881

de Greeff, J W; Hartman, E; Mullender-Wijnsma, M J; Bosker, R J; Doolaard, S; Visscher, C

2014-10-01

396

JANUS: Joint Academic Network Using Satellite. Brief Description of Project. IET Papers on Broadcasting: No. 287.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The JANUS (Joint Academic Network Using Satellite) satellite network is being planned to link European institutions wishing to jointly produce distance teaching materials. Earth stations with capabilities for transmit/receive functions, voice/data functions, two 64 kbs channels, and connection to local telephone exchange and computer networks will…

Bates, A. W.

397

Library Applications of a Wide Area Network: Promoting JANET to UK Academic Libraries.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes Project Jupiter, which was developed to promote the United Kingdom's Joint Academic Network (JANET) to its member libraries. Library uses of JANET are described, including online catalogs, commercial services, and electronic mail; the convergence of local area networks (LANs) and wide area networks (WANs) is discussed; and future…

MacColl, John A.

1990-01-01

398

Perceived parenting and social support: can they predict academic achievement in Argentinean college students?  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to test the ability to predict academic achievement through the perception of parenting and social support in a sample of 354 Argentinean college students. Their mean age was 23.50 years (standard deviation =2.62 years) and most of them (83.3%) were females. As a prerequisite for admission to college, students are required to pass a series of mandatory core classes and are expected to complete them in two semesters. Delay in completing the curriculum is considered low academic achievement. Parenting was assessed taking into account the mother and the father and considering two dimensions: responsiveness and demandingness. Perceived social support was analyzed considering four sources: parents, teachers, classmates, and best friend or boyfriend/girlfriend. Path analysis showed that, as hypothesized, responsiveness had a positive indirect effect on the perception of social support and enhanced achievement. Demandingness had a different effect in the case of the mother as compared to the father. In the mother model, demandingness had a positive direct effect on achievement. In the case of the father, however, the effect of demandingness had a negative and indirect impact on the perception of social support. Teachers were the only source of perceived social support that significantly predicted achievement. The pathway that belongs to teachers as a source of support was positive and direct. Implications for possible interventions are discussed. PMID:25258563

de la Iglesia, Guadalupe; Freiberg Hoffmann, Agustin; Fernández Liporace, Mercedes

2014-01-01

399

How social networks influence female students' choices to major in engineering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scope and Method of Study: This study examined how social influence plays a part in female students' choices of college major, specifically engineering instead of science, technology, and math. Social influence may show itself through peers, family members, and teachers and may encompass resources under the umbrella of social capital. The purpose of this study was to examine how female students' social networks, through the lens of social capital, influence her major choice of whether or not to study engineering. The variables of peer influence, parental influence, teacher/counselor influence, perception of engineering, and academic background were addressed in a 52 question, Likert scale survey. This survey has been modified from an instrument previously used by Reyer (2007) at Bradley University. Data collection was completed using the Dillman (2009) tailored design model. Responses were grouped into four main scales of the dependent variables of social influence, encouragement, perceptions of engineering and career motivation. A factor analysis was completed on the four factors as a whole, and individual questions were not be analyzed. Findings and Conclusions: This study addressed the differences in social network support for female freshmen majoring in engineering versus female freshmen majoring in science, technology, or math. Social network support, when working together from all angles of peers, teachers, parents, and teachers/counselors, transforms itself into a new force that is more powerful than the summation of the individual parts. Math and science preparation also contributed to female freshmen choosing to major in engineering instead of choosing to major in science, technology, or math. The STEM pipeline is still weak and ways in which to reinforce it should be examined. Social network support is crucial for female freshmen who are majoring in science, technology, engineering, and math.

Weinland, Kathryn Ann

400

Differentiating the concept of teacher efficacy for academic achievement, classroom management and discipline, and enhancement of social relations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The questions examined in this study reflected a multidimensional concept of teacher efficacy that extended the construct beyond the domain of academic achievement and included the domains of classroom management\\/discipline and social skills enhancement. A 25-item multidomain teacher efficacy instrument was assembled to measure teacher efficacy for the school domains of academic achievement, management\\/discipline, and student social relations. This study

Joan Cecile Reilly

2002-01-01

401

Prosocial norms and degree heterogeneity in social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We provide empirical evidence to support the claims that social diversity promotes prosocial behavior. We elicit a real-life social network and its members' adherence to a social norm, namely inequity aversion. The data reveal a positive relationship between subjects' prosociality and several measures of centrality. This result is in line with the theoretical literature that relates the evolution of social norms to the structure of social interactions and argues that central individuals are crucial for the emergence of prosocial behavior.

Ková?ík, Jaromír; Brañas-Garza, Pablo; Cobo-Reyes, Ramón; Espinosa, María Paz; Jiménez, Natalia; Ponti, Giovanni

2012-02-01

402

Local Nash Equilibrium in Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Nash equilibrium is widely present in various social disputes. As of now, in structured static populations, such as social networks, regular, and random graphs, the discussions on Nash equilibrium are quite limited. In a relatively stable static gaming network, a rational individual has to comprehensively consider all his/her opponents' strategies before they adopt a unified strategy. In this scenario, a new strategy equilibrium emerges in the system. We define this equilibrium as a local Nash equilibrium. In this paper, we present an explicit definition of the local Nash equilibrium for the two-strategy games in structured populations. Based on the definition, we investigate the condition that a system reaches the evolutionary stable state when the individuals play the Prisoner's dilemma and snow-drift game. The local Nash equilibrium provides a way to judge whether a gaming structured population reaches the evolutionary stable state on one hand. On the other hand, it can be used to predict whether cooperators can survive in a system long before the system reaches its evolutionary stable state for the Prisoner's dilemma game. Our work therefore provides a theoretical framework for understanding the evolutionary stable state in the gaming populations with static structures. PMID:25169150

Zhang, Yichao; Aziz-Alaoui, M. A.; Bertelle, Cyrille; Guan, Jihong

2014-01-01

403

Assembly effect of groups in online social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to the popularity and growth of online social networks, security in these networks becomes a critical problem. Previous works have proved that a virus can spread effectively in social networks. In this paper, groups in social networks are studied. We notice that groups on social network services sites can assemble people with similar characteristics, which may promote virus propagation in these networks. After our analysis, it is found that the use of groups can shorten the distance among users, and hence it would cause faster virus spread. We propose a virus propagation model and simulate it in a group network to show the assembly effect of groups. Our result shows that even with only one random attack, a virus can still spread rapidly, and the direct contact among group members is the reason for fast spreading.

Fan, W.; Yeung, K. H.; Wong, K. Y.

2013-03-01

404

Raccoon social networks and the potential for disease transmission.  

PubMed

Raccoons are an important vector of rabies and other pathogens. The degree to which these pathogens can spread through a raccoon population should be closely linked to association rates between individual raccoons. Most studies of raccoon sociality have found patterns consistent with low levels of social connectivity within populations, thus the likelihood of direct pathogen transmission between raccoons is theoretically low. We used proximity detecting collars and social network metrics to calculate the degree of social connectivity in an urban raccoon population for purposes of estimating potential pathogen spread. In contrast to previous assumptions, raccoon social association networks were highly connected, and all individuals were connected to one large social network during 15 out of 18 months of study. However, these metrics may overestimate the potential for a pathogen to spread through a population, as many of the social connections were based on relatively short contact periods. To more closely reflect varying probabilities of pathogen spread, we censored the raccoon social networks based on the total amount of time spent in close proximity between two individuals per month. As this time criteria for censoring the social networks increased from one to thirty minutes, corresponding measures of network connectivity declined. These findings demonstrate that raccoon populations are much more tightly connected than would have been predicted based on previous studies, but also point out that additional research is needed to calculate more precise transmission probabilities by infected individuals, and determine how disease infection changes normal social behaviors. PMID:24130746

Hirsch, Ben T; Prange, Suzanne; Hauver, Stephanie A; Gehrt, Stanley D

2013-01-01

405

Combining Topic Models and Social Networks for Chat Data Mining  

E-print Network

Combining Topic Models and Social Networks for Chat Data Mining Ville Tuulos and Henry Tirri July 4, 2004 HIIT TECHNICAL REPORT 2004­13 #12;Combining Topic Models and Social Networks for Chat Data Mining, Helsinki, Finland PO BOX 9800 FI-02015 TKK, Finland http://www.hiit.fi HIIT Technical Reports 2004­13 ISSN

Myllymäki, Petri

406

Privacy Leakage in Mobile Online Social Networks Balachander Krishnamurthy  

E-print Network

growth in "apps" (applications) for mobile devices and many are available for customized interactionPrivacy Leakage in Mobile Online Social Networks Balachander Krishnamurthy AT&T Labs ­ Research USA cew@cs.wpi.edu Abstract Mobile Online Social Networks (mOSNs) have recently grown in popularity

Camesano, Terri

407

Analyzing Implicit Social Networks in Multiplayer Online Games  

E-print Network

1 Analyzing Implicit Social Networks in Multiplayer Online Games Alexandru Iosup, Ruud van de. Contact: {A.Iosup,R.vandeBovenkamp,S.Shen,L.Jia,F.A.Kuipers}@tudelft.nl Abstract--For many networked games enhance user-experience, and extend the success of each game. Un- derstanding the social structure

Kuipers, Fernando A.

408

Bayesian-inference based recommendation in online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we propose a Bayesian-inference based recommendation system for online social networks. In our system, users share their movie ratings with friends. The rating similarity between a pair of friends is measured by a set of conditional probabilities derived from their mutual rating history. A user propagates a movie rating query along the social network to his direct

Xiwang Yang; Yang Guo; Yong Liu

2011-01-01

409

The structure of a large social network Balazs Szendroi  

E-print Network

The structure of a large social network Bal´azs Szendroi University of Washington and University of Utrecht G´abor Cs´anyi and Bal´azs Szendroi, Structure of a large social network cond-mat/0305580

Szendröi, Balázs

410

Social Network Analysis to Evaluate an Interdisciplinary Research Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We sought to examine the growth of an interdisciplinary center using social network analysis techniques. Specific aims were to examine the patterns of growth and interdisciplinary connectedness of the Center and to identify the social network characteristics of its productive members. The setting for this study was The Center for Interdisciplinary…

Aboelela, Sally W.; Merrill, Jacqueline A.; Carley, Kathleen M.; Larson, Elaine

2007-01-01

411

Organizational Social Network Research: Core Ideas and Key Debates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given the growing popularity of the social network perspective across diverse organizational subject areas, this review examines the coherence of the research tradition (in terms of leading ideas from which the diversity of new research derives) and appraises current directions and controversies. The leading ideas at the heart of the organizational social network research program include: an emphasis on relations

Martin Kilduff; Daniel J. Brass

2010-01-01

412

Social networks and infectious disease: The Colorado Springs study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The social network paradigm provides a set of concepts and methods useful for studying the structure of a population through which infectious agents transmitted during close personal contact spread, and an opportunity to develop improved disease control programs. The research discussed was a first attempt to use a social network approach to better understand factors affecting the transmission of a

A. S. Klovdahl; J. J. Potterat; D. E. Woodhouse; J. B. Muth; S. Q. Muth; W. W. Darrow

1994-01-01

413

Clinical issues in social network therapy for clients with schizophrenia.  

PubMed

Social networks are viable foci for therapeutic interventions. A social network therapy program for clients with schizophrenia was developed by a community-based mental health agency. This paper presents four of the most common clinical issues encountered and illustrates each with a case example. PMID:1458822

Wasylenki, D; James, S; Clark, C; Lewis, J; Goering, P; Gillies, L

1992-10-01

414

A New Addiction for Teacher Candidates: Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the transition to being a knowledge-based society, the internet usage has become an irreplaceable part of life. As socials networks have come into our lives, the internet usage has taken a different dimension. People can affiliate to social networks in order to make friends, exchange information, find partners, and to play games. The process…

Cam, Emre; Isbulan, Onur

2012-01-01

415

On the Bursty Evolution of Online Social Networks Sabrina Gaito  

E-print Network

On the Bursty Evolution of Online Social Networks Sabrina Gaito , Matteo Zignani , Gian Paolo Rossi and providers. In particular, dynamics involving edge creation has direct implications on strategies timestamped dataset describing the initial growth and evolution of a large social network in China. We analyze

Zhao, Ben Y.

416

Generating private recommendations in a social trust network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recommender systems have become increasingly important in e-commerce as they can guide customers with finding personalized services and products. A variant of recommender systems that generates recommendations from a set of trusted people is recently getting more attention in social networks. However, people are concerned about their privacy as the information revealed in recommender systems, particularly in social networks, can

Z. Erkin; T. Veugen; R. L. Lagendijk

2011-01-01

417

Individual Strategy Update and Emergence of Cooperation in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we critically study whether social networks can explain the emergence of cooperative behavior. We carry out an extensive simulation program in which we study the most representative social dilemmas. For the Prisoner's Dilemma, it turns out that the emergence of cooperation is dependent on the microdynamics. On the other hand, network clustering mostly facilitates global cooperation in

CARLOS P. ROCA; ANGEL SÁNCHEZ; JOSÉ A. CUESTA

2012-01-01

418

Social network extraction and analysis based on multimodal dyadic interaction.  

PubMed

Social interactions are a very important component in people's lives. Social network analysis has become a common technique used to model and quantify the properties of social interactions. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework to explore the characteristics of a social network extracted from multimodal dyadic interactions. For our study, we used a set of videos belonging to New York Times' Blogging Heads opinion blog. The Social Network is represented as an oriented graph, whose directed links are determined by the Influence Model. The links' weights are a measure of the "influence" a person has over the other. The states of the Influence Model encode automatically extracted audio/visual features from our videos using state-of-the art algorithms. Our results are reported in terms of accuracy of audio/visual data fusion for speaker segmentation and centrality measures used to characterize the extracted social network. PMID:22438733

Escalera, Sergio; Baró, Xavier; Vitrià, Jordi; Radeva, Petia; Raducanu, Bogdan

2012-01-01

419

Social Network Extraction and Analysis Based on Multimodal Dyadic Interaction  

PubMed Central

Social interactions are a very important component in people’s lives. Social network analysis has become a common technique used to model and quantify the properties of social interactions. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework to explore the characteristics of a social network extracted from multimodal dyadic interactions. For our study, we used a set of videos belonging to New York Times’ Blogging Heads opinion blog. The Social Network is represented as an oriented graph, whose directed links are determined by the Influence Model. The links’ weights are a measure of the “influence” a person has over the other. The states of the Influence Model encode automatically extracted audio/visual features from our videos using state-of-the art algorithms. Our results are reported in terms of accuracy of audio/visual data fusion for speaker segmentation and centrality measures used to characterize the extracted social network. PMID:22438733

Escalera, Sergio; Baró, Xavier; Vitrià, Jordi; Radeva, Petia; Raducanu, Bogdan

2012-01-01

420

Latino social network dynamics and the Hurricane Katrina disaster.  

PubMed

The aim of this qualitative research was to examine the dynamics of existing and emerging social networks among Latino survivors of Hurricane Katrina. Data were generated through individual, in-depth interviews conducted with 65 Latinos within six months of the storm striking the Gulf Coast of the United States in August 2005. The findings illustrated both the role of social networks in gathering information, making decisions and accessing resources, and how these existing social networks were disrupted and strained by overwhelming needs. Broader structural issues, including poverty and a lack of transportation, combined with marginalised status as immigrants, further constrained access to essential information and resources. In response, new, if temporary, social networks emerged, based primarily on shared nationality, language, and a sense of collective commitment. Practice implications include the need to consider the social network dynamics of marginalised groups in developing innovative strategies to overcome structural barriers to accessing resources essential for disaster preparedness and survival. PMID:21623889

Hilfinger Messias, DeAnne K; Barrington, Clare; Lacy, Elaine

2012-01-01

421

Why social network analysis is important to Air Force applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social network analysis is a powerful tool used to help analysts discover relationships amongst groups of people as well as individuals. It is the mathematics behind such social networks as Facebook and MySpace. These networks alone cause a huge amount of data to be generated and the issue is only compounded once one adds in other electronic media such as e-mails and twitter. In this paper we outline the basics of social network analysis and how it may be used in current and future Air Force applications.

Havig, Paul R.; McIntire, John P.; Geiselman, Eric; Mohd-Zaid, Fairul

2012-06-01

422

Relationships in Reform: The Role of Teachers' Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Scholars have focused their attention on systemic reform as a way to support instructional coherence. These efforts are often layered on to existing social relationships between school staff that are rarely taken into account when enacting reform. Social network theory posits that the structure of social relationships may influence the…

Daly, Alan J.; Moolenaar, Nienke M.; Bolivar, Jose M.; Burke, Peggy

2010-01-01

423

Ring Cohesion in Marriage and Social Networks Douglas R. White  

E-print Network

Ring Cohesion in Marriage and Social Networks Douglas R. White July, 2004 (third draft 3 of social integration are constructed through marriage? Lévi-Strauss (1969 [1949]) classified forms of elementary marriage cycles created by cousin marriage in terms of their implications for social cohesion

White, Douglas R.

424

Constellation: Programming decentralised social networks Anne-Marie Kermarrec1  

E-print Network

Constellation: Programming decentralised social networks Anne-Marie Kermarrec1 1 INRIA Rennes, Constellation, that seeks to simplify the realisa- tion and experimentation with modular social gossip-based applications. Constellation is based on two central obser- vations: (i) future decentralised social

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

425

Can Explicit Instruction in Social and Emotional Learning Skills Benefit the Social-Emotional Development, Well-Being, and Academic Achievement of Young Children?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the effect of a social and emotional learning skills curriculum, the "You Can Do It! Early Childhood Education Program" (YCDI), on the social-emotional development, well-being, and academic achievement of 99 preparatory and grade 1 students attending a Catholic school in Melbourne, Australia. One preparatory and one grade 1…

Ashdown, Daniela Maree; Bernard, Michael E.

2012-01-01

426

Analysis of topological characteristics of huge online social networking services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking services are a fast-growing business in the Internet. However, it is unknown if online relationships and their growth patterns are the same as in real-life social net- works. In this paper, we compare the structures of three online social networking services: Cyworld, MySpace, and orkut, each with more than 10 million users, respectively. We have access to complete

Yong-yeol Ahn; Seungyeop Han; Haewoon Kwak; Sue Moon; Hawoong Jeong

2007-01-01

427

Linking Parental Socialization to Interpersonal Protective Processes, Academic Self-Presentation, and Expectations among Rural African American Youth  

PubMed Central

Data obtained from two waves of a longitudinal study of 671 rural African American families, with an 11-year-old preadolescent, were examined to test pathways through which racial and ethnic socialization influence youth's self-presentation and academic expectation and anticipation through the enhancement of youth self-pride. Structural equation modeling analyses indicated that racial and ethnic socialization was linked with youth's expectation and anticipation for academic success, through youth self-pride, including racial identity and self-esteem, and academic self-presentation. The results highlight the need to disaggregate racial and ethnic socialization in order to better understand how these parenting domains uniquely forecast youth self-pride, as well as their orientation to education and academic success. PMID:19209975

Murry, Velma McBride; Berkel, Cady; Brody, Gene H.; Miller, Shannon J.; Chen, Yi-fu

2008-01-01

428

Fluid Centrality: A Social Network Analysis of Social-Technical Relations in Computer-Mediated Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, centrality is explored as a measure of computer-mediated communication (CMC) in networked learning. Centrality measure is quite common in performing social network analysis (SNA) and in analysing social cohesion, strength of ties and influence in CMC, and computer-supported collaborative learning research. It argues that measuring…

Enriquez, Judith Guevarra

2010-01-01

429

Increasing Social Capital for Disaster Response through Social Networking Services (SNS) in Japanese Local Governments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Researchers have argued that social networks within a community have positive effects on people's behavior in the four stages of disaster. The Japanese government is testing Social Networking Service (SNS) at the municipal level with the intention to improve community building, democratic processes and disaster management. This paper presents results from two case studies of local SNS in Yatsushiro city,

Alexander R. M. Schellong; J. W. Goethe

430

Understanding Classrooms through Social Network Analysis: A Primer for Social Network Analysis in Education Research  

PubMed Central

Social interactions between students are a major and underexplored part of undergraduate education. Understanding how learning relationships form in undergraduate classrooms, as well as the impacts these relationships have on learning outcomes, can inform educators in unique ways and improve educational reform. Social network analysis (SNA) provides the necessary tool kit for investigating questions involving relational data. We introduce basic concepts in SNA, along with methods for data collection, data processing, and data analysis, using a previously collected example study on an undergraduate biology classroom as a tutorial. We conduct descriptive analyses of the structure of the network of costudying relationships. We explore generative processes that create observed study networks between students and also test for an association between network position and success on exams. We also cover practical issues, such as the unique aspects of human subjects review for network studies. Our aims are to convince readers that using SNA in classroom environments allows rich and informative analyses to take place and to provide some initial tools for doing so, in the process inspiring future educational studies incorporating relational data.

Wiggins, Benjamin L.; Goodreau, Steven M.

2014-01-01

431

Anonymizing Weighted Social Network Graphs Sudipto Das, Omer Egecioglu, Amr El Abbadi  

E-print Network

real social network data sets. I. INTRODUCTION Social Networks have become increasingly popular appli, there has been considerable interest in the analysis of the weighted network model where the social networksAnonymizing Weighted Social Network Graphs Sudipto Das, ¨Omer Egecioglu, Amr El Abbadi Department

California at Santa Barbara, University of

432

Confirmation of Models for Interpretation and Use of the Social and Academic Behavior Risk Screener (SABRS).  

PubMed

The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the models for interpretation and use that serve as the foundation of an interpretation/use argument for the Social and Academic Behavior Risk Screener (SABRS). The SABRS was completed by 34 teachers with regard to 488 students in a Midwestern high school during the winter portion of the academic year. Confirmatory factor analysis supported interpretation of SABRS data, suggesting the fit of a bifactor model specifying 1 broad factor (General Behavior) and 2 narrow factors (Social Behavior [SB] and Academic Behavior [AB]). The interpretive model was further supported by analyses indicative of the internal consistency and interrater reliability of scores from each factor. In addition, latent profile analyses indicated the adequate fit of the proposed 4-profile SABRS model for use. When cross-referenced with SABRS cut scores identified via previous work, results revealed students could be categorized as (a) not at-risk on both SB and AB, (b) at-risk on SB but not on AB, (c) at-risk on AB but not on SB, or (d) at-risk on both SB and AB. Taken together, results contribute to growing evidence supporting the SABRS within universal screening. Limitations, implications for practice, and future directions for research are discussed herein. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25264747

Kilgus, Stephen P; Sims, Wesley A; von der Embse, Nathaniel P; Riley-Tillman, T Chris

2014-09-29

433

Academic, Social, and Behavioral Outcomes at Age 12 of Infants Born Preterm  

PubMed Central

The effects of gradient levels of perinatal morbidity on school outcomes have been investigated at age 12 in four preterm groups, classified as healthy (no medical or neurological illness), medical morbidity, neurological morbidity, and small-for-gestational-age (SGA), and a full-term comparison group. Teachers report on academic competence, social skills, and problem behaviors. Data on school type, classroom setting, and school service use are gathered from school records. Preterm groups are found to be equivalent to full-term peers in social skills and problem behavior. Preterm groups with neurological and SGA morbidity have the lowest academic competence scores. Unexpectedly, preterm infants with medical morbidity have higher academic competence scores compared with the other preterm groups. School service use increases with greater perinatal morbidity and is contingent on multiple rather than single indicators of perinatal morbidity. Continued monitoring of preterm infants through early adolescence will ensure that appropriate school services and resources are available to maximize their school success. PMID:19858524

Winchester, Suzy Barcelos; Sullivan, Mary C.; Marks, Amy Kerivan; Doyle, Thomas; DePalma, Jennifer; McGrath, Margaret M.

2009-01-01

434

Social networks uncovered: 10 tips every plastic surgeon should know.  

PubMed

Understanding online social networks is of critical importance to the plastic surgeon. With knowledge, it becomes apparent that the numerous networks available are similar in their structure, usage, and function. The key is communication between Internet media such that one maximizes exposure to patients. This article focuses on 2 social networking platforms that we feel provide the most utility to plastic surgeons. Ten tips are provided for incorporation of Facebook and Twitter into your practice. PMID:23042902

Dauwe, Phillip; Heller, Justin B; Unger, Jacob G; Graham, Darrell; Rohrich, Rod J

2012-11-01

435

Brief Report: How Do They Manage Social Interaction? The Influence of Concealing Academic Achievement Information on Self-Monitoring by Adolescents with Low Achievement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During social interactions people self-monitor their behavior at least partially to conceal socially devalued characteristics. This study examined the influences of concealing academic achievement on self-monitoring in an academically-relevant social interaction. An interview paradigm called for school-aged adolescent participants (total N = 86)…

Zhang, Baoshan; Zhao, Jun-Yan; Yu, Guoliang

2010-01-01

436

Polarity Related Influence Maximization in Signed Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Influence maximization in social networks has been widely studied motivated by applications like spread of ideas or innovations in a network and viral marketing of products. Current studies focus almost exclusively on unsigned social networks containing only positive relationships (e.g. friend or trust) between users. Influence maximization in signed social networks containing both positive relationships and negative relationships (e.g. foe or distrust) between users is still a challenging problem that has not been studied. Thus, in this paper, we propose the polarity-related influence maximization (PRIM) problem which aims to find the seed node set with maximum positive influence or maximum negative influence in signed social networks. To address the PRIM problem, we first extend the standard Independent Cascade (IC) model to the signed social networks and propose a Polarity-related Independent Cascade (named IC-P) diffusion model. We prove that the influence function of the PRIM problem under the IC-P model is monotonic and submodular Thus, a greedy algorithm can be used to achieve an approximation ratio of 1-1/e for solving the PRIM problem in signed social networks. Experimental results on two signed social network datasets, Epinions and Slashdot, validate that our approximation algorithm for solving the PRIM problem outperforms state-of-the-art methods. PMID:25061986

Li, Dong; Xu, Zhi-Ming; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Gupta, Anika; Sycara, Katia; Li, Sheng

2014-01-01

437

Polarity related influence maximization in signed social networks.  

PubMed

Influence maximization in social networks has been widely studied motivated by applications like spread of ideas or innovations in a network and viral marketing of products. Current studies focus almost exclusively on unsigned social networks containing only positive relationships (e.g. friend or trust) between users. Influence maximization in signed social networks containing both positive relationships and negative relationships (e.g. foe or distrust) between users is still a challenging problem that has not been studied. Thus, in this paper, we propose the polarity-related influence maximization (PRIM) problem which aims to find the seed node set with maximum positive influence or maximum negative influence in signed social networks. To address the PRIM problem, we first extend the standard Independent Cascade (IC) model to the signed social networks and propose a Polarity-related Independent Cascade (named IC-P) diffusion model. We prove that the influence function of the PRIM problem under the IC-P model is monotonic and submodular Thus, a greedy algorithm can be used to achieve an approximation ratio of 1-1/e for solving the PRIM problem in signed social networks. Experimental results on two signed social network datasets, Epinions and Slashdot, validate that our approximation algorithm for solving the PRIM problem outperforms state-of-the-art methods. PMID:25061986

Li, Dong; Xu, Zhi-Ming; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Gupta, Anika; Sycara, Katia; Li, Sheng

2014-01-01

438

Predicting Social Links for New Users across Aligned Heterogeneous Social Networks  

E-print Network

Online social networks have gained great success in recent years and many of them involve multiple kinds of nodes and complex relationships. Among these relationships, social links among users are of great importance. Many existing link prediction methods focus on predicting social links that will appear in the future among all users based upon a snapshot of the social network. In real-world social networks, many new users are joining in the service every day. Predicting links for new users are more important. Different from conventional link prediction problems, link prediction for new users are more challenging due to the following reasons: (1) differences in information distributions between new users and the existing active users (i.e., old users); (2) lack of information from the new users in the network. We propose a link prediction method called SCAN-PS (Supervised Cross Aligned Networks link prediction with Personalized Sampling), to solve the link prediction problem for new users with information tra...

Zhang, Jiawei; Yu, Philip S

2013-01-01

439

Social networking sites: a clinical dilemma?  

PubMed

Social networking sites (SNS) are having an increasing influence on patients' lives and doctors are far from certain about how to deal with this new challenge. In our literature search, we could find no research on how doctors could engage positively with SNS to improve patient outcomes or create more patient-led care. We need to acknowledge the fact that a review of a patient's SNS page has the potential to enhance assessment and management, particularly where a corroborant history is hard to attain. As doctors, we need to think clearly about how to adapt our practice in light of this new form of communication; in particular, whether there is a case for engaging with SNS to improve patient care. PMID:24293635

Maughan, Daniel Lawrence; Economou, Alexis

2015-02-01

440

Epidemic spreading in a hierarchical social network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A model of epidemic spreading in a population with a hierarchical structure of interpersonal interactions is described and investigated numerically. The structure of interpersonal connections is based on a scale-free network. Spatial localization of individuals belonging to different social groups, and the mobility of a contemporary community, as well as the effectiveness of different interpersonal interactions, are taken into account. Typical relations characterizing the spreading process, like a range of epidemic and epidemic curves, are discussed. The influence of preventive vaccinations on the spreading process is investigated. The critical value of preventively vaccinated individuals that is sufficient for the suppression of an epidemic is calculated. Our results are compared with solutions of the master equation for the spreading process and good agreement of the character of this process is found.

Grabowski, A.; Kosi?ski, R. A.

2004-09-01

441

A Study on the Efficacy of Project-Based Learning Approach on Social Studies Education: Conceptual Achievement and Academic Motivation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this research, an experimental study was carried out in social studies 4th grade students to develop students' conceptual achievement and motivation to succeed academically. The study aims to investigate the effectiveness of project-based learning (PBL) in social studies. A quasi-experimental research design (pre- and posttest) was used in…

Ilter, Ilhan

2014-01-01

442

Personal and Social-Contextual Factors in K–12 Academic Performance: An Integrative Perspective on Student Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our extensive literature review in the fields of educational, social, and cognitive psychology has led us to identify about a dozen variables that demonstrate direct empirical links to academic achievement at the K–12 level. Those variables are grouped into four major categories: student engagement, learning strategies, school climate, and social-familial influences. We then categorize the first two variables as personal

JIHYUN LEE; VALERIE J. SHUTE

2010-01-01

443

Social, Emotional, Ethical, and Academic Education: Creating a Climate for Learning, Participation in Democracy, and Well-Being  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, Jonathan Cohen argues that the goals of education need to be reframed to prioritize not only academic learning, but also social, emotional, and ethical competencies. Surveying the current state of research in the fields of social-emotional education, character education, and school-based mental health in the United States, Cohen…

Cohen, Jonathan

2006-01-01

444

The Social Status of Aggressive Students across Contexts: The Role of Classroom Status Hierarchy, Academic Achievement, and Grade  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tested the effects of 5 classroom contextual features on the social status (perceived popularity and social preference) that peers accord to aggressive students in late elementary school, including classroom peer status hierarchy (whether within-classroom differences in popularity are large or small), classroom academic level, and grade…

Garandeau, Claire F.; Ahn, Hai-Jeong; Rodkin, Philip C.

2011-01-01

445

Combining qualitative evaluation and social network analysis for the study of classroom social interactions  

E-print Network

appropriate methods of evaluation that let Preprint submitted to Elsevier Science 3 September 2002 #12 on the individual rather than on the social perspective. Therefore, we are now completing the evaluation methodCombining qualitative evaluation and social network analysis for the study of classroom social

Boyer, Edmond

446

Social-Tie-Based Information Dissemination in Mobile Opportunistic Social Networks  

E-print Network

Social-Tie-Based Information Dissemination in Mobile Opportunistic Social Networks Yunsheng Wang a distributed social tie strength calculation mechanism to identify the relationship between each set, The Strength of Weak Ties, the majority of the novel information dissemination is generated by weak ties. We

Wu, Jie

447

Empathetic Social Choice on Social Networks Amirali Salehi-Abari and Craig Boutilier  

E-print Network

's affinity for potential partners. The influence of social networks on voting behavior has received or certain forms of voting), and develop effective algorithms for consensus decision making that we believe, or policy-oriented, involve people at least some of whom are linked via myriad social ties. However, social

Boutilier, Craig

448

Social Insects: A Model System for Network Dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social insect colonies (ants, bees, wasps, and termites) show sophisticated collective problem-solving in the face of variable constraints. Individuals exchange information and materials such as food. The resulting network structure and dynamics can inform us about the mechanisms by which the insects achieve particular collective behaviors and these can be transposed to man-made and social networks. We discuss how network analysis can answer important questions about social insects, such as how effective task allocation or information flow is realized. We put forward the idea that network analysis methods are under-utilized in social insect research, and that they can provide novel ways to view the complexity of collective behavior, particularly if network dynamics are taken into account. To illustrate this, we present an example of network tasks performed by ant workers, linked by instances of workers switching from one task to another. We show how temporal network analysis can propose and test new hypotheses on mechanisms of task allocation, and how adding temporal elements to static networks can drastically change results. We discuss the benefits of using social insects as models for complex systems in general. There are multiple opportunities emergent technologies and analysis methods in facilitating research on social insect network. The potential for interdisciplinary work could significantly advance diverse fields such as behavioral ecology, computer sciences, and engineering.

Charbonneau, Daniel; Blonder, Benjamin; Dornhaus, Anna

449

Near consensus complex linear and nonlinear social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some of the nodes of complex social networks may support for a given proposal, while the rest of the nodes may be against the given proposal. Even though all the nodes support for or are against the given proposal, the decision certitudes of individual nodes may be different. In this case, the steady state values of the decision certitudes of the majority of the nodes are either higher than or lower than a threshold value. Deriving the near consensus property is a key to the analysis of the behaviors of complex social networks. So far, no result on the behaviors of the complex social networks satisfying the near consensus property has been reported. Hence, it is useful to extend the definition of the exact consensus property to that of a near consensus property and investigate the behaviors of the complex social networks satisfying the near consensus property. This paper extends the definition of exact consensus complex social networks to that of near consensus complex social networks. For complex linear social networks, this paper investigates the relationships among the vectors representing the steady state values of the decision certitudes of the nodes, the influence weight matrix and the set of vectors representing the initial state values of the decision certitudes of the nodes under a given near consensus specification. The above analysis is based on the Eigen theory. For complex nonlinear social networks with certain types of nonlinearities, the relationship between the influence weight matrix and the vectors representing the steady state values of the decision certitudes of the nodes is studied. When a complex nonlinear social network does not achieve the exact consensus property, the optimal near consensus condition that the complex social network can achieve is derived. This problem is formulated as an optimization problem. The total number of nodes that the decision certitudes of the nodes are either higher than or lower than a threshold value is maximized subject to the corresponding near consensus specification. The optimization problem is a nonsmooth optimization problem. The nonsmooth constraints are first approximated by smooth constraints. Then, the approximated optimization problem is solved via a conventional smooth optimization approach. Computer numerical simulation results as well as the comparisons of the behaviors of complex nonlinear social networks to those of the complex linear social networks are presented. The obtained results demonstrate that some complex social networks can satisfy the near consensus property but not the exact consensus property. Also, the conditions for the near consensus property are dependent on the types of nonlinearities, the influence weight matrix and the vectors representing the initial state values of the decision certitudes of the nodes.

Ling, Bingo Wing-Kuen; Ho, Charlotte Yuk-Fan; Wang, Lidong; Teo, Kok-Lay; Tse, Chi K.; Dai, Qingyun

2014-05-01

450

A systematic review protocol: social network analysis of tobacco use  

PubMed Central

Background Tobacco use is the single most preventable cause of death in the world. Evidence indicates that behaviours such as tobacco use can influence social networks, and that social network structures can influence behaviours. Social network analysis provides a set of analytic tools to undertake methodical analysis of social networks. We will undertake a systematic review to provide a comprehensive synthesis of the literature regarding social network analysis and tobacco use. The review will answer the following research questions: among participants who use tobacco, does social network structure/position influence tobacco use? Does tobacco use influence peer selection? Does peer selection influence tobacco use? Methods We will follow the Preferred Reporting Items for Systemic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines and search the following databases for relevant articles: CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature); Informit Health Collection; PsycINFO; PubMed/MEDLINE; Scopus/Embase; Web of Science; and the Wiley Online Library. Keywords include tobacco; smoking; smokeless; cigarettes; cigar and ‘social network’ and reference lists of included articles will be hand searched. Studies will be included that provide descriptions of social network analysis of tobacco use. Qualitative, quantitative and mixed method data that meets the inclusion criteria for the review, including methodological rigour, credibility and quality standards, will be synthesized using narrative synthesis. Results will be presented using outcome statistics that address each of the research questions. Discussion This systematic review will provide a timely evidence base on the role of social network analysis of tobacco use, forming a basis for future research, policy and practice in this area. This systematic review will synthesise the evidence, supporting the hypothesis that social network structures can influence tobacco use. This will also include exploring the relationship between social network structure, social network position, peer selection, peer influence and tobacco use across all age groups, and across different demographics. The research will increase our understanding of social networks and their impact on tobacco use, informing policy and practice while highlighting gaps in the literature and areas for further research. PMID:25108616

2014-01-01

451

Individual Choices in Dynamic Networks: An Experiment on Social Preferences  

PubMed Central

Game-theoretic models of network formation typically assume that people create relations so as to maximize their own outcome in the network. Recent experiments on network formation suggest that the assumption of self-interest might be unwarranted and that social preferences, such as altruism and inequality aversion, play a role in the formation of social networks. We developed an experiment to systematically investigate whether people show preferences for outcomes of others during network formation. We find that such preferences play a role when network decisions degenerate to simple two-person decision tasks. In more complex environments, however, we find little evidence for social preferences as a significant decision criterion. Furthermore, we find some evidence for farsighted behavior in network formation. PMID:24732665

van Dolder, Dennie; Buskens, Vincent

2014-01-01

452

Individual choices in dynamic networks: an experiment on social preferences.  

PubMed

Game-theoretic models of network formation typically assume that people create relations so as to maximize their own outcome in the network. Recent experiments on network formation suggest that the assumption of self-interest might be unwarranted and that social preferences, such as altruism and inequality aversion, play a role in the formation of social networks. We developed an experiment to systematically investigate whether people show preferences for outcomes of others during network formation. We find that such preferences play a role when network decisions degenerate to simple two-person decision tasks. In more complex environments, however, we find little evidence for social preferences as a significant decision criterion. Furthermore, we find some evidence for farsighted behavior in network formation. PMID:24732665

van Dolder, Dennie; Buskens, Vincent

2014-01-01

453

College Success: First Year Seminar's Effectiveness on Freshmen Academic and Social Integration, Impact on Academic Achievement and Retention at a Southern Institution  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Increasing student retention and improving graduation rates continues to remain a critical issue for undergraduate institutions. Previous research suggests that student attrition is predominantly voluntary, and is influenced by institutional characteristics. The importance of academic and social integration as a strategy to reduce attrition is…

Malik, Tarun

2011-01-01

454

SOCIAL NETWORKS, COGNITION AND CULTURE Douglas R. White  

E-print Network

1 SOCIAL NETWORKS, COGNITION AND CULTURE Douglas R. White Blackwell Companion to Handbook of Cognitive Anthropology Eds. D. Kronenfeld, G. Bennardo, V. De Munch, and M. Fischer Networks. Network studies are an important adjunct to further development of cognitive anthropology and theory. When

White, Douglas R.

455

NodeTrix: Hybrid Representation for Analyzing Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: The need to visualize large social networks is growing,as hardware capabilities make analyzing large networks feasible and many new data sets become available. Unfortunately, the visualizations in existing systems do not satisfactorily a nswer the basic dilemma,of being readable both for the global structure of the network and also for detailed analysis of local communities. To address this problem,

Nathalie Henry; Jean-Daniel Fekete; Michael J. Mcguffin

2007-01-01

456

NodeTrix: a Hybrid Visualization of Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The need to visualize large social networks is growing as hardware capabilities make analyzing large networks feasible and many new data sets become available. Unfortunately, the visualizations in existing systems do not satisfactorily resolve the basic dilemma of being readable both for the global structure of the network and also for detailed analysis of local communities. To address this problem,

Nathalie Henry; Jean-Daniel Fekete; Michael J. McGuffin

2007-01-01

457

The role of social identification as university student in learning: relationships between students’ social identity, approaches to learning, and academic achievement  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes research exploring the relationship between students’ self-perceptions in the context of university learning (i.e. student social identity), their approaches to learning, and academic achievement. The exploration of these inter-related aspects requires a mix of theoretical approaches, that is, in this research both social identity perspective from social psychology and the student learning research framework are used to

Ana-Maria Bliuc; Robert A. Ellis; Peter Goodyear; Daniela Muntele Hendres

2011-01-01

458

Socioscope: Human Relationship and Behavior Analysis in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we propose a socioscope model for social-network and human-behavior analysis based on mobile- phone call-detail records. Because of the diversity and complexity of human social behavior, no one technique will detect every attribute that arises when humans engage in social behaviors. We use multiple probability and statistical methods for quanti- fying social groups, relationships, and communication patterns

Huiqi Zhang; Ram Dantu; João W. Cangussu

2011-01-01

459

Social Network Analysis: A case study of the Islamist terrorist network  

SciTech Connect

Social Network Analysis is a compilation of methods used to identify and analyze patterns in social network systems. This article serves as a primer on foundational social network concepts and analyses and builds a case study on the global Islamist terrorist network to illustrate the use and usefulness of these methods. The Islamist terrorist network is a system composed of multiple terrorist organizations that are socially connected and work toward the same goals. This research utilizes traditional social network, as well as small-world, and scale-free analyses to characterize this system on individual, network and systemic levels. Leaders in the network are identified based on their positions in the social network and the network structure is categorized. Finally, two vital nodes in the network are removed and this version of the network is compared with the previous version to make implications of strengths, weaknesses and vulnerabilities. The Islamist terrorist network structure is found to be a resilient and efficient structure, even with important social nodes removed. Implications for counterterrorism are given from the results of each analysis.

Medina, Richard M [ORNL

2012-01-01

460

Health Extension in New Mexico: An Academic Health Center and the Social Determinants of Disease  

PubMed Central

The Agricultural Cooperative Extension Service model offers academic health centers methodologies for community engagement that can address the social determinants of disease. The University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center developed Health Extension Rural Offices (HEROs) as a vehicle for its model of health extension. Health extension agents are located in rural communities across the state and are supported by regional coordinators and the Office of the Vice President for Community Health at the Health Sciences Center. The role of agents is to work with different sectors of the community in identifying high-priority health needs and linking those needs with university resources in education, clinical service and research. Community needs, interventions, and outcomes are monitored by county health report cards. The Health Sciences Center is a large and varied resource, the breadth and accessibility of which are mostly unknown to communities. Community health needs vary, and agents are able to tap into an array of existing health center resources to address those needs. Agents serve a broader purpose beyond immediate, strictly medical needs by addressing underlying social determinants of disease, such as school retention, food insecurity, and local economic development. Developing local capacity to address local needs has become an overriding concern. Community-based health extension agents can effectively bridge those needs with academic health center resources and extend those resources to address the underlying social determinants of disease. PMID:20065282

Kaufman, Arthur; Powell, Wayne; Alfero, Charles; Pacheco, Mario; Silverblatt, Helene; Anastasoff, Juliana; Ronquillo, Francisco; Lucero, Ken; Corriveau, Erin; Vanleit, Betsy; Alverson, Dale; Scott, Amy

2010-01-01

461

Identifying and tracking dynamic processes in social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The detection and tracking of embedded malicious subnets in an active social network can be computationally daunting due to the quantity of transactional data generated in the natural interaction of large numbers of actors comprising a network. In addition, detection of illicit behavior may be further complicated by evasive strategies designed to camouflage the activities of the covert subnet. In this work, we move beyond traditional static methods of social network analysis to develop a set of dynamic process models which encode various modes of behavior in active social networks. These models will serve as the basis for a new application of the Process Query System (PQS) to the identification and tracking of covert dynamic processes in social networks. We present a preliminary result from application of our technique in a real-world data stream-- the Enron email corpus.

Chung, Wayne; Savell, Robert; Schütt, Jan-Peter; Cybenko, George

2006-05-01

462

Complex social contagion makes networks more vulnerable to disease outbreaks  

PubMed Central

Social network analysis is now widely used to investigate the dynamics of infectious disease spread. Vaccination dramatically disrupts disease transmission on a contact network, and indeed, high vaccination rates can potentially halt disease transmission altogether. Here, we build on mounting evidence that health behaviors - such as vaccination, and refusal thereof - can spread across social networks through a process of complex contagion that requires social reinforcement. Using network simulations that model health behavior and infectious disease spread, we find that under otherwise identical conditions, the process by which the health behavior spreads has a very strong effect on disease outbreak dynamics. This dynamic variability results from differences in the topology within susceptible communities that arise during the health behavior spreading process, which in turn depends on the topology of the overall social network. Our findings point to the importance of health behavior spread in predicting and controlling disease outbreaks. PMID:23712758

Campbell, Ellsworth; Salathé, Marcel

2013-01-01

463

Creating Entrepreneurial Networks: Academic Entrepreneurship, Mobility and Collaboration during PhD Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Network-building activities of PhD students are an important area of study in furthering our understanding of academic entrepreneurship. This paper focuses on PhD students' participation in network-building activities defined as mobility and collaboration, as well as own interest in and perceived grade of support for commercialisation from various…

Bienkowska, Dzamila; Klofsten, Magnus

2012-01-01

464

Counting on Kin: Social Networks, Social Support, and Child Health Status  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the results of new data collection in Mexico about the relationship between child well-being and social networks. Two research questions guide the analysis. First, under what conditions do networks generate greater (lesser) support? Second, what kinds of networks are associated with healthier children? We explore the health…

Kana'iaupuni, Shawn Malia; Donato, Katharine M.; Thompson-Colon, Theresa; Stainback, Melissa

2005-01-01

465

Social and academic impairment in youth with ADHD, predominately inattentive type and sluggish cognitive tempo.  

PubMed

Sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) was originally identified as a construct that characterized the inattention problems of some children with attention deficit disorder (ADD). Research has indicated that using SCT symptoms to identify a subset of youth with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, predominately inattentive type (ADHD-IT) may elucidate distinct patterns of impairment and thereby improve the external validity of ADHD subtypes. The objective of the current study was to investigate whether youth with clinically-assessed ADHD-IT and high levels of SCT exhibit unique social and academic impairments. In a clinic-referred sample of youth (N = 209; 23 % female) aged 6 to 17 years, participants who met criteria for three different groups were identified: ADHD, Combined Type (ADHD-CT; n = 80), ADHD-IT with low SCT symptoms (n = 74), and ADHD-IT with high SCT symptoms (n = 55). These groups were compared on indicators of social and academic functioning while considering the effects of co-occurring internalizing and disruptive behavior disorders. Youth with ADHD-IT high in SCT exhibited uniquely elevated withdrawal, as well as low leadership and low peer-directed relational and overt aggression, which were not accounted for by co-occurring disorders. This high-SCT group was also the only group to have more homework problems than the ADHD-CT group, but only when other disruptive behavior disorders were absent. The distinctiveness of the high-SCT group, which was primarily evident in social as opposed to academic functioning, provides partial support for the external validity and clinical utility of SCT. PMID:23709343

Marshall, Stephen A; Evans, Steven W; Eiraldi, Ricardo B; Becker, Stephen P; Power, Thomas J

2014-01-01

466

Time Allocation in Social Networks: Correlation Between Social Structure and Human Communication Dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent research has shown the deep impact of the dynamics of human interactions (or temporal social networks) on the spreading of information, opinion formation, etc. In general, the bursty nature of human interactions lowers the interaction between people to the extent that both the speed and reach of information diffusion are diminished. Using a large database of 20 million users of mobile phone calls we show evidence this effect is not homogeneous in the social network but in fact, there is a large correlation between this effect and the social topological structure around a given individual. In particular, we show that social relations of hubs in a network are relatively weaker from the dynamical point than those that are poorer connected in the information diffusion process. Our results show the importance of the temporal patterns of communication when analyzing and modeling dynamical process on social networks.

Miritello, Giovanna; Lara, Rubén; Moro, Esteban

467

The social network structure of a wild meerkat population: 3. Position of individuals within networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individuals in social groups interact with numerous other group members in a polyadic network. Interactions can depend on\\u000a the individual's own attributes (age, sex, status etc.), on their partner's attributes, and the group's network of social\\u000a interactions. Previous studies tend to look at a subset of dyadic interactions, focusing on particular classes of individuals.\\u000a We used social network analysis to

J. R. Madden; J. A. Drewe; G. P. Pearce; T. H. Clutton-Brock

468

Online social networking amongst teens: friend or foe?  

PubMed

The impact of Internet communication on adolescent social development is of considerable importance to health professionals, parents and teachers. Online social networking and instant messaging programs are popular utilities amongst a generation of techno-savvy youth. Although these utilities provide varied methods of communication, their social benefits are still in question. This study examined the relationship between online social interaction, perceived social support, self-esteem and psychological distress amongst teens. A total of 400 participants (M(age) = 14.31 years) completed an online survey consisting of parametric and non-parametric measures. No significant relationship was found between online interaction and social support. Time spent interacting online was negatively correlated with self-esteem and psychological distress. While previous research has focused on young adults, this study examines the impact of online social networking on emerging teens. It highlights the need for continued caution in the acceptance of these utilities. PMID:21685655

O'Dea, Bridianne; Campbell, Andrew

2011-01-01

469

Multi-Relational Characterization of Dynamic Social Network Communities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The emergence of the mediated social web - a distributed network of participants creating rich media content and engaging in interactive conversations through Internet-based communication technologies - has contributed to the evolution of powerful social, economic and cultural change. Online social network sites and blogs, such as Facebook, Twitter, Flickr and LiveJournal, thrive due to their fundamental sense of "community". The growth of online communities offers both opportunities and challenges for researchers and practitioners. Participation in online communities has been observed to influence people's behavior in diverse ways ranging from financial decision-making to political choices, suggesting the rich potential for diverse applications. However, although studies on the social web have been extensive, discovering communities from online social media remains challenging, due to the interdisciplinary nature of this subject. In this article, we present our recent work on characterization of communities in online social media using computational approaches grounded on the observations from social science.

Lin, Yu-Ru; Sundaram, Hari; Kelliher, Aisling

470

Online social networks—Paradise of computer viruses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Online social network services have attracted more and more users in recent years. So the security of social networks becomes a critical problem. In this paper, we propose a virus propagation model based on the application network of Facebook, which is the most popular among these social network service providers. We also study the virus propagation with an email virus model and compare the behaviors of a virus spreading on Facebook with the original email network. It is found that Facebook provides the same chance for a virus spreading while it gives a platform for application developers. And a virus will spread faster in the Facebook network if users of Facebook spend more time on it.

Fan, W.; Yeung, K. H.

2011-01-01

471

On investigating social dynamics in tactical opportunistic mobile networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The efficiency of military mobile network operations at the tactical edge is challenging due to the practical Disconnected, Intermittent, and Limited (DIL) environments at the tactical edge which make it hard to maintain persistent end-to-end wireless network connectivity. Opportunistic mobile networks are hence devised to depict such tactical networking scenarios. Social relations among warfighters in tactical opportunistic mobile networks are implicitly represented by their opportunistic contacts via short-range radios, but were inappropriately considered as stationary over time by the conventional wisdom. In this paper, we develop analytical models to probabilistically investigate the temporal dynamics of this social relationship, which is critical to efficient mobile communication in the battlespace. We propose to formulate such dynamics by developing various sociological metrics, including centrality and community, with respect to the opportunistic mobile network contexts. These metrics investigate social dynamics based on the experimentally validated skewness of users' transient contact distributions over time.

Gao, Wei; Li, Yong

2014-06-01

472

The Vertebrate Social Behavior Network: Evolutionary Themes and Variations  

PubMed Central

Based on a wide variety of data, it is now clear that the brains of birds and teleost (bony) fish possess a core “social behavior network” within the basal forebrain and midbrain that is homologous to the social behavior network of mammals. The nodes of this network are reciprocally connected, contain receptors for sex steroid hormones, and are involved in multiple forms of social behavior. Other hodological features and neuropeptide distributions are likewise very similar across taxa. This evolutionary conservation represents a boon for experiments on phenotypic behavioral variation, as the extraordinary social diversity of teleost fish and songbirds can now be used to generate broadly relevant insights into issues of brain function that are not particularly tractable in other vertebrate groups. Two such lines of research are presented here, each of which addresses functional variation within the network as it relates to divergent patterns of social behavior. In the first set of experiments, we have used a sexually polymorphic fish to demonstrate that natural selection can operate independently on hypothalamic neuroendocrine functions that are relevant for 1) gonadal regulation and 2) sex-typical behavioral modulation. In the second set of experiments, we have exploited the diversity of avian social organizations and ecologies to isolate species-typical group size as a quasi-independent variable. These experiments have shown that specific areas and peptidergic components of the social behavior network possess functional properties that evolve in parallel with divergence and convergence in sociality. PMID:15885690

Goodson, James L.

2008-01-01

473

Does Academic Apprenticeship Increase Networking Ties among Participants? A Case Study of an Energy Efficiency Training Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to address the requirements of future education in different fields of academic professional activity, a model called Academic Apprenticeship Education was initiated in Finland in 2009. The aim of this article is to analyse the development of expert networks in the context of a 1-year Academic Apprenticeship Education model in the field…

Hytönen, Kaisa; Palonen, Tuire; Lehtinen, Erno; Hakkarainen, Kai

2014-01-01

474

Social Balance on Networks: The Dynamics of Friendship and Enmity  

E-print Network

How do social networks evolve when both friendly and unfriendly relations exist? Here we propose a simple dynamics for social networks in which the sense of a relationship can change so as to eliminate imbalanced triads--relationship triangles that contains 1 or 3 unfriendly links. In this dynamics, a friendly link changes to unfriendly or vice versa in an imbalanced triad to make the triad balanced. Such networks undergo a dynamic phase transition from a steady state to "utopia"--all friendly links--as the amount of network friendliness is changed. Basic features of the long-time dynamics and the phase transition are discussed.

T. Antal; P. L. Krapivsky; S. Redner

2006-05-21

475

From Networking to Next-Working: How an Academic Department "Retreated" and Advanced at the Same Time.  

PubMed

Department-wide retreats conducted at periods of transition can enrich and benefit academic departments in several ways. Here, the authors describe the organization, conduct, and immediate outcomes of a department-wide retreat in a university department of psychiatry intended to (1) foster networking and communication among faculty who often work in "silos" and (2) invite the faculty to provide "internal consultations" regarding aspirational strategic goals and recommendations for short-term actionable tactics to address these goals. The retreat featured an evening networking and socializing poster session followed by a day-long event consisting of small group and large group interactive sessions. Participants were 120 faculty members including 44 new and younger faculty members who prepared and presented posters about themselves and their work. A variety of aspirational goals and specific recommendations for follow-up emerged from small groups were discussed in plenary sessions and were subsequently summarized and distributed to the faculty to be addressed by ongoing workgroups. Immediate informal feedback suggests that conducting and acting on recommendations ensuing from academic department retreats can foster at least a short-term sense of shared community and purpose, network faculty, identify commonly held values and aspirational goals, and potentially stimulate formation of innovative affinity groups and collaborations. Longer-term workgroup efforts and outcome assessments are required to assess the enduring results and value of such undertakings. PMID:24789482

Yager, Joel; Kenna, Heather; Hantke, Mindy

2014-05-01

476

Anonymizing Weighted Social Network Graphs Sudipto Das, Omer Egecioglu, Amr El Abbadi  

E-print Network

real social network data sets. I. INTRODUCTION Social Networks have become increasingly popular appli these social networks for understanding their structure [1], [2], [3], advertising and marketing [4Anonymizing Weighted Social Network Graphs Sudipto Das, ¨Omer Egecioglu, Amr El Abbadi Department

Egecioglu, Ã?mer

477

62 LINCOLN LABORATORY JOURNAL VOLUME 20, NUMBER 1, 2013 SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS WITH CONTENT AND GRAPHS  

E-print Network

in social network analysis. The quantity of content-based data created every day by traditional and social inferences from social networks. Network construction from general, real-world data presents several62 LINCOLN LABORATORY JOURNAL VOLUME 20, NUMBER 1, 2013 SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS WITH CONTENT

478

Kinship--king's social harmonisation project. Pilot phase of a social network for use in higher education (HE).  

PubMed

Students entering Higher Education are increasingly information and communications technology literate. Many students (graduates and undergraduates) arrive as "digital residents", who are adept with social media and technologically fluent. The informal use of social media for learning is becoming increasingly evident, along with the potentially detrimental effects of a poor digital profile on employment prospects. This paper describes the creation of Kinship (King's Social Harmonisation Project), a university hosted, members only social network, which is currently being piloted in the Medical School at King's College London. Along with a number of other teaching and learning resources, it is intended to use Kinship to establish an informal code of conduct by modelling and moderating appropriate professional online behaviour. Kinship was developed using an open source Elgg platform, thanks to funding of £20,000 from the College Teaching Fund under the mentorship of Brighton University (1). This educational research project, led by Medicine, was proposed to select, customise and evaluate a social networking platform in order to provide functionality that would enhance new and existing e-learning resources, support group interaction, participation and sharing and meet the diverse needs of three academic schools: Medicine, the Dental Institute and two separate Departments, the Modern Languages Centre and the Department of English from Arts & Humanities, as a pilot for wider College deployment. Student involvement is central to the project, from conducting the evaluation to moulding and customising the functionality and look of Kinship, in order to ensure that the site is authentic and evolves in response to their wishes and requirements. Formal evaluation of Kinship commences summer 2012. PMID:25461124

John, B A

2013-01-01

479

Classification of Message Spreading in a Heterogeneous Social Network  

E-print Network

Nowadays, social networks such as Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn become increasingly popular. In fact, they introduced new habits, new ways of communication and they collect every day several information that have different sources. Most existing research works fo-cus on the analysis of homogeneous social networks, i.e. we have a single type of node and link in the network. However, in the real world, social networks offer several types of nodes and links. Hence, with a view to preserve as much information as possible, it is important to consider so-cial networks as heterogeneous and uncertain. The goal of our paper is to classify the social message based on its spreading in the network and the theory of belief functions. The proposed classifier interprets the spread of messages on the network, crossed paths and types of links. We tested our classifier on a real word network that we collected from Twitter, and our experiments show the performance of our belief classifier.

Jendoubi, Siwar; Liétard, Ludovic; Yaghlane, Boutheina Ben

2015-01-01

480

Is There a Role for Social Networking Sites in Education?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace have become popular among millions of users including students of all ages. There are ongoing discussions over the potential of these sites to support teaching and learning, particularly to complement traditional or online classroom activities. This paper explores whether social networking have a place in teaching and learning by investigating how students use these sites and whether they find opportunities to discuss study related activities with their peers. Two small scale studies were carried out in a face-to-face undergraduate course in Singapore and students enrolled in a face-to-face Master’s programme in Brazil. Data were collected using surveys and interviews; findings were mixed. Many of the Brazilian students used social networking sites to both socialize and discuss their studies while the Singaporean students used such sites for social interactions only. The paper discusses these differences and offers suggestions for further research.

Santos, Ieda M.; Hammond, Michael; Durli, Zenilde; Chou, Shiao-Yuh

481

Impact of Social Punishment on Cooperative Behavior in Complex Networks  

PubMed Central

Social punishment is a mechanism by which cooperative individuals spend part of their resources to penalize defectors. In this paper, we study the evolution of cooperation in 2-person evolutionary games on networks when a mechanism for social punishment is introduced. Specifically, we introduce a new kind of role, punisher, which is aimed at reducing the earnings of defectors by applying to them a social fee. Results from numerical simulations show that different equilibria allowing the three strategies to coexist are possible as well as that social punishment further enhance the robustness of cooperation. Our results are confirmed for different network topologies and two evolutionary games. In addition, we analyze the microscopic mechanisms that give rise to the observed macroscopic behaviors in both homogeneous and heterogeneous networks. Our conclusions might provide additional insights for understanding the roots of cooperation in social systems. PMID:24162105

Wang, Zhen; Xia, Cheng-Yi; Meloni, Sandro; Zhou, Chang-Song; Moreno, Yamir

2013-01-01

482

Social network of family caregivers of disabled and dependent patients.  

PubMed

Cross-sectional study that used the Social Network Index and the genogram to assess the social network of 110 family caregivers of dependent patients attended by a Home Care Service in São Paulo, Brazil. Data were analyzed using the test U of Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis and Spearman correlation. Results were considered statistically significant when p<0,05. Few caregivers participated in activities outside the home and the average number of people they had a bond was 4,4 relatives and 3,6 friends. Caregivers who reported pain and those who had a partner had higher average number of relatives who to trust. The average number of friends was higher in the group that reported use of medication for depression. Total and per capita incomes correlated with the social network. It was found that family members are the primary caregiver's social network. PMID:25517841

Yamashita, Cintia Hitomi; Gaspar, Jaqueline Correia; Amendola, Fernanda; Alvarenga, Márcia Regina Martins; Oliveira, Maria Amélia de Campos

2014-08-01

483

Game-Theoretic Models of Information Overload in Social Networks  

E-print Network

We study the effect of information overload on user engagement in an asymmetric social network like Twitter. We introduce simple game-theoretic models that capture rate competition between celebrities producing updates in ...

Borgs, Christian

484

Use of social network sites for question and answer behavior  

E-print Network

In this thesis, we look at the behavior of posting questions as status updates on popular social network sites like Twitter and Facebook. This question asking behavior is similar to the use of search engines, question and ...

Panovich, Katrina (Katrina Marie)

2011-01-01

485

Mining Heterogeneous Social Networks for Egocentric Information Abstraction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social network is a powerful data structure that allows the depiction of relationship information between entities. However, real-world social networks are sometimes too complex for human to pursue further analysis. In this work, an unsupervised mechanism is proposed for egocentric information abstraction in heterogeneous social networks. To achieve this goal, we propose a vector space representation for heterogeneous social networks to identify combination of relations as features and compute statistical dependencies as feature values. These features, either linear or eyelie, intend to capture the semantic information in the surrounding environment of the ego. Then we design three abstraction measures to distill representative and important information to construct the abstracted graphs for visual presentation. The evaluations conducted on a real world movie datasct and an artificial crime dataset demonstrate that the abstractions can indeed retain significant information and facilitate more accurate and efficient human analysis.

Li, Cheng-Te; Lin, Shou-De

486

Social networking for nurse education: Possibilities, perils and pitfalls.  

PubMed

Abstract In this paper, we consider the potential and implications of using social networking sites such as Facebook® in nurse education. The concept of social networking and the use of Facebook will be explored, as will the theoretical constructs specific to the use of online technology and Web 2.0 tools. Theories around Communities of Inquiry (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000), Communities of Practice (Wenger, 1998), Activity Theory (Daniels, Cole, & Wertsch, 2007) and Actor-Network theory (Latour, 1997) will be briefly explored, as will the work of Vygotsky (1978), as applies to the social aspects of learning. Boundary issues, such as if and how faculty and students should or could be connected via social networking sites will also be explored. PMID:25267140

Green, Janet; Wyllie, Aileen; Jackson, Debra

2014-01-01

487

Social networking for nurse education: Possibilities, perils and pitfalls.  

PubMed

Abstract In this paper, we consider the potential and implications of using social networking sites such as Facebook® in nurse education. The concept of social networking and the use of Facebook will be explored, as will the theoretical constructs specific to the use of online technology and web 2.0 tools. Theories around Communities of Inquiry (Garrison, Anderson & Archer 2000), Communities of Practice (Wenger 1998), Activity Theory (Daniels, Cole & Wertsch 2007) and Actor Network Theory (Latour 1997) will be briefly explored, as will the work of Vygotsky (1978), as applies to the social aspects of learning. Boundary issues, such as if and how faculty and students should or could be connected via social networking sites will also be explored. PMID:24611647

Green, Janet; Wyllie, Aileen; Jackson, Debra

2014-03-11

488

Strategic delay and information exchange in endogenous social networks  

E-print Network

This thesis studies optimal stopping problems for strategic agents in the context of two economic applications: experimentation in a competitive market and information exchange in social networks. The economic agents (firms ...

Bimpikis, Kostas

2010-01-01

489

Effects of academic-industry relations on the professional socialization graduate science students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study asks if there has been a change in graduate student socialization in the biological sciences given the increased commercialism of life sciences. Drawing on the work of Steven Brint (1994) and Sheila Slaughter and Larry Leslie (1997) and Sheila Slaughter and Gary Rhoades (2004), this study asks if graduate student socialization has shifted emphasis from the social and moral dimensions of work (social trustee professionalism) to the practical, technical, and commercial dimensions (expert professionalism). Building on the survey results of the Acadia Project (Swazey, Louis, & Anderson, 1994; Louis, Anderson & Rosenberg, 1995), this qualitative study uses interviews with 25 graduate science students at two A.A.U. research universities that have been heavily involved in academic-industry relations to see how the students were professionally socialized throughout their educational careers. The student configuration compares males and females, U.S. and international students, and those funded by the government versus those receiving at least partial support from industry. It uses critical professionalization theory as a framework. The study found that students' career goals and values were usually set before graduate school primarily by females in non-elite institutions, such as community colleges, women's and liberal arts colleges, and non-flagship state universities. Also, university science faculty tend to continue to socialize students---even those planning to go into industry---for the professoriate, as their prestige is based on placing proteges into other elite schools. U.S. females and most students going into academics or government labs had the values of social trustee professionals while those going into industry held those of expert professionals. The former were more likely to recognize situations involving conflicts of interest or commitment. Almost all the students were disillusioned by the grants and promotion and tenure systems. They feel both tend to erode scientific norms. Both also require mentors to maintain large labs. International students tend not to get training in research ethics. In the conclusion, recommendations are made about recruiting more students into science careers, changing the mentoring and grants processes, and requiring ethics classes and work in undergraduate labs.

Holleman, Margaret Ann Phillippi

490

AntiSocial Networking: Crowdsourcing and the CyberDefence of National Critical Infrastructures  

E-print Network

AntiSocial Networking: Crowdsourcing and the CyberDefence of National Critical Infrastructures statesponsored. This paper identifies three different roles that social networking and social media have Critical Infrastructures, Software Security. 1. Introduction A small number of `mass market

Johnson, Chris

491

Bidirectional selection between two classes in complex social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The bidirectional selection between two classes widely emerges in various social lives, such as commercial trading and mate choosing. Until now, the discussions on bidirectional selection in structured human society are quite limited. We demonstrated theoretically that the rate of successfully matching is affected greatly by individuals' neighborhoods in social networks, regardless of the type of networks. Furthermore, it is found that the high average degree of networks contributes to increasing rates of successful matches. The matching performance in different types of networks has been quantitatively investigated, revealing that the small-world networks reinforces the matching rate more than scale-free networks at given average degree. In addition, our analysis is consistent with the modeling result, which provides the theoretical understanding of underlying mechanisms of matching in complex networks.

Zhou, Bin; He, Zhe; Jiang, Luo-Luo; Wang, Nian-Xin; Wang, Bing-Hong

2014-12-01

492

Bidirectional selection between two classes in complex social networks.  

PubMed

The bidirectional selection between two classes widely emerges in various social lives, such as commercial trading and mate choosing. Until now, the discussions on bidirectional selection in structured human society are quite limited. We demonstrated theoretically that the rate of successfully matching is affected greatly by individuals' neighborhoods in social networks, regardless of the type of networks. Furthermore, it is found that the high average degree of networks contributes to increasing rates of successful matches. The matching performance in different types of networks has been quantitatively investigated, revealing that the small-world networks reinforces the matching rate more than scale-free networks at given average degree. In addition, our analysis is consistent with the modeling result, which provides the theoretical understanding of underlying mechanisms of matching in complex networks. PMID:25524835

Zhou, Bin; He, Zhe; Jiang, Luo-Luo; Wang, Nian-Xin; Wang, Bing-Hong

2014-01-01

493

Sampling node group structure of social and information networks  

E-print Network

Lately, network sampling proved as a promising tool for simplifying large real-world networks and thus providing for their faster and more efficient analysis. Still, understanding the changes of network structure and properties under different sampling methods remains incomplete. In this paper, we analyze the presence of characteristic group of nodes (i.e., communities, modules and mixtures of the two) in social and information networks. Moreover, we observe the changes of node group structure under two sampling methods, random node selection based on degree and breadth-first sampling. We show that the sampled information networks contain larger number of mixtures than original networks, while the structure of sampled social networks exhibits stronger characterization by communities. The results also reveal there exist no significant differences in the behavior of both sampling methods. Accordingly, the selection of sampling method impact on the changes of node group structure to a much smaller extent that th...

Blagus, Neli; Šubelj, Lovro

2014-01-01

494

Bidirectional selection between two classes in complex social networks  

PubMed Central

The bidirectional selection between two classes widely emerges in various social lives, such as commercial trading and mate choosing. Until now, the discussions on bidirectional selection in structured human society are quite limited. We demonstrated theoretically that the rate of successfully matching is affected greatly by individuals' neighborhoods in social networks, regardless of the type of networks. Furthermore, it is found that the high average degree of networks contributes to increasing rates of successful matches. The matching performance in different types of networks has been quantitatively investigated, revealing that the small-world networks reinforces the matching rate more than scale-free networks at given average degree. In addition, our analysis is consistent with the modeling result, which provides the theoretical understanding of underlying mechanisms of matching in complex networks. PMID:25524835

Zhou, Bin; He, Zhe; Jiang, Luo-Luo; Wang, Nian-Xin; Wang, Bing-Hong

2014-01-01

495

Academic and Social Integration on Campus Among Sexual Minority Students: The Impacts of Psychological and Experiential Campus Climate.  

PubMed

A heterosexist campus climate can increase risk for mental health problems for sexual minority students; however, the relationship between campus climate for sexual minorities and academic outcomes remains understudied. Using a sample of sexual minority respondents extracted from a campus climate survey conducted at a large university in the Midwest, we examine relationships between multiple dimensions of psychological and experiential campus climate for sexual minorities with academic integration (academic disengagement, grade-point average [GPA]) and social integration (institutional satisfaction, acceptance on campus). We also investigate the protective role of engagement with informal academic and peer-group systems. Findings suggest campus climate affects sexual minority students' integration. In multivariate analyses, perceptions of whether lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) people could be open about their sexual identity was positively associated with acceptance on campus; personal heterosexist harassment was positively associated with academic disengagement and negatively with GPA. Students' informal academic integration (instructor relations) and informal social integration (LGB friends) demonstrated influential main effects but did not moderate any of the climate-outcome relationships. Researchers should further explore the relationships between climate and academic outcomes among sexual minority students, both collectively and among specific sub-groups, and address the role of other protective factors. PMID:25367265

Woodford, Michael R; Kulick, Alex

2014-11-01

496

Social and academic implications of acoustically hostile classrooms for hard of hearing children  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The correlation between lowered academic achievement and classroom noise has been demonstrated for normally hearing children (Shield and Dockrell, 2003). However, the implications of poor classroom acoustics on the socialization and academic performance of children who are hard of hearing have not been examined. Eleven hard of hearing students in one school district, ranging from kindergarten to grade 7, were the foci of the present study. Acoustic measurements of each of the 11 classrooms in both unoccupied and occupied conditions revealed that all classrooms were acoustically challenging for the hard of hearing students, particularly at transition times, when ventilation was operational, and in the primary grades, when language learning needs are greatest. Interviews with parents and teachers underscored the difficulty these students experienced in comprehending teacher instructions and participating in group work. The students seldom initiated conversation or seatwork independently, but, rather, followed the lead of their peers. The hard of hearing students experienced frequent difficulties in understanding or participating in informal peer-to-peer conversations in the classroom, and parents and teachers attributed the children's frequent social isolation and withdrawal at school to the combined effects of poor hearing abilities and hostile classroom acoustics. [Work supported by Hampton Research Fund.

Jamieson, Janet R.

2005-04-01

497

Cluster-Randomized Trial Demonstrating Impact on Academic Achievement of Elementary Social-Emotional Learning.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the results of a social and emotional learning (SEL) program on academic achievement among students attending a large, urban, high-risk school district. Using a cluster-randomized design, 24 elementary schools were assigned to receive either the intervention curriculum (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies, or PATHS) or a curriculum that delivered few if any SEL topics (i.e., the control group). In addition to state mastery test scores, demographic data, school attendance, and dosage information were obtained from 705 students who remained in the same group from the 3rd to the 6th grade. Analyses of odds ratios revealed that students enrolled in the intervention schools demonstrated higher levels of basic proficiency in reading, writing, and math at some grade levels. Although these between-groups differences held for race/ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status, significant within-group differences also were noted across these variables. Collectively, these findings indicated that social development instruction may be a promising approach to promote acquisition of academic proficiency, especially among youth attending high-risk school settings. Implications of these findings with respect to SEL programs conclude the article. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25485463

Schonfeld, David J; Adams, Ryan E; Fredstrom, Bridget K; Weissberg, Roger P; Gilman, Richard; Voyce, Charlene; Tomlin, Ricarda; Speese-Linehan, Dee

2014-12-01

498

Using social networking to enhance the EFL classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on a small experiment using Social Networking in an English class in an English Medium of Instruction tertiary-level institution in Zhuhai, Southern China. The investigation was carried out both in the classroom and online. Firstly, a Web 2.0 Social Networking Site (SNS) for English learning purposes, AlexCALL, was set up for a case study, and the experiment

Tianchong Wang; Dave Towey

2011-01-01

499

Improving the Readability of Clustered Social Networks using Node Duplication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract—Exploring communities,is an important,task in social network,analysis. Such communities,are currently identified using clustering methods to group actors. This approach often leads to actors belonging to one and only one cluster, whereas in real life a person can belong to several communities.,As a solution we propose,duplicating actors in social networks,and discuss potential impact of such a move. Several visual duplication designs,are

Nathalie Henry; Anastasia Bezerianos; Jean-daniel Fekete

2008-01-01

500

Why Do High School Students Lack Motivation in the Classroom? Toward an Understanding of Academic Amotivation and the Role of Social Support  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present series of studies sought to develop and conceptually validate a taxonomy of reasons that give rise to academic amotivation and to investigate its social antecedents and academic consequences. In Study 1 (N = 351), an exploratory factor analysis offered preliminary support for an academic amotivation taxonomy comprising four dimensions: ability beliefs, effort beliefs, characteristics of the task, and

Lisa Legault; Isabelle Green-Demers; Luc Pelletier

2006-01-01