Note: This page contains sample records for the topic academic social networking from Science.gov.
While these samples are representative of the content of Science.gov,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of Science.gov
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.
Last update: August 15, 2014.
1

The Influence of Social Networking Sites on High School Students' Social and Academic Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This dissertation examines the effects of social network sites on youth social and academic development. First, I provide a critical analysis of the extant research literature surrounding social network sites and youth. I merge scholarly thought in the areas of Internet studies, digital divides, social capital theory, psychological well-being,…

Ahn, June

2010-01-01

2

EFL Writers' Social Networks: Impact on Advanced Academic Literacy Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For non-native English writers, second language (L2) advanced academic literacy encompasses knowledge of the rhetorical, linguistic, social and cultural features of academic discourse as well as knowledge of English as used by their academic disciplines. Literacy is acquired through a socialization process embedded in social practice, patterned by…

Ferenz, Orna

2005-01-01

3

Analyzing different aspects of social network usages on students behaviors and academic performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of social networks has become increasingly relevant in recent years. This research focuses on analyzing the affect of social networks (SN) websites usage on students' behaviors and academic performances. This investigation included students gender based usage patterns of social networks websites with respect to our proposed websites scheme. We classified all students with similarity of social networks usage

Rozita Jamili Oskouei

2010-01-01

4

The Relationship between Online Social Networking and Academic and Social Integration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the relationship between online social networking (OSN) and perceptions of academic and social integration for first-year residential students at a rural regional comprehensive university. Students spent an average of 2.5 hours on OSN websites per day, primarily interacting with campus peers, friends and family. There was…

Kord, JoLanna; Wolf-Wendel, Lisa

2009-01-01

5

Academic Social Networking Brings Web 2.0 Technologies to the Middle Grades  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The middle grades are an exciting time for adolescents to explore, learn, and collaborate with one another (National Middle School Association, 2010). By incorporating an academic social network as part of the classroom experience, collaboration and active learning take on new forms, and a transformation from passive learning to active learning…

Taranto, Gregory; Dalbon, Melissa; Gaetano, Julie

2011-01-01

6

The SNAP Platform: Social Networking for Academic Purposes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This paper aims to introduce an enterprise-wide Web 2.0 learning support platform--SNAP, developed at Victoria University in Melbourne, Australia. Design/methodology/approach: Pointing to the evolution of the social web, the paper discusses the potential for the development of e-learning platforms that employ constructivist, connectivist,…

Kirkwood, Keith

2010-01-01

7

Department-level change: Using social network analysis to map the hidden structure of academic departments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Efforts to improve teaching in higher education have often focused on individual faculty. However, there is a growing consensus that the academic department is a more productive focus of change initiatives. Yet, academic departments are not all the same. Understanding the structure of relationships within a department is important for identifying who should be involved in the change effort and in what roles. It is also likely that a successful change effort will modify the structure of relationships within a department. This paper presents the preliminary results from a study of two academic departments at a research university. A social network for each department was constructed based on a web survey that asked faculty to identify colleagues with whom they had teaching-related conversations. We identify characteristics of the individuals and departments and describe how learning about this hidden structure can be beneficial to change agents.

Henderson, Charles; Quardokus, Kathleen

2013-01-01

8

Department-level change: Using social network analysis to map the hidden structure of academic departments  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Efforts to improve teaching in higher education have often focused on individual faculty. However, there is a growing consensus that the academic department is a more productive focus of change initiatives. Yet, academic departments are not all the same. Understanding the structure of relationships within a department is important for identifying who should be involved in the change effort and in what roles. It is also likely that a successful change effort will modify the structure of relationships within a department. This paper presents the preliminary results from a study of two academic departments at a research university. A social network for each department was constructed based on a web survey that asked faculty to identify colleagues with whom they had teaching-related conversations. We identify characteristics of the individuals and departments and describe how learning about this hidden structure can be beneficial to change agents.

Henderson, Charles R.; Quardokus, Kathleen

2013-07-16

9

It's Not Just What You Know, It's Who You Know: Testing a Model of the Relative Importance of Social Networks to Academic Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Applying three mathematical modeling techniques, this study proposes and tests the fit of an academic performance model, and then estimates the relative importance of four performance predictors: academic ability, performance goal orientation, educational technology use, and social network density. Drawing on social network theory, findings from…

Rizzuto, Tracey E.; LeDoux, Jared; Hatala, John Paul

2009-01-01

10

"I 'Deserve' Success": Academic Entitlement Attitudes and Their Relationships with Course Self-Efficacy, Social Networking, and Demographic Variables  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated differences in university students' academic entitlement (AE) by demographic group (sex, college class, college generational status) as well as AE's relationship with self-efficacy for college coursework and social networking. It also investigated predictors of AE in first-generation (FG) students and continuing-generation…

Boswell, Stefanie S.

2012-01-01

11

The Role of Social Networks in the Adjustment and Academic Success of International Students: A Case Study of a University in the Southwest  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study is a qualitative investigation of the role that social networks play in the adjustment and academic success of international students. With large numbers of international students enrolled on US campuses, it is important for practitioners to prepare, understand and address their dynamic needs. Based on social network, social capital and…

Kisang, Benjamin

2010-01-01

12

Topic and Role Discovery in Social Networks with Experiments on Enron and Academic Email  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous work in social network analysis (SNA) has modeled the existence of links from one entity to another, but not the attributes such as language content or topics on those links. We present the Author-Recipient-Topic (ART) model for social network analysis, which learns topic distributions based on the direction-sensitive messages sent between entities. The model builds on Latent Dirichlet Allocation

Andrew Mccallum; Xuerui Wang; Andrés Corrada-emmanuel

2007-01-01

13

Social support networks, stress, sense of coherence and academic success of university students with learning disabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study evaluated the extent to which 191 university students with learning disabilities (LD) differed from 190\\u000a students without disabilities in terms of their perceived social support, stress and sense of coherence. The study also investigated\\u000a students’ perceptions of their academic success at university as compared with their rating of their struggles and failures.\\u000a Findings indicated that students with

Tali Heiman

2006-01-01

14

The Author-Recipient-Topic Model for Topic and Role Discovery in Social Networks: Experiments with Enron and Academic Email  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous work in social network analysis (SNA) has modeled the existence of links from one entity to another, but not the language content or topics on those links. We present the Author-Recipient-Topic (ART) model for social network analysis, which learns topic distributions based on the the direction- sensitive messages sent between entities. The model builds on Latent Dirichlet Allocation and

Andrew McCallum; Andr ´ es Corrada-Emmanuel; Xuerui Wang

15

Social Bookmarking in Academic Libraries: Trends and Applications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents an exploration of the potential utilization of social bookmarking web sites by academic libraries. These web sites, which allow users and organizations to create accounts for bookmarking online content, provide academic libraries tools to collaborate and network, organize and share electronic resources and teach information…

Redden, Carla S.

2010-01-01

16

Student Collaborative Networks and Academic Performance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Undergraduate physics students commonly collaborate with one another on homework assignments, especially in more challenging courses. However, there currently exists a dearth of empirical research directly comparing the structure of students' collaborative networks to their academic performances in lower and upper division physics courses. We investigate such networks and associated performances through a mandated collaboration reporting system in two sophomore level and three junior level physics courses during the Fall 2012 and Spring 2013 semesters. We employ social network analysis to quantify the structure and time evolution of networks involving approximately 140 students. Analysis includes analytical and numerical assignments in addition to homework and exam scores. Preliminary results are discussed.

Schmidt, David; Bridgeman, Ariel; Kohl, Patrick

2013-04-01

17

Semantic Networks and Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To illustrate the need for social network metadata within semantic metadata. Design/methodology/approach: Surveys properties of social networks and the semantic web, suggests that social network analysis applies to semantic content, argues that semantic content is more searchable if social network metadata is merged with semantic web…

Downes, Stephen

2005-01-01

18

Language, Culture, Gender, and Academic Socialization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent research has explored the complex, situated process by which students from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds become socialized into academic discourses and practices. As part of a multiple case study involving seven international students, this study provides an in-depth analysis of the academic discourse socialization

Morita, Naoko

2009-01-01

19

A Computer Network for Social Scientists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a microcomputer-based network developed at the University of California Los Angeles to support education in the social sciences. Topics discussed include technological, managerial, and academic considerations of university networking; the use of the network in teaching macroeconomics, social demographics, and symbolic logic; and possible…

Gerber, Barry

1989-01-01

20

Computer Networks As Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer networks are inherently social networks, linking people, organizations, and knowledge. They are social institutions that should not be studied in isolation but as integrated into everyday lives. The proliferation of computer networks has facilitated a deemphasis on group solidarities at work and in the community and afforded a turn to networked societies that are loosely bounded and sparsely knit.

Barry Wellman

2001-01-01

21

Social Insect Networks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Social insect colonies have many of the properties of adaptive networks. The simple rules governing how local interactions among individuals translate into group behaviors are found across social groups, giving social insects the potential to have a profound impact on our understanding of the interplay between network dynamics and social evolution.

Jennifer Fewell (Arizona State University;School of Life Sciences)

2003-09-26

22

Performance Measures for the Academic Networked Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As more academic institutions spend larger sums of money to network their campuses and provide network connections to sources outside their campuses, questions emerge concerning the selection and configuration of appropriate network technologies and the appropriate types and levels of services to provide. Increasingly, academic administrators are…

McClure, Charles R.; Lopata, Cynthia

23

Assessing the Academic Networked Environment. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The provision of network access, resources, and services to members of the academic community is becoming an area of utmost interest and importance to academic administrators, faculty, and students. As the demand from network users grows rapidly, many network administrators are asking for resources to meet that demand; their requests are being met…

Lopata, Cynthia L.; McClure, Charles R.

24

Empirical Analysis of an Evolving Social Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks evolve over time, driven by the shared activities and affiliations of their members, by similarity of individuals' attributes, and by the closure of short network cycles. We analyzed a dynamic social network comprising 43,553 students, faculty, and staff at a large university, in which interactions between individuals are inferred from time-stamped e-mail headers recorded over one academic year

Gueorgi Kossinets; Duncan J. Watts

2005-01-01

25

Visualizing Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With today‘s ubiquity and popularity of social network applications, the ability to analyze and understand large networks in an efficient manner becomes critically important. However, as networks become larger and more complex, reasoning about social dynamics via simple statistics is not a feasible option. To overcome these limitations, we can rely on visual metaphors. Visualization nowadays is no longer a passive process that produces images from a set of numbers. Recent years have witnessed a convergence of social network analytics and visualization, coupled with interaction, that is changing the way analysts understand and characterize social networks. In this chapter, we discuss the main goal of visualization and how different metaphors are aimed towards elucidating different aspects of social networks, such as structure and semantics. We also describe a number of methods where analytics and visualization are interwoven towards providing a better comprehension of social structure and dynamics.

Correa, Carlos D.; Ma, Kwan-Liu

26

Visualizing Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two distinct forms of display have been used to construct images of networks, one based on points and lines and the other on matrices. In most point and line displays the points represent social actors and the lines represent connections among the act ors. In matrix displays the rows and columns both represent social actors and numbers or symbols in

Linton Freeman

2000-01-01

27

On compressing social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Motivated by structural properties of the Web graph that support efficient data structures for in memory adjacency queries, we study the extent to which a large network can be compressed. Boldi and Vigna (WWW 2004), showed that Web graphs can be compressed down to three bits of storage per edge; we study the compressibility of social networks where again adjacency

Flavio Chierichetti; Ravi Kumar; Silvio Lattanzi; Michael Mitzenmacher; Alessandro Panconesi; Prabhakar Raghavan

2009-01-01

28

The Impact of Children's Social Adjustment on Academic Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tested whether social adjustment added to the prediction of academic outcomes above and beyond prior academic functioning. Researchers collected school records and peer-, teacher-, and self-report measures for 1,255 third-grade children in the fall and spring of the school year. Measures of social adjustment included social acceptance…

DeRosier, Melissa E.; Lloyd, Stacey W.

2011-01-01

29

Privacy, Social Network Sites, and Social Relations  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the growth of the Internet comes a growth in a ubiquitous networked society. Common Web 2.0 applications include a rapidly growing trend for social network sites. Social network sites typically converged different relationship types into one group of “friends.” However, with such vast interconnectivity, convergence of relationships, and information sharing by individual users comes an increased risk of privacy

David J. Houghton; Adam N. Joinson

2010-01-01

30

Promoting Social Network Awareness: A Social Network Monitoring System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To increase communication and collaboration opportunities, members of a community must be aware of the social networks that exist within that community. This paper describes a social network monitoring system--the KIWI system--that enables users to register their interactions and visualize their social networks. The system was implemented in a…

Cadima, Rita; Ferreira, Carlos; Monguet, Josep; Ojeda, Jordi; Fernandez, Joaquin

2010-01-01

31

Improving Student Engagement in Social and Academic Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Kindergarten and third-grade students in two suburban communities located in northern Illinois participated in the implementation of a program for improving student's engagement in social interactions and academic activities. The problem documentation indicated a need for teacher's intervention in order to improve student's social academic

Kinzig, Karen; Nakai, Janet

32

Academic Libraries: "Social" or "Communal?" The Nature and Future of Academic Libraries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The apparent death of academic libraries, as measured by declining circulation of print materials, reduced use of reference services, and falling gate counts, has led to calls for a more "social" approach to academic libraries: installing cafes, expanding group study spaces, and developing "information commons." This study compares these social

Gayton, Jeffrey T.

2008-01-01

33

Evolve: Analyzing Evolving Social Networks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Many current social network analytic methods work by analyzing a static aggregate graph, which provides a limited view of the structure and behavior of real-world social networks. Social networks in reality are dynamic and evolve over time as people join ...

S. Macskassy

2012-01-01

34

Culturally Distinctive and Academic Socialization: Direct and Interactive Relationships with African American Adolescents’ Academic Adjustment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Theories of ethnic minority development have largely suggested that African American parents engage in a combination of practices\\u000a that include culturally distinctive socialization as well as behaviors that are characteristic of more universal forms of\\u000a academic socialization. However, few studies have examined how these socialization dimensions interact to influence the academic\\u000a adjustment of African American adolescents. The current study explored

Shauna M. Cooper; Ciara Smalls

2010-01-01

35

Collaboration in social networks  

PubMed Central

The very notion of social network implies that linked individuals interact repeatedly with each other. This notion allows them not only to learn successful strategies and adapt to them, but also to condition their own behavior on the behavior of others, in a strategic forward looking manner. Game theory of repeated games shows that these circumstances are conducive to the emergence of collaboration in simple games of two players. We investigate the extension of this concept to the case where players are engaged in a local contribution game and show that rationality and credibility of threats identify a class of Nash equilibria—that we call “collaborative equilibria”—that have a precise interpretation in terms of subgraphs of the social network. For large network games, the number of such equilibria is exponentially large in the number of players. When incentives to defect are small, equilibria are supported by local structures whereas when incentives exceed a threshold they acquire a nonlocal nature, which requires a “critical mass” of more than a given fraction of the players to collaborate. Therefore, when incentives are high, an individual deviation typically causes the collapse of collaboration across the whole system. At the same time, higher incentives to defect typically support equilibria with a higher density of collaborators. The resulting picture conforms with several results in sociology and in the experimental literature on game theory, such as the prevalence of collaboration in denser groups and in the structural hubs of sparse networks.

Dall'Asta, Luca; Marsili, Matteo; Pin, Paolo

2012-01-01

36

The malignant social network  

PubMed Central

Tumors contain a vastly complicated cellular network that relies on local communication to execute malignant programs. The molecular cues that are involved in cell-cell adhesion orchestrate large-scale tumor behaviors such as proliferation and invasion. We have recently begun to appreciate that many tumors contain a high degree of cellular heterogeneity and are organized in a cellular hierarchy, with a cancer stem cell (CSC) population identified at the apex in multiple cancer types. CSCs reside in unique microenvironments or niches that are responsible for directing their behavior through cellular interactions between CSCs and stromal cells, generating a malignant social network. Identifying cell-cell adhesion mechanisms in this network has implications for the basic understanding of tumorigenesis and the development of more effective therapies. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of cell-cell adhesion mechanisms used by CSCs and how these local interactions have global consequences for tumor biology.

Hale, James S.; Li, Meizhang; Lathia, Justin D.

2012-01-01

37

Social Network Sites: Definition History and Scholarship  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Social network,sites,(SNSs) are increasingly attracting the attention of academic,and,industry researchers intrigued by their affordances and reach.,This special theme section of the,Journal,of Computer-Mediated,Communicationbrings ,together scholarship on these emergent phenomena.,In this introductory article, we describe features of SNSs and propose a comprehensive definition. We then present one perspective on the history of such sites, discussing key changes and developments. After briefly

Danah Boyd; Nicole B. Ellison

2007-01-01

38

Applications of Social Network Analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A social network [2] is a description of the social structure between actors, mostly persons, groups or organizations. It indicates the ways in which they are connected with each other by some relationship such as friendship, kinship, finance exchange etc. In a nutshell, when the person uses already known/unknown people to create new contacts, it forms social networking. The social network is not a new concept rather it can be formed when similar people interact with each other directly or indirectly to perform particular task. Examples of social networks include a friendship networks, collaboration networks, co-authorship networks, and co-employees networks which depict the direct interaction among the people. There are also other forms of social networks, such as entertainment networks, business Networks, citation networks, and hyperlink networks, in which interaction among the people is indirect. Generally, social networks operate on many levels, from families up to the level of nations and assists in improving interactive knowledge sharing, interoperability and collaboration.

Thilagam, P. Santhi

39

Sustaining academic life : A case for applying principles of social sustainability to the academic profession  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper aims to examine the social sustainability of academic work in Australian tertiary institutions, in addition to offering a summary of recent research on social sustainability with a particular emphasis on Barron and Gauntlett's work. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Barron and Gauntlett's principles of social sustainability are used as a lens to investigate some of the current conditions of

Cathryn Hammond; Deborah Churchman

2008-01-01

40

Students as Spectators: Their Academic and Social Integration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is extensive research literature addressing the impact that the college experience has on students, linking the campus environment to their persistence and graduation, satisfaction, sense of community, academic and social integration, and academic performance. Researchers have yet to fully address the connection between students identifying…

Clopton, Aaron

2009-01-01

41

Severity of Academic Achievement and Social Skills Deficits  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the differences in the rated social skills of elementary-aged students at-risk for emotional/behavioural disorders (E/BD) based on severity of academic difficulties. Teachers nominated students at-risk for E/BD who were classified into four groups of academic difficulty based on the Wide Range Achievement Test-3. Students,…

Bloom, Elana L.; Karagiannakis, Anastasia; Toste, Jessica R.; Heath, Nancy L.; Konstantinopoulos, Effie

2007-01-01

42

SOCIAL NETWORKS AND STATUS ATTAINMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay traces the development of the research enterprise, known as the social resources theory, which formulated and tested a number of proposi- tions concerning the relationships between embedded resources in social networks and socioeconomic attainment. This enterprise, seen in the light of social capital, has accumulated a substantial body of research literature and supported the proposition that social capital,

Nan Lin

1999-01-01

43

Exploiting Social Structures and Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In recent years there has been much recent interest in the use of “online” social networks for maintaining and building relationships\\u000a with others. In this talk we explore some of the key characteristics of social networks and how they can potentially be exploited\\u000a to provide intelligent content sharing in the pervasive and mobile computing domain.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Wireless and mobile devices such

Roger M. Whitaker

2010-01-01

44

Social Interaction in Learning Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The original publication is available from www.springerlink.com.\\u000aSloep, P. (2009). Social Interaction in Learning Networks. In R. Koper (Ed.), Learning Network Services for Professional Development (pp 13-15). Berlin, Germany: Springer Verlag.

Peter Sloep

2009-01-01

45

Social Psychology Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With over 11,000 links contained within its pages, the Social Psychology Network site is arguably the largest social psychology database on the Internet. Maintained by Professor Scout Plous of Wesleyan University, the site has been generously supported by the National Science Foundation. Visitors will appreciate the very clean layout of the siteâÂÂs homepage, as they are presented with a search engine, along with a number of electronic forums, and a listing of related topics. To delve into the siteâÂÂs contents, visitors may wish to select from any one of the areas on the left-hand side of the homepage, which include listings of doctoral programs in social psychology and teaching resources. There are numerous other options for interested parties, and they lead to such offerings as rankings of doctoral programs in the field and distance learning options in the field. Finally, visitors can also view many of the siteâÂÂs documents in a number of languages, including Spanish, French, Italian, and German.

Plous, Scott

1996-01-01

46

Predictors of Cheating among Early Adolescents: Academic and Social Motivations.  

PubMed

This study examined the relations between middle school students' self-reported cheating and several indicators of academic and social motivation. It was hypothesized that students' academic self-efficacy and personal and classroom goal orientations would predict cheating. Social motivations were presumed to predict cheating above and beyond achievement motivation. Four dimensions of relationships within schools were measured: participation structure, teacher commitment and competence, teacher respect, and sense of school belonging. Logistic regression analyses were used to predict classification as a cheater or noncheater. Although academic motivation variables predicted cheating, the addition of the relationship variables significantly improved the classification rates. The final model included grade in school, academic self-efficacy, extrinsic goal orientation, participation structure, teacher commitment, and teacher respect. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11161642

Murdock, Tamera B.; Hale, Natalie M.; Weber, Mary Jo

2001-01-01

47

Social Networking Goes to School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Just a few years ago, social networking meant little more to educators than the headache of determining whether to penalize students for inappropriate activities captured on Facebook or MySpace. Now, teachers and students have an array of social-networking sites and tools--from Ning to VoiceThread and Second Life--to draw on for such serious uses…

Davis, Michelle R.

2010-01-01

48

Online social networks and learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This viewpoint essay seeks to argue that young people's online social networking can serve as sites for and supports for student learning in ways not currently assessed. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The two themes presented are based on a select review of the research literature as well as the author's explorations of young people's online social networking practices within MySpace

Christine Greenhow

2011-01-01

49

Churn in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the past, churn has been identified as an issue across most industry sectors. In its most general sense it refers to the rate of loss of customers from a company's customer base. There is a simple reason for the attention churn attracts: churning customers mean a loss of revenue. Emerging from business spaces like telecommunications (telcom) and broadcast providers, where churn is a major issue, it is also regarded as a crucial problem in many other businesses, such as online games creators, but also online social networks and discussion sites. Companies aim at identifying the risk of churn in its early stages, as it is usually much cheaper to retain a customer than to try to win him or her back. If this risk can be accurately predicted, marketing departments can target customers efficiently with tailored incentives to prevent them from leaving.

Karnstedt, Marcel; Hennessy, Tara; Chan, Jeffrey; Basuchowdhuri, Partha; Hayes, Conor; Strufe, Thorsten

50

The Contextual Effects of Community Social Capital on Academic Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although previous research has underscored the importance of family social capital in serving educational purposes, few studies have examined the relationship between social capital accumulated in a local community and the academic performance of all students living in the community. The current study has applied an explicit multilevel model to study this relationship. Hierarchical linear model analyses of a nationally

Yongmin Sun

1999-01-01

51

Relationships of Social Background to Classroom Experience and Academic Abilities: A Model for Academic Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study delineates the relationships between social background, classroom experience, and academic abilities. Classroom experience is mainly judged in terms of students' affective dispositions. The objective is to clarify how these dispositions are shaped by the personal and situational factors in a child's social background, and then how they,…

Madhere, Serge; Walker, Elaine

52

Social Science Research Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by Social Science Electronic Publishing (SSEP), this site allows users to freely access thousands of abstracts and full-text research papers. The core of the site is the SSRN Electronic Library, which contains an Abstract Database with over 15,600 entries and an Electronic Paper Collection, which currently contains over 4,200 full-text papers. Users can search title, abstract, and author fields, or browse the journals, which are grouped under the five respective Research Networks that form the SSRN: Accounting, Economics, Latin American, Financial, and Legal Scholarship. Within each journal entry, users may select from several display options to narrow their results and available full-text documents are indicated by a special symbol. Information on each of the five networks, including conference and job announcements, as well as information on subscribing and a list of site licenses, is accessible via a menu panel on the left side of the main page. According to SSEP, access to the abstracts and full-text papers will remain free of charge to all users until \\"the next revision to the web site this winter.\\"

2005-11-02

53

Social Science Research Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by Social Science Electronic Publishing (SSEP), this site allows users to freely access thousands of abstracts and full-text research papers. The core of the site is the SSRN Electronic Library, which contains an Abstract Database with over 15,600 entries and an Electronic Paper Collection, which currently contains over 4,200 full-text papers. Users can search title, abstract, and author fields, or browse the journals, which are grouped under the five respective Research Networks that form the SSRN: Accounting, Economics, Latin American, Financial, and Legal Scholarship. Within each journal entry, users may select from several display options to narrow their results and available full-text documents are indicated by a special symbol. Information on each of the five networks, including conference and job announcements, as well as information on subscribing and a list of site licenses, is accessible via a menu panel on the left side of the main page. According to SSEP, access to the abstracts and full-text papers will remain free of charge to all users until "the next revision to the web site this winter."

54

Modeling and Analysis of Social Networks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This dissertation develops new methods for the modeling and analysis of social networks. Social networks describe the complex relationships of individuals and groups in multiple overlapping contexts. Influence in a social network impacts behavior and deci...

R. S. Renfro

2001-01-01

55

Can Social Networks Assist Analysts Fight Terrorism.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

My primary research question is: can social networks assist analysts fight terrorism. My secondary research questions are as follows. First, how does social networking create linkages. Second, how have social networks been used to solve small problems. Th...

M. V. Ciaramella

2011-01-01

56

Entropy of dynamical social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dynamical social networks are evolving rapidly and are highly adaptive. Characterizing the information encoded in social networks is essential to gain insight into the structure, evolution, adaptability and dynamics. Recently entropy measures have been used to quantify the information in email correspondence, static networks and mobility patterns. Nevertheless, we still lack methods to quantify the information encoded in time-varying dynamical social networks. In this talk we present a model to quantify the entropy of dynamical social networks and use this model to analyze the data of phone-call communication. We show evidence that the entropy of the phone-call interaction network changes according to circadian rhythms. Moreover we show that social networks are extremely adaptive and are modified by the use of technologies such as mobile phone communication. Indeed the statistics of duration of phone-call is described by a Weibull distribution and is significantly different from the distribution of duration of face-to-face interactions in a conference. Finally we investigate how much the entropy of dynamical social networks changes in realistic models of phone-call or face-to face interactions characterizing in this way different type human social behavior.

Zhao, Kun; Karsai, Marton; Bianconi, Ginestra

2012-02-01

57

Different Aspects of Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A social network is a set of people (or organizations or other social entities) connected by a set of social relation- ships, such as friendship, co-working or information exchange. Social network analysis focuses on the analysis of patterns of relationships among people, organizations, states and such social entities. Social network analysis provides both a visual and a mathematical analysis of

Mohsen Jamali; Hassan Abolhassani

2006-01-01

58

The Possibilities of Network Sociality  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Technologically networked social forms are broad, extensive and in demand. The rapid development and growth of web 2.0, or the social web, is evidence of the need and indeed hunger for social connectivity: people are searching for many and varied ways of enacting being-together. However, the ways in which we think of, research and write about network(ed) sociality are relatively recent and arguably restricted, warranting further critique and development. This article attempts to do several things: it raises questions about the types of sociality enacted in contemporary techno-society; critically explores the notion of the networked individual and the focus on the individual evident in much of the technology and sociality literature and asks questions about the place of the social in these discussions. It argues for a more well-balanced and multilevelled approach to questions of sociality in networked societies. The article starts from the position that possibilities enabled/afforded by the technologies we have in place have an effect upon the ways in which we understand being in the world together and our possible actions and futures. These possibilities are more than simply supplementary; in many ways they are transformative. The ways in which we grapple with these questions reveals as much about our understandings of sociality as it does about the technologies themselves.

Willson, Michele

59

Social networks of women caregivers.  

PubMed

Social networks and the support that network members provide are important resources for family caregivers in sustaining their caregiving role. Caregivers' perceptions of support from family and friends have been linked to their health status (R. Kahn & T. Antonucci, 1980; I. Sandler & M. Barrera, 1984). The purpose of this study was to explore the social networks and types of perceived support described by women who are caregivers of cognitively impaired older adults. Content analysis was used to examine interview data from a longitudinal qualitative study of 20 women caregivers of cognitively impaired older persons. An important finding of this study was the identification of a typology of social networks of the women caregivers. The caregivers' perceptions of satisfaction with support received and experience of conflict with network members varied according to the characteristics of their social network. Those caregivers who belonged to diverse social networks reported high satisfaction with the support that they received and little or no conflict. Those caregivers with kin-dominated social networks reported little satisfaction with support received and a high degree of conflict. PMID:9078846

Fudge, H; Neufeld, A; Harrison, M J

1997-02-01

60

School Social Capital and Pupils' Academic Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is widely acknowledged that there are important ties among pupils, parents and schools affecting children's educational outcome. Using NELS: 88, a nationally representative sample of eighth graders in the United States, this study explores the role of schools in their academic performance. The study suggests that, with other things equal,…

Haghighat, Elhum

2005-01-01

61

Representing Dynamic Social Networks in Discrete Event Social Simulation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

One of the key structural components of social systems is the social network. The representation of this network structure is key to providing a valid representation of the society under study. The social science concept of homophily provides a conceptual...

J. K. Alt S. Lieberman

2010-01-01

62

Authentication for social networking messages  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

A tool for verifying that a message received by a social networking service was sent by a bona fide owner of a social networking account who purportedly sent the message. The tool receives a message and it locates in the message a string that was entered into a message text field of the message. The string is compared with a registered authentication string for the bona fide owner of the account. If the string in the message matches the registered authentication string, the string is removed from the message and the message is forwarded to the social networking service. If the string in the message does not match the registered authentication string, the message is blocked from being forwarded to the social networking service.

2014-04-29

63

The Social Science Research Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Social Science Research Network is a rapidly growing Web site containing full text scholarly working papers and forthcoming papers in the fields of accounting, economics, Latin American studies, and legal research. This column describes and analyzes the site.

John R. Clark

2002-01-01

64

Online Identities and Social Networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Online identities play a critical role in the social web that is taking shape on the Internet. Despite many technical proposals\\u000a for creating and managing online identities, none has received widespread acceptance. Design and implementation of online\\u000a identities that are socially acceptable on the Internet remains an open problem. This chapter discusses the interplay between\\u000a online identities and social networking.

Muthucumaru Maheswaran; Bader Ali; Hatice Ozguven; Julien Lord

2010-01-01

65

Social psychology and social networks: Individuals and social systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Social psychology,and social network,research are both centrally concerned,with human sociality. Despite some historically significant interactions between the two, these areas of investigationhave,not been usefully deployed together in recent research endeavours. This paper attempts tobring out some points of both theoretical and methodological contentions, to characterize the gap between them, to traverse briefly the trajectories of its historical development, and

Garry Robins; Yoshi Kashima

2008-01-01

66

Science, Society, and Social Networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increased use of social networking is changing the way that scientific societies interact with their members and others. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) uses a variety of online networks to engage its members and the broader scientific community. AAAS members and non-members can interact with AAAS staff and each other on AAAS sites on Facebook,

K. S. White; T. Lohwater

2009-01-01

67

Measurement of Online Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent years, the popularity of online social networks (OSN) has risen to unprecedented levels, with the most popular ones having hundreds of millions of users. This success has generated interest within the networking community and has given rise to a number of measurement and characterization studies, which provide a first step towards their…

Gjoka, Mina

2010-01-01

68

Reward Allocation and Academic versus Social Orientation toward School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Correlates 138 elementary school children's views about the purposes of school to their styles of reward allocation: academically motivated students allocated rewards equally to two hypothetical performers who had unequally helped a teacher perform a manual chore, while socially motivated children allocated rewards in an equity (performance-based)…

Peterson, Candida C.; Peterson, James L.

1978-01-01

69

Why Social Interaction and Good Communication in Academic Libraries Matters  

Microsoft Academic Search

In these times of extraordinary development in information and communication technologies (ICT) many new tools and services, and traditional tools, such as the catalog, could be developed or enhanced by librarians to effectively support the academic community in teaching and learning. This paper will discuss how social interaction between technical and public service librarians could enhance library services to the

Maria Anna Jankowska; Linnea Marshall

2004-01-01

70

Social, Mental, Academic and Physical Development in Groups Doing Sports  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study is to show whether sport has an effect on education/academic success and social, mental and physical development or not. The search involves 160 students studying at Physical Education and Sports High School at Karamanoglu Mehmetbey University. Graded quintet likert type questionnaire was used as a measuring means. The first…

Nas, Kazim; Temel, Veysel; Akpinar, Selahattin; Akpinar, Oznur

2012-01-01

71

Teaching and Learning: A Model for Academic and Social Cognition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Learners are multi-faceted, unique people. Discovering the whole individual is incumbent upon realizing the teaching/learning environments, common social and societal realities, and belief and value systems respective of academic and socio-societal factors that establish who one is as a learner and teacher. In "Learning and Teaching," the authors…

Schiering, Marjorie S.; Bogner, Drew; Buli-Holmberg, Jorun

2011-01-01

72

Maternal Intrusive Support in the Academic Context: Transactional Socialization Processes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This longitudinal study examined processes involved in transactional models of socialization, focusing on maternal intrusive support for children's academic achievement. Results suggested that low achievement elicited intrusive support through the mechanisms of increased maternal worry and increased child uncertainty. Day-to-day analyses suggested…

Pomerantz, Eva M.; Eaton, Missa Murry

2001-01-01

73

The Science of Infancy: Academic, Social, and Political Agendas  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effectiveness of researchers in infancy is conditioned by their participation in 3 agendas. The academic agenda is devoted to the question of understanding infants, the social agenda is devoted to the question of how to improve the life of infants, and the political agenda is devoted to finding the resources for both understanding and…

Sameroff, Arnold J.

2005-01-01

74

The Academic Library and Social Responsibility: A Focus on AIDS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the role of academic libraries and librarians and suggests they should become more involved in social and political issues such as AIDS education. The use of a mass media campaign as a model for library activities is explained, and problems surrounding AIDS education in libraries are addressed. (20 references) (LRW)

Segal, Judith

1991-01-01

75

Extracting Regular Behaviors from Social Media Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social media network analysis has become very popular in recent years. How do real networks evolve over time? What are the normal evolving behaviors in a social media network? In order to extract behaviors occurring regularly to reveal the microscopic evolving properties in social networks, the evolving process of networks is modeled as stochastic states transition, and the evolving behaviors

Leiming Yan; Jinwei Wang

2011-01-01

76

Understanding Academic Performance of International Students: The Role of Ethnicity, Academic and Social Integration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More than 3 million students study outside their home country, primarily at a Western university. A common belief among educators is that international students are insufficiently adjusted to higher education in their host country, both academically and socially. Furthermore, several groups of international students experience considerable amounts…

Rienties, Bart; Beausaert, Simon; Grohnert, Therese; Niemantsverdriet, Susan; Kommers, Piet

2012-01-01

77

The Social Dimension of Academic Discipline as a Discriminator of Academic Deans' Administrative Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This national study of academic deans examined the social and cognitive dimensions underlying disciplinary variations in respondents' self reports of their administrative behavior. Discriminant analyses identified significant linear functions that distinguished behaviors of deans from hard/pure, hard/applied, soft/pure, and soft/applied discipline…

Del Favero, Marietta

2005-01-01

78

Community analysis in social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an empirical study of different social networks obtained from digital repositories. Our analysis reveals the community structure and provides a useful visualising technique. We investigate the scaling properties of the community size distribution, and find that all the networks exhibit power law scaling in the community size distributions with exponent either -0.5 or -1. Finally we find that the networks' community structure is topologically self-similar using the Horton-Strahler index.

Arenas, A.; Danon, L.; Díaz-Guilera, A.; Gleiser, P. M.; Guimerà, R.

2004-03-01

79

Social class and academic guidance: A social-psychological analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Canadian research has consistently shown that, compared with high social class students, a lower proportion of low social class students have high educational expectations. This difference persists even when the level of mental ability between the 2 groups is the same. To answer the question of why so many low social class students do not have high educational expectations, a

Ramesh A. Deosaran

1978-01-01

80

Using Social Skills Interventions To Increase Academic and Social Growth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This action research project sought to increase the use of appropriate social skills by middle school students through an increased instructional emphasis on social skills. The specific social skills addressed were listening, encouraging, self-control, appropriate manners, and accepting others' ideas. These skills were introduced using M-charts…

Baty, Jody; Sorensen, June; Pancini, Mark; Pasier, Emilia H.

81

Random graph models of social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe some new exactly solvable models of the structure of social networks, based on random graphs with arbitrary degree distributions. We give models both for simple unipartite networks, such as acquaintance networks, and bipartite networks, such as affiliation networks. We compare the predictions of our models to data for a number of real-world social networks and find that in

M. E. J. Newman; D. J. Watts; S. H. Strogatz

2002-01-01

82

A model for social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social networks are organized into communities with dense internal connections, giving rise to high values of the clustering coefficient. In addition, these networks have been observed to be assortative, i.e., highly connected vertices tend to connect to other highly connected vertices, and have broad degree distributions. We present a model for an undirected growing network which reproduces these characteristics, with the aim of producing efficiently very large networks to be used as platforms for studying sociodynamic phenomena. The communities arise from a mixture of random attachment and implicit preferential attachment. The structural properties of the model are studied analytically and numerically, using the k-clique method for quantifying the communities.

Toivonen, Riitta; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Saramäki, Jari; Hyvönen, Jörkki; Kaski, Kimmo

2006-11-01

83

Assortative model for social networks.  

PubMed

In this Brief Report we present a version of a network growth model, generalized in order to describe the behavior of social networks. The case of study considered is the preprint archive at cul.arxiv.org. Each node corresponds to a scientist, and a link is present whenever two authors wrote a paper together. This graph is a nice example of degree-assortative network, that is, to say a network where sites with similar degree are connected to each other. The model presented is one of the few able to reproduce such behavior, giving some insight on the microscopic dynamics at the basis of the graph structure. PMID:15524673

Catanzaro, Michele; Caldarelli, Guido; Pietronero, Luciano

2004-09-01

84

Online Social Networking Issues Within Academia and Pharmacy Education  

PubMed Central

Online social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace are extremely popular as indicated by the numbers of members and visits to the sites. They allow students to connect with users with similar interests, build and maintain relationships with friends, and feel more connected with their campus. The foremost criticisms of online social networking are that students may open themselves to public scrutiny of their online personas and risk physical safety by revealing excessive personal information. This review outlines issues of online social networking in higher education by drawing upon articles in both the lay press and academic publications. New points for pharmacy educators to consider include the possible emergence of an “e-professionalism” concept; legal and ethical implications of using online postings in admission, discipline, and student safety decisions; how online personas may blend into professional life; and the responsibility for educating students about the risks of online social networking.

2008-01-01

85

Online social networking issues within academia and pharmacy education.  

PubMed

Online social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace are extremely popular as indicated by the numbers of members and visits to the sites. They allow students to connect with users with similar interests, build and maintain relationships with friends, and feel more connected with their campus. The foremost criticisms of online social networking are that students may open themselves to public scrutiny of their online personas and risk physical safety by revealing excessive personal information. This review outlines issues of online social networking in higher education by drawing upon articles in both the lay press and academic publications. New points for pharmacy educators to consider include the possible emergence of an "e-professionalism" concept; legal and ethical implications of using online postings in admission, discipline, and student safety decisions; how online personas may blend into professional life; and the responsibility for educating students about the risks of online social networking. PMID:18322572

Cain, Jeff

2008-02-15

86

Intelligent Visualisation of Social Network Analysis Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social Network Analysis (SNA) (Scott 1992) is the analysis of network data gathered in a social context. It has been used to examine social phenomena in such diverse areas as local communities, international organizations and sporting clubs. However, while the data collected by Social Network Analysts is eminently computable it has taken until relatively recently for SNA to make it's

Phillip Higgins; Debbie Richards; Mike McGrath

2000-01-01

87

Academic Support Systems: A Networked Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Basic design and implementation issues encountered in providing academic support systems are examined. "Academic support systems" describes the growing class of university computing that is being developed to integrate administrative computing environments. These systems may be typically characterized by the activities that center around a dean's…

Klingenstein, Kenneth J.

88

Extended Identity for Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nowadays we are experiencing the consolidation of social networks (SN). Although there are trends trying to integrate SN platforms. they remain as data silos between each other. Information can't be exchanged between them. In some cases, it would be desirable to connect this scattered information, in order to build a distributed identity. This contribution proposes an architecture for distributed social networking. Based on distributed user-centric identity, our proposal extends it by attaching user information. It also bridges the gap between distributed identity and distributed publishing capabilities.

Tapiador, Antonio; Fumero, Antonio; Salvachúa, Joaquín

89

Social Networks' XSS Worms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cross Site Scripting Worms, are malicious programs that propagates through visitors of a website in attempt to infect other visitors progressively. Cross site scripting vulnerabilities are exploited in many forms; one of the common forms is using worms on popular social websites, such as MySpace and Facebook. In this paper first we suggest a general model based on our discussions.

Mohammad Reza Faghani; Hossein Saidi

2009-01-01

90

Navigating Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors note that when it comes to balancing free speech and schools' responsibilities, the online world is largely uncharted waters. Questions remain about the rights of both students and teachers in the world of social media. Although the lower courts have ruled that students' freedom of speech rights offer them some protection for…

Hamblin, DeAnna; Bartlett, Marilyn J.

2013-01-01

91

Is Your Academic Library Pinning? Academic Libraries and Pinterest  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Academic libraries are flocking to online social networking sites in an effort to meet users where they are. Pinterest is the latest of these rapidly growing online social networking tools. The author of this article reports results from a survey on academic libraries' presence on Pinterest. The survey found most academic library pinboards are in…

Thornton, Elaine

2012-01-01

92

Masculinity, Educational Achievement and Social Status: A Social Network Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study utilises a quantitative case study social network approach to explore the connection between masculinity and scholastic achievement in two secondary, all-boys schools in Australia. In both schools two social networks representing social status are explored: the "friendship" network as a measure of status that includes emotional…

Lusher, Dean

2011-01-01

93

SocialBrowsing: Integrating Social Networks and Web Browsing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In this paper we introduce SocialBrowsing, a Firefox extension that adds social context to the web browsing experience. The extension is paired with services provided by social networking websites, analyzes the page's contents, and adds tooltips and highl...

J. Golbeck M. M. Wasser

2007-01-01

94

Privacy and Social Networking Sites  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

College students are relying on the Internet to make connections with other people every day. As the Internet has developed and grown, so have the capabilities for interaction. Social networking sites, a group of Web sites that provide people with the opportunity to create an online profile and to share that profile with others, are a part of…

Timm, Dianne M.; Duven, Carolyn J.

2008-01-01

95

Social Networking: It's Not What You Think.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This slide presentation reviews some of the current uses of the social networking sites available on the internet. It list some of the skills that are now considered obsolete and reviews the major social networking sites.

K. D. Jones

2010-01-01

96

Social Networking: It's Not What You Think  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews some of the current uses of the social networking sites available on the internet. It list some of the skills that are now considered obsolete and reviews the major social networking sites.

Jones, Kevin D.

2010-01-01

97

Why social networks are different from other types of networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We argue that social networks differ from most other types of networks, including technological and biological networks, in two important ways. First, they have nontrivial clustering or network transitivity and second, they show positive correlations, also called assortative mixing, between the degrees of adjacent vertices. Social networks are often divided into groups or communities, and it has recently been suggested

M. E. Newman

2003-01-01

98

Growth of the flickr social network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online social networking sites like MySpace, Orkut, and Flickr are among the most popular sites on the Web and continue to experience dramatic growth in their user population. The popularity of these sites offers a unique opportunity to study the dynamics of social networks at scale. Having a proper understanding of how online social networks grow can provide insights into

Alan Mislove; Hema Swetha Koppula; Krishna P. Gummadi; Peter Druschel; Bobby Bhattacharjee

2008-01-01

99

Measurement and analysis of online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online social networking sites like Orkut, YouTube, and Flickr are among the most popular sites on the Internet. Users of these sites form a social network, which provides a powerful means of sharing, organizing, and finding con- tent and contacts. The popularity of these sites provides an opportunity to study the characteristics of online social network graphs at large scale.

Alan Mislove; Massimiliano Marcon; P. Krishna Gummadi; Peter Druschel; Bobby Bhattacharjee

2007-01-01

100

Personal losses and deficiencies in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Personal losses or exit events and deficiencies in personal social networks have both been shown to be associated with episodes of depression. This study found no evidence for an inverse correlation between exit events and primary social network variables in depressed psychiatric outpatients and in normal subjects. Social network deficiencies are probably stable over time and although they may increase

Traolach S. Brugha

1984-01-01

101

Collaboration in the School Social Network  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social networks are fundamental to all people. Their social network describes how they are connected to others: close relationships, peripheral relationships, and those relationships that help connect them to other people, events, or things. As information specialists, school librarians develop a multidimensional social network that enables them…

Schultz-Jones, Barbara

2009-01-01

102

Identification of Social Tension in Organizational Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of email networks reveals properties similar to classic social networks such as homophily (assortativity) and community\\u000a formation. The technology underlying email enables the formation of a network but it does not explain characteristics of the\\u000a network that occur only as a result of patterns in human social behavior. Accordingly, a network formed from email activity\\u000a correlates to the social

Ben Collingsworth; Ronaldo Menezes

103

Fitcolab Experimental Online Social Networking System  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Scholars have recently started to explore specific characteristics of increasingly popular online social networks. This paper\\u000a presents Fitcolab online social network (OSN). This real life, modern OSN was created as an experimental research network\\u000a which should allow for examination of various phenomena pertaining to network structure of online social networks. The main\\u000a goal of the paper is to thoroughly describe

Haris Memic

2010-01-01

104

Collective privacy management in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social Networking is one of the major technological phe- nomena of the Web 2.0, with hundreds of millions of people participating. Social networks enable a form of self expres- sion for users, and help them to socialize and share content with other users. In spite of the fact that content sharing represents one of the prominent features of existing Social

Anna Cinzia Squicciarini; Mohamed Shehab; Federica Paci

2009-01-01

105

Network Analysis in the Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the last decade, there has been an explosion of interest in network research across the physical and social sciences. For social scientists, the theory of networks has been a goldmine, yielding explanations for social phenomena in a wide variety of disciplines from psychology to economics. In this essay, we review the kinds of things that social scientists have tried

Stephen P. Borgatti; Ajay Mehra; Daniel J. Brass; Giuseppe Labianca

2009-01-01

106

Network Analysis in the Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past decade, there has been an explosion of interest in network research across the physical and social sciences. For social scientists, the theory of networks has been a gold mine, yielding explanations for social phenomena in a wide variety of disciplines from psychology to economics. Here, we review the kinds of things that social scientists have tried to

Stephen P. Borgatti; Ajay Mehra; Daniel J. Brass; Giuseppe Labianca

2009-01-01

107

Early Adolescent Social Networks and Substance Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relationships between social network position and the use of tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, and inhalants in a sample of 1,119 sixth-grade youth. Social network analyses of peer nominations were used to categorize youth as "members" of social groups, "liaisons" between groups, or social "isolates." The results revealed that…

Henry, David B.; Kobus, Kimberly

2007-01-01

108

Reconfiguration and search of social networks.  

PubMed

Social networks tend to exhibit some topological characteristics different from regular networks and random networks, such as shorter average path length and higher clustering coefficient, and the node degree of the majority of social networks obeys exponential distribution. Based on the topological characteristics of the real social networks, a new network model which suits to portray the structure of social networks was proposed, and the characteristic parameters of the model were calculated. To find out the relationship between two people in the social network, and using the local information of the social network and the parallel mechanism, a hybrid search strategy based on k-walker random and a high degree was proposed. Simulation results show that the strategy can significantly reduce the average number of search steps, so as to effectively improve the search speed and efficiency. PMID:24574861

Zhang, Lianming; Peng, Aoyuan; Yu, Jianping

2013-01-01

109

Social network site addiction - an overview.  

PubMed

Research into frequent, excessive, and compulsive social network activity has increased the last years, in which terms such as "social network site addiction" and "Facebook addiction" have been used interchangeably. The aim of this review is to offer more knowledge and better understanding of social network site addiction (SNS-addiction) among researchers as well as clinicians by presenting a narrative overview of the research field in terms of definition, measurement, antecedents, consequences, and treatment as well as recommendations for future research efforts. Seven different measures of SNS-addiction have been developed, although they have to a very little extent been validated against each other. The small number of studies conducted so far on this topic suggests that SNSaddiction is associated with health-related, academic, and interpersonal problems/issues. However such studies have relied on a simple cross-sectional study design. It is therefore hard to draw any conclusions about potential causality and long-term effects at this point, beyond hypothetical speculations. Empirical studies suggest that SNS-addiction is caused by dispositional factors (e.g., personality, needs, self-esteem), although relevant explanatory socio-cultural and behavioral reinforcement factors remain to be empirically explored. No well-documented treatment for SNS-addiction exists, but knowledge gained from Internet addiction treatment approaches might be transferable to SNS-addiction. Overall, the research on this topic is in its infancy, and as such the SNS-addiction construct needs further conceptual and empirical exploration. There is a great demand for studies using careful longitudinal designs and studies which include objective measures of both behavior and health based on broad representative samples. PMID:24001298

Andreassen, Cecilie Schou; Pallesen, Stale

2014-01-01

110

Social Software: Participants' Experience Using Social Networking for Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social networking tools used in learning provides instructional design with tools for transformative change in education. This study focused on defining the meanings and essences of social networking through the lived common experiences of 7 college students. The problem of the study was a lack of learner voice in understanding the value of social

Batchelder, Cecil W.

2010-01-01

111

Pseudolikelihood Estimation for Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interest in log-linear modeling for social-network data has grown steadily since Holland and Leinhardt (1981) proposed their p1 model. That model was designed for a single binary relationship (directed graph) representing interactions between individuals. It assumed that interactions between pairs of individuals are mutually independent. Subsequent work has extended the model in various ways, including block-modeling and the case of

David Strauss; Michael Ikeda

1990-01-01

112

Text Mining in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social networks are rich in various kinds of contents such as text and multimedia. The ability to apply text mining algorithms effectively in the context of text data is critical for a wide variety of applications. Social networks require text mining algorithms for a wide variety of applications such as keyword search, classification, and clustering. While search and classification are well known applications for a wide variety of scenarios, social networks have a much richer structure both in terms of text and links. Much of the work in the area uses either purely the text content or purely the linkage structure. However, many recent algorithms use a combination of linkage and content information for mining purposes. In many cases, it turns out that the use of a combination of linkage and content information provides much more effective results than a system which is based purely on either of the two. This paper provides a survey of such algorithms, and the advantages observed by using such algorithms in different scenarios. We also present avenues for future research in this area.

Aggarwal, Charu C.; Wang, Haixun

113

Hacking Social Networks: Examining the Viability of Using Computer Network Attack Against Social Networks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Social Network Analysis (SNA) has been proposed as a tool to defeat transnational terrorist groups such as Al Qaeda. However, SNA is an descriptive tool that is a product of sociology and not an offensive tool used to attack a social network. SNA was not ...

I. R. Schuhart

2007-01-01

114

Effect of peer nominations of teacher-student support at individual and classroom levels on social and academic outcomes.  

PubMed

This longitudinal study examined the prospective relations between 713 elementary students' individual peer teacher support reputation (PTSR) and a measure of the classroom-wide dispersion of peer nominations of teacher support (Centralization of Teacher Support) on students' peer relatedness (i.e., peer acceptance and peer academic reputation) and academic motivation (i.e., academic self-efficacy and teacher-rated behavioral engagement). PTSR was measured as the proportion of classmates who nominated a given student on a descriptor of teacher-student support. Centralization of Teacher Support was assessed using social network analysis to identify the degree to which peer nominations of teacher support in a classroom centered on a few students. PTSR predicted changes in all student outcomes, above academic achievement and relevant covariates. Centralization of Teacher Support predicted changes in students' peer academic reputation, net the effect of PTSR and covariates. Students' academic achievement moderated effects of PTSR and Centralization of Teacher Support on some outcomes. Findings highlight the importance of peers' perceptions of teacher support and of the structure of those perceptions for children's social and academic outcomes. Implications for practice are discussed. PMID:24930822

Hughes, Jan N; Im, Myung Hee; Wehrly, Sarah E

2014-06-01

115

Community structure in social and biological networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of recent studies have focused on the statistical properties of networked systems such as social networks and the Worldwide Web. Researchers have concentrated particularly on a few properties that seem to be common to many networks: the small-world property, power-law degree distributions, and network transitivity. In this article, we highlight another property that is found in many networks,

Michelle Girvan; M. E. J. Newman

2002-01-01

116

Location Privacy Protection on Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Location information is considered as private in many scenarios. Protecting location information on mobile ad-hoc networks has attracted much research in past years. However, location information protection on social networks has not been paid much attention. In this paper, we present a novel location privacy protection approach on the basis of user messages in social networks. Our approach grants flexibility to users by offering them multiple protecting options. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to protect social network users' location information via text messages. We propose five algorithms for location privacy protection on social networks.

Zhan, Justin; Fang, Xing

117

Discovering Temporal Communities from Social Network Documents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Discovering communities from documents involved in social discourse is an important topic in social network analysis, enabling greater understanding of the relation- ships among actors within a social network as well as top- ical trends in communication. This paper studies the dis- covery of communities from communication documents pro- duced over time, including the discovery of temporal trends in community

Ding Zhou; Isaac G. Councill; Hongyuan Zha; C. Lee Giles

2007-01-01

118

An Interlibrary Loan Network Among Academic Libraries of Saudi Arabia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A literature review reveals that there is little interlibrary loan (ILL) cooperation among the academic libraries of Saudi Arabia, and this article proposes a model ILL Network to counter budgetary constraints and increasing amounts of information by sharing resources. Describes the model's organizational structure, governance, and operational…

Siddiqui, Moid Ahmad

1996-01-01

119

Small "p" Publishing: A Networked Blogging Approach to Academic Discourse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article highlights a middle ground for academic publishing between formal peer-reviewed journals and informal blogging that we call "Small "p" Publishing." Having implemented and tested a publishing network that illustrates this middle ground, we describe its unique contributions to scholars and learning communities. Three features that…

Martin, Julia W.; Hughes, Brian

2012-01-01

120

Social Network Theory and Educational Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Social Network Theory and Educational Change" offers a provocative and fascinating exploration of how social networks in schools can impede or facilitate the work of education reform. Drawing on the work of leading scholars, the book comprises a series of studies examining networks among teachers and school leaders, contrasting formal and…

Daly, Alan J., Ed.

2010-01-01

121

Effects of missing data in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We perform sensitivity analyses to assess the impact of missing data on the structural properties of social networks. The social network is conceived of as being generated by a bipartite graph, in which actors are linked together via multiple interaction contexts or affiliations. We discuss three principal missing data mechanisms: network boundary specification (non-inclusion of actors or affiliations), survey non-response,

Gueorgi Kossinets

2003-01-01

122

Discovering the staring people from social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we study a novel problem of staring people dis- covery from social networks, which is concerned with finding people who are not only authoritative but also sociable in the social network. We formalize this problem as an optimiza- tion programming problem. Taking the co-author network as a case study, we define three objective functions and pro- pose

Dewei Chen; Jie Tang; Juanzi Li; Lizhu Zhou

2009-01-01

123

Egocentric Social Network Analysis of Pathological Gambling  

PubMed Central

Aims To apply social network analysis (SNA) to investigate whether frequency and severity of gambling problems were associated with different network characteristics among friends, family, and co-workers. is an innovative way to look at relationships among individuals; the current study was the first to our knowledge to apply SNA to gambling behaviors. Design Egocentric social network analysis was used to formally characterize the relationships between social network characteristics and gambling pathology. Setting Laboratory-based questionnaire and interview administration. Participants Forty frequent gamblers (22 non-pathological gamblers, 18 pathological gamblers) were recruited from the community. Findings The SNA revealed significant social network compositional differences between the two groups: pathological gamblers (PGs) had more gamblers, smokers, and drinkers in their social networks than did nonpathological gamblers (NPGs). PGs had more individuals in their network with whom they personally gambled, smoked, and drank with than those with who were NPG. Network ties were closer to individuals in their networks who gambled, smoked, and drank more frequently. Associations between gambling severity and structural network characteristics were not significant. Conclusions Pathological gambling is associated with compositional but not structural differences in social networks. Pathological gamblers differ from non-pathological gamblers in the number of gamblers, smokers, and drinkers in their social networks. Homophily within the networks also indicates that gamblers tend to be closer with other gamblers. This homophily may serve to reinforce addictive behaviors, and may suggest avenues for future study or intervention.

Meisel, Matthew K.; Clifton, Allan D.; MacKillop, James; Miller, Joshua D.; Campbell, W. Keith; Goodie, Adam S.

2012-01-01

124

Bayesian Networks for Social Modeling  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a body of work developed over the past five years. The work addresses the use of Bayesian network (BN) models for representing and predicting social/organizational behaviors. The topics covered include model construction, validation, and use. These topics show the bulk of the lifetime of such model, beginning with construction, moving to validation and other aspects of model ‘critiquing’, and finally demonstrating how the modeling approach might be used to inform policy analysis. To conclude, we discuss limitations of using BN for this activity and suggest remedies to address those limitations. The primary benefits of using a well-developed computational, mathematical, and statistical modeling structure, such as BN, are 1) there are significant computational, theoretical and capability bases on which to build 2) ability to empirically critique the model, and potentially evaluate competing models for a social/behavioral phenomena.

Whitney, Paul D.; White, Amanda M.; Walsh, Stephen J.; Dalton, Angela C.; Brothers, Alan J.

2011-03-28

125

Association between co-authorship network and scientific productivity and impact indicators in academic medical research centers: A case study in Iran  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: We aimed to examine the co-authorship networks in three successful Iranian academic research centers, in order to find the association between the scientific productivity and impact indicators with network features in a case study. METHODS: We searched for English articles of the three research centers. We drew co-authorship maps of each center and calculated social network measures. RESULTS: The

Reza Yousefi-Nooraie; Marjan Akbari-Kamrani; Robert A Hanneman; Arash Etemadi

2008-01-01

126

Social skill as a determinant of social networks and perceived social support in schizophrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Factors influencing supportive social networks of people with schizophrenia are little understood. Data from 46 outpatients with schizophrenia were analysed using structural equation modelling to test plausible sets of inter-relationships between social skill, social networks, and social support. The data supported a tentative model about the causal relationships between variables. Paths showed that people with greater social skill had larger

E. M. Macdonald; H. J. Jackson; R. L. Hayes; A. J. Baglioni; C. Madden

1998-01-01

127

Towards Socially-Intelligent Wearable Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a wearable system that uses machine perception to quantify a user's social context and propagate this information to others in the user's social network. The social context is evaluated for the user's instantaneous, face-to- face interactions by evaluating proximity, collective speech features, head-movements, and galvanic skin responses. This information is then propagated to others within the user's social

Anmol Madan; Ron Caneel

128

Assessing Academic Advising Outcomes Using Social Cognitive Theory: A Validity and Reliability Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The validity and reliability of three instruments, the "Counselor Rubric for Gauging Student Understanding of Academic Planning," micro-analytic questions, and the "Student Survey for Understanding Academic Planning," all based on social cognitive theory, were tested as means to assess self-efficacy and self-regulated learning in college academic

Erlich, Richard J.; Russ-Eft, Darlene F.

2012-01-01

129

Adolescents' Fear of Social Consequences of Academic Success as a Function of Age and Sex.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Fear of Success Consequence Scale was used to assess early and mid-adolescents' fears of potential social consequences of academic success. Results indicated that fear of academic success decreased through adolescence and girls generally had a greater fear of academic success. (DWH)

Ishiyama, F. Ishu; Chabassol, David J.

1985-01-01

130

The Social Side of Information Networking.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores the social issues, including manners, security, crime (fraud), and social control associated with information networking, with emphasis on the Internet. Also addresses the influence of cellular phones, the Internet and other information technologies on society. (GR)

Katz, James E.

1997-01-01

131

Managing Trust in Online Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In recent years, there is a dramatic growth in number and popularity of online social networks. There are many networks available\\u000a with more than 100 million registered users such as Facebook, MySpace, QZone, Windows Live Spaces etc. People may connect,\\u000a discover and share by using these online social networks. The exponential growth of online communities in the area of social

Touhid Bhuiyan; Audun Josang; Yue Xu

2010-01-01

132

Starting Online: Exploring the Use of a Social Networking Site to Facilitate Transition into Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It has been widely recognised that transition into higher education (HE) can be challenging for incoming students. Literature identifies three main areas where students may benefit from support: social, practical and academic. This paper discusses a case study that explores the potential of a social networking environment to provide support in…

Knight, John; Rochon, Rebecca

2012-01-01

133

Service-Learning Project in a First-Year Seminar: A Social Network Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Understanding the effects of a service-learning component on the classroom culture, socially and academically, brings a novel perspective to designing, executing, and assessing these types of active-learning projects. This paper evaluates the success of a service-learning project from a perspective of social networks by investigating the question:…

Teymuroglu, Zeynep

2013-01-01

134

Reconsidering Social Networks for Enterprise Communication Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking applications leverage valuable information from social graphs and integrate communication capabilities to offer new services. However, currently, these applications are limited to communication capabilities such as click-to-call or click-to-conference. Once the communication session is established the social context and the communication context are not integrated in these services. For social network communication services such integration permits new and

Krishna Kishore Dhara; Venkatesh Krishnaswamy; Taranjeet Singh

2010-01-01

135

System and method for secure social networking  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

A system and method for secure social networking is disclosed. In one embodiment, a social networking site is accessible on the Internet for use by minors that allows for adult supervision and approval for participation on the site, and provides safeguards against abuses and misuse of many social networking sites available today. In another embodiment, a social networking site on the Internet is available for use by minors that permits users to access the Internet only according to guidelines previously approved by adults for each user. The system further comprises a call screening feature that allows incoming and outgoing calls according to guidelines previously approved by adults for each user.

2013-10-08

136

Probing next Generation Portuguese Academic Network  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide several viewpoints about monitoring aspects related to recent deployments of a new technology (IPv6). Design/methodology/approach: Several views and domains were used, with a common point: the Portuguese research and education network (RCTS). Findings: A significant amount of work is yet to be…

Friacas, Carlos; Massano, Emanuel; Domingues, Monica; Veiga, Pedro

2008-01-01

137

Psychology and social networks: a dynamic network theory perspective.  

PubMed

Research on social networks has grown exponentially in recent years. However, despite its relevance, the field of psychology has been relatively slow to explain the underlying goal pursuit and resistance processes influencing social networks in the first place. In this vein, this article aims to demonstrate how a dynamic network theory perspective explains the way in which social networks influence these processes and related outcomes, such as goal achievement, performance, learning, and emotional contagion at the interpersonal level of analysis. The theory integrates goal pursuit, motivation, and conflict conceptualizations from psychology with social network concepts from sociology and organizational science to provide a taxonomy of social network role behaviors, such as goal striving, system supporting, goal preventing, system negating, and observing. This theoretical perspective provides psychologists with new tools to map social networks (e.g., dynamic network charts), which can help inform the development of change interventions. Implications for social, industrial-organizational, and counseling psychology as well as conflict resolution are discussed, and new opportunities for research are highlighted, such as those related to dynamic network intelligence (also known as cognitive accuracy), levels of analysis, methodological/ethical issues, and the need to theoretically broaden the study of social networking and social media behavior. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24750076

Westaby, James D; Pfaff, Danielle L; Redding, Nicholas

2014-04-01

138

The Role of Social Relationships in the Association between Adolescents' Depressive Symptoms and Academic Achievement  

PubMed Central

While research has established that depression interferes with academic achievement, less is understood about the processes by which social relationships may buffer the relationship between depression and academic outcomes. In this study we examined the role of positive relationships in the school, family and peer contexts in the association between depressive symptoms and academic achievement among 894 adolescents aged 12-17 years living in Santiago, Chile. Depressive symptoms were associated with lower levels of academic achievement; parental monitoring, school belonging, positive mother relationships, and having academically inclined peers moderated this relationship, though some interactions differed by sex and age. Implications for promoting the academic success of adolescents experiencing depressive symptoms are discussed.

Maurizi, Laura K.; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Granillo, M. Teresa; Delva, Jorge

2013-01-01

139

Privacy Breach Analysis in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This chapter addresses various aspects of analyzing privacy breaches in social networks. We first review literature that defines three types of privacy breaches in social networks: interactive, active, and passive. We then survey the various network anonymization schemes that have been constructed to address these privacy breaches. After exploring these breaches and anonymization schemes, we evaluate a measure for determining the level of anonymity inherent in a network graph based on its topological structure. Finally, we close by emphasizing the difficulty of anonymizing social network data while maintaining usability for research purposes and offering areas for future work.

Nagle, Frank

140

Academic and Social Impairments of Elementary School Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined academic and social impairments of 6- to 11-year-old children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; n = 101) versus other referred children without ADHD (n = 53) and controls (n = 24). Parent and teacher ratings showed significantly lower academic performance and lower social functioning for children with ADHD…

McConaughy, Stephanie H.; Volpe, Robert J.; Antshel, Kevin M.; Gordon, Michael; Eiraldi, Ricardo B.

2011-01-01

141

Academic and Social Integration and Study Progress in Problem Based Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study explores the effects of problem-based learning (PBL) on social and academic integration and study progress. Three hundred and five first-year students from three different psychology curricula completed a questionnaire on social and academic integration. Effects of a full-fledged PBL environment were compared to (1) effects of a…

Severiens, Sabine E.; Schmidt, Henk G.

2009-01-01

142

The Impact of College Racial Composition on African American Students' Academic and Social Gains: Additional Evidence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The College Student Experiences Questionnaire (CSEA) was used to estimate the impact of attending a historically Black college or university on social and academic outcomes in college. Findings extend previous research by suggesting attendance at a historically Black college significantly enhances academic and social growth of students. (Author)

Flowers, Lamont A.

2002-01-01

143

It's Time We Teach Social-Emotional Competence as Well as We Teach Academic Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses the non-academic, social-emotional factors that contribute to student academic achievement, including the cognitive-behavioral characteristics of underachieving students and those with learning disabilities; the "You Can Do It! Education" (YCDI) theory of achievement; derivative research on social-emotional capabilities,…

Bernard, Michael E.

2006-01-01

144

The Relationship of Loneliness and Social Support with College Freshmen's Academic Performance and Persistence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on Tinto's (1993) model of academic persistence, this study investigated the relationship of loneliness, social support, and living arrangements with academic persistence decisions of 401 college freshmen. Participants completed a series of standardized instruments during class time. Social support was negatively related to loneliness and…

Nicpon, Megan Foley; Huser, Laura; Blanks, Elva Hull; Sollenberger, Sonja; Befort, Christie; Kurpius, Sharon E. Robinson

2007-01-01

145

How Important Is Personal/Social Development to Academic Achievement? The Elementary School Counselor's Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored elementary school counselors' perceptions of importance and implementation for state standards in support of academic achievement. Results indicate that Academic and Personal/Social standards are important to achievement with no statistical difference between the standards. Further, counselors implement Personal/Social

Barna, Jennifer S.; Brott, Pamelia E.

2011-01-01

146

Spreading in online social networks: The role of social reinforcement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some epidemic spreading models are usually applied to analyze the propagation of opinions or news. However, the dynamics of epidemic spreading and information or behavior spreading are essentially different in many aspects. Centola's experiments [ScienceSCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1185231 329, 1194 (2010)] on behavior spreading in online social networks showed that the spreading is faster and broader in regular networks than in random networks. This result contradicts with the former understanding that random networks are preferable for spreading than regular networks. To describe the spreading in online social networks, a unknown-known-approved-exhausted four-status model was proposed, which emphasizes the effect of social reinforcement and assumes that the redundant signals can improve the probability of approval (i.e., the spreading rate). Performing the model on regular and random networks, it is found that our model can well explain the results of Centola's experiments on behavior spreading and some former studies on information spreading in different parameter space. The effects of average degree and network size on behavior spreading process are further analyzed. The results again show the importance of social reinforcement and are accordant with Centola's anticipation that increasing the network size or decreasing the average degree will enlarge the difference of the density of final approved nodes between regular and random networks. Our work complements the former studies on spreading dynamics, especially the spreading in online social networks where the information usually requires individuals' confirmations before being transmitted to others.

Zheng, Muhua; Lü, Linyuan; Zhao, Ming

2013-07-01

147

Spreading in online social networks: the role of social reinforcement.  

PubMed

Some epidemic spreading models are usually applied to analyze the propagation of opinions or news. However, the dynamics of epidemic spreading and information or behavior spreading are essentially different in many aspects. Centola's experiments [Science 329, 1194 (2010)] on behavior spreading in online social networks showed that the spreading is faster and broader in regular networks than in random networks. This result contradicts with the former understanding that random networks are preferable for spreading than regular networks. To describe the spreading in online social networks, a unknown-known-approved-exhausted four-status model was proposed, which emphasizes the effect of social reinforcement and assumes that the redundant signals can improve the probability of approval (i.e., the spreading rate). Performing the model on regular and random networks, it is found that our model can well explain the results of Centola's experiments on behavior spreading and some former studies on information spreading in different parameter space. The effects of average degree and network size on behavior spreading process are further analyzed. The results again show the importance of social reinforcement and are accordant with Centola's anticipation that increasing the network size or decreasing the average degree will enlarge the difference of the density of final approved nodes between regular and random networks. Our work complements the former studies on spreading dynamics, especially the spreading in online social networks where the information usually requires individuals' confirmations before being transmitted to others. PMID:23944529

Zheng, Muhua; Lü, Linyuan; Zhao, Ming

2013-07-01

148

The Evolution of Social and Economic Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examine the dynamic formation and stochastic evolution of networks connecting individuals. The payoff to an individual from an economic or social activity depends on the network of connections among individuals. Over time individuals form and sever links connecting themselves to other individuals based on the improvement that the resulting network offers them relative to the current network. In addition

Matthew O. Jackson; Alison Watts

2002-01-01

149

Networking for philanthropy: increasing volunteer behavior via social networking sites.  

PubMed

Social networking sites (SNSs) provide a unique social venue to engage the young generation in philanthropy through their networking capabilities. An integrated model that incorporates social capital into the Theory of Reasoned Action is developed to explain volunteer behavior through social networks. As expected, volunteer behavior was predicted by volunteer intention, which was influenced by attitudes and subjective norms. In addition, social capital, an outcome of the extensive use of SNSs, was as an important driver of users' attitude and subjective norms toward volunteering via SNSs. PMID:24102569

Kim, Yoojung; Lee, Wei-Na

2014-03-01

150

Measuring the Effects of Students' Perceptions of Classroom Social Climate on Academic Self-Concept.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research measured the effects of students' perceptions of classroom social climate in middle school social studies classes on academic self-concept in social studies. The 185 subjects, consisting of 95 females and 90 males, were eighth graders enrolled in U.S. history courses. Students' perceptions of classroom social climate were measured by…

Byer, John L.

151

Exploring the Relationships between Students' Academic Motivation and Social Ability in Online Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research explicates the construct of social ability and describes the relationship between students' academic motivation and social ability in online learning environments. Findings reveal perceived peers social presence, perceived written communication skills, perceived instructor social presence, comfort with sharing personal information,…

Yang, Chia-Chi; Tsai, I-Chun; Kim, Bosung; Cho, Moon-Heum; Laffey, James M.

2006-01-01

152

The ART of Social Networking: How SART member clinics are connecting with patients online  

PubMed Central

Objective To study and describe the use of social networking websites among SART member clinics Design Cross-sectional study Setting University Based Practice Patients Not Applicable Interventions Not Applicable Main Outcome Measure Prevalence of social networking websites among SART member clinics and evaluation of content, volume and location (i.e mandated state, region) using multivariate regression analysis Results 384 SART registered clinics and 1,382 social networking posts were evaluated. Of the clinics, 96% have a website and 30% link to a social networking website. The majority of clinics (89%) with social networking websites were affiliated with non-academic centers. Social networking posts mostly provide information (31%) and/or advertise (28%), while the remaining offer support (19%) or are irrelevant (17%) to the target audience. Only 5% of posts involved patients requesting information. Clinic volume correlates with the presence of a clinic website and a social networking website (p<0.001). Conclusion Almost all SART member clinics have a website. Nearly one-third of these clinics host a social networking website like Facebook, Twitter and/or a Web-log (“blog”). Larger volume clinics commonly host social networking websites. These sites provide new ways to communicate with patients, but clinics should maintain policies on the incorporation of social networks into practice.

OMURTAG, Kenan; JIMENEZ, Patricia T.; RATTS, Valerie; ODEM, Randall; COOPER, Amber R.

2013-01-01

153

Implementation of a Focused Social Networking Crawler  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking sites are becoming more and more popular and thus there is increased value in attacking and exploiting them. The amount of users on them is attractive in terms of the information they make available. We implement a focused social networking crawler on the popular site, Facebook, in order to exploit user profile information and identify aspects of computer

Alice Leung; Roven Lin; Jesse Ng; Philip Szeto

154

Motivations for social networking at work  

Microsoft Academic Search

The introduction of a social networking site inside of a large enterprise enables a new method of communication between colleagues, encouraging both personal and professional sharing inside the protected walls of a company intranet. Our analysis of user behavior and interviews presents the case that professionals use internal social networking to build stronger bonds with their weak ties and to

Joan Morris Dimicco; David R. Millen; Werner Geyer; Casey Dugan; Beth Brownholtz; Michael J. Muller

2008-01-01

155

Minority Traders in Thai Village Social Networks.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines social networks in three villages in rural Thailand. Demonstrates that Mon (merchant group) villagers, despite their cultural similarity to other Thais, are less strongly linked into the networks of villagers in which they trade. Suggests that ethnicity provides a vehicle for social distance which is beneficial for commerce. (Author/GC)

Foster, Brian L.

1980-01-01

156

Gender Differences in Using Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to determine individuals' usage purposes of social networks with a focus on the possible differences between females and males. Facebook, which is one the most popular and being most widely used social network, is investigated in this study. The study group consisted of 870 Facebook users who responded to an online…

Mazman, S. Guzin; Usluel, Yasemin Kocak

2011-01-01

157

Intangibles, Global Networks & Corporate Social Responsibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Network organisations emphasise the importance of corporate and product intangible assets. In global competition, the managerial economics of intangibles imposes new network policies of corporate social responsibility, dominated by global social issues such as economic sustainability, eco-responsibility, worker protection and so on.

Silvio Brondoni

2010-01-01

158

Abusing Social Networks for Automated User Profiling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Recently, social networks such as Facebook have experienced a huge surge in popularity. The amount,of personal information stored in these sites calls for appropriate security precautions to pro- tect this data. In this paper, we describe how we are able to take advantage of a common weakness, namely the fact that an attacker can query the social network for

Marco Balduzzi; Christian Platzer; Thorsten Holz; Engin Kirda; Davide Balzarotti; Christopher Kruegel

2010-01-01

159

Social Networking on the Semantic Web  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Aims to investigate the way that the semantic web is being used to represent and process social network information. Design/methodology/approach: The Swoogle semantic web search engine was used to construct several large data sets of Resource Description Framework (RDF) documents with social network information that were encoded using the…

Finin, Tim; Ding, Li; Zhou, Lina; Joshi, Anupam

2005-01-01

160

Mining Social Networks for Targeted Advertising  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we propose a data mining framework that utilizes the concept of social network for the targeted advertising of products. This approach discovers the cohesive subgroups from customer's social network which is derived from customer's interaction data. Based on the set of cohesive subgroups, we infer the probabilities of customer's liking a product category from transaction records. Utilizing

Wan-shiou Yang; Jia-ben Dia; Hung-chi Cheng; Hsing-tzu Lin

2006-01-01

161

College students' social networking experiences on Facebook  

Microsoft Academic Search

Millions of contemporary young adults use social networking sites. However, little is known about how much, why, and how they use these sites. In this study, 92 undergraduates completed a diary-like measure each day for a week, reporting daily time use and responding to an activities checklist to assess their use of the popular social networking site, Facebook. At the

Tiffany A. Pempek; Yevdokiya A. Yermolayeva; Sandra L. Calvert

2009-01-01

162

Narcissism and social networking Web sites.  

PubMed

The present research examined how narcissism is manifested on a social networking Web site (i.e., Facebook.com). Narcissistic personality self-reports were collected from social networking Web page owners. Then their Web pages were coded for both objective and subjective content features. Finally, strangers viewed the Web pages and rated their impression of the owner on agentic traits, communal traits, and narcissism. Narcissism predicted (a) higher levels of social activity in the online community and (b) more self-promoting content in several aspects of the social networking Web pages. Strangers who viewed the Web pages judged more narcissistic Web page owners to be more narcissistic. Finally, mediational analyses revealed several Web page content features that were influential in raters' narcissistic impressions of the owners, including quantity of social interaction, main photo self-promotion, and main photo attractiveness. Implications of the expression of narcissism in social networking communities are discussed. PMID:18599659

Buffardi, Laura E; Campbell, W Keith

2008-10-01

163

Information Filtering on Coupled Social Networks  

PubMed Central

In this paper, based on the coupled social networks (CSN), we propose a hybrid algorithm to nonlinearly integrate both social and behavior information of online users. Filtering algorithm, based on the coupled social networks, considers the effects of both social similarity and personalized preference. Experimental results based on two real datasets, Epinions and Friendfeed, show that the hybrid pattern can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also enlarge the recommendation coverage while adopting global metric. Further empirical analyses demonstrate that the mutual reinforcement and rich-club phenomenon can also be found in coupled social networks where the identical individuals occupy the core position of the online system. This work may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of the structure and function of coupled social networks.

Nie, Da-Cheng; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Zhou, Jun-Lin; Fu, Yan; Zhang, Kui

2014-01-01

164

Science, Society, and Social Networking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The increased use of social networking is changing the way that scientific societies interact with their members and others. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) uses a variety of online networks to engage its members and the broader scientific community. AAAS members and non-members can interact with AAAS staff and each other on AAAS sites on Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter, as well as blogs and forums on the AAAS website (www.aaas.org). These tools allow scientists to more readily become engaged in policy by providing information on current science policy topics as well as methods of involvement. For example, members and the public can comment on policy-relevant stories from Science magazine’s ScienceInsider blog, download a weekly policy podcast, receive a weekly email update of policy issues affecting the scientific community, or watch a congressional hearing from their computer. AAAS resource websites and outreach programs, including Communicating Science (www.aaas.org/communicatingscience), Working with Congress (www.aaas.org/spp/cstc/) and Science Careers (http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org) also provide tools for scientists to become more personally engaged in communicating their findings and involved in the policy process.

White, K. S.; Lohwater, T.

2009-12-01

165

Trust Transitivity in Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Non-centralized recommendation-based decision making is a central feature of several social and technological processes, such as market dynamics, peer-to-peer file-sharing and the web of trust of digital certification. We investigate the properties of trust propagation on networks, based on a simple metric of trust transitivity. We investigate analytically the percolation properties of trust transitivity in random networks with arbitrary in/out-degree distributions, and compare with numerical realizations. We find that the existence of a non-zero fraction of absolute trust (i.e. entirely confident trust) is a requirement for the viability of global trust propagation in large systems: The average pair-wise trust is marked by a discontinuous transition at a specific fraction of absolute trust, below which it vanishes. Furthermore, we perform an extensive analysis of the Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) web of trust, in view of the concepts introduced. We compare different scenarios of trust distribution: community- and authority-centered. We find that these scenarios lead to sharply different patterns of trust propagation, due to the segregation of authority hubs and densely-connected communities. While the authority-centered scenario is more efficient, and leads to higher average trust values, it favours weakly-connected “fringe” nodes, which are directly trusted by authorities. The community-centered scheme, on the other hand, favours nodes with intermediate in/out-degrees, in detriment of the authorities and its “fringe” peers.

Richters, Oliver; Peixoto, Tiago P.

2011-01-01

166

Temporal Visualization and Analysis of Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a visual social browser for exploring the evolution of social networks over time. We consider the exchange of e-mails between actors as an approximation of social ties. Our system analyzes the dynamic progression of communication patterns of e-mail traffic within groups of individuals. It combines a discrete visualization view, a continuous visualization view, and an adjacency matrix

Peter A. Gloor; Rob Laubacher; Yan Zhao; Scott B. C. Dynes

167

Social Percolation on Inhomogeneous Spanning Network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Social Percolation model recently proposed by Solomon et al. is studied on the Ising correlated inhomogeneous network. The dynamics in this is studied so as to understand the role of correlations in the social structure. Thus, the possible role of the structural social connectivity is examined.

Gupta, Abhijit Kar; Stauffer, Dietrich

168

Supported Employment: A Route to Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Evidence suggests that social networks mediate social functioning, self-esteem, mental health and quality of life. This paper presents findings concerning changes in the social lives, skills, behaviour and life experiences of a group of people with intellectual disabilities (n = 18), who gained support from an employment agency to find…

Forrester-Jones, Rachel; Jones, Samantha; Heason, Sophie; Di'Terlizzi, Michele

2004-01-01

169

Structural equivalence of individuals in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this paper is to understand the interrelations among relations within concrete social groups. Social structure is sought, not ideal types, although the latter are relevant to interrelations among relations. From a detailed social network, patterns of global relations can be extracted, within which classes of equivalently positioned individuals are delineated. The global patterns are derived algebraically through

François Lorrain; Harrison C. White

1971-01-01

170

Social Networks in the Modern City  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social network, an interesting theoretical concept, has suffered through difficulties in developing from it any operational devices suitable for use in ordinary social survey research. Here one such device is presented, and its utility is examined in the contrasting urban contexts of Hull and Los Angeles. Also, the role of kinship in the social

Irving, Henry W.

1977-01-01

171

Internet-Based Community Networks: Finding the Social in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this chapter we explore the concept of community within social networks and the effect that this primarily social construct can have on the way in which we understand trust within an online network. To do this we analyse and compare a number of the definitions that are both traditionally used to identify online communities and which have developed with the advent of semantically described social networks. Taking these definitions we apply them to a number of groups within a visualisation of a social network and, using this case study, consider the differences that are apparent between the types of groups. Finally, we discuss how the social implications inherent within the definition of community interact with the trust and reputation systems that exist in such networks. In doing so, we focus on the social aspect of the social network and the ways in which the social and technical worlds entwine.

Lawrence, K. Faith

172

Social networks and context-aware spam  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks are popular for online communities. This paper evaluates the risk of sophisticated context-aware spam that could result from information sharing on social networks and discusses potential mitigation strategies. Unlike normal spam, context-aware spam would likely have a high click-through rate due to exploitation of authentic social connections. Context-aware spam could lead to more insidious attacks that try to

Garrett Brown; Travis Howe; Micheal Ihbe; Atul Prakash; Kevin Borders

2008-01-01

173

A virtual community in transition, a Russian social science and humanities network  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is about evolving patterns of participation in an electronically-supported network organised in 1999 in Russia for research scholars in the social sciences and humanities (the Russian Social Science and Humanities Network, RSSH.Net). The service provides search, databases, discussion and information services for a world-wide academic community interested in Russian studies. Its users are located in Russia, the FSU,

I. M. Garskova; C. S. Leonard

2003-01-01

174

HIV/AIDS, social capital, and online social networks.  

PubMed

The prospects for online social networks as sites of information-gathering and affiliation for persons with AIDS and others concerned about HIV/AIDS not only represent the latest development in a trend toward circumventing traditional media and official information sources, but also may offer hope for a revitalization of HIV/AIDS discourse in the public sphere. This article provides an overview of three decades of information-seeking on the pandemic and its social and personal implications, as well as case studies of three examples of social networking surrounding HIV/AIDS. It finds preliminary evidence of the formation of strong and weak ties as described in Social Network Theory and suggests that the online accumulation of social capital by opinion leaders could facilitate dissemination of messages on HIV/AIDS awareness and testing. PMID:23844886

Drushel, Bruce E

2013-08-01

175

Structure and evolution of online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we consider the evolution of structure within large online social networks. We present a series of measurements of two such networks, together comprising in excess of five million people and ten million friendship links, annotated with metadata capturing the time of every event in the life of the network. Our measurements expose a surprising segmentation of these

Ravi Kumar; Jasmine Novak; Andrew Tomkins

2006-01-01

176

Privacy Preservation in Social Networks with Sensitive Edge Weights  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the development of emerging social networks, such as Facebook and MySpace, security and privacy threats arising from social network analysis bring a risk of disclosure of confidential knowledge when the social network data is shared or made public. In addition to the current social network anonymity de-identification techniques, we study a situation, such as in a business transaction network,

Lian Liu; Jie Wang; Jinze Liu; Jun Zhang

2009-01-01

177

Privacy Preserving in Social Networks Against Sensitive Edge Disclosure  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the development of emerging social networks, such as Facebook and MySpace, security and privacy threats arising from social network analysis bring a risk of disclosure of confidential knowledge when the social network data is shared or made public. In addition to the current social network anonymity de-identification techniques, we study a situation, such as in business transaction networks or

Lian Liu; Jie Wang; Jinze Liu; Jun Zhang

178

Mobilizing Ideas in Knowledge Networks: A Social Network Analysis of the Human Resource Management Community 1990-2005  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to show the role of social networks in mobilizing how actors both impact and are impacted on by their colleagues. It seeks to compare the human resource management (HRM) academic community with two other comparable communities, and to identify those groups that are seen to work closely together.…

Henneberg, Stephan C.; Swart, Juani; Naude, Peter; Jiang, Zhizhong; Mouzas, Stefanos

2009-01-01

179

A Model of Academic Self-Concept: Perceived Difficulty and Social Comparison among Academically Accelerated Secondary School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Academic self-concept predicts students' future goals and is affected by a student's relative success compared with his or her peer group. This exploratory study used structural equation modeling to examine the contributions of the perceived level of difficulty of the curriculum, in addition to the contributions of social comparison and…

Wilson, Hope E.; Siegle, Del; McCoach, D. Betsy; Little, Catherine A.; Reis, Sally M.

2014-01-01

180

Social Network Analysis for Contact Tracing  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Contact tracing is an important control measure in the fight against infectious disease. Healthcare workers deduce potential\\u000a disease pathways and propose corresponding containment strategies from collecting and reviewing patients’ contact history.\\u000a Social Network Analysis (SNA) provides healthcare workers with a network approach for integrating and analyzing all collected\\u000a contact records via a simple network graph, called a contact network. Through

Yi-Da Chen; Hsinchun Chen; Chwan-Chuen King

181

Skills for Social and Academic Success: A School-Based Intervention for Social Anxiety Disorder in Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes Skills for Academic and Social Success (SASS), a cognitive–behavioral, school-based intervention for adolescents with social anxiety disorder. Clinic-based treatment studies for socially anxious youth are reviewed, and a strong rationale for transporting empirically-based interventions into schools, such as SASS, is provided. The SASS program consists of 12, 40-min group sessions that emphasize social skills and in-vivo exposure.

Paige H. Fisher; Carrie Masia-Warner; Rachel G. Klein

2004-01-01

182

Disease Dynamics in a Dynamic Social Network  

PubMed Central

We develop a framework for simulating a realistic, evolving social network (a city) into which a disease is introduced. We compare our results to prevaccine era measles data for England and Wales, and find that they capture the quantitative and qualitative features of epidemics in populations spanning two orders of magnitude. Our results provide unique insight into how and why the social topology of the contact network influences the propagation of the disease through the population. We argue that network simulation is suitable for concurrently probing contact network dynamics and disease dynamics in ways that prior modeling approaches cannot and it can be extended to the study of less well-documented diseases.

Christensen, Claire; Albert, Istvan; Grenfell, Bryan; Albert, Reka

2010-01-01

183

The regulation of social recognition, social communication and aggression: vasopressin in the social behavior neural network.  

PubMed

Neuropeptides in the arginine vasotocin/arginine vasopressin (AVT/AVP) family play a major role in the regulation of social behavior by their actions in the brain. In mammals, AVP is found within a circuit of recriprocally connected limbic structures that form the social behavior neural network. This review examines the role played by AVP within this network in controlling social processes that are critical for the formation and maintenance of social relationships: social recognition, social communication and aggression. Studies in a number of mammalian species indicate that AVP and AVP V1a receptors are ideally suited to regulate the expression of social processes because of their plasticity in response to factors that influence social behavior. The pattern of AVP innervation and V1a receptors across the social behavior neural network may determine the potential range and intensity of social responses that individuals display in different social situations. Although fundamental information on how social behavior is wired in the brain is still lacking, it is clear that different social behaviors can be influenced by the actions of AVP in the same region of the network and that AVP can act within multiple regions of this network to regulate the expression of individual social behaviors. The existing data suggest that AVP can influence social behavior by modulating the interpretation of sensory information, by influencing decision making and by triggering complex motor outputs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxytocin, Vasopressin, and Social Behavior. PMID:22079778

Albers, H Elliott

2012-03-01

184

A longitudinal study of the social and academic competence of economically disadvantaged bilingual preschool children.  

PubMed

This longitudinal study was conducted to gain understanding of the social-emotional and academic development of economically disadvantaged bilingual preschool children. In Study 1, the authors combined cognitive, psychosocial, and cultural-linguistic factors to determine profiles of social competence as measured by peer play. A person-centered analysis of 207 Hispanic American preschoolers (ages 4 and 5 years) yielded 6 distinct profiles, 2 of which were socially competent and 1 of which was vulnerable. Findings revealed profile differences in social competence and a significant relationship between bilingualism and social-emotional development. In Study 2, the authors determined which profiles were associated with later academic achievement and growth of English proficiency. Findings indicated a significant relationship of early social-emotional development to later academic success and English acquisition, highlighting the role of bilingualism. PMID:21219064

Oades-Sese, Geraldine V; Esquivel, Giselle B; Kaliski, Pamela K; Maniatis, Lisette

2011-05-01

185

Quality Criteria of Research Perceived by Academics in Social Sciences at Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to examine the problem of research quality in social sciences at higher education. Quality of research produced at higher education started to be questioned more often as research became the major factor determining academics' promotion and fund allocation to universities. In the study, we aimed to reveal how academics

Bakioglu, Aysen; Kurnaz, Ozlem

2009-01-01

186

Third-Year College Retention and Transfer: Effects of Academic Performance, Motivation, and Social Connectedness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We studied the effects of academic performance, motivation, and social connectedness on third-year retention, transfer, and dropout behavior. To accommodate the three outcome categories and nesting of data within institutions, we fit a hierarchical multinomial logistic regression path model with first-year academic performance as a mediating…

Allen, Jeff; Robbins, Steven B.; Casillas, Alex; Oh, In-Sue

2008-01-01

187

Taming the River: Negotiating the Academic, Financial, and Social Currents in Selective Colleges and Universities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Building on their important findings in "The Source of the River," the authors now probe even more deeply into minority underachievement at the college level. "Taming the River" examines the academic and social dynamics of different ethnic groups during the first two years of college. Focusing on racial differences in academic performance, the…

Charles, Camille Z.; Fischer, Mary J.; Mooney, Margarita A.; Massey, Douglas S.

2009-01-01

188

The Role of Parents in College Students' Sociopolitical Awareness, Academic, and Social Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relationship between parental contact (frequency of student-parent communication) and involvement (parents' interest and/or involvement in students' academic progress and decision-making) with college students' personal, social, and academic development. Parental involvement accounted for over two-thirds of the significant…

Harper, Casandra E.; Sax, Linda J.; Wolf, De'Sha S.

2012-01-01

189

Work and Technology in Higher Education: The Social Construction of Academic Computing. Technology and Education Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume contributes to the understanding of higher education's catalytic role in shaping the microcomputer revolution. Academic computing is viewed here as a social and cultural phenomenon. An in-depth collection of mainly ethnographic studies of the academic computing revolution--its consequences, meanings, and significance--is presented. The…

Shields, Mark A., Ed.

190

Academic performance and social competence of adolescents: predictions based on effortful control and empathy.  

PubMed

This study explored the predictive power of effortful control (EC) on empathy, academic performance, and social competence in adolescents. We obtained self-report measures of EC and dispositional empathy in 359 students (197 girls and 162 boys) aged between 12 and 14 years. Each student provided information about the prosocial behavior of the rest of his/her classmates and completed a sociogram. At the end of the school year, we calculated the mean grade of each student and the teacher responsible for each class completed a questionnaire on the academic skills of his/her students. The study confirmed the existence of a structural equation model (SEM) in which EC directly predicted academic performance and social competence. Additionally, empathic concern partially mediated the effect of EC on social competence. Finally, social competence significantly predicted academic performance. The article discusses the practical applications of the model proposed. PMID:24230950

Zorza, Juan P; Marino, Julián; de Lemus, Soledad; Acosta Mesas, Alberto

2013-01-01

191

Brand communities embedded in social networks.  

PubMed

Brand communities represent highly valuable marketing, innovation management, and customer relationship management tools. However, applying successful marketing strategies today, and in the future, also means exploring and seizing the unprecedented opportunities of social network environments. This study combines these two social phenomena which have largely been researched separately, and aims to investigate the existence, functionality and different types of brand communities within social networks. The netnographic approach yields strong evidence of this existence; leading to a better understanding of such embedded brand communities, their peculiarities, and motivational drivers for participation; therefore the findings contribute to theory by combining two separate research streams. Due to the advantages of social networks, brand management is now able to implement brand communities with less time and financial effort; however, choosing the appropriate brand community type, cultivating consumers' interaction, and staying tuned to this social engagement are critical factors to gain anticipated brand outcomes. PMID:23564989

Zaglia, Melanie E

2013-02-01

192

Brand communities embedded in social networks?  

PubMed Central

Brand communities represent highly valuable marketing, innovation management, and customer relationship management tools. However, applying successful marketing strategies today, and in the future, also means exploring and seizing the unprecedented opportunities of social network environments. This study combines these two social phenomena which have largely been researched separately, and aims to investigate the existence, functionality and different types of brand communities within social networks. The netnographic approach yields strong evidence of this existence; leading to a better understanding of such embedded brand communities, their peculiarities, and motivational drivers for participation; therefore the findings contribute to theory by combining two separate research streams. Due to the advantages of social networks, brand management is now able to implement brand communities with less time and financial effort; however, choosing the appropriate brand community type, cultivating consumers’ interaction, and staying tuned to this social engagement are critical factors to gain anticipated brand outcomes.

Zaglia, Melanie E.

2013-01-01

193

Social Networks in Improvement of Health Care  

PubMed Central

Social network is a social structure made of individuals or organizations associated with one or more types of interdependence (friendship, common interests, work, knowledge, prestige, etc.) which are the “nodes” of the network. Networks can be organized to exchange information, knowledge or financial assistance under the various interest groups in universities, workplaces and associations of citizens. Today the most popular and widely used networks are based on application of the Internet as the main ICT. Depending on the method of connection, their field of activity and expertise of those who participate in certain networks, the network can be classified into the following groups: a) Social Networks with personal physical connectivity (the citizens’ associations, transplant networks, etc.), b) Global social internet network (Facebook, Twitter, Skype), c) specific health internet social network (forums, Health Care Forums, Healthcare Industry Forum), d) The health community internet network of non professionals (DailyStrength, CaringBridge, CarePages, MyFamilyHealth), e) Scientific social internet network (BiomedExperts, ResearchGate, iMedExchange), f) Social internet network which supported professionals (HealthBoards, Spas and Hope Association of Disabled and diabetic Enurgi), g) Scientific medical internet network databases in the system of scientific and technical information (CC, Pubmed/Medline, Excerpta Medica/EMBASE, ISI Web Knowledge, EBSCO, Index Copernicus, Social Science Index, etc.). The information in the network are exchanged in real time and in a way that has until recently been impossible in real life of people in the community. Networks allow tens of thousands of specific groups of people performing a series of social, professional and educational activities in the place of living and housing, place of work or other locations where individuals are. Network provides access to information related to education, health, nutrition, drugs, procedures, etc., which gives a special emphasis on public health aspects of information, especially in the field of medicine and health care. The authors of this paper discuss the role and practical importance of social networks in improving the health and solving of health problems without the physical entrance into the health care system. Social networks have their advantages and disadvantages, benefits and costs, especially when it comes to information which within the network set unprofessional people from unreliable sources, without an adequate selection. The ethical aspect of the norms in this segment is still not adequately regulated, so any sanctions for the unauthorized and malicious use of social networks in private and other purposes in order to obtain personal gain at the expense of individuals or groups (sick or healthy, owners of certain businesses and companies, health organizations and pharmaceutical manufacturers, etc.), for which there is still no global or European codes and standards of conduct. Cyber crime is now one of the mostly present types of crime in modern times, as evidenced by numerous scandals that are happening both globally and locally.

Masic, Izet; Sivic, Suad; Toromanovic, Selim; Borojevic, Tea; Pandza, Haris

2012-01-01

194

Social network analysis and dual rover communications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social network analysis (SNA) refers to the collection of techniques, tools, and methods used in sociometry aiming at the analysis of social networks to investigate decision making, group communication, and the distribution of information. Human factors engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted a social network analysis on communication data collected during a 14-day field study operating a dual rover exploration mission to better understand the relationships between certain network groups such as ground control, flight teams, and planetary science. The analysis identified two communication network structures for the continuous communication and Twice-a-Day Communication scenarios as a split network and negotiated network respectfully. The major nodes or groups for the networks' architecture, transmittal status, and information were identified using graphical network mapping, quantitative analysis of subjective impressions, and quantified statistical analysis using Sociometric Statue and Centrality. Post-questionnaire analysis along with interviews revealed advantages and disadvantages of each network structure with team members identifying the need for a more stable continuous communication network, improved robustness of voice loops, and better systems training/capabilities for scientific imagery data and operational data during Twice-a-Day Communications.

Litaker, Harry L.; Howard, Robert L.

2013-10-01

195

Suicidal behaviour, social networks and psychiatric diagnosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The aim of this investigation was to examine the relationship between social network deficits and the occurrence of suicidal behaviour, and to describe the short-term interpersonal consequences of a suicidal attempt. Two questionnaires, concerned with the extent and self-perceived adequacy of social network, formed the basis of a structured interview. Fifty-two suicide attempters were interviewed within 48 hours of

Elaine E. Hart; Christopher L. Williams; John A. Davidson

1988-01-01

196

Latent Space Approaches to Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Network models,are widely used to represent relational information,among,interacting units. In studies of social networks, recent emphasis has been placed on random graph models where the nodes,usually represent individual social actors and the edges represent the presence,of a specified relation between,actors. vVe develop,a class of models,where,the probability,of a relation between,actors depends,on the positions of individuals in an unobserved,\\

Peter D. Hoff; Adrian E. Raftery; Mark S. Handcock

2002-01-01

197

The Social Network and Alcohol Use*  

PubMed Central

Objective: Previous research has found that a drinking-supportive social network has a strong influence on heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems over time. The objective of this work was to understand the individual difference and interpersonal factors that predict changes in the social network relevant to alcohol use. Method: Data are from a large, ongoing prospective sample of 634 newly married couples in the United States. The current study examined the association between individual, relationship, and partner factors as they relate to changes in the number of drinking buddies in the social network during the first 7 years of marriage. Results: After controlling for the number of drinking buddies before marriage, as well as the frequency of heavy drinking, several individual, relationship, and partner factors were associated with changes in the social network over time. For both husbands and wives, alcohol expectancies and a partner's social network related to changes in the number of drinking buddies over time. Additionally, husbands with higher levels of extroversion and agreeableness had a greater number of drinking buddies over time. Among wives, personality factors were not related to changes in the number of drinking buddies over time. Conclusions: This work extends previous research by examining factors that predict changes in the social network that are most influential in alcohol use. Identifying these factors is important for informing prevention and treatment efforts.

Homish, Gregory G.; Leonard, Kenneth E.

2008-01-01

198

Framework to study the social innovation networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The importance of innovations in business management is a widely accepted hypothesis. Lately the research on innovation has widened to include consideration of the impact of social networks on the innovation. This paper aims to contribute to research on this approach by suggesting a framework for studying the social aspects of economic innovations. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper discusses

Vesa P. Taatila; Jyrki Suomala; Reijo Siltala; Soili Keskinen

2006-01-01

199

Organized crime: A social network approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article applies the anthropological approach of social networktheory to the study of organized crime in its local, domestic and transnational contexts. It argues that a social network approach transcends existing criminological paradigms like organizational, patron-client and enterprise theories in that it emphasizes a common supposition held by each paradigm – that human relationships form the basis for organized criminal

Jeffrey Scott McIllwain

1999-01-01

200

Spatial and Social Networks in Organizational Innovation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on the enabling factors of innovation has focused on either the social component of organizations or on the spatial dimensions involved in the innovation process. But no one has examined the aggregate consequences of the link from spatial layout, to social networks, to innovation. This project enriches our understanding of how innovation…

Wineman, Jean D.; Kabo, Felichism W.; Davis, Gerald F.

2009-01-01

201

Network Analysis in Comparative Social Sciences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This essay describes the pertinence of Social Network Analysis (SNA) for the social sciences in general, and discusses its methodological and conceptual implications for comparative research in particular. The authors first present a basic summary of the theoretical and methodological assumptions of SNA, followed by a succinct overview of its…

Vera, Eugenia Roldan; Schupp, Thomas

2006-01-01

202

Creating Socially Networked Knowledge through Interdisciplinary Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We report on the experience of creating a socially networked system, the Research-oriented Social Environment (RoSE), for representing knowledge in the form of relationships between people, documents, and groups. Developed as an intercampus, interdisciplinary project of the University of California, this work reflects on a collaboration between…

Chuk, Eric; Hoetzlein, Rama; Kim, David; Panko, Julia

2012-01-01

203

District Policy and Teachers' Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Policy makers increasingly include provisions aimed at fostering professional community as part of reform initiatives. Yet little is known about the impact of policy on teachers' professional relations in schools. Drawing theoretically from social capital theory and methodologically from qualitative social network analysis, this article explores…

Coburn, Cynthia E.; Russell, Jennifer Lin

2008-01-01

204

Online Formative Assessments with Social Network Awareness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social network awareness (SNA) has been used extensively as one of the strategies to increase knowledge sharing and collaboration opportunities. However, most SNA studies either focus on being aware of peer's knowledge context or on social context. This work proposes online formative assessments with SNA, trying to address the problems of online…

Lin, Jian-Wei; Lai, Yuan-Cheng

2013-01-01

205

CORE NETWORKS, SOCIAL ISOLATION, AND NEW MEDIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence from the US General Social Surveys (GSS) suggests that during the past 20 years, people have become increasingly socially isolated and their core discussion networks have become smaller and less diverse. One explanation offered for this trend is the use of mobile phones and the Internet. This study reports on the findings of a 2008 survey that replicates and

Keith N. Hampton; Lauren F. Sessions; Eun Ja Her

2011-01-01

206

The Association between Preschool Children's Social Functioning and Their Emergent Academic Skills  

PubMed Central

This study examined the relationship between social functioning and emergent academic development in a sample of 467 preschool children (M = 55.9 months old, SD = 3.8). Teachers reported on children’s aggression, attention problems, and prosocial skills. Preliteracy, language, and early mathematics skills were assessed with standardized tests. Better social functioning was associated with stronger academic development. Attention problems were related to poorer academic development controlling for aggression and social skills, pointing to the importance of attention in these relations. Children’s social skills were related to academic development controlling for attention and aggression problems, consistent with models suggesting that children’s social strengths and difficulties are independently related to their academic development. Support was not found for the hypothesis that these relationships would be stronger in boys than in girls. Some relationships were stronger in African American than Caucasian children. Children’s self-reported feelings about school moderated several relationships, consistent with the idea that positive feelings about school may be a protective factor against co-occurring academic and social problems.

Arnold, David H.; Kupersmidt, Janis B.; Voegler-Lee, Mary Ellen; Marshall, Nastassja

2012-01-01

207

Behavioral and emotional adjustment, family functioning, academic performance, and social relationships in children with selective mutism.  

PubMed

This study addressed four questions which parents of children with selective mutism (SM) frequently ask: (1) Is SM associated with anxiety or oppositional behavior? (2) Is SM associated with parenting and family dysfunction? (3) Will my child fail at school? and (4) Will my child make friends or be teased and bullied? In comparison to a sample of 52 community controls, 52 children with SM were more anxious, obsessive, and prone to somatic complaints. In contrast, children with SM were less oppositional and evidenced fewer attentional difficulties at school. We found no group differences in family structure, economic resources, family functioning, maternal mood difficulties, recreational activities, or social networks. While parents reported no differences in parenting strategies, children with SM were described as less cooperative in disciplinary situations. The academic (e.g., reading and math) and classroom cooperative skills of children with SM did not differ from controls. Parents and teachers reported that children with SM had significant deficits in social skills. Though teachers and parents rated children with SM as less socially assertive, neither teachers nor parents reported that children with SM were victimized more frequently by peers. PMID:15482497

Cunningham, Charles E; McHolm, Angela; Boyle, Michael H; Patel, Sejal

2004-11-01

208

From Fiction to Fact: The Impact of CEO Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates the relationship between a CEO’s social network, firm identity, and firm performance. There are two competing theories that predict contradictory outcomes. Following social network theory, one would expect a positive relation between social networks and firm performance, while agency theory in general and Bebchuk’s managerial power approach in particular predicts a negative relationship between social networks and

Thomas Kirchmaier; Konstantinos Stathopoulos

2008-01-01

209

Enhancing Query Performance on Social Networks by Hopping and Replication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online social networking has become a phenomenon in the last few years. The scalability issues due to the growing usage of on- line social networks could be resolved by distributing the social network graph among different servers. Also, replications could be useful in pro- cessing the queries efficiently. In social networks like Orkut,most of the queries access the immediate neighbors

Vivek Mahajan; Satyanarayana R Valluri; Kamalakar Karlapalem

210

Classroom Social Experiences as Predictors of Academic Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A model linking children's peer acceptance in the classroom to academic performance via academic self-concept and internalizing symptoms was tested in a longitudinal study. A sample of 248 children was followed from 4th to 6th grade, with data collected from different informants in each year of the study to reduce respondent bias. A path analysis…

Flook, Lisa; Repetti, Rena L.; Ullman, Jodie B.

2005-01-01

211

Self-regulating academic learning and achievement: The emergence of a social cognitive perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

For three decades, social cognitive researchers have studied children's development of self-regulation as an achievement of socialization processes. I recount historically the emergence of a social cognitive perspective on self-regulation and identify its unique features. Two essential characteristics of students' self-regulated academic learning have been identified — their use of strategies and perceptions of self-efficacy. A social cognitive model of

Barry J. Zimmerman

1990-01-01

212

Social Network Supported Process Recommender System  

PubMed Central

Process recommendation technologies have gained more and more attention in the field of intelligent business process modeling to assist the process modeling. However, most of the existing technologies only use the process structure analysis and do not take the social features of processes into account, while the process modeling is complex and comprehensive in most situations. This paper studies the feasibility of social network research technologies on process recommendation and builds a social network system of processes based on the features similarities. Then, three process matching degree measurements are presented and the system implementation is discussed subsequently. Finally, experimental evaluations and future works are introduced.

Ye, Yanming; Yin, Jianwei; Xu, Yueshen

2014-01-01

213

Social network supported process recommender system.  

PubMed

Process recommendation technologies have gained more and more attention in the field of intelligent business process modeling to assist the process modeling. However, most of the existing technologies only use the process structure analysis and do not take the social features of processes into account, while the process modeling is complex and comprehensive in most situations. This paper studies the feasibility of social network research technologies on process recommendation and builds a social network system of processes based on the features similarities. Then, three process matching degree measurements are presented and the system implementation is discussed subsequently. Finally, experimental evaluations and future works are introduced. PMID:24672309

Ye, Yanming; Yin, Jianwei; Xu, Yueshen

2014-01-01

214

Principal Perspectives on Social Networking and the Disruptive Effects of Cyberbullying  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cyberbullying on social networking sites such as MySpace and Facebook has had negative effects on children at school. Cyberbullying disruption during the school day adds to the complexity of maintaining school operations, safety, and academic achievement. With the advancement of technology, there is a gap in the literature on the disruption in…

Welker, Heidi Stevenson

2010-01-01

215

Impact of Online Social Network on American College Students' Reading Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate social networking sites (SNS) and ways college students spend their time on both conventional academic and recreational reading. A total of 1,265 (466 male and 799 female) college students voluntarily participated in the study by completing a self-report survey. Descriptive analysis indicated that the…

Huang, SuHua; Capps, Matthew

2013-01-01

216

Opinions of University Graduates about Social Networks According to Their Personal Characteristics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research aims to determine opinions of university graduates about social networks according to their personal characteristics. The research was conducted on 203 university graduates who received teacher training at Sakarya University in 2010-2011 academic year. Two different data collection tools were administered to the participating…

Isbulan, Onur

2011-01-01

217

Globalizing Social Justice Education: The Case of The Global Solidarity Network Study e-Broad Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper documents the development, implementation, and evaluation of "The Global Solidarity Network Study e-Broad Program (GSNSeBP)", an online social justice educational program that is blended into an onsite academic course. This global electronic program, which was developed through a partnership between Catholic Relief Services (CRS) and…

Harrison, Yvonne D.; Kostic, Kevin; Toton, Suzanne C.; Zurek, Jerome

2010-01-01

218

Defining Appropriate Professional Behavior for Faculty and University Students on Social Networking Websites  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The vast majority of university students have profiles on social networking sites (e.g., Myspace, Facebook) (Salaway et al. 2008). However, it is yet to be determined what role this rapidly evolving method of communication will play in an academic setting. Data for the current study was collected from 459 university students and 159 university…

Malesky, L. Alvin; Peters, Chris

2012-01-01

219

Build your own social network laboratory with Social Lab: A tool for research in social media.  

PubMed

Social networking has surpassed e-mail and instant messaging as the dominant form of online communication (Meeker, Devitt, & Wu, 2010). Currently, all large social networks are proprietary, making it difficult to impossible for researchers to make changes to such networks for the purpose of study design and access to user-generated data from the networks. To address this issue, the authors have developed and present Social Lab, an Internet-based free and open-source social network software system available from http://www.sociallab.es . Having full availability of navigation and communication data in Social Lab allows researchers to investigate behavior in social media on an individual and group level. Automated artificial users ("bots") are available to the researcher to simulate and stimulate social networking situations. These bots respond dynamically to situations as they unfold. The bots can easily be configured with scripts and can be used to experimentally manipulate social networking situations in Social Lab. Examples for setting up, configuring, and using Social Lab as a tool for research in social media are provided. PMID:24061930

Garaizar, Pablo; Reips, Ulf-Dietrich

2014-06-01

220

How Do Online Social Networks Grow?  

PubMed Central

Online social networks such as Facebook, Twitter and Gowalla allow people to communicate and interact across borders. In past years online social networks have become increasingly important for studying the behavior of individuals, group formation, and the emergence of online societies. Here we focus on the characterization of the average growth of online social networks and try to understand which are possible processes behind seemingly long-range temporal correlated collective behavior. In agreement with recent findings, but in contrast to Gibrat's law of proportionate growth, we find scaling in the average growth rate and its standard deviation. In contrast, Renren and Twitter deviate, however, in certain important aspects significantly from those found in many social and economic systems. Whereas independent methods suggest no significance for temporally long-range correlated behavior for Renren and Twitter, a scaling analysis of the standard deviation does suggest long-range temporal correlated growth in Gowalla. However, we demonstrate that seemingly long-range temporal correlations in the growth of online social networks, such as in Gowalla, can be explained by a decomposition into temporally and spatially independent growth processes with a large variety of entry rates. Our analysis thus suggests that temporally or spatially correlated behavior does not play a major role in the growth of online social networks.

Zhu, Konglin; Li, Wenzhong; Fu, Xiaoming; Nagler, Jan

2014-01-01

221

Visual Matrix Clustering of Social Networks  

SciTech Connect

The prevailing choices to graphically represent a social network in today’s literature are a node-link graph layout and an adjacency matrix. Both visualization techniques have unique strengths and weaknesses when applied to different domain applications. In this article, we focus our discussion on adjacency matrix and how to turn the matrix-based visualization technique from merely showing pairwise associations among network actors (or graph nodes) to depicting clusters of a social network. We also use node-link layouts to supplement the discussion.

Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Foote, Harlan P.; May, Richard A.

2013-07-01

222

Social support, stress, health, and academic success in Ghanaian adolescents: A path analysis.  

PubMed

The aim of this study is to gain a better understanding of the role psychosocial factors play in promoting the health and academic success of adolescents. A total of 770 adolescent boys and girls in Senior High Schools were randomly selected to complete a self-report questionnaire. School reported latest terminal examination grades were used as the measure of academic success. Structural equation modelling indicated a relatively good fit to the posteriori model with four of the hypothesised paths fully supported and two partially supported. Perceived social support was negatively related to stress and predictive of health and wellbeing but not academic success. Stress was predictive of health but not academic success. Finally, health and wellbeing was able to predict academic success. These findings have policy implications regarding efforts aimed at promoting the health and wellbeing as well as the academic success of adolescents in Ghana. PMID:24793393

Glozah, Franklin N; Pevalin, David J

2014-06-01

223

Data retrieval from online social network profiles for social engineering applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the increased use of online social networking sites, data retrieval from social networking profiles is becoming a major tool for business. What makes social networking profile data different is its semi-structured format. The structure and the presentation of profile data change all the time. In social networking there is a lack of research into automated data retrieval from semi-structured

Sophia Alim; Ruqayya Abdulrahman; Daniel Neagu; Mick J. Ridley

2009-01-01

224

Social networks and the study of relations: networks as method, metaphor and form  

Microsoft Academic Search

Networks have recently become fashionable in social analysis but most of the new network approaches have paid scant attention to the long history of reflections upon the potential of networks as an analytical device in the social sciences. In this paper we chart the developments in networking thinking in two disciplinary areas – social network analysis and social anthropology –

Hannah Knox; Mike Savage; Penny Harvey

2006-01-01

225

Imparting Social Capital to Educationally Disadvantaged Students: A Study of the Early Academic Outreach Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the process of an academic preparation program, also known as an outreach program, imparting social capital to educationally disadvantaged students. The particular form of social capital to be examined will be the college knowledge needed to successfully prepare for college admission. The theoretical…

Jackson, Nicole Korgie

2010-01-01

226

Interrupted Trajectories: The Impact of Academic Failure on the Social Mobility of Working-Class Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Higher education (HE) is often viewed as a conduit for social mobility through which working-class students can secure improved life-chances. However, the link between HE and social mobility is largely viewed as unproblematic. Little research has explored the possible impact of academic failure (in HE) on the trajectories of working-class students…

Byrom, Tina; Lightfoot, Nic

2013-01-01

227

Developmental Antecedents and Social and Academic Consequences of Stereotype-Consciousness in Middle Childhood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study, which included 124 children ages 5-11, examined developmental antecedents and social and academic consequences of stereotype-consciousness, defined as awareness of others' stereotypes. Greater age and more frequent parent-reported racial socialization practices were associated with greater likelihood of stereotype-consciousness.…

McKown, Clark; Strambler, Michael J.

2009-01-01

228

Problems of Integrating Academic Disciplines in the Study of War, Violence, and Social Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The problems mankind faces are of such overwhelming importance that it is easy to see why we are interested in integrating the academic disciplines to study war, violence, and social change. Could not the behavioral sciences, properly mobilized, enable us to reduce the probabilities of war and violence, and make social change more tolerable?…

Milburn, Thomas

229

ENGAGE: A Blueprint for Incorporating Social Skills Training into Daily Academic Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student success in school depends, in part, on adequate social-interpersonal skills. Yet, in a time when all students are expected to reach specified academic goals, school personnel are hard-pressed to find ways to address the social-interpersonal behavior needs of their students. In this article, the authors discuss practical ways for teachers…

Schoenfeld, Naomi A.; Rutherford, Robert B.; Gable, Robert A.; Rock, Marcia L.

2008-01-01

230

Socially Oriented Student Entrepreneurship: A Study of Student Change Agency in the Academic Capitalism Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents two clarifying cases of socially oriented student entrepreneurship. The findings illuminate an overlooked organizational space located at the intersection of the public good and academic capitalist knowledge/learning regimes (Slaughter & Rhoades, 2004) that provides students with the entrepreneurial agency to create social

Mars, Matthew M.; Rhoades, Gary

2012-01-01

231

Social-Demographic, School, Neighborhood, and Parenting Influences on the Academic Achievement of Latino Young Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using data from a national sample of 388 Latino young adolescents, this study identified the social-demographic characteristics, influences in the broader social environment, and parenting practices that predict youth academic achievement. Youths who were Mexican American, older, and had an English language problem had lower levels of reading and mathematics achievement. Youths of mothers who began childbearing at older ages,

Mary Keegan Eamon

2005-01-01

232

Social Experiences in Kindergarten and Academic Achievement in Grade 1: A Monozygotic Twin Difference Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of this study was to examine how different types of social experiences in kindergarten relate to Grade 1 academic achievement, while controlling for possible genetic and shared environmental influences through the use of the monozygotic (MZ) twin difference method. Social experiences in kindergarten included relationship quality with the…

Vitaro, Frank; Boivin, Michel; Brendgen, Mara; Girard, Alain; Dionne, Ginette

2012-01-01

233

Academic Affiliations of Social Work Journal Article Authors, 2004-2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The researchers tabulated the academic affiliations of the authors of all articles published between 2004 and 2008 in 6 major social work journals to produce a ranking of the colleges and universities whose faculty made the most substantive contributions to the social work literature. The results of this analysis are compared with findings of 5…

Ligon, Jan; Cobb, Alicia; Thyer, Bruce

2012-01-01

234

Here Was Fellowship: A Social Portrait of Academic Women at Wellesley College, 1895-1920.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Women faculty at Wellesley College in the Progressive Era were not only the best female academics of their generation, they also created a rich social life and sense of community among themselves. At the same time they maintained a commitment to social activism. Their accomplishments and limitations are discussed. (IS)

Palmieri, Patricia A.

1983-01-01

235

Popularity, Social Acceptance, and Aggression in Adolescent Peer Groups: Links with Academic Performance and School Attendance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports a short-term longitudinal study focusing on popularity and social acceptance as predictors of academic engagement for a sample of 342 adolescents (approximate average age of 14). These youths were followed for 4 consecutive semesters. Popularity, social acceptance, and aggression were assessed with a peer nomination …

Schwartz, David; Gorman, Andrea Hopmeyer; Nakamoto, Jonathan; McKay, Tara

2006-01-01

236

A Social Support Intervention and Academic Achievement in College: Does Perceived Loneliness Mediate the Relationship?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examined whether a social support intervention reduced loneliness and increased academic achievement among college freshmen. Eighty-eight 1st-year students randomly assigned to a social support group program reported less loneliness in the spring of their freshman year and obtained higher grade point averages in the fall of their…

Mattanah, Jonathan F.; Brooks, Leonie J.; Brand, Bethany L.; Quimby, Julie L.; Ayers, Jean F.

2012-01-01

237

Congruence between Students' and Teachers' Goals: Implications for Social and Academic Motivation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined student-teacher goal congruence and its relation to social and academic motivation. Based on a sample of 97 ninth-graders, high levels of goal congruence for each of the four goals measured (prosocial, responsibility, learning, performance) was positively related to student interest in class and perceived social support from…

Spera, Christopher; Wentzel, Kathryn R.

2003-01-01

238

Self-concept in adolescence: a longitudinal study on reciprocal effects of self-perceptions in academic and social domains.  

PubMed

Fostering social and academic self-concepts are central educational goals. During mid-adolescence academic engagement and success seem to be devalued by peers and to be negatively associated with students' social standing. For this age group, is the development of a positive academic self-concept compatible with the development of a positive social self-concept? We investigated relations among academic self-concept, social self-concept, and academic achievement. 1282 students (47.60% female) participated in three-waves of measurement in Grade 5, 6, and 8. Earlier social self-concept of acceptance negatively predicted changes in academic self-concept over time while earlier social self-concept of assertion positively predicted changes in academic self-concept. There were no significant relations between social self-concepts and achievement but positive reciprocal relations between academic self-concept and achievement. Results indicate that fostering adolescents self-concept in social and academic domains are compatible goals. However, some students need support in managing the challenge to coordinate social and academic goals. PMID:24215963

Preckel, Franzis; Niepel, Christoph; Schneider, Marian; Brunner, Martin

2013-12-01

239

Community Core Evolution in Mobile Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Community detection in social networks attracts a lot of attention in the recent years. Existing methods always depict the relationship of two nodes using the temporary connection. However, these temporary connections cannot be fully recognized as the real relationships when the history connections among nodes are considered. For example, a casual visit in Facebook cannot be seen as an establishment of friendship. Hence, our question is the following: how to cluster the real friends in mobile social networks? In this paper, we study the problem of detecting the stable community core in mobile social networks. The cumulative stable contact is proposed to depict the relationship among nodes. The whole process is divided into timestamps. Nodes and their connections can be added or removed at each timestamp, and historical contacts are considered when detecting the community core. Also, community cores can be tracked through the incremental computing, which can help to recognize the evolving of community structure. Empirical studies on real-world social networks demonstrate that our proposed method can effectively detect stable community cores in mobile social networks.

Xiao, Weidong; Tang, Jiuyang

2013-01-01

240

Unveiling Social and Environmental Accounting Research in Spain: A Narrative of the Mobilisation of the Spanish Academic Community  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this paper is to present a personal overview of the process of mobilisation of the social and environmental accounting research (SEAR) Spanish academic community to develop social and environmental accounting research as a legitimate research field. Using the arguments of Hambrick and Chen (2008) for analysing new academic fields as admittance-seeking social movements, a narrative is provided

Carmen Correa

2011-01-01

241

Persistent ISR: the social network analysis connection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Persistent surveillance provides decision makers with unprecedented access to multisource data collected from humans and sensor assets around the globe, yet these data exist in the physical world and provide few overt clues to meaning behind actions. In this paper we explore the recent growth in online social networking and ask the questions: 1) can these sites provide value-added information to compliment physical sensing and 2) what are the mechanisms by which these data could inform situational awareness and decision making? In seeking these answers we consider the range of options provided by Social Network Analysis (SNA), and focus especially on the dynamic nature of these networks. In our discussion we focus on the wave of reform experienced by the North African nations in early 2011 known as the Arab Spring. Demonstrators made widespread use of social networking applications to coordinate, document, and publish material to aid their cause. Unlike members of covert social networks who hide their activity and associations, these demonstrators openly posted multimedia information to coordinate activity and stimulate global support. In this paper we provide a review of SNA approaches and consider how one might track network adaptations by capturing temporal and conceptual trends. We identify opportunities and challenges for merging SNA with physical sensor output, and conclude by addressing future challenges in the persistent ISR domain with respect to SNA.

Bowman, Elizabeth K.

2012-05-01

242

Mixing Patterns in a Large Social Network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study mixing in a large real social network consisting of over one million individuals, who form an Internet community and organise themselves in groups of different sizes. We consider mixing according to discrete characteristics such as gender and scalar characteristics such as age. On the basis of the users' list of friends and other data registered in the database we investigate the structure and time development of the network. We found that in the network under investigation assortative mixing is observed, i.e. the tendency for vertices in network to be connected to other vertices that are like them in some way.

Grabowski, A.; KosiXf1ski, R.

2008-05-01

243

Privacy in Social Networks: How Risky is Your Social Graph?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several efforts have been made for more privacy aware Online Social Networks (OSNs) to protect personal data against various privacy threats. However, despite the relevance of these proposals, we believe there is still the lack of a conceptual model on top of which privacy tools have to be designed. Central to this model should be the concept of risk. Therefore,

Cuneyt Gurcan Akcora; Barbara Carminati; Elena Ferrari

2012-01-01

244

Disclosing Personal Information on Social Networking Sites and Social Support  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the Internet growing faster than ever, online social networking sites (SNS) such as Facebook are becoming more popular. At last count, there were over 845 million active Facebook users who are interacting online. The continued influx of computer technology allows for newer means of communication in order to foster interpersonal relationships and promote self-disclosure (Ledbetter, Mazer, Degroot et al.,

An Mai

2012-01-01

245

Multidimensional Social Network in the Social Recommender System  

Microsoft Academic Search

All online sharing systems gather data that reflects users' collective behavior and their shared activities. This data can be used to extract different kinds of relationships which can be grouped into layers and which are basic components of the multi- dimensional social network (MSN) proposed in the paper. The layers are created on the basis of two types of relations

Przemys?aw Kazienko; Katarzyna Musial; Tomasz Kajdanowicz

2011-01-01

246

Social Scholarship: Applying Social Networking Technologies to Research Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Participatory web-based technologies have the potential to change the way scholars engage in scholarship. One reason Web 2.0 technologies, such as online social networking, are not widely integrated in PreK-12 and postsecondary education is the lack of modeling by educators. Their lack of research-based best practices limits the ability to…

Greenhow, Christine

2009-01-01

247

On Modularity of Social Network Communities: The Spectral Characterization  

Microsoft Academic Search

The term of social network communities refers to groups of individuals within which social interactions are intense and between which they are weak. A social network community mining problem (SNCMP) can be stated as the problem of finding all such communities from a given social network. A wide variety of applications can be formulated into SNCMPs, ranging from Web intelligence

Bo Yang; Jiming Liu; Jianfeng Feng; Dayou Liu

2008-01-01

248

The Application of Social Network Analysis to Team Sports  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews how current social network analysis might be used to investigate individual and group behavior in sporting teams. Social network analysis methods permit researchers to explore social relations between team members and their individual-level qualities simultaneously. As such, social network analysis can be seen as augmenting…

Lusher, Dean; Robins, Garry; Kremer, Peter

2010-01-01

249

Health and the Structure of Adolescent Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Much research has explored the role of social networks in promoting health through the provision of social support. However, little work has examined how social networks themselves may be structured by health. This article investigates the link between individuals' health and the characteristics of their social network positions.We first develop…

Haas, Steven A.; Schaefer, David R.; Kornienko, Olga

2010-01-01

250

The Application of Social Network Analysis to Team Sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews how current social network analysis might be used to investigate individual and group behavior in sporting teams. Social network analysis methods permit researchers to explore social relations between team members and their individual-level qualities simultaneously. As such, social network analysis can be seen as augmenting existing approaches for the examination of intra-group relations among teams and provide

Dean Lusher; Garry Robins; Peter Kremer

2010-01-01

251

Infrastructures for Online Social Networking Services [Guest editorial  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rapid proliferation of social media, online communities, and collectively produced knowledge resources has accelerated the convergence of technological and social networks, resulting in a dynamic ecosystem of online social networking services, environments, and applications. The proliferation of online social networks (OSNs) has had a profound impact on the Internet, reshaping its structure, design, and utility. Despite this success, however,

Anwitaman Datta; Marios D. Dikaiakos; Seif Haridi; Liviu Iftode

2012-01-01

252

Origin of peer influence in social networks.  

PubMed

Social networks pervade our everyday lives: we interact, influence, and are influenced by our friends and acquaintances. With the advent of the World Wide Web, large amounts of data on social networks have become available, allowing the quantitative analysis of the distribution of information on them, including behavioral traits and fads. Recent studies of correlations among members of a social network, who exhibit the same trait, have shown that individuals influence not only their direct contacts but also friends' friends, up to a network distance extending beyond their closest peers. Here, we show how such patterns of correlations between peers emerge in networked populations. We use standard models (yet reflecting intrinsically different mechanisms) of information spreading to argue that empirically observed patterns of correlation among peers emerge naturally from a wide range of dynamics, being essentially independent of the type of information, on how it spreads, and even on the class of underlying network that interconnects individuals. Finally, we show that the sparser and clustered the network, the more far reaching the influence of each individual will be. PMID:24655286

Pinheiro, Flávio L; Santos, Marta D; Santos, Francisco C; Pacheco, Jorge M

2014-03-01

253

Massive Social Network Analysis: Mining Twitter for Social Good  

SciTech Connect

Social networks produce an enormous quantity of data. Facebook consists of over 400 million active users sharing over 5 billion pieces of information each month. Analyzing this vast quantity of unstructured data presents challenges for software and hardware. We present GraphCT, a Graph Characterization Tooklit for massive graphs representing social network data. On a 128-processor Cray XMT, GraphCT estimates the betweenness centrality of an artificially generated (R-MAT) 537 million vertex, 8.6 billion edge graph in 55 minutes. We use GraphCT to analyze public data from Twitter, a microblogging network. Twitter's message connections appear primarily tree-structured as a news dissemination system. Within the public data, however, are clusters of conversations. Using GraphCT, we can rank actors within these conversations and help analysts focus attention on a much smaller data subset.

Ediger, David; Jiang, Karl; Riedy, Edward J.; Bader, David A.; Corley, Courtney D.; Farber, Robert M.; Reynolds, William

2010-10-11

254

Community extraction for social networks.  

PubMed

Analysis of networks and in particular discovering communities within networks has been a focus of recent work in several fields and has diverse applications. Most community detection methods focus on partitioning the entire network into communities, with the expectation of many ties within communities and few ties between. However, many networks contain nodes that do not fit in with any of the communities, and forcing every node into a community can distort results. Here we propose a new framework that extracts one community at a time, allowing for arbitrary structure in the remainder of the network, which can include weakly connected nodes. The main idea is that the strength of a community should depend on ties between its members and ties to the outside world, but not on ties between nonmembers. The proposed extraction criterion has a natural probabilistic interpretation in a wide class of models and performs well on simulated and real networks. For the case of the block model, we establish asymptotic consistency of estimated node labels and propose a hypothesis test for determining the number of communities. PMID:21502538

Zhao, Yunpeng; Levina, Elizaveta; Zhu, Ji

2011-05-01

255

Online and Offline Social Networks: Use of Social Networking Sites by Emerging Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social networking sites (e.g., MySpace and Facebook) are popular online communication forms among adolescents and emerging adults. Yet little is known about young people's activities on these sites and how their networks of "friends" relate to their other online (e.g., instant messaging) and offline networks. In this study, college students…

Subrahmanyam, Kaveri; Reich, Stephanie M.; Waechter, Natalia; Espinoza, Guadalupe

2008-01-01

256

Social Trust Prediction Using Heterogeneous Networks  

PubMed Central

Along with increasing popularity of social websites, online users rely more on the trustworthiness information to make decisions, extract and filter information, and tag and build connections with other users. However, such social network data often suffer from severe data sparsity and are not able to provide users with enough information. Therefore, trust prediction has emerged as an important topic in social network research. Traditional approaches are primarily based on exploring trust graph topology itself. However, research in sociology and our life experience suggest that people who are in the same social circle often exhibit similar behaviors and tastes. To take advantage of the ancillary information for trust prediction, the challenge then becomes what to transfer and how to transfer. In this article, we address this problem by aggregating heterogeneous social networks and propose a novel joint social networks mining (JSNM) method. Our new joint learning model explores the user-group-level similarity between correlated graphs and simultaneously learns the individual graph structure; therefore, the shared structures and patterns from multiple social networks can be utilized to enhance the prediction tasks. As a result, we not only improve the trust prediction in the target graph but also facilitate other information retrieval tasks in the auxiliary graphs. To optimize the proposed objective function, we use the alternative technique to break down the objective function into several manageable subproblems. We further introduce the auxiliary function to solve the optimization problems with rigorously proved convergence. The extensive experiments have been conducted on both synthetic and real- world data. All empirical results demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

HUANG, JIN; NIE, FEIPING; HUANG, HENG; TU, YI-CHENG; LEI, YU

2014-01-01

257

Black adolescents' relationships with natural mentors: associations with academic engagement via social and emotional development.  

PubMed

This study aimed to identify types of natural mentoring relationships that Black adolescents may experience and to connect these relationship types to academic outcomes via social and emotional development. Data were collected from 259 adolescents attending 3 middle schools in a Midwestern metropolitan area. Adolescents reported on whether or not they had a relationship with a natural mentor and answered several questions about characteristics of the relationship, as well as reporting on a number of indicators of positive development. Cluster analyses suggested two different types of natural mentoring relationships among study youth: less connected and more connected. We found that in comparison with youth without a natural mentor, youth who had a more connected natural mentoring relationship had greater student-reported academic engagement via higher social skills and psychological well-being and greater teacher-reported academic engagement via elevated social skills. We found that youth with less connected natural mentoring relationships did not differ from their counterparts without natural mentors on social skills, psychological well-being, or student- or teacher-reported academic engagement. Findings from the current study suggest that characteristics of the mentoring relationship may determine whether these relationships contribute to more positive outcomes among Black youth. Further, findings suggest that social and emotional development may transmit the positive effects of more connected natural mentoring relationships on Black youths' academic engagement. PMID:23356358

Hurd, Noelle M; Sellers, Robert M

2013-01-01

258

Critical mass and willingness to pay for social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Disagreement surrounds a formal definition of ‘critical mass’ and of the economic willingness to pay for membership in a social network. Our paper adapts work from percolation theory to analyze the structure of social networks, and draws an analogy for critical mass in social networks to the concept of phase changes in materials. We show how network growth can be

J. Christopher Westland

2010-01-01

259

Potential Applications of Social Norms Theory to Academic Advising  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the mid-1990s, social norms theory has become prevalent in student development literature and research. Subsequently, social norms interventions to change student behavior have spread across campuses nationwide through marketing campaigns. Theorists and practitioners have applied the social norms approach to primarily health-related student…

Demetriou, Cynthia

2005-01-01

260

Social cognitive predictors of Mexican American college students' academic and life satisfaction.  

PubMed

In this study, we used Lent's (2004) social cognitive model of well being to examine the academic and life satisfaction of 457 Mexican American college students attending a Hispanic-Serving Institution. Using structural equation modeling, results indicated that the model provided a good fit to the data. Specifically, we found positive relations from positive affect to enculturation, acculturation, college self-efficacy, academic satisfaction, and life satisfaction; from enculturation to college self-efficacy; from acculturation to college self-efficacy and college outcome expectations; from college self-efficacy to college outcome expectations, academic goal progress, academic satisfaction, and life satisfaction; from college outcome expectations to academic satisfaction; from academic goal progress to academic and life satisfaction; and from academic satisfaction to life satisfaction. Findings indicated the model was invariant across gender groups, and overall, 38% and 14% of the variance in academic satisfaction and life satisfaction, respectively, were explained by the predictor variables. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:21114357

Ojeda, Lizette; Flores, Lisa Y; Navarro, Rachel L

2011-01-01

261

Spatial Epidemic Modelling in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spread of infectious diseases is highly influenced by the structure of the underlying social network. The target of this study is not the network of acquaintances, but the social mobility network: the daily movement of people between locations, in regions. It was already shown that this kind of network exhibits small world characteristics. The model developed is agent based (ABM) and comprehends a movement model and a infection model. In the movement model, some assumptions are made about its structure and the daily movement is decomposed into four types: neighborhood, intra region, inter region and random. The model is Geographical Information Systems (GIS) based, and uses real data to define its geometry. Because it is a vector model, some optimization techniques were used to increase its efficiency.

Simoes, Joana Margarida

2005-06-01

262

Visualization of Social Networks with Node Graphs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson introduces the concept of node graphs for the purpose of visualizing social networks. The lesson is presented with an introductory physical activity where students create a living graph. Students, building on their existing knowledge regarding common graph types, learn how node graphs can be used to visualize data from social networks. Students will participate in a simulated contagious infection event and will accurately record data about the transmission of the disease. These data will be used to construct a single computer file to be used to create a single node graph for describing the network. Students will then be responsible for understanding how to interpret the resulting network graph in the context of the activity.

Santone, Adam

2012-02-13

263

The social adjustment, academic performance, and creativity of Taiwanese children with Tourette's syndrome.  

PubMed

The purpose was to describe the social adjustment, academic achievement, and creativity of 127 Taiwanese children with Tourette's Syndrome and a control group of 138 Taiwanese children with typical development and reports of the parents of both groups. The Tourette's Syndrome group had significantly more disruptive behaviors than the controls; most parents reported their children with Tourette's Syndrome had high academic achievement although the children scored significantly lower than controls on the Elaboration subtest of Creative Thinking. PMID:21879625

Wei, Mei-Hue

2011-06-01

264

Spreading paths in partially observed social networks  

PubMed Central

Understanding how and how far information, behaviors, or pathogens spread in social networks is an important problem, having implications for both predicting the size of epidemics, as well as for planning effective interventions. There are, however, two main challenges for inferring spreading paths in real-world networks. One is the practical difficulty of observing a dynamic process on a network, and the other is the typical constraint of only partially observing a network. Using a static, structurally realistic social network as a platform for simulations, we juxtapose three distinct paths: (1) the stochastic path taken by a simulated spreading process from source to target; (2) the topologically shortest path in the fully observed network, and hence the single most likely stochastic path, between the two nodes; and (3) the topologically shortest path in a partially observed network. In a sampled network, how closely does the partially observed shortest path (3) emulate the unobserved spreading path (1)? Although partial observation inflates the length of the shortest path, the stochastic nature of the spreading process also frequently derails the dynamic path from the shortest path. We find that the partially observed shortest path does not necessarily give an inflated estimate of the length of the process path; in fact, partial observation may, counterintuitively, make the path seem shorter than it actually is.

Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Christakis, Nicholas A.

2012-01-01

265

Network Analysis of Social Interactions in Laboratories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An ongoing study of the structure, function, and evolution of individual activity within lab groups is introduced. This study makes extensive use of techniques from social network analysis. These techniques allow rigorous quantification and hypothesis-testing of the interactions inherent in social groups and the impact of intrinsic characteristics of individuals on their social interactions. As these techniques are novel within the physics education research community, an overview of their meaning and application is given. We then present preliminary results from videotaped laboratory groups involving mixed populations of traditional and non-traditional students in an introductory algebra-based physics course.

Warren, Aaron R.

2009-01-24

266

Academic and Social Support Critical to Success in Academically Rigorous Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To ensure that more American students attend college and are prepared to participate in a global economy, secondary schools have increased academic rigor and raised standards. By emphasizing vertical alignment of courses from preschool through college, secondary schools can help close the expectation gap that exists between high school and college…

Campbell, Melissa

2010-01-01

267

Social Networks and Social Support: Implications for Natural Helper and Community Level Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The convincing evidence of the relationship between social support, social networks, and health status has influenced the development of program strategies which are relevant to health education. This article focuses on the linkage between social support and social networks and health education programs which involve interventions at the network and community level. Two broad strategies are addressed: programs enhancing entire

Barbara A. Israel

1985-01-01

268

Poor people, poor places, and poor health: the mediating role of social networks and social capital  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the dynamics between poverty and exclusion; neighbourhood, and health and well being by considering the role of social networks and social capital in the social processes involved. It is based on qualitative research taking two deprived areas as exemplary case studies, and involving depth interviews with residents. Neighbourhood influences on networks and social capital were explored, network

Vicky Cattell

2001-01-01

269

A social approach to security: Using social networks to help detect malicious web content  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the midst of a social networking revolution, social media has become the new vehicle for effective business marketing and transactions. As social aspects to the Internet continue to expand in both quantity and scope, so has the security threat towards enterprise networks and systems. Many social networking users also become main targets of spams, phishing, stalking, and other malware

Michael Robertson; Yin Pan; Bo Yuan

2010-01-01

270

Googling Social Interactions: Web Search Engine Based Social Network Construction  

PubMed Central

Social network analysis has long been an untiring topic of sociology. However, until the era of information technology, the availability of data, mainly collected by the traditional method of personal survey, was highly limited and prevented large-scale analysis. Recently, the exploding amount of automatically generated data has completely changed the pattern of research. For instance, the enormous amount of data from so-called high-throughput biological experiments has introduced a systematic or network viewpoint to traditional biology. Then, is “high-throughput” sociological data generation possible? Google, which has become one of the most influential symbols of the new Internet paradigm within the last ten years, might provide torrents of data sources for such study in this (now and forthcoming) digital era. We investigate social networks between people by extracting information on the Web and introduce new tools of analysis of such networks in the context of statistical physics of complex systems or socio-physics. As a concrete and illustrative example, the members of the 109th United States Senate are analyzed and it is demonstrated that the methods of construction and analysis are applicable to various other weighted networks.

Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Pan-Jun; Ahn, Yong-Yeol; Jeong, Hawoong

2010-01-01

271

General Network Properties of Friendship Online Social Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This paper explores visiting metrics and some of the more important general network properties of Fitcolab online social network\\u000a (OSN). The wide array of statistics was explored in order to obtain general insight that will not only be useful by itself\\u000a but would also serve as the starting platform for more focused research endeavors that are to be based on

Haris Memic

2010-01-01

272

Privacy protection issues in social networking sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking sites (SNS) have become very popular during the past few years, as they allow users to both express their individuality and meet people with similar interests. Nonetheless, there are also many potential threats to privacy associated with these SNS such as identity theft and disclosure of sensitive information. However, many users still are not aware of these threats

Ai Ho; Abdou Maiga; Esma Aïmeur

2009-01-01

273

Early Adolescent Social Networks and Computer Use.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A research project was conducted to examine the interactions between the social networks of young adolescents and their computer usage. Particular attention was focused upon whether computers tend to isolate youthful users. Adult anxiety regarding the damaging effects of computers on children was assessed. Parental involvement, orientation to…

Orleans, Myron; Laney, Margaret C.

274

Libraries' Place in Virtual Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Do libraries belong in the virtual world of social networking? With more than 100 million users, this environment is impossible to ignore. A rising philosophy for libraries, particularly in blog-land, involves the concept of being where the users are. Simply using new media to deliver an old message is not progress. Instead, librarians should…

Mathews, Brian S.

2007-01-01

275

Social Networking: A Collaborative Open Educational Resource  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies undertaken since the introduction of Web 2.0 have focussed mainly on open educational resources (OERs) such as email, blogging and virtual learning environments. No consistent efforts have been undertaken to study the use of social networking sites as a tool for learning in the second language classroom. This study examined the use of…

Toetenel, Lisette

2014-01-01

276

Knowledge diffusion based on social relationship network  

Microsoft Academic Search

The process of knowledge diffusion is a decision- making process through which information about knowledge move from one adopter to another, and then the adopters assess the value of knowledge to decide that whether accept it or not. Due to the cognitive ambiguity about new knowledge, the social relation network will play a very important role for the potential adopters'

Tang Houxing

2011-01-01

277

Virtual community as a heteroglossia social network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rheingold and Turkle treated virtual community the same as the community in the traditional sociology counterpart. Facing the huge online community constituted through web2.0 structure, we need to rethink the essential base of a virtual community. Bakhtin's dialogism theory offers us a new interpretation to treat a virtual community as a heteroglossia social network.

Ben-ray Jai

2009-01-01

278

Social Network Structures among Groundnut Farmers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Groundnut farmers in East Africa have experienced declines in production despite research and extension efforts to increase productivity. This study examined how social network structures related to acquisition of information about new seed varieties and productivity among groundnut farmers in Uganda and Kenya.…

Thuo, Mary; Bell, Alexandra A.; Bravo-Ureta, Boris E.; Okello, David K.; Okoko, Evelyn Nasambu; Kidula, Nelson L.; Deom, C. Michael; Puppala, Naveen

2013-01-01

279

The link prediction problem for social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given a snapshot of a social network, can we infer which new interactions among its members are likely to occur in the near future? We formalize this question as the link prediction problem, and develop approaches to link prediction based on measures the \\

David Liben-Nowell; Jon M. Kleinberg

2003-01-01

280

The Structure of Growing Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose some simple models of the growth of social networks, based on three general principles: (1) meetings take place between pairs of individuals at a rate which is high if a pair has one or more mutual friends and low otherwise; (2) acquaintances between pairs of individuals who rarely meet decay over time; (3) there is an upper limit

Emily M. Jin; Michelle Girvan; M. E. J. Newman

2001-01-01

281

A social network caught in the Web  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present an analysis of Club Nexus, an online community at Stanford University. Through the Nexus site we were able to study a reflection of the real world community structure within the student body. We observed and measured social network phenomena such as the small world effect, clustering, and the strength of weak ties. Using the rich profile data provided

Lada A. Adamic; Orkut Buyukkokten; Eytan Adar

2003-01-01

282

Social Support Networks and Elderly Health.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document is a summary of a study of the relationship between social support networks and health. The study was conducted among the age sixty and over population in the Lowell, Massachusetts area. A random sample of 300 names was drawn from a census l...

F. T. Gallo

1982-01-01

283

Ethical Considerations of Social Networking for Counsellors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of online social networking websites has increased among Canadians in recent years. There are many professional and ethical implications for counsellors who use these sites (Boyd, 2007). Although they offer advantages to counsellors, their use can also raise issues around ethical conduct. Because the counselling literature has not yet…

Bratt, William Edgar Vernon

2010-01-01

284

"Cloudworks": Social Networking for Learning Design  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Can we apply the best of Web 2.0 principles to an educational context? More specifically can we use this as a means of shifting teaching practice to a culture of sharing learning ideas and designs? This paper describes a new social networking site, "Cloudworks", which aims to provide a mechanism for sharing, discussing and finding learning and…

Conole, Grainne; Culver, Juliette

2009-01-01

285

Website Structure Mining using Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Web sites are typically designed attending to a variety of criteria. However, web site structure determines browsing behavior and way-finding results. The aim of this study is to identify the main profiles of web sites' organizational structure by modeling them as graphs and considering several social network analysis features. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A case study based on 80 institutional

M. Rocío Martínez-Torres; Sergio L. Toral Marín; Beatriz Palacios; Federico Barrero

2011-01-01

286

Social Network Analysis of Video Bloggers' Community  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vidoe blogs (or vlogs) have become increasingly popular in recent years. As the main motivation for vlogging is to interact with other vloggers, it is important to investigate the structure of the videobloggers' community and the interactions among vloggers. This research conducted a quantitative analysis using social network analysis. A list of personal vloggers was identified from VlogDIR and linking

John Warmbrodt; Hong Sheng; Richard Hall

2008-01-01

287

Exploring Area-Specific Microblogging Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

A BST R A C T Social networks can be used to find people who share similar interests or people who have knowledge in a specific domain. One method to find people is based on search by specific information about people or search by specific keywords they use. This method is limited to the explicit information provided by people. The

Ece Aksu Degirmencioglu; Suzan Uskudarli

2010-01-01

288

Parental Social Networks and Child Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper looks at the relationship between parents' social networks and aspects of child development. It has often been suggested that parents' links with kin, neighbors, friends, and local and non-local organizations are likely to have many effects on their children's development. These effects, however, have never been systematically…

Homel, R.; Burns, A.

289

Social Network Predictors of Bullying and Victimization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether bullies, victims, and aggressive victims (those who are both bullies and victims) differed on classroom social network variables, gender, and ethnicity. Survey data were collected from a primarily Latino and Asian sample of 1,368 Southern California 6th graders (mean age = 11.3 years). Logistic regression analyses were…

Mouttapa, Michele; Valente, Tom; Gallaher, Peggy; Rohrbach, Louise Ann; Unger, Jennifer B.

2004-01-01

290

Social Networking Services in E-Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is a report on the findings of a study conducted on the use of the social networking service NING in a cross-location e-learning setting named "Net Economy." We describe how we implemented NING as a fundamental part of the setting through a special phase concept and team building approach. With the help of user statistics, we examine…

Weber, Peter; Rothe, Hannes

2012-01-01

291

Effects of deception in social networks.  

PubMed

Honesty plays a crucial role in any situation where organisms exchange information or resources. Dishonesty can thus be expected to have damaging effects on social coherence if agents cannot trust the information or goods they receive. However, a distinction is often drawn between prosocial lies ('white' lies) and antisocial lying (i.e. deception for personal gain), with the former being considered much less destructive than the latter. We use an agent-based model to show that antisocial lying causes social networks to become increasingly fragmented. Antisocial dishonesty thus places strong constraints on the size and cohesion of social communities, providing a major hurdle that organisms have to overcome (e.g. by evolving counter-deception strategies) in order to evolve large, socially cohesive communities. In contrast, white lies can prove to be beneficial in smoothing the flow of interactions and facilitating a larger, more integrated network. Our results demonstrate that these group-level effects can arise as emergent properties of interactions at the dyadic level. The balance between prosocial and antisocial lies may set constraints on the structure of social networks, and hence the shape of society as a whole. PMID:25056625

Iñiguez, Gerardo; Govezensky, Tzipe; Dunbar, Robin; Kaski, Kimmo; Barrio, Rafael A

2014-09-01

292

Text documents as social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The extraction of keywords and features is a fundamental problem in text data mining. Document processing applications directly depend on the quality and speed of the identification of salient terms and phrases. Applications as disparate as automatic document classification, information visualization, filtering and security policy enforcement all rely on the quality of automatically extracted keywords. Recently, a novel approach to rapid change detection in data streams and documents has been developed. It is based on ideas from image processing and in particular on the Helmholtz Principle from the Gestalt Theory of human perception. By modeling a document as a one-parameter family of graphs with its sentences or paragraphs defining the vertex set and with edges defined by Helmholtz's principle, we demonstrated that for some range of the parameters, the resulting graph becomes a small-world network. In this article we investigate the natural orientation of edges in such small world networks. For two connected sentences, we can say which one is the first and which one is the second, according to their position in a document. This will make such a graph look like a small WWW-type network and PageRank type algorithms will produce interesting ranking of nodes in such a document.

Balinsky, Helen; Balinsky, Alexander; Simske, Steven J.

2012-02-01

293

Self-Concept and Social Anxiety as Predictor Variables of Academic Performance of Spanish Adolescents with Divorced Parents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: According to previous studies, when parents divorce it may increase the vulnerability of children to develop personal problems, such as lowering academic performance. This research examines the academic performance of Spanish children with divorced parents and its relation to academic self-concept and social anxiety. Method: The…

Orgiles, Mireia; Johnson, Blair T.; Huedo-Medina, Tania B.; Espada, Jose P.

2012-01-01

294

Social networks as embedded complex adaptive systems.  

PubMed

As systems evolve over time, their natural tendency is to become increasingly more complex. Studies in the field of complex systems have generated new perspectives on management in social organizations such as hospitals. Much of this research appears as a natural extension of the cross-disciplinary field of systems theory. This is the 15th in a series of articles applying complex systems science to the traditional management concepts of planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, and controlling. In this article, the authors discuss healthcare social networks as a hierarchy of embedded complex adaptive systems. The authors further examine the use of social network analysis tools as a means to understand complex communication patterns and reduce medical errors. PMID:20798616

Benham-Hutchins, Marge; Clancy, Thomas R

2010-09-01

295

Academic and Social Interaction for Hearing Impaired High School Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The education process of hearing-impaired students in 18 public secondary mathematics classrooms was examined in order to account for achievement and social adjustment differences between 11 mainstreamed and 7 self-contained classrooms. The classrooms were compared on the following dimensions: (1) social interactions among students, (2) teacher…

Mertens, Donna M.; Kluwin, Thomas N.

296

Accessing Social Capital through the Academic Mentoring Process  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores how mentors and mentees create and maintain social capital during the mentoring process. I employ a sociological conceptual framework and rigorous qualitative analytical techniques to examine how students of color and first-generation college students access social capital through mentoring relationships. The findings…

Smith, Buffy

2007-01-01

297

Accountability for Academics and Social Responsibility through Service Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Middle school teachers are accountable for helping young adolescents master a daunting number of basic skills and concepts. On the other hand, they are also expected to help their students develop a social conscience during what is arguably the most egocentric stage of their social development. This article presents a service learning project that…

Smith, David B.

2005-01-01

298

Academic Mergers in Social Work Programs: Autonomy or Disharmony?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from a 1991 survey of social work program deans and directors, the experiences of recently merged, long-term merged, and independent social work programs with salaries, financial resources, promotion and tenure, staff morale, enrollment, curriculum, class size, and access to central administration are compared. Respondents' views are…

Halter, Anthony; Gullerud, Ernest

1995-01-01

299

Weighted Key Player Problem for Social Network Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Social network analysis is a tool set whose uses range from measuring the impact of marketing campaigns to disrupting clandestine terrorist organizations. Social network analysis tools are primarily focused on the structure of relationships between actors...

R. M. McGuire

2011-01-01

300

Social networking profile correlates of schizotypy.  

PubMed

Social networking sites, such as Facebook, are extremely popular and have become a primary method for socialization and communication. Despite a report of increased use among those on the schizophrenia-spectrum, few details are known about their actual practices. In the current research, undergraduate participants completed measures of schizotypy and personality, and provided access to their Facebook profiles. Information from the profiles were then systematically coded and compared to the questionnaire data. As predicted, social anhedonia (SocAnh) was associated with a decrease in social participation variables, including a decrease in number of friends and number of photos, and an increase in length of time since communication with a friend, but SocAnh was also associated with an increase in profile length. Also, SocAnh was highly correlated with extraversion. Relatedly, extraversion uniquely predicted the number of friends and photos and length of time since communication with a friend. In addition, perceptual aberration/magical ideation (PerMag) was associated with an increased number of "black outs" on Facebook profile print-outs, a measure of paranoia. Overall, results from this naturalistic-like study show that SocAnh and extraversion are associated with decreased social participation and PerMag with increased paranoia related to information on social networking sites. PMID:22796101

Martin, Elizabeth A; Bailey, Drew H; Cicero, David C; Kerns, John G

2012-12-30

301

Social encounter networks: characterizing Great Britain.  

PubMed

A major goal of infectious disease epidemiology is to understand and predict the spread of infections within human populations, with the intention of better informing decisions regarding control and intervention. However, the development of fully mechanistic models of transmission requires a quantitative understanding of social interactions and collective properties of social networks. We performed a cross-sectional study of the social contacts on given days for more than 5000 respondents in England, Scotland and Wales, through postal and online survey methods. The survey was designed to elicit detailed and previously unreported measures of the immediate social network of participants relevant to infection spread. Here, we describe individual-level contact patterns, focusing on the range of heterogeneity observed and discuss the correlations between contact patterns and other socio-demographic factors. We find that the distribution of the number of contacts approximates a power-law distribution, but postulate that total contact time (which has a shorter-tailed distribution) is more epidemiologically relevant. We observe that children, public-sector and healthcare workers have the highest number of total contact hours and are therefore most likely to catch and transmit infectious disease. Our study also quantifies the transitive connections made between an individual's contacts (or clustering); this is a key structural characteristic of social networks with important implications for disease transmission and control efficacy. Respondents' networks exhibit high levels of clustering, which varies across social settings and increases with duration, frequency of contact and distance from home. Finally, we discuss the implications of these findings for the transmission and control of pathogens spread through close contact. PMID:23804621

Danon, Leon; Read, Jonathan M; House, Thomas A; Vernon, Matthew C; Keeling, Matt J

2013-08-22

302

Managing Trust in Online Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years, there is a dramatic growth in number and popularity of online social networks. There are many networks available with more than 100 million registered users such as Facebook, MySpace, QZone, Windows Live Spaces etc. People may connect, discover and share by using these online social networks. The exponential growth of online communities in the area of social networks attracts the attention of the researchers about the importance of managing trust in online environment. Users of the online social networks may share their experiences and opinions within the networks about an item which may be a product or service. The user faces the problem of evaluating trust in a service or service provider before making a choice. Recommendations may be received through a chain of friends network, so the problem for the user is to be able to evaluate various types of trust opinions and recommendations. This opinion or recommendation has a great influence to choose to use or enjoy the item by the other user of the community. Collaborative filtering system is the most popular method in recommender system. The task in collaborative filtering is to predict the utility of items to a particular user based on a database of user rates from a sample or population of other users. Because of the different taste of different people, they rate differently according to their subjective taste. If two people rate a set of items similarly, they share similar tastes. In the recommender system, this information is used to recommend items that one participant likes, to other persons in the same cluster. But the collaborative filtering system performs poor when there is insufficient previous common rating available between users; commonly known as cost start problem. To overcome the cold start problem and with the dramatic growth of online social networks, trust based approach to recommendation has emerged. This approach assumes a trust network among users and makes recommendations based on the ratings of the users that are directly or indirectly trusted by the target user.

Bhuiyan, Touhid; Josang, Audun; Xu, Yue

303

Discovery of Information Diffusion Process in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Information diffusion analysis in social networks is of significance since it enables us to deeply understand dynamic social interactions among users. In this paper, we introduce approaches to discovering information diffusion process in social networks based on process mining. Process mining techniques are applied from three perspectives: social network analysis, process discovery and community recognition. We then present experimental results by using a real-life social network data. The proposed techniques are expected to employ as new analytical tools in online social networks such as blog and wikis for company marketers, politicians, news reporters and online writers.

Kim, Kwanho; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Park, Jonghun

304

Social selection and peer influence in an online social network  

PubMed Central

Disentangling the effects of selection and influence is one of social science's greatest unsolved puzzles: Do people befriend others who are similar to them, or do they become more similar to their friends over time? Recent advances in stochastic actor-based modeling, combined with self-reported data on a popular online social network site, allow us to address this question with a greater degree of precision than has heretofore been possible. Using data on the Facebook activity of a cohort of college students over 4 years, we find that students who share certain tastes in music and in movies, but not in books, are significantly likely to befriend one another. Meanwhile, we find little evidence for the diffusion of tastes among Facebook friends—except for tastes in classical/jazz music. These findings shed light on the mechanisms responsible for observed network homogeneity; provide a statistically rigorous assessment of the coevolution of cultural tastes and social relationships; and suggest important qualifications to our understanding of both homophily and contagion as generic social processes.

Lewis, Kevin; Gonzalez, Marco; Kaufman, Jason

2012-01-01

305

Novel Visualizations and Interactions for Social Networks Exploration  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In the last decade, the popularity of social networking applications has dramatically increased. Social networks are collection\\u000a of persons or organizations connected by relations. Members of Facebook listed as friends or persons connected by family ties\\u000a in genealogical trees are examples of social networks. Today’s web surfers are often part of many online social networks:\\u000a they communicate in groups or

Nathalie Henry Riche; Jean-Daniel Fekete

2010-01-01

306

Spiking Neural P Systems and Modularization of Complex Networks from Cortical Neural Network to Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary. An idea of modularization of complex networks (from cortial neural net, Internet computer network, to market and social networks) is explained and some its topic motivations are presented. Then some known modularization algorithms and mod- ular architectures (constructions) of complex networks are discussed in the context of possible applications of spiking neural P systems in order to improve these

Adam Obtulowicz

307

Internet social network communities: Risk taking, trust, and privacy concerns  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individuals communicate and form relationships through Internet social networking websites such as Facebook and MySpace. We study risk taking, trust, and privacy concerns with regard to social network- ing websites among 205 college students using both reliable scales and behavior. Individuals with pro- files on social networking websites have greater risk taking attitudes than those who do not; greater risk

Joshua Fogel; Elham Nehmad

2009-01-01

308

Using Social Networks to Create Powerful Learning Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Regular readers of "Computers in Libraries" are aware that social networks are forming increasingly important linkages to professional and personal development in all libraries. Live and virtual social networks have become the new learning playground for librarians and library staff. Social networks have the ability to connect those who are…

Lenox, Marianne; Coleman, Maurice

2010-01-01

309

Psychological dimensions of social networks: A multimethod analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two exploratory studies are reported which sought to iden@ important psychological dimensions of social networks. Both studies investigated the social networks of college students, using as subfects the same 16 male and 16 female students. The first study employed multiple regression to generate predictor variables to students'ratings of satisfaction with their social network. The second study assessed how structurally contrasting

Barton J. Hirsch

1979-01-01

310

Public vs. private: comparing public social network information with email  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this research is to facilitate the design of systems which will mine and use sociocentric social networks without infringing privacy. We describe an extensive experiment we conducted within our organization comparing social network information gathered from various intranet public sources with social network information gathered from a private source - the organizational email system. We also report

Ido Guy; Michal Jacovi; Noga Meshulam; Inbal Ronen; Elad Shahar

2008-01-01

311

Differentiating Specialists and Generalists Within College Students' Social Support Networks.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An alternative scoring method for the Social Support Questionnaire was used to examine relationships among social network structure, support types and satisfaction determinants. College students' social networks consisted of nuclear, and other, family; friends; and others. Proportion of support network occupied by nuclear family was positively…

Bogat, G. Anne; And Others

1985-01-01

312

Autotagging Facebook: Social network context improves photo annotation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most personal photos that are shared online are embedded in some form of social network, and these social networks are a potent source of contextual information that can be leveraged for automatic image understanding. In this paper, we investigate the utility of social network context for the task of automatic face recognition in personal photographs. We combine face recognition scores

Zak Stone; Todd Zickler; Trevor Darrell

2008-01-01

313

Using social network methods to study school leadership  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network analysis is increasingly used in the study of policy implementation and school leadership. A key question that remains is that of instrument validity – that is, the question of whether these social network survey instruments measure what they purport to measure. In this paper, we describe our work to examine the validity of the School Staff Social Network

Virginia M. Pitts; James P. Spillane

2009-01-01

314

CORBEH CLASS [Contingencies for Learning Academic and Social Skills] Program for Acting-Out Children. Manual for Teachers. First Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A program which describes contingencies for learning academic and social skills (CLASS) is explained to involve an educational consultant training teachers of acting-out first and second graders to reinforce desired academic and social behaviors. Examined are the pre-intervention procedures of initial identification of acting-out students,…

Hops, Hyman; And Others

315

Promoting Social and Academic Integration into Higher Education by First-Year Student Nurses: The APPL Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Academic, Personal and Professional Learning (APPL) model of support for student nurses was developed and implemented as a pilot project in the Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences of a university in response to a number of internal and external drivers. The common theme across these drivers was the enhancement of the social, academic

Fergy, Sue; Marks-Maran, Di; Ooms, Ann; Shapcott, Jean; Burke, Linda

2011-01-01

316

Promoting Social and Academic Competence in the Classroom: An Intervention Study Examining the Contribution of the "Responsive Classroom" Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This exploratory study examined the contribution of the "RC" Approach over a two-year period. The "RC" Approach integrates social and academic learning in order to produce classroom environments that are conducive to learning by integrating social and academic learning. Two questions are addressed. First, how does teachers' use of "RC" practices…

Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Chiu, Yu-Jen I.

2007-01-01

317

Dynamic social networks in recovery homes.  

PubMed

Acute treatment aftercare in the form of sober living environments-i.e., recovery houses-provide an inexpensive and effective medium-term treatment alternative for many with substance use disorders. Limited evidence suggests that house-situated social relationships and associated social support are critical determinants of how successful these residential experiences are for their members, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying these relationships. This study explored the feasibility of using dynamic social network modeling to understand house-situated longitudinal associations among individual Alcoholics Anonymous related recovery behaviors, length of residence, dyadic interpersonal trust, and dyadic confidant relationship formation processes. Trust and confidant relationships were measured 3 months apart in U.S. urban-area recovery houses, all of which were part of a network of substance use recovery homes. A stochastic actor-based model was successfully estimated from this data set. Results suggest that confidant relationships are predicted by trust, while trust is affected by recovery behaviors and length of residence. Conceptualizing recovery houses as a set of independent, evolving social networks that can be modeled jointly appears to be a promising direction for research. PMID:24217855

Jason, Leonard A; Light, John M; Stevens, Edward B; Beers, Kimberly

2014-06-01

318

Recommending collaboration with social networks: a comparative evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies of information seeking and workplace collaboration often find that social relationships are a strong factor in determining who collaborates with whom. Social networks provide one means of visualizing existing and potential interaction in organizational settings. Groupware designers are using social networks to make systems more sensitive to social situations and guide users toward effective collaborations. Yet, the implications of

David W. McDonald

2003-01-01

319

A Longitudinal Study of the Social and Academic Competence of Economically Disadvantaged Bilingual Preschool Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

This longitudinal study was conducted to gain understanding of the social–emotional and academic development of economically disadvantaged bilingual preschool children. In Study 1, the authors combined cognitive, psychosocial, and cultural-linguistic factors to determine profiles of social competence as measured by peer play. A person-centered analysis of 207 Hispanic American preschoolers (ages 4 and 5 years) yielded 6 distinct profiles, 2

Geraldine V. Oades-Sese; Giselle B. Esquivel; Pamela K. Kaliski; Lisette Maniatis

2011-01-01

320

Exploratory community sensing in social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social networks generally provide an implementation of some kind of groups or communities which users can voluntarily join. Twitter does not have this functionality, and there is no notion of a formal group or community. We propose a method for identification of communities and assignment of semantic meaning to the discussion topics of the resulting communities. Using this analysis method and a sample of roughly a month's worth of Tweets from Twitter's "gardenhose" feed, we demonstrate the discovery of meaningful user communities on Twitter. We examine Twitter data streaming in real time and treat it as a sensor. Twitter is a social network which pioneered microblogging with the messages fitting an SMS, and a variety of clients, browsers, smart phones and PDAs are used for status updates by individuals, businesses, media outlets and even devices all over the world. Often an aggregate trend of such statuses may represent an important development in the world, which has been demonstrated with the Iran and Moldova elections and the anniversary of the Tiananmen in China. We propose using Twitter as a sensor, tracking individuals and communities of interest, and characterizing individual roles and dynamics of their communications. We developed a novel algorithm of community identification in social networks based on direct communication, as opposed to linking. We show ways to find communities of interest and then browse their neighborhoods by either similarity or diversity of individuals and groups adjacent to the one of interest. We use frequent collocations and statistically improbable phrases to summarize the focus of the community, giving a quick overview of its main topics. Our methods provide insight into the largest social sensor network in the world and constitute a platform for social sensing.

Khrabrov, Alexy; Stocco, Gabriel; Cybenko, George

2010-04-01

321

Temperament and Social Problem Solving Competence in Preschool: Influences on Academic Skills in Early Elementary School.  

PubMed

The goals of the current study were to examine whether children's social problem solving (SPS) skills are a mechanism through which temperament influences later academic achievement and whether sex moderates these associations. Participants included 1,117 children enrolled in the NICHD Early Child Care Study. During preschool, mothers and childcare providers rated children's temperamental shyness and inhibitory control, and SPS was assessed using a hypothetical-reflective measure during a laboratory visit. During kindergarten and first grade, teacher-report of math and language skills was collected. Results indicated that high ratings of inhibitory control in preschool, but not shyness, predicted better kindergarten and first grade academic skills. Furthermore, children's SPS competence mediated the relations between both shyness and inhibitory control on later academic skills. The child's sex did not moderate these associations. Results suggest that preventative efforts targeting early SPS skills may buffer against later academic adjustment problems among temperamentally extreme children. PMID:23355765

Walker, Olga L; Henderson, Heather A

2012-11-01

322

JANUS: Joint Academic Network Using Satellite. Brief Description of Project. IET Papers on Broadcasting: No. 287.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The JANUS (Joint Academic Network Using Satellite) satellite network is being planned to link European institutions wishing to jointly produce distance teaching materials. Earth stations with capabilities for transmit/receive functions, voice/data functions, two 64 kbs channels, and connection to local telephone exchange and computer networks will…

Bates, A. W.

323

Library Applications of a Wide Area Network: Promoting JANET to UK Academic Libraries.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes Project Jupiter, which was developed to promote the United Kingdom's Joint Academic Network (JANET) to its member libraries. Library uses of JANET are described, including online catalogs, commercial services, and electronic mail; the convergence of local area networks (LANs) and wide area networks (WANs) is discussed; and future…

MacColl, John A.

1990-01-01

324

Networking: an overview for leaders of academic medical centers.  

PubMed

Organizations face a unique challenge over the next decade. When technology was expensive, it was arguably necessary to use an undifferentiated, or monolithic, model for computer-based solutions to problems. This has fundamentally changed. Technology is now so inexpensive that solutions are not limited by costs, but rather by how well the implementors understand the many different problem domains. Thus, academic medical centers are faced with successive waves in information technology use. First, there will be a wave of innovation, driven by the need for specialization in problem solving. This will be followed by consolidation of the best of the approaches into the core systems of the institution. The average level of heterogeneity (cost) will be higher, but the overall quality of the solutions (benefit) will also be higher. If one can develop a strategy for managing and creatively limiting the heterogeneity, the cost-benefit ratio will be much more favorable. While there may be other strategies that will do this, we support the use of a strategy centered on enterprise networking. This strategy emphasizes not simply technology but also the cultural and organizational changes that empower innovation--within a framework that makes it possible to simply implement interoperability and data sharing within nearly all solutions. The organizations that survive the coming period of change and external pressure will be those that do the best job of managing their resources. Information will continue to be one of the most important resources.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8323639

Panko, W B; Erhardt-Domino, K; Pletcher, T; Wilson, W

1993-07-01

325

Academic, Social, and Economic Challenges Faced by Latinos to Attain a College Degree  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the academic, social and economic challenges faced by Latino students to attain a college degree. In addition, of prime importance was the need for improvement and persistence, which led to retention in college enrollment rates for Latino students both at the secondary and postsecondary levels. Findings from this study…

Stevenson, Kenel

2009-01-01

326

Socially, Developmentally, and Academically Appropriate Prevention Curriculum for 5th Graders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on a process in which program designers, classroom teachers, and students worked together to adapt the 7th grade "keepin' it REAL" prevention curriculum to a developmentally, socially, and academically appropriate curriculum for 5th graders. A Community-Based Participatory Research methodology (CBPR), combined with a 9-step…

Harthun, Mary L.; Dustman, Patricia A.; Reeves, Leslie J.; Marsiglia, Flavio F.; Hecht, Michael L.

2009-01-01

327

The Role of Parenting Self-Efficacy in Children's Social and Academic Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A latent variable structural model was constructed to test the relations among mothers' and fathers' parenting self-efficacy (PSE), their loneliness, and their child's peer-evaluated social competence, self-evaluated loneliness, teacher-evaluated motivational orientation, and academic skills. In order to do this, first the Self-Efficacy for…

Junttila, Niina; Vauras, Marja; Laakkonen, Eero

2007-01-01

328

Cambodian Early Adolescents' Academic Achievement: The Role of Social Capital  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the associations of parents' cultural beliefs and attitudes with respect to fate, traditional gender roles, aspirations, and involvement in children's academic achievement in Cambodia. Based on Coleman's social capital theory, a good parent-child relationship enables children's school success because…

Eng, Sothy

2013-01-01

329

Communication Disorders in the School: Perspectives on Academic and Social Success an Introduction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The critical role of communication in schools cannot be understated. Communication skills are a necessity both in the academic and social atmosphere of the school environment. Unfortunately, there are a large number of children in the schools today identified with speech and language disorders. This special edition of "Psychology in the Schools"…

Thatcher, Karen L.; Fletcher, Kathryn; Decker, Blair

2008-01-01

330

Indiana's Academic Standards: Grade 2 English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide to Indiana's academic standards in language arts, mathematics, science, and the social studies for Grade 2 students begins with a note to students and another note to parents. The guide spells out what students should know and be able to do in each subject, at each grade level. The guide also lists 10 things parents can do to help…

Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis.

331

Indiana's Academic Standards: Grade 1 English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide to Indiana's academic standards in language arts, mathematics, science, and the social studies for Grade 1 students begins with a note to students and another note to parents. The guide spells out what students should know and be able to do in each subject, at each grade level. The guide also lists 10 things parents can do to help…

Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis.

332

Indiana's Academic Standards: Kindergarten English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide to Indiana's academic standards in language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies for kindergarten students begins with a note to students and another to parents. The guide spells out what students should know and be able to do in each subject, at each grade level. It helps students understand what is required to meet the…

Indiana State Dept. of Public Instruction, Indianapolis.

333

Indiana's Academic Standards: Grade 3 English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide to Indiana's academic standards in English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and the Social Studies for Grade 3 students begins with a note to students and another note to parents. The guide spells out what students should know and be able to do in each subject, at each grade level. The guide also lists 10 things parents can do to…

Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis.

334

Social and Academic Profiles of Externalizing and Internalizing Groups: Risk Factors for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three groups of third-grade students classified as either Externals (n=30), Internalizers (n=55), or Controls (n=96) were contrasted on 19 measures in social and academic domains. Results indicate large differences between externalizing and internalizing groups compared with controls; however, both externalizing and internalizing groups had…

Gresham, Frank M.; Lane, Kathleen L.; MacMillan, Donald L.; Bocian, Kathleen M.

1999-01-01

335

Parent-School Relationships and Children's Academic and Social Outcomes in Public School Pre-Kindergarten  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two dimensions of parent-school relationships, parental school involvement and parents' perceptions of teacher responsiveness to child/parent, were examined in state-funded pre-kindergarten classrooms in a large urban school district. Children's social and academic outcomes were individually assessed in the fall and spring. Hierarchical Linear…

Powell, Douglas R.; Son, Seung-Hee; File, Nancy; San Juan, Robert R.

2010-01-01

336

Social Psychological Dispositions and Academic Achievement of Inuit and Non-Inuit Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines differences between Inuit and non-Inuit students in activism (social attitude), self-concept, and academic achievement. Inuits scored lower in activism and self-concept than non-Inuits. Suggests teachers create personalized classroom environments to positively affect activism and self-concept, and thereby enhancing achievement.…

Clifton, Rodney A.; Roberts, Lance W.

1988-01-01

337

Perceived Academic Control: Mediating the Effects of Optimism and Social Support on College Students' Psychological Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The first year of college presents numerous challenges experienced as overwhelming by some freshmen who may become overly stressed and depressed. This longitudinal study examined perceived academic control (PAC) as a mediator of optimism and social support's buffering effects on freshman students' psychological health. Multiple regressions…

Ruthig, Joelle C.; Haynes, Tara L.; Stupnisky, Robert H.; Perry, Raymond P.

2009-01-01

338

A Comparison of Ethnic Minority and Majority Students: Social and Academic Integration, and Quality of Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines students from ethnic minorities and majorities with regard to the relationships between their social and academic integration and their quality of learning. A total of 523 students at four universities completed a questionnaire: analyses of variance were used to examine mean differences, and structural equation modelling…

Severiens, Sabine; Wolff, Rick

2008-01-01

339

Do Friends Always Help Your Studies? Mediating Processes between Social Relations and Academic Motivation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous studies suggest that social relations can increase one's motivation to learn in school. However, other evidence showed that having more friends may also distract from one's academic involvement. To understand the mechanisms behind this apparent contradiction, this study identified and tested the effects of a potentially important positive…

Li, Manyu; Frieze, Irene Hanson; Nokes-Malach, Timothy J.; Cheong, Jeewon

2013-01-01

340

Academic Achievement, Perfectionism and Social Support as Predictors of Test Anxiety  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined likelihood of high school students' gender, levels of academic achievement, perfectionism and perceived social support in predicting their degree of test anxiety. Participants were 505 students from high schools in the Ankara metropolitan area. The Test Anxiety Inventory, Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale and Perceived…

Yildirim, Ibrahim; Genctanirim, Dilek; Yalcin, Ilhan; Baydan, Yaprak

2008-01-01

341

Profiles of School Adaptation: Social, Behavioral and Academic Functioning in Sexually Abused Girls  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: The short-term outcomes of child sexual abuse (CSA) on academic, behavioral and social adaptation at school were examined in order to: (1) document the proportion of sexually abused (SA) girls struggling in school and define the nature of their difficulties, (2) explore whether different profiles of school adaptation could be…

Daignault, Isabelle V.; Hebert, Martine

2009-01-01

342

Self-Representations of Social and Academic Competence: Contextual Correlates in Middle Childhood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Self-representations of 1st-, 3rd-, and 5th-graders' social and academic competence were examined in relation to children's personal (grade/age); family (attachment to parents, marital conflict, anxiety related to conflict); and school (teacher appraisals) contexts. Children who reported higher levels of security of attachment to parents and lower…

Isabella, Russell A.; Diener, Marissa L.

2010-01-01

343

Social Cognitive Predictors of College Students' Academic Performance and Persistence: A Meta-Analytic Path Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tested Social Cognitive Career Theory's (SCCT) academic performance model using a two-stage approach that combined meta-analytic and structural equation modeling methodologies. Unbiased correlations obtained from a previously published meta-analysis [Robbins, S. B., Lauver, K., Le, H., Davis, D., & Langley, R. (2004). Do psychosocial…

Brown, Steven D.; Tramayne, Selena; Hoxha, Denada; Telander, Kyle; Fan, Xiaoyan; Lent, Robert W.

2008-01-01

344

Common Time: embedding the concept of academic and social integration across cognate degree programmes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Common Time (CT) was a structured programme designed to enhance the social and academic engagement of a growingly diverse student body on a new campus that draws its population from a low?socioeconomic area. As a voluntary and non?remedial programme, it incorporated a range of formal and informal activities and processes to engage students. CT operates across degree programmes and involves

Jane Fowler; Craig Zimitat

2008-01-01

345

Commentary: Implementing Social-Emotional and Academic Innovations--Reflections, Reactions, and Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article "Implementation, Sustainability, and Scaling Up of Social-Emotional and Academic Innovations in Public Schools" by Elias, Zins, Graczyk, and Weissberg (2003) is a thought-provoking contribution, and one that begs for more application. Some of the points the authors raise have been articulated in the school and clinical evidence-based…

Elliott, Stephen N.; Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Roach, Andrew T.

2003-01-01

346

Children with ADHD and Depression: A Multisource, Multimethod Assessment of Clinical, Social, and Academic Functioning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although ADHD and depression are common comorbidities in youth, few studies have examined this particular clinical presentation. To address method bias limitations of previous research, this study uses multiple informants to compare the academic, social, and clinical functioning of children with ADHD, children with ADHD and depression, and…

Blackman, Gabrielle L.; Ostrander, Rick; Herman, Keith C.

2005-01-01

347

Students' Coping with Academic and Social Stress in an Inner-City Middle School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents the findings of several studies designed to examine students' coping processes in relation to stressful academic and social situations in the school environment. The setting for these studies was an inner-city intermediate school with approximately 423 students in the 1984-85 school year. Over 95 percent of the students were…

Fahs, Mary Ellen

348

Parent Involvement and Children's Academic and Social Development in Elementary School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Childcare and Youth Development (N = 1,364) were used to investigate children's trajectories of academic and social development across 1st, 3rd, and 5th grades. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to examine within- and between-child associations among…

El Nokali, Nermeen E.; Bachman, Heather J.; Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth

2010-01-01

349

Personality, Freshmen Proactive Social Behavior, and College Transition: Predictors beyond Academic Strategies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When transitioning to college freshmen must behave proactively in order to strive for success in their collegiate careers and their future life. Past research has mainly focused on the academic strategies of freshmen when investigating the predictors of successful college transition and has paid little attention to students' social strategies. The…

Wang, Yi; Cullen, Kristin L.; Yao, Xiang; Li, Yixuan

2013-01-01

350

Young, Gifted, and Female: A Look at Academic and Social Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article illuminates the current status of our understanding regarding the academic and social-emotional needs of gifted, early adolescent females in the United States. A synthesis of both theoretical and empirical studies addresses two foundational questions. First, how do we describe the unique population of gifted, female, adolescent…

Meredith, Corine Cadle

2009-01-01

351

The Differential Effects of General Mental Ability and Emotional Intelligence on Academic Performance and Social Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study considers the debate about whether emotional intelligence (EI) has incremental validity over and above traditional intelligence dimensions. We propose that EI and general mental abilities (GMA) differ in predicting academic performance and the quality of social interactions among college students. Using two college student samples, we…

Song, Lynda Jiwen; Huang, Guo-hua; Peng, Kelly Z.; Law, Kenneth S.; Wong, Chi-Sum; Chen, Zhijun

2010-01-01

352

Temperament and Social Problem Solving Competence in Preschool: Influences on Academic Skills in Early Elementary School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goals of the current study were to examine whether children's social problem solving (SPS) skills are a mechanism through which temperament influences later academic achievement and whether sex moderates these associations. The participants included 1117 children enrolled in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of…

Walker, Olga L.; Henderson, Heather A.

2012-01-01

353

The Role of Classroom Quality in Ameliorating the Academic and Social Risks Associated with Difficult Temperament  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examines the moderating role first grade classroom quality may have on the relations between children's difficult temperament (assessed in infancy) and their academic and social outcomes in early elementary school (first grade). Using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Study of Early Child…

Curby, Timothy W.; Rudasill, Kathleen Moritz; Edwards, Taylor; Perez-Edgar, Koraly

2011-01-01

354

Improving Social and Academic Outcomes for All Learners through the Use of Teacher Praise  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students who frequently engage in problem behavior tend to disrupt teacher instruction and impede others' learning, and they can seriously limit their own opportunities for academic and social success. The view that negative student-teacher interaction adversely impacts classroom climate is well documented. A positive and engaging classroom…

Marchant, Michelle; Anderson, Darlene H.

2012-01-01

355

The Relationship of Academic and Social Integration to Veterans' Educational Persistence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study sought to identify the relationship between academic and social integration and persistence for veterans in two-year colleges. Bean and Metzner's (1985) attrition theory served as the theoretical background of investigation for including variables throughout the seven research questions. The Beginning Postsecondary Student survey…

Barnhart, Dan

2011-01-01

356

Critical Links: Learning in the Arts and Student Academic and Social Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two purposes of this compendium are: (1) to recommend to researchers and funders of research promising lines of inquiry and study suggested by recent, strong studies of the academic and social effects of learning in the arts; and (2) to provide designers of arts education curriculum and instruction with insights found in the research that suggest…

Deasy, Richard J., Ed.

357

Academic, Personal and Social Problems of Afghan and Iranian Students in the United States.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Questionnaires or interviews were completed by 120 Afghan and 125 Iranian students enrolled in American universities, concerning their academic, personal, and social problems. Data were analyzed according to nationality, sex, age, marital status, major, duration of stay in U.S., financial sponsorship, and undergraduate v graduate student status.…

Payind, Mohammad Alam

1979-01-01

358

Social and Emotional Learning as a Catalyst for Academic Excellence. White Paper  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

ICF International's white paper explores how implementation of social and emotional learning (SEL) has the potential to prepare students for workforce success and positively influence student engagement and academic performance while reducing dropout rates. Self-improvement and leadership development sections of bookstores are replete with texts…

Marchesi, Antonio G.; Cook, Kimberly

2012-01-01

359

Gifted Students' Perceptions of the Academic and Social/Emotional Effects of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Grouping  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated student perceptions of differences in academic and social effects that occur when gifted and talented youth are grouped homogeneously (i.e., in special classes for gifted students) as contrasted with heterogeneously (i.e., in classes with many ability levels represented). Forty-four students in grades 5-11 completed…

Adams-Byers, Jan; Whitsell, Sara Squiller; Moon, Sidney M.

2004-01-01

360

Graph data partition models for online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online social networks have become important vehicles for connecting people for work and leisure. As these networks grow, data that are stored over these networks also grow, and management of these data becomes a challenge. Graph data models are a natural fit for representing online social networks but need to support distribution to allow the associated graph databases to scale

Prima Chairunnanda; Simon Forsyth; Khuzaima Daudjee

2012-01-01

361

Rapid innovation diffusion in social networks.  

PubMed

Social and technological innovations often spread through social networks as people respond to what their neighbors are doing. Previous research has identified specific network structures, such as local clustering, that promote rapid diffusion. Here we derive bounds that are independent of network structure and size, such that diffusion is fast whenever the payoff gain from the innovation is sufficiently high and the agents' responses are sufficiently noisy. We also provide a simple method for computing an upper bound on the expected time it takes for the innovation to become established in any finite network. For example, if agents choose log-linear responses to what their neighbors are doing, it takes on average less than 80 revision periods for the innovation to diffuse widely in any network, provided that the error rate is at least 5% and the payoff gain (relative to the status quo) is at least 150%. Qualitatively similar results hold for other smoothed best-response functions and populations that experience heterogeneous payoff shocks. PMID:25024191

Kreindler, Gabriel E; Young, H Peyton

2014-07-22

362

From biological and social network metaphors to coupled bio-social wireless networks  

PubMed Central

Biological and social analogies have been long applied to complex systems. Inspiration has been drawn from biological solutions to solve problems in engineering products and systems, ranging from Velcro to camouflage to robotics to adaptive and learning computing methods. In this paper, we present an overview of recent advances in understanding biological systems as networks and use this understanding to design and analyse wireless communication networks. We expand on two applications, namely cognitive sensing and control and wireless epidemiology. We discuss how our work in these two applications is motivated by biological metaphors. We believe that recent advances in computing and communications coupled with advances in health and social sciences raise the possibility of studying coupled bio-social communication networks. We argue that we can better utilise the advances in our understanding of one class of networks to better our understanding of the other.

Barrett, Christopher L.; Eubank, Stephen; Anil Kumar, V.S.; Marathe, Madhav V.

2010-01-01

363

Japanese Network Capital: The Impact of Social Networks on Japanese Political Participation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent scholarship shows that social capital has a large influence on political behavior. Social capital’s definition includes trust, norms of reciprocity, and social networks. Most studies, however, ignore the networking component. Here, we test the influence of social networks on political participation using new Japanese survey data. We separately test the effects of involvement in formally organized voluntary associations and

Ken’ichi Ikeda; Sean E. Richey

2005-01-01

364

The Importance of Networking in the Academic and Professional Experiences of Racial Minority Students in the USA  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Through examination of the experiences of minority undergraduate doctoral aspirants in the United States, this study points to the importance of academic and professional influences of networking, as well as its role in the academic attainment and professional experiences of underrepresented groups in academe. The findings suggest that networking

Davis, Dannielle Joy; Warfield, Markeba

2011-01-01

365

Perceived (Academic) Control and Causal Thinking in Achievement Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Striving to excel is a goal commonly shared by undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty members in academic achievement settings. Periodically, however, their sense of personal control and mastery is undermined by low-control experiences arising from a greater emphasis on success and failure, heightened academic competition, increased pressure to excel, more frequent academic failures, unfamiliar academic tasks, new social networks,

Raymond P. Perry

2003-01-01

366

Social network based microblog user behavior analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The influence of microblog on information transmission is becoming more and more obvious. By characterizing the behavior of following and being followed as out-degree and in-degree respectively, a microblog social network was built in this paper. It was found to have short diameter of connected graph, short average path length and high average clustering coefficient. The distributions of out-degree, in-degree and total number of microblogs posted present power-law characters. The exponent of total number distribution of microblogs is negatively correlated with the degree of each user. With the increase of degree, the exponent decreases much slower. Based on empirical analysis, we proposed a social network based human dynamics model in this paper, and pointed out that inducing drive and spontaneous drive lead to the behavior of posting microblogs. The simulation results of our model match well with practical situation.

Yan, Qiang; Wu, Lianren; Zheng, Lan

2013-04-01

367

Privacy policies for health social networking sites  

PubMed Central

Health social networking sites (HSNS), virtual communities where users connect with each other around common problems and share relevant health data, have been increasingly adopted by medical professionals and patients. The growing use of HSNS like Sermo and PatientsLikeMe has prompted public concerns about the risks that such online data-sharing platforms pose to the privacy and security of personal health data. This paper articulates a set of privacy risks introduced by social networking in health care and presents a practical example that demonstrates how the risks might be intrinsic to some HSNS. The aim of this study is to identify and sketch the policy implications of using HSNS and how policy makers and stakeholders should elaborate upon them to protect the privacy of online health data.

Li, Jingquan

2013-01-01

368

Application of Academic Design Principles to Social Skills Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Public schools are replete with children and adolescents like Billy, Reid, and Rowdy whom teachers describe as rude, disruptive, and obnoxious, and not all of them are in special education. Asher (1990) estimated that 10% of school-age children have social skills deficits severe enough to be rejected by their peers and up to 75% of children with…

Snider, Vicki E.; Battalio, Rosemary

2011-01-01

369

Minnesota Academic Standards in History and Social Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Public education in Minnesota must help students gain the knowledge and skills that are necessary to, in Thomas Jefferson's view, protect and maintain freedom. The Social Studies Standards in this document attempt to do just this by specifying the particular knowledge and skills that Minnesota students will be required to learn in the disciplines…

Minnesota Department of Education, 2004

2004-01-01

370

The Learning Curve: Elevating Children's Academic and Social Competence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Written for parents and for professionals working with children and their parents, this book demonstrates that children's social development must be given paramount importance in order for them to achieve long-term school success. The book shows parents how to be effective caregivers by knowing what to realistically expect from a child based on a…

Mishne, Judith Marks

371

Pivotal Response Treatments for Autism: Communication, Social, and Academic Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recognized as one of the top state-of-the-art treatments for autism in the United States, the innovative Pivotal Response Treatment uses natural learning opportunities to target and modify key behaviors in children with autism, leading to widespread positive effects on communication, behavior, and social skills. The product of 20 years of…

Koegel, Robert L.; Kern Koegel, Lynn

2006-01-01

372

Becoming Friends on Online Social Networking Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The internet has become an effective tool in communication, and SNS (Social Networking Service), such as Facebook or Twitter,\\u000a that allows anyone to disclose a variety of specific personal information. The purpose of the present study is to identify\\u000a which profile factors provided SNS users (or viewers) with a positive first impression. Results from study 1, the three factors\\u000a -

Wonmi Ahn; Borum Kim; Kwang-Hee Han

373

Exploring Semantic Social Networks Using Virtual Reality  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present Redgraph, a generic virtual reality visualization program for Semantic Web data capable of handling large data-sets, which we demonstrate on social network data from the U.S. Patent Trade Office. We develop a Semantic Web vocabulary of virtual reality terms compatible with GraphXML to map graph visualization into the Seman- tic Web itself. Our approach in visualizing Semantic Web

Harry Halpin; David J. Zielinski; Rachael Brady; Glenda Kelly

2008-01-01

374

Message framing in social networking sites.  

PubMed

Online social networking sites represent significant new opportunities for Internet advertisers. However, results based on the real world cannot be generalized to all virtual worlds. In this research, the moderating effects of need for cognition (NFC) and knowledge were applied to examine the impact of message framing on attitudes toward social networking sites. A total of 216 undergraduates participated in the study. Results reveal that for social networking sites, while high-NFC individuals form more favorable attitudes toward negatively framed messages than positively framed messages, low-NFC individuals form more favorable attitudes toward positively framed messages than negatively framed messages. In addition, low-knowledge individuals demonstrate more favorable attitudes toward negatively framed messages than positively framed messages; however, the framing effect does not differentially affect the attitudes of high-knowledge individuals. Furthermore, the framing effect does not differentially affect the attitudes of high-NFC individuals with high knowledge. In contrast, low-NFC individuals with low knowledge hold more favorable attitudes toward positively framed messages than negatively framed messages. PMID:23786169

Kao, Danny Tengti; Chuang, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Sui-Min; Zhang, Lei

2013-10-01

375

Help from My "Friends": Social Capital in the Social Network Sites of Low-Income Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development of social capital in young people is positively associated with educational attainment, achievement, and psychosocial factors. Prior research has explored factors that contribute to social capital, such as offline social networks. To a lesser extent, studies have analyzed the relationship between online social networks and…

Greenhow, Christine; Burton, Lisa

2011-01-01

376

Recruitment dynamics in adaptive social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We model recruitment in adaptive social networks in the presence of birth and death processes. Recruitment is characterized by nodes changing their status to that of the recruiting class as a result of contact with recruiting nodes. Only a susceptible subset of nodes can be recruited. The recruiting individuals may adapt their connections in order to improve recruitment capabilities, thus changing the network structure adaptively. We derive a mean-field theory to predict the dependence of the growth threshold of the recruiting class on the adaptation parameter. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of adaptation on the recruitment level, as well as on network topology. The theoretical predictions are compared with direct simulations of the full system. We identify two parameter regimes with qualitatively different bifurcation diagrams depending on whether nodes become susceptible frequently (multiple times in their lifetime) or rarely (much less than once per lifetime).

Shkarayev, Maxim S.; Schwartz, Ira B.; Shaw, Leah B.

2013-06-01

377

Children's perceptions of the classroom environment and social and academic performance: A longitudinal analysis of the contribution of the Responsive Classroom approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the contribution of the Responsive Classroom (RC) Approach, a set of teaching practices that integrate social and academic learning, to children's perceptions of their classroom, and children's academic and social performance over time. Three questions emerge: (a) What is the concurrent and cumulative relation between children's perceptions of the classroom and social and academic outcomes over time?

Laura L. Brock; Tracy K. Nishida; Cynthia Chiong; Kevin J. Grimm; Sara E. Rimm-Kaufman

2008-01-01

378

USING SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS TO EVALUATE COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING OF A REGIONAL COMMUNITY CANCER NETWORK  

PubMed Central

The Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TBCCN) is one of 25 Community Network Programs funded by the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI’s) Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities with the objectives to create a collaborative infrastructure of academic and community based organizations and to develop effective and sustainable interventions to reduce cancer health disparities. In order to describe the network characteristics of the TBCCN as part of our ongoing evaluation efforts, we conducted social network analysis surveys with our community partners in 2007 and 2008. One key finding showed that the mean trust value for the 20 community partners in the study increased from 1.8 to 2.1 (p<0.01), suggesting a trend toward increased trust in the network. These preliminary results suggest that TBCCN has led to greater collaboration among the community partners that were formed through its capacity-building and evidence-based dissemination activities for impacting cancer health disparities at the community level.

Luque, John; Tyson, Dinorah Martinez; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Gwede, Clement; Vadaparampil, Susan; Noel-Thomas, Shalewa; Meade, Cathy

2013-01-01

379

Rumor diffusion in an interests-based dynamic social network.  

PubMed

To research rumor diffusion in social friend network, based on interests, a dynamic friend network is proposed, which has the characteristics of clustering and community, and a diffusion model is also proposed. With this friend network and rumor diffusion model, based on the zombie-city model, some simulation experiments to analyze the characteristics of rumor diffusion in social friend networks have been conducted. The results show some interesting observations: (1) positive information may evolve to become a rumor through the diffusion process that people may modify the information by word of mouth; (2) with the same average degree, a random social network has a smaller clustering coefficient and is more beneficial for rumor diffusion than the dynamic friend network; (3) a rumor is spread more widely in a social network with a smaller global clustering coefficient than in a social network with a larger global clustering coefficient; and (4) a network with a smaller clustering coefficient has a larger efficiency. PMID:24453911

Tang, Mingsheng; Mao, Xinjun; Guessoum, Zahia; Zhou, Huiping

2013-01-01

380

Rumor Diffusion in an Interests-Based Dynamic Social Network  

PubMed Central

To research rumor diffusion in social friend network, based on interests, a dynamic friend network is proposed, which has the characteristics of clustering and community, and a diffusion model is also proposed. With this friend network and rumor diffusion model, based on the zombie-city model, some simulation experiments to analyze the characteristics of rumor diffusion in social friend networks have been conducted. The results show some interesting observations: (1) positive information may evolve to become a rumor through the diffusion process that people may modify the information by word of mouth; (2) with the same average degree, a random social network has a smaller clustering coefficient and is more beneficial for rumor diffusion than the dynamic friend network; (3) a rumor is spread more widely in a social network with a smaller global clustering coefficient than in a social network with a larger global clustering coefficient; and (4) a network with a smaller clustering coefficient has a larger efficiency.

Mao, Xinjun; Guessoum, Zahia; Zhou, Huiping

2013-01-01

381

Living–Learning Programs and First-Generation College Students’ Academic and Social Transition to College  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the role of living–learning (L\\/L) programs in facilitating first-generation students’ perceived academic\\u000a and social transition to college. Using a sample of 1,335 first-generation students from 33 4-year institutions who participated\\u000a in the National Study of Living–Learning Programs during Spring 2004, the results of the study show that first-generation\\u000a students in L\\/L programs reported a more successful academic

Karen Kurotsuchi Inkelas; Zaneeta E. Daver; Kristen E. Vogt; Jeannie Brown Leonard

2007-01-01

382

Longitudinal associations between depressive problems, academic performance, and social functioning in adolescent boys and girls.  

PubMed

Depressive problems and academic performance, social well-being, and social problems in adolescents are strongly associated. However, longitudinal and bidirectional relations between the two remain unclear, as well as the role of gender. Consequently, this study focuses on the relation between depressive problems and three types of functioning in adolescents while testing gender differences. Depressive problems and functioning of 2,230 children were measured with structured questionnaires. The measurements took place biennially over 3 waves, from late childhood into adolescence (age range = 10-18 years). To examine the longitudinal relation between depression and functioning, path analyses with cross-lagged effects were conducted with structural equation modeling. Multigroup analyses were used to test for gender differences, which were only observed for academic performance. Other findings indicated substantial stability in depressive problems and functioning over time and within-wave correlations between depression and the 3 types of functioning. Poor social well-being was predicted by depressive problems but not the other way around. The relation between depressive and social problems was bidirectional, that is, they predicted each other. Finally, depressive problems and academic performance were bidirectionally related as well but only in girls. PMID:23566082

Verboom, Charlotte E; Sijtsema, Jelle J; Verhulst, Frank C; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Ormel, Johan

2014-01-01

383

Assessing group interaction with social language network analysis.  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we discuss a new methodology, social language network analysis (SLNA), that combines tools from social language processing and network analysis to assess socially situated working relationships within a group. Specifically, SLNA aims to identify and characterize the nature of working relationships by processing artifacts generated with computer-mediated communication systems, such as instant message texts or emails. Because social language processing is able to identify psychological, social, and emotional processes that individuals are not able to fully mask, social language network analysis can clarify and highlight complex interdependencies between group members, even when these relationships are latent or unrecognized.

Pennebaker, James (UT Austin); Scholand, Andrew Joseph; Tausczik, Yla R. (UT Austin)

2010-04-01

384

Social Networking Technologies: A "Poke" for Campus Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Handwritten notes, meeting for coffee, eye contact, a handshake, a smile--are these social practices of yesteryear, soon to be replaced by the "wall posts" and "pokes" of today's social networking technologies? Although advances in social networking technologies allow for new and perhaps more efficient means of learning and communicating, they…

Berg, Joanne; Berquam, Lori; Christoph, Kathy

2007-01-01

385

TellUsWho: Guided Social Network Data Collection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Significant gaps exist in our knowledge of real world social network structures, which in turn limit our understanding of how to design social software. One important reason for this has been that researchers have not been able to systematically probe individuals in sufficient detail about 'who' and 'how' they interact with in the social networks they wish to study. To

Stephen T. Ricken; Richard P. Schuler; Sukeshini A. Grandhi; Quentin Jones

2010-01-01

386

Disk Layout Techniques for Online Social Network Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking applications' disk access patterns differ from those of traditional applications. However, today's disk layout techniques aren't adapted to social networking workloads, and thus their performance suffers. The authors' disk layout techniques leverage community structure in a social graph to make placement decisions that optimize read latency. Their layout manager, Bondhu, incorporates these techniques and is integrated into the

Imranul Hoque; Indranil Gupta

2012-01-01

387

Improving Family Forest Knowledge Transfer through Social Network Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To better engage Maine's family forest landowners our study used social network analysis: a computational social science method for identifying stakeholders, evaluating models of engagement, and targeting areas for enhanced partnerships. Interviews with researchers associated with a research center were conducted to identify how social network

Gorczyca, Erika L.; Lyons, Patrick W.; Leahy, Jessica E.; Johnson, Teresa R.; Straub, Crista L.

2012-01-01

388

Home vs. Public Schoolers' Relationships: Differences in Social Networks.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting the lack of basic information necessary to begin to make conclusions about a home schooled child's social contacts, a study investigated the social networks of home vs. public schooled children (with a child's "social network" defined as all of the people who interact on a regular basis with the child at least once a month). The subject…

Chatham-Carpenter, April D.

389

Legal Risks for Students Using Social Networking Sites  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are significant privacy, intellectual property, copyright and disclosure risks associated with the ill-considered use of social networking sites, however, the implementation of regulatory actions may also undermine the social and emerging educational utility of social networking sites for young people. Inevitably the burden of dealing with…

Henderson, Michael; de Zwart, Melissa; Lindsay, David; Phillips, Michael

2010-01-01

390

Local Topology of Social Network Based on Motif Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Network motifs – small subgraphs that reflect local topology can be used to discover general profile and properties of the\\u000a network. Analysis of motifs for the large social networks derived from email communication is presented in the paper. The\\u000a distribution of motifs in all analyzed real social networks is very similar one another and can be treated as the network

Krzysztof Juszczyszyn; Przemyslaw Kazienko; Katarzyna Musial

2008-01-01

391

Visualising the invisible: a network approach to reveal the informal social side of student learning.  

PubMed

World-wide, universities in health sciences have transformed their curriculum to include collaborative learning and facilitate the students' learning process. Interaction has been acknowledged to be the synergistic element in this learning context. However, students spend the majority of their time outside their classroom and interaction does not stop outside the classroom. Therefore we studied how informal social interaction influences student learning. Moreover, to explore what really matters in the students learning process, a model was tested how the generally known important constructs-prior performance, motivation and social integration-relate to informal social interaction and student learning. 301 undergraduate medical students participated in this cross-sectional quantitative study. Informal social interaction was assessed using self-reported surveys following the network approach. Students' individual motivation, social integration and prior performance were assessed by the Academic Motivation Scale, the College Adaption Questionnaire and students' GPA respectively. A factual knowledge test represented student' learning. All social networks were positively associated with student learning significantly: friendships (? = 0.11), providing information to other students (? = 0.16), receiving information from other students (? = 0.25). Structural equation modelling revealed a model in which social networks increased student learning (r = 0.43), followed by prior performance (r = 0.31). In contrast to prior literature, students' academic motivation and social integration were not associated with students' learning. Students' informal social interaction is strongly associated with students' learning. These findings underline the need to change our focus from the formal context (classroom) to the informal context to optimize student learning and deliver modern medics. PMID:22294429

Hommes, J; Rienties, B; de Grave, W; Bos, G; Schuwirth, L; Scherpbier, A

2012-12-01

392

The ties that lead: A social network approach to leadership  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article investigates, for leadership research, the implications of new directions in social network theory that emphasize networks as both cognitive structures in the minds of organizational members and opportunity structures that facilitate and constrain action. We introduce the four core ideas at the heart of the network research program: the importance of relations, actors' embeddedness, the social utility of

Prasad Balkundi; Martin Kilduff

2006-01-01

393

Social Networks and Careers of Young Adults with Intellectual Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies of the general population indicate that social networks influence a person's employment situation and career, especially in regard to how a person finds and gets a good job. Recent studies suggest that networks may function in similar ways for people with certain disabilities. In order to learn about the role that social networks played in…

Eisenman, Laura T.

2007-01-01

394

Information revelation and privacy in online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Participation in social networking sites has dramatically increased in recent years. Services such as Friendster, Tribe, or the Facebook allow millions of individuals to create online profiles and share personal information with vast networks of friends - and, often, unknown numbers of strangers. In this paper we study patterns of information revelation in online social networks and their privacy implications.

Ralph Gross; Alessandro Acquisti; H. John Heinz III

2005-01-01

395

Strategies for the Diffusion of Innovations on Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate the spread of innovations on a social network. The network consists of agents that are exposed to the introduction of a new product. Consumers decide whether or not to buy the product based on their own preferences and the decisions of their neighbors in the social network. We use and extend concepts from the literature on epidemics and

Floortje Alkemade; Carolina Castaldi

2005-01-01

396

Social Networks and Career Advancement of People With Disabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although organizational social networks are known to influence career mobility, the specific direction of this influence is different for diverse employee groups. Diversity in organizational network research has been operationalized on various dimensions such as race and ethnicity, age, religion, education, occupation, and gender. Missing in this stream of research are application and implications of social networks as they influence

Mukta Kulkarni

2012-01-01

397

Exploring Sociocentric and Egocentric Approaches for Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we introduce social network analysis for investigating the effect of network position and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) use on the performance of general practitioners (GPs) residing in rural Australia. Here, we highlight the data collection procedure, its benefits and limitations and standard measures of social network data. We first suggest that collection and analysis of relational

Liaquat Hossain; Joseph Davis

2006-01-01

398

Creating Entrepreneurial Networks: Academic Entrepreneurship, Mobility and Collaboration during PhD Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Network-building activities of PhD students are an important area of study in furthering our understanding of academic entrepreneurship. This paper focuses on PhD students' participation in network-building activities defined as mobility and collaboration, as well as own interest in and perceived grade of support for commercialisation from various…

Bienkowska, Dzamila; Klofsten, Magnus

2012-01-01

399

Relationship classification in large scale online social networks and its impact on information propagation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we study two tightly coupled topics in online social networks (OSN): relationship classification and information propagation. The links in a social network often reflect social relationships among users. In this work, we first investigate identifying the relationships among social network users based on certain social network property and limited pre- known information. Social networks have been widely

Shaojie Tang; Jing Yuan; Xufei Mao; Xiang-Yang Li; Wei Chen; Guojun Dai

2011-01-01

400

Optimizing online social networks for information propagation.  

PubMed

Online users nowadays are facing serious information overload problem. In recent years, recommender systems have been widely studied to help people find relevant information. Adaptive social recommendation is one of these systems in which the connections in the online social networks are optimized for the information propagation so that users can receive interesting news or stories from their leaders. Validation of such adaptive social recommendation methods in the literature assumes uniform distribution of users' activity frequency. In this paper, our empirical analysis shows that the distribution of online users' activity is actually heterogenous. Accordingly, we propose a more realistic multi-agent model in which users' activity frequency are drawn from a power-law distribution. We find that previous social recommendation methods lead to serious delay of information propagation since many users are connected to inactive leaders. To solve this problem, we design a new similarity measure which takes into account users' activity frequencies. With this similarity measure, the average delay is significantly shortened and the recommendation accuracy is largely improved. PMID:24816894

Chen, Duan-Bing; Wang, Guan-Nan; Zeng, An; Fu, Yan; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

2014-01-01

401

Optimizing Online Social Networks for Information Propagation  

PubMed Central

Online users nowadays are facing serious information overload problem. In recent years, recommender systems have been widely studied to help people find relevant information. Adaptive social recommendation is one of these systems in which the connections in the online social networks are optimized for the information propagation so that users can receive interesting news or stories from their leaders. Validation of such adaptive social recommendation methods in the literature assumes uniform distribution of users' activity frequency. In this paper, our empirical analysis shows that the distribution of online users' activity is actually heterogenous. Accordingly, we propose a more realistic multi-agent model in which users' activity frequency are drawn from a power-law distribution. We find that previous social recommendation methods lead to serious delay of information propagation since many users are connected to inactive leaders. To solve this problem, we design a new similarity measure which takes into account users' activity frequencies. With this similarity measure, the average delay is significantly shortened and the recommendation accuracy is largely improved.

Chen, Duan-Bing; Wang, Guan-Nan; Zeng, An; Fu, Yan; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

2014-01-01

402

Social Networking Adapted for Distributed Scientific Collaboration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Share is a social networking site with novel, specially designed feature sets to enable simultaneous remote collaboration and sharing of large data sets among scientists. The site will include not only the standard features found on popular consumer-oriented social networking sites such as Facebook and Myspace, but also a number of powerful tools to extend its functionality to a science collaboration site. A Virtual Observatory is a promising technology for making data accessible from various missions and instruments through a Web browser. Sci-Share augments services provided by Virtual Observatories by enabling distributed collaboration and sharing of downloaded and/or processed data among scientists. This will, in turn, increase science returns from NASA missions. Sci-Share also enables better utilization of NASA s high-performance computing resources by providing an easy and central mechanism to access and share large files on users space or those saved on mass storage. The most common means of remote scientific collaboration today remains the trio of e-mail for electronic communication, FTP for file sharing, and personalized Web sites for dissemination of papers and research results. Each of these tools has well-known limitations. Sci-Share transforms the social networking paradigm into a scientific collaboration environment by offering powerful tools for cooperative discourse and digital content sharing. Sci-Share differentiates itself by serving as an online repository for users digital content with the following unique features: a) Sharing of any file type, any size, from anywhere; b) Creation of projects and groups for controlled sharing; c) Module for sharing files on HPC (High Performance Computing) sites; d) Universal accessibility of staged files as embedded links on other sites (e.g. Facebook) and tools (e.g. e-mail); e) Drag-and-drop transfer of large files, replacing awkward e-mail attachments (and file size limitations); f) Enterprise-level data and messaging encryption; and g) Easy-to-use intuitive workflow.

Karimabadi, Homa

2012-01-01

403

Public health, academic medicine, and the alcohol industry's corporate social responsibility activities.  

PubMed

We explored the emerging relationships among the alcohol industry, academic medicine, and the public health community in the context of public health theory dealing with corporate social responsibility. We reviewed sponsorship of scientific research, efforts to influence public perceptions of research, dissemination of scientific information, and industry-funded policy initiatives. To the extent that the scientific evidence supports the reduction of alcohol consumption through regulatory and legal measures, the academic community has come into increasing conflict with the views of the alcohol industry. We concluded that the alcohol industry has intensified its scientific and policy-related activities under the general framework of corporate social responsibility initiatives, most of which can be described as instrumental to the industry's economic interests. PMID:23237151

Babor, Thomas F; Robaina, Katherine

2013-02-01

404

Mobile Context Provider for Social Networking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability to infer user context based on a mobile device together with a set of external sensors opens up the way to new context-aware services and applications. In this paper, we describe a mobile context provider that makes use of sensors available in a smartphone as well as sensors externally connected via bluetooth. We describe the system architecture from sensor data acquisition to feature extraction, context inference and the publication of context information to well-known social networking services such as Twitter and Hi5. In the current prototype, context inference is based on decision trees, but the middleware allows the integration of other inference engines. Experimental results suggest that the proposed solution is a promising approach to provide user context to both local and network-level services.

Santos, André C.; Cardoso, João M. P.; Ferreira, Diogo R.; Diniz, Pedro C.

405

Understanding how social networking influences perceived satisfaction with conference experiences  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Social networking is a key benefit derived from participation in conferences that bind the ties of a professional community. Building social networks can lead to satisfactory experiences while furthering participants' long- and short-term career goals. Although investigations of social networking can lend insight into how to effectively engage individuals and groups within a professional cohort, this area has been largely overlooked in past research. The present study investigates the relationship between social networking and satisfaction with the 10th Biennial Conference of Research on the Colorado Plateau using structural equation modelling. Results partially support the hypothesis that three dimensions of social networking – interpersonal connections, social cohesion, and secondary associations – positively contribute to the performance of various conference attributes identified in two focus group sessions. The theoretical and applied contributions of this paper shed light on the social systems formed within professional communities and resource allocation among service providers.

van Riper, Carena J.; van Riper, Charles, III; Kyle, Gerard T.; Lee, Martha, E.

2013-01-01

406

The role of parenting self-efficacy in children? social and academic behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

A latent variable structural model was constructed to test the relations among mothers’ and fathers’ parenting self-efficacy\\u000a (PSE), their loneliness, and their child’s peer-evaluated social competence, self-evaluated loneliness, teacher-evaluated\\u000a motivational orientation, and academic skills. In order to do this, first the Self-Efficacy for Parenting Tasks Index (Coleman\\u000a & Karraker, 2000) was applied to a sample of mothers (n=876) and fathers

Niina Junttila; Marija Vauras; Eero Laakkonen

2007-01-01

407

Social Networks of Women with Undefined Musculoskeletal Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted to investigate social integration among, and the availability of social support for, female patients with undefined musculoskeletal disorder compared to women with coronary heart disease. The aim was to elucidate the importance of a clear diagnosis for the social network relationships of these female patients. For the measurement of social support two instruments were used: an

Majen Espwall; Niclas Olofsson

2002-01-01

408

A Generalization Based Approach for Anonymizing Weighted Social Network Graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The increasing popularity of social networks, such as online communities and telecommunication systems, has generated interesting\\u000a knowledge discovery and data mining problems. Since social networks usually contain personal information of individuals, preserving\\u000a privacy in the release of social network data becomes an important concern. An adversary can use many types of background\\u000a knowledge to conduct an attack, such as topological

Xiangyu Liu; Xiaochun Yang

409

Predictors of Academic-Related Stress in College Students: An Examination of Coping, Social Support, Parenting, and Anxiety  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined potential predictors of the academic-related stress experienced by college students. In particular, the relationships among the coping strategies used by college students, social support, the parenting style used by college students' mothers and fathers, college students' experience of anxiety, and academic-related stress were…

Smith, Tara; Renk, Kimberly

2007-01-01

410

The End of Institutional Repositories and the Beginning of Social Academic Research Service: An Enhanced Role for Libraries  

Microsoft Academic Search

As more and more universities establish Institutional Repositories (IR), awareness is developing about the limitations of IRs in enhancing the academic research service. The concept of an IR needs to be expanded to include the integration of the processes that transform intellectual endeavor into a broadening array of academic and research support services which are fundamentally social. These include, but

Stuart M Basefsky

2009-01-01

411

The Academic and Social-Emotional Needs of Secondary Latino English Learners: Implications for Screening, Identification, and Instructional Planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nationwide statistics show that English Learners in grades 6–12 are often among the lowest performing students in all academic areas and have some of the highest rates of dropout. Their academic deficiencies are usually attributed to their limited English language proficiency, often ignoring the social-emotional, behavioral, and cognitive problems they might be experiencing. The purpose of this article is to

Sara M. Castro-Olivo; Jorge A. Preciado; Amanda K. Sanford; Valerie Perry

2011-01-01

412

On Being Gifted, but Sad and Misunderstood: Social, emotional, and academic outcomes of gifted students in the Wollongong Youth Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examined the relationships among personality factors, social support, emotional well-being, and academic achievement in 65 gifted secondary students, a sample drawn from a longitudinal study of over 950 students. The research demonstrated that, compared to their nongifted peers, gifted students had significantly higher academic outcomes for all subject areas except Geography and Physical Education. Teachers rated the gifted

Wilma Vialle; Patrick C. L. Heaven; Joseph Ciarrochi

2007-01-01

413

Location recommendation for location-based social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we study the research issues in realizing location recommendation services for large-scale location-based social networks, by exploiting the social and geographical characteristics of users and locations\\/places. Through our analysis on a dataset collected from Foursquare, a popular location-based social networking system, we observe that there exists strong social and geospatial ties among users and their favorite locations\\/places

Mao Ye; Peifeng Yin; Wang-Chien Lee

2010-01-01

414

Adolescent Substance Use in Different Social and Peer Contexts: A Social Network Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This exploratory study investigates whether associations between social network measures and substance use differ according to type of substance and social context. The analyses use data obtained from 13 and 15 year olds (N=3146) in a school-based survey and focus on three social network measures: sociometric position (e.g. group, dyad, isolate);…

Pearson, Michael; Sweeting, Helen; West, Patrick; Young, Robert; Gordon, Jacki; Turner, Katrina

2006-01-01

415

The effect of social interaction on learning engagement in a social networking environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the impact of social interactions among a class of undergraduate students on their learning engagement in a social networking environment. Thirteen undergraduate students enrolled in a course in a university in Hong Kong used an Elgg-based social networking platform throughout a semester to develop their digital portfolios and interact with each other. Student online activities were analyzed

Jie Lu; Daniel Churchill

2012-01-01

416

Social network analysis and agent-based modeling in social epidemiology  

PubMed Central

The past five years have seen a growth in the interest in systems approaches in epidemiologic research. These approaches may be particularly appropriate for social epidemiology. Social network analysis and agent-based models (ABMs) are two approaches that have been used in the epidemiologic literature. Social network analysis involves the characterization of social networks to yield inference about how network structures may influence risk exposures among those in the network. ABMs can promote population-level inference from explicitly programmed, micro-level rules in simulated populations over time and space. In this paper, we discuss the implementation of these models in social epidemiologic research, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. Network analysis may be ideal for understanding social contagion, as well as the influences of social interaction on population health. However, network analysis requires network data, which may sacrifice generalizability, and causal inference from current network analytic methods is limited. ABMs are uniquely suited for the assessment of health determinants at multiple levels of influence that may couple with social interaction to produce population health. ABMs allow for the exploration of feedback and reciprocity between exposures and outcomes in the etiology of complex diseases. They may also provide the opportunity for counterfactual simulation. However, appropriate implementation of ABMs requires a balance between mechanistic rigor and model parsimony, and the precision of output from complex models is limited. Social network and agent-based approaches are promising in social epidemiology, but continued development of each approach is needed.

2012-01-01

417

Classroom peer relationships and behavioral engagement in elementary school: the role of social network equity.  

PubMed

Applying social capital and systems theories of social processes, we examine the role of the classroom peer context in the behavioral engagement of low-income students (N = 80) in urban elementary school classrooms (N = 22). Systematic child observations were conducted to assess behavioral engagement among second to fifth graders in the fall and spring of the same school year. Classroom observations, teacher and child questionnaires, and social network data were collected in the fall. Confirming prior research, results from multilevel models indicate that students with more behavioral difficulties or less academic motivation in the fall were less behaviorally engaged in the spring. Extending prior research, classrooms with more equitably distributed and interconnected social ties-social network equity-had more behaviorally engaged students in the spring, especially in classrooms with higher levels of observed organization (i.e., effective management of behavior, time, and attention). Moreover, social network equity attenuated the negative relation between student behavioral difficulties and behavioral engagement, suggesting that students with behavioral difficulties were less disengaged in classrooms with more equitably distributed and interconnected social ties. Findings illuminate the need to consider classroom peer contexts in future research and intervention focused on the behavioral engagement of students in urban elementary schools. PMID:24081319

Cappella, Elise; Kim, Ha Yeon; Neal, Jennifer W; Jackson, Daisy R

2013-12-01

418

Novel Visualizations and Interactions for Social Networks Exploration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last decade, the popularity of social networking applications has dramatically increased. Social networks are collection of persons or organizations connected by relations. Members of Facebook listed as friends or persons connected by family ties in genealogical trees are examples of social networks. Today's web surfers are often part of many online social networks: they communicate in groups or forums on topics of interests, exchange emails with their friends and colleagues, express their ideas on public blogs, share videos on YouTube, exchange and comment photos on Flickr, participate to the edition of the online encyclopedia Wikipedia or contribute to daily news by collaborating to Wikinews or Agoravox.

Riche, Nathalie Henry; Fekete, Jean-Daniel

419

The NFL Coaching Network: Analysis of the Social Network Among Professional Football Coaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

The interactions of professional football coaches and teams in the National Football League (NFL) form a complex social network. This network provides a great opportunity to ana- lyze the influence that coaching mentors have on their pro- teges. In this paper, we use this social network to identify notable coaches and characterize championship coaches. We also utilize the coaching network

Andrew Fast; David Jensen

420

Social Networking-Another Breach In The Wall  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the increasing popularity of social networks like Facebook and MySpace, such sites have lately become the favourite destinations for spammers and attackers. Social networks have experienced complex social engineering attacks, massive spam and aggressive malware distribution in the recent past. This paper presents a practical case study of social engineering, malware distribution and phishing attacks against social networking sites that are identified over last few months. It is explained how private data of the users are exposed to attackers and how easily their privacy is compromised as a result of these attacks and their own careless behaviour.

Bamnote, Gajendra; Patil, Gajendra; Shejole, Amol

2010-11-01

421

The Social Fabric of Elementary Schools: A Network Typology of Social Interaction among Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While researchers are currently studying various forms of social network interaction among teachers for their impact on educational policy implementation and practice, knowledge on how various types of networks are interrelated is limited. The goal of this study is to understand the dimensionality that may underlie various types of social networks

Moolenaar, Nienke M.; Sleegers, Peter J. C.; Karsten, Sjoerd; Daly, Alan J.

2012-01-01

422

The Evolution of Social and Economic Networks 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

: We examine the dynamic formation and stochastic evolution of networks connecting individuals.The payoff to an individual from an economic or social activity depends on the network of connectionsamong individuals. Over time individuals form and sever links connecting themselves to other individualsbased on the improvement that the resulting network offers them relative to the current network. We callsuch sequences of

Matthew O. Jackson

1999-01-01

423

A Strategic Model of Social and Economic Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the stability and efficiency of social and economic networks, when self-interested individuals can form or sever links. First, for two stylized models, we characterize the stable and efficient networks. There does not always exist a stable network that is efficient. Next, we show that this tension persists generally: to assure that there exists a stable network that is

Matthew O. Jackson; Asher Wolinsky

1996-01-01

424

Academe as Extreme Sport: Black Women, Faculty Development, and Networking  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we describe the experiences of Black women academics who participated in one or more of the following programs geared towards supporting the research and professional development of faculty: (a) the Sisters of the Academy's (SOTA) Research Boot Camp; (b) the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity's Faculty Success…

Davis, Dannielle Joy; Chaney, Cassandra; Edwards, LaWanda; Thompson-Rogers, G. Kaye; Gines, Kathryn T.

2012-01-01

425

SocialSwarm: Exploiting distance in social networks for collaborative flash file distribution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks can serve as an effective mechanism for distribution of vulnerability patches and other malware immunization code. We propose a novel approach - SocialSwarm - by which peers exploit distances to their social peers to approximate levels of altruism and to collaborate on flash distribution of large files. SocialSwarm supports heterogeneous BitTorrent swarms of mixed social and non-social peers.

Matthew J. Probst; Jun Cheol Park; Ravin Abraham; Sneha Kumar Kasera

2010-01-01

426

Effect of a Career, Academic, Personal and Social Growth High School Transition Program Option on 9th-Grade Students' Achievement, Behavior, and Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a career, academic, personal, and social high school transition program option on 9th-grade students' achievement, behavior, and engagement. Students in the career, academic, personal, and social group (n = 30) and the comparison academic/elective course option programs group (n = 30)…

Gauchat, Tiffanie A.

2010-01-01

427

Social networks, social support mechanisms, and quality of life after breast cancer diagnosis  

PubMed Central

Purpose We examined mechanisms through which social relationships influence quality of life (QOL) in breast cancer survivors. Methods This study included 3,139 women from the Pathways Study who were diagnosed with breast cancer from 2006-2011 and provided data on social networks (presence of spouse or intimate partner, religious/social ties, volunteering, and numbers of close friends and relatives), social support (tangible, emotional/informational, affection, positive social interaction), and quality of life (QOL), measured by the FACT-B, approximately two months post-diagnosis. We used logistic models to evaluate associations between social network size, social support, and lower vs. higher than median QOL scores. We further stratified by stage at diagnosis and treatment. Results In multivariate-adjusted analyses, women who were characterized as socially isolated had significantly lower FACT-B (OR=2.18, 95%CI:1.72-2.77), physical well-being (WB) (OR=1.61, 95%CI:1.27-2.03), functional WB (OR=2.08, 95%CI:1.65-2.63), social WB (OR=3.46, 95%CI:2.73-4.39), and emotional WB (OR=1.67, 95%CI:1.33-2.11) scores and higher breast cancer symptoms (OR=1.48, 95%CI:1.18-1.87), compared with socially integrated women. Each social network member independently predicted higher QOL. Simultaneous adjustment for social networks and social support partially attenuated associations between social networks and QOL. The strongest mediator and type of social support that was most predictive of QOL outcomes was “positive social interaction”. However, each type of support was important depending on outcome, stage, and treatment status. Conclusions Larger social networks and greater social support were related to higher QOL after a diagnosis of breast cancer. Effective social support interventions need to evolve beyond social-emotional interventions and need to account for disease severity and treatment status.

Kroenke, Candyce H; Kwan, Marilyn L.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Ergas, Isaac J.; Wright, Jaime D.; Caan, Bette J.; Hershman, Dawn; Kushi, Lawrence H.

2013-01-01

428

Social networks, social support mechanisms, and quality of life after breast cancer diagnosis.  

PubMed

We examined mechanisms through which social relationships influence quality of life (QOL) in breast cancer survivors. This study included 3,139 women from the Pathways Study who were diagnosed with breast cancer from 2006 to 2011 and provided data on social networks (the presence of a spouse or intimate partner, religious/social ties, volunteering, and numbers of close friends and relatives), social support (tangible support, emotional/informational support, affection, positive social interaction), and QOL, measured by the FACT-B, approximately 2 months post diagnosis. We used logistic models to evaluate associations between social network size, social support, and lower versus higher than median QOL scores. We further stratified by stage at diagnosis and treatment. In multivariate-adjusted analyses, women who were characterized as socially isolated had significantly lower FACT-B (OR = 2.18, 95 % CI: 1.72-2.77), physical well-being (WB) (OR = 1.61, 95 % CI: 1.27-2.03), functional WB (OR = 2.08, 95 % CI: 1.65-2.63), social WB (OR = 3.46, 95 % CI: 2.73-4.39), and emotional WB (OR = 1.67, 95 % CI: 1.33-2.11) scores and higher breast cancer symptoms (OR = 1.48, 95 % CI: 1.18-1.87) compared with socially integrated women. Each social network member independently predicted higher QOL. Simultaneous adjustment for social networks and social support partially attenuated associations between social networks and QOL. The strongest mediator and type of social support that was most predictive of QOL outcomes was "positive social interaction." However, each type of support was important depending on outcome, stage, and treatment status. Larger social networks and greater social support were related to higher QOL after a diagnosis of breast cancer. Effective social support interventions need to evolve beyond social-emotional interventions and need to account for disease severity and treatment status. PMID:23657404

Kroenke, Candyce H; Kwan, Marilyn L; Neugut, Alfred I; Ergas, Isaac J; Wright, Jaime D; Caan, Bette J; Hershman, Dawn; Kushi, Lawrence H

2013-06-01

429

Antecedents and Consequences of Online Social Networking Behavior: The Case of Facebook  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the recent popularity of online social networks, there are few available studies that explain the differences between real life and internet social networks. Authoritative information about the outcomes of using social networking websites is even more sparse. In an attempt to close this literature gap, this exploratory study found that online social networks and real life social networks are

Adam Acar

2008-01-01

430

Social network models predict movement and connectivity in ecological landscapes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Network analysis is on the rise across scientific disciplines because of its ability to reveal complex, and often emergent, patterns and dynamics. Nonetheless, a growing concern in network analysis is the use of limited data for constructing networks. This concern is strikingly relevant to ecology and conservation biology, where network analysis is used to infer connectivity across landscapes. In this context, movement among patches is the crucial parameter for interpreting connectivity but because of the difficulty of collecting reliable movement data, most network analysis proceeds with only indirect information on movement across landscapes rather than using observed movement to construct networks. Statistical models developed for social networks provide promising alternatives for landscape network construction because they can leverage limited movement information to predict linkages. Using two mark-recapture datasets on individual movement and connectivity across landscapes, we test whether commonly used network constructions for interpreting connectivity can predict actual linkages and network structure, and we contrast these approaches to social network models. We find that currently applied network constructions for assessing connectivity consistently, and substantially, overpredict actual connectivity, resulting in considerable overestimation of metapopulation lifetime. Furthermore, social network models provide accurate predictions of network structure, and can do so with remarkably limited data on movement. Social network models offer a flexible and powerful way for not only understanding the factors influencing connectivity but also for providing more reliable estimates of connectivity and metapopulation persistence in the face of limited data.

Fletcher, Jr. , R. J.; Acevedo, M. A.; Reichert, B. E.; Pias, K. E.; Kitchens, W. M.

2011-01-01

431

Academic and social dimensions of student experience: The high school science classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study I asked how classroom participants defined and acted on academic and social dimensions of classroom life. Because little is known about how students think and feel about classroom experience (Erickson & Schultz, 1992), I focused on their perspectives. In attempting to sort out and report student perspectives, I used a case of one high school science classroom, Mr. Dansen's. Approaching the study of that case much like an anthropologist would, I treated the classroom as a "local world of science with characteristic habits of mind, behaviors, and meaning systems" (Page, 1994, p. 6). I assumed the centrality of meaning in guiding human behavior, accordingly, I used a social constructivist or interpretive theoretical lens. Ethnographic methods were used to document participants' views across a range of strategies: Classroom observations, interviews, a student focus group, a brief questionnaire, and the collection of school and classroom documents. I concluded that curriculum meaning-making is a series of balancing acts. In lessons teachers and students juggle diverse often contradictory academic and social relations. All of the situated activity constructs a fundamental imbalance in classroom experience. Students react to that perceived imbalance. Specifically, three categories of student response were ascertained. One, student isolates or those who withdraw significantly on some academic or social measure, about 45% of students in his class. Two, student enthusiasts; or those most enthusiastic about science and their science teacher, only 5% of students. Three, students who are ambivalent and waffle between engagement and withdrawal, about 50% of students. In sum, students withdrew in large numbers from the educational encounter. The major implication of this research is that students are clear-headed in their assessments of classroom life. Students' interpretations, in turn, directly influence whether or why they find school knowledge important. Thus, this study reveals the importance of considering student input as a legitimate factor in educational equations.

Longo, Ellen O'neil

432

Spread of two linked social norms on complex interaction networks.  

PubMed

In this paper, we study the spread of social norms, such as rules and customs that are components of human cultures. We consider the spread of two social norms, which are linked through individual behaviors. Spreading social norms depend not only on the social network structure, but also on the learning system. We consider four social network structures: (1) complete mixing, in which each individual interacts with the others at random, (2) lattice, in which each individual interacts with its neighbors with some probability and with the others at random, (3) power-law network, in which a few influential people have more social contacts than the others, and (4) random graph network, in which the number of contacts follows a Poisson distribution. Using the lattice model, we also investigate the effect of the small-world phenomenon on the dynamics of social norms. In our models, each individual learns a social norm by trial and error (individual learning) and also imitates the other's social norm (social learning). We investigate how social network structure and learning systems affect the spread of two linked social norms. Our main results are: (1) Social learning does not lead to coexistence of social norms. Individual learning produces coexistence, and the dynamics of coexistence depend on which social norms are learned individually. (2) Social norms spread fastest in the power-law network model, followed by the random graph model, the complete mixing model, the two-dimensional lattice model and the one-dimensional lattice. (3) We see a "small world effect" in the one-dimensional model, but not in two dimensions. PMID:15276000

Nakamaru, Mayuko; Levin, Simon A

2004-09-01

433

How social networks influence female students' choices to major in engineering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scope and Method of Study: This study examined how social influence plays a part in female students' choices of college major, specifically engineering instead of science, technology, and math. Social influence may show itself through peers, family members, and teachers and may encompass resources under the umbrella of social capital. The purpose of this study was to examine how female students' social networks, through the lens of social capital, influence her major choice of whether or not to study engineering. The variables of peer influence, parental influence, teacher/counselor influence, perception of engineering, and academic background were addressed in a 52 question, Likert scale survey. This survey has been modified from an instrument previously used by Reyer (2007) at Bradley University. Data collection was completed using the Dillman (2009) tailored design model. Responses were grouped into four main scales of the dependent variables of social influence, encouragement, perceptions of engineering and career motivation. A factor analysis was completed on the four factors as a whole, and individual questions were not be analyzed. Findings and Conclusions: This study addressed the differences in social network support for female freshmen majoring in engineering versus female freshmen majoring in science, technology, or math. Social network support, when working together from all angles of peers, teachers, parents, and teachers/counselors, transforms itself into a new force that is more powerful than the summation of the individual parts. Math and science preparation also contributed to female freshmen choosing to major in engineering instead of choosing to major in science, technology, or math. The STEM pipeline is still weak and ways in which to reinforce it should be examined. Social network support is crucial for female freshmen who are majoring in science, technology, engineering, and math.

Weinland, Kathryn Ann

434

Understanding Classrooms through Social Network Analysis: A Primer for Social Network Analysis in Education Research  

PubMed Central

Social interactions between students are a major and underexplored part of undergraduate education. Understanding how learning relationships form in undergraduate classrooms, as well as the impacts these relationships have on learning outcomes, can inform educators in unique ways and improve educational reform. Social network analysis (SNA) provides the necessary tool kit for investigating questions involving relational data. We introduce basic concepts in SNA, along with methods for data collection, data processing, and data analysis, using a previously collected example study on an undergraduate biology classroom as a tutorial. We conduct descriptive analyses of the structure of the network of costudying relationships. We explore generative processes that create observed study networks between students and also test for an association between network position and success on exams. We also cover practical issues, such as the unique aspects of human subjects review for network studies. Our aims are to convince readers that using SNA in classroom environments allows rich and informative analyses to take place and to provide some initial tools for doing so, in the process inspiring future educational studies incorporating relational data.

Wiggins, Benjamin L.; Goodreau, Steven M.

2014-01-01

435

Linking Parental Socialization to Interpersonal Protective Processes, Academic Self-Presentation, and Expectations among Rural African American Youth  

PubMed Central

Data obtained from two waves of a longitudinal study of 671 rural African American families, with an 11-year-old preadolescent, were examined to test pathways through which racial and ethnic socialization influence youth's self-presentation and academic expectation and anticipation through the enhancement of youth self-pride. Structural equation modeling analyses indicated that racial and ethnic socialization was linked with youth's expectation and anticipation for academic success, through youth self-pride, including racial identity and self-esteem, and academic self-presentation. The results highlight the need to disaggregate racial and ethnic socialization in order to better understand how these parenting domains uniquely forecast youth self-pride, as well as their orientation to education and academic success.

Murry, Velma McBride; Berkel, Cady; Brody, Gene H.; Miller, Shannon J.; Chen, Yi-fu

2008-01-01

436

Classroom Social Capital: Development of a Measure of Instrumental Social Support within Academic Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many universities implement programs and interventions to increase students' perceived instrumental social support within the classroom setting, yet to date, no measures exist to adequately assess such perceptions. In response to this need, the current research developed an operational definition of instrumental classroom social support and also…

Shecter, Julie

2009-01-01

437

Assessing Trust by Disclosure in Online Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Knowing about trust between members of an online social network (OSN) is essential for many applications. In this paper we propose and discuss methods for deriving information about trust within a social network by analyzing disclosure of personal information items. A formal model of trust and disclosure is presented and possible trust functions were analysed. We distinguish different types of

Guido Barbian

2011-01-01

438

Examining information behavior through social networks : An interdisciplinary review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to review the post-1996 literature of information science and other disciplines for the application of social network theory and social network analysis to research that provides an understanding of information environments. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The literature review involved a content analysis of 373 articles retrieved from five electronic journal databases offering broad disciplinary

Barbara Schultz-Jones

2009-01-01

439

Social Network Analysis to Evaluate an Interdisciplinary Research Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We sought to examine the growth of an interdisciplinary center using social network analysis techniques. Specific aims were to examine the patterns of growth and interdisciplinary connectedness of the Center and to identify the social network characteristics of its productive members. The setting for this study was The Center for Interdisciplinary…

Aboelela, Sally W.; Merrill, Jacqueline A.; Carley, Kathleen M.; Larson, Elaine

2007-01-01

440

Mining Social Networks for Viral Marketing Using Fuzzy Logic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Viral marketing has been one of the favorite strategies for marketers to achieve deeper market penetration. As such, viral marketing like recommendation network based marketing depends on the dynamics of the social influential interaction. The dynamics of the recommendations in social networks and their impact on the desired outcome in the form of purchase decisions can be studied as per

Soumya Banerjee; Hameed Al-Qaheri; Aboul Ella Hassanien

2010-01-01

441

Social Networks of Homeless Youth in Emerging Adulthood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little is known about the social networks of homeless youth in emerging adulthood despite the importance of this information for interventions to reduce health risks. This study examined the composition of social networks, and the risks and supports present within them, in a random sample of 349 homeless youth (33.4% female, 23.9% African…

Wenzel, Suzanne; Holloway, Ian; Golinelli, Daniela; Ewing, Brett; Bowman, Richard; Tucker, Joan

2012-01-01

442

A Social Network Analysis of Student Retention Using Archival Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study attempts to determine if a relationship exists between first-to-second-year retention and social network variables for a cohort of first-year students at a small liberal arts college. The social network is reconstructed using not survey data as is most common, but rather using archival data from a student information system. Each…

Eckles, James E.; Stradley, Eric G.

2012-01-01

443

Location-Based Social Networking: Impact on Trust in Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Location-based social networking (LBSN) is a service that utilizes location information to facilitate social networking. LBSN applications allow users to view the locations of their “friends.” They also may allow users to view information about other users of LBSN applications that are located in proximity. Users invite their friends to participate in LBSN. A process of consent follows in which

Sarah Fusco; Roba Abbas; Katina Michael; Anas Aloudat

2012-01-01

444

Employment, Social Networks, and Health in the Retirement Years.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined impact of employment on health of retirees (n=175). Results indicated that employment in retirement years was related to larger social networks and indirectly to better perceived health. Of three social network factors identified (family, friends, confidants), employment was significantly related only to friendship component. (Author/NB)

Mor-Barak, Michal E.; And Others

1992-01-01

445

Scholars and Faculty Members' Lived Experiences in Online Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research into faculty members' use of technology and social networking sites has largely focused upon pedagogical practice, at the expense of understanding user experiences with these technologies. Through phenomenological interviews with three faculty members, we investigate their lived experiences with social networking sites. Results point to a…

Veletsianos, George; Kimmons, Royce

2013-01-01

446

The Social Networking Arena: Battle of the Sexes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social networking via texting, Facebook, Twitter, and similar media is enormously popular with students, though it often leads to communication challenges along gender lines. Research supports the fact that men and women have divergent expectations for social networking and use it differently. Students can benefit from classroom experiences that…

Clipson, Timothy W.; Wilson, S. Ann; DuFrene, Debbie D.

2012-01-01

447

A Survey on Link Prediction Models for Social Network Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Link prediction for social network data is a fundamental data mining task in various application domains, including social network analysis, in- formation retrieval, recommendation systems, record linkage, marketing and bioinformatics. There are a variety of techniques for the link prediction problem, ranging from graph theory, metric learning, statistical relational learning to matrix factorization and probabilistic graphical models. In this survey,

Evan Wei Xiang

448

Organizational Social Network Research: Core Ideas and Key Debates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given the growing popularity of the social network perspective across diverse organizational subject areas, this review examines the coherence of the research tradition (in terms of leading ideas from which the diversity of new research derives) and appraises current directions and controversies. The leading ideas at the heart of the organizational social network research program include: an emphasis on relations

Martin Kilduff; Daniel J. Brass

2010-01-01

449

Potential of Social Networking Sites for Distance Education Student Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This chapter explores the potential of social networking sites for increasing student engagement for distance education learners. The authors present a modified student engagement model with a focus on the integration of technology, specifically social networking sites for community college distance education learners. The chapter concludes with…

Lester, Jaime; Perini, Michael

2010-01-01

450

Teachers Beware! The Dark Side of Social Networking  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Think teachers can post what they want on their own time? Think again. Many have lost their jobs over social networking gaffes in recent years. In this article, the author shares what he has learned about how school districts cope with teachers and online social networking sites, and offers recommendations to teachers who want to have an online…

Belch, Harry Ess

2012-01-01

451

The Buzz on Campus: Social Networking Takes Hold  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article talks about the latest trend in education, which is social networking. As this phenomenon continues to grow, community colleges are getting into the act, launching online initiatives and harnessing the technology to communicate, promote, and conduct important school business. School administrators believe that social networking can…

Violino, Bob

2009-01-01

452

Are Social Networking Websites Educational? Information Capsule. Volume 0909  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More and more school districts across the country are joining social networking sites, such as Facebook and MySpace. This Information Capsule discusses the frequency with which school districts are using social networking sites, how districts are using the sites, and potential drawbacks associated with their use. Issues for districts to consider…

Blazer, Christie

2009-01-01

453

Informal Social Networks amongst Administrative Staff at a University Hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study we apply Social Network Analysis and Agent Based Simulation techniques to visualize and explore informal social networks amongst staff at the Akdeniz University Hospital to assess and evaluate properties of the organization in term s of its ability to share knowledge and innovate, which is crucial for healthcare organizations delivering a health service. We first prepared an

Ugur Bilge; Utku Senol; Osman Saka

2009-01-01

454

Using Social Network Methods to Study School Leadership  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social network analysis is increasingly used in the study of policy implementation and school leadership. A key question that remains is that of instrument validity--that is, the question of whether these social network survey instruments measure what they purport to measure. In this paper, we describe our work to examine the validity of the…

Pitts, Virginia M.; Spillane, James P.

2009-01-01

455

Raccoon social networks and the potential for disease transmission.  

PubMed

Raccoons are an important vector of rabies and other pathogens. The degree to which these pathogens can spread through a raccoon population should be closely linked to association rates between individual raccoons. Most studies of raccoon sociality have found patterns consistent with low levels of social connectivity within populations, thus the likelihood of direct pathogen transmission between raccoons is theoretically low. We used proximity detecting collars and social network metrics to calculate the degree of social connectivity in an urban raccoon population for purposes of estimating potential pathogen spread. In contrast to previous assumptions, raccoon social association networks were highly connected, and all individuals were connected to one large social network during 15 out of 18 months of study. However, these metrics may overestimate the potential for a pathogen to spread through a population, as many of the social connections were based on relatively short contact periods. To more closely reflect varying probabilities of pathogen spread, we censored the raccoon social networks based on the total amount of time spent in close proximity between two individuals per month. As this time criteria for censoring the social networks increased from one to thirty minutes, corresponding measures of network connectivity declined. These findings demonstrate that raccoon populations are much more tightly connected than would have been predicted based on previous studies, but also point out that additional research is needed to calculate more precise transmission probabilities by infected individuals, and determine how disease infection changes normal social behaviors. PMID:24130746

Hirsch, Ben T; Prange, Suzanne; Hauver, Stephanie A; Gehrt, Stanley D

2013-01-01

456

How can social network analysis contribute to social behavior research in applied ethology?  

PubMed Central

Social network analysis is increasingly used by behavioral ecologists and primatologists to describe the patterns and quality of interactions among individuals. We provide an overview of this methodology, with examples illustrating how it can be used to study social behavior in applied contexts. Like most kinds of social interaction analyses, social network analysis provides information about direct relationships (e.g. dominant–subordinate relationships). However, it also generates a more global model of social organization that determines how individual patterns of social interaction relate to individual and group characteristics. A particular strength of this approach is that it provides standardized mathematical methods for calculating metrics of sociality across levels of social organization, from the population and group levels to the individual level. At the group level these metrics can be used to track changes in social network structures over time, evaluate the effect of the environment on social network structure, or compare social structures across groups, populations or species. At the individual level, the metrics allow quantification of the heterogeneity of social experience within groups and identification of individuals who may play especially important roles in maintaining social stability or information flow throughout the network.

Makagon, Maja M.; McCowan, Brenda; Mench, Joy A.

2013-01-01

457

Social Network Extraction and Analysis Based on Multimodal Dyadic Interaction  

PubMed Central

Social interactions are a very important component in people’s lives. Social network analysis has become a common technique used to model and quantify the properties of social interactions. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework to explore the characteristics of a social network extracted from multimodal dyadic interactions. For our study, we used a set of videos belonging to New York Times’ Blogging Heads opinion blog. The Social Network is represented as an oriented graph, whose directed links are determined by the Influence Model. The links’ weights are a measure of the “influence” a person has over the other. The states of the Influence Model encode automatically extracted audio/visual features from our videos using state-of-the art algorithms. Our results are reported in terms of accuracy of audio/visual data fusion for speaker segmentation and centrality measures used to characterize the extracted social network.

Escalera, Sergio; Baro, Xavier; Vitria, Jordi; Radeva, Petia; Raducanu, Bogdan

2012-01-01

458

Latino social network dynamics and the Hurricane Katrina disaster.  

PubMed

The aim of this qualitative research was to examine the dynamics of existing and emerging social networks among Latino survivors of Hurricane Katrina. Data were generated through individual, in-depth interviews conducted with 65 Latinos within six months of the storm striking the Gulf Coast of the United States in August 2005. The findings illustrated both the role of social networks in gathering information, making decisions and accessing resources, and how these existing social networks were disrupted and strained by overwhelming needs. Broader structural issues, including poverty and a lack of transportation, combined with marginalised status as immigrants, further constrained access to essential information and resources. In response, new, if temporary, social networks emerged, based primarily on shared nationality, language, and a sense of collective commitment. Practice implications include the need to consider the social network dynamics of marginalised groups in developing innovative strategies to overcome structural barriers to accessing resources essential for disaster preparedness and survival. PMID:21623889

Hilfinger Messias, DeAnne K; Barrington, Clare; Lacy, Elaine

2012-01-01

459

Emotional intelligence skills for maintaining social networks in healthcare organizations.  

PubMed

For healthcare organizations to survive in these increasingly challenging times, leadership and management must face mounting interpersonal concerns. The authors present the boundaries of internal and external social networks with respect to leadership and managerial functions: Social networks within the organization are stretched by reductions in available resources and structural ambiguity, whereas external social networks are stressed by interorganizational competitive pressures. The authors present the development of emotional intelligence skills in employees as a strategic training objective that can strengthen the internal and external social networks of healthcare organizations. The authors delineate the unique functions of leadership and management with respect to the application of emotional intelligence skills and discuss training and future research implications for emotional intelligence skill sets and social networks. PMID:15754856

Freshman, Brenda; Rubino, Louis

2004-01-01

460

Personal Social Network Factors Associated with Overdose Prevention Training Participation  

PubMed Central

We investigated social network factors associated with participation in overdose prevention training among injection drug users (IDUs). From 2008-2010, 106 IDUs who had witnessed an overdose in the past year from two syringe exchange programs in Los Angeles provided data on: overdose prevention training status (trained vs. untrained), social networks, history of overdose, and demographics. In multivariate logistic regression, naming at least one network member who had been trained in overdose prevention was significantly associated with being trained (Adjusted Odds Ratio 3.25, 95% Confidence Interval 1.09, 9.68). Using social network approaches may help increase training participation. Limitations are noted.

Iverson, Ellen; Wong, Carolyn F.; Jackson-Bloom, Jennifer; McNeeley, Miles; Davidson, Peter J.; McCarty, Christopher; Kral, Alex H.; Lankenau, Stephen E.

2013-01-01

461

Unveiling facebook: a measurement study of social network based applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online social networking sites such as Facebook and MyS- pace have become increasingly popular, with close to 500 million users as of August 2008. The introduction of the Facebook Developer Platform and OpenSocial allows third- party developers to launch their own applications for the existing massive user base. The viral growth of these social applications can potentially influence how content

Atif Nazir; Saqib Raza; Chen-nee Chuah

2008-01-01

462

Professionalism in Student Online Social Networking: The Role of Educators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social media now form a common part of university students' experience. Both at university and after graduation, in their personal and professional lives, social media offer opportunities for connection previously unavailable. The ubiquitous nature of social networking has brought with it professional and ethical issues that need to be…

Chester, A.; Kienhuis, M.; Pisani, H.; Shahwan-Akl, L.; White, K.

2013-01-01

463

Odyssey of the Mind: Social Networking in Cyberschool  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

K-12 online learning and cyber charter schools have grown at a tremendous rate over the past decade. At the same time, these online programs have struggled to provide the social spaces where students can interact that K-12 schools are traditionally able to provide. Social networking presents a unique opportunity to provide these kinds of social

Barbour, Michael K.; Plough, Cory

2012-01-01

464

A P2P File Sharing Network Topology Formation Algorithm Based on Social Network Information  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper applies the theory of social networks to P2P systems, creating a social-network-based P2P network topology formation algorithm for file sharing. The algorithm extends the Gnutella P2P file sharing technology, which uses super nodes for searching and for relaying shared files between network leafs that are located behind Firewalls\\/NATs. The topology of the P2P network is based on the

Jorn Altmann; Zelalem Berhanu Bedane

2010-01-01

465

A P2P File Sharing Network Topology Formation Algorithm Based on Social Network Information  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper applies the theory of social networks to P2P systems, creating a social-network-based P2P network topology formation algorithm for file sharing. The algorithm extends the Gnutella P2P file sharing technology, which uses super nodes for searching and for relaying shared files between network leafs that are located behind Firewalls\\/NATs. The topology of the P2P network is based on the

Jörn Altmann; Zelalem Berhanu Bedane

2009-01-01

466

Analysis of topological characteristics of huge online social networking services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking services are a fast-growing business in the Internet. However, it is unknown if online relationships and their growth patterns are the same as in real-life social net- works. In this paper, we compare the structures of three online social networking services: Cyworld, MySpace, and orkut, each with more than 10 million users, respectively. We have access to complete

Yong-yeol Ahn; Seungyeop Han; Haewoon Kwak; Sue Moon; Hawoong Jeong

2007-01-01

467

Personal and Social-Contextual Factors in K–12 Academic Performance: An Integrative Perspective on Student Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our extensive literature review in the fields of educational, social, and cognitive psychology has led us to identify about a dozen variables that demonstrate direct empirical links to academic achievement at the K–12 level. Those variables are grouped into four major categories: student engagement, learning strategies, school climate, and social-familial influences. We then categorize the first two variables as personal

JIHYUN LEE; VALERIE J. SHUTE

2010-01-01

468

The Social Status of Aggressive Students across Contexts: The Role of Classroom Status Hierarchy, Academic Achievement, and Grade  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tested the effects of 5 classroom contextual features on the social status (perceived popularity and social preference) that peers accord to aggressive students in late elementary school, including classroom peer status hierarchy (whether within-classroom differences in popularity are large or small), classroom academic level, and grade…

Garandeau, Claire F.; Ahn, Hai-Jeong; Rodkin, Philip C.

2011-01-01

469

The Diffusion of Academic Information: A Mathematical Model of Citations in the Sciences, Social Sciences and Arts and Humanities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the pattern of diffusion in the academic literatures of the sciences, social sciences, and arts and humanities based on citations. An examination of the citations of articles in the Science Citation Index, Social Science Citation Index, and Arts and Humanities Citation Index from a given year to the year in which the cited…

Barnett, George A.; And Others

470

Academics versus athletics: An examination of the effects of background and socialization on African American male student athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been stated that popular culture's deluging society with images of African American males as athletes and entertainers is detrimental to the academic and social growth of this group. African American males are over-represented in the sports world, which has recently been attributed to the intentional and intensive socialization of African American into sports. The consequences that have emerged

Krystal Beamon; Patricia A. Bell

2006-01-01

471

Three Year Cumulative Impacts of the 4Rs Program on Children's Social-Emotional, Behavioral, and Academic Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the last two decades, developmental science has made significant progress in understanding children's trajectories toward social-emotional and academic outcomes. At the same time, there has been dramatic growth in the design, implementation, and rigorous evaluation of school-based interventions to promote positive social-emotional development…

Jones, Stephanie M.; Brown, Joshua L.; Aber, J. Lawrence

2010-01-01

472

Social Networking Website Users and Privacy Concerns: A Mixed Methods Investigation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Social networking websites are the fastest growing entity on the Internet. Users of social networking websites post personal information and pictures on these websites. Privacy and social networking websites has been previously studied, however, since tho...

S. J. Mills

2009-01-01

473

Mobile Social Networking: A Case Study in an Australian Mobile Network Operator  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the context of increased importance of social applications and convergence between mobile and Web technological domains, this paper investigates potential strategies that MNOs can adopt regarding the offer of mobile social networking services. A case study in an Australian mobile network operator is presented in order to highlight the decision-making process for the launch of mobile networking services. General

Marcelo Nogueira Cortimiglia; Filippo Renga; Antonio Ghezzi

2011-01-01

474

Building Social Networks for Health Promotion: Shout-out Health, New Jersey, 2011  

PubMed Central

Background Building social networks for health promotion in high-poverty areas may reduce health disparities. Community involvement provides a mechanism to reach at-risk people with culturally tailored health information. Shout-out Health was a feasibility project to provide opportunity and support for women at risk for or living with human immunodeficiency virus infection to carry out health promotion within their informal social networks. Community Context The Shout-out Health project was designed by an academic–community agency team. During 3 months, health promotion topics were chosen, developed, and delivered to community members within informal social networks by participants living in Paterson and Jersey City, New Jersey. Methods We recruited women from our community agency partner’s clients; 57 women participated in in-person or online meetings facilitated by our team. The participants identified and developed the health topics, and we discussed each topic and checked it for message accuracy before the participants provided health promotion within their informal social networks. The primary outcome for evaluating feasibility included the women’s feedback about their experiences and the number of times they provided health promotion in the community. Other data collection included participant questionnaires and community-recipient evaluations. Outcome More than half of the participants reported substantial life challenges, such as unemployment and housing problems, yet with technical support and a modest stipend, women in both groups successfully provided health promotion to 5,861 people within their informal social networks. Interpretation Shout-out Health was feasible and has implications for building social networks to disseminate health information and reduce health disparities in communities.

Jones, Veronica M.; Storm, Deborah S.; Parrott, J. Scott; O'Brien, Kathy Ahearn

2013-01-01

475

Social class and academic achievement in college: The interplay of rejection sensitivity and entity beliefs.  

PubMed

Undergraduates, especially those from lower income backgrounds, may perceive their social class background as different or disadvantaged relative to that of peers and worry about negative social treatment. We hypothesized that concerns about discrimination based on one's social class (i.e., class-based rejection sensitivity or RS-class) would be damaging to undergraduates' achievement outcomes particularly among entity theorists, who perceive their personal characteristics as fixed. We reasoned that a perceived capacity for personal growth and change, characteristic of incremental theorists, would make the pursuit of a college degree and upward mobility seem more worthwhile and attainable. We found evidence across 3 studies that dispositionally held and experimentally primed entity (vs. incremental) beliefs predicted college academic performance as a function of RS-class. Studies 1a and 1b documented that high levels of both entity beliefs and RS-class predicted lower self-reported and official grades, respectively, among undergraduates from socioeconomically diverse backgrounds. In Study 2, high entity beliefs and RS-class at matriculation predicted decreased year-end official grades among lower class Latino students. Study 3 established the causal relationship of entity (vs. incremental) beliefs on academic test performance as a function of RS-class. We observed worse test performance with higher RS-class levels following an entity (vs. incremental) prime, an effect driven by lower income students. Findings from a 4th study suggest that entity theorists with RS-class concerns tend to believe less in upward mobility and, following academic setbacks, are prone to personal attributions of failure, as well as hopelessness. Implications for education and intervention are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24956316

Rheinschmidt, Michelle L; Mendoza-Denton, Rodolfo

2014-07-01

476

Social and academic impairment in youth with ADHD, predominately inattentive type and sluggish cognitive tempo.  

PubMed

Sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) was originally identified as a construct that characterized the inattention problems of some children with attention deficit disorder (ADD). Research has indicated that using SCT symptoms to identify a subset of youth with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, predominately inattentive type (ADHD-IT) may elucidate distinct patterns of impairment and thereby improve the external validity of ADHD subtypes. The objective of the current study was to investigate whether youth with clinically-assessed ADHD-IT and high levels of SCT exhibit unique social and academic impairments. In a clinic-referred sample of youth (N = 209; 23 % female) aged 6 to 17 years, participants who met criteria for three different groups were identified: ADHD, Combined Type (ADHD-CT; n = 80), ADHD-IT with low SCT symptoms (n = 74), and ADHD-IT with high SCT symptoms (n = 55). These groups were compared on indicators of social and academic functioning while considering the effects of co-occurring internalizing and disruptive behavior disorders. Youth with ADHD-IT high in SCT exhibited uniquely elevated withdrawal, as well as low leadership and low peer-directed relational and overt aggression, which were not accounted for by co-occurring disorders. This high-SCT group was also the only group to have more homework problems than the ADHD-CT group, but only when other disruptive behavior disorders were absent. The distinctiveness of the high-SCT group, which was primarily evident in social as opposed to academic functioning, provides partial support for the external validity and clinical utility of SCT. PMID:23709343

Marshall, Stephen A; Evans, Steven W; Eiraldi, Ricardo B; Becker, Stephen P; Power, Thomas J

2014-01-01

477

Polarity Related Influence Maximization in Signed Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Influence maximization in social networks has been widely studied motivated by applications like spread of ideas or innovations in a network and viral marketing of products. Current studies focus almost exclusively on unsigned social networks containing only positive relationships (e.g. friend or trust) between users. Influence maximization in signed social networks containing both positive relationships and negative relationships (e.g. foe or distrust) between users is still a challenging problem that has not been studied. Thus, in this paper, we propose the polarity-related influence maximization (PRIM) problem which aims to find the seed node set with maximum positive influence or maximum negative influence in signed social networks. To address the PRIM problem, we first extend the standard Independent Cascade (IC) model to the signed social networks and propose a Polarity-related Independent Cascade (named IC-P) diffusion model. We prove that the influence function of the PRIM problem under the IC-P model is monotonic and submodular Thus, a greedy algorithm can be used to achieve an approximation ratio of 1-1/e for solving the PRIM problem in signed social networks. Experimental results on two signed social network datasets, Epinions and Slashdot, validate that our approximation algorithm for solving the PRIM problem outperforms state-of-the-art methods.

Li, Dong; Xu, Zhi-Ming; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Gupta, Anika; Sycara, Katia; Li, Sheng

2014-01-01

478

Networked Information Retrieval Tools in the Academic Environment: Towards a Cybernetic Library.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the literature of networked information retrieval tools to explore the concept of an interactive text-based virtual reality environment that would encompass resources currently available on the Internet. Highlights include academic libraries, electronic mail, hypertext navigation systems, wide area information servers, knowbots and…

Brett, George H., II

1993-01-01

479

Brief Report: How Do They Manage Social Interaction? The Influence of Concealing Academic Achievement Information on Self-Monitoring by Adolescents with Low Achievement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During social interactions people self-monitor their behavior at least partially to conceal socially devalued characteristics. This study examined the influences of concealing academic achievement on self-monitoring in an academically-relevant social interaction. An interview paradigm called for school-aged adolescent participants (total N = 86)…

Zhang, Baoshan; Zhao, Jun-Yan; Yu, Guoliang

2010-01-01

480

The Barriers to Academic Engagement with Enterprise: A Social Scientist’s Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This paper explores the barriers to academic engagement with enterprise from a social scientist’s perspective and in relation\\u000a to United Kingdom post- 1994 universities in particular, expanding key themes from previous literature to consider both progress\\u000a and the limiting factors which still face university managers in their attempts to implement their ‘change’ agendas.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a The current strategy of re-orienting and branding

Linda Reichenfeld

481

Social Network Analysis: A case study of the Islamist terrorist network  

SciTech Connect

Social Network Analysis is a compilation of methods used to identify and analyze patterns in social network systems. This article serves as a primer on foundational social network concepts and analyses and builds a case study on the global Islamist terrorist network to illustrate the use and usefulness of these methods. The Islamist terrorist network is a system composed of multiple terrorist organizations that are socially connected and work toward the same goals. This research utilizes traditional social network, as well as small-world, and scale-free analyses to characterize this system on individual, network and systemic levels. Leaders in the network are identified based on their positions in the social network and the network structure is categorized. Finally, two vital nodes in the network are removed and this version of the network is compared with the previous version to make implications of strengths, weaknesses and vulnerabilities. The Islamist terrorist network structure is found to be a resilient and efficient structure, even with important social nodes removed. Implications for counterterrorism are given from the results of each analysis.

Medina, Richard M [ORNL

2012-01-01

482

Social Insects: A Model System for Network Dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social insect colonies (ants, bees, wasps, and termites) show sophisticated collective problem-solving in the face of variable constraints. Individuals exchange information and materials such as food. The resulting network structure and dynamics can inform us about the mechanisms by which the insects achieve particular collective behaviors and these can be transposed to man-made and social networks. We discuss how network analysis can answer important questions about social insects, such as how effective task allocation or information flow is realized. We put forward the idea that network analysis methods are under-utilized in social insect research, and that they can provide novel ways to view the complexity of collective behavior, particularly if network dynamics are taken into account. To illustrate this, we present an example of network tasks performed by ant workers, linked by instances of workers switching from one task to another. We show how temporal network analysis can propose and test new hypotheses on mechanisms of task allocation, and how adding temporal elements to static networks can drastically change results. We discuss the benefits of using social insects as models for complex systems in general. There are multiple opportunities emergent technologies and analysis methods in facilitating research on social insect network. The potential for interdisciplinary work could significantly advance diverse fields such as behavioral ecology, computer sciences, and engineering.

Charbonneau, Daniel; Blonder, Benjamin; Dornhaus, Anna

483

Topological implications of negative curvature for biological and social networks.  

PubMed

Network measures that reflect the most salient properties of complex large-scale networks are in high demand in the network research community. In this paper we adapt a combinatorial measure of negative curvature (also called hyperbolicity) to parametrized finite networks, and show that a variety of biological and social networks are hyperbolic. This hyperbolicity property has strong implications on the higher-order connectivity and other topological properties of these networks. Specifically, we derive and prove bounds on the distance among shortest or approximately shortest paths in hyperbolic networks. We describe two implications of these bounds to crosstalk in biological networks, and to the existence of central, influential neighborhoods in both biological and social networks. PMID:24730903

Albert, Réka; DasGupta, Bhaskar; Mobasheri, Nasim

2014-03-01

484

Near consensus complex linear and nonlinear social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some of the nodes of complex social networks may support for a given proposal, while the rest of the nodes may be against the given proposal. Even though all the nodes support for or are against the given proposal, the decision certitudes of individual nodes may be different. In this case, the steady state values of the decision certitudes of the majority of the nodes are either higher than or lower than a threshold value. Deriving the near consensus property is a key to the analysis of the behaviors of complex social networks. So far, no result on the behaviors of the complex social networks satisfying the near consensus property has been reported. Hence, it is useful to extend the definition of the exact consensus property to that of a near consensus property and investigate the behaviors of the complex social networks satisfying the near consensus property. This paper extends the definition of exact consensus complex social networks to that of near consensus complex social networks. For complex linear social networks, this paper investigates the relationships among the vectors representing the steady state values of the decision certitudes of the nodes, the influence weight matrix and the set of vectors representing the initial state values of the decision certitudes of the nodes under a given near consensus specification. The above analysis is based on the Eigen theory. For complex nonlinear social networks with certain types of nonlinearities, the relationship between the influence weight matrix and the vectors representing the steady state values of the decision certitudes of the nodes is studied. When a complex nonlinear social network does not achieve the exact consensus property, the optimal near consensus condition that the complex social network can achieve is derived. This problem is formulated as an optimization problem. The total number of nodes that the decision certitudes of the nodes are either higher than or lower than a threshold value is maximized subject to the corresponding near consensus specification. The optimization problem is a nonsmooth optimization problem. The nonsmooth constraints are first approximated by smooth constraints. Then, the approximated optimization problem is solved via a conventional smooth optimization approach. Computer numerical simulation results as well as the comparisons of the behaviors of complex nonlinear social networks to those of the complex linear social networks are presented. The obtained results demonstrate that some complex social networks can satisfy the near consensus property but not the exact consensus property. Also, the conditions for the near consensus property are dependent on the types of nonlinearities, the influence weight matrix and the vectors representing the initial state values of the decision certitudes of the nodes.

Ling, Bingo Wing-Kuen; Ho, Charlotte Yuk-Fan; Wang, Lidong; Teo, Kok-Lay; Tse, Chi K.; Dai, Qingyun

2014-05-01

485

Youth as Content Producers in a Niche Social Network Site  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most U.S. teenagers participate in online social network sites, devoting hours to these networks, often at the expense of other leisure-time activities. This article describes young people's activities within one topic-focused niche network, outlining its unique features and the role of young people as content producers within and beyond the…

Greenhow, Christine

2010-01-01

486

Mining (Social) Network Graphs to Detect Random Link Attacks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Modern communication networks are vulnerable to attackers who send unsolicited messages to innocent users, wasting network resources and user time. Some examples of such attacks are spam emails, annoying tele-marketing phone calls, viral marketing in social networks, etc. Existing techniques to identify these attacks are tailored to certain specific domains (like email spam filtering), but are not applicable to a

Nisheeth Shrivastava; Anirban Majumder; Rajeev Rastogi

2008-01-01

487

Leveraging Social Networking in the United States Army.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 2007, the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) began blocking social networking sites, such as YouTube and MySpace, from its computer networks based on concerns for bandwidth, network security, and posting of personal and operational information. In Februa...

J. J. Hall

2011-01-01